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Sample records for laterally mobile functionalized

  1. It is not just muscle mass: a review of muscle quality, composition and metabolism during ageing as determinants of muscle function and mobility in later life.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Robin A; Cameron-Smith, David; Poppitt, Sally D

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide estimates predict 2 billion people will be aged over 65 years by 2050. A major current challenge is maintaining mobility and quality of life into old age. Impaired mobility is often a precursor of functional decline, disability and loss of independence. Sarcopenia which represents the age-related decline in muscle mass is a well-established factor associated with mobility limitations in older adults. However, there is now evidence that not only changes in muscle mass but other factors underpinning muscle quality including composition, metabolism, aerobic capacity, insulin resistance, fat infiltration, fibrosis and neural activation may also play a role in the decline in muscle function and impaired mobility associated with ageing. Importantly, changes in muscle quality may precede loss of muscle mass and therefore provide new opportunities for the assessment of muscle quality particularly in middle-aged adults who could benefit from interventions to improve muscle function. This review will discuss the accumulating evidence that in addition to muscle mass, factors underpinning muscle quality influence muscle function and mobility with age. Further development of tools to assess muscle quality in community settings is needed. Preventative diet, exercise or treatment interventions particularly in middle-aged adults at the low end of the spectrum of muscle function may help preserve mobility in later years and improve healthspan.

  2. Impairment on the lateral mobility induced by structural changes underlies the functional deficiency of the lupus-associated polymorphism FcγRIIB-T232

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liling; Xia, Mengdie; Sun, Xiaolin; Li, Hua; Gu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Haowen; Yi, Junyang; Fang, Yan; Xie, Hengyi; Wang, Jing; Shen, Zhixun; Xue, Boxin; Sun, Yujie; Chen, Ying-Hua; Hu, Zhibin

    2016-01-01

    FcγRIIB functions to suppress the activation of immune cells. A single-nucleotide polymorphism in the transmembrane (TM) domain of FcγRIIB, FcγRIIB-T232, is associated with lupus. In this study, we investigated the pathogenic mechanism of FcγRIIB-T232 at both functional and structural levels. Our results showed that FcγRIIB-T232 exhibited significantly reduced lateral mobility compared with FcγRIIB-I232 and was significantly less enriched into the microclusters of immune complexes (ICs) after stimulation. However, if sufficient responding time is given for FcγRIIB-T232 to diffuse and interact with the ICs, FcγRIIB-T232 can restore its inhibitory function. Moreover, substituting the FcγRIIB-T232 TM domain with that of a fast floating CD86 molecule restored both the rapid mobility and the inhibitory function, which further corroborated the importance of fast mobility for FcγRIIB to function. Mechanistically, the crippled lateral mobility of FcγRIIB-T232 can be explained by the structural changes of the TM domain. Both atomistic simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance measurement indicated that the TM helix of FcγRIIB-T232 exhibited a more inclined orientation than that of FcγRIIB-I232, thus resulting in a longer region embedded in the membrane. Therefore, we conclude that the single-residue polymorphism T232 enforces the inclination of the TM domain and thereby reduces the lateral mobility and inhibitory functions of FcγRIIB. PMID:27799621

  3. Function Lateralization via Measuring Coherence Laterality

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ze; Mechanic-Hamilton, Dawn; Pluta, John; Glynn, Simon; Detre, John A.

    2009-01-01

    A data-driven approach for lateralization of brain function based on the spatial coherence difference of functional MRI (fMRI) data in homologous regions-of-interest (ROI) in each hemisphere is proposed. The utility of using coherence laterality (CL) to determine function laterality was assessed first by examining motor laterality using normal subjects’ data acquired both at rest and with a simple unilateral motor task and subsequently by examining mesial temporal lobe memory laterality in normal subjects and patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. The motor task was used to demonstrate that CL within motor ROI correctly lateralized functional stimulation. In patients with unilateral epilepsy studied during a scene-encoding task, CL in a hippocampus-parahippocampus-fusiform (HPF) ROI was concordant with lateralization based on task activation, and the CL index (CLI) significantly differentiated the right side group to the left side group. By contrast, normal controls showed a symmetric HPF CLI distribution. Additionally, similar memory laterality prediction results were still observed using CL in epilepsy patients with unilateral seizures after the memory encoding effect was removed from the data, suggesting the potential for lateralization of pathological brain function based on resting fMRI data. A better lateralization was further achieved via a combination of the proposed approach and the standard activation based approach, demonstrating that assessment of spatial coherence changes provides a complementary approach to quantifying task-correlated activity for lateralizing brain function. PMID:19345736

  4. Biphasic cell responses on laterally mobile films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourouklis, Andreas; Lerum, Ronald; Bermudez, Harry

    2013-03-01

    The engineering of polymer surfaces or matrices that are capable of controlling cell adhesion has been widely explored. In nearly all of these works, the polymer chains (and ligands) are chemically attached to the underlying substrate, and therefore these systems are inherently static. By contrast, cellular environments such as the extracellular matrix (ECM) are dynamic and remodeled by biochemical reactions and biophysical forces. Borrowing this concept from Nature, we created polymer films by an interfacial self-assembly process, whereby individual chains can exhibit lateral mobility (in-plane diffusive motion). NIH 3T3 fibroblasts seeded on such RGD-presenting polymer films show biphasic responses in spreading and adhesion strength to lateral mobility, with a minimal response for intermediate mobility values. Futhermore, preliminary immuno-staining experiments reveal that the total area of focal adhesions demonstrates a similar biphasic trend to the cellular-scale behaviors. In contrast, actin filaments or stress fibers appear to be unaffected by the substrate lateral mobility. These results show that lateral mobility is an important, although not fully explored aspect of mechano-sensing by cells, and can potentially give new perspectives on cell-ECM interactions. National Science Foundation

  5. Laterally Mobile, Functionalized Self-Assembled Monolayers at the Fluorous−Aqueous Interface in a Plug-Based Microfluidic System: Characterization and Testing with Membrane Protein Crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Kreutz, Jason E.; Li, Liang; Roach, L. Spencer; Hatakeyama, Takuji; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2009-11-04

    This paper describes a method to generate functionalizable, mobile self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) in plug-based microfluidics. Control of interfaces is advancing studies of biological interfaces, heterogeneous reactions, and nanotechnology. SAMs have been useful for such studies, but they are not laterally mobile. Lipid-based methods, though mobile, are not easily amenable to setting up the hundreds of experiments necessary for crystallization screening. Here we demonstrate a method, complementary to current SAM and lipid methods, for rapidly generating mobile, functionalized SAMs. This method relies on plugs, droplets surrounded by a fluorous carrier fluid, to rapidly explore chemical space. Specifically, we implemented his-tag binding chemistry to design a new fluorinated amphiphile, RfNTA, using an improved one-step synthesis of RfOEG under Mitsunobu conditions. RfNTA introduces specific binding of protein at the fluorous-aqueous interface, which concentrates and orients proteins at the interface, even in the presence of other surfactants. We then applied this approach to the crystallization of a his-tagged membrane protein, Reaction Center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, performed 2400 crystallization trials, and showed that this approach can increase the range of crystal-producing conditions, the success rate at a given condition, the rate of nucleation, and the quality of the crystal formed.

  6. Biased μ-opioid receptor agonists diversely regulate lateral mobility and functional coupling of the receptor to its cognate G proteins.

    PubMed

    Melkes, Barbora; Hejnova, Lucie; Novotny, Jiri

    2016-12-01

    There are some indications that biased μ-opioid ligands may diversely affect μ-opioid receptor (MOR) properties. Here, we used confocal fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to study the regulation by different MOR agonists of receptor movement within the plasma membrane of HEK293 cells stably expressing a functional yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-tagged μ-opioid receptor (MOR-YFP). We found that the lateral mobility of MOR-YFP was increased by (D-Ala(2),N-MePhe(4),Gly(5)-ol)-enkephalin (DAMGO) and to a lesser extent also by morphine but decreased by endomorphin-2. Interestingly, cholesterol depletion strongly enhanced the ability of morphine to elevate receptor mobility but significantly reduced or even eliminated the effect of DAMGO and endomorphin-2, respectively. Moreover, the ability of DAMGO and endomorphin-2 to influence MOR-YFP movement was diminished by pertussis toxin treatment. The results obtained by agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays indicated that DAMGO exhibited higher efficacy than morphine and endomorphin-2 did and that the efficacy of DAMGO, contrary to the latter agonists, was enhanced by cholesterol depletion. Overall, our study provides clear evidence that biased MOR agonists diversely affect receptor mobility in plasma membranes as well as MOR/G protein coupling and that the regulatory effect of different ligands depends on the membrane cholesterol content. These findings help to delineate the fundamental properties of MOR regarding their interaction with biased MOR ligands and cognate G proteins.

  7. MOTIVES FOR RESIDENTIAL MOBILITY IN LATER LIFE

    PubMed Central

    SERGEANT, JULIE F.; EKERDT, DAVID J.

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study delineates motives for residential mobility, describes dynamics between the elder and family members during the move decision process, and locates the move decision within ecological layers of the aging context. Interviews were conducted with 30 individuals and couples (ages 60-87) who experienced a community-based move within the past year, and with 14 extended family members. Reasons for moving (from perspectives of both elders who moved and their family members) were grouped into four themes and eleven issues that influenced the move decision. These themes parallel the ecological context of individual health and functioning, beliefs and attitudes, physical environment, and social pressures. Late-life mobility is a significant life transition that is the outcome of an ongoing appraisal and reappraisal of housing fit with individual functioning, needs, and aspirations. Family members are an integral part of these decision and residential mobility processes. Well, she moved because my sister and I decided she was going to move. But she wanted to move. It wouldn’t have happened if we hadn’t decided that she was gonna move. It was a little complicated . . . - Linda Brierton’s daughter, Karen PMID:18453180

  8. Quick lateral movements of the trunk in a seated position reflect mobility and activities of daily living (ADL) function in frail elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Akira; Higuchi, Yumi; Kimura, Daisuke; Okamoto, Kensuke; Arai, Shin; Iwata, Hiroshi; Fuchioka, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    A novel and safe performance test for measuring mobility is described. The test, which we have named the Seated Side Tapping test (Side Tapping test), requires the subjects to move their bodies laterally to the left and right in turn as quickly as possible whilst remaining in a seated position. We examined the associations between the results of the new test and those of other mobility tests, ADL, and the use of walking aids. The participants were 75 frail elderly people who were receiving rehabilitation services. Gait speed and the timed up and go (TUG) test were employed as mobility tests, and the participants' use of walking aids was recorded. The ADL score was assessed using the Barthel Index. Significant correlations were found between the side tapping test and gait speed (r=-0.59, p<0.01), and TUG (r=0.63, p<0.01). This test also revealed significant relationships with the ADL scores and the use of walking aids. These results indicate that an ability to perform quick lateral trunk movements in a seated position reflects their mobility during standing. Thus, we concluded that since the side tapping test is simple and safe, it is useful for detecting mobility impairments, ADL levels, and the need for walking aids, especially in frail elderly individuals.

  9. Modulation of membrane protein lateral mobility by polyphosphates and polyamines.

    PubMed

    Schindler, M; Koppel, D E; Sheetz, M P

    1980-03-01

    The lateral mobility of fluorescein-labeled membrane glycoproteins was measured in whole unlysed erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts by the technique of "fluorescence redistribution after fusion." Measurements were made on polyethylene glycol-fused cell pairs in which only one member of the couplet was initially fluorescently labeled. Diffusion coefficients were estimated from the rate of fluorescence redistribution determined from successive scans with a focused laser beam across individual fused pairs. This technique allows for the analysis of diffusion within cell membranes without the possible damaging photochemical events caused by photobleaching. It was found that lateral mobility of erythrocyte proteins can be increased by the addition of polyphosphates (i.e., ATP and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate) and decreased by the addition of organic polyamines (i.e., neomycin and spermine). This control is exerted by these molecules only when they contact the cytoplasmic side of the membrane and is not dependent upon high-energy phosphates. Microviscosity experiments employing diphenylhexatriene demonstrated no changes in membrane lipid state as a function of these reagents. Our results, in conjunction with data on the physical interactions of cytoskeletal proteins, suggest that the diffusion effector molecules alter the lateral mobility of erythrocyte membrane proteins through modifications of interactions in the shell, which is composed of spectrin, actin, and component 4.1.

  10. Modulation of Membrane Protein Lateral Mobility by Polyphosphates and Polyamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Melvin; Koppel, Dennis E.; Sheetz, Michael P.

    1980-03-01

    The lateral mobility of fluorescein-labeled membrane glycoproteins was measured in whole unlysed erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts by the technique of ``fluorescence redistribution after fusion.'' Measurements were made on polyethylene glycol-fused cell pairs in which only one member of the couplet was initially fluorescently labeled. Diffusion coefficients were estimated from the rate of fluorescence redistribution determined from successive scans with a focused laser beam across individual fused pairs. This technique allows for the analysis of diffusion within cell membranes without the possible damaging photochemical events caused by photobleaching. It was found that lateral mobility of erythrocyte proteins can be increased by the addition of polyphosphates (i.e., ATP and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate) and decreased by the addition of organic polyamines (i.e., neomycin and spermine). This control is exerted by these molecules only when they contact the cytoplasmic side of the membrane and is not dependent upon high-energy phosphates. Microviscosity experiments employing diphenylhexatriene demonstrated no changes in membrane lipid state as a function of these reagents. Our results, in conjunction with data on the physical interactions of cytoskeletal proteins, suggest that the diffusion effector molecules alter the lateral mobility of erythrocyte membrane proteins through modifications of interactions in the shell, which is composed of spectrin, actin, and component 4.1.

  11. Wearable sensor network to study laterality of brain functions.

    PubMed

    Postolache, Gabriela B; Girao, Pedro S; Postolache, Octavian A

    2015-08-01

    In the last decade researches on laterality of brain functions have been reinvigorated. New models of lateralization of brain functions were proposed and new methods for understanding mechanisms of asymmetry between right and left brain functions were described. We design a system to study laterality of motor and autonomic nervous system based on wearable sensors network. A mobile application was developed for analysis of upper and lower limbs movements, cardiac and respiratory function. The functionalities and experience gained with deployment of the system are described.

  12. Anxiety and Lateral Cerebral Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Don M.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Examines the effect of stressful and nonstressful experimental situations upon the processing capacity of each cerebral hemisphere, through observing the differential performance tasks presented to right and left visual half-fields (VHFs). Also examines attentional bias and lateral eye movements. (Author/RK)

  13. Lateral mobility of plasma membrane lipids in dividing Xenopus eggs.

    PubMed

    Tetteroo, P A; Bluemink, J G; Dictus, W J; van Zoelen, E J; de Laat, S W

    1984-07-01

    The lateral mobility of plasma membrane lipids was analyzed during first cleavage of Xenopus laevis eggs by fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR) measurements, using the lipid analogs 5-(N-hexadecanoyl)aminofluorescein ("HEDAF") and 5-(N-tetradecanoyl)aminofluorescein ("TEDAF") as probes. The preexisting plasma membrane of the animal side showed an inhomogeneous, dotted fluorescence pattern after labeling and the lateral mobility of both probes used was below the detection limits of the FPR method (D much less than 10(-10) cm2/sec). In contrast, the preexisting plasma membrane of the vegetal side exhibited homogeneous fluorescence and the lateral diffusion coefficient of both probes used was relatively high (HEDAF, D = 2.8 X 10(-8) cm2/sec; TEDAF, D = 2.4 X 10(-8) cm2/sec). In the cleaving egg visible transfer of HEDAF or TEDAF from prelabeled plasma membrane to the new membrane in the furrow did not occur, even on the vegetal side. Upon labeling during cleavage, however, the new membrane was uniformly labeled and both probes were mobile, as in the vegetal preexisting plasma membrane. These data show that the membrane of the dividing Xenopus egg comprises three macrodomains: (i) the animal preexisting plasma membrane; (ii) the vegetal preexisting plasma membrane; (iii) the new furrow membrane.

  14. Function of lateral line canal morphology.

    PubMed

    Klein, Adrian; Bleckmann, Horst

    2015-01-01

    Fish perceive water motions and pressure gradients with their lateral line. Lateral line information is used for prey detection, spatial orientation, predator avoidance, schooling behavior, intraspecific communication and station holding. The lateral line of most fishes consists of superficial neuromasts (SNs) and canal neuromasts (CNs). The distribution of SNs and CNs shows a high degree of variation among fishes. Researchers have speculated for decades about the functional significance of this diversity, often without any conclusive answers. Klein et al. (2013) examined how tubules, pore number and pore patterns affect the filter properties of lateral line canals in a marine teleost, the black prickleback (Xiphister atropurpureus). A preliminary mathematical model was formulated and biomimetic sensors were built. For the present study the mathematical model was extended to understand the major underlying principle of how canal dimensions influence the filter properties of the lateral line. Both the extended mathematical model and the sensor experiments show that the number and distribution of pores determine the spatial filter properties of the lateral line. In an environment with little hydrodynamic noise, simple and complex lateral line canals have comparable response properties. However, if exposed to highly turbulent conditions, canals with numerous widely spaced pores increase the signal to noise ratio significantly. © 2014 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Lateral Scapular Slide Test and Scapular Mobility in Volleyball Players

    PubMed Central

    Ozunlu, Nihan; Tekeli, Hatice; Baltaci, Gul

    2011-01-01

    Context: The stability of the scapula in relation to the entire moving upper extremity is the key in the throwing sequence. The importance of scapular positioning in volleyball players has been well documented in the literature, but no one has compared scapular positioning between volleyball players and sedentary people. Objective: To compare measurements of scapular mobility obtained using the lateral scapular slide test between volleyball players and sedentary participants without shoulder impairments and to compare changes in scapular mobility in players according to the number of years of sport participation. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 121 people at a single university volunteered. Of these, 67 were sedentary (age = 24.3 ± 2.34 years, height = 1.69 ± 0.09 m, mass = 65.1 ± 11.91 kg); 54 were volleyball players from 4 professional teams and were separated into 2 groups according to their years of sport participation. The first group was named young players (n = 31; age = 17.7 ± 2.58 years, height = 1.83 ± 0.10 m, mass = 68.3 ± 12.21 kg, sport participation ≤ 9 years), and the second group was named old players (n = 23; age = 26.9 ± 3.39 years, height = 1.95 ± 4.38 m, mass = 90.7 ± 5.75 kg, sport participation ≥ 10 years). Main Outcome Measure(s): Study participants completed a rating scale for pain and a questionnaire about demographic and shoulder problems. One assessor performed the lateral scapular slide test and additional flexibility measurements around the shoulder girdle. Flexibility (external rotation, internal rotation) and scapular position (1, 2, 3) were compared among groups (young players, old players, sedentary people) and between sides (dominant, nondominant). Results: In sedentary participants, we found differences for position 1 (t66 = 3.327, P = .002), position 2 (t66 = 2.491, P = .004), position 3 (t66 = 2.512, P = .006), and internal rotation

  16. Laterality index in functional MRI: methodological issues☆

    PubMed Central

    Seghier, Mohamed L.

    2008-01-01

    In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), hemispheric dominance is generally indicated by a measure called the laterality index (LI). The assessment of a meaningful LI measure depends on several methodological factors that should be taken into account when interpreting LI values or comparing between subjects. Principally, these include the nature of the quantification of left and right hemispheres contributions, localisation of volumes of interest within each hemisphere, dependency on statistical threshold, thresholding LI values, choice of activation and baseline conditions and reproducibility of LI values. This review discusses such methodological factors and the different approaches that have been suggested to deal with them. Although these factors are common to a range of fMRI domains, they are discussed here in the context of fMRI of the language system. PMID:18158224

  17. Lateral mobility and anchoring of recombinant GABAA receptors depend on subunit composition.

    PubMed

    Peran, M; Hicks, B W; Peterson, N L; Hooper, H; Salas, R

    2001-10-01

    The clustering of type A gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABA(A)R) at discrete and functionally significant domains on the nerve cell surface is an important determinant in the integration of synaptic inputs. To discern the role that the subunits of the GABA(A)R play in determining the receptor's cell surface topography and mobility, the alpha1, beta1, beta3, and gamma2s subunits were transfected into COS7, HEK293, and PC12 cells and the distribution and cell surface mobility of these recombinant receptors were examined. Our results show that alpha1 subunits are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum while beta1 and beta3 subunits are sorted to the plasma membrane where they form clusters. Co-expression and co-assembly of alpha1 and beta3 subunits result in the rescue of intracellular alpha1 subunits, which are transported as alphabeta subunit complexes to the cell surface where they formed clusters. Fluorescence photobleach recovery and single particle tracking of recombinant receptors show that, despite clustering, beta3 subunit homooligomers are mobile within a cell surface domain. Inclusion of alpha1 in beta3 or beta3gamma2s complexes, however, dramatically reduces the receptor's lateral mobility in COS 7 and PC12 cells and anchors GABA(A)Rs on the cell surface, suggesting the formation of a direct link to a component of the cytoskeleton. The mobility of recombinant receptors that include the alpha1 subunit mirrors the mobility of GABA(A)Rs on cell bodies and dendrites of cortical and spinal cord neurons. The results suggest that incorporation of alpha1 subunits give rise to a population of GABA(A)Rs that are immobilized on the cell surface.

  18. Effect of integral membrane proteins on the lateral mobility of plastoquinone in phosphatidylcholine proteoliposomes

    PubMed Central

    Blackwell, Mary F.; Whitmarsh, John

    1990-01-01

    Pyrene fluorescence quenching by plastoquinone was used to estimate the rate of plastoquinone lateral diffusion in soybean phosphatidylcholine proteoliposomes containing the following integral membrane proteins: gramicidin D, spinach cytochrome bf complex, spinach cytochrome f, reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, beef heart mitochondrial cytochrome bc1, and beef heart mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase. The measured plastoquinone lateral diffusion coefficient varied between 1 and 3 · 10-7 cm2 s-1 in control liposomes that lacked protein. When proteins were added, these values decreased: a 10-fold decrease was observed when 16-26% of the membrane surface area was occupied by protein for all the proteins but gramicidin. The larger protein complexes (cytochrome bf, Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centers, cytochrome bc1, and cytochrome oxidase), whose hydrophobic volumes were 15-20 times as large as that of cytochrome f and the gramicidin transmembrane dimer, were 15-20 times as effective in decreasing the lateral-diffusion coefficient over the range of concentrations studied. These proteins had a much stronger effect than that observed for bacteriorhodopsin in fluorescence photobleaching recovery measurements. The effect of high-protein concentrations in gramicidin proteoliposomes was in close agreement with fluorescence photobleaching measurements. The results are compared with the predictions of several theoretical models of lateral mobility as a function of integral membrane concentration. PMID:19431774

  19. Lateral superior olive function in congenital deafness

    PubMed Central

    Couchman, Kiri; Garrett, Andrew; Deardorff, Adam S.; Rattay, Frank; Resatz, Susanne; Fyffe, Robert; Walmsley, Bruce; Leão, Richardson N.

    2011-01-01

    The development of cochlear ilmplants for the treatment of patients with profound hearing loss has advanced considerably in the last few decades, particularly in the field of speech comprehension. However, attempts to provide not only sound decoding but also spatial hearing are limited by our understanding of circuit adaptations in the absence of auditory input. Here we investigate the lateral superior olive (LSO), a nucleus involved in interaural level difference (ILD) processing in the auditory brainstem using a mouse model of congenital deafness (the dn/dn mouse). An electrophysiological investigation of principal neurons of the LSO from the dn/dn mouse reveals a higher than normal proportion of single spiking (SS) neurons, and an increase in the hyperpolarisation-activated Ih current. However, inhibitory glycinergic input to the LSO appears to develop normally both pre and postsynaptically in dn/dn mice despite the absence of auditory nerve activity. In combination with previous electrophysiological findings from the dn/dn mouse, we also compile a simple Hodgkin and Huxley circuit model in order to investigate possible computational deficits in ILD processing resulting from congenital hearing loss. We find that the predominance of SS neurons in the dn/dn LSO may compensate for upstream modifications and help to maintain a functioning ILD circuit in the dn/dn mouse. This could have clinical repercussions on the development of stimulation paradigms for spatial hearing with cochlear implants. PMID:21276842

  20. Lateral superior olive function in congenital deafness.

    PubMed

    Couchman, Kiri; Garrett, Andrew; Deardorff, Adam S; Rattay, Frank; Resatz, Susanne; Fyffe, Robert; Walmsley, Bruce; Leão, Richardson N

    2011-07-01

    The development of cochlear implants for the treatment of patients with profound hearing loss has advanced considerably in the last few decades, particularly in the field of speech comprehension. However, attempts to provide not only sound decoding but also spatial hearing are limited by our understanding of circuit adaptations in the absence of auditory input. Here we investigate the lateral superior olive (LSO), a nucleus involved in interaural level difference (ILD) processing in the auditory brainstem using a mouse model of congenital deafness (the dn/dn mouse). An electrophysiological investigation of principal neurons of the LSO from the dn/dn mouse reveals a higher than normal proportion of single spiking (SS) neurons, and an increase in the hyperpolarisation-activated I(h) current. However, inhibitory glycinergic input to the LSO appears to develop normally both pre and postsynaptically in dn/dn mice despite the absence of auditory nerve activity. In combination with previous electrophysiological findings from the dn/dn mouse, we also compile a simple Hodgkin and Huxley circuit model in order to investigate possible computational deficits in ILD processing resulting from congenital hearing loss. We find that the predominance of SS neurons in the dn/dn LSO may compensate for upstream modifications and help to maintain a functioning ILD circuit in the dn/dn mouse. This could have clinical repercussions on the development of stimulation paradigms for spatial hearing with cochlear implants.

  1. Promoting Function, Independence, and Mobility

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptom management, the use of mobility aids, automobile adaptations and the use of assistance animals. Increasing Accessibility often requires the adaptation of tools and devices at one’s home or ...

  2. Lateral Transfer of Genes and Gene Fragments in Staphylococcus Extends beyond Mobile Elements ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Beiko, Robert G.; Ragan, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    The widespread presence of antibiotic resistance and virulence among Staphylococcus isolates has been attributed in part to lateral genetic transfer (LGT), but little is known about the broader extent of LGT within this genus. Here we report the first systematic study of the modularity of genetic transfer among 13 Staphylococcus genomes covering four distinct named species. Using a topology-based phylogenetic approach, we found, among 1,354 sets of homologous genes examined, strong evidence of LGT in 368 (27.1%) gene sets, and weaker evidence in another 259 (19.1%). Within-gene and whole-gene transfer contribute almost equally to the topological discordance of these gene sets against a reference phylogeny. Comparing genetic transfer in single-copy and in multicopy gene sets, we observed a higher frequency of LGT in the latter, and a substantial functional bias in cases of whole-gene transfer (little such bias was observed in cases of fragmentary genetic transfer). We found evidence that lateral transfer, particularly of entire genes, impacts not only functions related to antibiotic, drug, and heavy-metal resistance, as well as membrane transport, but also core informational and metabolic functions not associated with mobile elements. Although patterns of sequence similarity support the cohesion of recognized species, LGT within S. aureus appears frequently to disrupt clonal complexes. Our results demonstrate that LGT and gene duplication play important parts in functional innovation in staphylococcal genomes. PMID:21622749

  3. Differential regulation of the lateral mobility of plasma membrane phospholipids by the extracellular matrix and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Ramprasad, O G; Rangaraj, Nandini; Srinivas, G; Thiery, Jean Paul; Dufour, Sylvie; Pande, Gopal

    2008-05-01

    In this study, we compared qualitative and quantitative changes in the lateral mobility of phospholipid molecules in the plasma membrane of intact cells under various conditions of specific interaction of integrins in the cell membrane with two extracellular matrix (ECM) components viz. fibronectin (FN) and laminin (LN). We found a strong and specific correlation between the lower lateral mobility of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and higher lateral mobility of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) when cells were expressing high levels of alpha5beta1 integrin and thus were adherent and motile on FN. The interaction between PC and FN in alpha5 integrin expressing cells was aided by the strong affinity of alpha5 integrin to the FN matrix. Cholesterol was involved in regulating the lateral mobility of PC to a great extent and of PE to a lesser extent without affecting the overall microviscosity of the plasma membrane or the distribution of caveolin-marked domains. The distribution and mobility of PC and PE molecules in the lamellipodial regions differed from that in the rest of the membrane and also in the more motile and in the less motile cells. We propose that these differences in distribution of PC and PE in different regions of cell membrane and their respective lateral mobility are observed due to the specific interaction of PC molecules with FN molecules in the ECM. Our results outline a new role of integrin-matrix interactions in the regulation of membrane phospholipid behavior. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Augmented soft tissue mobilization vs natural history in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Blanchette, Marc-André; Normand, Martin C

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of augmented soft tissue mobilization (ASTM) on the treatment of lateral epicondylitis. This randomized clinical study assessed 27 subjects (12 men and 15 women) with lateral epicondylitis and were divided randomly into 2 groups. The experimental group (n = 15) received ASTM twice a week for 5 weeks. The subjects of the control group (n = 12) received advice on the natural evolution of lateral epicondylitis, computer ergonomics, and stretching exercises. Patient-rated outcome was assessed at baseline and after 6 weeks and 3 months using a visual analog scale and the Patient-Rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation. The function was assessed using the pain-free grip strength at baseline and after 6 weeks. Both groups showed improvements in pain-free grip strength, visual analog scale, and Patient-Rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation. Sample size for larger future randomized clinical trial was 116 participants. A larger study investigating the same hypothesis is warranted to detect difference in the effects of these treatments strategies. The study design is feasible, and minor improvements will help to minimize the potential bias. Copyright © 2011 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Reduced Lateral Mobility of Lipids and Proteins in Crowded Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Goose, Joseph E.; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2013-01-01

    Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of the E. coli outer membrane proteins FhuA, LamB, NanC, OmpA and OmpF in a POPE/POPG (3∶1) bilayer were performed to characterise the diffusive nature of each component of the membrane. At small observation times (<10 ns) particle vibrations dominate phospholipid diffusion elevating the calculated values from the longer time-scale bulk value (>50 ns) of 8.5×10−7 cm2 s−1. The phospholipid diffusion around each protein was found to vary based on distance from protein. An asymmetry in the diffusion of annular lipids in the inner and outer leaflets was observed and correlated with an asymmetry in charged residues in the vicinity of the inner and outer leaflet head-groups. Protein rotational and translational diffusion were also found to vary with observation time and were inversely correlated with the radius of gyration of the protein in the plane of the bilayer. As the concentration of protein within the bilayer was increased, the overall mobility of the membrane decreased reflected in reduced lipid diffusion coefficients for both lipid and protein components. The increase in protein concentration also resulted in a decrease in the anomalous diffusion exponent α of the lipid. Formation of extended clusters and networks of proteins led to compartmentalisation of lipids in extreme cases. PMID:23592975

  6. Lateral bias, functional asymmetry, dance training and dance injuries.

    PubMed

    Kimmerle, Marliese

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to: 1. provide a conceptual framework for consolidating laterality research in dance training from an interdisciplinary perspective; 2. encourage the reporting of lateral data; 3. promote the development of standardized methods for assessing lateral preference and functional asymmetry so that data sets from student screenings, lab studies, and injury reports can be compared; and 4. stimulate further laterality research in the dance studio to examine student preference and teaching bias, thereby promoting balanced training.

  7. Laterality patterns of brain functional connectivity: gender effects.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, Dardo; Volkow, Nora D

    2012-06-01

    Lateralization of brain connectivity may be essential for normal brain function and may be sexually dimorphic. Here, we study the laterality patterns of short-range (implicated in functional specialization) and long-range (implicated in functional integration) connectivity and the gender effects on these laterality patterns. Parallel computing was used to quantify short- and long-range functional connectivity densities in 913 healthy subjects. Short-range connectivity was rightward lateralized and most asymmetrical in areas around the lateral sulcus, whereas long-range connectivity was rightward lateralized in lateral sulcus and leftward lateralizated in inferior prefrontal cortex and angular gyrus. The posterior inferior occipital cortex was leftward lateralized (short- and long-range connectivity). Males had greater rightward lateralization of brain connectivity in superior temporal (short- and long-range), inferior frontal, and inferior occipital cortices (short-range), whereas females had greater leftward lateralization of long-range connectivity in the inferior frontal cortex. The greater lateralization of the male's brain (rightward and predominantly short-range) may underlie their greater vulnerability to disorders with disrupted brain asymmetries (schizophrenia, autism).

  8. Laterality Patterns of Brain Functional Connectivity: Gender Effects

    PubMed Central

    Tomasi, Dardo; Volkow, Nora D.

    2012-01-01

    Lateralization of brain connectivity may be essential for normal brain function and may be sexually dimorphic. Here, we study the laterality patterns of short-range (implicated in functional specialization) and long-range (implicated in functional integration) connectivity and the gender effects on these laterality patterns. Parallel computing was used to quantify short- and long-range functional connectivity densities in 913 healthy subjects. Short-range connectivity was rightward lateralized and most asymmetrical in areas around the lateral sulcus, whereas long-range connectivity was rightward lateralized in lateral sulcus and leftward lateralizated in inferior prefrontal cortex and angular gyrus. The posterior inferior occipital cortex was leftward lateralized (short- and long-range connectivity). Males had greater rightward lateralization of brain connectivity in superior temporal (short- and long-range), inferior frontal, and inferior occipital cortices (short-range), whereas females had greater leftward lateralization of long-range connectivity in the inferior frontal cortex. The greater lateralization of the male's brain (rightward and predominantly short-range) may underlie their greater vulnerability to disorders with disrupted brain asymmetries (schizophrenia, autism). PMID:21878483

  9. Brain Function Lateralization and Language Acquisition: the Evidence from Japanese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanches, Mary

    1979-01-01

    Presents evidence of differences in brain function lateralization between Japanese-speakers and speakers of Indo-European languages, and suggests that current conceptualizations of brain function specialization are not adequate. (AM)

  10. A new method to determine laterality of mobile telephone use in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Inyang, Imo; Benke, Geza; McKenzie, Ray; Wolfe, Rory; Abramson, Michael J

    2010-08-01

    As more children use mobile (cellular) telephones, public anxiety grows about the possible adverse health effects of radiofrequency (RF) exposure upon developing nervous systems. Most epidemiological studies investigating the health effects of mobile telephones have relied on self-reports from questionnaires. While there are some validation studies investigating the accuracy of self-reported mobile phone use in adults and adolescents, self-reported laterality of use has not been validated at any age. Although this study mainly sought to validate the accuracy of self-reported laterality of mobile telephone use in adolescents, investigation also covered number and duration of calls. We monitored 455 calls in 30 students, mean age (SD) 14 (0.4) years. For 1 week, participants used hardware modified phones (HMPs) which logged dosimetric parameters such as laterality (side of head), date, number and duration of calls. These 'gold standard' measurements were compared with questionnaire self-reported laterality and estimated typical weekly phone use. Agreement between HMPs and self-reported laterality was modest (kappa=0.3, 95% CI 0.0 to 0.6). Concordance between HMP measured and self-reported number of calls was fair (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)=0.38, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.69), but poor for duration (ICC=0.01, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.37) with wide limits of agreement for both. These results suggest that adolescent self-reported laterality was of limited validity. Adolescent self-reported phone use by number and duration of calls was generally inaccurate but comparable to recent adult studies. Epidemiological studies of mobile phone use based on self-reported information may underestimate true associations with health effects.

  11. Triadin: what possible function 20 years later?

    PubMed

    Marty, Isabelle; Fauré, Julien; Fourest-Lieuvin, Anne; Vassilopoulos, Stéphane; Oddoux, Sarah; Brocard, Julie

    2009-07-01

    During the last 20 years, the identification of triadin function in cardiac and skeletal muscle has been the focus of numerous studies. First thought of as the missing link between the ryanodine receptor and the dihydropyridine receptor and responsible of skeletal type excitation-contraction coupling, the current hypothesis on triadin function has slowly evolved, and triadin is envisaged now as a regulator of calcium release, both in cardiac and skeletal muscle. Nevertheless, none of the experiments performed up to now has given a clear cut view of what triadin really does in muscle. The problem became more complex with the identification of multiple triadin isoforms, having possibly multiple functions. Using a different approach from what has been done previously, we have obtained new clues about the function of triadin. Our data point to a possible involvement of triadin in reticulum structure, in relation with the microtubule network.

  12. Lateral Dispersal and Foraging Behavior of Entomopathogenic Nematodes in the Absence and Presence of Mobile and Non-Mobile Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Harit K.; Grewal, Parwinder S.

    2015-01-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes have been classified into cruisers (active searchers) and ambushers (sit and wait foragers). However, little is known about their dispersal and foraging behavior at population level in soil. We studied lateral dispersal of the ambush foraging Steinernema carpocapsae (ALL strain) and cruise foraging Heterorhabditis bacteriophora (GPS11 strain) from infected host cadavers in microcosms (0.05 m2) containing Wooster silt-loam soil (Oxyaquic fragiudalf) and vegetation in the presence or absence of non-mobile and mobile hosts. Results showed that the presence of a non-mobile host (Galleria mellonella larva in a wire mesh cage) enhanced H. bacteriophora dispersal for up to 24 hr compared with no-host treatment, but had no impact on S. carpocapsae dispersal. In contrast, presence of a mobile host (G. mellonella larvae) increased dispersal of S. carpocapsae compared with no host treatment, but had no effect on H. bacteriophora dispersal. Also H. bacteriophora was better at infecting non-mobile than mobile hosts released into the microcosms and S. carpocapsae was better at infecting mobile than non-mobile hosts, thus affirming the established cruiser-ambusher theory. However, results also revealed that a large proportion of infective juveniles (IJs) of both species stayed near (≤ 3.8 cm) the source cadaver (88-96% S. carpocapsae; 67–79% H. bacteriophora), and the proportion of IJs reaching the farthest distance (11.4 cm) was significantly higher for S. carpocapsae (1.4%) than H. bacteriophora (0.4%) in the presence of mobile hosts. S. carpocapsae also had higher average population displacement than H. bacteriophora in the presence of both the non-mobile (5.07 vs. 3.6 cm/day) and mobile (8.06 vs. 5.3 cm/day) hosts. We conclude that the two species differ in their dispersal and foraging behavior at the population level and this behavior is affected by both the presence and absence of hosts and by their mobility. PMID:26079715

  13. Two distinct forms of functional lateralization in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Gotts, Stephen J.; Jo, Hang Joon; Wallace, Gregory L.; Saad, Ziad S.; Cox, Robert W.; Martin, Alex

    2013-01-01

    The hemispheric lateralization of certain faculties in the human brain has long been held to be beneficial for functioning. However, quantitative relationships between the degree of lateralization in particular brain regions and the level of functioning have yet to be established. Here we demonstrate that two distinct forms of functional lateralization are present in the left vs. the right cerebral hemisphere, with the left hemisphere showing a preference to interact more exclusively with itself, particularly for cortical regions involved in language and fine motor coordination. In contrast, right-hemisphere cortical regions involved in visuospatial and attentional processing interact in a more integrative fashion with both hemispheres. The degree of lateralization present in these distinct systems selectively predicted behavioral measures of verbal and visuospatial ability, providing direct evidence that lateralization is associated with enhanced cognitive ability. PMID:23959883

  14. Functional calcium imaging in zebrafish lateral-line hair cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q X; He, X J; Wong, H C; Kindt, K S

    2016-01-01

    Sensory hair-cell development, function, and regeneration are fundamental processes that are challenging to study in mammalian systems. Zebrafish are an excellent alternative model to study hair cells because they have an external auxiliary organ called the lateral line. The hair cells of the lateral line are easily accessible, which makes them suitable for live, function-based fluorescence imaging. In this chapter, we describe methods to perform functional calcium imaging in zebrafish lateral-line hair cells. We compare genetically encoded calcium indicators that have been used previously to measure calcium in lateral-line hair cells. We also outline equipment required for calcium imaging and compare different imaging systems. Lastly, we discuss how to set up optimal imaging parameters and how to process and visualize calcium signals. Overall, using these methods, in vivo calcium imaging is a powerful tool to examine sensory hair-cell function in an intact organism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Effects of Enriched Neonatal Experiences Upon Later Cognitive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachs, Theodore D.; Cucinotta, Pattiann

    1971-01-01

    The data reported in this small study confirm previous research indicating that early stimulation, though initially affecting human behavior, has little permanent effect upon later functioning. (Author/WY)

  16. Functional hemispheric lateralization for language in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Alary, Mathieu; Delcroix, Nicolas; Leroux, Elise; Razafimandimby, Annick; Brazo, Perrine; Delamillieure, Pascal; Dollfus, Sonia

    2013-09-01

    It is widely reported that patients with schizophrenia exhibit decreased hemispheric lateralization. However, no study has evaluated relationships between the hemispheric anatomical and functional asymmetry in language areas. The present study aimed to determine whether decreased leftward hemispheric lateralization could be related to asymmetry of the grey matter volume in patients with schizophrenia. This investigation was the first to use a functional index of laterality to analyze the global functional network specifically involved in the language task. Twenty-seven right-handed patients with schizophrenia and 54 right-handed control subjects underwent a session of a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with a speech listening paradigm. Functional laterality indices (FLI) were calculated (Wilke, M. and Lidzba, K., 2007. LI-tool: a new toolbox to assess lateralization in functional MR-data. J Neurosci Methods. 163, 128-136). The indices of asymmetry in the volume of grey matter (GVAIs) were computed from the functional language network. Patients with schizophrenia exhibited significantly decreased leftward hemispheric lateralization. There was a positive correlation between GVAIs and FLIs in healthy subjects, while no such correlation was seen in patients with schizophrenia. This study reports for the first time a significant relationship between the anatomical and functional asymmetry in healthy subjects, but not in patients with schizophrenia. While decreased leftward functional lateralization for language was observed in patients with schizophrenia compared to the control group, this functional abnormality was not related to asymmetry in the volume of grey matter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. High-mobility capacitively-induced two-dimensional electrons in a lateral superlattice potential

    PubMed Central

    Lu, T. M.; Laroche, D.; Huang, S.-H.; Chuang, Y.; Li, J.-Y.; Liu, C. W.

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of a lateral periodic potential modulation, two-dimensional electrons may exhibit interesting phenomena, such as a graphene-like energy-momentum dispersion, Bloch oscillations, or the Hofstadter butterfly band structure. To create a sufficiently strong potential modulation using conventional semiconductor heterostructures, aggressive device processing is often required, unfortunately resulting in strong disorder that masks the sought-after effects. Here, we report a novel fabrication process flow for imposing a strong lateral potential modulation onto a capacitively induced two-dimensional electron system, while preserving the host material quality. Using this process flow, the electron density in a patterned Si/SiGe heterostructure can be tuned over a wide range, from 4.4 × 1010 cm−2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm−2, with a peak mobility of 6.4 × 105 cm2/V·s. The wide density tunability and high electron mobility allow us to observe sequential emergence of commensurability oscillations as the density, the mobility, and in turn the mean free path, increase. Magnetic-field-periodic quantum oscillations associated with various closed orbits also emerge sequentially with increasing density. We show that, from the density dependence of the quantum oscillations, one can directly extract the steepness of the imposed superlattice potential. This result is then compared to a conventional lateral superlattice model potential. PMID:26865160

  18. High-mobility capacitively-induced two-dimensional electrons in a lateral superlattice potential

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Tzu -Ming; Laroche, Dominique; Huang, S. -H.; ...

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of a lateral periodic potential modulation, two-dimensional electrons may exhibit interesting phenomena, such as a graphene-like energy-momentum dispersion, Bloch oscillations, or the Hofstadter butterfly band structure. To create a sufficiently strong potential modulation using conventional semiconductor heterostructures, aggressive device processing is often required, unfortunately resulting in strong disorder that masks the sought-after effects. Here, we report a novel fabrication process flow for imposing a strong lateral potential modulation onto a capacitively induced two-dimensional electron system, while preserving the host material quality. Using this process flow, the electron density in a patterned Si/SiGe heterostructure can be tuned overmore » a wide range, from 4.4 × 1010 cm–2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm–2, with a peak mobility of 6.4 × 105 cm2/V·s. The wide density tunability and high electron mobility allow us to observe sequential emergence of commensurability oscillations as the density, the mobility, and in turn the mean free path, increase. Magnetic-field-periodic quantum oscillations associated with various closed orbits also emerge sequentially with increasing density. We show that, from the density dependence of the quantum oscillations, one can directly extract the steepness of the imposed superlattice potential. Lastly, this result is then compared to a conventional lateral superlattice model potential.« less

  19. High-mobility capacitively-induced two-dimensional electrons in a lateral superlattice potential

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Tzu -Ming; Laroche, Dominique; Huang, S. -H.; Chuang, Y.; Li, J. -Y.; Liu, C. W.

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of a lateral periodic potential modulation, two-dimensional electrons may exhibit interesting phenomena, such as a graphene-like energy-momentum dispersion, Bloch oscillations, or the Hofstadter butterfly band structure. To create a sufficiently strong potential modulation using conventional semiconductor heterostructures, aggressive device processing is often required, unfortunately resulting in strong disorder that masks the sought-after effects. Here, we report a novel fabrication process flow for imposing a strong lateral potential modulation onto a capacitively induced two-dimensional electron system, while preserving the host material quality. Using this process flow, the electron density in a patterned Si/SiGe heterostructure can be tuned over a wide range, from 4.4 × 1010 cm–2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm–2, with a peak mobility of 6.4 × 105 cm2/V·s. The wide density tunability and high electron mobility allow us to observe sequential emergence of commensurability oscillations as the density, the mobility, and in turn the mean free path, increase. Magnetic-field-periodic quantum oscillations associated with various closed orbits also emerge sequentially with increasing density. We show that, from the density dependence of the quantum oscillations, one can directly extract the steepness of the imposed superlattice potential. Lastly, this result is then compared to a conventional lateral superlattice model potential.

  20. High-mobility capacitively-induced two-dimensional electrons in a lateral superlattice potential.

    PubMed

    Lu, T M; Laroche, D; Huang, S-H; Chuang, Y; Li, J-Y; Liu, C W

    2016-02-11

    In the presence of a lateral periodic potential modulation, two-dimensional electrons may exhibit interesting phenomena, such as a graphene-like energy-momentum dispersion, Bloch oscillations, or the Hofstadter butterfly band structure. To create a sufficiently strong potential modulation using conventional semiconductor heterostructures, aggressive device processing is often required, unfortunately resulting in strong disorder that masks the sought-after effects. Here, we report a novel fabrication process flow for imposing a strong lateral potential modulation onto a capacitively induced two-dimensional electron system, while preserving the host material quality. Using this process flow, the electron density in a patterned Si/SiGe heterostructure can be tuned over a wide range, from 4.4 × 10(10) cm(-2) to 1.8 × 10(11) cm(-2), with a peak mobility of 6.4 × 10(5) cm(2)/V·s. The wide density tunability and high electron mobility allow us to observe sequential emergence of commensurability oscillations as the density, the mobility, and in turn the mean free path, increase. Magnetic-field-periodic quantum oscillations associated with various closed orbits also emerge sequentially with increasing density. We show that, from the density dependence of the quantum oscillations, one can directly extract the steepness of the imposed superlattice potential. This result is then compared to a conventional lateral superlattice model potential.

  1. Functional Anatomy, Pathomechanics, and Pathophysiology of Lateral Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Hertel, Jay

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe the functional anatomy of the ankle complex as it relates to lateral ankle instability and to describe the pathomechanics and pathophysiology of acute lateral ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability. Data Sources: I searched MEDLINE (1985–2001) and CINAHL (1982–2001) using the key words ankle sprain and ankle instability. Data Synthesis: Lateral ankle sprains are among the most common injuries incurred during sports participation. The ankle functions as a complex with contributions from the talocrural, subtalar, and inferior tibiofibular joints. Each of these joints must be considered in the pathomechanics and pathophysiology of lateral ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability. Lateral ankle sprains typically occur when the rearfoot undergoes excessive supination on an externally rotated lower leg. Recurrent ankle sprain is extremely common; in fact, the most common predisposition to suffering a sprain is the history of having suffered a previous ankle sprain. Chronic ankle instability may be due to mechanical instability, functional instability, or most likely, a combination of these 2 phenomena. Mechanical instability may be due to specific insufficiencies such as pathologic laxity, arthrokinematic changes, synovial irritation, or degenerative changes. Functional instability is caused by insufficiencies in proprioception and neuromuscular control. Conclusions/Recommendations: Lateral ankle sprains are often inadequately treated, resulting in frequent recurrence of ankle sprains. Appreciation of the complex anatomy and mechanics of the ankle joint and the pathomechanics and pathophysiology related to acute and chronic ankle instability is integral to the process of effectively evaluating and treating ankle injuries. PMID:12937557

  2. Language Lateralization in Children Using Functional Transcranial Doppler Sonography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haag, Anja; Moeller, Nicola; Knake, Susanne; Hermsen, Anke; Oertel, Wolfgang H.; Rosenow, Felix; Hamer, Hajo M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Language lateralization with functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD) and lexical word generation has been shown to have high concordance with the Wada test and functional magnetic resonance imaging in adults. We evaluated a nonlexical paradigm to determine language dominance in children. Method: In 23 right-handed children (12…

  3. Language Lateralization in Children Using Functional Transcranial Doppler Sonography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haag, Anja; Moeller, Nicola; Knake, Susanne; Hermsen, Anke; Oertel, Wolfgang H.; Rosenow, Felix; Hamer, Hajo M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Language lateralization with functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD) and lexical word generation has been shown to have high concordance with the Wada test and functional magnetic resonance imaging in adults. We evaluated a nonlexical paradigm to determine language dominance in children. Method: In 23 right-handed children (12…

  4. Lateral mobility of minibasins during shortening: Insights from the SE Precaspian Basin, Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, Oliver B.; Fernandez, Naiara; Hudec, Michael R.; Jackson, Martin P. A.; Burg, George; Dooley, Tim P.; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.

    2017-04-01

    Minibasin provinces are widespread and can be found in all types of salt tectonic settings, many of which are prone to shortening. Previous studies of how minibasin provinces shorten assume that the salt between the minibasins is homogeneous and that the base of salt is flat or of low relief, such that minibasins are free to move laterally. Here we investigate how minibasin provinces respond to shortening when the lateral mobility of the minibasins is restricted by intra-salt sediment bodies, in order to gain a greater understanding of the controls on the structural styles and modes of tectono-stratigraphic evolution exhibited in minibasin provinces. We examine a borehole-constrained, 3D seismic reflection dataset from the SE Precaspian Basin (onshore western Kazakhstan). The study area is characterised by large, supra-salt minibasins and an array of smaller intra-salt sediment packages distributed between these larger minibasins. We first outline the evidence of episodic shortening between the Late Triassic and present, after the onset of supra-salt minibasin subsidence. Next, we document spatial variations in shortening style, showing how these relate to the concentration of intra-salt sediment packages. Finally, we develop synoptic models showing how intra-salt sediment packages influence both the lateral mobility of minibasins during shortening and the resultant structural style, and we compare and contrast our findings with existing models and other natural examples of shortened minibasin provinces. We conclude that minibasin provinces may have different degrees of lateral mobility depending on the presence, or absence, of intrasalt barriers, and that these variations provide a first-order control on basin-shortening style and tectono-stratigraphic evolution.

  5. Value of cephalic part of lateral crus in functional rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Sazgar, Amir A; Amali, Amin; Peyvasty, Mina Najarzad

    2016-12-01

    Reshaping of the nasal tip is the most difficult part of rhinoplasty. Over the years, there have been many advances in the field of rhinoplasty, including tip plasty. The goal of these continuous refinements in existing procedures has been to improve both aesthetic and functional outcomes. The cephalic part of the lateral crus of the lower lateral cartilage is what mainly contributes to nasal tip deformity. Various surgical techniques have been reported that used the cephalic part of lateral crus to refine the nasal tip and preserve alar integrity and nasal breathing function. In this review article, we have attempted to show the evolution of these methods while focusing on development of approaches that are basic for "modern rhinoplasty" and presenting our personal preferences. We have also endeavored to categorize these methods and clarify some misconceptions and inaccuracies in their descriptions.

  6. Motives for residential mobility in later life: post-move perspectives of elders and family members.

    PubMed

    Sergeant, Julie F; Ekerdt, David J

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study delineates motives for residential mobility, describes dynamics between the elder and family members during the move decision process, and locates the move decision within ecological layers of the aging context. Interviews were conducted with 30 individuals and couples (ages 60-87) who experienced a community-based move within the past year, and with 14 extended family members. Reasons for moving (from perspectives of both elders who moved and their family members) were grouped into four themes and eleven issues that influenced the move decision. These themes parallel the ecological context of individual health and functioning, beliefs and attitudes, physical environment, and social pressures. Late-life mobility is a significant life transition that is the outcome of an ongoing appraisal and reappraisal of housing fit with individual functioning, needs, and aspirations. Family members are an integral part of these decision and residential mobility processes.

  7. Flexible lateral isocenter: A novel mechanical functionality contributing to dose reduction in neurointerventional procedures.

    PubMed

    Borota, Ljubisa; Patz, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Aim of the study A new functionality that enables vertical mobility of the lateral arm of a biplane angiographic machine is referred to as the flexible lateral isocenter. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of the flexible lateral isocenter on the air-kerma rate under experimental conditions. Material and methods An anthropomorphic head-and-chest phantom with anteroposterior (AP) diameter of the chest varying from 22 cm to 30 cm simulated human bodies of different body constitutions. The angulation of the AP arm in the sagittal plane varied from 35 degrees to 55 degrees for each AP diameter. The air-kerma rate (mGy/min) values were read from the system dose display in two settings for each angle: flexible lateral isocenter and fixed lateral isocenter. Results The air-kerma rate was significantly lower for all AP diameters of the chest of the phantom when the flexible lateral isocenter was used: (a) For 22 cm, the p value was 0.028; (b) For 25 cm, the p value was 0.0169; (c) For 28 cm, the p value was 0.01005 and (d) For 30 cm, the p value was 0.01703. Conclusion Our results show that the flexible lateral isocenter contributes significantly to the reduction of the air-kerma rate, and thus to a safer environment in terms of dose lowering both for patients and staff.

  8. Lateral patellofemoral ligament reconstruction to restore functional capacity in patients previously undergoing lateral retinacular release

    PubMed Central

    Beckert, Mitch; Crebs, Dylan; Nieto, Michael; Gao, Yubo; Albright, John

    2016-01-01

    AIM To study patient outcomes after surgical correction for iatrogenic patellar instability. METHODS This retrospective study looked at 17 patients (19 knees) suffering from disabling medial patellar instability following lateral release surgery. All patients underwent lateral patellofemoral ligament (LPFL) reconstruction by a single surgeon. Assessments in all 19 cases included functional outcome scores, range of motion, and assessment for the presence of apprehension sign of the patella to determine if LPFL reconstruction surgery was successful at restoring patellofemoral stability. RESULTS No patients reported any residual postoperative symptoms of patellar instability. Also no patients demonstrated medial patellar apprehension or examiner induced subluxation with the medial instability test described earlier following LPFL reconstruction. Furthermore, all patients recovered normal range of motion compared to the contralateral limb. For patients with pre and postoperative outcome scores, the mean overall knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score increased significantly, from 34.39 preoperatively (range: 7.7-70.12) to 69.54 postoperatively (range: 26.82-91.46) at final follow-up (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION This novel technique for LPFL reconstruction is effective at restoring lateral restraint of the patellofemoral joint and improving joint functionality. PMID:27574606

  9. Reduction in lateral lipid mobility of lipid bilayer membrane by atmospheric pressure plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Tero, Ryugo; Yamashita, Ryuma; Yusa, Kota; Takikawa, Hirofumi

    2016-03-01

    Plasma medicine is an emerging research field in which various applications of electrical discharge, especially in the form of nonequilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure, are examined, for example, the application of plasma to biological targets for various purposes such as selective killing of tumor cells and blood stanching. We have focused on the behavior of an artificial cell membrane system at the solid-liquid interface. To evaluate the lateral lipid mobility, we measured the diffusion coefficient of the supported lipid bilayer (SLB) composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching by confocal laser scanning microscopy. It was found that the diffusion coefficient was decreased by plasma irradiation and that the diffusion coefficient decreasing rate proceeded with increasing plasma power. We investigated the effects of stimulation with an equilibrium chemical, H2O2, on the SLB and confirmed that the diffusion coefficient did not change at least up to a H2O2 concentration of 5 mM. These results indicate that transient active species generated by plasma play critical roles in the reduction in SLB fluidity. The effects of the two generated major oxidized lipid species, hydroxyl- or hydroperoxy-phosphatidylcholine (PC) and acyl-chain-truncated PCs terminated with aldehyde or carboxyl group, on lateral lipid mobility are discussed.

  10. A modified mobilization-with-movement to treat a lateral ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Mau, Heather; Baker, Russell T

    2014-08-01

    Lateral ankle sprains (LAS) are common in sports medicine and can result in a high rate of re-injury and chronic ankle instability (CAI). Recent evidence supports the use on mobilizations directed at the ankle in patients who have suffered a LAS. The Mulligan Concept of Mobilization-with-Movement (MWM) provides an intervention strategy for LASs, but requires pain-free mobilization application and little literature exists on modifications of these techniques. To present the use of a modified MWM to treat LASs when the traditional MWM technique could not be performed due to patient reported pain and to assess outcomes of the treatment. The subject of this case report is a 23 year-old female collegiate basketball player who had failed to respond to initial conservative treatments after being diagnosed with a lateral ankle sprain. The initial management and subsequent interventions are presented. After re-examination, the addition of a modification of a MWM technique produced immediate and clinically significant changes in patient symptoms. The use of the modified-MWM resulted in full resolution of symptoms and a rapid return to full athletic participation. After the initial application of the modified-MWM, the patient reported immediate pain-free ankle motion and ambulation. Following a total of 5 treatments, using only the modified MWM and taping technique, the patient was discharged with equal range of motion (ROM) bilaterally, a decreased Disablement in the Physically Active (DPA) Scale score, and an asymptomatic physical exam. Follow-up exam 6 weeks later indicated a full maintenance of these results. Recent evidence has been presented to support the use of mobilization techniques to treat patient limitations following ankle injury; however, the majority of evidence is associated with addressing the talar and dorsiflexion limitations. Currently, little evidence is available regarding the use of the MWM technique designed for LASs and the expected outcomes. This

  11. Effect of lateral mobility of fluorescent probes in lipid mixing assays of cell fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, S K; Cheng, M; Hui, S W

    1990-01-01

    Monolayers of human erythrocytes, immobilized on a cover slip, were induced to fuse by polyethylene glycol (mol wt 8,000). The mobility of fluorescent probes, 1-oleoyl-2-[12-[(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadizol-4-yl)amino]dodecanoyl] phosphatidyl-choline (C12-NBD-PC), from labeled cells to unlabeled cells was monitored by video-enhanced fluorescence microscopy. A dequenching curve was obtained from the measurement of fluorescence intensities of pairs of fused cells over time. The dequenching curve and the curve obtained from macroscopic measurements of a cell monolayer (described in the preceding article) were compared and discussed. The slow probe transfer rate between a pair of fused cells was explained by a diffusion model based on membrane area conservation and the geometry of the fusion lumen. An equivalent lumen between two fused cells, thought to be the main rate limitation of probe mobility after fusion, was calculated to be approximately 130 nm in diameter. Lumens of 75 nm in diameter were observed by electron microscopy. Thus, the rate of macroscopic fluorescence dequenching depends not only upon the fusion efficiency, but also upon the number of simultaneous fusion partners, the geometry of their contact points, and the lateral mobility of the fluorescent probes through these points. The relative fusion efficiency can be derived only from the saturation dequenching values. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:2291938

  12. Distribution and lateral mobility of DC-SIGN on immature dendritic cells--implications for pathogen uptake.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Aaron K; Thompson, Nancy L; Jacobson, Ken

    2008-03-01

    The receptor C-type lectin DC-SIGN (CD209) is expressed by immature dendritic cells, functioning as an antigen capture receptor and cell adhesion molecule. Various microbes, including HIV-1, can exploit binding to DC-SIGN to gain entry to dendritic cells. DC-SIGN forms discrete nanoscale clusters on immature dendritic cells that are thought to be important for viral binding. We confirmed that these DC-SIGN clusters also exist both in live dendritic cells and in cell lines that ectopically express DC-SIGN. Moreover, DC-SIGN has an unusual polarized lateral distribution in the plasma membrane of dendritic cells and other cells: the receptor is preferentially localized to the leading edge of the dendritic cell lamellipod and largely excluded from the ventral plasma membrane. Colocalization of DC-SIGN clusters with endocytic activity demonstrated that surface DC-SIGN clusters are enriched near the leading edge, whereas endocytosis of these clusters occurred preferentially at lamellar sites posterior to the leading edge. Therefore, we predicted that DC-SIGN clusters move from the leading edge to zones of internalization. Two modes of lateral mobility were evident from the trajectories of DC-SIGN clusters at the leading edge, directed and non-directed mobility. Clusters with directed mobility moved in a highly linear fashion from the leading edge to rearward locations in the lamella at remarkably high velocity (1420+/-260 nm/second). Based on these data, we propose that DC-SIGN clusters move from the leading edge--where the dendritic cell is likely to encounter pathogens in tissue--to a medial lamellar site where clusters enter the cell via endocytosis. Immature dendritic cells may acquire and internalize HIV and other pathogens by this process.

  13. Does cerebral lateralization develop? A study using functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound assessing lateralization for language production and visuospatial memory.

    PubMed

    Groen, Margriet A; Whitehouse, Andrew J O; Badcock, Nicholas A; Bishop, Dorothy V M

    2012-05-01

    In the majority of people, language production is lateralized to the left cerebral hemisphere and visuospatial skills to the right. However, questions remain as to when, how, and why humans arrive at this division of labor. In this study, we assessed cerebral lateralization for language production and for visuospatial memory using functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound in a group of 60 typically developing children between the ages of six and 16 years. The typical pattern of left-lateralized activation for language production and right-lateralized activation for visuospatial memory was found in the majority of the children (58%). No age-related change in direction or strength of lateralization was found for language production. In contrast, the strength of lateralization (independent of direction) for visuospatial memory function continued to increase with age. In addition, boys showed a trend for stronger right-hemisphere lateralization for visuospatial memory than girls, but there was no gender effect on language laterality. We tested whether having language and visuospatial functions in the same hemisphere was associated with poor cognitive performance and found no evidence for this "functional crowding" hypothesis. We did, however, find that children with left-lateralized language production had higher vocabulary and nonword reading age-adjusted standard scores than other children, regardless of the laterality of visuospatial memory. Thus, a link between language function and left-hemisphere lateralization exists, and cannot be explained in terms of maturational change.

  14. Outer Hair Cell Lateral Wall Structure Constrains the Mobility of Plasma Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Tetsuji; Hakizimana, Pierre; Wu, Siva; Hassan, Ahmed; Jacob, Stefan; Temirov, Jamshid; Fang, Jie; Mellado-Lagarde, Marcia; Gursky, Richard; Horner, Linda; Leibiger, Barbara; Leijon, Sara; Centonze, Victoria E.; Berggren, Per-Olof; Frase, Sharon; Auer, Manfred; Brownell, William E.; Fridberger, Anders; Zuo, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Nature’s fastest motors are the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs). These sensory cells use a membrane protein, Slc26a5 (prestin), to generate mechanical force at high frequencies, which is essential for explaining the exquisite hearing sensitivity of mammalian ears. Previous studies suggest that Slc26a5 continuously diffuses within the membrane, but how can a freely moving motor protein effectively convey forces critical for hearing? To provide direct evidence in OHCs for freely moving Slc26a5 molecules, we created a knockin mouse where Slc26a5 is fused with YFP. These mice and four other strains expressing fluorescently labeled membrane proteins were used to examine their lateral diffusion in the OHC lateral wall. All five proteins showed minimal diffusion, but did move after pharmacological disruption of membrane-associated structures with a cholesterol-depleting agent and salicylate. Thus, our results demonstrate that OHC lateral wall structure constrains the mobility of plasma membrane proteins and that the integrity of such membrane-associated structures are critical for Slc26a5’s active and structural roles. The structural constraint of membrane proteins may exemplify convergent evolution of cellular motors across species. Our findings also suggest a possible mechanism for disorders of cholesterol metabolism with hearing loss such as Niemann-Pick Type C diseases. PMID:26352669

  15. Laterally forced equatorial perturbations in a linear model. Part II: Mobile forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Chidong Zhang )

    1993-03-15

    Impacts of atmospheric mean zonal flows on equatorial perturbations laterally forced by extratropical mobile sources in a linear model are examined. An analytical solution of the model with a constant mean zonal flow reveals that amplitudes of forced waves can be significantly modulated by the mean zonal flow through its Doppler-shift effect on the forcing frequency. In general, amplitudes of westward-propagating waves, such as the Rossby and mixed Rossby-gravity waves, tend to be larger in mean westerlies than in mean easterlies for low-frequency forcing but smaller in mean westerlies for high-frequency forcing. The opposite dependence on the mean zonal flow applies to eastward-propagating waves, such as the Kelvin wave. The model numerical solutions show that the spatial structure of the laterally forced equatorial perturbation as a whole is sensitive to the mean zonal flow. Particularly, a substantial zonal variation in the equatorial perturbation occurs when the mean zonal flow varies in longitude. The main conclusion of this study emphasizes that the impact of the mean zonal flow on different equatorial waves is generally not the same and also varies with the forcing frequency. The study supports the speculation that the mean-flow impact is a contributing factor to the coherence between the longitudinal distributions of the atmospheric mean zonal wind field and laterally forced wave activity observed in the tropical upper troposphere.

  16. Fluvial bevelling of topography controlled by lateral channel mobility and uplift rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufe, Aaron; Paola, Chris; Burbank, Douglas W.

    2016-09-01

    Valley morphologies of rivers crossing zones of active uplift range from narrow canyons to broad alluvial surfaces. They provide illuminating examples of the fundamental, but poorly understood, competition between relief creation and landscape flattening. Motivated by a field example of abandoned kilometre-wide, fluvially eroded platforms on active detachment folds in the Tian Shan foreland, we present physical experiments investigating the controls on the area of a growing fold that is reworked by antecedent rivers. These experiments reproduce the range of observed field morphologies, varying from wholesale bevelling of the uplifting fold to the formation of narrow, steep-walled canyons. A log-linear fit to a simple dimensionless parameter shows that the competition between lateral channel mobility and rock-uplift rate explains >95% of the variance in the bevelled fraction of the folds. Our data suggest that lateral bedrock erosion rates of 0.5-40 m yr-1 are required to explain the formation of extensive platforms in the Tian Shan foreland and imply that varying water and sediment fluxes can cause striking changes in the degree of landscape flattening by influencing the lateral erosion rate.

  17. Functional Importance of Mobile Ribosomal Proteins.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kai-Chun; Wen, Jin-Der; Yang, Lee-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although the dynamic motions and peptidyl transferase activity seem to be embedded in the rRNAs, the ribosome contains more than 50 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins), whose functions remain largely elusive. Also, the precise forms of some of these r-proteins, as being part of the ribosome, are not structurally solved due to their high flexibility, which hinders the efforts in their functional elucidation. Owing to recent advances in cryo-electron microscopy, single-molecule techniques, and theoretical modeling, much has been learned about the dynamics of these r-proteins. Surprisingly, allosteric regulations have been found in between spatially separated components as distant as those in the opposite sides of the ribosome. Here, we focus on the functional roles and intricate regulations of the mobile L1 and L12 stalks and L9 and S1 proteins. Conformational flexibility also enables versatile functions for r-proteins beyond translation. The arrangement of r-proteins may be under evolutionary pressure that fine-tunes mass distributions for optimal structural dynamics and catalytic activity of the ribosome.

  18. Lateral Mobility and Nanoscale Spatial Arrangement of Chemokine-activated α4β1 Integrins on T Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Sosa-Costa, Alberto; Isern de Val, Sol; Sevilla-Movilla, Silvia; Teixidó, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine stimulation of integrin α4β1-dependent T lymphocyte adhesion is a key step during lymphocyte trafficking. A central question regarding α4β1 function is how its lateral mobility and organization influence its affinity and avidity following cell stimulation with chemokines and/or ligands. Using single particle tracking and superresolution imaging approaches, we explored the lateral mobility and spatial arrangement of individual α4β1integrins on T cells exposed to different activating stimuli. We show that CXCL12 stimulation leads to rapid and transient α4β1activation, measured by induction of the activation epitope recognized by the HUTS-21 anti-β1antibody and by increased talin-β1 association. CXCL12-dependent α4β1 activation directly correlated with restricted lateral diffusion and integrin immobilization. Moreover, co-stimulation by CXCL12 together with soluble VCAM-1 potentiated integrin immobilization with a 5-fold increase in immobile integrins compared with unstimulated conditions. Our data indicate that docking by talin of the chemokine-activated α4β1 to the actin cytoskeleton favors integrin immobilization, which likely facilitates ligand interaction and increased adhesiveness. Superresolution imaging showed that the nanoscale organization of high-affinity α4β1 remains unaffected following chemokine and/or ligand addition. Instead, newly activated α4β1 integrins organize on the cell membrane as independent units without joining pre-established integrin sites to contribute to cluster formation. Altogether, our results provide a rationale to understand how the spatiotemporal organization of activated α4β1 integrins regulates T lymphocyte adhesion. PMID:27481944

  19. Effects of core instability strength training on trunk muscle strength, spinal mobility, dynamic balance and functional mobility in older adults.

    PubMed

    Granacher, Urs; Lacroix, Andre; Muehlbauer, Thomas; Roettger, Katrin; Gollhofer, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Age-related postural misalignment, balance deficits and strength/power losses are associated with impaired functional mobility and an increased risk of falling in seniors. Core instability strength training (CIT) involves exercises that are challenging for both trunk muscles and postural control and may thus have the potential to induce benefits in trunk muscle strength, spinal mobility and balance performance. The objective was to investigate the effects of CIT on measures of trunk muscle strength, spinal mobility, dynamic balance and functional mobility in seniors. Thirty-two older adults were randomly assigned to an intervention group (INT; n = 16, aged 70.8 ± 4.1 years) that conducted a 9-week progressive CIT or to a control group (n = 16, aged 70.2 ± 4.5 years). Maximal isometric strength of the trunk flexors/extensors/lateral flexors (right, left)/rotators (right, left) as well as of spinal mobility in the sagittal and the coronal plane was measured before and after the intervention program. Dynamic balance (i.e. walking 10 m on an optoelectric walkway, the Functional Reach test) and functional mobility (Timed Up and Go test) were additionally tested. Program compliance was excellent with participants of the INT group completing 92% of the training sessions. Significant group × test interactions were found for the maximal isometric strength of the trunk flexors (34%, p < 0.001), extensors (21%, p < 0.001), lateral flexors (right: 48%, p < 0.001; left: 53%, p < 0.001) and left rotators (42%, p < 0.001) in favor of the INT group. Further, training-related improvements were found for spinal mobility in the sagittal (11%, p < 0.001) and coronal plane (11%, p = 0.06) directions, for stride velocity (9%, p < 0.05), the coefficient of variation in stride velocity (31%, p < 0.05), the Functional Reach test (20%, p < 0.05) and the Timed Up and Go test (4%, p < 0.05) in favor of the INT group. CIT proved to be a feasible exercise program for seniors with a high

  20. Cushioning and lateral stability functions of cloth sport shoes.

    PubMed

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Hong, Youlian; Li, Jing Xian

    2007-09-01

    In this study, we evaluated the protective functions of cloth sport shoes, including cushioning and lateral stability. Twelve male students participated in the study (mean +/- s: age 12.7 +/- 0.4 years, mass 40.7 +/- 5.9kg, height 1.50 +/- 0.04m). Cloth sport shoes, running shoes, basketball shoes, crosstraining shoes, and barefoot conditions were investigated in random sequence. Human pendulum and cutting movement tests were used to assess cushioning performance and lateral stability, respectively. For cushioning, the running shoes (2.06 body weight, BW) performed the best, while the cross-training shoes (2.30 BW) and the basketball shoes (2.37 BW) both performed better than the cloth sport shoes (2.55 BW) and going barefoot (2.63 BW). For the lateral stability test, range of inversion--eversion was found to be from 3.6 to 4.9 degrees, which was far less than that for adult participants (> 20 degrees). No significant differences were found between conditions. All conditions showed prolonged durations from foot-strike to maximum inversion (66-95 ms), which was less vigorous than that for adult participants (< 40 ms) and was unlikely to evoke intrinsic stability failure. In conclusion, the cloth sport shoe showed inferior cushioning capability but the same lateral stability as the other sports shoes for children.

  1. Lateralization of Cognitive Functions in Aphasia after Right Brain Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Ji-Wan; Hwang, Yu Mi; Sim, Hyunsub

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The lateralization of cognitive functions in crossed aphasia in dextrals (CAD) has been explored and compared mainly with cases of aphasia with left hemisphere damage. However, comparing the neuropsychological aspects of CAD and aphasia after right brain damage in left-handers (ARL) could potentially provide more insights into the effect of a shift in the laterality of handedness or language on other cognitive organization. Thus, this case study compared two cases of CAD and one case of ARL. Materials and Methods The following neuropsychological measures were obtained from three aphasic patients with right brain damage (two cases of CAD and one case of ARL); language, oral and limb praxis, and nonverbal cognitive functions (visuospatial neglect and visuospatial construction). Results All three patients showed impaired visuoconstructional abilities, whereas each patient showed a different level of performances for oral and limb praxis, and visuospatial neglect. Conclusion Based on the analysis of these three aphasic patients' performances, we highlighted the lateralization of language, handedness, oral and limb praxis, visuospatial neglect and visuospatial constructive ability in aphasic patients with right brain damage. PMID:22476990

  2. The spatiotemporal transfer function of the Limulus lateral eye

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    The dynamics of the Limulus retina may be well described by the spatiotemporal transfer function, which measures the response of the eye to moving sinusoidal gratings. We consider a model for this system, which incorporates an excitatory generator potential, and self- and lateral inhibitory processes. Procedures are described which allow estimation of parameters for the model consistent with the empirical transfer function data. Transfer functions calculated from the model show good agreement with laboratory measurements, and may be used to predict accurately the response of the eye to arbitrary moving stimuli. The model allows convenient interpretation of the transfer function measurements in terms of physiological processes which underly the response of the Limulus retina. PMID:211177

  3. Determination of lateral-stability derivatives and transfer-function coefficients from frequency-response data for lateral motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donegan, James J; Robinson, Samuel W , Jr; Gates, Ordway, B , jr

    1955-01-01

    A method is presented for determining the lateral-stability derivatives, transfer-function coefficients, and the modes for lateral motion from frequency-response data for a rigid aircraft. The method is based on the application of the vector technique to the equations of lateral motion, so that the three equations of lateral motion can be separated into six equations. The method of least squares is then applied to the data for each of these equations to yield the coefficients of the equations of lateral motion from which the lateral-stability derivatives and lateral transfer-function coefficients are computed. Two numerical examples are given to demonstrate the use of the method.

  4. Atypical functional lateralization of language in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kleinhans, Natalia M.; Müller, Ralph-Axel; Cohen, David N.; Courchesne, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Impaired language is a prominent behavioral marker of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), but its neurobiological underpinnings are incompletely understood. We studied letter and category fluency in 14 high functioning ASD individuals and 14 age-matched controls. Each fluency condition was compared to self-paced repetition of the word “nothing.” Responses were recorded to monitor performance. In letter fluency, the ASD group had significantly greater activation than controls in the right frontal and right superior temporal lobe. Between-group differences were not observed in left prefrontal cortex. By examining functional asymmetry in frontal cortex, we found that the ASD group had significantly reduced lateralization of activation patterns in letter fluency compared to the controls. In category fluency, no between-group differences in lateralization were found, in light of greater bilateral activation in controls. These findings indicate reduced hemispheric differentiation for certain verbal fluency tasks in ASD, consistent with some previous evidence of atypical functional and structural asymmetries in autism. Abnormal functional organization may contribute to the language impairment seen in ASD. PMID:18555209

  5. Lateral Mobility of Presynaptic L-Type Calcium Channels at Photoreceptor Ribbon Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Aaron J.; Chen, Minghui; Thoreson, Wallace B.

    2011-01-01

    At most synapses, presynaptic Ca2+ channels are positioned near vesicle release sites, and increasing this distance reduces synaptic strength. We examined the lateral membrane mobility of presynaptic L-type Ca2+ channels at photoreceptor ribbon synapses of the tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) retina. Movements of individual Ca2+ channels were tracked by coupling quantum dots to an antibody against the extracellular α2δ4 Ca2+ channel subunit. α2δ4 antibodies labeled photoreceptor terminals and co-localized with antibodies to synaptic vesicle protein SV2 and Ca2+ channel CaV1.4 α1 subunits. The results show that Ca2+ channels are dynamic and move within a confined region beneath the synaptic ribbon. The size of this confinement area is regulated by actin and membrane cholesterol. Fusion of nearby synaptic vesicles caused jumps in Ca2+ channel position, propelling them towards the outer edge of the confinement domain. Channels rebounded rapidly towards the center. Thus, although CaV channels are mobile, molecular scaffolds confine them beneath the ribbon to maintain neurotransmission even at high release rates. PMID:21430141

  6. High lateral mobility of endogenous and transfected alkaline phosphatase: a phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane protein

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    The lateral mobility of alkaline phosphatase (AP) in the plasma membrane of osteoblastic and nonosteoblastic cells was estimated by fluorescence redistribution after photobleaching in embryonic and in tumor cells, in cells that express AP naturally, and in cells transfected with an expression vector containing AP cDNA. The diffusion coefficient (D) and the mobile fraction, estimated from the percent recovery (%R), were found to be cell-type dependent ranging from (0.58 +/- 0.16) X 10(-9) cm2s-1 and 73.3 +/- 10.5 in rat osteosarcoma cells ROS 17/2.8 to (1.77 +/- 0.51) X 10(-9) cm2s-1 and 82.8 +/- 2.5 in rat osteosarcoma cells UMR106. Similar values of D greater than or equal to 10(-9) cm2s-1 with approximately 80% recovery were also found in fetal rat calvaria cells, transfected skin fibroblasts, and transfected AP- negative osteosarcoma cells ROS 25/1. These values of D are many times greater than "typical" values for membrane proteins, coming close to those of membrane lipid in fetal rat calvaria and ROS 17/2.8 cells (D = [4(-5)] X 10(-9) cm2s-1 with 75-80% recovery), estimated with the hexadecanoyl aminofluorescein probe. In all cell types, phosphatidylinositol (PI)-specific phospholipase C released 60-90% of native and transfection-expressed AP, demonstrating that, as in other tissue types, AP in these cells is anchored in the membrane via a linkage to PI. These results indicate that the transfected cells used in this study possess the machinery for AP insertion into the membrane and its binding to PI. The fast AP mobility appears to be an intrinsic property of the way the protein is anchored in the membrane, a conclusion with general implications for the understanding of the slow diffusion of other membrane proteins. PMID:2889741

  7. Predicting functional decline and survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ong, Mei-Lyn; Tan, Pei Fang; Holbrook, Joanna D

    2017-01-01

    Better predictors of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease course could enable smaller and more targeted clinical trials. Partially to address this aim, the Prize for Life foundation collected de-identified records from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis sufferers who participated in clinical trials of investigational drugs and made them available to researchers in the PRO-ACT database. In this study, time series data from PRO-ACT subjects were fitted to exponential models. Binary classes for decline in the total score of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis functional rating scale revised (ALSFRS-R) (fast/slow progression) and survival (high/low death risk) were derived. Data was segregated into training and test sets via cross validation. Learning algorithms were applied to the demographic, clinical and laboratory parameters in the training set to predict ALSFRS-R decline and the derived fast/slow progression and high/low death risk categories. The performance of predictive models was assessed by cross-validation in the test set using Receiver Operator Curves and root mean squared errors. A model created using a boosting algorithm containing the decline in four parameters (weight, alkaline phosphatase, albumin and creatine kinase) post baseline, was able to predict functional decline class (fast or slow) with fair accuracy (AUC = 0.82). However similar approaches to build a predictive model for decline class by baseline subject characteristics were not successful. In contrast, baseline values of total bilirubin, gamma glutamyltransferase, urine specific gravity and ALSFRS-R item score-climbing stairs were sufficient to predict survival class. Using combinations of small numbers of variables it was possible to predict classes of functional decline and survival across the 1-2 year timeframe available in PRO-ACT. These findings may have utility for design of future ALS clinical trials.

  8. Predicting functional decline and survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Mei-Lyn; Tan, Pei Fang

    2017-01-01

    Background Better predictors of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease course could enable smaller and more targeted clinical trials. Partially to address this aim, the Prize for Life foundation collected de-identified records from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis sufferers who participated in clinical trials of investigational drugs and made them available to researchers in the PRO-ACT database. Methods In this study, time series data from PRO-ACT subjects were fitted to exponential models. Binary classes for decline in the total score of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis functional rating scale revised (ALSFRS-R) (fast/slow progression) and survival (high/low death risk) were derived. Data was segregated into training and test sets via cross validation. Learning algorithms were applied to the demographic, clinical and laboratory parameters in the training set to predict ALSFRS-R decline and the derived fast/slow progression and high/low death risk categories. The performance of predictive models was assessed by cross-validation in the test set using Receiver Operator Curves and root mean squared errors. Results A model created using a boosting algorithm containing the decline in four parameters (weight, alkaline phosphatase, albumin and creatine kinase) post baseline, was able to predict functional decline class (fast or slow) with fair accuracy (AUC = 0.82). However similar approaches to build a predictive model for decline class by baseline subject characteristics were not successful. In contrast, baseline values of total bilirubin, gamma glutamyltransferase, urine specific gravity and ALSFRS-R item score—climbing stairs were sufficient to predict survival class. Conclusions Using combinations of small numbers of variables it was possible to predict classes of functional decline and survival across the 1–2 year timeframe available in PRO-ACT. These findings may have utility for design of future ALS clinical trials. PMID:28406915

  9. Functional pelvic orientation measured from lateral standing and sitting radiographs.

    PubMed

    DiGioia, Anthony M; Hafez, Mahmoud A; Jaramaz, Branislav; Levison, Timothy J; Moody, James E

    2006-12-01

    We prospectively obtained preoperative and 3-month postoperative lateral pelvic radiographs in the standing and sitting positions from 84 patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty. We measured pelvic orientation (flexion extension) using the anterior pelvic plane as defined by the anterior superior iliac spines and pubic tubercles as references. There was a trend towards upright pelvic alignment when standing, with a mean anterior pelvic plane angle of 1.2 degrees (range, -22 degrees - +27 degrees). In the sitting position the pelvis tended to extend posteriorly, with a mean anterior pelvic plane angle of -36.2 degrees (range, -64 degrees - +4 degrees). There was a wide variation in the arc of pelvic flexion extension as patients moved from standing to sitting, with are of pelvic motion in some patients as mobile as 70 degrees and in others as stiff as 5 degrees. There was no significant variation between males and females or between preoperative and postoperative pelvic flexion extension. There were substantial variations in pelvic orientation when comparing standing and sitting for an individual patient and between different patients. This variation can be unpredictable, and may influence implant alignment and stability after total hip arthroplasty.

  10. Association Between Dietary Intake and Function in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Jeri W; Gennings, Chris; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Hupf, Jonathan; Singleton, Jessica; Sharf, Valerie; Oskarsson, Björn; Fernandes Filho, J Americo M; Sorenson, Eric J; D'Amico, Emanuele; Goetz, Ray; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    There is growing interest in the role of nutrition in the pathogenesis and progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To evaluate the associations between nutrients, individually and in groups, and ALS function and respiratory function at diagnosis. A cross-sectional baseline analysis of the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Multicenter Cohort Study of Oxidative Stress study was conducted from March 14, 2008, to February 27, 2013, at 16 ALS clinics throughout the United States among 302 patients with ALS symptom duration of 18 months or less. Nutrient intake, measured using a modified Block Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis function, measured using the ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R), and respiratory function, measured using percentage of predicted forced vital capacity (FVC). Baseline data were available on 302 patients with ALS (median age, 63.2 years [interquartile range, 55.5-68.0 years]; 178 men and 124 women). Regression analysis of nutrients found that higher intakes of antioxidants and carotenes from vegetables were associated with higher ALSFRS-R scores or percentage FVC. Empirically weighted indices using the weighted quantile sum regression method of "good" micronutrients and "good" food groups were positively associated with ALSFRS-R scores (β [SE], 2.7 [0.69] and 2.9 [0.9], respectively) and percentage FVC (β [SE], 12.1 [2.8] and 11.5 [3.4], respectively) (all P < .001). Positive and significant associations with ALSFRS-R scores (β [SE], 1.5 [0.61]; P = .02) and percentage FVC (β [SE], 5.2 [2.2]; P = .02) for selected vitamins were found in exploratory analyses. Antioxidants, carotenes, fruits, and vegetables were associated with higher ALS function at baseline by regression of nutrient indices and weighted quantile sum regression analysis. We also demonstrated the usefulness of the weighted quantile sum regression method in the evaluation of diet. Those responsible for nutritional

  11. Functional anatomy of the lateral collateral ligament of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Hackl, M; Bercher, M; Wegmann, K; Müller, L P; Dargel, J

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the functional anatomy of the lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC) and the surrounding forearm extensors. Using 81 human cadaveric upper extremities, the anatomy of the forearm extensors-especially the anconeus, supinator and extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU)-was analyzed. After removal of aforementioned extensors the functional anatomy of the LCLC was analyzed. The origin of the LCLC was evaluated for isometry. The insertion types of the lateral ulnar collateral ligament (LUCL) were analyzed and classified. The ECU runs parallel to the RCL to dynamically preserve varus stability. The supinator and anconeus muscle fibers coalesce with the LCLC and lengthen during pronation. The anconeus fibers run parallel to the LUCL in full flexion. The LCLC consists of the annular ligament (AL) and the isometric radial collateral ligament (RCL). During elbow flexion, its posterior branches (LUCL) tighten while the anterior branches loosen. When performing a pivot shift test, the loosened LUCL fibers do not fully tighten in full extension. The LUCL inserts along with the AL at the supinator crest. Three different insertion types could be observed. The LUCL represents the posterior branch of the RCL rather than a distinct ligament. It is non-isometric and lengthens during elbow flexion. The RCL was found to be of vital importance for neutralization of posterolateral rotatory forces. Pronation of the forearm actively stabilizes the elbow joint as the supinator, anconeus and biceps muscle work in unison to increase posterolateral rotatory stability.

  12. Characterizing lateral resolution of interferometers: the Height Transfer Function (HTF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerband, B.; Hetzler, J.

    2005-08-01

    The lateral resolution of an interferometer is limited mainly by the design of the optical arrangement as well as the size of the beam stop. For its characterization the MTF1,2 is not very useful. The height of a structure normal to the surface under test is transferred into a phase of a reflected wavefront. Since imaging mechanisms for intensity and phase are very different, we propose a Height Transfer Function (HTF) to describe the lateral resolution of interferometers. The HTF shows the quotient of the reconstructed and the original height of a sine-modulated surface structure as a function of the spatial frequency. The HTF can be measured with a test sample of varying periodical surface profiles and spacings. Simulations can be made using a combination of geometrical ray tracing and Fourier transformation techniques. Two different layouts of null systems for the test of an asphere are compared. A device to measure the HTF is shown along with results for a variety of different interferometers.

  13. FUNCTIONALIZED LATERAL SURFACE COATED LASERS FOR CHEM-BIO DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, L L; Bond, T C; Cole, G D; Behymer, E M

    2007-07-05

    We present a class of compact, monolithic, photonic sensors consisting of multiple section edge emitting lasers with functionalized lateral surface coatings for low level detection of chemical or biological agents. Specifically, we discuss 8 {micro}m x 250 {micro}m Pd-coated H{sub 2} sensors and configurations to reduce the minimum detection limit from 138ppm for passive sensors to 1ppm for active sensors. Compared with conventional optical H{sub 2} sensors that use fiber gratings, surface plasmon resonances, or surface reflectance, our sensors offer the advantages of smaller size, wider dynamic range, monolithic integration of laser source and detector, and 2-D scalability to arrays of sensors that are functionalized to detect different agents.

  14. Metabolic Assessment of Suited Mobility Using Functional Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, J. R.; McFarland, S. M.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Existing methods for evaluating extravehicular activity (EVA) suit mobility have typically focused on isolated joint range of motion or torque, but these techniques have little to do with how well a crewmember functionally performs in an EVA suit. To evaluate suited mobility at the system level through measuring metabolic cost (MC) of functional tasks.

  15. Regional differences in the lateral mobility of plasma membrane lipids in a molluscan embryo.

    PubMed

    Speksnijder, J E; Dohmen, M R; Tertoolen, L G; de Laat, S W

    1985-07-01

    Regional and temporal differences in plasma membrane lipid mobility have been analyzed during the first three cleavage cycles of the embryo of the polar-lobe-forming mollusc Nassarius reticulatus by the fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR) method, using 1,1'-ditetradecyl 3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine iodide (C14diI) as a fluorescent lipid probe. During this period of development the lateral diffusion coefficient of membrane lipids is consistently greater in the vegetal polar lobe area as compared to the animal plasma membrane area (on average 30%), demonstrating the existence of an animal-vegetal polarity in plasma membrane properties. At third cleavage, the differences between animal and vegetal plasma membrane region become even more pronounced; in the four animal micromeres the diffusion coefficient (D) and mobile fraction (MF) are 2.9 +/- 0.2 X 10(-9) cm2/sec and 51 +/- 2%, respectively, while in the four vegetal macromeres D = 5.0 +/- 0.3 X 10(-9) cm2/sec and MF = 78 +/- 2%. Superimposed upon the observed animal-vegetal polarity, the lateral diffusion in the polar lobe membrane area shows a cell-cycle-dependent modulation. The highest mean values for D are reached during the S phase (ranging from 7.0 to 7.8 X 10(-9) cm2/sec in the three cycles measured), while at the end of G2 phase and during early mitosis mean values for D have decreased significantly (ranging from 5.0 to 5.9 X 10(-9) cm2/sec). Diffusion rates in the animal membranes of the embryo are constant during the three successive cell cycles (D = 4.3-5.0 X 10(-9) cm2/sec), except for a peak at the S phase of the first cell cycle (D = 6.0 X 10(-9) cm2/sec). These results are discussed in relation with previously observed ultrastructural heterogeneities in the Nassarius egg plasma membrane. It is speculated that the observed animal-vegetal polarity in the organization of the egg membrane might play an important role in the process of cell diversification during early development.

  16. Impingement of the Mobile Bearing on the Lateral Wall of the Tibial Tray in Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Inui, Hiroshi; Taketomi, Shuji; Yamagami, Ryota; Sanada, Takaki; Shirakawa, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-07-01

    Tilting of the mobile bearing relative to the tibial tray in the flexion position may result from the implantation of femoral components more laterally relative to tibial components during unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) using the Oxford Knee. The purpose of the present study was to compare femoral component positions after UKA using the phase 3 device and a novel device. We further evaluated the placement of the femoral components with the new device in the flexion position to determine the association with short-term prognosis. The location of femoral and tibial components in the flexion position of 38 knees implanted using the phase 3 device and 49 knees using a novel device was assessed at 1 year postoperatively using radiography of the proximal tibia and distal femur in the flexion position. The femoral component was implanted more laterally using the new device than using the phase 3 device in the flexion position (P = .012), which caused the impingement of the mobile bearing against the lateral wall of the tibial tray. After UKA using the new device, 10% of patients exhibited the tilting phenomenon of the mobile bearing because of the lateral implantation of the femoral implant. To prevent implantation of the femoral component too laterally using the new device during UKA, knee surgeons should set the drill guide more medially such that the center of the drill is aligned with the middle of the medial femoral condyle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. IQ, fetal testosterone and individual variability in children's functional lateralization.

    PubMed

    Mercure, Evelyne; Ashwin, Emma; Dick, Frederic; Halit, Hanife; Auyeung, Bonnie; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Johnson, Mark H

    2009-10-01

    Previous event-related potential (ERP) studies have revealed that faces and words show a robust difference in the lateralization of their N170. The present study investigated the development of this differential lateralization in school-age boys. We assessed the potential role of fetal testosterone (FT) level as a factor biasing the prenatal development of lateralization, and the role of reading skill and Verbal IQ as factors predicting left lateralization for words in childhood. The adult pattern of differential N170 lateralization for faces and words was not present in a group of 26 school-age boys. This suggests that N170 lateralization only appears with years of experience with these stimulus categories or with late childhood maturation. FT level measured by amniocentesis did not account for a significant part of the individual variability in lateralization. Verbal IQ correlated with the degree of left lateralization of the N170 to words, but this effect was not specific to language abilities and language lateralization. A strong correlation was observed between the degree of left lateralization for words and the degree of left lateralization for faces, and both lateralization scores correlated with Verbal and Performance IQ. Possible explanations for these results are discussed along with ERP correlates of words and faces in school-age boys.

  18. Executive function processes predict mobility outcomes in older adults.

    PubMed

    Gothe, Neha P; Fanning, Jason; Awick, Elizabeth; Chung, David; Wójcicki, Thomas R; Olson, Erin A; Mullen, Sean P; Voss, Michelle; Erickson, Kirk I; Kramer, Arthur F; McAuley, Edward

    2014-02-01

    To examine the relationship between performance on executive function measures and subsequent mobility outcomes in community-dwelling older adults. Randomized controlled clinical trial. Champaign-Urbana, Illinois. Community-dwelling older adults (N = 179; mean age 66.4). A 12-month exercise trial with two arms: an aerobic exercise group and a stretching and strengthening group. Established cognitive tests of executive function (flanker task, task switching, and a dual-task paradigm) and the Wisconsin card sort test. Mobility was assessed using the timed 8-foot up and go test and times to climb up and down a flight of stairs. Participants completed the cognitive tests at baseline and the mobility measures at baseline and after 12 months of the intervention. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to determine whether baseline executive function predicted postintervention functional performance after controlling for age, sex, education, cardiorespiratory fitness, and baseline mobility levels. Selective baseline executive function measurements, particularly performance on the flanker task (β = 0.15-0.17) and the Wisconsin card sort test (β = 0.11-0.16) consistently predicted mobility outcomes at 12 months. The estimates were in the expected direction, such that better baseline performance on the executive function measures predicted better performance on the timed mobility tests independent of intervention. Executive functions of inhibitory control, mental set shifting, and attentional flexibility were predictive of functional mobility. Given the literature associating mobility limitations with disability, morbidity, and mortality, these results are important for understanding the antecedents to poor mobility function that well-designed interventions to improve cognitive performance can attenuate. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Correlation between mobility assessed by the Modified Rivermead Mobility Index and physical function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gi-Tae; Kim, Mihyun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between mobility assessed by the Modified Rivermead Mobility Index and variables associated with physical function in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred stroke patients (35 males and 65 females; age 58.60 ± 13.91 years) participated in this study. Modified Rivermead Mobility Index, muscle strength (manual muscle test), muscle tone (Modified Ashworth Scale), range of motion of lower extremity, sensory function (light touch and proprioception tests), and coordination (heel to shin and lower-extremity motor coordination tests) were assessed. [Results] The Modified Rivermead Mobility Index was correlated with all the physical function variables assessed, except the degree of knee extension. In addition, stepwise linear regression analysis revealed that coordination (heel to shin test) was the explanatory variable closely associated with mobility in stroke patients. [Conclusion] The Modified Rivermead Mobility Index score was significantly correlated with all the physical function variables. Coordination (heel to shin test) was closely related to mobility function. These results may be useful in developing rehabilitation programs for stroke patients. PMID:27630440

  20. Functional imaging of the human lateral geniculate nucleus and pulvinar.

    PubMed

    Kastner, Sabine; O'Connor, Daniel H; Fukui, Miki M; Fehd, Hilda M; Herwig, Uwe; Pinsk, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    In the human brain, little is known about the functional anatomy and response properties of subcortical nuclei containing visual maps such as the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and the pulvinar. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 3 tesla (T), collective responses of neural populations in the LGN were measured as a function of stimulus contrast and flicker reversal rate and compared with those obtained in visual cortex. Flickering checkerboard stimuli presented in alternation to the right and left hemifields reliably activated the LGN. The peak of the LGN activation was found to be on average within +/-2 mm of the anatomical location of the LGN, as identified on high-resolution structural images. In all visual areas except the middle temporal (MT), fMRI responses increased monotonically with stimulus contrast. In the LGN, the dynamic response range of the contrast function was larger and contrast gain was lower than in the cortex. Contrast sensitivity was lowest in the LGN and V1 and increased gradually in extrastriate cortex. In area MT, responses were saturated at 4% contrast. Response modulation by changes in flicker rate was similar in the LGN and V1 and occurred mainly in the frequency range between 0.5 and 7.5 Hz; in contrast, in extrastriate areas V4, V3A, and MT, responses were modulated mainly in the frequency range between 7.5 and 20 Hz. In the human pulvinar, no activations were obtained with the experimental designs used to probe response properties of the LGN. However, regions in the mediodorsal right and left pulvinar were found to be consistently activated by bilaterally presented flickering checkerboard stimuli, when subjects attended to the stimuli. Taken together, our results demonstrate that fMRI at 3 T can be used effectively to study thalamocortical circuits in the human brain.

  1. Laterality of hand function in naturalistically housed chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Alison W; Weghorst, Jennifer A

    2005-05-01

    Studies of laterality of hand function in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) have the potential to tell us about the origins of handedness in Homo sapiens. However, the data are confusing, with discrepancies present between studies done in the field and the laboratory: the former show wild chimpanzees to be unlateralised at the population level, while the latter show captive chimpanzees as lateralised at the population level. This study of 26 semi-free ranging chimpanzees of Chester Zoo, UK, aimed to investigate a situation between the wild and captivity and provided ethological data for 43 categories of spontaneous manual use and 14 categories of tool use. Other variables recorded were subordinate hand activity, whether the subject was arboreal or terrestrial, and the identity of the subject. Using switching focal subject sampling, 23,978 bouts of hand use and 1,090 bouts of tool use were recorded. No population-level handedness was present for manual non-tool use activities in the naturalistically housed chimpanzees of Chester Zoo in a similar way to studies of wild chimpanzees. However, about half of the individuals were lateralised to one side or the other for the foraging behaviours of pick up, eat, and pluck. Using a modified version of McGrew and Marchant's (1997) Laterality Framework, these results are comparable to some wild and captive populations for similar foraging tasks. Bimanuality was rare and thus prevented comparison with captive experimental studies that have reported population right handedness. Behaviour involving contact with water elicited stronger lateralisation. Chester chimpanzees were more likely to exhibit hand preferences for manual tasks with increasing age but there were no effects of sex or rearing history on hand specialisations in adult individuals. Lateralisation was biased in tool use, which evoked significant left hand preferences in half the individuals, with no effect of age. Results are discussed comparatively with reference to

  2. Toxic chemicals and thyroid function: hard facts and lateral thinking.

    PubMed

    Duntas, Leonidas H; Stathatos, Nikos

    2015-12-01

    Increasing quantities of evidence-based data incriminate a large number of environmental pollutants for toxic effects on the thyroid. Among the many chemical contaminants, halogenated organochlorines and pesticides variably affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis and disrupt thyroid function. PCBs and their metabolites and PBDEs bind to thyroid transport proteins, such as transthyretin, displace thyroxine, and disrupt thyroid function. Meanwhile, at the molecular level, PCB congeners may activate phosphorylation of Akt, p-Akt, and forkhead box O3a (FoxO3a) protein resulting in inhibition of the natrium/iodide symporter. Given therefore the growing concern developing around these multiple toxic chemicals today invading numerous environments and their long-term deleterious effects not only on the thyroid but also on general health, we strongly advocate their strict regulation and, moreover, their gradual reduction. A good degree of "lateral thinking", we feel, will lead to a use of chemicals that will enhance life while concurrently carefully protecting the environment.

  3. [Respiratory domain of revised amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Functional Rating Scale].

    PubMed

    Lima, Sandra E; Pessolano, Fernando A; Monteiro, Sergio G; De Vito, Eduardo L

    2009-01-01

    Virtually all patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis will complain of dyspnea, which is perhaps the most distressing symptom of this devastating disease. The objective was to correlate respiratory domain of ALSFRS-R with forced vital capacity and maximal static pressures in the mouth. We designed a prospective study in 20 consecutive patients without dyspnea during 24 months. The global decline of ALSFRS-R was from 34.3 +/- 10.3 to 22.1 +/- 8.0 (p = 0.0325), the contribution of respiratory domain was irrelevant. Those who referred dyspnea (n: 12), forced vital capacity fell 41 +/- 21% of the initial value but with similar value of fall (46 +/- 23%) 8 patients did not referred dyspnea. Total score of ALSFRS-R correlated with forced vital capacity (litres), r: 0.73, p = 0.0016 and maximal inspiratory pressure (cm H2O), r: 0.84, p = 0.0038, but the fall of the forced vital capacity (%) did not correlate with dyspnea (r(s): 0.23, p = 0.1400). There was a moderate correlation between dyspnea and maximal inspiratory pressure (%), r(s): 0.58, p = 0.0300 and between dyspnea and maximal expiratory pressure (%), r(s): 0.49, p = 0.0400. We concluded that the respiratory functional deterioration could not be predicted using respiratory domain of ALSFRS-R. This suggests that respiratory domain of this scale does not replace to respiratory function testing measurements and, due to the respiratory insufficiency could not be clinically evident; performing pulmonary function tests provides an objective view and permit to make anticipatory actions.

  4. Aqueous-filled polymer microcavity arrays: versatile & stable lipid bilayer platforms offering high lateral mobility to incorporated membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Basit, Hajra; Gaul, Vinnie; Maher, Sean; Forster, Robert J; Keyes, Tia E

    2015-05-07

    A key prerequisite in an ideal supported lipid bilayer based cell membrane model is that the mobility of both the lipid matrix and its components are unhindered by the underlying support. This is not trivial and with the exception of liposomes, many of even the most advanced approaches, although accomplishing lipid mobility, fail to achieve complete mobility of incorporated membrane proteins. This is addressed in a novel platform comprising lipid bilayers assembled over buffer-filled, arrays of spherical cap microcavities formed from microsphere template polydimethoxysilane. Prior to bilayer assembly the PDMS is rendered hydrophilic by plasma treatment and the lipid bilayer prepared using Langmuir Blodgett assembly followed by liposome/proteoliposome fusion. Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy confirmed the pore suspended lipid bilayer exhibits diffusion coefficients comparable to free-standing vesicles in solution. The bilayer modified arrays are highly reproducible and stable over days. As the bilayers are suspended over deep aqueous reservoirs, reconstituted membrane proteins experience an aqueous interface at both membrane interfaces and attain full lateral mobility. Their utility as membrane protein platforms was exemplified in two case studies with proteins of different dimensions in their extracellular and cytoplasmic domains reconstituted into DOPC lipid bilayers; Glycophorin A, and Integrin αIIbβ3. In both cases, the proteins exhibited 100% mobility with high lateral diffusion coefficients.

  5. Priming by chemokines restricts lateral mobility of the adhesion receptor LFA-1 and restores adhesion to ICAM-1 nano-aggregates on human mature dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Borgman, Kyra J E; van Zanten, Thomas S; Manzo, Carlo; Cabezón, Raquel; Cambi, Alessandra; Benítez-Ribas, Daniel; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F

    2014-01-01

    LFA-1 is a leukocyte specific β2 integrin that plays a major role in regulating adhesion and migration of different immune cells. Recent data suggest that LFA-1 on mature dendritic cells (mDCs) may function as a chemokine-inducible anchor during homing of DCs through the afferent lymphatics into the lymph nodes, by transiently switching its molecular conformational state. However, the role of LFA-1 mobility in this process is not yet known, despite that the importance of lateral organization and dynamics for LFA-1-mediated adhesion regulation is broadly recognized. Using single particle tracking approaches we here show that LFA-1 exhibits higher mobility on resting mDCs compared to monocytes. Lymphoid chemokine CCL21 stimulation of the LFA-1 high affinity state on mDCs, led to a significant reduction of mobility and an increase on the fraction of stationary receptors, consistent with re-activation of the receptor. Addition of soluble monomeric ICAM-1 in the presence of CCL21 did not alter the diffusion profile of LFA-1 while soluble ICAM-1 nano-aggregates in the presence of CCL21 further reduced LFA-1 mobility and readily bound to the receptor. Overall, our results emphasize the importance of LFA-1 lateral mobility across the membrane on the regulation of integrin activation and its function as adhesion receptor. Importantly, our data show that chemokines alone are not sufficient to trigger the high affinity state of the integrin based on the strict definition that affinity refers to the adhesion capacity of a single receptor to its ligand in solution. Instead our data indicate that nanoclustering of the receptor, induced by multi-ligand binding, is required to maintain stable cell adhesion once LFA-1 high affinity state is transiently triggered by inside-out signals.

  6. Alternative energy estimation from the shower lateral distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Vitor; Escobar, Carlos; Brito, Joel; Dobrigkeit, Carola; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo

    The surface detector technique has been successfully used to detect cosmic ray showers for several decades. Scintillators or Cerenkov water tanks can be used to measure the number of particles and/or the energy density at a given depth in the atmosphere and reconstruct the primary particle properties. It has been shown that the experiment configuration and the resolution in reconstructing the core position determine a distance to the shower axis in which the lateral distribution function (LDF) of particles shows the least variation with respect to different primary particles type, simulation models and specific shapes of the LDF. Therefore, the signal at this distance (600 m for Haverah Park and 1000 m for Auger Observatory) has shown to be a good estimator of the shower energy. Revisiting the above technique, we show that a range of distances to the shower axis, instead of one single point, can be used as estimator of the shower energy. A comparison is done for the Auger Observatory configuration and the new estimator proposed here is shown to be a good and robust alternative to the standard single point procedure.

  7. IQ, Fetal Testosterone and Individual Variability in Children's Functional Lateralization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercure, Evelyne; Ashwin, Emma; Dick, Frederic; Halit, Hanife; Auyeung, Bonnie; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Johnson, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    Previous event-related potential (ERP) studies have revealed that faces and words show a robust difference in the lateralization of their N170. The present study investigated the development of this differential lateralization in school-age boys. We assessed the potential role of fetal testosterone (FT) level as a factor biasing the prenatal…

  8. IQ, Fetal Testosterone and Individual Variability in Children's Functional Lateralization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercure, Evelyne; Ashwin, Emma; Dick, Frederic; Halit, Hanife; Auyeung, Bonnie; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Johnson, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    Previous event-related potential (ERP) studies have revealed that faces and words show a robust difference in the lateralization of their N170. The present study investigated the development of this differential lateralization in school-age boys. We assessed the potential role of fetal testosterone (FT) level as a factor biasing the prenatal…

  9. Phaseolus vulgaris RbohB functions in lateral root development.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Jesús; Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Quinto, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory burst oxidase homologs (RBOHs) catalyze the reduction of oxygen to generate superoxide anion, a kind of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The ROS produced by RBOHs play essential roles in diverse processes, such as root hair development, stomata closure and signaling mechanisms in response to abiotic stimuli and during plant-pathogen interactions. Recently, we found that PvRbohB silencing in transgenic Phaseolus vulgaris roots had a negative impact on lateral root density. In this work, we show that the downregulation of PvRbohB affects both the growth and ROS levels in recently emerged lateral roots. In addition, we found that the PvRbohB promoter was activated during lateral root primordium initiation in the pericycle, and remained active throughout lateral root development. This study identifies RBOHs as potentially important players in lateral root development in P. vulgaris.

  10. Phaseolus vulgaris RbohB functions in lateral root development

    PubMed Central

    Montiel, Jesús; Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Quinto, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory burst oxidase homologs (RBOHs) catalyze the reduction of oxygen to generate superoxide anion, a kind of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The ROS produced by RBOHs play essential roles in diverse processes, such as root hair development, stomata closure and signaling mechanisms in response to abiotic stimuli and during plant-pathogen interactions. Recently, we found that PvRbohB silencing in transgenic Phaseolus vulgaris roots had a negative impact on lateral root density. In this work, we show that the downregulation of PvRbohB affects both the growth and ROS levels in recently emerged lateral roots. In addition, we found that the PvRbohB promoter was activated during lateral root primordium initiation in the pericycle, and remained active throughout lateral root development. This study identifies RBOHs as potentially important players in lateral root development in P. vulgaris. PMID:23221754

  11. Balance Confidence: A Predictor of Perceived Physical Function, Perceived Mobility, and Perceived Recovery 1 Year After Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Torkia, Caryne; Best, Krista L; Miller, William C; Eng, Janice J

    2016-07-01

    To estimate the effect of balance confidence measured at 1 month poststroke rehabilitation on perceived physical function, mobility, and stroke recovery 12 months later. Longitudinal study (secondary analysis). Multisite, community-based. Community-dwelling individuals (N=69) with stroke living in a home setting. Not applicable. Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale; physical function and mobility subscales of the Stroke Impact Scale 3.0; and a single item from the Stroke Impact Scale for perceived recovery. Balance confidence at 1 month postdischarge from inpatient rehabilitation predicts perceived physical function (model 1), mobility (model 2), and recovery (model 3) 12 months later after adjusting for important covariates. The covariates included in model 1 were age, sex, basic mobility, and depression. The covariates selected for model 2 were age, sex, balance capacity, and anxiety, and the covariates in model 3 were age, sex, walking capacity, and social support. The amount of variance in perceived physical function, perceived mobility, and perceived recovery that balance confidence accounted for was 12%, 9%, and 10%, respectively. After discharge from inpatient rehabilitation poststroke, balance confidence predicts individuals' perceived physical function, mobility, and recovery 12 months later. There is a need to address balance confidence at discharge from inpatient stroke rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Music reduces pain and increases functional mobility in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A; Wilson, Andrew D; Vase, Lene; Brattico, Elvira; Barrios, Fernando A; Jensen, Troels S; Romero-Romo, Juan I; Vuust, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The pain in Fibromyalgia (FM) is difficult to treat and functional mobility seems to be an important comorbidity in these patients that could evolve into a disability. In this study we wanted to investigate the analgesic effects of music in FM pain. Twenty-two FM patients were passively exposed to (1) self-chosen, relaxing, pleasant music, and to (2) a control auditory condition (pink noise). They rated pain and performed the "timed-up & go task (TUG)" to measure functional mobility after each auditory condition. Listening to relaxing, pleasant, self-chosen music reduced pain and increased functional mobility significantly in our FM patients. The music-induced analgesia was significantly correlated with the TUG scores; thereby suggesting that the reduction in pain unpleasantness increased functional mobility. Notably, this mobility improvement was obtained with music played prior to the motor task (not during), therefore the effect cannot be explained merely by motor entrainment to a fast rhythm. Cognitive and emotional mechanisms seem to be central to music-induced analgesia. Our findings encourage the use of music as a treatment adjuvant to reduce chronic pain in FM and increase functional mobility thereby reducing the risk of disability.

  13. Music reduces pain and increases functional mobility in fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A.; Wilson, Andrew D.; Vase, Lene; Brattico, Elvira; Barrios, Fernando A.; Jensen, Troels S.; Romero-Romo, Juan I.; Vuust, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The pain in Fibromyalgia (FM) is difficult to treat and functional mobility seems to be an important comorbidity in these patients that could evolve into a disability. In this study we wanted to investigate the analgesic effects of music in FM pain. Twenty-two FM patients were passively exposed to (1) self-chosen, relaxing, pleasant music, and to (2) a control auditory condition (pink noise). They rated pain and performed the “timed-up & go task (TUG)” to measure functional mobility after each auditory condition. Listening to relaxing, pleasant, self-chosen music reduced pain and increased functional mobility significantly in our FM patients. The music-induced analgesia was significantly correlated with the TUG scores; thereby suggesting that the reduction in pain unpleasantness increased functional mobility. Notably, this mobility improvement was obtained with music played prior to the motor task (not during), therefore the effect cannot be explained merely by motor entrainment to a fast rhythm. Cognitive and emotional mechanisms seem to be central to music-induced analgesia. Our findings encourage the use of music as a treatment adjuvant to reduce chronic pain in FM and increase functional mobility thereby reducing the risk of disability. PMID:24575066

  14. Lost in laterality: interpreting ''preferred side of the head during mobile phone use and risk of brain tumour'' associations.

    PubMed

    Schüz, Joachim

    2009-08-01

    Due to the highly localized exposure from mobile phones, the preferred side of the head during their use is important information when investigating a possible link with brain tumour risk, but at the same time, error and bias hamper the assessment of this information in case-control studies. Current studies provide evidence of reporting bias insofar as cases appear to over-report the side of the head where the tumour occurred as the one that they preferred in the past when using mobile phones. More refined methods of analysis among only cases or prospective studies with an assessment of the laterality of mobile phone use before the diagnosis of disease are needed to evaluate whether associations seen in some studies are entirely due to reporting bias or a mixture of reporting bias and a causal effect.

  15. Arcuate fasciculus laterality by diffusion tensor imaging correlates with language laterality by functional MRI in preadolescent children.

    PubMed

    Sreedharan, Ruma Madhu; Menon, Amitha C; James, Jija S; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Thomas, Sanjeev V

    2015-03-01

    Language lateralization is unique to humans. Functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) enable the study of language areas and white matter fibers involved in language, respectively. The objective of this study was to correlate arcuate fasciculus (AF) laterality by diffusion tensor imaging with that by fMRI in preadolescent children which has not yet been reported. Ten children between 8 and 12 years were subjected to fMRI and DTI imaging using Siemens 1.5 T MRI. Two language fMRI paradigms--visual verb generation and word pair task--were used. Analysis was done using SPM8 software. In DTI, the fiber volume of the arcuate fasciculus (AFV) and fractional anisotropy (FA) was measured. The fMRI Laterality Index (fMRI-LI) and DTI Laterality Index (DTI-LI) were calculated and their correlation assessed using the Pearson Correlation Index. Of ten children, mean age 10.6 years, eight showed left lateralization while bilateral language lateralization was seen in two. AFV by DTI was more on the left side in seven of the eight children who had left lateralization by fMRI. DTI could not trace the AF in one child. Of the two with bilateral language lateralization on fMRI, one showed larger AFV on the right side while the other did not show any asymmetry. There was a significant correlation (p < 0.02) between fMRI-LI and DTI-LI. Group mean of AFV by DTI was higher on the left side (2659.89 ± 654.75 mm(3)) as compared to the right (1824.11 ± 582.81 mm(3)) (p < 0.01). Like fMRI, DTI also reveals language laterality in children with a high degree of correlation between the two imaging modalities.

  16. Cervical Lateral Glide Neural Mobilization Is Effective in Treating Cervicobrachial Pain: A Randomized Waiting List Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanz, David; Calvo-Lobo, César; Unda-Solano, Francisco; Sanz-Corbalán, Irene; Romero-Morales, Carlos; López-López, Daniel

    2017-03-13

     Cervicobrachial pain (CP) is a high-incidence and prevalent condition. Cervical lateral glide (CLG) is a firstline treatment of CP. There is a current lack of enough high-quality randomized controlled double-blind clinical trials that measure the effectiveness of neural tissue mobilization techniques such as the CLG and its specific effect over CP.  The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of CLG neural mobilization in treating subjects who suffer from CP, compared with the complete absence of treatment.  This investigation was a single-center, blinded, parallel randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT).  One hundred forty-seven individuals were screened in a medical center from July to November 2015. Fifty-eight participants were diagnosed with CP.  Participants were recruited and randomly assigned into two groups of 29 subjects. The intervention group received CLG treatment, and the control group (CG) was assigned to a six-week waiting list to receive treatment. Randomization was carried out by concealed computer software randomized printed cards. The primary outcome was pain intensity, reported through the Numeric Rating Scale for Pain (NRSP). Secondary outcomes were physical function involving the affected upper limb using the Quick DASH scale and ipsilateral cervical rotation (ICR) using a CROM device. Assessments were made at baseline and one hour after treatment.  The CLG group NRSP mean value was significantly ( P  < 0.0001) superior to those obtained by the CG. Subjects treated with CLG reported an average NRSP decrease of 2.16 points (35%). CROM device and Quick DASH outcome values also reported significant ( P < 0.0001) improvements only in the CLG group. Cohen's d showed a very large effect of the CLG intervention at subject discharge.  Due to the lack of dipper subgroup analysis and additional reproductions of the applied protocol, the authors considered the generalization of the study results to be impossible.

  17. Pulmonary Function, Muscle Strength, and Incident Mobility Disability in Elders

    PubMed Central

    Buchman, Aron S.; Boyle, Patricia A.; Leurgans, Sue E.; Evans, Denis A.; Bennett, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Muscle strength, including leg strength and respiratory muscle strength, are relatively independently associated with mobility disability in elders. However, the factors linking muscle strength with mobility disability are unknown. To test the hypothesis that pulmonary function mediates the association of muscle strength with the development of mobility disability in elders, we used data from a longitudinal cohort study of 844 ambulatory elders without dementia participating in the Rush Memory and Aging Project with a mean follow-up of 4.0 years (SD = 1.39). A composite measure of pulmonary function was based on spirometric measures of forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume, and peak expiratory flow. Respiratory muscle strength was based on maximal inspiratory pressure and expiratory pressure and leg strength based on hand-held dynamometry. Mobility disability was defined as a gait speed less than or equal to 0.55 m/s based on annual assessment of timed walk. Secondary analyses considered time to loss of the ability to ambulate. In separate proportional hazards models which controlled for age, sex, and education, composite measures of pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength, and leg strength were each associated with incident mobility disability (all P values < 0.001). Further, all three were related to the development of incident mobility disability when considered together in a single model (pulmonary function: hazard ratio [HR], 0.721; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.577, 0.902; respiratory muscle strength: HR, 0.732; 95% CI, 0.593, 0.905; leg strength: HR, 0.791; 95% CI, 0.640, 0.976). Secondary analyses examining incident loss of the ability to ambulate revealed similar findings. Overall, these findings suggest that lower levels of pulmonary function and muscle strength are relatively independently associated with the development of mobility disability in the elderly. PMID:19934353

  18. Neurosensory function following mandibular nerve lateralization for placement of implants.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, H M

    2010-05-01

    This prospective cohort study investigates the types and duration of neurosensory disturbances (NDs) related to mandibular nerve (MN) lateralization for placement of implants. From March 2001 to March 2007, 87 patients underwent implant placement surgery with MN lateralization. All patients had panoramic radiograph and CT scans taken preoperatively. Patients completed questionnaires to report NDs 1 week after surgery, and at the end of each month within the year after surgery. All 87 patients (110 posterior segments, 23 bilateral and 64 unilateral) participated in the study. All patients reported NDs in the first week: anaesthesia in 81 sites, hypoesthesia in nine sites, burning in nine sites, pain in eight sites, pinching in two sites, and tickling in one site. The sites with NDs decreased to 29 sites (26%) at the end of first month, and to three sites (3%) at the end of the sixth month with no changes to the end of the year. 82 patients were satisfied with the result of nerve lateralization after 1 year. The mean time for full recovery of MN was 37+/-15 days. These findings indicate that concerning NDs, MN lateralization is a useful method for placing implants in the atrophic posterior mandible.

  19. Socioeconomic factors from midlife predict mobility limitation and depressed mood three decades later; Findings from the AGES-Reykjavik Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Taking into account our rapidly ageing population, older people are of particular interest in studying health inequalities. Most studies of older persons only include measures of current socioeconomic status (SES) and do not take into account data from earlier stages of life. In addition, only classic SES measures are used, while alternative measures, such as car ownership and house ownership, might equally well predict health. The present study aims to examine the effect of midlife socioeconomic factors on mobility limitation and depressed mood three decades later. Methods Data were from 4,809 men and women aged 33–65 years who participated in the Reykjavik Study (1967–1992) and who were re-examined in old age in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES) -Reykjavik Study (2002–2006). Results Education and occupation predicted mobility limitation and depressed mood. Independently, home and car ownership and the availability of housing features predicted mobility limitation. Shortages of food in childhood and lack of a car in midlife predicted depressed mood. Conclusion Socioeconomic factors from midlife and from childhood affect mobility limitation and depressed mood in old age. Prevention of health problems in old age should begin as early as midlife. PMID:23379351

  20. Quantifying functional mobility progress for chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Justin; Karunanithi, Mohan; Wark, Tim; Chan, Wilbur; Colavitti, Christine

    2006-01-01

    A method for quantifying improvements in functional mobility is presented based on patient-worn accelerometer devices. For patients with cardiovascular, respiratory, or other chronic disease, increasing the amount of functional mobility is a large component of rehabilitation programs. We have conducted an observational trial on the use of accelerometers for quantifying mobility improvements in a small group of chronic disease patients (n=15, 48 - 86 yrs). Cognitive impairments precluded complex instrumentation of patients, and movement data was obtained from a single 2-axis accelerometer device worn at the hip. In our trial, movement data collected from accelerometer devices was classified into Lying vs Sitting/Standing vs Walking/Activity movements. This classification enabled the amount of walking to be quantified and graphically presented to clinicians and carers for feedback on exercise efficacy. Presenting long term trends in this data to patients also provides valuable feedback for self managed care and assisting with compliance.

  1. Diabetes impairs hematopoietic stem cell mobilization by altering niche function.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Francesca; Lymperi, Stefania; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón; Saez, Borja; Spencer, Joel A; Yeap, Beow Y; Masselli, Elena; Graiani, Gallia; Prezioso, Lucia; Rizzini, Elisa Lodi; Mangoni, Marcellina; Rizzoli, Vittorio; Sykes, Stephen M; Lin, Charles P; Frenette, Paul S; Quaini, Federico; Scadden, David T

    2011-10-12

    Success with transplantation of autologous hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in patients depends on adequate collection of these cells after mobilization from the bone marrow niche by the cytokine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). However, some patients fail to achieve sufficient HSPC mobilization. Retrospective analysis of bone marrow transplant patient records revealed that diabetes correlated with poor mobilization of CD34+ HSPCs. In mouse models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes (streptozotocin-induced and db/db mice, respectively), we found impaired egress of murine HSPCs from the bone marrow after G-CSF treatment. Furthermore, HSPCs were aberrantly localized in the marrow niche of the diabetic mice, and abnormalities in the number and function of sympathetic nerve termini were associated with this mislocalization. Aberrant responses to β-adrenergic stimulation of the bone marrow included an inability of marrow mesenchymal stem cells expressing the marker nestin to down-modulate the chemokine CXCL12 in response to G-CSF treatment (mesenchymal stem cells are reported to be critical for HSPC mobilization). The HSPC mobilization defect was rescued by direct pharmacological inhibition of the interaction of CXCL12 with its receptor CXCR4 using the drug AMD3100. These data suggest that there are diabetes-induced changes in bone marrow physiology and microanatomy and point to a potential intervention to overcome poor HSPC mobilization in diabetic patients.

  2. Motives for Residential Mobility in Later Life: Post-Move Perspectives of Elders and Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sergeant, Julie F.; Ekerdt, David J.

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study delineates motives for residential mobility, describes dynamics between the elder and family members during the move decision process, and locates the move decision within ecological layers of the aging context. Interviews were conducted with 30 individuals and couples (ages 60-87) who experienced a community-based move…

  3. Moving the Nest: The Impact of Coresidential Children on Mobility in Later Midlife

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bures, Regina M.

    2009-01-01

    Using data from the 1992-2000 waves of the Health and Retirement Study, this article examines the relationship between the presence and age of children in the home and parental mobility in midlife. Although a substantial literature evaluates the factors affecting the timing of children leaving (and returning) home, less attention has been paid to…

  4. Motives for Residential Mobility in Later Life: Post-Move Perspectives of Elders and Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sergeant, Julie F.; Ekerdt, David J.

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study delineates motives for residential mobility, describes dynamics between the elder and family members during the move decision process, and locates the move decision within ecological layers of the aging context. Interviews were conducted with 30 individuals and couples (ages 60-87) who experienced a community-based move…

  5. Laterality of brain areas associated with arithmetic calculations revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-ting; Zhang, Quan; Zhang, Jing; Li, Wei

    2005-04-20

    Asymmetry of bilateral cerebral function, i.e. laterality, is an important phenomenon in many brain actions: arithmetic calculation may be one of these phenomena. In this study, first, laterality of brain areas associated with arithmetic calculations was revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Second, the relationship among laterality, handedness, and types of arithmetic task was assessed. Third, we postulate possible reasons for laterality. Using a block-designed experiment, twenty-five right-handed and seven left-handed healthy volunteers carried out simple calculations, complex calculations and proximity judgments. T1WI and GRE-EPI fMRI were performed with a GE 1.5T whole body MRI scanner. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM99) was used to process data and localize functional areas. Numbers of activated voxels were recorded to calculate laterality index for evaluating the laterality of functional brain areas. For both groups, the activation of functional areas in the frontal lobe showed a tendency towards the nonpredominant hand side, but the functional areas in the inferior parietal lobule had left laterality. During simple and complex calculations, the laterality indices of the prefrontal cortex and premotor area were higher in the right-handed group than that in the left-handed group, whereas the laterality of the inferior parietal lobule had no such significant difference. In both groups, when the difficulty of the task increased, the laterality of the prefrontal cortex, premotor area, and inferior parietal lobule decreased, but the laterality of posterior part of the inferior frontal gyrus increased. The laterality of the functional brain areas associated with arithmetic calculations can be detected with fMRI. The laterality of the functional areas was related to handedness and task difficulty.

  6. Single Molecule Lateral Mobility and Membrane Organization in DMPC/Cholesterol Mixtures at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Saame; Stillwell, William; Naumann, Christoph

    2002-03-01

    To better understand the lipid heterogeneity of biological membranes, we have studied the lateral mobility and membrane organization of DMPC and cholesterol (Chol) mixtures at the air-water interface using single molecule fluorescence imaging and epifluorescence microscopy. The single molecule imaging technique was used to track the lateral diffusion of single molecules of TRITC-DPPE or cholesteryl Bodipy. In the absence of Chol, mean square displacement histograms obtained from single molecule tracking of TRITC-DPPE show unobstructed diffusion. Including Chol at low levels of Chol (<10 moldiffusion at intermediate levels ( 30 molof Chol (>40 molmacroscopic phase separations. Data obtained from tracking experiments of cholesteryl-Bodipy also show complementary changes in diffusion. Our results indicate that our techniques provide insight into the micro and macro organization of lipid domains at the air-water interface.

  7. Lateralizing language function with pre-operative functional magnetic resonance imaging in early proficient bilingual patients.

    PubMed

    Połczyńska, Monika M; Japardi, Kevin; Bookheimer, Susan Y

    2017-03-23

    Research on bilinguals with brain lesions is complicated by high patient variability, making it difficult to find well-matched controls. We benefitted from a database of over 700 patients and conducted an analysis of pre-operative functional magnetic resonance imaging data to assess language dominance in 25 early, highly proficient Spanish-English bilinguals, and 25 carefully matched monolingual controls. Our results showed that early bilingualism is associated with greater bilateral hemispheric involvement, and monolingualism is associated with stronger left hemisphere lateralization (p=0.009). The bilinguals showed more pronounced right hemisphere activation (p=0.008). Although language dominance values were concordant in the bilingual group, there were a few (12%) atypical cases with different lateralization patterns in L1 and L2. Finally, we found distinct areas of activity in first and second language within the language network, in addition to regions of convergence. These data underscore the need to map all languages proficiently spoken by surgical candidates.

  8. The functional locus of the lateralized readiness potential.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Hiroaki; Wild-Wall, Nele; Sangals, Jörg; Sommer, Werner

    2004-03-01

    The lateralized readiness potential (LRP) is considered to reflect motor activation and has been used extensively as a tool in elucidating cognitive processes. In the present study, we attempted to more precisely determine the origins of the LRP within the cognitive system. The response selection and motor programming stages were selectively manipulated by varying symbolic stimulus response compatibility and the time to peak force of an isometric finger extension response. Stimulus response compatibility and time to peak force affected response latency, as measured in the electromyogram, in a strictly additive fashion. The effects of the experimental manipulations on stimulus- and response-synchronized LRPs indicate that the LRP starts after the completion of response-hand selection and at the beginning of motor programming. These results allow a more rigorous interpretation of LRP findings in basic and applied research.

  9. The role of the built environment and assistive devices for outdoor mobility in later life.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Philippa J

    2014-11-01

    Despite theoretical advances in our conceptualization of disability, the "environment" remains a largely unspecified term in disablement models. The purpose of this research is to draw upon on a unique state-of-the-art nationally representative data set with innovative measures that provide the opportunity to tease apart and specify the role of different environmental factors in the disablement process. Using multinomial logistic regression with data from the first round of the recently launched National Health and Aging Trends Study (N = 6,578 community-dwelling Americans age 65+), this paper examines the role of the built environment (e.g., stairs or ramps leading up to the home) and mobility devices on reported difficulty going outside by oneself. Almost three quarters of community-dwelling older Americans live in a residence that has stairs at the entrance. Older adults who use a walker to help them get around are adversely affected by stairs at the entrance to their home, effectively doubling the odds of reporting difficulty going outside independently. Roughly 10% of community-dwelling older Americans live in a residence with a ramp at the entryway, which reduces the odds of outdoor mobility difficulty threefold among those using wheeled mobility devices. However, ramps at the entryway are associated with a higher likelihood of reporting difficulty going outdoors among those who do not use any type of mobility device. A better understanding of the complexities of the environment in the disablement process is critical for the planning and development of age-friendly environments allowing older adults to age in place. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Method for seamless unlock function for mobile applications.

    PubMed

    Vasyltsov, Ihor; Bak, Changgyu; Vasyltsov, Ihor; Changgyu Bak; Bak, Changgyu; Vasyltsov, Ihor

    2016-08-01

    In this paper there is proposed an approach for seamless unlock security function for mobile application. The method combines the biomedical signals measured from human body and motion signals acquired from the devices. For this purpose a wearable device and a mobile device can be securely synchronized. It is shown that entropy extracted from biomedical ECG signal is comparable to the strength of the PIN-code security, the same time giving the easiness, flexibility, and seamlessness of the usage to the user. Also, it is shown that motion sensors can provide enough precision for the correct detection of the appropriate timing to unlock device.

  11. A Lateralization of Function Approach to Sex Differences in Spatial Ability: A Reexamination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rilea, Stacy L.

    2008-01-01

    The current study assessed the lateralization of function hypothesis (Rilea, S. L., Roskos-Ewoldsen, B., & Boles, D. (2004). "Sex differences in spatial ability: A lateralization of function approach." "Brain and Cognition," 56, 332-343) which suggested that it was the interaction of brain organization and the type of spatial task that led to sex…

  12. A Lateralization of Function Approach to Sex Differences in Spatial Ability: A Reexamination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rilea, Stacy L.

    2008-01-01

    The current study assessed the lateralization of function hypothesis (Rilea, S. L., Roskos-Ewoldsen, B., & Boles, D. (2004). "Sex differences in spatial ability: A lateralization of function approach." "Brain and Cognition," 56, 332-343) which suggested that it was the interaction of brain organization and the type of spatial task that led to sex…

  13. Lateral ink mobility and fringe field effects across the porous matrix of an electrophoretic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li Tsui, Kelly; Ahumada, Manuel; Bryning, Mateusz; Hartono, Michelle; Lee, Sang-Joon J.

    2013-03-01

    This investigation studies fringe field between laterally adjacent electrodes in a reverse-emulsion electrophoretic display (REED). The display consists of a nanodroplet ink and a porous matrix that serves as the "paper" between planar electrodes. One relative advantage of this type of electronic paper display is that it can be produced with lowcost materials and manufacturing processes. A concern for image resolution, however, is the fringe field effect that occurs in the gaps between neighboring electrodes. Ideally the dye-containing nanodroplets in the ink move in a direction that is strictly perpendicular to the opposing pairs of electrodes. However, nanodroplet saturation and potential gradients from neighboring electrodes may result in lateral displacement of the nanodroplets as well. Accordingly, this study examines how fringe field between neighboring electrodes is affected by lateral spacing and applied voltage. Transient and steady-state effects were studied by fabricating and testing devices that were patterned with different lateral spacing between electrodes, and switching under different voltage levels. Relative luminance was extracted from digital microscope images, captured in the vicinity between neighboring electrodes. Measurements were recorded for electrode spacing of 20 μm, 40 μm, 60 μm, and 80 μm with devices switched at ±1.5 V and ±2.5 V. Gradients in luminance overlapped at lateral distances below 60 μm, and became distinct for left and right electrodes spaced by at least 80 μm. Higher applied voltage resulted in steeper transition between light and dark states, but exhibited distortion at electrode edges.

  14. Cholesterol slows down the lateral mobility of an oxidized phospholipid in a supported lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Plochberger, Birgit; Stockner, Thomas; Chiantia, Salvatore; Brameshuber, Mario; Weghuber, Julian; Hermetter, Albin; Schwille, Petra; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2010-11-16

    We investigated the mobility and phase-partitioning of the fluorescent oxidized phospholipid analogue 1-palmitoyl-2-glutaroyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-N-Alexa647-ethanolamine (PGPE-Alexa647) in supported lipid bilayers. Compared to the conventional phospholipid dihexadecanoylphosphoethanolamine (DHPE)-Bodipy we found consistently higher diffusion constants. The effect became dramatic when immobile obstacles were inserted into the bilayer, which essentially blocked the diffusion of DHPE-Bodipy but hardly influenced the movements of PGPE-Alexa647. In a supported lipid bilayer made of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), the differences in probe mobility leveled off with increasing cholesterol content. Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we could ascribe this effect to increased interactions between the oxidized phospholipid and the membrane matrix, concomitant with a translation in the headgroup position of the oxidized phospholipid: at zero cholesterol content, its headgroup is shifted to the outside of the DOPC headgroup region, whereas increasing cholesterol concentrations pulls the headgroup into the bilayer plane.

  15. Cholesterol Slows down the Lateral Mobility of an Oxidized Phospholipid in a Supported Lipid Bilayer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the mobility and phase-partitioning of the fluorescent oxidized phospholipid analogue 1-palmitoyl-2-glutaroyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-N-Alexa647-ethanolamine (PGPE-Alexa647) in supported lipid bilayers. Compared to the conventional phospholipid dihexadecanoylphosphoethanolamine (DHPE)-Bodipy we found consistently higher diffusion constants. The effect became dramatic when immobile obstacles were inserted into the bilayer, which essentially blocked the diffusion of DHPE-Bodipy but hardly influenced the movements of PGPE-Alexa647. In a supported lipid bilayer made of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), the differences in probe mobility leveled off with increasing cholesterol content. Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we could ascribe this effect to increased interactions between the oxidized phospholipid and the membrane matrix, concomitant with a translation in the headgroup position of the oxidized phospholipid: at zero cholesterol content, its headgroup is shifted to the outside of the DOPC headgroup region, whereas increasing cholesterol concentrations pulls the headgroup into the bilayer plane. PMID:20942393

  16. Abnormal lateralization of functional connectivity between language and default mode regions in autism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lateralization of brain structure and function occurs in typical development, and abnormal lateralization is present in various neuropsychiatric disorders. Autism is characterized by a lack of left lateralization in structure and function of regions involved in language, such as Broca and Wernicke areas. Methods Using functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging from a large publicly available sample (n = 964), we tested whether abnormal functional lateralization in autism exists preferentially in language regions or in a more diffuse pattern across networks of lateralized brain regions. Results The autism group exhibited significantly reduced left lateralization in a few connections involving language regions and regions from the default mode network, but results were not significant throughout left- and right-lateralized networks. There is a trend that suggests the lack of left lateralization in a connection involving Wernicke area and the posterior cingulate cortex associates with more severe autism. Conclusions Abnormal language lateralization in autism may be due to abnormal language development rather than to a deficit in hemispheric specialization of the entire brain. PMID:24502324

  17. Study of the influence of the laterality of mobile phone use on the SAR induced in two head models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanmi, Amal; Varsier, Nadège; Hadjem, Abdelhamid; Conil, Emmanuelle; Picon, Odile; Wiart, Joe

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate and to analyse the influence of the laterality of mobile phone use on the exposure of the brain to radio-frequencies (RF) and electromagnetic fields (EMF) from different mobile phone models using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The study focuses on the comparison of the specific absorption rate (SAR) induced on the right and left sides of two numerical adult and child head models. The heads are exposed by both phone models operating in GSM frequency bands for both ipsilateral and contralateral configurations. A slight SAR difference between the two sides of the heads is noted. The results show that the variation between the left and the right sides is more important at 1800 MHz for an ipsilateral use. Indeed, at this frequency, the variation can even reach 20% for the SAR10g and the SAR1g induced in the head and in the brain, respectively. Moreover, the average SAR induced by the mobile phone in the half hemisphere of the brain in ipsilateral exposure is higher than in contralateral exposure. Owing to the superficial character of energy deposition at 1800 MHz, this difference in the SAR induced for the ipsilateral and contralateral usages is more significant at 1800 MHz than at 900 MHz. The results have shown that depending on the phantom head models, the SAR distribution in the brain can vary because of differences in anatomical proportions and in the geometry of the head models. The induced SAR in child head and in sub-regions of the brain is significantly higher (up to 30%) compared to the adult head. This paper confirms also that the shape/design of the mobile and the location of the antenna can have a large influence at high frequency on the exposure of the brain, particularly on the SAR distribution and on the distinguished brain regions.

  18. EEG and functional ultrasound imaging in mobile rats

    PubMed Central

    Sieu, Lim-Anna; Bergel, Antoine; Tiran, Elodie; Deffieux, Thomas; Pernot, Mathieu; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickaël; Cohen, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    We developed an integrated experimental framework which extends the brain exploration capabilities of functional ultrasound imaging to awake/mobile animals. In addition to hemodynamic data, this method further allows parallel access to EEG recordings of neuronal activity. This approach is illustrated with two proofs of concept: first, a behavioral study, concerning theta rhythm activation in a maze running task and, second, a disease-related study concerning spontaneous epileptic seizures. PMID:26237228

  19. Is SOD1 loss of function involved in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Saccon, Rachele A; Bunton-Stasyshyn, Rosie K A; Fisher, Elizabeth M C; Fratta, Pietro

    2013-08-01

    Mutations in the gene superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are causative for familial forms of the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. When the first SOD1 mutations were identified they were postulated to give rise to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis through a loss of function mechanism, but experimental data soon showed that the disease arises from a--still unknown--toxic gain of function, and the possibility that loss of function plays a role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis pathogenesis was abandoned. Although loss of function is not causative for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, here we re-examine two decades of evidence regarding whether loss of function may play a modifying role in SOD1-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. From analysing published data from patients with SOD1-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, we find a marked loss of SOD1 enzyme activity arising from almost all mutations. We continue to examine functional data from all Sod1 knockout mice and we find obvious detrimental effects within the nervous system with, interestingly, some specificity for the motor system. Here, we bring together historical and recent experimental findings to conclude that there is a possibility that SOD1 loss of function may play a modifying role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This likelihood has implications for some current therapies aimed at knocking down the level of mutant protein in patients with SOD1-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Finally, the wide-ranging phenotypes that result from loss of function indicate that SOD1 gene sequences should be screened in diseases other than amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  20. Is SOD1 loss of function involved in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

    PubMed Central

    Saccon, Rachele A.; Bunton-Stasyshyn, Rosie K. A.; Fisher, Elizabeth M.C.; Fratta, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the gene superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are causative for familial forms of the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. When the first SOD1 mutations were identified they were postulated to give rise to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis through a loss of function mechanism, but experimental data soon showed that the disease arises from a—still unknown—toxic gain of function, and the possibility that loss of function plays a role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis pathogenesis was abandoned. Although loss of function is not causative for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, here we re-examine two decades of evidence regarding whether loss of function may play a modifying role in SOD1–amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. From analysing published data from patients with SOD1–amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, we find a marked loss of SOD1 enzyme activity arising from almost all mutations. We continue to examine functional data from all Sod1 knockout mice and we find obvious detrimental effects within the nervous system with, interestingly, some specificity for the motor system. Here, we bring together historical and recent experimental findings to conclude that there is a possibility that SOD1 loss of function may play a modifying role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This likelihood has implications for some current therapies aimed at knocking down the level of mutant protein in patients with SOD1–amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Finally, the wide-ranging phenotypes that result from loss of function indicate that SOD1 gene sequences should be screened in diseases other than amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:23687121

  1. Fifteen years later: can residential mobility programs provide a long-term escape from neighborhood segregation, crime, and poverty?

    PubMed

    Keels, Micere; Duncan, Greg J; Deluca, Stefanie; Mendenhall, Ruby; Rosenbaum, James

    2005-02-01

    We examined whether the Gautreaux residential mobility program, which moved poor black volunteer families who were living in inner-city Chicago into more-affluent and integrated neighborhoods, produced long-run improvements in the neighborhood environments of the participants. We found that although all the participants moved in the 6 to 22 years since their initial placements, they continued to reside in neighborhoods with income levels that matched those of their placement neighborhoods. Families who were placed in higher-income, mostly white neighborhoods were currently living in the most-affluent neighborhoods. Families who were placed in lower-crime and suburban locations were most likely to reside in low-crime neighborhoods years later.

  2. Lateral mobility of L-type calcium channels in synaptic terminals of retinal bipolar cells.

    PubMed

    Thoreson, Wallace B; Mercer, Aaron J; Cork, Karlene M; Szalewski, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Efficient and precise release of glutamate from retinal bipolar cells is ensured by the positioning of L-type Ca(2+) channels close to release sites at the base of the synaptic ribbon. We investigated whether Ca(2+) channels at bipolar cell ribbon synapses are fixed in position or capable of moving in the membrane. We tracked the movements of individual L-type Ca(2+) channels in bipolar cell terminals after labeling channels with quantum dots (QDs) attached to α(2)δ(4) accessory Ca(2+) channel subunits via intermediary antibodies. We found that individual Ca(2+) channels moved within a confined domain of 0.13-0.15 μm(2) in bipolar cell terminals, similar to ultrastructural estimates of the surface area of the active zone beneath the ribbon. Disruption of actin expanded the confinement domain indicating that cytoskeletal interactions help to confine channels at the synapse, but the relatively large diffusion coefficients of 0.3-0.45 μm(2)/s suggest that channels are not directly anchored to actin. Unlike photoreceptor synapses, removing membrane cholesterol did not change domain size, indicating that lipid rafts are not required to confine Ca(2+) channels at bipolar cell ribbon synapses. The ability of Ca(2+) channels to move within the presynaptic active zone suggests that regulating channel mobility may affect release from bipolar cell terminals.

  3. Significance of protein crowding, order and mobility for photosynthetic membrane functions.

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2008-10-01

    Natural photosynthesis requires diffusion-based processes either for the functional communication of protein complexes or for the adaptation, maintenance and biogenesis of the photosynthetic apparatus. A conceptual problem with lateral diffusion in photosynthetic membranes arises from the fact that these membranes are densely packed with membrane integral protein complexes (molecular crowding). Theoretical analysis of PQ (plastoquinone) and protein diffusion in higher plant grana thylakoids reveal very inefficient lateral diffusion. In contrast, measurement of protein mobility in grana membranes shows that a fraction of protein complexes can move surprisingly fast. It is postulated that organization of protein complexes in supercomplexes and large-scale ordering of Photosystem II and light-harvesting complex II could be strategies for the optimization of diffusion in crowded thylakoid membranes.

  4. Mobile personal health records: an evaluation of features and functionality.

    PubMed

    Kharrazi, Hadi; Chisholm, Robin; VanNasdale, Dean; Thompson, Benjamin

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate stand-alone mobile personal health record (mPHR) applications for the three leading cellular phone platforms (iOS, BlackBerry, and Android), assessing each for content, function, security, and marketing characteristics. Nineteen stand-alone mPHR applications (8 for iOS, 5 for BlackBerry, and 6 for Android) were identified and evaluated. Main criteria used to include mPHRs were: operating standalone on a mobile platform; not requiring external connectivity; and covering a wide range of health topics. Selected mPHRs were analyzed considering product characteristics, data elements, and application features. We also reviewed additional features such as marketing tactics. Within and between the different mobile platforms attributes for the mPHR were highly variable. None of the mPHRs contained all attributes included in our evaluation. The top four mPHRs contained 13 of the 14 features omitting only the in-case-of emergency feature. Surprisingly, seven mPHRs lacked basic security measures as important as password protection. The mPHRs were relatively inexpensive: ranging from no cost to $9.99. The mPHR application cost varied in some instances based on whether it supported single or multiple users. Ten mPHRs supported multiple user profiles. Notably, eight mPHRs used scare tactics as marketing strategy. mPHR is an emerging health care technology. The majority of existing mPHR apps is limited by at least one of the attributes considered for this study; however, as the mobile market continues to expand it is likely that more comprehensive mPHRs will be developed in the near future. New advancements in mobile technology can be utilized to enhance mPHRs by long-term patient empowerment features. Marketing strategies for mPHRs should target specific subpopulations and avoid scare tactics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigating language lateralization during phonological and semantic fluency tasks using functional transcranial Doppler sonography

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Sigut, Eva; Payne, Heather; MacSweeney, Mairéad

    2015-01-01

    Although there is consensus that the left hemisphere plays a critical role in language processing, some questions remain. Here we examine the influence of overt versus covert speech production on lateralization, the relationship between lateralization and behavioural measures of language performance and the strength of lateralization across the subcomponents of language. The present study used functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD) to investigate lateralization of phonological and semantic fluency during both overt and covert word generation in right-handed adults. The laterality index (LI) was left lateralized in all conditions, and there was no difference in the strength of LI between overt and covert speech. This supports the validity of using overt speech in fTCD studies, another benefit of which is a reliable measure of speech production. PMID:24875468

  6. Investigating language lateralization during phonological and semantic fluency tasks using functional transcranial Doppler sonography.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Sigut, Eva; Payne, Heather; MacSweeney, Mairéad

    2015-01-01

    Although there is consensus that the left hemisphere plays a critical role in language processing, some questions remain. Here we examine the influence of overt versus covert speech production on lateralization, the relationship between lateralization and behavioural measures of language performance and the strength of lateralization across the subcomponents of language. The present study used functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD) to investigate lateralization of phonological and semantic fluency during both overt and covert word generation in right-handed adults. The laterality index (LI) was left lateralized in all conditions, and there was no difference in the strength of LI between overt and covert speech. This supports the validity of using overt speech in fTCD studies, another benefit of which is a reliable measure of speech production.

  7. Lateral displacement as a function of particle size using a piecewise curved planar interdigitated electrode array.

    PubMed

    Han, Ki-Ho; Han, Song-I; Frazier, A Bruno

    2009-10-21

    We describe the lateral displacement of a particle passing over a planar interdigitated electrode array at an angle as a function of the particle size. The lateral displacement was also measured as a function of the angle between the electrode and the direction of flow. A simplified line charge model was used for numerically estimating the lateral displacement of fluorescent polystyrene (PS) beads with three different diameters. Using the lateral displacement as a function of particle size, we developed a lateral dielectrophoretic (DEP) microseparator, which enables continuous discrimination of particles by size. The microchannel was divided into three regions, each with an electrode array placed at a different angle with respect to the direction of flow. The experiment using an admixture of 3-, 5-, and 10-microm PS beads showed that the lateral DEP microseparator could continuously separate out 99.86% of the 3-microm beads, 98.82% of the 5-microm beads, and 99.69% of the 10-microm beads, simply by using a 200-kHz 12-Vp-p AC voltage to create the lateral DEP force. The lateral DEP microseparator is thus a practical device for simultaneously separating particles according to size from a heterogeneous admixture.

  8. Mobile Phone Sensing of Cocaine in a Lateral Flow Assay Combined with a Biomimetic Material.

    PubMed

    Guler, Emine; Yilmaz Sengel, Tulay; Gumus, Z Pinar; Arslan, Mustafa; Coskunol, Hakan; Timur, Suna; Yagci, Yusuf

    2017-08-28

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are an ideal choice for drug abuse testing favored by their practicability, portability, and rapidity. LFA based on-site rapid screening devices provide positive/negative judgment in a short response time. The conventionally applied competitive assay format used for small molecule analysis such as abused drugs restricts the quantitation ability of LFA strips. We report herein, for the first time, a new strategy using the noncompetitive assay format via a biomimetic material, namely, poly(p-phenylene) β-cyclodextrin poly(ethylene glycol) (PPP-CD-g-PEG) combined with gold nanoparticle (AuNP) conjugates as the labeling agent to recognize the target cocaine molecule in the test zone. The intensities of the visualized red color in the test line indicate that the cocaine concentrations were analyzed via a smartphone application. Significantly, a combination of this platform with a smartphone application provides quantitative data on the cocaine amount, making it a very inventive and attractive approach especially for on-site applications at critical points such as traffic stops and the workplace.

  9. Abnormal Functional Lateralization and Activity of Language Brain Areas in Typical Specific Language Impairment (Developmental Dysphasia)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guibert, Clement; Maumet, Camille; Jannin, Pierre; Ferre, Jean-Christophe; Treguier, Catherine; Barillot, Christian; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Allaire, Catherine; Biraben, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    Atypical functional lateralization and specialization for language have been proposed to account for developmental language disorders, yet results from functional neuroimaging studies are sparse and inconsistent. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study compared children with a specific subtype of specific language impairment affecting…

  10. Abnormal Functional Lateralization and Activity of Language Brain Areas in Typical Specific Language Impairment (Developmental Dysphasia)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guibert, Clement; Maumet, Camille; Jannin, Pierre; Ferre, Jean-Christophe; Treguier, Catherine; Barillot, Christian; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Allaire, Catherine; Biraben, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    Atypical functional lateralization and specialization for language have been proposed to account for developmental language disorders, yet results from functional neuroimaging studies are sparse and inconsistent. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study compared children with a specific subtype of specific language impairment affecting…

  11. Early-phase adaptations to intrahospital training in strength and functional mobility of children with leukemia.

    PubMed

    San Juan, Alejandro F; Fleck, Steven J; Chamorro-Viña, Carolina; Maté-Muñoz, José L; Moral, Susana; García-Castro, Javier; Ramírez, Manuel; Madero, Luis; Lucia, Alejandro

    2007-02-01

    Improvements in chemotherapy and radiotherapy have contributed to the high survival rate (approximately 70%) of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). However, during treatment, lack of physical activity and treatment cause various short- to long-term side effects, such as muscle atrophy and physical deconditioning. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an intrahospital, short-duration (8 weeks) exercise training program on muscle strength and endurance and functional mobility of children with ALL. Seven children (4 boys and 3 girls; 4-7 years of age) who were in the maintenance phase of treatment for ALL were selected as subjects. Three training sessions of 90- to 120-minute duration were performed each week. Each session included 11 different strength exercises engaging the major muscle groups and aerobic training. Gains in strength and endurance were assessed with a 6 repetition maximum test for upper (seated bench press and seated lateral row) and lower extremities (leg press). Gains in functional mobility were assessed with the time up and go test (TUG) and the timed up and down stairs test (TUDS). Performance was significantly improved after the training program in all strength tests (p < 0.01 for seated bench press and p < 0.05 for both seated lateral row and seated leg press) and in the TUG test (p < 0.05). In summary, a period of time as short as 8 weeks is enough to produce clinically relevant early-phase adaptations in children receiving treatment against ALL (i.e., improved functional mobility and muscle strength). Although more research is needed in the area of exercise training and pediatric cancer, exercise sciences can play a beneficial role in assisting both oncologists in treating cancer and improving children's quality of life during and after treatment.

  12. Influence of expectations plus mobilization with movement in patient with lateral epicondylalgia: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Cervera, Francisco Vicente; Olteanu, Theodor Emanuel; Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; Díaz-Pulido, Belén; Ferrer-Peña, Raúl

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of expectations plus mobilization with movement (MWM) in kinesiophobia, perceived disability and sensorimotor variables in patients with lateral epicondylalgia. A pilot randomized controlled trial in 24 patients with lateral epicondylalgia was conducted. Perceived pain, pain-free grip strength, pressure pain detection threshold, kinesiophobia measured with the short version of Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia, perceived disability of the upper limb measured with disability of the arm, hand and shoulder questionnaire, and perceived disability specifically for the elbow joint measured with patient-rating tennis elbow evaluation, and also satisfaction were assessed. Participants were randomized to receive written instructions in order to create positive expectations regarding the technique in one group (n=12) or neutral expectations in the other one (n=12). All patients were treated for three sessions with the MWM technique. Measures were recorded before and after treatment. The effect size was calculated by Rosenthal “r” for nonparametrical tests. There were no significant statistical differences (P>0.05) between groups after receiving the treatment for none of the physical analyzed variables. The Wilcoxon test showed statistically significant changes in kinesiophobia (Z=−2.278, r=0.47, P=0.023) and perceived disability (Z= −2.934, r=0.61, P=0.003) within positive expectations group. In conclusion this pilot study shows that a positive expectation almost given in a sealed envelope before treatment plus MWM produced changes in kinesiophobia and perceived disability in the immediate term, in patients with lateral epicondylalgia. PMID:28349041

  13. Influence of expectations plus mobilization with movement in patient with lateral epicondylalgia: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cervera, Francisco Vicente; Olteanu, Theodor Emanuel; Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; Díaz-Pulido, Belén; Ferrer-Peña, Raúl

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of expectations plus mobilization with movement (MWM) in kinesiophobia, perceived disability and sensorimotor variables in patients with lateral epicondylalgia. A pilot randomized controlled trial in 24 patients with lateral epicondylalgia was conducted. Perceived pain, pain-free grip strength, pressure pain detection threshold, kinesiophobia measured with the short version of Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia, perceived disability of the upper limb measured with disability of the arm, hand and shoulder questionnaire, and perceived disability specifically for the elbow joint measured with patient-rating tennis elbow evaluation, and also satisfaction were assessed. Participants were randomized to receive written instructions in order to create positive expectations regarding the technique in one group (n=12) or neutral expectations in the other one (n=12). All patients were treated for three sessions with the MWM technique. Measures were recorded before and after treatment. The effect size was calculated by Rosenthal "r" for nonparametrical tests. There were no significant statistical differences (P>0.05) between groups after receiving the treatment for none of the physical analyzed variables. The Wilcoxon test showed statistically significant changes in kinesiophobia (Z=-2.278, r=0.47, P=0.023) and perceived disability (Z= -2.934, r=0.61, P=0.003) within positive expectations group. In conclusion this pilot study shows that a positive expectation almost given in a sealed envelope before treatment plus MWM produced changes in kinesiophobia and perceived disability in the immediate term, in patients with lateral epicondylalgia.

  14. Improving Vastus Medialis Obliquus Function Reduces Pressure Applied to Lateral Patellofemoral Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Elias, John J.; Kilambi, Srianjana; Goerke, Derek R.; Cosgarea, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    The current study was performed to characterize how improving vastus medialis obliquus (VMO) function influences the pressure applied to patellofemoral cartilage. An additional focus was characterizing how lateral and medial cartilage lesions influence cartilage pressures. Ten knees were flexed to 40°, 60° and 80° in vitro, and forces were applied to represent the VMO and other muscles of the quadriceps group while a thin film sensor measured joint pressures. The knees were loaded with a normal VMO force, with the VMO force decreased by approximately 50%, and with the VMO unloaded. After tests were performed with the cartilage intact, all tests were repeated with a 12 mm diameter lesion created within the lateral cartilage, with the lateral lesion repaired with silicone, and with a medial lesion created. Based on a two-way repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc tests, increasing the force applied by the VMO significantly (p < 0.05) decreased the maximum lateral pressure and significantly increased the maximum medial pressure at each flexion angle. A lateral cartilage lesion significantly increased the maximum lateral pressure, while a medial lesion did not significantly influence the maximum medial pressure. Improving VMO function can reduce the pressure applied to lateral cartilage when lateral lesions are present. PMID:18985700

  15. Reliability of a novel paradigm for determining hemispheric lateralization of visuospatial function

    PubMed Central

    WHITEHOUSE, ANDREW J. O.; BADCOCK, NICHOLAS; GROEN, MARGRIET A.; BISHOP, DOROTHY V. M.

    2010-01-01

    In most individuals, language production and visuospatial skills are subserved predominantly by the left and right hemispheres, respectively. Functional Transcranial Doppler (fTCD) provides a noninvasive and relatively low-cost method for measuring functional lateralization. However, while the silent word generation task provides an accurate and reliable paradigm for investigating lateralization of language production, there is no comparable gold-standard method for measuring visuospatial skills. Thirty undergraduate students (19 females) completed a task of spatial memory while undergoing fTCD recording. Participants completed this task at two different time points, separated by between 26 to 155 days. The relative activation between hemispheres averaged across all participants was found to be consistent across testing sessions. This was observed at the individual level also, with a quantitative index of lateralization showing high reproducibility. These findings indicate that the use of the spatial memory task with fTCD is a robust methodology for examining laterality of visuospatial skills. PMID:19709454

  16. 47 CFR 22.575 - Use of mobile channel for remote control of station functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of mobile channel for remote control of... Mobile Operation § 22.575 Use of mobile channel for remote control of station functions. Carriers may remotely control station functions (e.g. shut down or reactivate base transmitters, turn aviation...

  17. Psychological Symptoms in Youth and Later Socioeconomic Functioning: Do Associations Vary by Informant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dirks, Melanie A.; Boyle, Michael H.; Georgiades, Katholiki

    2011-01-01

    We examined whether associations between symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), depression, and anxiety assessed in a sample of 2,026 youth aged 6 to 16 years and socioeconomic functioning measured 18 years later varied as a function of whether parents or teachers had rated symptomatology.…

  18. Psychological Symptoms in Youth and Later Socioeconomic Functioning: Do Associations Vary by Informant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dirks, Melanie A.; Boyle, Michael H.; Georgiades, Katholiki

    2011-01-01

    We examined whether associations between symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), depression, and anxiety assessed in a sample of 2,026 youth aged 6 to 16 years and socioeconomic functioning measured 18 years later varied as a function of whether parents or teachers had rated symptomatology.…

  19. p53 genes function to restrain mobile elements

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Annika; Jones, Amanda E.; D'Brot, Alejandro; Lu, Wan-Jin; Kurtz, Paula; Moran, John V.; Rakheja, Dinesh; Chen, Kenneth S.; Hammer, Robert E.; Comerford, Sarah A.; Amatruda, James F.; Abrams, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the animal kingdom, p53 genes govern stress response networks by specifying adaptive transcriptional responses. The human member of this gene family is mutated in most cancers, but precisely how p53 functions to mediate tumor suppression is not well understood. Using Drosophila and zebrafish models, we show that p53 restricts retrotransposon activity and genetically interacts with components of the piRNA (piwi-interacting RNA) pathway. Furthermore, transposon eruptions occurring in the p53− germline were incited by meiotic recombination, and transcripts produced from these mobile elements accumulated in the germ plasm. In gene complementation studies, normal human p53 alleles suppressed transposons, but mutant p53 alleles from cancer patients could not. Consistent with these observations, we also found patterns of unrestrained retrotransposons in p53-driven mouse and human cancers. Furthermore, p53 status correlated with repressive chromatin marks in the 5′ sequence of a synthetic LINE-1 element. Together, these observations indicate that ancestral functions of p53 operate through conserved mechanisms to contain retrotransposons. Since human p53 mutants are disabled for this activity, our findings raise the possibility that p53 mitigates oncogenic disease in part by restricting transposon mobility. PMID:26701264

  20. The association between aerobic fitness and cognitive function in older men mediated by frontal lateralization.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Kazuki; Dan, Ippeita; Kyutoku, Yasushi; Suwabe, Kazuya; Byun, Kyeongho; Ochi, Genta; Kato, Morimasa; Soya, Hideaki

    2016-01-15

    Previous studies have shown that higher aerobic fitness is related to higher cognitive function and higher task-related prefrontal activation in older adults. However, a holistic picture of these factors has yet to be presented. As a typical age-related change of brain activation, less lateralized activity in the prefrontal cortex during cognitive tasks has been observed in various neuroimaging studies. Thus, this study aimed to reveal the relationship between aerobic fitness, cognitive function, and frontal lateralization. Sixty male older adults each performed a submaximal incremental exercise test to determine their oxygen intake (V·O2) at ventilatory threshold (VT) in order to index their aerobic fitness. They performed a color-word Stroop task while prefrontal activation was monitored using functional near infrared spectroscopy. As an index of cognitive function, Stroop interference time was analyzed. Partial correlation analyses revealed significant correlations among higher VT, shorter Stroop interference time and greater left-lateralized dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) activation when adjusting for education. Moreover, mediation analyses showed that left-lateralized DLPFC activation significantly mediated the association between VT and Stroop interference time. These results suggest that higher aerobic fitness is associated with cognitive function via lateralized frontal activation in older adults.

  1. Extraction of the lateral incisors to treat maxillary protrusion: quantitative evaluation of the stomatognathic functions.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yoshihito; Kuroda, Shingo; Sumiyoshi, Kumi; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2013-03-01

    To treat morphological abnormalities, impaction, and severe malposition of the teeth, the lateral incisors are sometimes extracted, followed by orthodontic space closure. This procedure often requires special consideration, not only with regard to esthetics but also for functional issues. However, thus far, few reports that have performed a functional evaluation in such cases. The purpose of this article is to report the successful treatment of an adult patient with a Class II division 1 malocclusion who was treated with extraction of the upper lateral incisors. The female patient, aged 23 years and 6 months, had a chief complaint of maxillary incisal protrusion and crooked teeth. In this patient, the upper lateral incisors were extracted to fulfill the patient's strong request, followed by orthodontic treatment using edgewise appliances. A high-pull J-hook headgear on the lower dental arch was used to prevent further labial inclination of the lower incisors. The total active treatment period was 37 months. The resulting occlusion and a satisfactory facial profile were maintained during a 4-year retention period. Additionally, this treatment did not affect the stomatognathic functions as assessed by the following criteria: range of the incisal path or condylar motion during maximal open-close movement, protrusive excursion, lateral excursion, and the chewing test. In conclusion, extraction of the upper lateral incisors can be an effective treatment choice when the upper lateral incisors are dwarfed, are nonvital, or demonstrate severe malposition.

  2. Measurement of plantar pressure distribution during gait for diagnosis of functional lateral ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Becker, HP; Rosenbaum, D; Claes, L; Gerngro, H

    1997-04-01

    INTRODUCTION:: Chronic functional instability of the lateral ankle may be difficult to distinguish from mechanical instability when radiological stress tests reveal only small ligamentous defects. For decision making whether to surgically reconstruct the ligaments or not, it can be helpful to use additional information on joint and foot function. Therefore, the aim of a prospective study of patients with longstanding chronic ankle instability was to demonstrate that the dynamic measurement of plantar pressure distribution can identify patients with functional ankle instability. [Table: see text] MATERIALS AND METHODS:: Sixty five patients (mean age 24 (4.6 years)) were included. After clinical examination and radiological stress views, plantar pressure patterns were measured during gait using a capacitive platform, the EMED-SF 2-system. Five trials of each foot were documented and the maximum impulses in eight points of the foot (central heel, lateral and medial heel, midfoot, 1st, 2nd, 5th metatarsal head and hallux) were calculated intraindividually and compared with a group of 100 healthy subjects. The medio-lateral loading factor (MLF) as the quotient of the medial and lateral relative impulses indicated the tendency to walk on the lateral edge of the foot. RESULTS:: Based on clinical criteria alone, two comparable groups of patients were separated, 35 with functional instability and 30 with mechanical instability. After collective analyses of the results, the patients with functional instability showed a significantly increased lateral loading of the unstable foot (p=0 0 1), whereas the mechanically unstable group tended to walk more on the medial side of the unstable foot (Table 1). DISCUSSION:: Dynamic measurement of plantar pressure can identify a group of patients walking on the lateral side of the unstable foot when compared with the stable foot. This finding is explained by a deficit of peroneal strength during stance phase based on a proprioceptive

  3. Lateral mobility of an amphipathic apolipoprotein, ApoC-III, bound to phosphatidylcholine bilayers with and without cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Winchil L. C.; Jacobson, Kenneth; Wu, En-Shinn; Derzko, Zenon

    1979-01-01

    The technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching was used to investigate the lateral mobility of a fluorescein-labeled amphipathic apolipoprotein, ApoC-III, bound to multibilayers prepared from dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine, egg phosphatidylcholine, and a 1:1 (molar ratio) mixture of egg phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol. In dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayers the lateral diffusion coefficient (D) for the protein is about 2 × 10-9 cm2 sec-1 at 20°C and about 9 × 10-8 cm2 sec-1 at 45°C. Plots of D versus temperature in this system show a transition between about 30 and 35°C. Arrhenius activation energies for the diffusion in this case between 15 and 30°C and between 35 and 45°C are 28.5 and 7.0 kcal mol-1, respectively (1 calorie = 4.18 joules). In egg phosphatidylcholine bilayers, D is about 3 × 10-8 cm2 sec-1 at 20°C and the Arrhenius activation energy for diffusion is 8.1 kcal mol-1 between 15 and 35°C in this system. In bilayers prepared from an equimolar mixture of egg phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol D at 20°C is about 1.4 × 10-9 cm2 sec-1 and the Arrhenius activation energy for the diffusion of the protein in this system between 15 and 35°C is 15.1 kcal mol-1. Light-scattering and fluorescence-polarization results indicate that binding of this protein does not affect the gel-to-liquid crystalline phase transition of bilayer membranes but does mediate a major, reversible aggregation of the vesicles at about 33°C. These results lend support to the view that ApoC-III resides in the head-group region of the bilayer and suggest that its lateral diffusion coefficient represents an upper bound for integral membrane proteins. PMID:293667

  4. Abnormal functional lateralization and activity of language brain areas in typical specific language impairment (developmental dysphasia)

    PubMed Central

    De Guibert, Clément; Maumet, Camille; Jannin, Pierre; Ferré, Jean-Christophe; Tréguier, Catherine; Barillot, Christian; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Allaire, Catherine; Biraben, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    Atypical functional lateralization and specialization for language have been proposed to account for developmental language disorders, yet results from functional neuroimaging studies are sparse and inconsistent. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study compared children with a specific subtype of specific language impairment affecting structural language (n=21), to a matched group of typically-developing children using a panel of four language tasks neither requiring reading nor metalinguistic skills, including two auditory lexico-semantic tasks (category fluency and responsive naming) and two visual phonological tasks based on picture naming. Data processing involved normalizing the data with respect to a matched pairs pediatric template, groups and between-groups analysis, and laterality indexes assessment within regions of interest using single and combined task analysis. Children with specific language impairment exhibited a significant lack of left lateralization in all core language regions (inferior frontal gyrus-opercularis, inferior frontal gyrus-triangularis, supramarginal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus), across single or combined task analysis, but no difference of lateralization for the rest of the brain. Between-group comparisons revealed a left hypoactivation of Wernicke’s area at the posterior superior temporal/supramarginal junction during the responsive naming task, and a right hyperactivation encompassing the anterior insula with adjacent inferior frontal gyrus and the head of the caudate nucleus during the first phonological task. This study thus provides evidence that this specific subtype of specific language impairment is associated with atypical lateralization and functioning of core language areas. PMID:21719430

  5. Abnormal functional lateralization and activity of language brain areas in typical specific language impairment (developmental dysphasia).

    PubMed

    de Guibert, Clément; Maumet, Camille; Jannin, Pierre; Ferré, Jean-Christophe; Tréguier, Catherine; Barillot, Christian; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Allaire, Catherine; Biraben, Arnaud

    2011-10-01

    Atypical functional lateralization and specialization for language have been proposed to account for developmental language disorders, yet results from functional neuroimaging studies are sparse and inconsistent. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study compared children with a specific subtype of specific language impairment affecting structural language (n = 21), to a matched group of typically developing children using a panel of four language tasks neither requiring reading nor metalinguistic skills, including two auditory lexico-semantic tasks (category fluency and responsive naming) and two visual phonological tasks based on picture naming. Data processing involved normalizing the data with respect to a matched pairs paediatric template, groups and between-groups analysis, and laterality indices assessment within regions of interest using single and combined task analysis. Children with specific language impairment exhibited a significant lack of left lateralization in all core language regions (inferior frontal gyrus-opercularis, inferior frontal gyrus-triangularis, supramarginal gyrus and superior temporal gyrus), across single or combined task analysis, but no difference of lateralization for the rest of the brain. Between-group comparisons revealed a left hypoactivation of Wernicke's area at the posterior superior temporal/supramarginal junction during the responsive naming task, and a right hyperactivation encompassing the anterior insula with adjacent inferior frontal gyrus and the head of the caudate nucleus during the first phonological task. This study thus provides evidence that this subtype of specific language impairment is associated with atypical lateralization and functioning of core language areas.

  6. Schizotypal personality traits and atypical lateralization in motor and language functions.

    PubMed

    Asai, Tomohisa; Sugimori, Eriko; Tanno, Yoshihiko

    2009-10-01

    Atypical cerebral lateralization in motor and language functions in regard to schizotypal personality traits in healthy populations, as well as among schizophrenic patients, has attracted attention because these traits may represent a risk factor for schizophrenia. Although the relationship between handedness and schizotypal personality has been widely examined, few studies have adopted an experimental approach. This study consisted of three experiments focusing on motor and language functional lateralization in regard to schizotypal personality in the absence of mental illness: line-drawing, finger tapping, and a semantic go/no-go task. The results suggested that positive schizotypal personality might be related to functional non-lateralization in regard to at least some functions (e.g., spatial motor control and semantic processing in the present study). Subjects with high schizotypal personality traits performed equally with their right and left-hands in the line-drawing task and they reacted equally with their right and left-hands in a semantic go/no-go task involving semantic auditory stimuli presented in both ears. However, those low in schizotypal personality traits showed typical lateralization in response to these tasks. We discuss the implications of these findings for schizotypal atypical lateralization.

  7. Domain mobility in proteins: functional and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Basu, Malay Kumar; Poliakov, Eugenia; Rogozin, Igor B

    2009-05-01

    A substantial fraction of eukaryotic proteins contains multiple domains, some of which show a tendency to occur in diverse domain architectures and can be considered mobile (or 'promiscuous'). These promiscuous domains are typically involved in protein-protein interactions and play crucial roles in interaction networks, particularly those contributing to signal transduction. They also play a major role in creating diversity of protein domain architecture in the proteome. It is now apparent that promiscuity is a volatile and relatively fast-changing feature in evolution, and that only a few domains retain their promiscuity status throughout evolution. Many such domains attained their promiscuity status independently in different lineages. Only recently, we have begun to understand the diversity of protein domain architectures and the role the promiscuous domains play in evolution of this diversity. However, many of the biological mechanisms of protein domain mobility remain shrouded in mystery. In this review, we discuss our present understanding of protein domain promiscuity, its evolution and its role in cellular function.

  8. Relationship Between Head-Turn Gait Speed and Lateral Balance Function in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harshvardhan; Sanders, Ozell; McCombe Waller, Sandy; Bair, Woei-Nan; Beamer, Brock; Creath, Robert A; Rogers, Mark W

    2017-10-01

    To determine and compare gait speed during head-forward and side-to-side head-turn walking in individuals with lower versus greater lateral balance. Cross-sectional study. University research laboratory. Older adults (N=93; 42 men, 51 women; mean age ± SD, 73 ± 6.08y) who could walk independently. (1) Balance tolerance limit (BTL), defined as the lowest perturbation intensity where a multistep balance recovery pattern was first evoked in response to randomized lateral waist-pull perturbations of standing balance to the left and right sides, at 6 different intensities (range from level 2: 4.5-cm displacement at 180cm/s(2) acceleration, to level 7: 22.5-cm displacement at 900cm/s(2) acceleration); (2) gait speed, determined using an instrumented gait mat; (3) balance, evaluated with the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale; and (4) mobility, determined with the Timed Up and Go (TUG). Individuals with low versus high BTL had a slower self-selected head-forward gait speed and head-turn gait speed (P=.002 and P<.001, respectively); the magnitude of difference was greater in head-turn gait speed than head-forward gait speed (Cohen's d=1.0 vs 0.6). Head-turn gait speed best predicted BTL. BTL was moderately and positively related (P=.003) to the ABC Scale and negatively related (P=.017) to TUG. Head-turn gait speed is affected to a greater extent than head-forward gait speed in older individuals with poorer lateral balance and at greater risk of falls. Moreover, head-turn gait speed can be used to assess the interactions of limitations in lateral balance function and gait speed in relation to fall risk in older adults. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hemispheric lateralization of resting-state functional connectivity of the ventral striatum: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Hu, Sien; Chao, Herta H; Li, Chiang-Shan R

    2017-01-21

    Resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) is widely used to examine cerebral functional organization. The ventral striatum (VS) is critical to motivated behavior, with extant studies suggesting functional hemispheric asymmetry. The current work investigated differences in rsFC between the left (L) and right (R) VS and explored gender differences in the extent of functional lateralization. In 106 adults, we computed a laterality index (fcLI) to query whether a target region shows greater or less connectivity to the L vs R VS. A total of 45 target regions with hemispheric masks were examined from the Automated Anatomic Labeling atlas. One-sample t test was performed to explore significant laterality in the whole sample and in men and women separately. Two-sample t test was performed to examine gender differences in fcLI. At a corrected threshold (p < 0.05/45 = 0.0011), the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) and posterior cingulate cortex (pCC) showed L lateralization and the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) and supramarginal gyrus (SMG) showed R lateralization in VS connectivity. Except for the pCC, these findings were replicated in a different data set (n = 97) from the Human Connectome Project. Furthermore, the fcLI of VS-pCC was negatively correlated with a novelty seeking trait in women but not in men. Together, the findings may suggest a more important role of the L VS in linking saliency response to self control and other internally directed processes. Right lateralization of VS connectivity to the SMG and IPS may support attention and action directed to external behavioral contingencies.

  10. Sex differences in handedness, asymmetry of the planum temporale and functional language lateralization.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Iris E; Aleman, André; Somers, Metten; Boks, Marco P; Kahn, René S

    2008-04-24

    Many studies have investigated sex differences in language lateralization. Despite the large number of investigations, controversy about the presence of sex differences in lateralization remains. This study aims to provide a complete overview of sex differences in several reflections of language lateralization: handedness, asymmetry of the Planum Temporale (PT) and functional lateralization of language, measured by asymmetric performance on dichotic listening tests (Right Ear Advantage) and asymmetry of language activation as measured with functional imaging techniques. Meta-analysis of studies that assessed handedness in males and females yielded more left-handedness in males (mean weighted odds ratio: 1.25, p<0.001). Meta-analysis of studies on PT asymmetry yielded no sex difference (Hedges g=-0.11, p=0.68). Results of the meta-analysis on dichotic listening studies also retrieved no sex difference in lateralization (Hedges g=0.09, p=0.18). When the studies were subdivided according to the paradigm they applied, studies that used the consonant-vowel task yielded a sex difference favouring males, while studies that applied other paradigms yielded no sex difference. The subdivision into applied paradigm largely overlapped with the subdivision into studies that did or did not focus on sex differences as their main topic. The observed sex effect may therefore be caused by publication bias. Meta-analysis of functional imaging studies yielded no sex difference (Hedges g=0.01, p=0.73) in language lateralization. Sub-analyses of studies that applied different paradigms all yielded no sex difference. In conclusion, males are more frequently non-right handed than females, but there is no sex difference in asymmetries of the Planum Temporale, dichotic listening or functional imaging findings during language tasks.

  11. Direct estimation of the lateral strain field using a double oscillating point spread function with a scaling factor estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebgott, Herve; Fromageau, Jeremie; Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Vray, Didier; Delachartre, Philippe

    2004-04-01

    This work presents a new approach to lateral strain estimation in the field of tissue elasticity imaging with ultrasound. A particular beamforming is used to produce a point spread function (PSF) with lateral oscillations. Lateral RF signals can then be considered as the juxtaposition of RF samples coming from the same depth. This enables to estimate the lateral strain with a scaling factor estimator applied to the lateral signals. The approach is validated in simulation on a medium stretched only in the lateral direction. The estimation is unbiased for lateral strain values from 0.5 to 7 % with standard deviation less than 0.5 %.

  12. Perception and Lateralization of Spoken Emotion by Youths with High-Functioning Forms of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Kimberly F.; Montgomery, Allen A.; Abramson, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    The perception and the cerebral lateralization of spoken emotions were investigated in children and adolescents with high-functioning forms of autism (HFFA), and age-matched typically developing controls (TDC). A dichotic listening task using nonsense passages was used to investigate the recognition of four emotions: happiness, sadness, anger, and…

  13. Perception and Lateralization of Spoken Emotion by Youths with High-Functioning Forms of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Kimberly F.; Montgomery, Allen A.; Abramson, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    The perception and the cerebral lateralization of spoken emotions were investigated in children and adolescents with high-functioning forms of autism (HFFA), and age-matched typically developing controls (TDC). A dichotic listening task using nonsense passages was used to investigate the recognition of four emotions: happiness, sadness, anger, and…

  14. Alone Is a Crowd: Social Motivations, Social Withdrawal, and Socioemotional Functioning in Later Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coplan, Robert J.; Rose-Krasnor, Linda; Weeks, Murray; Kingsbury, Adam; Kingsbury, Mila; Bullock, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    The primary goals of this study were to test a conceptual model linking social approach and avoidance motivations, socially withdrawn behaviors, and peer difficulties in later childhood and to compare the socioemotional functioning of different subtypes of withdrawn children (shy, unsociable, avoidant). Participants were 367 children, aged 9-12…

  15. Schizotypal Personality Traits and Atypical Lateralization in Motor and Language Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asai, Tomohisa; Sugimori, Eriko; Tanno, Yoshihiko

    2009-01-01

    Atypical cerebral lateralization in motor and language functions in regard to schizotypal personality traits in healthy populations, as well as among schizophrenic patients, has attracted attention because these traits may represent a risk factor for schizophrenia. Although the relationship between handedness and schizotypal personality has been…

  16. Schizotypal Personality Traits and Atypical Lateralization in Motor and Language Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asai, Tomohisa; Sugimori, Eriko; Tanno, Yoshihiko

    2009-01-01

    Atypical cerebral lateralization in motor and language functions in regard to schizotypal personality traits in healthy populations, as well as among schizophrenic patients, has attracted attention because these traits may represent a risk factor for schizophrenia. Although the relationship between handedness and schizotypal personality has been…

  17. Reconstruction of the form and function of lateral malleolus and ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Kiyokawa, Kensuke; Tanaka, Shinsuke; Kiduka, Yuichiro; Inoue, Yojiro; Yamauchi, Toshihiko; Tai, Yoshiaki

    2005-08-01

    Soft-tissue reconstruction alone cannot obtain normal ankle function in patients with large defects in the area of the lateral malleolus. The authors report a functional reconstructive method for the lateral malleolus, utilized in a male patient whose osteosarcoma in the fibula was resected with surrounding soft tissue. In order to reconstruct the lateral malleolus, the remaining half of the fibula at the knee was removed, and the fibular head was fixed with the tibia at the ankle joint. Ligaments were reconstructed with tendon grafts. Skin and soft-tissue defects were reconstructed with a combined composite flap comprised of a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap and a serratus anterior muscle flap. Dead space around the bone graft was filled with the serratus anterior muscle flap that was divided into two portions. The surface was covered with the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap. The patient regained almost normal function of the ankle joint. This technique would be a useful functional reconstructive method for patients with large defects in the area of the lateral malleolus.

  18. An Investigation of Cerebral Lateral Functioning and the EEG. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalf, David R.

    Forty-two volunteer subjects, mostly young adults, participated in developing a methodology for studying cognitive processes and cerebral lateral functions in relation to individual cognitive styles and age. Four test batteries were developed and refined in this study: the adult cognitive, the adult electroencephalogram (EEG), the children's…

  19. Habitual physical activity levels are associated with performance in measures of physical function and mobility in older men.

    PubMed

    Morie, Marina; Reid, Kieran F; Miciek, Renee; Lajevardi, Newsha; Choong, Karen; Krasnoff, Joanne B; Storer, Thomas W; Fielding, Roger A; Bhasin, Shalender; Lebrasseur, Nathan K

    2010-09-01

    To determine whether objectively measured physical activity levels are associated with physical function and mobility in older men. Cross-sectional. Academic research center. Eighty-two community-dwelling men aged 65 and older with self-reported mobility limitations were divided into a low-activity and a high-activity group based on the median average daily physical activity counts of the whole sample. Physical activity according to triaxial accelerometers; physical function and mobility according to the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), gait speed, stair climb time, and a lift-and-lower task; aerobic capacity according to maximum oxygen consumption (VO(2) max); and leg press and chest press maximal strength and peak power. Older men with higher physical activity levels had a 1.4-point higher mean SPPB score and a 0.35-m/s faster walking speed than those with lower physical activity levels. They also climbed a standard flight of stairs 1.85 seconds faster and completed 60% more shelves in a lift-and-lower task (all P<.01); muscle strength and power measures were not significantly different between the low- and high-activity groups. Correlation analyses and multiple linear regression models showed that physical activity is positively associated with all physical function and mobility measures, leg press strength, and VO(2) max. Older men with higher physical activity levels demonstrate better physical function and mobility than their less-active peers. Moreover, physical activity levels are predictive of performance in measures of physical function and mobility in older men. Future work is needed to determine whether modifications in physical activity levels can improve or preserve physical performance in later life. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2010, The American Geriatrics Society.

  20. Elevated serum autoantibody against high mobility group box 1 as a potent surrogate biomarker for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chi-Shin; Liu, Guan-Ting; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr; Liao, I-Lin; Chang, Hao-Teng

    2013-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a complicate and progressive onset devastating neurodegenerative disease. Its pathogenic mechanisms remain unclear and there is no specific test for diagnosis. For years, researchers have been vigorously searching for biomarkers associated with ALS to assist clinical diagnosis and monitor disease progression. Some specific inflammatory processes in the central nervous system have been reported to participate in the pathogenesis of ALS. As high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is elevated in spinal cord tissues of patients with ALS, we hypothesized, therefore, that serum autoantibody against HMGB1 (HMGB1 autoAb) might represent an effective biomarker for ALS. Patients with ALS, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and healthy age-matched control subjects were recruited for this study. ALS group consisted of 61 subjects, the other groups each consisted of forty subjects. We generated a polyclonal antibody against HMGB1 and developed an ELISA-based methodology for screening serum samples of these subjects. All samples were coded for masked comparison. For statistic analyses, two-tailed Student's t-test, ANOVA, Bonferroni multiple comparison test, Spearman correlation, and receiver operating characteristic curve were applied. We discovered that the level of HMGB1 autoAb significantly increased in patients with ALS as compared with that of patients with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and healthy control subjects. The differences between all groups were robust even at the early stages of ALS progression. More importantly, higher HMGB1 autoAb level was found in more severe disease status with significant correlation. Our study demonstrates that serum HMGB1 autoAb may serve as a biomarker for the diagnosis of ALS and can be used to monitor disease progression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Changes in brain glioma incidence and laterality correlates with use of mobile phones--a nationwide population based study in Israel.

    PubMed

    Barchana, Micha; Margaliot, Menahem; Liphshitz, Irena

    2012-01-01

    Mobile phones are in extensive use worldwide and concerns regarding their role in tumor formation were raised. Over the years multiple studies were published in order to investigate this issue using several approaches. The current study looks at secular trends of brain gliomas (low and high grade) incidence and changes in tumor's laterality over 30 years in a population extensively using this technology with a possible correlation to the spread of use of mobile phones. All brain gliomas that were diagnosed from 1980-2009 were included and subdivided into two groups--low and high grade. Secular and periodic time trend analyses of incidence rates and changes in laterality were performed. Preferred side of head using mobile phones was assessed with a questionnaire in a sample of adult individuals. A decrease in incidence of low grade giomas (LGG) that correlated with introduction of mobile technology was found from 2.57, 2.34 and 2.79 for every 100,000 in the period 1980 to the end of 1994 to 1.72, 1.82 and 1.57, respectively, over the last three 5-years periods (1995-2009). High-grade glioma incidences increased significantly from 1980-2009 but in the period after mobile phones were introduced (1994-2009) a lower, non significant, rate of increase was observed in males and a lower one (significant) in females. A shift towards left sided tumor location for all adult gliomas combined and separately for LGG and HGG was noted from 1995 onward. The shift was more marked for those who were diagnosed in ages 20-49 (p=0.03). We found a statistically significant decrease in LGG's over 30-years period that correlates with introducing of mobile phones technology and a shift in laterality towards left-sided tumors, the latter occurred in both low and high-grade gliomas.

  2. [Isolated functional loss of the lateral semicircular canal in vestibular neuritis].

    PubMed

    Blödow, A; Helbig, R; Bloching, M; Walther, L E

    2013-01-01

    Today, modern tools in vestibular testing are feasible to provide information about functional status of all five peripheral vestibular receptors. Isolated or combined loss of crista and macula receptor function can be determined in the diagnostic process. We describe a seldom case of isolated functional loss of lateral semicircular canal receptor function in a 55-year-old patient. Whereas there was no ispilateral caloric response and video head impulse test revealed a catch-up saccade, air-conducted (AC) cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP, oVEMP), subjective visual vertical and MRI were normal.

  3. Influence of Resting-State Network on Lateralization of Functional Connectivity in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Su, L; An, J; Ma, Q; Qiu, S; Hu, D

    2015-08-01

    Although most studies on epilepsy have focused on the epileptogenic zone, epilepsy is a system-level disease characterized by aberrant neuronal synchronization among groups of neurons. Increasingly, studies have indicated that mesial temporal lobe epilepsy may be a network-level disease; however, few investigations have examined resting-state functional connectivity of the entire brain, particularly in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis. This study primarily investigated whole-brain resting-state functional connectivity abnormality in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and right hippocampal sclerosis during the interictal period. We investigated resting-state functional connectivity of 21 patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with right hippocampal sclerosis and 21 neurologically healthy controls. A multivariate pattern analysis was used to identify the functional connections that most clearly differentiated patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with right hippocampal sclerosis from controls. Discriminative analysis of functional connections indicated that the patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with right hippocampal sclerosis exhibited decreased resting-state functional connectivity within the right hemisphere and increased resting-state functional connectivity within the left hemisphere. Resting-state network analysis suggested that the internetwork connections typically obey the hemispheric lateralization trend and most of the functional connections that disturb the lateralization trend are the intranetwork ones. The current findings suggest that weakening of the resting-state functional connectivity associated with the right hemisphere appears to strengthen resting-state functional connectivity on the contralateral side, which may be related to the seizure-induced damage and underlying compensatory mechanisms. Resting-state network-based analysis indicated that the compensatory mechanism among

  4. Functional MR imaging versus Wada test for evaluation of language lateralization: cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Medina, L Santiago; Aguirre, Elsa; Bernal, Byron; Altman, Nolan R

    2004-01-01

    To compare the total direct costs (fixed and variable costs) of functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and of the Wada test for evaluation of language lateralization. The direct fixed and variable costs of functional MR imaging (performed in 21 patients with mean age +/- SD of 15.5 years +/- 8.9) and of the Wada test (performed in 18 patients aged 19.2 years +/- 5.4) were determined prospectively with time and motion analyses. The labor of all personnel involved in evaluations of language lateralization was tracked, and involvement times were recorded to the nearest minute. All material items used in the studies were recorded. Costs of labor and of materials were determined from personnel reimbursement data and from vendor pricing, respectively. Direct fixed costs were determined from hospital accounting department records. Means (+/- SDs) were calculated for all direct fixed and variable costs. Total direct costs were determined for each procedure and compared by using the Student t test. The total direct costs of the Wada test (US dollars 1130.01 +/- US dollars 138.40) and of functional MR imaging (US dollars 301.82 +/- US dollars 10.65) were significantly different (P <.001). The cost of the Wada test was 3.7 times higher than that of functional MR imaging. Substantial savings are achievable with the use of functional MR imaging instead of the Wada test to evaluate language lateralization. Copyright RSNA, 2004

  5. Early fathering as a predictor of later psychosocial functioning among preschool children with behavior problems.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Sharonne D; Harvey, Elizabeth A; Lugo-Candelas, Claudia I; Breaux, Rosanna P

    2013-07-01

    The present study examined the role of early fathering in subsequent trajectories of social emotional and academic functioning of preschool children with behavior problems. Participants were 128 preschool-aged children (73 boys, 55 girls) with behavior problems whose biological fathers took part in a longitudinal study. Children were 3 years of age at the beginning of the study and were assessed annually for 3 years. Early paternal depressive symptoms predicted many aspects of children's outcome 3 years later, including externalizing and internalizing problems, social skills deficits, and lower cognitive and academic functioning, and predicted changes in children's externalizing, internalizing, and social problems across the preschool years. Paternal socioeconomic status (SES) also consistently predicted children's later functioning across these domains. Furthermore, self-reported paternal attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and laxness, as well as observed frequent commands were associated with later externalizing problems in children. Paternal depressive symptoms and laxness mediated the relation between paternal ADHD symptoms and child functioning. Results suggest that aspects of early father functioning play an important role in the psychosocial, cognitive, and academic development of preschool-aged children with behavior problems.

  6. Assessment of lateral line function: a potential technique for studies in ototoxicity.

    PubMed

    Brack, C L; Ramcharitar, J

    2012-02-01

    In zebrafish neuromast hair cells, the process of programmed cell death ototoxic damage is strikingly similar to that of degenerating hair cells of the mammalian organ of Corti. Therefore, in vivo zebrafish assays involving the lateral line have been developed for drug ototoxicity screening. This is accomplished by examination of canal neuromast morphology in treated larvae using fluorescent dyes. To-date however, physiological confirmation of lateral line dysfunction resulting from such ototoxins has not been reported in the scientific literature--neither for larval nor adult zebrafish. Here we describe a rapid, non-invasive far-field electrophysiological method for assessing lateral line function. We suggest that ototoxic and otoprotective agents identified in larval studies may be assessed using this tool in adult fish. In this way, potential drug candidates can be further screened en route to testing in mammalian models, before potential clinical trials begin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cerebellar on-beam and lateral inhibition: two functionally distinct circuits.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D; Yarom, Y

    2000-04-01

    Optical imaging of voltage-sensitive dyes in an isolated cerebellum preparation was used to study the spatiotemporal functional organization of the inhibitory systems in the cerebellar cortex. Responses to surface stimulation of the cortex reveal two physiologically distinct inhibitory systems, which we refer to as lateral and on-beam inhibition following classical terminology. Lateral inhibition occurs throughout the area responding to a stimulus, whereas on-beam inhibition is confined to the area directly excited by parallel fibers. The time course of the lateral inhibition is twice as long as that of the on-beam inhibition. Both inhibitory responses increase with stimulus intensity, but the lateral inhibition has a lower threshold, and it saturates at lower stimulus intensity. The amplitude of the on-beam inhibition is linearly related to the excitation at the same location, whereas that of the lateral inhibition is linearly related to the excitation at the center of the beam. Repetitive stimulation is required to activate on-beam inhibition, whereas the same stimulus paradigm reveals prolonged depression of the lateral inhibition. We conclude that lateral inhibition reflects the activation of molecular layer interneurons, and its major role is to increase the excitability of the activated area by disinhibition. The on-beam inhibition most likely reflects Golgi cell inhibition of granule cells. However, Purkinje cell collateral inhibition of Golgi cells cannot be excluded. Both possibilities suggest that the role of the on-beam inhibition is to efficiently modulate, in time and space, the mossy fiber input to the cerebellar cortex.

  8. Lateral Chain Length in Polyalkyl Acrylates Determines the Mobility of Fibronectin at the Cell/Material Interface

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cells, by interacting with surfaces indirectly through a layer of extracellular matrix proteins, can respond to a variety of physical properties, such as topography or stiffness. Polymer surface mobility is another physical property that is less well understood but has been indicated to hold the potential to modulate cell behavior. Polymer mobility is related to the glass-transition temperature (Tg) of the system, the point at which a polymer transitions from an amorphous solid to a more liquid-like state. This work shows that changes in polymer mobility translate to interfacial mobility of extracellular matrix proteins adsorbed on the material surface. This study has utilized a family of polyalkyl acrylates with similar chemistry but different degrees of mobility, obtained through increasing length of the side chain. These materials are used, in conjunction with fluorescent fibronectin, to determine the mobility of this interfacial layer of protein that constitutes the initial cell–material interface. Furthermore, the extent of fibronectin domain availability (III9, III10, - the integrin binding site), cell-mediated reorganization, and cell differentiation was also determined. A nonmonotonic dependence of fibronectin mobility on polymer surface mobility was observed, with a similar trend noted in cell-mediated reorganization of the protein layer by L929 fibroblasts. The availability of the integrin-binding site was higher on the more mobile surfaces, where a similar organization of the protein into networks at the material interface was observed. Finally, differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts was seen to be highly sensitive to surface mobility upon inhibition of cell contractility. Altogether, these findings show that polymer mobility is a subtle influence that translates to the cell/material interface through the protein layer to alter the biological activity of the surface. PMID:26715432

  9. Functional contribution of a conserved, mobile loop histidine of phosphoribulokinase

    PubMed Central

    Runquist, Jennifer A.; Miziorko, Henry M.

    2006-01-01

    In the Rhodobacter sphaeroides phosphoribulokinase (PRK) structure, there are several disordered regions, including a loop containing invariant residues Y98 and H100. The functional importance of these residues has been unclear. PRK is inactivated by diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC) and protected by the substrates ATP and Ru5P, as well as by the competitive inhibitor, 6-phosphogluconate, suggesting active site histidine residue(s). PRK contains only three invariant histidines: H45, H100, and H134. Previous mutagenesis studies discount significant function for H134, but implicate H45 in Ru5P binding. PRK mutant H45N is inactivated by DEPC, implicating a second active site histidine. To evaluate the function of H100, as well as another invariant loop residue Y98, PRK mutants Y98L, H100A, H100N, and H100Q were characterized. Mutant PRK binding stoichiometries for the fluorescent alternative substrate, trinitrophenyl-ATP, as well as the allosteric activator, NADH, are comparable to wild-type PRK values, suggesting intact effector and substrate binding sites. The KmRu5P for the H100 mutants shows modest eight- to 14-fold inflation effects, whereas Y98L exhibits a 40-fold inflation for KmRu5P. However, Y98L's Ki for the competitive inhibitor 6-phosphogluconate is close to that of wild-type PRK. These observations suggest that Y98 and H100 are not essential Ru5P binding determinants. The Vm of Y98L is diminished 27-fold compared with wild-type PRK. In contrast, H100A, H100N, and H100Q exhibit significant decreases in Vm of 2600-, 2300-, and 735-fold, respectively. Results suggest that the mobile region containing Y98 and H100 must contribute to PRK's active site. Moreover, H100’s imidazole significantly influences catalytic efficiency. PMID:16522805

  10. Hand preference, extent of laterality, and functional hand use in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Umansky, Richard; Watson, John S; Colvin, Lyn; Fyfe, Susan; Leonard, Seonaid; de Klerk, Nicholas; Leonard, Helen

    2003-07-01

    Residual hand use in functional tasks, extent of laterality, and right or left preference were studied in 145 2- to 24-year-old, postregression Australian subjects with Rett syndrome via parent questionnaire. Hand use was markedly restricted, more for complex than simple and for external (touching food and objects) than internal tasks (scratching, rubbing eyes), suggesting a deficit in cerebral control of external, goal-oriented hand use, which is perhaps genetically determined because there is significantly greater restriction of external tasks in subjects with demonstrated MECP2 mutations. Overall, 33.6% of patients were reported with a left-hand preference, 40.7% with a right-hand preference, and 25.7% with an equal hand preference. Extent of laterality was greater for external than internal and for complex than simple external tasks. Older subjects showed less functional hand use and possibly more overall laterality. However, their hand preference was similar to younger subjects. The anomalous pattern of hand preference in Rett syndrome may be linked to the primary apraxic deficit in this disorder rather than to late manifestation of laterality.

  11. Trait Approach and Avoidance Motivation: Lateralized Neural Activity Associated with Executive Function

    PubMed Central

    Spielberg, Jeffrey M.; Miller, Gregory A.; Engels, Anna S.; Herrington, John D.; Sutton, Bradley P.; Banich, Marie T.; Heller, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Motivation and executive function are both necessary for the completion of goal-directed behavior. Research investigating the manner in which these processes interact is beginning to emerge and has implicated middle frontal gyrus (MFG) as a site of interaction for relevant neural mechanisms. However, this research has focused on state motivation, and it has not examined functional lateralization. The present study examined the impact of trait levels of approach and avoidance motivation on neural processes associated with executive function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted while participants performed a color-word Stroop task. Analyses identified brain regions in which trait approach and avoidance motivation (measured by questionnaires) moderated activation associated with executive control. Approach was hypothesized to be associated with left-lateralized MFG activation, whereas avoidance was hypothesized to be associated with right-lateralized MFG activation. Results supported both hypotheses. Present findings implicate areas of middle frontal gyrus in top-down control to guide behavior in accordance with motivational goals. PMID:20728552

  12. Trait approach and avoidance motivation: lateralized neural activity associated with executive function.

    PubMed

    Spielberg, Jeffrey M; Miller, Gregory A; Engels, Anna S; Herrington, John D; Sutton, Bradley P; Banich, Marie T; Heller, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    Motivation and executive function are both necessary for the completion of goal-directed behavior. Research investigating the manner in which these processes interact is beginning to emerge and has implicated middle frontal gyrus (MFG) as a site of interaction for relevant neural mechanisms. However, this research has focused on state motivation, and it has not examined functional lateralization. The present study examined the impact of trait levels of approach and avoidance motivation on neural processes associated with executive function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted while participants performed a color-word Stroop task. Analyses identified brain regions in which trait approach and avoidance motivation (measured by questionnaires) moderated activation associated with executive control. Approach was hypothesized to be associated with left-lateralized MFG activation, whereas avoidance was hypothesized to be associated with right-lateralized MFG activation. Results supported both hypotheses. Present findings implicate areas of middle frontal gyrus in top-down control to guide behavior in accordance with motivational goals.

  13. Left hemispheric dominance of vestibular processing indicates lateralization of cortical functions in rats.

    PubMed

    Best, Christoph; Lange, Elena; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Reuss, Stefan; Dieterich, Marianne

    2014-11-01

    Lateralization of cortical functions such as speech dominance, handedness and processing of vestibular information are present not only in humans but also in ontogenetic older species, e.g. rats. In human functional imaging studies, the processing of vestibular information was found to be correlated with the hemispherical dominance as determined by the handedness. It is located mainly within the right hemisphere in right handers and within the left hemisphere in left handers. Since dominance of vestibular processing is unknown in animals, our aim was to study the lateralization of cortical processing in a functional imaging study applying small-animal positron emission tomography (microPET) and galvanic vestibular stimulation in an in vivo rat model. The cortical and subcortical network processing vestibular information could be demonstrated and correlated with data from other animal studies. By calculating a lateralization index as well as flipped region of interest analyses, we found that the vestibular processing in rats follows a strong left hemispheric dominance independent from the "handedness" of the animals. These findings support the idea of an early hemispheric specialization of vestibular cortical functions in ontogenetic older species.

  14. Reduced laterality as a trait marker of schizophrenia--evidence from structural and functional neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Oertel, Viola; Knöchel, Christian; Rotarska-Jagiela, Anna; Schönmeyer, Ralf; Lindner, Michael; van de Ven, Vincent; Haenschel, Corinna; Uhlhaas, Peter; Maurer, Konrad; Linden, David E J

    2010-02-10

    Laterality is a characteristic principle of the organization of the brain systems for language, and reduced hemispheric asymmetry has been considered a risk factor for schizophrenia. Here we sought support for the risk factor hypothesis by investigating whether reduced asymmetry of temporal lobe structure and function is also present in unaffected relatives. Sixteen schizophrenia patients, 16 age-matched first-degree relatives, and 15 healthy controls underwent high-resolution three-dimensional anatomical imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging during auditory stimulation. Both the overall auditory cortex and planum temporale volumes and the lateralization to the left hemisphere were markedly reduced in patients. The decrease of lateralization correlated with increased severity of symptoms. In addition, both the overall functional activation in response to auditory stimulation and its asymmetry were reduced in the patients. Relatives had intermediate values between patients and controls on both structural and functional measures. This study provides added support for the idea that reduced hemispheric asymmetry is a biological risk factor for schizophrenia.

  15. Resting-State Functional MR Imaging for Determining Language Laterality in Intractable Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    DeSalvo, Matthew N; Tanaka, Naoaki; Douw, Linda; Leveroni, Catherine L; Buchbinder, Bradley R; Greve, Douglas N; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2016-10-01

    Purpose To measure the accuracy of resting-state functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in determining hemispheric language dominance in patients with medically intractable focal epilepsies against the results of an intracarotid amobarbital procedure (IAP). Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board, and all subjects gave signed informed consent. Data in 23 patients with medically intractable focal epilepsy were retrospectively analyzed. All 23 patients were candidates for epilepsy surgery and underwent both IAP and resting-state functional MR imaging as part of presurgical evaluation. Language dominance was determined from functional MR imaging data by calculating a laterality index (LI) after using independent component analysis. The accuracy of this method was assessed against that of IAP by using a variety of thresholds. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated by using leave-one-out cross validation. Spatial maps of language components were qualitatively compared among each hemispheric language dominance group. Results Measurement of hemispheric language dominance with resting-state functional MR imaging was highly concordant with IAP results, with up to 96% (22 of 23) accuracy, 96% (22 of 23) sensitivity, and 96% (22 of 23) specificity. Composite language component maps in patients with typical language laterality consistently included classic language areas such as the inferior frontal gyrus, the posterior superior temporal gyrus, and the inferior parietal lobule, while those of patients with atypical language laterality also included non-classical language areas such as the superior and middle frontal gyri, the insula, and the occipital cortex. Conclusion Resting-state functional MR imaging can be used to measure language laterality in patients with medically intractable focal epilepsy. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  16. Assessment of cerebral lateralization in children using functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound (fTCD).

    PubMed

    Bishop, Dorothy V M; Badcock, Nicholas A; Holt, Georgina

    2010-09-27

    There are many unanswered questions about cerebral lateralization. In particular, it remains unclear which aspects of language and nonverbal ability are lateralized, whether there are any disadvantages associated with atypical patterns of cerebral lateralization, and whether cerebral lateralization develops with age. In the past, researchers interested in these questions tended to use handedness as a proxy measure for cerebral lateralization, but this is unsatisfactory because handedness is only a weak and indirect indicator of laterality of cognitive functions. Other methods, such as fMRI, are expensive for large-scale studies, and not always feasible with children. Here we will describe the use of functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound (fTCD) as a cost-effective, non-invasive and reliable method for assessing cerebral lateralization. The procedure involves measuring blood flow in the middle cerebral artery via an ultrasound probe placed just in front of the ear. Our work builds on work by Rune Aaslid, who co-introduced TCD in 1982, and Stefan Knecht, Michael Deppe and their colleagues at the University of Münster, who pioneered the use of simultaneous measurements of left- and right middle cerebral artery blood flow, and devised a method of correcting for heart beat activity. This made it possible to see a clear increase in left-sided blood flow during language generation, with lateralization agreeing well with that obtained using other methods. The middle cerebral artery has a very wide vascular territory (see Figure 1) and the method does not provide useful information about localization within a hemisphere. Our experience suggests it is particularly sensitive to tasks that involve explicit or implicit speech production. The 'gold standard' task is a word generation task (e.g. think of as many words as you can that begin with the letter 'B'), but this is not suitable for young children and others with limited literacy skills. Compared with other brain

  17. Measurements of water uptake of maize roots: the key function of lateral roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. A.; Zarebanadkouki, M.; Kroener, E.; Kaestner, A.; Carminati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is one of the most important crop worldwide. Despite its importance, there is limited information on the function of different root segments and root types of maize in extracting water from soils. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate locations of root water uptake in maize. We used neutron radiography to: 1) image the spatial distribution of maize roots in soil and 2) trace the transport of injected deuterated water (D2O) in soil and roots. Maizes were grown in aluminum containers (40×38×1 cm) filled with a sandy soil. When the plants were 16 days old, we injected D2O into selected soil regions containing primary, seminal and lateral roots. The experiments were performed during the day (transpiring plants) and night (not transpiring plants). The transport of D2O into roots was simulated using a new convection-diffusion numerical model of D2O transport into roots. By fitting the observed D2O transport we quantified the diffusional permeability and the water uptake of the different root segments. The maize root architecture consisted of a primary root, 4-5 seminal roots and many lateral roots connected to the primary and seminal roots. Laterals emerged from the proximal 15 cm of the primary and seminal roots. Water uptake occurred primarily in lateral roots. Lateral roots had the highest diffusional permeability (9.4×10-7), which was around six times higher that the diffusional permeability of the old seminal segments (1.4×10-7), and two times higher than the diffusional permeability of the young seminal segments (4.7×10-7). The radial flow of D2O into the lateral (6.7×10-5 ) was much higher than in the young seminal roots (1.1×10-12). The radial flow of D2O into the old seminal was negligible. We concluded that the function of the primary and seminal roots was to collect water from the lateral roots and transport it to the shoot. A maize root system with lateral roots branching from deep primary and seminal roots would be

  18. The absence of chlorophyll b affects lateral mobility of photosynthetic complexes and lipids in grana membranes of Arabidopsis and barley chlorina mutants.

    PubMed

    Tyutereva, Elena V; Evkaikina, Anastasiia I; Ivanova, Alexandra N; Voitsekhovskaja, Olga V

    2017-04-05

    The lateral mobility of integral components of thylakoid membranes, such as plastoquinone, xanthophylls, and pigment-protein complexes, is critical for the maintenance of efficient light harvesting, high rates of linear electron transport, and successful repair of damaged photosystem II (PSII). The packaging of the photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes in the membrane depends on their size and stereometric parameters which in turn depend on the composition of the complexes. Chlorophyll b (Chlb) is an important regulator of antenna size and composition. In this study, the lateral mobility (the mobile fraction size) of pigment-protein complexes and lipids in grana membranes was analyzed in chlorina mutants of Arabidopsis and barley lacking Chlb. In the Arabidopsis ch1-3 mutant, diffusion of membrane lipids decreased as compared to wild-type plants, but the diffusion of photosynthetic complexes was not affected. In the barley chlorina f2 3613 mutant, the diffusion of pigment-protein complexes significantly decreased, while the diffusion of lipids increased, as compared to wild-type plants. We propose that the size of the mobile fractions of pigment-protein complexes in grana membranes in vivo is higher than reported previously. The data are discussed in the context of the protein composition of antennae, characteristics of the plastoquinone pool, and production of reactive oxygen species in leaves of chlorina mutants.

  19. Factors affecting longitudinal functional decline and survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hazuki; Atsuta, Naoki; Nakamura, Ryoichi; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Ito, Mizuki; Senda, Jo; Katsuno, Masahisa; Izumi, Yuishin; Morita, Mitsuya; Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Taniguchi, Akira; Aiba, Ikuko; Abe, Koji; Mizoguchi, Kouichi; Oda, Masaya; Kano, Osamu; Okamoto, Koichi; Kuwabara, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Imai, Takashi; Aoki, Masashi; Tsuji, Shoji; Nakano, Imaharu; Kaji, Ryuji; Sobue, Gen

    2015-06-01

    Our objective was to elucidate the clinical factors affecting functional decline and survival in Japanese amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. We constructed a multicenter prospective ALS cohort that included 451 sporadic ALS patients in the analysis. We longitudinally utilized the revised Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R) as the functional scale, and determined the timing of introduction of a tracheostomy for positive-pressure ventilation and death. A joint modelling approach was employed to identify prognostic factors for functional decline and survival. Age at onset was a common prognostic factor for both functional decline and survival (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, respectively). Female gender (p = 0.019) and initial symptoms, including upper limb weakness (p = 0.010), lower limb weakness (p = 0.008) or bulbar symptoms (p = 0.005), were related to early functional decline, whereas neck weakness as an initial symptom (p = 0.018), non-use of riluzole (p = 0.030) and proximal dominant muscle weakness in the upper extremities (p = 0.01) were related to a shorter survival time. A decline in the ALSFRS-R score was correlated with a shortened survival time (p < 0.001). In conclusion, the factors affecting functional decline and survival in ALS were common in part but different to some extent. This difference has not been previously well recognized but is informative in clinical practice and for conducting trials.

  20. Functional mechanotransduction is required for cisplatin-induced hair cell death in the zebrafish lateral line.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andrew J; Hailey, Dale W; Stawicki, Tamara M; Wu, Patricia; Coffin, Allison B; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W; Simon, Julian A; Ou, Henry C

    2013-03-06

    Cisplatin, one of the most commonly used anticancer drugs, is known to cause inner ear hair cell damage and hearing loss. Despite much investigation into mechanisms of cisplatin-induced hair cell death, little is known about the mechanism whereby cisplatin is selectively toxic to hair cells. Using hair cells of the zebrafish lateral line, we found that chemical inhibition of mechanotransduction with quinine and EGTA protected against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Furthermore, we found that the zebrafish mutants mariner (myo7aa) and sputnik (cad23) that lack functional mechanotransduction were resistant to cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Using a fluorescent analog of cisplatin, we found that chemical or genetic inhibition of mechanotransduction prevented its uptake. These findings demonstrate that cisplatin-induced hair cell death is dependent on functional mechanotransduction in the zebrafish lateral line.

  1. Functional organization and visual representations of human ventral lateral prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Annie W.-Y.

    2013-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies in both human and non-human primates have identified face selective activation in the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) even in the absence of working memory (WM) demands. Further, research has suggested that this face-selective response is largely driven by the presence of the eyes. However, the nature and origin of visual category responses in the VLPFC remain unclear. In a broader sense, how do these findings relate to our current understandings of lateral prefrontal cortex? What do these findings tell us about the underlying function and organization principles of the VLPFC? What is the future direction for investigating visual representations in this cortex? This review focuses on the function, topography, and circuitry of the VLPFC to enhance our understanding of the evolution and development of this cortex. PMID:23847558

  2. Functional mechanotransduction is required for cisplatin-induced hair cell death in the zebrafish lateral line

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Andrew J.; Hailey, Dale W.; Stawicki, Tamara M.; Wu, Patricia; Coffin, Allison B.; Rubel, Edwin W.; Raible, David W.; Simon, Julian A.; Ou, Henry C.

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin, one of the most commonly used anti-cancer drugs, is known to cause inner ear hair cell damage and hearing loss. Despite much investigation into mechanisms of cisplatin-induced hair cell death, little is known about the mechanism whereby cisplatin is selectively toxic to hair cells. Using hair cells of the zebrafish lateral line, we found that chemical inhibition of mechanotransduction with quinine and EGTA protected against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Furthermore, we found that the zebrafish mutants mariner (myo7aa) and sputnik (cad23) that lack functional mechanotransduction were resistant to cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Using a fluorescent analogue of cisplatin, we found that chemical or genetic inhibition of mechanotransduction prevented its uptake. These findings demonstrate that cisplatin-induced hair cell death is dependent on functional mechanotransduction in the zebrafish lateral line. PMID:23467357

  3. Positive symptoms and duration of illness predict functional laterality and attention modulation in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Løberg, E-M; Jørgensen, H A; Green, M F; Rund, B R; Lund, A; Diseth, A; Oie, M; Hugdahl, K

    2006-04-01

    Dichotic listening (DL) performance in schizophrenia, reflecting hemispheric asymmetry and the functional integrity of the left temporal lobe, can vary with clinical characteristics. Previous studies have not taken the co-linearity of clinical variables into account. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the roles of positive symptoms and duration of illness in DL through Structural Equation Modeling (SEM), thus allowing for complex relationships between the variables. We pooled patients from four previous DL studies to create a heterogeneous group of 129 schizophrenic patients, all tested with a consonant-vowel syllables DL procedure that included attentional instructions. A model where positive symptoms predicted a laterality component and duration of illness predicted an attention component in DL was confirmed. Positive symptoms predicted reduced functional laterality, suggesting involvement of left temporal lobe language processing. Duration of illness predicted impaired attention modulation, possibly reflecting the involvement of frontotemporal networks.

  4. Lateralized auditory brain function in children with normal reading ability and in children with dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Blake W; McArthur, Genevieve; Hautus, Michael; Reid, Melanie; Brock, Jon; Castles, Anne; Crain, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    We examined central auditory processing in typically- and atypically-developing readers. Concurrent EEG and MEG brain measurements were obtained from a group of 16 children with dyslexia aged 8-12 years, and a group of 16 age-matched children with normal reading ability. Auditory responses were elicited using 500ms duration broadband noise. These responses were strongly lateralized in control children. Children with dyslexia showed significantly less lateralisation of auditory cortical functioning, and a different pattern of development of auditory lateralization with age. These results provide further evidence that the core neurophysiological deficit of dyslexia is a problem in the balance of auditory function between the two hemispheres. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ototoxin-induced cellular damage in neuromasts disrupts lateral line function in larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Buck, Lauren M J; Winter, Matthew J; Redfern, William S; Whitfield, Tanya T

    2012-02-01

    The ototoxicity of a number of marketed drugs is well documented, and there is an absence of convenient techniques to identify and eliminate this unwanted effect at a pre-clinical stage. We have assessed the validity of the larval zebrafish, or more specifically its lateral line neuromast hair cells, as a microplate-scale in vivo surrogate model of mammalian inner ear hair cell responses to ototoxin exposure. Here we describe an investigation of the pathological and functional consequences of hair cell loss in lateral line neuromasts of larval zebrafish after exposure to a range of well known human and non-human mammalian ototoxins. Using a previously described histological assay, we show that hair cell damage occurs in a concentration-dependent fashion following exposure to representatives from a range of drug classes, including the aminoglycoside antibiotics, salicylates and platinum-based chemotherapeutics, as well as a heavy metal. Furthermore, we detail the optimisation of a semi-automated method to analyse the stereotypical startle response in larval zebrafish, and use this to assess the impact of hair cell damage on hearing function in these animals. Functional assessment revealed robust and significant attenuation of the innate startle, rheotactic and avoidance responses of 5 day old zebrafish larvae after treatment with a number of compounds previously shown to induce hair cell damage and loss. Interestingly, a startle reflex (albeit reduced) was still present even after the apparent complete loss of lateral line hair cell fluorescence, suggesting some involvement of the inner ear as well as the lateral line neuromast hair cells in this reflex response. Collectively, these data provide evidence to support the use of the zebrafish as a pre-clinical indicator of drug-induced histological and functional ototoxicity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of thoracic and cervical joint mobilization on pulmonary function in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sang-Hun; Bang, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to conduct thoracic and cervical mobilization in stroke patients and determine its effects on respiratory function. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one stroke patients were studied. Subjects were divided into a control group (control group, n=11) who did not undergo thoracic and cervical joint mobilization, and an experimental group (thoracic and cervical mobilization group, n=10) who underwent thoracic and cervical joint mobilization. Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in the first second, well-known indicators of respiratory capabilities, were measured. Peak cough flow was measured as an indicator of cough capability. [Results] After the exercise, respiratory function in the thoracic and cervical mobilization group showed statistically significant improvements demonstrated by increases in forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in the first second, and peak cough flow. [Conclusion] The findings indicate that thoracic and cervical mobilization can improve the thoracic movements of stroke patients resulting in improved pulmonary function.

  7. Effect of thoracic and cervical joint mobilization on pulmonary function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sang-Hun; Bang, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to conduct thoracic and cervical mobilization in stroke patients and determine its effects on respiratory function. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one stroke patients were studied. Subjects were divided into a control group (control group, n=11) who did not undergo thoracic and cervical joint mobilization, and an experimental group (thoracic and cervical mobilization group, n=10) who underwent thoracic and cervical joint mobilization. Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in the first second, well-known indicators of respiratory capabilities, were measured. Peak cough flow was measured as an indicator of cough capability. [Results] After the exercise, respiratory function in the thoracic and cervical mobilization group showed statistically significant improvements demonstrated by increases in forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in the first second, and peak cough flow. [Conclusion] The findings indicate that thoracic and cervical mobilization can improve the thoracic movements of stroke patients resulting in improved pulmonary function. PMID:26957769

  8. Optimizing mobility in later life: the role of the urban built environment for older adults aging in place.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Philippa; Gallagher, Nancy Ambrose

    2013-12-01

    Hazards in the urban built environment can create barriers to mobility among older adults aging in place. We investigated the relationship between urban built environment characteristics and 15-month trajectories of mobility disability in a sample of 1,188 older adults living in Detroit, MI, a city that has undergone rapid economic and structural decline. Data come from the Michigan Minimum Data Set for Home Care (2001-2008), an enumerative database of older adults in Michigan who qualify for federal or state-funded home and community-based long-term care through a Medicaid waiver program. Standardized assessments are made at intake and every 90 days by case managers. Built environments were assessed with a virtual audit using the "Street View" feature of Google Earth. A summary accessibility score was created for each block based on a count of the number of accessible features (e.g., continuous barrier-free sidewalks and proximity of public transportation). Using growth mixture models, two latent trajectories of outdoor mobility were identified: one capturing occasional outdoor mobility (representing 83 % of the sample) and one capturing almost no mobility outside the home. Controlling for sociodemographic and health risk factors, individuals living in more accessible environments had a 18 % higher odds of being in the more mobile group (OR = 1.18, 95 % CI = 1.01, 1.41). These findings emphasize the importance of the built environment for mobility among urban-dwelling older adults.

  9. Lateral interactions and speed of information processing in highly functioning multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Helga; Bencsik, Krisztina; Rajda, Cecília; Benedek, Krisztina; Janáky, Márta; Beniczky, Sándor; Kéri, Szabolcs; Vécsei, László

    2007-06-01

    Visual impairment is a common feature of multiple sclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate lateral interactions in the visual cortex of highly functioning patients with multiple sclerosis and to compare that with basic visual and neuropsychologic functions. Twenty-two young, visually unimpaired multiple sclerosis patients with minimal symptoms (Expanded Disability Status Scale <2) and 30 healthy controls subjects participated in the study. Lateral interactions were investigated with the flanker task, during which participants were asked to detect the orientation of a low-contrast Gabor patch (vertical or horizontal), flanked with 2 collinear or orthogonal Gabor patches. Stimulus exposure time was 40, 60, 80, and 100 ms. Digit span forward/backward, digit symbol, verbal fluency, and California Verbal Learning Test procedures were used for background neuropsychologic assessment. Results revealed that patients with multiple sclerosis showed intact visual contrast sensitivity and neuropsychologic functions, whereas orientation detection in the orthogonal condition was significantly impaired. At 40-ms exposure time, collinear flankers facilitated the orientation detection performance of the patients resulting in normal performance. In conclusion, the detection of briefly presented, low-contrast visual stimuli was selectively impaired in multiple sclerosis. Lateral interactions between target and flankers robustly facilitated target detection in the patient group.

  10. Brain activation to negative stimuli mediates a relationship between adolescent marijuana use and later emotional functioning

    PubMed Central

    Heitzeg, Mary M.; Cope, Lora M.; Martz, Meghan E.; Hardee, Jillian E.; Zucker, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    This work investigated the impact of heavy marijuana use during adolescence on emotional functioning, as well as the brain functional mediators of this effect. Participants (n=40) were recruited from the Michigan Longitudinal Study (MLS). Data on marijuana use were collected prospectively beginning in childhood as part of the MLS. Participants were classified as heavy marijuana users (n=20) or controls with minimal marijuana use. Two facets of emotional functioning—negative emotionality and resiliency (a self-regulatory mechanism)—were assessed as part of the MLS at three time points: mean age 13.4; mean age 19.6; and mean age 23.1. Functional neuroimaging data during an emotion-arousal word task were collected at mean age 20.2.Negative emotionality decreased and resiliency increased across the three time points in controls but not heavy marijuana users. Compared with controls, heavy marijuana users had less activation to negative words in temporal, prefrontal, and occipital cortices, insula, and amygdala. Activation of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to negative words mediated an association between marijuana group and later negative emotionality. Activation of the cuneus/lingual gyrus mediated an association between marijuana group and later resiliency. Results support growing evidence that heavy marijuana use during adolescence affects later emotional outcomes. PMID:26403581

  11. Functional mobility and executive function in elderly diabetics and non-diabetics.

    PubMed

    Alvarenga, Patrícia P; Pereira, Daniele S; Anjos, Daniela M C

    2010-01-01

    Elderly diabetics tend to show cognitive deficits related to more complex processes such as the executive function, which can lead to a greater risk of falls. The aims of this study were to compare the functional mobility, the risk of falls and the executive function among elderly with and without type 2 diabetes, and to check the correlation between these variables. Forty community elderly participated in the study and were divided into two groups: G1 elderly with type 2 diabetes and G2 elderly without diabetes, being the variables age, body mass index and gender similar between the groups. The functional mobility and the risk of falls were assessed by the "Timed Up and Go" test (TUG and cognitive TUG) and the executive function was assessed by the Verbal Fluency Test (VFT) (animal category). Elderly with diabetes showed worse performance in the verbal fluency test (G1:14.9 ± 4.5; G2:17.7 ± 5.6; p = 0.031). A statistically between-group difference was observed regarding the functional mobility; being the G1 presenting worse performance in TUG (G1:10.5 ± 1.8 sec; G2:8.9 ± 1.9 sec; p = 0.01) and cognitive TUG (G1:13.9 ± 3.2 sec; G2:10.9 ± 2.3 sec; p = 0.004) tests. A significant correlation was observed between the cognitive TUG and VFT only in G1 (G1: Spearman's rho = -0.535; p = 0.015; G2: Spearman's rho =-0.250; p = 0.288). Diabetics presented worse performance in the functional mobility and in the verbal fluency test than non-diabetics elderly that suggests a greater risk of falls for the elderly with diabetes. The inclusion of these evaluation parameters for diabetics on the physical therapy clinical practice is crucial in order to maintain the functionality and to prevent falls.

  12. Variations in subject pool as a function of earlier or later participation.

    PubMed

    Bernard, L

    2000-04-01

    Data were obtained from 113 participants in a university subject pool during a 16-wk. semester. Without knowing the purpose of the study, participants self-selected to participate earlier (Weeks 3 and 4: n = 63) or later (Weeks 15 or 16) n = 50). Variations in scores on the NEO Personality Inventory--Revised, the Crowne-Marlowe Social Desirability Scale, the General Expectancy of Success Scale, the Shipley Institute of Living Scale, self-reported SATs and GPAs, and a measure of academic self-efficacy as a function of earlier or later participation were examined. Multivariate analysis of variance indicated that early participants differed significantly from later participants but not in predicted ways. Earlier participants scored higher on NEO PI-R Neuroticism; specifically men (n = 15) and women (n = 48) scored higher on Hostility, and women scored higher on Depression and Self-consciousness. An additional significant difference occurred for self-reported SAT Verbal scores for men, which were significantly higher for later participants. These temporal variations may represent confounds in research using university subject pools.

  13. Response properties of crayfish antennules to hydrodynamic stimuli: functional differences in the lateral and medial flagella.

    PubMed

    Monteclaro, Harold M; Anraku, Kazuhiko; Matsuoka, Tatsuro

    2010-11-01

    Antennules have been reported to influence localization of distant food odors, sex discrimination, and agonistic and social behaviors of decapod crustaceans. Although olfaction by the antennules is largely recognized, information on the sensitivity of antennules to hydrodynamic stimuli has been scant. In red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii antennules, mechanosensory setae outnumber the chemosensory setae. We studied the mechanosensitivity of crayfish antennules by recording neural activities from isolated antennules in response to sinusoidal dipole stimuli. Both the lateral and the medial flagellum of the antennules responded to hydrodynamic stimuli, although the medial flagellum showed more sensitivity at frequencies higher than 60 Hz. The most dominant setae present on the stimulated site were the simple setal type. Although both lateral and medial flagella are capable of detecting chemical and hydrodynamic cues, results from neural responses, morphological observations and antennular behavior observations indicate that the lateral flagellum of P. clarkii functions as an olfactory organ whereas the medial flagellum complements as a hydrodynamic receptor. It appears that in crayfish antennular sensory processing, crayfish simultaneously use chemical and hydrodynamic information. We have compared our data with the threshold of fish lateral line to the same stimuli and we discuss probable similarities in response properties.

  14. Functional consequences of structural differences in stingray sensory systems. Part I: mechanosensory lateral line canals.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Laura K; Kajiura, Stephen M; Gordon, Malcolm S

    2009-10-01

    Short range hydrodynamic and electrosensory signals are important during final stages of prey capture in elasmobranchs (sharks, skates and rays), and may be particularly useful for dorso-ventrally flattened batoids with mouths hidden from their eyes. In stingrays, both the lateral line canal and electrosensory systems are highly modified and complex with significant differences on ventral surfaces that relate to feeding ecology. This study tests functional hypotheses based on quantified differences in sensory system morphology of three stingray species, Urobatis halleri, Myliobatis californica and Pteroplatytrygon violacea. Part I investigates the mechanosensory lateral line canal system whereas part II focuses on the electrosensory system. Stingray lateral line canals include both pored and non-pored sections and differ in branching complexity and distribution. A greater proportion of pored canals and high pore numbers were predicted to correspond to increased response to water flow. Behavioral experiments were performed to compare responses of stingrays to weak water jets mimicking signals produced by potential prey at velocities of 10-20 cm s(-1). Bat rays, M. californica, have the most complex and broadly distributed pored canal network and demonstrated both the highest response rate and greater response intensity to water jet signals. Results suggest that U. halleri and P. violacea may rely on additional sensory input, including tactile and visual cues, respectively, to initiate stronger feeding responses. These results suggest that stingray lateral line canal morphology can indicate detection capabilities through responsiveness to weak water jets.

  15. Integral functions of electron lateral distribution and their fluctuations in electron-photon cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanenko, I. P.; Kanevsky, B. L.; Kirillov, A. A.; Linde, I. A.; Lyutov, Y. G.

    1985-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulated lateral distribution functions for electrons of EPC developing in lead, at superhigh energies (.1-1 PeV) for depths t or = 60 c.u. delta t=1t. c.u. are presented. The higher moment characteristics, i.e., variation, asymmetry, excess, are presented along with analytical solutions for the same characteristics at fixed observation level calculated to theory approximations A and B by using numerical inversion of the Laplace transformation. The conclusion is made of a complex, usually non-Gaussian shape of the function of the particle number distribution within a circle of given radius at fixed depth.

  16. Comparison of Posthospitalization Function and Community Mobility in Hospital Mobility Program and Usual Care Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cynthia J; Foley, Kathleen T; Lowman, John D; MacLennan, Paul A; Razjouyan, Javad; Najafi, Bijan; Locher, Julie; Allman, Richard M

    2016-07-01

    Low mobility is common during hospitalization and associated with loss or declines in ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL) and limitations in community mobility. To examine the effect of an in-hospital mobility program (MP) on posthospitalization function and community mobility. This single-blind randomized clinical trial used masked assessors to compare a MP with usual care (UC). Patients admitted to the medical wards of the Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center from January 12, 2010, through June 29, 2011, were followed up throughout hospitalization with 1-month posthospitalization telephone follow-up. One hundred hospitalized patients 65 years or older were randomly assigned to the MP or UC groups. Patients were cognitively intact and able to walk 2 weeks before hospitalization. Data analysis was performed from November 21, 2012, to March 14, 2016. Patients in the MP group were assisted with ambulation up to twice daily, and a behavioral strategy was used to encourage mobility. Patients in the UC group received twice-daily visits. Changes in self-reported ADL and community mobility were assessed using the Katz ADL scale and the University of Alabama at Birmingham Study of Aging Life-Space Assessment (LSA), respectively. The LSA measures community mobility based on the distance through which a person reports moving during the preceding 4 weeks. Of 100 patients, 8 did not complete the study (6 in the MP group and 2 in the UC group). Patients (mean age, 73.9 years; 97 male [97.0%]; and 19 black [19.0%]) had a median length of stay of 3 days. No significant differences were found between groups at baseline. For all periods, groups were similar in ability to perform ADL; however, at 1-month after hospitalization, the LSA score was significantly higher in the MP (LSA score, 52.5) compared with the UC group (LSA score, 41.6) (P = .02). For the MP group, the 1-month posthospitalization LSA score was similar to the LSA score measured at admission

  17. Intrinsic functional architecture of the macaque dorsal and ventral lateral frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Goulas, Alexandros; Stiers, Peter; Hutchison, R Matthew; Everling, Stefan; Petrides, Michael; Margulies, Daniel S

    2017-03-01

    Investigations of the cellular and connectional organization of the lateral frontal cortex (LFC) of the macaque monkey provide indispensable knowledge for generating hypotheses about the human LFC. However, despite numerous investigations, there are still debates on the organization of this brain region. In vivo neuroimaging techniques such as resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be used to define the functional circuitry of brain areas, producing results largely consistent with gold-standard invasive tract-tracing techniques and offering the opportunity for cross-species comparisons within the same modality. Our results using resting-state fMRI from macaque monkeys to uncover the intrinsic functional architecture of the LFC corroborate previous findings and inform current debates. Specifically, within the dorsal LFC, we show that 1) the region along the midline and anterior to the superior arcuate sulcus is divided in two areas separated by the posterior supraprincipal dimple, 2) the cytoarchitectonically defined area 6DC/F2 contains two connectional divisions, and 3) a distinct area occupies the cortex around the spur of the arcuate sulcus, updating what was previously proposed to be the border between dorsal and ventral motor/premotor areas. Within the ventral LFC, the derived parcellation clearly suggests the presence of distinct areas: 1) an area with a somatomotor/orofacial connectional signature (putative area 44), 2) an area with an oculomotor connectional signature (putative frontal eye fields), and 3) premotor areas possibly hosting laryngeal and arm representations. Our results illustrate in detail the intrinsic functional architecture of the macaque LFC, thus providing valuable evidence for debates on its organization.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Resting-state functional MRI is used as a complementary method to invasive techniques to inform current debates on the organization of the macaque lateral frontal cortex. Given that the macaque

  18. Executive Function Buffers the Association between Early Math and Later Academic Skills

    PubMed Central

    Ribner, Andrew D.; Willoughby, Michael T.; Blair, Clancy B.

    2017-01-01

    Extensive evidence has suggested that early academic skills are a robust indicator of later academic achievement; however, there is mixed evidence of the effectiveness of intervention on academic skills in early years to improve later outcomes. As such, it is clear there are other contributing factors to the development of academic skills. The present study tests the role of executive function (EF) (a construct made up of skills complicit in the achievement of goal-directed tasks) in predicting 5th grade math and reading ability above and beyond math and reading ability prior to school entry, and net of other cognitive covariates including processing speed, vocabulary, and IQ. Using a longitudinal dataset of N = 1292 participants representative of rural areas in two distinctive geographical parts of the United States, the present investigation finds EF at age 5 strongly predicts 5th grade academic skills, as do cognitive covariates. Additionally, investigation of an interaction between early math ability and EF reveals the magnitude of the association between early math and later math varies as a function of early EF, such that participants who have high levels of EF can “catch up” to peers who perform better on assessments of early math ability. These results suggest EF is pivotal to the development of academic skills throughout elementary school. Implications for further research and practice are discussed. PMID:28611712

  19. Executive Function Buffers the Association between Early Math and Later Academic Skills.

    PubMed

    Ribner, Andrew D; Willoughby, Michael T; Blair, Clancy B

    2017-01-01

    Extensive evidence has suggested that early academic skills are a robust indicator of later academic achievement; however, there is mixed evidence of the effectiveness of intervention on academic skills in early years to improve later outcomes. As such, it is clear there are other contributing factors to the development of academic skills. The present study tests the role of executive function (EF) (a construct made up of skills complicit in the achievement of goal-directed tasks) in predicting 5th grade math and reading ability above and beyond math and reading ability prior to school entry, and net of other cognitive covariates including processing speed, vocabulary, and IQ. Using a longitudinal dataset of N = 1292 participants representative of rural areas in two distinctive geographical parts of the United States, the present investigation finds EF at age 5 strongly predicts 5th grade academic skills, as do cognitive covariates. Additionally, investigation of an interaction between early math ability and EF reveals the magnitude of the association between early math and later math varies as a function of early EF, such that participants who have high levels of EF can "catch up" to peers who perform better on assessments of early math ability. These results suggest EF is pivotal to the development of academic skills throughout elementary school. Implications for further research and practice are discussed.

  20. Intermittent Theta-Burst Stimulation of the Lateral Cerebellum Increases Functional Connectivity of the Default Network

    PubMed Central

    Farzan, Faranak; Eldaief, Mark C.; Schmahmann, Jeremy D.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral cortical intrinsic connectivity networks share topographically arranged functional connectivity with the cerebellum. However, the contribution of cerebellar nodes to distributed network organization and function remains poorly understood. In humans, we applied theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation, guided by subject-specific connectivity, to regions of the cerebellum to evaluate the functional relevance of connections between cerebellar and cerebral cortical nodes in different networks. We demonstrate that changing activity in the human lateral cerebellar Crus I/II modulates the cerebral default mode network, whereas vermal lobule VII stimulation influences the cerebral dorsal attention system. These results provide novel insights into the distributed, but anatomically specific, modulatory impact of cerebellar effects on large-scale neural network function. PMID:25186750

  1. Tools and talk: an evolutionary perspective on the functional deficits associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Andrew; Turner, Martin R; Lemon, Roger

    2014-04-01

    We propose that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and frontotemporal dementia may be viewed as a failure of interlinked functional complexes having their origins in key evolutionary adaptations. We discuss how hand-arm function, locomotion, brainstem function (involving vocalization/speech, swallowing and breathing), and cognitive impairment share complex, interdependent evolutionary adaptations that can be traced back several million years. Fine movements of the hand facilitated tool-making and use enhanced by development of bipedalism. Development of the larynx and integration of respiratory control were central to vocalization, which when combined with gesture are intermediary to human language. These adaptations were accompanied by progressive encephalization, with development of Theory of Mind to facilitate socialization. The varied clinical phenotypes of ALS can thus be understood in the context of inter-related functional complexes that subserve "Tools and Talk"; they have a long evolutionary history and are related to specific developmental neural and gene networks.

  2. Differences in Lateral Drop Jumps From an Unknown Height Among Individuals With Functional Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Adam; Swanik, Charles; Thomas, Stephen; Glutting, Joseph; Knight, Christopher; Kaminski, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Functional ankle instability (FAI) is a debilitating condition that has been reported to occur after 20% to 50% of all ankle sprains. Landing from a jump is one common mechanism of ankle injury, yet few researchers have explored the role of visual cues and anticipatory muscle contractions, which may influence ankle stability, in lateral jumping maneuvers. Objective: To examine muscle-activation strategies between FAI and stable ankles under a lateral load and to evaluate the differences in muscle activation in participants with FAI and participants with stable ankles when they were unable to anticipate the onset of lateral loads during eyes-open versus eyes-closed conditions. Design: Case-control study. Setting: Controlled laboratory setting. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 40 people participated: 20 with FAI and 20 healthy, uninjured, sex- and age-matched persons (control group). Intervention(s): Participants performed a 2-legged lateral jump off a platform onto a force plate set to heights of 35 cm or 50 cm and then immediately jumped for maximal height. They performed jumps in 2 conditions (eyes open, eyes closed) and were unaware of the jump height when their eyes were closed. Main Outcome Measure(s): Amplitude normalized electromyographic (EMG) area (%), peak (%), and time to peak in the tibialis anterior (TA), peroneus longus (PL), and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscles were measured. Results: Regardless of the eyes-open or eyes-closed condition, participants with FAI had less preparatory TA (t158 = 2.22, P = .03) and PL (t158 = 2.09, P = .04) EMG area and TA (t158 = 2.45, P = .02) and PL (t158 = 2.17, P = .03) peak EMG than control-group participants. Conclusions: By removing visual cues, unanticipated lateral joint loads occurred simultaneously with decreased muscle activity, which may reduce dynamic restraint capabilities in persons with FAI. Regardless of visual impairment and jump height, participants with FAI exhibited PL and TA

  3. Meta-Analytic Connectivity Modeling Reveals Differential Functional Connectivity of the Medial and Lateral Orbitofrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zald, David H.; McHugo, Maureen; Ray, Kimberly L.; Glahn, David C.; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Laird, Angela R.

    2014-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is implicated in a broad range of behaviors and neuropsychiatric disorders. Anatomical tracing studies in nonhuman primates reveal differences in connectivity across subregions of the OFC, but data on the connectivity of the human OFC remain limited. We applied meta-analytic connectivity modeling in order to examine which brain regions are most frequently coactivated with the medial and lateral portions of the OFC in published functional neuroimaging studies. The analysis revealed a clear divergence in the pattern of connectivity for the medial OFC (mOFC) and lateral OFC (lOFC) regions. The lOFC showed coactivations with a network of prefrontal regions and areas involved in cognitive functions including language and memory. In contrast, the mOFC showed connectivity with default mode, autonomic, and limbic regions. Convergent patterns of coactivations were observed in the amygdala, hippocampus, striatum, and thalamus. A small number of regions showed connectivity specific to the anterior or posterior sectors of the OFC. Task domains involving memory, semantic processing, face processing, and reward were additionally analyzed in order to identify the different patterns of OFC functional connectivity associated with specific cognitive and affective processes. These data provide a framework for understanding the human OFC's position within widespread functional networks. PMID:23042731

  4. Electron-phonon scattering from Green's function transport combined with molecular dynamics: Applications to mobility predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markussen, Troels; Palsgaard, Mattias; Stradi, Daniele; Gunst, Tue; Brandbyge, Mads; Stokbro, Kurt

    2017-06-01

    We present a conceptually simple method for treating electron-phonon scattering and phonon limited mobilities. By combining Green's function based transport calculations and molecular dynamics, we obtain a temperature dependent transmission from which we evaluate the mobility. We validate our approach by comparing to mobilities and conductivities obtained by the Boltzmann transport equation for different bulk and one-dimensional systems. For bulk silicon and gold we compare against experimental values. We discuss limitations and advantages of each of the computational approaches.

  5. Band 3 and glycophorin are progressively aggregated in density-fractionated sickle and normal red blood cells. Evidence from rotational and lateral mobility studies.

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, J D; Golan, D E

    1993-01-01

    Band 3 aggregation in the plane of the red blood cell (RBC) membrane is postulated to be important in the pathophysiology of hemolysis of dense sickle and normal RBCs. We used the fluorescence photobleaching recovery and polarized fluorescence depletion techniques to measure the lateral and rotational mobility of band 3, glycophorins, and phospholipid analogues in membranes of density-separated intact RBCs from seven patients with sickle cell disease and eight normal controls. The fractions of laterally mobile band 3 and glycophorin decreased progressively as sickle RBC density increased. Normal RBCs also showed a progressive decrease in band 3 fractional mobility with increasing buoyant density. Rapidly rotating, slowly rotating, and rotationally immobile forms of band 3 were observed in both sickle and normal RBC membranes. The fraction of rapidly rotating band 3 progressively decreased and the fraction of rotationally immobile band 3 progressively increased with increasing sickle RBC density. Changes in the fraction of rotationally immobile band 3 were not reversible upon hypotonic swelling of dense sickle RBCs, and normal RBCs osmotically shrunken in sucrose buffers failed to manifest band 3 immobilization at median cell hemoglobin concentration values characteristic of dense sickle RBCs. We conclude that dense sickle and normal RBCs acquire irreversible membrane abnormalities that cause transmembrane protein immobilization and band 3 aggregation. Band 3 aggregates could serve as cell surface sites of autologous antibody binding and thereby lead to removal of dense sickle and normal (senescent) RBCs from the circulation. PMID:8423219

  6. Dissociated language functions: a matter of atypical language lateralization or cerebral plasticity?

    PubMed

    Acioly, Marcus Andre; Gharabaghi, Alireza; Zimmermann, Christoph; Erb, Michael; Heckl, Stefan; Tatagiba, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    The left hemisphere is generally considered to harbor language functions. Atypical cortical language lateralization is mainly demonstrated in left-handed and ambidextrous individuals, whereas dissociated language functions have been reported in association with brain injuries as a part of the reorganization process. We present a thoughtful discussion on the underlying mechanisms of dissociated language functions through an illustrative case of dissociated expressive language. A 31-year-old left-handed woman presented with a recurrent left frontal glioma. Preoperative language functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) panel revealed right-sided dominance for two different language tasks (verbal fluency and visual naming), and the word chain task demonstrated maximal activation in the left hemisphere at the posterior margin of the tumor. The patient was operated on awake to assess language functions intraoperatively. Preoperative fMRI findings were confirmed revealing a task-specific dissociation of expressive language functions. Surgical resection was taken to the functional boundaries. Postoperatively, no language dysfunction occurred. Dissociated language functions are prone to occur in long-standing lesions. Different patterns of dissociation may be encountered due to interindividual particularities and cerebral plasticity. The presented patient is unique by demonstrating new insight into expressive language dissociation, emphasizing the role of a preoperative language fMRI panel and the capability of intraoperative language mapping for identifying special language networks. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Mobilization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    istic and romantic emotionalism that typifies this genre. Longino, James C., et al. “A Study of World War Procurement and Industrial Mobilization...States. Harrisburg, PA: Military Service Publishing Co., 1941. CARL 355.22 J72b. Written in rough prose , this World War II era document explains the

  8. Mobility of Vulnerable Elders study: effect of the sit-to-stand activity on mobility, function, and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Slaughter, Susan E; Wagg, Adrian S; Jones, C Allyson; Schopflocher, Don; Ickert, Carla; Bampton, Erin; Jantz, Alyssa; Milke, Doris; Schalm, Corinne; Lycar, Colleen; Estabrooks, Carole A

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the effect of the sit-to-stand activity on the mobility, function, and health-related quality of life of nursing home residents with dementia. A longitudinal quasi-experimental intervention study with intervention and control groups. The study was conducted in 7 nursing homes (4 intervention; 3 control) in Edmonton, Canada. Eligible residents had a diagnosis of dementia and were able to transfer independently, or with the assistance of 1 person. Health care aides prompted residents to repeat the sit-to-stand activity daily during care routines on day and evening shifts. Mobility was measured using the 30-second sit-to-stand test and the time to complete one sit-to-stand. Function (Functional Independence Measure), health status (Health Utilities Index Mark 2 & 3) and disease-specific quality of life (Quality of Life-Alzheimer's Disease instrument) were also measured. Outcome measures were collected at baseline, and at 3 and 6 months. The covariates cognition, depression, and medical instability were derived from the Resident Assessment Instrument Minimum Data Set (Version 2.0), and the facility context covariate was measured using the Alberta Context Tool. A total of 111 residents completed the 6-month trial (56 intervention; 55 control). Residents in the intervention facilities maintained mobility, as measured by the time to complete one sit-to-stand (P = .01), and experienced a slower functional decline, as measured by the Functional Independence Measure (P = .01), from baseline to 6 months compared with residents in the control facilities, after adjusting for age, sex, cognition, depression, medical instability, and context. Maintaining the ability to transfer using the sit-to-stand activity is a promising means of optimizing the mobility and function for residents with dementia in nursing homes. Copyright © 2015 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Functional connectivity and laterality of the motor and sensory components in the volitional swallowing network

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Richard C.; Chen, Gang; Horwitz, Barry; Ludlow, Christy L.

    2012-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging has shown that multiple brain regions are active during volitional swallowing. Little is known, however, about which regions integrate motor execution and sensory feedback in the swallowing system. Although unilateral brain lesions in either hemisphere can produce swallowing deficits, some functional neuroimaging studies indicate that the left hemisphere has greater activation in certain sensory and motor-related swallowing regions. In this study, correlation coefficients were computed for five seed regions during volitional saliva swallowing to determine the functional relationships of these regions with the rest of the brain: the anterior and posterior insula, inferior frontal gyrus (BA44), primary sensory cortex (S1), and primary motor cortex (M1). A laterality index (LI) was derived that accounts for relative differences in total, positive connected voxels for the left/right hemisphere seeds. Clusters of significantly connected voxels were greater from the anterior and posterior insula than from the other three seed regions. Interactions of the insula with other brain regions were greater on the left than on the right during volitional swallowing. Group means showed laterality in the anterior insula (LI = 0.25) and the posterior insula (LI = 0.33). BA44 showed a lesser degree of difference in left versus right hemisphere interactions (LI = 0.12) while S1 did not show lateralization (LI = 0.02) and M1 showed some predominance of interactions in the right hemisphere (LI = −0.19). The greater connectivity from the left hemisphere insula to brain regions within and across hemispheres suggests that the insula is a primary integrative region for volitional swallowing in humans. PMID:22441258

  10. Functional connectivity and laterality of the motor and sensory components in the volitional swallowing network.

    PubMed

    Lowell, Soren Y; Reynolds, Richard C; Chen, Gang; Horwitz, Barry; Ludlow, Christy L

    2012-05-01

    Functional neuroimaging has shown that multiple brain regions are active during volitional swallowing. Little is known, however, about which regions integrate motor execution and sensory feedback in the swallowing system. Although unilateral brain lesions in either hemisphere can produce swallowing deficits, some functional neuroimaging studies indicate that the left hemisphere has greater activation in certain sensory and motor-related swallowing regions. In this study, correlation coefficients were computed for five seed regions during volitional saliva swallowing to determine the functional relationships of these regions with the rest of the brain: the anterior and posterior insula, inferior frontal gyrus (BA44), primary sensory cortex (S1), and primary motor cortex (M1). A laterality index (LI) was derived that accounts for relative differences in total, positive connected voxels for the left/right hemisphere seeds. Clusters of significantly connected voxels were greater from the anterior and posterior insula than from the other three seed regions. Interactions of the insula with other brain regions were greater on the left than on the right during volitional swallowing. Group means showed laterality in the anterior insula (LI = 0.25) and the posterior insula (LI = 0.33). BA44 showed a lesser degree of difference in left versus right hemisphere interactions (LI = 0.12) while S1 did not show lateralization (LI = 0.02) and M1 showed some predominance of interactions in the right hemisphere (LI = -0.19). The greater connectivity from the left hemisphere insula to brain regions within and across hemispheres suggests that the insula is a primary integrative region for volitional swallowing in humans.

  11. [Effects of acupuncture at left and right Hegu (LI 4) for cerebral function laterality].

    PubMed

    Wang, Linying; Xu, Chunsheng; Zhu, Yifang; Li, Chuanfu; Yang, Jun

    2015-08-01

    To explore the cerebral function laterality of acupuncture at left and right Hegu (LI 4) by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and provide objective evidences for side selection of Hegu (LI 4) in the clinical application. Eighty healthy volunteers were randomly divided into a left-acupoint group and a right-acupoint group, and they were treated with acupuncture at left Hegu (LI 4) and right Hegu (LI 4) respectively. After the arrival of qi, the task-state fMRI data in both groups was collected, and analysis of functional neuroimages (AFNI) software was used to perform intra-group and between-group comparisons. After acupuncture, acupuncture feelings were recorded and MGH acupuncture sensation scale (MASS) was recorded. The difference of MASS between the two groups was not significant (P>0. 05). The result of left-acupoint group showed an increased signal on right cerebral hemisphere, while the right-acupoint group showed extensive signal changes in both cerebral hemispheres. The analysis between left-acupoint group and retroflex right-acupoint group showed differences in brain areas. The central effect of acupuncture at left and right Hegu (LI 4) is dissymmetry, indicating right hemisphere laterality. The right lobus insularis and cingulate gyrus may be the key regions in the acupuncture at Hegu (LI 4).

  12. Correlation between ambulatory function and clinical factors in hemiplegic patients with intact single lateral corticospinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ji Seong; Kim, Jong Moon; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To define the relationship between the complete destruction of 1 lateral corticospinal tract (CST), as demonstrated by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography, and ambulatory function 6 months following stroke. Twenty-six adults (17 male, 9 female) with poststroke hemiplegia who were transferred to the physical medicine and rehabilitation department. Participants underwent DTI tractography, which showed that 1 lateral CST had been clearly destroyed. Functional ambulation classification (FAC) scores at admission, discharge, and 6 months after discharge were used to evaluate the patients’ ability to walk. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and the Korean version of the modified Barthel index (K-MBI) at admission, discharge, and 6 months after discharge were used to evaluate the degree of functional recovery. Of the 26 patients, 18 were nonambulatory (FAC level 1–3), and 8 were able to walk without support (FAC level 4–6). The type of stroke (infarction or hemorrhage), site of the lesion, spasticity of lower extremities, cranioplasty, and the time taken from onset to MRI were not statistically significantly correlated with the ability to walk. However, statistically significant correlations were found in relation to age, K-MBI scores, and initial NIHSS scores. Despite the complete damage to the lesion site and the preservation of 1 unilateral CST, as shown by DTI, good outcomes can be predicted on the basis of younger age, low NIHSS scores, and high MBI scores at onset. PMID:27495041

  13. Vastus medialis electrical stimulation to improve lower extremity function following a lateral patellar retinacular release.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Valma J; Ward, Alex R

    2002-09-01

    A single-case study design. To examine the effect of electrical stimulation of the vastus medialis muscle on stiffness, pain and function for a patient with delayed functional progress following a lateral patellar retinacular release. Five months after an arthroscopic lateral patellar retinacular release, the patient, although highly motivated, had made little progress using routine exercises and taping. An electrical stimulation program producing approximately 300 contractions daily of the vastus medialis muscle was implemented. The electrical stimulation applied for 33 of the 36 days was a rectangular and balanced biphasic pulse of 625-micros duration, 70-Hz frequency, 8-second peak on-time, 3-second off-time, 1-second ramp-up, and 0.5-second ramp-down. Objective measures of stair climbing and hopping, together with the subjective measure of therapist-palpated superomedial patella displacement force, were recorded for each treatment visit. Other subjective measures were the patient's daily recordings of knee pain and stiffness. Patient-reported stiffness reduced rapidly as the actual and cumulative number of daily contractions of the vastus medialis muscle increased. After 8 days of electrical stimulation, the patient was able to ascend stairs unassisted and after another 21 days to hop unsupported. Stiffness rapidly reduced and function started to improve once the electrical stimulation program was implemented. Recovery during the 36 days of treatment with electrical stimulation was greater than during the previous 5 months using other methods. Compliance was not an issue, nor was muscle soreness.

  14. Intensity of recreational physical activity throughout life and later life cognitive functioning in women.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Mary C; Moineddin, Rahim; Morra, Angela; Manson, Judith; Blake, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Long-term physical activity may affect risk of cognitive impairment but few studies have examined later life cognition in relation to intensity of life-long physical activity. We examined the associations between the intensity of long-term recreational physical activity and neuropsychological functioning in 90 healthy postmenopausal women on tests found to be useful in the early identification of dementia. Information was collected about their participation in strenuous and moderate activities between high school and menopause. Summary measures of long-term strenuous and moderate activity were constructed for each participant. All analyses were adjusted for relevant covariates. The six linear regression analyses showed significant positive associations between moderate activity and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Revised (WAIS-R), Digit Span backward, WAIS-R Digit Symbol, and Trail Making Test Part B. Significant negative relationships were found between strenuous activity and Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test delayed verbal recall, Complex Figure Test delayed visual memory, WAIS-R Digit Span backward, category fluency, and WAIS-R Digit Symbol. The associations found in the present study suggest that while moderate activity may be protective, long-term strenuous activity before menopause may lower cognitive performance later in life. These results support further investigation of the effects of life-long exercise intensity on cognition in later life.

  15. Functional Mobility Testing: A Novel Method to Create Suit Design Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, Scott A.; Benson, Elizabeth A.; Rajulu, Sudhakar L.

    2008-01-01

    This study was performed to aide in the creation of design requirements for the next generation of space suits that more accurately describe the level of mobility necessary for a suited crewmember through the use of an innovative methodology utilizing functional mobility. A novel method was utilized involving the collection of kinematic data while 20 subjects (10 male, 10 female) performed pertinent functional tasks that will be required of a suited crewmember during various phases of a lunar mission. These tasks were selected based on relevance and criticality from a larger list of tasks that may be carried out by the crew. Kinematic data was processed through Vicon BodyBuilder software to calculate joint angles for the ankle, knee, hip, torso, shoulder, elbow, and wrist. Maximum functional mobility was consistently lower than maximum isolated mobility. This study suggests that conventional methods for establishing design requirements for human-systems interfaces based on maximal isolated joint capabilities may overestimate the required mobility. Additionally, this method provides a valuable means of evaluating systems created from these requirements by comparing the mobility available in a new spacesuit, or the mobility required to use a new piece of hardware, to this newly established database of functional mobility.

  16. Functional Mobility Testing: A Novel Method to Create Suit Design Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, Scott A.; Benson, Elizabeth A.; Rajulu, Sudhakar L.

    2008-01-01

    This study was performed to aide in the creation of design requirements for the next generation of space suits that more accurately describe the level of mobility necessary for a suited crewmember through the use of an innovative methodology utilizing functional mobility. A novel method was utilized involving the collection of kinematic data while 20 subjects (10 male, 10 female) performed pertinent functional tasks that will be required of a suited crewmember during various phases of a lunar mission. These tasks were selected based on relevance and criticality from a larger list of tasks that may be carried out by the crew. Kinematic data was processed through Vicon BodyBuilder software to calculate joint angles for the ankle, knee, hip, torso, shoulder, elbow, and wrist. Maximum functional mobility was consistently lower than maximum isolated mobility. This study suggests that conventional methods for establishing design requirements for human-systems interfaces based on maximal isolated joint capabilities may overestimate the required mobility. Additionally, this method provides a valuable means of evaluating systems created from these requirements by comparing the mobility available in a new spacesuit, or the mobility required to use a new piece of hardware, to this newly established database of functional mobility.

  17. Lateral mobility of lipid analogues and GPI-anchored proteins in supported bilayers determined by fluorescent bead tracking.

    PubMed

    Fein, M; Unkeless, J; Chuang, F Y; Sassaroli, M; da Costa, R; Väänänen, H; Eisinger, J

    1993-07-01

    Lipid analogues and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins incorporated in glass-supported phospholipid bilayers (SBL) were coupled to small (30 nm diameter) fluorescent beads whose motion in the liquid phase was tracked by intensified fluorescence video microscopy. Streptavidin (St), covalently attached to the carboxyl modified surface of the polystyrene bead, bound either the biotinylated membrane component, or a biotinylated monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against a specific membrane constituent. The positions of the beads tethered to randomly diffusing membrane molecules were recorded at 0.2 sec intervals for about 1 min. The mean square displacement (rho) of the beads was found to be a linear function of diffusion time t, and the diffusion coefficient, D, was derived from the relation, rho(t) = 4Dt. The values of D for biotinylated phosphatidylethanolamine (Bi-PE) dispersed in an egg lecithin:cholesterol (80:20%) bilayer obtained by this methodology range from 0.05 to 0.6 micron 2/sec with an average of mean value of D = 0.26 micron 2/sec, similar to the value of mean value of D = 0.24 micron 2/sec for fluorescein-conjugated phosphatidylethanolamine (Fl-PE) linked to St-coupled beads by the anti-fluorescein mAb 4-4-20 or its Fab fragment. These values of D are comparable to those reported for Fl-PE linked to 30 nm gold particles but are several times lower than that of Fl-PE in the same planar bilayer as measured by fluorescence photobleaching recovery, D = 1.3 microns 2/sec. The mobilities of two GPI-anchored proteins in similar SBL were also determined by use of the appropriate biotinylated mAb and were found to be mean value of D = 0.25 and 0.56 micron 2/sec for the decay accelerating factor (DAF, CD55) and the human Fc gamma RIIIB (CD16) receptors, respectively. The methodology described here is suitable for tracking any accessible membrane component.

  18. Seven Years Later: Effects of a Neighborhood Mobility Program on Poor Black and Latino Adults' Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauth, Rebecca C.; Leventhal, Tama; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2008-01-01

    This study explored program effects on adults' well-being seven years following the implementation of a court-ordered neighborhood mobility program. Low-income black and Latino adults residing in poor, segregated neighborhoods in Yonkers, New York were randomly selected to relocate to publicly funded town-houses in middle-class neighborhoods…

  19. Effect of Mulligan's mobilization with movement technique on gait function in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Lim; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] We examined the effectiveness of Mulligan's mobilization with movement (MWM) technique on spatiotemporal variables of gait in individuals who had a stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups: Mulligan's mobilization with movement group (n=12) and "weight-bearing with placebo" mobilization with movement group (n=12). The subjects in the mobilization with movement group performed 5 sets of 10 glides a day, 5 times a week for 4 weeks. The mobilization with movement technique comprised grade III movements that involved gliding and resting. The control group subjects performed lunges in the same conditions as those of the experimental group. Gait function was measured in terms of spatiotemporal parameters to determine the effect of mobilization with movement. [Results] The mobilization with movement group showed significant improvements in velocity, cadence, stride length, single-support time, and step length of the affected side, and step length and stride length of the non-affected side. Overall, the mobilization with movement group showed significantly greater improvements than the control group in terms of velocity, cadence, and single-support time of the affected side. [Conclusion] Mobilization with movement can be used to improve the gait function of patients recovering from stroke.

  20. Effect of Mulligan’s mobilization with movement technique on gait function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Lim; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] We examined the effectiveness of Mulligan’s mobilization with movement (MWM) technique on spatiotemporal variables of gait in individuals who had a stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups: Mulligan’s mobilization with movement group (n=12) and “weight-bearing with placebo” mobilization with movement group (n=12). The subjects in the mobilization with movement group performed 5 sets of 10 glides a day, 5 times a week for 4 weeks. The mobilization with movement technique comprised grade III movements that involved gliding and resting. The control group subjects performed lunges in the same conditions as those of the experimental group. Gait function was measured in terms of spatiotemporal parameters to determine the effect of mobilization with movement. [Results] The mobilization with movement group showed significant improvements in velocity, cadence, stride length, single-support time, and step length of the affected side, and step length and stride length of the non-affected side. Overall, the mobilization with movement group showed significantly greater improvements than the control group in terms of velocity, cadence, and single-support time of the affected side. [Conclusion] Mobilization with movement can be used to improve the gait function of patients recovering from stroke. PMID:27630424

  1. Thalamic functional connectivity predicts seizure laterality in individual TLE patients: application of a biomarker development strategy.

    PubMed

    Barron, Daniel S; Fox, Peter T; Pardoe, Heath; Lancaster, Jack; Price, Larry R; Blackmon, Karen; Berry, Kristen; Cavazos, Jose E; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Devinsky, Orrin; Thesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive markers of brain function could yield biomarkers in many neurological disorders. Disease models constrained by coordinate-based meta-analysis are likely to increase this yield. Here, we evaluate a thalamic model of temporal lobe epilepsy that we proposed in a coordinate-based meta-analysis and extended in a diffusion tractography study of an independent patient population. Specifically, we evaluated whether thalamic functional connectivity (resting-state fMRI-BOLD) with temporal lobe areas can predict seizure onset laterality, as established with intracranial EEG. Twenty-four lesional and non-lesional temporal lobe epilepsy patients were studied. No significant differences in functional connection strength in patient and control groups were observed with Mann-Whitney Tests (corrected for multiple comparisons). Notwithstanding the lack of group differences, individual patient difference scores (from control mean connection strength) successfully predicted seizure onset zone as shown in ROC curves: discriminant analysis (two-dimensional) predicted seizure onset zone with 85% sensitivity and 91% specificity; logistic regression (four-dimensional) achieved 86% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The strongest markers in both analyses were left thalamo-hippocampal and right thalamo-entorhinal cortex functional connection strength. Thus, this study shows that thalamic functional connections are sensitive and specific markers of seizure onset laterality in individual temporal lobe epilepsy patients. This study also advances an overall strategy for the programmatic development of neuroimaging biomarkers in clinical and genetic populations: a disease model informed by coordinate-based meta-analysis was used to anatomically constrain individual patient analyses.

  2. Thalamic functional connectivity predicts seizure laterality in individual TLE patients: Application of a biomarker development strategy

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Daniel S.; Fox, Peter T.; Pardoe, Heath; Lancaster, Jack; Price, Larry R.; Blackmon, Karen; Berry, Kristen; Cavazos, Jose E.; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Devinsky, Orrin; Thesen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive markers of brain function could yield biomarkers in many neurological disorders. Disease models constrained by coordinate-based meta-analysis are likely to increase this yield. Here, we evaluate a thalamic model of temporal lobe epilepsy that we proposed in a coordinate-based meta-analysis and extended in a diffusion tractography study of an independent patient population. Specifically, we evaluated whether thalamic functional connectivity (resting-state fMRI-BOLD) with temporal lobe areas can predict seizure onset laterality, as established with intracranial EEG. Twenty-four lesional and non-lesional temporal lobe epilepsy patients were studied. No significant differences in functional connection strength in patient and control groups were observed with Mann-Whitney Tests (corrected for multiple comparisons). Notwithstanding the lack of group differences, individual patient difference scores (from control mean connection strength) successfully predicted seizure onset zone as shown in ROC curves: discriminant analysis (two-dimensional) predicted seizure onset zone with 85% sensitivity and 91% specificity; logistic regression (four-dimensional) achieved 86% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The strongest markers in both analyses were left thalamo-hippocampal and right thalamo-entorhinal cortex functional connection strength. Thus, this study shows that thalamic functional connections are sensitive and specific markers of seizure onset laterality in individual temporal lobe epilepsy patients. This study also advances an overall strategy for the programmatic development of neuroimaging biomarkers in clinical and genetic populations: a disease model informed by coordinate-based meta-analysis was used to anatomically constrain individual patient analyses. PMID:25610790

  3. Is an orthorhombic lateral packing and a proper lamellar organization important for the skin barrier function?

    PubMed

    Groen, Daniël; Poole, Dana S; Gooris, Gert S; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2011-06-01

    The lipid organization in the stratum corneum (SC), plays an important role in the barrier function of the skin. SC lipids form two lamellar phases with a predominantly orthorhombic packing. In previous publications a lipid model was presented, referred to as the stratum corneum substitute (SCS), that closely mimics the SC lipid organization and barrier function. Therefore, the SCS serves as a unique tool to relate lipid organization with barrier function. In the present study we examined the effect of the orthorhombic to hexagonal phase transition on the barrier function of human SC and SCS. In addition, the SCS was modified by changing the free fatty acid composition, resulting in a hexagonal packing and perturbed lamellar organization. By measuring the permeability to benzoic acid as function of temperature, Arrhenius plots were constructed from which activation energies were calculated. The results suggest that the change from orthorhombic to hexagonal packing in human SC and SCS, does not have an effect on the permeability. However, the modified SCS revealed an increased permeability to benzoic acid, which we related to its perturbed lamellar organization. Thus, a proper lamellar organization is more crucial for a competent barrier function than the presence of an orthorhombic lateral packing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Functional connectivity changes resemble patterns of pTDP-43 pathology in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Schulthess, Ines; Gorges, Martin; Müller, Hans-Peter; Lulé, Dorothée; Del Tredici, Kelly; Ludolph, Albert C.; Kassubek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    ‘Resting-state’ fMRI allows investigation of alterations in functional brain organization that are associated with an underlying pathological process. We determine whether abnormal connectivity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in a priori-defined intrinsic functional connectivity networks, according to a neuropathological staging scheme and its DTI-based tract correlates, permits recognition of a sequential involvement of functional networks. ‘Resting-state’ fMRI data from 135 ALS patients and 56 matched healthy controls were investigated for the motor network (corresponding to neuropathological stage 1), brainstem (stage 2), ventral attention (stage 3), default mode/hippocampal network (stage 4), and primary visual network (as the control network) in a cross-sectional analysis and longitudinally in a subgroup of 27 patients after 6 months. Group comparison from cross-sectional and longitudinal data revealed significantly increased functional connectivity (p < 0.05, corrected) in all four investigated networks (but not in the control network), presenting as a network expansion that was correlated with physical disability. Increased connectivity of functional networks, as investigated in a hypothesis-driven approach, is characterized by network expansions and resembled the pattern of pTDP-43 pathology in ALS. However, our data did not allow for the recognition of a sequential involvement of functional connectivity networks at the individual level. PMID:27929102

  5. War and remembrance: Combat exposure in young adulthood and memory function sixty years later.

    PubMed

    Nevarez, Michael D; Malone, Johanna C; Rentz, Dorene M; Waldinger, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    Identifying adaptive ways to cope with extreme stress is essential to promoting long-term health. Memory systems are highly sensitive to stress, and combat exposure during war has been shown to have deleterious effects on cognitive processes, such as memory, decades later. No studies have examined coping styles used by combat veterans and associations with later-life cognitive functioning. Defenses are coping mechanisms that manage difficult memories and feelings, with some more closely related to memory processes (e.g., suppression, repression). Utilizing a longitudinal database, we assessed how reliance on certain defense mechanisms after World War II combat exposure could affect cognitive health 60years later. Data spanning 75years were available on 71 men who had post-war assessment of combat exposure, defense mechanism ratings (ages 19-50), and late-life neuropsychological testing. Interaction models of combat exposure with defenses predicting late-life memory were examined. In bivariate analyses, greater reliance on suppression correlated with worse memory performance (r=-0.30, p=.01), but greater reliance on repression did not. Greater reliance on suppression strengthened the link between combat exposure and worse memory in late life (R(2)=0.24, p<.001). In contrast, greater reliance on repression attenuated the link between combat exposure and poorer late-life memory (R(2)=0.19, p<.001). Results suggest that coping styles may affect the relationship between early-adult stress and late-life cognition. Findings highlight the importance of understanding how coping styles may impact cognitive functioning as people move through adult life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Functional and structural comparison of visual lateralization in birds - similar but still different.

    PubMed

    Manns, Martina; Ströckens, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Vertebrate brains display physiological and anatomical left-right differences, which are related to hemispheric dominances for specific functions. Functional lateralizations likely rely on structural left-right differences in intra- and interhemispheric connectivity patterns that develop in tight gene-environment interactions. The visual systems of chickens and pigeons show that asymmetrical light stimulation during ontogeny induces a dominance of the left hemisphere for visuomotor control that is paralleled by projection asymmetries within the ascending visual pathways. But structural asymmetries vary essentially between both species concerning the affected pathway (thalamo- vs. tectofugal system), constancy of effects (transient vs. permanent), and the hemisphere receiving stronger bilateral input (right vs. left). These discrepancies suggest that at least two aspects of visual processes are influenced by asymmetric light stimulation: (1) visuomotor dominance develops within the ontogenetically stronger stimulated hemisphere but not necessarily in the one receiving stronger bottom-up input. As a secondary consequence of asymmetrical light experience, lateralized top-down mechanisms play a critical role in the emergence of hemispheric dominance. (2) Ontogenetic light experiences may affect the dominant use of left- and right-hemispheric strategies. Evidences from social and spatial cognition tasks indicate that chickens rely more on a right-hemispheric global strategy whereas pigeons display a dominance of the left hemisphere. Thus, behavioral asymmetries are linked to a stronger bilateral input to the right hemisphere in chickens but to the left one in pigeons. The degree of bilateral visual input may determine the dominant visual processing strategy when redundant encoding is possible. This analysis supports that environmental stimulation affects the balance between hemispheric-specific processing by lateralized interactions of bottom-up and top-down systems.

  7. Association between sensory function and medio-lateral knee position during functional tasks in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Cronström, Anna; Ageberg, Eva

    2014-12-13

    Patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury often exhibit reduced movement quality during functional tasks in the form of a knee-medial-to-foot position (KMFP). This movement pattern is suggested to be more common in women than in men, but the possible contributing sensorimotor factors for this altered knee position are poorly studied in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between sensory function and medio-lateral knee position during functional tasks in men and women with ACL injury. Fifty-one patients (23 women) aged 18-40 years with ACL injury were included in this cross-sectional study. Measures of sensory function were assessed by the threshold to detection of passive motion (TDPM) for knee kinesthesia and by the vibration perception threshold (VPT) for vibration sense. Movement quality was assessed by visual observation of the position of the knee relative to the foot during the following four functional tasks with different degrees of difficulty: the single-limb mini-squat, stair descending, the forward lunge, and the drop-jump. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used to determine the relationship between the sensory measures and the medio-lateral knee position during the functional tasks. Differences in TDPM and/or VPT between subjects with good and poor movement quality were evaluated using the independent t-test. Separate gender analyses were performed. Worse TDPM was associated with a KMFP during the drop jump in men. Worse VPT at the toe and ankle was associated with a KMFP during stair descending and the forward lunge in women, but no associations were found in men. Worse kinesthesia, measured by TDPM, might be associated with KMFP during the drop jump in men with ACL injury while worse vibration sense, measured by the VPT, at the foot and ankle might be related to KMFP in women. Further studies are needed to confirm these results.

  8. Alone is a crowd: social motivations, social withdrawal, and socioemotional functioning in later childhood.

    PubMed

    Coplan, Robert J; Rose-Krasnor, Linda; Weeks, Murray; Kingsbury, Adam; Kingsbury, Mila; Bullock, Amanda

    2013-05-01

    The primary goals of this study were to test a conceptual model linking social approach and avoidance motivations, socially withdrawn behaviors, and peer difficulties in later childhood and to compare the socioemotional functioning of different subtypes of withdrawn children (shy, unsociable, avoidant). Participants were 367 children, aged 9-12 years. Measures included assessments of social motivations (i.e., self-reported shyness and preference for solitude) and social withdrawal (observations of solitary behaviors in the schoolyard and self-reports of solitary activities outside of school), as well as self- and parent-reported peer difficulties and internalizing problems. Among the results, both shyness and preference for solitude were associated with socially withdrawn behaviors, which in turn predicted peer difficulties. However, only shyness (but not preference for solitude) also displayed a direct path to peer difficulties. As well, results from person-oriented analyses indicated that different subtypes of socially withdrawn children displayed decidedly different profiles with regard to indices of internalizing problems. For example, whereas unsociable children did not differ from their nonwithdrawn peers on indices of internalizing problems, socially avoidant (i.e., high in both shyness and unsociability) children reported the most pervasive socioemotional difficulties. Findings are discussed in terms of the implications of different forms of social withdrawal for socioemotional functioning in later childhood.

  9. A lateralization of function approach to sex differences in spatial ability: a reexamination.

    PubMed

    Rilea, Stacy L

    2008-07-01

    The current study assessed the lateralization of function hypothesis (Rilea, S. L., Roskos-Ewoldsen, B., & Boles, D. (2004). Sex differences in spatial ability: A lateralization of function approach. Brain and Cognition, 56, 332-343) which suggested that it was the interaction of brain organization and the type of spatial task that led to sex differences in spatial ability. A second purpose was to evaluate explanations for their unexpected findings on the mental rotation task. In Experiment 1, participants completed the Water Level, Paper Folding, and mental rotation tasks (using an object-based or self-based perspective), presented bilaterally. Sex differences were only observed on the Water Level Task; a right hemisphere advantage was observed on Water Level and mental rotation tasks. In Experiment 2, a human stick figure or a polygon was mentally rotated. Men outperformed women when rotating polygons, but not when rotating stick figures. Men demonstrated a right hemisphere advantage when rotating polygons; women showed no hemisphere differences for either stimulus. Thus, hemisphere processing, task complexity, and stimulus type may influence performance for men and women across different spatial measures.

  10. Do Executive Function Deficits Predict Later Substance Use Disorders Among Adolescents and Young Adults?

    PubMed Central

    Wilens, Timothy E.; Martelon, MaryKate; Fried, Ronna; Petty, Carter; Bateman, Clancey; Biederman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Objective There is increasing interest regarding the risk and overlap of executive function deficits (EFDs) in stable cigarette smoking and substance use disorders (SUD). Therefore, we examined whether earlier EFD was a risk factor for subsequent cigarette smoking and SUD and further explored the relationship between EFD and SUD. Method We assessed 435 subjects at the five-year follow-up (232 cases of ADHD; mean age ± SD: 15.4 ± 3.43 and 203 controls: 16.3 ± 3.42 years) and again four to five years later as part of a prospective family study of ADHD youth. Individuals were assessed by structured psychiatric interview for psychopathology and SUD. EFD was categorically defined in an individual that had at least 2 out of 6 abnormal neuropsychological tests of executive functioning. Results At the final follow-up period, ADHD was found to be a significant predictor of stable cigarette smoking (p<0.01) and SUD into late adolescence and young adult years (p<0.01). However, EFDs were not associated with an increase in subsequent substance use outcomes. New onset stable cigarette smoking, but not SUD, was associated with subsequent EFD (p<0.01). Conclusions Our results do not support the hypothesis that EFDs predicts later stable cigarette smoking or SUD in children with ADHD growing up. However, stable cigarette smoking is associated with subsequent EFD. PMID:21241951

  11. Functional lateralization of temporoparietal junction - imitation inhibition, visual perspective-taking and theory of mind.

    PubMed

    Santiesteban, Idalmis; Banissy, Michael J; Catmur, Caroline; Bird, Geoffrey

    2015-10-01

    Although neuroimaging studies have consistently identified the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) as a key brain region involved in social cognition, the literature is far from consistent with respect to lateralization of function. For example, during theory-of-mind tasks bilateral TPJ activation is found in some studies but only right hemisphere activation in others. Visual perspective-taking and imitation inhibition, which have been argued to recruit the same socio-cognitive processes as theory of mind, are associated with unilateral activation of either left TPJ (perspective taking) or right TPJ (imitation inhibition). The present study investigated the functional lateralization of TPJ involvement in the above three socio-cognitive abilities using transcranial direct current stimulation. Three groups of healthy adults received anodal stimulation over right TPJ, left TPJ or the occipital cortex prior to performing three tasks (imitation inhibition, visual perspective-taking and theory of mind). In contrast to the extant neuroimaging literature, our results suggest bilateral TPJ involvement in imitation inhibition and visual perspective-taking, while no effect of anodal stimulation was observed on theory of mind. The discrepancy between these findings and those obtained using neuroimaging highlight the efficacy of neurostimulation as a complementary methodological tool in cognitive neuroscience.

  12. Life Course Trajectories of Later-Life Cognitive Functions: Does Social Engagement in Old Age Matter?

    PubMed

    Park, Sojung; Kwon, Eunsun; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2017-04-07

    This study identified differential patterns of later-life cognitive function trajectories and examined to what extent life course factors and social engagement are associated with group trajectories. Data came from seven waves of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS 1998-2010; n = 7374; Observations = 41,051). Latent class growth analysis identified cognitive function trajectory groups, and multinomial logistic regression was used to examine the factors associated with group trajectories. Five heterogeneous trajectories were identified: stable high, stable moderate, stable low, high-to-moderate, and moderate-to-low. Findings suggest that, after adjusting for life course factors, individuals who became volunteers were more likely to belong to one of the two least vulnerable trajectories, stable high or high-to-moderate. Our findings suggest that, despite the cumulative life course factors evident in cognitive decline, social engagement in old age may serve as a potential protective resource.

  13. Diet and cognitive function in later life: a challenge for nutrition epidemiology.

    PubMed

    McNeill, G; Winter, J; Jia, X

    2009-02-01

    As the proportion of old and very old people in the population increases, new research on the influence of diet on health and nutritional needs in later life will be needed. Dietary assessment methods that rely on short-term memory or lengthy interviews, such as the 24-h recall and diet history methods, could have some limitations in this age group. There is some support for the use of food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) in older people, although their validity in the older old and in those with more advanced cognitive decline has not been extensively assessed. In a study designed to assess the validity of a modified FFQ in men and women over 65 years, 50 men and 47 women completed two FFQs, and 42 men and 41 women completed one FFQ followed by a 4-day weighed diet diary. Digit span forward (a test of short-term memory) and verbal fluency (a test of executive function) tests were used to assess the possible influence of cognitive function on repeatability and validity of the FFQ. The FFQ was found to have good repeatability for most nutrients and reasonable validity for some but not all nutrients. Cognitive function assessed prior to the dietary assessment showed no relationship with repeatability, but there was some evidence that validity was lower in those with lower executive function. Dietary assessment in healthy older people without overt cognitive decline can be achieved, but development and testing of methods of data collection for each target population and nutrient of interest are particularly important in this age group to ensure valid results. The possibility that cognitive decline influences dietary assessment needs to be borne in mind in the interpretation of observational studies of the influence of dietary intake on cognition in later life.

  14. Brain functional connectome abnormalities in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are associated with disability and cortical hyperexcitability.

    PubMed

    Geevasinga, N; Korgaonkar, M S; Menon, P; Van den Bos, M; Gomes, L; Foster, S; Kiernan, M C; Vucic, S

    2017-09-19

    The present study utilized a multimodal approach encompassing connectome networks combined with brain volume analysis, and assessment of cortical excitability to provide novel insights into amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathogenesis. Magnetic resonance images were acquired using a 3.0-Tesla Signa HDx scanner (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, USA), using an eight-channel head coil. Magnetic resonance images for the resting-state scan were acquired using an echo-planar imaging magnetic resonance sequence, acquiring 40 contiguous axial/oblique slices. Structural magnetic resonance imaging three-dimensional T1-weighted images were acquired in the sagittal plane using three-dimensional spoiled gradient echo sequences. For structural imaging, a T1-weighted high-resolution (3.0-Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging scan was used. Cortical excitability was assessed by using the threshold-tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation paradigm. Network-based statistics and whole-brain functional topology (using graph theoretical approaches) assessed functional connectivity. Using a global network-based statistical analysis approach, functional connectivity was increased in 12 network edges connecting 14 nodes (P < 0.05) within the frontal, temporal, parietal and subcortical regions. Analysis of local connectedness disclosed dichotomous effects with reduced connectivity in frontal regions and increased connectivity in occipital regions in ALS. Cortical hyperexcitability was evident in patients with ALS, negatively correlated with functional connectivity changes in the pre-central gyrus (P < 0.01). Connectivity changes in the frontal regions were negatively associated with functional disability (P < 0.05). Multimodal assessment of cortical function in patients with ALS identified deficits in functional connectivity associated with cortical hyperexcitability that correlated with patient disability. Novel integration of functional brain assessment further contributes to the

  15. WITHDRAWN: Immobilisation and functional treatment for acute lateral ankle ligament injuries in adults.

    PubMed

    Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J; Rowe, Brian H; Assendelft, Willem J J; Kelly, Karen D; Struijs, Peter A A; van Dijk, C N

    2013-03-28

    Acute lateral ankle ligament injuries (ankle sprains) are common problems in acute medical care. The treatment variation observed for the acutely injured lateral ankle ligament complex suggests a lack of evidence-based management strategies for this problem. The objective of this review was to assess the effectiveness of methods of immobilisation for acute lateral ankle ligament injuries and to compare immobilisation with functional treatment methods. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group specialised register (December 2001); the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (The Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2001), MEDLINE (1966-May 2000), EMBASE (1988-May 2000), reference lists of articles, and contacted organisations and researchers in the field. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing either different types of immobilisation or immobilisation versus functional treatments for injuries to the lateral ligament complex of the ankle in adults were included. Trials which investigated the treatment of chronic instability or post-surgical treatment were excluded. Data were independently extracted by two authors. Where appropriate, results of comparable studies were pooled using fixed effects models. Individual and pooled statistics were reported as relative risks with 95% confidence intervals for dichotomous outcomes and weighted (WMD) or standardised (SMD) mean differences and 95% confidence intervals for continuous outcome measures. Heterogeneity between trials was tested using a standard chi-squared test. Twenty-one trials involving 2184 participants were included. The mean validity score of the included trials increased from 9.1 (SD 3.0) to 10 (SD 2.9) after retrieving further information (maximum 18 points). Statistically significant differences in favour of functional treatment when compared with immobilisation were found for seven outcome measures: more patients returned to sport in the long term (relative risk (RR) 1.86, 95

  16. Neurocognitive and Functional Correlates of Mobile Phone Use in Middle-Aged and Older Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Depp, Colin A; Harmell, Alexandrea L; Vahia, Ipsit V; Mausbach, Brent T

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Our objective was to examine the association of mobile phone use and ownership with psychopathology, cognitive functioning and functional outcome in 196 outpatients aged 40 and older who were diagnosed with schizophrenia. Methods Participants reported their past and current mobile phone use on a standardized self-report scale and they were administered tests of global cognition, functional capacity and informant-rated functional outcome. Results The great majority of subjects had used a mobile phone (78%) but few currently owned one (27%). After adjusting for age (mean age 51), any past mobile phone use was associated with less severe negative symptoms, and higher global cognitive performance, functional capacity, and functional outcome. A total of 60% of participants reported being comfortable with mobile phones, but comfort was not associated with any cognitive or functional outcomes. Conclusions Most older patients with schizophrenia have used mobile phones and lifetime mobile phone use is a positive indicator of cognitive and functional status. PMID:25768842

  17. Neurocognitive and functional correlates of mobile phone use in middle-aged and older patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Depp, Colin A; Harmell, Alexandrea L; Vahia, Ipsit V; Mausbach, Brent T

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to examine the association of mobile phone use and ownership with psychopathology, cognitive functioning, and functional outcome in 196 outpatients aged 40 years and older who were diagnosed with schizophrenia. Participants reported their past and current mobile phone use on a standardized self-report scale and they were administered tests of global cognition, functional capacity, and informant-rated functional outcome. The great majority of subjects had used a mobile phone (78%) but few currently owned one (27%). After adjusting for age (mean age 51), any past mobile phone use was associated with less severe negative symptoms, and higher global cognitive performance, functional capacity, and functional outcome. A total of 60% of participants reported being comfortable with mobile phones, but comfort was not associated with any cognitive or functional outcomes. Most of the older patients with schizophrenia have used mobile phones and lifetime mobile phone use is a positive indicator of cognitive and functional status.

  18. Numbers and functional lateralization: A visual half-field and dichotic listening study in proficient bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Klichowski, Michal; Króliczak, Gregory

    2017-06-01

    Potential links between language and numbers and the laterality of symbolic number representations in the brain are still debated. Furthermore, reports on bilingual individuals indicate that the language-number interrelationships might be quite complex. Therefore, we carried out a visual half-field (VHF) and dichotic listening (DL) study with action words and different forms of symbolic numbers used as stimuli to test the laterality of word and number processing in single-, dual-language and mixed -task and language- contexts. Experiment 1 (VHF) showed a significant right visual field/left hemispheric advantage in response accuracy for action word, as compared to any form of symbolic number processing. Experiment 2 (DL) revealed a substantially reversed effect - a significant right ear/left hemisphere advantage for arithmetic operations as compared to action word processing, and in response times in single- and dual-language contexts for number vs. action words. All these effects were language independent. Notably, for within-task response accuracy compared across modalities significant differences were found in all studied contexts. Thus, our results go counter to findings showing that action-relevant concepts and words, as well as number words are represented/processed primarily in the left hemisphere. Instead, we found that in the auditory context, following substantial engagement of working memory (here: by arithmetic operations), there is a subsequent functional reorganization of processing single stimuli, whether verbs or numbers. This reorganization - their weakened laterality - at least for response accuracy is not exclusive to processing of numbers, but the number of items to be processed. For response times, except for unpredictable tasks in mixed contexts, the "number problem" is more apparent. These outcomes are highly relevant to difficulties that simultaneous translators encounter when dealing with lengthy auditory material in which single items such

  19. N-formyl peptide receptors in human neutrophils display distinct membrane distribution and lateral mobility when labeled with agonist and antagonist

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Receptors for bacterial N-formyl peptides are instrumental for neutrophil chemotactic locomotion and activation at sites of infection. As regulatory mechanisms for signal transduction, both rapid coupling of the occupied receptor to cytoskeletal components, and receptor lateral redistribution, have been suggested (Jesaitis et al., 1986, 1989). To compare the distribution and lateral diffusion of the nonactivated and activated neutrophil N-formyl-peptide receptor, before internalization, we used a new fluorescent N-formyl-peptide receptor antagonist, tertbutyloxycarbonyl-Phe(D)-Leu-Phe(D)-Leu-Phe-OH (Boc- FLFLF, 0.1-1 microM), and the fluorescent receptor agonist formyl-Nle- Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys (fnLLFnLYK, 0.1-1 microM). Fluorescent Boc-FLFLF did not elicit an oxidative burst in the neutrophil at 37 degrees C, as assessed by chemiluminescence and reduction of p-nitroblue tetrazolium chloride, but competed efficiently both with formyl-methionyl-leucyl- phenylalanine (fMLF) and fnLLFnLYK. It was not internalized, as evidenced by confocal microscopy and acid elution of surface bound ligand. The lateral mobility characteristics of the neutrophil fMLF receptor were investigated with the technique of FRAP. The diffusion coefficient (D) was similar for antagonist- and agonist-labeled receptors (D approximately 5 x 10(-10) cm2/s), but the fraction of mobile receptors was significantly lower in agonist- compared to antagonist-labeled cells, approximately 40% in contrast to approximately 60%. This reduction in receptor mobile fraction was slightly counteracted, albeit not significantly, by dihydrocytochalasin B (dhcB, 5 microM). To block internalization of agonist-labeled receptors, receptor mobility measurements were done at 14 degrees C. At this temperature, confocal microscopy revealed clustering of receptors in response to agonist binding, compared to a more uniform receptor distribution in antagonist-labeled cells. The pattern of agonist- induced receptor clustering was

  20. Functional studies of the parotid and pancreas glands in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Charchaflie, R J; Bustos Fernandez, L; Perec, C J; Gonzalez, E; Marzi, A

    1974-07-01

    Functional studies of the pancreas and parotid glands are reported in 17 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The exocrine function of the pancreas was studied by measuring amylase concentration after stimulation with the endogenous secretin-pancreozymine test (ESP). Under these conditions, the pancreatic amylase concentration in ALS patients was found to be markedly decreased by about 45% when compared with those of healthy control subjects. Different conclusions in the literature about a possible impairment of the exocrine pancreas in ALS patients induced us to study the function of the parotid gland, which has close structural, functional, and physiopathological relationship with the pancreas. Flow rate and bicarbonate concentration of parotid saliva were measured after indirect stimulation (intraoral citric acid) and direct stimulation (pilocarpine). After indirect stimulation, both parotid flow rate and bicarbonate concentration from ALS patients were found to be decreased by about 66% and 70% respectively, when compared with controls. On the other hand, direct stimulation with pilocarpine in ALS patients elicited normal responses in both flow rate and bicarbonate concentration of saliva. It is concluded that the pancreatic and parotid deficiencies observed in ALS patients do not indicate primary disease of these exocrine glands. This interpretation is further emphasized by the results obtained by a sweat test, plasma osmolarity, and sialographic studies. The possibility that the gland impairments observed might be due to modifications of the neuroendocrine mechanisms regulating their secretory activity is suggested.

  1. Functional studies of the parotid and pancreas glands in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Charchaflie, R. J.; Fernandez, L. Bustos; Perec, C. J.; Gonzalez, E.; Marzi, A.

    1974-01-01

    Functional studies of the pancreas and parotid glands are reported in 17 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The exocrine function of the pancreas was studied by measuring amylase concentration after stimulation with the endogenous secretin-pancreozymine test (ESP). Under these conditions, the pancreatic amylase concentration in ALS patients was found to be markedly decreased by about 45% when compared with those of healthy control subjects. Different conclusions in the literature about a possible impairment of the exocrine pancreas in ALS patients induced us to study the function of the parotid gland, which has close structural, functional, and physiopathological relationship with the pancreas. Flow rate and bicarbonate concentration of parotid saliva were measured after indirect stimulation (intraoral citric acid) and direct stimulation (pilocarpine). After indirect stimulation, both parotid flow rate and bicarbonate concentration from ALS patients were found to be decreased by about 66% and 70% respectively, when compared with controls. On the other hand, direct stimulation with pilocarpine in ALS patients elicited normal responses in both flow rate and bicarbonate concentration of saliva. It is concluded that the pancreatic and parotid deficiencies observed in ALS patients do not indicate primary disease of these exocrine glands. This interpretation is further emphasized by the results obtained by a sweat test, plasma osmolarity, and sialographic studies. The possibility that the gland impairments observed might be due to modifications of the neuroendocrine mechanisms regulating their secretory activity is suggested. PMID:4852110

  2. A Gain-of-Function Mutation in IAA28 Suppresses Lateral Root Development

    PubMed Central

    Rogg, Luise E.; Lasswell, Jamie; Bartel, Bonnie

    2001-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin is important in many aspects of plant development. We have isolated an auxin-resistant Arabidopsis mutant, iaa28-1, that is severely defective in lateral root formation and that has diminished adult size and decreased apical dominance. The iaa28-1 mutant is resistant to inhibition of root elongation by auxin, cytokinin, and ethylene, but it responds normally to other phytohormones. We identified the gene defective in the iaa28-1 mutant by using a map-based positional approach and found it to encode a previously uncharacterized member of the Aux/IAA gene family. IAA28 is preferentially expressed in roots and inflorescence stems, and in contrast to other Aux/IAA genes, IAA28 transcription is not induced by exogenous auxin. Studies of the gain-of-function iaa28-1 mutant suggest that IAA28 normally represses transcription, perhaps of genes that promote lateral root initiation in response to auxin signals. PMID:11251090

  3. [Reduction of functional mobility and cognitive capacity in type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Mari Cassol; Tozatti, Joana; Fachin, Silvia Maria; Oliveira, Patricia Pereira de; Santos, Rosa Ferreira dos; Silva, Maria Elisabeth Rossi da

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the functional mobility and its relationship to cognitive ability in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), age between 50 and 65 years and under 10 years of diagnosis. An observational, analytical and cross-sectional study, involving no diabetic and type 2 diabetic individuals with inadequate glycemic control, selected by convenience sampling. In both groups, were administered structured questionnaire and cognitive assessment with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the clock drawing test (CDT), besides assessment of functional mobility by the Timed Up & Go (TUG). In TUG, DM2 patients presented a mean time of 11.27 seconds versus 9.52 seconds (p = 0.013). The association between cognitive decline and decrease of mobility was positive in individuals with T2DM (p = 0.037). In the subgroup that showed decrease of mobility and associated cognitive decline, 18% were patients with DM2 and 1.6% were individuals without T2DM (p < 0.01). Patients with T2DM presented worse functional mobility and cognitive performance, supporting the hypothesis that DM2 influence functional mobility and cognitive ability, regardless of neuropathic or vascular complications. These data suggest that hyperglycemia is an aggravating factor in the performance of activities requiring mental functions such as attention, working memory and orientation.

  4. Relationship between functional vision and balance and mobility performance in community-dwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Aartolahti, Eeva; Häkkinen, Arja; Lönnroos, Eija; Kautiainen, Hannu; Sulkava, Raimo; Hartikainen, Sirpa

    2013-10-01

    Vision is an important prerequisite for balance control and mobility. The role of objectively measured visual functions has been previously studied but less is known about associations of functional vision, that refers to self-perceived vision-based ability to perform daily activities. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between functional vision and balance and mobility performance in a community-based sample of older adults. This study is part of a Geriatric Multidisciplinary Strategy for the Good Care of the Elderly project (GeMS). Participants (576) aged 76-100 years (mean age 81 years, 70 % women) were interviewed using a seven-item functional vision questionnaire (VF-7). Balance and mobility were measured by the Berg balance scale (BBS), timed up and go (TUG), chair stand test, and maximal walking speed. In addition, self-reported fear of falling, depressive symptoms (15-item Geriatric Depression Scale), cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination) and physical activity (Grimby) were assessed. In the analysis, participants were classified into poor, moderate, or good functional vision groups. The poor functional vision group (n = 95) had more comorbidities, depressed mood, cognition decline, fear of falling, and reduced physical activity compared to participants with moderate (n = 222) or good functional vision (n = 259). Participants with poor functional vision performed worse on all balance and mobility tests. After adjusting for gender, age, chronic conditions, and cognition, the linearity remained statistically significant between functional vision and BBS (p = 0.013), TUG (p = 0.010), and maximal walking speed (p = 0.008), but not between functional vision and chair stand (p = 0.069). Poor functional vision is related to weaker balance and mobility performance in community-dwelling older adults. This highlights the importance of widespread assessment of health, including functional vision, to prevent balance impairment and maintain

  5. Computational and Functional Characterization of Angiogenin Mutations, and Correlation with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Padhi, Aditya K.; Banerjee, Kamalika; Gomes, James; Banerjee, Manidipa

    2014-01-01

    The Angiogenin (ANG) gene is frequently mutated in patients suffering from the neurodegenerative disease - amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Most of the ALS-causing mutations in Angiogenin affect either its ribonucleolytic or nuclear translocation activity. Here we report the functional characterization of two previously uncharacterized missense mutations in Angiogenin - D22G and L35P. We predict the nature of loss-of-function(s) in these mutants through our previously established Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation extended to 100 ns, and show that the predictions are entirely validated through biochemical studies with wild-type and mutated proteins. Based on our studies, we provide a biological explanation for the loss-of-function of D22G-Angiogenin leading to ALS, and suggest that the L35P-Angiogenin mutation would probably cause ALS symptoms in individuals harboring this mutation. Our study thus highlights the strength of MD simulation-based predictions, and suggests that this method can be used for correlating mutations in Angiogenin or other effector proteins with ALS symptoms. PMID:25372031

  6. The functional architecture of the left posterior and lateral prefrontal cortex in humans.

    PubMed

    Volle, Emmanuelle; Kinkingnéhun, Serge; Pochon, Jean-Baptiste; Mondon, Karl; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Seassau, Magali; Duffau, Hugues; Samson, Yves; Dubois, Bruno; Levy, Richard

    2008-10-01

    The anatomical and functional organization of the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) is one of the most debated issues in cognitive and integrative neurosciences. The aim of this study is to determine whether the human LPFC is organized according to the domain of information, to the level of the processing or to both of these dimensions. In order to clarify this issue, we have designed an experimental protocol that combines a functional magnetic resonance imaging study in healthy subjects (n = 12) and a voxel-by-voxel lesion mapping study in patients with focal prefrontal lesions (n = 37) compared with normal controls (n = 48). Each method used the same original cognitive paradigm ("the domain n-back tasks") that tests by a cross-dimensional method the domain of information (verbal, spatial, faces) and the level of processing (from 1- to 3-back). Converging data from the 2 methods demonstrate that the left posterior LPFC is critical for the higher levels of cognitive control and is organized into functionally different subregions (Brodman's area 9/46, 6/8/9, and 44/45). These findings argue in favor of a hybrid model of organization of the left posterior LPFC in which domain-oriented (nonspatial and spatially oriented) and cross-domain executive-dependent regions coexist, reconciling previously divergent data.

  7. EEG functional network topology is associated with disability in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fraschini, Matteo; Demuru, Matteo; Hillebrand, Arjan; Cuccu, Lorenza; Porcu, Silvia; Di Stefano, Francesca; Puligheddu, Monica; Floris, Gianluca; Borghero, Giuseppe; Marrosu, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is one of the most severe neurodegenerative diseases, which is known to affect upper and lower motor neurons. In contrast to the classical tenet that ALS represents the outcome of extensive and progressive impairment of a fixed set of motor connections, recent neuroimaging findings suggest that the disease spreads along vast non-motor connections. Here, we hypothesised that functional network topology is perturbed in ALS, and that this reorganization is associated with disability. We tested this hypothesis in 21 patients affected by ALS at several stages of impairment using resting-state electroencephalography (EEG) and compared the results to 16 age-matched healthy controls. We estimated functional connectivity using the Phase Lag Index (PLI), and characterized the network topology using the minimum spanning tree (MST). We found a significant difference between groups in terms of MST dissimilarity and MST leaf fraction in the beta band. Moreover, some MST parameters (leaf, hierarchy and kappa) significantly correlated with disability. These findings suggest that the topology of resting-state functional networks in ALS is affected by the disease in relation to disability. EEG network analysis may be of help in monitoring and evaluating the clinical status of ALS patients. PMID:27924954

  8. EEG functional network topology is associated with disability in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraschini, Matteo; Demuru, Matteo; Hillebrand, Arjan; Cuccu, Lorenza; Porcu, Silvia; di Stefano, Francesca; Puligheddu, Monica; Floris, Gianluca; Borghero, Giuseppe; Marrosu, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is one of the most severe neurodegenerative diseases, which is known to affect upper and lower motor neurons. In contrast to the classical tenet that ALS represents the outcome of extensive and progressive impairment of a fixed set of motor connections, recent neuroimaging findings suggest that the disease spreads along vast non-motor connections. Here, we hypothesised that functional network topology is perturbed in ALS, and that this reorganization is associated with disability. We tested this hypothesis in 21 patients affected by ALS at several stages of impairment using resting-state electroencephalography (EEG) and compared the results to 16 age-matched healthy controls. We estimated functional connectivity using the Phase Lag Index (PLI), and characterized the network topology using the minimum spanning tree (MST). We found a significant difference between groups in terms of MST dissimilarity and MST leaf fraction in the beta band. Moreover, some MST parameters (leaf, hierarchy and kappa) significantly correlated with disability. These findings suggest that the topology of resting-state functional networks in ALS is affected by the disease in relation to disability. EEG network analysis may be of help in monitoring and evaluating the clinical status of ALS patients.

  9. Macular sub-layer thinning and association with pulmonary function tests in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Simonett, Joseph M.; Huang, Russell; Siddique, Nailah; Farsiu, Sina; Siddique, Teepu; Volpe, Nicholas J.; Fawzi, Amani A.

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder that may have anterior visual pathway involvement. In this study, we compare the macular structure of patients with ALS to healthy controls, and examine correlations between macular sub-layer thickness measurements and pulmonary function tests and disease duration. ALS patients underwent optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging to obtain macular cube scans of the right eye. Macular cube OCT data from age-matched healthy subjects were provided by the OCT reading center. Semi-automated retinal segmentation software was used to quantify macular sub-layers. Pulmonary function tests and time since symptom onset were collected retrospectively from the electronic medical records of ALS patients. Macular retinal nerve fiber layer was significantly thinner in ALS patients compared to healthy controls (P < 0.05). Total macular and other sub-layer thicknesses were not reduced in the ALS cohort. Macular retinal nerve fiber layer thickness positively correlated with forced vital capacity % predicted and forced expiratory volume in 1 second % predicted (P < 0.05). In conclusion, analysis of OCT measurements supports the involvement of the anterior visual pathway in ALS. Subtle structural thinning in the macular retinal nerve fiber layer correlates with pulmonary function tests. PMID:27383525

  10. Time away from work predicts later cognitive function: differences by activity during leave.

    PubMed

    Leist, Anja K; Glymour, M Maria; Mackenbach, Johan P; van Lenthe, Frank J; Avendano, Mauricio

    2013-08-01

    We sought to examine how different activities performed during employment gaps are associated with later cognitive function and change. Five cognitive measures were used to indicate cognitive impairment of 18,259 respondents to the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe (ages 50-73) in 2004/5 or 2006/7. Using complete employment histories, employment gaps of ≥6 months between ages 25 and 65 were identified. Controlling for early life socioeconomic status, school performance, and education, higher risk of cognitive impairment was associated with employment gaps described as unemployment (odds ratio [OR], 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-1.35) and sickness (OR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.52-2.09). In contrast, lower risk of cognitive impairment was associated with employment gaps described as training (OR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.52-1.01) or maternity leave (OR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.57-0.79). In longitudinal mixed effects models, training and maternity leave were associated with lower 2-year aging-related cognitive decline. Periods away from work described as unemployment or sickness are associated with lower cognitive function, whereas maternity and training leaves are associated with better late-life cognitive function. Both causation and selection mechanisms may explain these findings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Symptoms and Cognitive Functions in Adolescents in Relation to Mobile Phone Use during Night.

    PubMed

    Schoeni, Anna; Roser, Katharina; Röösli, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Many adolescents tend to leave their mobile phones turned on during night, accepting that they may be awakened by an incoming text message or call. Using self-reported and objective operator recorded mobile phone use data, we thus aimed to analyze how being awakened during night by mobile phone affects adolescents' perceived health and cognitive functions. In this cross-sectional study, 439 adolescents completed questionnaires about their mobile phone use during night, health related quality of life and possible confounding factors. Standardized computerized cognitive tests were performed to assess memory and concentration capacity. Objective operator recorded mobile phone use data was further collected for 233 study participants. Data were analyzed by multivariable regression models adjusted for relevant confounders including amount of mobile phone use. For adolescents reporting to be awakened by a mobile phone during night at least once a month the odds ratio for daytime tiredness and rapid exhaustibility were 1.86 (95% CI: 1.02-3.39) and 2.28 (95% CI: 0.97-5.34), respectively. Similar results were found when analyzing objective operator recorded mobile phone use data (tiredness: 1.63, 95% CI: 0.94-2.82 and rapid exhaustibility: 2.32, 95% CI: 1.01-5.36). The cognitive tests on memory and concentration capacity were not related to mobile phone use during night. Overall, being awakened during night by mobile phone was associated with an increase in health symptom reports such as tiredness, rapid exhaustibility, headache and physical ill-being, but not with memory and concentration capacity. Prevention strategies should focus on helping adolescents set limits for their accessibility by mobile phone, especially during night.

  12. Symptoms and Cognitive Functions in Adolescents in Relation to Mobile Phone Use during Night

    PubMed Central

    Schoeni, Anna; Roser, Katharina; Röösli, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Many adolescents tend to leave their mobile phones turned on during night, accepting that they may be awakened by an incoming text message or call. Using self-reported and objective operator recorded mobile phone use data, we thus aimed to analyze how being awakened during night by mobile phone affects adolescents’ perceived health and cognitive functions. In this cross-sectional study, 439 adolescents completed questionnaires about their mobile phone use during night, health related quality of life and possible confounding factors. Standardized computerized cognitive tests were performed to assess memory and concentration capacity. Objective operator recorded mobile phone use data was further collected for 233 study participants. Data were analyzed by multivariable regression models adjusted for relevant confounders including amount of mobile phone use. For adolescents reporting to be awakened by a mobile phone during night at least once a month the odds ratio for daytime tiredness and rapid exhaustibility were 1.86 (95% CI: 1.02–3.39) and 2.28 (95% CI: 0.97–5.34), respectively. Similar results were found when analyzing objective operator recorded mobile phone use data (tiredness: 1.63, 95% CI: 0.94–2.82 and rapid exhaustibility: 2.32, 95% CI: 1.01–5.36). The cognitive tests on memory and concentration capacity were not related to mobile phone use during night. Overall, being awakened during night by mobile phone was associated with an increase in health symptom reports such as tiredness, rapid exhaustibility, headache and physical ill-being, but not with memory and concentration capacity. Prevention strategies should focus on helping adolescents set limits for their accessibility by mobile phone, especially during night. PMID:26222312

  13. EFFECTIVENESS OF DRY NEEDLING, STRETCHING, AND STRENGTHENING TO REDUCE PAIN AND IMPROVE FUNCTION IN SUBJECTS WITH CHRONIC LATERAL HIP AND THIGH PAIN: A RETROSPECTIVE CASE SERIES.

    PubMed

    Pavkovich, Ron

    2015-08-01

    noted. Subjects reported improved sleep and functional mobility, which were commensurate with their different age ranges and initial reported limitations in mobility. The results of this case series show promising outcomes for the use of dry needling in the treatment of chronic lateral hip and thigh pain. Further controlled clinical trials are recommended to determine the effectiveness of adding dry needling as compared to other interventions for chronic lateral hip and thigh pain. Level 4.

  14. Orofacial function and monitoring of oral care in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bergendal, Birgitta; McAllister, Anita

    2017-04-01

    The aim was to assess orofacial function and monitor oral care in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to maintain oral comfort and oral health. A case series of 14 patients newly diagnosed with ALS accepted to participate in a quality improvement project. After initial examinations, baseline oral conditions were obtained and the patients were seen every 3 months. Nordic Orofacial Test-Screening (NOT-S) was used for evaluation of orofacial function. Patients were grouped according to initial symptoms in a bulbar group and a spinal group with eight and six patients, respectively. The mean age at diagnosis was 62.8 years. All were dentate with a mean of 26.7 natural teeth. Most patients had very good oral and dental conditions. As expected, orofacial functions were differently affected in the two groups; at initial NOT-S registration, the mean total score was 5.6 (range 3-8 domains) in the bulbar group and 0.7 (0-2 domains) in the spinal group. At final registration, the corresponding figures were 6.1 and 3.2. Oral and dental aids were introduced according to need. In the bulbar group, several orofacial functions became impaired at an early stage of disease development, and at final registrations many vital orofacial functions were severely compromised. The spinal group was less severely affected orally. However, all individuals irrespective of type of initial symptoms needed assistance in performing oral hygiene measures in the latter part of the disease period. Good oral health and oral comfort could be maintained in all participants and no other dental treatment was needed.

  15. Language Laterality in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Typical Controls: A Functional, Volumetric, and Diffusion Tensor MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Knaus, Tracey A.; Silver, Andrew M.; Kennedy, Meaghan; Lindgren, Kristen A.; Dominick, Kelli C.; Siegel, Jeremy; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Language and communication deficits are among the core features of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Reduced or reversed asymmetry of language has been found in a number of disorders, including ASD. Studies of healthy adults have found an association between language laterality and anatomical measures but this has not been systematically investigated in ASD. The goal of this study was to examine differences in gray matter volume of perisylvian language regions, connections between language regions, and language abilities in individuals with typical left lateralized language compared to those with atypical (bilateral or right) asymmetry of language functions. 14 adolescent boys with ASD and 20 typically developing adolescent boys participated, including equal numbers of left- and right-handed individuals in each group. Participants with typical left lateralized language activation had smaller frontal language region volume and higher fractional anisotropy of the arcuate fasciculus compared to the group with atypical language laterality, across both ASD and control participants. The group with typical language asymmetry included the most right-handed controls and fewest left-handers with ASD. Atypical language laterality was more prevalent in the ASD than control group. These findings support an association between laterality of language function and language region anatomy. They also suggest anatomical differences may be more associated with variation in language laterality than specifically with ASD. Language laterality therefore may provide a novel way of subdividing samples, resulting in more homogenous groups for research into genetic and neurocognitive foundations of developmental disorders. PMID:20031197

  16. Language laterality in autism spectrum disorder and typical controls: a functional, volumetric, and diffusion tensor MRI study.

    PubMed

    Knaus, Tracey A; Silver, Andrew M; Kennedy, Meaghan; Lindgren, Kristen A; Dominick, Kelli C; Siegel, Jeremy; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

    2010-02-01

    Language and communication deficits are among the core features of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Reduced or reversed asymmetry of language has been found in a number of disorders, including ASD. Studies of healthy adults have found an association between language laterality and anatomical measures but this has not been systematically investigated in ASD. The goal of this study was to examine differences in gray matter volume of perisylvian language regions, connections between language regions, and language abilities in individuals with typical left lateralized language compared to those with atypical (bilateral or right) asymmetry of language functions. Fourteen adolescent boys with ASD and 20 typically developing adolescent boys participated, including equal numbers of left- and right-handed individuals in each group. Participants with typical left lateralized language activation had smaller frontal language region volume and higher fractional anisotropy of the arcuate fasciculus compared to the group with atypical language laterality, across both ASD and control participants. The group with typical language asymmetry included the most right-handed controls and fewest left-handers with ASD. Atypical language laterality was more prevalent in the ASD than control group. These findings support an association between laterality of language function and language region anatomy. They also suggest anatomical differences may be more associated with variation in language laterality than specifically with ASD. Language laterality therefore may provide a novel way of subdividing samples, resulting in more homogenous groups for research into genetic and neurocognitive foundations of developmental disorders. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Increased carrier mobility in end-functionalized oligosilanes.

    PubMed

    Surampudi, S; Yeh, M-L; Siegler, M A; Hardigree, J F Martinez; Kasl, T A; Katz, H E; Klausen, R S

    2015-03-01

    We show that a class of oligosilane-arene σ, π-hybrid materials exhibits distinct and enhanced solid-state electronic properties relative to its parent components. In the single crystal structure, the σ-conjugation axis of one molecule points towards the π-face of a neighboring molecule due to an unusual gauche conformation. This organization is hypothesized to be beneficial for charge transport. We show that solution-deposited crystalline films of the hybrid materials show up to a 100-fold increase in space-charge limited current (SCLC) mobility relative to literature reports of photoinduced hole transport in oligosilane films. The discovery that σ, π-hybrids are more than the sum of their parts offers a design opportunity for new materials.

  18. Effects of virtual reality training on mobility and physical function in stroke.

    PubMed

    Malik, Arshad Nawaz; Masood, Tahir

    2017-10-01

    Stroke is a common disabling condition which declines the functional and mobility level. The purpose of the case series was to determine the effect of virtual reality training on sensorimotor function and mobility level in stroke patients. Ten male (40-60 year) patients of stroke (08 Infarction, 02 Haemorrhagic) were selected from Physiotherapy department of Pakistan Railway Hospital, Rawalpindi. The additional virtual reality training (15-20 minutes) was provided 03 days per week for 06weeks along with task oriented training. All patients were assessed through Fugl-Meyer Assessment-Lower Extremity (FMA-LE) and Timed Get Up and Go Test (TUG) at baseline and after 06 weeks of training. The results showed that there was significant improvement in mobility level of stroke patients. It is concluded that combination of task oriented and virtual reality training considerably improves the physical performance and mobility level in stroke patients.

  19. Frontal lobe function and behavioral changes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a study from Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Wei, QianQian; Chen, XuePing; Zheng, ZhenZhen; Huang, Rui; Guo, XiaoYan; Cao, Bei; Zhao, Bi; Shang, Hui-Fang

    2014-12-01

    Despite growing interest, the frequency and characteristics of frontal lobe functional and behavioral deficits in Chinese people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), as well as their impact on the survival of ALS patients, remain unknown. The Chinese version of the frontal assessment battery (FAB) and frontal behavioral inventory (FBI) were used to evaluate 126 sporadic ALS patients and 50 healthy controls. The prevalence of frontal lobe dysfunction was 32.5%. The most notable impairment domain of the FAB was lexical fluency (30.7%). The binary logistic regression model revealed that an onset age older than 45 years (OR 5.976, P = 0.002) and a lower educational level (OR 0.858, P = 0.002) were potential determinants of an abnormal FAB. Based on the FBI score, 46.0% of patients showed varied degrees of frontal behavioral changes. The most common impaired neurobehavioral domains were irritability (25.4%), logopenia (20.6%) and apathy (19.0%). The binary logistic regression model revealed that the ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised scale score (OR 0.127, P = 0.001) was a potential determinant of an abnormal FBI. Frontal functional impairment and the severity of frontal behavioral changes were not associated with the survival status or the progression of ALS by the cox proportional hazard model and multivariate regression analyses, respectively. Frontal lobe dysfunction and frontal behavioral changes are common in Chinese ALS patients. Frontal lobe dysfunction may be related to the onset age and educational level. The severity of frontal behavioral changes may be associated with the ALSFRS-R. However, the frontal functional impairment and the frontal behavioral changes do not worsen the progression or survival of ALS.

  20. Laterality effects in functional connectivity of the angular gyrus during rest and episodic retrieval.

    PubMed

    Bellana, Buddhika; Liu, Zhongxu; Anderson, John A E; Moscovitch, Morris; Grady, Cheryl L

    2016-01-08

    The angular gyrus (AG) is consistently reported in neuroimaging studies of episodic memory retrieval and is a fundamental node within the default mode network (DMN). Its specific contribution to episodic memory is debated, with some suggesting it is important for the subjective experience of episodic recollection, rather than retrieval of objective episodic details. Across studies of episodic retrieval, the left AG is recruited more reliably than the right. We explored functional connectivity of the right and left AG with the DMN during rest and retrieval to assess whether connectivity could provide insight into the nature of this laterality effect. Using data from the publically available 1000 Functional Connectome Project, 8min of resting fMRI data from 180 healthy young adults were analysed. Whole-brain functional connectivity at rest was measured using a seed-based Partial Least Squares (seed-PLS) approach (McIntosh and Lobaugh, 2004) with bilateral AG seeds. A subsequent analysis used 6-min of rest and 6-min of unconstrained, silent retrieval of autobiographical events from a new sample of 20 younger adults. Analysis of this dataset took a more targeted approach to functional connectivity analysis, consisting of univariate pairwise correlations restricted to nodes of the DMN. The seed-PLS analysis resulted in two Latent Variables that together explained ~86% of the shared cross-block covariance. The first LV revealed a common network consistent with the DMN and engaging the AG bilaterally, whereas the second LV revealed a less robust, yet significant, laterality effect in connectivity - the left AG was more strongly connected to the DMN. Univariate analyses of the second sample again revealed better connectivity between the left AG and the DMN at rest. However, during retrieval the left AG was more strongly connected than the right to non-medial temporal (MTL) nodes of the DMN, and MTL nodes were more strongly connected to the right AG. The multivariate

  1. Impact of glaucoma severity and laterality on vision-specific functioning: the Singapore Malay eye study.

    PubMed

    Chan, Errol W; Chiang, Peggy P C; Wong, Tien Y; Saw, Seang M; Loon, Seng C; Aung, Tin; Lamoureux, Ecosse

    2013-02-01

    We determined the impact of glaucoma severity and laterality on vision-specific functioning (VF) in an Asian population. The Singapore Malay Eye Study (SiMES) was a population-based cross-sectional study of 3280 Malays aged 40 to 80 years. VF was assessed using the VF-11 questionnaire. Associations between VF-11 score and glaucoma clinical indices (glaucoma severity in better and worse eyes, and laterality) were determined by multivariate regression modeling. Glaucoma severity was defined as mild, moderate, advanced, and severe based on the Hodapp-Anderson-Parish system. Rasch analysis was used to validate the VF-11 and determine its psychometric properties. Of 926 persons analyzed, 123 had glaucoma (13.3% glaucoma prevalence in analyzed sample). The mean ± SD VF score was 3.64 ± 1.05 log of odds units (Logits). In multivariate models adjusting for sociodemographic, ocular, and systemic variables, poorer VF was associated with increasingly worse eye visual field loss (β = 0.016, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.004-0.029, P < 0.001), but not that of the better eye (P > 0.05). Compared to controls, VF was reduced in individuals with worse eye advanced and severe glaucoma (β = -0.65, 95% CI -1.03 to -0.28, P < 0.05), but not mild or moderate glaucoma (P > 0.05). Compared to controls, VF was reduced in unilateral (β = -0.29, 95% CI -0.54 to -0.04, P < 0.05), but not bilateral glaucoma (P > 0.05). These associations remained significant after adjusting for presenting and best-corrected visual acuity. Among Singaporean Malays, unilateral, and advanced and severe glaucoma in the worse eye significantly impacts on VF. Identifying early-stage glaucoma, preventing progression, and visual rehabilitation in advanced glaucoma are important aspects of glaucoma management.

  2. Grammar tests increase the ability to lateralize language function in the Wada test.

    PubMed

    Połczyńska, Monika; Curtiss, Susan; Walshaw, Particia; Siddarth, Prabha; Benjamin, Chris; Moseley, Brian D; Vigil, Celia; Jones, Michael; Eliashiv, Dawn; Bookheimer, Susan

    2014-12-01

    Grammar is a core component of the language system, yet it is rarely assessed during the Wada (intracarotid amobarbital) test. It is hypothesized that adding grammar tests to the recovery phase of the Wada test will increase our ability to lateralize language function. Sixteen individuals (nine females, fifteen right-handed, mean age 38.4 years, SD=10.7) with medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy participated in the study. On EEG ten patients had seizures originating in the left hemisphere (LH), five in the right hemisphere (RH), and one was insufficiently lateralized. We included only patients who were LH-dominant on the standard test in the encoding phase of the Wada test. In the recovery phase of Wada testing the participants underwent evaluation with a standard language and a new test of grammar, the CYCLE-N. Ten patients underwent bilateral injections, six unilateral (one RH, five LH). As expected, injection in the LH decreased language performance to a greater extent than injection to the RH on both tests. However, the CYCLE-N produced more profound language deficits in the injected LH compared to the RH (p=0.01), whereas the standard tests did not cause such pronounced differences (p=0.2). The results suggest that the standard tests did not significantly differentiate the effects of the injections and the CYCLE-N, for the most part, did. Our results are of particular relevance to patients who are too obtunded to speak in the encoding phase. In sum, the CYCLE-N may be helpful in assessing hemispheric dominance for language. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Eye-Tracking Control to Assess Cognitive Functions in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Keller, Jürgen; Gorges, Martin; Aho-Özhan, Helena E A; Uttner, Ingo; Schneider, Erich; Kassubek, Jan; Pinkhardt, Elmar H; Ludolph, Albert C; Lulé, Dorothée

    2016-10-13

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder with pathological involvement of upper and lower motoneurons, subsequently leading to progressive loss of motor and speech abilities. In addition, cognitive functions are impaired in a subset of patients. To evaluate these potential deficits in severely physically impaired ALS patients, eye-tracking is a promising means to conduct cognitive tests. The present article focuses on how eye movements, an indirect means of communication for physically disabled patients, can be utilized to allow for detailed neuropsychological assessment. The requirements, in terms of oculomotor parameters that have to be met for sufficient eye-tracking in ALS patients are presented. The properties of stimuli, including type of neuropsychological tests and style of presentation, best suited to successfully assess cognitive functioning, are also described. Furthermore, recommendations regarding procedural requirements are provided. Overall, this methodology provides a reliable, easy to administer and fast approach for assessing cognitive deficits in patients who are unable to speak or write such as patients with severe ALS. The only confounding factor might be deficits in voluntary eye movement control in a subset of ALS patients.

  4. Visual experience, unilateral cortical lesions, and lateralization of function in rats.

    PubMed

    Tees, R C

    1984-12-01

    The effects of early visual experience and later unilateral neocortical lesions on the behavior of male hooded rats were measured on an open-field, 17-arm spatial maze, and a visual field or perimetry test. The comparison of behavior observed in the open field revealed that light-reared (LR) rats that suffered a right hemispheric lesion were more active and reared more than any of their dark-reared (DR) counterparts as well as LR animals that had left hemispheric or sham operations. On the radial maze task in which 8 of 17 arms were baited, the rats with unilateral lesions performed less effectively than did the sham-operated animals. The effect of the lesions was significantly greater for LR rats than their DR counterparts. The perimetry testing revealed that although the operated animals did react to stimuli throughout their visual field, some contralateral neglect was evident in the case of both LR and DR rats. The lesions did have a much greater impact on orientational behavior of operated LR rats. However, as was the case with respect to performance on the radial maze, no evidence emerged of any functional asymmetry following the unilateral cortical lesions. The results are discussed in terms of Denenberg's (1981) hypothesis about cerebral and functional asymmetry in the rat.

  5. Higher Mobility Scores in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis Are Associated with Better Lung Function

    PubMed Central

    Thobani, Aneesha; Alvarez, Jessica A.; Blair, Shaina; Jackson, Kaila; Gottlieb, Eric R.; Walker, Seth

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine whether mobility and physical activity were associated with lung function in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF). Design. This was a prospective cohort observational study in an urban, academic, specialized care center. Participants were ambulatory, nonhospitalized adults with CF. Main Outcome Measures. Mobility was assessed monthly by the Life-Space Assessment (LSA) questionnaire and quarterly by pedometer. Lung function was assessed by spirometry. Results. Twenty-seven subjects participated. Subjects recorded mean pedometer steps of 20,213 ± 11,331 over three days and FEV1% predicted of 77.48% ± 22.60% over one year. The LSA score at enrollment was correlated with initial pedometer steps (r = 0.42 and P = 0.03), and mean LSA score over one year was correlated with mean number of steps (r = 0.51 and P = 0.007). LSA mobility and pedometer scores were correlated with FEV1% predicted at enrollment and throughout the study. Conclusions. Mobility and physical activity measured by LSA questionnaire and pedometer are positively associated with lung function in adults with CF. This study confirms the importance of mobility and physical activity and supports the utility of a simple office-based questionnaire as a measure of mobility in adults with CF. PMID:25789173

  6. Electromagnetic field emitted by 902 MHz mobile phones shows no effects on children's cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Haarala, Christian; Bergman, Monica; Laine, Matti; Revonsuo, Antti; Koivisto, Mika; Hämäläinen, Heikki

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated the potential effects of a standard 902 MHz global system for mobile communication (GSM) mobile phone on 10-14 years old children's cognitive function. A total of 32 children (16 boys, 16 girls) participated with their own and parental consent. The subjects were 10-14 years old (mean 12.1 years, SD 1.1). They performed a battery of cognitive tests twice in a counter-balanced order: once while exposed to an active mobile phone and once during exposure to an inactive phone. The tests were selected from those we used earlier with adults. The statistical analyses showed no significant differences between the mobile phone off and on conditions in reaction times and accuracy over all tests or in any single test. It was concluded that a standard mobile phone has no effect on children's cognitive function as measured by response speed and accuracy. The present results challenge some earlier findings suggesting that the electromagnetic field (EMF) created by an active mobile phone would facilitate cognitive functioning. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  7. Correlation between permanent tooth eruption pattern and the predominance of the motor function laterality

    PubMed Central

    Veloso-Durán, Ana; Vazquez-Salceda, Carmen M.; López-Jiménez, Julian; Veloso-Durán, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To asses whether dental eruption order can play a role in the early diagnosis of crossed laterality. Study Design: Dental eruption pattern along with eye, ear, hand and foot lateralism were examined on 131 children between 6 to 8 years old from public schools from a multietnic population area of Barcelona city. Statistic methods (Statgraphics Plus 5.1 program) were used to evaluate data recollected. Results: Only foot and dentition lateralities behave as independent variables regarding hand laterality. So dental eruption laterality (along with the foot one) would be one of the parameters more related to hand laterality given that dentition variable relationship is greater that the foot one. This suggests that tooth eruption could be more clinically relevant. Crossed laterality hand-foot is significantly more predominant in men (13%) than in women (1,6%). Meanwhile, the relationship between hand and dentition didn’t show any influence of sex. Conclusions: Dental eruption order, can be used as a good parameter in the determination of the patient’s laterality. Key words:Dentition, dental eruption, motor laterality, crossed laterality. PMID:24608220

  8. Functional status, life-space mobility, and quality of life: a longitudinal mediation analysis.

    PubMed

    Bentley, John P; Brown, Cynthia J; McGwin, Gerald; Sawyer, Patricia; Allman, Richard M; Roth, David L

    2013-09-01

    Using the Wilson-Cleary model of patient outcomes as a conceptual framework, the impact of functional status on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among older adults was examined, including tests of the mediation provided by life-space mobility. Participants were enrollees in a population-based, longitudinal study of mobility among community-dwelling older adults. Data from four waves of the study equally spaced approximately 18 months apart (baseline, 18, 36, and 54 months) were used for participants who survived at least 1 year beyond the 54-month assessment (n = 677). Autoregressive mediation models using longitudinal data and cross-sectional mediation models using baseline data were evaluated and compared using structural equation modeling. The longitudinal autoregressive models supported the mediating role of life-space mobility and suggested that this effect is larger for the mental component summary score than the physical component summary score of the SF-12. Evidence for a reciprocal relationship over time between functional status, measured by ADL difficulty, and life-space mobility was suggested by modification indices; these model elaborations did not alter the substantive meaning of the mediation effects. Mediated effect estimates from longitudinal autoregressive models were generally larger than those from cross-sectional models, suggesting that mediating relationships would have been missed or were potentially underestimated in cross-sectional models. These results support a mediating role for life-space mobility in the relationship between functional status and HRQoL. Functional status limitations might cause diminished HRQoL in part by limiting mobility. Mobility limitations may precede functional status limitations in addition to being a consequence thereof.

  9. Functional status, life-space mobility, and quality of life: a longitudinal mediation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Cynthia J.; McGwin, Gerald; Sawyer, Patricia; Allman, Richard M.; Roth, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Using the Wilson–Cleary model of patient outcomes as a conceptual framework, the impact of functional status on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among older adults was examined, including tests of the mediation provided by life-space mobility. Methods Participants were enrollees in a population-based, longitudinal study of mobility among community-dwelling older adults. Data from four waves of the study equally spaced approximately 18 months apart (baseline, 18, 36, and 54 months) were used for participants who survived at least 1 year beyond the 54-month assessment (n = 677). Autoregressive mediation models using longitudinal data and cross-sectional mediation models using baseline data were evaluated and compared using structural equation modeling. Results The longitudinal autoregressive models supported the mediating role of life-space mobility and suggested that this effect is larger for the mental component summary score than the physical component summary score of the SF-12. Evidence for a reciprocal relationship over time between functional status, measured by ADL difficulty, and life-space mobility was suggested by modification indices; these model elaborations did not alter the substantive meaning of the mediation effects. Mediated effect estimates from longitudinal autoregressive models were generally larger than those from cross-sectional models, suggesting that mediating relationships would have been missed or were potentially underestimated in cross-sectional models. Conclusions These results support a mediating role for life-space mobility in the relationship between functional status and HRQoL. Functional status limitations might cause diminished HRQoL in part by limiting mobility. Mobility limitations may precede functional status limitations in addition to being a consequence thereof. PMID:23161329

  10. Assessment on self-care, mobility and social function of children with spina bifida in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Sirzai, Hulya; Dogu, Beril; Demir, Selamet; Yilmaz, Figen; Kuran, Banu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the functional performance in children with spina bifida, using the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) to look into capacity of twenty-eight children with spina bifida with lesions at different levels in different dimensions of self-care, mobility and social function. Mean age of the patients was 3.5 ± 2.3 (1–10) years. In the muscle test carried out, 13 patients (44.8%) had no movements including pelvic elevation in lower extremity muscles and they were at level 5. Sixteen patients (54%) were non-ambulatory according to the Hoofer ambulation classification. Raw and scale scores in the self-care, mobility and social function domains both in the functional skill scale and in the caregiver scale were found to be lower compared to the data of the normal population. A statistically significant correlation was observed in the self-care values of the Functional Skills Scales and the Caregiver Assistance Scale measurements, which was positive for age and negative for Functional Ambulation Scale and muscle test (P < 0.05). A positive relation was found between the Functional Skills Scales-mobility area and age while a negative relation was observed between Functional Ambulation Scale and muscle test (P < 0.005). A negative relation was also found between Caregiver Assistance Scale-mobility and Functional Ambulation Scale and muscle test (P < 0.005). In our study, the functional performance of the children was found to be low. Low-level lesions, encouraging muscular strength and independence in mobility are all very important factors for functional independence. PMID:25206788

  11. Ultrasound assessment of diaphragmatic function in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Riccardo; Mandrioli, Jessica; Zona, Stefano; Antenora, Federico; Iattoni, Andrea; Monelli, Marco; Fini, Nicola; Tonelli, Roberto; Clini, Enrico; Marchioni, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    Evaluation of diaphragm function in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is critical in determining when to commence non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV). Currently, forced vital capacity (FVC) and sniff nasal inspiratory pressure (SNIP) are volitional measures for this evaluation, but require collaboration and are poorly specific. The primary aim of this study was to assess whether diaphragmatic thickness measured by ultrasound (US) correlates with lung function impairment in ALS patients. The secondary aim was then to compare US diaphragm thickness index (ΔTdi) with a new parameter (ΔTmax index). 41 patients with ALS and 30 healthy subjects were enrolled in the study. All subjects underwent spirometry, SNIP and diaphragm US evaluation, while arterial blood gases were measured in some patients only. US assessed diaphragm thickness (Tdi) at tidal volume (Vt) or total lung capacity (TLC), and their ratio (ΔTmax) were recorded. Changes (Δ) in Tdi indices during tidal volume (ΔTdiVt) and maximal inspiration (ΔTdiTLC) were also assessed. ΔTdiTLC (p <0.001) and ΔTmax (p = 0.007), but not ΔTdiVt, differed between patients and controls. Significant correlation (p < 0.05) was found between ΔTdiTLC, ΔTmax and FVC. The ROC curve analysis for comparison of individual testing showed better accuracy with Δtmax than with ΔtdiTLC for FVC (AUC 0.76 and 0.27) and SNIP (AUC 0.71 and 0.25). Diaphragm thickness assessed by ultrasound significantly correlates with global respiratory alterations in patients with ALS. ΔTmax represents a new US index of early diaphragmatic dysfunction, better related with the routinely performed lung function tests. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  12. Fingertip Reconstruction with the Laterally Based Thenar Flap: Indications and Long-Term Functional Results

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    The thenar flap is a time-tested method of fingertip reconstruction, but functional outcome data are scarce in the literature. The purpose of this study was to analyze the long-term function following fingertip reconstruction with a laterally based thenar flap and to compare these results with other established methods. Nineteen patients underwent a thenar flap between 2001 and 2004. Patients ranged in age from 3 to 48 years. The mean angle of proximal interphalangeal immobilization was 66° (range 30–85°) and was greater for radial digits. Time to division ranged from 11 to 15 days. Seventeen patients underwent follow-up evaluation of range of motion, two-point discrimination, and sensory threshold (Semmes-Weinstein). A questionnaire measured patient satisfaction in three areas: sensibility, function, and appearance. The mean follow-up was 20 months. Reconstructive goals were met in all cases. The mean metacarpalphalangeal and proximal interphalangeal motion in the reconstructed fingers was not significantly reduced, compared to the unaffected side. The distal interphalangeal motion was 42°, compared to 55° in the contralateral side (p < 0.01). The mean static two-point discrimination in the flap was 6.8 mm, compared to 3.8 mm in the contralateral side. Fourteen of 17 patients exhibited monofilament thresholds of 33.1 g/mm2 or less. There were no hypertrophic or tender donor scars. This study does not support the contention that thenar flaps are associated with problematic donor scars and flexion contractures, even for adults or ulnar digits. Sensory recovery compared favorably to published results of cross-finger and homodigital flaps. When sound technical principles are followed, excellent outcomes can be expected. PMID:18780036

  13. Seven Years Later: Effects of a Neighborhood Mobility Program on Poor Black and Latino Adults’ Well-being*

    PubMed Central

    FAUTH, REBECCA C.; LEVENTHAL, TAMA; BROOKS-GUNN, JEANNE

    2011-01-01

    This study explored program effects on adults’ well-being seven years following the implementation of a court-ordered neighborhood mobility program. Low-income black and Latino adults residing in poor, segregated neighborhoods in Yonkers, New York were randomly selected to relocate to publicly funded town-houses in middle-class neighborhoods within the city. Adults who moved (n = 141) and demographically similar adults who were not selected to move (n = 106) were interviewed. Data indicate that 85 percent of adults who moved to the new housing remained there at follow-up. Results revealed that adults who moved resided in neighborhoods with higher collective efficacy and less disorder and danger, but had fewer neighborhood social ties than adults who stayed in poor neighborhoods. Movers were also more likely to work and less likely to receive welfare than nonmovers. Adults who remained in low-poverty neighborhoods at the time of the follow-up reported better physical health than adults residing in poor neighborhoods, but mental health did not vary by neighborhood. PMID:18649497

  14. Structural neural correlates of impaired mobility and subsequent decline in executive functions: A 12-month prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chun Liang; Best, John R.; Chiu, Bryan K.; Nagamatsu, Lindsay S; Voss, Michelle W.; Handy, Todd C.; Bolandzadeh, Niousha; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Impaired mobility, such as falls, may be an early biomarker of subsequent cognitive decline and is associated with subclinical alterations in both brain structure and function. In this 12-month prospective study, we examined whether there are volumetric differences in gray matter and subcortical regions, as well as cerebral white matter, between older fallers and non-fallers. In addition, we assessed whether these baseline volumetric differences are associated with changes in cognitive function over 12 months. A total of 66 community-dwelling older adults were recruited and categorized by their falls status. Magnetic resonance imaging occurred at baseline and participants’ physical and cognitive performances were assessed at baseline and 12-months. At baseline, fallers showed significantly lower volumes in gray matter, subcortical regions, and cerebral white matter compared with non-fallers. Notably, fallers had significantly lower left lateral orbitofrontal white matter volume. Moreover, lower left lateral orbitofrontal white matter volume at baseline was associated with greater decline in set-shifting performance over 12 months. Our data suggest that falls may indicate subclinical alterations in regional brain volume that are associated with subsequent decline in executive functions. PMID:27079333

  15. Lateral mobility of plasma membrane lipids in Xenopus eggs: regional differences related to animal/vegetal polarity become extreme upon fertilization.

    PubMed

    Dictus, W J; van Zoelen, E J; Tetteroo, P A; Tertoolen, L G; de Laat, S W; Bluemink, J G

    1984-01-01

    Regional differences in the lateral mobility properties of plasma membrane lipids have been studied in unfertilized and fertilized Xenopus eggs by fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR) measurements. Out of a variety of commonly used lipid probes only the aminofluorescein-labeled fatty acids HEDAF (5-(N-hexadecanoyl)-aminofluorescein) and TEDAF (5-(N-tetradecanoyl)-aminofluorescein) appear to partition into the plasma membrane. Under all experimental conditions used these molecules show partial recovery upon photobleaching indicating the existence of lipidic microdomains. In the unfertilized egg the mobile fraction of plasma membrane lipids (approximately 50%) has a fivefold smaller lateral diffusion coefficient (D = 1.5 X 10(-8) cm2/sec) in the animal than in the vegetal plasma membrane (D = 7.6 X 10(-8) cm2/sec). This demonstrates the presence of an animal/vegetal polarity within the Xenopus egg plasma membrane. Upon fertilization this polarity is strongly (greater than 100X) enhanced leading to the formation of two distinct macrodomains within the plasma membrane. At the animal side of the egg lipids are completely immobilized on the time scale of FPR measurements (D less than 10(-10) cm2/sec), whereas at the vegetal side D is only slightly reduced (D = 4.4 X 10(-8) cm2/sec). The immobilization of animal plasma membrane lipids, which could play a role in the polyspermy block, probably arises by the fusion of cortical granules which are more numerous here. The transition between the animal and the vegetal domain is sharp and coincides with the boundary between the presumptive ecto- and endoderm. The role of regional differences in the plasma membrane is discussed in relation to cell diversification in early development.

  16. Early Language Milestones Predict Later Language, but not Autism Symptoms in Higher Functioning Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenworthy, Lauren; Wallace, Gregory L.; Powell, Kelly; Anselmo, Cheryl; Martin, Alex; Black, David O.

    2012-01-01

    Language ability is a known predictor of outcome in children with autism but plays a more controversial role for higher functioning children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We studied the relationship between early language milestones and later structural language, adaptive functioning and autism symptoms in a sample of 76 children (mean age…

  17. The energy dependence of the lateral dose response functions of detectors with various densities in photon-beam dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khee Looe, Hui; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn

    2017-02-01

    The lateral dose response function is a general characteristic of the volume effect of a detector used for photon dosimetry in a water phantom. It serves as the convolution kernel transforming the true absorbed dose to water profile, which would be produced within the undisturbed water phantom, into the detector-measured signal profile. The shape of the lateral dose response function characterizes (i) the volume averaging attributable to the detector’s size and (ii) the disturbance of the secondary electron field associated with the deviation of the electron density of the detector material from the surrounding water. In previous work, the characteristic dependence of the shape of the lateral dose response function upon the electron density of the detector material was studied for 6 MV photons by Monte Carlo simulation of a wall-less voxel-sized detector (Looe et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 6585-07). This study is here continued for 60Co gamma rays and 15 MV photons in comparison with 6 MV photons. It is found (1) that throughout these photon spectra the shapes of the lateral dose response functions are retaining their characteristic dependence on the detector’s electron density, and (2) that their energy-dependent changes are only moderate. This appears as a practical advantage because the lateral dose response function can then be treated as practically invariant across a clinical photon beam in spite of the known changes of the photon spectrum with increasing distance from the beam axis.

  18. The long-lived fusogenic state induced in erythrocyte ghosts by electric pulses is not laterally mobile.

    PubMed Central

    Sowers, A E

    1987-01-01

    The long-lived fusogenic state induced in spherical-shaped erythrocyte ghosts by electric field pulses (Sowers, A.E. 1984. J. Cell Biol. 99:1989-1996; Sowers, A.E. 1986. J. Cell Biol. 102:1358-1362) was studied in terms of how the fusion yield depended on both (a) the location where membrane-membrane contact took place with respect to the orientation of the electric pulse and (b) the time interval between the pulse treatment and membrane-membrane contact. Fusion yields were greater for membrane-membrane contact locations closer to where the pulse-induced transmembrane voltage was expected to be greatest and showed a time interval-dependent accelerating decay. The portion of the membrane that became fusogenic included the area up to a latitude of approximately 38 degrees of arc towards the equators of the membranes. A time interval-dependent increase or decrease in rate of decay in the fusion yield for membrane-membrane contacts induced closer to the equator of the membranes did not occur showing that the pulse-induced fusogenic state is immobile in the early 5-45-s interval after induction and has a rate of decay, which does not permit long time interval changes in lateral position to be measured. PMID:3427195

  19. Measurement of output power density from mobile phone as a function of input sound frequency.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Emanuele; Magazù, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of power density emitted by a mobile phone were carried out as a function of the sound frequency transmitted by a sound generator, ranging from 250 to 14000 Hz. Output power density was monitored by means of the selective radiation meter Narda SRM 3000 in spectrum analysis mode, and the octave frequency analysis of each tone used for the experimental design was acquired by the sound level meter Larson Davis LxT Wind. Vodafone providers were used for mobile phone calls with respect to various local base station in Southern-Italy. A relationship between the mobile phone microwaves power density and the sound frequencies transmitted by the sound generator was observed. In particular, microwaves power density level decreases significantly at sound frequency values larger than 4500 Hz. This result can be explained assuming that discontinuous transmission mode of global system for mobile communications is powered not only in silence-mode, but also at frequencies larger than 4500 Hz.

  20. Monitoring Functional Capability of Individuals with Lower Limb Amputations Using Mobile Phones

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Mark V.; McCarthy, Cliodhna; Valentin, Juliana; Herrmann, Megan; Kording, Konrad; Jayaraman, Arun

    2013-01-01

    To be effective, a prescribed prosthetic device must match the functional requirements and capabilities of each patient. These capabilities are usually assessed by a clinician and reported by the Medicare K-level designation of mobility. However, it is not clear how the K-level designation objectively relates to the use of prostheses outside of a clinical environment. Here, we quantify participant activity using mobile phones and relate activity measured during real world activity to the assigned K-levels. We observe a correlation between K-level and the proportion of moderate to high activity over the course of a week. This relationship suggests that accelerometry-based technologies such as mobile phones can be used to evaluate real world activity for mobility assessment. Quantifying everyday activity promises to improve assessment of real world prosthesis use, leading to a better matching of prostheses to individuals and enabling better evaluations of future prosthetic devices. PMID:23750254

  1. Functional Contribution of the Transcription Factor ATF4 to the Pathogenesis of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Matus, Soledad; Lopez, Estefanía; Valenzuela, Vicente; Nassif, Melissa; Hetz, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress represents an early pathological event in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). ATF4 is a key ER stress transcription factor that plays a role in both adaptation to stress and the activation of apoptosis. Here we investigated the contribution of ATF4 to ALS. ATF4 deficiency reduced the rate of birth of SOD1G86R transgenic mice. The fraction of ATF4−/−-SOD1G85R transgenic mice that were born are more resistant to develop ALS, leading to delayed disease onset and prolonged life span. ATF4 deficiency completely attenuated the induction of pro-apoptotic genes, including BIM and CHOP, and also led to quantitative changes in the ER protein homeostasis network. Unexpectedly, ATF4 deficiency enhanced mutant SOD1 aggregation at the end stage of the disease. Studies in the motoneuron cell line NSC34 demonstrated that knocking down ATF4 enhances mutant SOD1 aggregation possibly due to alteration in the redox status of the cell. Our results support a functional role of ATF4 in ALS, offering a novel target for disease intervention. PMID:23874395

  2. A lateralized functional auditory network is involved in anuran sexual selection.

    PubMed

    Xue, Fei; Fang, Guangzhan; Yue, Xizi; Zhao, Ermi; Brauth, Steven E; Tang, Yezhong

    2016-12-01

    Right ear advantage (REA) exists in many land vertebrates in which the right ear and left hemisphere preferentially process conspecific acoustic stimuli such as those related to sexual selection. Although ecological and neural mechanisms for sexual selection have been widely studied, the brain networks involved are still poorly understood. In this study we used multi-channel electroencephalographic data in combination with Granger causal connectivity analysis to demonstrate, for the first time, that auditory neural network interconnecting the left and right midbrain and forebrain function asymmetrically in the Emei music frog (Babina daunchina), an anuran species which exhibits REA. The results showed the network was lateralized. Ascending connections between the mesencephalon and telencephalon were stronger in the left side while descending ones were stronger in the right, which matched with the REA in this species and implied that inhibition from the forebrainmay induce REA partly. Connections from the telencephalon to ipsilateral mesencephalon in response to white noise were the highest in the non-reproductive stage while those to advertisement calls were the highest in reproductive stage, implying the attention resources and living strategy shift when entered the reproductive season. Finally, these connection changes were sexually dimorphic, revealing sex differences in reproductive roles.

  3. Functional contribution of the transcription factor ATF4 to the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Matus, Soledad; Lopez, Estefanía; Valenzuela, Vicente; Nassif, Melissa; Hetz, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress represents an early pathological event in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). ATF4 is a key ER stress transcription factor that plays a role in both adaptation to stress and the activation of apoptosis. Here we investigated the contribution of ATF4 to ALS. ATF4 deficiency reduced the rate of birth of SOD1(G86R) transgenic mice. The fraction of ATF4(-/-)-SOD1(G85R) transgenic mice that were born are more resistant to develop ALS, leading to delayed disease onset and prolonged life span. ATF4 deficiency completely attenuated the induction of pro-apoptotic genes, including BIM and CHOP, and also led to quantitative changes in the ER protein homeostasis network. Unexpectedly, ATF4 deficiency enhanced mutant SOD1 aggregation at the end stage of the disease. Studies in the motoneuron cell line NSC34 demonstrated that knocking down ATF4 enhances mutant SOD1 aggregation possibly due to alteration in the redox status of the cell. Our results support a functional role of ATF4 in ALS, offering a novel target for disease intervention.

  4. Dissociating the semantic function of two neighbouring subregions in the left lateral anterior temporal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Sanjuán, Ana; Hope, Thomas M.H.; Parker Jones, 'Ōiwi; Prejawa, Susan; Oberhuber, Marion; Guerin, Julie; Seghier, Mohamed L.; Green, David W.; Price, Cathy J.

    2015-01-01

    We used fMRI in 35 healthy participants to investigate how two neighbouring subregions in the lateral anterior temporal lobe (LATL) contribute to semantic matching and object naming. Four different levels of processing were considered: (A) recognition of the object concepts; (B) search for semantic associations related to object stimuli; (C) retrieval of semantic concepts of interest; and (D) retrieval of stimulus specific concepts as required for naming. During semantic association matching on picture stimuli or heard object names, we found that activation in both subregions was higher when the objects were semantically related (mug–kettle) than unrelated (car–teapot). This is consistent with both LATL subregions playing a role in (C), the successful retrieval of amodal semantic concepts. In addition, one subregion was more activated for object naming than matching semantically related objects, consistent with (D), the retrieval of a specific concept for naming. We discuss the implications of these novel findings for cognitive models of semantic processing and left anterior temporal lobe function. PMID:25496810

  5. Attenuated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functioning predicts accelerated pubertal development in girls 1 year later.

    PubMed

    Saxbe, Darby E; Negriff, Sonya; Susman, Elizabeth J; Trickett, Penelope K

    2015-08-01

    Accelerated pubertal development has been linked to adverse early environments and may heighten subsequent mental and physical health risks. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functioning has been posited as a mechanism whereby stress may affect pubertal development, but the literature lacks prospective tests of this mechanism. The current study assessed 277 youth (M = 10.84 years, SD = 1.14), 138 boys and 139 girls, who reported on their pubertal development and underwent the Trier Social Stress Test for Children at baseline and returned to the laboratory approximately 1 year later (M = 1.12 years, range = 0.59-1.98 years). For girls, lower cortisol area under the curve (with respect to ground) at Time 1 predicted more advanced pubertal development at Time 2, controlling for Time 1 pubertal development. This association persisted after additional covariates including age, body mass index, race, and maltreatment history were introduced, and was driven by adrenal rather than gonadal development. Cortisol was not linked to boys' subsequent pubertal development, and no interaction by gender or by maltreatment appeared. These results suggest that attenuated cortisol, reported in other studies of children exposed to early adversity, may contribute to accelerated pubertal tempo in girls.

  6. Automatic numerical determination of lateral influence functions for fast-CAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Marshal A.; Yamazoe, Kenji; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents kernel convolution with pattern matching (KCPM), which is an updated version of fast-CAD pattern matching for assessing lithography process variations. With KCPM, kernels that capture lateral feature interaction between features due to process variations are convolved with a mask layout to calculate a match factor, which indicates approximate change in intensity at the target location. The algorithm incorporates a custom source, a mask with electromagnetic effects, and an arbitrary pupil function. For further accuracy improvement, we introduce a source splitting technique. Though the evaluation speed is decreased, R2 correlation of the match factor and change in intensity is increased. Results are shown with R2 correlation as high as 0.99 for nearly coherent and annular illumination. Additionally, with a numerical aperture of 1.35, unbalanced quadrapole illumination, 10mλ RMS random aberration in projection optics and complex mask with EMF effects included, R2 correlation of more than 0.87 is achieved. This process is extremely fast (40μs per location) making it valuable for a wide range of applications, most commonly hot spot detection and optimization.

  7. Dissociating the semantic function of two neighbouring subregions in the left lateral anterior temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Sanjuán, Ana; Hope, Thomas M H; Jones, 'Ōiwi Parker; Prejawa, Susan; Oberhuber, Marion; Guerin, Julie; Seghier, Mohamed L; Green, David W; Price, Cathy J

    2015-09-01

    We used fMRI in 35 healthy participants to investigate how two neighbouring subregions in the lateral anterior temporal lobe (LATL) contribute to semantic matching and object naming. Four different levels of processing were considered: (A) recognition of the object concepts; (B) search for semantic associations related to object stimuli; (C) retrieval of semantic concepts of interest; and (D) retrieval of stimulus specific concepts as required for naming. During semantic association matching on picture stimuli or heard object names, we found that activation in both subregions was higher when the objects were semantically related (mug-kettle) than unrelated (car-teapot). This is consistent with both LATL subregions playing a role in (C), the successful retrieval of amodal semantic concepts. In addition, one subregion was more activated for object naming than matching semantically related objects, consistent with (D), the retrieval of a specific concept for naming. We discuss the implications of these novel findings for cognitive models of semantic processing and left anterior temporal lobe function.

  8. Attenuated hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis functioning predicts accelerated pubertal development in girls 1 year later

    PubMed Central

    SAXBE, DARBY E.; NEGRIFF, SONYA; SUSMAN, ELIZABETH J.; TRICKETT, PENELOPE K.

    2015-01-01

    Accelerated pubertal development has been linked to adverse early environments and may heighten subsequent mental and physical health risks. Hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis functioning has been posited as a mechanism whereby stress may affect pubertal development, but the literature lacks prospective tests of this mechanism. The current study assessed 277 youth (M = 10.84 years, SD = 1.14), 138 boys and 139 girls, who reported on their pubertal development and underwent the Trier Social Stress Test for Children at baseline and returned to the laboratory approximately 1 year later (M = 1.12 years, range = 0.59–1.98 years). For girls, lower cortisol area under the curve (with respect to ground) at Time 1 predicted more advanced pubertal development at Time 2, controlling for Time 1 pubertal development. This association persisted after additional covariates including age, body mass index, race, and maltreatment history were introduced, and was driven by adrenal rather than gonadal development. Cortisol was not linked to boys’ subsequent pubertal development, and no interaction by gender or by maltreatment appeared. These results suggest that attenuated cortisol, reported in other studies of children exposed to early adversity, may contribute to accelerated pubertal tempo in girls. PMID:25154521

  9. Trajectories of mobility and IADL function in older patients diagnosed with major depression.

    PubMed

    Hybels, Celia F; Pieper, Carl F; Blazer, Dan G; Fillenbaum, Gerda G; Steffens, David C

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown an association between depression and functional limitations in older adults. Our aim was to explore the latent traits of trajectories of limitations in mobility and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) tasks in a sample of older adults diagnosed with major depression. Participants were 248 patients enrolled in a naturalistic depression treatment study. Mobility/IADL tasks included walking one-fourth mile, going up/down stairs, getting around the neighborhood, shopping, handling money, taking care of children, cleaning house, preparing meals and doing yardwork/gardening. Latent class trajectory analysis was used to identify classes of mobility/IADL function over a 4-year period. Class membership was then used to predict functional status over time. Using time as the only predictor, three latent class trajectories were identified: (1) Patients with few mobility/IADL limitations (42%), (2) Patients with considerable mobility/IADL limitations (37%) and (3) Patients with basically no limitations (21%). The classes differed primarily in their initial functional status, with some immediate improvement followed by no further change for patients in Classes 1 and 2 and a stable course for patients in Class 3. In a repeated measures mixed model controlling for potential confounders, class was a significant predictor of functional status. The effect of baseline depression score, cognitive status, self-perceived health and sex on mobility/IADL score differed by class. These findings show systematic variability in functional status over time among older patients with major depression, indicating that a single trajectory may not reflect the pattern for all patients. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Early exposure to ultraviolet-B radiation decreases immune function later in life

    PubMed Central

    Ceccato, Emma; Cramp, Rebecca L.; Seebacher, Frank; Franklin, Craig E.

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians have declined dramatically worldwide. Many of these declines are occurring in areas where no obvious anthropogenic stressors are present. It is proposed that in these areas, environmental factors such as elevated solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation could be responsible. Ultraviolet-B levels have increased in many parts of the world as a consequence of the anthropogenic destruction of the ozone layer. Amphibian tadpoles are particularly sensitive to the damaging effects of UV-B radiation, with exposure disrupting growth and fitness in many species. Given that UV-B can disrupt immune function in other animals, we tested the hypothesis that early UV-B exposure suppresses the immune responses of amphibian tadpoles and subsequent juvenile frogs. We exposed Limnodynastes peronii tadpoles to sublethal levels of UV-B radiation for 6 weeks after hatching, then examined indices of immune function in both the tadpoles and the subsequent metamorphs. There was no significant effect of UV-B on tadpole leucocyte counts or on their response to an acute antigen (phytohaemagglutinin) challenge. However, early UV-B exposure resulted in a significant reduction in both metamorph leucocyte abundance and their response to an acute phytohaemagglutinin challenge. These data demonstrate that early UV-B exposure can have carry-over effects on later life-history traits even if the applied stressor has no immediately discernible effect. These findings have important implications for our understanding of the effects of UV-B exposure on amphibian health and susceptibility to diseases such as chytridiomycosis. PMID:27668081

  11. The integration of lateral gastrocnemius muscle function and kinematics in running turkeys

    PubMed Central

    Higham, Timothy E.; Nelson, Frank E.

    2008-01-01

    Animals commonly move over a range of speeds, and encounter considerable variation in habitat structure, such as inclines. Hindlimb kinematics and muscle function in diverse groups of vertebrates are affected by these changes in behavior and habitat structure, providing a fruitful source of variation for studying the integration of kinematics and muscle function. While it has been observed in a variety of vertebrates that muscle length change can be minimal during locomotion, it is unclear how, and to what degree, in vivo muscle length change patterns are integrated with kinematics. We tested the hypothesis that the length of the turkey lateral gastrocnemius (LG), a biarticular muscle that has moments at the ankle and knee, is not solely affected by changes in joint kinematics. We recorded in vivo muscle length changes (using sonomicrometry) and hindlimb movements (using high-speed video) of wild turkeys running on various inclines, and at different speeds. We quantified the relationship between joint angle (knee and ankle separately) and muscle length in freshly euthanized specimens, and then applied an empirically derived correction for changes in pennation angle and tendon strain during locomotion to improve the accuracy of our predicted lengths. We estimated muscle length at four points during each stride and then compared these values with those measured directly. Other than during swing, the predicted changes in muscle length calculated from the changes in joint kinematics did not correspond with our measured values of LG length. Therefore, the lengths at which the LG operates inturkeys are not determined entirely by kinematics. In addition to strain in series elastic components, we hypothesize that heterogeneous strain within muscles, interactions between muscles and muscle pennation angle all contribute to the non-linear relationship between muscle length changes and kinematics. PMID:18657958

  12. Correlation between permanent tooth eruption pattern and the predominance of the motor function laterality.

    PubMed

    Veloso-Durán, Ana; Vazquez-Salceda, Ma Carmen; López-Jiménez, Julian; Veloso-Durán, Margarita; Puigdollers, Andreu

    2014-09-01

    To asses whether dental eruption order can play a role in the early diagnosis of crossed laterality. Dental eruption pattern along with eye, ear, hand and foot lateralism were examined on 131 children between 6 to 8 years old from public schools from a multietnic population area of Barcelona city. Statistic methods (Statgraphics Plus 5.1 program) were used to evaluate data recollected. Only foot and dentition lateralities behave as independent variables regarding hand laterality. So dental eruption laterality (along with the foot one) would be one of the parameters more related to hand laterality given that dentition variable relationship is greater that the foot one. This suggests that tooth eruption could be more clinically relevant. Crossed laterality hand-foot is significantly more predominant in men (13%) than in women (1,6%). Meanwhile, the relationship between hand and dentition didn't show any influence of sex. Dental eruption order, can be used as a good parameter in the determination of the patient's laterality.

  13. The electromagnetic interference of mobile phones on the function of a γ-camera.

    PubMed

    Javadi, Hamid; Azizmohammadi, Zahra; Mahmoud Pashazadeh, Ali; Neshandar Asli, Isa; Moazzeni, Taleb; Baharfar, Nastaran; Shafiei, Babak; Nabipour, Iraj; Assadi, Majid

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate whether or not the electromagnetic field generated by mobile phones interferes with the function of a SPECT γ-camera during data acquisition. We tested the effects of 7 models of mobile phones on 1 SPECT γ-camera. The mobile phones were tested when making a call, in ringing mode, and in standby mode. The γ-camera function was assessed during data acquisition from a planar source and a point source of Tc with activities of 10 mCi and 3 mCi, respectively. A significant visual decrease in count number was considered to be electromagnetic interference (EMI). The percentage of induced EMI with the γ-camera per mobile phone was in the range of 0% to 100%. The incidence of EMI was mainly observed in the first seconds of ringing and then mitigated in the following frames. Mobile phones are portable sources of electromagnetic radiation, and there is interference potential with the function of SPECT γ-cameras leading to adverse effects on the quality of the acquired images.

  14. Functional mobility and its contributing factors for older adults in different cities in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sang-I; Lee, Hsuei-Chen; Chang, Ku-Chou; Yang, Yi-Ching; Tsauo, Jau-Yih

    2017-02-01

    Impaired mobility is one of the primary causes of declined functional capacity in old age. The timed up-and-go test (TUG), a common mobility test, has been studied extensively in Western countries. The purposes of this study were to compare and identify factors associated with TUG performance in older adults with impaired mobility and living in different cities in Taiwan. Older adults living in Taipei, Tainan, and Niaosong cities were screened for mobility impairments and then recruited. A series of questionnaires and physical and functional tests were used to obtain information and measurements for potential contributing factors and TUG. Regression analysis was conducted to determine factors contributing to TUG. A total of 413 older adults participated in the study. The mean TUG was 14.3 seconds for participants across the three cities, and was significantly shorter in Tainan. Age, number of medications, fear of falling, depression, high intensity activity time, reaction time, single leg stance time, and functional reach distance were found to have significant contribution. These factors accounted for approximately half of the variance in TUG. The regression equations were not equal for the different cities, with depression being the only common determinant. Taiwanese older adults with mobility problems living in different cities performed differently in TUG and the contributing factors were also different. These findings indicate a need of further studies examining older adults in different environments. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Mobile Functional Reach Test in People Who Suffer Stroke: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Merchán-Baeza, Jose Antonio; González-Sánchez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Postural instability is one of the major complications found in people who survive a stroke. Parameterizing the Functional Reach Test (FRT) could be useful in clinical practice and basic research, as this test is a clinically accepted tool (for its simplicity, reliability, economy, and portability) to measure the semistatic balance of a subject. Objective The aim of this study is to analyze the reliability in the FRT parameterization using inertial sensor within mobile phones (mobile sensors) for recording kinematic variables in patients who have suffered a stroke. Our hypothesis is that the sensors in mobile phones will be reliable instruments for kinematic study of the FRT. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of 7 subjects over 65 years of age who suffered a stroke. During the execution of FRT, the subjects carried two mobile phones: one placed in the lumbar region and the other one on the trunk. After analyzing the data obtained in the kinematic registration by the mobile sensors, a number of direct and indirect variables were obtained. The variables extracted directly from FRT through the mobile sensors were distance, maximum angular lumbosacral/thoracic displacement, time for maximum angular lumbosacral/thoracic displacement, time of return to the initial position, and total time. Using these data, we calculated speed and acceleration of each. A descriptive analysis of all kinematic outcomes recorded by the two mobile sensors (trunk and lumbar) was developed and the average range achieved in the FRT. Reliability measures were calculated by analyzing the internal consistency of the measures with 95% confidence interval of each outcome variable. We calculated the reliability of mobile sensors in the measurement of the kinematic variables during the execution of the FRT. Results The values in the FRT obtained in this study (2.49 cm, SD 13.15) are similar to those found in other studies with this population and with the same age range. Intrasubject

  16. Mobile Functional Reach Test in People Who Suffer Stroke: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Merchán-Baeza, Jose Antonio; González-Sánchez, Manuel; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio

    2015-06-11

    Postural instability is one of the major complications found in people who survive a stroke. Parameterizing the Functional Reach Test (FRT) could be useful in clinical practice and basic research, as this test is a clinically accepted tool (for its simplicity, reliability, economy, and portability) to measure the semistatic balance of a subject. The aim of this study is to analyze the reliability in the FRT parameterization using inertial sensor within mobile phones (mobile sensors) for recording kinematic variables in patients who have suffered a stroke. Our hypothesis is that the sensors in mobile phones will be reliable instruments for kinematic study of the FRT. This is a cross-sectional study of 7 subjects over 65 years of age who suffered a stroke. During the execution of FRT, the subjects carried two mobile phones: one placed in the lumbar region and the other one on the trunk. After analyzing the data obtained in the kinematic registration by the mobile sensors, a number of direct and indirect variables were obtained. The variables extracted directly from FRT through the mobile sensors were distance, maximum angular lumbosacral/thoracic displacement, time for maximum angular lumbosacral/thoracic displacement, time of return to the initial position, and total time. Using these data, we calculated speed and acceleration of each. A descriptive analysis of all kinematic outcomes recorded by the two mobile sensors (trunk and lumbar) was developed and the average range achieved in the FRT. Reliability measures were calculated by analyzing the internal consistency of the measures with 95% confidence interval of each outcome variable. We calculated the reliability of mobile sensors in the measurement of the kinematic variables during the execution of the FRT. The values in the FRT obtained in this study (2.49 cm, SD 13.15) are similar to those found in other studies with this population and with the same age range. Intrasubject reliability values observed in the

  17. Differential muscle function between muscle synergists: long and lateral heads of the triceps in jumping and landing goats (Capra hircus).

    PubMed

    Carroll, Andrew M; Lee, David V; Biewener, Andrew A

    2008-10-01

    We investigate how the biarticular long head and monoarticular lateral head of the triceps brachii function in goats (Capra hircus) during jumping and landing. Elbow moment and work were measured from high-speed video and ground reaction force (GRF) recordings. Muscle activation and strain were measured via electromyography and sonomicrometry, and muscle stress was estimated from elbow moment and by partitioning stress based on its relative strain rate. Elbow joint and muscle function were compared among three types of limb usage: jump take-off (lead limb), the step prior to jump take-off (lag limb), and landing. We predicted that the strain and work patterns in the monoarticular lateral head would follow the kinematics and work of the elbow more closely than would those of the biarticular long head. In general this prediction was supported. For instance, the lateral head stretched (5 +/- 2%; mean +/- SE) in the lead and lag limbs to absorb work during elbow flexion and joint work absorption, while the long head shortened (-7 +/- 1%) to produce work. During elbow extension, both muscles shortened by similar amounts (-10 +/- 2% long; -13 +/- 4% lateral) in the lead limb to produce work. Both triceps heads functioned similarly in landing, stretching (13 +/- 3% in the long head and 19 +/- 5% in the lateral) to absorb energy. In general, the long head functioned to produce power at the shoulder and elbow, while the lateral head functioned to resist elbow flexion and absorb work, demonstrating that functional diversification can arise between mono- and biarticular muscle agonists operating at the same joint.

  18. The Functional Genetics of Handedness and Language Lateralization: Insights from Gene Ontology, Pathway and Disease Association Analyses.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Judith; Lor, Stephanie; Klose, Rena; Güntürkün, Onur; Ocklenburg, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Handedness and language lateralization are partially determined by genetic influences. It has been estimated that at least 40 (and potentially more) possibly interacting genes may influence the ontogenesis of hemispheric asymmetries. Recently, it has been suggested that analyzing the genetics of hemispheric asymmetries on the level of gene ontology sets, rather than at the level of individual genes, might be more informative for understanding the underlying functional cascades. Here, we performed gene ontology, pathway and disease association analyses on genes that have previously been associated with handedness and language lateralization. Significant gene ontology sets for handedness were anatomical structure development, pattern specification (especially asymmetry formation) and biological regulation. Pathway analysis highlighted the importance of the TGF-beta signaling pathway for handedness ontogenesis. Significant gene ontology sets for language lateralization were responses to different stimuli, nervous system development, transport, signaling, and biological regulation. Despite the fact that some authors assume that handedness and language lateralization share a common ontogenetic basis, gene ontology sets barely overlap between phenotypes. Compared to genes involved in handedness, which mostly contribute to structural development, genes involved in language lateralization rather contribute to activity-dependent cognitive processes. Disease association analysis revealed associations of genes involved in handedness with diseases affecting the whole body, while genes involved in language lateralization were specifically engaged in mental and neurological diseases. These findings further support the idea that handedness and language lateralization are ontogenetically independent, complex phenotypes.

  19. N-glycosylation enables high lateral mobility of GPI-anchored proteins at a molecular crowding threshold

    PubMed Central

    Hartel, Andreas J. W.; Glogger, Marius; Jones, Nicola G.; Abuillan, Wasim; Batram, Christopher; Hermann, Anne; Fenz, Susanne F.; Tanaka, Motomu; Engstler, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The protein density in biological membranes can be extraordinarily high, but the impact of molecular crowding on the diffusion of membrane proteins has not been studied systematically in a natural system. The diversity of the membrane proteome of most cells may preclude systematic studies. African trypanosomes, however, feature a uniform surface coat that is dominated by a single type of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG). Here we study the density-dependence of the diffusion of different glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored VSG-types on living cells and in artificial membranes. Our results suggest that a specific molecular crowding threshold (MCT) limits diffusion and hence affects protein function. Obstacles in the form of heterologous proteins compromise the diffusion coefficient and the MCT. The trypanosome VSG-coat operates very close to its MCT. Importantly, our experiments show that N-linked glycans act as molecular insulators that reduce retarding intermolecular interactions allowing membrane proteins to function correctly even when densely packed. PMID:27641538

  20. The key players of the primary root growth and development also function in lateral roots in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Huiyu; Jia, Yuebin; Niu, Tiantian; Yu, Qianqian; Ding, Zhaojun

    2014-05-01

    The core regulators which are required for primary root growth and development also function in lateral root development or lateral root stem cell niche maintenance. The primary root systems and the lateral root systems are the two important root systems which are vital to the survival of plants. Though the molecular mechanism of the growth and development of both the primary root systems and the lateral root systems have been extensively studied individually in Arabidopsis, there are not so much evidence to show that if both root systems share common regulatory mechanisms. AP2 family transcription factors such as PLT1 (PLETHORA1) and PLT2, GRAS family transcription factors such as SCR (SCARECROW) and SHR (SHORT ROOT) and WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX transcription factor WOX5 have been extensively studied and found to be essential for primary root growth and development. In this study, through the expression pattern analysis and mutant examinations, we found that these core regulators also function in lateral root development or lateral root stem cell niche maintenance.

  1. A longitudinal study of functional outcomes after surgical resection and microvascular reconstruction for oral cancer: tongue mobility and swallowing function.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lindsay; Rieger, Jana M; Harris, Jeffrey; Seikaly, Hadi

    2010-11-01

    Controversy exists regarding physiologic outcomes related to the tongue after radial forearm free flap (RFFF) reconstruction of hemiglossectomy defects. The purpose of this study is to report swallowing and tongue mobility outcomes for patients with RFFF reconstruction of the anterior two thirds of the tongue. Swallowing and tongue mobility were assessed at 4 different time points over the course of 1 year of treatment for 15 patients who underwent RFFF reconstruction of the anterior two thirds of the tongue. Preoperative swallowing function in the treatment group was compared with a patient group that had no involvement of the tongue. A comparison group of 14 patients with nasopharyngeal cancer was used to compare preintervention function in patients with and without lesions of the tongue. No differences existed between the experimental and comparison groups before intervention. Two significant differences were found for swallowing ability and tongue mobility in the experimental group. Some of the measures at 1 month postoperatively were significantly different from some of the preoperative measures for liquid swallows and posterior-tongue mobility. All measures returned to baseline by the study's end. Although some minor deficits exist in swallowing and tongue mobility after RFFF reconstruction, it appears that these problems are no longer evident 12 months postoperatively. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Slope of the lateral density function of extensive air showers around the knee region as an indicator of shower age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Rajat K.; Dam, Sandip

    2016-11-01

    Analyzing simulated extensive air shower (EAS) events generated with the Monte Carlo code CORSIKA, this paper critically studies the characteristics of lateral distribution of electrons in EAS around the knee energy region of the energy spectrum of primary cosmic rays. The study takes into account the issue of the lateral shower age parameter as an indicator of the stage of development of showers in the atmosphere. The correlation of the lateral shower age parameter with other EAS observables is examined, using simulated data in the context of its possible use in a multi-parameter study of EAS, with a view to obtaining information about the nature of the shower initiating primaries at sea level EAS experiments. It is shown that the observed slope of the lateral density function in the 3-dimensional plot, at least for the KASCADE data, supports the idea of a transition from light to heavy mass composition around the knee.

  3. Effect of fish oil on lateral mobility of prostaglandin F2α (FP) receptors and spatial distribution of lipid microdomains in bovine luteal cell plasma membrane in vitro.

    PubMed

    Plewes, M R; Burns, P D; Graham, P E; Hyslop, R M; Barisas, B G

    2017-01-01

    Lipid microdomains are ordered regions on the plasma membrane of cells, rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids, ranging in size from 10 to 200 nm in diameter. These lipid-ordered domains may serve as platforms to facilitate colocalization of intracellular signaling proteins during agonist-induced signal transduction. It is hypothesized that fish oil will disrupt the lipid microdomains, increasing spatial distribution of these lipid-ordered domains and lateral mobility of the prostaglandin (PG) F2α (FP) receptors in bovine luteal cells. The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of fish oil on (1) the spatial distribution of lipid microdomains, (2) lateral mobility of FP receptors, and (3) lateral mobility of FP receptors in the presence of PGF2α on the plasma membrane of bovine luteal cells in vitro. Bovine ovaries were obtained from a local abattoir and corpora lutea were digested using collagenase. In experiment 1, lipid microdomains were labeled using cholera toxin subunit B Alexa Fluor 555. Domains were detected as distinct patches on the plasma membrane of mixed luteal cells. Fish oil treatment decreased fluorescent intensity in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.01). In experiment 2, single particle tracking was used to examine the effects of fish oil treatment on lateral mobility of FP receptors. Fish oil treatment increased microdiffusion and macrodiffusion coefficients of FP receptors as compared to control cells (P < 0.05). In addition, compartment diameters of domains were larger, and residence times were reduced for receptors in fish oil-treated cells (P < 0.05). In experiment 3, single particle tracking was used to determine the effects of PGF2α on lateral mobility of FP receptors and influence of fish oil treatment. Lateral mobility of receptors was decreased within 5 min following the addition of ligand for control cells (P < 0.05). However, lateral mobility of receptors was unaffected by addition of ligand for fish oil-treated cells

  4. Tracking control of two-wheel driven mobile robot using compound sine function neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jun

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to propose a compound sine function neural network (NN) with continuous learning algorithm for the velocity and orientation angle tracking control of a mobile robot. Herein, two NN controllers embedded in the closed-loop control system are capable of on-line continuous learning and do not require any knowledge of the dynamics model. The neuron function of the hidden layer in the three-layer feed-forward network structure is on the basis of combining a sine function with a unipolar sigmoid function. In the NN algorithm, the weight values are only adjusted between the nodes in hidden layer and the output nodes, while the weight values between the input layer and the hidden layer are one, that is, constant, without the weight adjustment. The developed NN controllers have simple algorithm and fast learning convergence. Therefore, the proposed NN controllers can be suitable for the real-time tracking control of the mobile robots. The simulation results show that the proposed NN controller has better control performance in the tracking control of the mobile robot. The compound sine function NN provides a new way to solve tracking control problems for a mobile robot.

  5. Chaperonin function depends on structure and disorder in co-chaperonin mobile loops.

    PubMed

    Landry, S J; Steede, N K; Garaudy, A M; Maskos, K; Viitanen, P V

    1999-01-01

    Co-chaperonins from diverse organisms exhibit mobile loops which fold into a beta hairpin conformation upon binding to the chaperonin. GroES, Gp31, and human Hsp10 mobile loops exhibit a preference for the beta hairpin conformation in the free co-chaperonins, and the conformational dynamics of the human Hsp10 mobile loop appear to be restricted by nascent hairpin formation. Backbone conformational entropy must weigh against binding of co-chaperonins to chaperonins, and thus the conformational preferences of the loops may strongly influence chaperonin-binding affinity. Indeed, subtle mutations in the loops change GroEL-binding affinity and cause defects in chaperonin function, and these defects can be suppressed by mutations in GroEL which compensate for the changes in affinity. The fact that high-affinity co-chaperonin binding impairs chaperonin function has implications for the mechanism of chaperonin-assisted protein folding.

  6. Graph theory analysis of functional brain networks and mobility disability in older adults.

    PubMed

    Hugenschmidt, Christina E; Burdette, Jonathan H; Morgan, Ashley R; Williamson, Jeff D; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Laurienti, Paul J

    2014-11-01

    The brain's structural integrity is associated with mobility function in older adults. Changes in function may be evident earlier than changes in structure and may be more directly related to mobility. Therefore, we assessed whether functional brain networks varied with mobility function in older adults. Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging were collected on 24 young (mean age = 26.4±5.1) and 48 older (mean age = 72.04±5.1) participants. Older participants were divided into three groups by SPPB score: Low SPPB (score = 7-9), Mid SPPB (score = 10), High SPPB (score = 11-12).Graph theory-based methods were used to characterize and compare brain network organization. Connectivity in the somatomotor cortex distinguished between groups based on SPPB score. The community structure of the somatomotor cortex was significantly less consistent in the Low SPPB group (mean = 0.097±0.05) compared with Young (mean = 0.163±0.09, p = .03) SPPB group. Striking differences were evident in second-order connections between somatomotor cortex and superior temporal gyrus and insula that reached statistical significance. The Low SPPB group (mean = 140.87±109.30) had a significantly higher number of connections than Young (mean = 45.05±33.79, p = .0003) or High (mean = 49.61±35.31, p = .002) SPPB group. Older adults with poorer mobility function exhibited reduced consistency of somatomotor community structure and a greater number of secondary connections with vestibular and multisensory regions of the brain. Further study is needed to fully interpret these effects, but analysis of functional brain networks adds new insights to the contribution of the brain to mobility. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Mobile telephone use is associated with changes in cognitive function in young adolescents.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Michael J; Benke, Geza P; Dimitriadis, Christina; Inyang, Imo O; Sim, Malcolm R; Wolfe, Rory S; Croft, Rodney J

    2009-12-01

    As part of the Mobile Radiofrequency Phone Exposed Users' Study (MoRPhEUS), a cross-sectional epidemiological study examined cognitive function in secondary school students. We recruited 317, 7th grade students (144 boys, 173 girls, median age 13 years) from 20 schools around Melbourne, Australia. Participants completed an exposure questionnaire based on the Interphone study, a computerised cognitive test battery, and the Stroop colour-word test. The principal exposure metric was the total number of reported mobile phone voice calls per week. Linear regression models were fitted to cognitive test response times and accuracies. Age, gender, ethnicity, socio-economic status and handedness were fitted as covariates and standard errors were adjusted for clustering by school. The accuracy of working memory was poorer, reaction time for a simple learning task shorter, associative learning response time shorter and accuracy poorer in children reporting more mobile phone voice calls. There were no significant relationships between exposure and signal detection, movement monitoring or estimation. The completion time for Stroop word naming tasks was longer for those reporting more mobile phone voice calls. The findings were similar for total short message service (SMS, also known as text) messages per week, suggesting these cognitive changes were unlikely due to radiofrequency (RF) exposure. Overall, mobile phone use was associated with faster and less accurate responding to higher level cognitive tasks. These behaviours may have been learned through frequent use of a mobile phone.

  8. Longitudinal Relationships Between Productive Activities and Functional Health in Later Years: A Multivariate Latent Growth Curve Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunhee; Tang, Fengyan; Kim, Sung-Geun; Turk, Phillip

    2016-10-01

    This study examined the longitudinal relationships between functional health in later years and three types of productive activities: volunteering, full-time, and part-time work. Using the data from five waves (2000-2008) of the Health and Retirement Study, we applied multivariate latent growth curve modeling to examine the longitudinal relationships among individuals 50 or over. Functional health was measured by limitations in activities of daily living. Individuals who volunteered, worked either full time or part time exhibited a slower decline in functional health than nonparticipants. Significant associations were also found between initial functional health and longitudinal changes in productive activity participation. This study provides additional support for the benefits of productive activities later in life; engagement in volunteering and employment are indeed associated with better functional health in middle and old age. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Lateral Variations in Crustal Structure of Northern Victoria Land From Teleseismic Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piana Agostinet, N.; Amato, A.; di Bona, M.; Frederiksen, A.

    2002-12-01

    We investigate lateral variations in crustal structure of Terra Nova Bay (TNB) area using Receiver Functions (RFs) recorded during four austral summer campaigns (from 1993 to 2000). Seismic stations were deployed around Terra Nova Bay italian base, from the sea to reach the interior of the Transantartic Mountains (TAM), the most striking example of nocontractional mountain belt. RFs was computed from teleseismic waveforms, using frequency-domain deconvolution, following Di Bona's scheme [Di Bona, 1998]. Previous attempts to analyze the data-set, using 1-D models for S-velocity crustal structure, yielded to controversial results, but confirmed the existence of a thinned crust in the area and revealed a deepening of the Moho from the coast to inland [Di Bona et al., 1997]. However, a strong component of converted energy in tangential RFs suggested the presence of dipping and/or anisotropic layers, and stressed the limits of previous technique. To improve our knowledge about Moho geometry in TNB area, we have developed a new RFs inversion scheme. We compute RF components using Frederiksen's method [Frederiksen and Bostock, 2000] for modelling teleseimic wave propagation in anisotropic dipping structures, jointly with a Neighbourhood Algorithm [Sambridge, 1999] which explore the 24-parameters space that characterize our 3-D crustal models. Our main goals are: (1) to test our new RFs inversion methodology; (2) to map Moho-depth and intercrustal S-waves velocity discontinuities in TNB area, with the aim to emphasize dipping and anisotropic layers; (3) to analyze new teleseismic waveforms recorded near TNB base by a seismic station operating in continuous recording, from 1999 to present.

  10. Functional Connectivity Changes in Resting-State EEG as Potential Biomarker for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Parameswaran Mahadeva; Egan, Catriona; Pinto-Grau, Marta; Burke, Tom; Elamin, Marwa; Nasseroleslami, Bahman; Pender, Niall; Lalor, Edmund C.; Hardiman, Orla

    2015-01-01

    Background Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is heterogeneous and overlaps with frontotemporal dementia. Spectral EEG can predict damage in structural and functional networks in frontotemporal dementia but has never been applied to ALS. Methods 18 incident ALS patients with normal cognition and 17 age matched controls underwent 128 channel EEG and neuropsychology assessment. The EEG data was analyzed using FieldTrip software in MATLAB to calculate simple connectivity measures and scalp network measures. sLORETA was used in nodal analysis for source localization and same methods were applied as above to calculate nodal network measures. Graph theory measures were used to assess network integrity. Results Cross spectral density in alpha band was higher in patients. In ALS patients, increased degree values of the network nodes was noted in the central and frontal regions in the theta band across seven of the different connectivity maps (p<0.0005). Among patients, clustering coefficient in alpha and gamma bands was increased in all regions of the scalp and connectivity were significantly increased (p=0.02). Nodal network showed increased assortativity in alpha band in the patients group. The Clustering Coefficient in Partial Directed Connectivity (PDC) showed significantly higher values for patients in alpha, beta, gamma, theta and delta frequencies (p=0.05). Discussion There is increased connectivity in the fronto-central regions of the scalp and areas corresponding to Salience and Default Mode network in ALS, suggesting a pathologic disruption of neuronal networking in early disease states. Spectral EEG has potential utility as a biomarker in ALS. PMID:26091258

  11. Dorso-medial and ventro-lateral functional specialization of the human retrosplenial complex in spatial updating and orienting.

    PubMed

    Burles, Ford; Slone, Edward; Iaria, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    The retrosplenial complex is a region within the posterior cingulate cortex implicated in spatial navigation. Here, we investigated the functional specialization of this large and anatomically heterogeneous region using fMRI and resting-state functional connectivity combined with a spatial task with distinct phases of spatial 'updating' (i.e., integrating and maintaining object locations in memory during spatial displacement) and 'orienting' (i.e., recalling unseen locations from current position in space). Both spatial 'updating' and 'orienting' produced bilateral activity in the retrosplenial complex, among other areas. However, spatial 'updating' produced slightly greater activity in ventro-lateral portions, of the retrosplenial complex, whereas spatial 'orienting' produced greater activity in a more dorsal and medial portion of it (both regions localized along the parieto-occipital fissure). At rest, both ventro-lateral and dorso-medial subregions of the retrosplenial complex were functionally connected to the hippocampus and parahippocampus, regions both involved in spatial orientation and navigation. However, the ventro-lateral subregion of the retrosplenial complex displayed more positive functional connectivity with ventral occipital and temporal object recognition regions, whereas the dorso-medial subregion activity was more correlated to dorsal activity and frontal activity, as well as negatively correlated with more ventral parietal structures. These findings provide evidence for a dorso-medial to ventro-lateral functional specialization within the human retrosplenial complex that may shed more light on the complex neural mechanisms underlying spatial orientation and navigation in humans.

  12. Functional diversity of the lateral line system among populations of a native Australian freshwater fish.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Lindsey; Grierson, Pauline F; Davies, Peter M; Hemmi, Jan; Collin, Shaun P; Kelley, Jennifer L

    2017-06-15

    Fishes use their mechanoreceptive lateral line system to sense nearby objects by detecting slight fluctuations in hydrodynamic motion within their immediate environment. Species of fish from different habitats often display specialisations of the lateral line system, in particular the distribution and abundance of neuromasts, but the lateral line can also exhibit considerable diversity within a species. Here, we provide the first investigation of the lateral line system of the Australian western rainbowfish (Melanotaenia australis), a species that occupies a diversity of freshwater habitats across semi-arid northwest Australia. We collected 155 individuals from eight populations and surveyed each habitat for environmental factors that may contribute to lateral line specialisation, including water flow, predation risk, habitat structure and prey availability. Scanning electron microscopy and fluorescent dye labelling were used to describe the lateral line system in M. australis, and to examine whether the abundance and arrangement of superficial neuromasts (SNs) varied within and among populations. We found that the SNs of M. australis were present in distinct body regions rather than lines. The abundance of SNs within each body region was highly variable, and also differed among populations and individuals. Variation in SN abundance among populations was best explained by habitat structure and the availability of invertebrate prey. Our finding that specific environmental factors explain among-population variation in a key sensory system suggests that the ability to acquire sensory information is specialised for the particular behavioural needs of the animal. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Mobile personal health records for pregnancy monitoring functionalities: Analysis and potential.

    PubMed

    Bachiri, Mariam; Idri, Ali; Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; Toval, Ambrosio

    2016-10-01

    Personal Health Records (PHRs) are a rapidly growing area of health information technology. PHR users are able to manage their own health data and communicate with doctors in order to improve healthcare quality and efficiency. Mobile PHR (mPHR) applications for mobile devices have obtained an interesting market quota since the appearance of more powerful mobile devices. These devices allow users to gain access to applications that used to be available only for personal computers. This paper analyzes the functionalities of mobile PHRs that are specific to pregnancy monitoring. A well-known Systematic Literature Review (SLR) protocol was used in the analysis process. A questionnaire was developed for this task, based on the rigorous study of scientific literature concerning pregnancy and applications available on the market, with 9 data items and 35 quality assessments. The data items contain calendars, pregnancy information, health habits, counters, diaries, mobile features, security, backup, configuration and architectural design. A total of 33 mPHRs for pregnancy monitoring, available for iOS and Android, were selected from Apple App store and Google Play store, respectively. The results show that none of the mPHRs selected met 100% of the functionalities analyzed in this paper. The highest score achieved was 77%, while the lowest was 17%. In this paper, these features are discussed and possible paths for future development of similar applications are proposed, which may lead to a more efficient use of smartphone capabilities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Does quadriceps neuromuscular activation capability explain mobility function among older men and women?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Age-related impairment of neuromuscular activation has been shown to contribute to weakness in older adults. However, it is unclear to what extent impaired neuromuscular activation independently accounts for decline of mobility function. The hypothesis of this study is that capability to produce rap...

  15. Does neuromuscular activation capability explain mobility function among older men and women?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Age-related impairment of neuromuscular activation has been shown to contribute to weakness in older adults. However, it is unclear to what extent impaired neuromuscular activation independently accounts for decline of mobility function. The hypothesis of this study is that capability to produce rap...

  16. Temperature dependent carrier mobility in graphene: Effect of Pd nanoparticle functionalization and hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Bochen; Uddin, Md Ahsan; Singh, Amol; Webb, Richard; Koley, Goutam

    2016-02-01

    The two dimensional nature of graphene, with charge carriers confined within one atomic layer thickness, causes its electrical, optical, and sensing properties to be strongly influenced by the surrounding media and functionalization layers. In this study, the effect of catalytically active Pd nanoparticle (NP) functionalization and subsequent hydrogenation on the hall mobility and carrier density of chemical vapor deposition synthesized graphene has been investigated as a function of temperature. Prior to functionalization, the mobility decreased monotonically as the temperature was reduced from 298 to 10 K, indicating coulomb scattering as the dominant scattering mechanism as expected for bilayer graphene. Similar decreasing trend with temperature was also observed after 2 nm Pd deposition, however, hydrogenation of the Pd NP led to significant enhancement in mobility from ˜2250 to 3840 cm2/V s at room temperature, which further monotonically increased to 5280 cm2/V s at 10 K. We attribute this contrasting trend in temperature dependent mobility to a switch in the dominant scattering mechanism from coulomb to surface optical (SO) phonon scattering due to higher dielectric constant and polar nature of PdHx formed upon hydrogenation of the Pd NPs.

  17. Effectiveness of Exercise on Functional Mobility in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Hillary; Hills, Sara; Kline, Nicole; Weems, Kyra; Doty, Antonette

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We identified evidence evaluating the effect of exercise on functional mobility in adults (aged 18 y or older) with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: An exhaustive search was conducted using the electronic databases PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SPORTDiscus, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from the earliest available evidence (1975) to the present (January 2016) for studies whose participants were ambulatory adults with CP receiving conservative treatment to address functional mobility limitations. Two independent reviewers agreed on the eligibility, inclusion, and level of evidence of each study. The Maastricht-Amsterdam List (MAL) was used to assess evidence quality. Results: Five of the six studies included were randomized controlled trials, and one was a pre-post case series. Interventions included whole-body vibration, treadmill training without body-weight support, rhythmic auditory stimulation, dynamic balance and gait activities, progressive resistance training, and interactive serious gaming for balance. All studies were considered high quality, as indicated by their MAL scores. Four studies showed no statistical difference and trivial effect sizes between the intervention and the control group. Rhythmic auditory stimulation and interactive serious gaming were found to be statistically significant in benefiting adults with CP. Conclusions: Evidence of the effect of exercise on functional mobility for ambulatory adults with CP is lacking. A need exists for quality research to determine the best interventions for adults with CP to maximize functional mobility.

  18. Reliability of the Functional Mobility Scale for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Adrienne R.; Morris, Meg E.; Graham, H. Kerr; Wolfe, Rory; Baker, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This study examined inter-rater reliability of the Functional Mobility Scale (FMS) for children with cerebral palsy (CP) and the presence of rater bias. A consecutive sample of 118 children with CP, 2-18 years old (mean 10.3 years, SD 3.6), was recruited from a hospital setting. Children were classified using the gross motor function…

  19. High mobility graphene ion-sensitive field-effect transistors by noncovalent functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, W.; Nef, C.; Tarasov, A.; Wipf, M.; Stoop, R.; Knopfmacher, O.; Weiss, M.; Calame, M.; Schönenberger, C.

    2013-11-01

    Noncovalent functionalization is a well-known nondestructive process for property engineering of carbon nanostructures, including carbon nanotubes and graphene. However, it is not clear to what extend the extraordinary electrical properties of these carbon materials can be preserved during the process. Here, we demonstrated that noncovalent functionalization can indeed delivery graphene field-effect transistors (FET) with fully preserved mobility. In addition, these high-mobility graphene transistors can serve as a promising platform for biochemical sensing applications.Noncovalent functionalization is a well-known nondestructive process for property engineering of carbon nanostructures, including carbon nanotubes and graphene. However, it is not clear to what extend the extraordinary electrical properties of these carbon materials can be preserved during the process. Here, we demonstrated that noncovalent functionalization can indeed delivery graphene field-effect transistors (FET) with fully preserved mobility. In addition, these high-mobility graphene transistors can serve as a promising platform for biochemical sensing applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03940d

  20. Evaluation of electromagnetic interference of GSM mobile phones with pacemakers featuring remote monitoring functions.

    PubMed

    Calcagnini, G; Censi, F; Floris, M; Pignalberi, C; Ricci, R; Biancalana, G; Bartolini, P; Santini, M

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether global system for mobile communication (GSM) cellular phones can affect the home monitoring (HM) function implemented in last generation pacemakers (PM). We performed in vitro and in vivo tests on the BA03 PM (Biotronik GmbH, Berlin, Germany). In vitro we evaluated whether an improper HM procedure or an altered patient-activated HM function occurred. We used two cellular phone models, with a fixed external or internal antenna, positioned close to both the PM and the mobile phone-like device, during handover, ringing, and talking. All the tests were done with the PM in air, at 900 and 1,800 MHz GSM bands, under worst case conditions. A subset of these tests was repeated in 17 patients: the mobile phones were moved both around the PM implant site and the mobile cell phone-like device, during talking. In vitro, neither the HM procedure nor PM functioning were corrupted by the GSM communications: all the transmissions were correctly received, with a maximum transmission delay of about 110 seconds. In vivo, the rate of successful transmissions was 93%. Our data show that HM function does not call for specific restrictions on the use of GSM cellular phones.

  1. Effectiveness of Exercise on Functional Mobility in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Hillary; Hills, Sara; Kline, Nicole; Weems, Kyra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We identified evidence evaluating the effect of exercise on functional mobility in adults (aged 18 y or older) with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: An exhaustive search was conducted using the electronic databases PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SPORTDiscus, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from the earliest available evidence (1975) to the present (January 2016) for studies whose participants were ambulatory adults with CP receiving conservative treatment to address functional mobility limitations. Two independent reviewers agreed on the eligibility, inclusion, and level of evidence of each study. The Maastricht-Amsterdam List (MAL) was used to assess evidence quality. Results: Five of the six studies included were randomized controlled trials, and one was a pre–post case series. Interventions included whole-body vibration, treadmill training without body-weight support, rhythmic auditory stimulation, dynamic balance and gait activities, progressive resistance training, and interactive serious gaming for balance. All studies were considered high quality, as indicated by their MAL scores. Four studies showed no statistical difference and trivial effect sizes between the intervention and the control group. Rhythmic auditory stimulation and interactive serious gaming were found to be statistically significant in benefiting adults with CP. Conclusions: Evidence of the effect of exercise on functional mobility for ambulatory adults with CP is lacking. A need exists for quality research to determine the best interventions for adults with CP to maximize functional mobility. PMID:27904240

  2. Reliability of the Functional Mobility Scale for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Adrienne R.; Morris, Meg E.; Graham, H. Kerr; Wolfe, Rory; Baker, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This study examined inter-rater reliability of the Functional Mobility Scale (FMS) for children with cerebral palsy (CP) and the presence of rater bias. A consecutive sample of 118 children with CP, 2-18 years old (mean 10.3 years, SD 3.6), was recruited from a hospital setting. Children were classified using the gross motor function…

  3. Effect of Core Stability Training on Trunk Function, Standing Balance, and Mobility in Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Haruyama, Koshiro; Kawakami, Michiyuki; Otsuka, Tomoyoshi

    2017-03-01

    Trunk function is important for standing balance, mobility, and functional outcome after stroke, but few studies have evaluated the effects of exercises aimed at improving core stability in stroke patients. To investigate the effectiveness of core stability training on trunk function, standing balance, and mobility in stroke patients. An assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial was undertaken in a stroke rehabilitation ward, with 32 participants randomly assigned to an experimental group or a control group (n = 16 each). The experimental group received 400 minutes of core stability training in place of conventional programs within total training time, while the control group received only conventional programs. Primary outcome measures were evaluated using the Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS), which reflects trunk function. Secondary outcome measures were evaluated by pelvic tilt active range of motion in the sagittal plane, the Balance Evaluation Systems Test-brief version (Brief-BESTest), Functional Reach test, Timed Up-and-Go test (TUG), and Functional Ambulation Categories (FAC). A general linear repeated-measures model was used to analyze the results. A treatment effect was found for the experimental group on the dynamic balance subscale and total score of the TIS ( P = .002 and P < .001, respectively), pelvic tilt active range of motion ( P < .001), Brief-BESTest ( P < .001), TUG ( P = .008), and FAC ( P = .022). Core stability training has beneficial effects on trunk function, standing balance, and mobility in stroke patients. Our findings might provide support for introducing core stability training in stroke rehabilitation.

  4. Asymmetric projections of the arcuate fasciculus to the temporal cortex underlie lateralized language function in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Takaya, Shigetoshi; Kuperberg, Gina R.; Liu, Hesheng; Greve, Douglas N.; Makris, Nikos; Stufflebeam, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    The arcuate fasciculus (AF) in the human brain has asymmetric structural properties. However, the topographic organization of the asymmetric AF projections to the cortex and its relevance to cortical function remain unclear. Here we mapped the posterior projections of the human AF in the inferior parietal and lateral temporal cortices using surface-based structural connectivity analysis based on diffusion MRI and investigated their hemispheric differences. We then performed the cross-modal comparison with functional connectivity based on resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) and task-related cortical activation based on fMRI using a semantic classification task of single words. Structural connectivity analysis showed that the left AF connecting to Broca's area predominantly projected in the lateral temporal cortex extending from the posterior superior temporal gyrus to the mid part of the superior temporal sulcus and the middle temporal gyrus, whereas the right AF connecting to the right homolog of Broca's area predominantly projected to the inferior parietal cortex extending from the mid part of the supramarginal gyrus to the anterior part of the angular gyrus. The left-lateralized projection regions of the AF in the left temporal cortex had asymmetric functional connectivity with Broca's area, indicating structure-function concordance through the AF. During the language task, left-lateralized cortical activation was observed. Among them, the brain responses in the temporal cortex and Broca's area that were connected through the left-lateralized AF pathway were specifically correlated across subjects. These results suggest that the human left AF, which structurally and functionally connects the mid temporal cortex and Broca's area in asymmetrical fashion, coordinates the cortical activity in these remote cortices during a semantic decision task. The unique feature of the left AF is discussed in the context of the human capacity for language. PMID:26441551

  5. Asymmetric projections of the arcuate fasciculus to the temporal cortex underlie lateralized language function in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Shigetoshi; Kuperberg, Gina R; Liu, Hesheng; Greve, Douglas N; Makris, Nikos; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    The arcuate fasciculus (AF) in the human brain has asymmetric structural properties. However, the topographic organization of the asymmetric AF projections to the cortex and its relevance to cortical function remain unclear. Here we mapped the posterior projections of the human AF in the inferior parietal and lateral temporal cortices using surface-based structural connectivity analysis based on diffusion MRI and investigated their hemispheric differences. We then performed the cross-modal comparison with functional connectivity based on resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) and task-related cortical activation based on fMRI using a semantic classification task of single words. Structural connectivity analysis showed that the left AF connecting to Broca's area predominantly projected in the lateral temporal cortex extending from the posterior superior temporal gyrus to the mid part of the superior temporal sulcus and the middle temporal gyrus, whereas the right AF connecting to the right homolog of Broca's area predominantly projected to the inferior parietal cortex extending from the mid part of the supramarginal gyrus to the anterior part of the angular gyrus. The left-lateralized projection regions of the AF in the left temporal cortex had asymmetric functional connectivity with Broca's area, indicating structure-function concordance through the AF. During the language task, left-lateralized cortical activation was observed. Among them, the brain responses in the temporal cortex and Broca's area that were connected through the left-lateralized AF pathway were specifically correlated across subjects. These results suggest that the human left AF, which structurally and functionally connects the mid temporal cortex and Broca's area in asymmetrical fashion, coordinates the cortical activity in these remote cortices during a semantic decision task. The unique feature of the left AF is discussed in the context of the human capacity for language.

  6. Asymmetric projections of the arcuate fasciculus to the temporal cortex underlie lateralized language function in the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Takaya, Shigetoshi; Kuperberg, Gina R.; Liu, Hesheng; Greve, Douglas N.; Makris, Nikos; Stufflebeam, Steven M.

    2015-09-15

    The arcuate fasciculus (AF) in the human brain has asymmetric structural properties. However, the topographic organization of the asymmetric AF projections to the cortex and its relevance to cortical function remain unclear. Here we mapped the posterior projections of the human AF in the inferior parietal and lateral temporal cortices using surface-based structural connectivity analysis based on diffusion MRI and investigated their hemispheric differences. We then performed the cross-modal comparison with functional connectivity based on resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) and task-related cortical activation based on fMRI using a semantic classification task of single words. Structural connectivity analysis showed that the left AF connecting to Broca's area predominantly projected in the lateral temporal cortex extending from the posterior superior temporal gyrus to the mid part of the superior temporal sulcus and the middle temporal gyrus, whereas the right AF connecting to the right homolog of Broca's area predominantly projected to the inferior parietal cortex extending from the mid part of the supramarginal gyrus to the anterior part of the angular gyrus. The left-lateralized projection regions of the AF in the left temporal cortex had asymmetric functional connectivity with Broca's area, indicating structure-function concordance through the AF. During the language task, left-lateralized cortical activation was observed. Among them, the brain responses in the temporal cortex and Broca's area that were connected through the left-lateralized AF pathway were specifically correlated across subjects. These results suggest that the human left AF, which structurally and functionally connects the mid temporal cortex and Broca's area in asymmetrical fashion, coordinates the cortical activity in these remote cortices during a semantic decision task. As a result, the unique feature of the left AF is discussed in the context of the human capacity for language.

  7. Asymmetric projections of the arcuate fasciculus to the temporal cortex underlie lateralized language function in the human brain

    DOE PAGES

    Takaya, Shigetoshi; Kuperberg, Gina R.; Liu, Hesheng; ...

    2015-09-15

    The arcuate fasciculus (AF) in the human brain has asymmetric structural properties. However, the topographic organization of the asymmetric AF projections to the cortex and its relevance to cortical function remain unclear. Here we mapped the posterior projections of the human AF in the inferior parietal and lateral temporal cortices using surface-based structural connectivity analysis based on diffusion MRI and investigated their hemispheric differences. We then performed the cross-modal comparison with functional connectivity based on resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) and task-related cortical activation based on fMRI using a semantic classification task of single words. Structural connectivity analysis showed that themore » left AF connecting to Broca's area predominantly projected in the lateral temporal cortex extending from the posterior superior temporal gyrus to the mid part of the superior temporal sulcus and the middle temporal gyrus, whereas the right AF connecting to the right homolog of Broca's area predominantly projected to the inferior parietal cortex extending from the mid part of the supramarginal gyrus to the anterior part of the angular gyrus. The left-lateralized projection regions of the AF in the left temporal cortex had asymmetric functional connectivity with Broca's area, indicating structure-function concordance through the AF. During the language task, left-lateralized cortical activation was observed. Among them, the brain responses in the temporal cortex and Broca's area that were connected through the left-lateralized AF pathway were specifically correlated across subjects. These results suggest that the human left AF, which structurally and functionally connects the mid temporal cortex and Broca's area in asymmetrical fashion, coordinates the cortical activity in these remote cortices during a semantic decision task. As a result, the unique feature of the left AF is discussed in the context of the human capacity for language.« less

  8. Heat Transfer to Anode of Arc as Function of Transverse Magnetic Field and Lateral Gas Flow Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zama, Yoshiyuki; Shiino, Toru; Ishii, Yoko; Maeda, Yoshifumi; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2016-10-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding has useful joining technology because of high-energy and high-current characteristics. It can be flexible from the transverse magnetic field and lateral gas flow velocity. In this case, the weld defect occurs. In this research, the heat transfer to the anode of the arc as a function of the transverse magnetic field and lateral gas flow velocity is elucidated. That magnetic flux density and lateral gas velocity were varied from 0 to 3 mT and 0 to 50?m?s -1, respectively. The axial plasma gas argon flow rates were 3?slm. A transverse magnetic field is applied to the arc using Helmholtz coil. The anode is used by a water-cooled copper plate, and the heat transfer is measured by temperature of cooled water. As a result, the arc is deflected by the Lorentz force and lateral gas convection. Thus, the heat transfer to the anode of the arc decreases with increasing the transverse magnetic field and lateral gas flow velocity. In addition, the heat transfer to the anode changes with different attachments modes. The lateral gas flow causes a convective heat loss from the arc to the chamber walls.

  9. Reduced structural integrity and functional lateralization of the dorsal language pathway correlate with hallucinations in schizophrenia: a combined diffusion spectrum imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chen-Hao; Hwang, Tzung-Jeng; Chen, Pin-Jane; Chou, Tai-Li; Hsu, Yung-Chin; Liu, Chih-Min; Wang, Hsiao-Lan; Chen, Chung-Ming; Hua, Mau-Sun; Hwu, Hai-Gwo; Tseng, Wen-Yih Isaac

    2014-12-30

    Recent studies suggest that structural and functional alterations of the language network are associated with auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) in schizophrenia. However, the ways in which the underlying structure and function of the network are altered and how these alterations are related to each other remain unclear. To elucidate this, we used diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI) to reconstruct the dorsal and ventral pathways and employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a semantic task to obtain information about the functional activation in the corresponding regions in 18 patients with schizophrenia and 18 matched controls. The results demonstrated decreased structural integrity in the left ventral, right ventral and right dorsal tracts, and decreased functional lateralization of the dorsal pathway in schizophrenia. There was a positive correlation between the microstructural integrity of the right dorsal pathway and the functional lateralization of the dorsal pathway in patients with schizophrenia. Additionally, both functional lateralization of the dorsal pathway and microstructural integrity of the right dorsal pathway were negatively correlated with the scores of the delusion/hallucination symptom dimension. Our results suggest that impaired structural integrity of the right dorsal pathway is related to the reduction of functional lateralization of the dorsal pathway, and these alterations may aggravate AVHs in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. GENERAL: Collision avoidance for a mobile robot based on radial basis function hybrid force control technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Shu-Huan

    2009-10-01

    Collision avoidance is always difficult in the planning path for a mobile robot. In this paper, the virtual force field between a mobile robot and an obstacle is formed and regulated to maintain a desired distance by hybrid force control algorithm. Since uncertainties from robot dynamics and obstacle degrade the performance of a collision avoidance task, intelligent control is used to compensate for the uncertainties. A radial basis function (RBF) neural network is used to regulate the force field of an accurate distance between a robot and an obstacle in this paper and then simulation studies are conducted to confirm that the proposed algorithm is effective.

  11. Bone Marrow-Derived Cell Accumulation in the Spinal Cord Is Independent of Peripheral Mobilization in a Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Peake, Kyle; Manning, John; Lewis, Coral-Ann; Tran, Kevin; Rossi, Fabio; Krieger, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) are capable of migrating across the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and accumulating in the central nervous system (CNS) when transplanted into recipients conditioned with whole-body irradiation or chemotherapy. We used the chemotherapeutic agents busulfan and treosulfan to condition recipient mice for transplantation with bone marrow (BM) cells isolated from donor mice ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein. We attempted to increase the accumulation of BMDCs in the CNS by mobilization of BMDCs using either, or both, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) or plerixafor (AMD3100). We also used several concentrations of busulfan. We hypothesized that higher concentrations of busulfan and BMDC mobilization would increase numbers of GFP+ cells in the CNS. The doses of busulfan employed (60–125 mg/kg) all resulted in high levels of sustained chimerism (>85% 1 year post-transplant) in both the blood and BM of wild-type (WT) mice and an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) mouse model. Moreover, cells accumulated within the CNS in a dose-, time-, and disease-dependent manner. Conditioning with the hydrophilic busulfan analog treosulfan, which is unable to cross the BBB efficiently, also resulted in a high degree of BM chimerism. However, few GFP+ BMDCs were found within the CNS of WT or ALS mice of treosulfan-conditioned mice. Mobilization of BMDCs into the circulation using GCSF and/or AMD3100 did not lead to increased accumulation of GFP+ BMDCs within the CNS of WT or ALS mice. Weekly analysis of BMDC accumulation revealed that BMDCs accumulated more rapidly and to a greater extent in the CNS of ALS mice conditioned with a high dose (125 mg/kg) of busulfan compared to a lower dose (80 mg/kg). The number of GFP+ BMDCs in the CNS labeling with the proliferation marker Ki67 increased in parallel with BMDC accumulation within the CNS. Our results indicate that establishment of high levels of blood and BM chimerism

  12. Validity and reliability of skin markers for measurement of intersegmental mobility at L2-3 and L3-4 during lateral bending in healthy individuals: a fluoroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Hashemirad, Fahimeh; Hatef, Boshra; Jaberzadeh, Shapour; Ale Agha, Nasrin

    2013-01-01

    It is clinically important to assess kinematic parameters of lumbar spine movement to increase our understanding of lumbar mobility impairments in patients with low back pain. This is the first step for restoration of motor function. The use of non-invasive surface markers has currently attracted the interests of many researchers but scientific utilization of this technique for clinical research requires validity and reliability studies. The aim of the present study was to examine whether skin markers can be used to measure lumbar motions during lateral bending. Twelve healthy individuals were lying in prone position on the video fluoroscopy table and skin markers were attached over their spinous processes. Fluoroscopy images were taken in two positions of neutral and right lateral bending (RLB). The correlation of the L2-3 and L3-4 angles and lumbar curvature between markers and vertebrae measurements in the neutral and RLB positions was determined by Pearson Correlation Coefficient. The Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to measure inter-examiner reliability of measurement in five participants. The results showed high reliability (ranging from 0.94 to 0.99) for angular measurements at L2-3 and L3-4 and lumbar curvature and also significant correlation between angular measurement derived from markers and vertebrae at L2-3 (r = 0.7, p = 0.015), L3-4 and lumbar curvature (r = 0.91 p = 0.001). The results showed that motions of skin markers follow the motions of the assigned underlying lumbar vertebrae. Therefore, skin markers can be confidently used for estimation of lumbar movements during lateral bending. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Self Perceived Emotional Functioning of Spanish Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Jesús S.; Salas, Teresa; Fajardo, María L.; Iváñez, Lourdes; Rodríguez-Santos, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Background: ALS is a neurodegenerative disease of the entire motor system that most frequently ends with respiratory arrest in few years. Its diagnosis and the rapid progression of the motor dysfunctions produce a continued emotional impact. Studies on this impact are helpful to plan adequate psychotherapeutic strategies. Objective: To assess and analyze: First: How the patients with ALS perceive their emotional health. Second: The emotional impact of their physical disabilities. Third: The physical disabilities with highest emotional impact. Fourth: The feelings with highest emotional impact. Methods: Up to 110 Spanish patients with ALS were assessed less than 1 year from diagnosis, then twice more at 6 month intervals, using the ALS Quality of Life Assessment Questionnaire (ALSAQ-40) validated for use in Spanish. Descriptive analysis and correlation between variables were obtained. Results: Worries about the future, of lack of freedom, and of being a burden were prevalent feelings. On average depression was felt only “sometimes.” Only 25% of the variations in the emotional state were explained by changes in the physical state at first evaluation, and 16% at the last one. Emotional functioning correlated significantly with the physical disabilities at first and second evaluation, less so at third. Communication disabilities always had the highest impact. Depression at first evaluation and hopelessness at the next two evaluations had the highest emotional impact. Hopelessness did not correlate with any physical disability at the third evaluation. On the whole, emotional dysfunction was self perceived as intermediate (between none and worst), and remained stable at 1 year follow up, in both bulbar and spinal onset patients. Conclusions: Physical dysfunctions per se have a limited role in patients´ emotional distress. Communication disabilities, as well as feelings of depression at early stages of illness, and of hopelessness later on, had the most impact

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis inhibits sonic hedgehog function

    PubMed Central

    Drannik, Anna; Martin, Joan; Peterson, Randy; Ma, Xiaoxing; Jiang, Fan; Turnbull, John

    2017-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is a morphogen essential to the developing nervous system that continues to play an important role in adult life by contributing to cell proliferation and differentiation, maintaining blood-brain barrier integrity, and being cytoprotective against oxidative and excitotoxic stress, all features of importance in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). ALS is a fatal disease characterized by selective loss of motor neurons due to poorly understood mechanisms. Evidence indicates that Shh might play an important role in ALS, and that Shh signaling might be also adversely affected in ALS. Since little is known about the functional status of Shh pathway in patients with ALS, we therefore sought to determine whether Shh protein levels or biological activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was less in ALS patients than controls, and whether these measures could be correlated with ALS disease severity and disease progression, and with other CSF analytes of biological interest in ALS. Comparing Shh levels in the CSF of normal controls (n = 13), neurological controls (n = 12), and ALS patients (n = 9) measured by ELISA, we found that CSF Shh levels were not different between controls and ALS patients. However, when assessing Shh biological activity in CSF using in vitro cell-based assays, which measure Shh activity as inducible Gli-driven luminescence, we found that in the presence of exogenous recombinant Shh or the Shh agonist, purmorphamine, the inducible activity of CSF was significantly augmented in the control groups as expected, but not in the ALS group, suggesting the presence of an inhibitor of Shh signaling in ALS CSF samples. Since purmorphamine acts on Smoothened, downstream of Shh and its receptor Patched, the inhibitory action is downstream of Smoothened. Our results also demonstrated that while the inhibitory effect of ALS CSF on Shh signaling did not correlate significantly with ALS disease characteristics, the levels of IL-1β and TNF-α did. In

  15. Early thyroxine treatment in Down syndrome and thyroid function later in life.

    PubMed

    Zwaveling-Soonawala, Nitash; Witteveen, M Emma; Marchal, Jan Pieter; Klouwer, Femke C C; Ikelaar, Nadine A; Smets, Anne M J B; van Rijn, Rick R; Endert, Erik; Fliers, Eric; van Trotsenburg, A S Paul

    2017-05-01

    The hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis set point develops during the fetal period and first two years of life. We hypothesized that thyroxine treatment during these first two years, in the context of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) in children with Down syndrome, may have influenced the HPT axis set point and may also have influenced the development of Down syndrome-associated autoimmune thyroiditis. We included 123 children with Down syndrome 8.7 years after the end of an RCT comparing thyroxine treatment vs placebo and performed thyroid function tests and thyroid ultrasound. We analyzed TSH and FT4 concentrations in the subgroup of 71 children who were currently not on thyroid medication and had no evidence of autoimmune thyroiditis. TSH concentrations did not differ, but FT4 was significantly higher in the thyroxine-treated group than that in the placebo group (14.1 vs 13.0 pmol/L; P = 0.02). There was an increase in anti-TPO positivity, from 1% at age 12 months to 6% at age 24 months and 25% at age 10.7 years with a greater percentage of children with anti-TPO positivity in the placebo group (32%) compared with the thyroxine-treated group (18.5%) (P = 0.12). Thyroid volume at age 10.7 years (mean: 3.4 mL; range: 0.5-7.5 mL) was significantly lower (P < 0.01) compared with reference values (5.5 mL; range: 3-9 mL) and was similar in the thyroxine and placebo group. Thyroxine treatment during the first two years of life led to a mild increase in FT4 almost 9 years later on and may point to an interesting new mechanism influencing the maturing HPT axis set point. Furthermore, there was a trend toward less development of thyroid autoimmunity in the thyroxine treatment group, suggesting a protective effect of the early thyroxine treatment. Lastly, thyroid volume was low possibly reflecting Down-specific thyroid hypoplasia. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  16. Function of the ramus communicans of the medial and lateral palmar nerves of the horse.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, J; Taintor, J; Schumacher, J; Degraves, F; Schramme, M; Wilhite, R

    2013-01-01

    The role of the communicating branch between the medial and lateral palmar nerves of horses (i.e. the ramus communicans) in conveying sensory impulses proximally should be determined to avoid errors in interpreting diagnostic anaesthesia of the palmar nerves. Sensory nerve fibres in the ramus communicans of horses pass proximally from the lateral palmar nerve to merge with the medial palmar nerve, but not vice versa. To determine the direction of sensory impulses through the ramus communicans between lateral and medial palmar nerves. Pain in a thoracic foot was created with set-screw pressure applied to either the medial or lateral aspect of the sole of each forelimb of 6 horses. The palmar nerve on the side of the sole in which pain was created was anaesthetised proximal to the ramus communicans with local anaesthetic. Lameness was evaluated objectively by using a wireless, inertial, sensor-based, motion analysis system (Lameness Locator). Lameness was also evaluated subjectively by using a graded scoring system. Local anaesthetic was then administered adjacent to the ramus communicans to determine the effect of anaesthesia of the ramus communicans on residual lameness. When pain originated from the medial or the lateral aspect of the sole, anaesthesia of the ipsilateral palmar nerve proximal to the ramus communicans did not entirely resolve lameness. Anaesthesia of the ramus communicans further attenuated or resolved lameness. Sensory fibres pass in both directions in the ramus communicans to connect the medial and lateral palmar nerves. When administering a low palmar nerve block, both palmar nerves should be anaesthetised distal to the ramus communicans to avoid leaving nondesensitised sensory nerve fibres passing through this neural connection. Alternatively, local anaesthetic could also be deposited adjacent to the ramus communicans when anaesthetising the palmar nerves. © 2012 EVJ Ltd.

  17. Trajectories of the Framingham general cardiovascular risk profile in midlife and poor motor function later in life: the Whitehall II study.

    PubMed

    Elbaz, Alexis; Shipley, Martin J; Nabi, Hermann; Brunner, Eric J; Kivimaki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana

    2014-03-01

    Vascular risk factors are associated with increased risk of cognitive impairment and dementia, but their association with motor function, another key feature of aging, has received little research attention. We examined the association between trajectories of the Framingham general cardiovascular disease risk score (FRS) over midlife and motor function later in life. A total of 5376 participants of the Whitehall II cohort study (29% women) who had up to four repeat measures of FRS between 1991-1993 (mean age=48.6 years) and 2007-2009 (mean age=65.4 years) and without history of stroke or coronary heart disease in 2007-2009 were included. Motor function was assessed in 2007-2009 through objective tests (walking speed, chair rises, balance, finger tapping, grip strength). We used age- and sex-adjusted linear mixed models. Participants with poorer performances for walking speed, chair rises, and balance in 2007-2009 had higher FRS concurrently and also in 1991-1993, on average 16 years earlier. These associations were robust to adjustment for cognition, socio-economic status, height, and BMI, and not explained by incident mobility limitation prior to motor assessment. No association was found with finger tapping and grip strength. Cardiovascular risk early in midlife is associated with poor motor performances later in life. Vascular risk factors play an important and under-recognized role in motor function, independently of their impact on cognition, and suggest that better control of vascular risk factors in midlife may prevent physical impairment and disability in the elderly. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mobilizing patients in the intensive care unit: improving neuromuscular weakness and physical function.

    PubMed

    Needham, Dale M

    2008-10-08

    Early mobilization of patients in the hospital and the intensive care unit has a strong historical precedent. However, in more recent times, deep sedation and bed rest have been part of routine medical care for many mechanically ventilated patients. A growing body of literature demonstrates that survivors of severe critical illness commonly have significant and prolonged neuromuscular complications that impair their physical function and quality of life after hospital discharge. Bed rest, and its associated mechanisms, may play an important role in the pathogenesis of neuromuscular weakness in critically ill patients. A new approach for managing mechanically ventilated patients includes reducing deep sedation and increasing rehabilitation therapy and mobilization soon after admission to the intensive care unit. Emerging research in this field provides preliminary evidence supporting the safety, feasibility, and potential benefits of early mobilization in critical care medicine.

  19. Effects of task-oriented training on mobility function in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Salem, Yasser; Godwin, Ellen M

    2009-01-01

    Improvement in mobility function has been the primary goal in the rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy. Few studies have examined the effectiveness of task-oriented strength training for children with cerebral palsy. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of task-oriented strength training on mobility function in children with cerebral palsy. A single-blind, randomized controlled trial with pre-training and post-training evaluations. Ten children with cerebral palsy (GMFCS levels I-III) were randomly assigned to an experimental group (N = 5) or control group (N = 5). Mobility function was assessed using the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) and the Timed "Up and Go" (TUG) test. Participants in the control group received conventional physical therapy focused on improving walking and balance through facilitation and normalization of movement patterns. Participants in the experiment group received task-oriented strength training focused on strengthening the lower extremities and practicing functional tasks similar to those the child performs during daily activities. After the 5-week training period there were significant improvements in the experimental group for dimension D (p = 0.009), and dimension E (p = 0.009) of the GMFM. The experimental group significantly reduced the time taken to complete the TUG (p = 0.017). This study supports the efficacy of task-oriented strength training for improving mobility function in children with cerebral palsy. The findings demonstrate that the application of a task-oriented strength training program is linked to positive functional outcomes. The results suggest that children with cerebral palsy may benefit from a task-oriented strength training program. Further studies with a larger randomized sample and longer post-intervention follow-up are necessary to document the long-term effects of participation in task-oriented strength training programs in the cerebral palsy population.

  20. A concept of an automated function control for ambient aerosol measurements using mobility particle size spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, S.; Löschau, G.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2014-04-01

    An automated function control unit was developed to regularly check the ambient particle number concentration derived from a mobility particle size spectrometer as well as its zero-point behaviour. The function control allows unattended quality assurance experiments at remote air quality monitoring or research stations under field conditions. The automated function control also has the advantage of being able to get a faster system stability response than the recommended on-site comparisons with reference instruments. The method is based on a comparison of the total particle number concentration measured by a mobility particle size spectrometer and a condensation particle counter while removing diffusive particles smaller than 20 nm in diameter. In practice, the small particles are removed by a set of diffusion screens, as traditionally used in a diffusion battery. Another feature of the automated function control is to check the zero-point behaviour of the ambient aerosol passing through a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. The performance of the function control is illustrated with the aid of a 1-year data set recorded at Annaberg-Buchholz, a station in the Saxon air quality monitoring network. During the period of concern, the total particle number concentration derived from the mobility particle size spectrometer slightly overestimated the particle number concentration recorded by the condensation particle counter by 2 % (grand average). Based on our first year of experience with the function control, we developed tolerance criteria that allow a performance evaluation of a tested mobility particle size spectrometer with respect to the total particle number concentration. We conclude that the automated function control enhances the quality and reliability of unattended long-term particle number size distribution measurements. This will have beneficial effects for intercomparison studies involving different measurement sites, and help provide a higher

  1. Quantitative changes in testicular structure and function in rat exposed to mobile phone radiation.

    PubMed

    Çetkin, M; Kızılkan, N; Demirel, C; Bozdağ, Z; Erkılıç, S; Erbağcı, H

    2017-01-26

    The possible effects of the electromagnetic fields (EMF) generated by mobile phones on reproductive functions have been discussed in recent years. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of EMF emitted from mobile phones on the rat testis morphology and histopathology using stereological techniques. We also investigated cortisol, testosterone, FSH and LH levels. A total of thirty-two (n = 32) male Wistar albino rats were used in this study. Animals were randomly divided into four groups as control (C, n = 8), sham (Sh, n = 8), mobile phone speech (Sp, n = 8) and mobile phone standby (ST by). Morphometric measurements were made with the help of a computer-assisted stereological analysis system. The testis weight and volume were significantly lower in the EMF exposed groups. The mean volume fraction of interstitial tissue was higher, but the volume fraction of tubular tissue was lower in the EMF-exposed groups. The mean tubular and germinal tissue volume, seminiferous tubule diameter and germinal epithelium height were also lower in EMF exposed groups. The cortisol levels in the EMF-exposed groups were significantly higher. In conclusion, the EMF created by mobile phones caused morphologic and histological changes by the affecting germinal epithelium tissue negatively.

  2. Functional Outcomes of a New Mobile-Bearing Ultra-Congruent TKA System: Comparison With the Posterior Stabilized System.

    PubMed

    Machhindra, Morey Vivek; Kang, Jong Yeal; Kang, Yeon Gwi; Chowdhry, Madhav; Kim, Tae Kyun

    2015-12-01

    We determined whether a new mobile-bearing ultra-congruent (UC) TKA system provides better functional outcomes than an established posterior-stabilized (PS) prosthesis. The functional outcomes (motion arc, AKS scores, WOMAC Index, and SForm-36 scores evaluated at 1 and 2 years postoperatively), satisfaction and incidences of adverse events were compared between the knees implanted with mobile-bearing UC prosthesis (n=103) and the mobile-bearing PS prosthesis (n=99). At 2 years, mobile-bearing UC TKAs showed similar functional outcomes and satisfaction, but smaller motion arc compared to mobile-bearing PS TKAs (126° vs. 131°). There were no differences in the incidence of adverse events. Mobile-bearing UC prosthesis can be considered a safe and viable alternative to the PS design, with an expectation of smaller postoperative maximum flexion.

  3. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy reveals altered hemispheric laterality in relation to schizotypy during verbal fluency task.

    PubMed

    Hori, Hiroaki; Ozeki, Yuji; Terada, Sumio; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2008-12-12

    Previous functional neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that patients with schizophrenia and those with schizotypal personality disorder (SPD) show reduced laterality, or relative right hemispheric dominance, during the performance of cognitive activation tasks; however, neuroimaging studies looking at non-clinical schizotypy have been few. We have recently reported that schizotypal traits at a non-clinical level are associated with right prefrontal dominance during a letter version of the verbal fluency task (VFT), but it is unknown whether such relationship between schizotypy and functional laterality would be observed across various cognitive tasks. Here we examined the relationships of schizotypal traits as measured by the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ) in healthy adults with hemispheric lateralization of prefrontal activation during letter and category VFTs, using near-infrared spectroscopy. Thirty-two participants were divided into high- (n=16) and low- (n=16) SPQ groups by the median split of the total SPQ score. The high-SPQ group, but not low-SPQ group, showed significantly right-greater-than-left asymmetry of prefrontal activation during letter VFT, whereas such pronounced hemispheric asymmetry in relation to schizotypy was not found during category VFT. These results indicate that non-clinical schizotypy is related to right prefrontal preference during the letter version of VFT in particular, suggesting that the association between schizotypal traits and functional laterality may vary depending on cognitive activation tasks.

  4. Membrane orientation and lateral diffusion of BODIPY-cholesterol as a function of probe structure.

    PubMed

    Solanko, Lukasz M; Honigmann, Alf; Midtiby, Henrik Skov; Lund, Frederik W; Brewer, Jonathan R; Dekaris, Vjekoslav; Bittman, Robert; Eggeling, Christian; Wüstner, Daniel

    2013-11-05

    Cholesterol tagged with the BODIPY fluorophore via the central difluoroboron moiety of the dye (B-Chol) is a promising probe for studying intracellular cholesterol dynamics. We synthesized a new BODIPY-cholesterol probe (B-P-Chol) with the fluorophore attached via one of its pyrrole rings to carbon-24 of cholesterol (B-P-Chol). Using two-photon fluorescence polarimetry in giant unilamellar vesicles and in the plasma membrane (PM) of living intact and actin-disrupted cells, we show that the BODIPY-groups in B-Chol and B-P-Chol are oriented perpendicular and almost parallel to the bilayer normal, respectively. B-Chol is in all three membrane systems much stronger oriented than B-P-Chol. Interestingly, we found that the lateral diffusion in the PM was two times slower for B-Chol than for B-P-Chol, although we found no difference in lateral diffusion in model membranes. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy, performed for the first time, to our knowledge, with fluorescent sterols, revealed that the difference in lateral diffusion of the BODIPY-cholesterol probes was not caused by anomalous subdiffusion, because diffusion of both analogs in the PM was free but not hindered. Our combined measurements show that the position and orientation of the BODIPY moiety in cholesterol analogs have a severe influence on lateral diffusion specifically in the PM of living cells.

  5. Estimating associations of mobile phone use and brain tumours taking into account laterality: a comparison and theoretical evaluation of applied methods.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Kirsten; Deltour, Isabelle; Schüz, Joachim

    2012-12-10

    Estimating exposure-outcome associations using laterality information on exposure and on outcome is an issue, when estimating associations of mobile phone use and brain tumour risk. The exposure is localized; therefore, a potential risk is expected to exist primarily on the side of the head, where the phone is usually held (ipsilateral exposure), and to a lesser extent at the opposite side of the head (contralateral exposure). Several measures of the associations with ipsilateral and contralateral exposure, dealing with different sampling designs, have been presented in the literature. This paper presents a general framework for the analysis of such studies using a likelihood-based approach in a competing risks model setting. The approach clarifies the implicit assumptions required for the validity of the presented estimators, particularly that in some approaches the risk with contralateral exposure is assumed to be zero. The performance of the estimators is illustrated in a simulation study showing for instance that while in some scenarios there is a loss of statistical power, others - in case of a positive ipsilateral exposure-outcome association - would result in a negatively biased estimate of the contralateral exposure parameter, irrespective of any additional recall bias. In conclusion, our theoretical evaluations and results from the simulation study emphasize the importance of setting up a formal model, which furthermore allows for estimation in more complicated and perhaps more realistic exposure settings, such as taking into account exposure to both sides of the head.

  6. Heterochrony, modularity, and the functional evolution of the mechanosensory lateral line canal system of fishes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The canals of the mechanosensory lateral line system are components of the dermatocranium, and demonstrate phenotypic variation in bony fishes. Widened lateral line canals evolved convergently in a limited number of families of teleost fishes and it had been hypothesized that they evolved from narrow canals via heterochrony and explore modularity in the lateral line system. Two species of cichlids with different canal phenotypes were used to test a hypothesis of heterochrony. Histological material prepared from ontogenetic series of Aulonocara stuartgranti (widened canals) and Tramitichromis sp. (narrow canals) was analyzed using ANCOVA to determine rates of increase in canal diameter and neuromast size (length, width) and to compare the timing of onset of critical stages in canal morphogenesis (enclosure, ossification). Results A faster rate of increase in canal diameter and neuromast width (but not length), and a delay in onset of canal morphogenesis were found in Aulonocara relative to Tramitichromis. However, rates of increase in canal diameter and neuromast size among canals, among canal portions and among canals segments reveal similar trends within both species. Conclusion The evolution of widened lateral line canals is the result of dissociated heterochrony - acceleration in the rate of increase of both canal diameter and neuromast size, and delay in the onset of canal morphogenesis, in Aulonocara (widened canals) relative to Tramitichromis (narrow canals). Common rates of increase in canal diameter and neuromast size among canal portions in different dermatocranial bones and among canal segments reflect the absence of local heterochronies, and suggest modular integration among canals in each species. Thus, canal and neuromast morphology are more strongly influenced by their identities as features of the lateral line system than by the attributes of the dermatocranial bones in which the canals are found. Rate heterochrony manifested during the

  7. Gastric suction at birth associated with long-term risk for functional intestinal disorders in later life.

    PubMed

    Anand, K J S; Runeson, Bo; Jacobson, Bertil

    2004-04-01

    To test the hypothesis that noxious stimulation at birth may increase the long-term risk for developing psychosomatic or functional disorders during later life. Matched case-control study using sibling controls. The birth records were retrieved for the offspring of 494 mothers who, after uncomplicated pregnancies, had delivered two or more children with birth weights at least 2500 g, if at least one child was exposed to a perinatal complication or birth asphyxia. Among their offspring (N=1110), the 108 cases hospitalized for functional intestinal symptoms were identified from nationwide hospital discharge records. Of these, 96 cases were compared with 116 unaffected sibling controls. Functional intestinal symptoms occurred more commonly among the 1110 subjects (9.5%) than in the general population (3.4%, chi(2)=124, P<10(-6)). Gastric suction at birth occurred more frequently among the cases compared with their siblings (22.9% vs 11.2%). There were no differences in the number of cases and controls exposed to perinatal trauma or birth asphyxia. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that gastric suction at birth was associated with functional intestinal disorders during later life (odds ratio, 2.99; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-6.79; P=.009), whereas maternal, perinatal, or other confounding variables were not significant. Noxious stimulation caused by gastric suction at birth may promote the development of long-term visceral hypersensitivity and cognitive hypervigilance, leading to an increased prevalence of functional intestinal disorders in later life.

  8. Laterality in metaphor processing: lack of evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging for the right hemisphere theory.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Alexander M; Leube, Dirk T; Erb, Michael; Grodd, Wolfgang; Kircher, Tilo T J

    2007-02-01

    We investigated processing of metaphoric sentences using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Seventeen healthy subjects (6 female, 11 male) read 60 novel short German sentence pairs with either metaphoric or literal meaning and performed two different tasks: judging the metaphoric content and judging whether the sentence has a positive or negative connotation. Laterality indices for 8 regions of interest were calculated: Inferior frontal gyrus (opercular part and triangular part), superior, middle, and inferior temporal gyrus, precuneus, temporal pole, and hippocampus. A left lateralised network was activated with no significant differences in laterality between the two tasks. The lowest degree of laterality was found in the temporal pole. Other factors than metaphoricity per se might trigger right hemisphere recruitment. Results are discussed in the context of lesion and hemifield studies.

  9. Effects of blueberry supplementation on measures of functional mobility in older adults.

    PubMed

    Schrager, Matthew A; Hilton, James; Gould, Richard; Kelly, Valerie E

    2015-06-01

    Limited functional mobility in older adults has been associated with declines in tests of motor, psychomotor, and executive function. Animal studies have demonstrated reversals in indices of motor and psychomotor function via supplementation with polyphenolic-rich foods such as blueberries. The purpose of this study was to examine whether 6 weeks of daily consumption of 2 cups of frozen blueberries affects functional mobility in older adults. Pre- and post-intervention assessments of grip strength, simple reaction time, adaptive gait, and executive function were completed for older adults (age >60 years) partially randomly assigned to a blueberry (BB) supplementation or a carrot juice drink control (CAR) group. Paired t tests were used to assess within-group effects for outcome variables in each supplementation group, and a mixed-model analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to determine group (CAR vs. BB) differences. Mixed-model analysis indicated that the BB group demonstrated significant improvements relative to the CAR group in performance (i.e., number of step errors) of a challenging dual-task adaptive gait test that were independent of differences in gait speed. Within only the BB group, significant improvements were also seen in 3 other measures (i.e., usual gait speed; number of step errors during single-task adaptive gait; and gait speed during dual-task adaptive gait). These preliminary findings support the hypothesis that blueberry supplementation may provide an effective countermeasure to age-related declines in functional mobility and serve as justification for an expansion to larger trials to more fully assess this nonpharmacologic approach to maintaining optimal mobility and independence.

  10. Posterior cerebral artery laterality on magnetic resonance angiography predicts long-term functional outcome in middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Ichijo, Masahiko; Miki, Kazunori; Ishibashi, Satoru; Tomita, Makoto; Kamata, Tomoyuki; Fujigasaki, Hiroto; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2013-02-01

    Prominent posterior cerebral artery (PCA) laterality upon 3-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography is often encountered in patients with middle cerebral artery occlusion. We hypothesized that this sign is correlated with improved functional outcome in patients with middle cerebral artery occlusion treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Fifty acute ischemic stroke patients with middle cerebral artery occlusion were treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator from April 2007 to October 2009. All patients routinely underwent initial (first 3 hours) magnetic resonance scans on admission, and additional follow-up (14-21 days after stroke onset) computed tomography scans. Two film readers blinded to all clinical information assessed the presence or absence of PCA laterality on magnetic resonance angiography. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical and radiologic data on all patients. Out of 50 patients, 20 showed PCA laterality on magnetic resonance angiography. National Institute of Health Stroke Scale score 7 days after stroke onset was significantly lower (P=0.007), and infarct volume on follow-up computed tomography was significantly smaller (P=0.009) in patients with PCA laterality than in patients without this sign. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed an adjusted odds ratio of 8.49 for a favorable outcome (modified Rankin Scale score 0-1 at 6 months) in patients with PCA laterality (95% CI: 1.82 to 55.8, P=0.005). The presence of PCA laterality on magnetic resonance angiography before intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator can be used as a predictor of favorable functional outcome in patients with middle cerebral artery occlusion, probably due to improvement of recanalization rate.

  11. Factors associated with functional balance and mobility among elderly diabetic outpatients.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Renata Cereda; Jardim, José Roberto; Perracini, Monica Rodrigues; Ramos, Luiz Roberto

    2009-10-01

    To characterize balance and mobility among diabetic elderly outpatients and to estimate the extent to which functional balance and mobility abnormalities can be influenced by sociodemographic, clinical and other functional factors in a cross-sectional study. Ninety-one elderly (65+ years) outpatients were assessed. Mobility was evaluated by the Timed Up and Go Test (TUGT) and the balance, by the Berg Balance Scale (BS). TUGT mean score was 15.65 +/- 5.9 seconds and BS mean score was 49.31 +/- 7.3 points. Using linear regression analysis (alpha < 0.05), significant and independent positive relationships were obtained between TUGT and age, daily activities (ADL/IADL), step strategy, and proprioceptive sensitivity. Factors negatively associated with BS were: ADL/IADL, step strategy, proprioceptive sensitivity, orthostatic hypotension (OH) and conflictive sensory conditions. Elderly diabetic outpatients show abnormal balance and mobility related mainly to advanced age, disability, absence of step strategy, absence of proprioceptive sensitivity and presence of OH.

  12. Mobile and fixed bearing total knee prosthesis functional comparison during stair climbing.

    PubMed

    Catani, F; Benedetti, M G; De Felice, R; Buzzi, R; Giannini, S; Aglietti, P

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to determine the functional performance of the mobile bearing total knee replacement prosthesis as compared to the fixed bearing type total knee replacement prosthesis. Kinematics, kinetics, and electromyography data were gained from 10 patients with mobile bearing and 10 patients with a fixed bearing posterior stabilized Insall Burstein II total knee replacement during ascending and descending stairs. A control group of 10 normal subjects, matched by sex and age, was also analysed. No significant biomechanical differences in patients with different total knee replacement designs have been reported from level-walking studies. Slightly better performance of posterior retaining with respect to cruciate sacrificing total knee replacement designs have been claimed from stair climbing studies. Only one study has been conducted regarding mobile versus fixed bearing total knee replacement assessed by gait analysis. This study did not show any biomechanical differences between the two groups. Motion analysis was used to quantify the knee kinematics, kinetics, and electromyography (right and left longissimus dorsi, gluteus medius, rectus femoris, biceps femoris, semitendinosus, gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles) during stair ascent and descent. The mobile bearing group demonstrated a reduced knee extensor moment during stair climbing and descending, and a reduced knee adductor moment during stair climbing. When ascending stairs, most of the mobile bearing patients show a peak knee flexion and a peak knee flexion moment at the late stance phase during the double support period. This kinematic and kinetic pattern is absent in normal subject. Both mobile bearing and fixed bearing groups showed abnormal electromyography patterns in both descending and ascending. During stair climbing, the mobile bearing design demonstrates a different kinematic pattern to the fixed bearing total knee replacement. Lower limb compensatory mechanisms

  13. Use of mobile phones and changes in cognitive function in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S; Benke, G; Dimitriadis, C; Inyang, I; Sim, M R; Wolfe, R; Croft, R J; Abramson, M J

    2010-12-01

    Several studies have investigated the impact of mobile phone exposure on cognitive function in adults. However, children and adolescents are of special interest due to their developing nervous systems. Data were derived from the Australian Mobile Radiofrequency Phone Exposed Users' Study (MoRPhEUS) which comprised a baseline examination of year 7 students during 2005/2006 and a 1-year follow-up. Sociodemographic and exposure data were collected with a questionnaire. Cognitive functions were assessed with a computerised test battery and the Stroop Color-Word test. 236 students participated in both examinations. The proportion of mobile phone owners and the number of voice calls and short message services (SMS) per week increased from baseline to follow-up. Participants with more voice calls and SMS at baseline showed less reductions in response times over the 1-year period in various computerised tasks. Furthermore, those with increased voice calls and SMS exposure over the 1-year period showed changes in response time in a simple reaction and a working memory task. No associations were seen between mobile phone exposure and the Stroop test. We have observed that some changes in cognitive function, particularly in response time rather than accuracy, occurred with a latency period of 1 year and that some changes were associated with increased exposure. However, the increased exposure was mainly applied to those who had fewer voice calls and SMS at baseline, suggesting that these changes over time may relate to statistical regression to the mean, and not be the effect of mobile phone exposure.

  14. The importance of incorporating functional habitats into conservation planning for highly mobile species in dynamic systems.

    PubMed

    Webb, Matthew H; Terauds, Aleks; Tulloch, Ayesha; Bell, Phil; Stojanovic, Dejan; Heinsohn, Robert

    2017-01-28

    The distribution of mobile species in dynamic systems can vary greatly over time and space. Estimating their population size and geographic range can be problematic, with serious implications for conservation assessments. Scarce data on mobile species and the resources they need can also limit the type of analytical approaches available to derive such estimates. Here we quantify dynamic change in availability and use of key ecological resources required for breeding (i.e. food and nesting sites) for a critically endangered nomadic habitat specialist, the swift parrot (Lathamus discolor). We compare estimates of occupied habitat (km(2) ) derived from dynamic presence-background data climatic models to those derived from dynamic occupancy models that include a direct measure of food availability. We also compare estimates that incorporate fine resolution information on key ecological resources (i.e functional habitats) into distribution maps with more common approaches that typically focus on broader climatic suitability. For all models, both the extent and spatial location of occupied areas varied dramatically over the study period. The occupancy models produced significantly smaller (up to an order of magnitude) and more spatially discrete estimates of occupied habitat than climate-based models. Estimates accounting for the area of functional habitats were also significantly smaller than estimates based only on occupied habitat. Importantly, an increase (or decrease) in one functional habitat did not necessarily correspond to changes in the other, with consequences for overall habitat functionality. We argue that these patterns are typical for mobile resource specialists, but currently go unnoticed due to limited data on (1) species' presence/absence and (2) availability of key resources. Understanding changes in the relative availability of functional habitats is crucial to informing conservation planning and accurately assessing extinction risk for mobile

  15. An intensive virtual reality program improves functional balance and mobility of adolescents with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Brien, Marie; Sveistrup, Heidi

    2011-01-01

    To examine functional balance and mobility in adolescents with cerebral palsy classified at Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level I following an intensive short-duration virtual reality (VR) intervention. Single-subject, multiple-baseline design with 4 adolescents. Outcomes included the Community Balance and Mobility Scale (CB&M), the 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT), the Timed Up and Down Stairs, and the Gross Motor Function Measure Dimension E. Assessments were recorded 3 to 6 times at baseline, 5 times during intervention, and 4 times at follow-up. Daily 90-minute VR intervention was completed for 5 consecutive days. Visual, statistical, and clinical significance analyses were used. Statistically significant improvements were shown in all adolescents on CB&M and 6MWT. True change was recorded in all for the CB&M and in 3 for the 6MWT. Functional balance and mobility in adolescents with cerebral palsy classified at GMFCS level I improve with intense, short duration VR intervention, and changes are maintained at 1-month posttraining.

  16. Structural and functional asymmetry of lateral Heschl's gyrus reflects pitch perception preference.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Peter; Sluming, Vanessa; Roberts, Neil; Scherg, Michael; Goebel, Rainer; Specht, Hans J; Dosch, H Günter; Bleeck, Stefan; Stippich, Christoph; Rupp, André

    2005-09-01

    The relative pitch of harmonic complex sounds, such as instrumental sounds, may be perceived by decoding either the fundamental pitch (f0) or the spectral pitch (fSP) of the stimuli. We classified a large cohort of 420 subjects including symphony orchestra musicians to be either f0 or fSP listeners, depending on the dominant perceptual mode. In a subgroup of 87 subjects, MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and magnetoencephalography studies demonstrated a strong neural basis for both types of pitch perception irrespective of musical aptitude. Compared with f0 listeners, fSP listeners possessed a pronounced rightward, rather than leftward, asymmetry of gray matter volume and P50m activity within the pitch-sensitive lateral Heschl's gyrus. Our data link relative hemispheric lateralization with perceptual stimulus properties, whereas the absolute size of the Heschl's gyrus depends on musical aptitude.

  17. The frenectomy combined with a laterally positioned pedicle graft. Functional and esthetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Miller, P D

    1985-02-01

    In many cases it is necessary to perform a frenectomy to prevent reopening of a midline diastema following closure by orthodontic therapy. Often the loss of the interdental papilla between the maxillary incisors during the classic frenectomy creates an unacceptable esthetic result. A surgical technique combining a frenectomy with a laterally positioned pedicle graft is presented. The interdental papilla is left surgically undisturbed if it is of physiologic size. If it is enlarged, gingivoplasty is performed to reduce it to an appropriate size. Closure across the midline by laterally positioning gingiva and healing by primary intention results in attached gingiva across the midline. This attached gingiva may have a bracing effect and thus aid in preventing orthodontic relapse (reopening of the diastema). Twenty-seven cases were treated. No relapse was found in 24 cases and in 3 cases only minimal relapse was noted (less than 1 mm). The esthetic result is superior to that obtained with the classic frenectomy technique.

  18. Effects of a low-volume, vigorous intensity step exercise program on functional mobility in middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Doheny, Emer P; McGrath, Denise; Ditroilo, Massimiliano; Mair, Jacqueline L; Greene, Barry R; Caulfield, Brian; De Vito, Giuseppe; Lowery, Madeleine M

    2013-08-01

    Aging-related decline in functional mobility is associated with loss of independence. This decline may be mitigated through programs of physical activity. Despite reports of aging-related mobility impairment in middle-aged adults, this age group has been largely overlooked in terms of exercise programs that target functional mobility and the preservation of independence in older age. A method to quantitatively assess changes in functional mobility could direct rehabilitation in a proactive rather than reactive manner. Thirty-three healthy but sedentary middle-aged adults participated in a four week low-volume, vigorous intensity stepping exercise program. Two baseline testing sessions and one post-training testing session were conducted. Functional mobility was assessed using the timed up and go (TUG) test, with its constituent sit-to-walk and walk-to-sit phases examined using a novel inertial sensor-based method. Additionally, semi-tandem balance and knee extensor muscle isometric torque were assessed. Trunk acceleration during walk-to-sit reduced significantly post-training, suggesting altered movement control due to the exercise program. No significant training-induced changes in sit-to-walk acceleration, TUG time, balance or torque were observed. The novel method of functional mobility assessment presented provides a reliable means to quantify subtle changes in mobility during postural transitions. Over time, this exercise program may improve functional mobility.

  19. Digital disruption? Maternal mobile device use is related to infant social-emotional functioning.

    PubMed

    Myruski, Sarah; Gulyayeva, Olga; Birk, Samantha; Pérez-Edgar, Koraly; Buss, Kristin A; Dennis-Tiwary, Tracy A

    2017-09-24

    Mobile device use has become increasingly prevalent, yet its impact on infant development remains largely unknown. When parents use mobile devices in front of infants, the parent is physically present but most likely distracted and unresponsive. Research using the classic Still Face Paradigm (SFP) suggests that parental withdrawal and unresponsiveness may have negative consequences for children's social-emotional development. In the present study, 50 infants aged 7.20 to 23.60 months (M = 15.40, SD = 4.74) and their mothers completed a modified SFP. The SFP consisted of three phases: free play (FP; parent and infant play and interact), still face (SF; parent withdraws attention and becomes unresponsive), and reunion (RU; parent resumes normal interaction). The modified SFP incorporated mobile device use in the SF phase. Parents reported on their typical mobile device use and infant temperament. Consistent with the standard SFP, infants showed more negative affect and less positive affect during SF versus FP. Infants also showed more toy engagement and more engagement with mother during FP versus SF and RU. Infants showed the most social bids during SF and more room exploration in SF than RU. More frequent reported mobile device use was associated with less room exploration and positive affect during SF, and less recovery (i.e., engagement with mother, room exploration positive affect) during RU, even when controlling for individual differences in temperament. Findings suggest that the SFP represents a promising theoretical framework for understanding the impact of parent's mobile device use on infant social-emotional functioning and parent-infant interactions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Variability of Rheotaxis Behaviors in Larval Bullfrogs Highlights Species Diversity in Lateral Line Function

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Erika E. A.

    2016-01-01

    The morphology and distribution of lateral line neuromasts vary between ecomorphological types of anuran tadpoles, but little is known about how this structural variability contributes to differences in lateral-line mediated behaviors. Previous research identified distinct differences in one such behavior, positive rheotaxis towards the source of a flow, in two tadpole species, the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis; type 1) and the American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana; type 4). Because these two species had been tested under different flow conditions, we re-evaluated these findings by quantifying flow-sensing behaviors of bullfrog tadpoles in the same flow field in which X. laevis tadpoles had been tested previously. Early larval bullfrog tadpoles were exposed to flow in the dark, in the presence of a discrete light cue, and after treatment with the ototoxin gentamicin. In response to flow, tadpoles moved downstream, closer to a side wall, and higher in the water column, but they did not station-hold. Tadpoles exhibited positive rheotaxis, but with long latencies, low to moderate accuracy, and considerable individual variability. This is in contrast to the robust, stereotyped station-holding and accurate rheotaxis of X. laevis tadpoles. The presence of a discrete visual cue and gentamicin treatment altered spatial positioning and disrupted rheotaxis in both tadpole species. Species differences in lateral-line mediated behaviors may reflect differences in neuromast number and distribution, life history, or perceptual salience of other environmental cues. PMID:27870909

  1. System xC- is a mediator of microglial function and its deletion slows symptoms in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mice.

    PubMed

    Mesci, Pinar; Zaïdi, Sakina; Lobsiger, Christian S; Millecamps, Stéphanie; Escartin, Carole; Seilhean, Danielle; Sato, Hideyo; Mallat, Michel; Boillée, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is the most common adult-onset motor neuron disease and evidence from mice expressing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-causing SOD1 mutations suggest that neurodegeneration is a non-cell autonomous process where microglial cells influence disease progression. However, microglial-derived neurotoxic factors still remain largely unidentified in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. With excitotoxicity being a major mechanism proposed to cause motor neuron death in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, our hypothesis was that excessive glutamate release by activated microglia through their system [Formula: see text] (a cystine/glutamate antiporter with the specific subunit xCT/Slc7a11) could contribute to neurodegeneration. Here we show that xCT expression is enriched in microglia compared to total mouse spinal cord and absent from motor neurons. Activated microglia induced xCT expression and during disease, xCT levels were increased in both spinal cord and isolated microglia from mutant SOD1 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mice. Expression of xCT was also detectable in spinal cord post-mortem tissues of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and correlated with increased inflammation. Genetic deletion of xCT in mice demonstrated that activated microglia released glutamate mainly through system [Formula: see text]. Interestingly, xCT deletion also led to decreased production of specific microglial pro-inflammatory/neurotoxic factors including nitric oxide, TNFa and IL6, whereas expression of anti-inflammatory/neuroprotective markers such as Ym1/Chil3 were increased, indicating that xCT regulates microglial functions. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mice, xCT deletion surprisingly led to earlier symptom onset but, importantly, this was followed by a significantly slowed progressive disease phase, which resulted in more surviving motor neurons. These results are consistent with a deleterious contribution of microglial-derived glutamate during symptomatic

  2. B lymphocytes trigger monocyte mobilization and impair heart function after acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zouggari, Yasmine; Ait-Oufella, Hafid; Bonnin, Philippe; Simon, Tabassome; Sage, Andrew P; Guérin, Coralie; Vilar, José; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Tsiantoulas, Dimitrios; Laurans, Ludivine; Dumeau, Edouard; Kotti, Salma; Bruneval, Patrick; Charo, Israel F; Binder, Christoph J; Danchin, Nicolas; Tedgui, Alain; Tedder, Thomas F; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Mallat, Ziad

    2014-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is a severe ischemic disease responsible for heart failure and sudden death. Here, we show that after acute myocardial infarction in mice, mature B lymphocytes selectively produce Ccl7 and induce Ly6Chi monocyte mobilization and recruitment to the heart, leading to enhanced tissue injury and deterioration of myocardial function. Genetic (Baff receptor deficiency) or antibody-mediated (CD20- or Baff-specific antibody) depletion of mature B lymphocytes impeded Ccl7 production and monocyte mobilization, limited myocardial injury and improved heart function. These effects were recapitulated in mice with B cell–selective Ccl7 deficiency. We also show that high circulating concentrations of CCL7 and BAFF in patients with acute myocardial infarction predict increased risk of death or recurrent myocardial infarction. This work identifies a crucial interaction between mature B lymphocytes and monocytes after acute myocardial ischemia and identifies new therapeutic targets for acute myocardial infarction. PMID:24037091

  3. Hyponatremia, Cognitive Function, and Mobility in an Outpatient Heart Failure Population

    PubMed Central

    Albabtain, Monirah; Brenner, Michael J.; Nicklas, John M.; Hummel, Scott L.; McCormick, Michael P.; Pawlowski, Jeffrey L.; Remington, Tami L.; Gure, Tanya R.; Dorsch, Michael P.; Bleske, Barry E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The association of hyponatremia with cognitive impairment and mobility in heart failure (HF) patients is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if hyponatremia is associated with cognitive and mobility impairment as measured by simple, validated, and time-sensitive tests. Material/Methods This was a prospective study in patients with reduced and preserved ejection fraction (HFrEF, HFpEF) seen in outpatient HF clinics. Hyponatremia was defined as sodium level ≤136 mEq/L. Cognitive function was measured using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) tool, and mobility was measured with the Timed Up and Go test (TUG-t). Results A total of 121 patients were evaluated; 30% were hyponatremic (134±1.9 mEq/l, range 128–136 mEq/l). Overall, 92% of hyponatremic patients had cognitive impairment (MoCA <26) compared to 76% of the non-hyponatremic patients [relative risk 1.2 (confidence interval: 1.02–1.4, p=0.02)]. In regard to mobility, 72% of hyponatremic patients and 62% of non-hyponatremic patients (p=0.4) had TUG-t times that were considered to be worse than average. A total of 84% (N=76) of HFrEF and 71% (N=22) of HFpEF patients had cognitive impairment (p=0.86). HFrEF patients had significantly lower overall MoCA scores (21.2±3.7 vs. 23.3±3.6, p=0.006) and similar TUG-t times compared to HFpEF patients. Conclusions Most heart failure patients (HFrEF and HFpEF) seen in an ambulatory setting had impairment of cognitive function and mobility, with a higher prevalence among those with hyponatremia. Screening can be done using tests that can be administered in a clinical setting. PMID:27988787

  4. Dislocation mobility in ringwoodite and bridgmanite as functions of temperature and water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, H.; Yamazaki, D.; Sakurai, M.; Miyajima, N.; Ohfuji, H.; Katsura, T.; Yamamoto, T.

    2016-12-01

    Mantle convolution is driven by subduction of oceanic lithosphere into the mantle. Seismic observation indicates that some slabs penetrate into the lower mantle, whereas the others stagnate within the mantle transition zone. A key to address such observation is the viscosity contract between ringwoodite and bridgmanite, which are the dominant minerals in the lower part of mantle transition zone and lower mantle, respectively. However, direct creep experiments for these minerals under their stability fields cannot provide accurate enough information about the viscosity contrast because of the limited pressure range and low precision of rock-deformation apparatus. An alternative method to investigate the high-pressure mineral rheology is measurement the dislocation mobility by dislocation recovery experiments because the viscosity is inversely proportional to the dislocation mobility. In this study, we systematically measured the dislocation mobility in ringwoodite at 22 GPa as a function of temperature and water content, and in bridgmanite at 25 GPa as a function of temperature. The activation enthalpy for dislocation mobility are found to be 300±30 and 330±40 kJ/mol, respectively. The water content exponent for ringwoodite is 1.1±0.1. Our results show that dislocation motion in bridgmanite is by two orders of magnitude faster than anhydrous ringwoodite, but 1.5 orders of magnitude slower than water-saturated ringwoodite. Namely, bridgmanite is softer than dry ringwoodite, but harder than wet ringwoodite. Wet slabs will stagnate in the transition zone due to the low viscosity, whereas dry slabs will penetrate into the lower mantle. Comparison of the dislocation mobility in olivine, wadsleyite, ringwoodite, and bridgmanite also suggests that the mantle transition zone contains at least 1-2 wt. % of water to explain the viscosity profile estimated from postglacial rebound and gravity data.

  5. Hemifacial hyperhidrosis associated with ipsilateral/contralateral cervical disc herniation myelopathy. Functional considerations on how compression pattern determines the laterality.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Satoshi; Inukai, Yoko; Nishimura, Naoki; Sato, Maki; Sugenoya, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Sweating is an important mechanism for ensuring constant thermoregulation, but hyperhidrosis may be disturbing. We present five cases of hemifacial hyperhidrosis as a compensatory response to an/hypohidrosis caused by cervical disc herniation. All the patients complained of hemifacial hyperhidrosis, without anisocoria or blepharoptosis. Sweat function testing and thermography confirmed hyperhidrosis of hemifacial and adjacent areas. Neck MRI showed cervical disc herniation. Three of the patients had lateral compression with welldemarcated hypohidrosis below the hyperhidrosis on the same side as the cervical lesion. The rest had paramedian compression with poorly demarcated hyperhidrosis and hypohidrosis on the contralateral side. Although MRI showed no intraspinal pathological signal intensity, lateral dural compression might influence the circulation to the sudomotor pathway, and paramedian compression might influence the ipsilateral sulcal artery, which perfuses the sympathetic descending pathway and the intermediolateral nucleus. Sweat function testing and thermography should be performed to determine the focus of the hemifacial hyperhidrosis, and the myelopathy should be investigated on both sides.

  6. Physical Function and Spinal Mobility Remain Stable Despite Radiographic Spinal Progression in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis Treated with TNF-α Inhibitors for Up to 10 Years.

    PubMed

    Poddubnyy, Denis; Fedorova, Aleksandra; Listing, Joachim; Haibel, Hildrun; Baraliakos, Xenofon; Braun, Jürgen; Sieper, Joachim

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of radiographic spinal progression and disease activity on function and spinal mobility in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) treated with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitors for up to 10 years. Patients with AS who participated in 2 longterm open-label extensions of clinical trials with TNF-α inhibitors (43 receiving infliximab and 17 receiving etanercept) were included in this analysis based on the availability of spinal radiographs performed at baseline and at a later timepoint (yr 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10) during followup. Spinal radiographs were scored according to the modified Stoke Ankylosing Spondylitis Spine Score (mSASSS). Function was assessed by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), spinal mobility by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), and disease activity by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). After the initial improvement, BASFI and BASMI remained remarkably stable at low levels over up to 10 years despite radiographic spinal progression. In the generalized mixed effects model analysis, no association between the mSASSS and the BASFI change (β = 0.0, 95% CI -0.03 to 0.03) was found, while there was some effect of mSASSS changes on BASMI changes over time (β = 0.05, 95% CI 0.01-0.09). BASDAI showed a strong association with function (β = 0.64, 95% CI 0.54-0.73) and to a lesser extent, with spinal mobility (β = 0.14, 95% CI 0.01-0.26). Functional status and spinal mobility of patients with established AS remained stable during longterm anti-TNF-α therapy despite radiographic progression. This indicates that reduction and continuous control of inflammation might be able to outweigh the functional effect of structural damage progression in AS.

  7. Effects of thoracic mobilization and manipulation on function and mental state in chronic lower back pain.

    PubMed

    Sung, Youn-Bum; Lee, Jung-Ho; Park, Young-Han

    2014-11-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in function and mental state after thoracic mobilization and manipulation in patients with chronic lower back pain (LBP). [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-six subjects were randomly divided into mobilization group (group A), manipulation group (group B) and control group (group C). The Oswestry disability index (ODI) was used to measure the functional impairment of patients with LBP. A multiple spinal diagnosis was used to measure the range of motion (ROM) of vertebra segments. The Fear-avoidance beliefs questionnaire (FABQ) was used to investigate the mental state of LBP patients. [Results] Group A and group B were significantly different from group C in terms of the ODI. Between groups, there was no difference in ROM during trunk flexion. Group A and group B were also significantly different from the control group in extension ROM. The FABQ of group B was significantly different from that of group A. [Conclusion] Application of mobilization or manipulation to thoracic lumbar vertebrae has a positive effect on function, mental state, and ROM in patients with lower back pain.

  8. Effects of Thoracic Mobilization and Manipulation on Function and Mental State in Chronic Lower Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Youn-Bum; Lee, Jung-Ho; Park, Young-Han

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in function and mental state after thoracic mobilization and manipulation in patients with chronic lower back pain (LBP). [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-six subjects were randomly divided into mobilization group (group A), manipulation group (group B) and control group (group C). The Oswestry disability index (ODI) was used to measure the functional impairment of patients with LBP. A multiple spinal diagnosis was used to measure the range of motion (ROM) of vertebra segments. The Fear-avoidance beliefs questionnaire (FABQ) was used to investigate the mental state of LBP patients. [Results] Group A and group B were significantly different from group C in terms of the ODI. Between groups, there was no difference in ROM during trunk flexion. Group A and group B were also significantly different from the control group in extension ROM. The FABQ of group B was significantly different from that of group A. [Conclusion] Application of mobilization or manipulation to thoracic lumbar vertebrae has a positive effect on function, mental state, and ROM in patients with lower back pain. PMID:25435683

  9. Effects of tango on functional mobility in Parkinson's disease: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Hackney, Madeleine E; Kantorovich, Svetlana; Levin, Rebecca; Earhart, Gammon M

    2007-12-01

    Recent research has shown that dance, specifically tango, may be an appropriate and effective strategy for ameliorating functional mobility deficits in people who are frail and elderly. Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) experience declines in functional mobility that may be even more pronounced than those experienced by frail elderly individuals without PD. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two movement programs: tango classes or exercise classes. Nineteen subjects with PD were randomly assigned to a tango group or a group exercise class representative of the current classes offered in our geographical area for individuals with PD. Subjects completed a total of 20 tango or exercise classes and were evaluated the week before and the week following the intervention. Both groups showed significant improvements in overall Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) score and nonsignificant improvements in self-reported Freezing of Gait. In addition, the tango group showed significant improvements on the Berg Balance Scale. The exercise group did not improve on this measure. Finally, the tango group showed a trend toward improvement on the Timed Up and Go test that was not observed in the exercise group. Future studies with a larger sample are needed to confirm and extend our observation that tango may be an effective intervention to target functional mobility deficits in individuals with PD.

  10. DIABETES IMPAIRS HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL MOBILIZATION THROUGH ALTERATION OF NICHE FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Francesca; Lymperi, Stefania; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón; Saez, Borja; Spencer, Joel A; Yeap, Beow Y; Masselli, Elena; Graiani, Gallia; Prezioso, Lucia; Rizzini, Elisa Lodi; Mangoni, Marcellina; Rizzoli, Vittorio; Sykes, Stephen M; Lin, Charles P.; Frenette, Paul S.; Quaini, Federico; Scadden, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) transplantation success depends upon adequate cell collection after G-CSF-administration that a substantial fraction of patients fails to achieve. Retrospective analysis of patient records demonstrated that diabetes correlated with lower CD34+ cell mobilization. Using mouse models, we found impaired HSPC egress from the bone marrow in either streptozotocin-induced or db/db diabetic animals. HSPC aberrantly localized within the marrow microenvironment of diabetic animals in association with abnormalities in sympathetic neuron number and function. Markedly increased sympathetic neuron density was accompanied by abnormal response to β-adrenergic stimulation and a failure to generate the G-CSF-induced CXCL12 gradient in nestin-expressing mesenchymal cells associated with HSPC mobilization. Alternative mobilization by direct pharmacologic inhibition of CXCL12-CXCR4 interaction rescued the defect. These data reveal diabetes-induced changes in bone marrow physiology and microanatomy and point to a pathophysiologically based approach to overcome HSPC mobilization defects in diabetic patients. PMID:21998408

  11. Internal Anal Sphincter Function Following Lateral Internal Sphincterotomy for Anal Fissure

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Edward; Alper, Dan; Stein, Gideon Y.; Bramnik, Zachar; Dreznik, Zeev

    2005-01-01

    Background: Anal fissure is a common and painful disorder. Its relation to hypertonic anal sphincter is controversial. The most common surgical treatment of chronic anal fissure is lateral internal sphincterotomy. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term manometric results of sphincter healing following lateral internal sphincterotomy. Patients and Methods: Between 2000 and 2003, 50 patients with anal fissure were included in this study and underwent sphincterotomy; 12 healthy patients served as controls. All patients with anal fissure underwent manometric evaluation using a 6-channel perfusion catheter. All patients were examined 1 month before surgery and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months following surgery. The control group had 3 manometric evaluations 6 months apart. Results: The mean basal resting pressure before surgery was 138 ± 28 mm Hg. One month after surgery, the pressure dropped to 86 ± 15 mm Hg (P < 0.0001) and gradually rose to a plateau at 12 months (110 ± 18 mm Hg, P < 0.0001). At 12 months, the manometric pressure was significantly lower than the baseline (P < 0.0001). However, manometric measurements in the fissure group were still significantly higher than in the control group (110 ± 18 versus 73 ± 4.8 mm Hg, P < 0.0001). All patients were free of symptoms at the 12-month follow-up. Conclusion: Lateral internal sphincterotomy caused a significant decline in the resting anal pressure. During the first year following surgery, the tone of the internal anal sphincter gradually increased, indicating recovery, but still remained significantly lower than before surgery. However, postoperative resting pressures were higher than those in the control, and no patient suffered any permanent problems with incontinence, so this decrease may not be clinically significant. PMID:16041211

  12. Unfavorable polysomnographic sleep patterns predict poor sleep and poor psychological functioning 3 years later in patients with restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brand, Serge; Beck, Johannes; Hatzinger, Martin; Savic, Mirjana; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith

    2011-01-01

    Amongst the variety of disorders affecting sleep, restless legs syndrome (RLS) merits particular attention. Little is known about long-term outcomes for sleep or psychological functioning following a diagnosis of RLS. The aim of the present study was thus to evaluate sleep and psychological functioning at a 3-year follow-up and based on polysomnographic measurements. Thirty-eight patients (18 female and 20 male patients; mean age: 56.06, SD = 12.07) with RLS and sleep electroencephalographic recordings were followed-up 33 months later. Participants completed a series of self-rating questionnaires related to sleep and psychological functioning. Additionally, they completed a sleep log for 7 consecutive days. Age, male gender, increased light sleep (S1, S2) and sleep onset latency, along with low sleep efficiency, predicted psychological functioning and sleep 33 months later. Specifically, sleep fragmentation predicted poor psychological functioning, and both sleep fragmentation and light sleep predicted poor sleep. In patients with RLS, irrespective of medication or duration of treatment, poor objective sleep patterns at diagnosis predicted both poor psychological functioning and poor sleep about 3 years after diagnosis. The pattern of results suggests the need for more thorough medical and psychotherapeutic treatment and monitoring of patients with RLS. © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Multipoint incremental motor unit number estimation versus amyotrophic lateral sclerosis functional rating scale and the medical research council sum score as an outcome measure in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jagtap, Sujit Abajirao; Kuruvilla, Abraham; Govind, Preetha; Nair, Muralidharan D; Sarada, C; Varma, Ravi Prasad

    2014-07-01

    Monitoring the disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a challenge due to different rates of progression between patients. Besides clinical methods to monitor disease progression, such as the ALS functional rating scale (ALSFRS) and the medical research council (MRC) sum score, quantitative methods like motor unit number estimation (MUNE) are of interest. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the rate of progression in ALS using multipoint incremental MUNE and to compare MUNE, ALSFRS and MRC sum score at baseline and at 6 months for progression of the disease. Multipoint incremental MUNE using median nerve, ALS-FRS and MRC sum score was carried out in 29 ALS patients at baseline and then at 6 months. Of the 29 ALS patients studied, the mean MUNE at baseline was 21.80 (standard deviation [SD]: 19.46, range 4-73), 15.9 in the spinal onset group (SD: 14.60) and 30.16 (SD: 22.89) in the bulbar onset group. Spinal onset patients had 74.02% of baseline MUNE value while bulbar onset patients had only 24.74% baseline value MUNE at 6 months follow-up (Unpaired t-test, P = 0.001). ALSFRS and MRC sum score showed statistically significant decline (P < 0.001) at 6 months follow-up. MUNE had the highest sensitivity for progression of the disease when compared to the ALS FRS and MRC sum score. Multipoint incremental MUNE is a valuable tool for outcome measure in ALS and other diseases characterized by motor unit loss. The rate of decline of multipoint incremental MUNE is more sensitive than that of MRC sum score and ALSFRS-R, when expressed as the percentage change from baseline.

  14. Brief report: perception and lateralization of spoken emotion by youths with high-functioning forms of autism.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kimberly F; Montgomery, Allen A; Abramson, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    The perception and the cerebral lateralization of spoken emotions were investigated in children and adolescents with high-functioning forms of autism (HFFA), and age-matched typically developing controls (TDC). A dichotic listening task using nonsense passages was used to investigate the recognition of four emotions: happiness, sadness, anger, and neutrality. The participants with HFFA did not differ significantly in overall performance from the TDC, suggesting that the pervasive difficulty in processing emotions is not uniformly present in emotions expressed verbally. Both groups demonstrated a left-ear effect for the perception of emotion in nonsense passages, consistent with overall right-hemisphere superiority for this function.

  15. Lung Function, Respiratory Muscle Strength, and Thoracoabdominal Mobility in Women With Fibromyalgia Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Forti, Meire; Zamunér, Antonio R; Andrade, Carolina P; Silva, Ester

    2016-10-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is associated with a variety of symptoms, such as fatigue and dyspnea, which may be related to changes in the respiratory system. The objective of this work was to evaluate pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength, and thoracoabdominal mobility in women with FMS and its association with clinical manifestations. The study included 23 women with FMS and 23 healthy women (control group). Pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength, and thoracoabdominal mobility were assessed in all participants. Clinical manifestations such as number of active tender points, pain, fatigue, well-being, and general pressure pain threshold and pressure pain threshold in regions involved in respiratory function were also assessed. For data analysis, the Mann-Whitney test and Spearman correlation coefficient were used. The FMS group showed lower values of maximum voluntary ventilation (P = .030), maximal inspiratory pressure (P = .003), and cirtometry at the axillary and xiphoid levels (P < .001 and P < .001, respectively) as well as higher cirtometry at the abdominal level (P = .005) compared with the control group. However, there was no significant difference between groups for maximum expiratory pressure. In predicted percentage, maximal inspiratory pressure showed significant positive correlation with axillary cirtometry (r = 0.41, P = .049) and negative correlation with the number of active tender points (r = -0.44, P = .031) and fatigue (r = -0.41, P = .049). Subjects with FMS had lower respiratory muscle endurance, inspiratory muscle strength, and thoracic mobility than healthy subjects. In addition, inspiratory muscle strength was associated with the number of active tender points, fatigue, and axillary mobility. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  16. Effect of maitland mobilization in cervical and thoracic spine and therapeutic exercise on functional impairment in individuals with chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun-Su; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2017-03-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated joint mobilization and therapeutic exercise applied to the cervical spine and upper thoracic spine for functional impairment caused by chronic neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen study subjects were randomly assigned to two groups of nine people each. Therapeutic exercise only was applied to the cervical and upper thoracic spine for Group I, while both therapeutic exercise and joint mobilization were applied to Group II. The visual analog scale, neck disability index, active cervical range of motion, static balance capacity, and muscle tone were assessed with a pre-test. The intervention was carried out for 60 minutes a day, three times a week, for two weeks for each group, followed by a post-test using the same protocol as the pre-test. [Results] The visual analog scale, neck disability index, and active cervical range of motion improved significantly in both groups. Group II improved significantly more on right lateral flexion and rightward rotation. Muscle tone improved significantly in the upper trapezius in both groups. [Conclusion] The joint mobilization and therapeutic exercise for functional impairments caused by chronic neck pain had a significant effect on several types of functional impairment.

  17. Effect of maitland mobilization in cervical and thoracic spine and therapeutic exercise on functional impairment in individuals with chronic neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Keun-Su; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated joint mobilization and therapeutic exercise applied to the cervical spine and upper thoracic spine for functional impairment caused by chronic neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen study subjects were randomly assigned to two groups of nine people each. Therapeutic exercise only was applied to the cervical and upper thoracic spine for Group I, while both therapeutic exercise and joint mobilization were applied to Group II. The visual analog scale, neck disability index, active cervical range of motion, static balance capacity, and muscle tone were assessed with a pre-test. The intervention was carried out for 60 minutes a day, three times a week, for two weeks for each group, followed by a post-test using the same protocol as the pre-test. [Results] The visual analog scale, neck disability index, and active cervical range of motion improved significantly in both groups. Group II improved significantly more on right lateral flexion and rightward rotation. Muscle tone improved significantly in the upper trapezius in both groups. [Conclusion] The joint mobilization and therapeutic exercise for functional impairments caused by chronic neck pain had a significant effect on several types of functional impairment. PMID:28356648

  18. Vibrotactile perceived intensity for mobile devices as a function of direction, amplitude, and frequency.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Inwook; Seo, Jongman; Kim, Myongchan; Choi, Seungmoon

    2013-01-01

    Vibrotactile rendering is an emerging interaction method for information transmission in mobile devices, replacing or supplementing visual and auditory displays. To design effective vibrotactile actuators or display algorithms, an understanding of the perceived intensity (strength) of their vibrations is essential. This paper aims to build a robust model for the perceived intensities of mobile device vibrations, which can be immediately used by engineers and application designers. To this end, we carried out two psychophysical experiments using absolute magnitude estimation procedures. In Experiment I, we investigated the effects of vibration direction and device weight on the perceived intensity of mobile device vibrations. The vibration directions tested (height, width, and depth), and the device weights (90-130 g) were determined considering those of contemporary mobile devices. Only the vibration direction was found to be a statistically significant factor, showing the highest perceived intensities along the height direction of a mobile device. In Experiment II, we measured the perceived intensities of vibrations with various amplitudes and frequencies along the three vibration directions. Then, for each direction, a psychophysical magnitude function and equal sensation contours were constructed based on Stevens' power law, which clearly visualize the consequences of vibration parameter changes on the resulting perceptual strength. In addition, we found a monotonic relationship between the physical power of vibration absorbed by the hand and the resulting perceived intensity. This suggests that the former, which is greatly easier to acquire in practice, is a reliable predictor of the latter. We expect that the results of this study can provide immediate knowledge about the perceptual strength of vibrations that engineers and applications developers will find useful.

  19. Activity of cells in the lateral vestibular nucleus as a function of head position

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Y.; Rosenberg, Jay; Segundo, J. P.

    1968-01-01

    1. The spike activity of cells in the lateral vestibular nucleus was recorded in cats anaesthetized with pentobarbital sodium. Natural labyrinthine stimulation was applied by fixing the animal at different positions reached through roations about a longitudinal or transverse axis. 2. The majority of cells responded to rotations only about the longitudinal axis. Two types of response were found. The first was characterized by a transient change in activity which occurred only during the movement. The second type had an initial transient component and a subsequent steady component that persisted as long as the head remained fixed. 3. The interspike interval means, standard deviations, histograms and autocorrelograms of the steady response components of cells sensitive to lateral tilt were calculated. In every cell the relation between the head position with respect to gravity and the mean interspike interval of the steady discharge showed two main features. (a) `Directional sensitivity': the mean interval increased following rotation in one sense, and decreased following rotation in the other. In twenty-two out of thirty-three cells, the mean increased when the recording side was raised. The remaining cells showed the opposite relation. (b) `Multivaluedness': each particular position is associated with several different values of mean interval and these values had a relatively wide scatter. The curve that resulted from joining points in the order in which they occurred during the experiment was either closed, open, or combined closed and open portions. 4. The standard deviations, histograms and autocorrelograms also showed directional sensitivity and multivaluedness with respect to position. Several types of interspike interval histograms and autocorrelograms characterized lateral vestibular activity. The forms of the histogram and the autocorrelogram of the discharge from each cell usually remained unchanged during stimulation. 5. The extensive spread of the

  20. Motor-symptom laterality affects acquisition in Parkinson's disease: A cognitive and functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pei; Tan, Yu-Yan; Liu, Dong-Qiang; Herzallah, Mohammad M; Lapidow, Elizabeth; Wang, Ying; Zang, Yu-Feng; Gluck, Mark A; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2017-07-01

    Asymmetric onset of motor symptoms in PD can affect cognitive function. We examined whether motor-symptom laterality could affect feedback-based associative learning and explored its underlying neural mechanism by functional magnetic resonance imaging in PD patients. We recruited 63 early-stage medication-naïve PD patients (29 left-onset medication-naïve patients, 34 right-onset medication-naïve patients) and 38 matched normal controls. Subjects completed an acquired equivalence task (including acquisition, retention, and generalization) and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Learning accuracy and response time in each phase of the task were recorded for behavioral measures. Regional homogeneity was used to analyze resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data, with regional homogeneity lateralization to evaluate hemispheric functional asymmetry in the striatum. Left-onset patients made significantly more errors in acquisition (feedback-based associative learning) than right-onset patients and normal controls, whereas right-onset patients performed as well as normal controls. There was no significant difference among these three groups in the accuracy of either retention or generalization phase. The three groups did not show significant differences in response time. In the left-onset group, there was an inverse relationship between acquisition errors and regional homogeneity in the right dorsal rostral putamen. There were no significant regional homogeneity changes in either the left or the right dorsal rostral putamen in right-onset patients when compared to controls. Motor-symptom laterality could affect feedback-based associative learning in PD, with left-onset medication-naïve patients being selectively impaired. Dysfunction in the right dorsal rostral putamen may underlie the observed deficit in associative learning in patients with left-sided onset.© 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017

  1. Surface Mobility of Horizontally Vibrated Granular Layers as a Function of Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puls, Conor; McElwaine, Jim

    2005-11-01

    Stimulated by studies of avalanches where the critical slope angle is a function of layer depth [1], we investigate horizontally vibrated layers of various thickness, using acceleration to simulate the effects of gravity. The rectangular cell is 20 cm long in the direction of motion, and 8 cm transverse to that direction, containing polydisperse polystyrene particles of diameter 0.7-1.2 mm, 1-20 particles deep. We measure the RMS velocity of the mobilized surface particles in the frame of reference of the oscillating box, as a function of non-dimensional acceleration and layer depth. We find a depth-dependent threshold acceleration for surface mobility. The mobility also varies with time, due possibly to structural re-arrangement of the particles. The observations are compared to numerical simulations of the same phenomena using soft particle forces with friction, and to earlier experimental studies [2]. [1] O. Pouliquen, Phys. Fluids 11, 542 (1999). [2] G. Metcalfe et al., Phys. Rev. E 61, 031302 (2002).

  2. The Functional Mobility Scale: ability to detect change following single event multilevel surgery.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Adrienne; Graham, H Kerr; Morris, Meg E; Baker, Richard; Wolfe, Rory

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the ability of the Functional Mobility Scale (FMS) to detect change in children with cerebral palsy (CP) undergoing single event multilevel surgery (SEMLS). A retrospective study was conducted of gait laboratory records and video assessments for a consecutive sample of children with CP aged 4 to 18 years who were managed by multilevel surgery. FMS ratings and Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels were recorded preoperatively and at regular postoperative time points. The sample comprised 66 children (32 females, 34 males) with spastic diplegia, GMFCS Levels I (n=18), II (n=24), and III (n=24). The mean age at surgery was 10 years (SD 2y 6mo, range 6-16y). For each FMS distance (5, 50, and 500m) odds ratios showed significant deterioration in mobility at 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Mobility then improved to baseline levels by 12 months and improved further by 24 months postoperatively. GMFCS level remained stable throughout most of the postoperative period for children classified as GMFCS Level III preoperatively but not for children classified as Levels I or II. The FMS was found to be a clinically feasible tool for quantifying change after SEMLS in children with CP.

  3. Early mobilization programme improves functional capacity after major abdominal cancer surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, E P M; de Almeida, J P; Landoni, G; Galas, F R B G; Fukushima, J T; Fominskiy, E; de Brito, C M M; Cavichio, L B L; de Almeida, L A A; Ribeiro-Jr, U; Osawa, E A; Diz, M P E; Cecatto, R B; Battistella, L R; Hajjar, L A

    2017-09-13

    Major abdominal oncology surgery is associated with substantial postoperative loss of functional capacity, and exercise may be an effective intervention to improve outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess efficacy, feasibility and safety of a supervised postoperative exercise programme. We performed a single-blind, parallel-arm, randomized trial in patients who underwent major abdominal oncology surgery in a tertiary university hospital. Patients were randomized to an early mobilization postoperative programme based on supervised aerobic exercise, resistance and flexibility training or to standard rehabilitation care. The primary outcome was inability to walk without human assistance at postoperative day 5 or hospital discharge. A total of 108 patients were enrolled, 54 into the early mobilization programme group and 54 into the standard rehabilitation care group. The incidence of the primary outcome was nine (16.7%) and 21 (38.9%), respectively ( P =0.01), with an absolute risk reduction of 22.2% [95% confidence interval (CI) 5.9-38.6] and a number needed to treat of 5 (95% CI 3-17). All patients in the intervention group were able to follow at least partially the exercise programme, although the performance among them was rather heterogeneous. There were no differences between groups regarding clinical outcomes or complications related to the exercises. An early postoperative mobilization programme based on supervised exercises seems to be safe and feasible and improves functional capacity in patients undergoing major elective abdominal oncology surgery. However, its impact on clinical outcomes is still unclear. NCT01693172.

  4. Alcohol and cognitive function: assessment in everyday life and laboratory settings using mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Tiplady, Brian; Oshinowo, Bami; Thomson, Joanne; Drummond, Gordon Blair

    2009-12-01

    Mobile phone (cellphone) technology makes it practicable to assess cognitive function in a natural setting. We assessed this method and compared impairment of performance due to alcohol in everyday life with measurements made in the laboratory. Thirty-eight volunteers (20 male, aged 18-54 years) took part in the everyday study, completing assessments twice a day for 14 days following requests sent by text messages to the mobile phone. Twenty-six of them (12 male, aged 19-54) took part in a subsequent two-period crossover lab study comparing alcohol with no alcohol (placebo). Everyday entries with 5 or more units of alcohol consumed in the past 6 hours (inferred mean blood alcohol concentration 95 ml/100 ml) showed higher scores for errors in tests of attention and working memory compared with entries with no alcohol consumed that day. Response times were impaired for only 1 test, sustained attention to response. The laboratory comparison of alcohol (mean blood alcohol concentration 124 mg/100 ml) with placebo showed impairment to both reaction time and error scores for all tests. A similar degree of subjective drunkenness was reported in both settings. We found that mobile phones allowed practical research on cognitive performance in an everyday life setting. Alcohol impaired function in both laboratory and everyday life settings at relevant doses of alcohol.

  5. Cortisol in Neonatal Mother's Milk Predicts Later Infant Social and Cognitive Functioning in Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Amanda M; Murphy, Ashley M; Guitarra, Denisse; Slonecker, Emily; Suomi, Stephen J; Rosenberg, Kendra L; Novak, Melinda A; Meyer, Jerrold S; Hinde, Katie

    2017-03-29

    Milk provides not only the building blocks for somatic development but also the hormonal signals that contribute to the biopsychological organization of the infant. Among mammals, glucocorticoids (GCs) in mother's milk have been associated with infant temperament. This study extended prior work to investigate rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) mother-infant dyads (N = 34) from birth through 8 months postpartum. Regression analysis revealed that cortisol concentrations in milk during the neonatal period predicted impulsivity on a cognitive task, but not global social behaviors, months later. During this time period, sex-differentiated social behavior emerged. For female infants, milk cortisol concentrations predicted total frequency of play. Collectively, these findings support and extend the "lactational programming" hypothesis on the impact of maternal-origin hormones ingested via milk.

  6. Sex determination using discriminant function analysis in Indigenous (Kurubas) children and adolescents of Coorg, Karnataka, India: A lateral cephalometric study.

    PubMed

    Devang Divakar, Darshan; John, Jacob; Al Kheraif, Abdulaziz Abdullah; Mavinapalla, Seema; Ramakrishnaiah, Ravikumar; Vellappally, Sajith; Hashem, Mohamed Ibrahim; Dalati, M H N; Durgesh, B H; Safadi, Rima A; Anil, Sukumaran

    2016-11-01

    Aim: To test the validity of sex discrimination using lateral cephalometric radiograph and discriminant function analysis in Indigenous (Kuruba) children and adolescents of Coorg, Karnataka, India. Methods and materials: Six hundred and sixteen lateral cephalograms of 380 male and 236 females of age ranging from 6.5 to 18 years of Indigenous population of Coorg, Karnataka, India called Kurubas having a normal occlusion were included in the study. Lateral cephalograms were obtained in a standard position with teeth in centric occlusion and lips relaxed. Each radiograph was traced and cephalometric landmarks were measured using digital calliper. Calculations of 24 cephalometric measurements were performed. Results: Males exhibited significantly greater mean angular and linear cephalometric measurements as compared to females (p < 0.05) (Table 5). Also, significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed in all the variables according to age (Table 6). Out of 24 variables, only ULTc predicts the gender. The reliability of the derived discriminant function was assessed among study subjects; 100% of males and females were recognized correctly. Conclusion: The final outcome of this study validates the existence of sexual dimorphism in the skeleton as early as 6.5 years of age. There is a need for further research to determine other landmarks that can help in sex determination and norms for Indigenous (Kuruba) population and also other Indigenous population of Coorg, Karnataka, India.

  7. Conserved Functions of the MATE Transporter BIG EMBRYO1 in Regulation of Lateral Organ Size and Initiation Rate

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masaharu; Sato, Yutaka; Wu, Shan; Kang, Byung-Ho; McCarty, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic networks that determine rates of organ initiation and organ size are key regulators of plant architecture. Whereas several genes that influence the timing of lateral organ initiation have been identified, the regulatory pathways in which these genes operate are poorly understood. Here, we identify a class of genes implicated in regulation of the lateral organ initiation rate. Loss-of-function mutations in the MATE transporter encoded by maize (Zea mays) Big embryo 1 (Bige1) cause accelerated leaf and root initiation as well as enlargement of the embryo scutellum. BIGE1 is localized to trans-Golgi, indicating a possible role in secretion of a signaling molecule. Interestingly, phenotypes of bige1 bear striking similarity to cyp78a mutants identified in diverse plant species. We show that a CYP78A gene is upregulated in bige1 mutant embryos, suggesting a role for BIGE1 in feedback regulation of a CYP78A pathway. We demonstrate that accelerated leaf formation and early flowering phenotypes conditioned by mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana BIGE1 orthologs are complemented by maize Bige1, showing that the BIGE1 transporter has a conserved function in regulation of lateral organ initiation in plants. We propose that BIGE1 is required for transport of an intermediate or product associated with the CYP78A pathway. PMID:26276834

  8. Effect of a 4-week balance exercise with medio-lateral unstable sole on ankle joint functional ability.

    PubMed

    Nam, Su-Bin; Choi, Bo-Ram

    2017-07-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of 4-week of balance exercise with medio-lateral unstable sole on ankle muscle activation and functional ability. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty university students without current or past ankle injuries were assigned to either an experimental group or control group. The experimental group participated in a balance exercise program 3 times a week over 4 weeks, which consisted of one-leg stands and semi-squat exercises with medio-lateral unstable sole. The control group continued with their regular life activities without participation in the program. Electromyographic activities of peroneus longus and brevis muscles were recorded during stair descending immediately before and after the exercise program. Functional balance was tested with the Star Excursion Balance test immediately before and after the exercise program. Paired t-tests were used to assess statistical significance. [Results] Activation of peroneus longus and brevis and Star Excursion Balance Test scores in both groups did not show a significant difference between pre- and post-exercise. [Conclusion] A future study is suggested with increased level of medio-lateral perturbation during outcome measurements and exercises with addition of supervision in the exercise training and home program.

  9. Conserved Functions of the MATE Transporter BIG EMBRYO1 in Regulation of Lateral Organ Size and Initiation Rate.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masaharu; Sato, Yutaka; Wu, Shan; Kang, Byung-Ho; McCarty, Donald R

    2015-08-01

    Genetic networks that determine rates of organ initiation and organ size are key regulators of plant architecture. Whereas several genes that influence the timing of lateral organ initiation have been identified, the regulatory pathways in which these genes operate are poorly understood. Here, we identify a class of genes implicated in regulation of the lateral organ initiation rate. Loss-of-function mutations in the MATE transporter encoded by maize (Zea mays) Big embryo 1 (Bige1) cause accelerated leaf and root initiation as well as enlargement of the embryo scutellum. BIGE1 is localized to trans-Golgi, indicating a possible role in secretion of a signaling molecule. Interestingly, phenotypes of bige1 bear striking similarity to cyp78a mutants identified in diverse plant species. We show that a CYP78A gene is upregulated in bige1 mutant embryos, suggesting a role for BIGE1 in feedback regulation of a CYP78A pathway. We demonstrate that accelerated leaf formation and early flowering phenotypes conditioned by mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana BIGE1 orthologs are complemented by maize Bige1, showing that the BIGE1 transporter has a conserved function in regulation of lateral organ initiation in plants. We propose that BIGE1 is required for transport of an intermediate or product associated with the CYP78A pathway.

  10. Mobile patient applications within diabetes - from few and easy to advanced functionalities.

    PubMed

    Årsand, Eirik; Skrøvseth, Stein Olav; Hejlesen, Ole; Horsch, Alexander; Godtliebsen, Fred; Grøttland, Astrid; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Patient diaries as apps on mobile phones are becoming increasingly common, and can be a good support tool for patients who need to organize information relevant for their disease. Self-management is important to achieving diabetes treatment goals and can be a tool for lifestyle changes for patients with Type 2 diabetes. The autoimmune disease Type 1 diabetes requires a more intensive management than Type 2 - thus more advanced functionalities is desirable for users. Both simple and easy-to-use and more advanced diaries have their respective benefits, depending on the target user group and intervention. In this poster we summarize main findings and experience from more than a decade of research and development in the diabetes area. Several versions of the mobile health research platform-the Few Touch Application (FTA) are presented to illustrate the different approaches and results.

  11. The conception for creation of the multi-functional mobile automated complex for meteor observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, P.; Mozgova, A.

    2016-12-01

    The conception for creation of the multi-functional mobile automated complex for meteor observations in optical and adjacent wavelength is proposed. The observational complex will be equipped with panoramic video cameras of the optical and infrared wavelength (in necessary ultraviolet); dispersion device (pre-lens spectral grating) composed with a video camera for meteor spectra registration; microphones for detecting sound from possible electro-sonic bolides. For providing mobility of the complex and using it in expedition conditions the cameras will be installed on light-weight rotary device and equip it with GPS-receiver. For digitizing video-data the PC will be equipped with according electronics. Main characteristics of the proposed observational cameras are presented in the work as well.

  12. Mobility and transport of mercury and methylmercury in peat as a function of changes in water table regime and plant functional groups

    Treesearch

    Kristine M. Haynes; Evan S. Kane; Lynette Potvin; Erik A. Lilleskov; Randy Kolka; Carl P. J. Mitchell

    2017-01-01

    Climate change is likely to significantly affect the hydrology, ecology, and ecosystem function of peatlands, with potentially important but unclear impacts on mercury mobility within and transport from peatlands. Using a full-factorial mesocosm approach, we investigated the potential impacts on mercury mobility of water table regime changes (high and low) and...

  13. Pair mobility functions for rigid spheres in concentrated colloidal dispersions: Stresslet and straining motion couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yu; Swan, James W.; Zia, Roseanna N.

    2017-03-01

    Accurate modeling of particle interactions arising from hydrodynamic, entropic, and other microscopic forces is essential to understanding and predicting particle motion and suspension behavior in complex and biological fluids. The long-range nature of hydrodynamic interactions can be particularly challenging to capture. In dilute dispersions, pair-level interactions are sufficient and can be modeled in detail by analytical relations derived by Jeffrey and Onishi [J. Fluid Mech. 139, 261-290 (1984)] and Jeffrey [Phys. Fluids A 4, 16-29 (1992)]. In more concentrated dispersions, analytical modeling of many-body hydrodynamic interactions quickly becomes intractable, leading to the development of simplified models. These include mean-field approaches that smear out particle-scale structure and essentially assume that long-range hydrodynamic interactions are screened by crowding, as particle mobility decays at high concentrations. Toward the development of an accurate and simplified model for the hydrodynamic interactions in concentrated suspensions, we recently computed a set of effective pair of hydrodynamic functions coupling particle motion to a hydrodynamic force and torque at volume fractions up to 50% utilizing accelerated Stokesian dynamics and a fast stochastic sampling technique [Zia et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 224901 (2015)]. We showed that the hydrodynamic mobility in suspensions of colloidal spheres is not screened, and the power law decay of the hydrodynamic functions persists at all concentrations studied. In the present work, we extend these mobility functions to include the couplings of particle motion and straining flow to the hydrodynamic stresslet. The couplings computed in these two articles constitute a set of orthogonal coupling functions that can be utilized to compute equilibrium properties in suspensions at arbitrary concentration and are readily applied to solve many-body hydrodynamic interactions analytically.

  14. Adaptation to Turkish and Reliability Study of the Revised Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R)

    PubMed Central

    KOÇ, Filiz; BALAL, Mehmet; DEMİR, Turgay; ALPARSLAN, Z. Nazan; SARICA, Yakup

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal disease characterized by progressive degeneration of the motor neurons. It is difficult to define the severity of the clinical findings of this destructive disease owing to its rapid progression, which presents serious alterations in a short time even in the same patient. The present study was designed to evaulate the validity of the Turkish version of the Revised Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R), which has been used in various countries for measuring the functional status of ALS patients. Methods The ALSFRS-R scores of 41 ALS patients (24 male), in any stages of illness, were simultaneously assessed by two physicians. The functional status of the patients (motor system, bulbar, and pulmonary functions) was evaluated under 12 titles. In every subtitle, the functional status was evaluated as 0 for the worst functional status and 4 for the best functional status. The mean differentials for both subtitles and global scores and the 95% confidence bounds of these means were detected. The coherence was defined as the states in which the coefficient is above 0.80 and is statistically significant Results From the data obtained, the correlation between the two physicians was found to be statistically significant (p=0.000) in terms of the means of both subtitles and total scores. Conclusion It was shown in the present study that in the clinical follow-up of the disease, the Turkish version of ALSFRS-R is a simple, reliable, and easily applicable. PMID:28373799

  15. Anxiety in high-functioning autism: A pilot study of experience sampling using a mobile platform.

    PubMed

    Hare, Dougal Julian; Gracey, Carolyn; Wood, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    Anxiety and stress are everyday issues for many people with high-functioning autism, and while cognitive-behavioural therapy is the treatment of choice for the management of anxiety, there are challenges in using it with people with high-functioning autism. This study used modified experience sampling techniques to examine everyday anxiety and stress in adults with high-functioning autism and to explore the feasibility of delivering real-time stress management techniques using a mobile platform. High levels of anxiety were found to be characterised by worry, confusing thoughts and being alone but was not associated with internal focus, imagery or rumination. Participants reported improved mood and less worry and anxious thinking in the active phase of the study. These results support previous studies indicating that people with high-functioning autism differ in their experience of anxiety and provided preliminary data on the feasibility of real-time stress management. The limitations of this approach are discussed together with considerations for future work in the area of developing clinical interventions on mobile platforms.

  16. [Functional asymmetry of the frontal cortex and lateral hypothalamus of cats during food instrumental conditioning].

    PubMed

    Vanetsiian, G L; Pavlova, I V

    2003-01-01

    The synchronism and latency of auditory evoked potentials (EP) recorded in symmetric points of the frontal cortex and lateral hypothalamus of cats were measured at different stages of instrumental food conditioning and after the urgent transition to 30% reinforcement. Correlation coefficients between EPs in the cortex and hypothalamus were high (with left-side dominance) at the beginning of the experiments, when food motivation was high, and during the whole experiments in cases of high-probability of conditioned performance. Analysis of early positive P55-80 EP component showed that at all conditioning stages the peak latency of this component was shorter in the left cortical areas than in symmetrical points, whereas in the hypothalamus the shorter latency at the left side was observed at the stage of unstable conditioned reflex, and at the stage of stable reflex the latency of the studied component was shorter at the right side. During transition to 30% reinforcement, the latency was also shorter in the right hypothalamus. It is suggested that the high left-side correlation between the hypothalamus and cortex was associated with motivational and motor component of behavior rather than reflected the emotional stress induced by transition to another stereotype of food reinforcement (30%).

  17. Skeletal Muscle Remodelling as a Function of Disease Progression in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, L.; Jørgensen, L. H.; Bech, R. D.; Frandsen, U.; Schrøder, H. D.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle weakness is considered the pivotal sign of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Knowledge about the skeletal muscle degeneration/regeneration process and the myogenic potential is limited in ALS patients. Therefore, we investigate these processes in a time course perspective by analysing skeletal muscle biopsies from ALS patients collected before and after a 12-week period of normal daily activities and compare these with healthy age-matched control tissue. We do this by evaluating mRNA and protein (immunohistochemical) markers of regeneration, neurodegeneration, myogenesis, cell cycle regulation, and inflammation. Our results show morphological changes indicative of active denervation and reinnervation and an increase in small atrophic fibres. We demonstrate differences between ALS and controls in pathways controlling skeletal muscle homeostasis, cytoskeletal and regenerative markers, neurodegenerative factors, myogenic factors, cell cycle determinants, and inflammatory markers. Our results on Pax7 and MyoD protein expression suggest that proliferation and differentiation of skeletal muscle stem cells are affected in ALS patients, and the myogenic processes cannot overcome the denervation-induced wasting. PMID:27195289

  18. Optogenetic neuronal stimulation of the lateral cerebellar nucleus promotes persistent functional recovery after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aatman M.; Ishizaka, Shunsuke; Cheng, Michelle Y.; Wang, Eric H.; Bautista, Alex R.; Levy, Sabrina; Smerin, Daniel; Sun, Guohua; Steinberg, Gary K.

    2017-01-01

    Stroke induces network-wide changes in the brain, affecting the excitability in both nearby and remotely connected regions. Brain stimulation is a promising neurorestorative technique that has been shown to improve stroke recovery by altering neuronal activity of the target area. However, it is unclear whether the beneficial effect of stimulation is a result of neuronal or non-neuronal activation, as existing stimulation techniques nonspecifically activate/inhibit all cell types (neurons, glia, endothelial cells, oligodendrocytes) in the stimulated area. Furthermore, which brain circuit is efficacious for brain stimulation is unknown. Here we use the optogenetics approach to selectively stimulate neurons in the lateral cerebellar nucleus (LCN), a deep cerebellar nucleus that sends major excitatory output to multiple motor and sensory areas in the forebrain. Repeated LCN stimulations resulted in a robust and persistent recovery on the rotating beam test, even after cessation of stimulations for 2 weeks. Furthermore, western blot analysis demonstrated that LCN stimulations significantly increased the axonal growth protein GAP43 in the ipsilesional somatosensory cortex. Our results demonstrate that pan-neuronal stimulations of the LCN is sufficient to promote robust and persistent recovery after stroke, and thus is a promising target for brain stimulation. PMID:28569261

  19. Fifty Years Later: The Sequence, Structure and Function of Lacewing Cross-beta Silk

    SciTech Connect

    Weisman, Sarah; Okada, Shoko; Mudie, Stephen T.; Huson, Mickey G.; Trueman, Holly E.; Sriskantha, Alagacone; Haritos, Victoria S.; Sutherland, Tara D.

    2009-12-01

    Classic studies of protein structure in the 1950s and 1960s demonstrated that green lacewing egg stalk silk possesses a rare native cross-beta sheet conformation. We have identified and sequenced the silk genes expressed by adult females of a green lacewing species. The two encoded silk proteins are 109 and 67 kDa in size and rich in serine, glycine and alanine. Over 70% of each protein sequence consists of highly repetitive regions with 16-residue periodicity. The repetitive sequences can be fitted to an elegant cross-beta sheet structural model with protein chains folded into regular 8-residue long beta strands. This model is supported by wide-angle X-ray scattering data and tensile testing from both our work and the original papers. We suggest that the silk proteins assemble into stacked beta sheet crystallites bound together by a network of cystine cross-links. This hierarchical structure gives the lacewing silk high lateral stiffness nearly threefold that of silkworm silk, enabling the egg stalks to effectively suspend eggs and protect them from predators.

  20. Changes in tongue pressure, pulmonary function, and salivary flow in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Easterling, Caryn; Antinoja, Jodi; Cashin, Susan; Barkhaus, Paul E

    2013-06-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease involving nerve cells that control voluntary muscle movement (Rowland LP, Shneider NA, N Engl J Med 344(22):1688-1700, 2001). The aim of this study were to determine the pattern of neurodegenerative change in (1) isometric tongue strength (ITS) and spontaneous saliva swallow (SSS) pressure, (2) saliva weight, and (3) forced vital capacity (FVC) in patients with ALS who present with primary spinal versus primary bulbar symptoms. Twenty-three consecutive patients (age = 48-80 years, mean = 59.5 years) were enrolled. Data were collected over three visits (12-week interval) for each group: 9 patients with bulbar symptoms and 14 with spinal symptoms. A significant difference was noted in SSS and ITS in the group with bulbar symptoms from Trial 1 to II and from Trial II to III. SSS and ITS showed a significant difference when comparing Trial I to III but not when comparing Trial I to II for the spinal symptom group, indicating that this group experienced a slower decline in SSS. Saliva production did not show a significant change in the bulbar symptom group but did in the spinal group. FVC was significantly different when comparing Trial I to III and Trial II to III for both groups. FVC, SSS, and ITS may be complimentary measures used as a gauge of an ALS patient's ability to efficiently take oral nutrition and to support required alterations in diet consistency.

  1. Functional and pathological relevance of HERC family proteins: a decade later.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Tena, Susana; Cubillos-Rojas, Monica; Schneider, Taiane; Rosa, Jose Luis

    2016-05-01

    The HERC gene family encodes proteins with two characteristic domains in their sequence: the HECT domain and the RCC1-like domain (RLD). In humans, the HERC family comprises six members that can be divided into two groups based on their molecular mass and domain structure. Whereas large HERCs (HERC1 and HERC2) contain one HECT and more than one RLD, small HERCs (HERC3-6) possess single HECT and RLD domains. Accumulating evidence shows the HERC family proteins to be key components of a wide range of cellular functions, including neurodevelopment, DNA damage repair, cell growth and immune response. Considering the significant recent advances made regarding HERC functionality, an updated review summarizing the progress is greatly needed at 10 years since the last HERC review. We provide an integrated view of HERC function and go into detail about its implications for several human diseases such as cancer and neurological disorders.

  2. Mobile telephone use effects on peripheral audiovestibular function: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Bamiou, Doris-Eva; Ceranic, Borka; Cox, Robin; Watt, Hilary; Chadwick, Philip; Luxon, Linda M

    2008-02-01

    Low level radio-frequency (RF) signals may produce disorientation, headache and nausea. This double blind study tested nine case-subjects, who complained of various symptoms after prolonged mobile telephone use and 21 control subjects. Each subject underwent a series of trials, in which a dummy mobile telephone exposure system was held to each ear for 30 min in (a) pulsed, (b) continuous RF emission or, (c) no emission test modes. In the active pulsed and continuous modes the same mean power as the output of a typical handset was delivered at a carrier frequency of 882 MHz and at a maximum specific absorption rate (SAR) value of 1.3 W kg(-1) (+/- 30%). In Experiment I (auditory), transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE), which assess the outer hair cells in the inner ear, were conducted. In Experiment II (vestibular) the vestibulo-ocular reflex was recorded by video-oculography (VOG), at baseline and immediately post exposure. There were no significant TEOAE changes from baseline to post-exposure recording for any of the exposures and no significant differences in the TEOAEs' change from baseline to post exposure between cases and controls. The VOG did not identify any effect of the exposure on the vestibular end organ in either cases or controls. In conclusion, 30 min exposure to mobile phone RF did not show any immediate effects on vestibulocochlear function as measured by TEOAE and the VOR. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Potentially modifiable lifestyle factors, cognitive reserve, and cognitive function in later life: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Clare, Linda; Wu, Yu-Tzu; Teale, Julia C; MacLeod, Catherine; Matthews, Fiona; Brayne, Carol; Woods, Bob

    2017-03-01

    Potentially modifiable lifestyle factors may influence cognitive health in later life and offer potential to reduce the risk of cognitive decline and dementia. The concept of cognitive reserve has been proposed as a mechanism to explain individual differences in rates of cognitive decline, but its potential role as a mediating pathway has seldom been explored using data from large epidemiological studies. We explored the mediating effect of cognitive reserve on the cross-sectional association between lifestyle factors and cognitive function in later life using data from a population-based cohort of healthy older people. We analysed data from 2,315 cognitively healthy participants aged 65 y and over in the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study Wales (CFAS-Wales) cohort collected in 2011-2013. Linear regression modelling was used to investigate the overall associations between five lifestyle factors-cognitive and social activity, physical activity, diet, alcohol consumption, and smoking-and cognition, adjusting for demographic factors and chronic conditions. Mediation analysis tested for indirect effects of the lifestyle factors on cognition via cognitive reserve. After controlling for age, gender, and the presence of chronic conditions, cognitive and social activity, physical activity, healthy diet, and light-to-moderate alcohol consumption were positively associated with cognitive function, together accounting for 20% (95% CI 17%-23%) of variance in cognitive test scores. Cognitive reserve was an important mediator of this association, with indirect effects via cognitive reserve contributing 21% (95% CI 15%-27%) of the overall effect on cognition. The main limitations of the study derive from the cross-sectional nature of the data and the challenges of accurately measuring the latent construct of cognitive reserve. Cross-sectional associations support the view that enhancing cognitive reserve may benefit cognition, and maintenance of cognitive health may be supported

  4. Potentially modifiable lifestyle factors, cognitive reserve, and cognitive function in later life: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Tzu

    2017-01-01

    Background Potentially modifiable lifestyle factors may influence cognitive health in later life and offer potential to reduce the risk of cognitive decline and dementia. The concept of cognitive reserve has been proposed as a mechanism to explain individual differences in rates of cognitive decline, but its potential role as a mediating pathway has seldom been explored using data from large epidemiological studies. We explored the mediating effect of cognitive reserve on the cross-sectional association between lifestyle factors and cognitive function in later life using data from a population-based cohort of healthy older people. Methods and findings We analysed data from 2,315 cognitively healthy participants aged 65 y and over in the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study Wales (CFAS-Wales) cohort collected in 2011–2013. Linear regression modelling was used to investigate the overall associations between five lifestyle factors—cognitive and social activity, physical activity, diet, alcohol consumption, and smoking—and cognition, adjusting for demographic factors and chronic conditions. Mediation analysis tested for indirect effects of the lifestyle factors on cognition via cognitive reserve. After controlling for age, gender, and the presence of chronic conditions, cognitive and social activity, physical activity, healthy diet, and light-to-moderate alcohol consumption were positively associated with cognitive function, together accounting for 20% (95% CI 17%–23%) of variance in cognitive test scores. Cognitive reserve was an important mediator of this association, with indirect effects via cognitive reserve contributing 21% (95% CI 15%–27%) of the overall effect on cognition. The main limitations of the study derive from the cross-sectional nature of the data and the challenges of accurately measuring the latent construct of cognitive reserve. Conclusions Cross-sectional associations support the view that enhancing cognitive reserve may benefit cognition

  5. Structural and Functional Connectivity between the Lateral Posterior-Pulvinar Complex and Primary Visual Cortex in the Ferret

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chunxiu; Sellers, Kristin K.; Radtke-Schuller, Susanne; Lu, Jinghao; Xing, Lei; Ghukasyan, Vladimir; Li, Yuhui; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian; Murrow, Richard; Frohlich, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    The role of higher-order thalamic structures in sensory processing remains poorly understood. Here, we used the ferret (Mustela putorius furo) as a novel model species for the study of the lateral posterior-pulvinar complex (LP/pulvinar) and its structural and functional connectivity with area 17 (primary visual cortex, V1). We found reciprocal anatomical connections between the lateral part of the Lateral Posterior Nucleus of the LP/pulvinar (LPl) and V1. In order to investigate the role of this feedback loop between LPl and V1 in shaping network activity, we determined the functional interactions between LPl and supragranular, granular, and infragranular layers of V1 by recording multiunit activity (MUA) and local field potential (LFP). Coherence was strongest between LPl and supragranular V1 with the most distinct peaks in the delta and alpha frequency bands. Inter-area interaction measured by spike-phase coupling identified the delta frequency band dominated by infragranular V1 and multiple frequency bands that were most pronounced in supragranular V1. This inter-area coupling was differentially modulated by full-field synthetic and naturalistic visual stimulation. We also found that visual responses in LPl were distinct from the ones in V1 in terms of their reliability. Together, our data support a model of multiple communication channels between the LPl and layers of V1 that are enabled by oscillations in different frequency bands. This demonstration of anatomical and functional connectivity between LPl and V1 in ferrets provides a roadmap for studying the interaction dynamics during behavior and a template for identifying activity dynamics of other thalamic feedback loops. PMID:26505737

  6. An Objective Functional Characterisation of Head Movement Impairment in Individuals with Neck Muscle Weakness Due to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pancani, Silvia; Tindale, Wendy; Shaw, Pamela J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Neck muscle weakness and head drop are well recognised in patients with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but an objective characterisation of the consequent head movement impairment is lacking. The aim of this study was to quantitatively characterise head movements in ALS compared to aged matched controls. Methods We evaluated two groups, one of thirteen patients with ALS and one of thirteen age-matched controls, during the execution of a series of controlled head movements, performed while wearing two inertial sensors attached on the forehead and sternum, respectively. We quantified the differences between the two groups from the sensor data using indices of velocity, smoothness and movement coupling (intended as a measure of undesired out of plane movements). Findings Results confirmed a general limitation in the ability of the ALS patients to perform and control head movements. High inter-patient variability was observed due to a wide range of observed functional impairment levels. The ability to extend the head backward and flex it laterally were the most compromised, with significantly lower angular velocity (P < 0.05, Cohen’s d > 0.8), reduced smoothness and greater presence of coupled movements with respect to the controls. A significant reduction of angular velocity (P < 0.05, Cohen’s d > 0.8) in extension, axial rotation and lateral flexion was observed when patients were asked to perform the movements as fast as possible. Interpretation This pilot study is the first study providing a functional objective quantification of head movements in ALS. Further work involving different body areas and correlation with existing methods of evaluating neuromuscular function, such as dynamometry and EMG, is needed to explore the use of this approach as a marker of disease progression in ALS. PMID:28068376

  7. Do Executive Function Deficits Predict Later Substance Use Disorders among Adolescents and Young Adults?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilens, Timothy E.; Martelon, MaryKate; Fried, Ronna; Petty, Carter; Bateman, Clancey; Biederman, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There is increasing interest regarding the risk and overlap of executive function deficits (EFDs) in stable cigarette smoking and substance use disorders (SUD). Therefore, we examined whether earlier EFD was a risk factor for subsequent cigarette smoking and SUD and further explored the relationship between EFD and SUD. Method: We…

  8. Do Executive Function Deficits Predict Later Substance Use Disorders among Adolescents and Young Adults?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilens, Timothy E.; Martelon, MaryKate; Fried, Ronna; Petty, Carter; Bateman, Clancey; Biederman, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There is increasing interest regarding the risk and overlap of executive function deficits (EFDs) in stable cigarette smoking and substance use disorders (SUD). Therefore, we examined whether earlier EFD was a risk factor for subsequent cigarette smoking and SUD and further explored the relationship between EFD and SUD. Method: We…

  9. Laterality of motor cortical function measured by transcranial magnetic stimulation threshold tracking.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Kazumoto; Park, Susanna B; Howells, James; Huynh, William; Noto, Yu-Ichi; Shahrizaila, Nortina; Matamala, José M; Vucic, Steve; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2017-03-01

    Threshold tracking paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TTTMS) examines cortical function and is useful for diagnosis of motor neuron disorders. Differences in cortical function have been identified between dominant and non-dominant limbs using constant stimulus methods, but they remain unclear, potentially due to methodological differences. In this study we aimed to clarify differences in cortical function between dominant and non-dominant limbs using TTTMS. Single-pulse TMS, TTTMS, and nerve conduction studies were performed in 25 healthy, right-handed participants by recording from the abductor pollicis brevis muscle. There were no side-to-side differences observed in resting motor threshold, motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude, MEP latency, central motor conduction time, cortical silent period, short-interval intracortical inhibition and facilitation, compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude, CMAP latency, F-wave latency, or neurophysiological index. These findings suggest that, when using TTTMS, there are no differences in cortical function between dominant and non-dominant hemispheres. Muscle Nerve 55: 424-427, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Primary Cortical Folding in the Human Newborn: An Early Marker of Later Functional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubois, J.; Benders, M.; Borradori-Tolsa, C.; Cachia, A.; Lazeyras, F.; Leuchter, R. Ha-Vinh; Sizonenko, S. V.; Warfield, S. K.; Mangin, J. F.; Huppi, P. S.

    2008-01-01

    In the human brain, the morphology of cortical gyri and sulci is complex and variable among individuals, and it may reflect pathological functioning with specific abnormalities observed in certain developmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Since cortical folding occurs early during brain development, these structural abnormalities might be…

  11. Primary Cortical Folding in the Human Newborn: An Early Marker of Later Functional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubois, J.; Benders, M.; Borradori-Tolsa, C.; Cachia, A.; Lazeyras, F.; Leuchter, R. Ha-Vinh; Sizonenko, S. V.; Warfield, S. K.; Mangin, J. F.; Huppi, P. S.

    2008-01-01

    In the human brain, the morphology of cortical gyri and sulci is complex and variable among individuals, and it may reflect pathological functioning with specific abnormalities observed in certain developmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Since cortical folding occurs early during brain development, these structural abnormalities might be…

  12. Electrical stimulation as a treatment intervention to improve function, edema or pain following acute lateral ankle sprains: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Feger, Mark A; Goetschius, John; Love, Hailey; Saliba, Sue A; Hertel, Jay

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to assess whether electrical stimulation (ES), when used in conjunction with a standard treatment, can reduce levels of functional impairment, edema, and pain compared to a standard treatment alone, in patients following a lateral ankle sprain. We searched PubMed, CINAHL, SportDiscus, and Medline (OVID) databases through June 2014 using the terms "ankle sprain or ankle sprains or ligament injury or ligamentous injury," and "electric stimulation or electric stimulation or electrotherapy." Our search identified four randomized control trials, of which, neuromuscular ES and high-voltage pulsed stimulation were the only two ES modalities utilized. Effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cohen's d for comparison between treatment groups. Three of four effect sizes for function had 95% CI that crossed zero. Twenty-four of the thirty-two effect sizes for edema had 95% CI that crossed zero. All effect sizes for pain had 95% CI that crossed zero. Therefore, the use of ES is not recommended as a means to improve function, reduce edema, or decrease pain in the treatment of acute lateral ankle sprains. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Correlation between ambulatory function and clinical factors in hemiplegic patients with intact single lateral corticospinal tract: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ji Seong; Kim, Jong Moon; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-08-01

    To define the relationship between the complete destruction of 1 lateral corticospinal tract (CST), as demonstrated by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography, and ambulatory function 6 months following stroke.Twenty-six adults (17 male, 9 female) with poststroke hemiplegia who were transferred to the physical medicine and rehabilitation department. Participants underwent DTI tractography, which showed that 1 lateral CST had been clearly destroyed.Functional ambulation classification (FAC) scores at admission, discharge, and 6 months after discharge were used to evaluate the patients' ability to walk. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and the Korean version of the modified Barthel index (K-MBI) at admission, discharge, and 6 months after discharge were used to evaluate the degree of functional recovery.Of the 26 patients, 18 were nonambulatory (FAC level 1-3), and 8 were able to walk without support (FAC level 4-6). The type of stroke (infarction or hemorrhage), site of the lesion, spasticity of lower extremities, cranioplasty, and the time taken from onset to MRI were not statistically significantly correlated with the ability to walk. However, statistically significant correlations were found in relation to age, K-MBI scores, and initial NIHSS scores.Despite the complete damage to the lesion site and the preservation of 1 unilateral CST, as shown by DTI, good outcomes can be predicted on the basis of younger age, low NIHSS scores, and high MBI scores at onset.

  14. Lateralized sensitivity of motor memories to the kinematics of the opposite arm reveals functional specialization during bimanual actions.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Atsushi; Hirashima, Masaya; Nozaki, Daichi

    2014-07-02

    It is generally believed that the dominant arm exhibits greater functional advantages over the nondominant arm in every respect, including muscular strength and movement accuracy. Recent studies have proposed that this laterality is due to different underlying control strategies for each limb rather than different limb capabilities constraining performance. However, the functional role and mechanisms of these different control strategies have yet to be elucidated. Here, we report a specialized function of the nondominant arm that plays a significant role only during bimanual movements. Right-handed human participants performed bimanual reaching movements while only one arm was subjected to a force field. Consistent with our previous study, adaptation to the force field decreased gradually as the movement direction of the opposite arm deviated from the trained direction. We also observed that the decrement of the adaptation was significantly greater for the nondominant left arm. According to our previously proposed theory, this poorer generalization of the left arm originated from a difference in parameters characterizing motor memory; the nondominant arm's motor memory was more strongly influenced by the opposite arm's kinematics. Remarkably, a model incorporating this lateralized memory predicted that the nondominant arm would demonstrate greater adaptability to force fields associated with the opposite arm's movement. We confirmed this prediction experimentally and found that this advantage of the left arm disappeared in left-handed human participants. We concluded that the secondary supporting role often played by the nondominant arm in bimanual actions reflects its specialization rather than its inferiority.

  15. Functional pattern of brain FDG-PET in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Marco; Chiò, Adriano; Valentini, Maria Consuelo; Öberg, Johanna; Nobili, Flavio; Calvo, Andrea; Moglia, Cristina; Bertuzzo, Davide; Morbelli, Silvia; De Carli, Fabrizio; Fania, Piercarlo; Cistaro, Angelina

    2014-09-16

    We investigated a large sample of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) at rest in order to assess the value of (18)F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ((18)F-FDG) PET as a biomarker to discriminate patients from controls. A total of 195 patients with ALS and 40 controls underwent brain (18)F-FDG-PET, most within 5 months of diagnosis. Spinal and bulbar subgroups of ALS were also investigated. Twenty-five bilateral cortical and subcortical volumes of interest and cerebellum were taken into account, and (18)F-FDG uptakes were individually normalized by whole-brain values. Group analyses investigated the ALS-related metabolic changes. Discriminant analysis investigating sensitivity and specificity was performed using the 51 volumes of interest as well as age and sex. Metabolic connectivity was explored by voxel-wise interregional correlation analysis. Hypometabolism was found in frontal, motor, and occipital cortex and hypermetabolism in midbrain, temporal pole, and hippocampus in patients with ALS compared to controls. A similar metabolic pattern was also found in the 2 subgroups. Discriminant analysis showed a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 83% in separating patients from controls. Connectivity analysis found a highly significant positive correlation between midbrain and white matter in corticospinal tracts in patients with ALS. (18)F-FDG distribution changes in ALS showed a clear pattern of hypometabolism in frontal and occipital cortex and hypermetabolism in midbrain. The latter might be interpreted as the neurobiological correlate of diffuse subcortical gliosis. Discriminant analysis resulted in high sensitivity and specificity in differentiating patients with ALS from controls. Once validated by diseased-control studies, the present methodology might represent a potentially useful biomarker for ALS diagnosis. This study provides Class III evidence that (18)F-FDG-PET accurately distinguishes patients with ALS from normal controls (sensitivity 95

  16. Electromyographic assessment of forearm muscle function in tennis players with and without Lateral Epicondylitis.

    PubMed

    Alizadehkhaiyat, Omid; Frostick, Simon P

    2015-12-01

    There is no consensus about the main aetiology of Lateral Epicondylitis (LE) or Tennis Elbow. While electromyographic assessment of alterations in neuromuscular control and activation patterns of forearm muscles has received increasing interest as potential intrinsic factors in non-tennis players, there has been insufficient attention in tennis players. The purpose of present review was to search the literature for the electromyographic studies of forearm muscles in tennis players in order to (1) identify related implications for LE, (2) highlight key technical and methodological shortcomings, and (3) suggest potential pathways for future research. An electronic search of PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholars (1980 to October 2014) was conducted. Titles, abstracts, and full-text articles were screened to identify "peer-reviewed" studies specifically looking into "electromyographic assessment of forearm muscles" in "tennis players". After screening 104 articles, 13 original articles were considered in the main review involving a total of 216 participants (78% male, 22% female). There were indications of increased wrist extensor activity in all tennis strokes and less experienced single-handed players, however with insufficient evidence to support their relationship with the development of LE. Studies varied widely in study population, sample size, gender, level of tennis skills, electrode type, forearm muscles studied, EMG recording protocol, EMG normalisation method, and reported parameters. As a result, it was not possible to present combined results of existing studies and draw concrete conclusions in terms of clinical implications of findings. There is a need for establishment of specific guidelines and recommendations for EMG assessment of forearm musculature particularly in terms of electrode and muscle selection. Further studies of both healthy controls and tennis players suffering from LE with adequate sample sizes and well-defined demographics

  17. Clinical and electrophysiological assessment of inferior alveolar nerve function after lateral nerve transposition.

    PubMed

    Nocini, P F; De Santis, D; Fracasso, E; Zanette, G

    1999-04-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) transposition surgery may cause some degree of sensory impairment. Accurate and reproducible tests are mandatory to assess IAN conduction capacity following nerve transposition. In this study subjective (heat, pain and tactile-discriminative tests) and objective (electrophysiological) assessments were performed in 10 patients receiving IAN transposition (bilaterally in 8 cases) in order to evaluate any impairment of the involved nerves one year post-operatively. All patients reported a tingling, well-tolerated sensation in the areas supplied by the mental nerve with no anaesthesia or burning paresthesia. Tactile discrimination was affected the most (all but 1 patient). No action potential was recorded in 4 patients' sides (23.5%); 12 sides showed a decreased nerve conduction velocity (NCV) (70.5%) and 1 side normal NCV values (6%). There was no significant difference in NCV decrease between partial and total transposition sides, if examined separately. Nerve conduction findings were related 2-point discrimination scores, but not to changes in pain and heat sensitivity. These findings show that lateral nerve transposition, though resulting in a high percentage of minor IAN injuries, as determined by electrophysiological testing, provides a viable surgical procedure to allow implant placement in the posterior mandible without causing severe sensory complaints. Considering ethical and forensic implications, patients should be fully informed that a certain degree of nerve injury might be expected to occur from the procedure. Electrophysiological evaluation is a reliable way to assess the degree of IAN dysfunction, especially if combined with a clinical examination. Intraoperative monitoring of IAN conduction might help identify the pathogenetic mechanisms of nerve injury and the surgical steps that are most likely to harm nerve integrity.

  18. Submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Scott L; Herald, John; Alpert, Craig; Gretebeck, Kimberlee A; Champoux, Wendy S; Dengel, Donald R; Vaitkevicius, Peter V; Alexander, Neil B

    2016-01-01

    Background Submaximal oxygen uptake measures are more feasible and may better predict clinical cardiac outcomes than maximal tests in older adults with heart failure (HF). We examined relationships between maximal oxygen uptake, submaximal oxygen kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction. Methods Older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction (n = 25, age 75 ± 7 years) were compared to 25 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Assessments included a maximal treadmill test for peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), oxygen uptake kinetics at onset of and on recovery from a submaximal treadmill test, functional mobility testing [Get Up and Go (GUG), Comfortable Gait Speed (CGS), Unipedal Stance (US)], and self-reported physical activity (PA). Results Compared to controls, HF had worse performance on GUG, CGS, and US, greater delays in submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, and lower PA. In controls, VO2peak was more strongly associated with functional mobility and PA than submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics. In HF patients, submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics were similarly associated with GUG and CGS as VO2peak, but weakly associated with PA. Conclusions Based on their mobility performance, older HF patients with reduced ejection fraction are at risk for adverse functional outcomes. In this population, submaximal oxygen uptake measures may be equivalent to VO2 peak in predicting functional mobility, and in addition to being more feasible, may provide better insight into how aerobic function relates to mobility in older adults with HF. PMID:27594875

  19. Lateralized Resting-State Functional Brain Network Organization Changes in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bumhee; Roy, Bhaswati; Woo, Mary A.; Palomares, Jose A.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Harper, Ronald M.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) patients show brain injury in autonomic, affective, and cognitive sites, which can change resting-state functional connectivity (FC), potentially altering overall functional brain network organization. However, the status of such connectivity or functional organization is unknown in HF. Determination of that status was the aim here, and we examined region-to-region FC and brain network topological properties across the whole-brain in 27 HF patients compared to 53 controls with resting-state functional MRI procedures. Decreased FC in HF appeared between the caudate and cerebellar regions, olfactory and cerebellar sites, vermis and medial frontal regions, and precentral gyri and cerebellar areas. However, increased FC emerged between the middle frontal gyrus and sensorimotor areas, superior parietal gyrus and orbito/medial frontal regions, inferior temporal gyrus and lingual gyrus/cerebellar lobe/pallidum, fusiform gyrus and superior orbitofrontal gyrus and cerebellar sites, and within vermis and cerebellar areas; these connections were largely in the right hemisphere (p<0.005; 10,000 permutations). The topology of functional integration and specialized characteristics in HF are significantly changed in regions showing altered FC, an outcome which would interfere with brain network organization (p<0.05; 10,000 permutations). Brain dysfunction in HF extends to resting conditions, and autonomic, cognitive, and affective deficits may stem from altered FC and brain network organization that may contribute to higher morbidity and mortality in the condition. Our findings likely result from the prominent axonal and nuclear structural changes reported earlier in HF; protecting neural tissue may improve FC integrity, and thus, increase quality of life and reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:27203600

  20. Does loneliness mediate the relation between social support and cognitive functioning in later life?

    PubMed

    Ellwardt, Lea; Aartsen, Marja; Deeg, Dorly; Steverink, Nardi

    2013-12-01

    Research in gerontology has demonstrated mixed effects of social support on cognitive decline and dementia: Social support has been shown to be protective in some studies, but not in others. Moreover, little is known about the underlying mechanisms between social support and cognitive functioning. We investigate one of the possible mechanisms, and argue that subjective appraisals rather than received amounts of social support affect cognitive functioning. Loneliness is seen as an unpleasant experience that occurs when a person's network of relationships is felt to be deficient in some important way. As such, loneliness describes the extent to which someone's needs are not being met and thus provides a subjective assessment of support quality. We expect that receiving instrumental and emotional support reduces loneliness, which in turn preserves cognitive functioning. Data are from the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam (LASA) and include 2255 Dutch participants aged 55-85 over a period of six years. Respondents were measured every three years. Cognitive functioning was assessed with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Coding Task, and the Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices. The analytical approach comprised latent growth mediation models. Frequent emotional support related to reduced feelings of loneliness and better cognitive functioning. Increases in emotional support also directly enhanced cognitive performance. The protective effect of emotional support was strongest amongst adults aged 65 years and older. Increase in instrumental support did not buffer cognitive decline, instead there were indications for faster decline. After ruling out the possibility of reversed causation, we conclude that emotional support relationships are a more powerful protector of cognitive decline than instrumental support relationships. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of line dancing on physical function and perceived limitation in older adults with self-reported mobility limitations.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Crystal G; Hackney, Madeleine E

    2017-02-25

    Older adults with mobility limitations are at greater risk for aging-related declines in physical function. Line dancing is a popular form of exercise that can be modified, and is thus feasible for older adults with mobility limitations. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of 8 weeks of line dancing on balance, muscle strength, lower extremity function, endurance, gait speed, and perceived mobility limitations. An experimental design randomly assigned older adults to either an 8-week line dancing or usual care group. The convenience sample consisted of 23 participants with mobility limitations (age range: 65-93 years). The intervention used simple routines from novice line dance classes. At baseline and at 8 weeks, balance, knee muscle strength, lower extremity function, endurance, gait speed, and mobility limitations were measured. ANCOVA tests were conducted on each dependent variable to assess the effects of the intervention over time. Results found significant positive differences for the intervention group in lower extremity function (p < 0.01); endurance (p < 0.01); gait speed (p < 0.001); and self-reported mobility limitations (p < 0.05). Eight weeks of line dancing significantly improved physical function and reduced self-reported mobility limitations in these individuals. Line dancing could be recommended by clinicians as a potential adjunct therapy that addresses mobility limitations. Implications for Rehabilitation Line dancing may be an alternative exercise for older adults who need modifications due to mobility limitations. Line dancing incorporates cognitive and motor control. Line dancing can be performed alone or in a group setting. Dancing improves balance which can reduce risk of falls.

  2. Functional Brain Activity within the Medial and Lateral Portion of BA10 during a Prospective Memory Task

    PubMed Central

    Barban, Francesco; Carlesimo, Giovanni Augusto; Macaluso, Emiliano; Caltagirone, Carlo; Costa, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In this study we tested the gateway hypothesis of Broadmann area 10 (BA10). With a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) protocol we manipulated the saliency–stimulus-oriented (SO) attending– and the memory load – stimulus-independent (SI) attending–during a prospective memory (PM) task. We found a significant main effect of the SO manipulation within the medial BA10 and a significant interaction between SI attending and PM task within the left lateral BA10. Our results give experimental support to the gateway hypothesis. PMID:22713428

  3. Effects of Olmesartan on Endothelial Progenitor Cell Mobilization and Function in Carotid Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xin; Shao, Li; Fu, Yi-Min; Zou, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Olmesartan is a type of angiotensin II receptor inhibitor that can reduce the incidence of cardiovascular events. However, its role in the function of endothelial progenitor cells in atherosclerosis patients is still unclear. Our study aimed to explore the effects and mechanism of olmesartan on endothelial progenitor cell mobilization and function in carotid atherosclerosis. Material/Methods Forty carotid atherosclerosis patients were enrolled. Patients were administrated olmesartan 20 mg/day for 3 months. Flow cytometry was used for counting circulating endothelial progenitor cells; colorimetric method was used to measure the serum levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide. Cell migration, adhesion, and proliferation capacity, and related signaling pathway were also analyzed. Spearman rank correlation analysis was used to investigate the influence of olmesartan on endothelial progenitor cells and clinical characteristics (e.g., sex, age, blood pressure). Results Compared with the control group, the number of circulating endothelial progenitor cells was significantly decreased. Olmesartan can increase circulating endothelial progenitor cells number and the serum levels of eNOS and NO. Furthermore, it can improve cell migration, adhesion, and proliferation capacities. Spearman rank correlation analysis showed there is no relationship between olmesartan promotion effects on endothelial progenitor cell mobilization and the clinical characteristics (P>0.05). P-eNOS and P-Akt expression can be unregulated by RNH-6270 treatment and blocked by LY294002. Conclusions Olmesartan can effectively promote the endothelial progenitor cells mobilization and improve their function in patients with carotid atherosclerosis, independent of basic characteristics. This process relies on the PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway. PMID:25913171

  4. Effects of olmesartan on endothelial progenitor cell mobilization and function in carotid atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xin; Shao, Li; Fu, Yi-Min; Zou, Yong

    2015-04-26

    Olmesartan is a type of angiotensin II receptor inhibitor that can reduce the incidence of cardiovascular events. However, its role in the function of endothelial progenitor cells in atherosclerosis patients is still unclear. Our study aimed to explore the effects and mechanism of olmesartan on endothelial progenitor cell mobilization and function in carotid atherosclerosis. Forty carotid atherosclerosis patients were enrolled. Patients were administrated olmesartan 20 mg/day for 3 months. Flow cytometry was used for counting circulating endothelial progenitor cells; colorimetric method was used to measure the serum levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide. Cell migration, adhesion, and proliferation capacity, and related signaling pathway were also analyzed. Spearman rank correlation analysis was used to investigate the influence of olmesartan on endothelial progenitor cells and clinical characteristics (e.g., sex, age, blood pressure). Compared with the control group, the number of circulating endothelial progenitor cells was significantly decreased. Olmesartan can increase circulating endothelial progenitor cells number and the serum levels of eNOS and NO. Furthermore, it can improve cell migration, adhesion, and proliferation capacities. Spearman rank correlation analysis showed there is no relationship between olmesartan promotion effects on endothelial progenitor cell mobilization and the clinical characteristics (P>0.05). P-eNOS and P-Akt expression can be unregulated by RNH-6270 treatment and blocked by LY294002. Olmesartan can effectively promote the endothelial progenitor cells mobilization and improve their function in patients with carotid atherosclerosis, independent of basic characteristics. This process relies on the PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway.

  5. Effects on auditory function of chronic exposure to electromagnetic fields from mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Sanjeev; Varshney, Saurabh; Bist, Sampan Singh; Goel, Deepak; Mishra, Sarita; Jha, Vivek Kumar

    2016-08-01

    The widespread use of mobile phones has given rise to apprehension regarding the possible hazardous health effects of high-frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on auditory function. We conducted a study to investigate the effects of long-term (>4 yr) exposure to EMFs emitted by mobile phones on auditory function. Our study population was made up of 40 healthy medical students-31 men and 9 women, aged 20 to 30 years (mean 22.7). Of this group, 31 subjects typically held their phone to the right ear and 9 to the left ear; the non-phone-using ear served as each subject's control ear. The phone-using subjects were also split into two groups of 20 based on the duration of their daily phone use (≤60 min vs. >60 min). All subjects underwent pure-tone audiometry, speech audiometry, impedance audiometry, and brainstem evoked response audiometry (BERA), and comparisons were made between the phone-using ear and the control ear and between the shorter and longer duration of daily use. We found no statistically significant differences in high-frequency pure-tone average between the phone-using ears and the control ears (p = 0.69) or between the shorter- and longer-duration phone-using ears (p = 0.85). Moreover, statistical analysis of BERA findings revealed no significant differences between the phone-using ears and the control ears in terms of wave I-III, III-V, and I-V interpeak latencies (p = 0.59, 0.74 and 0.44, respectively). None of the subjects reported any subjective symptoms, such as headache, tinnitus, or sensations of burning or warmth behind, around, or on the phone-using ear. We conclude that the long-term exposure to EMFs from mobile phones does not affect auditory function.

  6. Functional performance of mobile versus fixed bearing total knee prostheses: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, W C H; Christen, B; Wymenga, A B; Schuster, A; van der Schaaf, D B; ten Ham, A; Wehrli, U

    2012-08-01

    The primary goal of this study was to assess the difference in active flexion between patients with a mobile versus a fixed bearing, cruciate retaining, and total knee arthroplasty. The study was designed as a randomised controlled multi-centre trial. Participants were assigned to interventions by using block-stratified, random allocation. Outcome parameters were active flexion, passive flexion, and Knee Society Score (KSS). Outcome parameters were assessed preoperatively and at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively by an independent nurse. Ninety-two patients from one centre were included, 46 in each group. Active flexion was comparable for the two groups, 99.9° for the mobile bearing group and 101° for the fixed bearing group with a baseline controlled difference of 1.0 (95% CI -3.9 to 5.8, n.s.). The Clinical KSS was comparable between the two bearing groups (Mobile 90.0 vs. fixed 92.4, n.s.). The functional KSS showed a difference that was attributable to the stair climbing subscore, which showed a difference in favour of the fixed bearing design between preoperative and 3 months (7.3 point difference; 95% CI 2.3-12.5; P = 0.005) as well as 12 months (4.8 point difference; 95% CI 0.1-9.6; P = 0.045). There were no short-term differences in active flexion between fixed bearing and mobile bearing total knee arthroplasty. I.

  7. Association of cigarette smoking with Chinese ankylosing spondylitis patients in Taiwan: a poor disease outcome in systemic inflammation, functional ability, and physical mobility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Hsiung; Chen, Hung-An; Lu, Chin-Li; Liao, Hsien-Tzung; Liu, Chin-Hsiu; Tsai, Chang-Youh; Chou, Chung-Tei

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the association between smoking and the disease activity, functional ability, physical mobility, and systemic inflammation in Chinese ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. Seventy five male Chinese AS patients in Taiwan were enrolled in the cross-sectional study. These patients fulfilled the 1984 modified New York criteria. Patients completed the questionnaires, containing the demographic data, disease activity, functional ability (BASFI), and patient's global assessment. Meanwhile, physical examinations were performed to determine the patient's physical mobility. Acute-phase reactants, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein levels were also measured in the AS patients. Smoking habits with smoking duration and smoking intensity (pack-years of smoking) were recorded. Among these physical mobility parameters, modified Schober's index (p < 0.001), cervical rotation (p = 0.034), later lumbar flexion (p = 0.002), chest expansion (p = 0.016), and occiput-to-wall distances (p = 0.003) were significantly impaired in smoking AS patients (n = 35) as compared to non-smoking (n = 40). Systemic inflammation parameter, ESR was significantly higher in smoking AS patients than non-smoking (p = 0.03). The odds ratio of advanced modified Schober's index, lateral lumbar flexion, fingertip-to-floor distance, chest expansion, and occiput-to-wall were significantly elevated in smoking AS patients as compared to non-smoking. Moreover, the smoking intensity correlated significantly with BASFI (r = 0.481, p = 0.005), cervical rotation (r = -0.401, p = 0.031), fingertip-to-floor distance (r = 0.485, p = 0.004), and occiput-to-wall distance (r = 0.473, p = 0.005) in the 35 smoking AS patients. The cigarette smokers in the Chinese AS patients have increased systemic inflammation and poor physical mobility. In addition, the higher smoking intensity in the AS smokers is associated with poor disease outcome, including functional ability and physical mobility

  8. Does a torsion adapter improve functional mobility, pain, and fatigue in patients with transtibial amputation?

    PubMed

    Segal, Ava D; Kracht, Rose; Klute, Glenn K

    2014-10-01

    Turning gait is an integral part of daily ambulation and likely poses a greater challenge for patients with transtibial amputation compared with walking a straight pathway. A torsion adapter is a prosthetic component that can increase transverse plane compliance of the prosthesis and decrease the torque applied to the residual limb, but whether this will improve patients' mobility, pain, and fatigue remains unknown. Does prescription of a torsion adapter translate to improvements in (1) functional mobility and (2) self-perceived pain and fatigue in moderately active patients with lower limb amputation? Ten unilateral transtibial amputees wore a torsion or rigid adapter in random order. Functional mobility was assessed through a field measurement using an activity monitor and through a laboratory measurement using a 6-minute walk test that included turns. The residual limb pain grade assessed self-perceived pain and the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory assessed fatigue. We found relatively small functional differences for amputees wearing a torsion adapter versus a rigid adapter. Amputees wearing a torsion adapter tended to take more low- and medium-intensity steps per day (331 ± 365 and 437 ± 511 difference in steps; effect size = 0.44 and 0.17; confidence interval [CI], 70-592 and 71-802; p = 0.019 and 0.024, respectively). They also experienced less pain interference with activities (1.9 ± 1.7 change in score; effect size = 0.83; CI, 0.3-3.4; p = 0.026) when wearing a torsion adapter. However, these patients took a similar number of total steps per day, walked a comparable distance in 6 minutes, and reported similar residual limb pain and fatigue. For a moderately active group of amputees, the torsion adapter did not translate to substantial improvements in functional mobility and self-perceived pain and fatigue. The small increases in low- and medium-intensity activities with less pain interference when wearing a torsion adapter provides evidence to support

  9. Photoluminescence changes of III-Nitride lateral polarity structures after chemical functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Nora G.; Franke, Alexander; Kirste, Ronny; Collazo, Ramon; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2016-12-01

    The photoluminescence changes of a III-Nitride semiconductor with various surface topographies were studied after chemical functionalization. Al x Ga1-x N with a composition of 70% aluminum was used and the surfaces were functionalized with a fluorophore dye-terminated peptide using a linker molecule. The stability of the wafers in water was studied using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry prior to modifying the material. The leaching data demonstrated that the AlGaN material in highly stable in biological conditions over 7 d. The attachment of the dye to the wafer was investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The PL spectrum showed a clear signature of the dye with a pronounced emission peak at approximately 260 nm, indicating a successful attachment to the surface.

  10. Ependymal cells along the lateral ventricle express functional P2X(7) receptors.

    PubMed

    Genzen, Jonathan R; Platel, Jean-Claude; Rubio, Maria E; Bordey, Angelique

    2009-09-01

    Ependymal cells line the cerebral ventricles and are located in an ideal position to detect central nervous system injury and inflammation. The signaling mechanisms of ependymal cells, however, are poorly understood. As extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate is elevated in the context of cellular damage, experiments were conducted to determine whether ependymal cells along the mouse subventricular zone (SVZ) express functional purinergic receptors. Using whole-cell patch clamp recording, widespread expression of P2X(7) receptors was detected on ependymal cells based on their antagonist sensitivity profile and absence of response in P2X(7) (-/-) mice. Immunocytochemistry confirmed the expression of P2X(7) receptors, and electron microscopy demonstrated that P2X(7) receptors are expressed on both cilia and microvilli. Ca(2+) imaging showed that P2X(7) receptors expressed on cilia are indeed functional. As ependymal cells are believed to function as partner cells in the SVZ neurogenic niche, P2X(7) receptors may play a role in neural progenitor response to injury and inflammation.

  11. Primary cortical folding in the human newborn: an early marker of later functional development

    PubMed Central

    Benders, M.; Borradori-Tolsa, C.; Cachia, A.; Lazeyras, F.; Ha-Vinh Leuchter, R.; Sizonenko, S. V.; Warfield, S. K.; Mangin, J. F.; Hüppi, P. S.

    2008-01-01

    In the human brain, the morphology of cortical gyri and sulci is complex and variable among individuals, and it may reflect pathological functioning with specific abnormalities observed in certain developmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Since cortical folding occurs early during brain development, these structural abnormalities might be present long before the appearance of functional symptoms. So far, the precise mechanisms responsible for such alteration in the convolution pattern during intra-uterine or post-natal development are still poorly understood. Here we compared anatomical and functional brain development in vivo among 45 premature newborns who experienced different intra-uterine environments: 22 normal singletons, 12 twins and 11 newborns with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dedicated post-processing tools, we investigated early disturbances in cortical formation at birth, over the developmental period critical for the emergence of convolutions (26–36 weeks of gestational age), and defined early ‘endophenotypes’ of sulcal development. We demonstrated that twins have a delayed but harmonious maturation, with reduced surface and sulcation index compared to singletons, whereas the gyrification of IUGR newborns is discordant to the normal developmental trajectory, with a more pronounced reduction of surface in relation to the sulcation index compared to normal newborns. Furthermore, we showed that these structural measurements of the brain at birth are predictors of infants’ outcome at term equivalent age, for MRI-based cerebral volumes and neurobehavioural development evaluated with the assessment of preterm infant's behaviour (APIB). PMID:18587151

  12. Hippocampal-dependent spatial memory functions might be lateralized in rats: An approach combining gene expression profiling and reversible inactivation.

    PubMed

    Klur, Sandra; Muller, Christophe; Pereira de Vasconcelos, Anne; Ballard, Theresa; Lopez, Joëlle; Galani, Rodrigue; Certa, Ulrich; Cassel, Jean-Christophe

    2009-09-01

    The hippocampus is involved in spatial memory processes, as established in a variety of species such as birds and mammals including humans. In humans, some hippocampal-dependent memory functions may be lateralized, the right hippocampus being predominantly involved in spatial navigation. In rodents, the question of possible lateralization remains open. Therefore, we first microdissected the CA1 subregion of the left and right dorsal hippocampi for analysis of mRNA expression using microarrays in rats having learnt a reference memory task in the Morris water-maze. Relative to untrained controls, 623 genes were differentially expressed in the right hippocampus, against only 74 in the left hippocampus, in the rats that had learnt the hidden platform location. Thus, in the right hippocampus, 299 genes were induced, 324 were repressed, and about half of them participate in signaling and transport, metabolism, and nervous system functions. In addition, most differentially expressed genes associated with spatial learning have been previously related to synaptic plasticity and memory. We then subjected rats to unilateral (left or right) or bilateral reversible functional inactivations in the dorsal hippocampus; lidocaine was infused either before each acquisition session or before retrieval of a reference spatial memory in the Morris water maze. We found that after drug-free acquisition, right or bilateral lidocaine inactivation (vs. left, or bilateral phosphate buffered saline (PBS) infusions) of the dorsal hippocampus just before a delayed (24 h) probe trial impaired performance. Conversely, left or bilateral hippocampus inactivation (vs. right, or bilateral PBS infusions) before each acquisition session weakened performance during a delayed, drug-free probe trial. Our data confirm a functional association between transcriptional activity within the dorsal hippocampus and spatial memory in the rat. Further, they suggest that there could be a leftward bias of hippocampal

  13. The Lateral Trigger Probability function for the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray showers detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bäuml, J.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Fajardo Tapia, I.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gascon, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Gesterling, K.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Guzman, A.; Hague, J. D.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meurer, C.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Nhung, P. T.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pȩkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Phan, N.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Robledo, C.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Silva Lopez, H. H.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tamashiro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşcău, O.; Tavera Ruiz, C. G.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tiwari, D. K.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winders, L.; Winnick, M. G.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept of Lateral Trigger Probability (LTP) function, i.e., the probability for an Extensive Air Shower (EAS) to trigger an individual detector of a ground based array as a function of distance to the shower axis, taking into account energy, mass and direction of the primary cosmic ray. We apply this concept to the surface array of the Pierre Auger Observatory consisting of a 1.5 km spaced grid of about 1600 water Cherenkov stations. Using Monte Carlo simulations of ultra-high energy showers the LTP functions are derived for energies in the range between 1017 and 1019 eV and zenith angles up to 65°. A parametrization combining a step function with an exponential is found to reproduce them very well in the considered range of energies and zenith angles. The LTP functions can also be obtained from data using events simultaneously observed by the fluorescence and the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory (hybrid events). We validate the Monte Carlo results showing how LTP functions from data are in good agreement with simulations.

  14. Which lateral radiographic positioning technique provides the most reliable and functional representation of a patient's sagittal balance?

    PubMed

    Marks, Michelle; Stanford, Chriss; Newton, Peter

    2009-04-20

    Prospective nonscoliotic cohort evaluation of the effects of various positions for obtaining standing lateral thoracolumbar radiographs. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of various upper extremity positions on thoracolumbar sagittal spinal alignment. The standing position used to capture a lateral plane radiograph can have marked effects on measurements of sagittal spinal alignment and may compound the variability between measurements from successive radiographs. Twenty-two healthy female adolescents performed 3 repeated trials of 4 standing positions in a motion analysis laboratory. The positions included: (1) relaxed standing with arms at sides (CONTROL), (2) standing with fists overlying ipsilateral clavicles (CLAVICLE), (3) active shoulder flexion to 30 degrees with elbows extended (30 ACTIVE), and (4) passive shoulder flexion to 30 degrees with hand supports (30 PASSIVE). Sagittal alignment of the spine was described by kyphosis, lordosis, and the sagittal vertical axis (SVA), all of which were measured from the positions of reflective markers attached to the surface of the back and pelvis. Differences between alignment measures obtained for each of the 3 radiographic positions relative to the functional position (CONTROL) were calculated. Mean differences were then compared between positions using repeated measures ANOVAs (alpha = 0.05). Relative to the CONTROL position, all other positions resulted in negative shifts in SVA (range = -1.1 cm- -4.6 cm), decreased kyphosis (range = -1 degrees- -3 degrees), and increased lordosis (4 degrees for all positions). The shift in the SVA with the 30 PASSIVE position was significantly less than the other 2 positions (P < 0.05) and demonstrated the least variability. Standing with the hands supported while flexing the shoulders 30 degrees during positioning for lateral spinopelvic radiographic acquisition resulted in an SVA and measures of sagittal plane curvature that were comparable with a

  15. Pair mobility functions for rigid spheres in concentrated colloidal dispersions: Force, torque, translation, and rotation.

    PubMed

    Zia, Roseanna N; Swan, James W; Su, Yu

    2015-12-14

    The formulation of detailed models for the dynamics of condensed soft matter including colloidal suspensions and other complex fluids requires accurate description of the physical forces between microstructural constituents. In dilute suspensions, pair-level interactions are sufficient to capture hydrodynamic, interparticle, and thermodynamic forces. In dense suspensions, many-body interactions must be considered. Prior analytical approaches to capturing such interactions such as mean-field approaches replace detailed interactions with averaged approximations. However, long-range coupling and effects of concentration on local structure, which may play an important role in, e.g., phase transitions, are smeared out in such approaches. An alternative to such approximations is the detailed modeling of hydrodynamic interactions utilizing precise couplings between moments of the hydrodynamic traction on a suspended particle and the motion of that or other suspended particles. For two isolated spheres, a set of these functions was calculated by Jeffrey and Onishi [J. Fluid Mech. 139, 261-290 (1984)] and Jeffrey [J. Phys. Fluids 4, 16-29 (1992)]. Along with pioneering work by Batchelor, these are the touchstone for low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamic interactions and have been applied directly in the solution of many important problems related to the dynamics of dilute colloidal dispersions [G. K. Batchelor and J. T. Green, J. Fluid Mech. 56, 375-400 (1972) and G. K. Batchelor, J. Fluid Mech. 74, 1-29 (1976)]. Toward extension of these functions to concentrated systems, here we present a new stochastic sampling technique to rapidly calculate an analogous set of mobility functions describing the hydrodynamic interactions between two hard spheres immersed in a suspension of arbitrary concentration, utilizing accelerated Stokesian dynamics simulations. These mobility functions provide precise, radially dependent couplings of hydrodynamic force and torque to particle translation

  16. Pair mobility functions for rigid spheres in concentrated colloidal dispersions: Force, torque, translation, and rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia, Roseanna N.; Swan, James W.; Su, Yu

    2015-12-01

    The formulation of detailed models for the dynamics of condensed soft matter including colloidal suspensions and other complex fluids requires accurate description of the physical forces between microstructural constituents. In dilute suspensions, pair-level interactions are sufficient to capture hydrodynamic, interparticle, and thermodynamic forces. In dense suspensions, many-body interactions must be considered. Prior analytical approaches to capturing such interactions such as mean-field approaches replace detailed interactions with averaged approximations. However, long-range coupling and effects of concentration on local structure, which may play an important role in, e.g., phase transitions, are smeared out in such approaches. An alternative to such approximations is the detailed modeling of hydrodynamic interactions utilizing precise couplings between moments of the hydrodynamic traction on a suspended particle and the motion of that or other suspended particles. For two isolated spheres, a set of these functions was calculated by Jeffrey and Onishi [J. Fluid Mech. 139, 261-290 (1984)] and Jeffrey [J. Phys. Fluids 4, 16-29 (1992)]. Along with pioneering work by Batchelor, these are the touchstone for low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamic interactions and have been applied directly in the solution of many important problems related to the dynamics of dilute colloidal dispersions [G. K. Batchelor and J. T. Green, J. Fluid Mech. 56, 375-400 (1972) and G. K. Batchelor, J. Fluid Mech. 74, 1-29 (1976)]. Toward extension of these functions to concentrated systems, here we present a new stochastic sampling technique to rapidly calculate an analogous set of mobility functions describing the hydrodynamic interactions between two hard spheres immersed in a suspension of arbitrary concentration, utilizing accelerated Stokesian dynamics simulations. These mobility functions provide precise, radially dependent couplings of hydrodynamic force and torque to particle translation

  17. Pair mobility functions for rigid spheres in concentrated colloidal dispersions: Force, torque, translation, and rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Zia, Roseanna N. Su, Yu; Swan, James W.

    2015-12-14

    The formulation of detailed models for the dynamics of condensed soft matter including colloidal suspensions and other complex fluids requires accurate description of the physical forces between microstructural constituents. In dilute suspensions, pair-level interactions are sufficient to capture hydrodynamic, interparticle, and thermodynamic forces. In dense suspensions, many-body interactions must be considered. Prior analytical approaches to capturing such interactions such as mean-field approaches replace detailed interactions with averaged approximations. However, long-range coupling and effects of concentration on local structure, which may play an important role in, e.g., phase transitions, are smeared out in such approaches. An alternative to such approximations is the detailed modeling of hydrodynamic interactions utilizing precise couplings between moments of the hydrodynamic traction on a suspended particle and the motion of that or other suspended particles. For two isolated spheres, a set of these functions was calculated by Jeffrey and Onishi [J. Fluid Mech. 139, 261–290 (1984)] and Jeffrey [J. Phys. Fluids 4, 16–29 (1992)]. Along with pioneering work by Batchelor, these are the touchstone for low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamic interactions and have been applied directly in the solution of many important problems related to the dynamics of dilute colloidal dispersions [G. K. Batchelor and J. T. Green, J. Fluid Mech. 56, 375–400 (1972) and G. K. Batchelor, J. Fluid Mech. 74, 1–29 (1976)]. Toward extension of these functions to concentrated systems, here we present a new stochastic sampling technique to rapidly calculate an analogous set of mobility functions describing the hydrodynamic interactions between two hard spheres immersed in a suspension of arbitrary concentration, utilizing accelerated Stokesian dynamics simulations. These mobility functions provide precise, radially dependent couplings of hydrodynamic force and torque to particle

  18. Anticlockwise or Clockwise? A Dynamic Perception-Action-Laterality Model for Directionality Bias in Visuospatial Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Karim, A.K.M. Rezaul; Proulx, Michael J.; Likova, Lora T.

    2016-01-01

    Reviewing the relevant literature in visual psychophysics and visual neuroscience we propose a three-stage model of directionality bias in visuospatial functioning. We call this model the ‘Perception-Action-Laterality’ (PAL) hypothesis. We analyzed the research findings for a wide range of visuospatial tasks, showing that there are two major directionality trends: clockwise versus anticlockwise. It appears these preferences are combinatorial, such that a majority of people fall in the first category demonstrating a preference for stimuli/objects arranged from left-to-right rather than from right-to-left, while people in the second category show an opposite trend. These perceptual biases can guide sensorimotor integration and action, creating two corresponding turner groups in the population. In support of PAL, we propose another model explaining the origins of the biases– how the neurogenetic factors and the cultural factors interact in a biased competition framework to determine the direction and extent of biases. This dynamic model can explain not only the two major categories of biases, but also the unbiased, unreliably biased or mildly biased cases in visuosptial functioning. PMID:27350096

  19. Self-reported walking ability predicts functional mobility performance in frail older adults.

    PubMed

    Alexander, N B; Guire, K E; Thelen, D G; Ashton-Miller, J A; Schultz, A B; Grunawalt, J C; Giordani, B

    2000-11-01

    To determine how self-reported physical function relates to performance in each of three mobility domains: walking, stance maintenance, and rising from chairs. Cross-sectional analysis of older adults. University-based laboratory and community-based congregate housing facilities. Two hundred twenty-one older adults (mean age, 79.9 years; range, 60-102 years) without clinical evidence of dementia (mean Folstein Mini-Mental State score, 28; range, 24-30). We compared the responses of these older adults on a questionnaire battery used by the Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly (EPESE) project, to performance on mobility tasks of graded difficulty. Responses to the EPESE battery included: (1) whether assistance was required to perform seven Katz activities of daily living (ADL) items, specifically with walking and transferring; (2) three Rosow-Breslau items, including the ability to walk up stairs and walk a half mile; and (3) five Nagi items, including difficulty stooping, reaching, and lifting objects. The performance measures included the ability to perform, and time taken to perform, tasks in three summary score domains: (1) walking ("Walking," seven tasks, including walking with an assistive device, turning, stair climbing, tandem walking); (2) stance maintenance ("Stance," six tasks, including unipedal, bipedal, tandem, and maximum lean); and (3) chair rise ("Chair Rise," six tasks, including rising from a variety of seat heights with and without the use of hands for assistance). A total score combines scores in each Walking, Stance, and Chair Rise domain. We also analyzed how cognitive/ behavioral factors such as depression and self-efficacy related to the residuals from the self-report and performance-based ANOVA models. Rosow-Breslau items have the strongest relationship with the three performance domains, Walking, Stance, and Chair Rise (eta-squared ranging from 0.21 to 0.44). These three performance domains are as strongly

  20. Hemifacial hyperhidrosis associated with ipsilateral/contralateral cervical disc herniation myelopathy. Functional considerations on how compression pattern determines the laterality

    PubMed Central

    Iwase, Satoshi; Inukai, Yoko; Nishimura, Naoki; Sato, Maki; Sugenoya, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sweating is an important mechanism for ensuring constant thermoregulation, but hyperhidrosis may be disturbing. We present five cases of hemifacial hyperhidrosis as a compensatory response to an/hypohidrosis caused by cervical disc herniation. All the patients complained of hemifacial hyperhidrosis, without anisocoria or blepharoptosis. Sweat function testing and thermography confirmed hyperhidrosis of hemifacial and adjacent areas. Neck MRI showed cervical disc herniation. Three of the patients had lateral compression with well-demarcated hypohidrosis below the hyperhidrosis on the same side as the cervical lesion. The rest had paramedian compression with poorly demarcated hyperhidrosis and hypohidrosis on the contralateral side. Although MRI showed no intraspi