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Sample records for laterally mobile functionalized

  1. It is not just muscle mass: a review of muscle quality, composition and metabolism during ageing as determinants of muscle function and mobility in later life.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Robin A; Cameron-Smith, David; Poppitt, Sally D

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide estimates predict 2 billion people will be aged over 65 years by 2050. A major current challenge is maintaining mobility and quality of life into old age. Impaired mobility is often a precursor of functional decline, disability and loss of independence. Sarcopenia which represents the age-related decline in muscle mass is a well-established factor associated with mobility limitations in older adults. However, there is now evidence that not only changes in muscle mass but other factors underpinning muscle quality including composition, metabolism, aerobic capacity, insulin resistance, fat infiltration, fibrosis and neural activation may also play a role in the decline in muscle function and impaired mobility associated with ageing. Importantly, changes in muscle quality may precede loss of muscle mass and therefore provide new opportunities for the assessment of muscle quality particularly in middle-aged adults who could benefit from interventions to improve muscle function. This review will discuss the accumulating evidence that in addition to muscle mass, factors underpinning muscle quality influence muscle function and mobility with age. Further development of tools to assess muscle quality in community settings is needed. Preventative diet, exercise or treatment interventions particularly in middle-aged adults at the low end of the spectrum of muscle function may help preserve mobility in later years and improve healthspan.

  2. Biphasic cell responses on laterally mobile films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourouklis, Andreas; Lerum, Ronald; Bermudez, Harry

    2013-03-01

    The engineering of polymer surfaces or matrices that are capable of controlling cell adhesion has been widely explored. In nearly all of these works, the polymer chains (and ligands) are chemically attached to the underlying substrate, and therefore these systems are inherently static. By contrast, cellular environments such as the extracellular matrix (ECM) are dynamic and remodeled by biochemical reactions and biophysical forces. Borrowing this concept from Nature, we created polymer films by an interfacial self-assembly process, whereby individual chains can exhibit lateral mobility (in-plane diffusive motion). NIH 3T3 fibroblasts seeded on such RGD-presenting polymer films show biphasic responses in spreading and adhesion strength to lateral mobility, with a minimal response for intermediate mobility values. Futhermore, preliminary immuno-staining experiments reveal that the total area of focal adhesions demonstrates a similar biphasic trend to the cellular-scale behaviors. In contrast, actin filaments or stress fibers appear to be unaffected by the substrate lateral mobility. These results show that lateral mobility is an important, although not fully explored aspect of mechano-sensing by cells, and can potentially give new perspectives on cell-ECM interactions. National Science Foundation

  3. Laterally Mobile, Functionalized Self-Assembled Monolayers at the Fluorous−Aqueous Interface in a Plug-Based Microfluidic System: Characterization and Testing with Membrane Protein Crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Kreutz, Jason E.; Li, Liang; Roach, L. Spencer; Hatakeyama, Takuji; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2009-11-04

    This paper describes a method to generate functionalizable, mobile self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) in plug-based microfluidics. Control of interfaces is advancing studies of biological interfaces, heterogeneous reactions, and nanotechnology. SAMs have been useful for such studies, but they are not laterally mobile. Lipid-based methods, though mobile, are not easily amenable to setting up the hundreds of experiments necessary for crystallization screening. Here we demonstrate a method, complementary to current SAM and lipid methods, for rapidly generating mobile, functionalized SAMs. This method relies on plugs, droplets surrounded by a fluorous carrier fluid, to rapidly explore chemical space. Specifically, we implemented his-tag binding chemistry to design a new fluorinated amphiphile, RfNTA, using an improved one-step synthesis of RfOEG under Mitsunobu conditions. RfNTA introduces specific binding of protein at the fluorous-aqueous interface, which concentrates and orients proteins at the interface, even in the presence of other surfactants. We then applied this approach to the crystallization of a his-tagged membrane protein, Reaction Center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, performed 2400 crystallization trials, and showed that this approach can increase the range of crystal-producing conditions, the success rate at a given condition, the rate of nucleation, and the quality of the crystal formed.

  4. Biased μ-opioid receptor agonists diversely regulate lateral mobility and functional coupling of the receptor to its cognate G proteins.

    PubMed

    Melkes, Barbora; Hejnova, Lucie; Novotny, Jiri

    2016-12-01

    There are some indications that biased μ-opioid ligands may diversely affect μ-opioid receptor (MOR) properties. Here, we used confocal fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to study the regulation by different MOR agonists of receptor movement within the plasma membrane of HEK293 cells stably expressing a functional yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-tagged μ-opioid receptor (MOR-YFP). We found that the lateral mobility of MOR-YFP was increased by (D-Ala(2),N-MePhe(4),Gly(5)-ol)-enkephalin (DAMGO) and to a lesser extent also by morphine but decreased by endomorphin-2. Interestingly, cholesterol depletion strongly enhanced the ability of morphine to elevate receptor mobility but significantly reduced or even eliminated the effect of DAMGO and endomorphin-2, respectively. Moreover, the ability of DAMGO and endomorphin-2 to influence MOR-YFP movement was diminished by pertussis toxin treatment. The results obtained by agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays indicated that DAMGO exhibited higher efficacy than morphine and endomorphin-2 did and that the efficacy of DAMGO, contrary to the latter agonists, was enhanced by cholesterol depletion. Overall, our study provides clear evidence that biased MOR agonists diversely affect receptor mobility in plasma membranes as well as MOR/G protein coupling and that the regulatory effect of different ligands depends on the membrane cholesterol content. These findings help to delineate the fundamental properties of MOR regarding their interaction with biased MOR ligands and cognate G proteins.

  5. MOTIVES FOR RESIDENTIAL MOBILITY IN LATER LIFE

    PubMed Central

    SERGEANT, JULIE F.; EKERDT, DAVID J.

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study delineates motives for residential mobility, describes dynamics between the elder and family members during the move decision process, and locates the move decision within ecological layers of the aging context. Interviews were conducted with 30 individuals and couples (ages 60-87) who experienced a community-based move within the past year, and with 14 extended family members. Reasons for moving (from perspectives of both elders who moved and their family members) were grouped into four themes and eleven issues that influenced the move decision. These themes parallel the ecological context of individual health and functioning, beliefs and attitudes, physical environment, and social pressures. Late-life mobility is a significant life transition that is the outcome of an ongoing appraisal and reappraisal of housing fit with individual functioning, needs, and aspirations. Family members are an integral part of these decision and residential mobility processes. Well, she moved because my sister and I decided she was going to move. But she wanted to move. It wouldn’t have happened if we hadn’t decided that she was gonna move. It was a little complicated . . . - Linda Brierton’s daughter, Karen PMID:18453180

  6. Quick lateral movements of the trunk in a seated position reflect mobility and activities of daily living (ADL) function in frail elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Akira; Higuchi, Yumi; Kimura, Daisuke; Okamoto, Kensuke; Arai, Shin; Iwata, Hiroshi; Fuchioka, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    A novel and safe performance test for measuring mobility is described. The test, which we have named the Seated Side Tapping test (Side Tapping test), requires the subjects to move their bodies laterally to the left and right in turn as quickly as possible whilst remaining in a seated position. We examined the associations between the results of the new test and those of other mobility tests, ADL, and the use of walking aids. The participants were 75 frail elderly people who were receiving rehabilitation services. Gait speed and the timed up and go (TUG) test were employed as mobility tests, and the participants' use of walking aids was recorded. The ADL score was assessed using the Barthel Index. Significant correlations were found between the side tapping test and gait speed (r=-0.59, p<0.01), and TUG (r=0.63, p<0.01). This test also revealed significant relationships with the ADL scores and the use of walking aids. These results indicate that an ability to perform quick lateral trunk movements in a seated position reflects their mobility during standing. Thus, we concluded that since the side tapping test is simple and safe, it is useful for detecting mobility impairments, ADL levels, and the need for walking aids, especially in frail elderly individuals.

  7. Modulation of membrane protein lateral mobility by polyphosphates and polyamines.

    PubMed

    Schindler, M; Koppel, D E; Sheetz, M P

    1980-03-01

    The lateral mobility of fluorescein-labeled membrane glycoproteins was measured in whole unlysed erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts by the technique of "fluorescence redistribution after fusion." Measurements were made on polyethylene glycol-fused cell pairs in which only one member of the couplet was initially fluorescently labeled. Diffusion coefficients were estimated from the rate of fluorescence redistribution determined from successive scans with a focused laser beam across individual fused pairs. This technique allows for the analysis of diffusion within cell membranes without the possible damaging photochemical events caused by photobleaching. It was found that lateral mobility of erythrocyte proteins can be increased by the addition of polyphosphates (i.e., ATP and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate) and decreased by the addition of organic polyamines (i.e., neomycin and spermine). This control is exerted by these molecules only when they contact the cytoplasmic side of the membrane and is not dependent upon high-energy phosphates. Microviscosity experiments employing diphenylhexatriene demonstrated no changes in membrane lipid state as a function of these reagents. Our results, in conjunction with data on the physical interactions of cytoskeletal proteins, suggest that the diffusion effector molecules alter the lateral mobility of erythrocyte membrane proteins through modifications of interactions in the shell, which is composed of spectrin, actin, and component 4.1.

  8. Wearable sensor network to study laterality of brain functions.

    PubMed

    Postolache, Gabriela B; Girao, Pedro S; Postolache, Octavian A

    2015-08-01

    In the last decade researches on laterality of brain functions have been reinvigorated. New models of lateralization of brain functions were proposed and new methods for understanding mechanisms of asymmetry between right and left brain functions were described. We design a system to study laterality of motor and autonomic nervous system based on wearable sensors network. A mobile application was developed for analysis of upper and lower limbs movements, cardiac and respiratory function. The functionalities and experience gained with deployment of the system are described.

  9. Anxiety and Lateral Cerebral Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Don M.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Examines the effect of stressful and nonstressful experimental situations upon the processing capacity of each cerebral hemisphere, through observing the differential performance tasks presented to right and left visual half-fields (VHFs). Also examines attentional bias and lateral eye movements. (Author/RK)

  10. Lateral mobility and anchoring of recombinant GABAA receptors depend on subunit composition.

    PubMed

    Peran, M; Hicks, B W; Peterson, N L; Hooper, H; Salas, R

    2001-10-01

    The clustering of type A gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABA(A)R) at discrete and functionally significant domains on the nerve cell surface is an important determinant in the integration of synaptic inputs. To discern the role that the subunits of the GABA(A)R play in determining the receptor's cell surface topography and mobility, the alpha1, beta1, beta3, and gamma2s subunits were transfected into COS7, HEK293, and PC12 cells and the distribution and cell surface mobility of these recombinant receptors were examined. Our results show that alpha1 subunits are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum while beta1 and beta3 subunits are sorted to the plasma membrane where they form clusters. Co-expression and co-assembly of alpha1 and beta3 subunits result in the rescue of intracellular alpha1 subunits, which are transported as alphabeta subunit complexes to the cell surface where they formed clusters. Fluorescence photobleach recovery and single particle tracking of recombinant receptors show that, despite clustering, beta3 subunit homooligomers are mobile within a cell surface domain. Inclusion of alpha1 in beta3 or beta3gamma2s complexes, however, dramatically reduces the receptor's lateral mobility in COS 7 and PC12 cells and anchors GABA(A)Rs on the cell surface, suggesting the formation of a direct link to a component of the cytoskeleton. The mobility of recombinant receptors that include the alpha1 subunit mirrors the mobility of GABA(A)Rs on cell bodies and dendrites of cortical and spinal cord neurons. The results suggest that incorporation of alpha1 subunits give rise to a population of GABA(A)Rs that are immobilized on the cell surface.

  11. Lateral superior olive function in congenital deafness.

    PubMed

    Couchman, Kiri; Garrett, Andrew; Deardorff, Adam S; Rattay, Frank; Resatz, Susanne; Fyffe, Robert; Walmsley, Bruce; Leão, Richardson N

    2011-07-01

    The development of cochlear implants for the treatment of patients with profound hearing loss has advanced considerably in the last few decades, particularly in the field of speech comprehension. However, attempts to provide not only sound decoding but also spatial hearing are limited by our understanding of circuit adaptations in the absence of auditory input. Here we investigate the lateral superior olive (LSO), a nucleus involved in interaural level difference (ILD) processing in the auditory brainstem using a mouse model of congenital deafness (the dn/dn mouse). An electrophysiological investigation of principal neurons of the LSO from the dn/dn mouse reveals a higher than normal proportion of single spiking (SS) neurons, and an increase in the hyperpolarisation-activated I(h) current. However, inhibitory glycinergic input to the LSO appears to develop normally both pre and postsynaptically in dn/dn mice despite the absence of auditory nerve activity. In combination with previous electrophysiological findings from the dn/dn mouse, we also compile a simple Hodgkin and Huxley circuit model in order to investigate possible computational deficits in ILD processing resulting from congenital hearing loss. We find that the predominance of SS neurons in the dn/dn LSO may compensate for upstream modifications and help to maintain a functioning ILD circuit in the dn/dn mouse. This could have clinical repercussions on the development of stimulation paradigms for spatial hearing with cochlear implants.

  12. Effect of integral membrane proteins on the lateral mobility of plastoquinone in phosphatidylcholine proteoliposomes

    PubMed Central

    Blackwell, Mary F.; Whitmarsh, John

    1990-01-01

    Pyrene fluorescence quenching by plastoquinone was used to estimate the rate of plastoquinone lateral diffusion in soybean phosphatidylcholine proteoliposomes containing the following integral membrane proteins: gramicidin D, spinach cytochrome bf complex, spinach cytochrome f, reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, beef heart mitochondrial cytochrome bc1, and beef heart mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase. The measured plastoquinone lateral diffusion coefficient varied between 1 and 3 · 10-7 cm2 s-1 in control liposomes that lacked protein. When proteins were added, these values decreased: a 10-fold decrease was observed when 16-26% of the membrane surface area was occupied by protein for all the proteins but gramicidin. The larger protein complexes (cytochrome bf, Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centers, cytochrome bc1, and cytochrome oxidase), whose hydrophobic volumes were 15-20 times as large as that of cytochrome f and the gramicidin transmembrane dimer, were 15-20 times as effective in decreasing the lateral-diffusion coefficient over the range of concentrations studied. These proteins had a much stronger effect than that observed for bacteriorhodopsin in fluorescence photobleaching recovery measurements. The effect of high-protein concentrations in gramicidin proteoliposomes was in close agreement with fluorescence photobleaching measurements. The results are compared with the predictions of several theoretical models of lateral mobility as a function of integral membrane concentration. PMID:19431774

  13. Lateral Transfer of Genes and Gene Fragments in Staphylococcus Extends beyond Mobile Elements ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Beiko, Robert G.; Ragan, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    The widespread presence of antibiotic resistance and virulence among Staphylococcus isolates has been attributed in part to lateral genetic transfer (LGT), but little is known about the broader extent of LGT within this genus. Here we report the first systematic study of the modularity of genetic transfer among 13 Staphylococcus genomes covering four distinct named species. Using a topology-based phylogenetic approach, we found, among 1,354 sets of homologous genes examined, strong evidence of LGT in 368 (27.1%) gene sets, and weaker evidence in another 259 (19.1%). Within-gene and whole-gene transfer contribute almost equally to the topological discordance of these gene sets against a reference phylogeny. Comparing genetic transfer in single-copy and in multicopy gene sets, we observed a higher frequency of LGT in the latter, and a substantial functional bias in cases of whole-gene transfer (little such bias was observed in cases of fragmentary genetic transfer). We found evidence that lateral transfer, particularly of entire genes, impacts not only functions related to antibiotic, drug, and heavy-metal resistance, as well as membrane transport, but also core informational and metabolic functions not associated with mobile elements. Although patterns of sequence similarity support the cohesion of recognized species, LGT within S. aureus appears frequently to disrupt clonal complexes. Our results demonstrate that LGT and gene duplication play important parts in functional innovation in staphylococcal genomes. PMID:21622749

  14. Promoting Function, Independence, and Mobility

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptom management, the use of mobility aids, automobile adaptations and the use of assistance animals. Increasing Accessibility often requires the adaptation of tools and devices at one’s home or ...

  15. Lateral bias, functional asymmetry, dance training and dance injuries.

    PubMed

    Kimmerle, Marliese

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to: 1. provide a conceptual framework for consolidating laterality research in dance training from an interdisciplinary perspective; 2. encourage the reporting of lateral data; 3. promote the development of standardized methods for assessing lateral preference and functional asymmetry so that data sets from student screenings, lab studies, and injury reports can be compared; and 4. stimulate further laterality research in the dance studio to examine student preference and teaching bias, thereby promoting balanced training.

  16. Reduced Lateral Mobility of Lipids and Proteins in Crowded Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Goose, Joseph E.; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2013-01-01

    Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of the E. coli outer membrane proteins FhuA, LamB, NanC, OmpA and OmpF in a POPE/POPG (3∶1) bilayer were performed to characterise the diffusive nature of each component of the membrane. At small observation times (<10 ns) particle vibrations dominate phospholipid diffusion elevating the calculated values from the longer time-scale bulk value (>50 ns) of 8.5×10−7 cm2 s−1. The phospholipid diffusion around each protein was found to vary based on distance from protein. An asymmetry in the diffusion of annular lipids in the inner and outer leaflets was observed and correlated with an asymmetry in charged residues in the vicinity of the inner and outer leaflet head-groups. Protein rotational and translational diffusion were also found to vary with observation time and were inversely correlated with the radius of gyration of the protein in the plane of the bilayer. As the concentration of protein within the bilayer was increased, the overall mobility of the membrane decreased reflected in reduced lipid diffusion coefficients for both lipid and protein components. The increase in protein concentration also resulted in a decrease in the anomalous diffusion exponent α of the lipid. Formation of extended clusters and networks of proteins led to compartmentalisation of lipids in extreme cases. PMID:23592975

  17. Two distinct forms of functional lateralization in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Gotts, Stephen J.; Jo, Hang Joon; Wallace, Gregory L.; Saad, Ziad S.; Cox, Robert W.; Martin, Alex

    2013-01-01

    The hemispheric lateralization of certain faculties in the human brain has long been held to be beneficial for functioning. However, quantitative relationships between the degree of lateralization in particular brain regions and the level of functioning have yet to be established. Here we demonstrate that two distinct forms of functional lateralization are present in the left vs. the right cerebral hemisphere, with the left hemisphere showing a preference to interact more exclusively with itself, particularly for cortical regions involved in language and fine motor coordination. In contrast, right-hemisphere cortical regions involved in visuospatial and attentional processing interact in a more integrative fashion with both hemispheres. The degree of lateralization present in these distinct systems selectively predicted behavioral measures of verbal and visuospatial ability, providing direct evidence that lateralization is associated with enhanced cognitive ability. PMID:23959883

  18. Lateral Dispersal and Foraging Behavior of Entomopathogenic Nematodes in the Absence and Presence of Mobile and Non-Mobile Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Harit K.; Grewal, Parwinder S.

    2015-01-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes have been classified into cruisers (active searchers) and ambushers (sit and wait foragers). However, little is known about their dispersal and foraging behavior at population level in soil. We studied lateral dispersal of the ambush foraging Steinernema carpocapsae (ALL strain) and cruise foraging Heterorhabditis bacteriophora (GPS11 strain) from infected host cadavers in microcosms (0.05 m2) containing Wooster silt-loam soil (Oxyaquic fragiudalf) and vegetation in the presence or absence of non-mobile and mobile hosts. Results showed that the presence of a non-mobile host (Galleria mellonella larva in a wire mesh cage) enhanced H. bacteriophora dispersal for up to 24 hr compared with no-host treatment, but had no impact on S. carpocapsae dispersal. In contrast, presence of a mobile host (G. mellonella larvae) increased dispersal of S. carpocapsae compared with no host treatment, but had no effect on H. bacteriophora dispersal. Also H. bacteriophora was better at infecting non-mobile than mobile hosts released into the microcosms and S. carpocapsae was better at infecting mobile than non-mobile hosts, thus affirming the established cruiser-ambusher theory. However, results also revealed that a large proportion of infective juveniles (IJs) of both species stayed near (≤ 3.8 cm) the source cadaver (88-96% S. carpocapsae; 67–79% H. bacteriophora), and the proportion of IJs reaching the farthest distance (11.4 cm) was significantly higher for S. carpocapsae (1.4%) than H. bacteriophora (0.4%) in the presence of mobile hosts. S. carpocapsae also had higher average population displacement than H. bacteriophora in the presence of both the non-mobile (5.07 vs. 3.6 cm/day) and mobile (8.06 vs. 5.3 cm/day) hosts. We conclude that the two species differ in their dispersal and foraging behavior at the population level and this behavior is affected by both the presence and absence of hosts and by their mobility. PMID:26079715

  19. The Effects of Enriched Neonatal Experiences Upon Later Cognitive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachs, Theodore D.; Cucinotta, Pattiann

    1971-01-01

    The data reported in this small study confirm previous research indicating that early stimulation, though initially affecting human behavior, has little permanent effect upon later functioning. (Author/WY)

  20. Language Lateralization in Children Using Functional Transcranial Doppler Sonography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haag, Anja; Moeller, Nicola; Knake, Susanne; Hermsen, Anke; Oertel, Wolfgang H.; Rosenow, Felix; Hamer, Hajo M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Language lateralization with functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD) and lexical word generation has been shown to have high concordance with the Wada test and functional magnetic resonance imaging in adults. We evaluated a nonlexical paradigm to determine language dominance in children. Method: In 23 right-handed children (12…

  1. High-mobility capacitively-induced two-dimensional electrons in a lateral superlattice potential

    PubMed Central

    Lu, T. M.; Laroche, D.; Huang, S.-H.; Chuang, Y.; Li, J.-Y.; Liu, C. W.

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of a lateral periodic potential modulation, two-dimensional electrons may exhibit interesting phenomena, such as a graphene-like energy-momentum dispersion, Bloch oscillations, or the Hofstadter butterfly band structure. To create a sufficiently strong potential modulation using conventional semiconductor heterostructures, aggressive device processing is often required, unfortunately resulting in strong disorder that masks the sought-after effects. Here, we report a novel fabrication process flow for imposing a strong lateral potential modulation onto a capacitively induced two-dimensional electron system, while preserving the host material quality. Using this process flow, the electron density in a patterned Si/SiGe heterostructure can be tuned over a wide range, from 4.4 × 1010 cm−2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm−2, with a peak mobility of 6.4 × 105 cm2/V·s. The wide density tunability and high electron mobility allow us to observe sequential emergence of commensurability oscillations as the density, the mobility, and in turn the mean free path, increase. Magnetic-field-periodic quantum oscillations associated with various closed orbits also emerge sequentially with increasing density. We show that, from the density dependence of the quantum oscillations, one can directly extract the steepness of the imposed superlattice potential. This result is then compared to a conventional lateral superlattice model potential. PMID:26865160

  2. High-mobility capacitively-induced two-dimensional electrons in a lateral superlattice potential

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Tzu -Ming; Laroche, Dominique; Huang, S. -H.; Chuang, Y.; Li, J. -Y.; Liu, C. W.

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of a lateral periodic potential modulation, two-dimensional electrons may exhibit interesting phenomena, such as a graphene-like energy-momentum dispersion, Bloch oscillations, or the Hofstadter butterfly band structure. To create a sufficiently strong potential modulation using conventional semiconductor heterostructures, aggressive device processing is often required, unfortunately resulting in strong disorder that masks the sought-after effects. Here, we report a novel fabrication process flow for imposing a strong lateral potential modulation onto a capacitively induced two-dimensional electron system, while preserving the host material quality. Using this process flow, the electron density in a patterned Si/SiGe heterostructure can be tuned over a wide range, from 4.4 × 1010 cm–2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm–2, with a peak mobility of 6.4 × 105 cm2/V·s. The wide density tunability and high electron mobility allow us to observe sequential emergence of commensurability oscillations as the density, the mobility, and in turn the mean free path, increase. Magnetic-field-periodic quantum oscillations associated with various closed orbits also emerge sequentially with increasing density. We show that, from the density dependence of the quantum oscillations, one can directly extract the steepness of the imposed superlattice potential. Lastly, this result is then compared to a conventional lateral superlattice model potential.

  3. High-mobility capacitively-induced two-dimensional electrons in a lateral superlattice potential

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Tzu -Ming; Laroche, Dominique; Huang, S. -H.; ...

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of a lateral periodic potential modulation, two-dimensional electrons may exhibit interesting phenomena, such as a graphene-like energy-momentum dispersion, Bloch oscillations, or the Hofstadter butterfly band structure. To create a sufficiently strong potential modulation using conventional semiconductor heterostructures, aggressive device processing is often required, unfortunately resulting in strong disorder that masks the sought-after effects. Here, we report a novel fabrication process flow for imposing a strong lateral potential modulation onto a capacitively induced two-dimensional electron system, while preserving the host material quality. Using this process flow, the electron density in a patterned Si/SiGe heterostructure can be tuned overmore » a wide range, from 4.4 × 1010 cm–2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm–2, with a peak mobility of 6.4 × 105 cm2/V·s. The wide density tunability and high electron mobility allow us to observe sequential emergence of commensurability oscillations as the density, the mobility, and in turn the mean free path, increase. Magnetic-field-periodic quantum oscillations associated with various closed orbits also emerge sequentially with increasing density. We show that, from the density dependence of the quantum oscillations, one can directly extract the steepness of the imposed superlattice potential. Lastly, this result is then compared to a conventional lateral superlattice model potential.« less

  4. High-mobility capacitively-induced two-dimensional electrons in a lateral superlattice potential.

    PubMed

    Lu, T M; Laroche, D; Huang, S-H; Chuang, Y; Li, J-Y; Liu, C W

    2016-02-11

    In the presence of a lateral periodic potential modulation, two-dimensional electrons may exhibit interesting phenomena, such as a graphene-like energy-momentum dispersion, Bloch oscillations, or the Hofstadter butterfly band structure. To create a sufficiently strong potential modulation using conventional semiconductor heterostructures, aggressive device processing is often required, unfortunately resulting in strong disorder that masks the sought-after effects. Here, we report a novel fabrication process flow for imposing a strong lateral potential modulation onto a capacitively induced two-dimensional electron system, while preserving the host material quality. Using this process flow, the electron density in a patterned Si/SiGe heterostructure can be tuned over a wide range, from 4.4 × 10(10) cm(-2) to 1.8 × 10(11) cm(-2), with a peak mobility of 6.4 × 10(5) cm(2)/V·s. The wide density tunability and high electron mobility allow us to observe sequential emergence of commensurability oscillations as the density, the mobility, and in turn the mean free path, increase. Magnetic-field-periodic quantum oscillations associated with various closed orbits also emerge sequentially with increasing density. We show that, from the density dependence of the quantum oscillations, one can directly extract the steepness of the imposed superlattice potential. This result is then compared to a conventional lateral superlattice model potential.

  5. Value of cephalic part of lateral crus in functional rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Sazgar, Amir A; Amali, Amin; Peyvasty, Mina Najarzad

    2016-12-01

    Reshaping of the nasal tip is the most difficult part of rhinoplasty. Over the years, there have been many advances in the field of rhinoplasty, including tip plasty. The goal of these continuous refinements in existing procedures has been to improve both aesthetic and functional outcomes. The cephalic part of the lateral crus of the lower lateral cartilage is what mainly contributes to nasal tip deformity. Various surgical techniques have been reported that used the cephalic part of lateral crus to refine the nasal tip and preserve alar integrity and nasal breathing function. In this review article, we have attempted to show the evolution of these methods while focusing on development of approaches that are basic for "modern rhinoplasty" and presenting our personal preferences. We have also endeavored to categorize these methods and clarify some misconceptions and inaccuracies in their descriptions.

  6. Lateral patellofemoral ligament reconstruction to restore functional capacity in patients previously undergoing lateral retinacular release

    PubMed Central

    Beckert, Mitch; Crebs, Dylan; Nieto, Michael; Gao, Yubo; Albright, John

    2016-01-01

    AIM To study patient outcomes after surgical correction for iatrogenic patellar instability. METHODS This retrospective study looked at 17 patients (19 knees) suffering from disabling medial patellar instability following lateral release surgery. All patients underwent lateral patellofemoral ligament (LPFL) reconstruction by a single surgeon. Assessments in all 19 cases included functional outcome scores, range of motion, and assessment for the presence of apprehension sign of the patella to determine if LPFL reconstruction surgery was successful at restoring patellofemoral stability. RESULTS No patients reported any residual postoperative symptoms of patellar instability. Also no patients demonstrated medial patellar apprehension or examiner induced subluxation with the medial instability test described earlier following LPFL reconstruction. Furthermore, all patients recovered normal range of motion compared to the contralateral limb. For patients with pre and postoperative outcome scores, the mean overall knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score increased significantly, from 34.39 preoperatively (range: 7.7-70.12) to 69.54 postoperatively (range: 26.82-91.46) at final follow-up (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION This novel technique for LPFL reconstruction is effective at restoring lateral restraint of the patellofemoral joint and improving joint functionality. PMID:27574606

  7. Does cerebral lateralization develop? A study using functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound assessing lateralization for language production and visuospatial memory.

    PubMed

    Groen, Margriet A; Whitehouse, Andrew J O; Badcock, Nicholas A; Bishop, Dorothy V M

    2012-05-01

    In the majority of people, language production is lateralized to the left cerebral hemisphere and visuospatial skills to the right. However, questions remain as to when, how, and why humans arrive at this division of labor. In this study, we assessed cerebral lateralization for language production and for visuospatial memory using functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound in a group of 60 typically developing children between the ages of six and 16 years. The typical pattern of left-lateralized activation for language production and right-lateralized activation for visuospatial memory was found in the majority of the children (58%). No age-related change in direction or strength of lateralization was found for language production. In contrast, the strength of lateralization (independent of direction) for visuospatial memory function continued to increase with age. In addition, boys showed a trend for stronger right-hemisphere lateralization for visuospatial memory than girls, but there was no gender effect on language laterality. We tested whether having language and visuospatial functions in the same hemisphere was associated with poor cognitive performance and found no evidence for this "functional crowding" hypothesis. We did, however, find that children with left-lateralized language production had higher vocabulary and nonword reading age-adjusted standard scores than other children, regardless of the laterality of visuospatial memory. Thus, a link between language function and left-hemisphere lateralization exists, and cannot be explained in terms of maturational change.

  8. Cushioning and lateral stability functions of cloth sport shoes.

    PubMed

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Hong, Youlian; Li, Jing Xian

    2007-09-01

    In this study, we evaluated the protective functions of cloth sport shoes, including cushioning and lateral stability. Twelve male students participated in the study (mean +/- s: age 12.7 +/- 0.4 years, mass 40.7 +/- 5.9kg, height 1.50 +/- 0.04m). Cloth sport shoes, running shoes, basketball shoes, crosstraining shoes, and barefoot conditions were investigated in random sequence. Human pendulum and cutting movement tests were used to assess cushioning performance and lateral stability, respectively. For cushioning, the running shoes (2.06 body weight, BW) performed the best, while the cross-training shoes (2.30 BW) and the basketball shoes (2.37 BW) both performed better than the cloth sport shoes (2.55 BW) and going barefoot (2.63 BW). For the lateral stability test, range of inversion--eversion was found to be from 3.6 to 4.9 degrees, which was far less than that for adult participants (> 20 degrees). No significant differences were found between conditions. All conditions showed prolonged durations from foot-strike to maximum inversion (66-95 ms), which was less vigorous than that for adult participants (< 40 ms) and was unlikely to evoke intrinsic stability failure. In conclusion, the cloth sport shoe showed inferior cushioning capability but the same lateral stability as the other sports shoes for children.

  9. Effect of lateral mobility of fluorescent probes in lipid mixing assays of cell fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, S K; Cheng, M; Hui, S W

    1990-01-01

    Monolayers of human erythrocytes, immobilized on a cover slip, were induced to fuse by polyethylene glycol (mol wt 8,000). The mobility of fluorescent probes, 1-oleoyl-2-[12-[(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadizol-4-yl)amino]dodecanoyl] phosphatidyl-choline (C12-NBD-PC), from labeled cells to unlabeled cells was monitored by video-enhanced fluorescence microscopy. A dequenching curve was obtained from the measurement of fluorescence intensities of pairs of fused cells over time. The dequenching curve and the curve obtained from macroscopic measurements of a cell monolayer (described in the preceding article) were compared and discussed. The slow probe transfer rate between a pair of fused cells was explained by a diffusion model based on membrane area conservation and the geometry of the fusion lumen. An equivalent lumen between two fused cells, thought to be the main rate limitation of probe mobility after fusion, was calculated to be approximately 130 nm in diameter. Lumens of 75 nm in diameter were observed by electron microscopy. Thus, the rate of macroscopic fluorescence dequenching depends not only upon the fusion efficiency, but also upon the number of simultaneous fusion partners, the geometry of their contact points, and the lateral mobility of the fluorescent probes through these points. The relative fusion efficiency can be derived only from the saturation dequenching values. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:2291938

  10. Distribution and lateral mobility of DC-SIGN on immature dendritic cells--implications for pathogen uptake.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Aaron K; Thompson, Nancy L; Jacobson, Ken

    2008-03-01

    The receptor C-type lectin DC-SIGN (CD209) is expressed by immature dendritic cells, functioning as an antigen capture receptor and cell adhesion molecule. Various microbes, including HIV-1, can exploit binding to DC-SIGN to gain entry to dendritic cells. DC-SIGN forms discrete nanoscale clusters on immature dendritic cells that are thought to be important for viral binding. We confirmed that these DC-SIGN clusters also exist both in live dendritic cells and in cell lines that ectopically express DC-SIGN. Moreover, DC-SIGN has an unusual polarized lateral distribution in the plasma membrane of dendritic cells and other cells: the receptor is preferentially localized to the leading edge of the dendritic cell lamellipod and largely excluded from the ventral plasma membrane. Colocalization of DC-SIGN clusters with endocytic activity demonstrated that surface DC-SIGN clusters are enriched near the leading edge, whereas endocytosis of these clusters occurred preferentially at lamellar sites posterior to the leading edge. Therefore, we predicted that DC-SIGN clusters move from the leading edge to zones of internalization. Two modes of lateral mobility were evident from the trajectories of DC-SIGN clusters at the leading edge, directed and non-directed mobility. Clusters with directed mobility moved in a highly linear fashion from the leading edge to rearward locations in the lamella at remarkably high velocity (1420+/-260 nm/second). Based on these data, we propose that DC-SIGN clusters move from the leading edge--where the dendritic cell is likely to encounter pathogens in tissue--to a medial lamellar site where clusters enter the cell via endocytosis. Immature dendritic cells may acquire and internalize HIV and other pathogens by this process.

  11. The spatiotemporal transfer function of the Limulus lateral eye

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    The dynamics of the Limulus retina may be well described by the spatiotemporal transfer function, which measures the response of the eye to moving sinusoidal gratings. We consider a model for this system, which incorporates an excitatory generator potential, and self- and lateral inhibitory processes. Procedures are described which allow estimation of parameters for the model consistent with the empirical transfer function data. Transfer functions calculated from the model show good agreement with laboratory measurements, and may be used to predict accurately the response of the eye to arbitrary moving stimuli. The model allows convenient interpretation of the transfer function measurements in terms of physiological processes which underly the response of the Limulus retina. PMID:211177

  12. Determination of lateral-stability derivatives and transfer-function coefficients from frequency-response data for lateral motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donegan, James J; Robinson, Samuel W , Jr; Gates, Ordway, B , jr

    1955-01-01

    A method is presented for determining the lateral-stability derivatives, transfer-function coefficients, and the modes for lateral motion from frequency-response data for a rigid aircraft. The method is based on the application of the vector technique to the equations of lateral motion, so that the three equations of lateral motion can be separated into six equations. The method of least squares is then applied to the data for each of these equations to yield the coefficients of the equations of lateral motion from which the lateral-stability derivatives and lateral transfer-function coefficients are computed. Two numerical examples are given to demonstrate the use of the method.

  13. Outer Hair Cell Lateral Wall Structure Constrains the Mobility of Plasma Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Tetsuji; Hakizimana, Pierre; Wu, Siva; Hassan, Ahmed; Jacob, Stefan; Temirov, Jamshid; Fang, Jie; Mellado-Lagarde, Marcia; Gursky, Richard; Horner, Linda; Leibiger, Barbara; Leijon, Sara; Centonze, Victoria E.; Berggren, Per-Olof; Frase, Sharon; Auer, Manfred; Brownell, William E.; Fridberger, Anders; Zuo, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Nature’s fastest motors are the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs). These sensory cells use a membrane protein, Slc26a5 (prestin), to generate mechanical force at high frequencies, which is essential for explaining the exquisite hearing sensitivity of mammalian ears. Previous studies suggest that Slc26a5 continuously diffuses within the membrane, but how can a freely moving motor protein effectively convey forces critical for hearing? To provide direct evidence in OHCs for freely moving Slc26a5 molecules, we created a knockin mouse where Slc26a5 is fused with YFP. These mice and four other strains expressing fluorescently labeled membrane proteins were used to examine their lateral diffusion in the OHC lateral wall. All five proteins showed minimal diffusion, but did move after pharmacological disruption of membrane-associated structures with a cholesterol-depleting agent and salicylate. Thus, our results demonstrate that OHC lateral wall structure constrains the mobility of plasma membrane proteins and that the integrity of such membrane-associated structures are critical for Slc26a5’s active and structural roles. The structural constraint of membrane proteins may exemplify convergent evolution of cellular motors across species. Our findings also suggest a possible mechanism for disorders of cholesterol metabolism with hearing loss such as Niemann-Pick Type C diseases. PMID:26352669

  14. Fluvial bevelling of topography controlled by lateral channel mobility and uplift rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufe, Aaron; Paola, Chris; Burbank, Douglas W.

    2016-09-01

    Valley morphologies of rivers crossing zones of active uplift range from narrow canyons to broad alluvial surfaces. They provide illuminating examples of the fundamental, but poorly understood, competition between relief creation and landscape flattening. Motivated by a field example of abandoned kilometre-wide, fluvially eroded platforms on active detachment folds in the Tian Shan foreland, we present physical experiments investigating the controls on the area of a growing fold that is reworked by antecedent rivers. These experiments reproduce the range of observed field morphologies, varying from wholesale bevelling of the uplifting fold to the formation of narrow, steep-walled canyons. A log-linear fit to a simple dimensionless parameter shows that the competition between lateral channel mobility and rock-uplift rate explains >95% of the variance in the bevelled fraction of the folds. Our data suggest that lateral bedrock erosion rates of 0.5-40 m yr-1 are required to explain the formation of extensive platforms in the Tian Shan foreland and imply that varying water and sediment fluxes can cause striking changes in the degree of landscape flattening by influencing the lateral erosion rate.

  15. Lateral Mobility and Nanoscale Spatial Arrangement of Chemokine-activated α4β1 Integrins on T Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Sosa-Costa, Alberto; Isern de Val, Sol; Sevilla-Movilla, Silvia; Teixidó, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine stimulation of integrin α4β1-dependent T lymphocyte adhesion is a key step during lymphocyte trafficking. A central question regarding α4β1 function is how its lateral mobility and organization influence its affinity and avidity following cell stimulation with chemokines and/or ligands. Using single particle tracking and superresolution imaging approaches, we explored the lateral mobility and spatial arrangement of individual α4β1integrins on T cells exposed to different activating stimuli. We show that CXCL12 stimulation leads to rapid and transient α4β1activation, measured by induction of the activation epitope recognized by the HUTS-21 anti-β1antibody and by increased talin-β1 association. CXCL12-dependent α4β1 activation directly correlated with restricted lateral diffusion and integrin immobilization. Moreover, co-stimulation by CXCL12 together with soluble VCAM-1 potentiated integrin immobilization with a 5-fold increase in immobile integrins compared with unstimulated conditions. Our data indicate that docking by talin of the chemokine-activated α4β1 to the actin cytoskeleton favors integrin immobilization, which likely facilitates ligand interaction and increased adhesiveness. Superresolution imaging showed that the nanoscale organization of high-affinity α4β1 remains unaffected following chemokine and/or ligand addition. Instead, newly activated α4β1 integrins organize on the cell membrane as independent units without joining pre-established integrin sites to contribute to cluster formation. Altogether, our results provide a rationale to understand how the spatiotemporal organization of activated α4β1 integrins regulates T lymphocyte adhesion. PMID:27481944

  16. Functional Importance of Mobile Ribosomal Proteins.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kai-Chun; Wen, Jin-Der; Yang, Lee-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although the dynamic motions and peptidyl transferase activity seem to be embedded in the rRNAs, the ribosome contains more than 50 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins), whose functions remain largely elusive. Also, the precise forms of some of these r-proteins, as being part of the ribosome, are not structurally solved due to their high flexibility, which hinders the efforts in their functional elucidation. Owing to recent advances in cryo-electron microscopy, single-molecule techniques, and theoretical modeling, much has been learned about the dynamics of these r-proteins. Surprisingly, allosteric regulations have been found in between spatially separated components as distant as those in the opposite sides of the ribosome. Here, we focus on the functional roles and intricate regulations of the mobile L1 and L12 stalks and L9 and S1 proteins. Conformational flexibility also enables versatile functions for r-proteins beyond translation. The arrangement of r-proteins may be under evolutionary pressure that fine-tunes mass distributions for optimal structural dynamics and catalytic activity of the ribosome.

  17. Functional pelvic orientation measured from lateral standing and sitting radiographs.

    PubMed

    DiGioia, Anthony M; Hafez, Mahmoud A; Jaramaz, Branislav; Levison, Timothy J; Moody, James E

    2006-12-01

    We prospectively obtained preoperative and 3-month postoperative lateral pelvic radiographs in the standing and sitting positions from 84 patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty. We measured pelvic orientation (flexion extension) using the anterior pelvic plane as defined by the anterior superior iliac spines and pubic tubercles as references. There was a trend towards upright pelvic alignment when standing, with a mean anterior pelvic plane angle of 1.2 degrees (range, -22 degrees - +27 degrees). In the sitting position the pelvis tended to extend posteriorly, with a mean anterior pelvic plane angle of -36.2 degrees (range, -64 degrees - +4 degrees). There was a wide variation in the arc of pelvic flexion extension as patients moved from standing to sitting, with are of pelvic motion in some patients as mobile as 70 degrees and in others as stiff as 5 degrees. There was no significant variation between males and females or between preoperative and postoperative pelvic flexion extension. There were substantial variations in pelvic orientation when comparing standing and sitting for an individual patient and between different patients. This variation can be unpredictable, and may influence implant alignment and stability after total hip arthroplasty.

  18. Metabolic Assessment of Suited Mobility Using Functional Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, J. R.; McFarland, S. M.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Existing methods for evaluating extravehicular activity (EVA) suit mobility have typically focused on isolated joint range of motion or torque, but these techniques have little to do with how well a crewmember functionally performs in an EVA suit. To evaluate suited mobility at the system level through measuring metabolic cost (MC) of functional tasks.

  19. Functional imaging of the human lateral geniculate nucleus and pulvinar.

    PubMed

    Kastner, Sabine; O'Connor, Daniel H; Fukui, Miki M; Fehd, Hilda M; Herwig, Uwe; Pinsk, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    In the human brain, little is known about the functional anatomy and response properties of subcortical nuclei containing visual maps such as the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and the pulvinar. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 3 tesla (T), collective responses of neural populations in the LGN were measured as a function of stimulus contrast and flicker reversal rate and compared with those obtained in visual cortex. Flickering checkerboard stimuli presented in alternation to the right and left hemifields reliably activated the LGN. The peak of the LGN activation was found to be on average within +/-2 mm of the anatomical location of the LGN, as identified on high-resolution structural images. In all visual areas except the middle temporal (MT), fMRI responses increased monotonically with stimulus contrast. In the LGN, the dynamic response range of the contrast function was larger and contrast gain was lower than in the cortex. Contrast sensitivity was lowest in the LGN and V1 and increased gradually in extrastriate cortex. In area MT, responses were saturated at 4% contrast. Response modulation by changes in flicker rate was similar in the LGN and V1 and occurred mainly in the frequency range between 0.5 and 7.5 Hz; in contrast, in extrastriate areas V4, V3A, and MT, responses were modulated mainly in the frequency range between 7.5 and 20 Hz. In the human pulvinar, no activations were obtained with the experimental designs used to probe response properties of the LGN. However, regions in the mediodorsal right and left pulvinar were found to be consistently activated by bilaterally presented flickering checkerboard stimuli, when subjects attended to the stimuli. Taken together, our results demonstrate that fMRI at 3 T can be used effectively to study thalamocortical circuits in the human brain.

  20. Laterality of hand function in naturalistically housed chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Alison W; Weghorst, Jennifer A

    2005-05-01

    Studies of laterality of hand function in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) have the potential to tell us about the origins of handedness in Homo sapiens. However, the data are confusing, with discrepancies present between studies done in the field and the laboratory: the former show wild chimpanzees to be unlateralised at the population level, while the latter show captive chimpanzees as lateralised at the population level. This study of 26 semi-free ranging chimpanzees of Chester Zoo, UK, aimed to investigate a situation between the wild and captivity and provided ethological data for 43 categories of spontaneous manual use and 14 categories of tool use. Other variables recorded were subordinate hand activity, whether the subject was arboreal or terrestrial, and the identity of the subject. Using switching focal subject sampling, 23,978 bouts of hand use and 1,090 bouts of tool use were recorded. No population-level handedness was present for manual non-tool use activities in the naturalistically housed chimpanzees of Chester Zoo in a similar way to studies of wild chimpanzees. However, about half of the individuals were lateralised to one side or the other for the foraging behaviours of pick up, eat, and pluck. Using a modified version of McGrew and Marchant's (1997) Laterality Framework, these results are comparable to some wild and captive populations for similar foraging tasks. Bimanuality was rare and thus prevented comparison with captive experimental studies that have reported population right handedness. Behaviour involving contact with water elicited stronger lateralisation. Chester chimpanzees were more likely to exhibit hand preferences for manual tasks with increasing age but there were no effects of sex or rearing history on hand specialisations in adult individuals. Lateralisation was biased in tool use, which evoked significant left hand preferences in half the individuals, with no effect of age. Results are discussed comparatively with reference to

  1. Toxic chemicals and thyroid function: hard facts and lateral thinking.

    PubMed

    Duntas, Leonidas H; Stathatos, Nikos

    2015-12-01

    Increasing quantities of evidence-based data incriminate a large number of environmental pollutants for toxic effects on the thyroid. Among the many chemical contaminants, halogenated organochlorines and pesticides variably affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis and disrupt thyroid function. PCBs and their metabolites and PBDEs bind to thyroid transport proteins, such as transthyretin, displace thyroxine, and disrupt thyroid function. Meanwhile, at the molecular level, PCB congeners may activate phosphorylation of Akt, p-Akt, and forkhead box O3a (FoxO3a) protein resulting in inhibition of the natrium/iodide symporter. Given therefore the growing concern developing around these multiple toxic chemicals today invading numerous environments and their long-term deleterious effects not only on the thyroid but also on general health, we strongly advocate their strict regulation and, moreover, their gradual reduction. A good degree of "lateral thinking", we feel, will lead to a use of chemicals that will enhance life while concurrently carefully protecting the environment.

  2. [Respiratory domain of revised amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Functional Rating Scale].

    PubMed

    Lima, Sandra E; Pessolano, Fernando A; Monteiro, Sergio G; De Vito, Eduardo L

    2009-01-01

    Virtually all patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis will complain of dyspnea, which is perhaps the most distressing symptom of this devastating disease. The objective was to correlate respiratory domain of ALSFRS-R with forced vital capacity and maximal static pressures in the mouth. We designed a prospective study in 20 consecutive patients without dyspnea during 24 months. The global decline of ALSFRS-R was from 34.3 +/- 10.3 to 22.1 +/- 8.0 (p = 0.0325), the contribution of respiratory domain was irrelevant. Those who referred dyspnea (n: 12), forced vital capacity fell 41 +/- 21% of the initial value but with similar value of fall (46 +/- 23%) 8 patients did not referred dyspnea. Total score of ALSFRS-R correlated with forced vital capacity (litres), r: 0.73, p = 0.0016 and maximal inspiratory pressure (cm H2O), r: 0.84, p = 0.0038, but the fall of the forced vital capacity (%) did not correlate with dyspnea (r(s): 0.23, p = 0.1400). There was a moderate correlation between dyspnea and maximal inspiratory pressure (%), r(s): 0.58, p = 0.0300 and between dyspnea and maximal expiratory pressure (%), r(s): 0.49, p = 0.0400. We concluded that the respiratory functional deterioration could not be predicted using respiratory domain of ALSFRS-R. This suggests that respiratory domain of this scale does not replace to respiratory function testing measurements and, due to the respiratory insufficiency could not be clinically evident; performing pulmonary function tests provides an objective view and permit to make anticipatory actions.

  3. Alternative energy estimation from the shower lateral distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Vitor; Escobar, Carlos; Brito, Joel; Dobrigkeit, Carola; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo

    The surface detector technique has been successfully used to detect cosmic ray showers for several decades. Scintillators or Cerenkov water tanks can be used to measure the number of particles and/or the energy density at a given depth in the atmosphere and reconstruct the primary particle properties. It has been shown that the experiment configuration and the resolution in reconstructing the core position determine a distance to the shower axis in which the lateral distribution function (LDF) of particles shows the least variation with respect to different primary particles type, simulation models and specific shapes of the LDF. Therefore, the signal at this distance (600 m for Haverah Park and 1000 m for Auger Observatory) has shown to be a good estimator of the shower energy. Revisiting the above technique, we show that a range of distances to the shower axis, instead of one single point, can be used as estimator of the shower energy. A comparison is done for the Auger Observatory configuration and the new estimator proposed here is shown to be a good and robust alternative to the standard single point procedure.

  4. IQ, Fetal Testosterone and Individual Variability in Children's Functional Lateralization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercure, Evelyne; Ashwin, Emma; Dick, Frederic; Halit, Hanife; Auyeung, Bonnie; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Johnson, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    Previous event-related potential (ERP) studies have revealed that faces and words show a robust difference in the lateralization of their N170. The present study investigated the development of this differential lateralization in school-age boys. We assessed the potential role of fetal testosterone (FT) level as a factor biasing the prenatal…

  5. Phaseolus vulgaris RbohB functions in lateral root development.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Jesús; Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Quinto, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory burst oxidase homologs (RBOHs) catalyze the reduction of oxygen to generate superoxide anion, a kind of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The ROS produced by RBOHs play essential roles in diverse processes, such as root hair development, stomata closure and signaling mechanisms in response to abiotic stimuli and during plant-pathogen interactions. Recently, we found that PvRbohB silencing in transgenic Phaseolus vulgaris roots had a negative impact on lateral root density. In this work, we show that the downregulation of PvRbohB affects both the growth and ROS levels in recently emerged lateral roots. In addition, we found that the PvRbohB promoter was activated during lateral root primordium initiation in the pericycle, and remained active throughout lateral root development. This study identifies RBOHs as potentially important players in lateral root development in P. vulgaris.

  6. Correlation between mobility assessed by the Modified Rivermead Mobility Index and physical function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gi-Tae; Kim, Mihyun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between mobility assessed by the Modified Rivermead Mobility Index and variables associated with physical function in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred stroke patients (35 males and 65 females; age 58.60 ± 13.91 years) participated in this study. Modified Rivermead Mobility Index, muscle strength (manual muscle test), muscle tone (Modified Ashworth Scale), range of motion of lower extremity, sensory function (light touch and proprioception tests), and coordination (heel to shin and lower-extremity motor coordination tests) were assessed. [Results] The Modified Rivermead Mobility Index was correlated with all the physical function variables assessed, except the degree of knee extension. In addition, stepwise linear regression analysis revealed that coordination (heel to shin test) was the explanatory variable closely associated with mobility in stroke patients. [Conclusion] The Modified Rivermead Mobility Index score was significantly correlated with all the physical function variables. Coordination (heel to shin test) was closely related to mobility function. These results may be useful in developing rehabilitation programs for stroke patients. PMID:27630440

  7. Priming by chemokines restricts lateral mobility of the adhesion receptor LFA-1 and restores adhesion to ICAM-1 nano-aggregates on human mature dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Borgman, Kyra J E; van Zanten, Thomas S; Manzo, Carlo; Cabezón, Raquel; Cambi, Alessandra; Benítez-Ribas, Daniel; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F

    2014-01-01

    LFA-1 is a leukocyte specific β2 integrin that plays a major role in regulating adhesion and migration of different immune cells. Recent data suggest that LFA-1 on mature dendritic cells (mDCs) may function as a chemokine-inducible anchor during homing of DCs through the afferent lymphatics into the lymph nodes, by transiently switching its molecular conformational state. However, the role of LFA-1 mobility in this process is not yet known, despite that the importance of lateral organization and dynamics for LFA-1-mediated adhesion regulation is broadly recognized. Using single particle tracking approaches we here show that LFA-1 exhibits higher mobility on resting mDCs compared to monocytes. Lymphoid chemokine CCL21 stimulation of the LFA-1 high affinity state on mDCs, led to a significant reduction of mobility and an increase on the fraction of stationary receptors, consistent with re-activation of the receptor. Addition of soluble monomeric ICAM-1 in the presence of CCL21 did not alter the diffusion profile of LFA-1 while soluble ICAM-1 nano-aggregates in the presence of CCL21 further reduced LFA-1 mobility and readily bound to the receptor. Overall, our results emphasize the importance of LFA-1 lateral mobility across the membrane on the regulation of integrin activation and its function as adhesion receptor. Importantly, our data show that chemokines alone are not sufficient to trigger the high affinity state of the integrin based on the strict definition that affinity refers to the adhesion capacity of a single receptor to its ligand in solution. Instead our data indicate that nanoclustering of the receptor, induced by multi-ligand binding, is required to maintain stable cell adhesion once LFA-1 high affinity state is transiently triggered by inside-out signals.

  8. Lost in laterality: interpreting ''preferred side of the head during mobile phone use and risk of brain tumour'' associations.

    PubMed

    Schüz, Joachim

    2009-08-01

    Due to the highly localized exposure from mobile phones, the preferred side of the head during their use is important information when investigating a possible link with brain tumour risk, but at the same time, error and bias hamper the assessment of this information in case-control studies. Current studies provide evidence of reporting bias insofar as cases appear to over-report the side of the head where the tumour occurred as the one that they preferred in the past when using mobile phones. More refined methods of analysis among only cases or prospective studies with an assessment of the laterality of mobile phone use before the diagnosis of disease are needed to evaluate whether associations seen in some studies are entirely due to reporting bias or a mixture of reporting bias and a causal effect.

  9. Music reduces pain and increases functional mobility in fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A.; Wilson, Andrew D.; Vase, Lene; Brattico, Elvira; Barrios, Fernando A.; Jensen, Troels S.; Romero-Romo, Juan I.; Vuust, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The pain in Fibromyalgia (FM) is difficult to treat and functional mobility seems to be an important comorbidity in these patients that could evolve into a disability. In this study we wanted to investigate the analgesic effects of music in FM pain. Twenty-two FM patients were passively exposed to (1) self-chosen, relaxing, pleasant music, and to (2) a control auditory condition (pink noise). They rated pain and performed the “timed-up & go task (TUG)” to measure functional mobility after each auditory condition. Listening to relaxing, pleasant, self-chosen music reduced pain and increased functional mobility significantly in our FM patients. The music-induced analgesia was significantly correlated with the TUG scores; thereby suggesting that the reduction in pain unpleasantness increased functional mobility. Notably, this mobility improvement was obtained with music played prior to the motor task (not during), therefore the effect cannot be explained merely by motor entrainment to a fast rhythm. Cognitive and emotional mechanisms seem to be central to music-induced analgesia. Our findings encourage the use of music as a treatment adjuvant to reduce chronic pain in FM and increase functional mobility thereby reducing the risk of disability. PMID:24575066

  10. Music reduces pain and increases functional mobility in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A; Wilson, Andrew D; Vase, Lene; Brattico, Elvira; Barrios, Fernando A; Jensen, Troels S; Romero-Romo, Juan I; Vuust, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The pain in Fibromyalgia (FM) is difficult to treat and functional mobility seems to be an important comorbidity in these patients that could evolve into a disability. In this study we wanted to investigate the analgesic effects of music in FM pain. Twenty-two FM patients were passively exposed to (1) self-chosen, relaxing, pleasant music, and to (2) a control auditory condition (pink noise). They rated pain and performed the "timed-up & go task (TUG)" to measure functional mobility after each auditory condition. Listening to relaxing, pleasant, self-chosen music reduced pain and increased functional mobility significantly in our FM patients. The music-induced analgesia was significantly correlated with the TUG scores; thereby suggesting that the reduction in pain unpleasantness increased functional mobility. Notably, this mobility improvement was obtained with music played prior to the motor task (not during), therefore the effect cannot be explained merely by motor entrainment to a fast rhythm. Cognitive and emotional mechanisms seem to be central to music-induced analgesia. Our findings encourage the use of music as a treatment adjuvant to reduce chronic pain in FM and increase functional mobility thereby reducing the risk of disability.

  11. Lateralizing language function with pre-operative functional magnetic resonance imaging in early proficient bilingual patients.

    PubMed

    Połczyńska, Monika M; Japardi, Kevin; Bookheimer, Susan Y

    2017-03-23

    Research on bilinguals with brain lesions is complicated by high patient variability, making it difficult to find well-matched controls. We benefitted from a database of over 700 patients and conducted an analysis of pre-operative functional magnetic resonance imaging data to assess language dominance in 25 early, highly proficient Spanish-English bilinguals, and 25 carefully matched monolingual controls. Our results showed that early bilingualism is associated with greater bilateral hemispheric involvement, and monolingualism is associated with stronger left hemisphere lateralization (p=0.009). The bilinguals showed more pronounced right hemisphere activation (p=0.008). Although language dominance values were concordant in the bilingual group, there were a few (12%) atypical cases with different lateralization patterns in L1 and L2. Finally, we found distinct areas of activity in first and second language within the language network, in addition to regions of convergence. These data underscore the need to map all languages proficiently spoken by surgical candidates.

  12. A Lateralization of Function Approach to Sex Differences in Spatial Ability: A Reexamination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rilea, Stacy L.

    2008-01-01

    The current study assessed the lateralization of function hypothesis (Rilea, S. L., Roskos-Ewoldsen, B., & Boles, D. (2004). "Sex differences in spatial ability: A lateralization of function approach." "Brain and Cognition," 56, 332-343) which suggested that it was the interaction of brain organization and the type of spatial task that led to sex…

  13. Moving the Nest: The Impact of Coresidential Children on Mobility in Later Midlife

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bures, Regina M.

    2009-01-01

    Using data from the 1992-2000 waves of the Health and Retirement Study, this article examines the relationship between the presence and age of children in the home and parental mobility in midlife. Although a substantial literature evaluates the factors affecting the timing of children leaving (and returning) home, less attention has been paid to…

  14. Motives for Residential Mobility in Later Life: Post-Move Perspectives of Elders and Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sergeant, Julie F.; Ekerdt, David J.

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study delineates motives for residential mobility, describes dynamics between the elder and family members during the move decision process, and locates the move decision within ecological layers of the aging context. Interviews were conducted with 30 individuals and couples (ages 60-87) who experienced a community-based move…

  15. Single Molecule Lateral Mobility and Membrane Organization in DMPC/Cholesterol Mixtures at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Saame; Stillwell, William; Naumann, Christoph

    2002-03-01

    To better understand the lipid heterogeneity of biological membranes, we have studied the lateral mobility and membrane organization of DMPC and cholesterol (Chol) mixtures at the air-water interface using single molecule fluorescence imaging and epifluorescence microscopy. The single molecule imaging technique was used to track the lateral diffusion of single molecules of TRITC-DPPE or cholesteryl Bodipy. In the absence of Chol, mean square displacement histograms obtained from single molecule tracking of TRITC-DPPE show unobstructed diffusion. Including Chol at low levels of Chol (<10 moldiffusion at intermediate levels ( 30 molof Chol (>40 molmacroscopic phase separations. Data obtained from tracking experiments of cholesteryl-Bodipy also show complementary changes in diffusion. Our results indicate that our techniques provide insight into the micro and macro organization of lipid domains at the air-water interface.

  16. Quantifying functional mobility progress for chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Justin; Karunanithi, Mohan; Wark, Tim; Chan, Wilbur; Colavitti, Christine

    2006-01-01

    A method for quantifying improvements in functional mobility is presented based on patient-worn accelerometer devices. For patients with cardiovascular, respiratory, or other chronic disease, increasing the amount of functional mobility is a large component of rehabilitation programs. We have conducted an observational trial on the use of accelerometers for quantifying mobility improvements in a small group of chronic disease patients (n=15, 48 - 86 yrs). Cognitive impairments precluded complex instrumentation of patients, and movement data was obtained from a single 2-axis accelerometer device worn at the hip. In our trial, movement data collected from accelerometer devices was classified into Lying vs Sitting/Standing vs Walking/Activity movements. This classification enabled the amount of walking to be quantified and graphically presented to clinicians and carers for feedback on exercise efficacy. Presenting long term trends in this data to patients also provides valuable feedback for self managed care and assisting with compliance.

  17. Abnormal lateralization of functional connectivity between language and default mode regions in autism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lateralization of brain structure and function occurs in typical development, and abnormal lateralization is present in various neuropsychiatric disorders. Autism is characterized by a lack of left lateralization in structure and function of regions involved in language, such as Broca and Wernicke areas. Methods Using functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging from a large publicly available sample (n = 964), we tested whether abnormal functional lateralization in autism exists preferentially in language regions or in a more diffuse pattern across networks of lateralized brain regions. Results The autism group exhibited significantly reduced left lateralization in a few connections involving language regions and regions from the default mode network, but results were not significant throughout left- and right-lateralized networks. There is a trend that suggests the lack of left lateralization in a connection involving Wernicke area and the posterior cingulate cortex associates with more severe autism. Conclusions Abnormal language lateralization in autism may be due to abnormal language development rather than to a deficit in hemispheric specialization of the entire brain. PMID:24502324

  18. Bioinspired, Mobile Robots With High Stability, Functionality and Low Cost

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-19

    MOBILE ROBOTS WITH HIGH STABILITY, FUNCTIONALITY AND LOW COST W911NF-11-1-0094 FINAL REPORT 2/15/11 – 9/30/13 THE HARVARD TEAM DARPA /DSO...ATTN: BAA 10-65 Dr. Gill Pratt 3701 North Fairfax Drive Arlington VA 22203-1714 Technical POC: Dr. Gill Pratt, DARPA /DSO Submission

  19. Method for seamless unlock function for mobile applications.

    PubMed

    Vasyltsov, Ihor; Bak, Changgyu; Vasyltsov, Ihor; Changgyu Bak; Bak, Changgyu; Vasyltsov, Ihor

    2016-08-01

    In this paper there is proposed an approach for seamless unlock security function for mobile application. The method combines the biomedical signals measured from human body and motion signals acquired from the devices. For this purpose a wearable device and a mobile device can be securely synchronized. It is shown that entropy extracted from biomedical ECG signal is comparable to the strength of the PIN-code security, the same time giving the easiness, flexibility, and seamlessness of the usage to the user. Also, it is shown that motion sensors can provide enough precision for the correct detection of the appropriate timing to unlock device.

  20. Is SOD1 loss of function involved in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Saccon, Rachele A; Bunton-Stasyshyn, Rosie K A; Fisher, Elizabeth M C; Fratta, Pietro

    2013-08-01

    Mutations in the gene superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are causative for familial forms of the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. When the first SOD1 mutations were identified they were postulated to give rise to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis through a loss of function mechanism, but experimental data soon showed that the disease arises from a--still unknown--toxic gain of function, and the possibility that loss of function plays a role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis pathogenesis was abandoned. Although loss of function is not causative for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, here we re-examine two decades of evidence regarding whether loss of function may play a modifying role in SOD1-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. From analysing published data from patients with SOD1-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, we find a marked loss of SOD1 enzyme activity arising from almost all mutations. We continue to examine functional data from all Sod1 knockout mice and we find obvious detrimental effects within the nervous system with, interestingly, some specificity for the motor system. Here, we bring together historical and recent experimental findings to conclude that there is a possibility that SOD1 loss of function may play a modifying role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This likelihood has implications for some current therapies aimed at knocking down the level of mutant protein in patients with SOD1-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Finally, the wide-ranging phenotypes that result from loss of function indicate that SOD1 gene sequences should be screened in diseases other than amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  1. Study of the influence of the laterality of mobile phone use on the SAR induced in two head models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanmi, Amal; Varsier, Nadège; Hadjem, Abdelhamid; Conil, Emmanuelle; Picon, Odile; Wiart, Joe

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate and to analyse the influence of the laterality of mobile phone use on the exposure of the brain to radio-frequencies (RF) and electromagnetic fields (EMF) from different mobile phone models using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The study focuses on the comparison of the specific absorption rate (SAR) induced on the right and left sides of two numerical adult and child head models. The heads are exposed by both phone models operating in GSM frequency bands for both ipsilateral and contralateral configurations. A slight SAR difference between the two sides of the heads is noted. The results show that the variation between the left and the right sides is more important at 1800 MHz for an ipsilateral use. Indeed, at this frequency, the variation can even reach 20% for the SAR10g and the SAR1g induced in the head and in the brain, respectively. Moreover, the average SAR induced by the mobile phone in the half hemisphere of the brain in ipsilateral exposure is higher than in contralateral exposure. Owing to the superficial character of energy deposition at 1800 MHz, this difference in the SAR induced for the ipsilateral and contralateral usages is more significant at 1800 MHz than at 900 MHz. The results have shown that depending on the phantom head models, the SAR distribution in the brain can vary because of differences in anatomical proportions and in the geometry of the head models. The induced SAR in child head and in sub-regions of the brain is significantly higher (up to 30%) compared to the adult head. This paper confirms also that the shape/design of the mobile and the location of the antenna can have a large influence at high frequency on the exposure of the brain, particularly on the SAR distribution and on the distinguished brain regions.

  2. Investigating language lateralization during phonological and semantic fluency tasks using functional transcranial Doppler sonography

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Sigut, Eva; Payne, Heather; MacSweeney, Mairéad

    2015-01-01

    Although there is consensus that the left hemisphere plays a critical role in language processing, some questions remain. Here we examine the influence of overt versus covert speech production on lateralization, the relationship between lateralization and behavioural measures of language performance and the strength of lateralization across the subcomponents of language. The present study used functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD) to investigate lateralization of phonological and semantic fluency during both overt and covert word generation in right-handed adults. The laterality index (LI) was left lateralized in all conditions, and there was no difference in the strength of LI between overt and covert speech. This supports the validity of using overt speech in fTCD studies, another benefit of which is a reliable measure of speech production. PMID:24875468

  3. Lateral displacement as a function of particle size using a piecewise curved planar interdigitated electrode array.

    PubMed

    Han, Ki-Ho; Han, Song-I; Frazier, A Bruno

    2009-10-21

    We describe the lateral displacement of a particle passing over a planar interdigitated electrode array at an angle as a function of the particle size. The lateral displacement was also measured as a function of the angle between the electrode and the direction of flow. A simplified line charge model was used for numerically estimating the lateral displacement of fluorescent polystyrene (PS) beads with three different diameters. Using the lateral displacement as a function of particle size, we developed a lateral dielectrophoretic (DEP) microseparator, which enables continuous discrimination of particles by size. The microchannel was divided into three regions, each with an electrode array placed at a different angle with respect to the direction of flow. The experiment using an admixture of 3-, 5-, and 10-microm PS beads showed that the lateral DEP microseparator could continuously separate out 99.86% of the 3-microm beads, 98.82% of the 5-microm beads, and 99.69% of the 10-microm beads, simply by using a 200-kHz 12-Vp-p AC voltage to create the lateral DEP force. The lateral DEP microseparator is thus a practical device for simultaneously separating particles according to size from a heterogeneous admixture.

  4. Abnormal Functional Lateralization and Activity of Language Brain Areas in Typical Specific Language Impairment (Developmental Dysphasia)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guibert, Clement; Maumet, Camille; Jannin, Pierre; Ferre, Jean-Christophe; Treguier, Catherine; Barillot, Christian; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Allaire, Catherine; Biraben, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    Atypical functional lateralization and specialization for language have been proposed to account for developmental language disorders, yet results from functional neuroimaging studies are sparse and inconsistent. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study compared children with a specific subtype of specific language impairment affecting…

  5. Fifteen years later: can residential mobility programs provide a long-term escape from neighborhood segregation, crime, and poverty?

    PubMed

    Keels, Micere; Duncan, Greg J; Deluca, Stefanie; Mendenhall, Ruby; Rosenbaum, James

    2005-02-01

    We examined whether the Gautreaux residential mobility program, which moved poor black volunteer families who were living in inner-city Chicago into more-affluent and integrated neighborhoods, produced long-run improvements in the neighborhood environments of the participants. We found that although all the participants moved in the 6 to 22 years since their initial placements, they continued to reside in neighborhoods with income levels that matched those of their placement neighborhoods. Families who were placed in higher-income, mostly white neighborhoods were currently living in the most-affluent neighborhoods. Families who were placed in lower-crime and suburban locations were most likely to reside in low-crime neighborhoods years later.

  6. Improving Vastus Medialis Obliquus Function Reduces Pressure Applied to Lateral Patellofemoral Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Elias, John J.; Kilambi, Srianjana; Goerke, Derek R.; Cosgarea, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    The current study was performed to characterize how improving vastus medialis obliquus (VMO) function influences the pressure applied to patellofemoral cartilage. An additional focus was characterizing how lateral and medial cartilage lesions influence cartilage pressures. Ten knees were flexed to 40°, 60° and 80° in vitro, and forces were applied to represent the VMO and other muscles of the quadriceps group while a thin film sensor measured joint pressures. The knees were loaded with a normal VMO force, with the VMO force decreased by approximately 50%, and with the VMO unloaded. After tests were performed with the cartilage intact, all tests were repeated with a 12 mm diameter lesion created within the lateral cartilage, with the lateral lesion repaired with silicone, and with a medial lesion created. Based on a two-way repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc tests, increasing the force applied by the VMO significantly (p < 0.05) decreased the maximum lateral pressure and significantly increased the maximum medial pressure at each flexion angle. A lateral cartilage lesion significantly increased the maximum lateral pressure, while a medial lesion did not significantly influence the maximum medial pressure. Improving VMO function can reduce the pressure applied to lateral cartilage when lateral lesions are present. PMID:18985700

  7. Influence of expectations plus mobilization with movement in patient with lateral epicondylalgia: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Cervera, Francisco Vicente; Olteanu, Theodor Emanuel; Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; Díaz-Pulido, Belén; Ferrer-Peña, Raúl

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of expectations plus mobilization with movement (MWM) in kinesiophobia, perceived disability and sensorimotor variables in patients with lateral epicondylalgia. A pilot randomized controlled trial in 24 patients with lateral epicondylalgia was conducted. Perceived pain, pain-free grip strength, pressure pain detection threshold, kinesiophobia measured with the short version of Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia, perceived disability of the upper limb measured with disability of the arm, hand and shoulder questionnaire, and perceived disability specifically for the elbow joint measured with patient-rating tennis elbow evaluation, and also satisfaction were assessed. Participants were randomized to receive written instructions in order to create positive expectations regarding the technique in one group (n=12) or neutral expectations in the other one (n=12). All patients were treated for three sessions with the MWM technique. Measures were recorded before and after treatment. The effect size was calculated by Rosenthal “r” for nonparametrical tests. There were no significant statistical differences (P>0.05) between groups after receiving the treatment for none of the physical analyzed variables. The Wilcoxon test showed statistically significant changes in kinesiophobia (Z=−2.278, r=0.47, P=0.023) and perceived disability (Z= −2.934, r=0.61, P=0.003) within positive expectations group. In conclusion this pilot study shows that a positive expectation almost given in a sealed envelope before treatment plus MWM produced changes in kinesiophobia and perceived disability in the immediate term, in patients with lateral epicondylalgia. PMID:28349041

  8. Influence of expectations plus mobilization with movement in patient with lateral epicondylalgia: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cervera, Francisco Vicente; Olteanu, Theodor Emanuel; Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; Díaz-Pulido, Belén; Ferrer-Peña, Raúl

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of expectations plus mobilization with movement (MWM) in kinesiophobia, perceived disability and sensorimotor variables in patients with lateral epicondylalgia. A pilot randomized controlled trial in 24 patients with lateral epicondylalgia was conducted. Perceived pain, pain-free grip strength, pressure pain detection threshold, kinesiophobia measured with the short version of Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia, perceived disability of the upper limb measured with disability of the arm, hand and shoulder questionnaire, and perceived disability specifically for the elbow joint measured with patient-rating tennis elbow evaluation, and also satisfaction were assessed. Participants were randomized to receive written instructions in order to create positive expectations regarding the technique in one group (n=12) or neutral expectations in the other one (n=12). All patients were treated for three sessions with the MWM technique. Measures were recorded before and after treatment. The effect size was calculated by Rosenthal "r" for nonparametrical tests. There were no significant statistical differences (P>0.05) between groups after receiving the treatment for none of the physical analyzed variables. The Wilcoxon test showed statistically significant changes in kinesiophobia (Z=-2.278, r=0.47, P=0.023) and perceived disability (Z= -2.934, r=0.61, P=0.003) within positive expectations group. In conclusion this pilot study shows that a positive expectation almost given in a sealed envelope before treatment plus MWM produced changes in kinesiophobia and perceived disability in the immediate term, in patients with lateral epicondylalgia.

  9. Psychological Symptoms in Youth and Later Socioeconomic Functioning: Do Associations Vary by Informant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dirks, Melanie A.; Boyle, Michael H.; Georgiades, Katholiki

    2011-01-01

    We examined whether associations between symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), depression, and anxiety assessed in a sample of 2,026 youth aged 6 to 16 years and socioeconomic functioning measured 18 years later varied as a function of whether parents or teachers had rated symptomatology.…

  10. Early-phase adaptations to intrahospital training in strength and functional mobility of children with leukemia.

    PubMed

    San Juan, Alejandro F; Fleck, Steven J; Chamorro-Viña, Carolina; Maté-Muñoz, José L; Moral, Susana; García-Castro, Javier; Ramírez, Manuel; Madero, Luis; Lucia, Alejandro

    2007-02-01

    Improvements in chemotherapy and radiotherapy have contributed to the high survival rate (approximately 70%) of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). However, during treatment, lack of physical activity and treatment cause various short- to long-term side effects, such as muscle atrophy and physical deconditioning. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an intrahospital, short-duration (8 weeks) exercise training program on muscle strength and endurance and functional mobility of children with ALL. Seven children (4 boys and 3 girls; 4-7 years of age) who were in the maintenance phase of treatment for ALL were selected as subjects. Three training sessions of 90- to 120-minute duration were performed each week. Each session included 11 different strength exercises engaging the major muscle groups and aerobic training. Gains in strength and endurance were assessed with a 6 repetition maximum test for upper (seated bench press and seated lateral row) and lower extremities (leg press). Gains in functional mobility were assessed with the time up and go test (TUG) and the timed up and down stairs test (TUDS). Performance was significantly improved after the training program in all strength tests (p < 0.01 for seated bench press and p < 0.05 for both seated lateral row and seated leg press) and in the TUG test (p < 0.05). In summary, a period of time as short as 8 weeks is enough to produce clinically relevant early-phase adaptations in children receiving treatment against ALL (i.e., improved functional mobility and muscle strength). Although more research is needed in the area of exercise training and pediatric cancer, exercise sciences can play a beneficial role in assisting both oncologists in treating cancer and improving children's quality of life during and after treatment.

  11. The association between aerobic fitness and cognitive function in older men mediated by frontal lateralization.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Kazuki; Dan, Ippeita; Kyutoku, Yasushi; Suwabe, Kazuya; Byun, Kyeongho; Ochi, Genta; Kato, Morimasa; Soya, Hideaki

    2016-01-15

    Previous studies have shown that higher aerobic fitness is related to higher cognitive function and higher task-related prefrontal activation in older adults. However, a holistic picture of these factors has yet to be presented. As a typical age-related change of brain activation, less lateralized activity in the prefrontal cortex during cognitive tasks has been observed in various neuroimaging studies. Thus, this study aimed to reveal the relationship between aerobic fitness, cognitive function, and frontal lateralization. Sixty male older adults each performed a submaximal incremental exercise test to determine their oxygen intake (V·O2) at ventilatory threshold (VT) in order to index their aerobic fitness. They performed a color-word Stroop task while prefrontal activation was monitored using functional near infrared spectroscopy. As an index of cognitive function, Stroop interference time was analyzed. Partial correlation analyses revealed significant correlations among higher VT, shorter Stroop interference time and greater left-lateralized dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) activation when adjusting for education. Moreover, mediation analyses showed that left-lateralized DLPFC activation significantly mediated the association between VT and Stroop interference time. These results suggest that higher aerobic fitness is associated with cognitive function via lateralized frontal activation in older adults.

  12. 47 CFR 22.575 - Use of mobile channel for remote control of station functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of mobile channel for remote control of... Mobile Operation § 22.575 Use of mobile channel for remote control of station functions. Carriers may... obstruction warning lights on or off, etc.) using a control transmitter operating on a mobile channel,...

  13. Measurement of plantar pressure distribution during gait for diagnosis of functional lateral ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Becker, HP; Rosenbaum, D; Claes, L; Gerngro, H

    1997-04-01

    INTRODUCTION:: Chronic functional instability of the lateral ankle may be difficult to distinguish from mechanical instability when radiological stress tests reveal only small ligamentous defects. For decision making whether to surgically reconstruct the ligaments or not, it can be helpful to use additional information on joint and foot function. Therefore, the aim of a prospective study of patients with longstanding chronic ankle instability was to demonstrate that the dynamic measurement of plantar pressure distribution can identify patients with functional ankle instability. [Table: see text] MATERIALS AND METHODS:: Sixty five patients (mean age 24 (4.6 years)) were included. After clinical examination and radiological stress views, plantar pressure patterns were measured during gait using a capacitive platform, the EMED-SF 2-system. Five trials of each foot were documented and the maximum impulses in eight points of the foot (central heel, lateral and medial heel, midfoot, 1st, 2nd, 5th metatarsal head and hallux) were calculated intraindividually and compared with a group of 100 healthy subjects. The medio-lateral loading factor (MLF) as the quotient of the medial and lateral relative impulses indicated the tendency to walk on the lateral edge of the foot. RESULTS:: Based on clinical criteria alone, two comparable groups of patients were separated, 35 with functional instability and 30 with mechanical instability. After collective analyses of the results, the patients with functional instability showed a significantly increased lateral loading of the unstable foot (p=0 0 1), whereas the mechanically unstable group tended to walk more on the medial side of the unstable foot (Table 1). DISCUSSION:: Dynamic measurement of plantar pressure can identify a group of patients walking on the lateral side of the unstable foot when compared with the stable foot. This finding is explained by a deficit of peroneal strength during stance phase based on a proprioceptive

  14. Schizotypal personality traits and atypical lateralization in motor and language functions.

    PubMed

    Asai, Tomohisa; Sugimori, Eriko; Tanno, Yoshihiko

    2009-10-01

    Atypical cerebral lateralization in motor and language functions in regard to schizotypal personality traits in healthy populations, as well as among schizophrenic patients, has attracted attention because these traits may represent a risk factor for schizophrenia. Although the relationship between handedness and schizotypal personality has been widely examined, few studies have adopted an experimental approach. This study consisted of three experiments focusing on motor and language functional lateralization in regard to schizotypal personality in the absence of mental illness: line-drawing, finger tapping, and a semantic go/no-go task. The results suggested that positive schizotypal personality might be related to functional non-lateralization in regard to at least some functions (e.g., spatial motor control and semantic processing in the present study). Subjects with high schizotypal personality traits performed equally with their right and left-hands in the line-drawing task and they reacted equally with their right and left-hands in a semantic go/no-go task involving semantic auditory stimuli presented in both ears. However, those low in schizotypal personality traits showed typical lateralization in response to these tasks. We discuss the implications of these findings for schizotypal atypical lateralization.

  15. Abnormal functional lateralization and activity of language brain areas in typical specific language impairment (developmental dysphasia).

    PubMed

    de Guibert, Clément; Maumet, Camille; Jannin, Pierre; Ferré, Jean-Christophe; Tréguier, Catherine; Barillot, Christian; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Allaire, Catherine; Biraben, Arnaud

    2011-10-01

    Atypical functional lateralization and specialization for language have been proposed to account for developmental language disorders, yet results from functional neuroimaging studies are sparse and inconsistent. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study compared children with a specific subtype of specific language impairment affecting structural language (n = 21), to a matched group of typically developing children using a panel of four language tasks neither requiring reading nor metalinguistic skills, including two auditory lexico-semantic tasks (category fluency and responsive naming) and two visual phonological tasks based on picture naming. Data processing involved normalizing the data with respect to a matched pairs paediatric template, groups and between-groups analysis, and laterality indices assessment within regions of interest using single and combined task analysis. Children with specific language impairment exhibited a significant lack of left lateralization in all core language regions (inferior frontal gyrus-opercularis, inferior frontal gyrus-triangularis, supramarginal gyrus and superior temporal gyrus), across single or combined task analysis, but no difference of lateralization for the rest of the brain. Between-group comparisons revealed a left hypoactivation of Wernicke's area at the posterior superior temporal/supramarginal junction during the responsive naming task, and a right hyperactivation encompassing the anterior insula with adjacent inferior frontal gyrus and the head of the caudate nucleus during the first phonological task. This study thus provides evidence that this subtype of specific language impairment is associated with atypical lateralization and functioning of core language areas.

  16. Abnormal functional lateralization and activity of language brain areas in typical specific language impairment (developmental dysphasia)

    PubMed Central

    De Guibert, Clément; Maumet, Camille; Jannin, Pierre; Ferré, Jean-Christophe; Tréguier, Catherine; Barillot, Christian; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Allaire, Catherine; Biraben, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    Atypical functional lateralization and specialization for language have been proposed to account for developmental language disorders, yet results from functional neuroimaging studies are sparse and inconsistent. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study compared children with a specific subtype of specific language impairment affecting structural language (n=21), to a matched group of typically-developing children using a panel of four language tasks neither requiring reading nor metalinguistic skills, including two auditory lexico-semantic tasks (category fluency and responsive naming) and two visual phonological tasks based on picture naming. Data processing involved normalizing the data with respect to a matched pairs pediatric template, groups and between-groups analysis, and laterality indexes assessment within regions of interest using single and combined task analysis. Children with specific language impairment exhibited a significant lack of left lateralization in all core language regions (inferior frontal gyrus-opercularis, inferior frontal gyrus-triangularis, supramarginal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus), across single or combined task analysis, but no difference of lateralization for the rest of the brain. Between-group comparisons revealed a left hypoactivation of Wernicke’s area at the posterior superior temporal/supramarginal junction during the responsive naming task, and a right hyperactivation encompassing the anterior insula with adjacent inferior frontal gyrus and the head of the caudate nucleus during the first phonological task. This study thus provides evidence that this specific subtype of specific language impairment is associated with atypical lateralization and functioning of core language areas. PMID:21719430

  17. Lateral mobility of an amphipathic apolipoprotein, ApoC-III, bound to phosphatidylcholine bilayers with and without cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Winchil L. C.; Jacobson, Kenneth; Wu, En-Shinn; Derzko, Zenon

    1979-01-01

    The technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching was used to investigate the lateral mobility of a fluorescein-labeled amphipathic apolipoprotein, ApoC-III, bound to multibilayers prepared from dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine, egg phosphatidylcholine, and a 1:1 (molar ratio) mixture of egg phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol. In dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayers the lateral diffusion coefficient (D) for the protein is about 2 × 10-9 cm2 sec-1 at 20°C and about 9 × 10-8 cm2 sec-1 at 45°C. Plots of D versus temperature in this system show a transition between about 30 and 35°C. Arrhenius activation energies for the diffusion in this case between 15 and 30°C and between 35 and 45°C are 28.5 and 7.0 kcal mol-1, respectively (1 calorie = 4.18 joules). In egg phosphatidylcholine bilayers, D is about 3 × 10-8 cm2 sec-1 at 20°C and the Arrhenius activation energy for diffusion is 8.1 kcal mol-1 between 15 and 35°C in this system. In bilayers prepared from an equimolar mixture of egg phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol D at 20°C is about 1.4 × 10-9 cm2 sec-1 and the Arrhenius activation energy for the diffusion of the protein in this system between 15 and 35°C is 15.1 kcal mol-1. Light-scattering and fluorescence-polarization results indicate that binding of this protein does not affect the gel-to-liquid crystalline phase transition of bilayer membranes but does mediate a major, reversible aggregation of the vesicles at about 33°C. These results lend support to the view that ApoC-III resides in the head-group region of the bilayer and suggest that its lateral diffusion coefficient represents an upper bound for integral membrane proteins. PMID:293667

  18. p53 genes function to restrain mobile elements

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Annika; Jones, Amanda E.; D'Brot, Alejandro; Lu, Wan-Jin; Kurtz, Paula; Moran, John V.; Rakheja, Dinesh; Chen, Kenneth S.; Hammer, Robert E.; Comerford, Sarah A.; Amatruda, James F.; Abrams, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the animal kingdom, p53 genes govern stress response networks by specifying adaptive transcriptional responses. The human member of this gene family is mutated in most cancers, but precisely how p53 functions to mediate tumor suppression is not well understood. Using Drosophila and zebrafish models, we show that p53 restricts retrotransposon activity and genetically interacts with components of the piRNA (piwi-interacting RNA) pathway. Furthermore, transposon eruptions occurring in the p53− germline were incited by meiotic recombination, and transcripts produced from these mobile elements accumulated in the germ plasm. In gene complementation studies, normal human p53 alleles suppressed transposons, but mutant p53 alleles from cancer patients could not. Consistent with these observations, we also found patterns of unrestrained retrotransposons in p53-driven mouse and human cancers. Furthermore, p53 status correlated with repressive chromatin marks in the 5′ sequence of a synthetic LINE-1 element. Together, these observations indicate that ancestral functions of p53 operate through conserved mechanisms to contain retrotransposons. Since human p53 mutants are disabled for this activity, our findings raise the possibility that p53 mitigates oncogenic disease in part by restricting transposon mobility. PMID:26701264

  19. Hemispheric lateralization of resting-state functional connectivity of the ventral striatum: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Hu, Sien; Chao, Herta H; Li, Chiang-Shan R

    2017-01-21

    Resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) is widely used to examine cerebral functional organization. The ventral striatum (VS) is critical to motivated behavior, with extant studies suggesting functional hemispheric asymmetry. The current work investigated differences in rsFC between the left (L) and right (R) VS and explored gender differences in the extent of functional lateralization. In 106 adults, we computed a laterality index (fcLI) to query whether a target region shows greater or less connectivity to the L vs R VS. A total of 45 target regions with hemispheric masks were examined from the Automated Anatomic Labeling atlas. One-sample t test was performed to explore significant laterality in the whole sample and in men and women separately. Two-sample t test was performed to examine gender differences in fcLI. At a corrected threshold (p < 0.05/45 = 0.0011), the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) and posterior cingulate cortex (pCC) showed L lateralization and the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) and supramarginal gyrus (SMG) showed R lateralization in VS connectivity. Except for the pCC, these findings were replicated in a different data set (n = 97) from the Human Connectome Project. Furthermore, the fcLI of VS-pCC was negatively correlated with a novelty seeking trait in women but not in men. Together, the findings may suggest a more important role of the L VS in linking saliency response to self control and other internally directed processes. Right lateralization of VS connectivity to the SMG and IPS may support attention and action directed to external behavioral contingencies.

  20. Sex differences in handedness, asymmetry of the planum temporale and functional language lateralization.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Iris E; Aleman, André; Somers, Metten; Boks, Marco P; Kahn, René S

    2008-04-24

    Many studies have investigated sex differences in language lateralization. Despite the large number of investigations, controversy about the presence of sex differences in lateralization remains. This study aims to provide a complete overview of sex differences in several reflections of language lateralization: handedness, asymmetry of the Planum Temporale (PT) and functional lateralization of language, measured by asymmetric performance on dichotic listening tests (Right Ear Advantage) and asymmetry of language activation as measured with functional imaging techniques. Meta-analysis of studies that assessed handedness in males and females yielded more left-handedness in males (mean weighted odds ratio: 1.25, p<0.001). Meta-analysis of studies on PT asymmetry yielded no sex difference (Hedges g=-0.11, p=0.68). Results of the meta-analysis on dichotic listening studies also retrieved no sex difference in lateralization (Hedges g=0.09, p=0.18). When the studies were subdivided according to the paradigm they applied, studies that used the consonant-vowel task yielded a sex difference favouring males, while studies that applied other paradigms yielded no sex difference. The subdivision into applied paradigm largely overlapped with the subdivision into studies that did or did not focus on sex differences as their main topic. The observed sex effect may therefore be caused by publication bias. Meta-analysis of functional imaging studies yielded no sex difference (Hedges g=0.01, p=0.73) in language lateralization. Sub-analyses of studies that applied different paradigms all yielded no sex difference. In conclusion, males are more frequently non-right handed than females, but there is no sex difference in asymmetries of the Planum Temporale, dichotic listening or functional imaging findings during language tasks.

  1. Perception and Lateralization of Spoken Emotion by Youths with High-Functioning Forms of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Kimberly F.; Montgomery, Allen A.; Abramson, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    The perception and the cerebral lateralization of spoken emotions were investigated in children and adolescents with high-functioning forms of autism (HFFA), and age-matched typically developing controls (TDC). A dichotic listening task using nonsense passages was used to investigate the recognition of four emotions: happiness, sadness, anger, and…

  2. Schizotypal Personality Traits and Atypical Lateralization in Motor and Language Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asai, Tomohisa; Sugimori, Eriko; Tanno, Yoshihiko

    2009-01-01

    Atypical cerebral lateralization in motor and language functions in regard to schizotypal personality traits in healthy populations, as well as among schizophrenic patients, has attracted attention because these traits may represent a risk factor for schizophrenia. Although the relationship between handedness and schizotypal personality has been…

  3. Reconstruction of the form and function of lateral malleolus and ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Kiyokawa, Kensuke; Tanaka, Shinsuke; Kiduka, Yuichiro; Inoue, Yojiro; Yamauchi, Toshihiko; Tai, Yoshiaki

    2005-08-01

    Soft-tissue reconstruction alone cannot obtain normal ankle function in patients with large defects in the area of the lateral malleolus. The authors report a functional reconstructive method for the lateral malleolus, utilized in a male patient whose osteosarcoma in the fibula was resected with surrounding soft tissue. In order to reconstruct the lateral malleolus, the remaining half of the fibula at the knee was removed, and the fibular head was fixed with the tibia at the ankle joint. Ligaments were reconstructed with tendon grafts. Skin and soft-tissue defects were reconstructed with a combined composite flap comprised of a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap and a serratus anterior muscle flap. Dead space around the bone graft was filled with the serratus anterior muscle flap that was divided into two portions. The surface was covered with the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap. The patient regained almost normal function of the ankle joint. This technique would be a useful functional reconstructive method for patients with large defects in the area of the lateral malleolus.

  4. An Investigation of Cerebral Lateral Functioning and the EEG. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalf, David R.

    Forty-two volunteer subjects, mostly young adults, participated in developing a methodology for studying cognitive processes and cerebral lateral functions in relation to individual cognitive styles and age. Four test batteries were developed and refined in this study: the adult cognitive, the adult electroencephalogram (EEG), the children's…

  5. [Isolated functional loss of the lateral semicircular canal in vestibular neuritis].

    PubMed

    Blödow, A; Helbig, R; Bloching, M; Walther, L E

    2013-01-01

    Today, modern tools in vestibular testing are feasible to provide information about functional status of all five peripheral vestibular receptors. Isolated or combined loss of crista and macula receptor function can be determined in the diagnostic process. We describe a seldom case of isolated functional loss of lateral semicircular canal receptor function in a 55-year-old patient. Whereas there was no ispilateral caloric response and video head impulse test revealed a catch-up saccade, air-conducted (AC) cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP, oVEMP), subjective visual vertical and MRI were normal.

  6. Domain mobility in proteins: functional and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Basu, Malay Kumar; Poliakov, Eugenia; Rogozin, Igor B

    2009-05-01

    A substantial fraction of eukaryotic proteins contains multiple domains, some of which show a tendency to occur in diverse domain architectures and can be considered mobile (or 'promiscuous'). These promiscuous domains are typically involved in protein-protein interactions and play crucial roles in interaction networks, particularly those contributing to signal transduction. They also play a major role in creating diversity of protein domain architecture in the proteome. It is now apparent that promiscuity is a volatile and relatively fast-changing feature in evolution, and that only a few domains retain their promiscuity status throughout evolution. Many such domains attained their promiscuity status independently in different lineages. Only recently, we have begun to understand the diversity of protein domain architectures and the role the promiscuous domains play in evolution of this diversity. However, many of the biological mechanisms of protein domain mobility remain shrouded in mystery. In this review, we discuss our present understanding of protein domain promiscuity, its evolution and its role in cellular function.

  7. Early fathering as a predictor of later psychosocial functioning among preschool children with behavior problems.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Sharonne D; Harvey, Elizabeth A; Lugo-Candelas, Claudia I; Breaux, Rosanna P

    2013-07-01

    The present study examined the role of early fathering in subsequent trajectories of social emotional and academic functioning of preschool children with behavior problems. Participants were 128 preschool-aged children (73 boys, 55 girls) with behavior problems whose biological fathers took part in a longitudinal study. Children were 3 years of age at the beginning of the study and were assessed annually for 3 years. Early paternal depressive symptoms predicted many aspects of children's outcome 3 years later, including externalizing and internalizing problems, social skills deficits, and lower cognitive and academic functioning, and predicted changes in children's externalizing, internalizing, and social problems across the preschool years. Paternal socioeconomic status (SES) also consistently predicted children's later functioning across these domains. Furthermore, self-reported paternal attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and laxness, as well as observed frequent commands were associated with later externalizing problems in children. Paternal depressive symptoms and laxness mediated the relation between paternal ADHD symptoms and child functioning. Results suggest that aspects of early father functioning play an important role in the psychosocial, cognitive, and academic development of preschool-aged children with behavior problems.

  8. Cerebellar on-beam and lateral inhibition: two functionally distinct circuits.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D; Yarom, Y

    2000-04-01

    Optical imaging of voltage-sensitive dyes in an isolated cerebellum preparation was used to study the spatiotemporal functional organization of the inhibitory systems in the cerebellar cortex. Responses to surface stimulation of the cortex reveal two physiologically distinct inhibitory systems, which we refer to as lateral and on-beam inhibition following classical terminology. Lateral inhibition occurs throughout the area responding to a stimulus, whereas on-beam inhibition is confined to the area directly excited by parallel fibers. The time course of the lateral inhibition is twice as long as that of the on-beam inhibition. Both inhibitory responses increase with stimulus intensity, but the lateral inhibition has a lower threshold, and it saturates at lower stimulus intensity. The amplitude of the on-beam inhibition is linearly related to the excitation at the same location, whereas that of the lateral inhibition is linearly related to the excitation at the center of the beam. Repetitive stimulation is required to activate on-beam inhibition, whereas the same stimulus paradigm reveals prolonged depression of the lateral inhibition. We conclude that lateral inhibition reflects the activation of molecular layer interneurons, and its major role is to increase the excitability of the activated area by disinhibition. The on-beam inhibition most likely reflects Golgi cell inhibition of granule cells. However, Purkinje cell collateral inhibition of Golgi cells cannot be excluded. Both possibilities suggest that the role of the on-beam inhibition is to efficiently modulate, in time and space, the mossy fiber input to the cerebellar cortex.

  9. Hand preference, extent of laterality, and functional hand use in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Umansky, Richard; Watson, John S; Colvin, Lyn; Fyfe, Susan; Leonard, Seonaid; de Klerk, Nicholas; Leonard, Helen

    2003-07-01

    Residual hand use in functional tasks, extent of laterality, and right or left preference were studied in 145 2- to 24-year-old, postregression Australian subjects with Rett syndrome via parent questionnaire. Hand use was markedly restricted, more for complex than simple and for external (touching food and objects) than internal tasks (scratching, rubbing eyes), suggesting a deficit in cerebral control of external, goal-oriented hand use, which is perhaps genetically determined because there is significantly greater restriction of external tasks in subjects with demonstrated MECP2 mutations. Overall, 33.6% of patients were reported with a left-hand preference, 40.7% with a right-hand preference, and 25.7% with an equal hand preference. Extent of laterality was greater for external than internal and for complex than simple external tasks. Older subjects showed less functional hand use and possibly more overall laterality. However, their hand preference was similar to younger subjects. The anomalous pattern of hand preference in Rett syndrome may be linked to the primary apraxic deficit in this disorder rather than to late manifestation of laterality.

  10. Trait Approach and Avoidance Motivation: Lateralized Neural Activity Associated with Executive Function

    PubMed Central

    Spielberg, Jeffrey M.; Miller, Gregory A.; Engels, Anna S.; Herrington, John D.; Sutton, Bradley P.; Banich, Marie T.; Heller, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Motivation and executive function are both necessary for the completion of goal-directed behavior. Research investigating the manner in which these processes interact is beginning to emerge and has implicated middle frontal gyrus (MFG) as a site of interaction for relevant neural mechanisms. However, this research has focused on state motivation, and it has not examined functional lateralization. The present study examined the impact of trait levels of approach and avoidance motivation on neural processes associated with executive function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted while participants performed a color-word Stroop task. Analyses identified brain regions in which trait approach and avoidance motivation (measured by questionnaires) moderated activation associated with executive control. Approach was hypothesized to be associated with left-lateralized MFG activation, whereas avoidance was hypothesized to be associated with right-lateralized MFG activation. Results supported both hypotheses. Present findings implicate areas of middle frontal gyrus in top-down control to guide behavior in accordance with motivational goals. PMID:20728552

  11. Left hemispheric dominance of vestibular processing indicates lateralization of cortical functions in rats.

    PubMed

    Best, Christoph; Lange, Elena; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Reuss, Stefan; Dieterich, Marianne

    2014-11-01

    Lateralization of cortical functions such as speech dominance, handedness and processing of vestibular information are present not only in humans but also in ontogenetic older species, e.g. rats. In human functional imaging studies, the processing of vestibular information was found to be correlated with the hemispherical dominance as determined by the handedness. It is located mainly within the right hemisphere in right handers and within the left hemisphere in left handers. Since dominance of vestibular processing is unknown in animals, our aim was to study the lateralization of cortical processing in a functional imaging study applying small-animal positron emission tomography (microPET) and galvanic vestibular stimulation in an in vivo rat model. The cortical and subcortical network processing vestibular information could be demonstrated and correlated with data from other animal studies. By calculating a lateralization index as well as flipped region of interest analyses, we found that the vestibular processing in rats follows a strong left hemispheric dominance independent from the "handedness" of the animals. These findings support the idea of an early hemispheric specialization of vestibular cortical functions in ontogenetic older species.

  12. Trait approach and avoidance motivation: lateralized neural activity associated with executive function.

    PubMed

    Spielberg, Jeffrey M; Miller, Gregory A; Engels, Anna S; Herrington, John D; Sutton, Bradley P; Banich, Marie T; Heller, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    Motivation and executive function are both necessary for the completion of goal-directed behavior. Research investigating the manner in which these processes interact is beginning to emerge and has implicated middle frontal gyrus (MFG) as a site of interaction for relevant neural mechanisms. However, this research has focused on state motivation, and it has not examined functional lateralization. The present study examined the impact of trait levels of approach and avoidance motivation on neural processes associated with executive function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted while participants performed a color-word Stroop task. Analyses identified brain regions in which trait approach and avoidance motivation (measured by questionnaires) moderated activation associated with executive control. Approach was hypothesized to be associated with left-lateralized MFG activation, whereas avoidance was hypothesized to be associated with right-lateralized MFG activation. Results supported both hypotheses. Present findings implicate areas of middle frontal gyrus in top-down control to guide behavior in accordance with motivational goals.

  13. Resting-State Functional MR Imaging for Determining Language Laterality in Intractable Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    DeSalvo, Matthew N; Tanaka, Naoaki; Douw, Linda; Leveroni, Catherine L; Buchbinder, Bradley R; Greve, Douglas N; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2016-10-01

    Purpose To measure the accuracy of resting-state functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in determining hemispheric language dominance in patients with medically intractable focal epilepsies against the results of an intracarotid amobarbital procedure (IAP). Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board, and all subjects gave signed informed consent. Data in 23 patients with medically intractable focal epilepsy were retrospectively analyzed. All 23 patients were candidates for epilepsy surgery and underwent both IAP and resting-state functional MR imaging as part of presurgical evaluation. Language dominance was determined from functional MR imaging data by calculating a laterality index (LI) after using independent component analysis. The accuracy of this method was assessed against that of IAP by using a variety of thresholds. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated by using leave-one-out cross validation. Spatial maps of language components were qualitatively compared among each hemispheric language dominance group. Results Measurement of hemispheric language dominance with resting-state functional MR imaging was highly concordant with IAP results, with up to 96% (22 of 23) accuracy, 96% (22 of 23) sensitivity, and 96% (22 of 23) specificity. Composite language component maps in patients with typical language laterality consistently included classic language areas such as the inferior frontal gyrus, the posterior superior temporal gyrus, and the inferior parietal lobule, while those of patients with atypical language laterality also included non-classical language areas such as the superior and middle frontal gyri, the insula, and the occipital cortex. Conclusion Resting-state functional MR imaging can be used to measure language laterality in patients with medically intractable focal epilepsy. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  14. Measurements of water uptake of maize roots: the key function of lateral roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. A.; Zarebanadkouki, M.; Kroener, E.; Kaestner, A.; Carminati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is one of the most important crop worldwide. Despite its importance, there is limited information on the function of different root segments and root types of maize in extracting water from soils. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate locations of root water uptake in maize. We used neutron radiography to: 1) image the spatial distribution of maize roots in soil and 2) trace the transport of injected deuterated water (D2O) in soil and roots. Maizes were grown in aluminum containers (40×38×1 cm) filled with a sandy soil. When the plants were 16 days old, we injected D2O into selected soil regions containing primary, seminal and lateral roots. The experiments were performed during the day (transpiring plants) and night (not transpiring plants). The transport of D2O into roots was simulated using a new convection-diffusion numerical model of D2O transport into roots. By fitting the observed D2O transport we quantified the diffusional permeability and the water uptake of the different root segments. The maize root architecture consisted of a primary root, 4-5 seminal roots and many lateral roots connected to the primary and seminal roots. Laterals emerged from the proximal 15 cm of the primary and seminal roots. Water uptake occurred primarily in lateral roots. Lateral roots had the highest diffusional permeability (9.4×10-7), which was around six times higher that the diffusional permeability of the old seminal segments (1.4×10-7), and two times higher than the diffusional permeability of the young seminal segments (4.7×10-7). The radial flow of D2O into the lateral (6.7×10-5 ) was much higher than in the young seminal roots (1.1×10-12). The radial flow of D2O into the old seminal was negligible. We concluded that the function of the primary and seminal roots was to collect water from the lateral roots and transport it to the shoot. A maize root system with lateral roots branching from deep primary and seminal roots would be

  15. Factors affecting longitudinal functional decline and survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hazuki; Atsuta, Naoki; Nakamura, Ryoichi; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Ito, Mizuki; Senda, Jo; Katsuno, Masahisa; Izumi, Yuishin; Morita, Mitsuya; Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Taniguchi, Akira; Aiba, Ikuko; Abe, Koji; Mizoguchi, Kouichi; Oda, Masaya; Kano, Osamu; Okamoto, Koichi; Kuwabara, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Imai, Takashi; Aoki, Masashi; Tsuji, Shoji; Nakano, Imaharu; Kaji, Ryuji; Sobue, Gen

    2015-06-01

    Our objective was to elucidate the clinical factors affecting functional decline and survival in Japanese amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. We constructed a multicenter prospective ALS cohort that included 451 sporadic ALS patients in the analysis. We longitudinally utilized the revised Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R) as the functional scale, and determined the timing of introduction of a tracheostomy for positive-pressure ventilation and death. A joint modelling approach was employed to identify prognostic factors for functional decline and survival. Age at onset was a common prognostic factor for both functional decline and survival (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, respectively). Female gender (p = 0.019) and initial symptoms, including upper limb weakness (p = 0.010), lower limb weakness (p = 0.008) or bulbar symptoms (p = 0.005), were related to early functional decline, whereas neck weakness as an initial symptom (p = 0.018), non-use of riluzole (p = 0.030) and proximal dominant muscle weakness in the upper extremities (p = 0.01) were related to a shorter survival time. A decline in the ALSFRS-R score was correlated with a shortened survival time (p < 0.001). In conclusion, the factors affecting functional decline and survival in ALS were common in part but different to some extent. This difference has not been previously well recognized but is informative in clinical practice and for conducting trials.

  16. Functional mechanotransduction is required for cisplatin-induced hair cell death in the zebrafish lateral line.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andrew J; Hailey, Dale W; Stawicki, Tamara M; Wu, Patricia; Coffin, Allison B; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W; Simon, Julian A; Ou, Henry C

    2013-03-06

    Cisplatin, one of the most commonly used anticancer drugs, is known to cause inner ear hair cell damage and hearing loss. Despite much investigation into mechanisms of cisplatin-induced hair cell death, little is known about the mechanism whereby cisplatin is selectively toxic to hair cells. Using hair cells of the zebrafish lateral line, we found that chemical inhibition of mechanotransduction with quinine and EGTA protected against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Furthermore, we found that the zebrafish mutants mariner (myo7aa) and sputnik (cad23) that lack functional mechanotransduction were resistant to cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Using a fluorescent analog of cisplatin, we found that chemical or genetic inhibition of mechanotransduction prevented its uptake. These findings demonstrate that cisplatin-induced hair cell death is dependent on functional mechanotransduction in the zebrafish lateral line.

  17. Functional organization and visual representations of human ventral lateral prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Annie W.-Y.

    2013-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies in both human and non-human primates have identified face selective activation in the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) even in the absence of working memory (WM) demands. Further, research has suggested that this face-selective response is largely driven by the presence of the eyes. However, the nature and origin of visual category responses in the VLPFC remain unclear. In a broader sense, how do these findings relate to our current understandings of lateral prefrontal cortex? What do these findings tell us about the underlying function and organization principles of the VLPFC? What is the future direction for investigating visual representations in this cortex? This review focuses on the function, topography, and circuitry of the VLPFC to enhance our understanding of the evolution and development of this cortex. PMID:23847558

  18. Lateral interactions and speed of information processing in highly functioning multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Helga; Bencsik, Krisztina; Rajda, Cecília; Benedek, Krisztina; Janáky, Márta; Beniczky, Sándor; Kéri, Szabolcs; Vécsei, László

    2007-06-01

    Visual impairment is a common feature of multiple sclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate lateral interactions in the visual cortex of highly functioning patients with multiple sclerosis and to compare that with basic visual and neuropsychologic functions. Twenty-two young, visually unimpaired multiple sclerosis patients with minimal symptoms (Expanded Disability Status Scale <2) and 30 healthy controls subjects participated in the study. Lateral interactions were investigated with the flanker task, during which participants were asked to detect the orientation of a low-contrast Gabor patch (vertical or horizontal), flanked with 2 collinear or orthogonal Gabor patches. Stimulus exposure time was 40, 60, 80, and 100 ms. Digit span forward/backward, digit symbol, verbal fluency, and California Verbal Learning Test procedures were used for background neuropsychologic assessment. Results revealed that patients with multiple sclerosis showed intact visual contrast sensitivity and neuropsychologic functions, whereas orientation detection in the orthogonal condition was significantly impaired. At 40-ms exposure time, collinear flankers facilitated the orientation detection performance of the patients resulting in normal performance. In conclusion, the detection of briefly presented, low-contrast visual stimuli was selectively impaired in multiple sclerosis. Lateral interactions between target and flankers robustly facilitated target detection in the patient group.

  19. Brain activation to negative stimuli mediates a relationship between adolescent marijuana use and later emotional functioning

    PubMed Central

    Heitzeg, Mary M.; Cope, Lora M.; Martz, Meghan E.; Hardee, Jillian E.; Zucker, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    This work investigated the impact of heavy marijuana use during adolescence on emotional functioning, as well as the brain functional mediators of this effect. Participants (n=40) were recruited from the Michigan Longitudinal Study (MLS). Data on marijuana use were collected prospectively beginning in childhood as part of the MLS. Participants were classified as heavy marijuana users (n=20) or controls with minimal marijuana use. Two facets of emotional functioning—negative emotionality and resiliency (a self-regulatory mechanism)—were assessed as part of the MLS at three time points: mean age 13.4; mean age 19.6; and mean age 23.1. Functional neuroimaging data during an emotion-arousal word task were collected at mean age 20.2.Negative emotionality decreased and resiliency increased across the three time points in controls but not heavy marijuana users. Compared with controls, heavy marijuana users had less activation to negative words in temporal, prefrontal, and occipital cortices, insula, and amygdala. Activation of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to negative words mediated an association between marijuana group and later negative emotionality. Activation of the cuneus/lingual gyrus mediated an association between marijuana group and later resiliency. Results support growing evidence that heavy marijuana use during adolescence affects later emotional outcomes. PMID:26403581

  20. Lateral Chain Length in Polyalkyl Acrylates Determines the Mobility of Fibronectin at the Cell/Material Interface

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cells, by interacting with surfaces indirectly through a layer of extracellular matrix proteins, can respond to a variety of physical properties, such as topography or stiffness. Polymer surface mobility is another physical property that is less well understood but has been indicated to hold the potential to modulate cell behavior. Polymer mobility is related to the glass-transition temperature (Tg) of the system, the point at which a polymer transitions from an amorphous solid to a more liquid-like state. This work shows that changes in polymer mobility translate to interfacial mobility of extracellular matrix proteins adsorbed on the material surface. This study has utilized a family of polyalkyl acrylates with similar chemistry but different degrees of mobility, obtained through increasing length of the side chain. These materials are used, in conjunction with fluorescent fibronectin, to determine the mobility of this interfacial layer of protein that constitutes the initial cell–material interface. Furthermore, the extent of fibronectin domain availability (III9, III10, - the integrin binding site), cell-mediated reorganization, and cell differentiation was also determined. A nonmonotonic dependence of fibronectin mobility on polymer surface mobility was observed, with a similar trend noted in cell-mediated reorganization of the protein layer by L929 fibroblasts. The availability of the integrin-binding site was higher on the more mobile surfaces, where a similar organization of the protein into networks at the material interface was observed. Finally, differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts was seen to be highly sensitive to surface mobility upon inhibition of cell contractility. Altogether, these findings show that polymer mobility is a subtle influence that translates to the cell/material interface through the protein layer to alter the biological activity of the surface. PMID:26715432

  1. Variations in subject pool as a function of earlier or later participation.

    PubMed

    Bernard, L

    2000-04-01

    Data were obtained from 113 participants in a university subject pool during a 16-wk. semester. Without knowing the purpose of the study, participants self-selected to participate earlier (Weeks 3 and 4: n = 63) or later (Weeks 15 or 16) n = 50). Variations in scores on the NEO Personality Inventory--Revised, the Crowne-Marlowe Social Desirability Scale, the General Expectancy of Success Scale, the Shipley Institute of Living Scale, self-reported SATs and GPAs, and a measure of academic self-efficacy as a function of earlier or later participation were examined. Multivariate analysis of variance indicated that early participants differed significantly from later participants but not in predicted ways. Earlier participants scored higher on NEO PI-R Neuroticism; specifically men (n = 15) and women (n = 48) scored higher on Hostility, and women scored higher on Depression and Self-consciousness. An additional significant difference occurred for self-reported SAT Verbal scores for men, which were significantly higher for later participants. These temporal variations may represent confounds in research using university subject pools.

  2. Functional consequences of structural differences in stingray sensory systems. Part I: mechanosensory lateral line canals.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Laura K; Kajiura, Stephen M; Gordon, Malcolm S

    2009-10-01

    Short range hydrodynamic and electrosensory signals are important during final stages of prey capture in elasmobranchs (sharks, skates and rays), and may be particularly useful for dorso-ventrally flattened batoids with mouths hidden from their eyes. In stingrays, both the lateral line canal and electrosensory systems are highly modified and complex with significant differences on ventral surfaces that relate to feeding ecology. This study tests functional hypotheses based on quantified differences in sensory system morphology of three stingray species, Urobatis halleri, Myliobatis californica and Pteroplatytrygon violacea. Part I investigates the mechanosensory lateral line canal system whereas part II focuses on the electrosensory system. Stingray lateral line canals include both pored and non-pored sections and differ in branching complexity and distribution. A greater proportion of pored canals and high pore numbers were predicted to correspond to increased response to water flow. Behavioral experiments were performed to compare responses of stingrays to weak water jets mimicking signals produced by potential prey at velocities of 10-20 cm s(-1). Bat rays, M. californica, have the most complex and broadly distributed pored canal network and demonstrated both the highest response rate and greater response intensity to water jet signals. Results suggest that U. halleri and P. violacea may rely on additional sensory input, including tactile and visual cues, respectively, to initiate stronger feeding responses. These results suggest that stingray lateral line canal morphology can indicate detection capabilities through responsiveness to weak water jets.

  3. Integral functions of electron lateral distribution and their fluctuations in electron-photon cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanenko, I. P.; Kanevsky, B. L.; Kirillov, A. A.; Linde, I. A.; Lyutov, Y. G.

    1985-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulated lateral distribution functions for electrons of EPC developing in lead, at superhigh energies (.1-1 PeV) for depths t or = 60 c.u. delta t=1t. c.u. are presented. The higher moment characteristics, i.e., variation, asymmetry, excess, are presented along with analytical solutions for the same characteristics at fixed observation level calculated to theory approximations A and B by using numerical inversion of the Laplace transformation. The conclusion is made of a complex, usually non-Gaussian shape of the function of the particle number distribution within a circle of given radius at fixed depth.

  4. The absence of chlorophyll b affects lateral mobility of photosynthetic complexes and lipids in grana membranes of Arabidopsis and barley chlorina mutants.

    PubMed

    Tyutereva, Elena V; Evkaikina, Anastasiia I; Ivanova, Alexandra N; Voitsekhovskaja, Olga V

    2017-04-05

    The lateral mobility of integral components of thylakoid membranes, such as plastoquinone, xanthophylls, and pigment-protein complexes, is critical for the maintenance of efficient light harvesting, high rates of linear electron transport, and successful repair of damaged photosystem II (PSII). The packaging of the photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes in the membrane depends on their size and stereometric parameters which in turn depend on the composition of the complexes. Chlorophyll b (Chlb) is an important regulator of antenna size and composition. In this study, the lateral mobility (the mobile fraction size) of pigment-protein complexes and lipids in grana membranes was analyzed in chlorina mutants of Arabidopsis and barley lacking Chlb. In the Arabidopsis ch1-3 mutant, diffusion of membrane lipids decreased as compared to wild-type plants, but the diffusion of photosynthetic complexes was not affected. In the barley chlorina f2 3613 mutant, the diffusion of pigment-protein complexes significantly decreased, while the diffusion of lipids increased, as compared to wild-type plants. We propose that the size of the mobile fractions of pigment-protein complexes in grana membranes in vivo is higher than reported previously. The data are discussed in the context of the protein composition of antennae, characteristics of the plastoquinone pool, and production of reactive oxygen species in leaves of chlorina mutants.

  5. Intrinsic functional architecture of the macaque dorsal and ventral lateral frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Goulas, Alexandros; Stiers, Peter; Hutchison, R Matthew; Everling, Stefan; Petrides, Michael; Margulies, Daniel S

    2017-03-01

    Investigations of the cellular and connectional organization of the lateral frontal cortex (LFC) of the macaque monkey provide indispensable knowledge for generating hypotheses about the human LFC. However, despite numerous investigations, there are still debates on the organization of this brain region. In vivo neuroimaging techniques such as resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be used to define the functional circuitry of brain areas, producing results largely consistent with gold-standard invasive tract-tracing techniques and offering the opportunity for cross-species comparisons within the same modality. Our results using resting-state fMRI from macaque monkeys to uncover the intrinsic functional architecture of the LFC corroborate previous findings and inform current debates. Specifically, within the dorsal LFC, we show that 1) the region along the midline and anterior to the superior arcuate sulcus is divided in two areas separated by the posterior supraprincipal dimple, 2) the cytoarchitectonically defined area 6DC/F2 contains two connectional divisions, and 3) a distinct area occupies the cortex around the spur of the arcuate sulcus, updating what was previously proposed to be the border between dorsal and ventral motor/premotor areas. Within the ventral LFC, the derived parcellation clearly suggests the presence of distinct areas: 1) an area with a somatomotor/orofacial connectional signature (putative area 44), 2) an area with an oculomotor connectional signature (putative frontal eye fields), and 3) premotor areas possibly hosting laryngeal and arm representations. Our results illustrate in detail the intrinsic functional architecture of the macaque LFC, thus providing valuable evidence for debates on its organization.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Resting-state functional MRI is used as a complementary method to invasive techniques to inform current debates on the organization of the macaque lateral frontal cortex. Given that the macaque

  6. Tools and talk: an evolutionary perspective on the functional deficits associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Andrew; Turner, Martin R; Lemon, Roger

    2014-04-01

    We propose that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and frontotemporal dementia may be viewed as a failure of interlinked functional complexes having their origins in key evolutionary adaptations. We discuss how hand-arm function, locomotion, brainstem function (involving vocalization/speech, swallowing and breathing), and cognitive impairment share complex, interdependent evolutionary adaptations that can be traced back several million years. Fine movements of the hand facilitated tool-making and use enhanced by development of bipedalism. Development of the larynx and integration of respiratory control were central to vocalization, which when combined with gesture are intermediary to human language. These adaptations were accompanied by progressive encephalization, with development of Theory of Mind to facilitate socialization. The varied clinical phenotypes of ALS can thus be understood in the context of inter-related functional complexes that subserve "Tools and Talk"; they have a long evolutionary history and are related to specific developmental neural and gene networks.

  7. Optimizing mobility in later life: the role of the urban built environment for older adults aging in place.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Philippa; Gallagher, Nancy Ambrose

    2013-12-01

    Hazards in the urban built environment can create barriers to mobility among older adults aging in place. We investigated the relationship between urban built environment characteristics and 15-month trajectories of mobility disability in a sample of 1,188 older adults living in Detroit, MI, a city that has undergone rapid economic and structural decline. Data come from the Michigan Minimum Data Set for Home Care (2001-2008), an enumerative database of older adults in Michigan who qualify for federal or state-funded home and community-based long-term care through a Medicaid waiver program. Standardized assessments are made at intake and every 90 days by case managers. Built environments were assessed with a virtual audit using the "Street View" feature of Google Earth. A summary accessibility score was created for each block based on a count of the number of accessible features (e.g., continuous barrier-free sidewalks and proximity of public transportation). Using growth mixture models, two latent trajectories of outdoor mobility were identified: one capturing occasional outdoor mobility (representing 83 % of the sample) and one capturing almost no mobility outside the home. Controlling for sociodemographic and health risk factors, individuals living in more accessible environments had a 18 % higher odds of being in the more mobile group (OR = 1.18, 95 % CI = 1.01, 1.41). These findings emphasize the importance of the built environment for mobility among urban-dwelling older adults.

  8. Meta-Analytic Connectivity Modeling Reveals Differential Functional Connectivity of the Medial and Lateral Orbitofrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zald, David H.; McHugo, Maureen; Ray, Kimberly L.; Glahn, David C.; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Laird, Angela R.

    2014-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is implicated in a broad range of behaviors and neuropsychiatric disorders. Anatomical tracing studies in nonhuman primates reveal differences in connectivity across subregions of the OFC, but data on the connectivity of the human OFC remain limited. We applied meta-analytic connectivity modeling in order to examine which brain regions are most frequently coactivated with the medial and lateral portions of the OFC in published functional neuroimaging studies. The analysis revealed a clear divergence in the pattern of connectivity for the medial OFC (mOFC) and lateral OFC (lOFC) regions. The lOFC showed coactivations with a network of prefrontal regions and areas involved in cognitive functions including language and memory. In contrast, the mOFC showed connectivity with default mode, autonomic, and limbic regions. Convergent patterns of coactivations were observed in the amygdala, hippocampus, striatum, and thalamus. A small number of regions showed connectivity specific to the anterior or posterior sectors of the OFC. Task domains involving memory, semantic processing, face processing, and reward were additionally analyzed in order to identify the different patterns of OFC functional connectivity associated with specific cognitive and affective processes. These data provide a framework for understanding the human OFC's position within widespread functional networks. PMID:23042731

  9. Effect of thoracic and cervical joint mobilization on pulmonary function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sang-Hun; Bang, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to conduct thoracic and cervical mobilization in stroke patients and determine its effects on respiratory function. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one stroke patients were studied. Subjects were divided into a control group (control group, n=11) who did not undergo thoracic and cervical joint mobilization, and an experimental group (thoracic and cervical mobilization group, n=10) who underwent thoracic and cervical joint mobilization. Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in the first second, well-known indicators of respiratory capabilities, were measured. Peak cough flow was measured as an indicator of cough capability. [Results] After the exercise, respiratory function in the thoracic and cervical mobilization group showed statistically significant improvements demonstrated by increases in forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in the first second, and peak cough flow. [Conclusion] The findings indicate that thoracic and cervical mobilization can improve the thoracic movements of stroke patients resulting in improved pulmonary function. PMID:26957769

  10. Effect of thoracic and cervical joint mobilization on pulmonary function in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sang-Hun; Bang, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to conduct thoracic and cervical mobilization in stroke patients and determine its effects on respiratory function. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one stroke patients were studied. Subjects were divided into a control group (control group, n=11) who did not undergo thoracic and cervical joint mobilization, and an experimental group (thoracic and cervical mobilization group, n=10) who underwent thoracic and cervical joint mobilization. Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in the first second, well-known indicators of respiratory capabilities, were measured. Peak cough flow was measured as an indicator of cough capability. [Results] After the exercise, respiratory function in the thoracic and cervical mobilization group showed statistically significant improvements demonstrated by increases in forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in the first second, and peak cough flow. [Conclusion] The findings indicate that thoracic and cervical mobilization can improve the thoracic movements of stroke patients resulting in improved pulmonary function.

  11. Intensity of recreational physical activity throughout life and later life cognitive functioning in women.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Mary C; Moineddin, Rahim; Morra, Angela; Manson, Judith; Blake, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Long-term physical activity may affect risk of cognitive impairment but few studies have examined later life cognition in relation to intensity of life-long physical activity. We examined the associations between the intensity of long-term recreational physical activity and neuropsychological functioning in 90 healthy postmenopausal women on tests found to be useful in the early identification of dementia. Information was collected about their participation in strenuous and moderate activities between high school and menopause. Summary measures of long-term strenuous and moderate activity were constructed for each participant. All analyses were adjusted for relevant covariates. The six linear regression analyses showed significant positive associations between moderate activity and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Revised (WAIS-R), Digit Span backward, WAIS-R Digit Symbol, and Trail Making Test Part B. Significant negative relationships were found between strenuous activity and Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test delayed verbal recall, Complex Figure Test delayed visual memory, WAIS-R Digit Span backward, category fluency, and WAIS-R Digit Symbol. The associations found in the present study suggest that while moderate activity may be protective, long-term strenuous activity before menopause may lower cognitive performance later in life. These results support further investigation of the effects of life-long exercise intensity on cognition in later life.

  12. Band 3 and glycophorin are progressively aggregated in density-fractionated sickle and normal red blood cells. Evidence from rotational and lateral mobility studies.

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, J D; Golan, D E

    1993-01-01

    Band 3 aggregation in the plane of the red blood cell (RBC) membrane is postulated to be important in the pathophysiology of hemolysis of dense sickle and normal RBCs. We used the fluorescence photobleaching recovery and polarized fluorescence depletion techniques to measure the lateral and rotational mobility of band 3, glycophorins, and phospholipid analogues in membranes of density-separated intact RBCs from seven patients with sickle cell disease and eight normal controls. The fractions of laterally mobile band 3 and glycophorin decreased progressively as sickle RBC density increased. Normal RBCs also showed a progressive decrease in band 3 fractional mobility with increasing buoyant density. Rapidly rotating, slowly rotating, and rotationally immobile forms of band 3 were observed in both sickle and normal RBC membranes. The fraction of rapidly rotating band 3 progressively decreased and the fraction of rotationally immobile band 3 progressively increased with increasing sickle RBC density. Changes in the fraction of rotationally immobile band 3 were not reversible upon hypotonic swelling of dense sickle RBCs, and normal RBCs osmotically shrunken in sucrose buffers failed to manifest band 3 immobilization at median cell hemoglobin concentration values characteristic of dense sickle RBCs. We conclude that dense sickle and normal RBCs acquire irreversible membrane abnormalities that cause transmembrane protein immobilization and band 3 aggregation. Band 3 aggregates could serve as cell surface sites of autologous antibody binding and thereby lead to removal of dense sickle and normal (senescent) RBCs from the circulation. PMID:8423219

  13. Thalamic functional connectivity predicts seizure laterality in individual TLE patients: application of a biomarker development strategy.

    PubMed

    Barron, Daniel S; Fox, Peter T; Pardoe, Heath; Lancaster, Jack; Price, Larry R; Blackmon, Karen; Berry, Kristen; Cavazos, Jose E; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Devinsky, Orrin; Thesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive markers of brain function could yield biomarkers in many neurological disorders. Disease models constrained by coordinate-based meta-analysis are likely to increase this yield. Here, we evaluate a thalamic model of temporal lobe epilepsy that we proposed in a coordinate-based meta-analysis and extended in a diffusion tractography study of an independent patient population. Specifically, we evaluated whether thalamic functional connectivity (resting-state fMRI-BOLD) with temporal lobe areas can predict seizure onset laterality, as established with intracranial EEG. Twenty-four lesional and non-lesional temporal lobe epilepsy patients were studied. No significant differences in functional connection strength in patient and control groups were observed with Mann-Whitney Tests (corrected for multiple comparisons). Notwithstanding the lack of group differences, individual patient difference scores (from control mean connection strength) successfully predicted seizure onset zone as shown in ROC curves: discriminant analysis (two-dimensional) predicted seizure onset zone with 85% sensitivity and 91% specificity; logistic regression (four-dimensional) achieved 86% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The strongest markers in both analyses were left thalamo-hippocampal and right thalamo-entorhinal cortex functional connection strength. Thus, this study shows that thalamic functional connections are sensitive and specific markers of seizure onset laterality in individual temporal lobe epilepsy patients. This study also advances an overall strategy for the programmatic development of neuroimaging biomarkers in clinical and genetic populations: a disease model informed by coordinate-based meta-analysis was used to anatomically constrain individual patient analyses.

  14. Functional connectivity changes resemble patterns of pTDP-43 pathology in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Schulthess, Ines; Gorges, Martin; Müller, Hans-Peter; Lulé, Dorothée; Del Tredici, Kelly; Ludolph, Albert C.; Kassubek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    ‘Resting-state’ fMRI allows investigation of alterations in functional brain organization that are associated with an underlying pathological process. We determine whether abnormal connectivity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in a priori-defined intrinsic functional connectivity networks, according to a neuropathological staging scheme and its DTI-based tract correlates, permits recognition of a sequential involvement of functional networks. ‘Resting-state’ fMRI data from 135 ALS patients and 56 matched healthy controls were investigated for the motor network (corresponding to neuropathological stage 1), brainstem (stage 2), ventral attention (stage 3), default mode/hippocampal network (stage 4), and primary visual network (as the control network) in a cross-sectional analysis and longitudinally in a subgroup of 27 patients after 6 months. Group comparison from cross-sectional and longitudinal data revealed significantly increased functional connectivity (p < 0.05, corrected) in all four investigated networks (but not in the control network), presenting as a network expansion that was correlated with physical disability. Increased connectivity of functional networks, as investigated in a hypothesis-driven approach, is characterized by network expansions and resembled the pattern of pTDP-43 pathology in ALS. However, our data did not allow for the recognition of a sequential involvement of functional connectivity networks at the individual level. PMID:27929102

  15. Functional lateralization of temporoparietal junction - imitation inhibition, visual perspective-taking and theory of mind.

    PubMed

    Santiesteban, Idalmis; Banissy, Michael J; Catmur, Caroline; Bird, Geoffrey

    2015-10-01

    Although neuroimaging studies have consistently identified the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) as a key brain region involved in social cognition, the literature is far from consistent with respect to lateralization of function. For example, during theory-of-mind tasks bilateral TPJ activation is found in some studies but only right hemisphere activation in others. Visual perspective-taking and imitation inhibition, which have been argued to recruit the same socio-cognitive processes as theory of mind, are associated with unilateral activation of either left TPJ (perspective taking) or right TPJ (imitation inhibition). The present study investigated the functional lateralization of TPJ involvement in the above three socio-cognitive abilities using transcranial direct current stimulation. Three groups of healthy adults received anodal stimulation over right TPJ, left TPJ or the occipital cortex prior to performing three tasks (imitation inhibition, visual perspective-taking and theory of mind). In contrast to the extant neuroimaging literature, our results suggest bilateral TPJ involvement in imitation inhibition and visual perspective-taking, while no effect of anodal stimulation was observed on theory of mind. The discrepancy between these findings and those obtained using neuroimaging highlight the efficacy of neurostimulation as a complementary methodological tool in cognitive neuroscience.

  16. Do Executive Function Deficits Predict Later Substance Use Disorders Among Adolescents and Young Adults?

    PubMed Central

    Wilens, Timothy E.; Martelon, MaryKate; Fried, Ronna; Petty, Carter; Bateman, Clancey; Biederman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Objective There is increasing interest regarding the risk and overlap of executive function deficits (EFDs) in stable cigarette smoking and substance use disorders (SUD). Therefore, we examined whether earlier EFD was a risk factor for subsequent cigarette smoking and SUD and further explored the relationship between EFD and SUD. Method We assessed 435 subjects at the five-year follow-up (232 cases of ADHD; mean age ± SD: 15.4 ± 3.43 and 203 controls: 16.3 ± 3.42 years) and again four to five years later as part of a prospective family study of ADHD youth. Individuals were assessed by structured psychiatric interview for psychopathology and SUD. EFD was categorically defined in an individual that had at least 2 out of 6 abnormal neuropsychological tests of executive functioning. Results At the final follow-up period, ADHD was found to be a significant predictor of stable cigarette smoking (p<0.01) and SUD into late adolescence and young adult years (p<0.01). However, EFDs were not associated with an increase in subsequent substance use outcomes. New onset stable cigarette smoking, but not SUD, was associated with subsequent EFD (p<0.01). Conclusions Our results do not support the hypothesis that EFDs predicts later stable cigarette smoking or SUD in children with ADHD growing up. However, stable cigarette smoking is associated with subsequent EFD. PMID:21241951

  17. A lateralization of function approach to sex differences in spatial ability: a reexamination.

    PubMed

    Rilea, Stacy L

    2008-07-01

    The current study assessed the lateralization of function hypothesis (Rilea, S. L., Roskos-Ewoldsen, B., & Boles, D. (2004). Sex differences in spatial ability: A lateralization of function approach. Brain and Cognition, 56, 332-343) which suggested that it was the interaction of brain organization and the type of spatial task that led to sex differences in spatial ability. A second purpose was to evaluate explanations for their unexpected findings on the mental rotation task. In Experiment 1, participants completed the Water Level, Paper Folding, and mental rotation tasks (using an object-based or self-based perspective), presented bilaterally. Sex differences were only observed on the Water Level Task; a right hemisphere advantage was observed on Water Level and mental rotation tasks. In Experiment 2, a human stick figure or a polygon was mentally rotated. Men outperformed women when rotating polygons, but not when rotating stick figures. Men demonstrated a right hemisphere advantage when rotating polygons; women showed no hemisphere differences for either stimulus. Thus, hemisphere processing, task complexity, and stimulus type may influence performance for men and women across different spatial measures.

  18. Functional studies of the parotid and pancreas glands in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Charchaflie, R J; Bustos Fernandez, L; Perec, C J; Gonzalez, E; Marzi, A

    1974-07-01

    Functional studies of the pancreas and parotid glands are reported in 17 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The exocrine function of the pancreas was studied by measuring amylase concentration after stimulation with the endogenous secretin-pancreozymine test (ESP). Under these conditions, the pancreatic amylase concentration in ALS patients was found to be markedly decreased by about 45% when compared with those of healthy control subjects. Different conclusions in the literature about a possible impairment of the exocrine pancreas in ALS patients induced us to study the function of the parotid gland, which has close structural, functional, and physiopathological relationship with the pancreas. Flow rate and bicarbonate concentration of parotid saliva were measured after indirect stimulation (intraoral citric acid) and direct stimulation (pilocarpine). After indirect stimulation, both parotid flow rate and bicarbonate concentration from ALS patients were found to be decreased by about 66% and 70% respectively, when compared with controls. On the other hand, direct stimulation with pilocarpine in ALS patients elicited normal responses in both flow rate and bicarbonate concentration of saliva. It is concluded that the pancreatic and parotid deficiencies observed in ALS patients do not indicate primary disease of these exocrine glands. This interpretation is further emphasized by the results obtained by a sweat test, plasma osmolarity, and sialographic studies. The possibility that the gland impairments observed might be due to modifications of the neuroendocrine mechanisms regulating their secretory activity is suggested.

  19. Functional studies of the parotid and pancreas glands in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Charchaflie, R. J.; Fernandez, L. Bustos; Perec, C. J.; Gonzalez, E.; Marzi, A.

    1974-01-01

    Functional studies of the pancreas and parotid glands are reported in 17 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The exocrine function of the pancreas was studied by measuring amylase concentration after stimulation with the endogenous secretin-pancreozymine test (ESP). Under these conditions, the pancreatic amylase concentration in ALS patients was found to be markedly decreased by about 45% when compared with those of healthy control subjects. Different conclusions in the literature about a possible impairment of the exocrine pancreas in ALS patients induced us to study the function of the parotid gland, which has close structural, functional, and physiopathological relationship with the pancreas. Flow rate and bicarbonate concentration of parotid saliva were measured after indirect stimulation (intraoral citric acid) and direct stimulation (pilocarpine). After indirect stimulation, both parotid flow rate and bicarbonate concentration from ALS patients were found to be decreased by about 66% and 70% respectively, when compared with controls. On the other hand, direct stimulation with pilocarpine in ALS patients elicited normal responses in both flow rate and bicarbonate concentration of saliva. It is concluded that the pancreatic and parotid deficiencies observed in ALS patients do not indicate primary disease of these exocrine glands. This interpretation is further emphasized by the results obtained by a sweat test, plasma osmolarity, and sialographic studies. The possibility that the gland impairments observed might be due to modifications of the neuroendocrine mechanisms regulating their secretory activity is suggested. PMID:4852110

  20. Functional Mobility Testing: A Novel Method to Create Suit Design Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, Scott A.; Benson, Elizabeth A.; Rajulu, Sudhakar L.

    2008-01-01

    This study was performed to aide in the creation of design requirements for the next generation of space suits that more accurately describe the level of mobility necessary for a suited crewmember through the use of an innovative methodology utilizing functional mobility. A novel method was utilized involving the collection of kinematic data while 20 subjects (10 male, 10 female) performed pertinent functional tasks that will be required of a suited crewmember during various phases of a lunar mission. These tasks were selected based on relevance and criticality from a larger list of tasks that may be carried out by the crew. Kinematic data was processed through Vicon BodyBuilder software to calculate joint angles for the ankle, knee, hip, torso, shoulder, elbow, and wrist. Maximum functional mobility was consistently lower than maximum isolated mobility. This study suggests that conventional methods for establishing design requirements for human-systems interfaces based on maximal isolated joint capabilities may overestimate the required mobility. Additionally, this method provides a valuable means of evaluating systems created from these requirements by comparing the mobility available in a new spacesuit, or the mobility required to use a new piece of hardware, to this newly established database of functional mobility.

  1. Mobilization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    istic and romantic emotionalism that typifies this genre. Longino, James C., et al. “A Study of World War Procurement and Industrial Mobilization...States. Harrisburg, PA: Military Service Publishing Co., 1941. CARL 355.22 J72b. Written in rough prose , this World War II era document explains the

  2. Effect of Mulligan's mobilization with movement technique on gait function in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Lim; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] We examined the effectiveness of Mulligan's mobilization with movement (MWM) technique on spatiotemporal variables of gait in individuals who had a stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups: Mulligan's mobilization with movement group (n=12) and "weight-bearing with placebo" mobilization with movement group (n=12). The subjects in the mobilization with movement group performed 5 sets of 10 glides a day, 5 times a week for 4 weeks. The mobilization with movement technique comprised grade III movements that involved gliding and resting. The control group subjects performed lunges in the same conditions as those of the experimental group. Gait function was measured in terms of spatiotemporal parameters to determine the effect of mobilization with movement. [Results] The mobilization with movement group showed significant improvements in velocity, cadence, stride length, single-support time, and step length of the affected side, and step length and stride length of the non-affected side. Overall, the mobilization with movement group showed significantly greater improvements than the control group in terms of velocity, cadence, and single-support time of the affected side. [Conclusion] Mobilization with movement can be used to improve the gait function of patients recovering from stroke.

  3. Effect of Mulligan’s mobilization with movement technique on gait function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Lim; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] We examined the effectiveness of Mulligan’s mobilization with movement (MWM) technique on spatiotemporal variables of gait in individuals who had a stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups: Mulligan’s mobilization with movement group (n=12) and “weight-bearing with placebo” mobilization with movement group (n=12). The subjects in the mobilization with movement group performed 5 sets of 10 glides a day, 5 times a week for 4 weeks. The mobilization with movement technique comprised grade III movements that involved gliding and resting. The control group subjects performed lunges in the same conditions as those of the experimental group. Gait function was measured in terms of spatiotemporal parameters to determine the effect of mobilization with movement. [Results] The mobilization with movement group showed significant improvements in velocity, cadence, stride length, single-support time, and step length of the affected side, and step length and stride length of the non-affected side. Overall, the mobilization with movement group showed significantly greater improvements than the control group in terms of velocity, cadence, and single-support time of the affected side. [Conclusion] Mobilization with movement can be used to improve the gait function of patients recovering from stroke. PMID:27630424

  4. EEG functional network topology is associated with disability in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fraschini, Matteo; Demuru, Matteo; Hillebrand, Arjan; Cuccu, Lorenza; Porcu, Silvia; Di Stefano, Francesca; Puligheddu, Monica; Floris, Gianluca; Borghero, Giuseppe; Marrosu, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is one of the most severe neurodegenerative diseases, which is known to affect upper and lower motor neurons. In contrast to the classical tenet that ALS represents the outcome of extensive and progressive impairment of a fixed set of motor connections, recent neuroimaging findings suggest that the disease spreads along vast non-motor connections. Here, we hypothesised that functional network topology is perturbed in ALS, and that this reorganization is associated with disability. We tested this hypothesis in 21 patients affected by ALS at several stages of impairment using resting-state electroencephalography (EEG) and compared the results to 16 age-matched healthy controls. We estimated functional connectivity using the Phase Lag Index (PLI), and characterized the network topology using the minimum spanning tree (MST). We found a significant difference between groups in terms of MST dissimilarity and MST leaf fraction in the beta band. Moreover, some MST parameters (leaf, hierarchy and kappa) significantly correlated with disability. These findings suggest that the topology of resting-state functional networks in ALS is affected by the disease in relation to disability. EEG network analysis may be of help in monitoring and evaluating the clinical status of ALS patients. PMID:27924954

  5. EEG functional network topology is associated with disability in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraschini, Matteo; Demuru, Matteo; Hillebrand, Arjan; Cuccu, Lorenza; Porcu, Silvia; di Stefano, Francesca; Puligheddu, Monica; Floris, Gianluca; Borghero, Giuseppe; Marrosu, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is one of the most severe neurodegenerative diseases, which is known to affect upper and lower motor neurons. In contrast to the classical tenet that ALS represents the outcome of extensive and progressive impairment of a fixed set of motor connections, recent neuroimaging findings suggest that the disease spreads along vast non-motor connections. Here, we hypothesised that functional network topology is perturbed in ALS, and that this reorganization is associated with disability. We tested this hypothesis in 21 patients affected by ALS at several stages of impairment using resting-state electroencephalography (EEG) and compared the results to 16 age-matched healthy controls. We estimated functional connectivity using the Phase Lag Index (PLI), and characterized the network topology using the minimum spanning tree (MST). We found a significant difference between groups in terms of MST dissimilarity and MST leaf fraction in the beta band. Moreover, some MST parameters (leaf, hierarchy and kappa) significantly correlated with disability. These findings suggest that the topology of resting-state functional networks in ALS is affected by the disease in relation to disability. EEG network analysis may be of help in monitoring and evaluating the clinical status of ALS patients.

  6. Macular sub-layer thinning and association with pulmonary function tests in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Simonett, Joseph M.; Huang, Russell; Siddique, Nailah; Farsiu, Sina; Siddique, Teepu; Volpe, Nicholas J.; Fawzi, Amani A.

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder that may have anterior visual pathway involvement. In this study, we compare the macular structure of patients with ALS to healthy controls, and examine correlations between macular sub-layer thickness measurements and pulmonary function tests and disease duration. ALS patients underwent optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging to obtain macular cube scans of the right eye. Macular cube OCT data from age-matched healthy subjects were provided by the OCT reading center. Semi-automated retinal segmentation software was used to quantify macular sub-layers. Pulmonary function tests and time since symptom onset were collected retrospectively from the electronic medical records of ALS patients. Macular retinal nerve fiber layer was significantly thinner in ALS patients compared to healthy controls (P < 0.05). Total macular and other sub-layer thicknesses were not reduced in the ALS cohort. Macular retinal nerve fiber layer thickness positively correlated with forced vital capacity % predicted and forced expiratory volume in 1 second % predicted (P < 0.05). In conclusion, analysis of OCT measurements supports the involvement of the anterior visual pathway in ALS. Subtle structural thinning in the macular retinal nerve fiber layer correlates with pulmonary function tests. PMID:27383525

  7. N-formyl peptide receptors in human neutrophils display distinct membrane distribution and lateral mobility when labeled with agonist and antagonist

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Receptors for bacterial N-formyl peptides are instrumental for neutrophil chemotactic locomotion and activation at sites of infection. As regulatory mechanisms for signal transduction, both rapid coupling of the occupied receptor to cytoskeletal components, and receptor lateral redistribution, have been suggested (Jesaitis et al., 1986, 1989). To compare the distribution and lateral diffusion of the nonactivated and activated neutrophil N-formyl-peptide receptor, before internalization, we used a new fluorescent N-formyl-peptide receptor antagonist, tertbutyloxycarbonyl-Phe(D)-Leu-Phe(D)-Leu-Phe-OH (Boc- FLFLF, 0.1-1 microM), and the fluorescent receptor agonist formyl-Nle- Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys (fnLLFnLYK, 0.1-1 microM). Fluorescent Boc-FLFLF did not elicit an oxidative burst in the neutrophil at 37 degrees C, as assessed by chemiluminescence and reduction of p-nitroblue tetrazolium chloride, but competed efficiently both with formyl-methionyl-leucyl- phenylalanine (fMLF) and fnLLFnLYK. It was not internalized, as evidenced by confocal microscopy and acid elution of surface bound ligand. The lateral mobility characteristics of the neutrophil fMLF receptor were investigated with the technique of FRAP. The diffusion coefficient (D) was similar for antagonist- and agonist-labeled receptors (D approximately 5 x 10(-10) cm2/s), but the fraction of mobile receptors was significantly lower in agonist- compared to antagonist-labeled cells, approximately 40% in contrast to approximately 60%. This reduction in receptor mobile fraction was slightly counteracted, albeit not significantly, by dihydrocytochalasin B (dhcB, 5 microM). To block internalization of agonist-labeled receptors, receptor mobility measurements were done at 14 degrees C. At this temperature, confocal microscopy revealed clustering of receptors in response to agonist binding, compared to a more uniform receptor distribution in antagonist-labeled cells. The pattern of agonist- induced receptor clustering was

  8. Language Laterality in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Typical Controls: A Functional, Volumetric, and Diffusion Tensor MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Knaus, Tracey A.; Silver, Andrew M.; Kennedy, Meaghan; Lindgren, Kristen A.; Dominick, Kelli C.; Siegel, Jeremy; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Language and communication deficits are among the core features of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Reduced or reversed asymmetry of language has been found in a number of disorders, including ASD. Studies of healthy adults have found an association between language laterality and anatomical measures but this has not been systematically investigated in ASD. The goal of this study was to examine differences in gray matter volume of perisylvian language regions, connections between language regions, and language abilities in individuals with typical left lateralized language compared to those with atypical (bilateral or right) asymmetry of language functions. 14 adolescent boys with ASD and 20 typically developing adolescent boys participated, including equal numbers of left- and right-handed individuals in each group. Participants with typical left lateralized language activation had smaller frontal language region volume and higher fractional anisotropy of the arcuate fasciculus compared to the group with atypical language laterality, across both ASD and control participants. The group with typical language asymmetry included the most right-handed controls and fewest left-handers with ASD. Atypical language laterality was more prevalent in the ASD than control group. These findings support an association between laterality of language function and language region anatomy. They also suggest anatomical differences may be more associated with variation in language laterality than specifically with ASD. Language laterality therefore may provide a novel way of subdividing samples, resulting in more homogenous groups for research into genetic and neurocognitive foundations of developmental disorders. PMID:20031197

  9. Frontal lobe function and behavioral changes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a study from Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Wei, QianQian; Chen, XuePing; Zheng, ZhenZhen; Huang, Rui; Guo, XiaoYan; Cao, Bei; Zhao, Bi; Shang, Hui-Fang

    2014-12-01

    Despite growing interest, the frequency and characteristics of frontal lobe functional and behavioral deficits in Chinese people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), as well as their impact on the survival of ALS patients, remain unknown. The Chinese version of the frontal assessment battery (FAB) and frontal behavioral inventory (FBI) were used to evaluate 126 sporadic ALS patients and 50 healthy controls. The prevalence of frontal lobe dysfunction was 32.5%. The most notable impairment domain of the FAB was lexical fluency (30.7%). The binary logistic regression model revealed that an onset age older than 45 years (OR 5.976, P = 0.002) and a lower educational level (OR 0.858, P = 0.002) were potential determinants of an abnormal FAB. Based on the FBI score, 46.0% of patients showed varied degrees of frontal behavioral changes. The most common impaired neurobehavioral domains were irritability (25.4%), logopenia (20.6%) and apathy (19.0%). The binary logistic regression model revealed that the ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised scale score (OR 0.127, P = 0.001) was a potential determinant of an abnormal FBI. Frontal functional impairment and the severity of frontal behavioral changes were not associated with the survival status or the progression of ALS by the cox proportional hazard model and multivariate regression analyses, respectively. Frontal lobe dysfunction and frontal behavioral changes are common in Chinese ALS patients. Frontal lobe dysfunction may be related to the onset age and educational level. The severity of frontal behavioral changes may be associated with the ALSFRS-R. However, the frontal functional impairment and the frontal behavioral changes do not worsen the progression or survival of ALS.

  10. Visual experience, unilateral cortical lesions, and lateralization of function in rats.

    PubMed

    Tees, R C

    1984-12-01

    The effects of early visual experience and later unilateral neocortical lesions on the behavior of male hooded rats were measured on an open-field, 17-arm spatial maze, and a visual field or perimetry test. The comparison of behavior observed in the open field revealed that light-reared (LR) rats that suffered a right hemispheric lesion were more active and reared more than any of their dark-reared (DR) counterparts as well as LR animals that had left hemispheric or sham operations. On the radial maze task in which 8 of 17 arms were baited, the rats with unilateral lesions performed less effectively than did the sham-operated animals. The effect of the lesions was significantly greater for LR rats than their DR counterparts. The perimetry testing revealed that although the operated animals did react to stimuli throughout their visual field, some contralateral neglect was evident in the case of both LR and DR rats. The lesions did have a much greater impact on orientational behavior of operated LR rats. However, as was the case with respect to performance on the radial maze, no evidence emerged of any functional asymmetry following the unilateral cortical lesions. The results are discussed in terms of Denenberg's (1981) hypothesis about cerebral and functional asymmetry in the rat.

  11. Eye-Tracking Control to Assess Cognitive Functions in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Keller, Jürgen; Gorges, Martin; Aho-Özhan, Helena E A; Uttner, Ingo; Schneider, Erich; Kassubek, Jan; Pinkhardt, Elmar H; Ludolph, Albert C; Lulé, Dorothée

    2016-10-13

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder with pathological involvement of upper and lower motoneurons, subsequently leading to progressive loss of motor and speech abilities. In addition, cognitive functions are impaired in a subset of patients. To evaluate these potential deficits in severely physically impaired ALS patients, eye-tracking is a promising means to conduct cognitive tests. The present article focuses on how eye movements, an indirect means of communication for physically disabled patients, can be utilized to allow for detailed neuropsychological assessment. The requirements, in terms of oculomotor parameters that have to be met for sufficient eye-tracking in ALS patients are presented. The properties of stimuli, including type of neuropsychological tests and style of presentation, best suited to successfully assess cognitive functioning, are also described. Furthermore, recommendations regarding procedural requirements are provided. Overall, this methodology provides a reliable, easy to administer and fast approach for assessing cognitive deficits in patients who are unable to speak or write such as patients with severe ALS. The only confounding factor might be deficits in voluntary eye movement control in a subset of ALS patients.

  12. Correlation between permanent tooth eruption pattern and the predominance of the motor function laterality

    PubMed Central

    Veloso-Durán, Ana; Vazquez-Salceda, Carmen M.; López-Jiménez, Julian; Veloso-Durán, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To asses whether dental eruption order can play a role in the early diagnosis of crossed laterality. Study Design: Dental eruption pattern along with eye, ear, hand and foot lateralism were examined on 131 children between 6 to 8 years old from public schools from a multietnic population area of Barcelona city. Statistic methods (Statgraphics Plus 5.1 program) were used to evaluate data recollected. Results: Only foot and dentition lateralities behave as independent variables regarding hand laterality. So dental eruption laterality (along with the foot one) would be one of the parameters more related to hand laterality given that dentition variable relationship is greater that the foot one. This suggests that tooth eruption could be more clinically relevant. Crossed laterality hand-foot is significantly more predominant in men (13%) than in women (1,6%). Meanwhile, the relationship between hand and dentition didn’t show any influence of sex. Conclusions: Dental eruption order, can be used as a good parameter in the determination of the patient’s laterality. Key words:Dentition, dental eruption, motor laterality, crossed laterality. PMID:24608220

  13. The energy dependence of the lateral dose response functions of detectors with various densities in photon-beam dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khee Looe, Hui; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn

    2017-02-01

    The lateral dose response function is a general characteristic of the volume effect of a detector used for photon dosimetry in a water phantom. It serves as the convolution kernel transforming the true absorbed dose to water profile, which would be produced within the undisturbed water phantom, into the detector-measured signal profile. The shape of the lateral dose response function characterizes (i) the volume averaging attributable to the detector’s size and (ii) the disturbance of the secondary electron field associated with the deviation of the electron density of the detector material from the surrounding water. In previous work, the characteristic dependence of the shape of the lateral dose response function upon the electron density of the detector material was studied for 6 MV photons by Monte Carlo simulation of a wall-less voxel-sized detector (Looe et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 6585-07). This study is here continued for 60Co gamma rays and 15 MV photons in comparison with 6 MV photons. It is found (1) that throughout these photon spectra the shapes of the lateral dose response functions are retaining their characteristic dependence on the detector’s electron density, and (2) that their energy-dependent changes are only moderate. This appears as a practical advantage because the lateral dose response function can then be treated as practically invariant across a clinical photon beam in spite of the known changes of the photon spectrum with increasing distance from the beam axis.

  14. Symptoms and Cognitive Functions in Adolescents in Relation to Mobile Phone Use during Night.

    PubMed

    Schoeni, Anna; Roser, Katharina; Röösli, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Many adolescents tend to leave their mobile phones turned on during night, accepting that they may be awakened by an incoming text message or call. Using self-reported and objective operator recorded mobile phone use data, we thus aimed to analyze how being awakened during night by mobile phone affects adolescents' perceived health and cognitive functions. In this cross-sectional study, 439 adolescents completed questionnaires about their mobile phone use during night, health related quality of life and possible confounding factors. Standardized computerized cognitive tests were performed to assess memory and concentration capacity. Objective operator recorded mobile phone use data was further collected for 233 study participants. Data were analyzed by multivariable regression models adjusted for relevant confounders including amount of mobile phone use. For adolescents reporting to be awakened by a mobile phone during night at least once a month the odds ratio for daytime tiredness and rapid exhaustibility were 1.86 (95% CI: 1.02-3.39) and 2.28 (95% CI: 0.97-5.34), respectively. Similar results were found when analyzing objective operator recorded mobile phone use data (tiredness: 1.63, 95% CI: 0.94-2.82 and rapid exhaustibility: 2.32, 95% CI: 1.01-5.36). The cognitive tests on memory and concentration capacity were not related to mobile phone use during night. Overall, being awakened during night by mobile phone was associated with an increase in health symptom reports such as tiredness, rapid exhaustibility, headache and physical ill-being, but not with memory and concentration capacity. Prevention strategies should focus on helping adolescents set limits for their accessibility by mobile phone, especially during night.

  15. Automatic numerical determination of lateral influence functions for fast-CAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Marshal A.; Yamazoe, Kenji; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents kernel convolution with pattern matching (KCPM), which is an updated version of fast-CAD pattern matching for assessing lithography process variations. With KCPM, kernels that capture lateral feature interaction between features due to process variations are convolved with a mask layout to calculate a match factor, which indicates approximate change in intensity at the target location. The algorithm incorporates a custom source, a mask with electromagnetic effects, and an arbitrary pupil function. For further accuracy improvement, we introduce a source splitting technique. Though the evaluation speed is decreased, R2 correlation of the match factor and change in intensity is increased. Results are shown with R2 correlation as high as 0.99 for nearly coherent and annular illumination. Additionally, with a numerical aperture of 1.35, unbalanced quadrapole illumination, 10mλ RMS random aberration in projection optics and complex mask with EMF effects included, R2 correlation of more than 0.87 is achieved. This process is extremely fast (40μs per location) making it valuable for a wide range of applications, most commonly hot spot detection and optimization.

  16. Functional Contribution of the Transcription Factor ATF4 to the Pathogenesis of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Matus, Soledad; Lopez, Estefanía; Valenzuela, Vicente; Nassif, Melissa; Hetz, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress represents an early pathological event in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). ATF4 is a key ER stress transcription factor that plays a role in both adaptation to stress and the activation of apoptosis. Here we investigated the contribution of ATF4 to ALS. ATF4 deficiency reduced the rate of birth of SOD1G86R transgenic mice. The fraction of ATF4−/−-SOD1G85R transgenic mice that were born are more resistant to develop ALS, leading to delayed disease onset and prolonged life span. ATF4 deficiency completely attenuated the induction of pro-apoptotic genes, including BIM and CHOP, and also led to quantitative changes in the ER protein homeostasis network. Unexpectedly, ATF4 deficiency enhanced mutant SOD1 aggregation at the end stage of the disease. Studies in the motoneuron cell line NSC34 demonstrated that knocking down ATF4 enhances mutant SOD1 aggregation possibly due to alteration in the redox status of the cell. Our results support a functional role of ATF4 in ALS, offering a novel target for disease intervention. PMID:23874395

  17. A lateralized functional auditory network is involved in anuran sexual selection.

    PubMed

    Xue, Fei; Fang, Guangzhan; Yue, Xizi; Zhao, Ermi; Brauth, Steven E; Tang, Yezhong

    2016-12-01

    Right ear advantage (REA) exists in many land vertebrates in which the right ear and left hemisphere preferentially process conspecific acoustic stimuli such as those related to sexual selection. Although ecological and neural mechanisms for sexual selection have been widely studied, the brain networks involved are still poorly understood. In this study we used multi-channel electroencephalographic data in combination with Granger causal connectivity analysis to demonstrate, for the first time, that auditory neural network interconnecting the left and right midbrain and forebrain function asymmetrically in the Emei music frog (Babina daunchina), an anuran species which exhibits REA. The results showed the network was lateralized. Ascending connections between the mesencephalon and telencephalon were stronger in the left side while descending ones were stronger in the right, which matched with the REA in this species and implied that inhibition from the forebrainmay induce REA partly. Connections from the telencephalon to ipsilateral mesencephalon in response to white noise were the highest in the non-reproductive stage while those to advertisement calls were the highest in reproductive stage, implying the attention resources and living strategy shift when entered the reproductive season. Finally, these connection changes were sexually dimorphic, revealing sex differences in reproductive roles.

  18. Functional contribution of the transcription factor ATF4 to the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Matus, Soledad; Lopez, Estefanía; Valenzuela, Vicente; Nassif, Melissa; Hetz, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress represents an early pathological event in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). ATF4 is a key ER stress transcription factor that plays a role in both adaptation to stress and the activation of apoptosis. Here we investigated the contribution of ATF4 to ALS. ATF4 deficiency reduced the rate of birth of SOD1(G86R) transgenic mice. The fraction of ATF4(-/-)-SOD1(G85R) transgenic mice that were born are more resistant to develop ALS, leading to delayed disease onset and prolonged life span. ATF4 deficiency completely attenuated the induction of pro-apoptotic genes, including BIM and CHOP, and also led to quantitative changes in the ER protein homeostasis network. Unexpectedly, ATF4 deficiency enhanced mutant SOD1 aggregation at the end stage of the disease. Studies in the motoneuron cell line NSC34 demonstrated that knocking down ATF4 enhances mutant SOD1 aggregation possibly due to alteration in the redox status of the cell. Our results support a functional role of ATF4 in ALS, offering a novel target for disease intervention.

  19. Dissociating the semantic function of two neighbouring subregions in the left lateral anterior temporal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Sanjuán, Ana; Hope, Thomas M.H.; Parker Jones, 'Ōiwi; Prejawa, Susan; Oberhuber, Marion; Guerin, Julie; Seghier, Mohamed L.; Green, David W.; Price, Cathy J.

    2015-01-01

    We used fMRI in 35 healthy participants to investigate how two neighbouring subregions in the lateral anterior temporal lobe (LATL) contribute to semantic matching and object naming. Four different levels of processing were considered: (A) recognition of the object concepts; (B) search for semantic associations related to object stimuli; (C) retrieval of semantic concepts of interest; and (D) retrieval of stimulus specific concepts as required for naming. During semantic association matching on picture stimuli or heard object names, we found that activation in both subregions was higher when the objects were semantically related (mug–kettle) than unrelated (car–teapot). This is consistent with both LATL subregions playing a role in (C), the successful retrieval of amodal semantic concepts. In addition, one subregion was more activated for object naming than matching semantically related objects, consistent with (D), the retrieval of a specific concept for naming. We discuss the implications of these novel findings for cognitive models of semantic processing and left anterior temporal lobe function. PMID:25496810

  20. Attenuated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functioning predicts accelerated pubertal development in girls 1 year later.

    PubMed

    Saxbe, Darby E; Negriff, Sonya; Susman, Elizabeth J; Trickett, Penelope K

    2015-08-01

    Accelerated pubertal development has been linked to adverse early environments and may heighten subsequent mental and physical health risks. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functioning has been posited as a mechanism whereby stress may affect pubertal development, but the literature lacks prospective tests of this mechanism. The current study assessed 277 youth (M = 10.84 years, SD = 1.14), 138 boys and 139 girls, who reported on their pubertal development and underwent the Trier Social Stress Test for Children at baseline and returned to the laboratory approximately 1 year later (M = 1.12 years, range = 0.59-1.98 years). For girls, lower cortisol area under the curve (with respect to ground) at Time 1 predicted more advanced pubertal development at Time 2, controlling for Time 1 pubertal development. This association persisted after additional covariates including age, body mass index, race, and maltreatment history were introduced, and was driven by adrenal rather than gonadal development. Cortisol was not linked to boys' subsequent pubertal development, and no interaction by gender or by maltreatment appeared. These results suggest that attenuated cortisol, reported in other studies of children exposed to early adversity, may contribute to accelerated pubertal tempo in girls.

  1. Dissociating the semantic function of two neighbouring subregions in the left lateral anterior temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Sanjuán, Ana; Hope, Thomas M H; Jones, 'Ōiwi Parker; Prejawa, Susan; Oberhuber, Marion; Guerin, Julie; Seghier, Mohamed L; Green, David W; Price, Cathy J

    2015-09-01

    We used fMRI in 35 healthy participants to investigate how two neighbouring subregions in the lateral anterior temporal lobe (LATL) contribute to semantic matching and object naming. Four different levels of processing were considered: (A) recognition of the object concepts; (B) search for semantic associations related to object stimuli; (C) retrieval of semantic concepts of interest; and (D) retrieval of stimulus specific concepts as required for naming. During semantic association matching on picture stimuli or heard object names, we found that activation in both subregions was higher when the objects were semantically related (mug-kettle) than unrelated (car-teapot). This is consistent with both LATL subregions playing a role in (C), the successful retrieval of amodal semantic concepts. In addition, one subregion was more activated for object naming than matching semantically related objects, consistent with (D), the retrieval of a specific concept for naming. We discuss the implications of these novel findings for cognitive models of semantic processing and left anterior temporal lobe function.

  2. The integration of lateral gastrocnemius muscle function and kinematics in running turkeys

    PubMed Central

    Higham, Timothy E.; Nelson, Frank E.

    2008-01-01

    Animals commonly move over a range of speeds, and encounter considerable variation in habitat structure, such as inclines. Hindlimb kinematics and muscle function in diverse groups of vertebrates are affected by these changes in behavior and habitat structure, providing a fruitful source of variation for studying the integration of kinematics and muscle function. While it has been observed in a variety of vertebrates that muscle length change can be minimal during locomotion, it is unclear how, and to what degree, in vivo muscle length change patterns are integrated with kinematics. We tested the hypothesis that the length of the turkey lateral gastrocnemius (LG), a biarticular muscle that has moments at the ankle and knee, is not solely affected by changes in joint kinematics. We recorded in vivo muscle length changes (using sonomicrometry) and hindlimb movements (using high-speed video) of wild turkeys running on various inclines, and at different speeds. We quantified the relationship between joint angle (knee and ankle separately) and muscle length in freshly euthanized specimens, and then applied an empirically derived correction for changes in pennation angle and tendon strain during locomotion to improve the accuracy of our predicted lengths. We estimated muscle length at four points during each stride and then compared these values with those measured directly. Other than during swing, the predicted changes in muscle length calculated from the changes in joint kinematics did not correspond with our measured values of LG length. Therefore, the lengths at which the LG operates inturkeys are not determined entirely by kinematics. In addition to strain in series elastic components, we hypothesize that heterogeneous strain within muscles, interactions between muscles and muscle pennation angle all contribute to the non-linear relationship between muscle length changes and kinematics. PMID:18657958

  3. Early exposure to ultraviolet-B radiation decreases immune function later in life

    PubMed Central

    Ceccato, Emma; Cramp, Rebecca L.; Seebacher, Frank; Franklin, Craig E.

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians have declined dramatically worldwide. Many of these declines are occurring in areas where no obvious anthropogenic stressors are present. It is proposed that in these areas, environmental factors such as elevated solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation could be responsible. Ultraviolet-B levels have increased in many parts of the world as a consequence of the anthropogenic destruction of the ozone layer. Amphibian tadpoles are particularly sensitive to the damaging effects of UV-B radiation, with exposure disrupting growth and fitness in many species. Given that UV-B can disrupt immune function in other animals, we tested the hypothesis that early UV-B exposure suppresses the immune responses of amphibian tadpoles and subsequent juvenile frogs. We exposed Limnodynastes peronii tadpoles to sublethal levels of UV-B radiation for 6 weeks after hatching, then examined indices of immune function in both the tadpoles and the subsequent metamorphs. There was no significant effect of UV-B on tadpole leucocyte counts or on their response to an acute antigen (phytohaemagglutinin) challenge. However, early UV-B exposure resulted in a significant reduction in both metamorph leucocyte abundance and their response to an acute phytohaemagglutinin challenge. These data demonstrate that early UV-B exposure can have carry-over effects on later life-history traits even if the applied stressor has no immediately discernible effect. These findings have important implications for our understanding of the effects of UV-B exposure on amphibian health and susceptibility to diseases such as chytridiomycosis. PMID:27668081

  4. Effects of mobile phone radiofrequency on the structure and function of the normal human hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Mousavy, Seyed Jafar; Riazi, Gholam Hossein; Kamarei, Mahmood; Aliakbarian, Hadi; Sattarahmady, Naghmeh; Sharifizadeh, Ahmad; Safarian, Shahrokh; Ahmad, Faizan; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2009-04-01

    Widespread use of mobile phones has increased the human exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs). It is required to investigate the effect of EMFs on the biological systems. In this paper the effect of mobile phone RF (910MHz and 940 MHz) on structure and function of HbA was investigated. Oxygen affinity was measured by sodium dithionite with UV-vis spectrophotometer. Structural changes were studied by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results indicated that mobile phone EMFs altered oxygen affinity and tertiary structure of HbA. Furthermore, the decrease of oxygen affinity of HbA corresponded to the EMFs intensity and time of exposure.

  5. Differential muscle function between muscle synergists: long and lateral heads of the triceps in jumping and landing goats (Capra hircus).

    PubMed

    Carroll, Andrew M; Lee, David V; Biewener, Andrew A

    2008-10-01

    We investigate how the biarticular long head and monoarticular lateral head of the triceps brachii function in goats (Capra hircus) during jumping and landing. Elbow moment and work were measured from high-speed video and ground reaction force (GRF) recordings. Muscle activation and strain were measured via electromyography and sonomicrometry, and muscle stress was estimated from elbow moment and by partitioning stress based on its relative strain rate. Elbow joint and muscle function were compared among three types of limb usage: jump take-off (lead limb), the step prior to jump take-off (lag limb), and landing. We predicted that the strain and work patterns in the monoarticular lateral head would follow the kinematics and work of the elbow more closely than would those of the biarticular long head. In general this prediction was supported. For instance, the lateral head stretched (5 +/- 2%; mean +/- SE) in the lead and lag limbs to absorb work during elbow flexion and joint work absorption, while the long head shortened (-7 +/- 1%) to produce work. During elbow extension, both muscles shortened by similar amounts (-10 +/- 2% long; -13 +/- 4% lateral) in the lead limb to produce work. Both triceps heads functioned similarly in landing, stretching (13 +/- 3% in the long head and 19 +/- 5% in the lateral) to absorb energy. In general, the long head functioned to produce power at the shoulder and elbow, while the lateral head functioned to resist elbow flexion and absorb work, demonstrating that functional diversification can arise between mono- and biarticular muscle agonists operating at the same joint.

  6. The long-lived fusogenic state induced in erythrocyte ghosts by electric pulses is not laterally mobile.

    PubMed Central

    Sowers, A E

    1987-01-01

    The long-lived fusogenic state induced in spherical-shaped erythrocyte ghosts by electric field pulses (Sowers, A.E. 1984. J. Cell Biol. 99:1989-1996; Sowers, A.E. 1986. J. Cell Biol. 102:1358-1362) was studied in terms of how the fusion yield depended on both (a) the location where membrane-membrane contact took place with respect to the orientation of the electric pulse and (b) the time interval between the pulse treatment and membrane-membrane contact. Fusion yields were greater for membrane-membrane contact locations closer to where the pulse-induced transmembrane voltage was expected to be greatest and showed a time interval-dependent accelerating decay. The portion of the membrane that became fusogenic included the area up to a latitude of approximately 38 degrees of arc towards the equators of the membranes. A time interval-dependent increase or decrease in rate of decay in the fusion yield for membrane-membrane contacts induced closer to the equator of the membranes did not occur showing that the pulse-induced fusogenic state is immobile in the early 5-45-s interval after induction and has a rate of decay, which does not permit long time interval changes in lateral position to be measured. PMID:3427195

  7. Slope of the lateral density function of extensive air showers around the knee region as an indicator of shower age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Rajat K.; Dam, Sandip

    2016-11-01

    Analyzing simulated extensive air shower (EAS) events generated with the Monte Carlo code CORSIKA, this paper critically studies the characteristics of lateral distribution of electrons in EAS around the knee energy region of the energy spectrum of primary cosmic rays. The study takes into account the issue of the lateral shower age parameter as an indicator of the stage of development of showers in the atmosphere. The correlation of the lateral shower age parameter with other EAS observables is examined, using simulated data in the context of its possible use in a multi-parameter study of EAS, with a view to obtaining information about the nature of the shower initiating primaries at sea level EAS experiments. It is shown that the observed slope of the lateral density function in the 3-dimensional plot, at least for the KASCADE data, supports the idea of a transition from light to heavy mass composition around the knee.

  8. Assessment on self-care, mobility and social function of children with spina bifida in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Sirzai, Hulya; Dogu, Beril; Demir, Selamet; Yilmaz, Figen; Kuran, Banu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the functional performance in children with spina bifida, using the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) to look into capacity of twenty-eight children with spina bifida with lesions at different levels in different dimensions of self-care, mobility and social function. Mean age of the patients was 3.5 ± 2.3 (1–10) years. In the muscle test carried out, 13 patients (44.8%) had no movements including pelvic elevation in lower extremity muscles and they were at level 5. Sixteen patients (54%) were non-ambulatory according to the Hoofer ambulation classification. Raw and scale scores in the self-care, mobility and social function domains both in the functional skill scale and in the caregiver scale were found to be lower compared to the data of the normal population. A statistically significant correlation was observed in the self-care values of the Functional Skills Scales and the Caregiver Assistance Scale measurements, which was positive for age and negative for Functional Ambulation Scale and muscle test (P < 0.05). A positive relation was found between the Functional Skills Scales-mobility area and age while a negative relation was observed between Functional Ambulation Scale and muscle test (P < 0.005). A negative relation was also found between Caregiver Assistance Scale-mobility and Functional Ambulation Scale and muscle test (P < 0.005). In our study, the functional performance of the children was found to be low. Low-level lesions, encouraging muscular strength and independence in mobility are all very important factors for functional independence. PMID:25206788

  9. Functional Connectivity Changes in Resting-State EEG as Potential Biomarker for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Parameswaran Mahadeva; Egan, Catriona; Pinto-Grau, Marta; Burke, Tom; Elamin, Marwa; Nasseroleslami, Bahman; Pender, Niall; Lalor, Edmund C.; Hardiman, Orla

    2015-01-01

    Background Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is heterogeneous and overlaps with frontotemporal dementia. Spectral EEG can predict damage in structural and functional networks in frontotemporal dementia but has never been applied to ALS. Methods 18 incident ALS patients with normal cognition and 17 age matched controls underwent 128 channel EEG and neuropsychology assessment. The EEG data was analyzed using FieldTrip software in MATLAB to calculate simple connectivity measures and scalp network measures. sLORETA was used in nodal analysis for source localization and same methods were applied as above to calculate nodal network measures. Graph theory measures were used to assess network integrity. Results Cross spectral density in alpha band was higher in patients. In ALS patients, increased degree values of the network nodes was noted in the central and frontal regions in the theta band across seven of the different connectivity maps (p<0.0005). Among patients, clustering coefficient in alpha and gamma bands was increased in all regions of the scalp and connectivity were significantly increased (p=0.02). Nodal network showed increased assortativity in alpha band in the patients group. The Clustering Coefficient in Partial Directed Connectivity (PDC) showed significantly higher values for patients in alpha, beta, gamma, theta and delta frequencies (p=0.05). Discussion There is increased connectivity in the fronto-central regions of the scalp and areas corresponding to Salience and Default Mode network in ALS, suggesting a pathologic disruption of neuronal networking in early disease states. Spectral EEG has potential utility as a biomarker in ALS. PMID:26091258

  10. Longitudinal Relationships Between Productive Activities and Functional Health in Later Years: A Multivariate Latent Growth Curve Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunhee; Tang, Fengyan; Kim, Sung-Geun; Turk, Phillip

    2016-10-01

    This study examined the longitudinal relationships between functional health in later years and three types of productive activities: volunteering, full-time, and part-time work. Using the data from five waves (2000-2008) of the Health and Retirement Study, we applied multivariate latent growth curve modeling to examine the longitudinal relationships among individuals 50 or over. Functional health was measured by limitations in activities of daily living. Individuals who volunteered, worked either full time or part time exhibited a slower decline in functional health than nonparticipants. Significant associations were also found between initial functional health and longitudinal changes in productive activity participation. This study provides additional support for the benefits of productive activities later in life; engagement in volunteering and employment are indeed associated with better functional health in middle and old age.

  11. Dorso-medial and ventro-lateral functional specialization of the human retrosplenial complex in spatial updating and orienting.

    PubMed

    Burles, Ford; Slone, Edward; Iaria, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    The retrosplenial complex is a region within the posterior cingulate cortex implicated in spatial navigation. Here, we investigated the functional specialization of this large and anatomically heterogeneous region using fMRI and resting-state functional connectivity combined with a spatial task with distinct phases of spatial 'updating' (i.e., integrating and maintaining object locations in memory during spatial displacement) and 'orienting' (i.e., recalling unseen locations from current position in space). Both spatial 'updating' and 'orienting' produced bilateral activity in the retrosplenial complex, among other areas. However, spatial 'updating' produced slightly greater activity in ventro-lateral portions, of the retrosplenial complex, whereas spatial 'orienting' produced greater activity in a more dorsal and medial portion of it (both regions localized along the parieto-occipital fissure). At rest, both ventro-lateral and dorso-medial subregions of the retrosplenial complex were functionally connected to the hippocampus and parahippocampus, regions both involved in spatial orientation and navigation. However, the ventro-lateral subregion of the retrosplenial complex displayed more positive functional connectivity with ventral occipital and temporal object recognition regions, whereas the dorso-medial subregion activity was more correlated to dorsal activity and frontal activity, as well as negatively correlated with more ventral parietal structures. These findings provide evidence for a dorso-medial to ventro-lateral functional specialization within the human retrosplenial complex that may shed more light on the complex neural mechanisms underlying spatial orientation and navigation in humans.

  12. N-glycosylation enables high lateral mobility of GPI-anchored proteins at a molecular crowding threshold

    PubMed Central

    Hartel, Andreas J. W.; Glogger, Marius; Jones, Nicola G.; Abuillan, Wasim; Batram, Christopher; Hermann, Anne; Fenz, Susanne F.; Tanaka, Motomu; Engstler, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The protein density in biological membranes can be extraordinarily high, but the impact of molecular crowding on the diffusion of membrane proteins has not been studied systematically in a natural system. The diversity of the membrane proteome of most cells may preclude systematic studies. African trypanosomes, however, feature a uniform surface coat that is dominated by a single type of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG). Here we study the density-dependence of the diffusion of different glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored VSG-types on living cells and in artificial membranes. Our results suggest that a specific molecular crowding threshold (MCT) limits diffusion and hence affects protein function. Obstacles in the form of heterologous proteins compromise the diffusion coefficient and the MCT. The trypanosome VSG-coat operates very close to its MCT. Importantly, our experiments show that N-linked glycans act as molecular insulators that reduce retarding intermolecular interactions allowing membrane proteins to function correctly even when densely packed. PMID:27641538

  13. Measurement of output power density from mobile phone as a function of input sound frequency.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Emanuele; Magazù, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of power density emitted by a mobile phone were carried out as a function of the sound frequency transmitted by a sound generator, ranging from 250 to 14000 Hz. Output power density was monitored by means of the selective radiation meter Narda SRM 3000 in spectrum analysis mode, and the octave frequency analysis of each tone used for the experimental design was acquired by the sound level meter Larson Davis LxT Wind. Vodafone providers were used for mobile phone calls with respect to various local base station in Southern-Italy. A relationship between the mobile phone microwaves power density and the sound frequencies transmitted by the sound generator was observed. In particular, microwaves power density level decreases significantly at sound frequency values larger than 4500 Hz. This result can be explained assuming that discontinuous transmission mode of global system for mobile communications is powered not only in silence-mode, but also at frequencies larger than 4500 Hz.

  14. Monitoring Functional Capability of Individuals with Lower Limb Amputations Using Mobile Phones

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Mark V.; McCarthy, Cliodhna; Valentin, Juliana; Herrmann, Megan; Kording, Konrad; Jayaraman, Arun

    2013-01-01

    To be effective, a prescribed prosthetic device must match the functional requirements and capabilities of each patient. These capabilities are usually assessed by a clinician and reported by the Medicare K-level designation of mobility. However, it is not clear how the K-level designation objectively relates to the use of prostheses outside of a clinical environment. Here, we quantify participant activity using mobile phones and relate activity measured during real world activity to the assigned K-levels. We observe a correlation between K-level and the proportion of moderate to high activity over the course of a week. This relationship suggests that accelerometry-based technologies such as mobile phones can be used to evaluate real world activity for mobility assessment. Quantifying everyday activity promises to improve assessment of real world prosthesis use, leading to a better matching of prostheses to individuals and enabling better evaluations of future prosthetic devices. PMID:23750254

  15. Effect of fish oil on lateral mobility of prostaglandin F2α (FP) receptors and spatial distribution of lipid microdomains in bovine luteal cell plasma membrane in vitro.

    PubMed

    Plewes, M R; Burns, P D; Graham, P E; Hyslop, R M; Barisas, B G

    2017-01-01

    Lipid microdomains are ordered regions on the plasma membrane of cells, rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids, ranging in size from 10 to 200 nm in diameter. These lipid-ordered domains may serve as platforms to facilitate colocalization of intracellular signaling proteins during agonist-induced signal transduction. It is hypothesized that fish oil will disrupt the lipid microdomains, increasing spatial distribution of these lipid-ordered domains and lateral mobility of the prostaglandin (PG) F2α (FP) receptors in bovine luteal cells. The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of fish oil on (1) the spatial distribution of lipid microdomains, (2) lateral mobility of FP receptors, and (3) lateral mobility of FP receptors in the presence of PGF2α on the plasma membrane of bovine luteal cells in vitro. Bovine ovaries were obtained from a local abattoir and corpora lutea were digested using collagenase. In experiment 1, lipid microdomains were labeled using cholera toxin subunit B Alexa Fluor 555. Domains were detected as distinct patches on the plasma membrane of mixed luteal cells. Fish oil treatment decreased fluorescent intensity in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.01). In experiment 2, single particle tracking was used to examine the effects of fish oil treatment on lateral mobility of FP receptors. Fish oil treatment increased microdiffusion and macrodiffusion coefficients of FP receptors as compared to control cells (P < 0.05). In addition, compartment diameters of domains were larger, and residence times were reduced for receptors in fish oil-treated cells (P < 0.05). In experiment 3, single particle tracking was used to determine the effects of PGF2α on lateral mobility of FP receptors and influence of fish oil treatment. Lateral mobility of receptors was decreased within 5 min following the addition of ligand for control cells (P < 0.05). However, lateral mobility of receptors was unaffected by addition of ligand for fish oil-treated cells

  16. Asymmetric projections of the arcuate fasciculus to the temporal cortex underlie lateralized language function in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Takaya, Shigetoshi; Kuperberg, Gina R.; Liu, Hesheng; Greve, Douglas N.; Makris, Nikos; Stufflebeam, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    The arcuate fasciculus (AF) in the human brain has asymmetric structural properties. However, the topographic organization of the asymmetric AF projections to the cortex and its relevance to cortical function remain unclear. Here we mapped the posterior projections of the human AF in the inferior parietal and lateral temporal cortices using surface-based structural connectivity analysis based on diffusion MRI and investigated their hemispheric differences. We then performed the cross-modal comparison with functional connectivity based on resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) and task-related cortical activation based on fMRI using a semantic classification task of single words. Structural connectivity analysis showed that the left AF connecting to Broca's area predominantly projected in the lateral temporal cortex extending from the posterior superior temporal gyrus to the mid part of the superior temporal sulcus and the middle temporal gyrus, whereas the right AF connecting to the right homolog of Broca's area predominantly projected to the inferior parietal cortex extending from the mid part of the supramarginal gyrus to the anterior part of the angular gyrus. The left-lateralized projection regions of the AF in the left temporal cortex had asymmetric functional connectivity with Broca's area, indicating structure-function concordance through the AF. During the language task, left-lateralized cortical activation was observed. Among them, the brain responses in the temporal cortex and Broca's area that were connected through the left-lateralized AF pathway were specifically correlated across subjects. These results suggest that the human left AF, which structurally and functionally connects the mid temporal cortex and Broca's area in asymmetrical fashion, coordinates the cortical activity in these remote cortices during a semantic decision task. The unique feature of the left AF is discussed in the context of the human capacity for language. PMID:26441551

  17. Asymmetric projections of the arcuate fasciculus to the temporal cortex underlie lateralized language function in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Shigetoshi; Kuperberg, Gina R; Liu, Hesheng; Greve, Douglas N; Makris, Nikos; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    The arcuate fasciculus (AF) in the human brain has asymmetric structural properties. However, the topographic organization of the asymmetric AF projections to the cortex and its relevance to cortical function remain unclear. Here we mapped the posterior projections of the human AF in the inferior parietal and lateral temporal cortices using surface-based structural connectivity analysis based on diffusion MRI and investigated their hemispheric differences. We then performed the cross-modal comparison with functional connectivity based on resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) and task-related cortical activation based on fMRI using a semantic classification task of single words. Structural connectivity analysis showed that the left AF connecting to Broca's area predominantly projected in the lateral temporal cortex extending from the posterior superior temporal gyrus to the mid part of the superior temporal sulcus and the middle temporal gyrus, whereas the right AF connecting to the right homolog of Broca's area predominantly projected to the inferior parietal cortex extending from the mid part of the supramarginal gyrus to the anterior part of the angular gyrus. The left-lateralized projection regions of the AF in the left temporal cortex had asymmetric functional connectivity with Broca's area, indicating structure-function concordance through the AF. During the language task, left-lateralized cortical activation was observed. Among them, the brain responses in the temporal cortex and Broca's area that were connected through the left-lateralized AF pathway were specifically correlated across subjects. These results suggest that the human left AF, which structurally and functionally connects the mid temporal cortex and Broca's area in asymmetrical fashion, coordinates the cortical activity in these remote cortices during a semantic decision task. The unique feature of the left AF is discussed in the context of the human capacity for language.

  18. Asymmetric projections of the arcuate fasciculus to the temporal cortex underlie lateralized language function in the human brain

    DOE PAGES

    Takaya, Shigetoshi; Kuperberg, Gina R.; Liu, Hesheng; ...

    2015-09-15

    The arcuate fasciculus (AF) in the human brain has asymmetric structural properties. However, the topographic organization of the asymmetric AF projections to the cortex and its relevance to cortical function remain unclear. Here we mapped the posterior projections of the human AF in the inferior parietal and lateral temporal cortices using surface-based structural connectivity analysis based on diffusion MRI and investigated their hemispheric differences. We then performed the cross-modal comparison with functional connectivity based on resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) and task-related cortical activation based on fMRI using a semantic classification task of single words. Structural connectivity analysis showed that themore » left AF connecting to Broca's area predominantly projected in the lateral temporal cortex extending from the posterior superior temporal gyrus to the mid part of the superior temporal sulcus and the middle temporal gyrus, whereas the right AF connecting to the right homolog of Broca's area predominantly projected to the inferior parietal cortex extending from the mid part of the supramarginal gyrus to the anterior part of the angular gyrus. The left-lateralized projection regions of the AF in the left temporal cortex had asymmetric functional connectivity with Broca's area, indicating structure-function concordance through the AF. During the language task, left-lateralized cortical activation was observed. Among them, the brain responses in the temporal cortex and Broca's area that were connected through the left-lateralized AF pathway were specifically correlated across subjects. These results suggest that the human left AF, which structurally and functionally connects the mid temporal cortex and Broca's area in asymmetrical fashion, coordinates the cortical activity in these remote cortices during a semantic decision task. As a result, the unique feature of the left AF is discussed in the context of the human capacity for language.« less

  19. Asymmetric projections of the arcuate fasciculus to the temporal cortex underlie lateralized language function in the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Takaya, Shigetoshi; Kuperberg, Gina R.; Liu, Hesheng; Greve, Douglas N.; Makris, Nikos; Stufflebeam, Steven M.

    2015-09-15

    The arcuate fasciculus (AF) in the human brain has asymmetric structural properties. However, the topographic organization of the asymmetric AF projections to the cortex and its relevance to cortical function remain unclear. Here we mapped the posterior projections of the human AF in the inferior parietal and lateral temporal cortices using surface-based structural connectivity analysis based on diffusion MRI and investigated their hemispheric differences. We then performed the cross-modal comparison with functional connectivity based on resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) and task-related cortical activation based on fMRI using a semantic classification task of single words. Structural connectivity analysis showed that the left AF connecting to Broca's area predominantly projected in the lateral temporal cortex extending from the posterior superior temporal gyrus to the mid part of the superior temporal sulcus and the middle temporal gyrus, whereas the right AF connecting to the right homolog of Broca's area predominantly projected to the inferior parietal cortex extending from the mid part of the supramarginal gyrus to the anterior part of the angular gyrus. The left-lateralized projection regions of the AF in the left temporal cortex had asymmetric functional connectivity with Broca's area, indicating structure-function concordance through the AF. During the language task, left-lateralized cortical activation was observed. Among them, the brain responses in the temporal cortex and Broca's area that were connected through the left-lateralized AF pathway were specifically correlated across subjects. These results suggest that the human left AF, which structurally and functionally connects the mid temporal cortex and Broca's area in asymmetrical fashion, coordinates the cortical activity in these remote cortices during a semantic decision task. As a result, the unique feature of the left AF is discussed in the context of the human capacity for language.

  20. Heat Transfer to Anode of Arc as Function of Transverse Magnetic Field and Lateral Gas Flow Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zama, Yoshiyuki; Shiino, Toru; Ishii, Yoko; Maeda, Yoshifumi; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2016-10-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding has useful joining technology because of high-energy and high-current characteristics. It can be flexible from the transverse magnetic field and lateral gas flow velocity. In this case, the weld defect occurs. In this research, the heat transfer to the anode of the arc as a function of the transverse magnetic field and lateral gas flow velocity is elucidated. That magnetic flux density and lateral gas velocity were varied from 0 to 3 mT and 0 to 50?m?s -1, respectively. The axial plasma gas argon flow rates were 3?slm. A transverse magnetic field is applied to the arc using Helmholtz coil. The anode is used by a water-cooled copper plate, and the heat transfer is measured by temperature of cooled water. As a result, the arc is deflected by the Lorentz force and lateral gas convection. Thus, the heat transfer to the anode of the arc decreases with increasing the transverse magnetic field and lateral gas flow velocity. In addition, the heat transfer to the anode changes with different attachments modes. The lateral gas flow causes a convective heat loss from the arc to the chamber walls.

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis inhibits sonic hedgehog function

    PubMed Central

    Drannik, Anna; Martin, Joan; Peterson, Randy; Ma, Xiaoxing; Jiang, Fan; Turnbull, John

    2017-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is a morphogen essential to the developing nervous system that continues to play an important role in adult life by contributing to cell proliferation and differentiation, maintaining blood-brain barrier integrity, and being cytoprotective against oxidative and excitotoxic stress, all features of importance in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). ALS is a fatal disease characterized by selective loss of motor neurons due to poorly understood mechanisms. Evidence indicates that Shh might play an important role in ALS, and that Shh signaling might be also adversely affected in ALS. Since little is known about the functional status of Shh pathway in patients with ALS, we therefore sought to determine whether Shh protein levels or biological activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was less in ALS patients than controls, and whether these measures could be correlated with ALS disease severity and disease progression, and with other CSF analytes of biological interest in ALS. Comparing Shh levels in the CSF of normal controls (n = 13), neurological controls (n = 12), and ALS patients (n = 9) measured by ELISA, we found that CSF Shh levels were not different between controls and ALS patients. However, when assessing Shh biological activity in CSF using in vitro cell-based assays, which measure Shh activity as inducible Gli-driven luminescence, we found that in the presence of exogenous recombinant Shh or the Shh agonist, purmorphamine, the inducible activity of CSF was significantly augmented in the control groups as expected, but not in the ALS group, suggesting the presence of an inhibitor of Shh signaling in ALS CSF samples. Since purmorphamine acts on Smoothened, downstream of Shh and its receptor Patched, the inhibitory action is downstream of Smoothened. Our results also demonstrated that while the inhibitory effect of ALS CSF on Shh signaling did not correlate significantly with ALS disease characteristics, the levels of IL-1β and TNF-α did. In

  2. Self Perceived Emotional Functioning of Spanish Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Jesús S.; Salas, Teresa; Fajardo, María L.; Iváñez, Lourdes; Rodríguez-Santos, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Background: ALS is a neurodegenerative disease of the entire motor system that most frequently ends with respiratory arrest in few years. Its diagnosis and the rapid progression of the motor dysfunctions produce a continued emotional impact. Studies on this impact are helpful to plan adequate psychotherapeutic strategies. Objective: To assess and analyze: First: How the patients with ALS perceive their emotional health. Second: The emotional impact of their physical disabilities. Third: The physical disabilities with highest emotional impact. Fourth: The feelings with highest emotional impact. Methods: Up to 110 Spanish patients with ALS were assessed less than 1 year from diagnosis, then twice more at 6 month intervals, using the ALS Quality of Life Assessment Questionnaire (ALSAQ-40) validated for use in Spanish. Descriptive analysis and correlation between variables were obtained. Results: Worries about the future, of lack of freedom, and of being a burden were prevalent feelings. On average depression was felt only “sometimes.” Only 25% of the variations in the emotional state were explained by changes in the physical state at first evaluation, and 16% at the last one. Emotional functioning correlated significantly with the physical disabilities at first and second evaluation, less so at third. Communication disabilities always had the highest impact. Depression at first evaluation and hopelessness at the next two evaluations had the highest emotional impact. Hopelessness did not correlate with any physical disability at the third evaluation. On the whole, emotional dysfunction was self perceived as intermediate (between none and worst), and remained stable at 1 year follow up, in both bulbar and spinal onset patients. Conclusions: Physical dysfunctions per se have a limited role in patients´ emotional distress. Communication disabilities, as well as feelings of depression at early stages of illness, and of hopelessness later on, had the most impact

  3. Tracking control of two-wheel driven mobile robot using compound sine function neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jun

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to propose a compound sine function neural network (NN) with continuous learning algorithm for the velocity and orientation angle tracking control of a mobile robot. Herein, two NN controllers embedded in the closed-loop control system are capable of on-line continuous learning and do not require any knowledge of the dynamics model. The neuron function of the hidden layer in the three-layer feed-forward network structure is on the basis of combining a sine function with a unipolar sigmoid function. In the NN algorithm, the weight values are only adjusted between the nodes in hidden layer and the output nodes, while the weight values between the input layer and the hidden layer are one, that is, constant, without the weight adjustment. The developed NN controllers have simple algorithm and fast learning convergence. Therefore, the proposed NN controllers can be suitable for the real-time tracking control of the mobile robots. The simulation results show that the proposed NN controller has better control performance in the tracking control of the mobile robot. The compound sine function NN provides a new way to solve tracking control problems for a mobile robot.

  4. Mobile telephone use is associated with changes in cognitive function in young adolescents.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Michael J; Benke, Geza P; Dimitriadis, Christina; Inyang, Imo O; Sim, Malcolm R; Wolfe, Rory S; Croft, Rodney J

    2009-12-01

    As part of the Mobile Radiofrequency Phone Exposed Users' Study (MoRPhEUS), a cross-sectional epidemiological study examined cognitive function in secondary school students. We recruited 317, 7th grade students (144 boys, 173 girls, median age 13 years) from 20 schools around Melbourne, Australia. Participants completed an exposure questionnaire based on the Interphone study, a computerised cognitive test battery, and the Stroop colour-word test. The principal exposure metric was the total number of reported mobile phone voice calls per week. Linear regression models were fitted to cognitive test response times and accuracies. Age, gender, ethnicity, socio-economic status and handedness were fitted as covariates and standard errors were adjusted for clustering by school. The accuracy of working memory was poorer, reaction time for a simple learning task shorter, associative learning response time shorter and accuracy poorer in children reporting more mobile phone voice calls. There were no significant relationships between exposure and signal detection, movement monitoring or estimation. The completion time for Stroop word naming tasks was longer for those reporting more mobile phone voice calls. The findings were similar for total short message service (SMS, also known as text) messages per week, suggesting these cognitive changes were unlikely due to radiofrequency (RF) exposure. Overall, mobile phone use was associated with faster and less accurate responding to higher level cognitive tasks. These behaviours may have been learned through frequent use of a mobile phone.

  5. Membrane orientation and lateral diffusion of BODIPY-cholesterol as a function of probe structure.

    PubMed

    Solanko, Lukasz M; Honigmann, Alf; Midtiby, Henrik Skov; Lund, Frederik W; Brewer, Jonathan R; Dekaris, Vjekoslav; Bittman, Robert; Eggeling, Christian; Wüstner, Daniel

    2013-11-05

    Cholesterol tagged with the BODIPY fluorophore via the central difluoroboron moiety of the dye (B-Chol) is a promising probe for studying intracellular cholesterol dynamics. We synthesized a new BODIPY-cholesterol probe (B-P-Chol) with the fluorophore attached via one of its pyrrole rings to carbon-24 of cholesterol (B-P-Chol). Using two-photon fluorescence polarimetry in giant unilamellar vesicles and in the plasma membrane (PM) of living intact and actin-disrupted cells, we show that the BODIPY-groups in B-Chol and B-P-Chol are oriented perpendicular and almost parallel to the bilayer normal, respectively. B-Chol is in all three membrane systems much stronger oriented than B-P-Chol. Interestingly, we found that the lateral diffusion in the PM was two times slower for B-Chol than for B-P-Chol, although we found no difference in lateral diffusion in model membranes. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy, performed for the first time, to our knowledge, with fluorescent sterols, revealed that the difference in lateral diffusion of the BODIPY-cholesterol probes was not caused by anomalous subdiffusion, because diffusion of both analogs in the PM was free but not hindered. Our combined measurements show that the position and orientation of the BODIPY moiety in cholesterol analogs have a severe influence on lateral diffusion specifically in the PM of living cells.

  6. Heterochrony, modularity, and the functional evolution of the mechanosensory lateral line canal system of fishes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The canals of the mechanosensory lateral line system are components of the dermatocranium, and demonstrate phenotypic variation in bony fishes. Widened lateral line canals evolved convergently in a limited number of families of teleost fishes and it had been hypothesized that they evolved from narrow canals via heterochrony and explore modularity in the lateral line system. Two species of cichlids with different canal phenotypes were used to test a hypothesis of heterochrony. Histological material prepared from ontogenetic series of Aulonocara stuartgranti (widened canals) and Tramitichromis sp. (narrow canals) was analyzed using ANCOVA to determine rates of increase in canal diameter and neuromast size (length, width) and to compare the timing of onset of critical stages in canal morphogenesis (enclosure, ossification). Results A faster rate of increase in canal diameter and neuromast width (but not length), and a delay in onset of canal morphogenesis were found in Aulonocara relative to Tramitichromis. However, rates of increase in canal diameter and neuromast size among canals, among canal portions and among canals segments reveal similar trends within both species. Conclusion The evolution of widened lateral line canals is the result of dissociated heterochrony - acceleration in the rate of increase of both canal diameter and neuromast size, and delay in the onset of canal morphogenesis, in Aulonocara (widened canals) relative to Tramitichromis (narrow canals). Common rates of increase in canal diameter and neuromast size among canal portions in different dermatocranial bones and among canal segments reflect the absence of local heterochronies, and suggest modular integration among canals in each species. Thus, canal and neuromast morphology are more strongly influenced by their identities as features of the lateral line system than by the attributes of the dermatocranial bones in which the canals are found. Rate heterochrony manifested during the

  7. Laterality in metaphor processing: lack of evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging for the right hemisphere theory.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Alexander M; Leube, Dirk T; Erb, Michael; Grodd, Wolfgang; Kircher, Tilo T J

    2007-02-01

    We investigated processing of metaphoric sentences using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Seventeen healthy subjects (6 female, 11 male) read 60 novel short German sentence pairs with either metaphoric or literal meaning and performed two different tasks: judging the metaphoric content and judging whether the sentence has a positive or negative connotation. Laterality indices for 8 regions of interest were calculated: Inferior frontal gyrus (opercular part and triangular part), superior, middle, and inferior temporal gyrus, precuneus, temporal pole, and hippocampus. A left lateralised network was activated with no significant differences in laterality between the two tasks. The lowest degree of laterality was found in the temporal pole. Other factors than metaphoricity per se might trigger right hemisphere recruitment. Results are discussed in the context of lesion and hemifield studies.

  8. Bone Marrow-Derived Cell Accumulation in the Spinal Cord Is Independent of Peripheral Mobilization in a Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Peake, Kyle; Manning, John; Lewis, Coral-Ann; Tran, Kevin; Rossi, Fabio; Krieger, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) are capable of migrating across the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and accumulating in the central nervous system (CNS) when transplanted into recipients conditioned with whole-body irradiation or chemotherapy. We used the chemotherapeutic agents busulfan and treosulfan to condition recipient mice for transplantation with bone marrow (BM) cells isolated from donor mice ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein. We attempted to increase the accumulation of BMDCs in the CNS by mobilization of BMDCs using either, or both, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) or plerixafor (AMD3100). We also used several concentrations of busulfan. We hypothesized that higher concentrations of busulfan and BMDC mobilization would increase numbers of GFP+ cells in the CNS. The doses of busulfan employed (60–125 mg/kg) all resulted in high levels of sustained chimerism (>85% 1 year post-transplant) in both the blood and BM of wild-type (WT) mice and an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) mouse model. Moreover, cells accumulated within the CNS in a dose-, time-, and disease-dependent manner. Conditioning with the hydrophilic busulfan analog treosulfan, which is unable to cross the BBB efficiently, also resulted in a high degree of BM chimerism. However, few GFP+ BMDCs were found within the CNS of WT or ALS mice of treosulfan-conditioned mice. Mobilization of BMDCs into the circulation using GCSF and/or AMD3100 did not lead to increased accumulation of GFP+ BMDCs within the CNS of WT or ALS mice. Weekly analysis of BMDC accumulation revealed that BMDCs accumulated more rapidly and to a greater extent in the CNS of ALS mice conditioned with a high dose (125 mg/kg) of busulfan compared to a lower dose (80 mg/kg). The number of GFP+ BMDCs in the CNS labeling with the proliferation marker Ki67 increased in parallel with BMDC accumulation within the CNS. Our results indicate that establishment of high levels of blood and BM chimerism

  9. Does quadriceps neuromuscular activation capability explain mobility function among older men and women?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-related impairment of neuromuscular activation has been shown to contribute to weakness in older adults. However, it is unclear to what extent impaired neuromuscular activation independently accounts for decline of mobility function. The hypothesis of this study is that capability to produce rap...

  10. Does neuromuscular activation capability explain mobility function among older men and women?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-related impairment of neuromuscular activation has been shown to contribute to weakness in older adults. However, it is unclear to what extent impaired neuromuscular activation independently accounts for decline of mobility function. The hypothesis of this study is that capability to produce rap...

  11. Temperature dependent carrier mobility in graphene: Effect of Pd nanoparticle functionalization and hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Bochen; Uddin, Md Ahsan; Singh, Amol; Webb, Richard; Koley, Goutam

    2016-02-01

    The two dimensional nature of graphene, with charge carriers confined within one atomic layer thickness, causes its electrical, optical, and sensing properties to be strongly influenced by the surrounding media and functionalization layers. In this study, the effect of catalytically active Pd nanoparticle (NP) functionalization and subsequent hydrogenation on the hall mobility and carrier density of chemical vapor deposition synthesized graphene has been investigated as a function of temperature. Prior to functionalization, the mobility decreased monotonically as the temperature was reduced from 298 to 10 K, indicating coulomb scattering as the dominant scattering mechanism as expected for bilayer graphene. Similar decreasing trend with temperature was also observed after 2 nm Pd deposition, however, hydrogenation of the Pd NP led to significant enhancement in mobility from ˜2250 to 3840 cm2/V s at room temperature, which further monotonically increased to 5280 cm2/V s at 10 K. We attribute this contrasting trend in temperature dependent mobility to a switch in the dominant scattering mechanism from coulomb to surface optical (SO) phonon scattering due to higher dielectric constant and polar nature of PdHx formed upon hydrogenation of the Pd NPs.

  12. Effectiveness of Exercise on Functional Mobility in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Hillary; Hills, Sara; Kline, Nicole; Weems, Kyra; Doty, Antonette

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We identified evidence evaluating the effect of exercise on functional mobility in adults (aged 18 y or older) with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: An exhaustive search was conducted using the electronic databases PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SPORTDiscus, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from the earliest available evidence (1975) to the present (January 2016) for studies whose participants were ambulatory adults with CP receiving conservative treatment to address functional mobility limitations. Two independent reviewers agreed on the eligibility, inclusion, and level of evidence of each study. The Maastricht-Amsterdam List (MAL) was used to assess evidence quality. Results: Five of the six studies included were randomized controlled trials, and one was a pre-post case series. Interventions included whole-body vibration, treadmill training without body-weight support, rhythmic auditory stimulation, dynamic balance and gait activities, progressive resistance training, and interactive serious gaming for balance. All studies were considered high quality, as indicated by their MAL scores. Four studies showed no statistical difference and trivial effect sizes between the intervention and the control group. Rhythmic auditory stimulation and interactive serious gaming were found to be statistically significant in benefiting adults with CP. Conclusions: Evidence of the effect of exercise on functional mobility for ambulatory adults with CP is lacking. A need exists for quality research to determine the best interventions for adults with CP to maximize functional mobility.

  13. Effectiveness of Exercise on Functional Mobility in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Hillary; Hills, Sara; Kline, Nicole; Weems, Kyra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We identified evidence evaluating the effect of exercise on functional mobility in adults (aged 18 y or older) with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: An exhaustive search was conducted using the electronic databases PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SPORTDiscus, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from the earliest available evidence (1975) to the present (January 2016) for studies whose participants were ambulatory adults with CP receiving conservative treatment to address functional mobility limitations. Two independent reviewers agreed on the eligibility, inclusion, and level of evidence of each study. The Maastricht-Amsterdam List (MAL) was used to assess evidence quality. Results: Five of the six studies included were randomized controlled trials, and one was a pre–post case series. Interventions included whole-body vibration, treadmill training without body-weight support, rhythmic auditory stimulation, dynamic balance and gait activities, progressive resistance training, and interactive serious gaming for balance. All studies were considered high quality, as indicated by their MAL scores. Four studies showed no statistical difference and trivial effect sizes between the intervention and the control group. Rhythmic auditory stimulation and interactive serious gaming were found to be statistically significant in benefiting adults with CP. Conclusions: Evidence of the effect of exercise on functional mobility for ambulatory adults with CP is lacking. A need exists for quality research to determine the best interventions for adults with CP to maximize functional mobility. PMID:27904240

  14. Reliability of the Functional Mobility Scale for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Adrienne R.; Morris, Meg E.; Graham, H. Kerr; Wolfe, Rory; Baker, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This study examined inter-rater reliability of the Functional Mobility Scale (FMS) for children with cerebral palsy (CP) and the presence of rater bias. A consecutive sample of 118 children with CP, 2-18 years old (mean 10.3 years, SD 3.6), was recruited from a hospital setting. Children were classified using the gross motor function…

  15. Structural and functional asymmetry of lateral Heschl's gyrus reflects pitch perception preference.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Peter; Sluming, Vanessa; Roberts, Neil; Scherg, Michael; Goebel, Rainer; Specht, Hans J; Dosch, H Günter; Bleeck, Stefan; Stippich, Christoph; Rupp, André

    2005-09-01

    The relative pitch of harmonic complex sounds, such as instrumental sounds, may be perceived by decoding either the fundamental pitch (f0) or the spectral pitch (fSP) of the stimuli. We classified a large cohort of 420 subjects including symphony orchestra musicians to be either f0 or fSP listeners, depending on the dominant perceptual mode. In a subgroup of 87 subjects, MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and magnetoencephalography studies demonstrated a strong neural basis for both types of pitch perception irrespective of musical aptitude. Compared with f0 listeners, fSP listeners possessed a pronounced rightward, rather than leftward, asymmetry of gray matter volume and P50m activity within the pitch-sensitive lateral Heschl's gyrus. Our data link relative hemispheric lateralization with perceptual stimulus properties, whereas the absolute size of the Heschl's gyrus depends on musical aptitude.

  16. The frenectomy combined with a laterally positioned pedicle graft. Functional and esthetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Miller, P D

    1985-02-01

    In many cases it is necessary to perform a frenectomy to prevent reopening of a midline diastema following closure by orthodontic therapy. Often the loss of the interdental papilla between the maxillary incisors during the classic frenectomy creates an unacceptable esthetic result. A surgical technique combining a frenectomy with a laterally positioned pedicle graft is presented. The interdental papilla is left surgically undisturbed if it is of physiologic size. If it is enlarged, gingivoplasty is performed to reduce it to an appropriate size. Closure across the midline by laterally positioning gingiva and healing by primary intention results in attached gingiva across the midline. This attached gingiva may have a bracing effect and thus aid in preventing orthodontic relapse (reopening of the diastema). Twenty-seven cases were treated. No relapse was found in 24 cases and in 3 cases only minimal relapse was noted (less than 1 mm). The esthetic result is superior to that obtained with the classic frenectomy technique.

  17. Electron and thermal neutron lateral distribution functions in EAS at high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchegolev, O. B.; Alekseenko, V. V.; Cai, Z. Y.; Cao, Z.; Cui, S. W.; Gromushkin, D. M.; Guo, X. W.; He, H. H.; Liu, Y.; Ma, X.; Stenkin, Yu V.; Stepanov, V. I.; Zhao, J.

    2016-05-01

    EAS array of novel type have been constructed on the base of ARGO-YBJ experiment (Tibet, China). It consists of the four specially designed scintillator en-detectors capable to measure two main EAS components: hadrons through thermal neutrons (n) and electrons (e). The results of simulation for these arrays using CORSIKA and GEANT4 codes are presented. Simulated thermal neutron and electron lateral distributions are compared with experimental data. Obtained distributions are compared with those obtained by other arrays.

  18. Variability of Rheotaxis Behaviors in Larval Bullfrogs Highlights Species Diversity in Lateral Line Function

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Erika E. A.

    2016-01-01

    The morphology and distribution of lateral line neuromasts vary between ecomorphological types of anuran tadpoles, but little is known about how this structural variability contributes to differences in lateral-line mediated behaviors. Previous research identified distinct differences in one such behavior, positive rheotaxis towards the source of a flow, in two tadpole species, the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis; type 1) and the American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana; type 4). Because these two species had been tested under different flow conditions, we re-evaluated these findings by quantifying flow-sensing behaviors of bullfrog tadpoles in the same flow field in which X. laevis tadpoles had been tested previously. Early larval bullfrog tadpoles were exposed to flow in the dark, in the presence of a discrete light cue, and after treatment with the ototoxin gentamicin. In response to flow, tadpoles moved downstream, closer to a side wall, and higher in the water column, but they did not station-hold. Tadpoles exhibited positive rheotaxis, but with long latencies, low to moderate accuracy, and considerable individual variability. This is in contrast to the robust, stereotyped station-holding and accurate rheotaxis of X. laevis tadpoles. The presence of a discrete visual cue and gentamicin treatment altered spatial positioning and disrupted rheotaxis in both tadpole species. Species differences in lateral-line mediated behaviors may reflect differences in neuromast number and distribution, life history, or perceptual salience of other environmental cues. PMID:27870909

  19. Estimating associations of mobile phone use and brain tumours taking into account laterality: a comparison and theoretical evaluation of applied methods.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Kirsten; Deltour, Isabelle; Schüz, Joachim

    2012-12-10

    Estimating exposure-outcome associations using laterality information on exposure and on outcome is an issue, when estimating associations of mobile phone use and brain tumour risk. The exposure is localized; therefore, a potential risk is expected to exist primarily on the side of the head, where the phone is usually held (ipsilateral exposure), and to a lesser extent at the opposite side of the head (contralateral exposure). Several measures of the associations with ipsilateral and contralateral exposure, dealing with different sampling designs, have been presented in the literature. This paper presents a general framework for the analysis of such studies using a likelihood-based approach in a competing risks model setting. The approach clarifies the implicit assumptions required for the validity of the presented estimators, particularly that in some approaches the risk with contralateral exposure is assumed to be zero. The performance of the estimators is illustrated in a simulation study showing for instance that while in some scenarios there is a loss of statistical power, others - in case of a positive ipsilateral exposure-outcome association - would result in a negatively biased estimate of the contralateral exposure parameter, irrespective of any additional recall bias. In conclusion, our theoretical evaluations and results from the simulation study emphasize the importance of setting up a formal model, which furthermore allows for estimation in more complicated and perhaps more realistic exposure settings, such as taking into account exposure to both sides of the head.

  20. GENERAL: Collision avoidance for a mobile robot based on radial basis function hybrid force control technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Shu-Huan

    2009-10-01

    Collision avoidance is always difficult in the planning path for a mobile robot. In this paper, the virtual force field between a mobile robot and an obstacle is formed and regulated to maintain a desired distance by hybrid force control algorithm. Since uncertainties from robot dynamics and obstacle degrade the performance of a collision avoidance task, intelligent control is used to compensate for the uncertainties. A radial basis function (RBF) neural network is used to regulate the force field of an accurate distance between a robot and an obstacle in this paper and then simulation studies are conducted to confirm that the proposed algorithm is effective.

  1. System xC- is a mediator of microglial function and its deletion slows symptoms in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mice.

    PubMed

    Mesci, Pinar; Zaïdi, Sakina; Lobsiger, Christian S; Millecamps, Stéphanie; Escartin, Carole; Seilhean, Danielle; Sato, Hideyo; Mallat, Michel; Boillée, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is the most common adult-onset motor neuron disease and evidence from mice expressing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-causing SOD1 mutations suggest that neurodegeneration is a non-cell autonomous process where microglial cells influence disease progression. However, microglial-derived neurotoxic factors still remain largely unidentified in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. With excitotoxicity being a major mechanism proposed to cause motor neuron death in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, our hypothesis was that excessive glutamate release by activated microglia through their system [Formula: see text] (a cystine/glutamate antiporter with the specific subunit xCT/Slc7a11) could contribute to neurodegeneration. Here we show that xCT expression is enriched in microglia compared to total mouse spinal cord and absent from motor neurons. Activated microglia induced xCT expression and during disease, xCT levels were increased in both spinal cord and isolated microglia from mutant SOD1 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mice. Expression of xCT was also detectable in spinal cord post-mortem tissues of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and correlated with increased inflammation. Genetic deletion of xCT in mice demonstrated that activated microglia released glutamate mainly through system [Formula: see text]. Interestingly, xCT deletion also led to decreased production of specific microglial pro-inflammatory/neurotoxic factors including nitric oxide, TNFa and IL6, whereas expression of anti-inflammatory/neuroprotective markers such as Ym1/Chil3 were increased, indicating that xCT regulates microglial functions. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mice, xCT deletion surprisingly led to earlier symptom onset but, importantly, this was followed by a significantly slowed progressive disease phase, which resulted in more surviving motor neurons. These results are consistent with a deleterious contribution of microglial-derived glutamate during symptomatic

  2. Hemifacial hyperhidrosis associated with ipsilateral/contralateral cervical disc herniation myelopathy. Functional considerations on how compression pattern determines the laterality.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Satoshi; Inukai, Yoko; Nishimura, Naoki; Sato, Maki; Sugenoya, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Sweating is an important mechanism for ensuring constant thermoregulation, but hyperhidrosis may be disturbing. We present five cases of hemifacial hyperhidrosis as a compensatory response to an/hypohidrosis caused by cervical disc herniation. All the patients complained of hemifacial hyperhidrosis, without anisocoria or blepharoptosis. Sweat function testing and thermography confirmed hyperhidrosis of hemifacial and adjacent areas. Neck MRI showed cervical disc herniation. Three of the patients had lateral compression with welldemarcated hypohidrosis below the hyperhidrosis on the same side as the cervical lesion. The rest had paramedian compression with poorly demarcated hyperhidrosis and hypohidrosis on the contralateral side. Although MRI showed no intraspinal pathological signal intensity, lateral dural compression might influence the circulation to the sudomotor pathway, and paramedian compression might influence the ipsilateral sulcal artery, which perfuses the sympathetic descending pathway and the intermediolateral nucleus. Sweat function testing and thermography should be performed to determine the focus of the hemifacial hyperhidrosis, and the myelopathy should be investigated on both sides.

  3. A concept of an automated function control for ambient aerosol measurements using mobility particle size spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, S.; Löschau, G.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2014-04-01

    An automated function control unit was developed to regularly check the ambient particle number concentration derived from a mobility particle size spectrometer as well as its zero-point behaviour. The function control allows unattended quality assurance experiments at remote air quality monitoring or research stations under field conditions. The automated function control also has the advantage of being able to get a faster system stability response than the recommended on-site comparisons with reference instruments. The method is based on a comparison of the total particle number concentration measured by a mobility particle size spectrometer and a condensation particle counter while removing diffusive particles smaller than 20 nm in diameter. In practice, the small particles are removed by a set of diffusion screens, as traditionally used in a diffusion battery. Another feature of the automated function control is to check the zero-point behaviour of the ambient aerosol passing through a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. The performance of the function control is illustrated with the aid of a 1-year data set recorded at Annaberg-Buchholz, a station in the Saxon air quality monitoring network. During the period of concern, the total particle number concentration derived from the mobility particle size spectrometer slightly overestimated the particle number concentration recorded by the condensation particle counter by 2 % (grand average). Based on our first year of experience with the function control, we developed tolerance criteria that allow a performance evaluation of a tested mobility particle size spectrometer with respect to the total particle number concentration. We conclude that the automated function control enhances the quality and reliability of unattended long-term particle number size distribution measurements. This will have beneficial effects for intercomparison studies involving different measurement sites, and help provide a higher

  4. Quantitative changes in testicular structure and function in rat exposed to mobile phone radiation.

    PubMed

    Çetkin, M; Kızılkan, N; Demirel, C; Bozdağ, Z; Erkılıç, S; Erbağcı, H

    2017-01-26

    The possible effects of the electromagnetic fields (EMF) generated by mobile phones on reproductive functions have been discussed in recent years. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of EMF emitted from mobile phones on the rat testis morphology and histopathology using stereological techniques. We also investigated cortisol, testosterone, FSH and LH levels. A total of thirty-two (n = 32) male Wistar albino rats were used in this study. Animals were randomly divided into four groups as control (C, n = 8), sham (Sh, n = 8), mobile phone speech (Sp, n = 8) and mobile phone standby (ST by). Morphometric measurements were made with the help of a computer-assisted stereological analysis system. The testis weight and volume were significantly lower in the EMF exposed groups. The mean volume fraction of interstitial tissue was higher, but the volume fraction of tubular tissue was lower in the EMF-exposed groups. The mean tubular and germinal tissue volume, seminiferous tubule diameter and germinal epithelium height were also lower in EMF exposed groups. The cortisol levels in the EMF-exposed groups were significantly higher. In conclusion, the EMF created by mobile phones caused morphologic and histological changes by the affecting germinal epithelium tissue negatively.

  5. Effects of blueberry supplementation on measures of functional mobility in older adults.

    PubMed

    Schrager, Matthew A; Hilton, James; Gould, Richard; Kelly, Valerie E

    2015-06-01

    Limited functional mobility in older adults has been associated with declines in tests of motor, psychomotor, and executive function. Animal studies have demonstrated reversals in indices of motor and psychomotor function via supplementation with polyphenolic-rich foods such as blueberries. The purpose of this study was to examine whether 6 weeks of daily consumption of 2 cups of frozen blueberries affects functional mobility in older adults. Pre- and post-intervention assessments of grip strength, simple reaction time, adaptive gait, and executive function were completed for older adults (age >60 years) partially randomly assigned to a blueberry (BB) supplementation or a carrot juice drink control (CAR) group. Paired t tests were used to assess within-group effects for outcome variables in each supplementation group, and a mixed-model analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to determine group (CAR vs. BB) differences. Mixed-model analysis indicated that the BB group demonstrated significant improvements relative to the CAR group in performance (i.e., number of step errors) of a challenging dual-task adaptive gait test that were independent of differences in gait speed. Within only the BB group, significant improvements were also seen in 3 other measures (i.e., usual gait speed; number of step errors during single-task adaptive gait; and gait speed during dual-task adaptive gait). These preliminary findings support the hypothesis that blueberry supplementation may provide an effective countermeasure to age-related declines in functional mobility and serve as justification for an expansion to larger trials to more fully assess this nonpharmacologic approach to maintaining optimal mobility and independence.

  6. Cortisol in Neonatal Mother's Milk Predicts Later Infant Social and Cognitive Functioning in Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Amanda M; Murphy, Ashley M; Guitarra, Denisse; Slonecker, Emily; Suomi, Stephen J; Rosenberg, Kendra L; Novak, Melinda A; Meyer, Jerrold S; Hinde, Katie

    2017-03-29

    Milk provides not only the building blocks for somatic development but also the hormonal signals that contribute to the biopsychological organization of the infant. Among mammals, glucocorticoids (GCs) in mother's milk have been associated with infant temperament. This study extended prior work to investigate rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) mother-infant dyads (N = 34) from birth through 8 months postpartum. Regression analysis revealed that cortisol concentrations in milk during the neonatal period predicted impulsivity on a cognitive task, but not global social behaviors, months later. During this time period, sex-differentiated social behavior emerged. For female infants, milk cortisol concentrations predicted total frequency of play. Collectively, these findings support and extend the "lactational programming" hypothesis on the impact of maternal-origin hormones ingested via milk.

  7. The importance of incorporating functional habitats into conservation planning for highly mobile species in dynamic systems.

    PubMed

    Webb, Matthew H; Terauds, Aleks; Tulloch, Ayesha; Bell, Phil; Stojanovic, Dejan; Heinsohn, Robert

    2017-01-28

    The distribution of mobile species in dynamic systems can vary greatly over time and space. Estimating their population size and geographic range can be problematic, with serious implications for conservation assessments. Scarce data on mobile species and the resources they need can also limit the type of analytical approaches available to derive such estimates. Here we quantify dynamic change in availability and use of key ecological resources required for breeding (i.e. food and nesting sites) for a critically endangered nomadic habitat specialist, the swift parrot (Lathamus discolor). We compare estimates of occupied habitat (km(2) ) derived from dynamic presence-background data climatic models to those derived from dynamic occupancy models that include a direct measure of food availability. We also compare estimates that incorporate fine resolution information on key ecological resources (i.e functional habitats) into distribution maps with more common approaches that typically focus on broader climatic suitability. For all models, both the extent and spatial location of occupied areas varied dramatically over the study period. The occupancy models produced significantly smaller (up to an order of magnitude) and more spatially discrete estimates of occupied habitat than climate-based models. Estimates accounting for the area of functional habitats were also significantly smaller than estimates based only on occupied habitat. Importantly, an increase (or decrease) in one functional habitat did not necessarily correspond to changes in the other, with consequences for overall habitat functionality. We argue that these patterns are typical for mobile resource specialists, but currently go unnoticed due to limited data on (1) species' presence/absence and (2) availability of key resources. Understanding changes in the relative availability of functional habitats is crucial to informing conservation planning and accurately assessing extinction risk for mobile

  8. Conserved Functions of the MATE Transporter BIG EMBRYO1 in Regulation of Lateral Organ Size and Initiation Rate

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masaharu; Sato, Yutaka; Wu, Shan; Kang, Byung-Ho; McCarty, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic networks that determine rates of organ initiation and organ size are key regulators of plant architecture. Whereas several genes that influence the timing of lateral organ initiation have been identified, the regulatory pathways in which these genes operate are poorly understood. Here, we identify a class of genes implicated in regulation of the lateral organ initiation rate. Loss-of-function mutations in the MATE transporter encoded by maize (Zea mays) Big embryo 1 (Bige1) cause accelerated leaf and root initiation as well as enlargement of the embryo scutellum. BIGE1 is localized to trans-Golgi, indicating a possible role in secretion of a signaling molecule. Interestingly, phenotypes of bige1 bear striking similarity to cyp78a mutants identified in diverse plant species. We show that a CYP78A gene is upregulated in bige1 mutant embryos, suggesting a role for BIGE1 in feedback regulation of a CYP78A pathway. We demonstrate that accelerated leaf formation and early flowering phenotypes conditioned by mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana BIGE1 orthologs are complemented by maize Bige1, showing that the BIGE1 transporter has a conserved function in regulation of lateral organ initiation in plants. We propose that BIGE1 is required for transport of an intermediate or product associated with the CYP78A pathway. PMID:26276834

  9. Conserved Functions of the MATE Transporter BIG EMBRYO1 in Regulation of Lateral Organ Size and Initiation Rate.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masaharu; Sato, Yutaka; Wu, Shan; Kang, Byung-Ho; McCarty, Donald R

    2015-08-01

    Genetic networks that determine rates of organ initiation and organ size are key regulators of plant architecture. Whereas several genes that influence the timing of lateral organ initiation have been identified, the regulatory pathways in which these genes operate are poorly understood. Here, we identify a class of genes implicated in regulation of the lateral organ initiation rate. Loss-of-function mutations in the MATE transporter encoded by maize (Zea mays) Big embryo 1 (Bige1) cause accelerated leaf and root initiation as well as enlargement of the embryo scutellum. BIGE1 is localized to trans-Golgi, indicating a possible role in secretion of a signaling molecule. Interestingly, phenotypes of bige1 bear striking similarity to cyp78a mutants identified in diverse plant species. We show that a CYP78A gene is upregulated in bige1 mutant embryos, suggesting a role for BIGE1 in feedback regulation of a CYP78A pathway. We demonstrate that accelerated leaf formation and early flowering phenotypes conditioned by mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana BIGE1 orthologs are complemented by maize Bige1, showing that the BIGE1 transporter has a conserved function in regulation of lateral organ initiation in plants. We propose that BIGE1 is required for transport of an intermediate or product associated with the CYP78A pathway.

  10. Sex determination using discriminant function analysis in Indigenous (Kurubas) children and adolescents of Coorg, Karnataka, India: A lateral cephalometric study.

    PubMed

    Devang Divakar, Darshan; John, Jacob; Al Kheraif, Abdulaziz Abdullah; Mavinapalla, Seema; Ramakrishnaiah, Ravikumar; Vellappally, Sajith; Hashem, Mohamed Ibrahim; Dalati, M H N; Durgesh, B H; Safadi, Rima A; Anil, Sukumaran

    2016-11-01

    Aim: To test the validity of sex discrimination using lateral cephalometric radiograph and discriminant function analysis in Indigenous (Kuruba) children and adolescents of Coorg, Karnataka, India. Methods and materials: Six hundred and sixteen lateral cephalograms of 380 male and 236 females of age ranging from 6.5 to 18 years of Indigenous population of Coorg, Karnataka, India called Kurubas having a normal occlusion were included in the study. Lateral cephalograms were obtained in a standard position with teeth in centric occlusion and lips relaxed. Each radiograph was traced and cephalometric landmarks were measured using digital calliper. Calculations of 24 cephalometric measurements were performed. Results: Males exhibited significantly greater mean angular and linear cephalometric measurements as compared to females (p < 0.05) (Table 5). Also, significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed in all the variables according to age (Table 6). Out of 24 variables, only ULTc predicts the gender. The reliability of the derived discriminant function was assessed among study subjects; 100% of males and females were recognized correctly. Conclusion: The final outcome of this study validates the existence of sexual dimorphism in the skeleton as early as 6.5 years of age. There is a need for further research to determine other landmarks that can help in sex determination and norms for Indigenous (Kuruba) population and also other Indigenous population of Coorg, Karnataka, India.

  11. Effects of a low-volume, vigorous intensity step exercise program on functional mobility in middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Doheny, Emer P; McGrath, Denise; Ditroilo, Massimiliano; Mair, Jacqueline L; Greene, Barry R; Caulfield, Brian; De Vito, Giuseppe; Lowery, Madeleine M

    2013-08-01

    Aging-related decline in functional mobility is associated with loss of independence. This decline may be mitigated through programs of physical activity. Despite reports of aging-related mobility impairment in middle-aged adults, this age group has been largely overlooked in terms of exercise programs that target functional mobility and the preservation of independence in older age. A method to quantitatively assess changes in functional mobility could direct rehabilitation in a proactive rather than reactive manner. Thirty-three healthy but sedentary middle-aged adults participated in a four week low-volume, vigorous intensity stepping exercise program. Two baseline testing sessions and one post-training testing session were conducted. Functional mobility was assessed using the timed up and go (TUG) test, with its constituent sit-to-walk and walk-to-sit phases examined using a novel inertial sensor-based method. Additionally, semi-tandem balance and knee extensor muscle isometric torque were assessed. Trunk acceleration during walk-to-sit reduced significantly post-training, suggesting altered movement control due to the exercise program. No significant training-induced changes in sit-to-walk acceleration, TUG time, balance or torque were observed. The novel method of functional mobility assessment presented provides a reliable means to quantify subtle changes in mobility during postural transitions. Over time, this exercise program may improve functional mobility.

  12. Hyponatremia, Cognitive Function, and Mobility in an Outpatient Heart Failure Population

    PubMed Central

    Albabtain, Monirah; Brenner, Michael J.; Nicklas, John M.; Hummel, Scott L.; McCormick, Michael P.; Pawlowski, Jeffrey L.; Remington, Tami L.; Gure, Tanya R.; Dorsch, Michael P.; Bleske, Barry E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The association of hyponatremia with cognitive impairment and mobility in heart failure (HF) patients is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if hyponatremia is associated with cognitive and mobility impairment as measured by simple, validated, and time-sensitive tests. Material/Methods This was a prospective study in patients with reduced and preserved ejection fraction (HFrEF, HFpEF) seen in outpatient HF clinics. Hyponatremia was defined as sodium level ≤136 mEq/L. Cognitive function was measured using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) tool, and mobility was measured with the Timed Up and Go test (TUG-t). Results A total of 121 patients were evaluated; 30% were hyponatremic (134±1.9 mEq/l, range 128–136 mEq/l). Overall, 92% of hyponatremic patients had cognitive impairment (MoCA <26) compared to 76% of the non-hyponatremic patients [relative risk 1.2 (confidence interval: 1.02–1.4, p=0.02)]. In regard to mobility, 72% of hyponatremic patients and 62% of non-hyponatremic patients (p=0.4) had TUG-t times that were considered to be worse than average. A total of 84% (N=76) of HFrEF and 71% (N=22) of HFpEF patients had cognitive impairment (p=0.86). HFrEF patients had significantly lower overall MoCA scores (21.2±3.7 vs. 23.3±3.6, p=0.006) and similar TUG-t times compared to HFpEF patients. Conclusions Most heart failure patients (HFrEF and HFpEF) seen in an ambulatory setting had impairment of cognitive function and mobility, with a higher prevalence among those with hyponatremia. Screening can be done using tests that can be administered in a clinical setting. PMID:27988787

  13. Adaptation to Turkish and Reliability Study of the Revised Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R)

    PubMed Central

    KOÇ, Filiz; BALAL, Mehmet; DEMİR, Turgay; ALPARSLAN, Z. Nazan; SARICA, Yakup

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal disease characterized by progressive degeneration of the motor neurons. It is difficult to define the severity of the clinical findings of this destructive disease owing to its rapid progression, which presents serious alterations in a short time even in the same patient. The present study was designed to evaulate the validity of the Turkish version of the Revised Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R), which has been used in various countries for measuring the functional status of ALS patients. Methods The ALSFRS-R scores of 41 ALS patients (24 male), in any stages of illness, were simultaneously assessed by two physicians. The functional status of the patients (motor system, bulbar, and pulmonary functions) was evaluated under 12 titles. In every subtitle, the functional status was evaluated as 0 for the worst functional status and 4 for the best functional status. The mean differentials for both subtitles and global scores and the 95% confidence bounds of these means were detected. The coherence was defined as the states in which the coefficient is above 0.80 and is statistically significant Results From the data obtained, the correlation between the two physicians was found to be statistically significant (p=0.000) in terms of the means of both subtitles and total scores. Conclusion It was shown in the present study that in the clinical follow-up of the disease, the Turkish version of ALSFRS-R is a simple, reliable, and easily applicable. PMID:28373799

  14. Effects of Thoracic Mobilization and Manipulation on Function and Mental State in Chronic Lower Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Youn-Bum; Lee, Jung-Ho; Park, Young-Han

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in function and mental state after thoracic mobilization and manipulation in patients with chronic lower back pain (LBP). [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-six subjects were randomly divided into mobilization group (group A), manipulation group (group B) and control group (group C). The Oswestry disability index (ODI) was used to measure the functional impairment of patients with LBP. A multiple spinal diagnosis was used to measure the range of motion (ROM) of vertebra segments. The Fear-avoidance beliefs questionnaire (FABQ) was used to investigate the mental state of LBP patients. [Results] Group A and group B were significantly different from group C in terms of the ODI. Between groups, there was no difference in ROM during trunk flexion. Group A and group B were also significantly different from the control group in extension ROM. The FABQ of group B was significantly different from that of group A. [Conclusion] Application of mobilization or manipulation to thoracic lumbar vertebrae has a positive effect on function, mental state, and ROM in patients with lower back pain. PMID:25435683

  15. Effects of tango on functional mobility in Parkinson's disease: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Hackney, Madeleine E; Kantorovich, Svetlana; Levin, Rebecca; Earhart, Gammon M

    2007-12-01

    Recent research has shown that dance, specifically tango, may be an appropriate and effective strategy for ameliorating functional mobility deficits in people who are frail and elderly. Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) experience declines in functional mobility that may be even more pronounced than those experienced by frail elderly individuals without PD. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two movement programs: tango classes or exercise classes. Nineteen subjects with PD were randomly assigned to a tango group or a group exercise class representative of the current classes offered in our geographical area for individuals with PD. Subjects completed a total of 20 tango or exercise classes and were evaluated the week before and the week following the intervention. Both groups showed significant improvements in overall Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) score and nonsignificant improvements in self-reported Freezing of Gait. In addition, the tango group showed significant improvements on the Berg Balance Scale. The exercise group did not improve on this measure. Finally, the tango group showed a trend toward improvement on the Timed Up and Go test that was not observed in the exercise group. Future studies with a larger sample are needed to confirm and extend our observation that tango may be an effective intervention to target functional mobility deficits in individuals with PD.

  16. Effects of thoracic mobilization and manipulation on function and mental state in chronic lower back pain.

    PubMed

    Sung, Youn-Bum; Lee, Jung-Ho; Park, Young-Han

    2014-11-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in function and mental state after thoracic mobilization and manipulation in patients with chronic lower back pain (LBP). [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-six subjects were randomly divided into mobilization group (group A), manipulation group (group B) and control group (group C). The Oswestry disability index (ODI) was used to measure the functional impairment of patients with LBP. A multiple spinal diagnosis was used to measure the range of motion (ROM) of vertebra segments. The Fear-avoidance beliefs questionnaire (FABQ) was used to investigate the mental state of LBP patients. [Results] Group A and group B were significantly different from group C in terms of the ODI. Between groups, there was no difference in ROM during trunk flexion. Group A and group B were also significantly different from the control group in extension ROM. The FABQ of group B was significantly different from that of group A. [Conclusion] Application of mobilization or manipulation to thoracic lumbar vertebrae has a positive effect on function, mental state, and ROM in patients with lower back pain.

  17. Fifty Years Later: The Sequence, Structure and Function of Lacewing Cross-beta Silk

    SciTech Connect

    Weisman, Sarah; Okada, Shoko; Mudie, Stephen T.; Huson, Mickey G.; Trueman, Holly E.; Sriskantha, Alagacone; Haritos, Victoria S.; Sutherland, Tara D.

    2009-12-01

    Classic studies of protein structure in the 1950s and 1960s demonstrated that green lacewing egg stalk silk possesses a rare native cross-beta sheet conformation. We have identified and sequenced the silk genes expressed by adult females of a green lacewing species. The two encoded silk proteins are 109 and 67 kDa in size and rich in serine, glycine and alanine. Over 70% of each protein sequence consists of highly repetitive regions with 16-residue periodicity. The repetitive sequences can be fitted to an elegant cross-beta sheet structural model with protein chains folded into regular 8-residue long beta strands. This model is supported by wide-angle X-ray scattering data and tensile testing from both our work and the original papers. We suggest that the silk proteins assemble into stacked beta sheet crystallites bound together by a network of cystine cross-links. This hierarchical structure gives the lacewing silk high lateral stiffness nearly threefold that of silkworm silk, enabling the egg stalks to effectively suspend eggs and protect them from predators.

  18. [Functional asymmetry of the frontal cortex and lateral hypothalamus of cats during food instrumental conditioning].

    PubMed

    Vanetsiian, G L; Pavlova, I V

    2003-01-01

    The synchronism and latency of auditory evoked potentials (EP) recorded in symmetric points of the frontal cortex and lateral hypothalamus of cats were measured at different stages of instrumental food conditioning and after the urgent transition to 30% reinforcement. Correlation coefficients between EPs in the cortex and hypothalamus were high (with left-side dominance) at the beginning of the experiments, when food motivation was high, and during the whole experiments in cases of high-probability of conditioned performance. Analysis of early positive P55-80 EP component showed that at all conditioning stages the peak latency of this component was shorter in the left cortical areas than in symmetrical points, whereas in the hypothalamus the shorter latency at the left side was observed at the stage of unstable conditioned reflex, and at the stage of stable reflex the latency of the studied component was shorter at the right side. During transition to 30% reinforcement, the latency was also shorter in the right hypothalamus. It is suggested that the high left-side correlation between the hypothalamus and cortex was associated with motivational and motor component of behavior rather than reflected the emotional stress induced by transition to another stereotype of food reinforcement (30%).

  19. Changes in tongue pressure, pulmonary function, and salivary flow in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Easterling, Caryn; Antinoja, Jodi; Cashin, Susan; Barkhaus, Paul E

    2013-06-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease involving nerve cells that control voluntary muscle movement (Rowland LP, Shneider NA, N Engl J Med 344(22):1688-1700, 2001). The aim of this study were to determine the pattern of neurodegenerative change in (1) isometric tongue strength (ITS) and spontaneous saliva swallow (SSS) pressure, (2) saliva weight, and (3) forced vital capacity (FVC) in patients with ALS who present with primary spinal versus primary bulbar symptoms. Twenty-three consecutive patients (age = 48-80 years, mean = 59.5 years) were enrolled. Data were collected over three visits (12-week interval) for each group: 9 patients with bulbar symptoms and 14 with spinal symptoms. A significant difference was noted in SSS and ITS in the group with bulbar symptoms from Trial 1 to II and from Trial II to III. SSS and ITS showed a significant difference when comparing Trial I to III but not when comparing Trial I to II for the spinal symptom group, indicating that this group experienced a slower decline in SSS. Saliva production did not show a significant change in the bulbar symptom group but did in the spinal group. FVC was significantly different when comparing Trial I to III and Trial II to III for both groups. FVC, SSS, and ITS may be complimentary measures used as a gauge of an ALS patient's ability to efficiently take oral nutrition and to support required alterations in diet consistency.

  20. Skeletal Muscle Remodelling as a Function of Disease Progression in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, L.; Jørgensen, L. H.; Bech, R. D.; Frandsen, U.; Schrøder, H. D.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle weakness is considered the pivotal sign of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Knowledge about the skeletal muscle degeneration/regeneration process and the myogenic potential is limited in ALS patients. Therefore, we investigate these processes in a time course perspective by analysing skeletal muscle biopsies from ALS patients collected before and after a 12-week period of normal daily activities and compare these with healthy age-matched control tissue. We do this by evaluating mRNA and protein (immunohistochemical) markers of regeneration, neurodegeneration, myogenesis, cell cycle regulation, and inflammation. Our results show morphological changes indicative of active denervation and reinnervation and an increase in small atrophic fibres. We demonstrate differences between ALS and controls in pathways controlling skeletal muscle homeostasis, cytoskeletal and regenerative markers, neurodegenerative factors, myogenic factors, cell cycle determinants, and inflammatory markers. Our results on Pax7 and MyoD protein expression suggest that proliferation and differentiation of skeletal muscle stem cells are affected in ALS patients, and the myogenic processes cannot overcome the denervation-induced wasting. PMID:27195289

  1. Functional and pathological relevance of HERC family proteins: a decade later.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Tena, Susana; Cubillos-Rojas, Monica; Schneider, Taiane; Rosa, Jose Luis

    2016-05-01

    The HERC gene family encodes proteins with two characteristic domains in their sequence: the HECT domain and the RCC1-like domain (RLD). In humans, the HERC family comprises six members that can be divided into two groups based on their molecular mass and domain structure. Whereas large HERCs (HERC1 and HERC2) contain one HECT and more than one RLD, small HERCs (HERC3-6) possess single HECT and RLD domains. Accumulating evidence shows the HERC family proteins to be key components of a wide range of cellular functions, including neurodevelopment, DNA damage repair, cell growth and immune response. Considering the significant recent advances made regarding HERC functionality, an updated review summarizing the progress is greatly needed at 10 years since the last HERC review. We provide an integrated view of HERC function and go into detail about its implications for several human diseases such as cancer and neurological disorders.

  2. Effect of maitland mobilization in cervical and thoracic spine and therapeutic exercise on functional impairment in individuals with chronic neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Keun-Su; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated joint mobilization and therapeutic exercise applied to the cervical spine and upper thoracic spine for functional impairment caused by chronic neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen study subjects were randomly assigned to two groups of nine people each. Therapeutic exercise only was applied to the cervical and upper thoracic spine for Group I, while both therapeutic exercise and joint mobilization were applied to Group II. The visual analog scale, neck disability index, active cervical range of motion, static balance capacity, and muscle tone were assessed with a pre-test. The intervention was carried out for 60 minutes a day, three times a week, for two weeks for each group, followed by a post-test using the same protocol as the pre-test. [Results] The visual analog scale, neck disability index, and active cervical range of motion improved significantly in both groups. Group II improved significantly more on right lateral flexion and rightward rotation. Muscle tone improved significantly in the upper trapezius in both groups. [Conclusion] The joint mobilization and therapeutic exercise for functional impairments caused by chronic neck pain had a significant effect on several types of functional impairment. PMID:28356648

  3. Structural and Functional Connectivity between the Lateral Posterior-Pulvinar Complex and Primary Visual Cortex in the Ferret

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chunxiu; Sellers, Kristin K.; Radtke-Schuller, Susanne; Lu, Jinghao; Xing, Lei; Ghukasyan, Vladimir; Li, Yuhui; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian; Murrow, Richard; Frohlich, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    The role of higher-order thalamic structures in sensory processing remains poorly understood. Here, we used the ferret (Mustela putorius furo) as a novel model species for the study of the lateral posterior-pulvinar complex (LP/pulvinar) and its structural and functional connectivity with area 17 (primary visual cortex, V1). We found reciprocal anatomical connections between the lateral part of the Lateral Posterior Nucleus of the LP/pulvinar (LPl) and V1. In order to investigate the role of this feedback loop between LPl and V1 in shaping network activity, we determined the functional interactions between LPl and supragranular, granular, and infragranular layers of V1 by recording multiunit activity (MUA) and local field potential (LFP). Coherence was strongest between LPl and supragranular V1 with the most distinct peaks in the delta and alpha frequency bands. Inter-area interaction measured by spike-phase coupling identified the delta frequency band dominated by infragranular V1 and multiple frequency bands that were most pronounced in supragranular V1. This inter-area coupling was differentially modulated by full-field synthetic and naturalistic visual stimulation. We also found that visual responses in LPl were distinct from the ones in V1 in terms of their reliability. Together, our data support a model of multiple communication channels between the LPl and layers of V1 that are enabled by oscillations in different frequency bands. This demonstration of anatomical and functional connectivity between LPl and V1 in ferrets provides a roadmap for studying the interaction dynamics during behavior and a template for identifying activity dynamics of other thalamic feedback loops. PMID:26505737

  4. An Objective Functional Characterisation of Head Movement Impairment in Individuals with Neck Muscle Weakness Due to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pancani, Silvia; Tindale, Wendy; Shaw, Pamela J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Neck muscle weakness and head drop are well recognised in patients with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but an objective characterisation of the consequent head movement impairment is lacking. The aim of this study was to quantitatively characterise head movements in ALS compared to aged matched controls. Methods We evaluated two groups, one of thirteen patients with ALS and one of thirteen age-matched controls, during the execution of a series of controlled head movements, performed while wearing two inertial sensors attached on the forehead and sternum, respectively. We quantified the differences between the two groups from the sensor data using indices of velocity, smoothness and movement coupling (intended as a measure of undesired out of plane movements). Findings Results confirmed a general limitation in the ability of the ALS patients to perform and control head movements. High inter-patient variability was observed due to a wide range of observed functional impairment levels. The ability to extend the head backward and flex it laterally were the most compromised, with significantly lower angular velocity (P < 0.05, Cohen’s d > 0.8), reduced smoothness and greater presence of coupled movements with respect to the controls. A significant reduction of angular velocity (P < 0.05, Cohen’s d > 0.8) in extension, axial rotation and lateral flexion was observed when patients were asked to perform the movements as fast as possible. Interpretation This pilot study is the first study providing a functional objective quantification of head movements in ALS. Further work involving different body areas and correlation with existing methods of evaluating neuromuscular function, such as dynamometry and EMG, is needed to explore the use of this approach as a marker of disease progression in ALS. PMID:28068376

  5. Potentially modifiable lifestyle factors, cognitive reserve, and cognitive function in later life: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Tzu

    2017-01-01

    Background Potentially modifiable lifestyle factors may influence cognitive health in later life and offer potential to reduce the risk of cognitive decline and dementia. The concept of cognitive reserve has been proposed as a mechanism to explain individual differences in rates of cognitive decline, but its potential role as a mediating pathway has seldom been explored using data from large epidemiological studies. We explored the mediating effect of cognitive reserve on the cross-sectional association between lifestyle factors and cognitive function in later life using data from a population-based cohort of healthy older people. Methods and findings We analysed data from 2,315 cognitively healthy participants aged 65 y and over in the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study Wales (CFAS-Wales) cohort collected in 2011–2013. Linear regression modelling was used to investigate the overall associations between five lifestyle factors—cognitive and social activity, physical activity, diet, alcohol consumption, and smoking—and cognition, adjusting for demographic factors and chronic conditions. Mediation analysis tested for indirect effects of the lifestyle factors on cognition via cognitive reserve. After controlling for age, gender, and the presence of chronic conditions, cognitive and social activity, physical activity, healthy diet, and light-to-moderate alcohol consumption were positively associated with cognitive function, together accounting for 20% (95% CI 17%–23%) of variance in cognitive test scores. Cognitive reserve was an important mediator of this association, with indirect effects via cognitive reserve contributing 21% (95% CI 15%–27%) of the overall effect on cognition. The main limitations of the study derive from the cross-sectional nature of the data and the challenges of accurately measuring the latent construct of cognitive reserve. Conclusions Cross-sectional associations support the view that enhancing cognitive reserve may benefit cognition

  6. Clinical and electrophysiological assessment of inferior alveolar nerve function after lateral nerve transposition.

    PubMed

    Nocini, P F; De Santis, D; Fracasso, E; Zanette, G

    1999-04-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) transposition surgery may cause some degree of sensory impairment. Accurate and reproducible tests are mandatory to assess IAN conduction capacity following nerve transposition. In this study subjective (heat, pain and tactile-discriminative tests) and objective (electrophysiological) assessments were performed in 10 patients receiving IAN transposition (bilaterally in 8 cases) in order to evaluate any impairment of the involved nerves one year post-operatively. All patients reported a tingling, well-tolerated sensation in the areas supplied by the mental nerve with no anaesthesia or burning paresthesia. Tactile discrimination was affected the most (all but 1 patient). No action potential was recorded in 4 patients' sides (23.5%); 12 sides showed a decreased nerve conduction velocity (NCV) (70.5%) and 1 side normal NCV values (6%). There was no significant difference in NCV decrease between partial and total transposition sides, if examined separately. Nerve conduction findings were related 2-point discrimination scores, but not to changes in pain and heat sensitivity. These findings show that lateral nerve transposition, though resulting in a high percentage of minor IAN injuries, as determined by electrophysiological testing, provides a viable surgical procedure to allow implant placement in the posterior mandible without causing severe sensory complaints. Considering ethical and forensic implications, patients should be fully informed that a certain degree of nerve injury might be expected to occur from the procedure. Electrophysiological evaluation is a reliable way to assess the degree of IAN dysfunction, especially if combined with a clinical examination. Intraoperative monitoring of IAN conduction might help identify the pathogenetic mechanisms of nerve injury and the surgical steps that are most likely to harm nerve integrity.

  7. Electromyographic assessment of forearm muscle function in tennis players with and without Lateral Epicondylitis.

    PubMed

    Alizadehkhaiyat, Omid; Frostick, Simon P

    2015-12-01

    There is no consensus about the main aetiology of Lateral Epicondylitis (LE) or Tennis Elbow. While electromyographic assessment of alterations in neuromuscular control and activation patterns of forearm muscles has received increasing interest as potential intrinsic factors in non-tennis players, there has been insufficient attention in tennis players. The purpose of present review was to search the literature for the electromyographic studies of forearm muscles in tennis players in order to (1) identify related implications for LE, (2) highlight key technical and methodological shortcomings, and (3) suggest potential pathways for future research. An electronic search of PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholars (1980 to October 2014) was conducted. Titles, abstracts, and full-text articles were screened to identify "peer-reviewed" studies specifically looking into "electromyographic assessment of forearm muscles" in "tennis players". After screening 104 articles, 13 original articles were considered in the main review involving a total of 216 participants (78% male, 22% female). There were indications of increased wrist extensor activity in all tennis strokes and less experienced single-handed players, however with insufficient evidence to support their relationship with the development of LE. Studies varied widely in study population, sample size, gender, level of tennis skills, electrode type, forearm muscles studied, EMG recording protocol, EMG normalisation method, and reported parameters. As a result, it was not possible to present combined results of existing studies and draw concrete conclusions in terms of clinical implications of findings. There is a need for establishment of specific guidelines and recommendations for EMG assessment of forearm musculature particularly in terms of electrode and muscle selection. Further studies of both healthy controls and tennis players suffering from LE with adequate sample sizes and well-defined demographics

  8. Do Executive Function Deficits Predict Later Substance Use Disorders among Adolescents and Young Adults?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilens, Timothy E.; Martelon, MaryKate; Fried, Ronna; Petty, Carter; Bateman, Clancey; Biederman, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There is increasing interest regarding the risk and overlap of executive function deficits (EFDs) in stable cigarette smoking and substance use disorders (SUD). Therefore, we examined whether earlier EFD was a risk factor for subsequent cigarette smoking and SUD and further explored the relationship between EFD and SUD. Method: We…

  9. Primary Cortical Folding in the Human Newborn: An Early Marker of Later Functional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubois, J.; Benders, M.; Borradori-Tolsa, C.; Cachia, A.; Lazeyras, F.; Leuchter, R. Ha-Vinh; Sizonenko, S. V.; Warfield, S. K.; Mangin, J. F.; Huppi, P. S.

    2008-01-01

    In the human brain, the morphology of cortical gyri and sulci is complex and variable among individuals, and it may reflect pathological functioning with specific abnormalities observed in certain developmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Since cortical folding occurs early during brain development, these structural abnormalities might be…

  10. Lateralized sensitivity of motor memories to the kinematics of the opposite arm reveals functional specialization during bimanual actions.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Atsushi; Hirashima, Masaya; Nozaki, Daichi

    2014-07-02

    It is generally believed that the dominant arm exhibits greater functional advantages over the nondominant arm in every respect, including muscular strength and movement accuracy. Recent studies have proposed that this laterality is due to different underlying control strategies for each limb rather than different limb capabilities constraining performance. However, the functional role and mechanisms of these different control strategies have yet to be elucidated. Here, we report a specialized function of the nondominant arm that plays a significant role only during bimanual movements. Right-handed human participants performed bimanual reaching movements while only one arm was subjected to a force field. Consistent with our previous study, adaptation to the force field decreased gradually as the movement direction of the opposite arm deviated from the trained direction. We also observed that the decrement of the adaptation was significantly greater for the nondominant left arm. According to our previously proposed theory, this poorer generalization of the left arm originated from a difference in parameters characterizing motor memory; the nondominant arm's motor memory was more strongly influenced by the opposite arm's kinematics. Remarkably, a model incorporating this lateralized memory predicted that the nondominant arm would demonstrate greater adaptability to force fields associated with the opposite arm's movement. We confirmed this prediction experimentally and found that this advantage of the left arm disappeared in left-handed human participants. We concluded that the secondary supporting role often played by the nondominant arm in bimanual actions reflects its specialization rather than its inferiority.

  11. Lateralized Resting-State Functional Brain Network Organization Changes in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bumhee; Roy, Bhaswati; Woo, Mary A.; Palomares, Jose A.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Harper, Ronald M.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) patients show brain injury in autonomic, affective, and cognitive sites, which can change resting-state functional connectivity (FC), potentially altering overall functional brain network organization. However, the status of such connectivity or functional organization is unknown in HF. Determination of that status was the aim here, and we examined region-to-region FC and brain network topological properties across the whole-brain in 27 HF patients compared to 53 controls with resting-state functional MRI procedures. Decreased FC in HF appeared between the caudate and cerebellar regions, olfactory and cerebellar sites, vermis and medial frontal regions, and precentral gyri and cerebellar areas. However, increased FC emerged between the middle frontal gyrus and sensorimotor areas, superior parietal gyrus and orbito/medial frontal regions, inferior temporal gyrus and lingual gyrus/cerebellar lobe/pallidum, fusiform gyrus and superior orbitofrontal gyrus and cerebellar sites, and within vermis and cerebellar areas; these connections were largely in the right hemisphere (p<0.005; 10,000 permutations). The topology of functional integration and specialized characteristics in HF are significantly changed in regions showing altered FC, an outcome which would interfere with brain network organization (p<0.05; 10,000 permutations). Brain dysfunction in HF extends to resting conditions, and autonomic, cognitive, and affective deficits may stem from altered FC and brain network organization that may contribute to higher morbidity and mortality in the condition. Our findings likely result from the prominent axonal and nuclear structural changes reported earlier in HF; protecting neural tissue may improve FC integrity, and thus, increase quality of life and reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:27203600

  12. Functional Brain Activity within the Medial and Lateral Portion of BA10 during a Prospective Memory Task

    PubMed Central

    Barban, Francesco; Carlesimo, Giovanni Augusto; Macaluso, Emiliano; Caltagirone, Carlo; Costa, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In this study we tested the gateway hypothesis of Broadmann area 10 (BA10). With a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) protocol we manipulated the saliency–stimulus-oriented (SO) attending– and the memory load – stimulus-independent (SI) attending–during a prospective memory (PM) task. We found a significant main effect of the SO manipulation within the medial BA10 and a significant interaction between SI attending and PM task within the left lateral BA10. Our results give experimental support to the gateway hypothesis. PMID:22713428

  13. Vibrotactile perceived intensity for mobile devices as a function of direction, amplitude, and frequency.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Inwook; Seo, Jongman; Kim, Myongchan; Choi, Seungmoon

    2013-01-01

    Vibrotactile rendering is an emerging interaction method for information transmission in mobile devices, replacing or supplementing visual and auditory displays. To design effective vibrotactile actuators or display algorithms, an understanding of the perceived intensity (strength) of their vibrations is essential. This paper aims to build a robust model for the perceived intensities of mobile device vibrations, which can be immediately used by engineers and application designers. To this end, we carried out two psychophysical experiments using absolute magnitude estimation procedures. In Experiment I, we investigated the effects of vibration direction and device weight on the perceived intensity of mobile device vibrations. The vibration directions tested (height, width, and depth), and the device weights (90-130 g) were determined considering those of contemporary mobile devices. Only the vibration direction was found to be a statistically significant factor, showing the highest perceived intensities along the height direction of a mobile device. In Experiment II, we measured the perceived intensities of vibrations with various amplitudes and frequencies along the three vibration directions. Then, for each direction, a psychophysical magnitude function and equal sensation contours were constructed based on Stevens' power law, which clearly visualize the consequences of vibration parameter changes on the resulting perceptual strength. In addition, we found a monotonic relationship between the physical power of vibration absorbed by the hand and the resulting perceived intensity. This suggests that the former, which is greatly easier to acquire in practice, is a reliable predictor of the latter. We expect that the results of this study can provide immediate knowledge about the perceptual strength of vibrations that engineers and applications developers will find useful.

  14. Photoluminescence changes of III-Nitride lateral polarity structures after chemical functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Nora G.; Franke, Alexander; Kirste, Ronny; Collazo, Ramon; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2016-12-01

    The photoluminescence changes of a III-Nitride semiconductor with various surface topographies were studied after chemical functionalization. Al x Ga1-x N with a composition of 70% aluminum was used and the surfaces were functionalized with a fluorophore dye-terminated peptide using a linker molecule. The stability of the wafers in water was studied using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry prior to modifying the material. The leaching data demonstrated that the AlGaN material in highly stable in biological conditions over 7 d. The attachment of the dye to the wafer was investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The PL spectrum showed a clear signature of the dye with a pronounced emission peak at approximately 260 nm, indicating a successful attachment to the surface.

  15. Ependymal cells along the lateral ventricle express functional P2X(7) receptors.

    PubMed

    Genzen, Jonathan R; Platel, Jean-Claude; Rubio, Maria E; Bordey, Angelique

    2009-09-01

    Ependymal cells line the cerebral ventricles and are located in an ideal position to detect central nervous system injury and inflammation. The signaling mechanisms of ependymal cells, however, are poorly understood. As extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate is elevated in the context of cellular damage, experiments were conducted to determine whether ependymal cells along the mouse subventricular zone (SVZ) express functional purinergic receptors. Using whole-cell patch clamp recording, widespread expression of P2X(7) receptors was detected on ependymal cells based on their antagonist sensitivity profile and absence of response in P2X(7) (-/-) mice. Immunocytochemistry confirmed the expression of P2X(7) receptors, and electron microscopy demonstrated that P2X(7) receptors are expressed on both cilia and microvilli. Ca(2+) imaging showed that P2X(7) receptors expressed on cilia are indeed functional. As ependymal cells are believed to function as partner cells in the SVZ neurogenic niche, P2X(7) receptors may play a role in neural progenitor response to injury and inflammation.

  16. Surface Mobility of Horizontally Vibrated Granular Layers as a Function of Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puls, Conor; McElwaine, Jim

    2005-11-01

    Stimulated by studies of avalanches where the critical slope angle is a function of layer depth [1], we investigate horizontally vibrated layers of various thickness, using acceleration to simulate the effects of gravity. The rectangular cell is 20 cm long in the direction of motion, and 8 cm transverse to that direction, containing polydisperse polystyrene particles of diameter 0.7-1.2 mm, 1-20 particles deep. We measure the RMS velocity of the mobilized surface particles in the frame of reference of the oscillating box, as a function of non-dimensional acceleration and layer depth. We find a depth-dependent threshold acceleration for surface mobility. The mobility also varies with time, due possibly to structural re-arrangement of the particles. The observations are compared to numerical simulations of the same phenomena using soft particle forces with friction, and to earlier experimental studies [2]. [1] O. Pouliquen, Phys. Fluids 11, 542 (1999). [2] G. Metcalfe et al., Phys. Rev. E 61, 031302 (2002).

  17. The Functional Mobility Scale: ability to detect change following single event multilevel surgery.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Adrienne; Graham, H Kerr; Morris, Meg E; Baker, Richard; Wolfe, Rory

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the ability of the Functional Mobility Scale (FMS) to detect change in children with cerebral palsy (CP) undergoing single event multilevel surgery (SEMLS). A retrospective study was conducted of gait laboratory records and video assessments for a consecutive sample of children with CP aged 4 to 18 years who were managed by multilevel surgery. FMS ratings and Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels were recorded preoperatively and at regular postoperative time points. The sample comprised 66 children (32 females, 34 males) with spastic diplegia, GMFCS Levels I (n=18), II (n=24), and III (n=24). The mean age at surgery was 10 years (SD 2y 6mo, range 6-16y). For each FMS distance (5, 50, and 500m) odds ratios showed significant deterioration in mobility at 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Mobility then improved to baseline levels by 12 months and improved further by 24 months postoperatively. GMFCS level remained stable throughout most of the postoperative period for children classified as GMFCS Level III preoperatively but not for children classified as Levels I or II. The FMS was found to be a clinically feasible tool for quantifying change after SEMLS in children with CP.

  18. Hippocampal-dependent spatial memory functions might be lateralized in rats: An approach combining gene expression profiling and reversible inactivation.

    PubMed

    Klur, Sandra; Muller, Christophe; Pereira de Vasconcelos, Anne; Ballard, Theresa; Lopez, Joëlle; Galani, Rodrigue; Certa, Ulrich; Cassel, Jean-Christophe

    2009-09-01

    The hippocampus is involved in spatial memory processes, as established in a variety of species such as birds and mammals including humans. In humans, some hippocampal-dependent memory functions may be lateralized, the right hippocampus being predominantly involved in spatial navigation. In rodents, the question of possible lateralization remains open. Therefore, we first microdissected the CA1 subregion of the left and right dorsal hippocampi for analysis of mRNA expression using microarrays in rats having learnt a reference memory task in the Morris water-maze. Relative to untrained controls, 623 genes were differentially expressed in the right hippocampus, against only 74 in the left hippocampus, in the rats that had learnt the hidden platform location. Thus, in the right hippocampus, 299 genes were induced, 324 were repressed, and about half of them participate in signaling and transport, metabolism, and nervous system functions. In addition, most differentially expressed genes associated with spatial learning have been previously related to synaptic plasticity and memory. We then subjected rats to unilateral (left or right) or bilateral reversible functional inactivations in the dorsal hippocampus; lidocaine was infused either before each acquisition session or before retrieval of a reference spatial memory in the Morris water maze. We found that after drug-free acquisition, right or bilateral lidocaine inactivation (vs. left, or bilateral phosphate buffered saline (PBS) infusions) of the dorsal hippocampus just before a delayed (24 h) probe trial impaired performance. Conversely, left or bilateral hippocampus inactivation (vs. right, or bilateral PBS infusions) before each acquisition session weakened performance during a delayed, drug-free probe trial. Our data confirm a functional association between transcriptional activity within the dorsal hippocampus and spatial memory in the rat. Further, they suggest that there could be a leftward bias of hippocampal

  19. The conception for creation of the multi-functional mobile automated complex for meteor observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, P.; Mozgova, A.

    2016-12-01

    The conception for creation of the multi-functional mobile automated complex for meteor observations in optical and adjacent wavelength is proposed. The observational complex will be equipped with panoramic video cameras of the optical and infrared wavelength (in necessary ultraviolet); dispersion device (pre-lens spectral grating) composed with a video camera for meteor spectra registration; microphones for detecting sound from possible electro-sonic bolides. For providing mobility of the complex and using it in expedition conditions the cameras will be installed on light-weight rotary device and equip it with GPS-receiver. For digitizing video-data the PC will be equipped with according electronics. Main characteristics of the proposed observational cameras are presented in the work as well.

  20. Mobile patient applications within diabetes - from few and easy to advanced functionalities.

    PubMed

    Årsand, Eirik; Skrøvseth, Stein Olav; Hejlesen, Ole; Horsch, Alexander; Godtliebsen, Fred; Grøttland, Astrid; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Patient diaries as apps on mobile phones are becoming increasingly common, and can be a good support tool for patients who need to organize information relevant for their disease. Self-management is important to achieving diabetes treatment goals and can be a tool for lifestyle changes for patients with Type 2 diabetes. The autoimmune disease Type 1 diabetes requires a more intensive management than Type 2 - thus more advanced functionalities is desirable for users. Both simple and easy-to-use and more advanced diaries have their respective benefits, depending on the target user group and intervention. In this poster we summarize main findings and experience from more than a decade of research and development in the diabetes area. Several versions of the mobile health research platform-the Few Touch Application (FTA) are presented to illustrate the different approaches and results.

  1. The Lateral Trigger Probability function for the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray showers detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bäuml, J.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Fajardo Tapia, I.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gascon, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Gesterling, K.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Guzman, A.; Hague, J. D.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meurer, C.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Nhung, P. T.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pȩkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Phan, N.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Robledo, C.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Silva Lopez, H. H.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tamashiro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşcău, O.; Tavera Ruiz, C. G.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tiwari, D. K.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winders, L.; Winnick, M. G.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept of Lateral Trigger Probability (LTP) function, i.e., the probability for an Extensive Air Shower (EAS) to trigger an individual detector of a ground based array as a function of distance to the shower axis, taking into account energy, mass and direction of the primary cosmic ray. We apply this concept to the surface array of the Pierre Auger Observatory consisting of a 1.5 km spaced grid of about 1600 water Cherenkov stations. Using Monte Carlo simulations of ultra-high energy showers the LTP functions are derived for energies in the range between 1017 and 1019 eV and zenith angles up to 65°. A parametrization combining a step function with an exponential is found to reproduce them very well in the considered range of energies and zenith angles. The LTP functions can also be obtained from data using events simultaneously observed by the fluorescence and the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory (hybrid events). We validate the Monte Carlo results showing how LTP functions from data are in good agreement with simulations.

  2. Hemifacial hyperhidrosis associated with ipsilateral/contralateral cervical disc herniation myelopathy. Functional considerations on how compression pattern determines the laterality

    PubMed Central

    Iwase, Satoshi; Inukai, Yoko; Nishimura, Naoki; Sato, Maki; Sugenoya, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sweating is an important mechanism for ensuring constant thermoregulation, but hyperhidrosis may be disturbing. We present five cases of hemifacial hyperhidrosis as a compensatory response to an/hypohidrosis caused by cervical disc herniation. All the patients complained of hemifacial hyperhidrosis, without anisocoria or blepharoptosis. Sweat function testing and thermography confirmed hyperhidrosis of hemifacial and adjacent areas. Neck MRI showed cervical disc herniation. Three of the patients had lateral compression with well-demarcated hypohidrosis below the hyperhidrosis on the same side as the cervical lesion. The rest had paramedian compression with poorly demarcated hyperhidrosis and hypohidrosis on the contralateral side. Although MRI showed no intraspinal pathological signal intensity, lateral dural compression might influence the circulation to the sudomotor pathway, and paramedian compression might influence the ipsilateral sulcal artery, which perfuses the sympathetic descending pathway and the intermediolateral nucleus. Sweat function testing and thermography should be performed to determine the focus of the hemifacial hyperhidrosis, and the myelopathy should be investigated on both sides. PMID:25014051

  3. Anxiety in high-functioning autism: A pilot study of experience sampling using a mobile platform.

    PubMed

    Hare, Dougal Julian; Gracey, Carolyn; Wood, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    Anxiety and stress are everyday issues for many people with high-functioning autism, and while cognitive-behavioural therapy is the treatment of choice for the management of anxiety, there are challenges in using it with people with high-functioning autism. This study used modified experience sampling techniques to examine everyday anxiety and stress in adults with high-functioning autism and to explore the feasibility of delivering real-time stress management techniques using a mobile platform. High levels of anxiety were found to be characterised by worry, confusing thoughts and being alone but was not associated with internal focus, imagery or rumination. Participants reported improved mood and less worry and anxious thinking in the active phase of the study. These results support previous studies indicating that people with high-functioning autism differ in their experience of anxiety and provided preliminary data on the feasibility of real-time stress management. The limitations of this approach are discussed together with considerations for future work in the area of developing clinical interventions on mobile platforms.

  4. The role of lateral habenula-dorsal raphe nucleus circuits in higher brain functions and psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Bei-Lin; Yang, Shao-Jun; Rusak, Benjamin

    2015-01-15

    Serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) play an important role in regulation of many physiological functions. The lateral nucleus of the habenular complex (LHb) is closely connected to the DRN both morphologically and functionally. The LHb is a key regulator of the activity of DRN serotonergic neurons, and it also receives reciprocal input from the DRN. The LHb is also a major way-station that receives limbic system input via the stria medullaris and provides output to the DRN and thereby indirectly connects a number of other brain regions to the DRN. The complex interactions of the LHb and DRN contribute to the regulation of numerous important behavioral and physiological mechanisms, including those regulating cognition, reward, pain sensitivity and patterns of sleep and waking. Disruption of these functions is characteristic of major psychiatric illnesses, so there has been a great deal of interest in how disturbed LHb-DRN interactions may contribute to the symptoms of these illnesses. This review summarizes recent research related to the roles of the LHb-DRN system in regulation of higher brain functions and the possible role of disturbed LHb-DRN function in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders, especially depression.

  5. Measuring Neuromuscular Junction Functionality in the SOD1(G93A) Animal Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rizzuto, Emanuele; Pisu, Simona; Musarò, Antonio; Del Prete, Zaccaria

    2015-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that leads to motor neuron degeneration, alteration in neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), muscle atrophy, and paralysis. To investigate the NMJ functionality in ALS we tested, in vitro, two innervated muscle types excised from SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice at the end-stage of the disease: the Soleus, a postural muscle almost completely paralyzed at that stage, and the diaphragm, which, on the contrary, is functional until death. To this aim we employed an experimental protocol that combined two types of electrical stimulation: the direct stimulation and the stimulation through the nerve. The technique we applied allowed us to determine the relevance of NMJ functionality separately from muscle contractile properties in SOD1(G93A) animal model. Functional measurements revealed that the muscle contractility of transgenic diaphragms is almost unaltered in comparison to control muscles, while transgenic Soleus muscles were severely compromised. In contrast, when stimulated via the nerve, both transgenic muscle types showed a strong decrease of the contraction force, a slowing down of the kinetic parameters, as well as alterations in the neurotransmission failure parameter. All together, these results confirm a severely impaired functionality in the SOD1(G93A) neuromuscular junctions.

  6. Prenatal Exposure to Benzo(a)pyrene Impairs Later-Life Cortical Neuronal Function

    PubMed Central

    McCallister, Monique M.; Maguire, Mark; Ramesh, Aramandla; Aimin, Qiao; Liu, Sheng; Khoshbouei, Habibeh; Aschner, Michael; Ebner, Ford F.; Hood, Darryl B.

    2009-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to environmental contaminants, such as Benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] has been shown to impair brain development. The overarching hypothesis of our work is that glutamate receptor subunit expression is crucial for cortical evoked responses and that prenatal B(a)P exposure modulates the temporal developmental expression of glutamatergic receptor subunits in the somatosensory cortex. To characterize prenatal B(a)P exposure on the development of cortical function, pregnant Long Evans rats were exposed to low-level B(a)P (300μg/kg BW) by oral gavage on gestational days 14 to 17. At this exposure dose, there was no significant effect of B(a)P on 1) the number of pups born per litter, 2) the pre-weaning growth curves and 3) initial and final brain to body weight ratios. Control and B(a)P-exposed offspring were profiled for B(a)P metabolites in plasma and whole brain during the pre-weaning period. No detectable levels of metabolites were found in the control offspring. However, a time-dependent decrease in total metabolite concentration was observed in B(a)P-exposed offspring. On PND100-120, cerebrocortical mRNA expression was determined for the glutamatergic NMDA receptor subunit (NR2B) in control and B(a)P-exposed offspring. Neural activity was also recorded from neurons in primary somatic sensory (barrel) cortex. Semiquantitative PCR from B(a)P-exposed offspring revealed a significant 50% reduction in NR2B mRNA expression in B(a)P-exposed offspring relative to controls. Recordings from B(a)P-exposed offspring revealed that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor -dependent neuronal activity in barrel cortex evoked by whisker stimulation was also significantly reduced (70%) as compared to controls. Analysis showed that the greatest deficit in cortical neuronal responses occurred in the shorter latency epochs from 5-20ms post-stimulus. The results suggest that in utero exposure to benzo(a)pyrene results in diminished mRNA expression of the NMDA NR2B receptor

  7. Submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Scott L; Herald, John; Alpert, Craig; Gretebeck, Kimberlee A; Champoux, Wendy S; Dengel, Donald R; Vaitkevicius, Peter V; Alexander, Neil B

    2016-01-01

    Background Submaximal oxygen uptake measures are more feasible and may better predict clinical cardiac outcomes than maximal tests in older adults with heart failure (HF). We examined relationships between maximal oxygen uptake, submaximal oxygen kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction. Methods Older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction (n = 25, age 75 ± 7 years) were compared to 25 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Assessments included a maximal treadmill test for peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), oxygen uptake kinetics at onset of and on recovery from a submaximal treadmill test, functional mobility testing [Get Up and Go (GUG), Comfortable Gait Speed (CGS), Unipedal Stance (US)], and self-reported physical activity (PA). Results Compared to controls, HF had worse performance on GUG, CGS, and US, greater delays in submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, and lower PA. In controls, VO2peak was more strongly associated with functional mobility and PA than submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics. In HF patients, submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics were similarly associated with GUG and CGS as VO2peak, but weakly associated with PA. Conclusions Based on their mobility performance, older HF patients with reduced ejection fraction are at risk for adverse functional outcomes. In this population, submaximal oxygen uptake measures may be equivalent to VO2 peak in predicting functional mobility, and in addition to being more feasible, may provide better insight into how aerobic function relates to mobility in older adults with HF. PMID:27594875

  8. Aromatic Lateral Substituents Influence the Excitation Energies of Hexaaza Lanthanide Macrocyclic Complexes: A Wave Function Theory and Density Functional Study.

    PubMed

    Rabanal-León, Walter A; Murillo-López, Juliana A; Páez-Hernández, Dayán; Arratia-Pérez, Ramiro

    2015-09-24

    The high interest in lanthanide chemistry, and particularly in their luminescence, has been encouraged by the need of understanding the lanthanide chemical coordination and how the design of new luminescent materials can be affected by this. This work is focused on the understanding of the electronic structure, bonding nature, and optical properties of a set of lanthanide hexaaza macrocyclic complexes, which can lead to potential optical applications. Here we found that the DFT ground state of the open-shell complexes are mainly characterized by the manifold of low lying f states, having small HOMO-LUMO energy gaps. The results obtained from the wave function theory calculations (SO-RASSI) put on evidence the multiconfigurational character of their ground state and it is observed that the large spin-orbit coupling and the weak crystal field produce a strong mix of the ground and the excited states. The electron localization function (ELF) and the energy decomposition analysis (EDA) support the idea of a dative interaction between the macrocyclic ligand and the lanthanide center for all the studied systems; noting that, this interaction has a covalent character, where the d-orbital participation is evidenced from NBO analysis, leaving the f shell completely noninteracting in the chemical bonding. From the optical part we observed in all cases the characteristic intraligand (IL) (π-π*) and ligand to metal charge-transfer (LMCT) bands that are present in the ultraviolet and visible regions, and for the open-shell complexes we found the inherent f-f electronic transitions on the visible and near-infrared region.

  9. Hemispheric Lateralization of Resting-State Functional Connectivity of the Anterior Insula: Association with Age, Gender, and a Novelty-Seeking Trait

    PubMed Central

    Kann, Sarah; Zhang, Sheng; Manza, Peter; Leung, Hoi-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) is widely used to examine cerebral functional organization. The imaging literature has described lateralization of insula activations during cognitive and affective processing. Evidence appears to support a role of the right-hemispheric insula in attentional orientation to salient stimulus, interoception, and physiological arousal, and a role of the left-hemispheric insula in cognitive and affective control, as well as perspective taking. In this study, in a large data set of healthy adults, we examined lateralization of the rsFC of the anterior insula (AI) by computing a laterality index (LI) of connectivity with 54 regions from the Automated Anatomic Labeling atlas. At a corrected threshold (p < 0.001), the AI is left lateralized in connectivity with the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, superior frontal gyrus, inferior frontal cortex, and posterior orbital gyrus and right lateralized in connectivity with the postcentral gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, and superior parietal lobule. In gender differences, women, but not men, showed right-lateralized connectivity to the thalamus. Furthermore, in a subgroup of participants assessed by the tridimensional personality questionnaire, novelty seeking is correlated with the extent of left lateralization of AI connectivity to the pallidum and putamen in men and with the extent of right lateralization of AI connectivity to the parahippocampal gyrus in women. These findings support hemispheric functional differentiation of the AI. PMID:27604154

  10. Hemispheric Lateralization of Resting-State Functional Connectivity of the Anterior Insula: Association with Age, Gender, and a Novelty-Seeking Trait.

    PubMed

    Kann, Sarah; Zhang, Sheng; Manza, Peter; Leung, Hoi-Chung; Li, Chiang-Shan R

    2016-11-01

    Resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) is widely used to examine cerebral functional organization. The imaging literature has described lateralization of insula activations during cognitive and affective processing. Evidence appears to support a role of the right-hemispheric insula in attentional orientation to salient stimulus, interoception, and physiological arousal, and a role of the left-hemispheric insula in cognitive and affective control, as well as perspective taking. In this study, in a large data set of healthy adults, we examined lateralization of the rsFC of the anterior insula (AI) by computing a laterality index (LI) of connectivity with 54 regions from the Automated Anatomic Labeling atlas. At a corrected threshold (p < 0.001), the AI is left lateralized in connectivity with the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, superior frontal gyrus, inferior frontal cortex, and posterior orbital gyrus and right lateralized in connectivity with the postcentral gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, and superior parietal lobule. In gender differences, women, but not men, showed right-lateralized connectivity to the thalamus. Furthermore, in a subgroup of participants assessed by the tridimensional personality questionnaire, novelty seeking is correlated with the extent of left lateralization of AI connectivity to the pallidum and putamen in men and with the extent of right lateralization of AI connectivity to the parahippocampal gyrus in women. These findings support hemispheric functional differentiation of the AI.

  11. Negative Symptoms and Functioning During the First Year after a Recent Onset of Schizophrenia and Eight Years Later

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Joseph; Subotnik, Kenneth L.; Gitlin, Michael J.; Gretchen-Doorly, Denise; Ered, Arielle; Villa, Kathleen F.; Hellemann, Gerhard S.; Nuechterlein, Keith H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the longitudinal course of negative symptoms, especially in relationship to functioning, in the early phase of schizophrenia is crucial to developing intervention approaches. The course of negative symptoms and daily functioning was examined over a one-year period following a recent onset of schizophrenia and at an 8-year follow-up point. Methods The study included 149 recent-onset schizophrenia patients who had a mean age of 23.7 (SD=4.4) years and mean education of 12.9 (SD=2.2) years. Negative symptom (BPRS and SANS) and functional outcome (SCORS) assessments were conducted frequently by trained raters. Results After antipsychotic medication stabilization, negative symptoms during the first outpatient year were moderately stable (BPRS ICC=0.64 and SANS ICC=0.66). Despite this overall moderate stability, 24% of patients experienced at least one period of negative symptoms exacerbation. Furthermore, entry level of negative symptoms was significantly associated with poor social functioning (r =−.34, p < .01) and work/school functioning (r =−.25, p < .05) at 12 months, and with negative symptoms at the 8-year follow-up (r =.29, p <.05). Discussion Early negative symptoms are fairly stable during the first outpatient year, are predictors of daily functioning at 12 months, and predict negative symptoms 8 years later. Despite the high levels of stability, negative symptoms did fluctuate in a subsample of patients. These findings suggest that negative symptoms may be an important early course target for intervention aimed at promoting recovery. PMID:25499044

  12. Pair mobility functions for rigid spheres in concentrated colloidal dispersions: Force, torque, translation, and rotation.

    PubMed

    Zia, Roseanna N; Swan, James W; Su, Yu

    2015-12-14

    The formulation of detailed models for the dynamics of condensed soft matter including colloidal suspensions and other complex fluids requires accurate description of the physical forces between microstructural constituents. In dilute suspensions, pair-level interactions are sufficient to capture hydrodynamic, interparticle, and thermodynamic forces. In dense suspensions, many-body interactions must be considered. Prior analytical approaches to capturing such interactions such as mean-field approaches replace detailed interactions with averaged approximations. However, long-range coupling and effects of concentration on local structure, which may play an important role in, e.g., phase transitions, are smeared out in such approaches. An alternative to such approximations is the detailed modeling of hydrodynamic interactions utilizing precise couplings between moments of the hydrodynamic traction on a suspended particle and the motion of that or other suspended particles. For two isolated spheres, a set of these functions was calculated by Jeffrey and Onishi [J. Fluid Mech. 139, 261-290 (1984)] and Jeffrey [J. Phys. Fluids 4, 16-29 (1992)]. Along with pioneering work by Batchelor, these are the touchstone for low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamic interactions and have been applied directly in the solution of many important problems related to the dynamics of dilute colloidal dispersions [G. K. Batchelor and J. T. Green, J. Fluid Mech. 56, 375-400 (1972) and G. K. Batchelor, J. Fluid Mech. 74, 1-29 (1976)]. Toward extension of these functions to concentrated systems, here we present a new stochastic sampling technique to rapidly calculate an analogous set of mobility functions describing the hydrodynamic interactions between two hard spheres immersed in a suspension of arbitrary concentration, utilizing accelerated Stokesian dynamics simulations. These mobility functions provide precise, radially dependent couplings of hydrodynamic force and torque to particle translation

  13. Pair mobility functions for rigid spheres in concentrated colloidal dispersions: Force, torque, translation, and rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia, Roseanna N.; Swan, James W.; Su, Yu

    2015-12-01

    The formulation of detailed models for the dynamics of condensed soft matter including colloidal suspensions and other complex fluids requires accurate description of the physical forces between microstructural constituents. In dilute suspensions, pair-level interactions are sufficient to capture hydrodynamic, interparticle, and thermodynamic forces. In dense suspensions, many-body interactions must be considered. Prior analytical approaches to capturing such interactions such as mean-field approaches replace detailed interactions with averaged approximations. However, long-range coupling and effects of concentration on local structure, which may play an important role in, e.g., phase transitions, are smeared out in such approaches. An alternative to such approximations is the detailed modeling of hydrodynamic interactions utilizing precise couplings between moments of the hydrodynamic traction on a suspended particle and the motion of that or other suspended particles. For two isolated spheres, a set of these functions was calculated by Jeffrey and Onishi [J. Fluid Mech. 139, 261-290 (1984)] and Jeffrey [J. Phys. Fluids 4, 16-29 (1992)]. Along with pioneering work by Batchelor, these are the touchstone for low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamic interactions and have been applied directly in the solution of many important problems related to the dynamics of dilute colloidal dispersions [G. K. Batchelor and J. T. Green, J. Fluid Mech. 56, 375-400 (1972) and G. K. Batchelor, J. Fluid Mech. 74, 1-29 (1976)]. Toward extension of these functions to concentrated systems, here we present a new stochastic sampling technique to rapidly calculate an analogous set of mobility functions describing the hydrodynamic interactions between two hard spheres immersed in a suspension of arbitrary concentration, utilizing accelerated Stokesian dynamics simulations. These mobility functions provide precise, radially dependent couplings of hydrodynamic force and torque to particle translation

  14. Pair mobility functions for rigid spheres in concentrated colloidal dispersions: Force, torque, translation, and rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Zia, Roseanna N. Su, Yu; Swan, James W.

    2015-12-14

    The formulation of detailed models for the dynamics of condensed soft matter including colloidal suspensions and other complex fluids requires accurate description of the physical forces between microstructural constituents. In dilute suspensions, pair-level interactions are sufficient to capture hydrodynamic, interparticle, and thermodynamic forces. In dense suspensions, many-body interactions must be considered. Prior analytical approaches to capturing such interactions such as mean-field approaches replace detailed interactions with averaged approximations. However, long-range coupling and effects of concentration on local structure, which may play an important role in, e.g., phase transitions, are smeared out in such approaches. An alternative to such approximations is the detailed modeling of hydrodynamic interactions utilizing precise couplings between moments of the hydrodynamic traction on a suspended particle and the motion of that or other suspended particles. For two isolated spheres, a set of these functions was calculated by Jeffrey and Onishi [J. Fluid Mech. 139, 261–290 (1984)] and Jeffrey [J. Phys. Fluids 4, 16–29 (1992)]. Along with pioneering work by Batchelor, these are the touchstone for low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamic interactions and have been applied directly in the solution of many important problems related to the dynamics of dilute colloidal dispersions [G. K. Batchelor and J. T. Green, J. Fluid Mech. 56, 375–400 (1972) and G. K. Batchelor, J. Fluid Mech. 74, 1–29 (1976)]. Toward extension of these functions to concentrated systems, here we present a new stochastic sampling technique to rapidly calculate an analogous set of mobility functions describing the hydrodynamic interactions between two hard spheres immersed in a suspension of arbitrary concentration, utilizing accelerated Stokesian dynamics simulations. These mobility functions provide precise, radially dependent couplings of hydrodynamic force and torque to particle

  15. Cue-locked lateralized components in a tactile spatial attention task: Evidence for a functional dissociation between ADAN and LSN.

    PubMed

    Gherri, Elena; Gooray, Elena; Forster, Bettina

    2016-04-01

    ERP studies investigating the control processes responsible for spatial orienting in touch have consistently observed that the anterior directing attention negativity (ADAN) elicited by an attention-directing cue is followed by a sustained negativity contralateral to the cued hand. Recent evidence suggested that the later negativity, labeled late somatotopic negativity (LSN), might reflect distinct neurocognitive processes from those associated with the ADAN. To investigate the functional meaning of the ADAN and LSN components, we measured ERPs elicited by bilateral tactile cues indicating to covertly shift tactile attention to the left or right hand. Participants performed two spatial attention tasks that differed only for the difficulty of the target/nontarget discrimination at attended locations. The LSN but not the ADAN was sensitive to our experimental manipulation of task difficulty, suggesting that this component might reflect sensory-specific preparatory processes prior to a forthcoming tactile stimulus.

  16. SU-E-T-232: Micro Diamonds - Determination of Their Lateral Response Function Via Gap-Beam Dose Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Poppinga, D; Looe, H; Chofor, N; Schoenfeld, A; Fischer, J; Meyners, J; Delfs, B; Stelljes, T; Poppe, B; Verona, C; Verona-Rinati, G; Marinelli, M; Harder, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is the measurement of the lateral response function of microDiamonds by comparison with radiochromic film dose measurement. In this study a TM60019 microDiamond (PTW Freiburg, Germany) and a prototype synthetic diamond detector with smaller sensitive volume were investigated. Methods: Two lead blocks were positioned below the gantry head of an Elekta Synergy accelerator using a gantry mount. Between the blocks two sheets of paper were fixed. The water phantom was positioned below the gantry mount, so that the block to water distance was 20 cm. The gap beam profile was measured at 5 cm water depth by radiochromic EBT3 film and diamond detectors. The film was fixed on a RW3 plate, moved by the step motor system of the phantom and digitized by an Epson 10000XL scanner using the red color channel. Results: The lateral response of the prototype diamond detector is comparable to that of film measurements, i.e. has negligible width. This corresponds to the small detector volume of the prototype detector. In contrast to this the FWHM values of the gap-beam dose profiles measured with the TM60019 detector are somewhat larger, which corresponds to the larger sensitive detector volume. Conclusion: This study has illustrated the high spatial resolution of the diamond detectors. In comparison with filmmeasured narrow-beam dose profiles, the TM60019 has a spatial resolution function of about 2 mm FWHM, whereas the FWHM for the prototype is practically negligible. However due to the low signal caused by the small sensitive volume, measurements with the prototype in clinical routine are a challenge. On the other hand the TM60019 is a good compromise between detector volume and signal output and thus a well suited detector for most clinically relevant small field situations.

  17. Mobility-Related Consequences of Reduced Lower-Extremity Peripheral Nerve Function with Age: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Rachel E.; Caserotti, Paolo; Cauley, Jane A.; Boudreau, Robert M.; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Vinik, Aaron I.; Newman, Anne B.; Strotmeyer, Elsa S.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to systematically review the relationship between lower-extremity peripheral nerve function and mobility in older adults. The National Library of Medicine (PubMed) was searched on March 23, 2015 with no limits on publication dates. One reviewer selected original research studies of older adults (≥65 years) that assessed the relationship between lower-extremity peripheral nerve function and mobility-related outcomes. Participants, study design and methods of assessing peripheral nerve impairment were evaluated and results were reported and synthesized. Eight articles were identified, including 6 cross-sectional and 2 longitudinal studies. These articles investigated 6 elderly cohorts (4 from the U.S. and 2 from Italy): 3 community-dwelling (including 1 with only disabled women and 1 without mobility limitations at baseline), 1 with both community-dwelling and institutionalized residents, 1 from a range of residential locations, and 1 of patients with peripheral arterial disease. Mean ages ranged from 71-82 years. Nerve function was assessed by vibration threshold (n=2); sensory measures and clinical signs and symptoms of neuropathy (n=2); motor nerve conduction (n=1); and a combination of both sensory measures and motor nerve conduction (n=3). Each study found that worse peripheral nerve function was related to poor mobility, although relationships varied based on the nerve function measure and mobility domain assessed. Six studies found that the association between nerve function and mobility persisted despite adjustment for diabetes. Evidence suggests that peripheral nerve function impairment at various levels of severity is related to poor mobility independent of diabetes. Relationships varied depending on peripheral nerve measure, which may be particularly important when investigating specific biological mechanisms. Future research needs to identify risk factors for peripheral nerve decline beyond diabetes, especially those

  18. For Your Phone Only: Custom Protocols for Efficient Secure Function Evaluation on Mobile Devices (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    constrained mobile devices. In this work, we develop Efficient Mobile Oblivious Computation ( EMOC ), a set of two SFE protocols customized for the mobile...Mobile Oblivious Computation ( EMOC ), a set of two SFE protocols customized for the mobile platform. Using partially homomorphic cryptosystems, we develop...Computation ( EMOC ) techniques use partially homo- morphic cryptosystems to restate secure computation as a series of simple arithmetic operations

  19. Effect of sternoclavicular joint mobilization on pain and function in a patient with massive supraspinatus tear.

    PubMed

    Mischke, John Jacob; Emerson Kavchak, Alicia J; Courtney, Carol A

    2016-01-01

    Massive irreparable rotator cuff tears can be difficult to treat conservatively, especially when the patient has multiple comorbidities. Although there is evidence to support interventions aimed at the spine, there is paucity in the literature describing interventions to the sternoclavicular joint (SCJ) in individuals with rotator cuff pathology. A 57-year-old female with multiple comorbidities and a body mass index of 59 was referred to physical therapy with a 4-month history of right shoulder pain, significant functional limitations, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), demonstrating a full-thickness supraspinatus tear. She presented initially with active shoulder flexion range of motion (ROM) 0-80°, numeric pain rating scale (NPRS) 7/10, and QuickDASH 65.9%. After six physical therapy sessions, the patient had plateaued with improvements in pain and ROM. SCJ mobilizations at visit 7 immediately improved pain, active ROM, and subjective reports of function. The patient was discharged after 13 visits with increased active shoulder flexion ROM to 0-170°, NPRS 1/10, QuickDASH 31.8%, and Global Rating of Change (GROC) +5. This case highlights the successful conservative treatment of an individual with an irreparable rotator cuff tear and numerous comorbidities by using a multimodal approach including SCJ mobilizations.

  20. Structural and functional hallmarks of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis progression in motor- and memory-related brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Stoppel, Christian Michael; Vielhaber, Stefan; Eckart, Cindy; Machts, Judith; Kaufmann, Jörn; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Kollewe, Katja; Petri, Susanne; Dengler, Reinhard; Hopf, Jens-Max; Schoenfeld, Mircea Ariel

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) multiple motor and extra-motor regions display structural and functional alterations. However, their temporal dynamics during disease-progression are unknown. To address this question we employed a longitudinal design assessing motor- and novelty-related brain activity in two fMRI sessions separated by a 3-month interval. In each session, patients and controls executed a Go/NoGo-task, in which additional presentation of novel stimuli served to elicit hippocampal activity. We observed a decline in the patients' movement-related activity during the 3-month interval. Importantly, in comparison to controls, the patients' motor activations were higher during the initial measurement. Thus, the relative decrease seems to reflect a breakdown of compensatory mechanisms due to progressive neural loss within the motor-system. In contrast, the patients' novelty-evoked hippocampal activity increased across 3 months, most likely reflecting the build-up of compensatory processes typically observed at the beginning of lesions. Consistent with a stage-dependent emergence of hippocampal and motor-system lesions, we observed a positive correlation between the ALSFRS-R or MRC-Megascores and the decline in motor activity, but a negative one with the hippocampal activation-increase. Finally, to determine whether the observed functional changes co-occur with structural alterations, we performed voxel-based volumetric analyses on magnetization transfer images in a separate patient cohort studied cross-sectionally at another scanning site. Therein, we observed a close overlap between the structural changes in this cohort, and the functional alterations in the other. Thus, our results provide important insights into the temporal dynamics of functional alterations during disease-progression, and provide support for an anatomical relationship between functional and structural cerebral changes in ALS. PMID:25161894

  1. Dissociation of Structural and Functional Integrities of the Motor System in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Behavioral-Variant Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jong Seok; Ferguson, Michele; Tan, Rachel; Mioshi, Eneida; Simon, Neil; Burrell, James; Vucic, Steve; Hodges, John R.; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study investigated the structural and functional changes in the motor system in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; n=25) and behavioral-variant fronto-temporal dementia (bvFTD; n=17) relative to healthy controls (n=37). Methods Structural changes were examined using a region-of-interest approach, applying voxel-based morphometry for gray-matter changes and diffusion tensor imaging for white-matter changes. Functional changes in the motor system were elucidated using threshold-tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) measurements of upper motor-neuron excitability. Results The structural analyses showed that in ALS there were more white-matter changes in the corticospinal and motor-cortex regions and more gray-matter changes in the cerebellum in comparison to controls. bvFTD showed substantial gray- and white-matter changes across virtually all motor-system regions compared to controls, although the brainstem was affected less than the other regions. Direct comparisons across patient groups showed that the gray- and white-matter motor-system changes inclusive of the motor cortex were greater in bvFTD than in ALS. By contrast, the functional integrity of the motor system was more adversely affected in ALS than in bvFTD, with both patient groups showing increased excitability of upper motor neurons compared to controls. Conclusions Cross-correlation of structural and functional data further revealed a neural dissociation of different motor-system regions and tracts covarying with the TMS excitability across both patient groups. The structural and functional motor-system integrities appear to be dissociated between ALS and bvFTD, which represents useful information for the diagnosis of motor-system changes in these two disorders. PMID:26932257

  2. Apyrase Functions in Plant Phosphate Nutrition and Mobilizes Phosphate from Extracellular ATP1

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Collin; Sun, Yu; Naus, Katie; Lloyd, Alan; Roux, Stanley

    1999-01-01

    ATP, which is present in the extracellular matrix of multicellular organisms and in the extracellular fluid of unicellular organisms, has been shown to function as a signaling molecule in animals. The concentration of extracellular ATP (xATP) is known to be functionally modulated in part by ectoapyrases, membrane-associated proteins that cleave the γ- and β-phosphates on xATP. We present data showing a previously unreported (to our knowledge) linkage between apyrase and phosphate transport. An apyrase from pea (Pisum sativum) complements a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) phosphate-transport mutant and significantly increases the amount of phosphate taken up by transgenic plants overexpressing the gene. The transgenic plants show enhanced growth and augmented phosphate transport when the additional phosphate is supplied as inorganic phosphate or as ATP. When scavenging phosphate from xATP, apyrase mobilizes the γ-phosphate without promoting the transport of the purine or the ribose. PMID:9952450

  3. Mobile impurity in a Fermi sea from the functional renormalization group analytically continued to real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamikado, Kazuhiko; Kanazawa, Takuya; Uchino, Shun

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by experiments with cold atoms, we investigate a mobile impurity immersed in a Fermi sea in three dimensions at zero temperature by means of the functional renormalization group. We first perform the derivative expansion of the effective action to calculate the ground-state energy and Tan's contact across the polaron-molecule transition for several mass imbalances. Next we study quasiparticle properties of the impurity by using a real-time method recently developed in nuclear physics, which allows one to go beyond the derivative expansion. We obtain the spectral function of the polaron and the effective mass and quasiparticle weight of attractive and repulsive polarons, and clarify how they are affected by mass imbalances.

  4. On the mobility, membrane location and functionality of mechanosensitive channels in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Jonas; Galbiati, Heloisa; Rasmussen, Akiko; Miller, Samantha; Poolman, Bert

    2016-09-06

    Bacterial mechanosensitive channels protect cells from structural damage during hypoosmotic shock. MscS, MscL and MscK are the most abundant channels in E. coli and arguably the most important ones in osmoprotection. By combining physiological assays with quantitative photo-activated localization microscopy (qPALM), we find an almost linear relationship between channel abundance and cell survival. A minimum of 100 MscL (or MscS) channels is needed for protection when a single type of channel is expressed. Under native-like conditions MscL, MscS as well as MscK distribute homogeneously over the cytoplasmic membrane and the lateral diffusion of the channels is in accordance with their relative protein mass. However, we observe cluster formation and a reduced mobility of MscL when the majority of the subunits of the pentameric channel contain the fluorescent mEos3.2 protein. These data provide new insights into the quantitative biology of mechanosensitive channels and emphasizes the need for care in analysing protein complexes even when the fluorescent tag has been optimized for monomeric behaviour.

  5. Mobile phone emission increases inter-hemispheric functional coupling of electroencephalographic α rhythms in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Fabrizio; Tombini, Mario; Buffo, Paola; Assenza, Giovanni; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Benvenga, Antonella; Babiloni, Claudio; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2012-05-01

    It has been reported that GSM electromagnetic fields (GSM-EMFs) of mobile phones modulate - after a prolonged exposure - inter-hemispheric synchronization of temporal and frontal resting electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms in normal young and elderly subjects (Vecchio et al., 2007, 2010). Here we tested the hypothesis that this can be even more evident in epileptic patients, who typically suffer from abnormal mechanisms governing synchronization of rhythmic firing of cortical neurons. Eyes-closed resting EEG data were recorded in ten patients affected by focal epilepsy in real and sham exposure conditions. These data were compared with those obtained from 15 age-matched normal subjects of the previous reference studies. The GSM device was turned on (45 min) in the "GSM" condition and was turned off (45 min) in the other condition ("sham"). The mobile phone was always positioned on the left side in both patients and control subjects. Spectral coherence evaluated the inter-hemispheric synchronization of EEG rhythms at the following frequency bands: delta (about 2-4 Hz), theta (about 4-6 Hz), alpha1 (about 6-8 Hz), alpha2 (about 8-10 Hz), and alpha3 (about 10-12 Hz). The effects on the patients were investigated comparing the inter-hemispheric EEG coherence in the epileptic patients with the control group of subjects evaluated in the previous reference studies. Compared with the control subjects, epileptic patients showed a statistically significant higher inter-hemispheric coherence of temporal and frontal alpha rhythms (about 8-12 Hz) in the GSM than "Sham" condition. These results suggest that GSM-EMFs of mobile phone may affect inter-hemispheric synchronization of the dominant (alpha) EEG rhythms in epileptic patients. If confirmed by future studies on a larger group of epilepsy patients, the modulation of the inter-hemispheric alpha coherence due to the GSM-EMFs could have clinical implications and be related to changes in cognitive-motor function.

  6. Health and Quality of Life Perception in Older Adults: The Joint Role of Cognitive Efficiency and Functional Mobility.

    PubMed

    Forte, Roberta; Boreham, Colin A G; De Vito, Giuseppe; Pesce, Caterina

    2015-09-10

    Cognitive and mobility functions are involved in health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The present cross-sectional study aimed at investigating what facets of efficient cognition and functional mobility interactively contribute to mental and physical HRQoL. Fifty-six healthy older individuals (aged 65-75 years) were evaluated for mental and physical HRQoL, core cognitive executive functions (inhibition, working memory, and cognitive flexibility), and functional mobility (walking) under single and dual task conditions. Multiple regression analyses were run to verify which core executive functions predicted mental and physical HRQoL and whether the ability to perform complex (dual) walking tasks moderated such association. Inhibitory efficiency and the ability to perform physical-mental dual tasks interactively predicted mental HRQoL, whereas cognitive flexibility and the ability to perform physical dual tasks interactively predicted physical HRQoL. Different core executive functions seem relevant for mental and physical HRQoL. Executive function efficiency seems to translate into HRQoL perception when coupled with tangible experience of the ability to walk under dual task conditions that mirror everyday life demands. Implications of these results for supporting the perception of mental and physical quality of life at advanced age are discussed, suggesting the usefulness of multicomponent interventions and environments conducive to walking that jointly aid successful cognitive aging and functional mobility.

  7. Development of an Objective Space Suit Mobility Performance Metric Using Metabolic Cost and Functional Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, Shane M.; Norcross, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Existing methods for evaluating EVA suit performance and mobility have historically concentrated on isolated joint range of motion and torque. However, these techniques do little to evaluate how well a suited crewmember can actually perform during an EVA. An alternative method of characterizing suited mobility through measurement of metabolic cost to the wearer has been evaluated at Johnson Space Center over the past several years. The most recent study involved six test subjects completing multiple trials of various functional tasks in each of three different space suits; the results indicated it was often possible to discern between different suit designs on the basis of metabolic cost alone. However, other variables may have an effect on real-world suited performance; namely, completion time of the task, the gravity field in which the task is completed, etc. While previous results have analyzed completion time, metabolic cost, and metabolic cost normalized to system mass individually, it is desirable to develop a single metric comprising these (and potentially other) performance metrics. This paper outlines the background upon which this single-score metric is determined to be feasible, and initial efforts to develop such a metric. Forward work includes variable coefficient determination and verification of the metric through repeated testing.

  8. Classification of ion mobility spectra by functional groups using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, S.; Nazarov, E.; Wang, Y. F.; Eiceman, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    Neural networks were trained using whole ion mobility spectra from a standardized database of 3137 spectra for 204 chemicals at various concentrations. Performance of the network was measured by the success of classification into ten chemical classes. Eleven stages for evaluation of spectra and of spectral pre-processing were employed and minimums established for response thresholds and spectral purity. After optimization of the database, network, and pre-processing routines, the fraction of successful classifications by functional group was 0.91 throughout a range of concentrations. Network classification relied on a combination of features, including drift times, number of peaks, relative intensities, and other factors apparently including peak shape. The network was opportunistic, exploiting different features within different chemical classes. Application of neural networks in a two-tier design where chemicals were first identified by class and then individually eliminated all but one false positive out of 161 test spectra. These findings establish that ion mobility spectra, even with low resolution instrumentation, contain sufficient detail to permit the development of automated identification systems.

  9. Effect of 902 MHz mobile phone transmission on cognitive function in children.

    PubMed

    Preece, A W; Goodfellow, S; Wright, M G; Butler, S R; Dunn, E J; Johnson, Y; Manktelow, T C; Wesnes, K

    2005-01-01

    We examine whether a standard mobile exposure at 902 MHz has a significant effect on cognitive function in 18 children 10-12 years of age. These were in a single group in which each child was given a single training session and then three test sessions in a randomized, three-way crossover design, using the cognitive drug research (CDR) cognitive assessment system. Exposures were 0, 0.025, or 0.25 W from a standard Nokia 3110 mobile phone handset mounted on a plastic headset in normal use position. The results of testing showed that the baseline (0 W) performance for the reaction time measurements was considerably slower than for the comparable measures in adult. There was a tendency for reaction time to be shorter during exposure to radiation than in the sham (baseline) condition, an effect that was most marked for simple reaction time. However, no effects reached statistical significance after Bonferroni correction. Therefore, we conclude that this study on 18 children did not replicate our earlier finding in adults that exposure to microwave radiation was associated with a reduction in reaction time. It should be noted that the present study investigated the effects of radiation from a GSM handset, whereas in our previous study the effect on reaction time was observed only with a more powerful analogue handset.

  10. Automated, on-line quantification of left ventricular dimensions and function by echocardiography with backscatter imaging and lateral gain compensation.

    PubMed

    Pérez, J E; Klein, S C; Prater, D M; Fraser, C E; Cardona, H; Waggoner, A D; Holland, M R; Miller, J G; Sobel, B E

    1992-11-01

    To provide on-line quantification of left ventricular cavity dimensions and function by echocardiography 60 control subjects and 10 patients with cardiac dysfunction were studied. A novel, ultrasound imaging system was used which was developed to detect and track, in real time, ventricular endocardial blood boundaries based on quantitative assessment of acoustic properties of tissue. In addition, lateral gain compensation, a robust and novel image enhancement procedure, was used to provide instantaneous measurement and display of cavity areas and functional indexes on a beat-by-beat basis within regions of interest drawn around the blood pool cavity. In control subjects, short-axis end-diastolic area averaged 13.1 +/- 3.7 cm2 (SD), end-systolic area 5.9 +/- 2.7 cm2, and fractional area change 55.6 +/- 11.2%. Apical views yielded corresponding values of 23.8 +/- 4.5 cm2, 15.5 +/- 3.4 cm2 and 34.7 +/- 7.8%. Instantaneous peak rate of cavity area change approximated 50 cm2/s in systole and 60 cm2/s in diastole in each view. Serial measurements of area and functional index were reproducible over intervals of 2 to 3 weeks. Patients with dilated ventricles exhibited average apical view area values of 49.1 +/- 6.1 cm2 and 43.1 +/- 4.9 cm2 in diastole and systole with a fractional area change of 12.2 +/- 3.0%. Thus, results with on-line echocardiographic backscatter imaging-assisted automated edge detection are reproducible and capable of delineating cardiac dysfunction conveniently, promptly and serially at the bedside.

  11. Language lateralization of hearing native signers: A functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD) study of speech and sign production

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Sigut, Eva; Daws, Richard; Payne, Heather; Blott, Jonathan; Marshall, Chloë; MacSweeney, Mairéad

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies suggest greater involvement of the left parietal lobe in sign language compared to speech production. This stronger activation might be linked to the specific demands of sign encoding and proprioceptive monitoring. In Experiment 1 we investigate hemispheric lateralization during sign and speech generation in hearing native users of English and British Sign Language (BSL). Participants exhibited stronger lateralization during BSL than English production. In Experiment 2 we investigated whether this increased lateralization index could be due exclusively to the higher motoric demands of sign production. Sign naïve participants performed a phonological fluency task in English and a non-sign repetition task. Participants were left lateralized in the phonological fluency task but there was no consistent pattern of lateralization for the non-sign repetition in these hearing non-signers. The current data demonstrate stronger left hemisphere lateralization for producing signs than speech, which was not primarily driven by motoric articulatory demands. PMID:26605960

  12. Language lateralization of hearing native signers: A functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD) study of speech and sign production.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Sigut, Eva; Daws, Richard; Payne, Heather; Blott, Jonathan; Marshall, Chloë; MacSweeney, Mairéad

    2015-12-01

    Neuroimaging studies suggest greater involvement of the left parietal lobe in sign language compared to speech production. This stronger activation might be linked to the specific demands of sign encoding and proprioceptive monitoring. In Experiment 1 we investigate hemispheric lateralization during sign and speech generation in hearing native users of English and British Sign Language (BSL). Participants exhibited stronger lateralization during BSL than English production. In Experiment 2 we investigated whether this increased lateralization index could be due exclusively to the higher motoric demands of sign production. Sign naïve participants performed a phonological fluency task in English and a non-sign repetition task. Participants were left lateralized in the phonological fluency task but there was no consistent pattern of lateralization for the non-sign repetition in these hearing non-signers. The current data demonstrate stronger left hemisphere lateralization for producing signs than speech, which was not primarily driven by motoric articulatory demands.

  13. Management of Grade III Mobile Anterior Tooth in Function Using Endostabilizer – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Swapnil N

    2014-01-01

    Impact of implant dentistry is such that today very few dentists think about saving grade III mobile anterior teeth. A patient with grade III mobility of central incisor due to apical root resorption was treated by using 80 no.stainless steel ‘H’ file as endostabiliser and one year follow up was done. Endostabiliser reduced the mobility of grade III mobile teeth drastically, immediately after its placement. Tooth was absolutely asymptomatic throughout one year follow up. PMID:25654043

  14. Method for determining hydrogen mobility as a function of temperature in superconducting niobium cavities

    DOEpatents

    May, Robert

    2008-03-11

    A method for determining the mobility of hydrogen as a function of temperature in superconducting niobium cavities comprising: 1) heating a cavity under test to remove free hydrogen; 2) introducing hydrogen-3 gas into the cavity; 3) cooling the cavity to allow absorption of hydrogen-3; and 4) measuring the amount of hydrogen-3 by: a) cooling the cavity to about 4.degree. K while flowing a known and regulated amount of inert carrier gas such as argon or helium into the cavity; b) allowing the cavity to warm at a stable rate from 4.degree. K to room temperature as it leaves the chamber; and c) directing the exit gas to an ion chamber radiation detector.

  15. Functional mobility and balance in community-dwelling elderly submitted to multisensory versus strength exercises

    PubMed Central

    Alfieri, Fábio Marcon; Riberto, Marcelo; Gatz, Lucila Silveira; Ribeiro, Carla Paschoal Corsi; Lopes, José Augusto Fernandes; Santarém, José Maria; Battistella, Linamara Rizzo

    2010-01-01

    It is well documented that aging impairs balance and functional mobility. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of multisensory versus strength exercises on these parameters. We performed a simple blinded randomized controlled trial with 46 community-dwelling elderly allocated to strength ([GST], N = 23, 70.2-years-old ± 4.8 years) or multisensory ([GMS], N = 23, 68.8-years-old ± 5.9 years) exercises twice a week for 12 weeks. Subjects were evaluated by blinded raters using the timed ‘up and go’ test (TUG), the Guralnik test battery, and a force platform. By the end of the treatment, the GMS group showed a significant improvement in TUG (9.1 ± 1.9 seconds (s) to 8.0 ± 1.0 s, P = 0.002); Guralnik test battery (10.6 ± 1.2 to 11.3 ± 0.8 P = 0.009); lateromedial (6.1 ± 11.7 cm to 3.1 ± 1.6 cm, P = 0.02) and anteroposterior displacement (4.7 ± 4.2 cm to 3.4 ± 1.0 cm, P = 0.03), which were not observed in the GST group. These results reproduce previous findings in the literature and mean that the stimulus to sensibility results in better achievements for the control of balance and dynamic activities. Multisensory exercises were shown to be more efficacious than strength exercises to improve functional mobility. PMID:20711437

  16. Nanometer-resolution measurement and modeling of lateral variations of the effective work function at metal-bilayer /oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, W.; Park, K.-B.; Pelz, J. P.

    2006-03-01

    Future CMOS technology will require metal gates with a ``tunable'' effective work function (EWF) to precisely adjust the transistor turn-on voltage. It was shown using macroscopic C-V measurements that this could be done by adjusting the thickness of a very thin low-EWF metal covered by a high-EWF metal film (or vice-versa) on a SiO2 film [1,2]. We are using nm-resolution Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy (BEEM) and Internal Photemission (Int-PE) to investigate whether a 5-nm Pt/1.4-nm Al/SiO2 gate stack has a laterally inhomogeneous energy barrier at the metal/SiO2 interface, produced by nm-sized pinholes in the thin Al film. Initial measurements of the average BEEM threshold voltage vs. applied oxide bias do in fact suggest an inhomogeneous energy barrier at the interface. Further BEEM and Int-PE measurements and finite-element electrostatic simulations are on-going, and will be discussed. Work supported by the Semiconductor Research Corp. [1] Gao et al., Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 765, D1.4.1-6 (2003). [2] I.S. Jeon et al., IEDM-04, 303 (2004).

  17. [Correlation between corticospinal tract degeneration through magnetic resonance imaging, and functional scale (ALSFRS) in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Garcia, Larissa Nery; Silva, Alexandre Vallota da; Carrete, Henrique; Favero, Francis Meire; Fontes, Sissy Veloso; Moneiro, Marcelo Tavares; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle de

    2007-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that affects the corticospinal tract. ALS functional rating scale (ALSFRS) is a questionnaire that quantifies motor deficits, while diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) evaluates the integrity of fibers through the fractional anisotropy (FA). In the present study, seven ALS patients were evaluated by ALSFRS and immediately submitted to DTI, getting FA values in the following regions: cerebral peduncle (PC), internal capsule (CI) and the white matter under the primary motor cortex (M1), secondary motor cortex (M2) and somesthetic cortex (SI). A control group was constituted by twelve healthy individuals. FA values in patients were significantly lower when compared with controls, with a tendency to higher reductions in the right hemisphere and more inferior regions. Interestingly, FA values were reduced in somesthetic area. No correlation was observed between symptoms duration and FA values. Despite the correlation observed between ALSFRS scores and degeneration in PC and CI, our results suggest that this subjective scale is not a good parameter for the evaluation of the structural damage in encephalic portions of the corticospinal tract.

  18. Action Processing and Mirror Neuron Function in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Jelsone-Swain, Laura; Persad, Carol; Burkard, David; Welsh, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a highly debilitating and rapidly fatal neurodegenerative disease. It has been suggested that social cognition may be affected, such as impairment in theory of mind (ToM) ability. Despite these findings, research in this area is scarce and the investigation of neural mechanisms behind such impairment is absent. Nineteen patients with ALS and eighteen healthy controls participated in this study. Because the mirror neuron system (MNS) is thought to be involved in theory of mind, we first implemented a straightforward action-execution and observation task to assess basic MNS function. Second, we examined the social-cognitive ability to understand actions of others, which is a component of ToM. We used fMRI to assess BOLD activity differences between groups during both experiments. Theory of mind was also measured behaviorally using the Reading the Mind in the Eyes test (RME). ALS patients displayed greater BOLD activity during the action-execution and observation task, especially throughout right anterior cortical regions. These areas included the right inferior operculum, premotor and primary motor regions, and left inferior parietal lobe. A conjunction analysis showed significantly more co-activated voxels during both the observation and action-execution conditions in the patient group throughout MNS regions. These results support a compensatory response in the MNS during action processing. In the action understanding experiment, healthy controls performed better behaviorally and subsequently recruited greater regions of activity throughout the prefrontal cortex and middle temporal gyrus. Lastly, action understanding performance was able to cluster patients with ALS into high and lower performing groups, which then differentiated RME performance. Collectively, these data suggest that social cognition, particularly theory of mind, may be affected in a subset of patients with ALS. This impairment may be related to functioning of

  19. Functional Mobility Performance and Balance Confidence in Older Adults after Sensorimotor Adaptation Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buccello-Stout, Regina R.; Cromwell, Ronita L.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Weaver, G. D.

    2010-01-01

    Research indicates a main contributor of injury in older adults is from falling. The decline in sensory systems limits information needed to successfully maneuver through the environment. The objective of this study was to determine if prolonged exposure to the realignment of perceptual-motor systems increases adaptability of balance, and if balance confidence improves after training. A total of 16 older adults between ages 65-85 were randomized to a control group (walking on a treadmill while viewing a static visual scene) and an experimental group (walking on a treadmill while viewing a rotating visual scene). Prior to visual exposure, participants completed six trials of walking through a soft foamed obstacle course. Participants came in twice a week for 4 weeks to complete training of walking on a treadmill and viewing the visual scene for 20 minutes each session. Participants completed the obstacle course after training and four weeks later. Average time, penalty, and Activity Balance Confidence Scale scores were computed for both groups across testing times. The older adults who trained, significantly improved their time through the obstacle course F (2, 28) = 9.41, p < 0.05, as well as reduced their penalty scores F (2, 28) = 21.03, p < 0.05, compared to those who did not train. There was no difference in balance confidence scores between groups across testing times F (2, 28) = 0.503, p > 0.05. Although the training group improved mobility through the obstacle course, there were no differences between the groups in balance confidence.

  20. 'Hidden lamination' in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus: the functional organization of this thalamic region in the rat.

    PubMed

    Reese, B E

    1988-01-01

    The cyto-and myeloarchitecture of the rat's dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) display none of the laminar features characteristic of this thalamic region in carnivores and primates. Despite this, the rodent's nucleus contains a segregation of functionally and ocularly distinct afferents--organizational properties manifested in the prominent lamination of these other mammalian forms. The rat's dLGN can be divided into two main regions: an inner core and an outer shell. The inner core contains two ocular laminae receiving direct retinotopic projections from the contralateral nasal and ipsilateral temporal retinae, mapping the contralateral visual hemifield. The outer shell receives a retinotopic projection from the complete contralateral retina only, the representation of the ipsilateral hemifield being extremely compressed at the medial edge of this lamina. The retinotopic maps in these three ocular laminae (contra, ipsi, contra) are in conjugate register, so that lines of projection course rostro-ventro-medially from the optic tract at the thalamic surface through these laminae. Three morphologically distinct retinal ganglion cell types project to the dLGN, and the axons of these ganglion cells are partially segregated within the optic tract in anticipation of their segregation within the nucleus, where they terminate at distinct locations along the lines of projection. Type I and III cells terminate in the inner core of the nucleus, while type II and III cells terminate in the outer shell. The outer shell also receives a direct projection from the superior colliculus. These characteristics of the afferent termination within the rat's dLGN support the view of a general mammalian plan for the organization of this thalamic region, and provide a basis for further experimentation to test speculations about potentially homologous subdivisions of this nucleus. Conclusions regarding functionally analogous pathways are proposed with less confidence, due to the

  1. Improvements in hip flexibility do not transfer to mobility in functional movement patterns.

    PubMed

    Moreside, Janice M; McGill, Stuart M

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the transference of increased passive hip range of motion (ROM) and core endurance to functional movement. Twenty-four healthy young men with limited hip mobility were randomly assigned to 4 intervention groups: group 1, stretching; group 2, stretching plus hip/spine disassociation exercises; group 3, core endurance; and group 4, control. Previous work has documented the large increase in passive ROM and core endurance that was attained over the 6-week interventions, but whether these changes transferred to functional activities was unclear. Four dynamic activities were analyzed before and after the 6-week interventions: active standing hip extension, lunge, a standing twist/reach maneuver, and exercising on an elliptical trainer. A Vicon motion capture system collected body segment kinematics, with hip and lumbar spine angles subsequently calculated in Visual 3D. Repeated measures analyses of variance determined group effects on various hip and spine angles, with paired t-tests on specific pre/post pairs. Despite the large increases in passive hip ROM, there was no evidence of increased hip ROM used during functional movement testing. Similarly, the only significant change in lumbar motion was a reduction in lumbar rotation during the active hip extension maneuver (p < 0.05). These results indicate that changes in passive ROM or core endurance do not automatically transfer to changes in functional movement patterns. This implies that training and rehabilitation programs may benefit from an additional focus on 'grooving' new motor patterns if newfound movement range is to be used.

  2. Nonvolatile memory functionality of ZnO nanowire transistors controlled by mobile protons.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jongwon; Hong, Woong-Ki; Jo, Minseok; Jo, Gunho; Choe, Minhyeok; Park, Woojin; Sohn, Jung Inn; Nedic, Stanko; Hwang, Hyungsang; Welland, Mark E; Lee, Takhee

    2011-01-25

    We demonstrated the nonvolatile memory functionality of ZnO nanowire field effect transistors (FETs) using mobile protons that are generated by high-pressure hydrogen annealing (HPHA) at relatively low temperature (400 °C). These ZnO nanowire devices exhibited reproducible hysteresis, reversible switching, and nonvolatile memory behaviors in comparison with those of the conventional FET devices. We show that the memory characteristics are attributed to the movement of protons between the Si/SiO(2) interface and the SiO(2)/ZnO nanowire interface by the applied gate electric field. The memory mechanism is explained in terms of the tuning of interface properties, such as effective electric field, surface charge density, and surface barrier potential due to the movement of protons in the SiO(2) layer, consistent with the UV photoresponse characteristics of nanowire memory devices. Our study will further provide a useful route of creating memory functionality and incorporating proton-based storage elements onto a modified CMOS platform for FET memory devices using nanomaterials.

  3. Functional mobility in a divided attention task in older adults with cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Borges, Sheila de Melo; Radanovic, Márcia; Forlenza, Orestes Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Motor disorders may occur in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and at early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), particularly under divided attention conditions. We examined functional mobility in 104 older adults (42 with MCI, 26 with mild AD, and 36 cognitively healthy) using the Timed Up and Go test (TUG) under 4 experimental conditions: TUG single task, TUG plus a cognitive task, TUG plus a manual task, and TUG plus a cognitive and a manual task. Statistically significant differences in mean time of execution were found in all four experimental conditions when comparing MCI and controls (p < .001), and when comparing MCI and AD patients (p < .05). Receiver-operating characteristic curve analyses showed that all four testing conditions could differentiate the three groups (area under the curve > .8, p < .001 for MCI vs. controls; area under the curve > .7, p < .001 for MCI vs. AD). The authors conclude that functional motor deficits occurring in MCI can be assessed by the TUG test, in single or dual task modality.

  4. Influence of Early Intensive Rehabilitation on Functional Mobility after Low Back Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bizheva, Tsvetelina; Lubenova, Daniela; Maznev, Ivan; Grigorova-Petrova, Kristin; Dimitrova, Antoaneta; Vasileva, Danche; Nikolova, Milena

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The research aims to determine the influence of early goal-oriented physical therapy program in combination with educational booklet and standard physical therapy without written instructions on functional mobility outcomes in patients after low back surgery. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty patients with similar functional impairments were randomly divided into two groups, a control group (CG n = 10) and an experimental group (EG n = 20). The outcome measures include time to move from lying to sitting position, the TUG test and the 6-meter walk test. Rehabilitation program includes daily physical therapy with mild to moderate intensity, achieving sitting position and education sessions how to perform activities of daily living (ADL) from the first day after surgery. RESULTS: There was a significant improvement from baseline in two groups for all performed tests (p < 0.001). Statistical significant differences between two groups for transfers in bed on discharge (p < 0.05), in one month (p < 0.01) and for TUG in one month (p < 0.05) were found. CONCLUSION: The study revealed that early rehabilitation program consists of therapeutic exercises and written educational booklet after low back surgery improves transfer abilities and basic activities in one month. PMID:28028409

  5. Design and function of an electron mobility spectrometer with a thick gas electron multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchard, Gloria M.; Puddu, Silvia; Waker, Anthony J.

    2016-04-01

    The design and function of an electron mobility spectrometer (EMS) including a thick gas electron multiplier (THGEM) is presented. The THGEM was designed to easily be incorporated in an existing EMS to investigate the ability to detect tritium in air using a micropattern gas detector. The THGEM and a collection plate (anode) were installed and the appropriate circuitry was designed and connected to supply the required voltages to the THGEM-EMS. An alpha source (241Am) was used to generate electron-ion pairs within the gas-filled sensitive volume of the EMS. The electrons were used to investigate the THGEM-EMS response as a function of applied voltage to the THGEM and anode. The relative gas-gain and system resolution of the THGEM-EMS were measured at various applied voltage settings. It was observed a potential difference across the THGEM of +420 V and potential difference across the induction region of +150 V for this EMS setup resulted in the minimum voltage requirements to operate with a stable gain and system resolution. Furthermore, as expected, the gain is strongly affected not only by the potential difference across the THGEM, but also by the applied voltage to the anode and resulting potential difference between the THGEM and anode.

  6. Functionalized surface-confined pores: guest binding directed by lateral noncovalent interactions at the solid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Kazukuni; Katayama, Keisuke; Blunt, Matthew Oliver; Iritani, Kohei; De Feyter, Steven; Tobe, Yoshito

    2014-08-26

    We present here the construction of self-assembled two-dimensional (2D) molecular networks that contain pores equipped with functional groups that promote guest-specific binding at the liquid/solid interface. For this purpose, a dehydrobenzo[12]annulene (DBA) derivative, DBA-F, having perfluoroalkyl groups at the end of the three alternating alkoxy chains connected by para-phenylene linkers was synthesized. For comparison DBA-H, having the same carbon backbone without fluorine substituents, was also prepared. STM observations revealed that these molecules formed porous 2D networks whose pores were decorated with either fluoroalkane or simple alkane perimeters. Hexakis(phenylethynyl)benzene, HPEB, and its octadecafluoro derivative, HPEB-F surrounded by 18 fluorine atoms, were employed as planar guest molecules of suitable size. The fluoroalkane-lined pores present in the network of DBA-F exhibited good binding ability toward both guest molecules via fluorophilicity and electrostatic interaction, respectively. In contrast the binding ability of the alkane-lined pore of the network of DBA-H for the fluorinated guest HPEB-F was poor as a result of weaker electrostatic interaction. Interestingly, with HPEB as a guest, this network underwent a periodical structural deformation through an induced-fit mechanism to form a superlattice structure consisting of free and occupied pores. These observations are discussed based on modeling experiments using molecular mechanics and quantum chemical methods to elucidate the roles of lateral noncovalent interactions and size matching between the pore and the guest molecules used for 2D guest binding.

  7. Functional alterations of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in motor neurons of a mouse model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis†

    PubMed Central

    Cheroni, Cristina; Marino, Marianna; Tortarolo, Massimo; Veglianese, Pietro; De Biasi, Silvia; Fontana, Elena; Zuccarello, Laura Vitellaro; Maynard, Christa J.; Dantuma, Nico P.; Bendotti, Caterina

    2009-01-01

    In familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and in rodent models of the disease, alterations in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) may be responsible for the accumulation of potentially harmful ubiquitinated proteins, leading to motor neuron death. In the spinal cord of transgenic mice expressing the familial ALS superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene mutation G93A (SOD1G93A), we found a decrease in constitutive proteasome subunits during disease progression, as assessed by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. In parallel, an increased immunoproteasome expression was observed, which correlated with a local inflammatory response due to glial activation. These findings support the existence of proteasome modifications in ALS vulnerable tissues. To functionally investigate the UPS in ALS motor neurons in vivo, we crossed SOD1G93A mice with transgenic mice that express a fluorescently tagged reporter substrate of the UPS. In double-transgenic UbG76V-GFP /SOD1G93A mice an increase in UbG76V-GFP reporter, indicative of UPS impairment, was detectable in a few spinal motor neurons and not in reactive astrocytes or microglia, at symptomatic stage but not before symptoms onset. The levels of reporter transcript were unaltered, suggesting that the accumulation of UbG76V-GFP was due to deficient reporter degradation. In some motor neurons the increase of UbG76V-GFP was accompanied by the accumulation of ubiquitin and phosphorylated neurofilaments, both markers of ALS pathology. These data suggest that UPS impairment occurs in motor neurons of mutant SOD1-linked ALS mice and may play a role in the disease progression. PMID:18826962

  8. Zebrafish second heart field development relies on progenitor specification in anterior lateral plate mesoderm and nkx2.5 function.

    PubMed

    Guner-Ataman, Burcu; Paffett-Lugassy, Noelle; Adams, Meghan S; Nevis, Kathleen R; Jahangiri, Leila; Obregon, Pablo; Kikuchi, Kazu; Poss, Kenneth D; Burns, Caroline E; Burns, C Geoffrey

    2013-03-01

    Second heart field (SHF) progenitors perform essential functions during mammalian cardiogenesis. We recently identified a population of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) in zebrafish expressing latent TGFβ-binding protein 3 (ltbp3) that exhibits several defining characteristics of the anterior SHF in mammals. However, ltbp3 transcripts are conspicuously absent in anterior lateral plate mesoderm (ALPM), where SHF progenitors are specified in higher vertebrates. Instead, ltbp3 expression initiates at the arterial pole of the developing heart tube. Because the mechanisms of cardiac development are conserved evolutionarily, we hypothesized that zebrafish SHF specification also occurs in the ALPM. To test this hypothesis, we Cre/loxP lineage traced gata4(+) and nkx2.5(+) ALPM populations predicted to contain SHF progenitors, based on evolutionary conservation of ALPM patterning. Traced cells were identified in SHF-derived distal ventricular myocardium and in three lineages in the outflow tract (OFT). We confirmed the extent of contributions made by ALPM nkx2.5(+) cells using Kaede photoconversion. Taken together, these data demonstrate that, as in higher vertebrates, zebrafish SHF progenitors are specified within the ALPM and express nkx2.5. Furthermore, we tested the hypothesis that Nkx2.5 plays a conserved and essential role during zebrafish SHF development. Embryos injected with an nkx2.5 morpholino exhibited SHF phenotypes caused by compromised progenitor cell proliferation. Co-injecting low doses of nkx2.5 and ltbp3 morpholinos revealed a genetic interaction between these factors. Taken together, our data highlight two conserved features of zebrafish SHF development, reveal a novel genetic relationship between nkx2.5 and ltbp3, and underscore the utility of this model organism for deciphering SHF biology.

  9. Zebrafish second heart field development relies on progenitor specification in anterior lateral plate mesoderm and nkx2.5 function

    PubMed Central

    Guner-Ataman, Burcu; Paffett-Lugassy, Noelle; Adams, Meghan S.; Nevis, Kathleen R.; Jahangiri, Leila; Obregon, Pablo; Kikuchi, Kazu; Poss, Kenneth D.; Burns, Caroline E.; Burns, C. Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Second heart field (SHF) progenitors perform essential functions during mammalian cardiogenesis. We recently identified a population of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) in zebrafish expressing latent TGFβ-binding protein 3 (ltbp3) that exhibits several defining characteristics of the anterior SHF in mammals. However, ltbp3 transcripts are conspicuously absent in anterior lateral plate mesoderm (ALPM), where SHF progenitors are specified in higher vertebrates. Instead, ltbp3 expression initiates at the arterial pole of the developing heart tube. Because the mechanisms of cardiac development are conserved evolutionarily, we hypothesized that zebrafish SHF specification also occurs in the ALPM. To test this hypothesis, we Cre/loxP lineage traced gata4+ and nkx2.5+ ALPM populations predicted to contain SHF progenitors, based on evolutionary conservation of ALPM patterning. Traced cells were identified in SHF-derived distal ventricular myocardium and in three lineages in the outflow tract (OFT). We confirmed the extent of contributions made by ALPM nkx2.5+ cells using Kaede photoconversion. Taken together, these data demonstrate that, as in higher vertebrates, zebrafish SHF progenitors are specified within the ALPM and express nkx2.5. Furthermore, we tested the hypothesis that Nkx2.5 plays a conserved and essential role during zebrafish SHF development. Embryos injected with an nkx2.5 morpholino exhibited SHF phenotypes caused by compromised progenitor cell proliferation. Co-injecting low doses of nkx2.5 and ltbp3 morpholinos revealed a genetic interaction between these factors. Taken together, our data highlight two conserved features of zebrafish SHF development, reveal a novel genetic relationship between nkx2.5 and ltbp3, and underscore the utility of this model organism for deciphering SHF biology. PMID:23444361

  10. Lateral asymmetry as a function of motor practice type of complex upper- and lower-limb movement in young children.

    PubMed

    Marinsek, Miha

    2016-01-01

    The influence of different motor practice types on lateral asymmetry of performance was investigated in 40 preschool children. Lateral preference was measured prior the experiment. For the purpose of present study dribbling a ball with a hand and foot was used to assess lateral asymmetry of performance before and after three different motor practice types. Motor practice with the non-dominant, dominant, and both (contralateral) limbs took place in the indoor facility 4 times/week for 6 weeks. Each session lasted 30-40 min. Our results showed that unilateral practice of dribbling is more beneficial for diminishing lateral asymmetry of performance in comparison to bilateral practice. Moreover, participants who practiced with their dominant limb diminished lateral asymmetry of performance the most and made the largest overall improvement. We did not find important differences between acquisitions of dribbling with upper- and lower-extremity. In this sense, the results support the notion of lateral asymmetry of performance to be task-specific.

  11. Vitamin B-12 status in infancy is positively associated with development and cognitive functioning 5 y later in Nepalese children.

    PubMed

    Kvestad, Ingrid; Hysing, Mari; Shrestha, Merina; Ulak, Manjeswori; Thorne-Lyman, Andrew L; Henjum, Sigrun; Ueland, Per M; Midttun, Øyvind; Fawzi, Wafaie; Chandyo, Ram K; Shrestha, Prakash S; Strand, Tor A

    2017-03-22

    Background: Poor vitamin B-12 (cobalamin) status is widespread in South Asia. Insufficient vitamin B-12 status has been linked to poor neurodevelopment in young children.Objective: We measured the associations between vitamin B-12 status in infancy (2-12 mo) and the development and cognitive functioning in Nepalese children 5 y later.Design: Vitamin B-12 status was assessed in infancy with the use of plasma cobalamin, total homocysteine (tHcy), and methylmalonic acid (MMA). At 5 y of age, we measured development with the use of the Ages and Stages Questionnaire, 3rd edition (ASQ-3), and cognitive functioning by using the Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment, 2nd edition (NEPSY II), in 320 children. In regression models, we estimated the associations between vitamin B-12 status, including a combined indicator of vitamin B-12 status (3cB12) and scores on the ASQ-3 and NEPSY II subtests.Results: All markers of vitamin B-12 status with the exception of plasma cobalamin were significantly associated with the total ASQ-3 scores in the multiple regression models. A 1-unit increase in the 3cB12 score was associated with an increase in the total ASQ-3 score of 4.88 (95% CI: 2.09, 7.68; P = 0.001). Increases in both plasma tHcy and MMA (indicating poorer status) were associated with a decrease in scores on the NEPSY II affect recognition and geometric puzzle subtests. Each unit increment in 3cB12 scores was associated with increases of 0.82 (95% CI: 0.49, 1.14; P < 0.0005), 0.59 (95% CI: 0.10, 1.09; P = 0.020), and 0.24 (95% CI: 0.02, 0.47; P = 0.035) in the affect recognition, geometric puzzle, and block construction scores, respectively.Conclusions: Vitamin B-12 status in infancy is associated with development and performance on social perception tasks and visuospatial abilities at 5 y of age. The long-term effects of poor vitamin B-12 status in infancy need further investigation in randomized controlled trials.

  12. Habitual physical activity levels are associated with performance in measures of physical function and mobility in older men

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical activity according to triaxial accelerometers; physical function and mobility according to the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), gait speed, stair climb time, and a lift-and-lower task; aerobic capacity according to maximum oxygen consumption (VO(2) max); and leg press and chest pr...

  13. Habitual physical activity levels are associated with performance in measures of physical function and mobility in older men

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: To determine whether objectively measured physical activity levels are associated with measures of physical function and mobility in older men. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Academic research center. Participants: Eighty-two community-dwelling men >/= 65 years of age with self-report...

  14. Driving Performance during Word Generation--Testing the Function of Human Brain Lateralization Using fTCD in an Ecologically Relevant Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lust, J. M.; Geuze, R. H.; Groothuis, A. G. G.; van der Zwan, J. E.; Brouwer, W. H.; van Wolffelaar, P. C.; Bouma, A.

    2011-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that cerebral lateralization of function enhances cognitive performance. Evidence was found in birds and fish. However, recent research in humans did not support this hypothesis. We aimed to replicate and extend these findings for single- and dual-task performance in an ecologically relevant task. We combined a word…

  15. A Combined fMRI and DTI Examination of Functional Language Lateralization and Arcuate Fasciculus Structure: Effects of Degree versus Direction of Hand Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Propper, Ruthe E.; O'Donnell, Lauren J.; Whalen, Stephen; Tie, Yanmei; Norton, Isaiah H.; Suarez, Ralph O.; Zollei, Lilla; Radmanesh, Alireza; Golby, Alexandra J.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between hand preference degree and direction, functional language lateralization in Broca's and Wernicke's areas, and structural measures of the arcuate fasciculus. Results revealed an effect of degree of hand preference on arcuate fasciculus structure, such that consistently-handed individuals,…

  16. Functional evidence for a direct excitatory projection from the lateral habenula to the ventral tegmental area in the rat.

    PubMed

    Brown, P Leon; Shepard, Paul D

    2016-09-01

    The lateral habenula, a phylogenetically conserved epithalamic structure, is activated by aversive stimuli and reward omission. Excitatory efferents from the lateral habenula predominately inhibit midbrain dopamine neuronal firing through a disynaptic, feedforward inhibitory mechanism involving the rostromedial tegmental nucleus. However, the lateral habenula also directly targets dopamine neurons within the ventral tegmental area, suggesting that opposing actions may result from increased lateral habenula activity. In the present study, we tested the effect of habenular efferent stimulation on dopamine and nondopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area of Sprague-Dawley rats using a parasagittal brain slice preparation. Single pulse stimulation of the fasciculus retroflexus excited 48% of dopamine neurons and 51% of nondopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area of rat pups. These proportions were not altered by excision of the rostromedial tegmental nucleus and were evident in both cortical- and striatal-projecting dopamine neurons. Glutamate receptor antagonists blocked this excitation, and fasciculus retroflexus stimulation elicited evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials with a nearly constant onset latency, indicative of a monosynaptic, glutamatergic connection. Comparison of responses in rat pups and young adults showed no significant difference in the proportion of neurons excited by fasciculus retroflexus stimulation. Our data indicate that the well-known, indirect inhibitory effect of lateral habenula activation on midbrain dopamine neurons is complemented by a significant, direct excitatory effect. This pathway may contribute to the role of midbrain dopamine neurons in processing aversive stimuli and salience.

  17. The Effect of Thoracic Joint Mobilization and Self-stretching Exercise on Pulmonary Functions of Patients with Chronic Neck Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hwangbo, Pil-Neo; Hwangbo, Gak; Park, Jungseo; Lee, Sangyong

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to determine the effect of thoracic joint mobilization and self-stretching exercise on the pulmonary functions of patients with chronic neck pain. [Subjects] The present study was performed with 34 patients with chronic neck pain featuring thoracic kyphosis; we divided them into a thoracic joint mobilization group (TJMG, n = 11), self-stretching exercise group (SSEG, n = 11), and thoracic joint mobilization and self-stretching exercise group (TJMSSEG, n = 12). [Methods] Treatments and exercise were conducted three times a week for six weeks in TJMG, SSEG, and TJMSSEG; the subjects’ pulmonary functions in terms of forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume at one second (FEV1), and peak expiratory flow (PEF) were measured using CardioTouch equipment. [Results] Comparisons of the individuals within each of the TJMG, SSEG, and TJMSSEG showed that all of FVC, FEV1, and PEF increased significantly; Comparisons within each of the showed that FVC, FEV1, and PEF increased significantly. Among the study groups, FVC was significantly higher in TJMSSEG than in TJMG after six weeks; FEV1 was significantly higher in TJMSSEG than in TJMG and SSEG after four and six weeks; and PEF was significantly higher in TJMSSEG than in TJMG and SSEG after six weeks. [Conclusion] The study results indicate that thoracic joint mobilization and self-stretching exercise are effective interventions for increasing FVC, FEV1, and PEF among pulmonary functions. PMID:25435700

  18. Isolated Photosystem I Reaction Centers on a Functionalized Gated High Electron Mobility Transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Eliza, Sazia A.; Lee, Ida; Tulip, Fahmida S; Islam, Syed K; Mostafa, Salwa; Greenbaum, Elias; Ericson, Milton Nance

    2011-01-01

    In oxygenic plants, photons are captured with high quantum efficiency by two specialized reaction centers (RC) called Photosystem I (PS I) and Photosystem II (PS II). The captured photon triggers rapid charge separation and the photon energy is converted into an electrostatic potential across the nanometer-scale nm reaction centers. The exogenous photovoltages from a single PS I RC have been previously measured using the technique of Kelvin force probe microscopy (KFM). However, biomolecular photovoltaic applications require two-terminal devices. This paper presents for the first time, a micro-device for detection and characterization of isolated PS I RCs. The device is based on an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structure. AlGaN/GaN HEMTs show high current throughputs and greater sensitivity to surface charges compared to other field-effect devices. PS I complexes immobilized on the floating gate of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs resulted in significant changes in the device characteristics under illumination. An analytical model has been developed to estimate the RCs of a major orientation on the functionalized gate surface of the HEMTs.

  19. Tri-component, mobile bearing, total ankle replacement: mid-term functional outcome and survival.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Rohit; Turner, Jake; Sharma, Vikas; Nayak, Ramesh K

    2012-01-01

    Tri-component, mobile bearing, uncemented, total ankle replacements were introduced after the high failure rates of cemented, highly constrained, first-generation, total ankle replacement implants. A total of 30 primary total ankle replacements in 29 patients (20 males and 9 females) were followed up in the present retrospective study for up to 13 (mean 5.1 ± 4) years. The postoperative functional and radiographic outcomes were measured. Failure was defined as revision of either of the components for any reason or conversion of the total ankle replacement to arthrodesis because of debilitating pain that did not resolve after surgery. Of the 29 patients, 2 underwent revision and 1 underwent arthrodesis. All 3 patients had the malpositioned talar implant revised. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was 81 at 1 year postoperatively. Revision of the tibial or talar component for any reason or conversion of the ankle replacement to arthrodesis was considered failure for the survival analysis. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a 5-year survival rate of 87.6%. The last failure occurred 23.3 months after surgery.

  20. Correlation between functional mobility and cognitive performance in older adults with cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Borges, Sheila de Melo; Radanovic, Márcia; Forlenza, Orestes Vicente

    2016-12-09

    Association between cognitive impairment and gait performance occurs in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), particularly under "divided attention" conditions, leading to a greater risk of falls. We studied 36 controls, 42 MCI, and 26 mild AD patients, using the Timed Up-and-Go test (TUG) under four conditions: TUG single - TUG1; TUG cognitive - TUG2; TUG manual -TUG3; TUG cognitive and manual - TUG4. Cognition was assessed using the MMSE, SKT, Exit25, and TMT (A and B). We found significant correlations between cognitive scores and TUG2 [r values (MMSE: -0.383, TMT-A: 0.430, TMT-B: 0.386, Exit25: 0.455, SKT: 0.563)] and TUG4 [(MMSE: -0.398, TMT-A: 0.384, TMT-B: 0.352,Exit25: 0.466, SKT: 0.525)] in the AD group, and between all TUG modalities and SKT in MCI and AD. Our results revealed that functional mobility impairment in cognitive dual tasks correlated to cognitive decline in AD patients and to attention and memory impairment in MCI.

  1. ScaMo: Realisation of an OO-functional DSL for cross platform mobile applications development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macos, Dragan; Solymosi, Andreas

    2013-10-01

    The software market is dynamically changing: the Internet is going mobile, the software applications are shifting from the desktop hardware onto the mobile devices. The largest markets are the mobile applications for iOS, Android and Windows Phone and for the purpose the typical programming languages include Objective-C, Java and C ♯. The realization of the native applications implies the integration of the developed software into the environments of mentioned mobile operating systems to enable the access to different hardware components of the devices: GPS module, display, GSM module, etc. This paper deals with the definition and possible implementation of an environment for the automatic application generation for multiple mobile platforms. It is based on a DSL for mobile application development, which includes the programming language Scala and a DSL defined in Scala. As part of a multi-stage cross-compiling algorithm, this language is translated into the language of the affected mobile platform. The advantage of our method lies in the expressiveness of the defined language and the transparent source code translation between different languages, which implies, for example, the advantages of debugging and development of the generated code.

  2. Sex-Related Hemispheric Lateralization of Amygdala Function in Emotionally Influenced Memory: An fMRI Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahill, Larry; Uncapher, Melina; Kilpatrick, Lisa; Alkire, Mike T.; Turner, Jessica

    2004-01-01

    The amygdala appears necessary for enhanced long-term memory associated with emotionally arousing events. Recent brain imaging investigations support this view and indicate a sex-related hemispheric lateralization exists in the amygdala relationship to memory for emotional material. This study confirms and further explores this finding. Healthy…

  3. Language Laterality in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Typical Controls: A Functional, Volumetric, and Diffusion Tensor MRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knaus, Tracey A.; Silver, Andrew M.; Kennedy, Meaghan; Lindgren, Kristen A.; Dominick, Kelli C.; Siegel, Jeremy; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Language and communication deficits are among the core features of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Reduced or reversed asymmetry of language has been found in a number of disorders, including ASD. Studies of healthy adults have found an association between language laterality and anatomical measures but this has not been systematically…

  4. Can transcranial direct current stimulation on the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex improves balance and functional mobility in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Lattari, Eduardo; Costa, Samara Sezana; Campos, Carlos; de Oliveira, Aldair José; Machado, Sérgio; Maranhao Neto, Geraldo Albuquerque

    2017-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique increasingly explored for Parkinson's disease (PD). Although evidence is still inconsistent, there are preliminary findings suggesting its efficacy to improve motor function in individuals with PD, as the role of secondary motor areas remains unclear. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) tDCS on balance and functional mobility of individuals with PD. Seventeen individuals with PD, on-medication, aged between 40 and 90 years were recruited to enroll in a double-blind, randomized, cross-over trial. Each participant completed two conditions at least 48h apart, namely anodal-tDCS and sham-tDCS (placebo). The a-tDCS condition targeted the left DLPC (F3) and was applied during 20min using a 2mA current intensity. In the sham-tDCS condition, electrode position remained the same but the stimulator was turned off after 30s. Functional mobility and balance were assessed using the Berg Balance Scale, Dynamic Gait Index and Timed Up and Go. There were significant differences between conditions on all outcome measures, as the a-tDCS condition was associated with better performance in comparison to the sham condition (p<0.05). Our findings suggest that a-tDCS on the left DLPFC improves balance and functional mobility in comparison to sham-tDCS. Compensatory mechanisms that support motor function in individuals with PD may have been enhanced by a-tDCS on the DLPFC, leading to improved functional mobility and balance. Future trials should explore left DLPFC stimulation with larger samples and compare t-DCS protocols targeting several brain regions.

  5. Effect of Intravenous Infusion of G-CSF-Mobilized Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells on Upper Extremity Function in Cerebral Palsy Children

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of intravenous infusion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (mPBMC) mobilized by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on upper extremity function in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Methods Fifty-seven children with CP were enrolled. Ten patients were excluded due to follow-up loss. In total, 47 patients (30 males and 17 females) were analyzed. All patients' parents provided signed consent before the start of the study. After administration of G-CSF for 5 days, mPBMC was collected and cryopreserved. Patients were randomized into two groups 1 month later. Twenty-two patients were administered mPBMC and 25 patients received normal saline as placebo. Six months later, the two groups were switched, and administered mPBMC and placebo, respectively. Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test (QUEST) and the Manual Ability Classification System (MACS) were used to evaluate upper motor function. Results All subdomain and total scores of QUEST were significantly improved after mPBMC and placebo infusion, without significant differences between mPBMC and placebo groups. A month after G-CSF, all subdomain and total scores of QUEST were improved. The level of MACS remained unchanged in both mPBMC and placebo groups. Conclusion In this study, intravenously infused mPBMC showed no significant effect on upper extremity function in children with CP, as compared to placebo. The effect of mPBMC was likely masked by the effect of G-CSF, which was used in both groups and/or G-CSF itself might have other neurotrophic potentials in children with CP. PMID:28289643

  6. Neuromorphic expansion of the GLONASS onboard functions for a mobile technological platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devyatisil'nyi, A. S.

    2015-10-01

    A method, model, and algorithm for finding the motion parameters of a mobile technological platform from measuring data provided by a three-component unit of newtonmeters (accelerometers) and a GLONASS onboard system for multipoint reception are suggested.

  7. Nano-enabled paper humidity sensor for mobile based point-of-care lung function monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Mitradip; Nemade, Harshal B; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar

    2017-03-22

    The frequency of breathing and peak flow rate of exhaled air are necessary parameters to detect chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPDs) such as asthma, bronchitis, or pneumonia. We developed a lung function monitoring point-of-care-testing device (LFM-POCT) consisting of mouthpiece, paper-based humidity sensor, micro-heater, and real-time monitoring unit. Fabrication of a mouthpiece of optimal length ensured that the exhaled air was focused on the humidity-sensor. The resistive relative humidity sensor was developed using a filter paper coated with nanoparticles, which could easily follow the frequency and peak flow rate of the human breathing. Adsorption followed by condensation of the water molecules of the humid air on the paper-sensor during the forced exhalation reduced the electrical resistance of the sensor, which was converted to an electrical signal for sensing. A micro-heater composed of a copper-coil embedded in a polymer matrix helped in maintaining an optimal temperature on the sensor surface. Thus, water condensed on the sensor surface only during forcible breathing and the sensor recovered rapidly after the exhalation was complete by rapid desorption of water molecules from the sensor surface. Two types of real-time monitoring units were integrated into the device based on light emitting diodes (LEDs) and smart phones. The LED based unit displayed the diseased, critical, and fit conditions of the lungs by flashing LEDs of different colors. In comparison, for the mobile based monitoring unit, an application was developed employing an open source software, which established a wireless connectivity with the LFM-POCT device to perform the tests.

  8. Challenges with Deploying and Integrating Environmental Control and Life Support Functions in a Lunar Architecture with High Degrees of Mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagdigian, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Visions of lunar outposts often depict a collection of fixed elements such as pressurized habitats, in and around which human inhabitants spend the large majority of their surface stay time. In such an outpost, an efficient deployment of environmental control and life support equipment can be achieved by centralizing certain functions within one or a minimum number of habitable elements and relying on the exchange of gases and liquids between elements via atmosphere ventilation and plumbed interfaces. However, a rigidly fixed outpost can constrain the degree to which the total lunar landscape can be explored. The capability to enable widespread access across the landscape makes a lunar architecture with a high degree of surface mobility attractive. Such mobility presents unique challenges to the efficient deployment of environmental control and life support functions in multiple elements that may for long periods of time be operated independently. This paper describes some of those anticipated challenges.

  9. A functional-dependencies-based Bayesian networks learning method and its application in a mobile commerce system.

    PubMed

    Liao, Stephen Shaoyi; Wang, Huai Qing; Li, Qiu Dan; Liu, Wei Yi

    2006-06-01

    This paper presents a new method for learning Bayesian networks from functional dependencies (FD) and third normal form (3NF) tables in relational databases. The method sets up a linkage between the theory of relational databases and probabilistic reasoning models, which is interesting and useful especially when data are incomplete and inaccurate. The effectiveness and practicability of the proposed method is demonstrated by its implementation in a mobile commerce system.

  10. Site-specific differences in the association between plantar tactile perception and mobility function in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Black, Mieniecia L.; Christou, Evangelos A.; Clark, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Impaired somatosensation is common in older adults and contributes to age-related loss of mobility function. However, little is known about whether somatosensation at different sites on the plantar surface of the foot are differentially related to mobility function. Such a finding may have important implications for clinical care of older adults and other at-risk populations, such as for optimizing interventions (e.g., footwear for augmenting somatosensory feedback) and for improving the efficiency of clinical assessment. Materials and Methods: Tactile perception was evaluated with a 10 g monofilament at four sites on the plantar surface of each foot: great toe (GT), first metatarsal head (MT1), heel (H) and fifth metatarsal head (MT5). Mobility function was assessed with the Berg Balance Scale and walking speed. Results: Sixty-one older adults participated. Tactile perception was significantly positively associated with Berg Balance Score (adjusted r = 0.30 − 0.75; p = 0.03 − < 0.001), with the strongest association found at the site of the MT1. Only at this site was tactile perception found to be significantly associated with usual walking speed (adjusted r = 0.51; p < 0.001) and maximal walking speed (adjusted r = 0.38, p = 0.004). Clinically mild somatosensory impairment at MT1, but not at other sites, was found to yield substantial deficits in both Berg Balance Score and walking speed. Discussion: The present findings indicate that tactile perception at MT1 is more closely linked to mobility function than is tactile perception at GT, MT5 or H. These findings warrant further research to examine whether interventions (e.g., textured insoles) and assessments that preferentially or exclusively focus on the site of MT1 may be more effective for optimizing clinical care. PMID:24782765

  11. Ankle proprioceptive acuity is associated with objective as well as self-report measures of balance, mobility, and physical function.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Nandini; Simonsick, Eleanor; Metter, E Jeffrey; Ko, Seunguk; Ferrucci, Luigi; Studenski, Stephanie

    2016-06-01

    Ankle proprioceptive information is integrated by the central nervous system to generate and modulate muscle contractions for maintaining standing balance. This study evaluated the association of ankle joint proprioception with objective and self-report measures of balance, mobility, and physical function across the adult life span. Seven hundred and ninety participants (age range 24-97 years, 362 women) who completed ankle proprioception assessment between 2010 and 2014 were included in the present study from the population-based cohort of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), USA. Outcome measures included ankle joint proprioception measured as threshold for perception of passive movement (TPPM); single leg stance time; perceived difficulty for standing balance; usual, fastest, and narrow-path gait speed; walking index; short physical performance battery score; and self-reported activity restriction due to fear of falling. Descriptive variables included age, sex, body mass index, education, strength, and cognition. Analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) in general linear model (GLM) or multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed, as appropriate, to test the hypothesis that balance, mobility, and physical function were significantly different according to TPPM quintiles even after adjusting for relevant covariates. Those with TPPM >2.2° consistently demonstrated poor balance, mobility, and physical function. However, with increase in challenge (single leg stance, fastest walking speed, and SPPB), TPPM >1.4° was associated with significantly worse performance. In conclusion, ankle proprioceptive acuity has an overall graded relationship with objective and self-report measures of balance, mobility, and physical function. However, the cutoff proprioceptive acuity associated with substantial decline or inability to perform could depend on the challenge induced.

  12. Element mobilization from Bakken shales as a function of water chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Burns, Scott; Giammar, Daniel E; Fortner, John D

    2016-04-01

    Waters that return to the surface after injection of a hydraulic fracturing fluid for gas and oil production contain elements, including regulated metals and metalloids, which are mobilized through interactions between the fracturing fluid and the shale formation. The rate and extent of mobilization depends on the geochemistry of the formation and the chemical characteristics of the fracturing fluid. In this work, laboratory scale experiments investigated the influence of water chemistry on element mobilization from core samples taken from the Bakken formation, one of the most productive shale oil plays in the US. Fluid properties were systematically varied and evaluated with regard to pH, oxidant level, solid:water ratio, temperature, and chemical additives. Element mobilization strongly depended on solution pH and redox conditions and to a lesser extent on the temperature and solid:water ratio. The presence of oxygen and addition of hydrogen peroxide or ammonium persulfate led to pyrite oxidation, resulting in elevated sulfate concentrations. Further, depending on the mineral carbonates available to buffer the system pH, pyrite oxidation could lower the system pH and enhance the mobility of several metals and metalloids.

  13. Effect of electromagnetic radiations from mobile phone base stations on general health and salivary function

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kushpal; Nagaraj, Anup; Yousuf, Asif; Ganta, Shravani; Pareek, Sonia; Vishnani, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Cell phones use electromagnetic, nonionizing radiations in the microwave range, which some believe may be harmful to human health. The present study aimed to determine the effect of electromagnetic radiations (EMRs) on unstimulated/stimulated salivary flow rate and other health-related problems between the general populations residing in proximity to and far away from mobile phone base stations. Materials and Methods: A total of four mobile base stations were randomly selected from four zones of Jaipur, Rajasthan, India. Twenty individuals who were residing in proximity to the selected mobile phone towers were taken as the case group and the other 20 individuals (control group) who were living nearly 1 km away in the periphery were selected for salivary analysis. Questions related to sleep disturbances were measured using Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and other health problems were included in the questionnaire. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. Results: It was unveiled that a majority of the subjects who were residing near the mobile base station complained of sleep disturbances, headache, dizziness, irritability, concentration difficulties, and hypertension. A majority of the study subjects had significantly lesser stimulated salivary secretion (P < 0.01) as compared to the control subjects. Conclusions: The effects of prolonged exposure to EMRs from mobile phone base stations on the health and well-being of the general population cannot be ruled out. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the effect of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on general health and more specifically on oral health. PMID:27011934

  14. Chronic electrical stimulation of the contralesional lateral cerebellar nucleus enhances recovery of motor function after cerebral ischemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Andre G.; Baker, Kenneth B.; Schuster, Daniel; Butler, Robert S.; Rezai, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Novel neurorehabilitative strategies are needed to improve motor outcomes following stroke. Based on the disynaptic excitatory projections of the dentatothalamocortical pathway to the motor cortex as well as anterior and posterior cortical areas, we hypothesize that chronic electrical stimulation of the contralesional dentate (lateral cerebellar) nucleus output can enhance motor recovery after ischemia via augmentation of perilesional cortical excitability. Seventy five Wistar rats were pre-trained in the Montoya staircase task and subsequently suffered left cerebral ischemia with the 3-vessel occlusion model. All survivors underwent stereotactic right lateral cerebellar nucleus (LCN) implantation of bipolar electrodes. Rats were then randomized to 4 groups: LCN stimulation at 10 pps, 20 pps, 50 pps or sham stimulation, which was delivered for a period of six weeks. Performance on the Montoya task was re-assessed over the last four weeks of the stimulation period. On the right (contralesional) side, motor performance of the groups undergoing sham, 10 pps, 20 pps and 50 pps stimulation was, respectively, 2.5± 2.7; 2.1 ± 2.5; 6.0 ± 3.9 (p<0.01) and 4.5 ± 3.5 pellets. There was no difference on the left (ipsilesional) side motor performance among the sham or stimulation groups, varying from 15.9 ± 6.7 to 17.2 ± 2.1 pellets. We conclude that contralesional chronic electrical stimulation of the lateral cerebellar nucleus at 20 pps but not at 10 or 50 pps improves motor recovery in rats following ischemic strokes. This effect is likely to be mediated by increased perilesional cortical excitability via chronic activation of the dentatothalamocortical pathway. PMID:19445910

  15. Kinematic and kinetic evidence for functional lateralization in a symmetrical motor task: the water polo eggbeater kick.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Nuno; Sanders, Ross H

    2015-03-01

    Bilaterality and motor lateralization have been associated with neural lateralization, suggesting that the dominant and non-dominant systems might have different specializations. The study of symmetrical motor tasks can provide evidence relating to this hypothesis. The water polo eggbeater kick is a skill comprising anti-phase and directionally opposite rotations of the right and left lower limbs to provide upward thrust to elevate the body. Effectiveness of the skill depends on moving the feet in predominantly horizontal directions with an orientation that produces lift throughout as much of the cycle as possible. The purpose of this study was to investigate the motor lateralization of the dominant (D) and non-dominant (ND) lower limbs during the execution of the water polo eggbeater kick technique. Twelve right-handed and right-footed water polo players performed eggbeater kicks in the vertical position to maintain maximum height. Three-dimensional kinematics and the pattern of vertical forces were quantified for nine cycles for each player. The pattern of vertical force produced showed asymmetries between the equivalent phases of the cycles of the dominant and non-dominant limbs (D, 222.8 N; ND, 201.0 N; p < 0.001). Based on the vertical force patterns, the non-dominant ankle had a less efficient motion during the phase of knee flexion (recovery phase). This was a consequence of larger negative pitch angles created by the non-dominant foot for the equivalent phase. Negative pitch angles counteract the lift forces responsible for the upward propulsion of the player. The effectiveness of the dominant side during the recovery phase was a consequence of bilateral differences in rotation and inversion motions by the ankle and hip. Differences in the technique of the dominant and non-dominant side, particularly during the phase of knee flexion, supported the 'dynamic dominance theory' where each hemisphere/limb might be tuned to control different parameters of task

  16. Mobility functions of a spheroidal particle near a planar elastic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daddi-Moussa-Ider, Abdallah; Lisicki, Maciej; Gekle, Stephan

    2016-11-01

    Using an analytical theory, we compute the leading order corrections to the translational, rotational and translation-rotation coupling mobilities of a prolate spheroid immersed in a Newtonian fluid and moving nearby an elastic cell membrane. The corrections are expressed in terms of the spheroid-to-membrane distance, spheroid orientation and the characteristic frequencies associated with membrane shearing and bending. We find that the corrections to the translation-rotation coupling mobility are primarily determined by bending resistance whereas shearing elasticity manifests itself in a more pronounced way in the rotational mobility. We further demonstrate the validity of the analytical approximation by close comparison with boundary integral simulations of a truly extended spheroidal particle. The analytical calculations are found to be in a good agreement with the numerical simulations over the whole range of the applied frequencies.

  17. Mobile genetic elements in Clostridium difficile and their role in genome function

    PubMed Central

    Mullany, Peter; Allan, Elaine; Roberts, Adam P.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 11% the Clostridium difficile genome is made up of mobile genetic elements which have a profound effect on the biology of the organism. This includes transfer of antibiotic resistance and other factors that allow the organism to survive challenging environments, modulation of toxin gene expression, transfer of the toxin genes themselves and the conversion of non-toxigenic strains to toxin producers. Mobile genetic elements have also been adapted by investigators to probe the biology of the organism and the various ways in which these have been used are reviewed. PMID:25576774

  18. Asymmetrical Deterministic Lateral Displacement Gaps for Dual Functions of Enhanced Separation and Throughput of Red Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Zeming, Kerwin Kwek; Salafi, Thoriq; Chen, Chia-Hung; Zhang, Yong

    2016-03-10

    Deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) method for particle separation in microfluidic devices has been extensively used for particle separation in recent years due to its high resolution and robust separation. DLD has shown versatility for a wide spectrum of applications for sorting of micro particles such as parasites, blood cells to bacteria and DNA. DLD model is designed for spherical particles and efficient separation of blood cells is challenging due to non-uniform shape and size. Moreover, separation in sub-micron regime requires the gap size of DLD systems to be reduced which exponentially increases the device resistance, resulting in greatly reduced throughput. This paper shows how simple application of asymmetrical DLD gap-size by changing the ratio of lateral-gap (GL) to downstream-gap (GD) enables efficient separation of RBCs without greatly restricting throughput. This method reduces the need for challenging fabrication of DLD pillars and provides new insight to the current DLD model. The separation shows an increase in DLD critical diameter resolution (separate smaller particles) and increase selectivity for non-spherical RBCs. The RBCs separate better as compared to standard DLD model with symmetrical gap sizes. This method can be applied to separate non-spherical bacteria or sub-micron particles to enhance throughput and DLD resolution.

  19. Surgical outcomes of lateral approach for jugular foramen schwannoma: postoperative facial nerve and lower cranial nerve functions.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yang-Sun; So, Yoon Kyoung; Park, Kwan; Baek, Chung-Hwan; Jeong, Han-Sin; Hong, Sung Hwa; Chung, Won-Ho

    2009-01-01

    The lateral surgical approach to jugular foramen schwannomas (JFS) may result in complications such as temporary facial nerve palsy (FNP) and hearing loss due to the complicated anatomical location. Ten patients with JFS surgically treated by variable methods of lateral approach were retrospectively reviewed with emphasis on surgical methods, postoperative FNP, and lower cranial nerve status. Gross total removal of the tumors was achieved in eight patients. Facial nerves were rerouted at the first genu (1G) in six patients and at the second genu in four patients. FNP of House-Brackmann (HB) grade III or worse developed immediately postoperatively in six patients regardless of the extent of rerouting. The FNP of HB grade III persisted for more than a year in one patient managed with rerouting at 1G. Among the lower cranial nerves, the vagus nerve was most frequently paralyzed preoperatively and lower cranial nerve palsies were newly developed in two patients. The methods of the surgical approach to JFS can be modified depending on the size and location of tumors to reduce injury of the facial nerve and loss of hearing. Careful manipulation and caution are also required for short facial nerve rerouting as well as for long rerouting to avoid immediately postoperative FNP.

  20. Cerebral laterality for language is related to adult salivary testosterone levels but not digit ratio (2D:4D) in men: A functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound study.

    PubMed

    Papadatou-Pastou, Marietta; Martin, Maryanne

    2017-03-01

    The adequacy of three competing theories of hormonal effects on cerebral laterality are compared using functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD). Thirty-three adult males participated in the study (21 left-handers). Cerebral lateralization was measured by fTCD using an extensively validated word generation task. Adult salivary testosterone (T) and cortisol (C) concentrations were measured by luminescence immunoassay and prenatal T exposure was indirectly estimated by the somatic marker of 2nd to 4th digit length ratio (2D:4D). A significant quadratic relationship between degree of cerebral laterality for language and adult T concentrations was observed, with enhanced T levels for strong left hemisphere dominance and strong right hemisphere dominance. No systematic effects on laterality were found for cortisol or 2D:4D. Findings suggest that higher levels of T are associated with a relatively attenuated degree of interhemispheric sharing of linguistic information, providing support for the callosal and the sexual differentiation hypotheses rather than the Geschwind, Behan and Galaburda (GBG) hypothesis.

  1. High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 correlates with renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD).

    PubMed

    Bruchfeld, Annette; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Lindholm, Bengt; Barany, Peter; Yang, Lihong; Stenvinkel, Peter; Tracey, Kevin J

    2008-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with inflammation and malnutrition and carries a markedly increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 (HMGB-1) is a 30-kDa nuclear and cytosolic protein known as a transcription and growth factor, recently identified as a proinflammatory mediator of tissue injury. Recent data implicates HMGB-1 in endotoxin lethality, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. The aim of this post-hoc, cross-sectional study was to determine whether HMGB-1 serum levels are elevated in CKD patients. The study groups were categorized as follows: 110 patients starting dialysis defined as CKD 5; 67 patients with moderately to severely reduced renal function or CKD 3-4; and 48 healthy controls. High-sensitivity C-reactive-protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), serum-albumin (S-albumin), hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)), hemoglobin, subjective global nutritional assessment (SGA), and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were analyzed. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare groups and Spearman's rank correlation test was used for continuous variables. HMGB-1, measured by Western blot, was significantly (P < 0.001) elevated in CKD 5 (146.7 +/- 58.6 ng/mL) and CKD 3-4 (85.6 +/- 31.8) compared with controls (10.9 +/- 10.5). HMGB-1 levels were correlated positively with TNF (Rho = 0.52; P < 0.001), hs-CRP (Rho = 0.38; P < 0.001), IL-6 (Rho = 0.30; P < 0.001), HbA(1c) (Rho = 0.14; P = 0.02) and SGA (Rho = 0.21; P = 0.002) and negatively correlated with GFR (Rho = -0.69; P = 0.0001), Hb (Rho = -0.60; P < 0.001), S-albumin (Rho = -0.31; P < 0.001). The current study has revealed that HMGB-1 is elevated significantly in CKD patients and correlates with GFR as well as markers of inflammation and malnutrition. Future studies may delineate whether HMGB-1 is also a marker of disease activity and severity as well as a predictor of outcome in CKD.

  2. Assessment of Postflight Locomotor Performance Utilizing a Test of Functional Mobility: Strategic and Adaptive Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, L. E.; Mulavara, A. P.; Peters, B. T.; Cohen, H. S.; Richards, J. T.; Miller, C. A.; Brady, R.; Ruttley, T. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Space flight induces adaptive modification in sensorimotor function, allowing crewmembers to operate in the unique microgravity environment. This adaptive state, however, is inappropriate for a terrestrial environment. During a re-adaptation period upon their return to Earth, crewmembers experience alterations in sensorimotor function, causing various disturbances in perception, spatial orientation, posture, gait, and eye-head coordination. Following long duration space flight, sensorimotor dysfunction would prevent or extend the time required to make an emergency egress from the vehicle; compromising crew safety and mission objectives. We are investigating two types of motor learning that may interact with each other and influence a crewmember's ability to re-adapt to Earth's gravity environment. In strategic learning, crewmembers make rapid modifications in their motor control strategy emphasizing error reduction. This type of learning may be critical during the first minutes and hours after landing. In adaptive learning, long-term plastic transformations occur, involving morphological changes and synaptic modification. In recent literature these two behavioral components have been associated with separate brain structures that control the execution of motor strategies: the strategic component was linked to the posterior parietal cortex and the adaptive component was linked to the cerebellum (Pisella, et al. 2004). The goal of this paper was to demonstrate the relative contributions of the strategic and adaptive components to the re-adaptation process in locomotor control after long duration space flight missions on the International Space Station (ISS). The Functional Mobility Test (FMT) was developed to assess crewmember s ability to ambulate postflight from an operational and functional perspective. Sixteen crewmembers were tested preflight (3 sessions) and postflight (days 1, 2, 4, 7, 25) following a long duration space flight (approx 6 months) on the ISS. We

  3. Structural and functional comparison of mobile and recalcitrant humic fractions from agricultural soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mobile humic acid (MHA) and calcium humate (CaHA) are humic fractions sequentially extracted from soil samples. MHA is extracted by dilute NaOH, and CaHA is subsequently extracted by dilute NaOH from the dilute HCl-washed soil residues of the first extraction. This chapter reviews the recent advance...

  4. Lower Extremity Muscle Mass Predicts Functional Performance in Mobility-Limited Elders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives This study examined the influence of lower extremity body composition and muscle strength on the severity of mobility-disability in community-dwelling older adults. Methods Fifty-seven older males and females (age 74.2 +/- 7 yrs; BMI 28.9 +/- 6 kg/m2) underwent an objective assessment ...

  5. Toward a Wireless Open Source Instrument: Functional Near-infrared Spectroscopy in Mobile Neuroergonomics and BCI Applications

    PubMed Central

    von Lühmann, Alexander; Herff, Christian; Heger, Dominic; Schultz, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) and neuroergonomics research have high requirements regarding robustness and mobility. Additionally, fast applicability and customization are desired. Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an increasingly established technology with a potential to satisfy these conditions. EEG acquisition technology, currently one of the main modalities used for mobile brain activity assessment, is widely spread and open for access and thus easily customizable. fNIRS technology on the other hand has either to be bought as a predefined commercial solution or developed from scratch using published literature. To help reducing time and effort of future custom designs for research purposes, we present our approach toward an open source multichannel stand-alone fNIRS instrument for mobile NIRS-based neuroimaging, neuroergonomics and BCI/BMI applications. The instrument is low-cost, miniaturized, wireless and modular and openly documented on www.opennirs.org. It provides features such as scalable channel number, configurable regulated light intensities, programmable gain and lock-in amplification. In this paper, the system concept, hardware, software and mechanical implementation of the lightweight stand-alone instrument are presented and the evaluation and verification results of the instrument's hardware and physiological fNIRS functionality are described. Its capability to measure brain activity is demonstrated by qualitative signal assessments and a quantitative mental arithmetic based BCI study with 12 subjects. PMID:26617510

  6. Toward a Wireless Open Source Instrument: Functional Near-infrared Spectroscopy in Mobile Neuroergonomics and BCI Applications.

    PubMed

    von Lühmann, Alexander; Herff, Christian; Heger, Dominic; Schultz, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) and neuroergonomics research have high requirements regarding robustness and mobility. Additionally, fast applicability and customization are desired. Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an increasingly established technology with a potential to satisfy these conditions. EEG acquisition technology, currently one of the main modalities used for mobile brain activity assessment, is widely spread and open for access and thus easily customizable. fNIRS technology on the other hand has either to be bought as a predefined commercial solution or developed from scratch using published literature. To help reducing time and effort of future custom designs for research purposes, we present our approach toward an open source multichannel stand-alone fNIRS instrument for mobile NIRS-based neuroimaging, neuroergonomics and BCI/BMI applications. The instrument is low-cost, miniaturized, wireless and modular and openly documented on www.opennirs.org. It provides features such as scalable channel number, configurable regulated light intensities, programmable gain and lock-in amplification. In this paper, the system concept, hardware, software and mechanical implementation of the lightweight stand-alone instrument are presented and the evaluation and verification results of the instrument's hardware and physiological fNIRS functionality are described. Its capability to measure brain activity is demonstrated by qualitative signal assessments and a quantitative mental arithmetic based BCI study with 12 subjects.

  7. Precise determination of nonlinear function of ion mobility for explosives and drugs at high electric fields for microchip FAIMS.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dapeng; Wang, Yonghuan; Li, Lingfeng; Wang, Xiaozhi; Luo, Jikui

    2015-01-01

    High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) separates ions by utilizing the characteristics of nonlinear ion mobility at high and low electric fields. Accurate ion discrimination depends on the precise solution of nonlinear relationships and is essential for accurate identification of ion species for applications. So far, all the nonlinear relationships of ion mobility obtained are based at low electric fields (E/N <65 Td). Microchip FAIMS (μ-FAIMS) with small dimensions has high electric field up to E/N = 250 Td, making the approximation methods and conclusions for nonlinear relationships inappropriate for these systems. In this paper, we deduced nonlinear functions based on the first principle and a general model. Furthermore we considered the hydrodynamics of gas flow through microchannels. We then calculated the specific alpha coefficients for cocaine, morphine, HMX, TNT and RDX, respectively, based on their FAIMS spectra measured by μ-FAIMS system at ultra-high fields up to 250 Td. The results show that there is no difference in nonlinear alpha functions obtained by the approximation and new method at low field (<120 Td), but the error induced by using approximation method increases monotonically with the increase in field, and could be as much as 30% at a field of 250 Td.

  8. Functional correlates of the lateral and medial entorhinal cortex: objects, path integration and local-global reference frames.

    PubMed

    Knierim, James J; Neunuebel, Joshua P; Deshmukh, Sachin S

    2014-02-05

    The hippocampus receives its major cortical input from the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) and the lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC). It is commonly believed that the MEC provides spatial input to the hippocampus, whereas the LEC provides non-spatial input. We review new data which suggest that this simple dichotomy between 'where' versus 'what' needs revision. We propose a refinement of this model, which is more complex than the simple spatial-non-spatial dichotomy. MEC is proposed to be involved in path integration computations based on a global frame of reference, primarily using internally generated, self-motion cues and external input about environmental boundaries and scenes; it provides the hippocampus with a coordinate system that underlies the spatial context of an experience. LEC is proposed to process information about individual items and locations based on a local frame of reference, primarily using external sensory input; it provides the hippocampus with information about the content of an experience.

  9. Fathers' postnatal distress, parenting self-efficacy, later parenting behavior, and children's emotional-behavioral functioning: A longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Rominov, Holly; Giallo, Rebecca; Whelan, Thomas A

    2016-12-01

    Fathers' postnatal distress has been associated with subsequent emotional and behavioral problems for children; however, the mechanisms by which this occurs have received less attention. One potential pathway could be via the negative effects that father mental health problems and parenting self-efficacy (PSE) in the postnatal period have on later parenting behaviors. Using a nationally representative cohort of Australian father-child dyads (N = 3,741), the long-term relationships between fathers' psychological distress and PSE in the postnatal period, parenting behavior when children were aged 4-5 years, and emotional-behavioral outcomes for children aged 8-9 years were explored. Path analysis indicated that high distress and low PSE in the postnatal period was associated with higher levels of hostile parenting and lower parenting consistency when children were aged 4-5 years; in turn, these were associated with poorer child outcomes at 8-9 years. These results remained significant after controlling for socioeconomic position, couple relationship quality, mothers' and fathers' mental health, and fathers' concurrent parenting behavior. The pathways among PSE, parenting hostility, parenting consistency, and children's outcomes at age 8-9 years differed for fathers of boys compared with fathers of girls. Results highlight the importance of father-inclusive assessments of postnatal mental health. Support programs targeting new fathers' perceptions of parenting competence may be particularly important for fathers experiencing postnatal distress. For fathers, building a stronger sense of parenting competence in the postnatal period is important for later parenting behavior, which relates to children's emotional and behavioral outcomes during middle childhood. (PsycINFO Database Record

  10. Lateral Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    apl.uw.edu/dasaro LONG-TERM GOALS I seek to understand the processes controlling lateral mixing in the ocean, particularly at the submesoscale ...APPROACH During AESOP, Lee and D’Asaro pioneered an innovative approach to measuring submesoscale structure in strong fronts. An adaptive measurement...injection of potential vorticity and scalars is predicted to create an intense ‘ submesoscale soup’ of high small-scale variance. The combination of small

  11. Lateral Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-08

    to mesoscale forcing. APPROACH Figure 1: MVP system deployed from stern of R/V Endeavor in Sargasso Sea . 1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for...integrative efforts with other sea -going investigators and numerical modelers. The Lateral Mixing Experiment project was an ideal opportunity to...2011 I also participated in the sea -going part of this project, taking my group on the R/V Endeavor in June 2011. Our role was to sample around the

  12. Lateral Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    ocean as it responds to mesoscale forcing. APPROACH Figure 1: MVP system deployed from stern of R/V Endeavor in Sargasso Sea . My approach for...therefore requires integrative efforts with other sea -going investigators and numerical modelers. The Lateral Mixing Experiment project was an ideal...also participated in the sea -going part of this project, taking my group on the R/V Endeavor in June 2011. Our role was to sample around the center of

  13. On the use of knee functional calibration to determine the medio-lateral axis of the femur in gait analysis: Comparison with EOS biplanar radiographs as reference.

    PubMed

    Sauret, Christophe; Pillet, Hélène; Skalli, Wafa; Sangeux, Morgan

    2016-10-01

    Accurate calibration of the medio-lateral axis of the femur is crucial for clinical decision making based on gait analysis. This study proposes a protocol utilizing biplanar radiographs to provide a reference medio-lateral axis based on the anatomy of the femur. The biplanar radiographs allowed 3D modelling of the bones of the lower limbs and the markers used for motion capture, in the standing posture. A comprehensive analysis was performed and results from biplanar radiographs were reliable for 3D marker localization (±0.35mm) and for 3D localization of the anatomical landmarks (±1mm), leading to a precision of 1° for the orientation of the condylar axis of the femur and a 95% confidence interval of ±3° after registration with motion capture data. The anatomical condylar axis was compared to a conventional, marker-based, axis and three functional calibration techniques (axis transformation, geometric axis fit and DynaKAD). Results for the conventional method show an average difference with the condylar axis of 15° (SD: 6°). Results indicate DynaKAD functional axis was the closest to the anatomical condylar axis, mean: 1° (SD: 5°) when applied to passive knee flexion movement. However, the range of the results exceeded 15° for all methods. Hence, the use of biplanar radiographs, or an alternative imaging technique, may be required to locate the medio-lateral axis of the femur reliably prior to clinical decision making for femur derotational osteotomies.

  14. Gender Roles and Physical Function in Older Adults: Cross-Sectional Analysis of the International Mobility in Aging Study (IMIAS)

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tamer; Vafaei, Afshin; Auais, Mohammad; Guralnik, Jack; Zunzunegui, Maria Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the relationships between physical function and gender-stereotyped traits and whether these relationships are modified by sex or social context. Methods A total of 1995 community-dwelling older adults from the International Mobility in Aging Study (IMIAS) aged 65 to 74 years were recruited in Natal (Brazil), Manizales (Colombia), Tirana (Albania), Kingston (Ontario, Canada), and Saint-Hyacinthe (Quebec, Canada). We performed a cross-sectional analysis. Study outcomes were mobility disability, defined as having difficulty in walking 400 meters without assistance or climbing a flight of stairs without resting, and low physical performance, defined as a score < 8 on the Short Physical Performance Battery. The 12-item Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI) was used to classify participants into four gender roles (Masculine, Feminine, Androgynous, and Undifferentiated) using site-specific medians of femininity and masculinity as cut-off points. Poisson regression models were used to estimate prevalence rate ratios (PRR) of mobility disability and poor physical performance according to gender roles. Results In models adjusted for sex, marital status, education, income, and research site, when comparing to the androgynous role, we found higher prevalence of mobility disability and poor physical performance among participants endorsing the feminine role (PRR = 1.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03–1.39 and PRR = 1.37, CI 1.01–1.88, respectively) or the undifferentiated role (PRR = 1.23, 95% CI 1.07–1.42 and PRR = 1.58, CI 1.18–2.12, respectively). Participants classified as masculine did not differ from androgynous participants in prevalence rates of mobility disability or low physical performance. None of the multiplicative interactions by sex and research site were significant. Conclusion Feminine and undifferentiated gender roles are independent risk factors for mobility disability and low physical performance in older adults. Longitudinal

  15. Felt Obligation to Help Others as a Protective Factor Against Losses in Psychological Well-being Following Functional Decline in Middle and Later Life

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    This study examined felt obligation to help others in two domains (close others and society) as protective factors against losses in psychological well-being following functional decline. Lagged-dependent regression models were estimated using data from 849 respondents aged 35–74 years and without any functional limitations at baseline in the 1995–2005 National Survey of Midlife in the United States. Greater felt obligation to help close others protected against declining self-acceptance in the face of more severe functional decline, and greater felt obligation to help society protected against declining personal growth and self-acceptance. Greater felt obligation to help close others and society protected against increasing depressive symptoms at younger ages in adulthood. Findings suggest the importance for additional research on how aspects of altruism can promote psychological adaptation to declining functional health in middle and later life. PMID:19825942

  16. Felt obligation to help others as a protective factor against losses in psychological well-being following functional decline in middle and later life.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Emily A

    2009-11-01

    This study examined felt obligation to help others in two domains (close others and society) as protective factors against losses in psychological well-being following functional decline. Lagged-dependent regression models were estimated using data from 849 respondents aged 35-74 years and without any functional limitations at baseline in the 1995-2005 National Survey of Midlife in the United States. Greater felt obligation to help close others protected against declining self-acceptance in the face of more severe functional decline, and greater felt obligation to help society protected against declining personal growth and self-acceptance. Greater felt obligation to help close others and society protected against increasing depressive symptoms at younger ages in adulthood. Findings suggest the importance for additional research on how aspects of altruism can promote psychological adaptation to declining functional health in middle and later life.

  17. High-mobility group box 1 is dispensable for autophagy, mitochondrial quality control, and organ function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Huebener, Peter; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Pradere, Jean-Philippe; Quinzii, Catarina M; Friedman, Richard; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Trent, Chad M; Mederacke, Ingmar; Zhao, Enpeng; Dapito, Dianne H; Lin, Yuxi; Goldberg, Ira J; Czaja, Mark J; Schwabe, Robert F

    2014-03-04

    In vitro studies have demonstrated a critical role for high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in autophagy and the autophagic clearance of dysfunctional mitochondria, resulting in severe mitochondrial fragmentation and profound disturbances of mitochondrial respiration in HMGB1-deficient cells. Here, we investigated the effects of HMGB1 deficiency on autophagy and mitochondrial function in vivo, using conditional Hmgb1 ablation in the liver and heart. Unexpectedly, deletion of Hmgb1 in hepatocytes or cardiomyocytes, two cell types with abundant mitochondria, did not alter mitochondrial structure or function, organ function, or long-term survival. Moreover, hepatic autophagy and mitophagy occurred normally in the absence of Hmgb1, and absence of Hmgb1 did not significantly affect baseline and glucocorticoid-induced hepatic gene expression. Collectively, our findings suggest that HMGB1 is dispensable for autophagy, mitochondrial quality control, the regulation of gene expression, and organ function in the adult organism.

  18. Brain reorganization as a function of walking experience in 12-month-old infants: implications for the development of manual laterality

    PubMed Central

    Corbetta, Daniela; Friedman, Denise R.; Bell, Martha Ann

    2014-01-01

    Hand preference in infancy is marked by many developmental shifts in hand use and arm coupling as infants reach for and manipulate objects. Research has linked these early shifts in hand use to the emergence of fundamental postural–locomotor milestones. Specifically, it was found that bimanual reaching declines when infants learn to sit; increases if infants begin to scoot in a sitting posture; declines when infants begin to crawl on hands and knees; and increases again when infants start walking upright. Why such pattern fluctuations during periods of postural–locomotor learning? One proposed hypothesis is that arm use practiced for the specific purpose of controlling posture and achieving locomotion transfers to reaching via brain functional reorganization. There has been scientific support for functional cortical reorganization and change in neural connectivity in response to motor practice in adults and animals, and as a function of crawling experience in human infants. In this research, we examined whether changes in neural connectivity also occurred as infants coupled their arms when learning to walk and whether such coupling mapped onto reaching laterality. Electroencephalogram (EEG) coherence data were collected from 43 12-month-old infants with varied levels of walking experience. EEG was recorded during quiet, attentive baseline. Walking proficiency was laboratory assessed and reaching responses were captured using small toys presented at mid-line while infants were sitting. Results revealed greater EEG coherence at homologous prefrontal/central scalp locations for the novice walkers compared to the prewalkers or more experienced walkers. In addition, reaching laterality was low in prewalkers and early walkers but high in experienced walkers. These results are consistent with the interpretation that arm coupling practiced during early walking transferred to reaching via brain functional reorganization, leading to the observed developmental changes in

  19. Brain reorganization as a function of walking experience in 12-month-old infants: implications for the development of manual laterality.

    PubMed

    Corbetta, Daniela; Friedman, Denise R; Bell, Martha Ann

    2014-01-01

    Hand preference in infancy is marked by many developmental shifts in hand use and arm coupling as infants reach for and manipulate objects. Research has linked these early shifts in hand use to the emergence of fundamental postural-locomotor milestones. Specifically, it was found that bimanual reaching declines when infants learn to sit; increases if infants begin to scoot in a sitting posture; declines when infants begin to crawl on hands and knees; and increases again when infants start walking upright. Why such pattern fluctuations during periods of postural-locomotor learning? One proposed hypothesis is that arm use practiced for the specific purpose of controlling posture and achieving locomotion transfers to reaching via brain functional reorganization. There has been scientific support for functional cortical reorganization and change in neural connectivity in response to motor practice in adults and animals, and as a function of crawling experience in human infants. In this research, we examined whether changes in neural connectivity also occurred as infants coupled their arms when learning to walk and whether such coupling mapped onto reaching laterality. Electroencephalogram (EEG) coherence data were collected from 43 12-month-old infants with varied levels of walking experience. EEG was recorded during quiet, attentive baseline. Walking proficiency was laboratory assessed and reaching responses were captured using small toys presented at mid-line while infants were sitting. Results revealed greater EEG coherence at homologous prefrontal/central scalp locations for the novice walkers compared to the prewalkers or more experienced walkers. In addition, reaching laterality was low in prewalkers and early walkers but high in experienced walkers. These results are consistent with the interpretation that arm coupling practiced during early walking transferred to reaching via brain functional reorganization, leading to the observed developmental changes in

  20. C1 lateral mass screw placement with intentional sacrifice of the C2 ganglion: functional outcomes and morbidity in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Squires, Jason; Molinari, Robert W

    2010-08-01

    Placement of C1 lateral mass screws may be facilitated by intentional C2 root sacrifice. Functional outcomes and morbidity following intentional sacrifice of the C2 root have not been reported in the literature. The objective is to find out if intentional C2 nerve root sacrifice affects functional outcomes and operative morbidity in patients undergoing posterior cervical fusion with C1 lateral mass screws. The study is a case report. Twenty-two consecutive elderly patients (10 males, 12 females with an average age of 77 years) with C1-2 instability were treated with posterior cervical fusion using C1 lateral mass screw placement. Five patients had preservation of the bilateral C2 nerve roots (PRES group) and 18 patients had intentional sacrifice of the bilateral C2 nerve root (SAC group). Operative times, blood loss, hospital length of stay, and complications were recorded for each patient. Functional outcomes, pain, and satisfaction scores were compared between the two groups at the time of ultimate follow-up. Average follow-up time was 19.3 months (range 6-66). The SAC group demonstrated significantly decreased operative time (109.4 vs. 187 min) and a trend towards decreased blood loss (344 vs. 1,030 mL). At ultimate follow-up both groups experienced similar mild disability with no significant difference in NDI scores, analog pain, and satisfaction scores. No patient had C2 root dysesthesia, swallowing, or speech difficulty. In this small case series, intentional sacrifice of the bilateral C2 nerve root ganglion resulted in less operative time and decreased blood loss in elderly patents undergoing C1-2 posterior fusion with the Harms technique. Functional outcome, pain and satisfaction scores were not adversely affected when this technique was used in elderly patients.

  1. Multilevel orthopedic surgery for crouch gait in cerebral palsy: An evaluation using functional mobility and energy cost

    PubMed Central

    Ganjwala, Dhiren

    2011-01-01

    Background: The evidence for the effectiveness of orthopaedic surgery to correct crouch gait in cerebral diplegic is insufficient. The crouch gait is defined as walking with knee flexion and ankle dorsiflexion through out the stance phase. Severe crouch gait in patients with spastic diplegia causes excessive loading of the patellofemoral joint and may result in anterior knee pain, gait deterioration, and progressive loss of function. We retrospectively evaluated the effect of surgery on the mobility and energy consumption at one year or more with the help of validated scales and scores. Materials and Methods: 18 consecutive patients with mean age of 14.6 years with cerebral diplegia with crouched gait were operated for multilevel orthopaedic surgery. Decisions for surgery were made with the observations on gait analysis and physical examination. The surgical intervention consisted of lengthening of short muscle-tendon units, shortening of long muscles and correction of osseous deformities. The paired samples t test was used to compare values of physical examination findings, walking speed and physiological cost index. Two paired sample Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare functional walking scales. Results: After surgery, improvements in functional mobility, walking speed and physiological cost index were found. No patient was able to walk 500 meters before surgery while all were able to walk after surgery. The improvements that were noted at one year were maintained at two years. Conclusions: Multilevel orthopedic surgery for older children and adolescents with crouch gait is effective for improving function and independence. PMID:21772623

  2. Ferroelectricity in Covalently functionalized Two-dimensional Materials: Integration of High-mobility Semiconductors and Nonvolatile Memory.

    PubMed

    Wu, Menghao; Dong, Shuai; Yao, Kailun; Liu, Junming; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-11-09

    Realization of ferroelectric semiconductors by conjoining ferroelectricity with semiconductors remains a challenging task because most present-day ferroelectric materials are unsuitable for such a combination due to their wide bandgaps. Herein, we show first-principles evidence toward the realization of a new class of two-dimensional (2D) ferroelectric semiconductors through covalent functionalization of many prevailing 2D materials. Members in this new class of 2D ferroelectric semiconductors include covalently functionalized germanene, and stanene (Nat. Commun. 2014, 5, 3389), as well as MoS2 monolayer (Nat. Chem. 2015, 7, 45), covalent functionalization of the surface of bulk semiconductors such as silicon (111) (J. Phys. Chem. B 2006, 110 , 23898), and the substrates of oxides such as silica with self-assembly monolayers (Nano Lett. 2014, 14, 1354). The newly predicted 2D ferroelectric semiconductors possess high mobility, modest bandgaps, and distinct ferroelectricity that can be exploited for developing various heterostructural devices with desired functionalities. For example, we propose applications of the 2D materials as 2D ferroelectric field-effect transistors with ultrahigh on/off ratio, topological transistors with Dirac Fermions switchable between holes and electrons, ferroelectric junctions with ultrahigh electro-resistance, and multiferroic junctions for controlling spin by electric fields. All these heterostructural devices take advantage of the combination of high-mobility semiconductors with fast writing and nondestructive reading capability of nonvolatile memory, thereby holding great potential for the development of future multifunctional devices.

  3. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Murillo L.; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen; Watts, Benjamin; Kaneno, Ramon; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Daemen, Luke; Saeki, Margarida J.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2016-03-01

    The most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigate the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. From these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier design is potentially safer to healthy cells.

  4. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, Murillo L.; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen; Watts, Benjamin; Kaneno, Ramon; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Daemen, Luke; Saeki, Margarida J.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2016-03-02

    Here, the most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigate the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. In conclusion, from these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier design is potentially safer to healthy cells.

  5. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    DOE PAGES

    Martins, Murillo L.; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen; ...

    2016-03-02

    Here, the most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigatemore » the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. In conclusion, from these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier design is potentially safer to healthy cells.« less

  6. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Murillo L.; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen; Watts, Benjamin; Kaneno, Ramon; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Daemen, Luke; Saeki, Margarida J.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2016-01-01

    The most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigate the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. From these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier design is potentially safer to healthy cells. PMID:26932808

  7. Lower lateral crural reverse plasty.

    PubMed

    Kubilay, Utku; Azizli, Elad; Erdoğdu, Suleyman

    2013-11-01

    The lateral crus plays a significant role in the aesthetic appearance of the nose. Excessive concavities of the lower lateral crura can lead to heavy aesthetic disfigurement of the nasal tip and to insufficiencies of the external nasal valve. The lateral crus of the alar cartilage may also cause a concavity of the alar rim and even collapse of the alar rim in severe cases. Surgical techniques performed on the lateral crus help to treat both functional and aesthetic deformities of the lateral nasal tip. We present a reverse plasty technique for the lateral crus, and we evaluated the advantages and disadvantages of the technique.

  8. Functional connectivity of the left and right hippocampi: Evidence for functional lateralization along the long-axis using meta-analytic approaches and ultra-high field functional neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jennifer L; Salibi, Nouha; Deshpande, Gopikrishna

    2016-07-15

    Theories regarding the functional specialization of the hippocampus date back to over a century ago. Two main theories have dominated the field. First, evidence has supported the notion of hemispheric specialization, which appears to be preserved across species. Second, an emergent and mounting set of data has suggested an anterior-posterior neurofunctional gradient. However, no study has examined these theories, and their potential interaction, using objective, robust methodological approaches. Here, we employed an established meta-analytic technique and use ultra-high field, high-resolution functional and structural neuroimaging to examine hippocampal lateralization with consideration for a long-axis differentiation. Data revealed strong support for an evolutionarily preserved hemispheric specialization. Specifically, we found intra- and interhemispheric differences with regard to anterior and posterior functional and structural connectivity, between the right and left hippocampi. For task-independent functional connectivity, we found the right anterior hippocampus to have functional connectivity with a large, distributed network, whereas the left anterior hippocampus demonstrated primarily fronto-limbic connectivity. These patterns were reversed for the posterior segmentations. Not surprisingly, for task-dependent connectivity, we found interhemispheric differences within key ipsilateral structures (i.e., parahippocampal gyrus) for both anterior and posterior segmentations. Furthermore, we identified pivotal neural hubs that share connectivity across behavioral domains, and are supported by structural connectivity (i.e., posterior cingulate cortex). Thus, our data provide evidence for a hemisphere-specific, anterior-posterior specialization of the hippocampal formation.

  9. New Markov Model Approaches to Deciphering Microbial Genome Function and Evolution: Comparative Genomics of Laterally Transferred Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Borodovsky, M.

    2013-04-11

    Algorithmic methods for gene prediction have been developed and successfully applied to many different prokaryotic genome sequences. As the set of genes in a particular genome is not homogeneous with respect to DNA sequence composition features, the GeneMark.hmm program utilizes two Markov models representing distinct classes of protein coding genes denoted "typical" and "atypical". Atypical genes are those whose DNA features deviate significantly from those classified as typical and they represent approximately 10% of any given genome. In addition to the inherent interest of more accurately predicting genes, the atypical status of these genes may also reflect their separate evolutionary ancestry from other genes in that genome. We hypothesize that atypical genes are largely comprised of those genes that have been relatively recently acquired through lateral gene transfer (LGT). If so, what fraction of atypical genes are such bona fide LGTs? We have made atypical gene predictions for all fully completed prokaryotic genomes; we have been able to compare these results to other "surrogate" methods of LGT prediction.

  10. Functional role of GABAergic and glycinergic inhibition in the intermediate nucleus of the lateral lemniscus of the big brown bat.

    PubMed

    Kutscher, Andrew; Covey, Ellen

    2009-06-01

    The intermediate nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (INLL) is a major input to the inferior colliculus (IC), the auditory midbrain center where multiple pathways converge to create neurons selective for specific temporal features of sound. However, little is known about how INLL processes auditory information or how it contributes to integrative processes at the IC. INLL receives excitatory projections from the cochlear nucleus and inhibitory projections from the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB), so it must perform some form of integration. To address the question of what role inhibitory synaptic inputs play in the INLL of the big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus), we recorded sound-evoked responses of single neurons and iontophoretically applied bicuculline to block GABA(A) receptors or strychnine to block glycine receptors. Neither bicuculline nor strychnine had a consistent effect on response latency or frequency response areas. Bicuculline increased spike counts and response durations in most units, suggesting that GABAergic input suppressed the late part of the response and provided some gain control. Strychnine reduced the responses of some units with sustained discharge patterns to one or a few spikes at stimulus onset, but increased others. INLL is the only part of the auditory system where reduced responsiveness has been seen in vivo while blocking glycine. However, in vitro studies in the MNTB suggest that glycine can be facilitatory, possibly through presynaptic action. These results show that GABA consistently reduces spike counts and response durations, whereas glycine is suppressive in some INLL neurons but facilitatory in others.

  11. Evaluating Diabetes Mobile Applications for Health Literate Designs and Functionality, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Graff, Kaitlin; Harris, Jenine K.; McQueen, Amy; Smith, Madeleine; Fairchild, Maggie; Kreuter, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The expansion of mobile health technologies, particularly for diabetes-related applications (apps), grew exponentially in the past decade. This study sought to examine the extent to which current mobile apps for diabetes have health literate features recommended by participants in an Institute of Medicine Roundtable and compare the health literate features by app cost (free or not). Methods We used diabetes-related keywords to identify diabetes-related apps for iOS devices. A random sample of 110 apps (24% of total number of apps identified) was selected for coding. The coding scheme was adapted from the discussion paper produced by participants in the Institute of Medicine Roundtable. Results Most diabetes apps in this sample addressed diabetes management and therapeutics, and paid apps were more likely than free apps to use plain language strategies, to label links clearly, and to have at least 1 feature (a “back” button) that helps with the organization. Conclusion Paid apps were more likely than free apps to use strategies that should be more useful and engaging for people with low health literacy. Future work can investigate ways to make free diabetes mobile apps more user-friendly and accessible. PMID:25950568

  12. Functional Mobility Testing: A Novel Method to Establish Human System Interface Design Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, Scott A.; Benson, Elizabeth A.; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2008-01-01

    Across all fields of human-system interface design it is vital to posses a sound methodology dictating the constraints on the system based on the capabilities of the human user. These limitations may be based on strength, mobility, dexterity, cognitive ability, etc. and combinations thereof. Data collected in an isolated environment to determine, for example, maximal strength or maximal range of motion would indeed be adequate for establishing not-to-exceed type design limitations, however these restraints on the system may be excessive over what is basally needed. Resources may potentially be saved by having a technique to determine the minimum measurements a system must accommodate. This paper specifically deals with the creation of a novel methodology for establishing mobility requirements for a new generation of space suit design concepts. Historically, the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station vehicle and space hardware design requirements documents such as the Man-Systems Integration Standards and International Space Station Flight Crew Integration Standard explicitly stated that the designers should strive to provide the maximum joint range of motion capabilities exhibited by a minimally clothed human subject. In the course of developing the Human-Systems Integration Requirements (HSIR) for the new space exploration initiative (Constellation), an effort was made to redefine the mobility requirements in the interest of safety and cost. Systems designed for manned space exploration can receive compounded gains from simplified designs that are both initially less expensive to produce and lighter, thereby, cheaper to launch.

  13. Mobile Device Applications for the Visualization of Functional Connectivity Networks and EEG Electrodes: iBraiN and iBraiNEEG

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Gonzalo M.; Fuentes, Jorge A.; Gálvez, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Multiple functional MRI (fMRI)-based functional connectivity networks were obtained by Yeo et al. (2011), and the visualization of these complex networks is a difficult task. Also, the combination of functional connectivity networks determined by fMRI with electroencephalography (EEG) data could be a very useful tool. Mobile devices are becoming increasingly common among users, and for this reason, we describe here two applications for Android and iOS mobile devices: one that shows in an interactive way the seven Yeo functional connectivity networks, and another application that shows the relative position of 10–20 EEG electrodes with Yeo’s seven functional connectivity networks. PMID:27807416

  14. Mobile Device Applications for the Visualization of Functional Connectivity Networks and EEG Electrodes: iBraiN and iBraiNEEG.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Gonzalo M; Fuentes, Jorge A; Gálvez, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Multiple functional MRI (fMRI)-based functional connectivity networks were obtained by Yeo et al. (2011), and the visualization of these complex networks is a difficult task. Also, the combination of functional connectivity networks determined by fMRI with electroencephalography (EEG) data could be a very useful tool. Mobile devices are becoming increasingly common among users, and for this reason, we describe here two applications for Android and iOS mobile devices: one that shows in an interactive way the seven Yeo functional connectivity networks, and another application that shows the relative position of 10-20 EEG electrodes with Yeo's seven functional connectivity networks.

  15. Effectiveness of an early mobilization program on functional capacity after coronary artery bypass surgery: A randomized controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    da Costa Torres, Daniel; dos Santos, Priscila Maria Ramos; Reis, Helder José Lima; Paisani, Denise Moraes; Chiavegato, Luciana Dias

    2016-01-01

    Background: Muscle atrophy and prolonged inactivity are associated with an increased sensation of fatigue and reduced functional capacity in the postoperative period in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Cardiac rehabilitation after hospital discharge is highly recommended and contributes to improvement in functional capacity and quality of life. However, few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of early mobilization protocols during hospitalization on the patterns of physical activity and functional capacity after coronary artery bypass grafting. Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of an early mobilization program on the functional capacity of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting in the short and long term. Methods: This is a prospective, randomized, controlled, single-blind trial protocol that will evaluate 66 consecutive patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Patients will be randomized into two training groups: the control group (N = 33), which will perform breathing exercises and the intervention group (N = 33), which will perform breathing exercises and aerobic exercises. The groups will receive treatment from first to the seventh postoperative day, twice daily. In the preoperative period, the following outcomes will be assessed: physical activity level (Baecke Questionnaire), Functional Independence Measure, and functional capacity (6-min walking test). Functional capacity will be reassessed after the 7th and 60th postoperative day. Pulmonary complications and length of hospital stay will also be evaluated. Statistical analysis will be calculated using linear mixed models and will be based on intention-to-treat. The level of significance will be set at α = 5%. PMID:28348739

  16. High-intensity interval training on an aquatic treadmill in adults with osteoarthritis: effect on pain, balance, function, and mobility.

    PubMed

    Bressel, Eadric; Wing, Jessica E; Miller, Andrew I; Dolny, Dennis G

    2014-08-01

    Although aquatic exercise is considered a potentially effective treatment intervention for people with osteoarthritis (OA), previous research has focused primarily on calisthenics in a shallow pool with the inherent limitations on regulating exercise intensity. The purpose of this study was to quantify the efficacy of a 6-week aquatic treadmill exercise program on measures of pain, balance, function, and mobility. Eighteen participants (age = 64.5 ± 10.2 years) with knee OA completed a non-exercise control period followed by a 6-week exercise period. Outcome measures included visual analog scales for pain, posturography for balance, sit-to-stand test for function, and a 10-m walk test for mobility. The exercise protocol included balance training and high-intensity interval training (HIT) in an aquatic treadmill using water jets to destabilize while standing and achieve high ratings of perceived exertion (14-19) while walking. In comparison with pretests, participants displayed reduced joint pain (pre = 50.3 ± 24.8 mm vs. post = 15.8 ± 10.6 mm), improved balance (equilibrium pre = 66.6 ± 11.0 vs. post = 73.5 ± 7.1), function (rising index pre = 0.49 ± 0.19% vs. post = 0.33 ± 0.11%), and mobility (walk pre = 8.6 ± 1.4 s vs. post = 7.8 ± 1.1 s) after participating in the exercise protocol (p = 0.03-0.001). The same benefits were not observed after the non-exercise control period. Adherence to the exercise protocol was exceptional and no participants reported adverse effects, suggesting that aquatic treadmill exercise that incorporates balance and HIT training was well tolerated by patients with OA and may be effective at managing symptoms of OA.

  17. Upper-Extremity and Mobility Subdomains From the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Adult Physical Functioning Item Bank

    PubMed Central

    Hays, Ron D.; Spritzer, Karen L.; Amtmann, Dagmar; Lai, Jin-Shei; DeWitt, Esi Morgan; Rothrock, Nan; DeWalt, Darren A.; Riley, William T.; Fries, James F.; Krishnan, Eswar

    2013-01-01

    Objective To create upper-extremity and mobility subdomain scores from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) physical functioning adult item bank. Design Expert reviews were used to identify upper-extremity and mobility items from the PROMIS item bank. Psychometric analyses were conducted to assess empirical support for scoring upper-extremity and mobility subdomains. Setting Data were collected from the U.S. general population and multiple disease groups via self-administered surveys. Participants The sample (N=21,773) included 21,133 English-speaking adults who participated in the PROMIS wave 1 data collection and 640 Spanish-speaking Latino adults recruited separately. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures We used English- and Spanish-language data and existing PROMIS item parameters for the physical functioning item bank to estimate upper-extremity and mobility scores. In addition, we fit graded response models to calibrate the upper-extremity items and mobility items separately, compare separate to combined calibrations, and produce subdomain scores. Results After eliminating items because of local dependency, 16 items remained to assess upper extremity and 17 items to assess mobility. The estimated correlation between upper extremity and mobility was .59 using existing PROMIS physical functioning item parameters (r=.60 using parameters calibrated separately for upper-extremity and mobility items). Conclusions Upper-extremity and mobility subdomains shared about 35% of the variance in common, and produced comparable scores whether calibrated separately or together. The identification of the subset of items tapping these 2 aspects of physical functioning and scored using the existing PROMIS parameters provides the option of scoring these subdomains in addition to the overall physical functioning score. PMID:23751290

  18. Calculation of interface roughness scattering-limited vertical and horizontal mobilities in InAs/GaSb superlattices as a function of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmulowicz, F.; Brown, G. J.

    2013-01-01

    Superlattice transport has acquired new relevance owing to the current interest in InAs/GaSb and other superlattices (SL) for third-generation infrared detector focal plane arrays. Interface-roughness scattering (IRS) is known to limit carrier mobilities at low temperatures. Whereas horizontal (in-plane) transport measurements are standard, perpendicular transport measurements (across SL layers)—the ones relevant to the operation of infrared sensors—are non-routine and seldom performed; vertical SL transport is also less well studied theoretically. Therefore, we extend our previous work on low-temperature SL transport by studying horizontal and vertical IRS-limited transport in InAs/GaSb SLs as a function of temperature, SL parameters, and the degree of roughness. Electron mobilities are calculated by solving the Boltzmann equation with temperature-dependent bands and carrier screening, and the results are discussed by analyzing the behavior of the relaxation rates and spectral mobilities, defined as mobilities as a function of carrier energy. New computational tools are devised to handle the implicit integral equation for the horizontal relaxation rates. We find that the behavior of the relaxation rates and spectral mobilities undergoes a change for energies below and above the conduction band bandwidth, which dictates the ultimate behavior of mobilities as a function of temperature. The calculated mobilities are found to display a rich variety of behaviors as a function of temperature, either increasing, decreasing, or remaining relatively constant, depending on the correlation length of interface roughness, Λ, and the conduction band bandwidth. Since the horizontal mobility is a double-valued function of Λ, the temperature dependence of mobilities can be used to eliminate this indeterminacy in order to assess the degree of interface roughness.

  19. Scratching beneath the surface: new insights into the functional properties of the lateral occipital area and parahippocampal place area.

    PubMed

    Cant, Jonathan S; Goodale, Melvyn A

    2011-06-01

    We used fMRI on neurologically intact humans to investigate whether or not there are different neural substrates for the different kinds of information that a visual surface signals (shape from texture vs material properties from texture). Participants attended to differences in the shape (flat/convex), texture and color (wood/rock), or material properties (soft/hard) of a set of circular surfaces. Attending to shape activated the contour-sensitive lateral occipital (LO) area, and attending to texture activated a region of the collateral sulcus (CoS) that overlaps with the parahippocampal place area (PPA). Interestingly, attending to material properties activated the same texture-sensitive region in the CoS. These results demonstrate the existence of different neural substrates for the different types of information that a visual surface signals. With regard to object shape, the organization of the LO area may be complex, with neurons tuned not only to the outline shape of objects, but also to their surface curvature independent of contour. Moreover, to our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that processing surface texture, which occurs within the scene-sensitive PPA, is a route to accessing knowledge about an object's material properties. With this in mind, we propose that models of visual cortical organization should focus not only on the particular stimulus category to which a region maximally responds (e.g., objects, scenes), but also on the stimulus attributes that best support the processing of that category (e.g., shape, texture, material properties).

  20. Are economic recessions at the time of leaving school associated with worse physical functioning in later life?

    PubMed Central

    Hessel, Philipp; Avendano, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This paper examines whether economic conditions at the time of leaving school or college are associated with physical functioning at old age among cohorts in 11 European countries. Methods Data came from 10,338 participants in the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) aged 50-74 who left school or college between 1956 and 1986. Data on functional limitations, as well as employment, marriage and fertility retrospective histories were linked to national unemployment rates during the year individuals left school. Models included country-fixed effects and controls for early-life circumstances. Results Higher unemployment rates during the school-leaving year were associated with fewer functional limitations at ages 50-74 among men (RR[Rate ratio]=0.63, 95%CI=0.47-0.83), but more physical functioning limitations among women (RR=1.30, 95%CI=1.13-1.50), particularly with (post-)secondary education. Economic conditions at the age of leaving school were associated with several labor market, marriage, fertility and health behavior outcomes, but controlling for these factors did not attenuate associations. Results were similar in models that controlled for selection into higher education due to measured covariates. Conclusions Worse economic conditions during the school-leaving year predicted better health at old age among men but worse health among women. Both selection and causation mechanisms may explain this association. PMID:24051367

  1. Developmental Trajectories in Toddlers' Self-Restraint Predict Individual Differences in Executive Functions 14 Years Later: A Behavioral Genetic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Naomi P.; Miyake, Akira; Robinson, JoAnn L.; Hewitt, John K.

    2011-01-01

    We examined whether self-restraint in early childhood predicted individual differences in 3 executive functions (EFs; inhibiting prepotent responses, updating working memory, and shifting task sets) in late adolescence in a sample of approximately 950 twins. At ages 14, 20, 24, and 36 months, the children were shown an attractive toy and told not…

  2. Left-Right Axis Differentiation and Functional Lateralization: a Haplotype in the Methyltransferase Encoding Gene SETDB2 Might Mediate Handedness in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Ocklenburg, Sebastian; Arning, Larissa; Gerding, Wanda M; Hengstler, Jan G; Epplen, Jörg T; Güntürkün, Onur; Beste, Christian; Akkad, Denis A

    2016-11-01

    Handedness is a multifactorial trait, and genes contributing to the differentiation of the left-right axis during embryogenesis have been identified as a major gene group associated with this trait. The methyltransferase SETDB2 (SET domain, bifurcated 2) has been shown to regulate structural left-right asymmetry in the vertebrate central nervous system by suppressing fgf8 expression. Here, we investigated the relation of genetic variation in SETDB2-and its paralogue SETDB1-with different handedness phenotypes in 950 healthy adult participants. We identified a haplotype on SETDB2 for which homozygous individuals showed a significantly lower lateralization quotient for handedness than the rest of the cohort after correction for multiple comparisons. Moreover, direction of handedness was significantly associated with genetic variation in this haplotype. This effect was mainly, but not exclusively, driven by the sequence variation rs4942830, as individuals homozygous for the A allele of this single nucleotide polymorphism had a significantly lower lateralization quotient than individuals with at least one T allele. These findings further confirm a role of genetic pathways relevant for structural left-right axis differentiation for functional lateralization. Moreover, as the protein encoded by SETDB2 regulates gene expression epigenetically by histone H3 methylation, our findings highlight the importance of investigating the role of epigenetic modulations of gene expression in relation to handedness.

  3. Experimental determination of the lateral dose response functions of detectors to be applied in the measurement of narrow photon-beam dose profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppinga, D.; Meyners, J.; Delfs, B.; Muru, A.; Harder, D.; Poppe, B.; Looe, HK

    2015-12-01

    This study aims at the experimental determination of the detector-specific 1D lateral dose response function K(x) and of its associated rotational symmetric counterpart K(r) for a set of high-resolution detectors presently used in narrow-beam photon dosimetry. A combination of slit-beam, radiochromic film, and deconvolution techniques served to accomplish this task for four detectors with diameters of their sensitive volumes ranging from 1 to 2.2 mm. The particular aim of the experiment was to examine the existence of significant negative portions of some of these response functions predicted by a recent Monte-Carlo-simulation (Looe et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 6585-607). In a 6 MV photon slit beam formed by the Siemens Artiste collimation system and a 0.5 mm wide slit between 10 cm thick lead blocks serving as the tertiary collimator, the true cross-beam dose profile D(x) at 3 cm depth in a large water phantom was measured with radiochromic film EBT3, and the detector-affected cross-beam signal profiles M(x) were recorded with a silicon diode, a synthetic diamond detector, a miniaturized scintillation detector, and a small ionization chamber. For each detector, the deconvolution of the convolution integral M(x)  =  K(x)  ∗  D(x) served to obtain its specific 1D lateral dose response function K(x), and K(r) was calculated from it. Fourier transformations and back transformations were performed using function approximations by weighted sums of Gaussian functions and their analytical transformation. The 1D lateral dose response functions K(x) of the four types of detectors and their associated rotational symmetric counterparts K(r) were obtained. Significant negative curve portions of K(x) and K(r) were observed in the case of the silicon diode and the diamond detector, confirming the Monte-Carlo-based prediction (Looe et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 6585-607). They are typical for the perturbation of the secondary electron field by a detector with

  4. Relaxation of interphase stresses on the later stages of the heterogeneous decomposition of solid solutions. I. Functional of the energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustyugov, Yu. M.; Kondrat'ev, V. V.

    2008-05-01

    For describing the isomorphic heterogeneous decomposition of binary supersaturated solid solutions at the stage of coalescence under conditions of dislocation-matrix diffusion with a relaxation of stresses caused by phase separation, we consider a system representing a precipitation-phase particle in a surrounding matrix + dislocations intersecting the interphase surface and supplying an alloying component to it. In the approximations based on the continuity of the distribution of misfit dislocations on the interphase surface and of the average concentration field, we obtained an expression for the total energy of the system in the form of a functional which depends on the fraction of the relaxed regions of the interphase surface, the number of supplying (feeding) dislocations, and their mutual arrangement. The need for the use of a model functional appears within the framework of the variational problem for determining the equilibrium parameters of the system.

  5. A journey through the pituitary gland: Development, structure and function, with emphasis on embryo-foetal and later development.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castorina, Sergio; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Loreto, Carla; Leonardi, Rosi; Aiello, Flavia Concetta; Magro, Gaetano; Imbesi, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    The pituitary gland and the hypothalamus are morphologically and functionally associated in the endocrine and neuroendocrine control of other endocrine glands. They therefore play a key role in a number of regulatory feedback processes that co-ordinate the whole endocrine system. Here we review the neuroendocrine system, from the discoveries that led to its identification to some recently clarified embryological, functional, and morphological aspects. In particular we review the pituitary gland and the main notions related to its development, organization, cell differentiation, and vascularization. Given the crucial importance of the factors controlling neuroendocrine system development to understand parvocellular neuron function and the aetiology of the congenital disorders related to hypothalamic-pituitary axis dysfunction, we also provide an overview of the molecular and genetic studies that have advanced our knowledge in the field. Through the action of the hypothalamus, the pituitary gland is involved in the control of a broad range of key aspects of our lives: the review focuses on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, particularly GnRH, whose abnormal secretion is associated with clinical conditions involving delayed or absent puberty and reproductive dysfunction.

  6. Contrast sensitivity function and mobility in elderly patients with macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, D T; Burdett, R

    1989-07-01

    Eleven control subjects, 64-79 years of age, and 10 subjects with macular degeneration, 70-82 years of age, were included in this study. Each participant was tested for visual acuity, spatial and temporal contrast sensitivity, and mobility in an unfamiliar environment. The course was designed with a pair of steps, ramps, and a level pathway. The subjects were timed and videotaped. The number of errors was recorded. Visual acuity and contrast sensitivity were significantly different between groups. The time to complete the course was significantly different between groups; however, the difference did not remain significant after age-adjustment.

  7. Mobility and transport of mercury and methylmercury in peat as a function of changes in water table regime and plant functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Kristine M.; Kane, Evan S.; Potvin, Lynette; Lilleskov, Erik A.; Kolka, Randall K.; Mitchell, Carl P. J.

    2017-02-01

    Climate change is likely to significantly affect the hydrology, ecology, and ecosystem function of peatlands, with potentially important but unclear impacts on mercury mobility within and transport from peatlands. Using a full-factorial mesocosm approach, we investigated the potential impacts on mercury mobility of water table regime changes (high and low) and vegetation community shifts (sedge-dominated, Ericaceae-dominated, or unmanipulated control) in peat monoliths at the PEATcosm mesocosm facility in Houghton, Michigan. Lower and more variable water table regimes and the loss of Ericaceae shrubs act significantly and independently to increase both total Hg and methylmercury concentrations in peat pore water and in spring snowmelt runoff. These differences are related to enhanced peat decomposition and internal regeneration of electron acceptors which are more strongly related to water table regime than to plant community changes. Loss of Ericaceae shrubs and an increase in sedge cover may also affect Hg concentrations and mobility via oxygen shuttling and/or the provision of labile root exudates. Altered hydrological regimes and shifting vegetation communities, as a result of global climate change, are likely to enhance Hg transport from peatlands to downstream aquatic ecosystems.

  8. Correlation between hip function and knee kinematics evaluated by three-dimensional motion analysis during lateral and medial side-hopping.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Hiromitsu; Takiguchi, Kohei; Shibata, Yohei; Okubo, Satoshi; Yoshiya, Shinichi; Kuroda, Ryosuke

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] Kinematic and kinetic characteristics of the limb during side-hopping and hip/knee interaction during this motion have not been clarified. The purposes of this study were to examine the biomechanical parameters of the knee during side hop and analyze its relationship with clinical measurements of hip function. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven male college rugby players were included. A three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to assess motion characteristics of the knee during side hop. In addition, hip range of motion and muscle strength were evaluated. Subsequently, the relationship between knee motion and the clinical parameters of the hip was analyzed. [Results] In the lateral touchdown phase, the knee was positioned in an abducted and externally rotated position, and increasing abduction moment was applied to the knee. An analysis of the interaction between knee motion and hip function showed that range of motion for hip internal rotation was significantly correlated with external rotation angle and external rotation/abduction moments of the knee during the lateral touchdown phase. [Conclusion] Range of motion for hip internal rotation should be taken into consideration for identifying the biomechanical characteristics in the side hop test results.

  9. Correlation between hip function and knee kinematics evaluated by three-dimensional motion analysis during lateral and medial side-hopping

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Hiromitsu; Takiguchi, Kohei; Shibata, Yohei; Okubo, Satoshi; Yoshiya, Shinichi; Kuroda, Ryosuke

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Kinematic and kinetic characteristics of the limb during side-hopping and hip/knee interaction during this motion have not been clarified. The purposes of this study were to examine the biomechanical parameters of the knee during side hop and analyze its relationship with clinical measurements of hip function. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven male college rugby players were included. A three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to assess motion characteristics of the knee during side hop. In addition, hip range of motion and muscle strength were evaluated. Subsequently, the relationship between knee motion and the clinical parameters of the hip was analyzed. [Results] In the lateral touchdown phase, the knee was positioned in an abducted and externally rotated position, and increasing abduction moment was applied to the knee. An analysis of the interaction between knee motion and hip function showed that range of motion for hip internal rotation was significantly correlated with external rotation angle and external rotation/abduction moments of the knee during the lateral touchdown phase. [Conclusion] Range of motion for hip internal rotation should be taken into consideration for identifying the biomechanical characteristics in the side hop test results. PMID:27799670

  10. Congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors: functional and periodontal aspects in patients treated with implants or space closure and tooth re-contouring.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Luciana Manzotti De; Pini, Núbia Inocencya Pavesi; Hayacibara, Roberto Massayuki; Silva, Rafael Santos; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate functional and periodontal aspects in patients with unilateral or bilateral congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors, treated with either implants or space closure and tooth re-contouring. The sample consisted of 68 volunteers, divided into 3 groups: SCR - space closure and tooth re-contouring with composite resin (n = 26); SOI - implants placed in the area of agenesis (n = 20); and CG - control group (n = 22). A modified Helkimo questionnaire and the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders were used by a single, previously calibrated evaluator to assess signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorder. The periodontal assessment involved the following aspects: plaque index, bleeding upon probing, pocket depth greater than 3 mm, gingival recession, abfraction, periodontal biotype and papilla index. The data were analyzed using Fisher's exact test and the nonparametric Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests (α=.05). No differences in periodontal status were found between treatments. None of the groups were associated with signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorder. Both treatment alternatives for patients with congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors were satisfactory and achieved functional and periodontal results similar to those of the control group.

  11. Congenitally Missing Maxillary Lateral Incisors: Functional and Periodontal Aspects in Patients Treated with Implants or Space Closure and Tooth Re-Contouring

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Luciana Manzotti De; Pini, Núbia Inocencya Pavesi; Hayacibara, Roberto Massayuki; Silva, Rafael Santos; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate functional and periodontal aspects in patients with unilateral or bilateral congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors, treated with either implants or space closure and tooth re-contouring. The sample consisted of 68 volunteers, divided into 3 groups: SCR - space closure and tooth re-contouring with composite resin (n = 26); SOI – implants placed in the area of agenesis (n = 20); and CG - control group (n = 22). A modified Helkimo questionnaire and the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders were used by a single, previously calibrated evaluator to assess signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorder. The periodontal assessment involved the following aspects: plaque index, bleeding upon probing, pocket depth greater than 3 mm, gingival recession, abfraction, periodontal biotype and papilla index. The data were analyzed using Fisher's exact test and the nonparametric Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests (α=.05). No differences in periodontal status were found between treatments. None of the groups were associated with signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorder. Both treatment alternatives for patients with congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors were satisfactory and achieved functional and periodontal results similar to those of the control group. PMID:23346262

  12. Congenitally Missing Maxillary Lateral Incisors: Update on the Functional and Esthetic Parameters of Patients Treated with Implants or Space Closure and Teeth Recontouring

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Núbia Inocencya Pavesi; Marchi, Luciana Manzotti De; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2015-01-01

    Maxillary lateral incisor agenesis (MLIA) is a condition that affects both dental esthetics and function in young patients, and represents an important challenge for clinicians. Although several treatment options are available, the mesial repositioning of the canines followed by teeth recontouring into lateral incisors; or space opening/maintenance followed by implant placement have recently emerged as two important treatment approaches. In this article, the current and latest literature has been reviewed in order to summarize the functional and esthetic outcomes obtained with these two forms of treatment of MLIA patients in recent years. Indications, clinical limitations and the most important parameters to achieve the best possible results with each treatment modality are also discussed. Within the limitations of this review, it is not possible to assert at this point in time that one treatment approach is more advantageous than the other. Long-term followup studies comparing the existing treatment options are still lacking in the literature, and they are necessary to shed some light on the issue. It is possible, however, to state that adequate multidisciplinary diagnosis and planning are imperative to define the treatment option that will provide the best individual results for patients with MLIA. PMID:25646137

  13. Clinical evaluation of a new orthosis, the 'walkabout', for restoration of functional standing and short distance mobility in spinal paralysed individuals.

    PubMed

    Middleton, J W; Yeo, J D; Blanch, L; Vare, V; Peterson, K; Brigden, K

    1997-09-01

    The Walkabout orthosis is a relatively new device for assisted standing and mobility in spinal paralysed individuals. The design, with a medially-mounted single-axis hinge joint linking two knee-ankle-foot orthoses, is quite different to other currently available orthoses which have laterally positioned hip joints such as the Reciprocal Gait Orthosis or Hip Guidance Orthosis. Twenty-five spinal cord injured patients were fitted and trained with the Walkabout orthosis and followed up regularly for just under 2 years on average. Sixty percent of all the patients fitted have incorporated use of the Walkabout orthosis into their lifestyles. Maintenance of joint mobility and psychological benefits were the most important outcomes of Walkabout usage. Loss of thoraco-lumbar mobility was found to be a limiting factor in successful use of the Walkabout orthosis in patients without active hip flexion. Patient selection criteria should include demonstrated spinal stability without significant deformity, controlled muscle spasm, less than 5 degrees of hip or knee flexion contracture, achievable neutral ankle position, mobility of the thoraco-lumbar spine into lateral flexion, good upper limb strength, and motivation with realistic expectations.

  14. Orientation-dependent proton double-quantum NMR build-up function for soft materials with anisotropic mobility.

    PubMed

    Naumova, Anna; Tschierske, Carsten; Saalwächter, Kay

    In recent years, the analysis of proton double-quantum NMR build-up curves has become an important tool to quantify anisotropic mobility in different kinds of soft materials such as polymer networks or liquid crystals. In the former case, such data provides a measure of orientation-dependent residual (time-averaged) dipolar couplings arising from anisotropic segmental motions, informing about the length and the state of local stretching of the network chains. Previous studies of macroscopically ordered, i.e. stretched, networks were subject to the limitation that a detailed build-up curve analysis on the basis of a universal "Abragam-like" (A-l) build-up function valid for a proton multi-spin system was only possible for an isotropic orientation-averaged response. This situation is here remedied by introducing a generic orientation-dependent build-up function for an anisotropically mobile protonated molecular segment. We discuss an application to the modeling of data for a stretched network measured at different orientations with respect to the magnetic field, and present a validation by fitting data of different liquid-crystal molecules oriented in the magnetic field.

  15. Fitting a bilateral transhumeral amputee with utensil prostheses and their functional assessment 10 years later: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jen Wen; Wu, Yee Hwa

    2005-11-01

    Traumatic transhumeral amputations resulting from electric burn injury are uncommon and present a significant rehabilitation challenge. Compensating for loss of fine, coordinated function of the upper extremities with prostheses is difficult medically, technologically, psychologically, and socially. We followed up a patient with traumatic bilateral transhumeral amputation who was fitted with specially designed bilateral low-temperature utensil prostheses for 10 years. A bilateral utensil prosthesis consists of 2 thermoplastic sockets, an elastic harness, 2 utensil holders, and several different utensils. The characteristics of utensil prostheses are low cost, quick fabrication, and responsiveness to a patient's needs. Ten years after the patient's first prosthesis fitting, he still used these specially designed prostheses. By using these devices and his feet, the patient has regained independence in most activities of daily living and gained a new working skill.

  16. Enhanced dispersion stability and mobility of carboxyl-functionalized carbon nanotubes in aqueous solutions through strong hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahk, Yeon Kyoung; He, Xu; Gitsis, Emmanouil; Kuo, Yu-Ying; Kim, Nayoung; Wang, Jing

    2015-10-01

    Dispersion of carbon nanotubes has been heavily studied due to its importance for their technical applications, toxic effects, and environmental impacts. Common electrolytes, such as sodium chloride and potassium chloride, promote agglomeration of nanoparticles in aqueous solutions. On the contrary, we discovered that acetic electrolytes enhanced the dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with carboxyl functional group through the strong hydrogen bond, which was confirmed by UV-Vis spectrometry, dispersion observations and aerosolization-quantification method. When concentrations of acetate electrolytes such as ammonium acetate (CH3CO2NH4) and sodium acetate (CH3CO2Na) were lower than 0.03 mol per liter, MWCNT suspensions showed better dispersion and had higher mobility in porous media. The effects by the acetic environment are also applicable to other nanoparticles with the carboxyl functional group, which was demonstrated with polystyrene latex particles as an example.

  17. Reinforcement function design and bias for efficient learning in mobile robots

    SciTech Connect

    Touzet, C.; Santos, J.M.

    1998-06-01

    The main paradigm in sub-symbolic learning robot domain is the reinforcement learning method. Various techniques have been developed to deal with the memorization/generalization problem, demonstrating the superior ability of artificial neural network implementations. In this paper, the authors address the issue of designing the reinforcement so as to optimize the exploration part of the learning. They also present and summarize works relative to the use of bias intended to achieve the effective synthesis of the desired behavior. Demonstrative experiments involving a self-organizing map implementation of the Q-learning and real mobile robots (Nomad 200 and Khepera) in a task of obstacle avoidance behavior synthesis are described. 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Service Dogs for People with Spinal Cord Injury: Outcomes Regarding Functional Mobility and Important Occupations.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Claude; Gagnon, Dany H; Routhier, François; Dumont, Frédéric; Poissant, Lise; Corriveau, Hélène; Tousignant, Michel

    2015-01-01

    No research using standardized tests based on direct observations along with longitudinal studies have shown the effects of service dogs on persons with mobility impairment. Our research objectives were to document the consequences of the use of the service dog on wheelchair propelling, grasping objects, shoulder pain, occupational performance, reintegration into normal living and psychosocial impacts for people with spinal cord injury (SCI). A cross sectional study was conducted with 45 males and 21 females with SCI (average age = 41.2). They were assessed in their homes and their communities, two to five years after they received their service dogs. Observations were based on four testing methods. An ongoing longitudinal study is reported, based on 9 months (n = 8 to 16) of data from four standardised questionnaires. Results demonstrate that services dogs are an efficient assistive technology for persons with SCI.

  19. Gait and Functional Mobility Deficits in Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Joan A; Robertson-Dick, Erin E; Hall, Deborah A; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) results from a "premutation" (PM) size CGG repeat expansion in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. Cerebellar gait ataxia is the primary feature in some FXTAS patients causing progressive disability. However, no studies have quantitatively characterized gait and mobility deficits in FXTAS. We performed quantitative gait and mobility analysis in seven FMR1 PM carriers with FXTAS and ataxia, six PM carriers without FXTAS, and 18 age-matched controls. We studied four independent gait domains, trunk range of motion (ROM), and movement transitions using an instrumented Timed Up and Go (i-TUG). We correlated these outcome measures with FMR1 molecular variables and clinical severity scales. PM carriers with FXTAS were globally impaired in every gait performance domain except trunk ROM compared to controls. These included total i-TUG duration, stride velocity, gait cycle time, cadence, double-limb support and swing phase times, turn duration, step time before turn, and turn-to-sit duration, and increased gait variability on several measures. Carriers without FXTAS did not differ from controls on any parameters, but double-limb support time was close to significance. Balance and disability scales correlated with multiple gait and movement transition parameters, while the FXTAS Rating Scale did not. This is the first study to quantitatively examine gait and movement transitions in FXTAS patients. Gait characteristics were consistent with those from previous cohorts with cerebellar ataxia. Sensitive measures like the i-TUG may help determine efficacy of interventions, characterize disease progression, and provide early markers of disease in FXTAS.

  20. Developmental trajectories in toddlers' self-restraint predict individual differences in executive functions 14 years later: a behavioral genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Naomi P; Miyake, Akira; Robinson, JoAnn L; Hewitt, John K

    2011-09-01

    We examined whether self-restraint in early childhood predicted individual differences in 3 executive functions (EFs; inhibiting prepotent responses, updating working memory, and shifting task sets) in late adolescence in a sample of approximately 950 twins. At ages 14, 20, 24, and 36 months, the children were shown an attractive toy and told not to touch it for 30 s. Latency to touch the toy increased with age, and latent class growth modeling distinguished 2 groups of children that differed in their latencies to touch the toy at all 4 time points. Using confirmatory factor analysis, we decomposed the 3 EFs (measured with latent variables at age 17 years) into a Common EF factor (isomorphic to response inhibition ability) and 2 factors specific to updating and shifting. Less-restrained children had significantly lower scores on the Common EF factor, equivalent scores on the Updating-Specific factor, and higher scores on the Shifting-Specific factor than did the more-restrained children. The less-restrained group also had lower IQ scores, but this effect was entirely mediated by the EF components. Twin models indicated that the associations were primarily genetic in origin for the Common EF variable but split between genetics and nonshared environment for the Shifting-Specific variable. These results suggest a biological relation between individual differences in self-restraint and EFs, one that begins early in life and persists into late adolescence.

  1. Land use mix and five-year mortality in later life: Results from the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Tzu; Prina, A. Matthew; Jones, Andy; Barnes, Linda E.; Matthews, Fiona E.; Brayne, Carol; MRC CFAS

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the potential modifying effect of age and mediation effect of co-morbidity on the association between land use mix, a measure of neighbourhood walkability, and five-year mortality among the 2424 individuals participating in the year-10 follow-up of the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study in England. Postcodes of participants were mapped onto Lower-layer Super Output Areas, a small area level geographical unit in the UK, and linked to Generalised Land Use data. Cox regression models were fitted to investigate the association. For the younger older age group (75–79 years), the effect of high land use mix on an elevated risk of mortality was mediated by co-morbidity. For older old age groups (80–84, 85+ years), a higher land use mix was directly associated with a 10% lower risk of five-year mortality. The findings suggest differential impacts of land use mix on the health of the younger and older old. PMID:26798962

  2. Chondroitinase ABC Combined with Neurotrophin NT-3 Secretion and NR2D Expression Promotes Axonal Plasticity and Functional Recovery in Rats with Lateral Hemisection of the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    García-Alías, Guillermo; Petrosyan, Hayk A.; Schnell, Lisa; Horner, Philip J.; Bowers, William J.; Mendell, Lorne M.; Fawcett, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Elevating spinal levels of neurotrophin NT-3 (NT3) while increasing expression of the NR2D subunit of the NMDA receptor using a HSV viral construct promotes formation of novel multisynaptic projections from lateral white matter (LWM) axons to motoneurons in neonates. However, this treatment is ineffective after postnatal day 10. Because chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) treatment restores plasticity in the adult CNS, we have added ChABC to this treatment and applied the combination to adult rats receiving a left lateral hemisection (Hx) at T8. All hemisected animals initially dragged the ipsilateral hindpaw and displayed abnormal gait. Rats treated with ChABC or NT3/HSV-NR2D recovered partial hindlimb locomotor function, but animals receiving combined therapy displayed the most improved body stability and interlimb coordination [Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor scale and gait analysis]. Electrical stimulation of the left LWM at T6 did not evoke any synaptic response in ipsilateral L5 motoneurons of control hemisected animals, indicating interruption of the white matter. Only animals with the full combination treatment recovered consistent multisynaptic responses in these motoneurons indicating formation of a detour pathway around the Hx. These physiological findings were supported by the observation of increased branching of both cut and intact LWM axons into the gray matter near the injury. ChABC-treated animals displayed more sprouting than control animals and those receiving NT3/HSV-NR2D; animals receiving the combination of all three treatments showed the most sprouting. Our results indicate that therapies aimed at increasing plasticity, promoting axon growth and modulating synaptic function have synergistic effects and promote better functional recovery than if applied individually. PMID:22159095

  3. Chondroitinase ABC combined with neurotrophin NT-3 secretion and NR2D expression promotes axonal plasticity and functional recovery in rats with lateral hemisection of the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    García-Alías, Guillermo; Petrosyan, Hayk A; Schnell, Lisa; Horner, Philip J; Bowers, William J; Mendell, Lorne M; Fawcett, James W; Arvanian, Victor L

    2011-12-07

    Elevating spinal levels of neurotrophin NT-3 (NT3) while increasing expression of the NR2D subunit of the NMDA receptor using a HSV viral construct promotes formation of novel multisynaptic projections from lateral white matter (LWM) axons to motoneurons in neonates. However, this treatment is ineffective after postnatal day 10. Because chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) treatment restores plasticity in the adult CNS, we have added ChABC to this treatment and applied the combination to adult rats receiving a left lateral hemisection (Hx) at T8. All hemisected animals initially dragged the ipsilateral hindpaw and displayed abnormal gait. Rats treated with ChABC or NT3/HSV-NR2D recovered partial hindlimb locomotor function, but animals receiving combined therapy displayed the most improved body stability and interlimb coordination [Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor scale and gait analysis]. Electrical stimulation of the left LWM at T6 did not evoke any synaptic response in ipsilateral L5 motoneurons of control hemisected animals, indicating interruption of the white matter. Only animals with the full combination treatment recovered consistent multisynaptic responses in these motoneurons indicating formation of a detour pathway around the Hx. These physiological findings were supported by the observation of increased branching of both cut and intact LWM axons into the gray matter near the injury. ChABC-treated animals displayed more sprouting than control animals and those receiving NT3/HSV-NR2D; animals receiving the combination of all three treatments showed the most sprouting. Our results indicate that therapies aimed at increasing plasticity, promoting axon growth and modulating synaptic function have synergistic effects and promote better functional recovery than if applied individually.

  4. Anxiety in High-Functioning Autism: A Pilot Study of Experience Sampling Using a Mobile Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Dougal Julian; Gracey, Carolyn; Wood, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety and stress are everyday issues for many people with high-functioning autism, and while cognitive-behavioural therapy is the treatment of choice for the management of anxiety, there are challenges in using it with people with high-functioning autism. This study used modified experience sampling techniques to examine everyday anxiety and…

  5. Mobile Innovations, Executive Functions, and Educational Developments in Conflict Zones: A Case Study from Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckner, Elizabeth; Kim, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Prior research suggests that exposure to conflict can negatively impact the development of executive functioning, which in turn can affect academic performance. Recognizing the need to better understand the potentially widespread executive function deficiencies among Palestinian students and to help develop educational resources targeted to youth…

  6. Item response theory analysis of the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale-Revised in the Pooled Resource Open-Access ALS Clinical Trials Database.

    PubMed

    Bacci, Elizabeth D; Staniewska, Dorota; Coyne, Karin S; Boyer, Stacey; White, Leigh Ann; Zach, Neta; Cedarbaum, Jesse M

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to examine dimensionality and item-level performance of the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R) across time using classical and modern test theory approaches. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Item Response Theory (IRT) analyses were conducted using data from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) Pooled Resources Open-Access ALS Clinical Trials (PRO-ACT) database with complete ALSFRS-R data (n = 888) at three time-points (Time 0, Time 1 (6-months), Time 2 (1-year)). Results demonstrated that in this population of 888 patients, mean age was 54.6 years, 64.4% were male, and 93.7% were Caucasian. The CFA supported a 4* individual-domain structure (bulbar, gross motor, fine motor, and respiratory domains). IRT analysis within each domain revealed misfitting items and overlapping item response category thresholds at all time-points, particularly in the gross motor and respiratory domain items. Results indicate that many of the items of the ALSFRS-R may sub-optimally distinguish among varying levels of disability assessed by each domain, particularly in patients with less severe disability. Measure performance improved across time as patient disability severity increased. In conclusion, modifications to select ALSFRS-R items may improve the instrument's specificity to disability level and sensitivity to treatment effects.

  7. Pulsed and continuous wave mobile phone exposure over left versus right hemisphere: effects on human cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Haarala, Christian; Takio, Fiia; Rintee, Taija; Laine, Matti; Koivisto, Mika; Revonsuo, Antti; Hämäläinen, Heikki

    2007-05-01

    The possible effects of continuous wave (CW) and pulse modulated (PM) electromagnetic field (EMF) on human cognition was studied in 36 healthy male subjects. They performed cognitive tasks while exposed to CW, PM, and sham EMF. The subjects performed the same tasks twice during each session; once with left-sided and once with right-sided exposure. The EMF conditions were spread across three testing sessions, each session separated by 1 week. The exposed hemisphere, EMF condition, and test order were counterbalanced over all subjects. We employed a double-blind design: both the subject and the experimenter were unaware of the EMF condition. The EMF was created with a signal generator connected via amplifier to a dummy phone antenna, creating a power output distribution similar to the original commercial mobile phone. The EMF had either a continuous power output of 0.25 W (CW) or pulsed power output with a mean of 0.25 W. An additional control group of 16 healthy male volunteers performed the same tasks without any exposure equipment to see if mere presence of the equipment could have affected the subjects' performance. No effects were found between the different EMF conditions, separate hemisphere exposures, or between the control and experimental group. In conclusion, the current results indicate that normal mobile phones have no discernible effect on human cognitive function as measured by behavioral tests.

  8. Design of mobile phone lens with extended depth of field based on point-spread function focus invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hsin-Yueh; Yang, Sidney S.; Chang, Horng

    2008-08-01

    Due to the application of mobile phone lens, the clear image for the different object distance from infinity to close-up creates a new bargaining. We found that wave-front coding applied to extend the depth of field may solve this problem. By means of using cubic phase mask (CPM), the blurred point-spread function (PSF) is substantially invariant to defocus. Thus, the ideal hyperfocal distance condition can be satisfied as long as the constant blurred image can eventually be recovered by a simple digital signal processing. In this paper, we propose a different design method of computational imaging lens for mobile phone up to ideal depth of field based on PSF focus invariance. Because of the difficulty for comparing the similarity to different PSFs, we define a new metric, of correlation, to evaluate and optimize the PSF similarity. Besides, by means of adding the anti-symmetric free form phase plate at aperture stop and using the correlation and Strehl ratio as the two major optimization operands, we can get the optimum phase plate surface to achieve the required extended depth of field (EDoF). The resulted PSF on focal plane is significantly invariant to object distance varying from infinity to 10cm.

  9. Noninvasive and painless magnetic stimulation of nerves improved brain motor function and mobility in a cerebral palsy case.

    PubMed

    Flamand, Véronique H; Schneider, Cyril

    2014-10-01

    Motor deficits in cerebral palsy disturb functional independence. This study tested whether noninvasive and painless repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation could improve motor function in a 7-year-old boy with spastic hemiparetic cerebral palsy. Stimulation was applied over different nerves of the lower limbs for 5 sessions. We measured the concurrent aftereffects of this intervention on ankle motor control, gait (walking velocity, stride length, cadence, cycle duration), and function of brain motor pathways. We observed a decrease of ankle plantar flexors resistance to stretch, an increase of active dorsiflexion range of movement, and improvements of corticospinal control of ankle dorsiflexors. Joint mobility changes were still present 15 days after the end of stimulation, when all gait parameters were also improved. Resistance to stretch was still lower than prestimulation values 45 days after the end of stimulation. This case illustrates the sustained effects of repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation on brain plasticity, motor function, and gait. It suggests a potential impact for physical rehabilitation in cerebral palsy.

  10. Lateral conduction infrared photodetector

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jin K.; Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2011-09-20

    A photodetector for detecting infrared light in a wavelength range of 3-25 .mu.m is disclosed. The photodetector has a mesa structure formed from semiconductor layers which include a type-II superlattice formed of alternating layers of InAs and In.sub.xGa.sub.1-xSb with 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5. Impurity doped regions are formed on sidewalls of the mesa structure to provide for a lateral conduction of photo-generated carriers which can provide an increased carrier mobility and a reduced surface recombination. An optional bias electrode can be used in the photodetector to control and vary a cut-off wavelength or a depletion width therein. The photodetector can be formed as a single-color or multi-color device, and can also be used to form a focal plane array which is compatible with conventional read-out integrated circuits.

  11. Comparison of Pulmonary Functions at Onset of Ventilatory Insufficiency in Patients With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, and Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Han Eol; Lee, Jang Woo; Kang, Seong Woong; Choi, Won Ah; Oh, Hyeonjun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate pulmonary functions of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), and myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD) at the onset of ventilatory insufficiency. Methods This retrospective study included ALS, DMD, and MMD patients with regular outpatient clinic follow-up in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at Gangnam Severance Hospital before the application of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV). The patients were enrolled from August 2001 to March 2014. If patients experienced ventilatory insufficiency, they were treated with NIPPV, and their pulmonary functions were subsequently measured. Results Ninety-four DMD patients, 41 ALS patients, and 21 MMD patients were included in the study. The mean SpO2 was lower in the MMD group than in the other two groups. The mean forced vital capacity (FVC) in the supine position was approximately low to mid 20% on average in DMD and ALS patients, whereas it was 10% higher in MMD patients. ALS patients showed a significantly lower FVC in the supine position than in the sitting position. Maximal insufflation capacity, unassisted peak cough flow, maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), and maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) were significantly higher in MMD group than in the other groups. MEP was significantly the lowest in DMD patients, followed by in ALS, and MMD patients, in order. Conclusion Disease-specific values of pulmonary function, including FVC, MEP, and MIP, can be accurately used to assess the onset of ventilatory insufficiency in patients with ALS, DMD, and MMD. PMID:26949672

  12. Functional disability and compromised mobility among older women with urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Erekson, Elisabeth A.; Ciarleglio, Maria M.; Hanissian, Paul D.; Strohbehn, Kris; Bynum, Julie P.W.; Fried, Terri R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to determine the prevalence of functional disability among older women with urinary incontinence (UI). Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of the 2005-06 National Social Life, Health and Aging Project (NSHAP). Daily UI was defined as answering “daily” to the question, “How frequently...have you had difficulty controlling your bladder, including leaking small amounts of urine, leaking when you cough or sneeze, or not being able to make it to the bathroom on time?” We then explored functional status. Women were asked about seven basic activities of daily living (ADLs). Statistical analyses with percentage estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were performed. Logistic regression was performed to assess the association between functional status and daily UI. Results In total, 1,412 women were included in our analysis. Daily UI was reported by 177 (12.5%) women. Functional dependence or disability with any ADLs was reported in 62.1% (95% CI 54.2%, 70.1%) of women with daily UI. Among women with daily UI, 23.6% (95% CI 16.8%, 30.5%) reported specific difficulty or dependence with using the toilet signifying functional limitations which may contribute to urine leakage. After adjusting for age category, race/ethnicity, education level, and parity, women with daily UI had 3.31 increased odds of functional difficulty or dependence compared with continent older women. Conclusion Over 60% of older women with daily UI reported functional difficulty or dependence and 1/4 of women with daily UI specifically reported difficulty or dependence with using the toilet. PMID:25185600

  13. Interactions between Callous Unemotional Behaviors and Executive Function in Early Childhood Predict later Aggression and Lower Peer-liking in Late-childhood.

    PubMed

    Waller, Rebecca; Hyde, Luke W; Baskin-Sommers, Arielle R; Olson, Sheryl L

    2017-04-01

    Callous unemotional (CU) behaviors are linked to aggression, behavior problems, and difficulties in peer relationships in children and adolescents. However, few studies have examined whether early childhood CU behaviors predict aggression or peer-rejection during late-childhood or potential moderation of this relationship by executive function. The current study examined whether the interaction of CU behaviors and executive function in early childhood predicted different forms of aggression in late-childhood, including proactive, reactive, and relational aggression, as well as how much children were liked by their peers. Data from cross-informant reports and multiple observational tasks were collected from a high-risk sample (N = 240; female = 118) at ages 3 and 10 years old. Parent reports of CU behaviors at age 3 predicted teacher reports of reactive, proactive, and relational aggression, as well as lower peer-liking at age 10. Moderation analysis showed that specifically at high levels of CU behaviors and low levels of observed executive function, children were reported by teachers as showing greater reactive and proactive aggression, and were less-liked by peers. Findings demonstrate that early childhood CU behaviors and executive function have unique main and interactive effects on both later aggression and lower peer-liking even when taking into account stability in behavior problems over time. By elucidating how CU behaviors and deficits in executive function potentiate each other during early childhood, we can better characterize the emergence of severe and persistent behavior and interpersonal difficulties across development.

  14. Genetic influence on exercise-induced changes in physical function among mobility-limited older adults

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Fang-Chi; Brinkley, Tina E.; Carter, Christy S.; Church, Timothy S.; Dodson, John A.; Goodpaster, Bret H.; McDermott, Mary M.; Nicklas, Barbara J.; Yank, Veronica; Johnson, Julie A.; Pahor, Marco

    2014-01-01

    To date, physical exercise is the only intervention consistently demonstrated to attenuate age-related declines in physical function. However, variability exists in seniors' responsiveness to training. One potential source of variability is the insertion (I allele) or deletion (D allele) of a 287 bp fragment in intron 16 of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene. This polymorphism is known to influence a variety of physiological adaptions to exercise. However, evidence is inconclusive regarding the influence of this polymorphism on older adults' functional responses to exercise. This study aimed to evaluate the association of ACE I/D genotypes with changes in physical function among Caucasian older adults (n = 283) following 12 mo of either structured, multimodal physical activity or health education. Measures of physical function included usual-paced gait speed and performance on the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). After checking Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, we used using linear regression to evaluate the genotype*treatment interaction for each outcome. Covariates included clinic site, body mass index, age, sex, baseline score, comorbidity, and use of angiotensin receptor blockers or ACE inhibitors. Genotype frequencies [II (19.4%), ID (42.4%), DD (38.2%)] were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P > 0.05). The genotype*treatment interaction was statistically significant for both gait speed (P = 0.002) and SPPB (P = 0.020). Exercise improved gait speed by 0.06 ± 0.01 m/sec and SPPB score by 0.72 ± 0.16 points among those with at least one D allele (ID/DD carriers), but function was not improved among II carriers. Thus, ACE I/D genotype appears to play a role in modulating functional responses to exercise training in seniors. PMID:24423970

  15. Abnormal band of lateral meniscus.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Brian; Goldblatt, John

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a case of an "abnormal band" of the lateral meniscus, extending from the posterior horn of the true lateral meniscus to its antero-mid portion, observed during arthroscopy in a 45-year-old white man of Bosnian descent. The periphery of the aberrant lateral meniscus was freely mobile, and not connected to the underlying true lateral meniscus. Preoperative physical examination findings were consistent with medial-sided meniscal pathology only; however, evidence of an anomalous lateral meniscus was seen with magnetic resonance imaging. This anatomical pattern is rare and has been reported in the literature only once, in a report of 2 Asian patients. This article illustrates an anatomical variant of the lateral meniscus in a non-Asian patient with a clinical presentation that has not been previously described. In addition to the case report, the article presents a comprehensive review of the existing body of literature on anomalous lateral meniscus patterns. We believe that the definitions of the types of aberrant meniscus can be clarified to establish improved accuracy in reporting.

  16. Mobile Phone-Based Joint Angle Measurement for Functional Assessment and Rehabilitation of Proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Mourcou, Quentin; Fleury, Anthony; Diot, Bruno; Franco, Céline; Vuillerme, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of joint functional and proprioceptive abilities is essential for balance, posture, and motor control rehabilitation. Joint functional ability refers to the capacity of movement of the joint. It may be evaluated thereby measuring the joint range of motion (ROM). Proprioception can be defined as the perception of the position and of the movement of various body parts in space. Its role is essential in sensorimotor control for movement acuity, joint stability, coordination, and balance. Its clinical evaluation is commonly based on the assessment of the joint position sense (JPS). Both ROM and JPS measurements require estimating angles through goniometer, scoliometer, laser-pointer, and bubble or digital inclinometer. With the arrival of Smartphones, these costly clinical tools tend to be replaced. Beyond evaluation, maintaining and/or improving joint functional and proprioceptive abilities by training with physical therapy is important for long-term management. This review aims to report Smartphone applications used for measuring and improving functional and proprioceptive abilities. It identifies that Smartphone applications are reliable for clinical measurements and are mainly used to assess ROM and JPS. However, there is lack of studies on Smartphone applications which can be used in an autonomous way to provide physical therapy exercises at home. PMID:26583101

  17. A Mobile Computing Solution for Collecting Functional Analysis Data on a Pocket PC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, James; Dixon, Mark R.

    2007-01-01

    The present paper provides a task analysis for creating a computerized data system using a Pocket PC and Microsoft Visual Basic. With Visual Basic software and any handheld device running the Windows MOBLE operating system, this task analysis will allow behavior analysts to program and customize their own functional analysis data-collection…

  18. Extending the Belgian eID Technology with Mobile Security Functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapon, Jorn; Verdegem, Bram; Verhaeghe, Pieter; Naessens, Vincent; de Decker, Bart

    The Belgian Electronic Identity Card was introduced in 2002. The card enables Belgian citizens to prove their identity digitally and to sign electronic documents. Today, only a limited number of citizens really use the card in electronic applications. A major reason is the lack of killer functionality and killer applications.

  19. A molecular dynamics study of the lateral free energy profile of a pair of cholesterol molecules as a function of their distance in phospholipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Oono, Kimiko; Okazaki, Susumu; Hatta, Ichiro

    2012-04-01

    Free energy profile of a pair of cholesterol molecules in a leaflet of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers in the liquid-crystalline phase has been calculated as a function of their lateral distance using a combination of NPT-constant atomistic molecular dynamics calculations (P = 1 atm and T = 310.15 K) and the thermodynamic integration method. The calculated free energy clearly shows that the two cholesterol molecules form a dimer separated by a distance of 1.0-1.5 nm in POPC bilayers. Well depth of the free energy profile is about 3.5 kJ/mol, which is comparable to the thermal energy kBT at 310.15 K. This indicates that the aggregation of cholesterol molecules in the bilayers depends on the temperature as well as the concentration of the system. The free energy function obtained here may be used as a reference when coarse grained potential model is investigated for this two-component system. Local structure of POPC molecules around two cholesterol molecules has also been investigated.

  20. Effects of lipid-analog detergent solubilization on the functionality and lipidic cubic phase mobility of the Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Morales, Luis F; Morales-Pérez, Claudio L; De La Cruz-Rivera, Pamela C; Asmar-Rovira, Guillermo; Báez-Pagán, Carlos A; Quesada, Orestes; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2011-10-01

    Over the past three decades, the Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been one of the most extensively studied membrane protein systems. However, the effects of detergent solubilization on nAChR stability and function are poorly understood. The use of lipid-analog detergents for nAChR solubilization has been shown to preserve receptor stability and functionality. The present study used lipid-analog detergents from phospholipid-analog and cholesterol-analog detergent families for solubilization and affinity purification of the receptor and probed nAChR ion channel function using planar lipid bilayers (PLBs) and stability using analytical size exclusion chromatography (A-SEC) in the detergent-solubilized state. We also examined receptor mobility on the lipidic cubic phase (LCP) by measuring the nAChR mobile fraction and diffusion coefficient through fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments using lipid-analog and non-lipid-analog detergents. Our results show that it is possible to isolate stable and functional nAChRs using lipid-analog detergents, with characteristic ion channel currents in PLBs and minimal aggregation as observed in A-SEC. Furthermore, fractional mobility and diffusion coefficient values observed in FRAP experiments were similar to the values observed for these parameters in the recently LCP-crystallized β(2)-adrenergic receptor. The overall results show that phospholipid-analog detergents with 16 carbon acyl-chains support nAChR stability, functionality and LCP mobility.

  1. Functional and Aesthetic Tragal Reconstruction in the Age of Mobile Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Gaball, Curtis W.

    2016-01-01

    We present a method to create a tragus using the patient's conchal cartilage. It is a simplified, single-stage technique with well-hidden incisions, yet it maintains the rigidity of a natural tragus. This patient did not have a history of radiation to the area, which may compromise healing with this technique. The cosmetic importance of the tragus has been described, but its functionality in accommodating modern technology has not been previously discussed. The main treatment goal for this patient was to gain the ability to wear earphones (clinical question/level of evidence: therapeutic, V). PMID:28101391

  2. A Mobile Computing Solution for Collecting Functional Analysis Data on a Pocket PC

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, James; Dixon, Mark R

    2007-01-01

    The present paper provides a task analysis for creating a computerized data system using a Pocket PC and Microsoft Visual Basic. With Visual Basic software and any handheld device running the Windows Moble operating system, this task analysis will allow behavior analysts to program and customize their own functional analysis data-collection system. The program will allow the user to select the type of behavior to be recorded, choose between interval and frequency data collection, and summarize data for graphing and analysis. We also provide suggestions for customizing the data-collection system for idiosyncratic research and clinical needs. PMID:17624078

  3. Alcohol consumption negates estrogen-mediated myocardial repair in ovariectomized mice by inhibiting endothelial progenitor cell mobilization and function.

    PubMed

    Mackie, Alexander R; Krishnamurthy, Prasanna; Verma, Suresh K; Thorne, Tina; Ramirez, Veronica; Qin, Gangjian; Abramova, Tatiana; Hamada, Hiromichi; Losordo, Douglas W; Kishore, Raj

    2013-06-21

    We have shown previously that estrogen (estradiol, E2) supplementation enhances voluntary alcohol consumption in ovariectomized female rodents and that increased alcohol consumption impairs ischemic hind limb vascular repair. However, the effect of E2-induced alcohol consumption on post-infarct myocardial repair and on the phenotypic/functional properties of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) is not known. Additionally, the molecular signaling of alcohol-estrogen interactions remains to be elucidated. This study examined the effect of E2-induced increases in ethanol consumption on post-infarct myocardial function/repair. Ovariectomized female mice, implanted with 17β-E2 or placebo pellets were given access to alcohol for 6 weeks and subjected to acute myocardial infarction. Left ventricular functions were consistently depressed in mice consuming ethanol compared with those receiving only E2. Alcohol-consuming mice also displayed significantly increased infarct size and reduced capillary density. Ethanol consumption also reduced E2-induced mobilization and homing of EPCs to injured myocardium compared with the E2-alone group. In vitro, exposure of EPCs to ethanol suppressed E2-induced proliferation, survival, and migration and markedly altered E2-induced estrogen receptor-dependent cell survival signaling and gene expression. Furthermore, ethanol-mediated suppression of EPC biology was endothelial nitric oxide synthase-dependent because endothelial nitric oxide synthase-null mice displayed an exaggerated response to post-acute myocardial infarction left ventricular functions. These data suggest that E2 modulation of alcohol consumption, and the ensuing EPC dysfunction, may negatively compete with the beneficial effects of estrogen on post-infarct myocardial repair.

  4. Presurgical functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD) with intravenous echo enhancing agent SonoVue enables determination of language lateralization in epilepsy patients with poor temporal bone windows.

    PubMed

    House, Patrick M; Brückner, Katja E; Lohmann, Hubertus H

    2011-03-01

    Presurgical determination of language lateralization is important for planning and outcome estimation of neurosurgical interventions in patients with drug-refractory epilepsy. Functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD) provides an established measure for language lateralization using the temporal bone windows for continuous recording of the cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) in both middle cerebral arteries (MCAs). However, because of insufficient temporal bone windows, fTCD cannot be applied properly in every patient. Here, we established stable and sufficient CBFV signals in both MCAs using continuous intravenous application of echo-enhancing agent SonoVue in 7 of 10 patients with poor temporal bone windows and were thus able to determine language lateralization. We conclude that the application of SonoVue can solve one principal disadvantage of fTCD and improves the applicability of the technique as a presurgical functional language lateralization procedure.

  5. Evolutionary and functional insights into Leishmania META1: evidence for lateral gene transfer and a role for META1 in secretion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Leishmania META1 has for long been a candidate molecule for involvement in virulence: META1 transcript and protein are up-regulated in metacyclic Leishmania. Yet, how META1 contributes to virulence remains unclear. We sought insights into the possible functions of META1 by studying its evolutionary origins. Results Using multiple criteria including sequence similarity, nucleotide composition, phylogenetic analysis and selection pressure on gene sequence, we present evidence that META1 originated in trypanosomatids as a result of a lateral gene transfer of a bacterial heat-inducible protein, HslJ. Furthermore, within the Leishmania genome, META1 sequence is under negative selection pressure against change/substitution. Using homology modeling of Leishmania META1 based on solved NMR structure of HslJ, we show that META1 and HslJ share a similar structural fold. The best hit for other proteins with similar fold is MxiM, a protein involved in the type III secretion system in Shigella. The striking structural similarity shared by META1, HslJ and MxiM suggests a possibility of shared functions. Upon structural superposition with MxiM, we have observed a putative hydrophobic cavity in META1. Mutagenesis of select hydrophobic residues in this cavity affects the secretion of the secreted acid phosphatase (SAP), indicating META1's involvement in secretory processes in Leishmania. Conclusions Overall, this work uses an evolutionary biology approach, 3D-modeling and site-directed mutagenesis to arrive at new insights into functions of Leishmania META1. PMID:22093578

  6. Functional Laterality of Task-Evoked Activation in Sensorimotor Cortex of Preterm Infants: An Optimized 3 T fMRI Study Employing a Customized Neonatal Head Coil

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Collins, Adam PR; Müller, Nicole; Stegmann-Woessner, Gaby; Jankowski, Jacob; Gieseke, Jürgen; Born, Mark; Seitz, Hermann; Bartmann, Peter; Schild, Hans H.; Pruessmann, Klaas P.; Boecker, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Background Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in neonates has been introduced as a non-invasive method for studying sensorimotor processing in the developing brain. However, previous neonatal studies have delivered conflicting results regarding localization, lateralization, and directionality of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses in sensorimotor cortex (SMC). Amongst the confounding factors in interpreting neonatal fMRI studies include the use of standard adult MR-coils providing insufficient signal to noise, and liberal statistical thresholds, compromising clinical interpretation at the single subject level. Patients / methods Here, we employed a custom-designed neonatal MR-coil adapted and optimized to the head size of a newborn in order to improve robustness, reliability and validity of neonatal sensorimotor fMRI. Thirteen preterm infants with a median gestational age of 26 weeks were scanned at term-corrected age using a prototype 8-channel neonatal head coil at 3T (Achieva, Philips, Best, NL). Sensorimotor stimulation was elicited by passive extension/flexion of the elbow at 1 Hz in a block design. Analysis of temporal signal to noise ratio (tSNR) was performed on the whole brain and the SMC, and was compared to data acquired with an ‘adult’ 8 channel head coil published previously. Task-evoked activation was determined by single-subject SPM8 analyses, thresholded at p < 0.05, whole-brain FWE-corrected. Results Using a custom-designed neonatal MR-coil, we found significant positive BOLD responses in contralateral SMC after unilateral passive sensorimotor stimulation in all neonates (analyses restricted to artifact-free data sets = 8/13). Improved imaging characteristics of the neonatal MR-coil were evidenced by additional phantom and in vivo tSNR measurements: phantom studies revealed a 240% global increase in tSNR; in vivo studies revealed a 73% global and a 55% local (SMC) increase in tSNR, as compared to the ‘adult’ MR

  7. Lateral Dominance and Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Albert J.

    1979-01-01

    Theory and research on the relation of lateral dominance to the causation of reading disability are reviewed. Both direct and indirect measures of cerebral hemisphere functioning are considered. (SBH)

  8. Maintaining Functional Independence in Elderly Adults: The Roles of Health Status and Financial Resources in Predicting Home Modifications and Use of Mobility Equipment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieson, Kathleen M.; Kronenfeld, Jennie Jacobs; Keith, Verna M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether health status (i.e., need characteristics) and financial resources (i.e., enabling characteristics) were important predictors of two types of functional adaptations among elderly adults: home modifications such as putting nonslip tape on rugs or installing more telephones and use of equipment for mobility or…

  9. Relationship of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate hydrolysis to calcium mobilization and functional activation in fluoride-treated neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    English, D; Debono, D J; Gabig, T G

    1987-01-01

    Sodium fluoride (20 mM) effected rapid hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) in human neutrophils. Intracellular free Ca2+ levels increased after PIP2 hydrolysis but before respiratory burst activation. Both the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ levels and the extent of functional activation were dependent on the availability of extracellular Ca2+. The rate of F(-)-stimulated PIP2 hydrolysis, however, was not affected when the rise in cytosolic Ca2+ was severely limited by depletion of extracellular Ca2+. Fluoride caused the specific hydrolysis of PIP2 in isolated neutrophil plasma membranes. This effect occurred in the presence of low levels of available Ca2+ and was accompanied by the release of inositol phosphates. We conclude that PIP2 hydrolysis is an early event in the response of neutrophils to F-. This response is not Ca2+-regulated but may lead to an influx of Ca2+ from the extracellular medium. Activation of a PIP2-specific phospholipase independent of a change in cytosolic free Ca2+ levels may be the initial event in the stimulus-response pathway triggered by fluoride. PMID:3036911

  10. Relationship of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate hydrolysis to calcium mobilization and functional activation in fluoride-treated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    English, D; Debono, D J; Gabig, T G

    1987-07-01

    Sodium fluoride (20 mM) effected rapid hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) in human neutrophils. Intracellular free Ca2+ levels increased after PIP2 hydrolysis but before respiratory burst activation. Both the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ levels and the extent of functional activation were dependent on the availability of extracellular Ca2+. The rate of F(-)-stimulated PIP2 hydrolysis, however, was not affected when the rise in cytosolic Ca2+ was severely limited by depletion of extracellular Ca2+. Fluoride caused the specific hydrolysis of PIP2 in isolated neutrophil plasma membranes. This effect occurred in the presence of low levels of available Ca2+ and was accompanied by the release of inositol phosphates. We conclude that PIP2 hydrolysis is an early event in the response of neutrophils to F-. This response is not Ca2+-regulated but may lead to an influx of Ca2+ from the extracellular medium. Activation of a PIP2-specific phospholipase independent of a change in cytosolic free Ca2+ levels may be the initial event in the stimulus-response pathway triggered by fluoride.

  11. The Effects of Long Duration Bed Rest on Functional Mobility and Balance: Relationship to Resting State Motor Cortex Connectivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdeniz, B.; Koppelmans, V.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Kofman, I. S.; DeDios, Y. E.; Riascos-Castaneda, R. F.; Wood, S. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Seidler, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    NASA offers researchers from a variety of backgrounds the opportunity to study bed rest as an experimental analog for space flight. Extended exposure to a head-down tilt position during long duration bed rest can resemble many of the effects of a low-gravity environment such as reduced sensory inputs, body unloading and increased cephalic fluid distribution. The aim of our study is to a) identify changes in brain function that occur with prolonged bed rest and characterize their recovery time course; b) assess whether and how these changes impact behavioral and neurocognitive performance. Thus far, we completed data collection from six participants that include task based and resting state fMRI. The data have been acquired through the bed rest facility located at the University of Texas Medical Branch (Galveston, TX). Subjects remained in bed with their heads tilted down 6 degrees below their feet for 70 consecutive days. Behavioral measures and neuroimaging assessments were obtained at seven time points: a) 7 and 12 days before bed rest; b) 7, 30, and 65 days during bed rest; and c) 7 and 12 days after bed rest. Functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (FcMRI) analysis was performed to assess the connectivity of motor cortex in and out of bed rest. We found a decrease in motor cortex connectivity with vestibular cortex and the cerebellum from pre bed rest to in bed rest. We also used a battery of behavioral measures including the functional mobility test and computerized dynamic posturography collected before and after bed rest. We will report the preliminary results of analyses relating brain and behavior changes. Furthermore, we will also report the preliminary results of a spatial working memory task and vestibular stimulation during in and out of bed rest.

  12. Nonthermal effects of mobile-phone frequency microwaves on uteroplacental functions in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Matsuzaki, Ichiyo; Hatta, Kotaro; Nobukuni, Yoshitaka; Kambayashi, Yasuhiro; Ogino, Keiki

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to high-density microwaves can cause detrimental effects on the testis, eye, and other tissues, and induce significant biologic changes through thermal actions. To examine nonthermal effect of continuous wave (CW) 915MHz microwaves used in cellular phones, we compared the effects of microwaves with those of heat. Thirty-six pregnant rats were assigned to six groups: rats exposed to microwaves at 0.6 or 3mW/cm(2) incident power density at 915MHz for 90min, rats immersed in water at 38 or 40 degrees C, which induces about the same increase in colonic temperature of 1.0 or 3.5 degrees C as 0.6 or 3mW/cm(2) microwaves, respectively; rats immersed in water at 34 degrees C, which is considered to be thermoneutral; and control rats. We identified significant differences in the uteroplacental circulation, and in placental endocrine and immune functions between pregnant rats immersed in water at 34 and 38 degrees C, but not between rats immersed at 38 degrees C and those exposed to microwaves at 0.6mW/cm(2). By contrast, we observed significant decreases in uteroplacental blood flow and estradiol in rats exposed to microwaves at 3mW/cm(2) as compared with those immersed in water at 40 degrees C. These results suggest microwaves at 0.6mW/cm(2) at 915MHz, equal to a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.4W/kg, which is the maximum permissible exposure level recommended by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), do not exert nonthermal effects on blood estradiol and progesterone, on splenic natural killer cell activity, on the uteroplacental circulation.

  13. Quantitative EEG analysis for assessment to 'plan' a task in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients: a study of executive functions (planning) in ALS patients.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Jayashree; Bhatia, Manvir; Sahu, Shweta; Anand, Sneh

    2004-12-01

    An attempt has been made to study the ability of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to 'plan' a task. Electroencephalogram (EEG) data corresponding to 'planning of a movement task' is analyzed in comparison with a normal relaxed state. The study was conducted on 12 patients with ALS (6 males, 3 females, mean age 46.75 years) and on same number of controls (10 males, 2 females, mean age 48.75 years) to evaluate a difference in the ability to 'plan' a movement task between them. Patients with ALS were divided in two groups defined by unclear/clear speech. It has been observed that patients with ALS having unclear speech (Group I) showed considerable reduction (p<0.0001) in 'planning' a movement task, whereas patients with ALS having clear speech (Group II) showed no deficit in 'planning' a movement task (p=0.0577), both in comparison with age-matched controls. Apart from supporting the earlier reports of a possible extended neuronal degeneration across wide area of the frontal lobes, the findings reveal a possible reduction in planning, an executive function of the prefrontal cortex of brain, and also reveal that speech impairment may be associated with cognitive deficits in patients with ALS.

  14. Lateral Diffusion, Function, and Expression of the Slow Channel Congenital Myasthenia Syndrome αC418W Nicotinic Receptor Mutation with Changes in Lipid Raft Components*

    PubMed Central

    Oyola-Cintrón, Jessica; Caballero-Rivera, Daniel; Ballester, Leomar; Baéz-Pagán, Carlos A.; Martínez, Hernán L.; Vélez-Arroyo, Karla P.; Quesada, Orestes; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid rafts, specialized membrane microdomains in the plasma membrane rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids, are hot spots for a number of important cellular processes. The novel nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) mutation αC418W, the first lipid-exposed mutation identified in a patient that causes slow channel congenital myasthenia syndrome was shown to be cholesterol-sensitive and to accumulate in microdomains rich in the membrane raft marker protein caveolin-1. The objective of this study is to gain insight into the mechanism by which lateral segregation into specialized raft membrane microdomains regulates the activable pool of nAChRs. We performed fluorescent recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), quantitative RT-PCR, and whole cell patch clamp recordings of GFP-encoding Mus musculus nAChRs transfected into HEK 293 cells to assess the role of cholesterol and caveolin-1 (CAV-1) in the diffusion, expression, and functionality of the nAChR (WT and αC418W). Our findings support the hypothesis that a cholesterol-sensitive nAChR might reside in specialized membrane microdomains that upon cholesterol depletion become disrupted and release the cholesterol-sensitive nAChRs to the pool of activable receptors. In addition, our results in HEK 293 cells show an interdependence between CAV-1 and αC418W that could confer end plates rich in αC418W nAChRs to a susceptibility to changes in cholesterol levels that could cause adverse drug reactions to cholesterol-lowering drugs such as statins. The current work suggests that the interplay between cholesterol and CAV-1 provides the molecular basis for modulating the function and dynamics of the cholesterol-sensitive αC418W nAChR. PMID:26354438

  15. Low birth weight, later renal function, and the roles of adulthood blood pressure, diabetes, and obesity in a British birth cohort.

    PubMed

    Silverwood, Richard J; Pierce, Mary; Hardy, Rebecca; Sattar, Naveed; Whincup, Peter; Ferro, Charles; Savage, Caroline; Kuh, Diana; Nitsch, Dorothea

    2013-12-01

    Low birth weight has been shown to be associated with later renal function, but it is unclear to what extent this is explained by other established kidney disease risk factors. Here we investigate the roles of diabetes, hypertension, and obesity using data from the Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development, a socially stratified sample of 5362 children born in March 1946 in England, Scotland, and Wales, and followed since. The birth weight of 2192 study members with complete data was related to three markers of renal function at age 60-64 (estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) calculated using cystatin C (eGFRcys), eGFR calculated using creatinine and cystatin C (eGFRcr-cys), and the urine albumin-creatinine ratio) using linear regression. Each 1 kg lower birth weight was associated with a 2.25 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) (95% confidence interval 0.80-3.71) lower eGFRcys and a 2.13 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) (0.69-3.58) lower eGFRcr-cys. There was no evidence of an association with urine albumin-creatinine ratio. These associations with eGFR were not confounded by socioeconomic position and were not explained by diabetes or hypertension, but there was some evidence that they were stronger in study members who were overweight in adulthood. Thus, our findings highlight the role of lower birth weight in renal disease and suggest that in those born with lower birth weight particular emphasis should be placed on avoiding becoming overweight.

  16. A Genome-Wide Analysis of the LBD (LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES Domain) Gene Family in Malus domestica with a Functional Characterization of MdLBD11

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ling; Liu, Xin; Hao, Yujin

    2013-01-01

    The plant-specific LBD (LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES domain) genes belong to a major family of transcription factor that encode a zinc finger-like domain. It has been shown that LBD genes play crucial roles in the growth and development of Arabidopsis and other plant species. However, no detailed information concerning this family is available for apple. In the present study, we analyzed the apple (Malus domestica) genome and identified 58 LBD genes. This gene family was tested for its phylogenetic relationships with homologous genes in the Arabidopsis genome, as well as its location in the genome, structure and expression. We also transformed one MdLBD gene into Arabidopsis to evaluate its function. Like Arabidopsis, apple LBD genes also have a conserved CX2CX6CX3C zinc finger-like domain in the N terminus and can be divided into two classes. The expression profile indicated that apple LBD genes exhibited a variety of expression patterns, suggesting that they have diverse functions. At the same time, the expression analysis implied that members of this apple gene family were responsive to hormones and stress and that they may participate in hormone-mediated plant organogenesis, which was demonstrated with the overexpression of the apple LBD gene MdLBD11, resulting in an abnormal phenotype. This phenotype included upward curling leaves, delayed flowering, downward-pointing flowers, siliques and other abnormal traits. Based on these data, we concluded that the MdLBD genes may play an important role in apple growth and development as in Arabidopsis and other species. PMID:23468909

  17. Opposing effects of traumatic brain injury on excitatory synaptic function in the lateral amygdala in the absence and presence of preinjury stress.

    PubMed

    Klein, Rebecca C; Acheson, Shawn K; Qadri, Laura H; Dawson, Alina A; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Wetsel, William C; Moore, Scott D; Laskowitz, Daniel T; Dawson, Hana N

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability among young adults and is highly prevalent among recently deployed military personnel. Survivors of TBI often experience cognitive and emotional deficits, suggesting that long-term effects of injury may disrupt neuronal function in critical brain regions, including the amygdala, which is involved in emotion and fear memory. Amygdala hyperexcitability has been reported in both TBI and posttraumatic stress disorder patients, yet little is known regarding the effects of combined stress and TBI on amygdala structure and function at the neuronal level. The present study seeks to determine how the long-term effects of preinjury foot-shock stress and TBI interact to influence synaptic plasticity in the lateral amygdala (LA) of adult male C57BL/6J mice by using whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology 2-3 months postinjury. In the absence of stress, TBI resulted in a significant increase in membrane excitability and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in LA pyramidal-like neurons. Foot-shock stress in the absence of TBI also resulted in increased sEPSC activity. In contrast, when preinjury stress and TBI occurred in combination, sEPSC activity was significantly decreased compared with either condition alone. There were no significant differences in inhibitory activity or total dendritic length among any of the treatment groups. These results demonstrate that stress and TBI may be contributing to amygdala hyperexcitability via different mechanisms and that these pathways may counterbalance each other with respect to long-term pathophysiology in the LA.

  18. Functional over-load saves motor units in the SOD1-G93A transgenic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, T; Tyreman, N; Li, S; Putman, C T; Hegedus, J

    2010-02-01

    The fastest, most forceful motor units are lost progressively during asymptomatic disease in the SOD1(G93A) transgenic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. As the disease progresses the surviving motor units must increase their levels of activity to sustain posture and movement. If activity-dependent conversion of motor units to more fatigue resistant types increased their resilience and hence survival, we hypothesized that an experimental increase in motor unit activity in the hindlimb muscles of the SOD1(G93A) transgenic mouse should "save" those motor units that are normally lost in the first 90 days of age. To test this hypothesis, we partially denervated hindlimb muscles in SOD1(G93A) and their corresponding control SOD1(WT) transgenic mice by avulsion of either L4 or L5 spinal roots at 40 days of age. Whole muscle and single motor unit isometric twitch forces were recorded and the numbers intact motor units in fast-twitch tibialis anterior, medial gastrocnemius, extensor digitorum longus muscles and the slow-twitch soleus muscle were calculated at 90 days of age. We found that the rapid age-dependent decline in numbers of functional motor units in fast-twitch muscles of the SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice was dramatically reduced by the functional hyperactivity in the partially denervated muscles and, that these muscles comprised a significantly higher component of type IIA and type IID/X fibers than those muscles that were innervated by nerves in intact spinal roots. We conclude that the vulnerable motor units are saved by increasing their neuromuscular activity and consequently, converting them to slower, less forceful, fatigue resistant motor units.

  19. Functional analysis of DNA bending and unwinding by the high mobility group domain of LEF-1

    PubMed Central

    Giese, Klaus; Pagel, John; Grosschedl, Rudolf

    1997-01-01

    LEF-1 (lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1) is a cell type-specific member of the family of high mobility group (HMG) domain proteins that recognizes a specific nucleotide sequence in the T cell receptor (TCR) α enhancer. In this study, we extend the analysis of the DNA-binding properties of LEF-1 and examine their contributions to the regulation of gene expression. We find that LEF-1, like nonspecific HMG-domain proteins, can interact with irregular DNA structures such as four-way junctions, albeit with lower efficiency than with specific duplex DNA. We also show by a phasing analysis that the LEF-induced DNA bend is directed toward the major groove. In addition, we find that the interaction of LEF-1 with a specific binding site in circular DNA changes the linking number of DNA and unwinds the double helix. Finally, we identified two nucleotides in the LEF-1-binding site that are important for protein-induced DNA bending. Mutations of these nucleotides decrease both the extent of DNA bending and the transactivation of the TCRα enhancer by LEF-1, suggesting a contribution of protein-induced DNA bending to the function of TCRα enhancer. PMID:9371763

  20. The effects of self-mobilization techniques for the sciatic nerves on physical functions and health of low back pain patients with lower limb radiating pain

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ui-Cheol; Kim, Cheol-Yong; Park, Young-Han; Hwang-Bo, Gak; Nam, Chan-Woo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of self-mobilization techniques for the sciatic nerves on the quality of life in patients with chronic low back pain in the lower limbs accompanied by radiating pain. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were divided into two groups: a group receiving of lumbar segmental stabilization exercise training including sciatic nerve mobilization techniques, which included 8 males and 7 females, and a group receiving lumbar segmental stabilization exercise training, which included 8 males and 7 females. [Results] There were statistically significant differences in comparison of measurement results between the groups before and after the intervention. [Conclusion] Application of mobilization techniques for the sciatic nerves may promote healing of the soft tissues by stimulating the functions of the nervous system to improve nervous system adaptability and decrease sensitivity, helping to alleviate the symptoms. PMID:26957726

  1. Executive function is independently associated with performances of balance and mobility in community-dwelling older adults after mild stroke: implications for falls prevention

    PubMed Central

    Liu-Ambrose, Teresa; Pang, Marco; Eng, Janice J

    2015-01-01

    Background Stroke survivors have a high incidence of falls. Impaired executive-controlled processes are frequent in stroke survivors and are associated with falls in this population. Better understanding of the independent association between executive-controlled processes and physiological fall risk (i.e. performances of balance and mobility) could enhance future interventions that aim to prevent falls and to promote an independent lifestyle among stroke survivors. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of 63 adults who suffered a mild stroke >1 year prior to the study, aged > or =50 years. Results Cognitive flexibility was independently associated with performances of balance and mobility in community-dwelling older adults after mild stroke, after accounting for age, quadriceps strength of the paretic side and current physical activity level. Conclusions Clinicians may need to consider cognitive function when assessing and treating impaired balance and mobility in community-dwelling older adults after mild stroke. PMID:17143004

  2. New insights into trehalose metabolism by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: NTH2 encodes a functional cytosolic trehalase, and deletion of TPS1 reveals Ath1p-dependent trehalose mobilization.

    PubMed

    Jules, Matthieu; Beltran, Gemma; François, Jean; Parrou, Jean Luc

    2008-02-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the synthesis of endogenous trehalose is catalyzed by a trehalose synthase complex, TPS, and its hydrolysis relies on a cytosolic/neutral trehalase encoded by NTH1. In this work, we showed that NTH2, a paralog of NTH1, encodes a functional trehalase that is implicated in trehalose mobilization. Yeast is also endowed with an acid trehalase encoded by ATH1 and an H+/trehalose transporter encoded by AGT1, which can together sustain assimilation of exogenous trehalose. We showed that a tps1 mutant defective in the TPS catalytic subunit cultivated on trehalose, or on a dual source of carbon made of galactose and trehalose, accumulated high levels of intracellular trehalose by its Agt1p-mediated transport. The accumulated disaccharide was mobilized as soon as cells entered the stationary phase by a process requiring a coupling between its export and immediate extracellular hydrolysis by Ath1p. Compared to what is seen for classical growth conditions on glucose, this mobilization was rather unique, since it took place prior to that of glycogen, which was postponed until the late stationary phase. However, when the Ath1p-dependent mobilization of trehalose identified in this study was impaired, glycogen was mobilized earlier and faster, indicating a fine-tuning control in carbon storage management during periods of carbon and energy restriction.

  3. Decreased Immunoreactivities and Functions of the Chloride Transporters, KCC2 and NKCC1, in the Lateral Superior Olive Neurons of Circling Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Jonu; Maskey, Dhiraj; Park, Ki Sup; Kim, Myeung Ju

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We tested the possibility of differential expression and function of the potassium-chloride (KCC2) and sodium-potassium-2 chloride (NKCC1) co-transporters in the lateral superior olive (LSO) of heterozygous (+/cir) or homozygous (cir/cir) mice. Methods Mice pups aged from postnatal (P) day 9 to 16 were used. Tails from mice were cut for DNA typing. For Immunohistochemical analysis, rabbit polyclonal anti-KCC2 or rabbit polyclonal anti-NKCC1 was used and the density of immunolabelings was evaluated using the NIH image program. For functional analysis, whole cell voltage clamp technique was used in brain stem slices and the changes of reversal potentials were evaluated at various membrane potentials. Results Immunohistochemical analysis revealed both KCC2 and NKCC1 immunoreactivities were more prominent in heterozygous (+/cir) than homozygous (cir/cir) mice on P day 16. In P9-P12 heterozygous (+/cir) mice, the reversal potential (Egly) of glycine-induced currents was shifted to a more negative potential by 50 µM bumetanide, a known NKCC1 blocker, and the negatively shifted Egly was restored by additional application of 1 mM furosemide, a KCC2 blocker (-58.9±2.6 mV to -66.0±1.5 mV [bumetanide], -66.0±1.5 mV to -59.8±2.8 mV [furosemide+bumetanide], n=11). However, only bumetanide was weakly, but significantly effective (-60.1±2.9 mV to -62.7±2.6 mV [bumetanide], -62.7±2.6 mV to -62.1±2.5 mV [furosemide+bumetanide], n=7) in P9-P12 homozygous (cir/cir) mice. Conclusion The less prominent immunoreactivities and weak or absent responses to bumetanide or furosemide suggest impaired function or delayed development of both transporters in homozygous (cir/cir) mice. PMID:21461058

  4. Safety, Pharmacokinetic, and Functional Effects of the Nogo-A Monoclonal Antibody in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Randomized, First-In-Human Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Meininger, Vincent; Pradat, Pierre-François; Corse, Andrea; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Rix Brooks, Benjamin; Caress, James B.; Cudkowicz, Merit; Kolb, Stephen J.; Lange, Dale; Leigh, P. Nigel; Meyer, Thomas; Milleri, Stefano; Morrison, Karen E.; Orrell, Richard W.; Peters, Gary; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.; Shefner, Jeremy; Lavrov, Arseniy; Williams, Nicola; Overend, Phil; Price, Jeffrey; Bates, Stewart; Bullman, Jonathan; Krull, David; Berges, Alienor; Abila, Bams; Meno-Tetang, Guy; Wurthner, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The neurite outgrowth inhibitor, Nogo-A, has been shown to be overexpressed in skeletal muscle in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); it is both a potential biomarker and therapeutic target. We performed a double-blind, two-part, dose-escalation study, in subjects with ALS, assessing safety, pharmacokinetics (PK) and functional effects of ozanezumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against Nogo-A. In Part 1, 40 subjects were randomized (3∶1) to receive single dose intravenous ozanezumab (0.01, 0.1, 1, 5, or 15 mg/kg) or placebo. In Part 2, 36 subjects were randomized (3∶1) to receive two repeat doses of intravenous ozanezumab (0.5, 2.5, or 15 mg/kg) or placebo, approximately 4 weeks apart. The primary endpoints were safety and tolerability (adverse events [AEs], vital signs, electrocardiogram (ECG), and clinical laboratory tests). Secondary endpoints included PK, immunogenicity, functional endpoints (clinical and electrophysiological), and biomarker parameters. Overall, ozanezumab treatment (0.01–15 mg/kg) was well tolerated. The overall incidence of AEs in the repeat dose 2.5 mg/kg and 15 mg/kg ozanezumab groups was higher than in the repeat dose placebo group and repeat dose 0.5 mg/kg ozanezumab group. The majority were considered not related to study drug by the investigators. Six serious AEs were reported in three subjects receiving ozanezumab; none were considered related to study drug. No study drug-related patterns were identified for ECG, laboratory, or vital signs parameters. One subject (repeat dose 15 mg/kg ozanezumab) showed a weak, positive anti-ozanezumab-antibody result. PK results were generally consistent with monoclonal antibody treatments. No apparent treatment effects were observed for functional endpoints or muscle biomarkers. Immunohistochemical staining showed dose-dependent co-localization of ozanezumab with Nogo-A in skeletal muscle. In conclusion, single and repeat dose ozanezumab treatment was well tolerated and demonstrated co

  5. Mobile Launcher Moves for Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    In anticipation of launching NASA’s Space Launch System heavy-lift rocket later in this decade, engineers wanted to check the mobile launcher, or ML, to see how it would behave moving atop a craw...

  6. Creating Live Interactions to Mitigate Barriers (CLIMB): A Mobile Intervention to Improve Social Functioning in People With Chronic Psychotic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Schlosser, Danielle; Nahum, Mor

    2016-01-01

    Background Numerous psychosocial interventions for individuals with chronic psychotic disorders (CPD) have shown positive effects on social cognitive and functional outcome measures. However, access to and engagement with these interventions remains limited. This is partly because these interventions require specially trained therapists, are not available in all clinical settings, and have a high scheduling burden for participants, usually requiring a commitment of several weeks. Delivering interventions remotely via mobile devices may facilitate access, improve scheduling flexibility, and decrease participant burden, thus improving adherence to intervention requirements. To address these needs, we designed the Creating Live Interactions to Mitigate Barriers (CLIMB) digital intervention, which aims to enhance social functioning in people with CPD. CLIMB consists of two treatment components: a computerized social cognition training (SCT) program and optimized remote group therapy (ORGT). ORGT is an innovative treatment that combines remote group therapy with group texting (short message service, SMS). Objectives The objectives of this single-arm study were to investigate the feasibility of delivering 6 weeks of CLIMB to people with CPD and explore the initial effects on outcomes. Methods Participants were recruited, screened and enrolled via the Internet, and delivered assessments and interventions remotely using provided tablets (iPads). Participants were asked to complete 18 hours of SCT and to attend 6 remote group therapy sessions. To assess feasibility, adherence to study procedures, attrition rates, engagement metrics, and acceptability of the intervention were evaluated. Changes on measures of social cognition, quality of life, and symptoms were also explored. Results In total, 27 participants were enrolled over 12 months. Remote assessments were completed successfully on 96% (26/27) of the enrolled participants. Retention in the 6-week trial was 78% (21

  7. Lateral Elbow Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bhabra, Gev; Wang, Allan; Ebert, Jay R.; Edwards, Peter; Zheng, Monica; Zheng, Ming H.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral elbow tendinopathy, commonly known as tennis elbow, is a condition that can cause significant functional impairment in working-age patients. The term tendinopathy is used to describe chronic overuse tendon disorders encompassing a group of pathologies, a spectrum of disease. This review details the pathophysiology of tendinopathy and tendon healing as an introduction for a system grading the severity of tendinopathy, with each of the 4 grades displaying distinct histopathological features. Currently, there are a large number of nonoperative treatments available for lateral elbow tendinopathy, with little guidance as to when and how to use them. In fact, an appraisal of the clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses studying these treatment modalities reveals that no single treatment reliably achieves outstanding results. This may be due in part to the majority of clinical studies to date including all patients with chronic tendinopathy rather than attempting to categorize patients according to the severity of disease. We relate the pathophysiology of the different grades of tendinopathy to the basic science principles that underpin the mechanisms of action of the nonoperative treatments available to propose a treatment algorithm guiding the management of lateral elbow tendinopathy depending on severity. We believe that this system will be useful both in clinical practice and for the future investigation of the efficacy of treatments. PMID:27833925

  8. Hemispheric lateralization in reasoning.

    PubMed

    Turner, Benjamin O; Marinsek, Nicole; Ryhal, Emily; Miller, Michael B

    2015-11-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that reasoning in humans relies on a number of related processes whose neural loci are largely lateralized to one hemisphere or the other. A recent review of this evidence concluded that the patterns of lateralization observed are organized according to two complementary tendencies. The left hemisphere attempts to reduce uncertainty by drawing inferences or creating explanations, even at the cost of ignoring conflicting evidence or generating implausible explanations. Conversely, the right hemisphere aims to reduce conflict by rejecting or refining explanations that are no longer tenable in the face of new evidence. In healthy adults, the hemispheres work together to achieve a balance between certainty and consistency, and a wealth of neuropsychological research supports the notion that upsetting this balance results in various failures in reasoning, including delusions. However, support for this model from the neuroimaging literature is mixed. Here, we examine the evidence for this framework from multiple research domains, including an activation likelihood estimation analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of reasoning. Our results suggest a need to either revise this model as it applies to healthy adults or to develop better tools for assessing lateralization in these individuals.

  9. Functional interaction between the orexin-1 and CB1 receptors within the nucleus accumbens in the conditioned place preference induced by the lateral hypothalamus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fatahi, Zahra; Assar, Nasim; Mahmoudi, Dorna; Pahlevani, Pouyan; Moradi, Marzieh; Haghparast, Abbas

    2015-02-28

    Several studies have shown that chemical stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus (LH) by carbachol induces the conditioned place preference (CPP) in rats. LH is the main source of the orexinergic neurons and sends projections to some areas of the brain such as the nucleus accumbens (NAc). We tried to determine the role of intra-accumbal orexin-1 (OX1) receptors in development (acquisition) and expression of reward-related behaviors induced by LH stimulation and involvement of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in this area. Adult male Wistar rats were unilaterally implanted by two separate cannulae into the LH and NAc. The CPP paradigm was done; conditioning scores and locomotor activities were recorded. The results showed that intra-accumbal administration of SB334867 as a selective OX1 receptor antagonist (1, 3, 10 and 30nM/0.5μl DMSO) 5min before intra-LH carbachol (250nM/0.5μl saline) during 3-day conditioning phase, could dose-dependently inhibit the development of LH-induced CPP. In expression experiments, intra-NAc administration of SB334867 on the test day could decrease the expression of LH stimulation-induced CPP. Furthermore, concurrent intra-accumbal administration of effective/ineffective doses of SB334867 and AM251 (45 and 15μM) as a CB1 receptor antagonist, before carbachol during the conditioning phase, could attenuate the development of LH stimulation-induced CPP. It seems that the orexinergic projection from the LH to the NAc is involved in the LH stimulation-induced CPP and OX1 receptor in the NAc has a substantial role in this phenomenon. Our findings also suggest the existence a functional interaction between OX1 and CB1 receptors within the NAc in place preference.

  10. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-related VAPB P56S mutation differentially affects the function and survival of corticospinal and spinal motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Aliaga, Leonardo; Lai, Chen; Yu, Jia; Chub, Nikolai; Shim, Hoon; Sun, Lixin; Xie, Chengsong; Yang, Wan-Jou; Lin, Xian; O'Donovan, Michael J; Cai, Huaibin

    2013-11-01

    The substitution of Proline with Serine at residue 56 (P56S) of vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein B (VAPB) has been linked to an atypical autosomal dominant form of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 8 (ALS8). To investigate the pathogenic mechanism of P56S VAPB in ALS, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice that heterologously express human wild-type (WT) and P56S VAPB under the control of a pan-neuronal promoter Thy1.2. While WT VAPB Tg mice did not exhibit any overt motor behavioral phenotypes, P56S VAPB Tg mice developed progressive hyperactivities and other motor abnormalities. VAPB protein was accumulated as large punctate in the soma and proximal dendrites of both corticospinal motor neurons (CSMNs) and spinal motor neurons (SMNs) in P56S VAPB Tg mice. Concomitantly, a significant increase of endoplasmic reticulum stress and unfolded protein response and the resulting up-regulation of pro-apoptotic factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein expression were observed in the CSMNs and SMNs of P56S VAPB Tg mice. However, only a progressive loss of CSMNs but not SMNs was found in P56S VAPB Tg mice. In SMNs, P56S VAPB promoted a rather selective translocation of VAPB protein onto the postsynaptic site of C-boutons that altered the morphology of C-boutons and impaired the spontaneous rhythmic discharges of SMNs. Therefore, these findings provide new pathophysiological mechanisms of P56S VAPB that differentially affect the function and survival of CSMNs and SMNs in ALS8.

  11. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-related VAPB P56S mutation differentially affects the function and survival of corticospinal and spinal motor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Aliaga, Leonardo; Lai, Chen; Yu, Jia; Chub, Nikolai; Shim, Hoon; Sun, Lixin; Xie, Chengsong; Yang, Wan-Jou; Lin, Xian; O'Donovan, Michael J.; Cai, Huaibin

    2013-01-01

    The substitution of Proline with Serine at residue 56 (P56S) of vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein B (VAPB) has been linked to an atypical autosomal dominant form of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 8 (ALS8). To investigate the pathogenic mechanism of P56S VAPB in ALS, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice that heterologously express human wild-type (WT) and P56S VAPB under the control of a pan-neuronal promoter Thy1.2. While WT VAPB Tg mice did not exhibit any overt motor behavioral phenotypes, P56S VAPB Tg mice developed progressive hyperactivities and other motor abnormalities. VAPB protein was accumulated as large punctate in the soma and proximal dendrites of both corticospinal motor neurons (CSMNs) and spinal motor neurons (SMNs) in P56S VAPB Tg mice. Concomitantly, a significant increase of endoplasmic reticulum stress and unfolded protein response and the resulting up-regulation of pro-apoptotic factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein expression were observed in the CSMNs and SMNs of P56S VAPB Tg mice. However, only a progressive loss of CSMNs but not SMNs was found in P56S VAPB Tg mice. In SMNs, P56S VAPB promoted a rather selective translocation of VAPB protein onto the postsynaptic site of C-boutons that altered the morphology of C-boutons and impaired the spontaneous rhythmic discharges of SMNs. Therefore, these findings provide new pathophysiological mechanisms of P56S VAPB that differentially affect the function and survival of CSMNs and SMNs in ALS8. PMID:23771029

  12. NMDA currents modulate the synaptic input-output functions of neurons in the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus in Mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Porres, Christian P; Meyer, Elisabeth M M; Grothe, Benedikt; Felmy, Felix

    2011-03-23

    Neurons in the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (DNLL) receive excitatory and inhibitory inputs from the superior olivary complex (SOC) and convey GABAergic inhibition to the contralateral DNLL and the inferior colliculi. Unlike the fast glycinergic inhibition in the SOC, this GABAergic inhibition outlasts auditory stimulation by tens of milliseconds. Two mechanisms have been postulated to explain this persistent inhibition. One, an "integration-based" mechanism, suggests that postsynaptic excitatory integration in DNLL neurons generates prolonged activity, and the other favors the synaptic time course of the DNLL output itself. The feasibility of the integration-based mechanism was tested in vitro in DNLL neurons of Mongolian gerbils by quantifying the cellular excitability and synaptic input-output functions (IO-Fs). All neurons were sustained firing and generated a near monotonic IO-F on current injections. From synaptic stimulations, we estimate that activation of approximately five fibers, each on average liberating ∼18 vesicles, is sufficient to trigger a single postsynaptic action potential. A strong single pulse of afferent fiber stimulation triggered multiple postsynaptic action potentials. The steepness of the synaptic IO-F was dependent on the synaptic NMDA component. The synaptic NMDA receptor current defines the slope of the synaptic IO-F by enhancing the temporal and spatial EPSP summation. Blocking this NMDA-dependent amplification during postsynaptic integration of train stimulations resulted into a ∼20% reduction of the decay time course of the GABAergic inhibition. Thus, our data show that the NMDA-dependent amplification of the postsynaptic activity contributes to the GABAergic persistent inhibition generated by DNLL neurons.

  13. Application of positive airway pressure in restoring pulmonary function and thoracic mobility in the postoperative period of bariatric surgery: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Brigatto, Patrícia; Carbinatto, Jéssica C.; Costa, Carolina M.; Montebelo, Maria I. L.; Rasera-Júnior, Irineu; Pazzianotto-Forti, Eli M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether the application of bilevel positive airway pressure in the postoperative period of bariatric surgery might be more effective in restoring lung volume and capacity and thoracic mobility than the separate application of expiratory and inspiratory positive pressure. Method: Sixty morbidly obese adult subjects who were hospitalized for bariatric surgery and met the predefined inclusion criteria were evaluated. The pulmonary function and thoracic mobility were preoperatively assessed by spirometry and cirtometry and reevaluated on the 1st postoperative day. After preoperative evaluation, the subjects were randomized and allocated into groups: EPAP Group (n=20), IPPB Group (n=20) and BIPAP Group (n=20), then received the corresponding intervention: positive expiratory pressure (EPAP), inspiratory positive pressure breathing (IPPB) or bilevel inspiratory positive airway pressure (BIPAP), in 6 sets of 15 breaths or 30 minutes twice a day in the immediate postoperative period and on the 1st postoperative day, in addition to conventional physical therapy. Results: There was a significant postoperative reduction in spirometric variables (p<0.05), regardless of the technique used, with no significant difference among the techniques (p>0.05). Thoracic mobility was preserved only in group BIPAP (p>0.05), but no significant difference was found in the comparison among groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: The application of positive pressure does not seem to be effective in restoring lung function after bariatric surgery, but the use of bilevel positive pressure can preserve thoracic mobility, although this technique was not superior to the other techniques. PMID:25590448

  14. Lehr's fields of campaniform sensilla in beetles (Coleoptera): functional morphology. III. Modification of elytral mobility or shape in flying beetles.

    PubMed

    Frantsevich, Leonid; Gorb, Stanislav; Radchenko, Vladimir; Gladun, Dmytro

    2015-03-01

    Some flying beetles have peculiar functional properties of their elytra, if compared with the vast majority of beetles. A "typical" beetle covers its pterothorax and the abdomen from above with closed elytra and links closed elytra together along the sutural edges. In the open state during flight, the sutural edges diverge much more than by 90°. Several beetles of unrelated taxa spread wings through lateral incisions on the elytra and turn the elytron during opening about 10-12° (Cetoniini, Scarabaeus, Gymnopleurus) or elevate their elytra without partition (Sisyphus, Tragocerus). The number of campaniform sensilla in their elytral sensory field is diminished in comparison with beetles of closely related taxa lacking that incision. Elytra are very short in rove beetles and in long-horn beetles Necydalini. The abundance of sensilla in brachyelytrous long-horn beetles Necydalini does not decrease in comparison with macroelytrous Cerambycinae. Strong reduction of the sensory field was found in brachyelytrous Staphylinidae. Lastly, there are beetles lacking the linkage of the elytra down the sutural edge (stenoelytry). Effects of stenoelytry were also not uniform: Oedemera and flying Meloidae have the normal amount of sensilla with respect to their body size, whereas the sensory field in the stenoelytrous Eulosia bombyliformis is 5-6 times less than in chafers of the same size but with normally linking broad elytra.

  15. Mechatronic demonstrator for testing sensors to be used in mobile robotics functioning on the inverted pendulum concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandru, L.; Dolga, V.; Moldovan, C.; Savu, D.

    2016-08-01

    As the educational system is evolving, there are a lot of Mechatronic demonstrators used in schools and universities to demonstrate some technical, theoretical principle and analyzing new concept to apply this studied information, build practical hardware parts. The idea of using mobile robots for different applications is very common today. For choosing the best hardware and software configuration for the mobile robot it is necessary to make a documented analysis of the environment in which the mobile robot will perform. In our demonstrator we want to collect information from an optical sensor what can be used to maintain stability in a mobile robot equilibrium reading the reflected light from a surface. After hardware build we make a particularity study to see how optical sensors response in different ambient light and surface. To show some reference point we are collecting data from gyroscopic, accelerometer or rotation sensors.

  16. The Sociability of Mobile TV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerts, David

    Both mobile phones and television are known for the social practices they enable. Television has been a social medium since its introduction in households all over the world. Although its main aim is entertaining and informing its viewers, people often watch television together with close relatives or good friends, talk about what is going on while watching television or even structure their social activities around a television show (e.g., eating dinner while watching the news) (Lull 1980). But television programs are also part of social interactions away from the television set, when discussing favorite television programs around the water cooler at work, or recommending shows to watch to good friends. The main function of mobile phones on the other hand has always been social from the start: communicating with other people, when and wherever you want, first using voice communication and later also with text messages and video communication. So what happens when these two social media are combined? It is clear that mobile TV cannot be successful without taking social practices when watching TV on a mobile device into account. Although one approach could be to let the users appropriate the device in their social environment, as happened with text messaging, the risk that it does not match their current practices is too big. A better approach is to design mobile TV applications that take direct advantage of the social aspects of each medium, which means adding interactive features that will enable and support social interaction between users on different levels. In order to get an idea of the possibilities, it is interesting to look at recent research in the closely related domain of interactive television.

  17. Mobile Learning Using Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicente, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The participation in mobile learning programs is conditioned by having/using mobile communication technology. Those who do not have or use such technology cannot participate in mobile learning programs. This study evaluates who are the most likely participants of mobile learning programs by examining the demographic profile and mobile phone usage…

  18. The Arabidopsis LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES-domain gene ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2 functions in the repression of KNOX gene expression and in adaxial-abaxial patterning.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wan-ching; Shuai, Bin; Springer, Patricia S

    2003-10-01

    The normal development of lateral organs of the shoot requires the simultaneous repression of meristem-specific genes and the activation of organ-specific genes. ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2 (AS2) is required for the development of normal leaf shape and for the repression of KNOX genes in the leaf. AS2 is a member of the recently identified, plant-specific LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES (LOB)-domain gene family. Expression of AS2 at high levels resulted in repression of the KNOX homeobox genes BREVIPEDICELLUS, KNAT2, and KNAT6 but not of the related SHOOT MERISTEMLESS gene. Overexpression of AS2 also led to a perturbation of normal adaxial-abaxial asymmetry in lateral organs, resulting in the replacement of abaxial cell types with adaxial cell types. These results indicate that AS2 is sufficient to induce adaxial cell fate and repress KNOX gene expression.

  19. Developmental Responses of the Lateral Hypothalamus to Leptin in Neonatal Rats, and its Implications for the Development of Functional Connections with the Ventral Tegmental Area.

    PubMed

    Gjerde, E; Long, H; Richard, D; Walker, C-D

    2016-03-01

    Food intake is regulated by a close communication between the hypothalamus and the mesocorticolimbic pathways, which are still developing during the perinatal period in the rat, and are known targets for peripheral metabolic hormones such as leptin. A key region for this communication is the lateral hypothalamus (LH), although the onset of leptin responsiveness in the LH is unknown. We examined the activation of cellular signalling molecules in identified LH neurones on postnatal day (PND)10 and 16 and determined whether leptin directly targets orexin A (ORX-A) or neurotensin (NT) LH neurones through the detection of leptin receptors (ObRb) mRNA on these neurones. Next, using retrograde labelling in PND6 pups, we tested whether phenotypically identified neurones of the LH that respond to leptin project to ventral tegmental area (VTA) neurones. Leptin significantly induced phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK)1/2 and phosphorylated signal transducer activator of transcription (pSTAT)3 in the LH on PND16, whereas, on PND10, modest pERK1/2- and sparse pSTAT3-positive cells were identified. On PND16, most pERK1/2-activated neurones contain ORX-A and leptin-induced pSTAT3 was observed in other unidentified neurones. Afferents to the VTA were observed on PND6, including a large input from the LH, which contained both ORX-A-positive and non-ORX-A neurones, with some of these ORX-A neurones being activated by leptin treatment. Leptin receptor (ObRb) mRNA in the LH did not colocalise with ORX-A neurones on PND10, and only a few NT-positive neurones displayed ObRb mRNA expression. Thus, functional responsiveness to leptin in LH neurones is only partially achieved prior to the onset of independent feeding on PND16, and ORX-A neurones are indirectly activated by leptin. The presence of anatomical connections between the LH and the VTA in the first week of life, prior to the development of leptin responsiveness in both structures, suggests that tissue

  20. Lateral diffusion of membrane proteins: consequences of hydrophobic mismatch and lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Ramadurai, Sivaramakrishnan; Duurkens, Ria; Krasnikov, Victor V; Poolman, Bert

    2010-09-08

    Biological membranes are composed of a large number lipid species differing in hydrophobic length, degree of saturation, and charge and size of the headgroup. We now present data on the effect of hydrocarbon chain length of the lipids and headgroup composition on the lateral mobility of the proteins in model membranes. The trimeric glutamate transporter (GltT) and the monomeric lactose transporter (LacY) were reconstituted in giant unilamellar vesicles composed of unsaturated phosphocholine lipids of varying acyl chain length (14-22 carbon atoms) and various ratios of DOPE/DOPG/DOPC lipids. The lateral mobility of the proteins and of a fluorescent lipid analog was determined as a function of the hydrophobic thickness of the bilayer (h) and lipid composition, using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The diffusion coefficient of LacY decreased with increasing thickness of the bilayer, in accordance with the continuum hydrodynamic model of Saffman-Delbrück. For GltT, the mobility had its maximum at diC18:1 PC, which is close to the hydrophobic thickness of the bilayer in vivo. The lateral mobility decreased linearly with the concentration of DOPE but was not affected by the fraction of anionic lipids from DOPG. The addition of DOPG and DOPE did not affect the activity of GltT. We conclude that the hydrophobic thickness of the bilayer is a major determinant of molecule diffusion in membranes, but protein-specific properties may lead to deviations from the Saffman-Delbrück model.

  1. To What Extent Do Joint Attention, Imitation, and Object Play Behaviors in Infancy Predict Later Communication and Intellectual Functioning in ASD?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, Kenneth K.; Watson, Linda R.; Baranek, Grace T.; Poe, Michele D.

    2012-01-01

    The extent to which early social communication behaviors predict later communication and intellectual outcomes was investigated via retrospective video analysis. Joint attention, imitation, and complex object play behaviors were coded from edited home videos featuring scenes of 29 children with ASD at 9-12 and/or 15-18 months. A quantitative…

  2. Functional characterization of Tn4401, a Tn3-based transposon involved in blaKPC gene mobilization.

    PubMed

    Cuzon, Gaelle; Naas, Thierry; Nordmann, Patrice

    2011-11-01

    The carbapenemase gene bla(KPC), which is rapidly spreading worldwide, is located on a Tn3-based transposon, Tn4401. In a transposition-conjugation assay, Tn4401 was able to mobilize bla(KPC-2) gene at a frequency of 4.4 × 10(-6)/recipient cell. A 5-bp target site duplication was evidenced upon each insertion without target site specificity. This study demonstrated that Tn4401 is an active transposon capable of mobilizing bla(KPC) genes at high frequency.

  3. [Lateral retinacular release].

    PubMed

    Verdonk, P; Bonte, F; Verdonk, R

    2008-09-01

    This overview of numerous studies discusses, based on short-term and long-term results, which diagnoses are indications for lateral retinacular release. No significant differences in outcome between arthroscopic and open lateral release could be documented. Isolated lateral release offers a good success rate for treating a stable patella with excessive lateral pressure. In patellar instability, the results are less favorable in long-term follow-up evaluation. Hyperlaxity with hypermobility of the patella is an absolute contraindication. Lateral release provides only temporary benefit for patellofemoral osteoarthritis. Proximal and/or distal realignment of the extensor mechanism gives better results than isolated lateral release.

  4. Analysis of carbon functional groups in mobile humic acid and recalcitrant calcium humate extracted from eight US soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solid state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a common tool to study the structure of soil humic fractions; however, knowledge regarding carbon structural relationships in humic fractions is limited. In this study, mobile humic acid (MHA) and recalcitrant calcium humate (CaHA) fr...

  5. Academic Performance of High School Students as a Function of Mental Capacity, Cognitive Style, Mobility-Fixity Dimension, and Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niaz, Mansoor; De Nunez, Grecia Saud; De Pineda, Isangela Ruiz

    2000-01-01

    Students at a Venezuela high school were tested to determine creativity, cognitive variables, and academic performance. Multiple regression analyses showed that the mobility-fixity dimension was the most consistent predictor of academic performance with creativity scores also explaining variance between subject areas. Results suggest the…

  6. Effects of Functional Limb Overloading on Symmetrical Weight Bearing, Walking Speed, Perceived Mobility, and Community Participation among Patients with Chronic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Alabdulwahab, Sami S; Ahmad, Fuzail; Singh, Harpreet

    2015-01-01

    Background. Stroke is a leading cause for long-term disability that often compromises the sensorimotor and gait function accompanied by spasticity. Gait abnormalities persist through the chronic stages of the condition and only a small percentage of these persons are able to walk functionally in the community. Material and Method. Patients with chronic stroke were recruited from outpatient rehabilitation unit at Department of Neurology & Neurosurgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, having a history of first stroke at least six months before recruitment, with unilateral motor deficits affecting gait. The patients were randomly assigned to either the functional limb overloading (FLO) or Limb Overloading Resistance Training (LORT) group and provided four weeks of training. Result. We found that there was an improvement in gait performance, weight bearing on affected limb, and perceived mobility and community participation. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that has evaluated the effects of functional limb overloading training on symmetric weight bearing, walking ability, and perceived mobility and participation in chronic hemiplegic population. The study demonstrated a beneficial effect of training on all the outcomes, suggesting that the functional limb overloading training can be a useful tool in the management of gait problems in chronic stroke patients.

  7. Effects of Functional Limb Overloading on Symmetrical Weight Bearing, Walking Speed, Perceived Mobility, and Community Participation among Patients with Chronic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Alabdulwahab, Sami S.; Ahmad, Fuzail; Singh, Harpreet

    2015-01-01

    Background. Stroke is a leading cause for long-term disability that often compromises the sensorimotor and gait function accompanied by spasticity. Gait abnormalities persist through the chronic stages of the condition and only a small percentage of these persons are able to walk functionally in the community. Material and Method. Patients with chronic stroke were recruited from outpatient rehabilitation unit at Department of Neurology & Neurosurgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, having a history of first stroke at least six months before recruitment, with unilateral motor deficits affecting gait. The patients were randomly assigned to either the functional limb overloading (FLO) or Limb Overloading Resistance Training (LORT) group and provided four weeks of training. Result. We found that there was an improvement in gait performance, weight bearing on affected limb, and perceived mobility and community participation. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that has evaluated the effects of functional limb overloading training on symmetric weight bearing, walking ability, and perceived mobility and participation in chronic hemiplegic population. The study demonstrated a beneficial effect of training on all the outcomes, suggesting that the functional limb overloading training can be a useful tool in the management of gait problems in chronic stroke patients. PMID:26600952

  8. A Mobile App to Stabilize Daily Functional Activity of Breast Cancer Patients in Collaboration With the Physician: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Egbring, Marco; Far, Elmira; Roos, Malgorzata; Dietrich, Michael; Brauchbar, Mathis; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A

    2016-01-01

    Background The well-being of breast cancer patients and reporting of adverse events require close monitoring. Mobile apps allow continuous recording of disease- and medication-related symptoms in patients undergoing chemotherapy. Objective The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a mobile app on patient-reported daily functional activity in a supervised and unsupervised setting. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled study of 139 breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Patient status was self-measured using Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group scoring and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Participants were randomly assigned to a control group, an unsupervised group that used a mobile app to record data, or a supervised group that used the app and reviewed data with a physician. Primary outcome variables were change in daily functional activity and symptoms over three outpatient visits. Results Functional activity scores declined in all groups from the first to second visit. However, from the second to third visit, only the supervised group improved, whereas the others continued to decline. Overall, the supervised group showed no significant difference from the first (median 90.85, IQR 30.67) to third visit (median 84.76, IQR 18.29, P=.72). Both app-using groups reported more distinct adverse events in the app than in the questionnaire (supervised: n=1033 vs n=656; unsupervised: n=852 vs n=823), although the unsupervised group reported more symptoms overall (n=4808) in the app than the supervised group (n=4463). Conclusions The mobile app was associated with stabilized daily functional activity when used under collaborative review. App-using participants could more frequently report adverse events, and those under supervision made fewer and more precise entries than unsupervised participants. Our findings suggest that patient well-being and awareness of chemotherapy adverse effects can be improved by using a mobile app in

  9. [Mobile ISCR elements: structure, functions, and role in the emergence, increasing and spreading of blocks of bacterial genes of multiple antibiotic resistance].

    PubMed

    Il'ina, T S

    2012-01-01

    The recently discovered method of horizontal distribution of bacterial genes with atypical ISCR sequences is reviewed using an example of drug resistance genes. The adjacent DNA segment mobilization is provided by the transposition of such elements, including rolling circle replication, formation of autonomous nonreplicable circular structures, and homological recombination. The gene distribution capacity with the ISCR elements is more significant than the capacity of transposons and integrons, thereby providing formation of groups of mobile genes, including antibiotic-resistance genes of pathogenic bacteria. The structure and functions of the ISCR elements were discussed together with their similarity and dissimilarity with the group of IS91-similar elements and their role in the emergence of blocks of bacterial genes encoding of multiple antibiotic resistance and their contribution to evolution of bacterial and plasmid genes.

  10. Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis)

    MedlinePlus

    .org Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis) Page ( 1 ) Tennis elbow, or lateral epicondyliti s, is a painful condition of the elbow caused by overuse. Not surprisingly, playing tennis or other racquet sports can cause ...

  11. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (a-my-o-TROE-fik LAT-ur-ul skluh-ROE-sis), or ALS, is a progressive nervous system (neurological) disease that ...

  12. Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (efMRI) of depth-by-disparity perception: additional evidence for right-hemispheric lateralization.

    PubMed

    Baecke, Sebastian; Lützkendorf, Ralf; Tempelmann, Claus; Müller, Charles; Adolf, Daniela; Scholz, Michael; Bernarding, Johannes

    2009-07-01

    In natural environments depth-related information has to be extracted very fast from binocular disparity even if cues are presented shortly. However, few studies used efMRI to study depth perception. We therefore analyzed extension and localization of activation evoked by depth-by-disparity stimuli that were displayed for 1 s. As some clinical as well as neuroimaging studies had found a right-hemispheric lateralization of depth perception the sample size was increased to 26 subjects to gain higher statistical significance. All individuals reported a stable depth perception. In the random effects analysis the maximum activation of the disparity versus no disparity condition was highly significant and located in the extra-striate cortex, presumably in V3A (P < 0.05, family wise error). The activation was more pronounced in the right hemisphere. However, in the single-subject analysis depth-related right-hemispheric lateralization was observed only in 65% of the subjects. Lateralization of depth-by-disparity may therefore be obscured in smaller groups.

  13. Effects of two different mobilization techniques on pain, range of motion and functional disability in patients with adhesive capsulitis: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Surabhi; Raza, Shahid; Moiz, Jamal Ali; Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad H.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to compare the effects of two different mobilization techniques in the management of patients with adhesive capsulitis. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty non-diabetic men and women with adhesive capsulitis were randomly allocated to the reverse distraction group (n=15) or Kaltenborn group (n=15). The reverse distraction technique and Kaltenborn’s caudal and posterior glides (grades III and IV) were applied 10–15 times along with conventional physical therapy for 18 treatment sessions in 6 weeks. Pain was measured with a visual analog scale, abduction and external rotation range of motion with goniometry, hand behind back reach with inch tape, and functional disability with the Flexilevel scale of shoulder function before and after the treatment. [Results] Although all the variables improved significantly in both groups after 18 intervention sessions, reverse distraction was significantly better than Kaltenborn’s caudal and posterior glides in decreasing pain and improving abduction range of motion and functional scores. [Conclusion] This study supports the clinical use of reverse distraction as an alternative to conventional mobilization techniques to decrease pain and improve range of motion and functional scores in patients with adhesive capsulitis. PMID:28174448

  14. Analysis of Handoff Mechanisms in Mobile IP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraj, Maria Nadine Simonel; Issac, Biju; Haldar, Manas Kumar

    2011-06-01

    One of the most important challenges in mobile Internet Protocol (IP) is to provide service for a mobile node to maintain its connectivity to network when it moves from one domain to another. IP is responsible for routing packets across network. The first major version of IP is the Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4). It is one of the dominant protocols relevant to wireless network. Later a newer version of IP called the IPv6 was proposed. Mobile IPv6 is mainly introduced for the purpose of mobility. Mobility management enables network to locate roaming nodes in order to deliver packets and maintain connections with them when moving into new domains. Handoff occurs when a mobile node moves from one network to another. It is a key factor of mobility because a mobile node can trigger several handoffs during a session. This paper briefly explains on mobile IP and its handoff issues, along with the drawbacks of mobile IP.

  15. Imaging lesions of the lateral hip.

    PubMed

    Pan, Judong; Bredella, Miriam A

    2013-07-01

    The lateral aspect of the hip is composed of a complex array of osseous and soft tissue structures. Both common and uncommon clinical entities are encountered in the lateral hip. This article briefly introduces fundamental imaging anatomy and the functional roles of different osseous and soft tissue structures in the lateral aspect of the hip, followed by a discussion of relevant imaging findings of lateral hip pathology. Greater trochanteric pain syndrome is frequently encountered in patients with lateral hip pain and encompasses a spectrum of soft tissue abnormalities including trochanteric and subgluteal bursitis, and tendinopathy or tears of the gluteal tendons. In addition, different types of injuries to the gluteal myotendinous unit and injuries to the indirect head of the rectus femoris, proximal iliotibial band, and the lateral joint capsular ligaments can present with lateral hip pain. Some of the less common soft tissue abnormalities of the lateral hip include Morel-Lavallée lesion and meralgia paresthetica.

  16. Lateral flow strip assay

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Robin R; Benett, William J; Coleman, Matthew A; Pearson, Francesca S; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L

    2011-03-08

    A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

  17. Structure and function of airway surface layer of the human lungs & mobility of probe particles in complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Liheng

    Numerous infectious particles such as bacteria and pathogens are deposited on the airway surface of the human lungs during our daily breathing. To avoid infection the lung has evolved to develop a smart and powerful defense system called mucociliary clearance. The airway surface layer is a critical component of this mucus clearance system, which consists of two parts: (1) a mucus layer, that traps inhaled particles and transports them out of the lung by cilia-generated flow; and (2) a periciliary layer, that provides a favorable environment for ciliary beating and cell surface lubrication. For 75 years, it has been dogma that a single gel-like mucus layer, which is composed of secreted mucin glycoproteins, is transported over a "watery" periciliary layer. This one-gel model, however, does not explain fundamental features of the normal system, e.g. formation of a distinct mucus layer, nor accurately predict how the mucus clearance system fails in disease. In the first part of this thesis we propose a novel "Gel-on-Brush" model with a mucus layer (the "gel") and a "brush-like" periciliary layer, composed of mucins tethered to the luminal of airway surface, and supporting data accurately describes both the biophysical and cell biological bases for normal mucus clearance and its failure in disease. Our "Gel-on-Brush" model describes for the first time how and why mucus is efficiently cleared in health and unifies the pathogenesis of major human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It is expected that this "Gel-on-Brush" model of airway surface layer opens new directions for treatments of airway diseases. A dilemma regarding the function of mucus is that, although mucus traps any inhaled harmful particulates, it also poses a long-time problem for drug delivery: mobility of cargos carrying pharmaceutical agents is slowed down in mucus. The second part of this thesis aims to answer the question: can we theoretically understand the

  18. Function of Jam-B/Jam-C interaction in homing and mobilization of human and mouse hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Arcangeli, Marie-Laure; Bardin, Florence; Frontera, Vincent; Bidaut, Ghislain; Obrados, Elodie; Adams, Ralf H; Chabannon, Christian; Aurrand-Lions, Michel

    2014-04-01

    The junctional adhesion molecules Jam-b and Jam-c interact together at interendothelial junctions and have been involved in the regulation of immune response, inflammation, and leukocyte migration. More recently, Jam-c has been found to be expressed by hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) in mouse. Conversely, we have reported that Jam-b is present on bone marrow stromal cells and that Jam-b-deficient mice have defects in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cell pool. In this study, we have addressed whether interaction between Jam-b and Jam-c participates to HSPC mobilization or hematopoietic reconstitution after irradiation. We show that a blocking monoclonal antibody directed against Jam-c inhibits hematopoietic reconstitution, progenitor homing to the bone marrow, and induces HSPC mobilization in a Jam-b dependent manner. In the latter setting, antibody treatment over a period of 3 days does not alter hematopoietic differentiation nor induce leukocytosis. Results are translated to human hematopoietic system in which a functional adhesive interaction between JAM-B and JAM-C is found between human HSPC and mesenchymal stem cells. Such an interaction does not occur between HSPC and human endothelial cells or osteoblasts. It is further shown that anti-JAM-C blocking antibody interferes with CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor homing in mouse bone marrow suggesting that monoclonal antibodies inhibiting JAM-B/JAM-C interaction may represent valuable therapeutic tools to improve stem cell mobilization protocols.

  19. First-principles hybrid functional study of the electronic structure and charge carrier mobility in perovskite CH3NH3SnI3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Li-Juan; Zhao, Yu-Qing; Chen, Chang-Wen; Wang, Lin-Zhi; Liu, Biao; Cai, Meng-Qiu

    2016-10-01

    We calculate the electronic properties and carrier mobility of perovskite CH3NH3SnI3 as a solar cell absorber by using the hybrid functional method. The calculated result shows that the electron and hole mobilities have anisotropies with a large magnitude of 1.4 × 104 cm2·V-1·s-1 along the y direction. In view of the huge difference between hole and electron mobilities, the perovskite CH3NH3SnI3 can be considered as a p-type semiconductor. We also discover a relationship between the effective mass anisotropy and electronic occupation anisotropy. The above results can provide reliable guidance for its experimental applications in electronics and optoelectronics. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51172067), the Hunan Provincial Natural Science Fund for Distinguished Young Scholars, China (Grant No. 13JJ1013), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education, China (Grant No. 20130161110036), and the New Century Excellent Talents in University, China (Grant No. NCET-12-0171.D).

  20. Lateral Diffusion in an Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Saxton, Michael J.

    1982-01-01

    Lateral diffusion of molecules in lipid bilayer membranes can be hindered by the presence of impermeable domains of gel-phase lipid or of proteins. Effective-medium theory and percolation theory are used to evaluate the effective lateral diffusion constant as a function of the area fraction of fluid-phase lipid and the permeability of the obstructions to the diffusing species. Applications include the estimation of the minimum fraction of fluid lipid needed for bacterial growth, and the enhancement of diffusion-controlled reactions by the channeling effect of solid patches of lipid. PMID:7052153

  1. Charge carrier mobility and concentration as a function of composition in AgPO3-AgI glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Ana Candida Martins; Nascimento, Marcio Luis Ferreira; Bragatto, Caio Barca; Souquet, Jean-Louis

    2011-12-01

    Conductivity data of the xAgI(1 - x)AgPO3 system (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.5) were collected in the liquid and glassy states. The difference in the dependence of ionic conductivity on temperature below and above their glass transition temperatures (Tg) is interpreted by a discontinuity in the charge carrier's mobility mechanisms. Charge carrier displacement occurs through an activated mechanism below Tg and through a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-Hesse mechanism above this temperature. Fitting conductivity data with the proposed model allows one to determine separately the enthalpies of charge carrier formation and migration. For the five investigated compositions, the enthalpy of charge carrier formation is found to decrease, with x, from 0.86 to 0.2 eV, while the migration enthalpy remains constant at ≈0.14 eV. Based on these values, the charge carrier mobility and concentration in the glassy state can then be calculated. Mobility values at room temperature (≈10-4 cm2 V-1 s-1) do not vary significantly with the AgI content and are in good agreement with those previously measured by the Hall-effect technique. The observed increase in ionic conductivity with x would thus only be due to an increase in the effective charge carrier concentration. Considering AgI as a weak electrolyte, the change in the effective charge carrier concentration is justified and is correlated to the partial free energy of silver iodide forming a regular solution with AgPO3.

  2. The lateral reticular nucleus: a precerebellar centre providing the cerebellum with overview and integration of motor functions at systems level. A new hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Alstermark, Bror; Ekerot, Carl-Fredrik

    2013-11-15

    The lateral reticular nucleus (LRN) is a major precerebellar centre of mossy fibre information to the cerebellum from the spinal cord that is distinct from the direct spinocerebellar paths. The LRN has traditionally been considered to provide the cerebellum with segregated information from several spinal systems controlling posture, reaching, grasping, locomotion, scratching and respiration. However, results are presented that show extensive convergence on a majority of LRN neurons from spinal systems. We propose a new hypothesis suggesting that the LRN may use extensive convergence from the different input systems to provide overview and integration of linked motor components to the cerebellum. This integrated information is sent in parallel with the segregated information from the individual systems to the cerebellum that finally may compare the activity and make necessary adjustments of various motor behaviours.

  3. Corps Mobilization Posture.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    lation. The " one - stop " service concept is fundamental among these elements. Despite what the Corps’ internal structure may be, external customers (e.g...34 one - stop " service dictates that there be a total vertical and lateral communi- cations network between the lead district and all elements that must...should approve the " one - stop " service concept for application to advance mobilization planning and execution. b. COE should approve the concept of MC

  4. Optineurin and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Hirofumi; Kawakami, Hideshi

    2013-07-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a devastating disease, and thus it is important to identify the causative gene and resolve the mechanism of the disease. We identified optineurin as a causative gene for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We found three types of mutations: a homozygous deletion of exon 5, a homozygous Q398X nonsense mutation and a heterozygous E478G missense mutation within its ubiquitin-binding domain. Optineurin negatively regulates the tumor necrosis factor-α-induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B. Nonsense and missense mutations abolished this function. Mutations related to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis also negated the inhibition of interferon regulatory factor-3. The missense mutation showed a cyotoplasmic distribution different from that of the wild type. There are no specific clinical symptoms related to optineurin. However, severe brain atrophy was detected in patients with homozygous deletion. Neuropathologically, an E478G patient showed transactive response DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa-positive neuronal intracytoplasmic inclusions in the spinal and medullary motor neurons. Furthermore, Golgi fragmentation was identified in 73% of this patient's anterior horn cells. In addition, optineurin is colocalized with fused in sarcoma in the basophilic inclusions of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with fused in sarcoma mutations, and in basophilic inclusion body disease. These findings strongly suggest that optineurin is involved in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  5. A comparative study on the influence of different organic amendments on trace element mobility and microbial functionality of a polluted mine soil.

    PubMed

    Abad-Valle, P; Iglesias-Jiménez, E; Álvarez-Ayuso, E

    2017-03-01

    A mine soil heavily polluted with zinc and cadmium was employed to evaluate the capacity of organic amendments of different origin to simultaneously reduce soil trace element mobility and enhance soil microbial functionality. With this aim, four organic products, namely olive processing solid waste (OPSW), municipal solid waste compost (MSWC), leonardite and peat, were applied individually at different doses (0, 1, 2 and 5%) to mine soil under controlled laboratory conditions. Extraction studies and analysis of soil microbiological parameters (basal soil respiration and dehydrogenase, β-glucosidase, urease, arylsulfatase and acid and alkaline phosphatase activities) were performed to assess the effect of such amendments on soil restoration. Their ability to decrease mine soil mobile trace element contents followed the sequence MSWC > OPSW > peat > leonardite, with the former achieving reduction levels of 78 and 73% for Zn and Cd, respectively, when applied at a dose of 5%. This amendment also showed a good performance to restore soil microbial functionality. Thus, basal soil respiration and dehydrogenase, urease and alkaline phosphatase activities experienced increases of 187, 79, 42 and 26%, respectively, when mine soil was treated with 5% MSWC. Among tested organic products, MSWC proved to be the best amendment to perform both the chemical and the microbial soil remediation.

  6. Comparative morphology of stingray lateral line canal and electrosensory systems.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Laura K

    2008-11-01

    Elasmobranchs (sharks, skates, and rays) possess a variety of sensory systems including the mechanosensory lateral line and electrosensory systems, which are particularly complex with high levels of interspecific variation in batoids (skates and rays). Rays have dorsoventrally compressed, laterally expanded bodies that prevent them from seeing their mouths and more often than not, their prey. This study uses quantitative image analysis techniques to identify, quantify, and compare structural differences that may have functional consequences in the detection capabilities of three Eastern Pacific stingray species. The benthic round stingray, Urobatis halleri, pelagic stingray, Pteroplatytrygon (Dasyatis) violacea, and benthopelagic bat ray, Myliobatis californica, show significant differences in sensory morphology. Ventral lateral line canals correlate with feeding ecology and differ primarily in the proportion of pored and nonpored canals and the degree of branching complexity. Urobatis halleri shows a high proportion of nonpored canals, while P. violacea has an intermediate proportion of pored and nonpored canals with almost no secondary branching of pored canals. In contrast, M. californica has extensive and highly branched pored ventral lateral line canals that extended laterally toward the wing tips on the anterior edge of the pectoral fins. Electrosensory morphology correlates with feeding habitat and prey mobility; benthic feeders U. halleri and M. californica, have greater electrosensory pore numbers and densities than P. violacea. The percentage of the wing surface covered by these sensory systems appears to be inversely related to swimming style. These methods can be applied to a broader range of species to enable further discussion of the relationship of phylogeny, ecology, and morphology, while the results provide testable predictions of detection capabilities.

  7. Experimental determination of contaminant metal mobility as a function of temperature, time and solution chemistry. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, S.; Bruton, C.; O'Day, P.; Sahai, N.

    1997-01-01

    'Strontium is significantly more mobile than other hazardous radioactive metals. Its partitioning between aqueous and solid phases is controlled by reactions that occur at the interface between natural waters and minerals. At a groundwater site in Hanford (200-BP-5), the aerial extent of the {sup 90}Sr plume is 100 times larger than the aerial extent of the {sup 137}Cs and the {sup 239}Pu plumes. Similarly, contaminated, perched watertables at INEL have much higher aqueous concentrations of {sup 90}Sr than {sup 137}Cs, presumably because Cs is preferentially sorbed to solids (Duncan 1995). Under high physical flow conditions, such as those in the highly fractured rock at Hanford and INEL, {sup 90}Sr present in plumes may spread off-site and cause contamination of aquifers or other water sources. Geochemical factors that may contribute to the overall mobility of Sr in natural waters are the solubilities of phases such as strontianite (SrCO{sub 3}) and formation of strong complexes with sulfate and nitrate. Although {sup 90}Sr is mobilized in natural waters in these examples, significant concentrations may also be present in solid phases. Sorption experiments using a wide variety of substrates at room temperature have shown that Sr is removed from solution under certain conditions. Additionally, strontianite (SrCO{sub 3}) may precipitate at low Sr concentrations in the pH range of waters in contact with basaltic rocks, which varies between pH 8 and 10. Waters contain variable amounts of carbonate owing to atmospheric interactions; the partial pressure of CO{sub 2} is about 10 x 3.5 atm in air and commonly as high as 10 x 2.5 atm in soils. The objective of this work is to determine the fundamental data needed to predict the behavior of strontium at temperature and time scales appropriate to thermal remediation. The authors approach combines macroscopic sorption/precipitation and desorption/dissolution kinetic experiments, which track changes in solution composition

  8. Mobile App-Based Interventions to Support Diabetes Self-Management: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials to Identify Functions Associated with Glycemic Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuan; Yao, Xun; Vespasiani, Giacomo; Nicolucci, Antonio; Dong, Yajie; Kwong, Joey; Li, Ling; Sun, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Background Mobile health apps for diabetes self-management have different functions. However, the efficacy and safety of each function are not well studied, and no classification is available for these functions. Objective The aims of this study were to (1) develop and validate a taxonomy of apps for diabetes self-management, (2) investigate the glycemic efficacy of mobile app-based interventions among adults with diabetes in a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), and (3) explore the contribution of different function to the effectiveness of entire app-based interventions using the taxonomy. Methods We developed a 3-axis taxonomy with columns of clinical modules, rows of functional modules and cells of functions with risk assessments. This taxonomy was validated by reviewing and classifying commercially available diabetes apps. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, and ClinicalTrials.gov from January 2007 to May 2016. We included RCTs of adult outpatients with diabetes that compared using mobile app-based interventions with usual care alone. The mean differences (MDs) in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) concentrations and risk ratios of adverse events were pooled using a random-effects meta-analysis. After taxonomic classification, we performed exploratory subgroup analyses of the presence or absence of each module across the included app-based interventions. Results Across 12 included trials involving 974 participants, using app-based interventions was associated with a clinically significant reduction of HbA1c (MD 0.48%, 95% CI 0.19%-0.77%) without excess adverse events. Larger HbA1c reductions were noted among patients with type 2 diabetes than those with type 1 diabetes (MD 0.67%, 95% CI 0.30%-1.03% vs MD 0.36%, 95% CI 0.08%-0.81%). Having a complication prevention module in app-based interventions was associated with a greater HbA1c reduction (with complication

  9. An Improved Forwarding of Diverse Events with Mobile Sinks in Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Waseem; Arshad, Farzana; Ahmed, Imran; Abdul, Wadood; Ghouzali, Sanaa; Niaz, Iftikhar Azim; Javaid, Nadeem

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel routing strategy to cater the energy consumption and delay sensitivity issues in deep underwater wireless sensor networks is proposed. This strategy is named as ESDR: Event Segregation based Delay sensitive Routing. In this strategy sensed events are segregated on the basis of their criticality and, are forwarded to their respective destinations based on forwarding functions. These functions depend on different routing metrics like: Signal Quality Index, Localization free Signal to Noise Ratio, Energy Cost Function and Depth Dependent Function. The problem of incomparable values of previously defined forwarding functions causes uneven delays in forwarding process. Hence forwarding functions are redefined to ensure their comparable values in different depth regions. Packet forwarding strategy is based on the event segregation approach which forwards one third of the generated events (delay sensitive) to surface sinks and two third events (normal events) are forwarded to mobile sinks. Motion of mobile sinks is influenced by the relative distribution of normal nodes. We have also incorporated two different mobility patterns named as; adaptive mobility and uniform mobility for mobile sinks. The later one is implemented for collecting the packets generated by the normal nodes. These improvements ensure optimum holding time, uniform delay and in-time reporting of delay sensitive events. This scheme is compared with the existing ones and outperforms the existing schemes in terms of network lifetime, delay and throughput. PMID:27827905

  10. Reading Disability and Laterality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparrow, Sara S.

    The purpose of this study was to determine how retarded readers differed from normal readers in the various ways laterality is manifested. An additional purpose was to investigate the development of laterality as seen across several age levels. Subjects were 80 white male 9-, 10-, 11-, and 12-year-olds from regular classrooms in suburban…

  11. Mobility in geometrically confined membranes.

    PubMed

    Domanov, Yegor A; Aimon, Sophie; Toombes, Gilman E S; Renner, Marianne; Quemeneur, François; Triller, Antoine; Turner, Matthew S; Bassereau, Patricia

    2011-08-02

    Lipid and protein lateral mobility is essential for biological function. Our theoretical understanding of this mobility can be traced to the seminal work of Saffman and Delbrück, who predicted a logarithmic dependence of the protein diffusion coefficient (i) on the inverse of the size of the protein and (ii) on the "membrane size" for membranes of finite size [Saffman P, Delbrück M (1975) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 72:3111-3113]. Although the experimental proof of the first prediction is a matter of debate, the second has not previously been thought to be experimentally accessible. Here, we construct just such a geometrically confined membrane by forming lipid bilayer nanotubes of controlled radii connected to giant liposomes. We followed the diffusion of individual molecules in the tubular membrane using single particle tracking of quantum dots coupled to lipids or voltage-gated potassium channels KvAP, while changing the membrane tube radius from approximately 250 to 10 nm. We found that both lipid and protein diffusion was slower in tubular membranes with smaller radii. The protein diffusion coefficient decreased as much as 5-fold compared to diffusion on the effectively flat membrane of the giant liposomes. Both lipid and protein diffusion data are consistent with the predictions of a hydrodynamic theory that extends the work of Saffman and Delbrück to cylindrical geometries. This study therefore provides strong experimental support for the ubiquitous Saffman-Delbrück theory and elucidates the role of membrane geometry and size in regulating lateral diffusion.

  12. Mobility in geometrically confined membranes

    PubMed Central

    Domanov, Yegor A.; Aimon, Sophie; Toombes, Gilman E. S.; Renner, Marianne; Quemeneur, François; Triller, Antoine; Turner, Matthew S.; Bassereau, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Lipid and protein lateral mobility is essential for biological function. Our theoretical understanding of this mobility can be traced to the seminal work of Saffman and Delbrück, who predicted a logarithmic dependence of the protein diffusion coefficient (i) on the inverse of the size of the protein and (ii) on the “membrane size” for membranes of finite size [Saffman P, Delbrück M (1975) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 72:3111—3113]. Although the experimental proof of the first prediction is a matter of debate, the second has not previously been thought to be experimentally accessible. Here, we construct just such a geometrically confined membrane by forming lipid bilayer nanotubes of controlled radii connected to giant liposomes. We followed the diffusion of individual molecules in the tubular membrane using single particle tracking of quantum dots coupled to lipids or voltage-gated potassium channels KvAP, while changing the membrane tube radius from approximately 250 to 10 nm. We found that both lipid and protein diffusion was slower in tubular membranes with smaller radii. The protein diffusion coefficient decreased as much as 5-fold compared to diffusion on the effectively flat membrane of the giant liposomes. Both lipid and protein diffusion data are consistent with the predictions of a hydrodynamic theory that extends the work of Saffman and Delbrück to cylindrical geometries. This study therefore provides strong experimental support for the ubiquitous Saffman–Delbrück theory and elucidates the role of membrane geometry and size in regulating lateral diffusion. PMID:21768336

  13. Fresh or Cryopreserved CD34(+)-Selected Mobilized Peripheral Blood Stem and Progenitor Cells for the Treatment of Poor Graft Function Following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ghobadi, Armin; Fiala, Mark A; Ramsingh, Giridharan; Gao, Feng; Abboud, Camille N; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith; Uy, Geoffrey L; Grossman, Brenda J; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F

    2017-03-17

    CD34(+)-selected stem cell boost (SCB) without conditioning have recently been utilized for poor graft function (PGF) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) with promising results. Unfortunately, many patients have been unable to receive the boost infusion as their donors were unwilling or unable to undergo an additional stem cell collection. Therefore, we conducted this study utilizing either fresh or cryopreserved peripheral blood stem cell products to create CD34(+)-selected boost infusions for the treatment of PGF. Additionally, to explore relationship of CD34(+) dose and response we included a cohort of donors mobilized with plerixafor in addition to the standard G-CSF. Twenty six patients with poor graft function were included in this study. Seventeen donor-recipient pairs were enrolled onto the prospective study; Additional 9 patients treated off-protocol were reviewed retrospectively. Three different donor products were used for CD34(+) selection: (1) fresh mobilized product using G-CSF only, (2) fresh mobilized products using G-CSF and plerixafor, and (3) cryopreserved cells mobilized with G-CSF. CD34(+) cell selection was performed using a CliniMACS. The infusion was not preceded by administration of any chemotherapy or conditioning regimen. Primary objective was hematologic response rate and secondary objectives included CD34(+) yields, incidence and severity of acute and chronic GVHD, overall survival (OS), and relapse-free survival (RFS). The median post-selection CD34(+) count per kg of recipient weight was 3.1x10(6), 10.9x10(6), and 1x10(6) for G-CSF only, G-CSF plus plerixafor, and cryopreserved products, respectively. The median CD34(+) yields (defined as the number of CD34(+) cells after selection/CD34(+) cells prior to CD34(+) selection) was 69%, 66%, and 28% for G-CSF only, G-CSF plus plerixafor, and cryopreserved products, respectively. Following SCB, 16 of the 26 recipients (62%) had a complete response including

  14. Functional correction of neurological and somatic disorders at later stages of disease in MPS IIIA mice by systemic scAAV9-hSGSH gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Haiyan; Cataldi, Marcela P; Ware, Tierra A; Zaraspe, Kimberly; Meadows, Aaron S; Murrey, Darren A; McCarty, Douglas M

    2016-01-01

    The reversibility of neuropathic lysosomal storage diseases, including MPS IIIA, is a major goal in therapeutic development, due to typically late diagnoses and a large population of untreated patients. We used self-complementary adeno-associated virus (scAAV) serotype 9 vector expressing human N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH) to test the efficacy of treatment at later stages of the disease. We treated MPS IIIA mice at 1, 2, 3, 6, and 9 months of age with an intravenous injection of scAAV9-U1a-hSGSH vector, leading to restoration of SGSH activity and reduction of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) throughout the central nervous system (CNS) and somatic tissues at a dose of 5E12 vg/kg. Treatment up to 3 months age improved learning ability in the Morris water maze at 7.5 months, and lifespan was normalized. In mice treated at 6 months age, behavioral performance was impaired at 7.5 months, but did not decline further when retested at 12 months, and lifespan was increased, but not normalized. Treatment at 9 months did not increase life-span, though the GAG storage pathology in the CNS was improved. The study suggests that there is potential for gene therapy intervention in MPS IIIA at intermediate stages of the disease, and extends the clinical relevance of our systemic scAAV9-hSGSH gene delivery approach. PMID:27331076

  15. Interaction with the Redox Cofactor MYW and Functional Role of a Mobile Arginine in Eukaryotic Catalase-Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) are unique bifunctional heme peroxidases with an additional posttranslationally formed redox-active Met-Tyr-Trp cofactor that is essential for catalase activity. On the basis of studies of bacterial KatGs, controversial mechanisms of hydrogen peroxide oxidation were proposed. The recent discovery of eukaryotic KatGs with differing pH optima of catalase activity now allows us to scrutinize those postulated reaction mechanisms. In our study, secreted KatG from the fungus Magnaporthe grisea (MagKatG2) was used to analyze the role of a remote KatG-typical mobile arginine that was shown to interact with the Met-Tyr-Trp adduct in a pH-dependent manner in bacterial KatGs. Here we present crystal structures of MagKatG2 at pH 3.0, 5.5, and 7.0 and investigate the mobility of Arg461 by molecular dynamics simulation. Data suggest that at pH ≥4.5 Arg461 mostly interacts with the deprotonated adduct Tyr. Elimination of Arg461 by mutation to Ala slightly increases the thermal stability but does not alter the active site architecture or the kinetics of cyanide binding. However, the variant Arg461Ala lost the wild-type-typical optimum of catalase activity at pH 5.25 (kcat = 6450 s–1) but exhibits a broad plateau between pH 4.5 and 7.5 (kcat = 270 s–1 at pH 5.5). Moreover, significant differences in the kinetics of interconversion of redox intermediates of wild-type and mutant protein mixed with either peroxyacetic acid or hydrogen peroxide are observed. These findings together with published data from bacterial KatGs allow us to propose a role of Arg461 in the H2O2 oxidation reaction of KatG. PMID:27293030

  16. Inversion of Pn travel times for lateral variations of moho geometry beneath the central Andes and comparison with the receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumont, David; Paul, Anne; Zandt, George; Beck, Susan L.

    We inverted the Pn travel times to characterize the geometry of the Moho along a profile across the Central Andes (20°S) where previous workers have estimated the crustal thickness using receiver functions. Contrary to receiver functions, this technique is not sensitive to the crustal Vs. Therefore, the comparison of the two approaches provides valuable complementary information. Overall, our results are in good agreement with those based on receiver functions. However, some important discrepancies are observed beneath the Western Cordillera and the Subandes, where we find crusts 10-km thinner than in previous models. We confirm that the central part of the orogen appears to be isostatically compensated by the presence of a thick crust. However, at both edges, the topography probably requires additional support, low-density mantle beneath the Western Cordillera and a strong flexural support of the Brazilian shield beneath the Subandes.

  17. Nutrition as a part of healthy aging and reducing cardiovascular risk: improving functionality in later life using quality protein, with optimized timing and distribution.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Beryl M; Axford, Samantha

    2014-09-01

    Aging is associated with many physiological changes, which may in time lead to numerous pathophysiological outcomes, including adverse vascular events. For example, senescence of the immune system and cellular senescence both contribute to rising inflammation with age, potentially induced by the overall burden of comorbid illness, adipose tissue mass, diet, socioeconomic status, and physical activity. In turn, this chronic inflammation decreases physical and cognitive performance, and promotes sarcopenia and the syndrome of frailty. These events and others decrease the functionality of life as we age and include an increased risk of thrombosis and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. In this review, we aim to overview the aging process primarily as related to functional impairment, and provide evidence for the role of protein, and specifically differential quality protein, in particular whey protein, and timing and distribution of intake, to help reduce some of the morbid effects of aging, including reducing obesity, improving glycemic control, and improving vascular function.

  18. Acute pulmonary exacerbation and lung function decline in patients with cystic fibrosis: high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) between inflammation and infection.

    PubMed

    Chirico, V; Lacquaniti, A; Leonardi, S; Grasso, L; Rotolo, N; Romano, C; Di Dio, G; Lionetti, E; David, A; Arrigo, T; Salpietro, C; La Rosa, M

    2015-04-01

    Airway inflammation plays a central role in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease, and biomarkers of inflammation, such as high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) could be used to monitor disease activity. The main aim of this study was to confirm the role of HMGB1 in CF patients, correlating its serum and sputum levels with pulmonary function and inflammation. Serum and sputum HMGB1 were evaluated in a cohort of 31 CF patients and 30 non-smoking healthy subjects (HS group). Acute pulmonary exacerbation events and lung function decline have been also evaluated during a 3-year follow-up period. Serum HMGB1 levels were significantly higher than those measured in HS, such as sputum HMGB1. Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed that patients with high HMGB1 values experienced a significantly faster evolution to decline of lung function. A multiple Cox regression analysis assessed that an increase of serum HMGB1 was associated with 5% increased risk of pulmonary disease progression, whereas elevated sputum HMGB1 was related to a 10% increased risk of lung function decline. In CF patients, HMGB1 closely reflects the entity of pulmonary impairment and represents a strong and independent risk marker for progression of lung function decline.

  19. Reduced Activation in Lateral Prefrontal Cortex and Anterior Cingulate during Attention and Cognitive Control Functions in Medication-Naive Adolescents with Depression Compared to Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halari, Rozmin; Simic, Mima; Pariante, Carmine M.; Papadopoulos, Andrew; Cleare, Anthony; Brammer, Michael; Fombonne, Eric; Rubia, Katya

    2009-01-01

    Background: There is increasing recognition of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adolescence. In adult MDD, abnormalities of fronto-striatal and fronto-cingulate circuitries mediating cognitive control functions have been implicated in the pathogenesis and been related to problems with controlling negative thoughts. No neuroimaging studies of…

  20. Treatment of femoral subtrochanteric fractures with proximal lateral femur locking plates

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sun-jun; Zhang, Shi-min; Yu, Guang-rong

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the outcome of subtrochanteric hip fractures treated with proximal lateral femur locking plate. METHOD: We retrospectively reviewed the clinical results of 48 cases of femoral subtrochanteric fractures treated with proximal lateral femur locking plates from January 2008 to May 2010. The progress of fracture healing, as well as the occurrence of complications, was recorded. The function of the hip joint was evaluated by the Harris social index and the Parker and Palmer mobility score one year after the operation. RESULT: 45 patients were followed up until fracture union or a revision surgery. Among the 45 patients, 43 patients obtained fracture union without further intervention. Thirty-eight fractures healed with no loss of position at 1-year follow-up. There were no cases of hip screw cutting through the femoral head. The mean score of the Harris social index was 86.5±9.8 (73~95). The mean Parker and Palmer mobility score was 7.4±2.1 (3~9). CONCLUSION: The proximal lateral femur locking plate is the kind of stable and effective internal fixation for treating subtrochanteric hip fractures which has the advantage of stable fixation especially for the lateral femoral wall fracture. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453626

  1. Selenium reduces mobile phone (900 MHz)-induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial function, and apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kahya, Mehmet Cemal; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Çiğ, Bilal

    2014-08-01

    Exposure to mobile phone-induced electromagnetic radiation (EMR) may affect biological systems by increasing free oxygen radicals, apoptosis, and mitochondrial depolarization levels although selenium may modulate the values in cancer. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of 900 MHz radiation on the antioxidant redox system, apoptosis, and mitochondrial depolarization levels in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. Cultures of the cancer cells were divided into four main groups as controls, selenium, EMR, and EMR + selenium. In EMR groups, the cells were exposed to 900 MHz EMR for 1 h (SAR value of the EMR was 0.36 ± 0.02 W/kg). In selenium groups, the cells were also incubated with sodium selenite for 1 h before EMR exposure. Then, the following values were analyzed: (a) cell viability, (b) intracellular ROS production, (c) mitochondrial membrane depolarization, (d) cell apoptosis, and (e) caspase-3 and caspase-9 values. Selenium suppressed EMR-induced oxidative cell damage and cell viability (MTT) through a reduction of oxidative stress and restoring mitochondrial membrane potential. Additionally, selenium indicated anti-apoptotic effects, as demonstrated by plate reader analyses of apoptosis levels and caspase-3 and caspase-9 values. In conclusion, 900 MHz EMR appears to induce apoptosis effects through oxidative stress and mitochondrial depolarization although incubation of selenium seems to counteract the effects on apoptosis and oxidative stress.

  2. Charge transport calculations by a wave-packet dynamical approach using maximally localized Wannier functions based on density functional theory: Application to high-mobility organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Hirose, Kenji

    2017-01-01<