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  1. Latina Landscape: Queer Toronto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez, Karleen Pendleton

    2008-01-01

    A group of Latinas sat down one day around a wooden table on the third floor of a downtown Toronto community center, lit candles and began to write. They came together through a flier inviting all Latinas interested in writing. On the second meeting, they named themselves Lengua Latina (Latin Tongue). Lengua Latina is a structure established by…

  2. Latinas in Need

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Beth

    2007-01-01

    In the summer of 2006, the New York City-based Spanish-language newspaper "La Prensa" ran a series of articles on the surprisingly stressful life of the young Latina in America. The series brought to light grim statistics uncovered in the academic community that had largely escaped the mainstream. Namely, young Latinas--ages 12-17--are more likely…

  3. Heart Truth for Latinas

    MedlinePlus

    ... for about a fifth. Latinas also have high rates of some factors that increase the risk of developing heart disease, such as diabetes, overweight and obesity, and physical inactivity. But there’s good news too: ...

  4. Latina Teen Suicide and Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Andrea J.; Wiggs, Christine Bracamonte; Valencia, Celina; Bauman, Sheri

    2013-01-01

    Latina adolescents experience depression and suicidal ideations in a disproportionate manner compared to their non-Latina counterparts. We investigate suicide and depressive symptoms among a state-wide sample (N = 650) of adolescent Latina girls with a focus on bullying as a predictor. Bullying rates are higher than previous studies have found for…

  5. Latina/o Students' Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahaffy, Kimberly A.; Pantoja, Christina

    2013-01-01

    To better understand Latina/o students' needs in a predominantly White institution of higher education with low Latina/o retention rates, semistructured interviews were completed with 30 Latina/o students. The themes that emerged through qualitative analysis of the interviews were: linguistic and financial barriers; a need for unity; availability…

  6. Academic Engagement and Achievement among Latina/o and Non-Latina/o Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boutakidis, Ioakim P.; Rodríguez, James L.; Miller, Kari Knutson; Barnett, Mathew

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an exploratory study of the relation between academic engagement and academic achievement for Latina/o and non-Latina/o adolescents attending a predominantly low-income, Latina/o urban middle school in Southern California. A sample of 61 students (37 Latinas/os and 24 non-Latinas/os) participated in the study. The Latina/o…

  7. Examining Latina College Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Amanda R.

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this qualitative narrative study were to explore the potential areas of conflict Latina college students experience between their educational goals and traditional cultural gender roles and expectations. Participants were selected utilizing purposeful sampling methods. All participants were first-generation college students.…

  8. Latina women and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Worth, D; Rodriguez, R

    1987-01-01

    The incidence of AIDS in Latina women is over 11 times that of white women. Women account for 13% of all Latino AIDS deaths since 1980. This examination of the impact of AIDS on Latino women concentrates on Manhattan's Lower East Side. The AIDS deaths among Puerto Rican women in this neighborhood are predominantly intravenous drug abuse related. Latina women accounted for more than 1/2 of all female AIDS deaths on the Lower East Side during the 1980-1985 period. The age range is parallel with that in the rest of New York City, with the exception of a higher number of deaths on the Lower East Side in the age ranges of 15-19 and over 40. Serious obstacles exist to providing AIDS risk reduction information to Puerto Rican women and their partners. Latinos account for 11% of all US AIDS cases among gay and bisexual men. The cultural proscription against these sexual practices in the Puerto Rican community makes AIDS education related to such practices extremely difficult. Many of the female sex partners of these men are unaware of their bisexuality, and, therefore not aware that they are at risk of HIV infection. The Latina women most at risk are young, poor, and have low educational levels. Latina women seriously underutilize ongoing primary health care, family planning, prenatal or pediatric care. Attempts to reach Latina women with AIDS risk reduction education must also contend with issues such as cultural gender roles. Females tend to be dependent on males and defer to male decision making related to sexual practices. In formulating policy regarding services and education, it is essential to involve the leadership of the Latino community. PMID:12268416

  9. Feminist Identity among Latina Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manago, Adriana M.; Brown, Christia Spears; Leaper, Campbell

    2009-01-01

    This study explores developing conceptions of feminism among Latina adolescents, their prevalence of feminist endorsement, and whether home environment and well-being are related to feminist identity. One hundred and forty Latina girls (Grades 9 to 12, M age = 15) wrote personal narratives of their understanding of feminism and whether they…

  10. Physical activity and acculturation among U.S. Latinas of childbearing age.

    PubMed

    Vermeesch, Amber L; Stommel, Manfred

    2014-04-01

    The majority of Latinas of childbearing age is not sufficiently active; a significant health disparity, and is at risk for deleterious health consequences. The study's objectives were to explore acculturation and associated factors' effect on engagement in physical activity (PA) among Latinas. Based on data (2008-2011 National Health Interview Survey; N = 7,278), multinomial logistic models predicted odds of adherence to 2008 PA Guidelines for Americans. Among 3,386,680 Latinas, 18 to 47 years, 58.9% (standard error [SE] = 0.0073) met neither aerobic nor muscle-strengthening recommendations, after controlling for poverty, income, marital status, and competing obligations. Less acculturated Latinas (Spanish-preferring) were less likely to engage in PA than English-preferring counterparts (odds ratio [OR] = 0.57, p < .01). Spanish-preferring foreign-born Latinas have substantially smaller odds of meeting PA guidelines than U.S.-born English-preferring Latinas (OR = 0.3, p < .001). Puerto Ricans and Dominican immigrants are least likely to meet guidelines. Latinas are not homogeneous. Country of origin and acculturation should be considered in future PA interventions. PMID:24107780

  11. Suicidal Behavior among Latina College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesin, Megan S.; Jeglic, Elizabeth L.

    2012-01-01

    Latina college students are one of the fastest-growing segments of the college student population. Although there is evidence suggesting Latina high school students are at increased risk of engaging in suicidal behavior, it is unclear Bwhether this risk continues in college. Over the course of 3 years, 554 Latina college students, the majority of…

  12. Stories of Success: Latinas Redefining Cultural Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Leslie D.

    2012-01-01

    In this essay, the stories of successful Latina scholars are captured and shared through a series of interviews. Inquiring about the k-20 experience of the Latinas, the study provides timely insights that counter mainstream deficit perspectives on the Latino population. Specifically, these Latinas' stories show how they have been inspired by…

  13. Teacher's Guide to "Artes Latinae".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masciantonio, Rudolph; And Others

    The purpose of this guide is to assist teachers in the classroom utilization of "Artes Latinae", the Encyclopaedia Britannica Latin instructional system. This guide is intended as a supplement to the publisher's teacher's manual and presupposes familiarity with it. Stress has been placed on the early units of the textbook, since the inexperienced…

  14. Latina "Testimonios": A Reflexive, Critical Analysis of a "Latina Space" at a Predominantly White Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Judith; Garcia, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    Judith Flores and Silvia Garcia (University of Utah) draw from the work of their mentor, Rina Benmayor and "Telling to live: Latina feminist testimonios" to establish an organization for Latinas who are staff, faculty, students, alumni, and community members at a predominantly White institution (PWI). Critical race feminism (CRF), Latina/o…

  15. Hearing the Silence: Acknowledging the Voice of My Latina Sisters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Vogt, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Latina community college students experience a number of challenges during their transition to college. Findings from a larger study indicated that Latina community college students experienced racism and stereotyping on campus responding with silence. Silence occurred in two ways: (1) Latinas were forced to be silent, and/or (2) Latinas chose to…

  16. Hybrid Citizenship: Latina Youth and the Politics of Belonging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bondy, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Drawing from interview data collected from high school students in Broward County, Florida, this article explores how eight adolescent Latinas understand citizenship and belonging vis-à-vis circulating images and discourses on Latina/o immigration, immigrant, and Latina. The author examines Latina youths' citizenship identities and belonging using…

  17. Mentoring Latina Nurses: A Multicultural Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera-Goba, Migdalia V.; Nieto, Sonia

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the meaning and significance of mentoring for Latinas/os in nursing. Based on qualitative, in-depth phenomenological interviews, the primary purpose of the study was to understand the experiences of Latina nursing students in order to identify conditions that affect their educational experiences. Seventeen…

  18. Latina Student Perceptions of Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaqub, Samia

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the learning that occurs in Latina students who enroll in learning communities designed for underprepared community college students. The research question guiding this study is: What are the experiences of Latina students enrolled in developmental learning community courses which have the greatest impact on…

  19. Inhalant Use in Latina Early Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzmán, Bianca L.; Kouyoumdjian, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine how lifetime use and extent of use of inhalants by Latina girls is impacted by age, acculturation, grades, ditching, sexual behaviors (light petting, heavy petting, and going all the way) and sexual agency. A total of 273 females who self-identified as being Latina whose mean age was 13.94 completed…

  20. A Latina Principal Leading for Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Frank; Murakami, Elizabeth T.; Cerecer, Patricia Quijada

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the role that racial identity plays among Latina school principals is examined through a case study of a principal in a K-3 elementary school. Based on a Latina/o critical race framework and a phenomenological research approach, the study explores the degree to which having a strong understanding of one's racial identity…

  1. Diabetes-Related Behaviors in Latinas and Non-Latinas in California

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Matthew J.; Davey, Adam; Alos, Victor A.; Whitaker, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Certain dietary and physical activity behaviors have been associated with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, yet little is known about the prevalence of these behaviors among Latinas (Latino women). The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to compare the prevalence of diabetes-related behaviors in Latinas and non-Latinas. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Using data from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey, we compared self-reported diabetes-related behaviors of Latinas (n = 4,321) to non-Latinas (n = 21,112) after excluding women who were pregnant or had diabetes. For six behaviors, we determined the cut point for the least healthy tertile: walking, doing moderate to vigorous physical activity, and consuming fried potatoes, sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), desserts, and fast food. We used logistic regression to examine the association between Latina ethnicity and being in the least healthy tertile compared with the other two tertiles for each of these behaviors. RESULTS In multivariate models adjusted for age, income, education, marital status, health status, smoking, and acculturation, Latinas had a higher risk (odds ratio [95% CI]) of being in the least healthy tertile for the consumption of fast food (1.94 [1.63–2.31]), SSBs (1.53 [1.29–1.82]), and fried potatoes (1.32 [1.18–1.67]), and lower risk for desserts (0.82 [0.70–0.95]). Latinas and non-Latinas had similar physical activity levels. CONCLUSIONS Dietary differences between Latinas and non-Latinas (particularly in the consumption of fast food and SSBs) may be the focus of interventions to prevent diabetes in Latinas. Further research among Latinas is needed to understand and modify these dietary behaviors. PMID:22961569

  2. Aspirations of Latina adolescent suicide attempters

    PubMed Central

    Hausmann-Stabile, Carolina; Gulbas, Lauren; Zayas, Luis H.

    2013-01-01

    Parents’ aspirations and expectations are communicated to their offspring. Children internalize their parents’ aspirations and accept some of the expectations while rejecting others, all part of the developmental process and identity-consolidation. When the aspirations and expectations of youth and parents are incongruent, the outcomes in youths’ behavior can be deleterious, such as when adolescents manifest suicidal behaviors. We examined aspirations expressed by 12 Latina adolescent suicide attempters and their parents and compared them to 12 non-suicidal Latinas and parents. Qualitative analyses revealed that incongruence of aspirations between girls and their parents were greater among suicidal teens. Suicidal and non-suicidal Latinas presented contrasting aspirations: the former on gaining independence and the latter on completing their education and pursuing careers. Findings may inform developmental research and ways in which clinicians and policymakers can help Latinas achieve their own and their parents’ aspirations. PMID:24013464

  3. Latinas and HIV/AIDS: Implications for the 90s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maldonado, Miguelina

    1991-01-01

    Among Latinas, the number of cases of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is increasing relentlessly. From August 1989 to August 1990, there was a 53 percent increase nationally in cumulative AIDS cases among Latinas. In New York City, AIDS is the leading cause of death among Latinas aged 25-34. The conditions and circumstances that place…

  4. Latina Educators: Building Bridges for Those Who Follow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewlett-Gomez, Michele R.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how Latina educators build bridges for themselves and those who follow, identity factors for Latinas, the growth and diversity of Latina educators their challenges along the career path, their language proficiency, interrupted schooling, perceptions of others, and workplace culture. (Author/VWL)

  5. "Laberintos y Testimonios": Latina Faculty in the Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machado-Casas, Margarita; Ruiz, Elsa Cantu; Cantu, Norma E.

    2013-01-01

    This special issue of the "Journal of Educational Foundations" explores the struggles faced by Latina faculty. These struggles became evident through an examination of Latina faculty members at a specific Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI). The essays in this special issue examine the experiences and trajectory of several Latina faculty…

  6. "Mujeres" in the Principal's Office: Latina School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Méndez-Morse, Sylvia; Murakami, Elizabeth T.; Byrne-Jiménez, Mónica; Hernandez, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This article is based on a national survey of Latina/o principals and assistant principals conducted by the National Latina/o Leadership Project and focuses on the women participants. Included is a description of Latinas' leadership experiences, their career paths, and the influence of racial/ethnic identity on their leadership practice. The…

  7. Disparities in Health Indicators for Latinas in California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Portillo, Carmen J.; Garbanati, James Allen

    1999-01-01

    Analyzes health indicators for Latinas in rural and urban California. Discusses Latina demographics; causes of death; life expectancy; and profiles for breast cancer, cervical cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and AIDS. Examines Latina risk factors: poverty, high dropout rates, lack of health insurance, obesity, physical inactivity, low levels of…

  8. Latina Teacher Agency in Public Schools: Love, Tensions, and Perseverance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, Pablo; Gonzalez, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    This article examined the manner in which Latina teachers' enacted agency to challenge institutional barriers impacting Latinas/os in the educational system. A theoretical framework is suggested as a tool to describe the practices of four Latina teachers working in elementary schools serving a high population of Latino students in Southern…

  9. "La Importancia de la Hermandad Latina": Examining the Psychosociocultural Influences of Latina-Based Sororities on Academic Persistence Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgada-Guerro, Marla; Gloria, Alberta M.

    2013-01-01

    Using a psychosociocultural (PSC) approach, we examined how self-beliefs, social support, and cultural fit influenced the academic persistence decisions of 115 Latina sorority members. Upper-division Latinas reported higher self-efficacy than lower-division Latinas; however, lower-division students reported higher college stress and more perceived…

  10. Navigating Multiple Worlds: A Grounded Theory of Latina Students' Identity as Latina First-Generation College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Patricia Lynn

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore Latina students' identity as Latina first-generation college students. Constructivist grounded theory (Charmaz, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006) was used to explore two research questions: (a) For Latina students who are the first in their family to go to college, what is their understanding of being a Latina…

  11. TELEMEDICINA: UN DESAFÍO PARA AMÉRICA LATINA

    PubMed Central

    Litewka, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    La telemedicina es una tendencia creciente en la prestación de los servicios médicos. Aunque la eficacia de esta práctica no ha estado bien establecida, es probable que los países en desarrollo compartirán este nuevo paradigma con los desarrollados. Los defensores de la telemedicina en América Latina sostienen que será una herramienta útil para reducir las disparidades y mejorar la accesibilidad de atención de salud. Aunque América Latina quizá se convierta en un lugar para la investigación e investigación de estos procedimientos, no está claro cómo la telemedicina podría contribuir a mejorar la accesibilidad para las poblaciones desfavorecidas, o coexistir con sistemas de atención de salud públicos crónicamente enfermos. Telemedicine is a growing trend in the provision of medical services. Although the effectiveness of this practice has not been well established, it is likely that developing countries will share this new paradigm with developed ones. Supporters of telemedicine in Latin America maintain that it will be a useful tool for reducing disparities and improving health care accessibility. Although Latin America might become a place for research and investigation of these procedures, it is not clear how telemedicine could contribute to improving accessibility for disadvantaged populations, or coexist with chronically ill-funded public healthcare systems. PMID:21625326

  12. TELEMEDICINA: UN DESAFÍO PARA AMÉRICA LATINA.

    PubMed

    Litewka, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    La telemedicina es una tendencia creciente en la prestación de los servicios médicos. Aunque la eficacia de esta práctica no ha estado bien establecida, es probable que los países en desarrollo compartirán este nuevo paradigma con los desarrollados. Los defensores de la telemedicina en América Latina sostienen que será una herramienta útil para reducir las disparidades y mejorar la accesibilidad de atención de salud. Aunque América Latina quizá se convierta en un lugar para la investigación e investigación de estos procedimientos, no está claro cómo la telemedicina podría contribuir a mejorar la accesibilidad para las poblaciones desfavorecidas, o coexistir con sistemas de atención de salud públicos crónicamente enfermos.Telemedicine is a growing trend in the provision of medical services. Although the effectiveness of this practice has not been well established, it is likely that developing countries will share this new paradigm with developed ones. Supporters of telemedicine in Latin America maintain that it will be a useful tool for reducing disparities and improving health care accessibility. Although Latin America might become a place for research and investigation of these procedures, it is not clear how telemedicine could contribute to improving accessibility for disadvantaged populations, or coexist with chronically ill-funded public healthcare systems.

  13. Attributions about Addiction among Latina Women

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Frank; De La Rosa, Mario; Rojas, Patria; Schwartz, Seth J.; Duan, Rui

    2011-01-01

    This cross-sectional, secondary analysis study utilizes data from a prior study of intergenerational substance use among Latina women (n = 316). We explored the influence of substance use frequency and type, as well as cultural and socioeconomic factors on attributions about addiction among a predominantly immigrant sample of Latina women. Women who were less proficient in English (an indicator of adoption of the receiving culture in the acculturation process) and more proficient in Spanish (an indicator of heritage-culture retention) endorsed more spiritual model attributions than women who were more proficient in English and less proficient in Spanish. Women were more proficient in Spanish more frequently endorsed the disease attribution model. Alcohol, marijuana use and non-medical sedative use were linked with spiritual, moral /character and disease attribution models respectively. Participants reporting higher education levels indicated less agreement with the moral/character model of addiction. Implications for culturally tailored social work interventions for Latina women are discussed. PMID:22162943

  14. The Latinas' Guide to the Information Superhighway: A Bilingual Guide for Latinas by Latinas = Guia para Mujeres Latinas sobre la Supercarretera de la Informacion: Una Guia Bilingue para Latinas por medio de Latinas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MANA, A National Latina Organization, Washington, DC.

    This guide to the Internet is designed to give Latinas basic information on computers and the information superhighway. Written in both Spanish and English, the guide begins by defining the Internet and making some suggestions about acquiring access to a computer. Among the topics discussed are how to choose an Internet service provider, how to…

  15. Engineering Education through the Latina Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villa, Elsa Q.; Wandermurem, Luciene; Hampton, Elaine M.; Esquinca, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Less than 20% of undergraduates earning a degree in engineering are women, and even more alarming is minority women earn a mere 3.1% of those degrees. This paper reports on a qualitative study examining Latinas' identity development toward and in undergraduate engineering and computer science studies using a sociocultural theory of learning. Three…

  16. Nutrient and food intakes differ among Latina subgroups during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Hromi-Fiedler, Amber; Bermúdez-Millán, Angela; Segura-Pérez, Sofia; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Objective To document nutrient and food group serving intakes from food sources among Latina subgroups living in the same geographical area. Design A cross-sectional study. Nutrient and food group serving intakes were assessed by means of a 24 h recall administered immediately after a prenatal survey. Setting Hartford, CT, USA. Subjects A total of 233 low-income pregnant Latinas. For analyses, Latinas were classified into two groups on the basis of self-reported ethnic identity: Puerto Ricans and non-Puerto Rican Latinas. Results Puerto Rican Latinas were more likely than non-Puerto Rican Latinas to be more acculturated and to consume foods (i.e. processed meat, cheese, soft drinks) and higher levels of nutrients (i.e. fat, SFA, MUFA, trans fatty acids) that have been implicated in the development of chronic diseases. By contrast, non-Puerto Rican Latinas were more likely to consume foods (i.e. fruits, dark green/yellow vegetables, tomatoes, non-starchy vegetables) and higher levels of nutrients (i.e. fibre, vegetable protein, folate, β-carotene) that promote health when compared with Puerto Rican Latinas. Conclusions Findings suggest that acculturation may play a role in dietary intake. Clinicians and dietitians need to be aware of these differences to encourage healthy eating patterns among more acculturated pregnant Latina clients. PMID:21729472

  17. TELEMEDICINA: UN DESAFÍO PARA AMÉRICA LATINA.

    PubMed

    Litewka, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    La telemedicina es una tendencia creciente en la prestación de los servicios médicos. Aunque la eficacia de esta práctica no ha estado bien establecida, es probable que los países en desarrollo compartirán este nuevo paradigma con los desarrollados. Los defensores de la telemedicina en América Latina sostienen que será una herramienta útil para reducir las disparidades y mejorar la accesibilidad de atención de salud. Aunque América Latina quizá se convierta en un lugar para la investigación e investigación de estos procedimientos, no está claro cómo la telemedicina podría contribuir a mejorar la accesibilidad para las poblaciones desfavorecidas, o coexistir con sistemas de atención de salud públicos crónicamente enfermos.Telemedicine is a growing trend in the provision of medical services. Although the effectiveness of this practice has not been well established, it is likely that developing countries will share this new paradigm with developed ones. Supporters of telemedicine in Latin America maintain that it will be a useful tool for reducing disparities and improving health care accessibility. Although Latin America might become a place for research and investigation of these procedures, it is not clear how telemedicine could contribute to improving accessibility for disadvantaged populations, or coexist with chronically ill-funded public healthcare systems. PMID:21625326

  18. Evaluation of Amigas Latinas Motivando el Alma (ALMA): a pilot promotora intervention focused on stress and coping among immigrant Latinas.

    PubMed

    Tran, Anh N; Ornelas, India J; Perez, Georgina; Green, Melissa A; Lyn, Michelle; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2014-04-01

    Recent immigrant Latinas are at increased risk of poor mental health due to stressors associated with adapting to life in the United States. This study evaluated Amigas Latinas Motivando el Alma, a promotora intervention to reduce stress and promote health and coping among recent immigrant Latinas. Using a pre- and post-test design, we evaluated mental health outcomes, specifically, in promotoras. Promotoras' knowledge levels related to role of promotora and stress management increased, depressive symptoms and stress levels decreased, and coping responses and perceived social support increased as well. Results suggest that promotora programs may be an effective way to improve mental health in recent immigrant Latinas.

  19. Health Disparity among Latina Women: Comparison with Non-Latina Women.

    PubMed

    Paz, Karen; Massey, Kelly P

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing the Latino community and focusing on the women that make up this fast-growing demographic create a better understanding of the needs and considerations for health-care professionals and social policies. It is important that national health and health-care data on the Latino ethnic group be presented by gender in order to determine areas specific to women. This review focuses on the existing health and health-care data of Latino women (Latinas). The ability to distinguish the health-care experiences of Latinas will increase the understanding of existing barriers to their health care, the initiatives needed to overcome them, and increase the overall quality of health among Latina women.

  20. Health Disparity among Latina Women: Comparison with Non-Latina Women

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Karen; Massey, Kelly P.

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing the Latino community and focusing on the women that make up this fast-growing demographic create a better understanding of the needs and considerations for health-care professionals and social policies. It is important that national health and health-care data on the Latino ethnic group be presented by gender in order to determine areas specific to women. This review focuses on the existing health and health-care data of Latino women (Latinas). The ability to distinguish the health-care experiences of Latinas will increase the understanding of existing barriers to their health care, the initiatives needed to overcome them, and increase the overall quality of health among Latina women. PMID:27478393

  1. Acculturation and weight loss strategies among Latinas.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Becky; Ayala, Guadalupe X; Wing, Rena R

    2015-04-01

    This study examined the relationship between indicators of acculturation and weight loss strategies among Latinas. Latinas residing in the United States longer had more experience with various weight loss strategies (r = 0.24, p = 0.05). Controlling for demographic factors and BMI, years of U.S. residence was related to whether increased physical activity (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.01-1.39, p = 0.04) and reduced portion sizes (OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.02-1.91, p = 0.03) were used as strategies for weight loss. More English spoken at home was associated with use of reducing calories as a strategy for weight loss (OR 4.13, 95% CI 1.06-16.09, p = 0.04). Regardless of acculturation level, less empirically supported methods such as using herbal products and a girdle were more prevalent than commonly recommended methods such as using meal replacement products and commercial weight loss programs. Behavioral weight loss interventions for Latinas should consider acculturation to more effectively target subgroups, address cultural practices, and teach lifestyle-appropriate strategies. PMID:24150420

  2. Latina University Professors, Insights into the Journeys of Those Who Strive to Leadership within Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasquez-Guignard, Sandra Jeannette

    2010-01-01

    The statistics on Latinas who hold positions as professors and leaders in higher education are grim. Although there are more Latinas going to college, only 1% of professors in the U.S. are Latina. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the lived experiences of 4 Latina professors to learn about their journeys to secure positions…

  3. When "Jerry Springer" Visits Your Classroom: Teaching Latina Literature in a Contested Ground.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, Carmen

    2001-01-01

    Demonstrates how drama can highlight the complex process of readers' interpretations of texts, describing a study of Latina literature in a diverse fifth grade classroom. Results show how the Latina teacher-researcher read her students' interpretations of Latina cultural perspectives while also reading her as a Latina teacher-researcher. Results…

  4. Volunteerism: Latina/o Students and Private-College Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fajardo, Ismael; Lott, Joe L., II.; Contreras, Frances

    2014-01-01

    Using data from the Cooperative Institutional Research Program from University of California Los Angeles ("n" = 523), this study investigates curricular and co-curricular experiences that influence the odds of volunteering for Latina/o students who attend private institutions. Results show that Latinas/os who rated themselves highly on…

  5. Barriers to and Facilitators of Health for Latina Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Latina undergraduate students' barriers and facilitators of health are examined: Barriers to psychological health--separating from family, pressure to succeed, and racism; Barriers to physical health--lacking health insurance, and discomfort using campus sports facilities; and Facilitators of psychological health--membership in Latina student…

  6. Civic Engagement Measures for Latina/o College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcantar, Cynthia M.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter uses a critical quantitative approach to study models and measures of civic engagement for Latina/o college students. The chapter describes the importance of a critical quantitative approach to study civic engagement of Latina/o college students, then uses Hurtado et al.'s (Hurtado, S., 2012) model to examine the civic engagement…

  7. Latina High School Leaving: Some Practical Solutions. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romo, Harriett D.

    Leaving school early has a dramatic impact on Hispanic girls, because Latinas face greater barriers than males when seeking high-wage jobs and opportunities in postsecondary education. This Digest examines how gender roles, families, schools, and friends influence Latinas in their education and career decisions, and outlines practical dropout…

  8. Latina/o School Principals: Identity, Leadership and Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murakami, Elizabeth T.; Hernandez, Frank; Mendez-Morse, Sylvia; Byrne-Jimenez, Monica

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to further define and inform about the influence of Latina/o principals in schools as an alternative to traditional forms of leadership. The principals' Latina/o identity, their leadership styles and advocacy towards the improvement of student achievement were examined. This research focused on three questions: (a) How did…

  9. Latina Mothers' Perceptions of Mental Health and Mental Health Promotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vera, Elizabeth M.; Conner, Wendy

    2007-01-01

    Latina mothers' perceptions of mental health and factors that promote/restore mental health were explored in this qualitative study. Participants discussed the importance of community, safety, and financial stability in addition to conventional factors that are related to mental health. Implications for working with urban Latinas and their…

  10. Mirrors Reflecting Latinas' Realities in an Urban Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz de Sabates, Gabriela

    2007-01-01

    What are the realities of Latina adult learners? This question guided the design of this research project. Utilizing a focus group approach, six Latinas in Kansas City, Kansas, had the opportunity to speak freely about themselves and to share their stories with each other. In this article, the author focuses on the voices of these women without…

  11. Latina Youth, Education, and Citizenship: A Feminist Transnational Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bondy, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores adolescent Latinas' citizenship identities in school from a feminist transnational perspective. Data were drawn from qualitative research studies on Latina youths' educational experiences and from a qualitative project conducted by the author. Cultural citizenship theories were used to analyze the data. The analysis revealed…

  12. Wanted and Used: Latina Bilingual Education Teachers at Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amos, Yukari Takimoto

    2016-01-01

    In response to the increasing number of Spanish-speaking students at public schools, Spanish-speaking teachers are in demand. In regards to this high demand, how are Latina/o bilingual education teachers treated at school? Using critical race theory's counter-stories, this study investigated the working conditions of two Latina bilingual teachers.…

  13. The Experiences of Latina Graduate Students in Psychology Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celaya, Patricia E.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the experience of Latinas in doctoral programs in psychology using a qualitative phenomenological methodology. Eleven women who self-identified as Latina and were in the process of working towards a doctoral degree in psychology participated in in-person interviews that were audio-recorded. Participants described experiences…

  14. A Mother's Humiliation: School Organizational Violence toward Latina Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monzo, Lilia D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines how Latina mothers experience violence in schools through everyday interactions with those positioned with greater power in our society. Drawing on Bourdieu's concept of symbolic violence, the article discusses how deficit perspectives held toward Latina mothers and the privileging of White, middle-class frames result in…

  15. Chicana/Latina "Testimonios": Mapping the Methodological, Pedagogical, and Political

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgado Bernal, Dolores; Burciaga, Rebeca; Flores Carmona, Judith

    2012-01-01

    While the genre of "testimonio" has deep roots in oral cultures and in Latin American human rights struggles, the publication and subsequent adoption of "This Bridge Called My Back" and, more recently, "Telling to Live: Latina Feminist Testimonios" by Chicanas and Latinas, have demonstrated the power of "testimonio" as a genre that exposes…

  16. Latina Administrators' Ways of Leadership: Preparando Chicanas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Michelle Marie

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to 1) identify the pathways and strategies by which Latina administrators reach their positions within student affairs, 2) examine how the intersection of gender and ethnicity influence their leadership and 3) describe their leadership styles utilizing traditional models, or something unique to Latinas. As the number…

  17. Intimate Partner Violence among Pregnant and Parenting Latina Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Bernie Sue; Campbell, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the nature and extent of mutual violence among a sample of pregnant and parenting Latina adolescent females and their partners. The sample consisted of 73 Latina adolescent females between the ages of 14 and 20 who were referred to a community-based organization for case management, education, and…

  18. First Generation Latina Persistence Group Mentoring and Sophomore Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, Amy Edith

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to help increase success for first-generation Latina students at Arizona State University by providing a group mentoring support experience during the spring semester of their sophomore year. Thirteen first-generation Latinas in their sophomore year were recruited from the Obama Scholars Program at Arizona State…

  19. Family Responsibilities among Latina College Students from Immigrant Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sy, Susan R.; Romero, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine different types of family responsibilities among Latina college students and how these responsibilities affect their college experiences. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 first- and second-generation Latina women, aged 18 to 29. Results point to three key emergent themes regarding the role…

  20. Familism, Family Environment, and Suicide Attempts among Latina Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pena, Juan B.; Kuhlberg, Jill A.; Zayas, Luis H.; Baumann, Ana A.; Gulbas, Lauren; Hausmann-Stabile, Carolina; Nolle, Allyson P.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examined the relationship between familism and family environment type as well as the relationship between family environment type and suicide attempts among Latina youth. Latina teen attempters (n = 109) and nonattempters (n = 107) were recruited from the New York City area. Latent class analysis revealed three family…

  1. Cultivating a Guerrera Spirit in Latinas: The Praxis of Mothering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzman, Bianca

    2012-01-01

    In this article I argue that mothering in the home is an educational tool for creating positive self-agency in Latina girls. This essay articulates the ways in which my lived experiences as a Latina mother informs the socialization of "guerrera" girls. I engage in a process of "testimonio" to demonstrate how mothering, by using tools such as…

  2. In Their Own Words: Latina Success in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cejda, Brent D.

    2010-01-01

    Greater numbers of Latinas are participating in postsecondary education, however these gains have not resulted in increased graduation rates. This study examines the lived experiences of 36 Latina baccalaureate graduates to gain a deeper understanding of how they achieved this important educational goal. The primary conclusion of this…

  3. Estrategias para mejorar los resultados academicos para las latinas (Strategies for Improving the Educational Outcomes of Latinas). ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Wendy

    The educational experiences of Latinas are affected by the interaction of many factors, including poverty, racism, sexual harassment, and lack of English language proficiency. This Spanish-language digest presents a range of strategies that schools can employ to promote the academic achievement of Latinas. Schools should communicate that Hispanic…

  4. The "Latina epidemiologic paradox" revisited: the role of birthplace and acculturation in predicting infant low birth weight for Latinas in Los Angeles, CA.

    PubMed

    Hoggatt, Katherine J; Flores, Marie; Solorio, Rosa; Wilhelm, Michelle; Ritz, Beate

    2012-10-01

    The "Latina epidemiologic paradox" refers to the observation that despite socioeconomic disadvantages, Latina mothers in the United States (US) have a similar or lower risk for delivering an infant with low birth weight (LBW) compared to non-Latina White mothers. An analogous paradox may exist between foreign-born (FB) and US-born (USB) Latinas. Our goal was to assess differences in LBW in USB Latinas, FB Latinas, and non-Latina Whites in Los Angeles County in 2003 using birth records and survey data. Using logistic regression, we estimated associations between LBW and birthplace/ethnicity in a birth cohort and nested survey responder group and between LBW and acculturation in responders to a follow-up survey. USB Latinas and FB Latinas had a higher prevalence of LBW infants compared to Whites (odds ratio [OR] = 1.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] = (1.17, 1.53) and OR = 1.32, 95% CI = (1.18, 1.49), respectively); when we adjusted for additional maternal risk factors these point estimates were attenuated, and interval estimates were consistent with a modest positive or inverse association. Among Latinas only, LBW was more common for high-acculturated FB and USB Latinas compared to low-acculturated FB Latinas, and there was limited evidence that environmental or behavior risk factors had less impact in low-acculturated Latinas. In summary, adjusting only for demographics, Latinas in our study were more likely to have LBW infants compared to Whites, in contrast to the Latina paradox hypothesis. Furthermore, adjusting for environmental or behavioral factors attenuated the positive association, but there was little evidence that Latinas had a lower prevalence of LBW regardless of the variables included in the models. Finally, among Latinas, there was limited evidence that associations between known risk factors and LBW were modified by acculturation.

  5. Reflections of a Latina Student-Teacher: Refusing Low Expectations for Latina/o Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavazos, Alyssa G.

    2009-01-01

    This narrative provides a personal account of the author's student-teaching experience in a primarily Latina/o high school. In an analysis of the journal in which observations were during the experience, the following themes emerged: (a) high expectations before the semester, (b) conflicting messages, (c) teachers' expectations for standard…

  6. Undergraduate Latina/o Student Organizations: A Latina/o Critical Theory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Latina/o college enrollment is on the rise, but degree attainment continues to be an obstacle. In fact, Latin@s continue to hold the lowest levels of educational attainment (Fry, 2011). Therefore, it is important to better understand factors impacting their higher education journey. One of these factors includes involvement in registered student…

  7. Access Barriers to Prenatal Care in Emerging Adult Latinas.

    PubMed

    Torres, Rosamar

    2016-03-01

    Despite efforts to improve access to prenatal care, emerging adult Latinas in the United States continue to enter care late in their pregnancies and/or underutilize these services. Since little is known about emerging adult Latinas and their prenatal care experiences, the purpose of this study was to identify actual and perceived prenatal care barriers in a sample of 54 emerging adult Latinas between 18 and 21 years of age. More than 95% of the sample experienced personal and institutional barriers when attempting to access prenatal care. Results from this study lend support for policy changes for time away from school or work to attend prenatal care and for group prenatal care.

  8. Formative research on HPV vaccine acceptability among Latina farmworkers.

    PubMed

    Luque, John S; Castañeda, Heide; Tyson, Dinorah Martinez; Vargas, Natalia; Meade, Cathy D

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the barriers and benefits to human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in a low-income, Latina farmworker population in central Florida. This study reports on formative qualitative research conducted on perceptions of benefits, barriers, costs, place, and promotion related to the HPV vaccine from surveys and interviews with a sample of 46 low-income, Latina farm workers and 19 health care workers serving this population. It was found that Latina farmworkers hold many misperceptions about the HPV vaccine and the potential links between HPV infection and cervical cancer. In addition, it was observed that HPV vaccination intention was inversely related to concerns about adolescent sexual behavior and low perceived risk of infection but might be positively influenced by belief in illness prevention and physician recommendation. These findings add to the growing research on HPV vaccine acceptability among Latina subgroups to inform intervention development, marketing materials, education, and policy. PMID:21881079

  9. The Latina Paradox: An Opportunity for Restructuring Prenatal Care Delivery

    PubMed Central

    McGlade, Michael S.; Saha, Somnath; Dahlstrom, Marie E.

    2004-01-01

    Latina mothers in the United States enjoy surprisingly favorable birth outcomes despite their social disadvantages. This “Latina paradox” is particularly evident among Mexican-born women. The social and cultural factors that contribute to this paradox are maintained by community networks—informal systems of prenatal care that are composed of family, friends, community members, and lay health workers. This informal system confers protective factors that provide a behavioral context for healthy births. US-born Latinas are losing this protection, although it could be maintained with the support of community-based informal care systems. We recommend steps to harness the benefits of informal systems of prenatal care in Latino communities to meet the increasing needs of pregnant Latina women. PMID:15569952

  10. Latina and Non-Latina Mothers' Perceived Health Barriers and Benefits and Their Relationship to Children's Health Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Highland, Krista B; Lundahl, Alyssa; Kidwell, Katherine M; Hankey, Maren; Caballos, Miguel; McChargue, Dennis

    2016-06-01

    Objectives Disparities exist in rates of overweight/obesity between Latino and non-Latino populations. Attention should be given to risk factors that may be modifiable through interventions involving both the parent and child. The current study sought to identify ethnic differences in parental health beliefs and their relation to children's health behaviors. Methods Latina and non-Latina mothers (N = 203) at rural and urban clinics and health departments completed self-report questionnaires. Key information included beliefs about barriers and benefits to health practices and children's health behaviors. Results Children of Latina mothers consumed significantly more soda and fried foods and exercised less than children of non-Latina mothers. Latina mothers were significantly more likely to perceive barriers to healthy eating and significantly less likely to perceive benefits to healthy eating and physical activity than non-Latina mothers. Ethnicity mediated the relationship between maternal views of health benefits and soda consumption. Conclusions Policy changes are needed to promote health education and increase the accessibility of healthy foods and safe places to exercise for Latino families. PMID:27003152

  11. Effects of ethnic targeting on the perceived effectiveness of cancer prevention messages among latinas and non-latina white women.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, A Susana

    2013-01-01

    In general, efforts to target Latinos are made through Spanish-language messages, yet 75% of U.S. Latinos are bilingual or English dominant. Acculturation (adapting mainstream traits) is associated with increased lifestyle-related risk behaviors. Latinos maintain cultural traits and ethnic identification even as they appear to acculturate (e.g., through language). This raises questions about how to communicate health information to more-acculturated Latinos who are not reached by traditional Spanish outreach yet may not identify with general-market messages. This study tested the relative efficacy of English-language messages targeted to Latinas, compared with general-market messages, among highly acculturated Latina women and non-Latina White women. In this pair of online experiments, Latinas (n = 715) and non-Latina White women (n = 704) rated the perceived effectiveness of general-market versus Latina-targeted Pap smear and mammogram public service announcements. In 1 of 2 experiments ethnically targeted messages were rated relatively more effective for the intended audience and equally effective for the general audience. The author discusses implications for how campaigns reach U.S. Latinos across the acculturation spectrum.

  12. Latina and Non-Latina Mothers' Perceived Health Barriers and Benefits and Their Relationship to Children's Health Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Highland, Krista B; Lundahl, Alyssa; Kidwell, Katherine M; Hankey, Maren; Caballos, Miguel; McChargue, Dennis

    2016-06-01

    Objectives Disparities exist in rates of overweight/obesity between Latino and non-Latino populations. Attention should be given to risk factors that may be modifiable through interventions involving both the parent and child. The current study sought to identify ethnic differences in parental health beliefs and their relation to children's health behaviors. Methods Latina and non-Latina mothers (N = 203) at rural and urban clinics and health departments completed self-report questionnaires. Key information included beliefs about barriers and benefits to health practices and children's health behaviors. Results Children of Latina mothers consumed significantly more soda and fried foods and exercised less than children of non-Latina mothers. Latina mothers were significantly more likely to perceive barriers to healthy eating and significantly less likely to perceive benefits to healthy eating and physical activity than non-Latina mothers. Ethnicity mediated the relationship between maternal views of health benefits and soda consumption. Conclusions Policy changes are needed to promote health education and increase the accessibility of healthy foods and safe places to exercise for Latino families.

  13. Vaginal Douching Among Latinas: Practices and Meaning

    PubMed Central

    Baquero, María; Anderson, Matthew R.; Alvarez, Adelyn; Karasz, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Vaginal douching is widely practiced by American women, particularly among minority groups, and is associated with increased risk of pelvic and vaginal infections. This research sought to investigate vaginal hygiene practices and meaning associated with them among Latina women and adolescents. Study results would guide development of an intervention to decrease douching among Latinas. Methods In depth qualitative interviews conducted with English- and Spanish-speaking women aged 16–40, seeking care for any reason who reported douching within the last year (n = 34). Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and analyzed using qualitative methods. One-third of interviews were conducted in Spanish. Results Two explanatory models for douching motives emerged: one stressed cosmetic benefits; the other, infection prevention and control. Most women reported douching to eliminate menstrual residue; a small number reported douching in context of sexual intercourse or vaginal symptoms. Many were unaware of associated health risks. Respondents typically learned about douching from female family members and friends. Male partners were described as having little to no involvement in the decision to douche. Women varied in their willingness to stop douching. Two-thirds reported receiving harm reduction messages about “overdouching”. About half indicated previous discussion about douching with health care providers; some had reduced frequency in response to counseling. A number of previously unreported vaginal hygiene practices and products were described, including use of a range of traditional hygiene practices, and products imported from outside the US. Conclusions Respondents expressed a range of commitment to douching. Counseling messages acknowledging benefits women perceive as well as health risks should be developed and delivered tailored to individual beliefs. Further research is needed to assess prevalence and safety of previously unreported practices

  14. The Role of Parents and Partners in the Pregnancy Behaviors of Young Latinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliam, Melissa L.

    2007-01-01

    Pregnancy among young Latinas demands attention. These teens have higher birthrates than other teen populations. Seven focus groups (N = 40) were conducted with Latinas to explore how relationships between young Latinas and their mothers, fathers, and male partners contribute to teen pregnancy. ATLAS/ti (a qualitative data analysis software…

  15. Safe, Affirming, and Productive Spaces: Classroom Engagement among Latina High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kristy S.

    2013-01-01

    Responding to recent reports that Latina students often lack feelings of belonging at school and are dropping out in increasing numbers, this study explores how classroom environments influence engagement or disengagement among Latina students. Through case studies with five Latina 10th-grade students, this research examines how variations in the…

  16. Examining Education for Latinas/os in Chicago: A CRT/LatCrit Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davila, Erica R.; de Bradley, Ann Aviles

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the sociopolitical context of education policy, particularly as it relates to Latina/o education. The authors highlight the status of Latinas/os within the Chicago Public Schools (CPS) to examine the impact of education policy designed to benefit few and disenfranchise most. They draw attention to the injustices of Latinas/os…

  17. Successful Latina Scientists and Engineers: Their Lived Mentoring Experiences and Career Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Miguel, Anitza M.; Kim, Mikyong Minsun

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing a phenomenological perspective and method, this study aimed to reveal the lived career mentoring experiences of Latinas in science and engineering and to understand how selected Latina scientists and engineers achieved high-level positions. Our in-depth interviews revealed that (a) it is important to have multiple mentors for Latinas'…

  18. Latina Teachers in Los Angeles: Navigating Race/Ethnic and Class Boundaries in Multiracial Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Glenda Marisol

    2011-01-01

    This is the first major study of the professional lives and workplace experiences of Latina teachers who work in urban, multiracial schools. While there is a plethora of research on Latina immigrant women working in factories, the informal economy and low skill-jobs in the U.S., the work experiences of college-educated Latina professionals, with a…

  19. Soy Mujer!: A Case Study for Understanding Latina Achievement in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Latinas are one of fastest growing segments of the population in the United States, which clearly shows a need to better understand and support education for Latinas within higher education. This study sought to understand the process for and experience of Latinas' academic achievement within higher education. The study focused particularly…

  20. Motivation of Latina/o Students in Algebra I: Intertwining Research and Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Elsa Cantu

    2011-01-01

    Latinas/os, the largest and fastest growing minority ethnic group in the United States (impels research that focuses on the education of Latinas/os and the need to reduce the achievement gap that persists between Latinas/os and other groups. Such research has gained in popularity; however, it is still very limited. I use my teaching experience…

  1. High-Stakes Testing and Latina/o Students: Creating a Hierarchy of College Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruecker, Todd

    2013-01-01

    This article examines how high-stakes testing policies can constrain the way teachers at predominately Latina/o high schools teach literacy and subsequently influence the success of Latina/o students at college. It is based on a year and a half study of seven Latina/o students making transition from a high school to a community college or…

  2. #Hermandad: Twitter as a Counter-Space for Latina Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernández, Estee

    2015-01-01

    Latinas are significantly underrepresented in doctoral programs in U.S. higher education institutions. While pursuing doctoral studies is a challenging experience for anyone, Latina doctoral students are particularly burdened with additional stressors in an academic environment that does not support Latina/o cultural values, such as…

  3. Increasing Latina/o Students' Baccalaureate Attainment: A Focus on Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oseguera, Leticia; Locks, Angela M.; Vega, Irene I.

    2009-01-01

    Notwithstanding years of retention efforts, graduation rates of Latinas/os remain alarmingly low. The purpose of this review is threefold. First, the authors go beyond traditional theory and highlight those scholars who shed new information on retention for Latina/o students. Second, they summarize factors that specifically affect Latina/o…

  4. Acculturation and Sexual Risk Behaviors among Latina Adolescents Transitioning to Young Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jieha; Hahm, Hyeouk Chris

    2010-01-01

    Latinas in the United States are at a disproportionate risk for STDs and sexual risk behaviors. Among Latinas, acculturation has been found to be one of the most important predictors of these behaviors. Therefore, this study examined the longitudinal association between Latina adolescents' level of acculturation and multiple sexual risk outcomes,…

  5. The Career Development of Latina Women Achieving the Position of Public High School Principal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palacio, Consuelo A.

    2013-01-01

    For this qualitative study, I used the lens of the Social Cognitive Career Theory to investigate the lived experiences of Latina women navigating their career paths into the roles of public high school principals. Latina women are underrepresented and in some states they are not represented at all. Few Latina women have secured the position of…

  6. Making the Rice: Latina Performance "Testimonios" of Hybridity, Assimilation, and Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correa, Ellen; Lovegrove, Dawn

    2012-01-01

    This performance "testimonio" is the result of collaboration between two U.S. Latina graduate students/ university instructors: a Latina of Puerto Rican descent and a white Chicana. It is a dialogue in which the authors "come together to engage our differences, face-to-face, and work to find common ground" (The Latina Feminist Group, 2001, p. 1).…

  7. Latinas in Higher Education: An Interpretive Study of Experiential Influences That Impact Their Life Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres-Capeles, Belkis

    2012-01-01

    This basic interpretive qualitative study used individual semi-structured interviews to explore and understand the experiences of seven self-identified Latina participants, who reside in Northeast Ohio and belong to a volunteer organization promoting professional Latinas. The study used Latina Critical Race theory and feminist perspectives to…

  8. The Latina/o Pathway to the Ph.D.: Abriendo Caminos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellanos, Jeanett, Ed.; Gloria, Alberta M., Ed.; Kamimura, Mark, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This is the first book specifically to engage with the absence of Latinas/os in doctoral studies. It proposes educational and administrative strategies to open up the pipeline, and institutional practices to ensure access, support, models and training for Latinas/os aspiring to the Ph.D. The under-education of Latina/o youth begins early. Given…

  9. Latina College Students: Issues and Challenges for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Adele Lozano; Guido-DiBrito, Florence; Torres, Vasti; Talbot, Donna

    2000-01-01

    Argues that Latina college and university students face distinct challenges and barriers to participation in higher education. Explores various Latina student issues including "labeling," barriers, and factors contributing to success. Examines effective strategies for student and academic affairs administrators to support Latina success in higher…

  10. Latina/os in Rhetoric and Composition: Learning from Their Experiences with Language Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavazos, Alyssa Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    "Latina/os in Rhetoric and Composition: Learning from their Experiences with Language Diversity" explores how Latina/o academics' experiences with language difference contributes to their Latina/o academic identity and success in academe while remaining connected to their heritage language and cultural background. Using qualitative…

  11. Maternal Stress and Efficacy for Latina Mothers with Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denney, Maria K.; Okamoto, Yukari; Singer, George H. S.; Brenner, Mary E.; Barkley, Steven C.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the levels of maternal stress and efficacy for Spanish- and English-speaking Latina mothers whose infants were in neonatal intensive care. Thirty-two Latina mothers participated in the study. Significant group differences were found between Spanish-and English-speaking Latina mothers. More stress was experienced by Spanish-…

  12. Cervical Cancer Screening Interventions for U.S. Latinas: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Jacqueline; Dattalo, Patrick; Crowley, Meghan

    2012-01-01

    The high cervical cancer mortality rate among Latinas compared with other ethnic groups in the United States is of major concern. Latina women are almost twice as likely to die from cervical cancer as non-Hispanic white women. To improve Latina cervical cancer screening rates, interventions have been developed and tested. This systematic review…

  13. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to Understand Cervical Cancer Screening among Latinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roncancio, Angelica M.; Ward, Kristy K.; Sanchez, Ingrid A.; Cano, Miguel A.; Byrd, Theresa L.; Vernon, Sally W.; Fernandez-Esquer, Maria Eugenia; Fernandez, Maria E.

    2015-01-01

    To reduce the high incidence of cervical cancer among Latinas in the United States it is important to understand factors that predict screening behavior. The aim of this study was to test the utility of theory of planned behavior in predicting cervical cancer screening among a group of Latinas. A sample of Latinas (N = 614) completed a baseline…

  14. Culture-Specific Assets to Consider when Counseling Latina/o Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villalba, Jose A., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Strength-based cultural considerations for counseling Latina/o children and adolescents are not well articulated in the literature. Furthermore, research and demographic data indicate concerns for Latinas/os, such as acculturative stress and discrimination. This article describes treatment applications focused on Latina/o youth's cultural…

  15. Promoting College Access among Latina/o English Language Learners: Implications for Professional School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Amy L.; Pérusse, Rachelle; Rojas, Eliana D.

    2015-01-01

    According to the U.S. Department of Education (2010), Latina/o English language learners (ELL students) are less likely to complete high school and attend college compared to their White non-Latina/o peers. Numerous factors affect Latina/o ELL students' academic achievement, including insufficient resources, acculturation issues, attitudinal…

  16. HPV Vaccine Awareness, Barriers, Intentions, and Uptake in Latina Women.

    PubMed

    Lechuga, Julia; Vera-Cala, Lina; Martinez-Donate, Ana

    2016-02-01

    Latina women are at heightened risk of cervical cancer incidence and mortality. The human papillomavirus (HPV) is the principal cause of the majority of cervical cancer cases. A vaccine that protects against HPV was licensed in 2006. Eight years post-licensure, mixed research findings exist regarding the factors that predict vaccine uptake in Latinas. We conducted a population-based phone survey with a random sample of 296 Latinas living in a Midwestern U.S. City. Intention to vaccinate was significantly associated with health care provider recommendations, worry about side effects, knowing other parents have vaccinated, perceived severity of HPV, and worry that daughter may become sexually active following vaccination. Worry that daughter may become sexually active was the only factor related to vaccine uptake. Findings suggest that training providers to discuss the low risk of severe side effects, consequences of persistent HPV, and sexuality related concerns with Latino women may encourage vaccination. PMID:25432149

  17. Practices That Reduce the Latina Survival Disparity After Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, J. Emilio; Ang, Alfonzo; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Latina breast cancer patients are 20 percent more likely to die within 5 years after diagnosis compared with white women, even though they have a lower incidence of breast cancer, lower general mortality rates, and some better health behaviors. Existing data only examine disparities in the utilization of breast cancer care; this research expands the study question to which utilization factors drive the shorter survival in Latina women compared with white women. Methods This longitudinal linked Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare cohort study examined early stage breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1992 and 2000 and followed for 5–11 years after diagnosis (N=44,999). Modifiable utilization factors included consistent visits to primary care providers and to specialists after diagnosis, consistent post-diagnosis mammograms, and receipt of initial care consistent with current standards of care. Results Of the four utilization factors potentially driving this disparity, a lack of consistent post-diagnosis mammograms was the strongest driver of the Latina breast cancer survival disparity. Consistent mammograms attenuated the hazard of death from 23% [hazard ratio, HR, (95% confidence interval, 95%CI)=1.23 (1.1,1.4)] to a nonsignificant 12% [HR (95%CI)=1.12 (0.7,1.3)] and reduced the excess hazard of death in Latina women by 55%. Effect modification identified that visits to primary care providers have a greater protective impact on the survival of Latina compared to white women [HR (95%CI)=0.9 (0.9,0.9)]. Conclusions We provide evidence that undetected new or recurrent breast cancers due to less consistent post-diagnosis mammograms contribute substantially to the long-observed Latina survival disadvantage. Interventions involving primary care providers may be especially beneficial to this population. PMID:24106867

  18. Social support and physical activity change in Latinas: Results from the Seamos Saludables trial

    PubMed Central

    Marquez, Becky; Dunsiger, Shira I.; Pekmezi, Dori; Larsen, Britta A.; Marcus, Bess H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Family responsibilities and poor social support are barriers to physical activity among Latinas. This study evaluated the effects of a home- and print-based intervention on social support, moderating effects of familial ties on support and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and mediating effects of support on MVPA. Methods Participants were randomized to receive through the mail either individually tailored physical activity intervention or general wellness print materials. Familial ties and social support were assessed by marital and child status and the social support for physical activity measure, respectively. MVPA was measured using the 7-day Physical Activity Recall Interview and accelerometer. Assessments were conducted at baseline, 6 months post-treatment, and 12 months follow-up. Results Participants (n=266; 40.6 ± 9.9 years old) were mostly immigrant and Spanish-speaking Latinas. The intervention group achieved greater increases in family and friend support compared to the wellness control group from baseline to post-treatment and follow-up (p<0.05). Intervention changes in support did not depend on marital or child status. The intervention also increased minutes per week of MVPA more than the wellness control (p<0.05) and the effect did not depend on marital or child status. There were significant indirect effects of treatment, indicating the intervention achieved greater increases in MVPA by increasing family (ab=5.21, SE=2.94, 95% CI=0.91–14.11) and friend (ab=6.83, SE=5.15, 95% CI=0.16–20.56) support. Conclusions The intervention improved and sustained support from family and friends and MVPA irrespective of familial ties. Social support mediated increases in MVPA. PMID:26863464

  19. Latina mothers' influences on child appetite regulation.

    PubMed

    Silva Garcia, Karina; Power, Thomas G; Fisher, Jennifer Orlet; O'Connor, Teresia M; Hughes, Sheryl O

    2016-08-01

    Parents influence child weight through interactions that shape the development of child eating behaviors. In this study we examined the association between maternal autonomy promoting serving practices and child appetite regulation. We predicted that maternal autonomy promoting serving practices would be positively associated with child appetite regulation. Participants were low-income Latino children-a group at high risk for the development of childhood obesity. A total of 186 low-income Latina mothers and their 4-5 year old children came to a laboratory on two separate days. On the first day, mothers and children chose foods for a meal from a buffet and were audio/videotaped so that maternal autonomy promoting serving practices could be later coded. On the second day, children completed the Eating in the Absence of Hunger (EAH) task to measure child appetite regulation. Mothers also completed the Child Eating Behavior Questionnaire (CEBQ) to measure other aspects of child appetite regulation (food responsiveness, satiety responsiveness, and emotional overeating). Maternal autonomy promotion during serving was assessed using seven separate measures of child and maternal behavior. Principal components analyses of these serving measures yielded three components: allows child choice, child serves food, and mother does not restrict. Consistent with hypotheses, maternal autonomy promoting serving practices (i.e., allows child choice and does not restrict) were negatively associated with maternal reports of child food responsiveness and emotional overeating (CEBQ). The results for the EAH task were more complex-mothers who were autonomy promoting in their serving practices had children who ate the most in the absence of hunger, but this linear effect was moderated somewhat by a quadratic effect, with moderate levels of autonomy promotion during serving associated with the greatest child EAH. PMID:27083128

  20. Multiple Influences: Latinas, Middle School Science, and School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the multiple school and school science experiences of eight Latina students of Central American descent in a tracked, urbanized, middle school setting. Framed by a sociocultural perspective, I describe how eight seventh and eighth grade Latino girls interacted with school science. Implications for the concept "science for…

  1. Getting Personal: Progress and Pitfalls in HIV Prevention among Latinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaro, Hortensia; Raj, Anita; Reed, Elizabeth; Ulibarri, Monica

    2011-01-01

    This article first presents the political, personal, and epidemiological context of Hortensia Amaro's 1988 publication in "Psychology of Women Quarterly" ("PWQ"), "Considerations for Prevention of HIV Infection Among Hispanic Women" (Amaro, 1988). Second, it provides a brief summary of progress in HIV prevention with Latinas. The third section…

  2. Difficult Dialogues: Interviewer, White Inner Voice, and Latina Interviewee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spanakis, Nicole C.

    2004-01-01

    Clinical psychology trainees attain multicultural competence not only by reading the relevant literature but also by working directly with multiculturally diverse clients. This article is an examination of this type of interaction that occurred between the author (a doctoral clinical psychology trainee) and a Latina.

  3. Latinas without Work: Family, Occupational, and Economic Stress Following Unemployment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Gloria J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined stressors in family, occupational, and economic domains among 114 Latinas following job loss. Stressors from the occupational stress domain were the greatest source for these women. Women who valued the job they lost and who were older reported the highest level of occupational stress. (Author/BH)

  4. Immigrant Latina Mothers' Participation in a Community Mathematization Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Craig

    2008-01-01

    This paper shows how Latina, immigrant mothers expanded their mathematical boundaries by participating in a community mathematization project. These mothers were not only participants, but also curriculum designers in collaboration with university researchers. By involving the mothers in the design of the project, researchers improved the…

  5. Sexuality Education among Latinas: Experiences, Preferences, Attitudes and Risk Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojas-Guyler, Liliana; King, Keith A.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated sexuality topics discussed by parents, sources of sexuality education, sexual risk behaviors, and attitudes about who should educate children about sexuality among a sample of 204 adult Latinas. Nearly half of sexually active women (having ever had sex) reported condom use and 36.7% reported discussing sexual history with…

  6. "Mujerista" Mentoring for Chicanas/Latinas in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villaseñor, María Joaquina; Reyes, María Estefani; Muñoz, Imelda

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we suggest that just as there are barriers and challenges that are particular to Chicanas/Latinas in terms of student retention and persistence, so must the mentoring offered to these students take into account their particular social, cultural, and gendered contexts. In response, we argue for a model of "mujerista"…

  7. Weaving Authenticity and Legitimacy: Latina Faculty Peer Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Núñez, Anne-Marie; Murakami, Elizabeth T.; Gonzales, Leslie D.

    2015-01-01

    As an alternative to typical top-down mentoring models, the authors advance a conception of peer mentoring that is based on research about collectivist strategies that Latina faculty employ to navigate the academy. The authors advance recommendations for institutional agents to support mentoring for faculty who are members of historically…

  8. Perceptions of Latinas on the Traditional Prenatal Genetic Counseling Model.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Stephanie; Noblin, Sarah Jane; Lemons, Jennifer; Peterson, Susan K; Carreno, Carlos; Harbison, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    The traditional genetic counseling model encompasses an individualized counseling session that includes the presentation of information about genes, chromosomes, personalized risk assessment, and genetic testing and screening options. Counselors are challenged to balance the provision of enough basic genetic information to ensure clients' understanding of the genetic condition in question with a personalized discussion of what this information means to them. This study explored the perceptions Latinas have about prenatal genetic counseling sessions and aimed to determine if they had preferences about the delivery of care. Data were collected through focus groups and one-on-one, semi-structured interviews of 25 Spanish speaking Latinas who received genetic counseling during their current pregnancy. We implemented grounded theory to evaluate participant responses, and were able to identify common emergent themes. Several themes were identified including an overall satisfaction with their prenatal genetic counseling appointment, desire for a healthy baby, peace of mind following their appointment, lack of desire for invasive testing, and faith in God. Several participants stated a preference for group genetic counseling over the traditional individual genetic counseling model. Our data indicate that Latinas value the information presented at prenatal genetic counseling appointments despite disinterest in pursuing genetic testing or screening and suggest that group prenatal genetic counseling may be an effective alternative to the traditional genetic counseling model in the Latina population. PMID:25475921

  9. A Longitudinal Analysis of Latina/o Students' Academic Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordes-Edgar, Veronica; Arredondo, Patricia; Kurpius, Sharon Robinson; Rund, James

    2011-01-01

    This was a 4.5-year follow-up study of university persistence involving 71 Latina/o students, who were initially surveyed as 1st-semester freshmen. Academic (high school grade point average [GPA], entrance exam scores, and college GPA) and nonacademic (self-beliefs, social support, and academic persistence decisions) factors were examined to…

  10. The Educational Journey of a Latina Feminist Community Psychologist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzman, Bianca

    2012-01-01

    This narrative describes how my educational journey led me to become a Latina feminist community psychologist. My experiences as a Central American woman living in the United States has made me deeply committed to feminist community values and the importance of social justice. Throughout the journey, I connect how immigration status, culture, and…

  11. Latina Early Childhood Teachers Negotiating Language Policies "en La Frontera"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdez, Verónica E.

    2014-01-01

    Grounded in new language policy studies (McCarty, Collins, & Hopson, 2011), this qualitative study examines two bilingual Latina preschool teachers' language views, experiences, skills, and goals in a Texas/Mexico border community to determine how these factors mediate their choice to use Spanish/English in their instructional practices…

  12. Troubled Relationships: High-Risk Latina Adolescents and Nonresident Fathers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Vera; Corona, Rosalie

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study explored 18 high-risk adolescent Latinas' perceptions of their relationships with nonresident fathers. A number of interrelated factors--early childhood memories, mothers' interpretations, and fathers' behaviors--shaped girls' perceptions, which in turn, influenced how they interacted with fathers. Some girls struggled to…

  13. Culturally Responsive Professional Development for Latinas in Family Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figuerido, Jody

    2012-01-01

    Latina Family Child Care (FCC) Educators provide early education and care (EEC) for children in their homes. High quality EEC programs, including the FCC setting, help children form a firm foundation for future learning, resulting in positive outcomes. In order to provide this level of programming, educators must participate in specialized…

  14. The Girl Game Company: Engaging Latina Girls in Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denner, Jill; Bean, Steve; Martinez, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the Girl Game Company's involvement in teaching Latina girls to design and program computer games while building a network of support to help them pursue IT courses and careers. Afterschool programs like the Girl Game Company can fill an important gap by providing opportunities for underserved youth to build IT fluency. A…

  15. Perceptions of Latinas on the Traditional Prenatal Genetic Counseling Model.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Stephanie; Noblin, Sarah Jane; Lemons, Jennifer; Peterson, Susan K; Carreno, Carlos; Harbison, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    The traditional genetic counseling model encompasses an individualized counseling session that includes the presentation of information about genes, chromosomes, personalized risk assessment, and genetic testing and screening options. Counselors are challenged to balance the provision of enough basic genetic information to ensure clients' understanding of the genetic condition in question with a personalized discussion of what this information means to them. This study explored the perceptions Latinas have about prenatal genetic counseling sessions and aimed to determine if they had preferences about the delivery of care. Data were collected through focus groups and one-on-one, semi-structured interviews of 25 Spanish speaking Latinas who received genetic counseling during their current pregnancy. We implemented grounded theory to evaluate participant responses, and were able to identify common emergent themes. Several themes were identified including an overall satisfaction with their prenatal genetic counseling appointment, desire for a healthy baby, peace of mind following their appointment, lack of desire for invasive testing, and faith in God. Several participants stated a preference for group genetic counseling over the traditional individual genetic counseling model. Our data indicate that Latinas value the information presented at prenatal genetic counseling appointments despite disinterest in pursuing genetic testing or screening and suggest that group prenatal genetic counseling may be an effective alternative to the traditional genetic counseling model in the Latina population.

  16. Increasing Latina/o College Completion: Mistakes and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Kenneth P.; Ballysingh, Tracy Arambula

    2012-01-01

    In this essay, the authors accomplish three tasks: (a) identify common limitations of programs designed to increase the success rates of Latina/o college students; (b) describe the common characteristics of programs that exhibit effective practice; and (c) provide a framework to guide colleges and universities in designing effective program…

  17. Egg Contribution Towards the Diet of Pregnant Latinas

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez-Millán, Ángela; Hromi-Fiedler, Amber; Damio, Grace; Segura-Pérez, Sofia; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Proper nutrition during gestation is important to prevent adverse pregnancy outcomes. Eggs contain many important nutrients necessary for fetal development and human survival. Three focus groups were conducted with Latina women living in Connecticut to identify cultural beliefs toward egg consumption during pregnancy, traditional egg dishes, and methods of preparation. A cross-sectional study was then carried out with a sample of predominately Puerto Rican pregnant Latinas (N = 241) to identify the frequency of consumption of eggs and egg-containing dishes as well as methods of preparation using a tailored food frequency questionnaire modified for this population. Paired sample t-tests were used to examine if there were differences in weekly mean egg intake patterns between the year prior to the pregnancy and during pregnancy based on a Food Frequency Questionnaire. Women were categorized into eggs consumers and non-consumers if they consumed or did not consume eggs during the previous day based on 24-hour recall data. Independent-sample t-test and chi-square cross-tabulation analyses were conducted to examine the association between egg consumption and nutrient intake categories. Results showed that eggs and egg-containing traditional dishes are consumed by Latinas before and during pregnancy. Egg consumers had higher intakes of protein, fat, vitamin K, vitamin E, selenium, beta carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin, cholesterol, total polyunsaturated fatty acids, and docosahexaenoic acid. Eggs contribute significantly to the diet of pregnant Latinas. PMID:21883065

  18. Latina/o Dropouts: Generating Community Cultural Wealth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burciaga, Rebeca; Erbstein, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    This article builds upon a community cultural wealth framework (Yosso, 2005) to discuss how strategies for school persistence are articulated, cultivated and employed through individual aspirations and practices. The analysis draws from testimonios of six Latina/o young adults between the ages of 18 and 20 living in California's 9-County…

  19. Sustaining Latina Student Organizations: An Exploratory Instrumental Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellanos, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing the exploratory case study methodology, the author examines the conditions that support and limit a Latina-based student organization at a predominately White institution of higher education. Seven organizational structures were found to influence the organization's ability to advance its aims, from interviews, documents, observations,…

  20. School Securitization and Latina/o Educational Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peguero, Anthony A.; Portillos, Edwardo L.; González, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Increasing control and security has become a common strategy to address school violence. Some argue, however, that increasing social control has detrimental consequences for racial and ethnic minorities, especially Latinas/os. This study utilizes mixed methods to research the influence of school justice, fairness, order, and discipline may have on…

  1. Chicana/Latina "Testimonios" on Effects and Responses to Microaggressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Lindsay Perez; Cueva, Bert Maria

    2012-01-01

    "Testimonio" in educational research can reveal both the oppression that exists within educational institutions and the powerful efforts in which students of color engage to challenge and transform those spaces. We utilize "testimonio" as a methodological approach to understand how undocumented and U.S.-born Chicana/Latina students experience the…

  2. Treatment Adherence among Latina Female Adolescent Suicide Attempters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Piacentini, John; Van Rossem, Ronan; Graae, Flemming; Cantwell, Coleen; Castro-Blanco, David; Feldman, Julie

    1999-01-01

    Disenfranchised Latina adolescents (N=140) and their mothers presenting at a large urban emergency room after a suicide attempt by the adolescent were assessed to examine treatment adherence. Predictor variables for treatment adherence were established. Results are discussed in relation to treatment session attendance. Implications for the…

  3. Multiple influences: Latinas, middle school science, and school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Carolyn

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the multiple school and school science experiences of eight Latina students of Central American descent in a tracked, urbanized, middle school setting. Framed by a sociocultural perspective, I describe how eight seventh and eighth grade Latino girls interacted with school science. Implications for the concept "science for all" are discussed.

  4. Mentoring Experiences and Latina/o University Student Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salas, Richard; Aragon, Antonette; Alandejani, Jehan; Timpson, William M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the experiences of 17 Latina/o students who participated in a university mentoring program that included academic and cultural resources, involvement, and leadership opportunities. The goal was to understand their lived experiences and their own perceptions of their academic success and persistence. An interpretive…

  5. Knowledge and Perceptions of Reproductive Health among Latinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojas-Guyler, Liliana; Price, Kimberly L. J.; Young, Kathleen; King, Keith A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess potential relationships among reproductive health knowledge, preventive health behaviors, perceived severity and risk of breast cancer, cervical cancer, and sexually transmitted infections and selected demographical variables and characteristics related to acculturation among Latina immigrants.…

  6. Mathematically Successful Latina and Latino Students: Stressors and Supports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Evelyn M.

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the school experiences of six mathematically successful Latina and Latino middle school students. I examined each student's experiences in depth and identified commonalities and differences among the students using qualitative research methods and a comparative case study design. I used a critical multiculturalism perspective…

  7. Teenage Pregnancy among Latinas: Examining Risk and Protective Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogan-Ates, Aysun; Carrion-Basham, Carla Y.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the role of three groups of risk and protective factors (e.g., individual, family, and extrafamilial) that are associated with teen pregnancy. Two groups of Latina adolescents (aged 15 to 19), nonpregnant/ nonparenting (NP; N = 48) and pregnant/parenting (P; N = 46), completed a demographic survey, an adolescent profile…

  8. A Qualitative Study of Resilient Latina/o College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavazos, Javier, Jr.; Johnson, Michael B.; Fielding, Cheryl; Cavazos, Alyssa G.; Castro, Veronica; Vela, Luti

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted with 11 Latina/o college students in order to provide insight into how these students develop a sense of resilience. Five factors from J. H. McMillan and D. F. Reed's (1994) concept of resiliency appeared to play an important role in these students' high academic achievement: high educational goals, support and…

  9. Racial Counternarratives and Latina Epistemologies in Relational Organizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonilla, Christopher Milk

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the perceptions and actions of working-class Latina family leaders as they promote their epistemological values during the community organizing of a "huerta" (vegetable garden) in an urban bilingual school. I focus on how their racial counternarratives are embedded in the intersected oppression of their local context…

  10. Falling through the Cracks: Critical Transitions in the Latina/o Educational Pipeline. 2006 Latina/o Education Summit Report. CSRC Research Report. Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Lindsay Perez; Huidor, Ofelia; Malagon, Maria C.; Sanchez, Gloria; Solorzano, Daniel G.

    2006-01-01

    This report has explores the research literature on Latina/o students throughout the four segments of the educational pipeline: K-12, community college, undergraduate, and graduate. The Latina/o educational pipeline does not ensure a smooth flow of students from one end of the conduit to the other, but a broken trickle of fewer and fewer students…

  11. Latina Women: How They Succeed Factors That Influence the Career Advancement of Latina Women in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crespo, Noemi

    2013-01-01

    Demographic changes among the Hispanic population across the United States depict evidence that there is a need across all segments of higher education to develop a diverse pool of administrative leaders that are representative of the rapidly changing population. This study aims to understand Latina women in higher education, their career paths to…

  12. HIV Risk Behaviors Among Latina Women Tested for HIV in Florida by Country of Birth, 2012.

    PubMed

    Taveras, Janelle; Trepka, Mary Jo; Khan, Hafiz; Madhivanan, Purnima; Gollub, Erica L; Devieux, Jessy

    2016-10-01

    Latina women in the United States (US) are disproportionately affected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Data are limited on the risk differences in HIV among Latinas by country of birth. This paper describes the risk behaviors among Latina women tested for HIV at public sites in Florida. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the demographic characteristics associated with the report of specific risk behaviors. Results indicate that foreign-born Latina women were 54 % less likely to report partner risk [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.40, 0.54] than US-born Latina women. Reported risk behaviors varied by race/ethnicity, US-born versus foreign-born status, and by Latina country of origin. Knowledge of these differences can aid in targeting HIV prevention messaging, program decision-making, and allocation of resources, corresponding to the central approach of High Impact Prevention and the National HIV/AIDS Strategy.

  13. Breast Cancer Treatment Decision Making among Latinas and non-Latina Whites: A Communication Model Predicting Decisional Outcomes and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Yanez, Betina; Stanton, Annette L.; Maly, Rose C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Deciding among medical treatment options is a pivotal event following cancer diagnosis, a task that can be particularly daunting for individuals uncomfortable with communication in a medical context. Few studies have explored the surgical decision-making process and associated outcomes among Latinas. We propose a model to elucidate pathways though which acculturation (indicated by language use) and reports of communication effectiveness specific to medical decision making contribute to decisional outcomes (i.e., congruency between preferred and actual involvement in decision making, treatment satisfaction) and quality of life among Latinas and non-Latina White women with breast cancer. Methods Latinas (N = 326) and non-Latina Whites (N = 168) completed measures six months after breast cancer diagnosis, and quality of life was assessed 18 months after diagnosis. Structural equation modeling was used to examine relationships between language use, communication effectiveness, and outcomes. Results Among Latinas, 63% reported congruency in decision making, whereas 76% of non-Latina Whites reported congruency. In Latinas, greater use of English was related to better reported communication effectiveness. Effectiveness in communication was not related to congruency in decision making, but several indicators of effectiveness in communication were related to greater treatment satisfaction, as was greater congruency in decision making. Greater treatment satisfaction predicted more favorable quality of life. The final model fit the data well only for Latinas. Differences in quality of life and effectiveness in communication were observed between racial/ethnic groups. Conclusions Findings underscore the importance of developing targeted interventions for physicians and Latinas with breast cancer to enhance communication in decision making. PMID:22746263

  14. The Differential Role of Youth Development Program Participation for Latina/o Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    Over the next 20 years, experts predict that the number of Latina/o children in the U.S. will double, so that by the year 2025, one in four school children will be Latina/o (White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans, 1998). Yet the academic achievement of Latina/os lags far behind that of other ethnic and racial…

  15. The influence of Marianismo on psychoanalytic work with Latinas. Transference and countertransference implications.

    PubMed

    Cofresí, Norma I

    2002-01-01

    Marianismo, the traditional sexual code of behavior for Latinas, specifies chastity before marriage, sexual passivity after marriage, and the subordination of women to men. In addition to describing traditional gender role expectations for Latinos, this paper discusses marianismo as an important organizer of various conflicts experienced by Latinas. It also presents selected case material from a psychoanalysis to illustrate the impact of Marianismo on the therapeutic process when both the analyst and the patient are Latinas.

  16. Psychosocial concerns among Latinas with life-limiting advanced cancers.

    PubMed

    Nedjat-Haiem, Frances R; Carrion, Iraida V; Lorenz, Karl A; Ell, Kathleen; Palinkas, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that limited dialogue in end-of-life (EOL) care can negatively impact decision-making and place of death. Furthermore, when vulnerable populations are faced with EOL cancer care, they experience issues resulting from previous gaps in services attributed to sociocultural and economic issues that influence EOL care. These conditions place an additional burden on disadvantaged populations which can cause distress, especially as disparate conditions continue to persist. Little is known about Latinos' psychosocial concerns that lead to distress in EOL care. The objective of this study is to explore Latinas' experiences with life-limiting cancer conditions to identify the EOL care concerns that impact their dying experience. This study used a phenomenological approach to explore the EOL care concerns of 24 Latinas receiving treatment for metastatic cancers in a public sector healthcare system in Los Angeles, California. In-depth interviews were recorded and transcribed, and qualitative analysis was performed using Atlas.ti software.

  17. Lessons learned from urban Latinas with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Adams, Carmen Rivera

    2003-07-01

    This study focused on Latinas (female Hispanics) with Type 2 diabetes because this disease has a high prevalence and incidence among this population and cultural norms may affect women's experiences with diabetes. The study used a descriptive phenomenology design with a purposive sample of 13 Latina volunteers recruited from a local community health center in southern New England. Data were collected via interviews in English or Spanish. Six themes emerged from the analysis: stress as a cause and effect; too little, too late; profound sadness, diabetic anger, and loss of control; obsession with diet; life under a magnifying glass; and religion as a lifeline. Further research should pursue development of a culturally relevant approach to the health care management of Latinos.

  18. "En Sus Proprias Palabras" ("In Their Own Words"): Latina Women's Perspectives on Enablers of HIV Testing Using Freelisting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Sharon D.; Sudha, S.; Herrera, Samantha; Ruiz, Carolina; Thomas, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Comprehensive information on the facilitators of HIV testing in Latino women (Latinas) in the Southeastern USA is lacking. Efforts to rectify this should include Latina perspectives on the issue. This study aimed to (1) solicit Latina perspectives using qualitative methodology and (2) characterise enablers of HIV testing follow-through.…

  19. Real Women Have Curves: A Longitudinal Investigation of TV and the Body Image Development of Latina Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schooler, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Contextualizing Latina girls' body image development requires an appreciation of mainstream body ideals, Latino/a cultural values, and the process by which Latina girls traverse the borders between them. The current study examines how media use and acculturation act across adolescence to shape the development of body image among Latina girls.…

  20. The Growing Educational Equity Gap for California's Latina/o Students. Latino Policy & Issues Brief. Number 29

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Lindsay Pérez; Vélez, Verónica N.; Solórzano, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    Although recent studies suggest that educational attainment for Latina/os has been improving, in this brief report the authors show that when demographic change is taken into consideration, it is clear that Latina/o students in California are not making gains but falling further behind. In California, approximately 60 percent of Latina/o students…

  1. Hispanic/Latina Women and AIDS: A Critical Perspective. JSRI Working Paper No. 36. JSRI Research & Publications Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasini-Caceres, Lydia; Cook, Amy Beth

    Women are a rapidly growing group of people with AIDS in the United States, and Hispanic/Latina and African American women are disproportionately represented. This paper reviews the literature on the epidemiology of AIDS/HIV infection among Latina women, children, and adolescents and discusses the needs of Latinas regarding AIDS prevention…

  2. Latina Mothers and Daughters: Ways of Knowing, Being, and Becoming in the Context of Bilingual Family Science Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayumova, Shakhnoza; Karsli, Elif; Allexsaht-Snider, Martha; Buxton, Cory

    2015-01-01

    Building on previous research of family engagement and using perspectives drawn from Chicana/Latina feminist theories, in this ethnographic study we explored how Latina mothers and daughters negotiated and contested multiple ways of knowing during bilingual science family workshops. Our research illustrated that critical pedagogies Latina mothers…

  3. Work Experiences of Latina Immigrants: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Eggerth, Donald E.; DeLaney, Sheli C.; Flynn, Michael A.; Jacobson, C. Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Almost half of the Latino immigrants working in the United States are women. However, studies concerning the work experiences of Latinas are almost absent in the literature. This article reports the findings from a qualitative study using eight focus groups (n = 53) of Latina immigrant workers. The focus group transcripts were analyzed using the grounded theory approach in which themes emerge from iterative readings of the transcripts by a group of investigators. This study identified themes related to excessive workload, familiar work/unfamiliar hazards, cultural tensions, lack of health care, pregnancy, sexual harassment, and family obligations/expectations. The responses of the Latina workers in this study clearly indicated that they live within a complex web of stressors, both as workers and as women. The increased economic opportunities that come with immigration to the United States are accompanied by many opportunities for exploitation, especially if they are undocumented. It is hoped that the findings of this study will raise awareness regarding these issues and spur further work in this area. PMID:26346566

  4. Beyond the Hispanic/Latina/o Label: Counseling Students from Four Representative Nations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannigan, Terence P.

    2016-01-01

    Clinicians working with students of Hispanic/Latina/o background may tend to categorize these students as Hispanic/Latino/a regardless of their or their ancestors' country of origin. This article challenges the wisdom of using such broad terminology, because it masks considerable differences among Hispanic/Latina/o students, and proposes instead…

  5. Reframing the School-to-Prison Pipeline: The Experiences of Latina/o Youth and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantoja, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that school-to-prison pipeline (SPP) research on Latina/os shows the existence of an interconnected system of policies and social practices, in and out of schools, punitive and non-punitive in nature, which together work to criminalize Latina/o students and their families. This intersection (Crenshaw, 1991) and multiplicity…

  6. Our Deliberate Success: Recognizing What Works for Latina/o Students across the Educational Pipeline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodríguez, Louie F.; Oseguera, Leticia

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify the best practices across the K-20 pipeline that work for Latina/o students for the purposes of developing a framework for Latina/o student success. The authors suggest that the field needs to be explicit when it comes to recognizing "what works" and encourage researchers, practitioners, and…

  7. Latina/o Student Perceptions of Post-Baccalaureate Education: Identifying Challenges to Increased Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Gary A.; Tollefson, Kaia

    2014-01-01

    The percentage of Latinas/os decreases at each stage in the educational pipeline and is especially proportionally low at the post-baccalaureate level. This study investigates the complexities of the quest to increase post-baccalaureate participation for Latina/o students. We present data on post-baccalaureate education by utilizing 2 comprehensive…

  8. Career Development for African American and Latina Females. ERIC/CUE Digest, Number 125

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiler, Jeanne

    Low-income African American and Latina adolescent females need extensive support for developing and implementing career plans. This digest discusses ways schools and other institutions can provide an education that furthers career development. Interventions that have been shown to be effective with disadvantaged African American and Latina female…

  9. School Counselors' Perceptions of Differences between Successful and Less Successful Latina/o High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vela, Javier Cavazos; Lu, Ming-Tsan P.; Gonzalez, Stacey L.; Smith, Robert L.; Azadi-Setayesh, Shaghayegh

    2015-01-01

    In this qualitative study, we conducted in-depth interviews with secondary school counselors to understand differences between successful and less successful Latina/o students. Using an ecological framework as a theoretical lens, we highlighted differences between successful and less successful Latina/o high school students consistent with…

  10. The Impact of Individual, Interpersonal, and Institutional Factors on Latina/o College Students' Life Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vela, Javier C.; Ikonomopoulos, James; Hinojosa, Karina; Gonzalez, Stacey L.; Duque, Omar; Calvillo, Megan

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript investigated the contributions of individual, interpersonal, and institutional factors on Latina/o college students' life satisfaction. Participants included 130 Latina/o students enrolled at a Hispanic Serving Institution. Results indicated that search for meaning in life, mentoring, and family support were significant predictors…

  11. Cultural Considerations in Providing Chemical Dependency Treatment for Latinas in Southern California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Elizabeth; Castillo, Paula; Van Fleet, Peggie; Laydon, Abraham J.

    La Casita is a culturally relevant 6-month residential substance abuse treatment program in southeast Los Angeles County (California) for low income Latina women. Most participants are second and third generation Latinas who clearly identify themselves as being Hispanic but behave in a bicultural manner. The average La Casita resident is 30 years…

  12. Talking about Ourselves, Talking about Our Mothers: Latina Prospective Teachers Narrate Their Life Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Mary Louise

    2010-01-01

    Through a Bakhtinian conceptual framework, this text explores Latina prospective teachers' life histories--their experiences at home, in their K-12 schooling, on campus in a Midwestern university, and in their teacher education program. Further, it shows how often, when asked about their own experiences, Latinas responded with stories of their…

  13. Latinas and Problem Solving: What They Say and What They Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerra, Paula; Lim, Woong

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors present three adolescent Latinas' perceptions of ideal mathematical competencies, their perception of their individual "abilities" in mathematics, and their work on a mathematics problem-solving task. Results indicate that these Latinas recognize flexible mathematics as the ideal mathematical competency in…

  14. Latinas and Postpartum Depression: Role of Partner Relationship, Additional Children, and Breastfeeding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassert, Silva; Kurpius, Sharon E. Robinson

    2011-01-01

    Breastfeeding, additional children, and partner relationship predicted postpartum depression among 59 Latinas who had an infant who was 6 months old or younger. The most powerful predictor was conflict with partner. Counselors working with Latinas experiencing postpartum depression should explore the partner relationship, particularly relationship…

  15. Health Behaviors Among Pregnant Latina Women at Risk for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a common complication of pregnancy, increases the risk of subsequent diabetes and obesity. Latina women have over twice the risk for developing GDM as compared to non-Latina white women. Health-promoting practices during pregnancy may improve metabolic status an...

  16. Understanding How Biculturalism Contributes to Latinas' Pursuit of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominguez, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    Latina/os are the fastest growing minority group in the United States and in California, yet they have not been able to maintain an adequate educational attainment and achievement level in comparison to other ethnic groups (Marin & Marin, 1991). Typically, Latinas are not able to achieve the amount of education they set out to accomplish…

  17. "Testimonios" of Latina Junior Faculty: Bridging Academia, Family, and Community Lives in the Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saldana, Lilliana Patricia; Castro-Villarreal, Felicia; Sosa, Erica

    2013-01-01

    Relying on Latina/Chicana feminist and critical race theories of identity, and "testimonio" as methodology of knowledge production (Latina Feminist Group, 2001), the authors examine the complexity of their professional and personal identities as academics and members of families and communities to theorize their common experiences as…

  18. Feasibility and Acceptability of a School-Based Coping Intervention for Latina Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Carolyn; Pintor, Jessie Kemmick; Lindgren, Sandi

    2010-01-01

    Latino girls (Latinas) experience disproportionate rates of emotional distress, including suicidal ideation, which may be indicative of inadequate coping abilities. Prevention of mental health problems, a U.S. public health priority, is particularly critical for Latina adolescents due to lack of access to mental health treatments. The purpose of…

  19. Discrimination against Latina/os: A Meta-Analysis of Individual-Level Resources and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Debbiesiu L.; Ahn, Soyeon

    2012-01-01

    This meta-analysis synthesizes the findings of 60 independent samples from 51 studies examining racial/ethnic discrimination against Latina/os in the United States. The purpose was to identify individual-level resources and outcomes that most strongly relate to discrimination. Discrimination against Latina/os significantly results in outcomes…

  20. Literacy Benefits for Latina/o Parents Engaged in a Spanish Literacy Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larrotta, Clarena; Ramirez, Ysabel

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study reports on a Latina/o parent literacy project teaching literacy lessons in Spanish to Latina mothers and their children enrolled at a public elementary school. The participating mothers study and practice reading strategies to later put them into practice with their children. Data sources include: Parents' reflective…

  1. Latina Faculty Transcending Barriers: Peer Mentoring in a Hispanic-Serving Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murakami, Elizabeth T.; Núñez, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors conducted a research metasynthesis of publications by a group of Latina tenure-track faculty participating in a peer mentoring group, the Research for the Educational Advancement of Latin@s (REAL) collaborative, housed in one Hispanic Serving Institution. Due to the small representation of Latinas in the academy, the…

  2. Latina/o Community Funds of Knowledge for Health and Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanoni, Joseph; Rucinski, Dianne; Flores, Jovita; Perez, Idida; Gomez, Guillermo; Davis, Rochelle; Jones, Rise

    2011-01-01

    Community organizing brings Latina/o families together to enhance repertoires of culturally relevant practices to promote health and curriculum. The Healthy Schools Campaign, a 4-year environmental justice partnership between public health researchers and Latina/o organizations in 2 neighborhoods of Chicago, was formed to confront the epidemics of…

  3. Latina Resilience in Higher Education: Contributing Factors Including Seasonal Farmworker Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graff, Cristina Santamaria; McCain, Terrence; Gomez-Vilchis, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Many Latina students overcome multiple obstacles to earn university degrees. Five married Latina women with children and seasonal farmworker backgrounds are the focus of this study which is analyzed through resiliency theory to understand factors contributing to their academic resilience. Variables connected to academic success are explored and…

  4. Positive Psychology and Familial Factors as Predictors of Latina/o Students' Psychological Grit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vela, Javier C.; Lu, Ming-Tsan P.; Lenz, A. Stephen; Hinojosa, Karina

    2015-01-01

    Positive psychology is a useful framework to understand Latina/o students' experiences. In the current study, we examined how presence of meaning in life, search for meaning in life, hope, and family importance influenced 128 Latina/o college students' psychological grit. We used the Meaning in Life Questionnaire (MLQ), Subjective Happiness Scale,…

  5. Latina/o Achievement at Predominantly White Universities: The Importance of Culture and Ethnic Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerezo, Alison; Chang, Tai

    2013-01-01

    In this exploratory study, the authors examined the influence of cultural fit on the achievement of Latina/o college students by testing whether cultural integration factors (i.e., cultural congruity, ethnic identity, connection with ethnic minority peers) predict college GPA (grade point average). Participants were 113 Latina/o students enrolled…

  6. Understanding Predictors of Enrollment in Advanced Placement (AP) Coursework among Latina/o Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavazos, Lionel Javier, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to (a) determine the extent to which Latina/o students' perceptions of support from high school teachers and counselors, as well as acculturation, predict enrollment in AP coursework; (b) examine Latina/o students' perceptions of different forms of support that appear to play a role in academic success…

  7. Factors Associated with Delayed Childbearing: From the Voices of Expectant Latina Adults and Teens in California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, M. Antonia; Ralph, Lauren; Minnis, Alexandra M.; Arons, Abigail; Marchi, Kristen S.; Lehrer, Jocelyn A.; Braveman, Paula A.; Brindis, Claire D.

    2010-01-01

    There has been limited research on the protective factors that help Latinas delay childbearing until adulthood. In-depth interviews were conducted with 65 pregnant Latina teenage and adult women in California who were about to have their first child. Lack of or inconsistent birth control use as teens was attributed to wanting or ambivalence toward…

  8. Examining the Precollege Attributes and Values of Latina/o Bachelor's Degree Attainers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerna, Oscar S.; Perez, Patricia A.; Saenz, Victor

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on understanding successful Latina/o college student retention at 4-year institutions. Deficit models fail to consider how Latina/o students use different forms of capital (i.e., social, cultural, economic, and human) in earning a degree. Using data from the UCLA's Cooperative Institutional Research Program, factors associated…

  9. Helping Latina/o Students Navigate the College Choice Process: Considerations for Secondary School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study utilized interviews with 20 Latina/o high school seniors and five secondary school counselors in South Texas to further understand how counselors help Latina/o students navigate their college choice process. Findings indicate counselors provided students with access to college information and facilitated university…

  10. "That "Fuego," That Fire in Their Stomach": Academically Successful Latinas/os and "Racial Opportunity Cost"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venzant Chambers, Terah T.; Locke, Leslie A.; Tagarao, Annel M.

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the racial opportunity cost of academic achievement for Latina/o students who graduated from urban high schools and participated in a larger study of 18 high-achieving students of color. The article focuses on the ways the school context influenced their success. Interviews with the seven Latina/o participants reveal that…

  11. Resisting the Dominant Narrative: The Role of Stories in Latina Educational Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujimoto, Maria Oropeza

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on how stories influence Latinas' motivation and resiliency toward academic success and how Latina parents support their daughters in resisting racial discrimination. In the spirit of Critical Race Theory, it concludes with a counterstory of hope and possibility about how higher education can create a space for all students…

  12. Perceived Educational Barriers, Cultural Fit, Coping Responses, and Psychological Well-Being of Latina Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gloria, Alberta M.; Castellanos, Jeanett; Orozco, Veronica

    2005-01-01

    Given the unique educational experiences and disproportional representation of Latinas in higher education, this study examined how Latinas' perception of educational barriers and cultural fit influenced their coping responses and subsequent well-being in college. Participants (N = 98) were primarily second-generation Mexican heritage women who…

  13. Understanding the Experiences of Latina/o Students: A Qualitative Study for Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavazos, Alyssa G.; Cavazos, Javier, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    A qualitative study with nine Latina/o college students was conducted to determine their experiences with their high school teachers. After careful data analysis, the following themes emerged: (a) some Latina/o students receive high expectations and others receive low expectations, (b) low expectations for non-AP students exist, and (c) some…

  14. High School Counselors' Support and Latina/o Students' Career Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vela, Javier Cavazos; Flamez, Brandé; Clark, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined the impact of high school counselors' support of Latina/o students' career development outcomes. We used a quantitative, predictive design to explore Latina/o students' vocational self-efficacy and outcome expectations. Perceptions of investment, accessibility, positive regard, appraisal, and expectations from school…

  15. Paving a Pathway for Latinas to Access College or a Post-Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz Herrera, Sandra Luz

    2010-01-01

    The extensive research on Latinas in education has historically focused on the many challenges and barriers that impede them from accessing a high-quality education that will ultimately open the doors to a college education or post-secondary options and opportunities. Barriers that have been attributed to impeding Latinas from succeeding are…

  16. Five Concepts for Counselors to Incorporate in Their Work with Latina/o Youth and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochoa, Mariaelena

    2009-01-01

    This article is practitioner based and focuses on how high school counselors can facilitate the development of Latina/o youth and parents who on a daily basis face psychological and social issues that confront their lives. My work with Latina/o troubled youth and parents, over a 33 year period, has led me to propose five concepts that can serve…

  17. College Access Factors of Urban Latina Girls: The Role of Math Ability Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaragoza-Petty, Alma L.; Zarate, Maria Estela

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the role of math perceptions on the college enrollment of Latinas in urban settings. Using primarily qualitative methods, this study examines the K-12 schooling experiences of 35 Latina students who were part of a larger fifteen-year study. Students had different college enrollment outcomes despite having similarly low…

  18. Internalized Racism, Perceived Racism, and Ethnic Identity: Exploring Their Relationship in Latina/o Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hipolito-Delgado, Carlos P.

    2016-01-01

    For Latina/o undergraduates, ethnic identity is an important construct linked to self-esteem and educational attainment. Internalized and perceived racism have been hypothesized to hinder ethnic identity development in Latina/o undergraduates. To assess if internalized and perceived racism were inversely related to ethnic identity, the author…

  19. Lived Experiences and Perceptions on Mentoring among Latina Scientists and Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Miguel, Anitza M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to reveal the lived mentoring experiences of Latinas in science and engineering. The study also sought to understand how Latina scientists and engineers achieved high-level positions within their organizations and the impediments they encountered along their professional journey. The theoretical framework…

  20. Childhood Sexual Abuse, Culture, and Coping: A Qualitative Study of Latinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ligiero, Daniela P.; Fassinger, Ruth; McCauley, Moira; Moore, Jessica; Lyytinen, Nina

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to articulate a model of how Latinas cope with childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and the ways in which personal and cultural variables influence their coping strategies. Nine women who identified as Latina and as survivors of CSA participated in an in-depth interview. The data were analyzed using a grounded theory…

  1. Latinas/os Succeeding in Academia: The Effect of Mentors and Multiethnic Coursework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavazos, Alyssa G.

    2016-01-01

    Academia often devalues diverse identities, cultures, and languages through emphasis placed on academic values. To ascertain how established and new Latina/o academics achieved success in academia, the author conducted interviews with ten Latina/o academics; they noted mentoring and multiethnic coursework as influential in their success as…

  2. African American and Latina(o) Community College Students' Social Capital and Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandoval-Lucero, Elena; Maes, Johanna B.; Klingsmith, Libby

    2014-01-01

    Using a framework of social and cultural capital, this study examined successful African American and Latina/o community college students. Based on focus group interviews with twenty two African American and Latina/o undergraduates at an urban community college, the authors reveal how social and cultural capital gained from students'…

  3. "Por Los Ojos De Madres": Latina Mothers' Understandings of College Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortez, Laura Jean; Martinez, Melissa Ann; Sáenz, Victor B.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, data from six focus groups with 30 Latina mothers in South Texas were analyzed utilizing a "funds of knowledge" approach to uncover their understandings of college readiness and their role in ensuring their children are college ready. Findings indicate that Latina mothers perceived college readiness in a holistic fashion,…

  4. Family and Work Influences on the Transition to College among Latina Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sy, Susan R.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of family obligations and part-time work on Latina adolescents' stress and academic achievement during the transition to college. One hundred seventeen Latina college students from immigrant families completed surveys assessing the mother-daughter relationship, family obligations, work-school conflict, school and…

  5. ¡Apóyenos! Latina/o Student Recommendations for High School Supports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWhirter, Ellen Hawley; Luginbuhl, Paula J.; Brown, Kimbree

    2014-01-01

    We examined 401 Latina/o high school students' postsecondary plans and their responses to an open-ended question about how their schools should better help Latina/o students to achieve their plans. The majority of students planned to enroll in postsecondary education or training. Boys and those responding in Spanish were more likely not to…

  6. First-Generation Latina Graduate Students: Balancing Professional Identity Development with Traditional Family Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyva, Valerie Lester

    2011-01-01

    The author discusses the little-examined tensions that female and Latina first-generation college students (FGS) experience while negotiating their ethnic and professional identities. Despite having general parental support for pursuing an education, Latina and female FGS who are graduate students in the author's university department must juggle…

  7. Mathematical Problem Solving among Latina/o Kindergartners: An Analysis of Opportunities to Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Erin E.; Celedon-Pattichis, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    This study explores opportunities to learn mathematics problem solving for Latina/o students in 3 kindergarten classrooms in the southwest. Mixed methods were used to examine teaching practices that engaged Latina/o students in problem solving and supported their learning. Findings indicate that although students in all 3 classrooms showed growth…

  8. Targets but Not Victims: Latina/o College Students and Arizona's Racial Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendez, Julian J.; Cabrera, Nolan L.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the experiences of 18 Latina/o students attending the University of Arizona in the wake of SB 1070 (anti-immigrant) and HB 2281 (anti-Mexican American Studies). Students experienced a hostile campus climate; however, many channeled their frustrations into political engagement. Findings indicate that despite anti-Latina/o…

  9. Breast Cancer in Latinas: Gene Expression, Differential Response to Treatments, and Differential Toxicities in Latinas Compared with Other Population Groups

    PubMed Central

    Colon-Otero, Gerardo; Bueno Hume, Celyne; Copland, John A.; Perez, Edith A.

    2010-01-01

    Disparities in clinical outcomes of breast cancer have been described among different racial and ethnic groups in the U.S. Convincing data exist showing that Latina women have a lower incidence of breast cancer but a higher breast cancer–related mortality rate compared with white women. Noticeable differences in breast cancer incidence are present even within different Latina subsets with a higher incidence in second- and third-generation women compared with foreign born. An increasing amount of data exists pointing to significant differences in the genetics and biology of breast cancer in Latinas as a significant contributor to the higher mortality, including a higher incidence of triple-negative breast cancers (which do not overexpress HER-2 protein and are negative for estrogen receptors and progesterone receptors). Other social and environmental factors are likely to play a significant role as well, including a lower rate of screening mammography, variable access to medical care, among others. Recent data are inconclusive regarding differences among racial/ethnic groups in the response to chemotherapy. Data on racial/ethnic variations in the pharmacogenomics of chemotherapy, endocrine treatments, and toxicity are more limited, with some data suggesting differences in frequencies of polymorphisms of genes involved in the metabolism of some of these agents. Further studies are needed on this subject. PMID:20427382

  10. Breast cancer in Latinas: gene expression, differential response to treatments, and differential toxicities in Latinas compared with other population groups.

    PubMed

    Patel, Tejal A; Colon-Otero, Gerardo; Bueno Hume, Celyne; Copland, John A; Perez, Edith A

    2010-01-01

    Disparities in clinical outcomes of breast cancer have been described among different racial and ethnic groups in the U.S. Convincing data exist showing that Latina women have a lower incidence of breast cancer but a higher breast cancer-related mortality rate compared with white women. Noticeable differences in breast cancer incidence are present even within different Latina subsets with a higher incidence in second- and third-generation women compared with foreign born. An increasing amount of data exists pointing to significant differences in the genetics and biology of breast cancer in Latinas as a significant contributor to the higher mortality, including a higher incidence of triple-negative breast cancers (which do not overexpress HER-2 protein and are negative for estrogen receptors and progesterone receptors). Other social and environmental factors are likely to play a significant role as well, including a lower rate of screening mammography, variable access to medical care, among others. Recent data are inconclusive regarding differences among racial/ethnic groups in the response to chemotherapy. Data on racial/ethnic variations in the pharmacogenomics of chemotherapy, endocrine treatments, and toxicity are more limited, with some data suggesting differences in frequencies of polymorphisms of genes involved in the metabolism of some of these agents. Further studies are needed on this subject.

  11. EL PROGRAMA CITI: UNA ALTERNATIVA PARA LA CAPACITACIÓN EN ÉTICA DE LA INVESTIGACIÓN EN AMÉRICA LATINA

    PubMed Central

    Litewka, Sergio; Goodman, Kenneth; Braunschweiger, y Paul

    2011-01-01

    El Programa CITI (Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative) es un curso basado en Internet y desarrollado por voluntarios, que brinda material educacional sobre protección de sujetos humanos en investigaciones biomédicas y de conducta, buenas prácticas clínicas, conducta responsable de la investigación y trato humanitario a animales de laboratorio. Es un esfuerzo conjunto del Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center y la Universidad de Miami. Con la colaboración de expertos locales, gran parte del contenido se ha adaptado para América Latina, se ha traducido al español y portugués y se han establecido acuerdos de colaboración con instituciones especializadas en bioética en Chile, Brasil, Costa Rica y Perú. Los autores presentan una metodología accesible para la capacitación en ética de la investigación y una justificación de su uso y difusión en América Latina PMID:21687817

  12. Pregnancy Intentions and Teenage Pregnancy Among Latinas: A Mediation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, Corinne H.; Doherty, Irene; Padian, Nancy S.; Hubbard, Alan E.; Minnis, Alexandra M.

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT The extent to which pregnancy intentions mediate the relationship between individual, familial and cultural characteristics and adolescent pregnancy is not well understood. The role of intentions may be particularly important among Latina teenagers, whose attitudes toward pregnancy are more favorable than those of other groups and whose pregnancy rates are high. METHODS Prospective, time-varying data from 2001–2004 were used to investigate whether two measures of pregnancy intentions, wantedness and happiness, mediated associations between risk factors and pregnancy among 213 Latina adolescents in San Francisco. Participants were tested for pregnancy and interviewed about pregnancy intentions, partnerships, family characteristics and activities every six months for two years. Associations and mediation were examined using logistic regression. RESULTS Neither pregnancy intention variable mediated relationships between participant characteristics and pregnancy. After adjustment for other measures, wantedness was strongly associated with pregnancy (odds ratio, 2.6), while happiness was not. Having a strong family orientation was associated with happiness (3.7) but unrelated to pregnancy. Low sexual relationship power with a main partner was associated with an elevated risk of pregnancy (3.3). If the pregnancy intentions of all participants were changed to definitely not wanting pregnancy, the estimated decline in pregnancy risk would be 16%. CONCLUSIONS Pregnancy intentions were important not as mediators but rather as independent risk factors for pregnancy. Differences in pregnancy rates between groups of Latinas may be less a function of intentional choice than of situational factors. Interventions and research should focus on identifying and targeting factors that hinder effective contraceptive use among teenagers who want to avoid pregnancy. PMID:20887287

  13. Discrimination and Depressive Symptoms Among Latina/o Adolescents of Immigrant Parents.

    PubMed

    Lopez, William D; LeBrón, Alana M W; Graham, Louis F; Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Discrimination is associated with negative mental health outcomes for Latina/o adolescents. While Latino/a adolescents experience discrimination from a number of sources and across contexts, little research considers how the source of discrimination and the context in which it occurs affect mental health outcomes among Latina/o children of immigrants. We examined the association between source-specific discrimination, racial or ethnic background of the source, and school ethnic context with depressive symptoms for Latina/o adolescents of immigrant parents. Using multilevel linear regression with time-varying covariates, we regressed depressive symptoms on source-specific discrimination, racial or ethnic background of the source of discrimination, and school percent Latina/o. Discrimination from teachers (β = 0.06, p < .05), students (β = 0.05, p < .05), Cubans (β = 0.19, p < .001), and Latinas/os (β = 0.19, p < .001) were positively associated with depressive symptoms. These associations were not moderated by school percent Latina/o. The findings indicate a need to reduce discrimination to improve Latina/o adolescents' mental health.

  14. From ethnography to intervention: developing a breast cancer control program for Latinas.

    PubMed

    Hubbell, F A; Chavez, L R; Mishra, S I; Magana, J R; Burciaga Valdez, R

    1995-01-01

    Latinas are less likely than Anglo women to have appropriate breast cancer screening for reasons that may include culturally based beliefs as well as socioeconomic factors. This study employed ethnographic methods to explore breast cancer-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among Latinas, Anglo women, and physicians, tested the generalizability of the findings in a telephone survey of randomly selected women, and used the results to design a culturally sensitive breast cancer control intervention in Orange County, Calif. Respondents for the ethnographic interviews included 28 Salvadoran immigrants, 39 Mexican immigrants, 27 Chicanas (U.S.-born Latinas of Mexican heritage), 27 Anglo women, and 30 physicians selected through organization-based network sampling. Latinas had very different beliefs about risk factors for breast cancer and held more fatalistic attitudes about the disease. For example, they believed that trauma to the breast was among the most important risk factors. Results of a telephone survey of 1225 randomly selected women (269 U.S.-born Latinas, 425 Mexican immigrants, 109 other Latina immigrants, and 422 Anglo women) generally confirmed the dissimilar beliefs among Latinas and Anglo women. The findings influenced our decision to design and pilot-test a breast cancer control intervention based on Bandura's self-efficacy theory and Freire's empowerment pedagogy. The methodology and findings of this study have important implications for future cancer control research and interventions. PMID:8562209

  15. Relationship power, control, and dating violence among Latina girls.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Vera; Chesney-Lind, Meda; Foley, Julia

    2012-06-01

    We drew on the theory of gender and power and grounded theory methodology to explore how 18 Latina girls conceptualized power and control within their heterosexual dating relationships. Our findings indicate that boys/men used a number of strategies to control girls, including: regulating appearances and behaviors; cheating and threatening to cheat; and physical and sexual violence. Girls used a variety of strategies to resist these attempts to control them, including: lying, flirting, and cheating; reactive violence; breaking up; and maintaining emotional distance. Girls attempted to subvert boys' attempts to control them; however, these attempts were not always successful given the constraints of gender that adolescent females must negotiate. PMID:22926188

  16. Social Capital and Well-Being: Structural Analyses of Latina Mothers by Nativity.

    PubMed

    Held, Mary L; Cuellar, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Objective This study examined the direct and mediating effects of maternal social capital on health and well-being for native- and foreign-born Latina mothers and their children. Methods Data were drawn from the baseline and nine-year follow up waves of the Fragile Families and Child Well-being Study. The study included a sample of 874 Latina mothers. Mplus7 was used to perform structural equation modeling to determine whether exogenous indicators (age, education, and economic well-being) predicted social capital, whether social capital predicted mother and child well-being, and whether mediating effects helped explain each relationship. Results For native-born Latinas (n = 540), social capital did not predict maternal or child well-being. However, social capital significantly mediated the effects of age, education, and economic well-being on maternal well-being. For foreign-born Latinas (n = 334), social capital was a significant predictor of maternal well-being. Social capital also mediated the effects of age, education, and economic well-being on maternal, but not child well-being. Younger and foreign-born Latinas who report higher educational attainment and economic well-being have greater social capital, and thus better self-reported health. Conclusion Findings suggest that social capital is particularly relevant to the health of foreign-born Latinas. For all Latina mothers, social capital may serve as a protective mitigating factor to better health. Health service providers should evaluate the potential to integrate programs that promote social capital accumulation for Latinas. Further research should examine factors to improve the health of Latinas' children.

  17. Breast Cancer Knowledge, Attitudes, and Early Detection Practices in United States-Mexico Border Latinas

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Yelena; Moraros, John; King, Sasha; Prapsiri, Surasri; Thompson, Beti

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Evidence suggests Latinas residing along the United States-Mexico border face higher breast cancer mortality rates compared to Latinas in the interior of either country. The purpose of this study was to investigate breast cancer knowledge, attitudes, and use of breast cancer preventive screening among U.S. Latina and Mexican women residing along the U.S.-Mexico border. Methods For this binational cross-sectional study, 265 participants completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire that obtained information on sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge, attitudes, family history, and screening practices. Differences between Mexican (n=128) and U.S. Latina (n=137) participants were assessed by Pearson's chi-square, Fischer's exact test, t tests, and multivariate regression analyses. Results U.S. Latinas had significantly increased odds of having ever received a mammogram/breast ultrasound (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=2.95) and clinical breast examination (OR=2.67) compared to Mexican participants. A significantly greater proportion of Mexican women had high knowledge levels (54.8%) compared to U.S. Latinas (45.2%, p<0.05). Age, education, and insurance status were significantly associated with breast cancer screening use. Conclusions Despite having higher levels of breast cancer knowledge than U.S. Latinas, Mexican women along the U.S.-Mexico border are not receiving the recommended breast cancer screening procedures. Although U.S. border Latinas had higher breast cancer screening levels than their Mexican counterparts, these levels are lower than those seen among the general U.S. Latina population. Our findings underscore the lack of access to breast cancer prevention screening services and emphasize the need to ensure that existing breast cancer screening programs are effective in reaching women along the U.S.-Mexico border. PMID:21970564

  18. Latina girls of Puerto Rican origin who are successful in science and mathematics high school courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oquendo-Rodriguez, Aida L.

    Professions and careers related to science and mathematics lack representation of minorities. Within these underrepresented minority populations there is no other group more affected than Latina women and girls. Women in general, are still underrepresented in many areas of our society. While women's roles are changing in today's society, most changes encourage the participation of more White/Anglo women in traditionally male roles. Latina women are still more disadvantaged than White women. There is no doubt that education is significant in increasing the participation of minorities in the fields of science and mathematics, especially for minority girls (Oakes, 1990; Rodriguez, 1993). This study explored the interests, life experiences, characteristics and motivations of Latina girls of Puerto Rican origin who are successful in science and mathematics high school courses. The study identifies factors that can influence the interest of Latina girls of Puerto Rican origin in science and mathematics career choices. This research is significant and relevant to educators and policy makers, especially to science and mathematics educators. The research is primarily descriptive and exploratory. It explores the social characteristics of Latina girls and professional women who have been successful in science and mathematics high school courses. The research offers the reader a visit to the participants' homes with descriptions and the opportunity to explore the thoughts and life experiences of Latina girls, their mothers and young Latina professionals of Puerto Rican origin. This research reveals the common characteristics of successful students found in the Latina girls of Puerto Rican origin who where interviewed. Creating a portrait of Latina girls of Puerto Rican origin who are successful in science and mathematics high school courses in one of the school districts of western Massachusetts. The research findings reveal that teacher relationships, family expectations

  19. Spirituality Among Latinas/os Implications of Culture in Conceptualization and Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Campesino, Maureen; Schwartz, Gary E.

    2009-01-01

    Despite growing transnational migration between the United States and Latin American countries, culturally relevant conceptualizations of spirituality among Latinas/os remain lacking in healthcare research. Grounded in Latina feminist theology, this article elucidates cultural values that influence spirituality and describes findings from a study using a new questionnaire to explore spirituality among Latinas in Puerto Rico and the US mainland. Results support the saliency of cultural values such as personalismo and familismo as the context for spiritual perspectives, which may function independently of the Catholic Church structure. PMID:16495689

  20. The influence of time perspective on cervical cancer screening among Latinas in the United States.

    PubMed

    Roncancio, Angelica M; Ward, Kristy K; Fernandez, Maria E

    2014-12-01

    To develop effective interventions to increase cervical cancer screening among Latinas, we should understand the role of cultural factors, such as time perspective, in the decision to be screened. We examined the relation between present time orientation, future time orientation, and self-reported cervical cancer screening among Latinas. A group of 206 Latinas completed a survey measuring factors associated with screening. Logistic regression analyses revealed that future time orientation was significantly associated with self-reported screening. Understanding the influence of time orientation on cervical cancer screening will assist us in developing interventions that effectively target time perspective and screening.

  1. The Influence of Time Perspective on Cervical Cancer Screening among Latinas in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Roncancio, Angelica M.; Ward, Kristy K.; Fernandez, Maria E.

    2014-01-01

    To develop effective interventions to increase cervical cancer screening among Latinas, we should understand the role of cultural factors, such as time perspective, in the decision to be screened. We examined the relation between present time orientation, future time orientation and self-reported cervical cancer screening among Latinas. A group of 206 Latinas completed a survey measuring factors associated with screening. Logistic regression analyses revealed that future time orientation was significantly associated with self-reported screening. Understanding the influence of time orientation on cervical cancer screening will assist us in developing interventions that effectively target time perspective and screening. PMID:23928988

  2. Spirituality among Latinas/os: implications of culture in conceptualization and measurement.

    PubMed

    Campesino, Maureen; Schwartz, Gary E

    2006-01-01

    Despite growing transnational migration between the United States and Latin American countries, culturally relevant conceptualizations of spirituality among Latinas/os remain lacking in healthcare research. Grounded in Latina feminist theology, this article elucidates cultural values that influence spirituality and describes findings from a study using a new questionnaire to explore spirituality among Latinas in Puerto Rico and the US mainland. Results support the saliency of cultural values such as personalismo and familismo as the context for spiritual perspectives, which may function independently of the Catholic Church structure. PMID:16495689

  3. Understanding the patient-provider communication needs and experiences of Latina and non-Latina White women following an abnormal mammogram.

    PubMed

    Molina, Yamile; Hohl, Sarah D; Ko, Linda K; Rodriguez, Edgar A; Thompson, Beti; Beresford, Shirley A A

    2014-12-01

    Latinas are more likely to delay recommended follow-up care than non-Latina White (NLW) women after an abnormal mammogram result. Ethnic differences in communication needs and experiences with health-care staff and providers may contribute to these delays as well as satisfaction with care. Nonetheless, little research has explored the aspects of communication that may contribute to patient comprehension, adherence to follow-up care, and satisfaction across ethnicity. The purpose of this exploratory, qualitative study was to identify patients' communication needs and experiences with follow-up care among Latina and NLW women who received an abnormal mammogram. We conducted 41 semi-structured interviews with 19 Latina and 22 NLW women between the ages of 40 and 74 who had received an abnormal mammogram. Communication themes indicated that women's needs and experiences concerning abnormal mammograms and follow-up care varied across ethnicity. Latinas and NLW women appeared to differ in their comprehension of abnormal results and follow-up care as a result of language barriers and health literacy. Both groups of women identified clear, empathic communication as being important in patient-provider communication; however, Latinas underscored the need for warm communicative styles, and NLW women emphasized the importance of providing more information. Women with high levels of satisfaction with patient-provider interactions appeared to have positive perspectives of subsequent screening and cancer treatment. To improve patient satisfaction and adherence to follow-up care among Latinas, educational programs are necessary to counsel health-care professionals with regard to language, health literacy, and empathic communication needs in health-care service delivery.

  4. Effects of acculturation on prenatal anxiety among Latina women.

    PubMed

    Barcelona de Mendoza, Veronica; Harville, Emily; Theall, Katherine; Buekens, Pierre; Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2016-08-01

    Anxiety in pregnancy has been associated with adverse birth outcomes. Relatively few studies have investigated how acculturation affects mental health in pregnancy among Latinas. The goal of this study was to determine if acculturation was associated with anxiety over the course of pregnancy in a sample of predominantly Puerto Rican women. Women were recruited in pregnancy for participation in Proyecto Buena Salud, a prospective cohort study of Latina women (n = 1412). Acculturation was measured via the Psychological Acculturation Scale (PAS), language preference and generation in the USA. Anxiety was measured using the State-Trait Anxiety Instrument. Linear and logistic multivariable regressions were used to investigate associations. After adjustment, women with bicultural identification had significantly lower trait anxiety scores in early pregnancy (β = -3.62, SE = 1.1, p < 0.001) than low acculturated women. Women with higher levels of acculturation as indicated by English-language preference (β = 1.41, SE = 0.7, p = 0.04) and second or third generation in the USA had significantly higher trait anxiety scores in early pregnancy (β = 1.83, SE = 0.6, p < 0.01). Bicultural psychological acculturation was associated with lower trait anxiety in early pregnancy, while English-language preference and higher generation in the USA were associated with higher trait anxiety in early pregnancy. PMID:26790686

  5. Examining the Interplay Among Family, Culture, and Latina Teen Suicidal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Gulbas, Lauren E.; Zayas, Luis H.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we explored the relationships among culture, family, and attempted suicide by U.S. Latinas. We analyzed qualitative interviews conducted with Latina teen suicide attempters (n = 10) and their parents. We also incorporated data collected from adolescents with no reported history of self-harm (n = 10) and their parents to examine why some individuals turned to suicide under similar experiences of cultural conflict. Our results revealed that Latina teens who attempted suicide lacked the resources to forge meaningful social ties. Without the tools to bridge experiences of cultural contradiction, girls in our sample described feeling isolated and alone. Under such conditions, adolescents turned to behaviors aimed at self-destruction. Unlike their peers who attempted suicide, adolescent Latinas with no lifetime history of attempted suicide were able to mobilize resources in ways that balanced experiences of acculturative tension by creating supportive relationships with other individuals. PMID:25288407

  6. Promotion of Latina Health: Intersectionality of IPV and Risk for HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Rountree, Michele A; Granillo, Teresa; Bagwell-Gray, Meredith

    2016-04-01

    Latina women in the United States are vulnerable to two intersecting public health concerns: intimate partner violence (IPV) and subsequent risk for HIV/AIDS infection. Examination of the cultural and contextual life factors of this understudied population is crucial to developing culturally relevant HIV interventions. Focus groups with Latinas (15 monolingual; 10 bilingual) who have experienced IPV were conducted. Monolingual and bilingual Latinas endorsed that they were concerned about HIV infection, naming partner infidelity and experiences of forced and coerced sex as primary reasons for their concern. However, monolingual participants had lower levels of HIV knowledge, spending much time discussing myths of HIV infection, whereas bilingual participants spent more time discussing specific prevention techniques, including challenges related to the violence in their relationships. These findings suggest that HIV/AIDS prevention programs for Latinas need to pay close attention to the different historical, contextual, and cultural experiences of this at-risk group of women.

  7. Motivational interviewing to reduce cardiovascular risk in African American and Latina women.

    PubMed

    Witt, Dawn R; Lindquist, Ruth; Treat-Jacobson, Diane; Boucher, Jackie L; Konety, Suma H; Savik, Kay

    2013-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death for women, and disproportionally so for African American and Latina women. CVD is largely preventable and many risks can be attributable to health behaviors, implementing and sustaining positive health behaviors is a challenge. Motivational interviewing is one promising intervention for initiating behavior change. The purpose of this review was to identify, synthesize, and critically analyze the existing literature on the use of motivational interviewing as a behavioral intervention to reduce CVD risk among African American and Latina women. Seven studies were identified that met inclusion criteria. Results of this review suggest that motivational interviewing has mixed results when used to reduce cardiovascular risk factors in African American and Latina women. More research using a standardized motivational interviewing approach is needed to definitively determine if it is an effective behavioral intervention to reduce CVD risk when used in populations of African American and Latina women.

  8. Household food insecurity is associated with depressive symptoms among low-income pregnant Latinas.

    PubMed

    Hromi-Fiedler, Amber; Bermúdez-Millán, Angela; Segura-Pérez, Sofia; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2011-10-01

    Latinas experience high rates of poverty, household food insecurity and prenatal depression. To date, only one USA study has examined the relationship between household food insecurity and prenatal depression, yet it focused primarily on non-Latina white and non-Latina black populations. Therefore, this study examined the independent association of household food insecurity with depressive symptoms among low-income pregnant Latinas. This cross-sectional study included 135 low income pregnant Latinas living in Hartford, Connecticut. Women were assessed at enrolment for household food security during pregnancy using an adapted and validated version of the US Household Food Security Survey Module. Prenatal depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. A cut-off of ≥21 was used to indicate elevated levels of prenatal depressive symptoms (EPDS). Multivariate backwards stepwise logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for EPDS. Almost one third of participants had EPDS. Women who were food insecure were more likely to experience EPDS compared to food secure women (OR = 2.59; 95% CI = 1.03-6.52). Being primiparous, experiencing heartburn and reporting poor/fair health during pregnancy, as well as having a history of depression were also independent risk factors for experiencing EPDS. Findings from this study suggest the importance of assessing household food insecurity when evaluating depression risk among pregnant Latinas.

  9. Purity and passion: risk and morality in Latina immigrants' and physicians' beliefs about cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Martinez, R G; Chavez, L R; Hubbell, F A

    1997-06-01

    This paper examines how physicians' beliefs about risk factors for cervical cancer compare with Mexican and Salvadoran immigrant women's views (hereafter Latina immigrants). Between August 15, 1991 and August 15, 1992, we conducted ethnographic interviews with 39 Mexican immigrant women, 28 Salvadoran immigrant women, and 30 physicians in northern Orange County, California. Physicians and Latina immigrants converge on their beliefs that sexual behavior is a predominant risk factor for cervical cancer. They diverge, however, on their reasons. Latina immigrants' perceptions of health risks are embedded in a larger set of cultural values centering around gender relations, sexuality, and morality. Latina immigrants also emphasized men's behavior as risk factors. Physicians' views, on the other hand, are largely based on the epidemiology of cervical cancer risk factors. They emphasized beginning sexual relations at an early age, multiple sexual partners, and infection with sexually transmitted viruses. Some physicians, however, displayed moral interpretations of the sex-based risk factors for cervical cancer through the use of the culturally-loaded term "promiscuous" in place of "multiple sexual partners," through specific references to morality, and through characterizations of women at risk for cervical cancer. Both the physicians and the Latina immigrants in our study paid considerably less attention to socioeconomic factors. Our results have important implications for physicians who provide health care for Latina immigrants. Physicians should be clear to point out that women need not be "promiscuous" to get cervical cancer.

  10. Early infant feeding decisions in low-income Latinas.

    PubMed

    Bunik, Maya; Clark, Lauren; Zimmer, Lorena Marquez; Jimenez, Luz M; O'Connor, Mary E; Crane, Lori A; Kempe, Allison

    2006-01-01

    Breastfeeding rates remain low, especially among low-income minority women. The objective of this qualitative study was to assess barriers to breastfeeding and reasons for combination feeding among low-income Latina women and their families. Meetings were held with key informants to inform the sampling plan and develop questions for focus groups. Data were collected from eight qualitative focus groups with primiparous mothers postpartum, mothers breastfeeding at 4 to 6 months, mothers formula feeding at 4 to 6 months, grandmothers and fathers, and 29 individual interviews with formula- and combination-feeding mothers. Transcripts of focus groups and interviews were content coded and analyzed for thematic domains and then compared for concurrence and differences. Four main domains with 15 categories were identified: (a) Best of both: Mothers desire to ensure their babies get both the healthy aspects of breast milk and "vitamins" in formula. (b) Breastfeeding can be a struggle: Breastfeeding is natural but can be painful, embarrassing, and associated with breast changes and diet restrictions. (c) Not in Mother's Control: Mothers want to breastfeed, but things happen that cause them to discontinue breastfeeding. (d) Family and cultural beliefs: Relatives give messages about supplementation for babies who are crying or not chubby. Negative emotions are to be avoided so as to not affect mother's milk. Those counseling Latina mothers about infant feeding should discourage and/or limit early supplementation with formula, discuss the myth of "best of both," understand the fatalism involved in problem-solving breastfeeding issues, and enlist the altruism embedded in the family unit for support of the mother-infant pair. PMID:17661603

  11. Barriers to treatment engagement for depression among Latinas.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Susan; Whittemore, Robin

    2013-06-01

    In spite of successful treatment options for depression, the majority of Americans with severe depression do not receive treatment. Latinos are even less likely to engage in treatment than non-Hispanic Whites. The purpose of this study is to explore barriers to treatment engagement and, more specifically, how childhood adversity and gender-based violence (GBV) contribute to a lack of perceived support for treatment engagement. Experiences of GBV and childhood adversity can call into question deeply held family, cultural, and religious values, and affect the perceived quality of the therapeutic relationship and attitudes about depression treatment. A qualitative descriptive methodology was used to understand the experiences of a sample of 12 Latinas who were part of a diabetes prevention study (n = 67) and had been referred for treatment because of elevated symptoms of depression. Results indicate that the often-cited barriers to mental health care (i.e., language barriers, economic considerations, and lack of illness recognition) did not serve as deterrents for Latinas in this study. Participants recognized that they were depressed and agreed with the assessment of depression. However, none of the women followed up on the recommendation to seek care. What has emerged from this study is how cultural values, such as familismo and marianismo, and the lack of responsiveness from family and religious leaders in the context of exposure to GBV and childhood adversity created significant barriers to treatment engagement. This study highlights the need for nurses to screen for these exposures and to engage in shared decision making about treatment. PMID:23805926

  12. Impact of the Environment: How Does Attending a Hispanic-Serving Institution Influence the Engagement of Baccalaureate-Seeking Latina/o Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fosnacht, Kevin; Nailos, Jennifer N.

    2016-01-01

    Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) enroll the majority of Latina/o students in higher education; however, it is unclear how HSIs influence Latina/os' postsecondary experiences. In this study, we examined how the Latina/o student experience differed between students who did and did not attend 4-year HSIs. The results suggest that HSIs generally…

  13. Latina/o Student Success in Higher Education: Models of Empowerment at Hispanic Serving-Institutions (HSIs), Emerging HSIs, and Non-HSIs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuellar, Marcela

    2012-01-01

    While Latina/o enrollments in higher education are on the rise, more than half of these students enroll at a unique institutional type, Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs). As Latina/o enrollments in higher education increase, the number of HSIs and emerging HSIs also increases. Knowledge is presently limited on the Latina/o college choice to…

  14. Does Percentage of Latinas/os Affect Graduation Rates at 4-Year Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs), Emerging HSIs, and Non-HSIs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Gina A.

    2013-01-01

    As the population of college-aged Latinas/os grows, the number of Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs) increases. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the percentage of Latinas/os has an effect on the institutional graduation rates of Latina/o students attending HSIs, emerging HSIs, and non-HSIs. Data were drawn from the Integrated…

  15. Community readiness to promote Latinas' participation in breast cancer prevention clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Lawsin, Catalina R; Borrayo, Evelinn A; Edwards, Ruth; Belloso, Carolina

    2007-07-01

    The high breast cancer (BC) mortality rates that exist among Hispanic women (Latinas) are a health disparity burden that needs to be addressed. Prevention clinical trials are a burgeoning area of cancer prevention efforts and may serve to promote parity. Unfortunately, Latinas, along with other ethnic minority women, continue to be under-represented in this form of research. Previous studies have examined individual barriers to ethnic minorities' participation, but none have assessed community factors contributing to Latinas' under-representation in these studies. The present study addressed these limitations from a community perspective by exploring which factors might inhibit Latinas' participation in clinical trials, specifically BC prevention trials. Using the Community Readiness Model (CRM), 19 key informants were interviewed in four communities, two rural and two urban, in Colorado, USA. The key informant assessment involved a semistructured interview that measured the level of community readiness to encourage participation in BC prevention activities. The results reflected a community climate that did not recognise BC as a health problem that affected Latinas in participating communities. Compared to other healthcare priorities, participation in BC prevention clinical trials was considered a low priority in these communities. Overall, leadership and community resources were not identified or allocated to encourage the participation of Latinas. The results highlight the lack of awareness regarding clinical trials among both community members and leaders. According to the CRM, strategies to enhance awareness at multiple levels in the community are necessary. This study demonstrates how the CRM can be used to better understand a community's perspective on BC, and specifically, the under-representation of Latinas in clinical trials.

  16. Surgical Treatment Differences Among Latina and African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Campesino, Maureen; Koithan, Mary; Ruiz, Ester; Glover, Johanna Uriri; Juarez, Gloria; Choi, Myunghan; Krouse, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To describe breast cancer treatment choices from the perspectives of Latina and African American breast cancer survivors. Design An interdisciplinary team conducted a mixed-methods study of women treated for stages I–IV breast cancer. Setting Participants’ homes in metropolitan areas. Sample 39 participants in three groups: monolingual Spanish-speaking Latinas (n = 15), English-speaking Latinas (n = 15), and African American women (n = 9). Methods Individual participant interviews were conducted by racially and linguistically matched nurse researchers, and sociodemographic data were collected. Content and matrix analysis methods were used. Main Research Variables Perceptions of breast cancer care. Findings High rates of mastectomy were noted for early-stage treatment (stage I or II). Among the participants diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer, the majority of English-speaking Latinas (n = 9) and African American women (n = 4) received a mastectomy. However, the majority of the Spanish-speaking Latina group (n = 5) received breast-conserving surgery. Four factors influenced the choice of mastectomy over lumpectomy across the three groups: clinical indicators, fear of recurrence, avoidance of adjuvant side effects, and perceived favorable survival outcomes. Spanish-speaking Latinas were more likely to rely on physician treatment recommendations, and the other two groups used a shared decision-making style. Conclusions Additional study is needed to understand how women select and integrate treatment information with the recommendations they receive from healthcare providers. Among the Spanish-speaking Latina group, limited English proficiency, the use of translators in explaining treatment options, and a lack of available educational materials in Spanish are factors that influenced reliance on physician recommendations. Implications for Nursing Oncology nurses were notably absent in supporting the women’s treatment decision making

  17. New Voices in the Struggle/Nuevas Voces en la Lucha: Toward Increasing Latina/o Faculty in Theological Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Caroline Sotello Viernes; Hernandez, Edwin I.; Pena, Milagros; Gonzalez, Juan Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Little progress has been made to increase Latina/o faculty representation in theological education. In this study, 33 interviews with Latina/o theological faculty identify supports and challenges to their scholarly development. Latino critical theory guides the analysis. Narratives reveal faculty experiences with oppression, challenging dominant…

  18. Pregnancy Prevention among Latina Adolescents--The Role of Social Capital and Cultural Norms: An Interview with Dr. Claire Brindis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prevention Researcher, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Recently, Dr. Brindis and her colleagues compared four communities with high poverty and lower than average birth rates among Latina adolescents, with four communities which also had high poverty but had higher than average birth rates among Latina adolescents. Their goal was to examine the social capital and cultural norms within these…

  19. Unintended Pregnancy and Intimate Partner Violence before and during Pregnancy among Latina Women in Los Angeles, California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Kathryn R.; Garcia, Lorena

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to examine the relationship between unintended pregnancy and intimate partner violence (IPV) before and during pregnancy among Latinas. A cross-sectional interview measuring pregnancy intent, IPV, and acculturation, using the Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans (ARSMA-II), was conducted among Latina women…

  20. Through Resistance and Political Struggle: The Academic Success of Latina/o Students inside a Public Flagship University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velez, Daniel Carlos

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study explores how Latina/os recount their experiences and successes (or lack thereof) at a flagship public university. It examines how Latina/os form their identities in relation to their notions of academic success in the college environment, where social dynamics of race/ethnicity, class, and gender operate and intersect.…

  1. "Desafios y Bendiciones": A Multiperspective Examination of the Educational Experiences and Coping Responses of First-Generation College Latina Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gloria, Alberta M.; Castellanos, Jeanett

    2012-01-01

    Taking a multiperspective approach, seven Latina students, two student services personnel, and one mental health service provider are interviewed to gain different stakeholder perspectives regarding Latina first-generation college educational and coping experiences. Familial involvement and connections with family, peers, and university personnel…

  2. Proyecto Bilingüe: Constructing a Figured World of Bilingual Education for Latina/o Bilingual Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ek, Lucila D.; Chávez, Guadalupe Domínguez

    2015-01-01

    Using theories of figured worlds, we demonstrate how Proyecto Bilingüe, a Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction program, constructs a figured world of bilingual education for Latina/o bilingual teachers. We drew from a larger qualitative study to conduct a thematic analysis of interviews with Latina/o bilingual teachers, their written…

  3. Indigenous Mexican Culture, Identity and Academic Aspirations: Results from a Community-Based Curriculum Project for Latina/Latino Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luna, Nora; Evans, William P.; Davis, Bret

    2015-01-01

    The Latina/Latino population is the largest minority group in the United States and has the highest high school dropout rate of any ethnic group. Nationally, just over one-half of Latina/Latino students graduate on time with a regular diploma, compared to nearly 80% of Whites. Because of the growing population and the wide achievement gap, there…

  4. Acting Bicultural versus Feeling Bicultural: Cultural Adaptation and School-Related Attitudes among U.S. Latina/o Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acevedo-Polakovich, Ignacio D.; Quirk, Kelley M.; Cousineau, Jennifer R.; Saxena, Suchita R.; Gerhart, James I.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines whether incorporating a multidimensional perspective to the study of the relation between cultural adaptation and academic attitudes among Latinas/os in the United States can clarify this relation. Hypotheses about the relation between cultural adaptation and academic attitudes were examined using data provided by U.S. Latina/o…

  5. The Ethnic Niche as an Economic Pathway for the Dark Skinned: Labor Market Incorporation of Latina/o Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morales, Maria Cristina

    2008-01-01

    A significant number of Latina/os are turning to employment in ethnic niches as an alternative to general labor markets. This study places special focus on how skin color segmentation or colorism influences job-market allocation. The hypothesis is that dark-skinned Latina/os are more likely to be employed in ethnically homogeneous jobsites or…

  6. Genetic risk score does not correlate with body mass index of Latina women in a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Coenen, Kimberly R; Karp, Sharon M; Gesell, Sabina B; Dietrich, Mary S; Morgan, Thomas M; Barkin, Shari L

    2011-10-01

    Obesity disproportionately affects Latina women. Common genetic variants are convincingly associated with body mass index (BMI) and may be used to create genetic risk scores (GRS) for obesity that could define genetically influenced forms of obesity and alter response to clinical trial interventions. The objective of this study was (1) to identify the frequency and effect size of common obesity genetic variants in Latina women; (2) to determine the clinical utility of a GRS for obesity with Latina women participating in a community-based clinical trial. DNA from 85 Latina women was genotyped for eight genetic variants previously associated with BMI in Caucasians, but not yet assessed in Latina populations. The main outcome measure was the correlation of GRS (sum of eight risk alleles) with BMI, waist circumference, and percent body fat. A majority (83%) of participants had a BMI ≥25. Frequency of loci near FTO, MC4R, and GNPDA2 were lower in Latinas than Caucasians. Association of each locus with BMI was lower in Latinas compared to Caucasians with no significant correlations with BMI. We conclude that an eight locus GRS has no clinical utility for explaining obesity or predicting response to intervention in Latina women participating in a clinical trial.

  7. The Majority in the Minority: Expanding the Representation of Latina/o Faculty, Administrators and Students in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellanos, Jeanett, Ed.; Jones, Lee, Ed.

    This collection discusses various aspects of increasing the representation of Latinas and Latinos in U.S. higher education. The selections provide historical background, review issues of access and achievement, and present problems of status and barriers to success. The book opens with "Latina/o Undergraduate Experiences in American Higher…

  8. Representacion E Identidad: Content Analysis of Latina Biographies for Primary and Preadolescent Children Published 1955-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lara, Margaret A.

    2012-01-01

    This study discusses the results of a content analysis of 75 Latina biographies for primary and pre-adolescent students that were published over a 16-year period, spanning from 1995 to 2010. Significant to this study was how Latinas were represented in the biographies and what changes can be seen over time. Using a rubric based on research by…

  9. Social, Occupational, and Spatial Exposures and Mental Health Disparities of Working-Class Latinas in the US.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Chin; Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Hatzudis, Kiki; Sönmez, Sevil

    2016-06-01

    Grounded in ecosocial theory, this paper discusses the mental health disparities of working-class Latinas from multiple perspectives. An overview of working-class Latinas' prevalent mental health disorders, barriers to care and suggestions for interventions and future studies are provided. PMID:26044667

  10. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to Understand Cervical Cancer Screening Among Latinas.

    PubMed

    Roncancio, Angelica M; Ward, Kristy K; Sanchez, Ingrid A; Cano, Miguel A; Byrd, Theresa L; Vernon, Sally W; Fernandez-Esquer, Maria Eugenia; Fernandez, Maria E

    2015-10-01

    To reduce the high incidence of cervical cancer among Latinas in the United States it is important to understand factors that predict screening behavior. The aim of this study was to test the utility of theory of planned behavior in predicting cervical cancer screening among a group of Latinas. A sample of Latinas (N = 614) completed a baseline survey about Pap test attitudes subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and intention to be screened for cervical cancer. At 6 months postbaseline, cervical cancer screening behavior was assessed. Structural equation modeling was used to test the theory. Model fit statistics indicated good model fit: χ(2)(48) = 54.32, p = .246; comparative fit index = .992; root mean square error of approximation = .015; weighted root mean square residual = .687. Subjective norms (p = .005) and perceived behavioral control (p < .0001) were positively associated with intention to be screened for cervical cancer, and the intention to be screened predicted actual cervical cancer screening (p < .0001). The proportion of variance (R2) in intention accounted for by the predictors was .276 and the R2 in cervical cancer screening accounted for was .130. This study provides support for the use of the theory of planned behavior in predicting cervical cancer screening among Latinas. This knowledge can be used to inform the development of a theory of planned behavior-based intervention to increase cervical cancer screening among Latinas and reduce the high incidence of cervical cancer in this group of women.

  11. Suicidal behavior inLatinas: explanatory cultural factors and implications for intervention.

    PubMed

    Zayas, Luis H; Pilat, Allyson M

    2008-06-01

    We posit that the high rates of suicidal behavior by teenage Hispanic females reported in large-scale surveys can be understood as a cultural phenomenon, a product of specific elements of the history, tradition, ideology, or social norms of a particular society, and that treatment interventions must take family and cultural factors into consideration. For over a decade, surveys have reported that among ethnic and racial minority youth in the United States, Latinas have the highest rates of suicidal behavior compared to African American and non-Hispanic White adolescent females. However, other research shows that the psychological profiles of suicidal Latina adolescent girls and the risk factors for Latina suicidal behavior may not be that different from non-Hispanic suicidal adolescent females. The unique situation of adolescent Latinas involves the convergence of cultural and familial factors (i.e., familism, acculturation, relatedness, autonomy, etc.) with the developmental, social, and individual factors frequently associated with suicidal behaviors. Based on this background, family-oriented interventions appear to be the most appropriate approach to the prevention and treatment of Hispanic suicidal girls. Factors implicated in Latina suicidal behavior and community-based interventions that include the adolescent and her family are suggested. PMID:18611132

  12. Effect of Maternal–Child Home Visitation on Pregnancy Spacing for First-Time Latina Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Chesnokova, Arina; Matone, Meredith; Luan, Xianqun; Localio, A. Russell; Rubin, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the impact of a maternal–child home visitation program on birth spacing for first-time Latina mothers, focusing on adolescents and women who identified as Mexican or Puerto Rican. Methods. This was a retrospective cohort study. One thousand Latina women enrolled in the Pennsylvania Nurse–Family Partnership between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2007, were matched to nonenrolled Latina women using propensity scores. The primary outcome was the time to second pregnancy that resulted in a live birth (interpregnancy interval). Proportional hazards models and bootstrap methods compared the time to event. Results. Home visitation was associated with a small decrease in the risk of a short interpregnancy interval (≤ 18 months) among Latina women (hazards ratio [HR] = 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.75, 0.99). This effect was driven by outcomes among younger adolescent women (HR = 0.80; 95% CI = 0.65, 0.96). There was also a trend toward significance for women of Mexican heritage (HR = 0.74; 95% CI = 0.49, 1.07), although this effect might be attributed to individual agency performance. Conclusions. Home visitation using the Nurse–Family Partnership model had measurable effects on birth spacing in Latina women. PMID:24354820

  13. Breast cancer interventions serving US-based Latinas: current approaches and directions

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Yamile; Thompson, Beti; Espinoza, Noah; Ceballos, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Despite efforts to reduce morbidity and mortality in breast cancer, Latinas continue to have lower 5-year survival rates than their non-Latina white counterparts. All along the cancer continuum from screening to follow-up of abnormal screening to diagnosis and treatment to survivorship, Latinas fare poorer than non-Latina whites. To close this gap, a number of research projects across the continuum have attempted to improve breast cancer outcomes. In this review, we examine studies that have been carried out in breast cancer along the cancer continuum. We focus not only on randomized, controlled trials, but also on quasi-experimental, and pre- and post-test studies that provided interventions for positive breast cancer outcomes. We examine not only the intervention outcomes, but also the type of intervention targets and type of intervention implementation. In future breast cancer research among Latinas, more emphasis should be placed on the steps in detection and treatment that occur after screening. PMID:23826775

  14. Reducing the Excess Burden of Cervical Cancer Among Latinas: Translating Science into Health Promotion Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Murphy, Sheila T.; Moran, Meghan Bridgid; Cortessis, Victoria K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Although deaths from cervical cancer are declining, Latinas are not benefiting equally in this decline. Incidence of invasive cervical cancer among Los Angeles’, California Latinas is much higher than among non-Latina Whites (14.7 versus 8.02 per 100,000). This paper examines cervical cancer screening among Latinas. Methods Ninety-seven women of Mexican origin participated in 12 focus groups exploring barriers to screening. Saturation was reached. Results All participants knew what a Pap test was and most knew its purpose. More acculturated participants understood the link between HPV and cervical cancer. More recent immigrants did not. There was confusion whether women who were not sexually active need to be screened. Most frequently mentioned barriers were lack of time and concern over missing work. Lower income and less acculturated women were less likely to be aware of free/low-cost clinics. Older and less acculturated participants held more fatalistic beliefs, were more embarrassed about getting a Pap test, were more fearful of being perceived as sexually promiscuous, and were more fearful of receiving disapproval from their husbands. Conclusions Latinas are informed regarding cervical cancer screening; rather they encounter barriers such as a lack of time, money and support. Health promotion interventions can be enhanced via peer-to-peer education, by addressing barriers to cervical cancer screening with in-language, culturally tailored interventions, and working with clinics on systemic changes, such as extended clinic hours. PMID:24587769

  15. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to Understand Cervical Cancer Screening Among Latinas.

    PubMed

    Roncancio, Angelica M; Ward, Kristy K; Sanchez, Ingrid A; Cano, Miguel A; Byrd, Theresa L; Vernon, Sally W; Fernandez-Esquer, Maria Eugenia; Fernandez, Maria E

    2015-10-01

    To reduce the high incidence of cervical cancer among Latinas in the United States it is important to understand factors that predict screening behavior. The aim of this study was to test the utility of theory of planned behavior in predicting cervical cancer screening among a group of Latinas. A sample of Latinas (N = 614) completed a baseline survey about Pap test attitudes subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and intention to be screened for cervical cancer. At 6 months postbaseline, cervical cancer screening behavior was assessed. Structural equation modeling was used to test the theory. Model fit statistics indicated good model fit: χ(2)(48) = 54.32, p = .246; comparative fit index = .992; root mean square error of approximation = .015; weighted root mean square residual = .687. Subjective norms (p = .005) and perceived behavioral control (p < .0001) were positively associated with intention to be screened for cervical cancer, and the intention to be screened predicted actual cervical cancer screening (p < .0001). The proportion of variance (R2) in intention accounted for by the predictors was .276 and the R2 in cervical cancer screening accounted for was .130. This study provides support for the use of the theory of planned behavior in predicting cervical cancer screening among Latinas. This knowledge can be used to inform the development of a theory of planned behavior-based intervention to increase cervical cancer screening among Latinas and reduce the high incidence of cervical cancer in this group of women. PMID:25712240

  16. Health Care Access and Breast Cancer Screening Among Latinas Along the California–Mexican Border

    PubMed Central

    Malcarne, Vanessa L.; Foster-Fishman, Pennie G.; Davidson, William S.; Mumman, Manpreet K.; Riley, Natasha; Sadler, Georgia R.

    2013-01-01

    Latinas are more likely to exhibit late stage breast cancers at the time of diagnosis and have lower survival rates compared to white women. A contributing factor may be that Latinas have lower rates of mammography screening. This study was guided by the Behavioral Model of Health Services Use to examine factors associated with mammography screening utilization among middle-aged Latinas. An academic–community health center partnership collected data from community-based sample of 208 Latinas 40 years and older in the San Diego County who completed measures assessing psychosocial factors, health care access, and recent mammography screening. Results showed that 84.6 % had ever had a mammogram and 76.2 % of women had received a mammogram in the past 2 years. Characteristics associated with mammography screening adherence included a lower acculturation (OR 3.663) a recent physician visit in the past year (OR 6.304), and a greater confidence in filling out medical forms (OR 1.743), adjusting for covariates. Results demonstrate that an annual physical examination was the strongest predictor of recent breast cancer screening. Findings suggest that in this community, improving access to care among English-speaking Latinas and addressing health literacy issues are essential for promoting breast cancer screening utilization. PMID:24150421

  17. Health care access and breast cancer screening among Latinas along the California-Mexican border.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Sheila F; Malcarne, Vanessa L; Foster-Fishman, Pennie G; Davidson, William S; Mumman, Manpreet K; Riley, Natasha; Sadler, Georgia R

    2014-08-01

    Latinas are more likely to exhibit late stage breast cancers at the time of diagnosis and have lower survival rates compared to white women. A contributing factor may be that Latinas have lower rates of mammography screening. This study was guided by the Behavioral Model of Health Services Use to examine factors associated with mammography screening utilization among middle-aged Latinas. An academic-community health center partnership collected data from community-based sample of 208 Latinas 40 years and older in the San Diego County who completed measures assessing psychosocial factors, health care access, and recent mammography screening. Results showed that 84.6 % had ever had a mammogram and 76.2 % of women had received a mammogram in the past 2 years. Characteristics associated with mammography screening adherence included a lower acculturation (OR 3.663) a recent physician visit in the past year (OR 6.304), and a greater confidence in filling out medical forms (OR 1.743), adjusting for covariates. Results demonstrate that an annual physical examination was the strongest predictor of recent breast cancer screening. Findings suggest that in this community, improving access to care among English-speaking Latinas and addressing health literacy issues are essential for promoting breast cancer screening utilization.

  18. Cultural and child-related predictors of distress among Latina caregivers of children with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Long, Kristin A; Kao, Barbara; Plante, Wendy; Seifer, Ronald; Lobato, Debra

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this article is to examine associations among socioeconomic, cultural, and child factors and maternal distress among families of children with intellectual disabilities (ID). Latino and nonLatino White (NLW) mothers of children with and without ID (N  =  192) reported on familism, language acculturation, maternal distress, child adaptive functioning, and child behavior problems. Among mothers of children with ID, higher levels of child behavior problems mediated the association between Latina ethnicity and elevated maternal distress. Associations between child behavior problems and maternal distress in Latina mothers of children with ID were moderated by single-parent marital status, higher familism, and lower English usage. Thus, child and cultural factors contribute to elevated distress among Latina mothers of children with ID.

  19. The influence of marianismo beliefs on physical activity of immigrant Latinas

    PubMed Central

    D'Alonzo, Karen T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To verify and explicate the impact of marianismo beliefs on the physical activity behaviors of immigrant Latinas. Design/Method Twenty–eight immigrant Latinas, ages 18–40 years, were recruited to participate in two focus group interviews. Data collection and analysis were driven by Spradley’s Developmental Research Sequence (DRS) Results Two domain terms were identified: “Life is too fast here” and “The woman is the center of the family”. Six included terms and five cultural themes were specified. Discussion/Conclusions A combination of marianismo beliefs, acculturation stress, loss of social support and conflicts between collectivist and individualist values combine to adversely influence physical activity behaviors of immigrant Latinas. Implications for Practice Physical activity interventions for Hispanic women should capitalize on the strengths of the marianista, address factors leading to acculturation stress among women and their families and the establishment of bridges of social support among new groups of immigrants. PMID:22294337

  20. Beyond the discourse of reproductive choice: narratives of pregnancy resolution among Latina/o teenage parents.

    PubMed

    Mann, Emily S; Cardona, Vanessa; Gómez, Cynthia A

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that the US teenage birth rate has declined dramatically in recent years, teen births among Latinas are higher than any other racial/ethnic group. Most studies focus on the causes and consequences of early motherhood among Latina teenagers, neglecting other important dimensions of the issue. This study examines how Latina/o teenage parents living in California narrate their experiences with unintended pregnancy resolution. Qualitative analysis reveals three central themes. First, participants expressed shock upon learning they or their partner was pregnant, followed by acceptance about their impending parenthood. Second, participants' views of abortion and adoption largely foreclosed these options as pathways by which to resolve their unintended pregnancies. Third, participants recounted numerous stories of the messages they received from parents, other family members and male partners that were frequently directive regarding how to resolve their pregnancies. These findings have implications for young people's reproductive health and rights, and for reproductive justice more broadly.

  1. Emotion Socialization Practices in Latina and European American Mothers of Preschoolers with Behavior Problems

    PubMed Central

    Lugo-Candelas, Claudia I.; Harvey, Elizabeth A.; Breaux, Rosanna P.

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined mothers’ emotion socialization of 3-year-old children with behavior problems, to determine whether emotion socialization practices, as well as the relation between these practices and child functioning, varied across ethnicities. Participants were 134 preschoolers with behavior problems. Mothers were European American (n = 96) and Latina American (n = 38; predominately Puerto Rican). Audiotaped mother-child interactions were coded for emotion socialization behaviors. Latina and European American mothers used similar emotion socialization practices on most dimensions. Latina mothers were more likely to minimize or not respond to their children’s negative affect. However, this difference did not appear to have ramifications for children. This study provided evidence for both differences and similarities across ethnicities on emotion socialization practices. PMID:27042157

  2. Beyond the discourse of reproductive choice: narratives of pregnancy resolution among Latina/o teenage parents.

    PubMed

    Mann, Emily S; Cardona, Vanessa; Gómez, Cynthia A

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that the US teenage birth rate has declined dramatically in recent years, teen births among Latinas are higher than any other racial/ethnic group. Most studies focus on the causes and consequences of early motherhood among Latina teenagers, neglecting other important dimensions of the issue. This study examines how Latina/o teenage parents living in California narrate their experiences with unintended pregnancy resolution. Qualitative analysis reveals three central themes. First, participants expressed shock upon learning they or their partner was pregnant, followed by acceptance about their impending parenthood. Second, participants' views of abortion and adoption largely foreclosed these options as pathways by which to resolve their unintended pregnancies. Third, participants recounted numerous stories of the messages they received from parents, other family members and male partners that were frequently directive regarding how to resolve their pregnancies. These findings have implications for young people's reproductive health and rights, and for reproductive justice more broadly. PMID:25953108

  3. El cambio de vida: conceptualizations of menopause and midlife among urban Latina women.

    PubMed

    Villarruel, Antonia M; Harlow, Sioban D; Lopez, Maria; Sowers, MaryFran

    2002-01-01

    The experience of menopause among Latina women has seldom been described. The purpose of this study was to conceptualize and contextualize the experience of menopause from the perspective of Latina women. A series of focus group sessions were conducted with postmenopausal Latina women living in a large midwestern city. Themes derived from content analysis included: (a) The primacy of health and the importance of harmony and balance; (b) El cambio de vida--something you have to go through; and (c) This time is for me: reorientation and restructuring. Rediscovery and redefinition as opposed to being defined by physical symptoms marked this life phase. Implications of study findings are discussed within the context of an emerging biopsychosocial perspective of midlife and menopause transition.

  4. Amigas Latinas Motivando el ALMA (ALMA): Development and Pilot Implementation of a Stress Reduction Promotora Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Green, Melissa A.; Perez, Georgina; Ornelas, India J.; Tran, Anh N.; Blumenthal, Connie; Lyn, Michelle; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2014-01-01

    Use of mental health care services for psychological distress is limited among Latino immigrants. In geographic areas where migration has been rapid, mental health systems possess limited capacity to provide bilingual and bicultural assistance. The development of a bilingual and bicultural workforce is a necessary yet long-term solution. More immediate strategies, however, are needed to meet the needs of immigrant Latinos. This paper describes the development of a stress-reduction focused, lay health advisor training that targets individual behavior change among Latina immigrants. The theoretical foundation, curriculum components, and pilot implementation of the training are discussed. As natural leaders, Latina promotoras disseminated learned strategies and resources within their communities. The lay health advisor model is a salient method for disseminating information regarding mental health and stress reduction among Latinas. PMID:25364312

  5. Cultural and child-related predictors of distress among Latina caregivers of children with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Long, Kristin A; Kao, Barbara; Plante, Wendy; Seifer, Ronald; Lobato, Debra

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this article is to examine associations among socioeconomic, cultural, and child factors and maternal distress among families of children with intellectual disabilities (ID). Latino and nonLatino White (NLW) mothers of children with and without ID (N  =  192) reported on familism, language acculturation, maternal distress, child adaptive functioning, and child behavior problems. Among mothers of children with ID, higher levels of child behavior problems mediated the association between Latina ethnicity and elevated maternal distress. Associations between child behavior problems and maternal distress in Latina mothers of children with ID were moderated by single-parent marital status, higher familism, and lower English usage. Thus, child and cultural factors contribute to elevated distress among Latina mothers of children with ID. PMID:25715183

  6. Amigas Latinas Motivando el ALMA (ALMA): Development and Pilot Implementation of a Stress Reduction Promotora Intervention.

    PubMed

    Green, Melissa A; Perez, Georgina; Ornelas, India J; Tran, Anh N; Blumenthal, Connie; Lyn, Michelle; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2012-08-01

    Use of mental health care services for psychological distress is limited among Latino immigrants. In geographic areas where migration has been rapid, mental health systems possess limited capacity to provide bilingual and bicultural assistance. The development of a bilingual and bicultural workforce is a necessary yet long-term solution. More immediate strategies, however, are needed to meet the needs of immigrant Latinos. This paper describes the development of a stress-reduction focused, lay health advisor training that targets individual behavior change among Latina immigrants. The theoretical foundation, curriculum components, and pilot implementation of the training are discussed. As natural leaders, Latina promotoras disseminated learned strategies and resources within their communities. The lay health advisor model is a salient method for disseminating information regarding mental health and stress reduction among Latinas.

  7. The cultural context of obesity: Exploring perceptions of obesity and weight loss among Latina immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Agne, April A.; Daubert, Rebecca; Munoz, Maria L.; Scarinci, Isabel; Cherrington, Andrea L.

    2013-01-01

    Background This study used focus group methodology to examine perceptions of obesity and weight management among Latina immigrant women in Alabama. Methods Four focus groups (N=25) were conducted in Spanish as part of a participatory intervention development process. Participants were obese/overweight Latina immigrant women (BMI >25) primarily recruited from a community hospital. Results The majority of participants were from Mexico. Participants described obesity in the context of short-term effects such as physical symptoms and aesthetics. Perceived weight gain was related to lifestyle changes since moving to the U.S. Social isolation, depression, and stress were reported to contribute to weight gain. Participants expressed interest in weight loss but emphasized a desire for programs that preserve traditional foods and include family. Conclusion Weight-management programs designed for Latina immigrants should address their perceptions of obesity. This data also suggests that those interventions that preserve culture and incorporate family may have increased community buy-in. PMID:22130571

  8. Weight-Related Eating Among Less-Acculturated Latina College Students.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Elizabeth Diane; Gutierrez, Angelica

    2016-10-01

    Less-acculturated Latinos have been found to have unique patterns of weight-related eating attitudes and behaviors. This study examined body mass index (BMI), body image, and various facets of emotional distress as contributors to weight-related eating among less-acculturated female Latina college students. It was hypothesized that unique combinations of BMI, body image, depression, anxiety, and stress would predict routine restraint, compensatory restraint, susceptibility to external cues, and emotional eating in less-acculturated Latina college students. Participants were 141 college students from a rural region in southeastern California who completed questionnaires. Preoccupation with being overweight, a body-image variable, significantly predicted routine and compensatory restraint whereas stress was an important correlate of reasons for eating other than hunger. Implications of the findings include the potential to inform models of weight-related eating among less-acculturated Latina college students. Limitations include homogeneity of sample pertinent to Latino descent. Future directions are discussed. PMID:26976002

  9. Intimate partner sexual violence: a comparison of foreign- versus US-born physically abused Latinas.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, Courtenay E; Messing, Jill T; Amanor-Boadu, Yvonne; O'Sullivan, Chris O; Webster, Daniel; Campbell, Jacquelyn

    2014-02-01

    Men's violence against women-particularly intimate partner sexual violence (IPSV)-is associated with the transmission of HIV. Men who physically abuse their female intimate partners often also sexually abuse them. Latinas are one of the fastest growing populations in the USA and at high-risk for contracting HIV, though little is known about IPSV against physically abused Latinas, including whether there is an association between nativity of the victim and the likelihood of sexual violence by intimate partners. This study examined the (1) prevalence of recent (past 6 months) IPSV against 555 physically abused, help-seeking Latinas and (2) relationship of nativity to recent IPSV. This study used data collected in 2002–2003 from participants in one major city on the East Coast and one West Coast county, who were involved in the Risk Assessment Validation (RAVE) Study. The RAVE Study assessed the accuracy of four different methods for predicting risk of future intimate partner violence. IPSV was defined as an abusive male partner physically forcing sex (rape) or making the woman have sex without a condom. Recent IPSV was reported by 38 % of the sample. Among those reporting recent IPSV, multiple assaults were common: 30%of women were raped and 51%were made to have unprotected sex six or more times during the past 6 months. IPSV was significantly associated with nativity. Physically abused Latinas who were foreign born had two times greater odds of reporting recent IPSV than physically abused Latinas born in the USA, after controlling for other demographic covariates. Exploratory post hoc analyses examining all pairwise comparisons of IPSV against Latinas born in the USA, Mexico, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean also revealed some significant differences that warrant further study with larger samples. HIV prevention efforts aimed at reducing IPSV in this population are needed.

  10. Intimate partner sexual violence: a comparison of foreign- versus US-born physically abused Latinas.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, Courtenay E; Messing, Jill T; Amanor-Boadu, Yvonne; O'Sullivan, Chris O; Webster, Daniel; Campbell, Jacquelyn

    2014-02-01

    Men's violence against women-particularly intimate partner sexual violence (IPSV)-is associated with the transmission of HIV. Men who physically abuse their female intimate partners often also sexually abuse them. Latinas are one of the fastest growing populations in the USA and at high-risk for contracting HIV, though little is known about IPSV against physically abused Latinas, including whether there is an association between nativity of the victim and the likelihood of sexual violence by intimate partners. This study examined the (1) prevalence of recent (past 6 months) IPSV against 555 physically abused, help-seeking Latinas and (2) relationship of nativity to recent IPSV. This study used data collected in 2002–2003 from participants in one major city on the East Coast and one West Coast county, who were involved in the Risk Assessment Validation (RAVE) Study. The RAVE Study assessed the accuracy of four different methods for predicting risk of future intimate partner violence. IPSV was defined as an abusive male partner physically forcing sex (rape) or making the woman have sex without a condom. Recent IPSV was reported by 38 % of the sample. Among those reporting recent IPSV, multiple assaults were common: 30%of women were raped and 51%were made to have unprotected sex six or more times during the past 6 months. IPSV was significantly associated with nativity. Physically abused Latinas who were foreign born had two times greater odds of reporting recent IPSV than physically abused Latinas born in the USA, after controlling for other demographic covariates. Exploratory post hoc analyses examining all pairwise comparisons of IPSV against Latinas born in the USA, Mexico, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean also revealed some significant differences that warrant further study with larger samples. HIV prevention efforts aimed at reducing IPSV in this population are needed. PMID:23959640

  11. Anticipatory guidance preferences of Latina migrant farmworker mothers

    PubMed Central

    Kilanowski, Jill F.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of the study was to learn preferences of Latina migrant farmworker (MFW) mothers’ in the presentation of health education materials by discussing the strengths and weaknesses of numerous mixed-media samples. Method This community-based participatory study was qualitative and descriptive in design. Focus groups were conducted in Spanish in four Midwest migrant camps with a convenience sample of mothers (n=31). Adult learning and cultural care theories guided the study. Various modes of educational materials on various topics were presented. Results Mothers preferred comic book-style handouts, games, food replicas, text in English/Spanish, and DVDs, but almost all did not have media-playing equipment. They did not like black-and-white photos, or cartoon-like illustrations. Identified themes of importance were colored illustrations, sizes mothers could easily carry in purses, and limited verbiage on a page. Discussion Learned knowledge will be used to customize health promotion interventions that are sensitive to MFW preferred learning styles. The findings from this study can inform other interventions with Latino populations and serve as a prototype for other populations of immigrant non-English speaking mothers. PMID:23611456

  12. Measurement of disordered eating in Latina college women.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Elizabeth D; Julian, Anne K; Murray, Kate E

    2013-04-01

    The Eating Disorder Risk Composite (EDRC) comprises the Drive for Thinness, Bulimia, and Body Dissatisfaction subscales of the Eating Disorder Inventory, Third Edition (EDI-3, Garner, 2004). Past research conducted with Latina college women (LCW) has found older versions of the EDRC subscales to be reliable, but the EDI-3's EDRC factor structure has yet to be studied among LCW. The present study investigated the pattern of responses to and the factor structure of the EDRC in LCW. It was hypothesized that eating pathology would be present and that a factor analysis would find some discrepancies between the original factor structure of the EDRC and the factor structure from LCW. Analyses of data on a 6-point Likert scale indicate that drive for thinness and body dissatisfaction are far more prevalent than is bulimic symptomology in LCW. Principal Axis Factoring with promax rotation was used to extract three factors very similar to the original EDRC. Some discrepancies in the item loadings were observed, most notably that half of the items from the original Body Dissatisfaction subscale did not load together on one factor. Overall, the EDRC appears to be a good measurement of eating- and body-related phenomena among LCW. Implications, limitations, and future directions are discussed. PMID:23557825

  13. Measurement of Disordered Eating in Latina College Women

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Elizabeth D.; Julian, Anne K.; Murray, Kate E.

    2013-01-01

    The Eating Disorder Risk Composite (EDRC) comprises the Drive for Thinness, Bulimia, and Body Dissatisfaction subscales of the Eating Disorder Inventory, Third Edition (EDI-3, Garner, 2004). Past research conducted with Latina college women (LCW) has found older versions of the EDRC subscales to be reliable, but the EDI-3’s EDRC factor structure has yet to be studied among LCW. The present study investigated the pattern of responses to and the factor structure of the EDRC in LCW. It was hypothesized that eating pathology would be present and that a factor analysis would find some discrepancies between the original factor structure of the EDRC and the factor structure from LCW. Analyses of data on a 6-point Likert scale indicate that drive for thinness and body dissatisfaction are far more prevalent than is bulimic symptomology in LCW. Principal Axis Factoring with promax rotation was used to extract three factors very similar to the original EDRC. Some discrepancies in the item loadings were observed, most notably that half of the items from the original Body Dissatisfaction subscale did not load together on one factor. Overall, the EDRC appears to be a good measurement of eating- and body-related phenomena among LCW. Implications, limitations, and future directions are discussed. PMID:23557825

  14. SE-FIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yongkang; Weislogel, Mark; Schaeffer, Ben; Semerjian, Ben; Yang, Lihong; Zimmerli, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    The mathematical theory of capillary surfaces has developed steadily over the centuries, but it was not until the last few decades that new technologies have put a more urgent demand on a substantially more qualitative and quantitative understanding of phenomena relating to capillarity in general. So far, the new theory development successfully predicts the behavior of capillary surfaces for special cases. However, an efficient quantitative mathematical prediction of capillary phenomena related to the shape and stability of geometrically complex equilibrium capillary surfaces remains a significant challenge. As one of many numerical tools, the open-source Surface Evolver (SE) algorithm has played an important role over the last two decades. The current effort was undertaken to provide a front-end to enhance the accessibility of SE for the purposes of design and analysis. Like SE, the new code is open-source and will remain under development for the foreseeable future. The ultimate goal of the current Surface Evolver Fluid Interface Tool (SEFIT) development is to build a fully integrated front-end with a set of graphical user interface (GUI) elements. Such a front-end enables the access to functionalities that are developed along with the GUIs to deal with pre-processing, convergence computation operation, and post-processing. In other words, SE-FIT is not just a GUI front-end, but an integrated environment that can perform sophisticated computational tasks, e.g. importing industry standard file formats and employing parameter sweep functions, which are both lacking in SE, and require minimal interaction by the user. These functions are created using a mixture of Visual Basic and the SE script language. These form the foundation for a high-performance front-end that substantially simplifies use without sacrificing the proven capabilities of SE. The real power of SE-FIT lies in its automated pre-processing, pre-defined geometries, convergence computation operation

  15. Latina adolescent suicide ideations and attempts: associations with connectedness to parents, peers, and teachers.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Susan M; Wyman, Peter; Warren, Keith

    2012-12-01

    Associations between suicidal behavior and social-ecological variables were examined among 1,618 Latina high school students (mean age = 15) from the nationally representative Add Health sample (68% were U.S.-born). Ideations were associated with having a suicidal friend, lower perceived father support, and overall parental caring. Attempts were associated with having a suicidal friend, and lower perceived teacher and parental support. Peer and mother relationship variables were not predictors of ideations or attempts. The protective role of father and teacher support has not previously been emphasized in the literature. Strengthening connections to parents and teachers may reduce suicidal behavior in adolescent Latinas.

  16. Preparing for a healthy future today: Folic acid formative research with young Latina adults.

    PubMed

    Flores, Alina L; Prue, Christine E; Panissidi, Paula; Lira, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Young Latina adults require targeted health messages to meet the unique needs of this life stage. Folic acid messages for the prevention of neural tube defects that are effective for other women might not be relevant to this group. The aim of this study was to identify barriers and motivators to folic acid consumption for this population and develop educational materials and messages that address their needs. This article presents 3 phases of formative research that formed the basis for the development of Spanish-language print materials and radio advertisements aimed at promoting folic acid consumption among young Latina adults.

  17. Latina Adolescent Suicide Ideations and Attempts: Associations with Connectedness to Parents, Peers, and Teachers

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Susan M.; Wyman, Peter; Warren, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Associations between suicidal behavior and social-ecological variables were examined among 1,618 Latina high school students (mean age = 15) from the nationally representative Add Health sample (68% were U.S.-born). Ideations were associated with having a suicidal friend, lower perceived father support, and overall parental caring. Attempts were associated with having a suicidal friend, and lower perceived teacher and parental support. Peer and mother relationship variables were not predictors of ideations or attempts. The protective role of father and teacher support has not previously been emphasized in the literature. Strengthening connections to parents and teachers may reduce suicidal behavior in adolescent Latinas. PMID:23062099

  18. Public Discourse versus Public Policy: Latinas/os, Affirmative Action, and the Court of Public Opinion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledesma, María C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to highlight the power of popular discourse in shaping public policy debates concerning educational access and opportunity for historically marginalized and minoritized students, especially for Latinas/os. I argue that proponents of race-conscious policies would do well to challenge the elimination of affirmative…

  19. An Exploratory Case Study of Providers' Collaborative Consultation Practices with Latina Mothers during Home Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cambray-Engstrom, Elizabeth; Salisbury, Christine

    2010-01-01

    In this exploratory case study, 4 early intervention providers' use of collaborative intervention strategies and everyday activities was examined in relation to the participation of a small group of Latina mothers (n = 10) during home visits over a 6-month period in an urban community. Videotapes (n = 40) of home visits were clustered into more…

  20. Substance Abuse Treatment: Critical Issues and Challenges in the Treatment of Latina Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaro, Hortensia; Nieves, Rita; Johannes, Sergut Wolde; Cabeza, Nirzka M. Labault

    1999-01-01

    Among 66 Latina mothers in a residential substance abuse treatment program, 80% reported childhood experiences of abuse. Compared to other female participants, women abused as children were more likely to be predominantly Spanish speakers, to have health problems, to have had children removed from their custody, and to drop out quickly from…

  1. The Chosen Few: Latinas and the New Technologies. JSRI Occasional Paper No. 65. Latino Studies Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingle, Yolanda Rodriguez

    If higher education is serious about attracting and retaining Latinas to the faculty rank and giving them significant roles in the academic arena, more understanding and comprehensive organizational change are needed. When minority individuals are brought in one at a time, they are less likely to integrate effectively into the social structure,…

  2. Disrupting Apartheid of Knowledge: "Testimonio" as Methodology in Latina/o Critical Race Research in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Lindsay Perez

    2009-01-01

    This article utilizes a Latina/o critical race theory (LatCrit) framework to disrupt a narrowly defined process of knowledge production in academia, informed by Eurocentric epistemologies and specific ideological beliefs. This process has created an apartheid of knowledge in academia. Disrupting this apartheid allows critical race researchers to…

  3. "Esta pagina me recordo": Young Latinas Using Personal Life Stories as Tools for Meaning-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Robertson, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Because schools place such high importance on text-based analysis often devoid of opportunities to draw on home knowledge, diverse ways of making meaning from books are often ignored. This qualitative study of a bilingual second-grade classroom examined the manner in which four young Latina students told stories about their life experiences in…

  4. Sex in the New World: an empowerment model for HIV prevention in Latina immigrant women.

    PubMed

    Gómez, C A; Hernández, M; Faigeles, B

    1999-04-01

    In 1996, nearly 60% of U.S. AIDS cases among Latinas were attributed to unprotected sex with men. Economic disadvantage, language barriers, and strong cultural gender norms regarding sex exacerbate the risk for HIV infection among Latina immigrant women. Through a collaboration among scientists and providers, this study was designed to evaluate the impact of a multifaceted empowerment program for Latina immigrant women on HIV risk behaviors. Women (N = 74) were followed for the first 6 months of their participation and attended up to nine distinct types of activities (e.g., information meetings, friendship circles, and workshops). Although the program was not developed to specifically target HIV risk behaviors, women showed significant increases in sexual communication comfort, were less likely to maintain traditional sexual gender norms, and reported changes in decision-making power. Targeting broader sociocultural issues may increase the necessary skills for Latina women to prevent HIV infection from their sexual partners. Successful collaborations between scientists and providers are critical in developing effective, community-relevant interventions. PMID:10097964

  5. Birth Experiences of Immigrant Latina Women in a New Growth Community.

    PubMed

    Niebler, Meagan; Documét, Patricia I; Chaves-Gnecco, Diego; Guadamuz, Thomas E

    2016-09-01

    A woman's birth experience can impact the physical and mental well-being of mothers long after the birth of their child. Little is known about the experiences of Latina women in areas with small, yet growing Latino populations. To understand Latina's perceptions of their childbirth experience and to see how insurance status impacts that experience, we conducted in-depth, semi-structured interviews with a non-proportional quota sampling of ten Latina women, five with and five without health insurance. Most women reported a positive global experience; the birth of a healthy child was the most important factor influencing birth experiences for all of them. Locus of control and support from medical providers and loved ones also shaped experiences. Uninsured women reported lower levels of perceived control and support, which did impact their birthing experience. These differences could be influenced by social status and position. Medical provider, hospital, and policy recommendations are made which could lead to improvements in uninsured Latinas' childbirth experiences. PMID:27294734

  6. Latina Professor Revitalizing Historical Memory: Resistance Politics and Transformation within Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arce, Josephine

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on how a Chicana/Latina professor contributed to the development of social consciousness with Spanish bilingual credential candidates in a Teacher Education Multiple Subject Credential Program, in California, USA. As a teacher educator, my goals were to look deeply at my teaching approach and to evaluate what the students and I…

  7. "Escuchando a Las Maestras/os": Immigration Politics and Latina/o Preservice Bilingual Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Patricia; Ek, Lucila D.

    2008-01-01

    This article draws from a larger study based in South Texas that examines the professional and personal narratives of 63 Latina/o preservice educators preparing to teach in bilingual classrooms. Using qualitative methods, we collected data where participants' voices and opinions regarding U.S. immigration issues were documented during classroom…

  8. Critical Race Theory, Racial Microaggressions, and Campus Racial Climate for Latina/o Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yosso, Tara J.; Smith, William A.; Ceja, Miguel; Solorzano, Daniel G.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, Tara Yosso, William Smith, Miguel Ceja, and Daniel Solorzano expand on their previous work by employing critical race theory to explore and understand incidents of racial microaggressions as experienced by Latina/o students at three selective universities. The authors explore three types of racial microaggressions--interpersonal…

  9. Overcoming Personal and Academic Challenges: Perspectives from Latina/o College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavazos, Javier, Jr.; Johnson, Michael B.; Sparrow, Gregory Scott

    2010-01-01

    Eleven Latina/o college students were interviewed to provide insight into what kind of coping responses they used to overcome challenges and when such responses were employed. The following responses emerged: positive reframing, acceptance, self-talk, maintaining focus on final goals, using low expectations as motivation, self-reflection, taking…

  10. Misspoken in Arizona: Latina/o Students Document the Articulations of Racism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cammarota, Julio

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on racism expressed by school personnel (administrators and teachers) and experienced by Latina/o students at a high school located in Tucson, Arizona. Students in a specialized social science research program, called the Social Justice Education Project (SJEP), documented personal encounters with racist articulations at their…

  11. Achieving a College Education: The Psychological Experiences of Latina/o Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zell, Maristela C.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the psychological and subjective experiences of Latina/o community college students. The impact of these experiences on their persistence toward achieving their education goals is also examined. Interviews with 17 community college students yielded 8 themes: overcoming personal and social challenges, maturation, self-discovery…

  12. Becoming Part of a Community: Teaching Strategies of Latina Nursing Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canales, Mary K.; Bowers, Barbara J.; Norton, Sally

    2000-01-01

    A study of 10 Latina nursing faculty explored cultural competence and ways to integrate culture and community in nursing curriculum. Teaching strategies they identified included keeping the concept of "The Other" in class discussions and interpreting culture as community. (Contains 31 references.) (SK)

  13. Latinas/os in Community College Developmental Education: Increasing Moments of Academic and Interpersonal Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acevedo-Gil, Nancy; Santos, Ryan E.; Alonso, LLuliana; Solorzano, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the experiences of Latinas/os in community college English and math developmental education courses. Critical race theory in education and the theory of validation serve as guiding frameworks. The authors find that institutional agents provide academic validation by emphasizing high expectations, focusing on social…

  14. Predictors of Parenting among Economically Disadvantaged Latina Mothers: Mediating and Moderating Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prelow, Hazel M.; Weaver, Scott R.; Bowman, Marvella A.; Swenson, Rebecca R.

    2010-01-01

    Structural equation modeling was used to examine the role of ecological risk factors, maternal psychological distress, and social network support on the parenting behaviors of 535 economically disadvantaged Latina mothers, who were surveyed for the Welfare Children, & Families: A Three City Study. We predicted that ecological risk would influence…

  15. Latina Faculty in the Labyrinth: Constructing and Contesting Legitimacy in Hispanic Serving Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Leslie D.; Murakami, Elizabeth; Nunez, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the presence and experiences of Latina academics in the U.S., especially those who serve in Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs). Following the theme of this special issue related to Women of Color Faculty's "Testimonios" and "Laberintos," the authors add to the notion of academia as a labyrinth…

  16. Proving Them Wrong: Academically Resilient First-Generation Latinas in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Rosanna A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the educational trajectories of academically resilient first-generation Latinas in college. More specifically, the study focused on the factors that led them to become academically successful. The researcher of this study conducted a narrative inquiry analysis of the K-16 educational trajectories of five academically resilient…

  17. Access and Opportunity for Latina/o Undocumented College Students: Familial and Institutional Support Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Patricia A.; Rodriguez, James L.

    2011-01-01

    This article focused on the educational experiences of Latina/o undocumented college students attending a public Hispanic-Serving Institution. Familial and institutional factors that promote educational opportunities are explored. A total of 15 semi-structured interviews serve as the data source for this exploratory, qualitative study. Interview…

  18. Communication Experiences of Latina and Latino Immigrant Custodial Workers within a University Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Wilfredo

    2011-01-01

    The organizational communication subdiscipline has made great strides in theory and research in recent years, but little is known about the workplace communication experiences of Latinas and Latinos in the United States. Even less is known about these sociocultural group members' experiences when they work in lower status, blue-collar roles in…

  19. Familial factors related to suicidal ideation of Latina adolescents in the United States.

    PubMed

    Piña-Watson, Brandy; Castillo, Linda G; Rodriguez, Kimberly M; Ray, Sara

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether a Latina adolescent's perception of mother connectedness, father connectedness, parental caring, autonomy granting from parents, and parental interest in their child's school life predicts suicidal ideation above and beyond known risk factors of adolescent depression and acculturation. Using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) Wave 1, 2 secondary logistic regression data analyses were conducted on a sample of 345 Latina adolescents. Results of correlational analyses indicated that perceived mother connectedness, father connectedness, parental caring, and academic interest were positively related; depression and nativity were negatively related to reports of suicidal ideation. Additionally, in a model with adolescents who reported having both a mother and father figure present in their life, depression and academic interest were significant predictors of suicidal ideation. In a second model, which included all Latinas regardless of the presence of both parents, depression, nativity, perceived academic interest, and caring were significant predictors. Implications are discussed for suicide prevention and intervention with Latina adolescents. PMID:24593057

  20. Voices and Perspectives of Latina Paraeducators: The Journey toward Teacher Certification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valenciana, Christine; Weisman, Evelyn Marino; Flores, Susana Y.

    2006-01-01

    This study employed open-ended questions on a survey, a focus group interview and participant observations to document the perspectives of Latina paraeducators concerning the challenges and support systems they encountered in order to complete college and gain admission to a teacher certification program. Findings reveal that their challenges…

  1. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Preventive Intervention for Perinatal Depression in High-Risk Latinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Huynh-Nhu; Perry, Deborah F.; Stuart, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: A randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral (CBT) intervention to prevent perinatal depression in high-risk Latinas. Method: A sample of 217 participants, predominantly low-income Central American immigrants who met demographic and depression risk criteria, were randomized into usual…

  2. Low-Income Latina Mothers' Expectations for Their Pregnant Daughters' Autonomy and Interdependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadeem, Erum; Romo, Laura F.

    2008-01-01

    Forty-five pregnant Latina adolescents and their mothers (23 English-speaking, 22 Spanish-speaking) were videotaped conversing about feelings and plans related to the adolescent's pregnancy. The prevalence of the mothers' messages about the daughter's reliance on the family unit (interdependence) and the daughter's self-sufficiency (autonomy) were…

  3. Pedagogies from "Nepantla": "Testimonio," Chicana/Latina Feminisms and Teacher Education Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto, Linda; Villenas, Sofia A.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a process of testimonial co-creation between two teacher educators. We created "testimonios" in dialogue to examine who we are, how we "know," and how we teach as Chicana/Latina educators of prospective teachers in predominantly white institutions (PWIs). An active exploration of our lived experiences growing up as…

  4. Latinas: Hispanic Women in the United States. The Hispanic Experience in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza, Hedda

    The term "Latinas" encompasses many different groups of women. Despite the disparities among the cultures of their countries of origin, Spanish-speaking peoples have been lumped as "Hispanics," and later "Latinos," in the United States. The Latino group is rapidly becoming the largest minority population in the United States. Minority status has…

  5. Sex Education and Cultural Values: Experiences and Attitudes of Latina Immigrant Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villar, Maria Elena; Concha, Maritza

    2012-01-01

    The paper aims to further explore the role that culture plays in the provision and assimilation of sex education among Latina immigrants in the USA. To accomplish this, researchers conducted focus groups and interviews with 30 women from Central and South America who have lived in the USA for at least five years. Participants were asked to reflect…

  6. Commentary: Latina Literacies in "Convivencia": Communal Spaces of Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villenas, Sofia A.

    2005-01-01

    Inspired by Delgado-Gaitan's work with Latina mothers' stories of transformation, this commentary engages scholarship on the communal "mujer-" or womanist-oriented spaces of teaching and learning. The author explores themes of "convivencia" (communalism) centered on faith, spirituality, and humor central to creating compassionate spaces of…

  7. Latina Spanish High School Teachers' Negotiation of Capital in New Latino Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colomer, Soria Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Based on a qualitative study documenting how Spanish teachers bear an especially heavy burden as unofficial translators, interpreters, and school representatives, this article documents how some Latina high school Spanish teachers struggle to form social networks with Latino students in new Latino school communities. Employing social frameworks,…

  8. Linguistic Violence, Insecurity, and Work: Language Ideologies of Latina/o Bilingual Teacher Candidates in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ek, Lucila D.; Sánchez, Patricia; Quijada Cerecer, Patricia D.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing from a larger qualitative study, this article examines the narratives of bilingual Latina/o teacher candidates in South Texas. The findings reveal that bilingual teacher candidates are linguistically subordinated by the marginalized status of Spanish in the United States and by deficit perspectives of Spanish of the Southwest. Their…

  9. Adapting an evidence-based survivorship intervention for Latina breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Meneses, Karen; Gisiger-Camata, Silvia; Schoenberger, Yu-Mei; Weech-Maldonado, Robert; McNees, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Aim About 120,000 Latina breast cancer survivors (LBCS) live in the USA with the numbers expected to increase. LBCS experience survivorship disparities and report poor quality of life outcomes. Despite poor outcomes, few survivorship interventions for LBCS are available. Adapting evidence-based interventions for Latinas may be one strategy to reduce disparities. Materials & Methods An evidence-based intervention called the Breast Cancer Education Intervention was adapted for Latinas. First, certified translation and cognitive interview to assess cultural relevance were conducted. Next, a pilot sample of 40 Latinas who participated in the intervention were asked to provide follow-up evaluation of their satisfaction with and usefulness of the translated education manual and intervention. Results Thirty LBCS completed the intervention, and 14 LBCS submitted an evaluation summary expressing satisfaction with usefulness, readability and relevance. Conclusion The process by which translation and cultural adaptation of an evidence-based intervention provides beginning foundation to support and reduce disparities among LBCS. PMID:25776285

  10. Feasibility and Acceptability of a School-Based Coping Intervention for Latina Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Carolyn; Pintor, Jessie Kemmick; Lindgren, Sandi

    2010-01-01

    Latino girls (Latinas) experience disproportionate rates of emotional distress, including suicidal ideation, which may be indicative of inadequate coping abilities. Prevention of mental health problems, a U.S. public health priority, is particularly critical for Latina adolescents due to lack of access to mental health treatments. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of Project Wings, a 14-session stress management/coping intervention. Latinas in school (ages 15–21) met weekly for 2-hr with two bilingual experienced facilitators to participate in sharing circles, relaxation exercise, and skill building. Intervention participation and post-intervention focus group data were analyzed. Fall semester intervention (n = 10) occurred during school (72% attendance rate); spring semester intervention (n = 11) was after school (84% attendance rate). Focus group data confirmed acceptability. Latina adolescents will participate in a school-based, group-based stress management/coping intervention. The findings offer insights about intervention recruitment and retention that are specifically relevant to school nurses. Future research includes intervention testing using a randomized study design. PMID:19850950

  11. Neighborhood Context, SES, and Parenting: Including a Focus on Acculturation among Latina Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceballo, Rosario; Hurd, Noelle

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the influence of contextual factors on parenting strategies among a sample of 104 Latina, European American, and African American mother-child pairs. The parenting constructs under investigation were selected as part of a collaborative research project among members of the parenting subgroup of the Study Group on Race, Culture,…

  12. The Role of Enculturation and Acculturation on Latina College Student Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cano, Miguel Angel; Castillo, Linda G.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship of acculturation, enculturation, and White attitudinal marginalization with distress among 214 Latina college students. Results showed that 12% of the variance in perceived distress was accounted for by all predictor variables with only behavioral enculturation and White attitudinal marginalization being…

  13. Complicating a Latina/o-Serving Identity at a Hispanic Serving Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Gina A.

    2016-01-01

    As institutions not founded to "serve" Latina/o students, Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs) are criticized for solely being "Hispanic-enrolling," with access and graduation rates being hypothesized as indicators of an organizational identity for HSIs. Drawing from a case study with 88 participants, the purpose of this…

  14. A Latina/o Campus Community's Readiness to Address Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Concerns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera-Ramos, Zully A.; Oswald, Ramona F.; Buki, Lydia P.

    2015-01-01

    In response to the call for new and innovative methods of assessing campus climate (Worthington, 2008), the current study is the first to examine the readiness of a Latina/o campus community to address lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) concerns. Using the Community Readiness Model, data were collected through individual interviews with a total of…

  15. Ensuring Latina/o College Student Success: A Data-Driven Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, Eric M.; Monzon, Reynaldo I.

    2013-01-01

    Many colleges and universities are trying to understand the factors that contribute to Latina/o college student success. San Diego State University (SDSU) has been recognized by The Education Trust Report (2012) for having the highest increase in graduation rates, but most importantly, comparably to White students, increasing the graduation rates…

  16. Latina/o Student Achievement: A Collaborative Mission of Professional Associations of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arredondo, Patricia; Castillo, Linda G.

    2011-01-01

    Latina/o student achievement is a priority for the American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education (AAHHE). To date, AAHHE has worked deliberately on this agenda. However, well-established higher education associations such as the Association of American Universities (AAU) and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) are…

  17. Critical Race Theory, Disability Microaggressions and Latina/o Student Experiences in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dávila, Brianne

    2015-01-01

    This research draws upon critical race theory (CRT) to explore the experiences of Latina/o students in special education. It seeks to extend the theoretical construct of racial microaggressions and illustrate the additional layer of disability as I present data that are particular to the context of special education and the assigned label of…

  18. Latina Bilingual Novice Teachers' First Year: Negotiating Relationships, Roles and Responsibilities within and beyond the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Arcelia L.

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzes self reported transition experiences of five Latina bilingual novice teachers' into the classroom and documents how they participate in their own socialization as bilingual teachers. Informed by a sociocultural perspective of teaching and learning as socially constructed and mediated and by a critical perspective of education,…

  19. The Effects of Generational Status and University Environment on Latina/o Undergraduates' Persistence Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguinaga, Arellys; Gloria, Alberta M.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the importance of identity and cultural fit within the university on Latina/o undergraduates' academic persistence decisions. The psychosociocultural model (Gloria & Rodriguez, 2000) provided a framework for the study in which 128 Latino/a students' generational level in the United States, cultural congruity, perceptions of…

  20. Urban-Schooled Latina/os, Academic Literacies, and Identities: (Re)Conceptualizing College Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hungerford-Kresser, Holly; Amaro-Jimenez, Carla

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative case study focuses on the early college experiences of five Latina/o urban-schooled students who graduated in the top 10% of their high school class, guaranteeing them admission into a prestigious four year state university. Although all participated in transition initiatives, and initially felt equipped to participate in…

  1. Empowering Chicana/o and Latina: A Framework for High School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Using Hipolito-Delgado and Lee's empowerment theory for the professional school counselor as a framework, this qualitative study explored the techniques employed by school counselors to facilitate the empowerment of Chicana/o and Latina/o students in large California urban high schools. The qualitative methodology included in-depth interviews…

  2. Empowering Chicana/o and Latina/o High School Students: A Guide for School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Alejandro; Hipolito-Delgado, Carlos P.

    2016-01-01

    A qualitative research study was conducted with 15 school counselors to identify the strategies they used to empower Chicana/o and Latina/o high school students. The findings of this study revealed that participants facilitated student empowerment by developing personal relationships with students, involving alumni, building sociocultural…

  3. Understanding Latina and Latino College Choice: A Social Capital and Chain Migration Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Patricia A.; McDonough, Patricia M.

    2008-01-01

    Through interviews and focus groups with 106 high school juniors and seniors, this research examined the college choice process for Latina and Latino students in the greater Los Angeles basin. Using chain migration theory within a social capital framework, the results indicated that as primarily first-generation college students, the students in…

  4. Assessing Cultural Orientation, Cultural Fit, and Help-Seeking Attitudes of Latina Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gloria, Alberta M.; Castellanos, Jeanett; Segura-Herrera, Theresa A.; Mayorga, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed the influence of cultural orientation and cultural ft of 121 Latina undergraduates' help-seeking attitudes. Mexican and Anglo orientation, cultural congruity, and perceptions of the university environment did not predict help-seeking attitudes; however, differences emerged by class standing and self-reported previous counseling…

  5. Career Development of Latinas in Mid-Level Community College Administration: A Phenomenological Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-De Jesus, Naydeen Tyffane

    2012-01-01

    Glass ceilings have been identified by scholars throughout the past 20 years as barriers to the upward career mobility of women and of people of color. There is an indication that glass ceiling barriers exist in the higher education sector. Latinas, as a subgroup of women of color, occupy many of the mid-level administrative positions in community…

  6. "'Confianza' Is Where I Can Be Myself": Latina Mothers' Constructions of Community in Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyrness, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    This paper brings together ethnographic data and testimonies from a group of Latina mother activists with critical race theories, to challenge dominant views of home-school relations and re-envision the "homeplace" as a site of radical resistance (Hooks (1990) "Yearning: race, gender and cultural politics" (Boston, MA, South End Press)). Madres…

  7. "Si, Dios Quiere"...Latina Mothers' Coping Strategies to Maintain Their Positive Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch-Scalco, Rhonda Jeannean

    2009-01-01

    Parenting a child with a disability is a lifelong journey. The coping strategies utilized by parents impact the well-being of the family, especially the mothers. The purpose of this dissertation was to explore the maternal well-being of Latina and Anglo mothers who have a child with severe to profound disabilities. Predictive variables, such as…

  8. Ethnography in Charting Paths toward Personal and Social Liberation: Using My Latina Cultural Intuition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monzó, Lilia D.

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on a Chicana feminist epistemology, the author, a Latina immigrant, presents how she used her cultural intuition to engage in a two-year ethnography with Latino immigrant families. She argues that for her engaging in ethnography with her "own community" is an endeavor that calls to the fore her homegrown epistemologies and her…

  9. Research Considerations and Theoretical Application for Best Practices in Higher Education: Latina/os Achieving Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellanos, Jeanett; Gloria, Alberta M.

    2007-01-01

    This scholarly article addresses the Latina/o undergraduate experiences proposing a (re)definition of educational success. Discussing strength-based practices of "familia", mentorship, cultural congruity, and professional development from a psychosociocultural (PSC) approach, the article presents practical recommendations and directions for…

  10. "La Familia": The Important Ingredient for Latina/o College Student Engagement and Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matos, Jennifer M. D.

    2015-01-01

    This article utilizes Yosso's (2005) community cultural framework and the six forms of cultural capital (aspirational, familial, linguistic, navigational, resistant, social) as corrective reframes of the cultural deficit model. Although the prevailing literature on Latina/o parents and families portray this population as being unmotivated and…

  11. Racial Battle Fatigue for Latina/o Students: A Quantitative Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Jeremy D.; Smith, William A.; Hung, Man

    2014-01-01

    Previous literature demonstrates that as a result of racial microaggressions and hostile campus racial climates, Latina/o students often state they experience psychological, physiological, and behavioral stress responses during and after racialized incidents on campuses. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively test the racial battle fatigue…

  12. The Perceived Impact of Holding a College Leadership Position on First-Generation Latina Alumnae

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kempf, Rosalyn Alma

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the leadership experiences of first-generation Latina college alumnae in order to gain insight into the intersection of leadership, gender, and social capital. Using a qualitative approach, it examined the ways in which their leadership positions impacted their collegiate experience and their later lives. This descriptive…

  13. Toward Reducing Risk for Eating Disorders and Obesity in Latina College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franko, Debra L.; Jenkins, Amy; Rodgers, Rachel F.

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of 2 computer-based programs was tested with Latina college women (N = 64). Compared with participants in the control group, intervention participants improved their motivation to eat fruits and vegetables (F&V; p = 0.042) and to participate in physical activity (p = 0.023) and significantly increased their F&V intake (pre- to…

  14. Leadership for Social Change: Learning from the Perspectives of Latina/Chicana Activist Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venegas-García, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    Literature in leadership studies is devoid of knowledge about the unique ways that Latina/Chicana educators engage as leaders, activists, and agents for change. Women's studies, ethnic studies, and Chicana feminist studies alert us to the complex role that social context and the intersectionality of gender, ethnicity/race, and class play in…

  15. Using Photovoice, Latina Transgender Women Identify Priorities in a New Immigrant-Destination State

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Scott D.; Alonzo, Jorge; Mann, Lilli; Simán, Florence; Garcia, Manuel; Abraham, Claire; Sun, Christina J.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the immigrant Latino/a transgender community in the southeastern United States. This study used photovoice, a methodology aligned with community-based participatory research, to explore needs, assets, and priorities of Latina transgender women in North Carolina. Nine immigrant Latina male-to-female transgender women documented their daily experiences through photography, engaged in empowerment-based photo-discussions, and organized a bilingual community forum to move knowledge to action. From the participants’ photographs and words, 11 themes emerged in three domains: daily challenges (e.g., health risks, uncertainty about the future, discrimination, and anxiety about family reactions); needs and priorities (e.g., health and social services, emotional support, and collective action); and community strengths and assets (e.g., supportive individuals and institutions, wisdom through lived experiences, and personal and professional goals). At the community forum, 60 influential advocates, including Latina transgender women, representatives from community-based organizations, health and social service providers, and law enforcement, reviewed findings and identified ten recommended actions. Overall, photovoice served to obtain rich qualitative insight into the lived experiences of Latina transgender women that was then shared with local leaders and agencies to help address priorities. PMID:27110226

  16. Positioning and Latinas/os: A Study of Small-Group Interactions in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez Leiva, Carlos Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    This study explores social interaction and mathematics performance, especially regarding how bilingual Latino/a students' positioning and participation evolved as they interacted with others in mathematics problem solving. Historically, Latinas/os have faced segregation in different ways that affect the quality of their social interactions…

  17. Chicana Feminist Strategies in a Participatory Action Research Project with Transnational Latina Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses a participatory action research (PAR) project carried out with three transnational Latina youth in northern California and how the university researcher incorporated Chicana feminist strategies in the study. PAR and Chicana feminism place at the heart of research the knowledge that ordinary people produce, referring to this…

  18. Utility of Acculturation in Physical Activity Research in Latina Adults: An Integrative Review of Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benitez, Tanya J.; Dodgson, Joan E.; Coe, Kathryn; Keller, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Latina adults in the United States have a disproportionately higher prevalence of chronic diseases related to low physical activity levels than non-Hispanic women. Literature indicates that acculturation may be a contributing factor to being physically active, but the extent of this association remains unclear. An integrative review of literature…

  19. Recruiting Urban Latina Adolescents and Their Families: Challenges and Lessons Learned in Suicide Attempts Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zayas, Luis H.; Hausmann-Stabile, Carolina; Pilat, Allyson M.

    2009-01-01

    Recruiting research samples within vulnerable populations can be challenging, especially due to geographic dispersal and the services accessed, as well as hesitation related to legal status and stigma. Public health, however, requires sustained recruitment efforts. We describe challenges and solutions in recruiting urban adolescent Latinas who had…

  20. Familism, Parent-Adolescent Conflict, Self-Esteem, Internalizing Behaviors and Suicide Attempts among Adolescent Latinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhlberg, Jill A.; Pena, Juan B.; Zayas, Luis H.

    2010-01-01

    Adolescent Latinas continue to report higher levels of suicide attempts than their African-American and White peers. The phenomenon is still not understood and is theorized to be the result of the confluence of many cultural, familial, and individual level factors. In Latino cultures, belief in the importance of the family, the value known as…

  1. Cultivating Campus Environments to Maximize Success among Latino and Latina College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiyama, Judy Marquez; Museus, Samuel D.; Vega, Blanca E.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter highlights the factors that hinder or contribute to the success of Latino and Latina students at predominantly White institutions. The Culturally Engaging Campus Environments (CECE) Model is offered as a framework from which to create environments for Latino/a students to thrive in college.

  2. The ALAS Project: Removing Barriers to Mental Health Care for Latina Immigrant Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Jamie; Perreira, Krista M.; Beeber, Linda; Schwartz, Todd A.

    2008-01-01

    As the Latino population in the U.S. grows, clinicians, researchers, and practitioners have begun to develop strategies to help Latino children and their parents adapt to life in the United States. This article describes how the stressors of immigration contribute to the development of depressive symptoms among Latina mothers, and how these…

  3. Improving Health Behaviours of Latina Mothers of Youths and Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magaña, S.; Li, H.; Miranda, E.; Paradiso de Sayu, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Latina mothers who care for children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) over the lifespan struggle to take care of their own health needs in the context of their caregiving experience. Services are typically aimed at the persons with IDD and not their family caregivers. Yet, attending to family caregiver needs may…

  4. Comparing Educational Trajectories of Two Chinese Students and One Latina Student, a Social Capital Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prado, Jose M.

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study compares and analyzes the social network experiences of two working-class Chinese students from immigrant families (Sally, Alex) to those of one working-class Latina student from an immigrant family (Elizabeth). Theory holds that these students would have difficulty obtaining educational resources and support (i.e., social…

  5. Psychosocial Predictors and Correlates of Dysphoria in Adolescent and Young Adult Latinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, Thomas F.; Newcomb, Michael D.; Duclos, Alisa; Goodyear, Rodney K.

    2007-01-01

    This study determined how multiple ecodevelopmental domains influenced dysphoria in a community sample of Latina adolescents. Risk factors tested include childhood maltreatment, parental alcohol-related problems, and polysubstance problems. Protective factors include general self-efficacy, social conformity, and family connection. Female…

  6. Dispelling Seven Myths Concerning Latina/o Students: A Call to Action for School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavazos, Javier, Jr.; Cavazos, Alyssa G.; Hinojosa, Maria G.; Silva, Marcos

    2009-01-01

    Research has illustrated that school counselors "do not" provide Latina/o students with sufficient information about higher education (Immerwahr, 2003; Zalaquett, 2005), high expectations (Martinez, 2003), and individual counseling and guidance (Vela Gude et al., in press). Because school counselors are supposed to play an important role in…

  7. Health Outcomes of Midlife and Older Latina and Black American Mothers of Children with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magana, Sandra; Smith, Matthew J.

    2006-01-01

    The impact of caring for a child with a developmental disability on the physical and mental health of Latina and Black American women was examined. We used the National Health Interview Survey to compare the health of older mothers who were co-residing with a child who had a developmental disability to the health of same age mothers without…

  8. Latinas and African American Women at Work: Race, Gender, and Economic Inequality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Irene, Ed.

    The 13 chapters of this book, written by various sociologists, document how race and gender intersect to put African American and Latina women at a disadvantage in the workplace. The articles encompass 30 years of change for women at all levels of the workforce, from those who spend time on the welfare rolls to middle class professionals, and look…

  9. A Community-Engaged Research Approach to Improve Mental Health Among Latina Immigrants: ALMA Photovoice.

    PubMed

    Perez, Georgina; Della Valle, Pamela; Paraghamian, Sarah; Page, Rachel; Ochoa, Janet; Palomo, Fabiana; Suarez, Emilia; Thrasher, Angela; Tran, Anh N; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2016-05-01

    Recent Latina immigrants are at increased risk of poor mental health due to stressors associated with adapting to life in the United States. Existing social and health care policies often do not adequately address the mental health concerns of new Latino populations. Amigas Latinas Motivando el Alma, a community-partnered research project, seeks to improve immigrant Latinas' mental health outcomes. Using Photovoice methodology, promotoras (lay health advisors) reflected on community factors affecting mental health through photography and guided discussion. Discussions were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded using content analysis to identify salient themes. Promotoras reviewed codes to develop themes that they presented in community forums to reach local policy makers and to increase community awareness. These forums included an exhibit of the promotoras' photographs and discussion of action steps to address community concerns. Themes included transitioning to life in the United States, parenting, education, and combating racism. Nearly 150 stakeholders attended the community forums and proposed responses to promotoras' photographic themes. Our findings suggest that Photovoice provides an opportunity for Latinas and the larger community to identify issues that they find most important and to explore avenues for action and change by creating sustainable partnerships between the community and forum attendees.

  10. Mentoring Affirmations and Interventions: A Bridge to Graduate School for Latina/o Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luna, Veronica; Prieto, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Using individual interviews, this study examined how a group of Latina/o undergraduate students in Texas considered graduate studies. Findings reveal that familial support, perceived community responsibility, and their participation in a mentoring program all played a considerable role in demystifying graduate studies. Implications support the…

  11. Quinceaneras and Quadratics: Experiences of Latinas in State-Supported Residential Schools of Science and Math

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayman, Donna M.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study sought to understand the experiences of Latinas enrolled in residential state schools of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Goals of the study focused on understanding experiences and identifying factors such as decisions to enroll, barriers and supports, and issues contributing to retention. These schools…

  12. Understanding Latina/o Students' Meaning in Life, Spirituality, and Subjective Happiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavazos Vela, Javier; Castro, Veronica; Cavazos, Leticia; Cavazos, Michelle; Gonzalez, Stacey Lee

    2015-01-01

    One-hundred nineteen Latina/o college students provided perceptions of presence of meaning in life, search for meaning in life, daily spiritual experiences, and subjective happiness. Perceptions of meaning in life and daily spiritual experiences were significant predictors of subjective happiness. A discussion regarding the importance of these…

  13. The National Latina/o Psychological Association: Like a Phoenix Rising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavez-Korell, Shannon; Delgado-Romero, Edward A.; Illes, Roseanne

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the re-founding of the National Hispanic Psychological Association into the National Latina/o Psychological Association. A brief history is provided, followed by current status and resources, connections to counseling psychology, and implications for the Society of Counseling Psychology and for the future of the National…

  14. Latina Adolescent Suicide Ideations and Attempts: Associations with Connectedness to Parents, Peers, and Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Luca, Susan M.; Wyman, Peter; Warren, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Associations between suicidal behavior and social-ecological variables were examined among 1,618 Latina high school students (mean age = 15) from the nationally representative Add Health sample (68% were U.S.-born). Ideations were associated with having a suicidal friend, lower perceived father support, and overall parental caring. Attempts were…

  15. Documentation Status as a Contextual Determinant of HIV Risk Among Young Transgender Latinas

    PubMed Central

    Palazzolo, Sarah L.; De Jesus, Maria; Maguire-Marshall, Molly; Barker, Suyanna L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the contextual factors that determine or mitigate vulnerability to HIV among Latina transgender women. Documentation status (legal authorization to live in the United States) has been cited by other studies as a barrier to recruitment or engagement in HIV-related care among immigrant Latinos, but not explored as a determinant of HIV risk for transgender immigrant Latinas. Methods: We collaborated with a community-based organization to explore these contextual, including social and structural, factors. In-depth interviews in Spanish captured life histories of eight 18- to 29-year-old transgender Latinas, who collectively self-identify as chicas trans. Codes were assigned deductively from the interview guide, and emerging themes were identified throughout data collection. Results: Most participants migrated to the United States from Central America after experiencing discrimination and violence in their countries of origin. Participants emphasized documentation status as a critical factor in three areas related to social and structural determinants of HIV risk: gender identity expression, access to services, and relationship power dynamics. Chicas trans who gained legal asylum reported greater control over sexual relationships, improved access to services, and less risky employment. Conclusions: Documentation status emerged as a key HIV risk factor for this population. For undocumented transgender Latinas, legal asylum appears to be a promising HIV-related protective factor. Further research could assess whether legal assistance combined with wraparound support services affects HIV prevention for this population. PMID:26669583

  16. Language Policy and Latina Immigrants: An Analysis of Personal Experience and Identity in Interview Talk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kendall A.; De Fina, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This article examines how Spanish-speaking Latina (im)migrants position themselves relative to US language policies. Drawing from interviews with 15 Latin American women in the USA, we illustrate how understandings of language policy are constructed through individuals' reports of everyday experiences and framed within the constraints of…

  17. The Impact of High-Stakes Testing on Latina/o Students' College Aspirations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Jessica M.; Arellano, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the influence high-stakes testing has on Latina/o student aspirations and subsequent college enrollment. It quantitatively examines the critical juncture of high school exit and college entry at a school district serving a predominately Latino population. Findings confirm a strong correlation between the math and English…

  18. The Transition of Latina Immigrant Community College from ESL to Transfer Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Dirkson

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study used narrative analysis to gain a greater understanding of the educational experiences of Latina immigrant English language learners (ELLs) and how they achieved and advance academically in the community college. The study used race-based (i.e., critical race theory and Latcrit) and asset-based methodologies (i.e., community…

  19. Predictors of Resilience and Thriving among Latina/o Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan Consoli, Melissa L.; Delucio, Kevin; Noriega, Erika; Llamas, Jasmín

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies of Latina/o well-being indicate that supportive family members, religion or spirituality, and cultural values (e.g., "familismo") aid in coping with adversities. The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of several factors (spirituality, hope, social support, and cultural values) in predicting resilience…

  20. Latina/o Food Industry Employees' Work Experiences: Work Barriers, Facilitators, Motivators, Training Preferences, and Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanagui-Munoz, Marlen; Garriott, Patton O.; Flores, Lisa Y.; Cho, Seonghee; Groves, James

    2012-01-01

    The present study explored the work experiences, job satisfaction, and work behaviors of Latina/o restaurant workers. A total of 10 semistructured focus group (N = 75) interviews were conducted in the Midwest and Southwest. Data were analyzed using a combination of Consensual Qualitative Research (CQR; Hill et al., 2005; Hill, Thompson, &…

  1. Latina/o Academics' Resilient Qualities in Their Linguistically Diverse Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavazos, Alyssa G.

    2016-01-01

    Emphasis placed on academic writing in English may create challenges for multilingual academics as they negotiate diverse languages. Based on personal interviews with bilingual Latina/o academics in rhetoric and composition, this study reveals that their language practices reflect diverse resilient qualities at various stages in their academic…

  2. Balancing Dreams and Realities: The College Choice Process for High-Achieving Latinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernández, Ebelia

    2015-01-01

    This study's narratives of 17 high-achieving Latinas revealed how their college choice was a constant balancing of individual and family expectations, being "close, but far enough away," and "getting your money's worth." With the use of critical race theory, further analysis revealed the influence of "familismo" on…

  3. Colorism in the Classroom: How Skin Tone Stratifies African American and Latina/o Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Although racial inequality is frequently studied in education, skin tone stratification has received less attention from educational researchers. Inequality by skin tone, also known as "colorism", contributes to larger patterns of racial inequality for African Americans and Latina/os. Discrimination by skin tone affects many dimensions…

  4. Practitioners' Perspectives on Cultural Sensitivity in Latina/o Teen Pregnancy Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson-Lee, Ada M.; Russell, Stephen T.; Lee, Faye C. H.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined practitioners' understandings of cultural sensitivity in the context of pregnancy prevention programs for Latina teens. Fifty-eight practitioners from teen pregnancy prevention programs in California were interviewed in a guided conversation format. Three themes emerged in our analysis. First, practitioners' definitions of…

  5. The Achievement Gap among Newcomer Immigrant Adolescents: Life Stressors Hinder Latina/o Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Sita G.; Barrera, Alinne Z.; Strambler, Michael J.; Muñoz, Ricardo F.; Macciomei, Erynn

    2016-01-01

    This study compares life stressors and school outcomes among newcomer immigrant adolescents from Latin America, Asia, and the Caribbean. Participants attended a predominantly low-income, urban international public high school in the northeast. The Latina/o students were exposed to more life stressors and had lower attendance and achievement than…

  6. Criterion Referenced Tests to Accompany "Artes Latinae," Level 1, Book 1. Tentative Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masciantonio, Rudolph

    These tests are designed to measure the achievement of each pupil at the approximate midpoint of each unit in "Artes Latinae," Level 1, Book 1. They were produced in response to the need expressed by many teachers to provide a means of more frequent evaluation of pupil progress. Tests for 13 units are provided. They supplement the unit tests…

  7. Teacher's Guide to Accompany "Artes Latinae," the Encyclopaedia Britannica Latin Instructional System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masciantonio, Rudolph; And Others

    This guide, a supplement to the "Artes Latinae Level One Teacher's Manual," prepared for use in the School District of Philadelphia, focuses primarily on how to adapt this course, intended for individualized instruction, to group instruction. Discussion of the multisensory instructional system includes remarks concerning the use of films, study…

  8. Exploring Relationships of Cultural, Gender, and Personal Identity among Latinos and Latinas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miville, Marie L.; Helms, Janet E.

    This study explored the potential relationships of personal identity with collective identities based on membership in socially disadvantaged groups (e.g. being Latino/a, being a woman) and socially advantaged group memberships (e.g. being a man) for Latinos and Latinas. The interrelationships among the cultural identity, gender identity, and…

  9. The Health Effects of Attending College for Latina Undergraduate Students and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount, Jill Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Background and objective. Latinos are the largest ethnic minority in the U.S. and by 2050 they are estimated to become one quarter of the population, yet only one in ten has a college degree. More Latino women (Latinas) are currently attending college than Latino men. To date research has focused on their experiences and where they obtain support…

  10. Risk and Resilience in Rural Communities: The Experiences of Immigrant Latina Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffaelli, Marcela; Tran, Steve P.; Wiley, Angela R.; Galarza-Heras, Maria; Lazarevic, Vanja

    2012-01-01

    Immigrants from Latin America are increasingly settling in rural U.S. communities that welcome them as workers but are often unprepared to address their needs and promote their well-being. Building on recent descriptive studies, we examined factors associated with individual and family well-being in a sample of 112 immigrant Latina mothers (mean…

  11. Success Factors Impacting Latina/o Persistence in Higher Education Leading to STEM Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta, Claudia; Caspary, Melissa; Boothe, Diane

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates how Latina/Latino youth resist, conform to, and persist in schooling, and explores their preparation for an education in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields. Using Latino Critical Race Theory as a framework, evidence of the "sticky mess" of racial inequalities (Espinoza and Harris in"…

  12. Acculturation, Familism and Mother-Daughter Relations among Suicidal and Non-Suicidal Adolescent Latinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zayas, Luis H.; Bright, Charlotte L.; Alvarez-Sanchez, Thyria; Cabassa, Leopoldo J.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the role of acculturation, familism and Latina mother-daughter relations in suicide attempts by comparing 65 adolescents with recent suicide attempts and their mothers to 75 teens without any attempts and their mothers. Attempters and non-attempters were similar in acculturation and familistic attitudes but attempters report…

  13. Adaptation of Consultation Planning for Native American and Latina Women with Breast Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belkora, Jeffrey; Franklin, Lauren; O'Donnell, Sara; Ohnemus, Julie; Stacey, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    Context: Resource centers in rural, underserved areas are implementing Consultation Planning (CP) to help women with breast cancer create a question list before a doctor visit. Purpose: To identify changes needed for acceptable delivery of CP to rural Native Americans and Latinas. Methods: We interviewed and surveyed 27 Native American and Latino…

  14. "I Was Scared to Be the Stupid": Latinas in Residential Academies of Science and Math

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayman, Donna

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the experiences of Latinas in state residential academies of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Goals of this project focused on understanding their experiences and identifying factors leading to the decision to enroll, along with issues contributing to retention. These schools represent powerful opportunities…

  15. Predictors of Latina/o Community College Student Vocational Choice in STEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Joel D.; Starobin, Soko S.; Santos Laanan, Frankie

    2016-01-01

    This study confirmed appropriate measurement model fit for a theoretical model, the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) vocational choice (STEM-VC) model. This model identified factors that successfully predicted a student's vocational choice decision to pursue a STEM degree for Latina/o and White community college students.…

  16. Why Izzie Didn't Go to College: Choosing Work over College as Latina Feminism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harklau, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Background/Context: Explanations for the relatively low numbers of Latinas pursuing higher education have tended to focus on socialization into traditional gender roles. However, recent scholarship has challenged this view, suggesting that gender roles--particularly among recent immigrants--are mutable and subject to constant renegotiation.…

  17. Latina Mothers' Views of a Parent-to-Parent Support Group in the Special Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Tracy Gershwin; Milian, Madeline; Islas Lopez, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Parent-professional partnership literature continues to emphasize the importance of including the parent voice. Spanish-speaking families are often excluded from such studies because of the language barrier. This article presents a qualitative interview study of eight Latina mothers of children with severe disabilities. All participants were…

  18. Mathematics-Related Anxiety and Attitudes: Examining the Impact among Latina Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gautreau, Cynthia; Brye, Michelle VanderVeldt; Lunceford, Christina

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate mathematics-related anxiety and attitudes among Latina preservice teachers. Three sections from the Inventory of Mathematics Attitudes, Experience, and Self Awareness were administered to preservice teachers enrolled in a curriculum and instruction mathematics course during the 1st semester of a…

  19. A Career Decision-Making Profile of Latina/o Incoming College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risco, Cristina M.; Duffy, Ryan D.

    2011-01-01

    The current study explored the work values, career decidedness, and career choice comfort of 236 Latina/o incoming college students. Of a possible 13 work values, students placed more importance on work enjoyment, genuine interest in the field, and job security and less importance on family expectations, having free time, and working without close…

  20. No Longer on the Margins: Researching the Hybrid Literate Identities of Black and Latina Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddix, Marcelle

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author takes a close look at the discursive ways that Black and Latina preservice teachers reconcile tensions between their racial and linguistic identities and the construction of teacher identities in the current context of preservice teacher education in the United States. Through the study of language as representative of…

  1. Sal Adelante Mujer!: Support Group for Latina First-Year College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segura-Malady, Evelyn E.

    2014-01-01

    Latinas are at a disadvantage when it comes to earning a college degree, as is evidenced by the fact that they take longer to complete their degrees than Black, Asian, and white college students and have the lowest graduation rates in comparison to these respective groups (Fry, 2004; Fry, 2012; Rodriguez, Guido-Brito, Torres, & Talbot, 2000).…

  2. Broadening conceptions of learning science: A case study of Latina students in middle school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czech, Maria Antonina

    2001-07-01

    Low representation of Latinas in science research and professions, have prompted studies that document forces that promote or deter Latinas' participation. Short-term intervention studies of minority girls in secondary school sciences corroborate these findings. However, few studies examine middle school Latinas' science learning experiences that consider their ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status and language. This dissertation examines the social organization of learning in a gifted science teacher's eighth grade classroom, and the experiences of four eighth grade Latinas, as they develop their identity as science learners. Multiple ethnographic tools were utilized to collect data. The analysis of the organization of learning in the classroom, through the lenses of sociocultural and feminist theories, reflects a cohesive use of multiple social practices to promote scientific literacy. High interaction characterizes this classroom, providing positive results for the participants as science learners. The exceptionally talented science teacher scripted students' ideas on chart paper, used realia and experimentation, utilized the Spanish language as resource, maximized physical space for access to learning, and built caring relationships. The four case studies portray the diversity in the social organization of learning through the experiences of four Latinas. Individually, they developed their identity as science learners in unique ways---e.g., they utilized discourse, sought out mentoring, confronted their ethnic identity, expanded the notion of learning beyond traditional norms, became language brokers, all to achieve a level of scientific literacy. The implications of this study on research of Latinas in science education are (1) increase the use of social practice and identity in analysis, (2) include diverse groups, especially Latina scholars in research, (3) examine the benefits of primary language and translation in classrooms, (4) research mixed gender

  3. Familism, mother-daughter mutuality, and suicide attempts of adolescent Latinas.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Ana A; Kuhlberg, Jill A; Zayas, Luis H

    2010-10-01

    National surveys in the U.S. reveal that Latina adolescents have higher rates of suicide attempts than females of other ethnic and racial groups. Past reports indicate that the suicide attempts among Latinas are lodged within family contexts in which sociocultural and individual experiences influence parental and adolescent behaviors. To better understand the parent-adolescent relations that explain the Latina suicidal phenomenon, we examined how the high value on family unity and support, as reflected by familism, and its effects on mother-daughter mutuality (i.e., reciprocal empathy and engagement) were evident in a group of adolescent Latinas with suicide attempts and a group of adolescent Latinas without suicide attempts. Drawing from data on 169 mother-daughter dyads recruited from Latino communities in a Northeastern metropolis and who self-identified as being of Latino origin or heritage, we considered how differences in familism between mothers and daughters influenced their sense of mutuality, the adolescents' internalizing and externalizing behaviors, and suicide attempts. Results show that gaps in familism (mothers scoring higher than their daughters on the scale) predicted less mother-daughter mutuality and more externalizing behaviors in the adolescents. Also, mother-daughter mutuality was negatively related to internalizing and externalizing behaviors which, in turn, predicted suicide attempts. Findings point to further research on family interactions that raise the risk for suicidality in Latino youth, particularly to including fathers and siblings in study designs. Clinical implications point to enhancing family and dyadic communication skills focusing mutuality while observing the cultural value of familism. PMID:20954772

  4. Quality of life among immigrant Latina breast cancer survivors: realities of culture and enhancing cancer care.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Class, Maria; Perret-Gentil, Monique; Kreling, Barbara; Caicedo, Larisa; Mandelblatt, Jeanne; Graves, Kristi D

    2011-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Latinas. This study examined social, cultural, and health care system factors that impact the quality of life and survivorship experiences of Latina immigrant breast cancer survivors. We interviewed Latina breast cancer survivors (n = 19) and, based on the interview findings, conducted two focus groups (n = 9). Research staff translated transcripts from Spanish into English. Two trained raters reviewed the content and identified themes. Thematic content analysis was used to categorize and organize data. Participants were largely monolingual in Spanish, predominantly from Central and South America and most (68%) had lived in the U.S. for ten or more years. All women were diagnosed and treated in the U.S. and were an average of 3.1 years from diagnosis. Women's survivorship experiences appeared to be shaped by cultural beliefs and experiences as immigrants such as secrecy/shame about a breast cancer diagnosis, feelings of isolation, importance of family support (familism), challenges with developing social relationships in the U.S. (less personalismo), and, for some, their partner's difficulty with showing emotional support (machismo). Navigating the U.S. medical system and language barriers were additional challenges in the participants' health care interactions. Latina breast cancer survivors adhere to certain cultural values and face unique issues as immigrants, potentially influencing overall quality of life and doctor-patient communication. Efforts to improve Latina immigrant breast cancer survivors' quality of life could include increased assessment of psychosocial functioning and referral to social support services, culturally sensitive navigation programs, and consistent use of appropriately trained interpreters.

  5. Brief Report: Effects of Acculturation on a Culturally Adapted Diabetes Intervention for Latinas

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Manuel; Toobert, Deborah; Strycker, Lisa; Osuna, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Objective To inform the refinement of a culturally adapted diabetes intervention, we evaluated acculturation’s association with variables at several sequential steps: baseline measures of diet and physical activity, intervention engagement, putative mediators (problem solving and social resources), and outcomes (fat consumption and physical activity). Method Latina women (N = 280) recruited from health organizations were randomly assigned to a culturally adapted lifestyle intervention (!Viva Bien!) or usual care. A brief version of the Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans-II (ARSMA-II) acculturation scales (Anglo and Latina orientations) was administered at baseline. Assessments at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months included social supportive resources for diet and exercise, problem solving, saturated fat consumption, and physical activity. Results Latina orientation was negatively related to saturated fat intake and physical activity at baseline. Latina orientation also was positively related to session attendance during months 6–12 of the intervention. Independent of 6-month intervention effects, Anglo orientation was significantly positively related to improvements in problem solving and dietary supportive resources. Anglo orientation related negatively to improved physical activity at 6 and 12 months. There were no acculturation-by-intervention interactions on putative mediators or outcomes. Conclusions The cultural-adaptation process was successful in creating an engaging and effective intervention for Latinas at all levels of acculturation. However, independent of intervention effects, acculturation was related to putative mediating variables (problem solving and social resources) and an outcome variable (physical activity), an indication of acculturation’s general influence on lifestyle and coping factors. PMID:21859212

  6. Absorption and optical conduction in InSe/ZnSe/InSe thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Garni, S. E.; Qasrawi, A. F.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, (n)InSe/(p)ZnSe and (n)InSe/(p)ZnSe/(n)InSe heterojunction thin film transistor (TFT) devices are produced by the thermal evaporation technique. They are characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy techniques. While the InSe films are found to be amorphous, the ZnSe and InSe/ZnSe films exhibited polycrystalline nature of crystallization. The optical analysis has shown that these devices exhibit a conduction band offsets of 0.47 and valence band offsets of 0.67 and 0.74eV, respectively. In addition, while the dielectric spectra of the InSe and ZnSe displayed resonance peaks at 416 and 528THz, the dielectric spectra of InSe/ZnSe and InSe/ZnSe/InSe layers indicated two additional peaks at 305 and 350THz, respectively. On the other hand, the optical conductivity analysis and modeling in the light of free carrier absorption theory reflected low values of drift mobilities associated with incident alternating electric fields at terahertz frequencies. The drift mobility of the charge carrier particles at femtoseconds scattering times increased as a result of the ZnSe sandwiching between two InSe layers. The valence band offsets, the dielectric resonance at 305 and 350THz and the optical conductivity values nominate TFT devices for use in optoelectronics.

  7. Esquizofrenia y trastorno en el consumo de sustancias: prevalencia y characterísticas sociodemográficas en la población Latina

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Castro, Lorena; Raventós-Vorst, Henriette; Escamilla, Michael

    2012-01-01

    El interés por comprender la co-morbilidad de la esquizofrenia y el trastorno en el uso de sustancias, ha aumentado debido al incremento de este diagnóstico, a los efectos negativos observados en el sujeto y a los costos en los servicios de salud. Este trastorno dual puede tener efectos dramáticos en el curso clínico del trastorno psicótico tales como: mayores recaídas, re-hospitalizaciones, síntomas más severos, no adherencia al tratamiento antipsicótico, cambios marcados del humor, aumento en el grado de hostilidad e ideación suicida, así como alteraciones en otras áreas del funcionamiento incluyendo violencia, victimización, indigencia y problemas legales. La literatura proveniente en particular de Estados Unidos y Europa sugiere que el rango de prevalencia para este diagnóstico puede oscilar entre el 10% hasta el 70%. En este estudio, revisamos la prevalencia del diagnóstico dual de esquizofrenia y trastorno en el uso sustancias, así como sus características sociodemográficas, con base en la literatura disponible alrededor del mundo dando énfasis en la poblacion latina. A pesar de que este diagnóstico es ampliamente aceptado, se conoce poco sobre su prevalencia en la población latina, sobre los factores ambientales, demográficos, clínicos y otras características de estos individuos. Un mejor conocimiento sobre este diagnóstico permitiría mejorar los métodos para la detección y adecuada valoración del trastorno en el uso de sustancias en personas con trastornos metales severos como la esquizofrenia. PMID:21404151

  8. But I've already had a healthy baby: folic acid formative research with Latina mothers.

    PubMed

    Prue, Christine E; Flores, Alina L; Panissidi, Paula; Lira, Andrea

    2008-10-01

    Each year, approximately 3000 pregnancies in the United States are affected by neural tube defects (NTDs), serious birth defects of the brain and spine. Daily periconceptional consumption of folic acid can reduce the incidence of NTDs by 50%-70%. This study was designed to understand Latina mothers' folic acid awareness, knowledge, and behaviors and to capture their reactions to advertising concepts and draft educational materials. The goal of the materials was to increase folic acid consumption through the use of a daily multivitamin. This study presents three phases of research that led to the development of Spanish language print advertisements, posters, a brochure, and radio ads that promote folic acid consumption in a manner that addresses the needs of Latina mothers.

  9. From community college to 4-year institutions: Latinas' successful completion of STEM baccalaureate degrees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamudio, Rocio

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the narrative of Latina graduates who successfully navigated through community college and 4-year institutions in the STEM fields. Rather than focus on what these students lack as much of the current research does, the study explored what assets these students bring that supports their success in STEM fields. Utilizing an ethnographic interview approach, participants who attained STEM baccalaureates in California were interviewed. Qualitative findings revealed various experiences, attitudes, and cultural influences that led to successful completion of a STEM degree. First, the study found that successful community college Latina STEM graduates exhibit grit, are resilient, determined, and have positive attitudes about their underrepresentation in STEM. Second, participants sought after peer, faculty, and staff relationships that helped them be successful. Lastly, participants had the support of their families and reported a high level of connectedness to their culture. Implications, recommendations for practice, and directions for future research are discussed.

  10. Developing a Culturally Sensitive Lifestyle Behavior Change Program for Older Latinas.

    PubMed

    Schwingel, Andiara; Linares, Deborah E; Gálvez, Patricia; Adamson, Brynn; Aguayo, Liliana; Bobitt, Julie; Castañeda, Yvette; Sebastião, Emerson; Marquez, David X

    2015-12-01

    Despite the burgeoning U.S. Latino population and their increased risk of chronic disease, little emphasis had been placed on developing culturally sensitive lifestyle interventions in this area. This article examines older Latinas' sociocultural context relative to health with the goal of developing a culturally sensitive health behavior intervention. Photo-elicitation indicated two emerging themes that influenced lifestyle choices: family caregiving and religion. Researchers partnered with a faith-based organization to develop and implement a 6-month lifestyle intervention for Latinas ages 50 and older: Abuelas en Acción (AEA). At completion, interviews were conducted to understand women's experiences and the influence AEA had on their lifestyles and health. Findings suggest that religious content empowered and deeply affected women; however, the intergenerational content presented significant challenges for instruction, retention, and implementation. We discuss findings in relation to the health intervention literature and provide suggestions for future interventions drawing on religion, family, and health behavior change. PMID:25595148

  11. Are suicide attempts by young Latinas a cultural idiom of distress?

    PubMed Central

    Zayas, Luis H.; Gulbas, Lauren E.

    2015-01-01

    The high rates of suicide attempts among adolescent Hispanic females in the United States have been well established by epidemiological and clinical studies. In this paper, we review the research history of Latina suicide attempts and their characteristics. Then we apply multifaceted conceptual and empirical criteria found in the anthropological and psychiatric literature about cultural idioms of distress to the suicide attempts of young Latinas. We contrast the suicide-attempt phenomenon to the well-known ataque de nervios and propose that the phenomenon may reflect a developmental or cultural variant of the ataque. The attempt-as-idiom proposition is intended to invite discussion that can deepen our understanding of the cultural roots of the suicide attempts and their possible designation as cultural idiom. Establishing the meaning of suicide attempts within a cultural perspective can assist psychological and psychiatric research and clinical interventions. PMID:23075802

  12. Prevalence and Correlates of Heterosexual Anal Intercourse among Black and Latina Female Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Roye, Carol F.; Krauss, Beatrice J.; Silverman, Paula L.

    2009-01-01

    Anal intercourse (AI) is a recognized HIV risk behavior, yet little is known about AI among female adolescents. We studied the prevalence and correlates of heterosexual AI (HAI) among Black and Latina female adolescents. The data come from two randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of HIV-prevention interventions with Black and Latina female adolescents. In the second RCT, a Sexual Relationship Power (SRP) Scale was added to the questionnaire. Thirty-five percent of participants in the first RCT (N = 244) and 23% of those in the second RCT (N = 101) reported engaging in HAI, most without a condom. Significant correlations existed between HAI and a high-risk sexual history. HAI is prevalent in this population. Nurses must educate adolescent female patients about risks associated with HAI. PMID:20116300

  13. Acculturation, Coping Styles, and Health Risk Behaviors Among HIV Positive Latinas

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Mónica; Stein, Judith; Milburn, Norweeta G.; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among acculturation, coping styles, substance use, sexual risk behavior, and medication non-adherence among 219 Latinas living with HIV/AIDS in Los Angeles, CA. Coping styles were hypothesized to mediate the link between acculturation and health risk behaviors for HIV positive Latinas. Structural equation modeling revealed that greater acculturation was related to less positive coping and more negative coping. In turn, negative coping was associated with more health risk behaviors and more non-adherence. Positive coping was associated with less substance use as reflected in use of cigarettes and alcohol and less non-adherence. Coping styles mediated the relationship between acculturation and health risk behaviors. Findings echo previous works examining the Hispanic Health Paradox wherein more acculturated Latinos exhibit increased risk behavior and maladaptive coping styles. HIV/AIDS interventions need to be mindful of cultural differences within Hispanic populations and be tailored to address these differences. PMID:19847637

  14. A Comparison of Two Educational Methods on Immigrant Latinas Breast Cancer Knowledge and Screening Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Calderón, José Luis; Bazargan, Mohsen; Sangasubana, Nisaratana; Hays, Ron D.; Hardigan, Patrick; Baker, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    Underutilization of screening mammography by Latinas continues unabated and may contribute to disparities in disease-free survival and mortality. Objective Comparison of two discussion group-centered educational interventions at enhancing breast cancer knowledge, breast self-exams (BSE), and screening mammography. Methods Pre-test post-test study design. Two cohorts of 200 Latinas each participated in survey screening and discussion groups at baseline. One cohort also viewed an animated video and had BSE training. Breast cancer knowledge, self-reported BSE and mammography history were measured at baseline and three months post-intervention. Results Breast cancer knowledge scores were good for both groups at baseline, and significantly increased at three month follow-up for both groups (p<.05) but no significant difference was observed between groups at baseline or post-intervention. Conclusion Community-based discussion groups are a cost-effective method for improving breast cancer knowledge and promoting screening behaviors. PMID:20675947

  15. Urban occupational health in the Mexican and Latino/Latina immigrant population: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Gany, Francesca; Novo, Patricia; Dobslaw, Rebecca; Leng, Jennifer

    2014-10-01

    Mexican and Latino/Latina immigrants represent a rapidly growing population within the United States. The majority settle in urban areas. As a group, Mexican immigrants typically have low educational attainment and socioeconomic status, and limited English proficiency. These immigrants often find work in hazardous jobs, with high injury and fatality rates. They often have inadequate or no safety training, no personal protective equipment, limited understanding of workers' rights, job insecurity, fear of report of undocumented status and lack health care benefits. This review includes what has been published on the urban occupational health of this population. The findings suggest that Mexican and Latino/Latina immigrants experience higher rates of work-related fatalities and injuries compared to other populations, and may be less likely to report such incidents to employers or to apply for workers' compensation. There is a strong need to develop effective programs to address the health and safety of this vulnerable population.

  16. Work Conditions and Health and Well-Being of Latina Hotel Housekeepers.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Chin; Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Sönmez, Sevil

    2016-06-01

    Hotel housekeepers are exposed to a plethora of disproportionately high work-induced hazards that can lead to adverse health consequences. Latina hotel housekeepers are rendered particularly vulnerable to elevated occupational hazards and resultant health strains due to their socioeconomic status, immigration status, language barriers, and lack of access to healthcare services. The findings from the 27 interviews with Latina hotel housekeepers indicated that the interviewees were exposed to physical, chemical, and social hazards in the workplace and suffered musculoskeletal injuries. In terms of psychological wellness, the time pressure of cleaning rooms quickly and work-related stress stemming from workplace mistreatment emerged as major work-related stressors. Recommendations are made for the introduction of multilevel interventions designed to prevent work-related injuries and illnesses and to promote healthier workplaces.

  17. But I've already had a healthy baby: folic acid formative research with Latina mothers.

    PubMed

    Prue, Christine E; Flores, Alina L; Panissidi, Paula; Lira, Andrea

    2008-10-01

    Each year, approximately 3000 pregnancies in the United States are affected by neural tube defects (NTDs), serious birth defects of the brain and spine. Daily periconceptional consumption of folic acid can reduce the incidence of NTDs by 50%-70%. This study was designed to understand Latina mothers' folic acid awareness, knowledge, and behaviors and to capture their reactions to advertising concepts and draft educational materials. The goal of the materials was to increase folic acid consumption through the use of a daily multivitamin. This study presents three phases of research that led to the development of Spanish language print advertisements, posters, a brochure, and radio ads that promote folic acid consumption in a manner that addresses the needs of Latina mothers. PMID:18752460

  18. Community Health Advocate-Identified Enablers of HIV Testing for Latina Immigrant Women.

    PubMed

    Massengale, Kelley E; Morrison, Sharon D; Sudha, S

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to identify enablers or facilitators of HIV testing among Latina immigrant women through qualitative interviews with five community health advocates (CHAs). CHAs act as cultural bridges between Latinos and service providers. We employed a single case-study design using the PEN-3 model as a conceptual framework for situating HIV testing behaviors within cultural and structural contexts of Latina immigrant women's lives. A cross-case analysis of themes revealed that intrinsic enablers of HIV testing included individual trust, confidentiality, intergenerational family participation, and peers. The extrinsic enablers were local community outreach, bicultural/bilingual testing staff, service location and mass media outlets. These results have implications for the cultural competency of health and social service providers, instituting and revising HIV testing outreach interventions, and the earlier identification of women who may have been infected. They offer important insights for promoting other health behaviors among the Latino communities. PMID:27427927

  19. Validating the Multidimensional Measure of Cultural Identity Scales for Latinos Among Latina Mothers and Daughters

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Frank R.; Félix-Ortiz, Maria; Rice, Christopher; De La Rosa, Mario; Rojas, Patria; Duan, Rui

    2009-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Multidimensional Measure of Cultural Identity Scales for Latinos (MMCISL; Félix-Ortiz, Newcomb, & Myers, 1994) have never been examined in an adult Latina sample representing various levels of nativity and nationality. The rationale for the study was to confirm the factor structure and psychometric properties of the MMCISL with a predominantly immigrant sample of Latina mothers and daughters (n = 316). Adequate reliability estimates were found for 6 of the original 10 scales. Confirmatory factor analyses provided evidence of construct validity for the reliable scales. The Preferred Latino Affiliation scale was the only scale to meet strict measurement invariance criteria across mothers and daughters. Criterion validity was evidenced by relations between the Familiarity with Latino Culture scale and all criterion variables. Implications for acculturation and cultural identity research involving the MMCISL are discussed. PMID:19364206

  20. Urban occupational health in the Mexican and Latino/Latina immigrant population: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Gany, Francesca; Novo, Patricia; Dobslaw, Rebecca; Leng, Jennifer

    2014-10-01

    Mexican and Latino/Latina immigrants represent a rapidly growing population within the United States. The majority settle in urban areas. As a group, Mexican immigrants typically have low educational attainment and socioeconomic status, and limited English proficiency. These immigrants often find work in hazardous jobs, with high injury and fatality rates. They often have inadequate or no safety training, no personal protective equipment, limited understanding of workers' rights, job insecurity, fear of report of undocumented status and lack health care benefits. This review includes what has been published on the urban occupational health of this population. The findings suggest that Mexican and Latino/Latina immigrants experience higher rates of work-related fatalities and injuries compared to other populations, and may be less likely to report such incidents to employers or to apply for workers' compensation. There is a strong need to develop effective programs to address the health and safety of this vulnerable population. PMID:23468371

  1. Fatalism and cancer risk knowledge among a sample of highly acculturated Latinas.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, A Susana

    2014-03-01

    Fatalistic beliefs about cancer are associated with decreased likelihood of knowing about cancer risk factors and engaging in cancer prevention and screening behaviors. Research suggests that Latinas are especially likely to hold fatalistic beliefs. However, this research has been in less-acculturated, high-poverty convenience samples. This study examined cancer knowledge, cancer fatalism, and the association between fatalism and knowledge in a national sample of highly acculturated, middle-income Latinas (N = 715). Results indicate that cancer fatalism is pervasive, and knowledge about cancer risk factors is lacking among this population. Fatalistic beliefs are paradoxically associated with cancer knowledge. Opportunities for tailored communications to improve health behaviors and additional research to understand causes/effects of these findings are discussed in the context of a growing body of research about how to communicate health information to more-acculturated Latinos.

  2. Culturally Sensitive Intervention for Latina Women with Eating Disorders: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Rodríguez, Mae Lynn; Baucom, Donald H.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We describe cognitive-behavioral therapy for bulimia nervosa (CBT-BN) with a Latina woman that incorporates culturally relevant topics. Method A single case report of a 31-year-old monolingual Latina woman with BN describes the application of a couple-based intervention adjunctive to CBT-BN. Results The patient reported no binge and purge episodes by session 20 and remained symptom free until the end of treatment (session 26). Improvement was observed in the Eating Disorders Examination (EDE) comparing baseline (EDE=5.74) with post treatment (EDE=1.25). Conclusions The case illustrates how cultural adaptations such as including a family member, being flexible on topics and scheduling, and providing culturally relevant interventions can lead to successful completion of a course of therapy and facilitate ongoing interventions to ensure continued recovery. PMID:25598951

  3. Predictors of Gestational Weight Gain among White and Latina Women and Associations with Birth Weight

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Monica L.; Bodenlos, Jamie S.; Sankey, Heather Z.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined racial/ethnic differences in gestational weight gain (GWG) predictors and association of first-trimester GWG to overall GWG among 271 White women and 300 Latina women. Rates of within-guideline GWG were higher among Latinas than among Whites (28.7% versus 24.4%, p < 0.016). Adjusted odds of above-guideline GWG were higher among prepregnancy overweight (OR = 3.4, CI = 1.8–6.5) and obese (OR = 4.5, CI = 2.3–9.0) women than among healthy weight women and among women with above-guideline first-trimester GWG than among those with within-guideline first-trimester GWG (OR = 4.9, CI = 2.8–8.8). GWG was positively associated with neonate birth size (p < 0.001). Interventions targeting prepregnancy overweight or obese women and those with excessive first-trimester GWG are needed.

  4. Intersectionality at Work: Determinants of Labor Supply among Immigrant Latinas1

    PubMed Central

    Flippen, Chenoa

    2015-01-01

    This article borrows from the intersectionality literature to investigate how legal status, labor market position, and family characteristics structure the labor supply of immigrant Latinas in Durham, NC, a new immigrant destination. The analysis takes a broad view of labor force participation, analyzing the predictors of whether or not women work; whether and how the barriers to work vary across occupations; and variation in hours and weeks worked among the employed. I also explicitly investigate the extent to which family constraints interact with other social characteristics, especially legal status, in shaping women’s labor market position. Results highlight that immigrant Latinas experience multiple, interrelated constraints on employment owing to their position as low-skill workers in a labor market highly segregated by gender and nativity, to their status as members of a largely undocumented population, and as wives and mothers in an environment characterized by significant work-family conflict. PMID:26843783

  5. Cigarette advertising in magazines for Latinas, White women, and men, 1998--2002: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Senaida; Hickman, Norval; Klonoff, Elizabeth A; Landrine, Hope; Kashima, Kennon; Parekh, Bina; Brouillard, Catherine R; Zolezzi, Michelle; Jensen, Jennifer A; Weslowski, Zorahna

    2005-04-01

    Cigarette ads in popular magazines play a role in smoking and in brand preferences among women and men, but few studies have analyzed ads directed at women vs men, and no study has examined ads directed at women of different ethnic groups. Hence, we examined cigarette ads in popular magazines for White women, Latinas, and men 1998 through 2002 for the first time. Significant differences in the number of cigarette ads by magazine audience were found, along with significant differences in the type and brands of cigarettes advertised to each group. These preliminary findings suggest that the tobacco industry may target women in a manner that differs from its targeting of men, and may target Latinas in a manner that it does not target White women. Results are discussed in terms of the need for further research on tobacco ads directed at women.

  6. Latina Workers in North Carolina: Work Organization, Domestic Responsibilities, Health, and Family Life.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Guadalupe; Trejo, Grisel; Schiemann, Elizabeth; Quandt, Sara A; Daniel, Stephanie S; Sandberg, Joanne C; Arcury, Thomas A

    2016-06-01

    This analysis describes the work organization and domestic work experienced by migrant Latinas, and explores the linkage between work and health. Twenty Latina workers in North Carolina with at least one child under age 12 completed in-depth interviews focused on their work organization, domestic responsibilities, work-family conflict, health, and family health. Using a systematic qualitative analysis, these women described a demanding work organization that is contingent and exploitative, with little control or support. They also described demanding domestic roles, with gendered and unequal division of household work. The resulting work-family conflict affects their mental and physical health, and has negative effects on the care and health of their families. The findings from this study highlight that work stressors from an unfavorable work organization create work-family conflict, and that work-family conflict in this population has a negative influence on workers' health and health behaviors.

  7. Work Conditions and Health and Well-Being of Latina Hotel Housekeepers.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Chin; Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Sönmez, Sevil

    2016-06-01

    Hotel housekeepers are exposed to a plethora of disproportionately high work-induced hazards that can lead to adverse health consequences. Latina hotel housekeepers are rendered particularly vulnerable to elevated occupational hazards and resultant health strains due to their socioeconomic status, immigration status, language barriers, and lack of access to healthcare services. The findings from the 27 interviews with Latina hotel housekeepers indicated that the interviewees were exposed to physical, chemical, and social hazards in the workplace and suffered musculoskeletal injuries. In terms of psychological wellness, the time pressure of cleaning rooms quickly and work-related stress stemming from workplace mistreatment emerged as major work-related stressors. Recommendations are made for the introduction of multilevel interventions designed to prevent work-related injuries and illnesses and to promote healthier workplaces. PMID:26001842

  8. The Characteristics and Experiences of Successful Undergraduate Latina Students Who Persist in Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Carrie

    Females and underrepresented ethnic minorities earn a small percentage of engineering and computer science bachelor's degrees awarded in the United States, earn an even smaller proportion of master's and doctoral degrees, and are underrepresented in the engineering workforce (Engineering Workforce Commission, [2006], as cited in National Science Foundation, 2012; United States Department of Education, [2006], as cited in National Science Foundation, 2009a; United States Department of Education, [2006], as cited in National Science Foundation, 2009b). Considerable research has examined the perceptions, culture, curriculum, and pedagogy in engineering that inhibits the achievement of women and underrepresented ethnic minorities. This action research study used a qualitative approach to examine the characteristics and experiences of Latina students who pursued a bachelor's degree in the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University (ASU) as part of the 2008 first-time full-time freshman cohort. The researcher conducted two semi-structured individual interviews with seven undergraduate Latina students who successfully persisted to their fourth (senior) year in engineering. The researcher aimed to understand what characteristics made these students successful and how their experiences affected their persistence in an engineering major. The data collected showed that the Latina participants were motivated to persist in their engineering degree program due to their parents' expectations for success and high academic achievement; their desire to overcome the discrimination, stereotyping, and naysayers that they encountered; and their aspiration to become a role model for their family and other students interested in pursuing engineering. From the data collected, the researcher provided suggestions to implement and adapt educational activities and support systems within the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering to improve the retention and graduation rates

  9. Poor HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge among Utah Latinas overdue for recommended cancer screenings.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Brynn; Bodson, Julia; Warner, Echo L; Dyer, Jane; Kepka, Deanna

    2016-08-01

    Individuals overdue for recommended cancer screenings may not be receiving adequate cancer prevention education. Since Latinas have the highest incidence of cervical cancer among all racial/ethnic groups, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination education is especially important for this population. The correlates of HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge were assessed among Latinas who were overdue for recommended cancer screenings. N = 206 Latinas who were overdue for recommended cancer screenings were recruited by health educators from local community groups. Bivariate analyses and multivariable regression models were used to investigate factors associated with HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge among participants as well as to assess correlates of HPV vaccine receipt for eligible children of participants. In multivariable regression analyses, years living in the U.S. (p = 0.05) and health insurance status (p = 0.03) were significantly related to HPV vaccine-related knowledge measures. Age (p < 0.01), birthplace (p = 0.02), years living in the U.S. (p = 0.05), annual household income (p = 0.05), cervical cancer screening status (p = 0.03), and HPV vaccine-related knowledge measures (p < 0.01) were significantly associated with HPV vaccination outcomes for eligible daughters of participants. Cervical cancer screening status (p = 0.02) and HPV vaccine-related knowledge measures (p = 0.01) were significantly associated with HPV vaccination outcomes for eligible sons of participants. Results indicate poor HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge among Latinas. Interventions to improve HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge in Utah's growing Latino population should target vulnerable individuals (e.g., not employed outside the home, less educated, less acculturated, poor, uninsured, overdue for cervical cancer screening) by using materials that are culturally sensitive, linguistically appropriate, and easily accessible.

  10. Goal Development of Latina/o Students in a Developmental Learning Community at a Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorch, Theresa M.

    2014-01-01

    Community colleges benefit from a diverse population with various reasons for attending. For example, 23% of Latina/o students that earned a PhD between 1990 and 2000 began their education in a community college (Rivas, Pérez, Alvarez, & Solórzano, 2007). However, there are a number who often do not persist toward their goals. To begin with,…

  11. A further examination of the "epidemiologic paradox": birth outcomes among Latinas.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Terry J.; Raggio, Tanya Pagan; Chiasson, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Low rates of low birthweight (LBW) among foreign-born Latinas of low socioeconomic status have been called the "epidemiologic paradox." This study examined the extent to which the paradox can be explained by differential distribution of risk factors. PROCEDURES: The data source was the 1996-1997 New York City Birth File with 78,364 singleton births to Latinas. Ancestries included Colombians, Dominicans, Ecuadorians, Mexicans, Puerto Ricans and other Hispanics. First, a logistic regression was used to predict a LBW birth with ancestry and birthplace as the only independent variables. Demographic, medical and behavioral risks were added in subsequent regression models. FINDINGS: The LBW rate for the sample was 6.8%, with significant differences between birthplace subgroups and among ancestries. Puerto Ricans had the highest LBW rates, 9.1% for the mainland-born and 9.2% for the island-born. In separate regressions for six ancestry groups, birthplace was a significant predictor of LBW only among Mexicans and other Hispanics. CONCLUSION: In this population-based study of Latina women in New York City, the positive birth outcomes of foreign-born women are largely due to their more favorable distribution of behavioral risk factors. The "epidemiologic paradox" does not account for the LBW rates among Puerto Ricans in New York City, a high percentage of whom are mainland-born (73.4%). Compared to other Latinas, Puerto Rican women are likely to have experienced far more years of acculturation, which can result in negative health behaviors. PMID:15868775

  12. Increasing Cervical Cancer Screening Among US Hispanics/Latinas: A Qualitative Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Lilli; Foley, Kristie L.; Tanner, Amanda E.; Sun, Christina J.; Rhodes, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Hispanic/Latina women experience the highest cervical cancer incidence rates of any racial/ethnic group in the United States (US), and tend to present with more severe cases and experience higher mortality compared to most other populations. The goal of this qualitative systematic review was to explore existing interventions to increase cervical cancer screening among US Hispanics/Latinas and to identify characteristics of effective interventions and research gaps. Materials and Methods Six online databases were searched from their inception through June 30, 2013, using designated search terms and keywords. Peer-reviewed articles that documented an intervention designed to improve screening for cervical cancer among Hispanics/Latinas ages 18 years and older living in the US were reviewed. Data were abstracted using a standardized form to document intervention characteristics and results. Results Forty-five articles, describing 32 unique interventions, met inclusion criteria. Identified interventions consisted primarily of educational programs and/or provision of screening. Interventions used lay health advisors (LHAs), clinic-based outreach/delivery strategies, partnerships with churches, and mass media campaigns. Twelve interventions resulted in significant increases in cervical cancer screening rates. Conclusions Interventions developed utilizing theory, applying community-based participatory research approaches, and using lay health advisors were identified as having the greatest potential for improving cervical cancer screening among Hispanics/Latinas. There continues to be a need for the development of interventions in geographic areas with new and emerging Hispanic/Latino populations and that are comprehensive, follow participants for longer periods of time, and broaden the roles and build the capacities of LHAs. PMID:25154515

  13. Properties of Se/InSe Thin-Film Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasrawi, A. F.; Kayed, T. S.; Elsayed, Khaled A.

    2016-06-01

    Se, InSe, and Se/InSe thin films have been prepared by the physical vapor deposition technique at pressure of ˜10-5 torr. The structural, optical, and electrical properties of the films and Se/InSe interface were investigated by means of x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and current-voltage ( I- V) characteristics. XRD analysis indicated that the prepared InSe films were amorphous while the Se films were polycrystalline having hexagonal structure with unit cell parameters of a = 4.3544 Å and c = 4.9494 Å. Spectral reflectance and transmittance analysis showed that both Se and InSe films exhibited indirect allowed transitions with energy bandgaps of 1.92 eV and 1.34 eV, respectively. The Se/InSe interface exhibited two energy bandgaps of 0.98 eV and 1.73 eV above and below 2.2 eV, respectively. Dielectric constant values were also calculated from reflectance spectra for the three layers in the frequency range of 500 THz to 272 THz. The dielectric constant exhibited a promising feature suggesting use of the Se/InSe interface as an optical resonator. Moreover, the Au/Se/InSe/Ag heterojunction showed some rectifying properties that could be used in standard optoelectronic devices. The ideality factor and height of the energy barrier to charge carrier motion in this device were found to be 1.72 and 0.66 eV, respectively.

  14. Comparison of self-rated health among Latina immigrants in a Southern U.S. city and a national sample

    PubMed Central

    White, Kari; Scarinci, Isabel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background In the United States (U.S.), Latinos often report fair/poor self-rated health, which is an indicator for increased morbidity and mortality. Foreign-born Latinos in new immigrant destinations, such as the South, may rate their health more poorly than their counterparts elsewhere in the U.S., due to factors associated with migration and settlement in these communities. Methods We assessed foreign-born Latinas’ self-rated health in Birmingham, Alabama (n=765), and compared it to that of foreign-born Latinas in the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS; n=8,746). Birmingham participants were matched to Latinas in the NHIS using propensity scores. We examined factors associated with reporting worse health using ordered logistic regression and inverse probability of treatment weights. Results After propensity score matching, 47.6% of foreign-born Latinas in the Birmingham study reported their health as fair/poor, compared to 17.9% of foreign-born Latinas in the NHIS (p<0.001). The association between being Mexican-born versus from other countries with poorer health was stronger in the Birmingham study (odds ratio: 4.46 [95% CI: 1.91–10.4]) than in the NHIS (odds ratio 1.09 [95%CI: 1.08–1.09]). Shorter durations of U.S. residence were associated with better health for Latinas in the NHIS but not those in Birmingham. Conclusions In this study of Latina immigrants in a new settlement community in the South, women reported worse health than foreign-born Latinas in other U.S. regions, suggesting they may be at increased risk for adverse health outcomes. Future studies are needed to better understand the factors associated with these differences to reduce morbidity and mortality burdens. PMID:26263236

  15. "El Sexo no es Malo": Maternal Values Accompanying Contraceptive Use Advice to Young Latina Adolescent Daughters.

    PubMed

    Romo, Laura F; Bravo, Magali; Cruz, Maria Elena; Rios, Rebeca M; Kouyoumdjian, Claudia

    2010-06-01

    In this study, we utilized observational methods to identify maternal values and concerns accompanying contraceptive use advice in Latina mother-daughter sexuality conversations. The sample included non-sexually active early adolescents around 12 years of age and their mostly Spanish-speaking Latina mothers. Videotaped conversations were coded for the prevalence of messages related to four sexual values (abstinence, delay sex until older, sex is "normal", sex is "improper") and concerns about pregnancy and STD transmission. We examined whether the duration of time spent conversing about these messages was associated with participant characteristics, general communication openness, and the amount of time the dyads spent discussing contraceptive use. Results indicated that Latina mothers who had fewer years of education and lower family income talked longer to their daughters about the need to delay sex, avoid risky situations that would increase their chances of getting pregnant or acquiring an STD, and engage in self-protective practices. Less perceived openness in general communication as reported by both the mothers and the daughters was associated with increased time discussing that sex is improper. Although the duration of contraceptive use messages was brief, mothers and daughters who discussed the fact that sex is normal, and who communicated more about the importance of delaying sex, talked longer about contraceptive use practices compared to mothers and daughters who engaged in minimal discussion of these sexual values.

  16. Fortalezas familiares program: building sociocultural and family strengths in latina women with depression and their families.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Carmen R; Abegglen, Jessica; Hauser, Claire T

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe Fortalezas Familiares (FF; Family Strengths), a community-based prevention program designed to address relational family processes and promote well-being among Latino families when a mother has depression. Although depression in Latina women is becoming increasingly recognized, risk and protective mechanisms associated with children's outcomes when a mother has depression are not well understood for Latino families. We begin by reviewing the literature on risk and protective psychosocial mechanisms by which maternal depression may affect Latino youth, using family systems theory and a developmental psychopathology framework with an emphasis on sociocultural factors shaping family processes. Next, we describe the theoretical basis and development of the FF program, a community-based 12-week intervention for Latina immigrant women with depression, other caregivers, and their children. Throughout this article, we use a case study to illustrate a Latina mother's vulnerability to depression and the family's response to the FF program. Recommendations for future research and practice include consideration of sociocultural processes in shaping both outcomes of Latino families and their response to interventions. PMID:24033237

  17. Health literacy predicts change in physical activity self-efficacy among sedentary Latinas.

    PubMed

    Dominick, Gregory M; Dunsiger, Shira I; Pekmezi, Dorothy W; Marcus, Bess H

    2013-06-01

    Health literacy (HL) is associated with preventive health behaviors. Self-efficacy is a predictor of health behavior, including physical activity (PA); however, causal pathways between HL and self-efficacy for PA are unknown, especially among Latinas who are at risk for chronic disease. To explore this potential relationship, secondary analyses were conducted on data [Shortened Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (STOFHLA), PA self-efficacy, and socio-demographics] from a 6-month, randomized controlled trial of a print-based PA intervention (n = 89 Spanish-speaking Latinas). Linear regression models revealed associations between HL and baseline self-efficacy in addition to changes in self-efficacy at 6-months. After controlling for significant covariates, higher HL scores were associated with lower baseline PA self-efficacy. Regardless of treatment assignment, higher HL scores at baseline predicted greater changes in PA self-efficacy at 6-months. HL may contribute to Latinas' improved PA self-efficacy, though further research is warranted.

  18. An exploratory study of nonsuicidal self-injury and suicidal behaviors in adolescent Latinas.

    PubMed

    Gulbas, Lauren E; Hausmann-Stabile, Carolina; De Luca, Susan M; Tyler, Tee R; Zayas, Luis H

    2015-07-01

    To date, there is little research to validate empirically differences between nonsuicidal self-injurious behavior (NSSI) and attempted suicide among Latina adolescents. Understanding the characteristics and contextual features of self-harmful behaviors among Latina teens is a critical public health and social justice matter given the disproportionate rates of attempted suicide and anticipated population growth of this vulnerable group. In this article, we draw on an ecodevelopmental model to focus attention on factors in the sociocultural environment that shape suicidal behaviors and NSSIs. Through analysis of qualitative interviews conducted with girls who used NSSI (n = 18), attempted suicide (n = 29), used NSSI and attempted suicide (n = 8,) and had no reported lifetime history of self-harm (n = 28), we describe the sociocultural factors that shaped psychosocial vulnerabilities and gave rise to decisions to use NSSI or attempt suicide. Our analysis revealed that adolescents who engaged in NSSI perceived their negative feelings as something that could be controlled through self-injurious acts, whereas powerlessness was a theme underlying the emotional states of girls who attempted suicide. When NSSI ceased to function as a mechanism for control, girls came to sudden decisions to attempt suicide. Most teens identified specific, and often multiple, situations that induced intense affective states and shaped decisions to inflict self-harm. Two situational experiences emerged as particularly salient and promising for subsequent studies on self-harmful behaviors among Latina adolescents: transnational stress and bullying. We describe each of these and offer suggestions for future research and practice.

  19. Always aware (Siempre pendiente): Latina mothers' parenting in high-risk neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Ceballo, Rosario; Kennedy, Traci M; Bregman, Allyson; Epstein-Ngo, Quyen

    2012-10-01

    Poor mothers contend with numerous economic and environmental stressors that may severely tax their resources for parenting. This study relied on qualitative interviews with 49 low-income Latina mothers to examine how parenting practices are used when facing neighborhood poverty and the threat of community violence. Several themes emerged in the interviews regarding mothers' approaches to parenting. First, Latina mothers in our sample relied on three strategies previously identified in the literature: (a) strict monitoring, (b) physical and/or social withdrawal from the neighborhood, and (c) engagement in positive, enriching activities for children. In concert with these strategies, these mothers also emphasized the importance of (d) establishing strong parent-child communication as essential to effective parenting in challenging environments. Furthermore, two overarching, culturally salient parental goals were identified: (a) fostering principles of educación in their children and (b) maintaining astute parental awareness (estar pendiente) of children's physical as well as emotional states. Our findings illuminated culturally specific meanings that accompany parenting practices for low-income Latina mothers and underscored the importance of adapting culturally sensitive interventions for parents. PMID:22924421

  20. Always aware (Siempre pendiente): Latina mothers' parenting in high-risk neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Ceballo, Rosario; Kennedy, Traci M; Bregman, Allyson; Epstein-Ngo, Quyen

    2012-10-01

    Poor mothers contend with numerous economic and environmental stressors that may severely tax their resources for parenting. This study relied on qualitative interviews with 49 low-income Latina mothers to examine how parenting practices are used when facing neighborhood poverty and the threat of community violence. Several themes emerged in the interviews regarding mothers' approaches to parenting. First, Latina mothers in our sample relied on three strategies previously identified in the literature: (a) strict monitoring, (b) physical and/or social withdrawal from the neighborhood, and (c) engagement in positive, enriching activities for children. In concert with these strategies, these mothers also emphasized the importance of (d) establishing strong parent-child communication as essential to effective parenting in challenging environments. Furthermore, two overarching, culturally salient parental goals were identified: (a) fostering principles of educación in their children and (b) maintaining astute parental awareness (estar pendiente) of children's physical as well as emotional states. Our findings illuminated culturally specific meanings that accompany parenting practices for low-income Latina mothers and underscored the importance of adapting culturally sensitive interventions for parents.

  1. Success factors impacting Latina/o persistence in higher education leading to STEM opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, Claudia; Caspary, Melissa; Boothe, Diane

    2013-12-01

    This study investigates how Latina/Latino youth resist, conform to, and persist in schooling, and explores their preparation for an education in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields. Using Latino Critical Race Theory as a framework, evidence of the "sticky mess" of racial inequalities (Espinoza and Harris in Calif Law Rev 10:499-559, 1997) and the concept of community cultural wealth (Yosso in Race Ethn Educ 8:69-91, 2005) will be used to understand how Latina/o students successfully persist in college. Quantitative and qualitative findings collected at two public universities in 2007-2012 show that Latina/o parents play a significant role in influencing their children's decision to attend college; family, friend and community support and hard work have also been instrumental in college success. This is evident through parents' encouragement to persist, expectations to do well and students serving as role models for siblings and peers. As policy makers in the educational arena emphasize STEM fields, there is a significant opportunity for Latino students to make valuable contributions.

  2. Interpersonal and social correlates of depressive symptoms among Latinas in farmworker families living in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Roblyer, Martha I Zapata; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Suerken, Cynthia K; Trejo, Grisel; Ip, Edward H; Arcury, Thomas A; Quandt, Sara A

    2016-01-01

    Little research is available about the mental health of Latina women in farmworker families living in the southern United States, where Latino immigrants are relatively recent arrivals. This study examined interpersonal correlates (family conflict, family's outward orientation, and perceived discrimination) and social correlates (residential mobility and economic insecurity) of depressive symptoms and of meeting a threshold of depressive symptoms that could be clinically significant (a cut-point of 10 or higher in a short Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale) among Latinas in farmworker families living in North Carolina. Data were collected from April 19, 2011 to April 20, 2012 as part of Niños Sanos, a prospective study of Latino women and children (N = 248). Regression models showed that exposure to family conflict, perceived discrimination, and economic insecurity were associated with more depressive symptoms. Likewise, perceived discrimination and economic insecurity were associated with a threshold of depressive symptoms that could be clinically significant, above and beyond family conflict. The findings suggested that policies that lessen the discrimination of farmworkers and their families and reduce economic insecurity, as well as interventions that support positive family functioning, might be beneficial for the mental health of Latinas in farmworker families living in new immigrant destinations. PMID:26327338

  3. Survivorship education for Latina breast cancer survivors: Empowering Survivors through education

    PubMed Central

    Juarez, Gloria; Mayorga, Lina; Hurria, Arti; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Nueva Luz is an English and Spanish quality of life (QOL) intervention developed to address the educational needs of Latina breast cancer survivors and provide strategies to assist in their transition into survivorship. Methods A qualitative approach was used to evaluate the English and Spanish educational intervention (Nueva Luz). A purposive sample of eight Latina breast cancer survivors was selected from the group who received the intervention to participate in a digitally recorded interview. Data was analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Findings provide evidence that the one-on-one tailored approach is a feasible and acceptable method of providing a bilingual psychosocial intervention. The provision of printed bilingual information along with the verbal instruction from a bilingual and culturally competent health care provider can be effective in helping Latina breast cancer survivor’s transition successfully into survivorship, improve QOL and contribute to better patient outcomes Conclusions The study informs our understanding of the cultural context in patient education content and delivery of psychosocial interventions. The findings may also have relevance for other ethnic minority cancer survivors. PMID:24416043

  4. Qualitative Exploration of an Effective Depression Literacy Fotonovela with at Risk Latina Immigrants.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Maria Y; Organista, Kurt C

    2015-09-01

    While depression is prevalent among immigrant Latinas, mental health literacy is low. Culturally tailored health narratives can improve mental health literacy and are now increasingly featured in Spanish language fotonovelas (i.e., booklets in a comic book format with posed photographs and dialogue bubbles). The purpose of this qualitative study is to explore why a depression literacy fotonovela proved effective with Latina immigrants at risk for depression in a quantitative randomized control study. This study is the qualitative companion of the previously published quantitative piece of a mixed methods study, the latter revealing posttest improvements in depression knowledge, self-efficacy to identify the need for treatment, and decreased stigma towards mental health care (Hernandez and Organista in Am J Community Psychol 2013. doi: 10.1007/s10464-013-9587-1 ). Twenty-five immigrant Latinas participated in structured interviews, in the current qualitative study, 3 weeks after participating in the quantitative study. Results suggest depression literacy improved because participants evidenced high recall of the storyline and characters, which they also found appealing (e.g., liked peer and professional support offered to depressed main character). Further, identification with the main character was reflected in participants recalling similar circumstances impacting their mental health. Despite some improvement, stigma related to depression and its treatment remained for some women. Future research for the improvement of health literacy tools is discussed. PMID:25987298

  5. "El Sexo no es Malo": Maternal Values Accompanying Contraceptive Use Advice to Young Latina Adolescent Daughters.

    PubMed

    Romo, Laura F; Bravo, Magali; Cruz, Maria Elena; Rios, Rebeca M; Kouyoumdjian, Claudia

    2010-06-01

    In this study, we utilized observational methods to identify maternal values and concerns accompanying contraceptive use advice in Latina mother-daughter sexuality conversations. The sample included non-sexually active early adolescents around 12 years of age and their mostly Spanish-speaking Latina mothers. Videotaped conversations were coded for the prevalence of messages related to four sexual values (abstinence, delay sex until older, sex is "normal", sex is "improper") and concerns about pregnancy and STD transmission. We examined whether the duration of time spent conversing about these messages was associated with participant characteristics, general communication openness, and the amount of time the dyads spent discussing contraceptive use. Results indicated that Latina mothers who had fewer years of education and lower family income talked longer to their daughters about the need to delay sex, avoid risky situations that would increase their chances of getting pregnant or acquiring an STD, and engage in self-protective practices. Less perceived openness in general communication as reported by both the mothers and the daughters was associated with increased time discussing that sex is improper. Although the duration of contraceptive use messages was brief, mothers and daughters who discussed the fact that sex is normal, and who communicated more about the importance of delaying sex, talked longer about contraceptive use practices compared to mothers and daughters who engaged in minimal discussion of these sexual values. PMID:20543876

  6. La contribución de los Centros Colaboradores de la OMS/OPS en los avances de la promoción de la salud en América Latina.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Hiram V; Mantilla Uribe, Blanca P; Contreras Rengifo, Adolfo; Westphal, Marcia F; Mendes, Rosilda

    2016-09-01

    Los "Centros Colaboradores" de la Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS) son instituciones designadas para prestar apoyo estratégico en el desarrollo de los objetivos y la ejecución de las actividades de la OMS, y para generar capacidad institucional en países y regiones. En las Américas existen ocho Centros Colaboradores directamente relacionados a la promoción de la salud. Cuatro centros se ubican en Norteamérica y los otros cuatro en América Latina. El propósito de este artículo es describir los Centros Colaboradores de la Región de América Latina. Los centros han sido importantes en el desarrollo de la agenda de promoción de la salud de la región, la consolidación de la estrategia de entornos saludables y el fortalecimiento de las redes académicas y profesionales de promoción de la salud.

  7. La contribución de los Centros Colaboradores de la OMS/OPS en los avances de la promoción de la salud en América Latina.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Hiram V; Mantilla Uribe, Blanca P; Contreras Rengifo, Adolfo; Westphal, Marcia F; Mendes, Rosilda

    2016-09-01

    Los "Centros Colaboradores" de la Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS) son instituciones designadas para prestar apoyo estratégico en el desarrollo de los objetivos y la ejecución de las actividades de la OMS, y para generar capacidad institucional en países y regiones. En las Américas existen ocho Centros Colaboradores directamente relacionados a la promoción de la salud. Cuatro centros se ubican en Norteamérica y los otros cuatro en América Latina. El propósito de este artículo es describir los Centros Colaboradores de la Región de América Latina. Los centros han sido importantes en el desarrollo de la agenda de promoción de la salud de la región, la consolidación de la estrategia de entornos saludables y el fortalecimiento de las redes académicas y profesionales de promoción de la salud. PMID:25795656

  8. Mennonite Country: The Role of Latina Leaders in the Familial, Social, and Educational Outreach of Immigrant Latino Families in North Central Indiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    López, Anayeli; Anguiano, Rubén P. Viramontez

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the role of Latina leaders in serving Latino families in North Central Indiana and how they produced social capital through service and leadership. The larger sample of the ethnographic study consisted of 40 Latino families (63 parents) and 14 school personnel. This study focused specifically on 13 Latina women who were…

  9. "Shaping Communities" as a Christian Practice and Popular Religion: Their Implications for Latina/o Religious Education in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Michael G.

    2008-01-01

    This article sets Dorothy Bass' Christian practices movement in critical dialogue with U.S. Latina/o popular religion in order to explore ways that these distinctive sets of practices could enrich one another. Then, it focuses on "shaping communities" as a Christian practice and correlates it with the U.S. Latina/o popular religious practices…

  10. Abriendo Caminos Para La Educacion: A Case Study of a Parent Outreach Initiative Building on the Knowledge, Skills, and Resources of the Latina/o Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Graciela

    2010-01-01

    Informed by research studies that demonstrate a positive relationship between parent engagement and student academic attainment, state and national parent outreach initiatives have aimed to bridge the gap between Latina/o parents and schools. Such was the case with the Latina/o Family, School and Community "Avanzando" Project, which supported the…

  11. Exploring the Sexual Health Priorities and Needs of Immigrant Latinas in the Southeastern United States: A Community-Based Participatory Research Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashman, Rebecca; Eng, Eugenia; Siman, Florence; Rhodes, Scott D.

    2011-01-01

    Latinas living in the United States are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted infections. However, few effective interventions currently exist that are designed to meet the priorities and needs of recently arrived and less acculturated immigrant Latinas who are settling in the southeastern United States. To identify…

  12. Mathematics and Racial Identity Co-Construction in Multiple Sociopolitical Contexts: A Case Study of a Latina Undergraduate Student from an Urban Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppland-Cordell, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Although urban Latinas/os have participated in mathematics workshops in urban universities for over three decades as part of the Emerging Scholars Program (ESP), few studies have explored Latina/o students' perspectives of how and why these learning environments support them in attaining mathematical success. This article presents an in-depth…

  13. The Ordinary-ness of Institutional Racism: The Effect of History and Law in the Segregation and Integration of Latinas/os in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Juan Carlos

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the effect of history and law in the segregation and integration of Latinas/os in schools. Initially, a Critical Race Theory (CRT) analysis of the question of the effects of Latina/o school desegregation history and law on their present-day educational conditions highlighted the reasons for the omni-present struggle for…

  14. "A Moving Target": A Critical Race Analysis of Latina/o Faculty Experiences, Perspectives, and Reflections on the Tenure and Promotion Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urrieta, Luis, Jr.; Méndez, Lina; Rodríguez, Esmeralda

    2015-01-01

    This article examines how Latina/o professors perceive, experience, and reflect on the tenure and promotion process. Findings for this longitudinal study are drawn from a purposive sample of nine female and seven male, Latina/o tenure-track faculty participants. Using a Critical Race Theory, Latino Critical (LatCrit) Race Theory, and Chicana…

  15. A Report Card on Latina/o Leadership in California's Public Universities: A Trend Analysis of Faculty, Students, and Executives in the CSU and UC Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Jose L.; Acevedo-Gil, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The article examines the status of leadership in two California public higher education systems: California State University (CSU) and the University of California (UC) from 2001 to 2009. Findings reveal that the representation of Latina/o faculty and administrators does not reflect the density in the Latina/o undergraduate student and general…

  16. The Influence of Techno-Capital and Techno-Disposition on the College-Going Processes of Latina/O College Students in Central Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Charles; Straubhaar, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    Latina/o students are one of the least likely populations to access technology and possess the techno-capital necessary to succeed in postsecondary education. This phenomenological qualitative research study used interviews with 20 Latina/o college students in Central Texas to examine how techno-capital and techno-disposition interact in complex…

  17. "Cuento" Group Work in Emerging Rural Latino Communities: Promoting Personal-Social Development of Latina/o Middle School Students of Mexican Heritage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villalba, Jose A.; Ivers, Nathaniel N.; Ohlms, Amanda Bartley

    2010-01-01

    The experiences of Latina/o youth in rural emerging Latino communities are largely absent in the literature. This article proposes the benefits of a "Cuento" group work intervention designed to promote Latina/o student personal-social development. An outline of the group intervention offered to middle school students of Mexican Heritage is…

  18. In the Eye of the Perfect Storm: The Convergence of Policy and Latina/o Trends in Access and Financial Concerns, 1975-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, José L.; Sáenz, Victor B.

    2014-01-01

    The authors paint a national portrait of Latina/o trends over more than 30 years in terms of demographic and financial concerns that pertain to access at 4-year institutions. Using a multiple policy streams framework, the authors contend that growing numbers of Latina/os are in the eye of the perfect storm in a global economy that calls for more…

  19. The College Pathways of Foreign-Born and Native-Born Latina/o College Students at Four-Year Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saenz, Victor B.; Rodriguez, Angelica Aguilar; Martinez, Melissa A.; Romo, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    With the continued growth of Latinas/os in higher education, it has become more important than ever for university leaders, administrators, and policy makers to understand the complex factors that lead to their participation and success. It is also important to acknowledge that a good proportion of these Latina/o students are foreign-born. This…

  20. Mental Health Stigma and Self-Concealment as Predictors of Help-Seeking Attitudes among Latina/o College Students in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Hadrian; Masuda, Akihiko; Swartout, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    The study examined whether mental health stigma and self-concealment are uniquely related to various dimensions of attitudes toward seeking professional psychological services (i.e., help-seeking attitudes) in Latina/o college students. Data from 129 Latina/o undergraduates (76% female) were used in the analysis. Results revealed that mental…

  1. The Satisfaction of Latina Breast Cancer Survivors with Their Healthcare and Health-Related Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Wildes, Kimberly A.; Miller, Alexander R.; de Majors, Sandra San Miguel; Otto, Pamela M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship of satisfaction with the cancer care doctor and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among Latina breast cancer survivors (BCS) by (1) assessing whether satisfaction would be positively correlated with HRQOL and (2) assessing whether satisfaction would significantly influence HRQOL while controlling for covariates. Methods The cross-sectional study used self-report data from 117 Latina BCS. Satisfaction was measured with the Hall Satisfaction Index, and HRQOL was measured with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–General (FACT-G). Analyses included calculation of descriptive statistics, t tests, bivariate correlations, analyses of variance (ANOVAs), and multivariate analyses. Results Latina BCS had high satisfaction and generally good HRQOL. The Hall Satisfaction Index total score was positively associated with FACT-G functional well-being (r=0.265, p=0.004). Multivariate analyses showed that the Hall Satisfaction Index total score was a significant predictor of FACT-G functional well-being (p=0.012). Employment status was also a significant predictor, where being employed or retired resulted in better functional well-being than being unemployed. Conclusions Latina BCS were quite satisfied with their cancer care doctors, and high levels of satisfaction with the cancer care doctor influenced functional well-being when confounding variables were controlled. Despite reportedly high satisfaction, Latina BCS did report barriers to satisfaction that could be considered cultural. Implications are discussed. PMID:21736447

  2. The importance of familia for Latina/o college students: examining the role of familial support in intragroup marginalization.

    PubMed

    Llamas, Jasmín D; Morgan Consoli, Melissa

    2012-10-01

    Intragroup marginalization refers to the perceived interpersonal distancing by members of the heritage culture when an individual exhibits cultural characteristics of the dominant group. This study expands understanding of the college experience of Latina/o students by examining relationships between intragroup marginalization, college adjustment, resilience, and thriving in a sample of 181 Latina/o college students, ranging from freshman to graduate students. In addition, the role of familial social support is explored to determine any possible mediating effects on the relationship between intragroup marginalization, college adjustment, resilience, and thriving. Findings revealed that intragroup marginalization predicted college adjustment, resilience, and thriving. Familial social support was found to mediate the relationship between intragroup marginalization and thriving. This research highlights the negative impact of intragroup marginalization for Latina/o students, as well as the role of familial support in thriving. The results also shed light on the Latina/o college experience as a means to improving Latina/o students' college outcomes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Picking fruit from our backyard's trees: The meaning of nostalgia in shaping Latinas' eating practices in the United States.

    PubMed

    Viladrich, Anahí; Tagliaferro, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Based on a focus group study conducted in New York City (NYC), this paper examines the traditional staples (i.e., nostalgic foods) that Latinas regularly consume in the U.S., along with their beliefs regarding the impact of such foods on weight gain and related body image. Our research findings highlight the "double-bind" of nostalgic foods, defined by Latinas' retention of highly caloric familiar items along with their progressive abandonment of fresh produce and fruits. Despite participants' efforts to eat healthy staples from their homelands, they mostly kept foods perceived as unhealthy (e.g., fatty meats, fried foods). This phenomenon was informed by the "same-food paradox," represented by Latinas' beliefs that the same traditional foods that would make them lose weight in their native countries would lead them to gain weight in the U.S. Our qualitative data show that participants' concerns about their weight gain in the U.S. is in tune with their general body dissatisfaction, as indicated by our quantitative results. Finally, our findings reveal the role of stress in promoting Latinas' deleterious daily habits, including their consumption of fat-saturated snacks. Overall, these results speak to the cultural and structural barriers to healthy eating that financially strapped study participants experienced in NYC. In order to design successful public health interventions targeting Latinas, the nostalgic aspects of food preferences should be considered in conjunction with the barriers that keep them from engaging with healthier lifestyles in the U.S.

  4. Picking fruit from our backyard's trees: The meaning of nostalgia in shaping Latinas' eating practices in the United States.

    PubMed

    Viladrich, Anahí; Tagliaferro, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Based on a focus group study conducted in New York City (NYC), this paper examines the traditional staples (i.e., nostalgic foods) that Latinas regularly consume in the U.S., along with their beliefs regarding the impact of such foods on weight gain and related body image. Our research findings highlight the "double-bind" of nostalgic foods, defined by Latinas' retention of highly caloric familiar items along with their progressive abandonment of fresh produce and fruits. Despite participants' efforts to eat healthy staples from their homelands, they mostly kept foods perceived as unhealthy (e.g., fatty meats, fried foods). This phenomenon was informed by the "same-food paradox," represented by Latinas' beliefs that the same traditional foods that would make them lose weight in their native countries would lead them to gain weight in the U.S. Our qualitative data show that participants' concerns about their weight gain in the U.S. is in tune with their general body dissatisfaction, as indicated by our quantitative results. Finally, our findings reveal the role of stress in promoting Latinas' deleterious daily habits, including their consumption of fat-saturated snacks. Overall, these results speak to the cultural and structural barriers to healthy eating that financially strapped study participants experienced in NYC. In order to design successful public health interventions targeting Latinas, the nostalgic aspects of food preferences should be considered in conjunction with the barriers that keep them from engaging with healthier lifestyles in the U.S. PMID:26593102

  5. Adaptation of the U.S. Food Security Survey Module for Low-Income Pregnant Latinas: Qualitative Phase

    PubMed Central

    Hromi-Fiedler, Amber; Bermúdez-Millán, Angela; Segura-Pérez, Sofia; Damio, Grace; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to: 1) assessed the face validity of the 18-items US Household Food Security Scale Module (US HFSSM) among low-income pregnant Latinas and 2) adapt the US HFSSM to the target population. This study was conducted in the United States in Hartford, Connecticut where 40% of residents are of Latina descent. Three focus groups (N=14total) were held with pregnant and postpartum Latinas from April – June 2004 to assess the understanding and applicability (face validity) of the US HFSSM as well as adapt the US HFSSM based on their recommendations. This was followed by pre-testing (N=7) to make final adaptations to the US HFSSM. Overall, the items in the US HFSSM were clear and understandable to participants, but some questions sounded repetitive to them. Participants felt the questions were applicable to other pregnant Latinas in their community and shared food security related experiences and strategies. Participants recommendations led to key adaptations to the US HFSSM including reducing the scale to 15-items, wording statements as questions, including two time periods, replacing the term “balanced meals” with “healthy and varied”, replacing the term “low cost foods” with “cheap foods” and including a definition of the term, and including a coping mechanism of avoiding running out of food. The adapted US HFSSM was found to have good face validity among pregnant Latinas and can be used to assess food insecurity among this vulnerable population. PMID:20046909

  6. ¿Y ahora qué? Anticipated immigration status barriers and Latina/o high school students' future expectations.

    PubMed

    McWhirter, Ellen Hawley; Ramos, Karina; Medina, Cynthia

    2013-07-01

    Latina/o high school students without documentation face a challenging situation when they graduate from high school, with pathways to work and postsecondary education stymied by their immigration status. We examined the effects of anticipated barriers associated with immigration status, age, and sex on the dependent variables of vocational outcome expectations, anticipated external and internal barriers, and postsecondary schooling plans in a sample of 475 Latina/o high school students. Findings include that students anticipating immigration status problems had lower vocational outcome expectations and anticipated more external barriers to pursuing their postsecondary plans. Latina girls and older high school students anticipating immigration status problems were more likely to plan to attend 2-year rather than 4-year colleges, and less likely to plan on postsecondary education, respectively. Implications for practice, policy, and research are discussed.

  7. Providers’ Perspectives Regarding the Development of a Web-Based Depression Intervention for Latina/o Youth

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Tatiana M.; Soltis, Kathryn; Albia, Christina MinHee; de Arellano, Michael; Ruggiero, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Latina/o youth appear to be at significant risk for depression and, of concern, is high underutilization of mental health services observed in this population. There is a tremendous need for novel intervention methods to better serve the unique needs of this population. This paper describes the development of Rise Above (Siempre Sale el Sol), a Web-based, self-help, depression intervention for Latina/o adolescents funded by the National Institute of Mental Health. We applied a cultural adaptation model to an evidence-based depression treatment to reduce potential service barriers and increase the relevance and potential efficacy of the intervention for Latina/o youth. We conducted thematic interviews with 32 national experts to obtain feedback that would inform our application of the cultural adaptation model, the potential efficacy of the intervention, and the feasibility of implementation. Future directions for the evaluation of Rise Above (Siempre Sale el Sol) are described. PMID:25133417

  8. A Collaborative Care Telemedicine Intervention to Overcome Treatment Barriers for Latina Women with Depression during the Perinatal Period

    PubMed Central

    Baker-Ericzén, Mary J.; Connelly, Cynthia D.; Hazen, Andrea L.; Dueñas, Cecilia; Landsverk, John A.; Horwitz, Sarah McCue

    2013-01-01

    Maternal depression is highly prevalent (10 to 20%) during the perinatal period with rates as high as 35 to 40% for Latinas. However, few Latinas are either identified or treated during the perinatal period. To address these disparities, the Perinatal Mental Health Model (PMH) was designed to ameliorate the barriers that prevent adequate diagnoses and intervention. The PMH is a culturally sensitive, short-term telemedicine, and collaborative care intervention for addressing depression among Mexican American mothers. It attends to sociocultural and socioeconomic dimensions and is delivered by trained mental health advisors within obstetric care settings. This article describes the feasibility and acceptability of utilizing the PMH. Participants (n=79) were selected from a first year ongoing randomized trial in community obstetric clinics. The intervention seems feasible and acceptable; low-income Latinas, identified as depressed during the perinatal period, reported having access to a range of appropriate community services and high satisfaction. PMID:22709321

  9. An Examination of Factors Associated with Healthcare Discrimination in Latina Immigrants: The Role of Healthcare Relationships and Language

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Vanessa B.; Williams, Karen Patricia; Wang, Judy; Shavers, Vickie; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding factors that are associated with perceived discrimination in Latina immigrants may provide opportunities to improve care for this growing population. Objective To examine the prevalence of discrimination experiences in urban Latina immigrants and identify socio-cultural and healthcare factors that predict discrimination experiences. Design Cross-sectional survey of 166 Latina immigrants. Measurements Socio-cultural: region of origin, primary language, and education. Healthcare factors: insurance, place of care, patient-provider communication, trust in provider, and satisfaction with care. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine factors that predicted discrimination. Results 42% had at least one discrimination experience. Communication with providers was the factor most strongly associated with reporting having a discrimination experience while controlling for other variables (p<. 01). Women with good communication with their provider were 71% less likely to report discrimination. Conclusion Better communication with providers may reduce Latinas’ perceptions of discrimination and thereby improve healthcare access and use of services. PMID:26744111

  10. Patients' cultural beliefs in patient-provider communication with African American women and Latinas diagnosed with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mott-Coles, Susan

    2014-08-01

    African American women and Latinas often experience suboptimal breast cancer care. This article describes providers' self-rated skills in communication practices when working with African American women and Latinas diagnosed with breast cancer. Current literature reveals how providers are lacking in the ability to communicate with these patients and often fail to incorporate cultural beliefs into breast cancer care and treatment. This poor communication and failure to acknowledge cultural beliefs can be correlated with poor patient outcomes. In a study of providers' perceptions of how they address the cultural beliefs of African American women and Latinas diagnosed with breast cancer, interviews with physicians, inpatient nurses, cancer clinic nurses, mammography technicians, and ultrasound technicians showed that they used the same approach for all patients, regardless of race, ethnicity, or culture but felt they practiced culturally sensitive care. Increased and improved cultural competence education is recommended for providers at all levels as a first step toward increasing culturally competent communications.

  11. Latina high school students figured world of STEM: Identity formation in formal and informal communities of practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcantara, Minosca Victoria

    In the United States, the education and skill levels of the American population are not measuring up to the growing demands of the STEM workplace. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) (2007) projects that over the next 20 years, there will be an estimated shortage of 21 million skilled workers. STEM professions (those in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics), will continue to lead this workforce growth. However, fewer students are majoring in these areas of critical need, particularly women and minorities. Only a small fraction of U.S.-born scientists and engineers training to fill these positions are members of underrepresented minorities (Latino, Black, and American Indian/Native Alaskan students), yet this same population is expected to experience the greatest growth over the next several decades. Using qualitative methods, I explore the role formal and informal communities of practice play in either motivating or hindering Latinas' interest in STEM career. I use the narratives of 16 low-income, urban Latina high school seniors to provide a counternarrative as to the reasons for these underrepresentation. Teachers in the U.S. play a significant role in the reproduction of the culturally prototypical conception of math and science students; the best and brightest in the school. Teachers' role in positioning Latina students in honors/gifted programs based on their perceptions of students' characteristics and their recommendations for placement in honors classes/ programs, STEM extracurricular activities and summer programs are critical to Latina's "good student" identity formation which has a significant role in their motivation or erasure of STEM identities. Latinas in this study strongly identified with their school and were very concerned in maintaining their good student identities. They defined academic success based on the grades they obtained and the colleges they were accepted into. I propose an identity model, L-STEM which highlight the power

  12. Geographies of displacement: Latina/os, oral history, and the politics of gentrification in San Francisco's Mission District.

    PubMed

    Mirabal, Nancy Raquel

    2009-05-01

    During the 1990s and early 2000s, working-class and poor neighborhoods in San Francisco underwent dramatic economic and racial changes. One of the most heavily gentrified neighborhoods was the Mission District. As a result of local politics, housing and rental policies, real estate speculation, and development, thousands of Latina/o families were displaced. Using oral historical and ethnographic methodologies, print media, archival sources, and policy papers, this article traces the gentrification of the Mission District from the perspective of the Latina/o community. It also examines how gentrification was articulated as a positive turn within the larger public discourse on space and access. PMID:19824231

  13. Teaching and Popularization of Astronomy in Latin America by the Liada Perspective. (Spanish Title: Enseñanza y Divulgación de la Astronomía en la América Latina en la Perspectiva de la Liada.) Ensino e Divulgação da Astronomia na América Latina na Perspectiva da Liada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretones, Paulo Sergio

    2008-12-01

    The goal of this work is to present an analysis of the developed activities of the Teaching and Popularization Section (SEDA) of the Liga Ibero-Americana de Astronomía (LIADA). After a history of the LIADA, are presented the projects of the section that have the support of 16 coordinators from most Latin-American countries. The projects that aim to attract the attention of the general public, teachers and students to encourage the observation and send reports to be posted at the Internet page are presented. More specifically, the projects and reports related with eclipses ocurriesd since the year 2000. Using the available files on the page of the section, an analysis and discussion about their importance for scientific education is done. It is presented a data form as a suggestion for reports buy individuais or institutions and the importance of the systematization of experiences to give more visibility and changes of informations in the area. It is concluded with an assessment of the projects, their potential and limitations, as well as suggestions of future projects looking for more interaction between the Latin American countries and making the Section available to this goal.

    Esto trabajo visa divulgar y analizar las actividades de La Sección de Enseñanza y Divulgación de la Astronomía (SEDA) de la Liga Iberoamericana de Astronomía (LIADA). Después de un histórico da la LIADA, son presentados los diversos proyectos de la Sección que cuenta con la colaboración de los coordinadores locales en la mayoría de los países de la América Latina. Son presentados los proyectos que visan chamar la atención de público en general, estudiantes y profesores para la observación del cielo e posterior envío de los relatos para colocación en la página de La Sección en la Internet. Más específicamente son analizados los proyectos y relatos relacionados con los eclipses ocurridos desde el año 2000. Utilizando-se los ficheros

  14. STEMujeres: A case study of the life stories of first-generation Latina engineers and scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vielma, Karina I.

    Research points to the many obstacles that first-generation, Latina students face when attempting to enter fields in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, STEM. This qualitative, case study examined the personal and educational experiences of first-generation Latina women who successfully navigated the STEM educational pipeline earning bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees in various fields of engineering. Three research questions guided the study: (1) How does a first-generation Latina engineer and scientist describe her life experiences as she became interested in STEM? (2) How does she describe her educational experiences as she navigated the educational pipeline in the physics, mathematics, and/or engineering field(s)? (3) How did she respond to challenges, obstacles and microaggressions, if any, while navigating the STEM educational pipeline? The study was designed using a combination of Critical Race Theory frameworks---Chicana feminist theory and racial microaggressions. Through a life history case study approach, the women shared their stories of success. With the participants' help, influential persons in their educational paths were identified and interviewed. Data were analyzed using crystallization and thematic results indicated that all women in this study identified their parents as planting the seed of interest through the introduction of mathematics. The women unknowingly prepared to enter the STEM fields by taking math and science coursework. They were guided to apply to STEM universities and academic programs by others who knew about their interest in math and science including teachers, counselors, and level-up peers---students close in age who were just a step more advanced in the educational pipeline. The women also drew from previous familial struggles to guide their perseverance and motivation toward educational degree completion. The lives of the women where complex and intersected with various forms of racism including

  15. Contextualizing diversity and culture within cancer control interventions for Latinas: changing interventions, not cultures.

    PubMed

    Erwin, Deborah O; Treviño, Michelle; Saad-Harfouche, Frances G; Rodriguez, Elisa M; Gage, Elizabeth; Jandorf, Lina

    2010-08-01

    While there is a growing interest in the development of cancer control intervention initiatives, there continues to be a need to understand how the nuances of different Latino cultures translate to opportunities and barriers for access to cancer screening and care. The diversity by country of origin for Latinas in the United States is often overlooked in cancer control initiatives, and the application of qualitative research can expose processes of inequity and cultural variation to improve these initiatives. This paper presents an interpretation of diverse Latina immigrants' perceptions, experiences and knowledge about breast and cervical cancer screening and demonstrates the use of the PEN-3 model to analyze these data to develop an effective outreach intervention. We conducted 13 focus groups consisting of a total of 112 Latinas in New York City (nine groups) and rural and urban sites in Arkansas (four groups) in 2003 through 2004. Through nonprobability theoretical sampling, we included women from Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic and Mexico in New York and recent Mexican immigrants in Arkansas. Findings demonstrated that country of origin and current geographic residency in the U.S. were significant determinants of women's perspectives on community-based religious organizations, knowledge of anatomy, experiences with the medical system, and access to services which are essential factors to consider in developing effective cancer control interventions. Although breast and cervical cancer are considered women's health issues, they cannot be addressed outside the sociopolitical structures of local communities, especially for the most recent immigrant women. Applying the PEN-3 framework to these data demonstrated a valuable method to interpret and transform qualitative data into intervention content and structure that responds to characteristics and perspectives within diverse Latino communities, such as gender relations, religious affiliations and experiences.

  16. Are Health-care Relationships Important for Mammography Adherence in Latinas?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Judy; Yi, Bin; Harrison, Toni Michelle; Feng, Shibao; Huerta, Elmer E.; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S.

    2008-01-01

    Background Latinas are the fastest growing racial ethnic group in the United States and have an incidence of breast cancer that is rising three times faster than that of non-Latino white women, yet their mammography use is lower than that of non-Latino women. Objectives We explored factors that predict satisfaction with health-care relationships and examined the effect of satisfaction with health-care relationships on mammography adherence in Latinas. Design and Setting We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 166 Latinas who were ≥40 years old. Women were recruited from Latino-serving clinics and a Latino health radio program. Measurements Mammography adherence was based on self-reported receipt of a mammogram within the past 2 years. The main independent variable was overall satisfaction with one’s health-care relationship. Other variables included: self report of patient-provider communication, level of trust in providers, primary language, country of origin, discrimination experiences, and perceptions of racism. Results Forty-three percent of women reported very high satisfaction in their health-care relationships. Women with high trust in providers and those who did not experience discrimination were more satisfied with their health-care relationships compared to women with lower trust and who experienced discrimination (p < .01). Satisfaction with the health-care relationship was, in turn, significantly associated with mammography adherence (OR: 3.34, 95% CI: 1.47–7.58), controlling for other factors. Conclusions Understanding the factors that impact Latinas’ mammography adherence may inform intervention strategies. Efforts to improve Latina’s satisfaction with physicians by building trust may lead to increased use of necessary mammography. PMID:18839258

  17. An exploratory study of nonsuicidal self-injury and suicidal behaviors in adolescent Latinas.

    PubMed

    Gulbas, Lauren E; Hausmann-Stabile, Carolina; De Luca, Susan M; Tyler, Tee R; Zayas, Luis H

    2015-07-01

    To date, there is little research to validate empirically differences between nonsuicidal self-injurious behavior (NSSI) and attempted suicide among Latina adolescents. Understanding the characteristics and contextual features of self-harmful behaviors among Latina teens is a critical public health and social justice matter given the disproportionate rates of attempted suicide and anticipated population growth of this vulnerable group. In this article, we draw on an ecodevelopmental model to focus attention on factors in the sociocultural environment that shape suicidal behaviors and NSSIs. Through analysis of qualitative interviews conducted with girls who used NSSI (n = 18), attempted suicide (n = 29), used NSSI and attempted suicide (n = 8,) and had no reported lifetime history of self-harm (n = 28), we describe the sociocultural factors that shaped psychosocial vulnerabilities and gave rise to decisions to use NSSI or attempt suicide. Our analysis revealed that adolescents who engaged in NSSI perceived their negative feelings as something that could be controlled through self-injurious acts, whereas powerlessness was a theme underlying the emotional states of girls who attempted suicide. When NSSI ceased to function as a mechanism for control, girls came to sudden decisions to attempt suicide. Most teens identified specific, and often multiple, situations that induced intense affective states and shaped decisions to inflict self-harm. Two situational experiences emerged as particularly salient and promising for subsequent studies on self-harmful behaviors among Latina adolescents: transnational stress and bullying. We describe each of these and offer suggestions for future research and practice. PMID:26052816

  18. Food Insecurity is Related to Increased Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Among Latinas

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Nurgül; Hromi-Fiedler, Amber; Segura-Pérez, Sofia; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the independent association of food insecurity with type 2 diabetes (T2D), and to identify the T2D risk factors related to food insecurity among Latinas. Methods Case-control study in a convenience sample of 201 Latinas (100 cases with T2D, 101 controls) aged 35–60 years and living in an urban setting. Self-reported data, including food insecurity, T2D status, depression symptoms, and socioeconomic, demographic, and lifestyle characteristics (food and alcohol intake, cigarette smoking, physical activity) were collected, and height, weight and waist circumference were measured. Separate multivariate logistic regression models were specified for T2D and food insecurity. Results Participants with very low food security were 3.3 times more likely to have T2D (OR 3.33, 95% CI 1.34-8.23) independently of employment status, acculturation, waist circumference, and lifestyle characteristics. High waist circumference (>88cm) (OR 2.46, 95% CI 1.13-5.38) and being in the lowest quartile of physical activity level (OR 3.75, 95% CI 1.21-11.62) were also risk factors for T2D. Elevated depression symptoms and participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) were positively related to low and very low food security after adjusting for waist circumference (P<.01); cigarette smoking was positively associated with very low food security, and nutrition knowledge was negatively related to low food security (P<.01). Conclusions These results highlight the need for interventions focusing on prevention of depression and food insecurity among Latinas with T2D. PMID:21942166

  19. Breastfeeding offers protection against obesity in children of recently immigrated Latina women.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, Sofia G; Heyman, Melvin B; Wojcicki, Janet M

    2014-06-01

    Breastfeeding has been found to have a protective effect on subsequent development of obesity in childhood, particularly in white, non-Hispanic populations. The protective effect of nursing for more than 12 months in children of Latina women is less clear, which may be due to differences in levels of acculturation in previously studied populations. We evaluated the association between breastfeeding for 12 months or more and risk for obesity in a cohort of children of recently immigrated relatively unacculturated Latina mothers. Maternal characteristics at birth, including length of stay in the United States, breastfeeding habits at 4-6 weeks of age, 6 months, and 1 year, and anthropometric measurements were obtained for a cohort of 196 children participating in a prospective study. At 1 year of age 39.0% of infants were being breastfed. Being breastfed at 1 year of age was associated with a decreased risk of obesity in both univariate (odds ratio (OR) 0.49, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.21-0.83) and multivariate models (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.02-0.93) adjusting for maternal BMI, marital status, education level, country of origin, age, years of living in the United States, and child's birth weight at 3 years of age, regardless of mother's acculturation status using length of stay in the United States as a proxy for acculturation. The association with breastfeeding persisted at 4 years of age as a protective factor for obesity (OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.11-0.80). Breastfeeding for longer than 12 months provides a significant protective effect on the development of obesity in early childhood in a cohort of children of high-risk recently immigrated Latina women in San Francisco who were relatively unacculturated to the United States. PMID:24249439

  20. Madres para la Salud: Design of a Theory-based Intervention for Postpartum Latinas

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Colleen; Records, Kathie; Ainsworth, Barbara; Belyea, Michael; Permana, Paska; Coonrod, Dean; Vega-López, Sonia; Nagle-Williams, Allison

    2011-01-01

    Background Weight gain in young women suggests that childbearing may be an important contributor to the development of obesity in women. Depressive symptoms can interfere with resumption of normal activity levels following childbirth or with the initiation of or adherence to physical activity programs essential for losing pregnancy weight. Depression symptoms may function directly to promote weight gain through a physiologic mechanism. Obesity and its related insulin resistance may contribute to depressed mood physiologically. Although physical activity has well-established beneficial effects on weight management and depression, women tend to under participate in physical activity during childbearing years. Further, the mechanisms underpinning the interplay of overweight, obesity, physical activity, depression, and inflammatory processes are not clearly explained. Objectives This report describes the theoretical rationale, design considerations, and cultural relevance for “Madres para la Salud” [Mothers for Health]. Design and Methods Madres para la Salud is a 12 month prospective, randomized controlled trial exploring the effectiveness of a culturally specific intervention using “bouts” of physical activity to effect changes in body fat, systemic and fat tissue inflammation, and postpartum depression symptoms in sedentary postpartum Latinas. Summary The significance and innovation of Madres para la Salud includes use of a theory-driven approach to intervention, specification and cultural relevance of a social support intervention, use of a Promotora model to incorporate cultural approaches, use of objective measures of physical activity in post partum Latinas women, and the examination of biomarkers indicative of cardiovascular risk related to physical activity behaviors in postpartum Latinas. PMID:21238614

  1. An Exploratory Study of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and Suicidal Behaviors in Adolescent Latinas

    PubMed Central

    Gulbas, Lauren E.; Hausmann-Stabile, Carolina; De Luca, Susan M.; Tyler, Tee R.; Zayas, Luis H.

    2015-01-01

    To date, there is little research to validate empirically differences between non-suicidal self-injurious behavior (NSSI) and attempted suicide among Latina adolescents. Understanding the characteristics and contextual features of self-harmful behaviors among Latina teens is a critical public health and social justice matter given the disproportionate rates of attempted suicide and anticipated population growth of this vulnerable group. In this article, we draw on an ecodevelopmental model to focus attention on factors in the sociocultural environment that shape suicidal and non-suicidal self-injurious behaviors. Through analysis of qualitative interviews conducted with girls who used NSSI (n = 18), attempted suicide (n = 29), used NSSI and attempted suicide (n = 8,) and had no reported lifetime history of self-harm (n = 28), we describe the sociocultural factors that shaped psychosocial vulnerabilities and gave rise to decisions to use NSSI or attempt suicide. Our analysis revealed that adolescents who engaged in NSSI perceived their negative feelings as something that could be controlled through self-injurious acts, whereas powerlessness was a theme underlying the emotional states of girls who attempted suicide. When NSSI ceased to function as a mechanism for control, girls came to sudden decisions to attempt suicide. Most teens identified specific, and often multiple, situations that induced these intense affective states and shaped decisions to inflict self-harm. Two situational experiences emerged as particularly salient and promising for subsequent studies on self-harmful behaviors among Latina adolescents: transnational stress and bullying. We describe each of these and offer suggestions for future research and practice. PMID:26052816

  2. Feasibility of enlisting social network members to promote weight loss among Latinas.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Becky; Wing, Rena R

    2013-05-01

    Shaping network members into sources of support for healthy eating and exercise behaviors may be an effective strategy to enhance obesity treatment outcomes. This pilot study examined the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a behavioral weight loss intervention adapted for Latinas with a social network component. Twenty-seven Latinas (43.0±10.2 years and body mass index 36.9±5.7) participated in a 24-week randomized controlled intervention study. Participants attended group-based treatment either individually (Individual Lifestyle Group [ILG]) or with a weight loss partner selected from their existing network (Partner Lifestyle Group [PLG]). Repeated measures analysis of variance was conducted to compare ILG and PLG participants on changes in weight or psychosocial variables. Participants in both intervention groups attended 70% of treatment sessions; 96% and 100% completed assessment at post-treatment (12 weeks) and follow-up (24 weeks), respectively. Significant weight loss (P<0.01) was achieved at post-treatment (ILG -4.7±4.2 kg and PLG -4.3±4.4 kg) and follow-up (ILG -5.0±6.4 kg and PLG -4.7±5.0 kg), with nearly 50% of participants losing at least 5% of initial body weight. Both groups also experienced increased self-efficacy for weight loss (P<0.01), self-efficacy for exercise (P=0.02), and family social support for exercise habits (P=0.01). There were no significant differences between groups. Results from this study suggest a behavioral weight loss intervention for Latinas is feasible, but there is less support for the efficacy of weight loss partners.

  3. The Influence of Trauma History and Relationship Power on Latinas' Sexual Risk for HIV/STIs.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Mary E; Gamble, Heather L; Buscemi, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    A community sample of Latinas completed surveys that included measures of sexual abuse and intimate partner violence history, relationship power, negotiating power regarding condom use, perceived HIV/STI risk of sexual partner, and sexual behavior. Over half of the women reported a history of intimate partner violence in the past year and/or sexual abuse in their lifetime. Intimate partner violence was correlated with lower overall sexual relationship power scores, while sexual abuse was correlated with lower condom use negotiating power. More extensive intimate partner violence had the strongest association with higher HIV/STI risk, controlling for relationship status, sexual abuse, and relationship power.

  4. Correlates of Depressive Symptoms After Birth for Latinas Who Are Overweight or Obese

    PubMed Central

    Records, Kathie; Keller, Colleen; Coonrod, Dean; Ainsworth, Barbara; Todd, Michael; Belyea, Michael; Nagle-Williams, Allison; Permana, Paska; Vega Lopez, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Depression symptoms and overweight/obesity are common concerns during childbearing. Both conditions are associated with poor outcomes at birth and can have long-lasting consequences. Predictors of depressive symptoms among overweight and obese low-income and ethnically diverse women are not known. Data are from the Madres para la Salud trial with 139 postpartum Latinas. Depressive symptoms during a prior pregnancy were positively related while social support and moderate intensity physical activity were negatively related to depressive symptoms after birth. Social support and physical activity may be effective interventions, particularly for women who have experienced depressive symptoms in a prior pregnancy. PMID:25383619

  5. Determinants of Implementation Effectiveness in a Physical Activity Program for Church-Going Latinas.

    PubMed

    Beard, Megan; Chuang, Emmeline; Haughton, Jessica; Arredondo, Elva M

    2016-01-01

    Faith-based interventions show promise for reducing health disparities among ethnic minority populations. However, churches vary significantly in their readiness and willingness to support these programs. Semistructured interviews were conducted with priests, other church leaders, and lay health advisors in churches implementing a physical activity intervention targeting Latinas. Implementation effectiveness was operationalized as average 6-month participation rates in physical activity classes at each church. Factors facilitating implementation include church leader support and strength of parishioners' connection to the church. Accounting for these church-level factors may be critical in determining church readiness to participate in health promotion activities. PMID:27536927

  6. Poor HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge among Utah Latinas overdue for recommended cancer screenings.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Brynn; Bodson, Julia; Warner, Echo L; Dyer, Jane; Kepka, Deanna

    2016-08-01

    Individuals overdue for recommended cancer screenings may not be receiving adequate cancer prevention education. Since Latinas have the highest incidence of cervical cancer among all racial/ethnic groups, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination education is especially important for this population. The correlates of HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge were assessed among Latinas who were overdue for recommended cancer screenings. N = 206 Latinas who were overdue for recommended cancer screenings were recruited by health educators from local community groups. Bivariate analyses and multivariable regression models were used to investigate factors associated with HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge among participants as well as to assess correlates of HPV vaccine receipt for eligible children of participants. In multivariable regression analyses, years living in the U.S. (p = 0.05) and health insurance status (p = 0.03) were significantly related to HPV vaccine-related knowledge measures. Age (p < 0.01), birthplace (p = 0.02), years living in the U.S. (p = 0.05), annual household income (p = 0.05), cervical cancer screening status (p = 0.03), and HPV vaccine-related knowledge measures (p < 0.01) were significantly associated with HPV vaccination outcomes for eligible daughters of participants. Cervical cancer screening status (p = 0.02) and HPV vaccine-related knowledge measures (p = 0.01) were significantly associated with HPV vaccination outcomes for eligible sons of participants. Results indicate poor HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge among Latinas. Interventions to improve HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge in Utah's growing Latino population should target vulnerable individuals (e.g., not employed outside the home, less educated, less acculturated, poor, uninsured, overdue for cervical cancer screening) by using materials that are culturally sensitive, linguistically appropriate, and easily accessible. PMID

  7. Religious influences on the reproductive health decisions of HIV-positive Latinas on the border.

    PubMed

    Instone, Susan; Mueller, Mary-Rose

    2011-12-01

    The number of HIV-positive Latinas of child-bearing age living on the US-Mexico border is a growing concern. Little is known about how religious beliefs influence the reproductive health decisions of these women in light of disease demands and cultural and religious norms that support high fertility rates and childbearing. Such decisions may be further complicated by the stigma of HIV/AIDS and structural issues related to immigration status and trans-border lives. This paper analyzes extant literature and supports the need for further research so that policy makers and heath and social service providers can develop meaningful and comprehensive reproductive-health related interventions.

  8. Achieving a college education: The psychological experiences of Latina/o community college students

    PubMed Central

    Zell., Maristela C.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the psychological and subjective experiences of Latina/o community college students. The impact of these experiences on their persistence toward achieving their education goals is also examined. Qualitative interviews with 15 community college students yielded eight themes: Overcoming personal and social challenges, maturation, self-discovery and college adjustment, self-efficacy, continuously strategizing, sense of purpose, perception of faculty, perception of advisors, and guided and groomed by family to succeed. Implications for practice and recommendations for community colleges are discussed. PMID:21544236

  9. Breast health beliefs, behaviors, and barriers among latina permanent resident and migratory farm workers.

    PubMed

    Schlehofer, Michèle M; Brown-Reid, Tina P

    2015-01-01

    There is a dearth of research on the breast health behaviors of migratory farm workers. This research used focus group methodology to compare the breast cancer beliefs and barriers of Latina women working as migratory farmers (n = 33) and permanent residents (n = 31). In comparison to their permanent resident counterparts, migrant farmers had low knowledge about the causes of breast cancer, and experienced significant barriers to care. Many barriers were cultural-specific, including culturally-based gender roles. These findings have significant implications for designing culturally-relevant interventions to improve access to care among this population. PMID:25970102

  10. Pressure stabilized Se-Se dimer formation in PbSe 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremholm, M.; Hor, Y. S.; Cava, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    The preparation of PbSe 2 through the reaction of PbSe with excess Se at 4.5 GPa and 650 °C is reported. The crystal structure, determined from X-ray powder diffraction data (CuAl 2 structure type, I4/mcm (#140), a = 6.42695(11) Å, c = 7.70254(13) Å, Z = 4), consists of layers of [Se 2] 2- dimers with Pb 2+ in square antiprismatic coordination with Se. This is a rare crystal structure for divalent metal chalcogenides, previously only identified for SrS 2 and BaTe 2. Undoped PbSe 2 as well as Bi 3+- and Ag +-doped samples (10% Pb substitution) show semi-metallic resistivity down to 0.4 K. Magnetic susceptibility measurement of PbSe 2 shows no magnetic ordering above 1.8 K. The Seebeck coefficients show nearly linear behavior from 35 to 400 K and the largest numerical values are found in the case of undoped PbSe 2, + 99 μVK -1, and Bi 3+-doped PbSe 2, - 146 μVK -1, at the highest temperature measured, 400 K.

  11. "A pesar de todo" (Despite Everything): The Persistence of Latina Graduate Engineering Students at a Hispanic-Serving Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguirre-Covarrubias, Sandra; Arellano, Eduardo; Espinoza, Penelope

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses a mixed-methods study of personal and programmatic factors that affected persistence of Latina graduate engineering students at a Hispanic-serving institution (HSI). The study's findings enabled us to share recommendations that may be useful to HSIs and other colleges and universities.

  12. Pregnant Latina Teenagers: Psychosocial and Developmental Determinants of How they Select and Perceive the Men Who Father their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodyear, Rodney K.; Newcomb, Micheal D.; Locke, Thomas F.

    2002-01-01

    Data from a community sample of 493 pregnant Latina teenagers were used to test a mediated model of mate selection with 5 classes of variables: (a) male partner characteristics (antisocial behaviors, negative relationships with women, harm risk, and relationship length), (b) young women's psychosocial variables (antisocial behaviors, drug use,…

  13. Sowing the "Semillas" of Critical Multicultural Citizenship for Latina/o Undocumented Youth: Spaces in School and out of School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salazar, Maria del Carmen; Martinez, Lisa M.; Ortega, Debora

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to address how spaces in school and out of school support or constrain undocumented Latina/o youths' development as critical multicultural citizens. We draw on data from a multi-phase, qualitative study to present findings indicating that the youths persevered through academic and civic engagement. Ultimately, the…

  14. Writing Latina/o Historical Narratives: Narratives at the Intersection of Critical Historical Inquiry and LatCrit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinas, Cinthia S.; Fránquiz, María E.; Rodríguez, Noreen Naseem

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative case study examines the experiences of Latina prospective teachers enrolled in a bilingual social studies methods course that focused attention upon critical historical inquiry. The students built historical narratives that deliberately addressed oft-ignored histories of Communities of Color. The analysis argues however that…

  15. Influence of Social Context on Eating, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behaviors of Latina Mothers and their Preschool-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Ana C.; Sussner, Katarina M.; Greaney, Mary L.; Peterson, Karen E.

    2009-01-01

    As more U.S. children grow up in Latino families, understanding how social class, culture, and environment influence feeding practices is key to preventing obesity. The authors conducted six focus groups and 20 in-depth interviews among immigrant, low-income Latina mothers in the Northeast United States and classified 17 emergent themes from…

  16. Stories to Our Children: A Program Aimed at Developing Authentic and Culturally Relevant Literature for Latina/o Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosado, Luis; Amaro-Jiménez, Carla; Kieffer, Ivonne

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a unique program co-sponsored by a local public library, a university teacher preparation program, and a school district, created to support Latina/o parents as they produced authentic and culturally relevant literature representing multiple ethnic groups living in the Southwestern United States. A program like the one…

  17. Outcome Results from "Yo Veo": A Visual Intervention for Teachers Working with Immigrant Latino/Latina Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Mimi V.; Hall, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study reports results from the outcome evaluation of "Yo Veo," a visual intervention with schoolteachers, which structures conversations about challenges that teachers face teaching Latino/Latina immigrant students. Method: The intervention was delivered to teachers at two middle schools in the southeastern United States,…

  18. A Qualitative Study of Acculturation and Diabetes Risk among Urban, Immigrant Latinas: Implications for Diabetes Prevention Efforts

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Matthew J.; Shuman, Sara J.; Barrios, Dulce M.; Alos, Victor A.; Whitaker, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand how acculturation influences diabetes risk among urban, immigrant Latinas (Hispanic women). Methods Five focus groups were conducted with 26 urban, immigrant Latinas who were at high clinical risk for developing diabetes. The focus group sessions were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The authors independently analyzed transcripts using an inductive method of open coding, and themes were established by consensus among authors. Results All of the participants were foreign-born and had low levels of acculturation. During the acculturation process, they noted changes in their lifestyle behaviors and the family context in which those behaviors are shaped. They reported that since living in the U.S., their improved economic circumstances led to increased consumption of less healthy foods and beverages and a more sedentary lifestyle. They also described changing family roles and responsibilities, including working outside the home, which constrained healthy food choices. However, they perceived that their position of influence within the family offered opportunities to help family members prevent diabetes. Conclusions Lifestyle interventions to prevent diabetes in Latinas should address their acculturation experiences, which impact family functioning and health behaviors related to diabetes risk. For example, given the perceived link between Latinas’ improved economic circumstances and their diabetes risk, prevention programs should incorporate strategies to help Latinas avoid adopting less healthy lifestyle behaviors that become affordable during the acculturation process. PMID:24872386

  19. The Feasibility, Acceptability, and Preliminary Effectiveness of a Promotora-Led Diabetes Prevention Program (PL-DPP) in Latinas

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Matthew J.; Perez, Alberly; Alos, Victor A.; Whitaker, Robert C.; Ciolino, Jody D.; Mohr, David C.; Ackermann, Ronald T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this pilot study is to test the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effectiveness of a Promotora-Led Diabetes Prevention Program (PL-DPP) in Hispanic women (Latinas). Methods Twenty Latina adults with prediabetes were enrolled in this single-arm pilot trial of PL-DPP. Participants underwent a year-long lifestyle intervention consisting of 24 sessions divided into 14 weekly core sessions and 10 post-core sessions offered either biweekly or monthly. Each session was led by a promotora in Spanish. The primary outcome was weight change over the 12-month study period. Results The study participants were socioeconomically challenged, middle-aged Latinas with limited access to health care. Eighteen participants (90%) completed at least 12 sessions, and 1 was lost to follow-up. Overall, participants reported high levels of satisfaction with PL-DPP. At 12 months, the participants achieved a mean weight loss of 10.8 pounds, which corresponded to 5.6% of initial body weight. Significant pre-post reductions in waist circumference, diastolic blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, and insulin levels were also observed. Modest reductions in A1C and fasting plasma glucose were not significant. Conclusions The PL-DPP demonstrated feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effectiveness in a high-risk population of Latinas. Future research examining this intervention in a randomized clinical trial should explore factors impacting its effects using both qualitative and quantitative methods. PMID:26023095

  20. The New Juan Crow in Education: Revealing Panoptic Measures and Inequitable Resources That Hinder Latina/o Postsecondary Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madrigal-Garcia, Yanira I.; Acevedo-Gil, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the distribution of inequitable resources, a culture of control, and implications for postsecondary pathways for Latinas/os in five California high schools. This study integrated critical race theory in education, school culture, and the concept of "panopticon" to examine school structures, climate, and…

  1. "I Don't Belong Here": Chicanas/Latinas at a Hispanic Serving Institution Creating Community through "Muxerista" Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ek, Lucila D.; Quijada Cerecer, Patricia D.; Alanis, Iliana; Rodriguez, Mariela A.

    2010-01-01

    In order to create more diverse communities and greater social justice in academia, a group of Chicana/Latina junior faculty at a Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) established a research collaborative, Research for the Educational Advancement of Latin@s (REAL). Using a co-operative inquiry and dialogical epistemology, we document how REAL is an…

  2. Empowering the Self, Creating Worlds: Lesbian and Gay Latina/o College Students' Identity Negotiation in Figured Worlds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pena-Talamantes, Abraham E.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing from Holland, Lachicotte, Skinner, and Cain's (1998) identity theory, this study sought to understand how six self-identified lesbian and gay Latina/o college students negotiated their sexual and ethnic identities. Participants identified two equally flawed dimensions, the hometown and college figured worlds, from which they sought an…

  3. BRCA genetic counseling among at-risk Latinas in New York City: new beliefs shape new generation.

    PubMed

    Sussner, Katarina M; Edwards, Tiffany; Villagra, Cristina; Rodriguez, M Carina; Thompson, Hayley S; Jandorf, Lina; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis B

    2015-02-01

    Despite the life-saving information that genetic counseling can provide for women at hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer (HBOC) risk, Latinas disproportionately underuse such services. Understanding Latinas' beliefs and attitudes about BRCA genetic counseling may be the key to better health promotion within this underserved, at-risk group. We conducted 12 focus groups (N = 54) with at-risk Latina women in New York City, followed by 30 in-depth interviews among a subset of the focus group women. Both were professionally transcribed, translated where applicable and data analysis was completed by two coders trained in qualitative methods. Results revealed personal and community knowledge about BRCA genetic counseling was relatively low, although women felt largely positive about counseling. The main motivator to undergo genetic counseling was concerns about learning family members' cancer status, while the main barrier was competing demands. Generational differences were apparent, with younger women (approximately <55 years) reporting that they were more interested in educating themselves about counseling and other ways to prevent cancer. Younger women were also less likely to ascribe to traditionally Latino-centered cultural beliefs which could serve as barriers (e.g. machismo, fatalismo, destino) to undergoing genetic counseling. Participants were largely enthusiastic about educational efforts to increase awareness of genetic counseling among Latinos. Revealing the beliefs and attitudes of underserved Latinas may help shape culturally appropriate educational materials and promotion programs to increase BRCA genetic counseling uptake within this underrepresented community.

  4. A Curriculum of the Borderlands: High School Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies as "Sitios y Lengua"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de los Rios, Cati V.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing from a nine-month critical teacher inquiry investigation, this article examines the experiences of eleventh and twelfth grade students who participated in a year-long Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies course in California shortly after the passing of Arizona House Bill 2281 (HB 2281). Through a borderlands analysis, I explore how these students…

  5. A Social Justice Approach to Achievement: Guiding Latina/o Students toward Educational Attainment with a Challenging, Socially Relevant Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cammarota, Julio

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how an experimental social science curriculum has influenced Latina/o students' perspectives of their potential to graduate high school and attend college. The curriculum, which is called the Social Justice Education Project (SJEP), requires students to adopt a serious academic subjectivity to analyze and address social…

  6. Experiences of Latina First Generation College Students: Exploring Resources Supporting the Balancing of Academic Pursuits and Family Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corona-Ordonez, Hercilia B.

    2013-01-01

    This study used a qualitative interview approach and thematic analysis (Braune and Clark, 2006) to interview first generation college student Latinas, exploring their experiences with higher education, their navigation/negotiation of resources for academic success and for wellness of self and family, and barriers they face as they attempt to both…

  7. Latina First Year Experience: Factors that Contribute to Persistence from the First to the Second Year in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corona, Guadalupe Rodriguez

    2010-01-01

    There is limited research that identifies the university, familial and community factors that support the persistence of Latinas in higher education from the first to second year. The research that does exist has tended to focus on how institutional programs and activities have failed to work for first-generation students. Therefore, there is a…

  8. Taking off the Color-Blind Glasses: Recognizing and Supporting Latina/o Students in a Predominantly White School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Sherry; Larson, Larry L.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports findings of a collaborative research project examining and seeking to improve the schooling experiences of a small but growing population of Latina/o students in a small-town secondary school over a 4-year period. The school was studied through ethnographic methods and surveys in 2005 and 2008. Initial findings were shared…

  9. Latina/o or Mexicana/o?: The Relationship between Socially Assigned Race and Experiences with Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Edward D.; Winston, Nadia C.; Garcia, John A.; Sanchez, Gabriel R.

    2016-01-01

    Discrimination based on one’s racial or ethnic background is one of the oldest and most perverse practices in the United States. While much of this research has relied on self-reported racial categories, a growing body of research is attempting to measure race through socially-assigned race. Socially-assigned or ascribed race measures how individuals feel they are classified by other people. This paper draws on the socially assigned race literature and explores the impact of socially assigned race on experiences with discrimination using a 2011 nationally representative sample of Latina/os (n=1,200). While much of the current research on Latina/os has been focused on the aggregation across national origin group members, this paper marks a deviation by using socially-assigned race and national origin to understand how being ascribed as Mexican is associated with experiences of discrimination. We find evidence that being ascribed as Mexican increases the likelihood of experiencing discrimination relative to being ascribed as White or Latina/o. Furthermore, we find that being miss-classified as Mexican (ascribed as Mexican, but not of Mexican origin) is associated with a higher likelihood of experiencing discrimination compared to being ascribed as white, ascribed as Latina/o, and correctly ascribed as Mexican. We provide evidence that socially assigned race is a valuable complement to self-identified race/ethnicity for scholars interested in assessing the impact of race/ethnicity on a wide range of outcomes.

  10. Sacrificing a Latina/o Presence in the Professoriate: An Analysis of Affirmative Action as Racial Remedy and Silent Covenant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espino, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the extent to which affirmative action policies and practices as remedies for racial injustice in higher education reflect a silent covenant that sacrifices the cultivation and presence of Latina/o faculty. Drawing upon the lived experiences of 22 Mexican American faculty and post-doctoral fellows, the author argues that,…

  11. The Digital Literacy Practices of Latina/o Immigrant Parents in an After-School Technology Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machado-Casas, Margarita; Sánchez, Patricia; Ek, Lucila D.

    2014-01-01

    Drawing from a larger qualitative four-year study of an after-school technology partnership called "La Clase Mágica" at the University of Texas at San Antonio (LCM@UTSA), the authors focus on how digital literacies mediate the literacy learning of Latina/o bilingual immigrant parents. They also discuss how the elementary school and…

  12. Urban Latina/o Undergraduate Students' Negotiations of Identities and Participation in an Emerging Scholars Calculus I Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppland-Cordell, Sarah B.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a qualitative multiple case study that explored how two urban Latina/o undergraduate students' emerging mathematical and racial identity constructions influenced their participation in a culturally diverse, Emerging Scholars Program, Calculus I workshop at a predominately White urban university. Drawing on…

  13. Positive Psychology and Familial Factors as Predictors of Latina/o Students' Hope and College Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavazos Vela, Javier; Lerma, Eunice; Lenz, A. Stephen; Hinojosa, Karina; Hernandez-Duque, Omar; Gonzalez, Stacey L.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the contributions of positive psychology and familial factors as predictors of hope and academic performance among 166 Latina/o college students enrolled at a Hispanic Serving Institution of Higher Education. The results indicated that presence of meaning in life, search for meaning in life, daily spiritual experiences, and…

  14. Implementing an Additive, College Access and Readiness Program for Latina/o High School Students in the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaro-Jimenez, Carla; Hungerford-Kresser, Holly

    2013-01-01

    In this article we draw on the experiences of a diverse group of 34 first-generation college students, collected over a year, who served as peer mentors to minority and Latina/o high school students enrolled in four Title I (low-income) high schools in the Southwest U.S. The article identifies the successes and challenges of implementing an…

  15. Undergraduate Latina/o Students: A Systematic Review of Research Identifying Factors Contributing to Academic Success Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisp, Gloria; Taggart, Amanda; Nora, Amaury

    2015-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to produce an up-to-date and comprehensive summary of qualitative and quantitative evidence specific to the factors related to undergraduate Latina/o student academic success outcomes during college. The purpose of the study was to make sense of and provide critique to this rapidly growing body of research, as…

  16. Organizing High Schools for Latina/o Youth Success: Boundary Crossing to Access and Build Community Wealth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achinstein, Betty; Curry, Marnie W.; Ogawa, Rodney T.; Athanases, Steven Z.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a 2-year critical case study of an urban high school innovating to enhance the academic performance of low-income Latina/o students, highlighting high-leverage practices that promote boundary crossing between school and community. First, we highlight foundational elements of school logic, mission, and community ethos that…

  17. Healthy Start Programa Madrina: A Promotora Home Visiting Outreach and Education Program to Improve Perinatal Health among Latina Pregnant Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bill, Debra E.; Hock-Long, Linda; Mesure, Maryann; Bryer, Pamela; Zambrano, Neydary

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of Healthy Start Programa Madrina (HSPM), a home visiting promotora outreach and education program for Latina pregnant women and to present the 10-year findings of the program (1996-2005). Perinatal health disparities continue to persist among low-income…

  18. AESA 2012 Presidential Address "What My Community Means to Me": Reimagining Civic Praxis with Latina/Chicana Feminisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villenas, Sofia A.

    2015-01-01

    This article invites imaginings of democracy and education with and through "other" knowledges. It argues for the possibilities of working across difference as articulated in the transnational, border, and decolonial perspectives of Chicana/Latina feminisms. Specifically, it explores Gloria Anzaldúa's notions of…

  19. Adaptation of a Cancer Clinical Trials Education Program for African American and Latina/o Community Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelto, Debra J.; Sadler, Georgia Robins; Njoku, Ogo; Rodriguez, Maria Carina; Villagra, Cristina; Malcarne, Vanessa L.; Riley, Natasha E.; Behar, Alma I.; Jandorf, Lina

    2016-01-01

    The pilot study reported in this article culturally and linguistically adapted an educational intervention to promote cancer clinical trials (CCTs) participation among Latinas/os and African Americans. The single-session slide presentation with embedded videos, originally developed through a campus-community partnership in Southern California, was…

  20. Teaching for Empowerment and Excellence: The Transformative Potential of Teacher Expectations in an Urban Latina/o Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liou, Daniel D.; Rojas, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    The researchers conducted a study to gather information about one Chicano teacher's disposition and perception of high expectations for his Latina/o students and their opportunities to learn. Findings of this paper demonstrate the ways in which institutional memory such as an ethnic studies college education as well as this teacher's…

  1. Investigating Predictors of College-Going Self-Efficacy and Educational Goals for Latina/o High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berbery, Maria Luz

    2013-01-01

    This study examined predictors of college-going self-efficacy and educational goals in a sample of Latina/o high school students (N = 119). Specifically, the study investigated the variance accounted for by school performance, ethnic identity, barriers, and family support in college-going self-efficacy and educational goals. Important findings…

  2. The Effects of English Language Proficiency and Curricular Pathways: Latina/os' Mathematics Achievement in Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosqueda, Eduardo; Maldonado, Saul I.

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes nationally-representative quantitative data from the first (2002) and second (2004) waves of the Educational Longitudinal Study to examine the relationship between Latina/o secondary school students' degree of English-language proficiency (ELP), mathematics course-taking measures, and 12th grade mathematics achievement.…

  3. Identify the Cracks; That's Where the Light Slips In: The Narratives of Latina/o Bilingual Middle-Class Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapayese, Yvette V.

    2016-01-01

    In this qualitative study, I examine the intersections of learner identity, power, and language through the experiences and insights of Latina/o 2nd-generation middle-class children who occupy a unique positionality between the discourses surrounding bilingual education. Through narrative inquiry, emerging bilingual middle-class students actualize…

  4. Countering Deficit Thinking: Agency, Capabilities and the Early Learning Experiences of Children of Latina/o Immigrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colegrove, Kiyomi Sánchez-Suzuki; Adair, Jennifer Keys

    2014-01-01

    This article documents what happened in a first grade classroom when young Latina/o children of immigrants had consistent classroom-based opportunities to use their agency in their learning. Applying theoretical constructs from development economics to data from the Agency and Young Children ethnographic project, we explore three forms of agency…

  5. El Libro de Recuerdos (Book of Memories): A Latina Student's Exploration of Self and Religion in Public School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Cynthia C.

    2009-01-01

    This article is an exploration of how an alternative text reflects the multiple identities of one high school Latina, focusing in particular on her religious identity. In this ethnographic case study, the author addresses three questions: 1) In what ways does literacy activity inside the school, in the form of the science scrapbook, allow for this…

  6. Teaching that Breaks Your Heart: Reflections on the Soul Wounds of a First-Year Latina Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrillo, Juan F.

    2010-01-01

    In this powerful essay, Juan F. Carrillo, a teacher educator in Austin, Texas, reflects on an encounter with a first-year Latina teacher, Christina, who has decided to leave the profession. Despite successfully learning and applying critical pedagogy, Christina finds herself isolated and frustrated, stuck between a societal push for standardized…

  7. How Science Texts and Hands-on Explorations Facilitate Meaning Making: Learning from Latina/o Third Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varelas, Maria; Pieper, Lynne; Arsenault, Amy; Pappas, Christine C.; Keblawe-Shamah, Neveen

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined opportunities for reasoning and meaning making that read-alouds of children's literature science information books and related hands-on explorations offered to young Latina/o students in an urban public school. Using a qualitative, interpretative framework, we analyzed classroom discourse and children's writing…

  8. Understanding the Interconnectedness between Language Choices, Cultural Identity Construction and School Practices in the Life of a Latina Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercuri, Sandra Patricia

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative research looks at the effects that language choices and cultural practices have on identity development in the education of minority students in the United States. It examines the educational journey of Irma, a Latina educator. Through the analysis of interviews with the participant, this paper intends to show the effects of…

  9. Challenging Colorblindness in Arizona: Latina/o Students' Counter-Narratives of Race and Racism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cammarota, Julio

    2014-01-01

    This essay reviews Latina/o students' counter-narratives challenging colorblindness. The author highlights the experiences of students from Tucson Unified School District's Mexican American Studies program. By examining student counter-narratives, the author also identifies race-related terms that are more suitable for dialogue among and…

  10. Latina Mothers' and Daughters' Expectations for Autonomy at Age 15 (La Quinceañera)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romo, Laura F.; Mireles-Rios, Rebeca; Lopez-Tello, Gisselle

    2014-01-01

    American children gain more autonomy as they progress through adolescence, however, autonomy-granting for Latina adolescent girls from immigrant families is a relatively unexplored question. In this study, we identified behaviors that Mexican mothers and their daughters deemed to be appropriate when they reach the age of "La…

  11. A Qualitative Study about Cervical Cancer Screening among Latinas Living in a Rural Area of California: Lessons for Health Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinzon-Perez, Helda; Perez, Miguel; Torres, Victor; Krenz, Vickie

    2005-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major health concern for Latinas, who are also less likely to undergo a Pap smear exam than the general population. This study identifies alterable determinants of Pap smear screening for Latino women living in a rural area of California. It involved the design and pilot testing of a culturally appropriate instrument and the…

  12. Prevalence and Correlates of Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Among a Midwest Community Sample of Low-Acculturated Latinas

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Donate, Ana; Vera, Lina M; Zhang, Xiao; Vedro, Rhea; Angulo, Rosario; Atkinson, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    Background Low adherence to cervical and breast cancer (CBC) screening recommendations contributes to high CBC mortality among Latinas. Purpose To estimate the prevalence of, and factors associated with, last 12-month Pap smear and mammogram receipt among a Midwest community sample of low-acculturated Latinas. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study with 278 Latina immigrants in Dane County, Wisconsin. Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire. We estimated multivariate logistic regression models to identify factors associated with CBC screening receipt. Results Rates of last 12-month Pap smear and mammogram receipt were 56.8% and 39.4%, respectively. Age, knowledge of screening recommendations, and having a regular health care provider were independently associated with both Pap smear and mammogram receipt. Having ever used Planned Parenthood and fatalism beliefs were uniquely correlated with Pap smear and mammogram receipt, respectively. Conclusions Modifiable individual, structural, and cultural factors contribute to suboptimal rates of CBC screening among low-acculturated Latina immigrants. PMID:24185166

  13. Modeling the Effects of Diversity Experiences and Multiple Capitals on Latina/o College Students' Academic Self-Confidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunez, Anne-Marie

    2009-01-01

    This study develops a model predicting academic self-confidence for 2nd-year Latina/o college students. Findings indicate that forms of academic, cultural, social, and intercultural capital (the capacity to negotiate diverse racial and ethnic environments) are positively associated with academic self-confidence. The prevalence of negative…

  14. Pathways to Achievement: Career and Educational Aspirations and Expectations of Latina/o Immigrant Parents and Early Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavira, Gabriela; Cooper, Catherine R.; Vasquez-Salgado, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on sociocultural and related theories, 4 questions examined career and educational aspirations and expectations among 24 immigrant Latina/o early adolescents and their parents as predictors of students' grades. First, adolescents' career aspirations and expectations were correlated, and both parents and adolescents held educational…

  15. Building Social Capital in Hightown: The Role of "Confianza" in Latina Immigrants' Social Networks in the New South

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitts, Shanan; McClure, Greg

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we examine the social networks of immigrant Latinas from two women's groups in northwestern North Carolina. We explore how participants built social capital and confidence in self through sharing knowledge and experiences in intimate, "mujerista" spaces. We argue that traditional analyses of social capital, framed in…

  16. Restructuring the Master's Tools: Black Female and Latina Faculty Navigating and Contributing in Classrooms through Oppositional Positions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sule, Venice Thandi

    2011-01-01

    Employing critical race feminism, this article explores how black and Latina women faculty alter the teaching and learning environment at a predominantly white, research institution (PWI). The limited research on faculty of color at PWIs focuses on barriers to career success, yet places less emphasis on how these faculty negotiate barriers and…

  17. Latina/o Pre-Service Teachers' Use of Language and Culture while Assisting Children in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vomvoridi-Ivanovic, Eugenia

    2009-01-01

    Guided by symbolic interactionism and cultural historical activity theory this study investigated how four bilingual Latina/o pre-service teachers use language (Spanish and English) and culture, defined as social practices, as instructional resources in mathematics. The setting of the study was an after-school bilingual mathematics program, namely…

  18. Latina/o or Mexicana/o?: The Relationship between Socially Assigned Race and Experiences with Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Edward D.; Winston, Nadia C.; Garcia, John A.; Sanchez, Gabriel R.

    2016-01-01

    Discrimination based on one’s racial or ethnic background is one of the oldest and most perverse practices in the United States. While much of this research has relied on self-reported racial categories, a growing body of research is attempting to measure race through socially-assigned race. Socially-assigned or ascribed race measures how individuals feel they are classified by other people. This paper draws on the socially assigned race literature and explores the impact of socially assigned race on experiences with discrimination using a 2011 nationally representative sample of Latina/os (n=1,200). While much of the current research on Latina/os has been focused on the aggregation across national origin group members, this paper marks a deviation by using socially-assigned race and national origin to understand how being ascribed as Mexican is associated with experiences of discrimination. We find evidence that being ascribed as Mexican increases the likelihood of experiencing discrimination relative to being ascribed as White or Latina/o. Furthermore, we find that being miss-classified as Mexican (ascribed as Mexican, but not of Mexican origin) is associated with a higher likelihood of experiencing discrimination compared to being ascribed as white, ascribed as Latina/o, and correctly ascribed as Mexican. We provide evidence that socially assigned race is a valuable complement to self-identified race/ethnicity for scholars interested in assessing the impact of race/ethnicity on a wide range of outcomes. PMID:27709119

  19. Proyecto Interconexiones: pilot-test of a community-based depression care program for Latina violence survivors

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaidis, Christina; Mejia, Angie; Perez, Marlen; Alvarado, Anabertha; Celaya-Alston, Rosemary; Quintero, Yolanda; Aguillon, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Background Latina intimate partner violence (IPV) survivors often face great barriers to depression care. We sought to use a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach to create and evaluate a community-based depression care program for Latina IPV survivors. Methods We created a multi-faceted, culturally-tailored intervention, based on principles of chronic illness management. A promotora provided case management services and led 12 weekly group sessions. Participants completed surveys at baseline and 6 months and participated in open-ended exit interviews. Results 10 Spanish-speaking Latina women participated in the intervention. The program had excellent attendance, with 100% of women attending at least 10 group sessions, and high satisfaction. We found a large decrease in depression severity (PHQ-9 17.3 to 7.2, p=0.001), as well as improvements in depression self-efficacy, self-esteem, and stress. Conclusion This study offers promising preliminary data to support the use of community-based approaches to reducing depression disparities in Latina IPV survivors. PMID:24375180

  20. Teacher Agency in Bilingual Spaces: A Fresh Look at Preparing Teachers to Educate Latina/o Bilingual Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Deborah; Martinez, Ramon Antonio

    2013-01-01

    This review poses an increasingly common--and increasingly urgent--question in the field of teacher education: How can teachers best be prepared to educate Latina/o bilingual learners? The answers that the authors offer here challenge some of the prevailing assumptions about language and bilingualism that inform current approaches to teacher…