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Sample records for latino worker perceptions

  1. Engaging Men as Promotores de Salud: Perceptions of Community Health Workers among Latino Men in North Carolina*

    PubMed Central

    Villa-Torres, Laura; Fleming, Paul; Barrington, Clare

    2016-01-01

    The promotor de salud, or community health worker (CHW) role, is highly feminized and little is known about how men view their participation in CHW programs. We conducted in-depth interviews with Latino men in North Carolina to explore this gap. We used systematic coding and display procedures informed by Grounded Theory to analyze the data. Men described their communities as lacking cohesion, making integration of Latino immigrants difficult. Most did not consider themselves leaders or feel they had leaders in their communities. Their perceptions of the feminized CHW role as well as the volunteer or low-paid nature of CHW work conflicted with men’s provider role. They also did not think they could perform the CHW role because they lacked education, skills, and broad networks. Efforts to increase male participation in CHW programs in new Latino immigrant destinations will need to understand and address these gender and migration-related dynamics in order to engage both women and men in improving the health of their communities. PMID:24989349

  2. Engaging men as promotores de salud: perceptions of community health workers among Latino men in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Villa-Torres, Laura; Fleming, Paul J; Barrington, Clare

    2015-02-01

    The promotor de salud, or community health worker (CHW) role, is highly feminized and little is known about how men view their participation in CHW programs. We conducted in-depth interviews with Latino men in North Carolina to explore this gap. We used systematic coding and display procedures informed by Grounded Theory to analyze the data. Men described their communities as lacking cohesion, making integration of Latino immigrants difficult. Most did not consider themselves leaders or feel they had leaders in their communities. Their perceptions of the feminized CHW role as well as the volunteer or low-paid nature of CHW work conflicted with men's provider role. They also did not think they could perform the CHW role because they lacked education, skills, and broad networks. Efforts to increase male participation in CHW programs in new Latino immigrant destinations will need to understand and address these gender and migration-related dynamics in order to engage both women and men in improving the health of their communities.

  3. Perceptions of Health and Safety among Immigrant Latino/a Dairy Workers in the U.S.

    PubMed Central

    Menger, Lauren M.; Pezzutti, Florencia; Tellechea, Teresa; Stallones, Lorann; Rosecrance, John; Roman-Muniz, Ivette Noami

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. dairy industry is increasingly relying on an immigrant workforce to help meet growing demands. Due to scant research, little is known about the factors related to workplace safety among this occupational group. The purpose of this study was to identify dairy worker perceptions of the barriers to and facilitators for enhancing workplace safety. Focus groups (FG) were conducted with 44 immigrant Latino/a workers from 2 dairies in South Dakota and 1 dairy in Colorado to gain firsthand insights into their work experiences. Interviews were conducted in Spanish, audio recorded, transcribed, and translated into English. Results were analyzed through a two-step qualitative coding process. The Contributing Factors in Accident Causation model was used as a guiding framework. Promising points of intervention identified were related to the workers, the work itself, the physical environment, equipment issues, the social–psychological environment, and management/organizational factors. Suggestions for how to improve safety outcomes in the dairy industry are provided. It is likely that the dairy industry will continue to employ a growing number of immigrant workers. Therefore, these findings have significant implications that can be used to guide the development of culturally congruent policies and practices. PMID:27303660

  4. Noise and hearing protection: Latino construction workers' experiences.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Cheryl; Kerr, Madeleine; Garcia, Carolyn; Halterman, Eve

    2007-04-01

    This study explored Latino construction workers' experiences with occupational noise and hearing protection to provide qualitative data to be used in designing an intervention to prevent noise-induced hearing loss. An ecological framework provided the theoretical foundation for this study. Fifteen Latino construction workers participated in one of four focus groups exploring perceptions of exposure to noise on the job and barriers to and supports for wearing hearing protection. Support for an ecological framework was apparent in the environmental and personal factors revealed in the data: how it feels, personal responsibility, they make us wear it, we don't care about ears, it won't happen to me, being Latino, keeping our jobs, hearing protection is uncomfortable, and we can handle it. Researchers are applying results of this study in the development of a hearing conservation intervention for Latino construction workers to be evaluated in a randomized, controlled trial.

  5. The Prevalence of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Latino Poultry Processing Workers and Other Latino Manual Workers

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Michael S.; Walker, Francis O.; Blocker, Jill N.; Schulz, Mark R.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Mora, Dana; Chen, Haiying; Marín, Antonio J.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in Latino poultry processing workers. Methods Symptoms and nerve conduction studies were used to prospectively assess 287 Latino poultry processing workers and 226 Latinos in other manual labor occupations. Results The prevalence of CTS was higher in poultry processing (8.7%) compared to non-poultry manual workers (4.0%, p < 0.0001). The adjusted odds ratio for the prevalence of CTS in poultry workers was 2.51 (95% CI of 1.80 to 3.50) compared to non-poultry workers. Within the poultry workers, those who performed packing, sanitation, and chilling had a trend toward less CTS than those who performed tasks requiring more repetitive and strenuous hand movements. Discussion Latino poultry processing workers have a high prevalence of CTS, which likely results from the repetitive and strenuous nature of the work. PMID:22258161

  6. Assessing Oral Cancer Awareness Among Rural Latino Migrant Workers.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Virginia J; Schenck, David P; Chaney, Elizabeth H; Padhya, Tapan

    2016-06-01

    Latino migrant farm workers suffer significant health disparities, including poor oral health. The purpose of this research was to assess Latino migrant farm workers' OC awareness, including knowledge and care-seeking behaviors. A 42-item survey was developed. Trained, bilingual researchers verbally administered the survey to migrant farm workers in Hillsborough County, Florida. Frequencies and descriptive statistics were generated to report baseline data. The sample consisted of 53.7 % female respondents. The mean age for males and females respectively was 38.7 and 39.2. Most respondents had attended grade school; 6.7 % never attended school. Perceptions of cancer susceptibility were present; knowledge of OC risk factors, signs and symptoms was low. Participants were unlikely to seek preventive care. The results contribute to the limited studies regarding Latino migrant farm workers and oral cancer risk factor awareness and knowledge. Findings highlight factors influencing motivation and care-seeking behaviors, as well as provide guidance for development of educational materials.

  7. Empowerment and Civic Surrogacy: Community Workers' Perceptions of Their Own and Their Latino/a Students' Civic Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This article examines how three Nashville educational support professionals' conceptions of empowerment map onto their civic expectations for their Latino/a students and themselves. It argues that these expectations are inversely related, with students standing as surrogates for professionals' civic selves or professionals acting as civic…

  8. Empowerment and Civic Surrogacy: Community Workers' Perceptions of Their Own and Their Latino/a Students' Civic Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This article examines how three Nashville educational support professionals' conceptions of empowerment map onto their civic expectations for their Latino/a students and themselves. It argues that these expectations are inversely related, with students standing as surrogates for professionals' civic selves or professionals acting as civic…

  9. Occupational safety beliefs among Latino residential roofing workers.

    PubMed

    Arcury, Thomas A; Summers, Phillip; Carrillo, Lourdes; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Quandt, Sara A; Mills, Thomas H

    2014-06-01

    This analysis describes beliefs about work safety and personal protective equipment (PPE) among Latino roofing workers, it delineates their perceptions of work environment characteristics that affect work safety and PPE use, and it describes how they experience work injuries and the consequences of these injuries. In-depth interviews were completed with 10 current and former Latino residential roofers. Interview transcripts were subjected to systematic qualitative analysis. Participants' valued productivity over safety, and this had a negative influence on their safety behavior and reduced their PPE use. They understood that roofing was hazardous. They limited use of PPE when they felt it reduced productivity and when it was uncomfortable. Work environment characteristics that affected safety included company size, the physical demands of the job, lack of training, the need for work, general life stress, and distractions at work. An injury had to result in lost work time to be considered significant. Access to health care is limited by employers not providing Workers' compensation. Future research is needed to substantiate these descriptive results and to delineate factors that are associated with safety behavior and use of PPE. Interventions, based on a lay health educator model, are needed to improve safety in this population. Safety regulations need to be evaluated and their enforcement needs to be improved. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Latinos' Perceptions of Interethnic Couples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Amber L.; Riggio, Heidi R.; Palavinelu, Subha; Culpepper, Lane Locher

    2012-01-01

    Numerous survey findings indicate that the majority of White Americans are accepting of interracial romantic relationships. However, relatively few studies have looked at how different American ethnic minority groups view such relationships. The current research examined Latinos' evaluations of intraethnic and interethnic couples. Latino…

  11. One-year Incidence of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Latino Poultry Processing Workers and Other Latino Manual Workers

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Michael S.; Walker, Francis O.; Newman, Jill C.; Schulz, Mark R.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Mora, Dana; Chen, Haiying; Eaton, Bethany; Quandt, Sara A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) over one year in Latino poultry processing workers. Methods Symptoms and nerve conduction studies were used to identify Latino poultry processing workers (106 wrists) and Latinos in other manual labor occupations (257 wrists) that did not have CTS at baseline, and these individuals were then evaluated in the same manner one year later. Results Based on wrists, the one-year incidence of CTS was higher in poultry processing workers than non-poultry manual workers (19.8% vs. 11.7%, p = 0.022). Poultry workers had a higher odds (1.89; p = 0.089) of developing CTS over one year compared to non-poultry manual workers. Discussion Latino poultry processing workers have an incidence of CTS that is possibly higher than Latinos in other manual labor positions. Latino poultry workers’ high absolute and relative risk of CTS likely results from the repetitive and strenuous nature of poultry processing work. PMID:23996875

  12. Latino High School Students' Perceptions of Caring: Keys to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza, Rubén; Soto Huerta, Mary Esther

    2014-01-01

    This mixed methods investigation specifically examined Latino high school adolescents' perceptions of teacher behaviors that demonstrate caring. A chi-square test was conducted to analyze the frequency of responses, and focus group interviews were conducted to expand on the results. The data indicated that although Latino male students were as…

  13. Latino High School Students' Perceptions of Caring: Keys to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza, Rubén; Soto Huerta, Mary Esther

    2014-01-01

    This mixed methods investigation specifically examined Latino high school adolescents' perceptions of teacher behaviors that demonstrate caring. A chi-square test was conducted to analyze the frequency of responses, and focus group interviews were conducted to expand on the results. The data indicated that although Latino male students were as…

  14. Social Work Practice with Latinos: Key Issues for Social Workers

    PubMed Central

    Furman, Rich; Negi, Nalini Junko; Iwamoto, Derek Kenji; Rowan, Diana; Shukraft, Allison; Gragg, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The Latino population is the fastest growing group in the United States; thus, it is imperative that social workers and other mental health practitioners be knowledgeable about the current literature on how to effectively serve this population. This article elucidates key issues and knowledge, such as immigration and migration concerns; discusses how to assess for levels of acculturation; examines cultural values; and highlights salient work issues and health disparities that Latinos experience. Recommendations on how agencies and universities can recruit and promote bilingual practitioners are introduced. Finally, culturally responsive strategies for professional use of self and fostering the therapeutic alliance are discussed. PMID:19366165

  15. Occupational injuries on thoroughbred horse farms: a description of Latino and non-Latino workers' experiences.

    PubMed

    Swanberg, Jennifer E; Clouser, Jessica M; Westneat, Susan C; Marsh, Mary W; Reed, Deborah B

    2013-11-29

    Animal production is a dangerous industry and increasingly reliant on a Latino workforce. Within animal production, little is known about the risks or the occupational hazards of working on farms involved in various aspects of thoroughbred horse breeding. Extant research suggests that horse workers are at risk of musculoskeletal and respiratory symptoms, kicks, and other injuries. However, limited known research has examined the experiences of the industry's workers, including immigrant workers, despite their prominence and increased vulnerability. Using data collected from thoroughbred farm representatives via a phone-administered survey, a 2-hour face-to-face semi-structured interview, and farm injury logs, this article identifies and describes types of injuries experienced by workers (N = 284) and their surrounding circumstances. Results indicate that general injuries and musculoskeletal strains, sprains, and tears account for a majority of injuries among workers on thoroughbred farms. Upper limbs and extremities are most frequently injured, while direct contact with the horse accounted for over half of all injuries. No differences in the diagnoses or distribution of injury were found by ethnicity; however, Latinos were more often struck by or trampled by a horse while non-Latinos were more often injured by an insect or plant. Implications and opportunities for future research are discussed.

  16. Effects of High School Teacher Perception on Latino Student Academic Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Justin

    2013-01-01

    As the Latino population increases nationally, educators must develop the work ethic among their Latino students to meet the requirements for student achievement. This case study examined if teachers' perceptions of the Latino population affected the academic motivation of their Latino students at a low-income, primarily Latino high school in…

  17. Airway obstruction among Latino poultry processing workers in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Mirabelli, Maria C; Chatterjee, Arjun B; Mora, Dana C; Arcury, Thomas A; Blocker, Jill N; Chen, Haiying; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Marín, Antonio J; Schulz, Mark R; Quandt, Sara A

    2015-01-01

    This analysis was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of airway obstruction among Latino poultry processing workers. Data were collected from 279 poultry processing workers and 222 other manual laborers via spirometry and interviewer-administered questionnaires. Participants employed in poultry processing reported the activities they perform at work. Participants with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) or FEV1/forced expiratory volume (FVC) below the lower limits of normal were categorized as having airway obstruction. Airway obstruction was identified in 13% of poultry processing workers and 12% of the comparison population. Among poultry processing workers, the highest prevalence of airway obstruction (21%) occurred among workers deboning chickens (prevalence ratio: 1.75; 95% confidence interval: 0.97, 3.15). These findings identify variations in the prevalence of airway obstruction across categories of work activities.

  18. Latino High School Students' Perceptions of Gangs and Crews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Edward M.; Wishard, Alison; Gallimore, Ronald; Rivera, Wendy

    2006-01-01

    Controversies around definitions and perceptions of gangs are heightened by the scarcity of research on crews. In an open-ended interview, 77 Latino 10th graders from a random longitudinal sample provided information about gangs and crews. Although less than 10% reported having been in gangs or crews, 84% reported having personal contact with…

  19. Latino High School Students' Perceptions of Gangs and Crews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Edward M.; Wishard, Alison; Gallimore, Ronald; Rivera, Wendy

    2006-01-01

    Controversies around definitions and perceptions of gangs are heightened by the scarcity of research on crews. In an open-ended interview, 77 Latino 10th graders from a random longitudinal sample provided information about gangs and crews. Although less than 10% reported having been in gangs or crews, 84% reported having personal contact with…

  20. Pesticide knowledge and risk perception among adolescent Latino farmworkers.

    PubMed

    McCauley, L A; Sticker, D; Bryan, C; Lasarev, M R; Scherer, J A

    2002-11-01

    A substantial proportion of the agricultural production in the U.S. is dependent on the labor of Latino farmworkers. While exact figures are not known, it is estimated that adolescents make up 7% of this valuable workforce. These young workers may be at increased risk for the toxic effects of environmental exposures encountered during their work. Furthermore, language barriers and health beliefs may influence the risk perceptions of this population. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of migrant adolescent farmworkers in 1998 to investigate their work practices, health beliefs, and pesticide knowledge. The large majority of the adolescents in our sample were from Mexico, and 36.3% spoke primarily indigenous languages. Many of the adolescents (64.7%) were traveling and working in the U.S. independent of their parents. Few of the adolescents reported having received pesticide training; however, 21.6% of the sample reported that their current work involved mixing and/or applying agricultural chemicals. The scores on the pesticide knowledge questionnaire were found to significantly predict self-reported use of protection for adolescent farmworkers. The results of this study point to a need for improved pesticide training in youth agricultural workers and specialized education efforts directed toward minorities who speak indigenous dialects. Special attention is merited toward adolescent farmworkers who report that their work includes mixing or applying agricultural chemicals. As the number of adolescent farmworkers increases in the U.S. and the characteristics of the migrant stream continue to change, culturally and developmentally appropriate instruments are needed to adequately assess the health beliefs and protective practices of this population.

  1. Parental Perceptions of Neighborhood Effects in Latino Comunas

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Pilar; Sanchez, Ninive; Castillo, Marcela; Delva, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To obtain rich information about how adult Latinos living in high-poverty/high-drug use neighborhoods perceive and negotiate their environment. Methods In 2008, thirteen adult caregivers in Santiago, Chile were interviewed with open-ended questions to ascertain beliefs about neighborhood effects and drug use. Analysis Inductive analysis was used to develop the codebook/identify trends. Discussion Residents externalized their understanding of drug use and misuse by invoking the concept of delinquent youth. A typology of their perceptions is offered. Learning more about residents’ circumstances may help focus on needs-based interventions. More research with Latino neighborhoods is needed for culturally-competent models of interventions. PMID:22497879

  2. Perceived stigma of purchasing sex among Latino and non-Latino male clients of female sex workers in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pitpitan, Eileen V.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Semple, Shirley J.; Wagner, Karla D.; Chavarin, Claudia V.; Earnshaw, Valerie A.; Patterson, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    HIV prevention efforts must be comprehensive in their understanding of the factors involved in HIV risk. Male clients, who have received less research attention than female sex workers (FSWs), may experience stigma as a function of purchasing sex. Perceived stigma may be related to poor psychological outcomes, risky psychosexual characteristics, and higher drug and sexual risk behavior among male clients of FSWs. However, perceived stigma of purchasing sex may differ between clients of different ethnic groups. In the present study, we examine the correlates of perceived stigma of purchasing sex among Latino vs. non-Latino male clients of FSWs in Tijuana, Mexico. Using time-location sampling, we recruited 375 male clients (323 Latino, 52 non-Latino) in Tijuana who completed a computerized survey on various measures. We measured perceived stigma of purchasing sex using three items we developed for this study. Using linear regression analyses we found that perceived stigma was associated with greater guilt, a greater feeling of escape from everyday life, and more negative condom attitudes among Latino clients. This was not found among non-Latino clients. Features of Latino culture, like machismo, and how they may relate to stigma of purchasing sex are discussed. PMID:23979714

  3. Perceived stigma of purchasing sex among Latino and non-Latino male clients of female sex workers in Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pitpitan, Eileen V; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Semple, Shirley J; Wagner, Karla D; Chavarin, Claudia V; Earnshaw, Valerie A; Patterson, Thomas L

    2015-02-01

    HIV prevention efforts must be comprehensive in their understanding of the factors involved in HIV risk. Male clients, who have received less research attention than female sex workers (FSWs), may experience stigma as a function of purchasing sex. Perceived stigma may be related to poor psychological outcomes, risky psychosexual characteristics, and higher drug and sexual risk behavior among male clients of FSWs. However, perceived stigma of purchasing sex may differ between clients of different ethnic groups. In the present study, we examine the correlates of perceived stigma of purchasing sex among Latino versus non-Latino male clients of FSWs in Tijuana, Mexico. Using time-location sampling, we recruited 375 male clients (323 Latino, 52 non-Latino) in Tijuana who completed a computerized survey on various measures. We measured perceived stigma of purchasing sex using three items we developed for this study. Using linear regression analyses we found that perceived stigma was associated with greater guilt, a greater feeling of escape from everyday life, and more negative condom attitudes among Latino clients. This was not found among non-Latino clients. Features of Latino culture, like machismo, and how they may relate to stigma of purchasing sex are discussed.

  4. The Latino Migrant Worker HIV Prevention Program: building a community partnership through a community health worker training program.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Jesús; Silva-Suarez, Georgina; Serna, Claudia A; De La Rosa, Mario

    2012-01-01

    There is limited information on the impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on Latino migrant workers (LMWs), although available data indicate that this community is being disproportionally affected. The need for prevention programs that address the specific needs of LMWs is becoming well recognized. HIV prevention interventions that train and employ community health workers are a culturally appropriate way to address the issues of community trust and capacity building in this community. This article describes the Latino Migrant Worker HIV Prevention Program and its efforts to train and engage community health workers in the prevention of HIV among LMWs in South Florida.

  5. Perceptions of Educational Barriers Affecting the Academic Achievement of Latino K-12 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becerra, David

    2012-01-01

    This study examined different factors affecting the perceptions of barriers in academic achievement of Latino K-12 students. The study used data from 1,508 participants who identified themselves as being of Hispanic or Latino heritage in the 2004 National Survey of Latinos: Education, compiled by the Pew Hispanic Center between August 7 and…

  6. Perceptions of Educational Barriers Affecting the Academic Achievement of Latino K-12 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becerra, David

    2012-01-01

    This study examined different factors affecting the perceptions of barriers in academic achievement of Latino K-12 students. The study used data from 1,508 participants who identified themselves as being of Hispanic or Latino heritage in the 2004 National Survey of Latinos: Education, compiled by the Pew Hispanic Center between August 7 and…

  7. Latino Parents' Perceptions of Pediatric Weight Counseling Terms.

    PubMed

    Knierim, Shanna Doucette; Newcomer, Sophia; Castillo, Alyssa; Rahm, Alanna Kulchak; Raghunath, Silvia; Clarke, Christina; Wright, Leslie; Haemer, Matthew; Hambidge, Simon J

    2017-09-12

    Little is known about Latino parents' perceptions of weight-related language in English or Spanish, particularly for counseling obese youth. We sought to identify English and Spanish weight counseling terms perceived as desirable for providers to use, motivating, and inoffensive by Latino parents across demographic groups. Latino parents of children treated at urban safety-net clinics completed surveys in English or Spanish. Parents rated the desirable, motivating, or offensive properties of terms for excess weight using a 5-point scale. We compared parental ratings of terms and investigated the association of parent and child characteristics with parent perceptions of terms. 525 surveys met inclusion criteria (255 English, 270 Spanish). English survey respondents rated "unhealthy weight" and "too much weight for his/her health" the most motivating and among the most desirable and least offensive terms. Spanish survey respondents found "demasiado peso para su salud" highly desirable, highly motivating, inoffensive and valued its connection to the child's health. "Overweight"/"sobrepeso" and "high BMI"/"índice de masa corporal alta" were not as desirable or as motivating. "Chubby", "fat", "gordo", and "muy gordo" were the least motivating and most offensive terms. Parents' ratings of commonly used clinical terms varied widely across demographic groups, but more desirable terms had less variability. "Unhealthy weight", "too much weight for his/her health" and the Spanish equivalent "demasiado peso para su salud" were the most desirable, motivating, and minimally offensive terms. Latino parents' positive perceptions of these terms occurred across parent and child characteristics, supporting their use in weight counseling. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Work safety climate and safety practices among immigrant Latino residential construction workers.

    PubMed

    Arcury, Thomas A; Mills, Thomas; Marín, Antonio J; Summers, Phillip; Quandt, Sara A; Rushing, Julia; Lang, Wei; Grzywacz, Joseph G

    2012-08-01

    Latino residential construction workers experience high rates of occupational fatality and injury. Work safety climate is an especially important consideration for improving the safety of these immigrant workers. This analysis describes work safety climate among Latino residential construction workers, delineates differences in work safety climate by personal and employment characteristics, and determines associations of work safety climate with specific work safety behaviors. Data are from a cross-sectional survey of 119 Latino residential framers, roofers, and general construction workers in western North Carolina; 90 of these participants also provided longitudinal daily diary data for up to 21 days using an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) system. Measures included the Perceived Safety Climate Scale, and daily reports of five individual and five collective safety practices. Work safety climate was mixed among workers, with roofers (19.9) having lower levels than framers (24.3) or general construction workers (24.3). Days reported for several individual (glove-related risks, not doing something known to be unsafe) and collective safety practices (attended daily safety meeting, not needing to use damaged equipment, not seeing coworker create an unsafe situation) were positively associated with work safety climate. Work safety climate predicts subsequent safety behaviors among Latino residential construction workers, with differences by trade being particularly important. Interventions are needed to improve safety training for employers as well as workers. Further research should expand the number of workers and trades involved in analyses of work safety climate. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Promoting adoption of fall prevention measures among Latino workers and residential contractors: formative research findings.

    PubMed

    Teran, Suzanne; Blecker, Hillary; Scruggs, Kelsie; García Hernández, Javier; Rahke, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Falls from heights remain a concern in construction, particularly for foreign-born Latino construction workers employed by small residential contractors. The social ecological model provides a framework to assess the individual and contextual factors influencing the risk for falls. Five focus groups and thirteen in-depth interviews with workers, small residential contractors, and key informants were conducted in 2012 in San Francisco and Philadelphia. Data were analyzed with qualitative methods. Economic conditions in residential construction, coupled with a lack of enforcement and vulnerabilities of the foreign-born workforce, are principal contributors to risk for falls. Small contractors perceive strong economic disincentives for implementation of fall protection and foreign-born Latino workers experience a variety of social, cultural and occupational pressures impeding its use. Increased adoption of fall protection cannot be accomplished solely by targeting Latino construction workers. Research is needed on incentives to influence contractor behavior and facilitate adoption of fall protection measures. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Latino and Non-Latino Perceptions of the Air Quality in California's San Joaquin Valley.

    PubMed

    Brown, Paul; Cameron, Linda; Cisneros, Ricardo; Cox, Rachel; Gaab, Erin; Gonzalez, Mariaelena; Ramondt, Steven; Song, Anna

    2016-12-15

    The San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of California has poor air quality, high rates of asthma, and high rates of obesity. Informational campaigns aimed at increasing awareness of the health impacts of poor air quality and promoting behavior change need to be tailored to the specific target audiences. The study examined perceptions of air quality, perceived health impacts, and methods of accessing information about air quality between Latinos and other groups in the SJV. Residents of the SJV (n = 744) where surveyed via one of three methods: community organizations (256), public locations (251), and an internet panel (237). The results suggest that people perceive the air quality in their region to be generally unhealthy, particularly for sensitive groups. The air quality is more likely to be reported as being unhealthy by people with health problems and less unhealthy by Latinos and people who report regularly exercising. Latinos are more likely to report working outdoors regularly, but also more likely to report being able to reduce their exposure if the air quality is unhealthy. The results report differences in informational sources about air quality, suggesting that informational campaigns should target high risk groups using a variety of media.

  11. Ethnic Enclave Residence, Employment, and Commuting of Latino Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Cathy Yang

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of living in ethnic enclaves in different parts of a metropolitan area on low-skilled Latino immigrants' employment accessibility. It does so by comparing the employment status and commuting times of Latinos living in and out of ethnic neighborhoods in central city, inner-ring suburbs, and outer-ring suburbs in…

  12. Ethnic Enclave Residence, Employment, and Commuting of Latino Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Cathy Yang

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of living in ethnic enclaves in different parts of a metropolitan area on low-skilled Latino immigrants' employment accessibility. It does so by comparing the employment status and commuting times of Latinos living in and out of ethnic neighborhoods in central city, inner-ring suburbs, and outer-ring suburbs in…

  13. Social isolation among Latino workers in rural North Carolina: exposure and health implications.

    PubMed

    Mora, Dana C; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Anderson, Andrea M; Chen, Haiying; Arcury, Thomas A; Marín, Antonio J; Quandt, Sara A

    2014-10-01

    Immigrant Latinos frequently experience social isolation in their receiving communities. This paper investigates the prevalence of social isolation among immigrant workers in a new settlement area and delineates the association between social isolation and physical and mental health outcomes. Interviews were conducted in Spanish with immigrant Latino manual workers (N = 743) in western North Carolina. The CES-D and the SF-12 questionnaires assessed health outcomes. A social isolation scale was used to assess degree of social isolation. Nearly 1 in 5 workers (19.5 %) reported the highest level of social isolation. Social isolation was associated with higher depressive symptoms and poorer physical and mental health, related to quality of life. Social isolation is a common experience among immigrant Latinos that may have negative implications for physical and mental health. Community outreach efforts to minimize experiences of isolation may be useful in protecting immigrant physical and mental health.

  14. Evaluation of a pilot promotora program for Latino forest workers in southern Oregon.

    PubMed

    Bush, Diane E; Wilmsen, Carl; Sasaki, Timothy; Barton-Antonio, Dinorah; Steege, Andrea L; Chang, Charlotte

    2014-07-01

    Forest work, an occupation with some of the highest injury and illness rates, is conducted primarily by Latino immigrant workers. This study evaluates a pilot program where promotoras (lay community health educators) provided occupational health and safety trainings for Latino forest workers. Evaluation methods included a focus group, post-tests, and qualitative feedback. Community capacity to address working conditions increased through (i) increased leadership and community access to information and resources; and (ii) increased worker awareness of workplace health and safety rights and resources. Fear of retaliation remains a barrier to workers taking action; nevertheless, the promotoras supported several workers in addressing-specific workplace issues. For working conditions to significantly improve, major structural influences need to be addressed. A long-term, organizationally supported promotora program can play a key role in linking and supporting change at the individual, interpersonal and community levels, contributing to and supporting structural change. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Evaluation of a Community Health Worker Intervention to Reduce HIV/AIDS Stigma and Increase HIV Testing Among Underserved Latinos in the Southwestern U.S.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Davida; Espinoza, Lilia; Nguyen-Rodriguez, Selena; Diaz, Gaby; Carricchi, Ana; Galvez, Gino; Garcia, Melawhy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Latinos are at an elevated risk for HIV infection. Continued HIV/AIDS stigma presents barriers to HIV testing and affects the quality of life of HIV-positive individuals, yet few interventions addressing HIV/AIDS stigma have been developed for Latinos. Methods An intervention led by community health workers (promotores de salud, or promotores) targeting underserved Latinos in three southwestern U.S. communities was developed to decrease HIV/AIDS stigma and increase HIV knowledge and perception of risk. The intervention was led by HIV-positive and HIV-affected (i.e., those who have, or have had, a close family member or friend with HIV/AIDS) promotores, who delivered interactive group-based educational sessions to groups of Latinos in Spanish and English. To decrease stigma and motivate behavioral and attitudinal change, the educational sessions emphasized positive Latino cultural values and community assets. The participant pool comprised 579 Latino adults recruited in El Paso, Texas (n=204); San Ysidro, California (n=175); and Los Angeles, California (n=200). Results From pretest to posttest, HIV/AIDS stigma scores decreased significantly (p<0.001). Significant increases were observed in HIV/AIDS knowledge (p<0.001), willingness to discuss HIV/AIDS with one's sexual partner (p<0.001), and HIV risk perception (p=0.006). Willingness to test for HIV in the three months following the intervention did not increase. Women demonstrated a greater reduction in HIV/AIDS stigma scores when compared with their male counterparts, which may have been related to a greater increase in HIV/AIDS knowledge scores (p=0.016 and p=0.007, respectively). Conclusion Promotores interventions to reduce HIV/AIDS stigma and increase HIV-related knowledge, perception of risk, and willingness to discuss sexual risk with partners show promise in reaching underserved Latino communities. PMID:26327724

  16. Evaluation of a Community Health Worker Intervention to Reduce HIV/AIDS Stigma and Increase HIV Testing Among Underserved Latinos in the Southwestern U.S.

    PubMed

    Rios-Ellis, Britt; Becker, Davida; Espinoza, Lilia; Nguyen-Rodriguez, Selena; Diaz, Gaby; Carricchi, Ana; Galvez, Gino; Garcia, Melawhy

    2015-01-01

    Latinos are at an elevated risk for HIV infection. Continued HIV/AIDS stigma presents barriers to HIV testing and affects the quality of life of HIV-positive individuals, yet few interventions addressing HIV/AIDS stigma have been developed for Latinos. An intervention led by community health workers (promotores de salud, or promotores) targeting underserved Latinos in three southwestern U.S. communities was developed to decrease HIV/AIDS stigma and increase HIV knowledge and perception of risk. The intervention was led by HIV-positive and HIV-affected (i.e., those who have, or have had, a close family member or friend with HIV/AIDS) promotores, who delivered interactive group-based educational sessions to groups of Latinos in Spanish and English. To decrease stigma and motivate behavioral and attitudinal change, the educational sessions emphasized positive Latino cultural values and community assets. The participant pool comprised 579 Latino adults recruited in El Paso, Texas (n=204); San Ysidro, California (n=175); and Los Angeles, California (n=200). From pretest to posttest, HIV/AIDS stigma scores decreased significantly (p<0.001). Significant increases were observed in HIV/AIDS knowledge (p<0.001), willingness to discuss HIV/AIDS with one's sexual partner (p<0.001), and HIV risk perception (p=0.006). Willingness to test for HIV in the three months following the intervention did not increase. Women demonstrated a greater reduction in HIV/AIDS stigma scores when compared with their male counterparts, which may have been related to a greater increase in HIV/AIDS knowledge scores (p=0.016 and p=0.007, respectively). Promotores interventions to reduce HIV/AIDS stigma and increase HIV-related knowledge, perception of risk, and willingness to discuss sexual risk with partners show promise in reaching underserved Latino communities.

  17. Employer provision of personal protective equipment to Latino workers in North Carolina residential construction.

    PubMed

    Grzywacz, Joseph G; Quandt, Sara A; Mills, Thomas; Marín, Antonio; Summers, Phillip; Lang, Wei; Evia, Carlos; Arcury, Thomas A

    2012-01-01

    Despite federal regulations requiring provision of personal protective equipment (PPE) without cost to workers in the United States, very little is known about whether immigrant Latino construction workers receive no-cost PPE from their employers, and the role that employer provision plays in regular use of PPE. This study used cross-sectional data from a community-based sample of 119 Latino construction workers in western North Carolina to document receipt of employer-provided PPE by construction workers, investigate sources of variation in the receipt of employer-paid PPE, and delineate associations of employer-paid PPE with workers' regular use of PPE. The results suggest that the residential construction subsector generally fails to provide workers with PPE at no cost, as is required by regulation. Analyses also suggest that recent immigrants are least likely to receive no-cost, employer-provided PPE, and that when employers do provide no-cost PPE, Latino construction workers are more likely to use it regularly.

  18. The association of skin conditions with housing conditions among North Carolina Latino migrant farm workers.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Cheryl J; Feldman, Steven R; Quandt, Sara A; Isom, Scott; Chen, Haiying; Spears, Chaya R; Arcury, Thomas A

    2014-09-01

    Skin conditions are common among Latino migrant farm workers. Although many skin conditions are related to occupational exposures, poor housing conditions may also contribute to skin ailments in migrant farm workers. To evaluate the association between housing conditions and skin conditions among Latino migrant farm workers. A cross-sectional study design using interview questionnaires, home inspections, and environmental sampling was implemented to document housing quality of farm worker camps/homes and the prevalence of self-reported skin conditions in Latino migrant farm workers. Interviews were completed with 371 farm workers residing in 186 of the 226 camps (camp response rate 82.3%). Self-reported pruritus (31%), rash (25%), scaling (12%), blisters (11%), and ingrown nails (10%) were common among the participants. Pruritus was more likely to be reported by farm workers living in dwellings without air-conditioning (P < 0.05). Rash was associated with dwellings reported to have a low humidity (P < 0.05). Scaling was more likely to be reported by farm workers living in dwellings with indoor temperatures in the thermal discomfort range (P < 0.05). No statistically significant associations were detected for indoor allergens and self-reported skin ailments among migrant farm workers. Skin conditions are common among migrant farm workers in North Carolina. The quality of housing conditions, particularly hot, dry indoor thermal environment, demonstrated significant associations with pruritus, rash, and scaling. The impact of housing characteristics on pruritus and blisters was greatest in new migrant farm workers. Further research is needed to delineate additional housing factors that could cause or exacerbate skin diseases in farm workers. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  19. Work organization and musculoskeletal health: clinical findings from immigrant Latino poultry processing and other manual workers.

    PubMed

    Grzywacz, Joseph G; Arcury, Thomas A; Mora, Dana; Anderson, Andrea M; Chen, Haiying; Rosenbaum, Daryl A; Schulz, Mark R; Quandt, Sara A

    2012-08-01

    To determine the potential role of differential exposure to work organization hazards in musculoskeletal disorders among immigrant Latino workers. Self-reported work organization data were obtained from immigrant Latino workers in poultry processing and nonpoultry, manual occupations (N = 742). Clinical evaluations for epicondylitis, rotator cuff syndrome, and back pain were obtained from a subsample (n = 518). Several work organization hazards (eg, low job control, high psychological demands) were elevated among poultry processing workers. Job control predicted epicondylitis (odds ratio [OR] = 0.77) and rotator cuff syndrome (OR = 0.79); psychological demand predicted rotator cuff syndrome (OR = 1.30) and back pain (OR = 1.24); awkward posture and repeated movements predicted all three outcomes; and management safety commitment predicted rotator cuff syndrome (OR = 1.65) and back pain (OR = 1.81). Immigrant poultry processing workers are exposed to greater work organization hazards that may contribute to occupational health disparities.

  20. The prevalence of melasma and its association with quality of life in adult male Latino migrant workers.

    PubMed

    Pichardo, Rita; Vallejos, Quirina; Feldman, Steven R; Schulz, Mark R; Verma, Amit; Quandt, Sara A; Arcury, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    Melasma is a common condition of Latino women that detracts from their quality of life (QOL). The prevalence and impact of melasma in Latino men is not well characterized. To assess the prevalence of melasma and its association with QOL in Latino men from Mexico and Central America working in the USA. The prevalence of melasma was assessed in three studies of Latino men: by direct examination in a study of 25 Latino poultry workers; by direct examination in a study of 54 Latino farm workers; and by examination of store-and-forward teledermatology images in a study of 300 Latino farm workers. QOL was assessed with a Spanish version of the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). The prevalence of melasma was 36.0%, 7.4%, and 14.0% in the three studies. The prevalence of melasma was greatest amongst those aged 31 years and older, who were from Guatemala, and who spoke an indigenous language. The presence of melasma was associated with higher DLQI scores, indicating a poorer QOL, in the poultry worker population. Melasma is a common condition in Latino men and is associated with a poor QOL in some affected individuals. Clinicians should be aware that melasma may be a concern for their male Latino patients. Research on the association of skin conditions with QOL amongst minority men is needed.

  1. Finding Good Opportunities within Unauthorized Markets: U.S. Occupational Mobility for Male Latino Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kossoudji, Sherrie A.; Cobb-Clark, Deborah A.

    1996-01-01

    Examines the determinants of occupational mobility for a sample of unauthorized Latino men who received temporary residency status under the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act. Data show English language ability, experience, risk of being apprehended, migrant networks, and the wage penalty for unauthorized workers all play roles in mobility…

  2. Learning in Context: Preparing Latino Workers for Careers and Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Elizabeth; Oppenheim, Emma

    2010-01-01

    Adult education services, including education for those lacking basic literacy and numeracy, preparation for the high school equivalency diploma, and English-as-a-second-language courses, play a crucial role in bridging the basic skills gap for Latinos and other workers with limited formal education and training. With recent policy and program…

  3. The Use of Female Commercial Sex Workers' Services by Latino Day Laborers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galvan, Frank H.; Ortiz, Daniel J.; Martinez, Victor; Bing, Eric G.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the characteristics of Latino day laborers who have sex with female commercial sex workers (CSWs). A sample of 450 day laborers in Los Angeles was used. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the association of independent variables with the likelihood of having sex with a CSW. Overall, 26% of the 450 day…

  4. Learning in Context: Preparing Latino Workers for Careers and Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Elizabeth; Oppenheim, Emma

    2010-01-01

    Adult education services, including education for those lacking basic literacy and numeracy, preparation for the high school equivalency diploma, and English-as-a-second-language courses, play a crucial role in bridging the basic skills gap for Latinos and other workers with limited formal education and training. With recent policy and program…

  5. Mexican American Social Workers' Perceptions of Doctoral Education and Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tijerina, Mary; Deepak, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    An increase in Latinos in the social work academy is critical due to current underrepresentation in social work education programs and rapid Latino population growth in the United States. In this qualitative study, perceptions of Mexican American master's of social work-level practitioners regarding social work doctoral education and academia were…

  6. Mexican American Social Workers' Perceptions of Doctoral Education and Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tijerina, Mary; Deepak, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    An increase in Latinos in the social work academy is critical due to current underrepresentation in social work education programs and rapid Latino population growth in the United States. In this qualitative study, perceptions of Mexican American master's of social work-level practitioners regarding social work doctoral education and academia were…

  7. Social marketing to plan a fall prevention program for Latino construction workers.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Nancy N; Shrestha, Pramen P

    2012-08-01

    Latino construction workers experience disparities in occupational death and injury rates. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration funded a fall prevention training program at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas in response to sharp increases in fall-related accidents from 2005 to 2007. The grant's purpose was to improve fall protection for construction workers, with a focus on Latinos. This study assessed the effectiveness of social marketing for increasing fall prevention behaviors. A multi-disciplinary team used a social marketing approach to plan the program. We conducted same day class evaluations and follow-up interviews 8 weeks later. The classes met trainee needs as evidenced by class evaluations and increased safety behaviors. However, Spanish-speaking Latinos did not attend in the same proportion as their representation in the Las Vegas population. A social marketing approach to planning was helpful to customize the training to Latino worker needs. However, due to the limitations of behavior change strategies, future programs should target employers and their obligation to provide safer workplaces. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Occupational injury and work organization among immigrant Latino residential construction workers.

    PubMed

    Grzywacz, Joseph G; Quandt, Sara A; Marín, Antonio; Summers, Phillip; Lang, Wei; Mills, Thomas; Evia, Carlos; Rushing, Julia; Donadio, Katherine; Arcury, Thomas A

    2012-08-01

    Rates of occupational injury among immigrant workers are widely believed to be underestimated. The goal of this study was to enhance understanding of the burden of occupational injury and the work organization factors underlying injury among immigrant Latino residential construction workers. Prospective data were obtained from a community-based sample of Latino residential construction workers (N = 107) over a 3-month period. Twenty-eight participants were injured, resulting in an injury incidence rate of 55.0/100 FTE (95% CI = 41.4-71.6) during the 3-month observation period. The injury rate involving days away from work during the observation period was 3.9/100 FTE (CI = 0.2-7.2). Injuries were elevated among roofers relative to framers and general construction workers. Roofers had elevated exposure to a variety of deleterious work organization factors. Although imprecise given the small sample, our results suggest a threefold to fourfold underestimate of the injury burden to immigrant Latino construction workers. Work organization may contribute to elevated rates of non-fatal occupational injury, particularly among roofers. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. School Social Workers' Perceptions of Cyberbullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slovak, Karen; Singer, Jonathan B.

    2011-01-01

    Although cyberbullying is a growing concern among students, parents, and school personnel, there has been little research exploring school social workers (SSWs) at the elementary, middle, and high school levels about their perceptions of the seriousness and pervasiveness of this issue as well as their responses to it. Data for this study came from…

  10. School Social Workers' Perceptions of Cyberbullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slovak, Karen; Singer, Jonathan B.

    2011-01-01

    Although cyberbullying is a growing concern among students, parents, and school personnel, there has been little research exploring school social workers (SSWs) at the elementary, middle, and high school levels about their perceptions of the seriousness and pervasiveness of this issue as well as their responses to it. Data for this study came from…

  11. Sex with sex workers among latino day laborers in Suburban Maryland.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Fernanda T; Reisen, Carol A; Gonzales, Felisa A; Arroyo, Juan C; Zea, Maria Cecilia; Poppen, Paul J

    2013-07-01

    Using the structural-environmental conceptual framework, this study employed mixed methods to address the question of whether sex with female sex workers contributes to HIV risk among male immigrant Latino day laborers in suburban Maryland. Because contextual factors can greatly affect HIV risk for both sex workers and their clients, this study investigated the organizational structure of sex work, factors that predicted men's hiring of sex workers, sexual behaviors performed with sex workers, and the use of condoms. Qualitative research was conducted to inform the development of a quantitative survey, but also provided crucial descriptions about the motivations, locations, arrangements, and sexual activities related to sex work. Key informant interviews (N = 10), in-depth interviews with day laborers (N = 10) and Latina female sex workers (N = 4), and two focus groups with day laborers (N = 11) were conducted, and a quantitative survey administered via Audio-enhanced Computer-assisted Self-interviewing (N = 174). Condom use was nearly universal in encounters with female sex workers, thus indicating that the sex workers were not an important source of HIV transmission in this context. Logistic regression was performed to test a model predicting sex with sex workers. Latino day laborers who reported more immigrant stress and who did not have a partner in the U.S. were more likely to have had sex with a sex worker, as were men who reported binge drinking. Structural and social conditions influenced the hiring of sex workers. Further research is warranted to better understand the interrelationships among these circumstances and to inform the development of programs to address them.

  12. Sex with Sex Workers among Latino Day Laborers in Suburban Maryland

    PubMed Central

    Reisen, Carol A.; Gonzales, Felisa A.; Arroyo, Juan C.; Zea, Maria Cecilia; Poppen, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Using the structural-environmental conceptual framework, this study employed mixed methods to address the question of whether sex with female sex workers contributes to HIV risk among male immigrant Latino day laborers in suburban Maryland. Because contextual factors can greatly affect HIV risk for both sex workers and their clients, this study investigated the organizational structure of sex work, factors that predicted men’s hiring of sex workers, sexual behaviors performed with sex workers, and the use of condoms. Qualitative research was conducted to inform the development of a quantitative survey, but also provided crucial descriptions about the motivations, locations, arrangements, and sexual activities related to sex work. Key informant interviews (N= 10), in-depth interviews with day laborers (N= 10) and Latina female sex workers (N = 4), and two focus groups with day laborers (N= 11) were conducted, and a quantitative survey administered via Audio-enhanced Computer-assisted Self-interviewing (N = 174). Condom use was nearly universal in encounters with female sex workers, thus indicating that the sex workers were not an important source of HIV transmission in this context. Logistic regression was performed to test a model predicting sex with sex workers. Latino day laborers who reported more immigrant stress and who did not have a partner in the U.S. were more likely to have had sex with a sex worker, as were men who reported binge drinking. Structural and social conditions influenced the hiring of sex workers. Further research is warranted to better understand the interrelationships among these circumstances and to inform the development of programs to address them. PMID:23070528

  13. Symptoms of heat illness among Latino farm workers in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Mirabelli, Maria C; Quandt, Sara A; Crain, Rebecca; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Robinson, Erin N; Vallejos, Quirina M; Arcury, Thomas A

    2010-11-01

    Symptoms of occupational heat illness provide an early warning that workers are in potentially life-threatening environmental conditions. This analysis was designed to assess the extent to which strategies to reduce the health impact of extreme heat were associated with the prevalence of heat illness among Latino farm workers. Between June and September 2009, a total of 300 Latino men and women participated in a cross-sectional survey about farm worker health. Participants reported whether they were employed through the H-2A temporary agricultural worker program and whether they had ever worked in conditions of extreme heat during their work in the U.S. agricultural industry. Workers who had worked in extreme heat also responded to questions about selected activities and behaviors and whether they experienced symptoms of heat illness. Data analysis was conducted in 2009 to assess associations of altering work hours and activities, drinking more water, resting in shaded areas, and going to air-conditioned places during or after work, with the prevalence of symptoms of heat illness among H-2A and non-H-2A workers. Working in extreme heat was reported by 281 respondents (94%), among whom 112 (40%) reported symptoms of heat illness. Changes in work hours and activities during hot conditions were associated with a lower prevalence of heat illness among H-2A workers but not among non-H-2A workers. These findings suggest the need to improve the understanding of working conditions for farm workers and to assess strategies to reduce agricultural workers' environmental heat exposure. Copyright © 2010 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Applying the Theory of Work Adjustment to Latino Immigrant Workers: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Eggerth, Donald E.; Flynn, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Blustein mapped career decision making onto Maslow’s model of motivation and personality and concluded that most models of career development assume opportunities and decision-making latitude that do not exist for many individuals from low income or otherwise disadvantaged backgrounds. Consequently, Blustein argued that these models may be of limited utility for such individuals. Blustein challenged researchers to reevaluate current career development approaches, particularly those assuming a static world of work, from a perspective allowing for changing circumstances and recognizing career choice can be limited by access to opportunities, personal obligations, and social barriers. This article represents an exploratory effort to determine if the theory of work adjustment (TWA) might meaningfully be used to describe the work experiences of Latino immigrant workers, a group living with severe constraints and having very limited employment opportunities. It is argued that there is significant conceptual convergence between Maslow’s hierarchy of needs and the work reinforcers of TWA. The results of an exploratory, qualitative study with a sample of 10 Latino immigrants are also presented. These immigrants participated in key informant interviews concerning their work experiences both in the United States and in their home countries. The findings support Blustein’s contention that such workers will be most focused on basic survival needs and suggest that TWA reinforcers are descriptive of important aspects of how Latino immigrant workers conceptualize their jobs. PMID:26345693

  15. Applying the Theory of Work Adjustment to Latino Immigrant Workers: An Exploratory Study.

    PubMed

    Eggerth, Donald E; Flynn, Michael A

    2012-02-01

    Blustein mapped career decision making onto Maslow's model of motivation and personality and concluded that most models of career development assume opportunities and decision-making latitude that do not exist for many individuals from low income or otherwise disadvantaged backgrounds. Consequently, Blustein argued that these models may be of limited utility for such individuals. Blustein challenged researchers to reevaluate current career development approaches, particularly those assuming a static world of work, from a perspective allowing for changing circumstances and recognizing career choice can be limited by access to opportunities, personal obligations, and social barriers. This article represents an exploratory effort to determine if the theory of work adjustment (TWA) might meaningfully be used to describe the work experiences of Latino immigrant workers, a group living with severe constraints and having very limited employment opportunities. It is argued that there is significant conceptual convergence between Maslow's hierarchy of needs and the work reinforcers of TWA. The results of an exploratory, qualitative study with a sample of 10 Latino immigrants are also presented. These immigrants participated in key informant interviews concerning their work experiences both in the United States and in their home countries. The findings support Blustein's contention that such workers will be most focused on basic survival needs and suggest that TWA reinforcers are descriptive of important aspects of how Latino immigrant workers conceptualize their jobs.

  16. Measuring Latinos' perceptions of depression: a confirmatory factor analysis of the Illness Perception Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J; Lagomasino, Isabel T; Dwight-Johnson, Megan; Hansen, Marissa C; Xie, Bin

    2008-10-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire adapted for a clinical sample of low-income Latinos suffering from depression. Participants (N = 339) were recruited from public primary care centers. Their average age was 49.73 years and the majority was foreign born females of either Mexican or Central American descent. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test the factor structure of this measure. Construct and discriminant validity and internal consistency were evaluated. After the elimination of three items because of low factor loadings (< .40) and the specification of seven error covariances, a revised model composed of 24 items had adequate goodness-of-fit indices and factor loadings, supporting construct validity. Each of the subscales reported satisfactory internal consistency. Intercorrelations between the 5 illness perception factors provided initial support for the discriminant validity of these factors in the context of depression. The establishment of the psychometric properties of this adapted measure will pave the way for future studies examining the role illness perceptions play in the help seeking and management of depression among Latinos.

  17. The Prevalence of Melasma and Its Association with Quality of Life among Adult Male Migrant Latino Workers

    PubMed Central

    Pichardo, Rita; Vallejos, Quirina; Feldman, Steven R.; Schulz, Mark R.; Verma, Amit; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Melasma is a common condition of Latina women that detracts from their quality of life. The prevalence and impact of melasma in Latino men is not well characterized. Purpose We assess the prevalence of melasma and its association with quality of life among Latino men from Mexico and Central America working in the U.S. Methods The prevalence of melasma was assessed in three studies of Latino men; by direct examination in a study of 25 Latino poultry workers, by direct examination in a study of 54 Latino farmworkers, and by examination of store-and-forward teledermatology images in a study of 300 Latino farmworkers. Quality of life (QOL) was assessed with a Spanish version of the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Results The prevalence of melasma was 36.0%, 7.4%, and 14.0% in the three studies. Prevalence of melasma was greatest among those aged 31 years and older, who were from Guatemala, and who spoke an indigenous language. Presence of melasma was associated with higher DLQI scores, indicating worse life quality, in the poultry worker population. Conclusions Melasma is a common condition in Latino men associated with poor quality of life in some affected individuals. Clinicians should be aware that melasma may be a concern for their male Latino patients. Research on the association of skin conditions with quality of life among minority men is needed. PMID:19126046

  18. Understanding Latino Parental Involvement in Education: Perceptions, Expectations, and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarate, Maria Estela

    2007-01-01

    The Latino community has been characterized by low high school graduation rates, low college completion rates and substandard schooling conditions. As schools and policymakers seek to improve the educational conditions of Latinos, parental influence in the form of school involvement is assumed to play some role in shaping students' educational…

  19. Pre-experience Perceptions About Telemedicine Among African Americans and Latinos in South Central Los Angeles

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Alison; Baker, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This study explores perceptions about telemedicine among urban underserved African American and Latino populations. Telemedicine has been advanced as a vehicle to increase access to specialty care among the urban underserved, yet little is known about its acceptability among these populations. We conducted 10 focus groups with African American and Latino participants (n = 87) in urban Los Angeles in order to explore perceptions about this novel type of care. We found that concerns about telemedicine varied between the two racial/ethnic groups. These findings have implications for important issues such as adoption of telemedicine, patient satisfaction, and doctor–patient interaction. It will be critical to consider perceptions of this healthcare innovation in the development of strategies to market and implement telemedicine among urban, underserved African American and Latino populations. PMID:19566397

  20. Perceptions of legal status: Associations with psychosocial experiences among undocumented Latino/a immigrants.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Cory L; Meca, Alan; Xie, Dong; Schwartz, Seth J; Moise, Rhoda K

    2017-03-01

    In the present study we used a mixed-method design to examine perceptions of legal status and their association with psychosocial experiences among undocumented Latino/a immigrants in the United States Participants were asked to compare their perceived social experiences with those of documented Latinos/as in order to determine whether differences in such perceptions might emerge and whether such perceptions might differentially impact well-being. A community sample of 140 self-reported undocumented Latino/a immigrants completed questionnaires measuring perceptions of legal status, well-being (global and psychological), perceived context of reception, and experiences of discrimination. Results indicated that individuals who perceived their experiences as different from those of documented Latinos/as due to an unauthorized legal status reported less social equality as evidenced by lower well-being, increased experiences of discrimination, and a more adverse context of reception. Moreover, individuals who perceived their social experiences as different from those of documented Latinos/as due to their legal status reported issues centering on 2 domains: limited opportunity/restricted social mobility and discrimination/unfair treatment. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed in terms of advancing theory and from a multicultural counseling perspective. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Perception of Childhood Obesity and Support for Prevention Policies among Latinos and Whites

    PubMed Central

    Puricelli Perin, Douglas M.; Frerichs, Leah; Costa, Sergio; Ramirez, Amelie G.; Huang, Terry T.-K.

    2014-01-01

    A cross-sectional survey was administered to Latino and White residents of Omaha, NE, to assess perception of the childhood obesity problem, attribution of responsibility, and support for obesity-related policies. The sample included 40.8% (n = 271) Latinos and 59.2% (n = 393) Whites. Among Latinos, 25% did not see childhood obesity as a problem, compared to 6% of Whites (P < 0.001). This difference persisted after adjusting for age, gender, and education level (odds ratio (OR) 2.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07–4.14). Latinos were more likely to agree that government was responsible for addressing childhood obesity compared to Whites (OR 2.81, 95% CI 1.82–4.35). Higher support for policy interventions was observed among individuals who perceived childhood obesity as a big problem compared to those who did not, independent of race, sex, age, or education level. The relationship between support for tax-based policies and perception of the childhood obesity problem was mainly evident among Latinos rather than Whites. Despite city-wide efforts to address obesity, differential penetration in community subgroups appears evident. There is room to further engage Latinos in the cause of obesity. Deepening community awareness about the consequences and complexity of childhood obesity can lead to stronger support for childhood obesity policy interventions. PMID:25045532

  2. Perception of childhood obesity and support for prevention policies among Latinos and Whites.

    PubMed

    Puricelli Perin, Douglas M; Frerichs, Leah; Costa, Sergio; Ramirez, Amelie G; Huang, Terry T-K

    2014-01-01

    A cross-sectional survey was administered to Latino and White residents of Omaha, NE, to assess perception of the childhood obesity problem, attribution of responsibility, and support for obesity-related policies. The sample included 40.8% (n = 271) Latinos and 59.2% (n = 393) Whites. Among Latinos, 25% did not see childhood obesity as a problem, compared to 6% of Whites (P < 0.001). This difference persisted after adjusting for age, gender, and education level (odds ratio (OR) 2.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-4.14). Latinos were more likely to agree that government was responsible for addressing childhood obesity compared to Whites (OR 2.81, 95% CI 1.82-4.35). Higher support for policy interventions was observed among individuals who perceived childhood obesity as a big problem compared to those who did not, independent of race, sex, age, or education level. The relationship between support for tax-based policies and perception of the childhood obesity problem was mainly evident among Latinos rather than Whites. Despite city-wide efforts to address obesity, differential penetration in community subgroups appears evident. There is room to further engage Latinos in the cause of obesity. Deepening community awareness about the consequences and complexity of childhood obesity can lead to stronger support for childhood obesity policy interventions.

  3. A Qualitative Analysis of the Perception of Stigma Among Latinos Receiving Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Interian, Alejandro; Martinez, Igda E.; Guarnaccia, Peter J.; Vega, William A.; Escobar, Javier I.

    2008-01-01

    Objective This study sought to describe the role of stigma in antidepressant adherence among Latinos. Methods The study utilized data generated from six focus groups of Latino outpatients receiving antidepressants (N=30). By using a grounded theory approach, qualitative analysis focused specifically on the role of stigma in antidepressant treatment, as well as salient Latino values. Results Perceptions of stigma were related to both the diagnosis of depression and use of antidepressant medication. Qualitative analyses showed that antidepressant use was seen as implying more severe illness, weakness or failure to cope with problems, and being under the effects of a drug. Reports of stigma were also related to social consequences. Also, the perceived negative attributes of antidepressant use were at odds with self-perceived cultural values. Conclusions Stigma was a prominent concern among Latinos receiving antidepressants, and stigma often affected adherence. Furthermore, culture is likely to play an important role in the communication of stigma and its associated complications. PMID:18048562

  4. FBO LEADERS’ PERCEPTIONS OF THE PSYCHO-SOCIAL CONTEXTS IN RURAL LATINOS

    PubMed Central

    VACCA, RAFFAELE; WIENS, BRENDA; LOE, EMILY; LAFLAM, MELODY; PÉREZ, AWILDA; LOCKE, BARBARA

    2016-01-01

    LATINOS COMPRISE THE LARGEST MINORITY RURAL POPULATION IN THE U.S. AND THEY ARE OFTEN EXPOSED TO ADVERSE SOCIAL HEALTH DETERMINANTS THAT CAN DETRIMENTALLY AFFECT THEIR MENTAL HEALTH. GUIDED BY THE CBPR PRINCIPLES, THIS STUDY AIMED TO DESCRIBE FBO LEADERS’ PERCEPTIONS OF THE CONTEXTS AFFECTING MENTAL WELL-BEING AND POTENTIAL APPROACHES TO MENTAL HEALTH PROMOTION IN RURAL, LATINO IMMIGRANTS. THIS IS A DESCRIPTIVE, QUALITATIVE ARM OF A LARGER STUDY IN WHICH COMMUNITY-ACADEMIC MEMBERS HAVE PARTNERED TO DEVELOP A CULTURALLY TAILORED MENTAL HEALTH PROMOTION INTERVENTION AMONG RURAL LATINOS. FBO’S LEADERS (N=15), FROM DIFFERENT DENOMINATIONS IN NORTH FLORIDA, WERE INTERVIEWED UNTIL SATURATION WAS REACHED. FBO LEADERS REMARKED THAT IN ADDITION TO RELIGIOSITY, WHICH LATINOS ALREADY HAVE, MORE COMMUNITY BUILDING AND INVOLVEMENT IS NECESSARY TO THE PROMOTION OF MENTAL HEALTH. PMID:26818929

  5. Poor safety climate, long work hours, and musculoskeletal discomfort among Latino horse farm workers.

    PubMed

    Swanberg, Jennifer; Clouser, Jessica Miller; Gan, Wenqi; Flunker, John C; Westneat, Susan; Browning, Steven R

    2017-09-03

    This study investigated the prevalence of self-reported musculoskeletal discomfort (MSD) and work-related factors associated with elevated MSD among Latino thoroughbred farm workers. Participants (N = 225) were recruited using a community-based purposive sampling approach to participate in in-person interviews. Of these workers, 85% experienced MSD. MSD was divided into tertiles; the upper tertile was defined as elevated. Multivariable Poisson regression revealed associations between any elevated MSD and longer tenure on horse farms, longer work hours, and poor safety climate. Elevated neck/back MSD was associated with longer tenure, longer work hours, and poor safety climate. Elevated upper extremity MSD was associated with age and poor safety climate. Elevated lower extremity MSD was associated with longer tenure, longer work hours, and being female. Musculoskeletal discomfort is common among these workers. Improving safety climate and minimizing long work hours is recommended.

  6. Employer differences in upper-body musculoskeletal disorders and pain among immigrant Latino poultry processing workers.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Daryl A; Mora, Dana C; Arcury, Thomas A; Chen, Haiying; Quandt, Sara A

    2014-01-01

    Between-employer differences in working conditions may lead to variable injury rates. The objective of this paper is to assess the difference in the prevalence of epicondylitis, rotator cuff syndrome, and low back pain among immigrant Latino poultry workers at plants of three different employers. Data were collected from a cross-sectional study among 286 poultry processing workers. Community-based sampling was used to recruit participants in western North Carolina. Rotator cuff syndrome (26.7%) and low back pain (27.9%) were more prevalent among employees of one specific employer. Multivariate analysis showed significant associations of low back pain and rotator cuff syndrome with age, task performed in the processing line, and employer. Employer is a major predictor of musculoskeletal disorders and pain. Line speed and work pace may account for these differences and provide an opportunity for regulation and intervention to protect the health of workers.

  7. A Guide to the Design of Occupational Safety and Health Training for Immigrant, Latino/a Dairy Workers

    PubMed Central

    Menger, Lauren M.; Rosecrance, John; Stallones, Lorann; Roman-Muniz, Ivette Noami

    2016-01-01

    Industrialized dairy production in the U.S. relies on an immigrant, primarily Latino/a, workforce to meet greater production demands. Given the high rates of injuries and illnesses on U.S. dairies, there is pressing need to develop culturally appropriate training to promote safe practices among immigrant, Latino/a dairy workers. To date, there have been few published research articles or guidelines specific to developing effective occupational safety and health (OSH) training for immigrant, Latino/a workers in the dairy industry. Literature relevant to safety training for immigrant workers in agriculture and other high-risk industries (e.g., construction) was examined to identify promising approaches. The aim of this paper is to provide a practical guide for researchers and practitioners involved in the design and implementation of effective OSH training programs for immigrant, Latino/a workers in the dairy industry. The search was restricted to peer-reviewed academic journals and guidelines published between 1980 and 2015 by universities or extension programs, written in English, and related to health and safety training among immigrant, Latino/a workers within agriculture and other high-risk industries. Relevant recommendations regarding effective training transfer were also included from literature in the field of industrial–organizational psychology. A total of 97 articles were identified, of which 65 met the inclusion criteria and made a unique and significant contribution. The review revealed a number of promising strategies for how to effectively tailor health and safety training for immigrant, Latino/a workers in the dairy industry grouped under five main themes: (1) understanding and involving workers; (2) training content and materials; (3) training methods; (4) maximizing worker engagement; and (5) program evaluation. The identification of best practices in the design and implementation of training programs for immigrant, Latino/a workers within

  8. A Guide to the Design of Occupational Safety and Health Training for Immigrant, Latino/a Dairy Workers.

    PubMed

    Menger, Lauren M; Rosecrance, John; Stallones, Lorann; Roman-Muniz, Ivette Noami

    2016-01-01

    Industrialized dairy production in the U.S. relies on an immigrant, primarily Latino/a, workforce to meet greater production demands. Given the high rates of injuries and illnesses on U.S. dairies, there is pressing need to develop culturally appropriate training to promote safe practices among immigrant, Latino/a dairy workers. To date, there have been few published research articles or guidelines specific to developing effective occupational safety and health (OSH) training for immigrant, Latino/a workers in the dairy industry. Literature relevant to safety training for immigrant workers in agriculture and other high-risk industries (e.g., construction) was examined to identify promising approaches. The aim of this paper is to provide a practical guide for researchers and practitioners involved in the design and implementation of effective OSH training programs for immigrant, Latino/a workers in the dairy industry. The search was restricted to peer-reviewed academic journals and guidelines published between 1980 and 2015 by universities or extension programs, written in English, and related to health and safety training among immigrant, Latino/a workers within agriculture and other high-risk industries. Relevant recommendations regarding effective training transfer were also included from literature in the field of industrial-organizational psychology. A total of 97 articles were identified, of which 65 met the inclusion criteria and made a unique and significant contribution. The review revealed a number of promising strategies for how to effectively tailor health and safety training for immigrant, Latino/a workers in the dairy industry grouped under five main themes: (1) understanding and involving workers; (2) training content and materials; (3) training methods; (4) maximizing worker engagement; and (5) program evaluation. The identification of best practices in the design and implementation of training programs for immigrant, Latino/a workers within

  9. Latino and Non-Latino Perceptions of the Air Quality in California’s San Joaquin Valley

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Paul; Cameron, Linda; Cisneros, Ricardo; Cox, Rachel; Gaab, Erin; Gonzalez, Mariaelena; Ramondt, Steven; Song, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of California has poor air quality, high rates of asthma, and high rates of obesity. Informational campaigns aimed at increasing awareness of the health impacts of poor air quality and promoting behavior change need to be tailored to the specific target audiences. The study examined perceptions of air quality, perceived health impacts, and methods of accessing information about air quality between Latinos and other groups in the SJV. Residents of the SJV (n = 744) where surveyed via one of three methods: community organizations (256), public locations (251), and an internet panel (237). The results suggest that people perceive the air quality in their region to be generally unhealthy, particularly for sensitive groups. The air quality is more likely to be reported as being unhealthy by people with health problems and less unhealthy by Latinos and people who report regularly exercising. Latinos are more likely to report working outdoors regularly, but also more likely to report being able to reduce their exposure if the air quality is unhealthy. The results report differences in informational sources about air quality, suggesting that informational campaigns should target high risk groups using a variety of media. PMID:27983706

  10. Perceptions of College Financial Aid among California Latino Youth. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarate, Maria Estela; Pachon, Harry P.

    2006-01-01

    The Tomas Rivera Policy Institute (TRPI) survey of California Latino youth perceptions of college financial aid reveals: (1) Ninety-eight percent of respondents felt it was important to have a college education; (2) Thirty-eight percent of respondents did not feel the benefits of college outweigh the costs; (3) Not being able to work and incurring…

  11. Latino Immigrant Men's Perceptions of Depression and Attitudes toward Help Seeking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.

    2007-01-01

    Perceptions of depression, attitudes toward depression treatments, help-seeking preferences, and perceived barriers to care were examined in a sample of 56 Latino immigrant men recruited from a primary health care clinic. Each participant was presented a vignette depicting an individual with major depression. Men described the vignette as a…

  12. Latino/a Immigration: Actions and Outcomes Based on Perceptions and Emotions or Facts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casas, J. Manuel; Cabrera, Ana P.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how the perceived increase in Latino/a immigration, the present economic conditions, and the tendency to ascribe negative attributes and behaviors to the immigrant are resulting in anti-immigration actions and laws. It directs attention to the detrimental effects that such perceptions, actions, and laws are having on the…

  13. Latino Immigrant Men's Perceptions of Depression and Attitudes toward Help Seeking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.

    2007-01-01

    Perceptions of depression, attitudes toward depression treatments, help-seeking preferences, and perceived barriers to care were examined in a sample of 56 Latino immigrant men recruited from a primary health care clinic. Each participant was presented a vignette depicting an individual with major depression. Men described the vignette as a…

  14. Latino/a Immigration: Actions and Outcomes Based on Perceptions and Emotions or Facts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casas, J. Manuel; Cabrera, Ana P.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how the perceived increase in Latino/a immigration, the present economic conditions, and the tendency to ascribe negative attributes and behaviors to the immigrant are resulting in anti-immigration actions and laws. It directs attention to the detrimental effects that such perceptions, actions, and laws are having on the…

  15. "…you earn money by suffering pain:" Beliefs About Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Among Latino Poultry Processing Workers.

    PubMed

    Arcury, Thomas A; Mora, Dana C; Quandt, Sara A

    2015-06-01

    The nature of poultry processing puts workers at risk for developing neurological injuries, particularly carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Many poultry processing workers are Latino immigrants. This qualitative analysis uses an explanatory models of illness (EMs) framework to describe immigrant Latino poultry processing workers' (Guatemalan and Mexican) beliefs of CTS. Understanding these workers' CTS EMs provides a foundation for recommendations to reduce the risk factors for this occupational injury. In-depth interviews were completed with 15 poultry processing workers diagnosed with CTS. Systematic qualitative analysis was used to delineate beliefs about causes, symptoms, physiology, treatments, quality-of-life and health implications of CTS. Participants' EMs largely reflect current biomedical understanding of CTS. These EMs are similar for Guatemalan and Mexican workers. Beliefs about causes include factors in the work environment (e.g., repetition, cold) and individual physical weakness. Treatments include over-the-counter medicine, as well as traditional remedies. Most know the future impact of CTS will include chronic pain. These workers know what causes CTS and that curing it would require quitting their jobs, but feel that they must endure CTS to support their families. Latino poultry processing workers, whether Guatemalan or Mexican, have a fairly complete understanding of what causes CTS, how to treat it, and what they must do to cure it. However, situational factors force them to endure CTS. Policy changes are needed to change the structure of work in poultry processing, particularly line speed and break frequency, if the prevalence of CTS is to be reduced.

  16. Gangs of Chicago: Perceptions of crime and its effect on the recreation behavior of Latino residents in urban communities

    Treesearch

    Monika Stodolska; Juan Carlos Acevedo; Kimberly J. Shinew

    2009-01-01

    Perception of safety is an important factor affecting the leisure behavior of Latinos residing in urban neighborhoods. Yet research on how fear of crime and fear of gangs in particular affect leisure of ethnic and racial minorities is underdeveloped. The objectives of this study are to examine how gangs operate in recreation spaces in Latino neighborhoods, how gangs...

  17. Cohort study of physical activity and injury among Latino farm workers

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Hong; Stoecklin-Marois, Maria; Li, Chin-Shang; McCurdy, Stephen A.; Schenker, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study characterized physical activity and its association with injury among Latino farm workers. Methods An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect baseline and follow-up data on 843 and 640 Latino farm workers, respectively. Participants were 18–55 years old, engaged in farm work and residing in Mendota, CA at baseline interview. The questionnaire assessed self-reported physical activity and risk of injury. Results The 12 month prevalence of injury decreased from 9.0% at baseline to 6.9% at follow up interview. In GEE models adjusted for age, follow-up time, gender, smoking, income and years working in agriculture, poor/fair self-assessed health status (OR=1.82, 95% CI: 1.18, 2.82) and 2–3 hours per day of sitting/watching TV/using a computer (OR=0.50, 95% CI: 0.30–0.83) were significantly associated with injury. Conclusions Physical activity was not associated with injury in this population. Efforts to reduce injuries should focus on known risk factors such as poor health status. PMID:25943698

  18. Dermatologist-diagnosed skin diseases among immigrant Latino poultry processors and other manual workers in North Carolina, USA.

    PubMed

    Pichardo-Geisinger, Rita; Muñoz-Ali, Diana; Arcury, Thomas A; Blocker, Jill N; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Mora, Dana C; Chen, Haiying; Schulz, Mark R; Feldman, Steve R; Quandt, Sara A

    2013-11-01

    Immigrant Latino workers represent an expanding workforce in rural areas of the USA, where their employment is concentrated in occupations such as poultry processing that entail chemical, infectious, and mechanical skin exposures. Occupation-related skin illnesses in this vulnerable population are not well characterized. This study was designed to describe the prevalences of skin diseases among immigrant Latino poultry processors and other manual workers in North Carolina. Community-based sampling was used to recruit 742 immigrant Latino workers, 518 of whom underwent a physical examination supervised by a board-certified dermatologist. The presence or absence of skin disease on the face, neck, arms, hands, and feet was recorded. Workers ranged in age from 18 years to 68 years. Slightly over half of the sample were male (52.6%). Poultry workers represented 55.8% of the study sample. Infectious skin diseases were the most common diagnosis, present in 52.3% of workers. Inflammatory skin diseases were present in 28.2% and pigmentary disorders in 21.8% of workers. The most common skin conditions were tinea pedis (37.6%), onychomycosis (31.9%), scars (13.7%), acne (11.8%), and melasma (9.3%). Age, sex, first language, and work as a poultry processor accounted in part for the prevalence of these diseases. Several skin diseases are highly prevalent in immigrant Latino workers and may relate to work environment. These may impair the quality of life of these workers and predispose them to further illness. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  19. Personal protective equipment and work safety climate among Latino poultry processing workers in Western North Carolina, USA.

    PubMed

    Arcury, Thomas A; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Anderson, Andrea M; Mora, Dana C; Carrillo, Lourdes; Chen, Haiying; Quandt, Sara A

    2012-01-01

    Job-appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) is important for decreasing the high rates of occupational injury experienced by poultry processing workers. This analysis describes the job-appropriate PPE provided to poultry processing workers by their employers and the PPE used by these workers, and it delineates the association of work safety climate with job-appropriate PPE. Data are from a cross-sectional study of 403 Latino poultry processing workers in North Carolina. Most poultry processing workers are not provided with nor use job-appropriate PPE; however, more workers use PPE than are provided. The provision and use of PPE differs by employer. Work safety climate was associated with use of job-appropriate PPE. Poultry processing workers should be provided with job-appropriate PPE. Workers' use of PPE is an indicator of safety climate. Further research about work safety climate and other work organization characteristics and job safety characteristics is needed.

  20. Perceptions of Subjective Burden among Latino Families Caring for a Loved One with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Mercedes; Barrio, Concepción

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore perceptions of subjective burden among Latino family members providing care for a loved one with schizophrenia. Data were collected from outpatient community mental health centers and featured 64 Latino family members who were primarily Spanish speaking and of Mexican origin. We used qualitative methods to examine subjective burden based on an open section of the Family Burden Interview Schedule. Five salient themes emerged capturing family members’ subjective burden experience: (a) interpersonal family relationships, (b) emotional and physical health, (c) loss of role expectations, (d) religion and spirituality, and (e) stigma. Overall, findings illustrated that families perceived numerous challenges in their caregiving. Implications for research and practice among Latino family members are discussed. PMID:25952273

  1. Mediators and Moderators of the Effectiveness of a Community Health Worker Intervention That Improved Dietary Outcomes in Pregnant Latino Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Megha K.; Kieffer, Edith C.; Choi, Hwajung; Schumann, Christina; Heisler, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Background. Pregnancy is an opportune time to initiate diabetes prevention strategies for minority and underserved women, using culturally tailored interventions delivered by community health workers. A community-partnered randomized controlled trial (RCT) with pregnant Latino women resulted in significantly improved vegetable, fiber, added sugar,…

  2. Moving up the Economic Ladder: Latino Workers and the Nation's Future Prosperity. State of Hispanic America, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Sonia M., Ed.

    This collection of papers looks at the employment status of the U.S. Hispanic population, a significant and growing segment of the nation's labor force. It analyzes characteristics of Latino workers, including educational attainment by Hispanic subgroups, work experience and skills, and computer literacy. The eight papers are: (1) "What…

  3. Mediators and Moderators of the Effectiveness of a Community Health Worker Intervention That Improved Dietary Outcomes in Pregnant Latino Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Megha K.; Kieffer, Edith C.; Choi, Hwajung; Schumann, Christina; Heisler, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Background. Pregnancy is an opportune time to initiate diabetes prevention strategies for minority and underserved women, using culturally tailored interventions delivered by community health workers. A community-partnered randomized controlled trial (RCT) with pregnant Latino women resulted in significantly improved vegetable, fiber, added sugar,…

  4. The Perceptions of Dislocated Workers under the Workforce Investment Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Michael S.; Brown, James M.

    2012-01-01

    This descriptive qualitative case study investigated the perceptions of dislocated workers offered program services through the Workforce Investment Act's (WIA) Dislocated Worker program in Minnesota. This research focused on recently dislocated workers who lost their jobs through no fault of their own and hence were eligible for unemployment…

  5. Illnesses and injuries reported by Latino poultry workers in western North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Quandt, Sara A; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Marín, Antonio; Carrillo, Lourdes; Coates, Michael L; Burke, Bless; Arcury, Thomas A

    2006-05-01

    Poultry processing is the largest sector of the meat products industry. Many workers are immigrants; few data exist on their illness and injury rates and the impact of workplace safety environment. Survey interviews were conducted with a representative sample of 200 Latino poultry workers employed by three different companies in western North Carolina; topics included symptoms, work-related illnesses and injuries, and plant safety climate. Most respondents were <35 years of age and had been in the US <10 years. Frequency of self-reported symptoms was high, particularly for musculoskeletal symptoms. Despite symptoms, workers reported not missing work or seeking medical care. Occupational injuries and illnesses and symptoms varied by company. Between-company differences in injury and illness rates were consistent with perceived safety and company provision of personal protective equipment. Symptoms reported exceeded rates reported by other community, clinical, and occupational samples. Findings suggest policy changes and research are needed to reduce the high rates of occupational illnesses and injuries in this vulnerable population. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Sociocultural factors of teenage pregnancy in Latino communities: preparing social workers for culturally responsive practice.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Elizabeth; Pecukonis, Edward V; Zhou, Kelly

    2014-11-01

    Despite gains in reducing teenage pregnancy during the past 20 years, disparities in teenage pregnancy rates persist: The teenage pregnancy rate in Latino communities is now nearly double the average rate of teenage pregnancy in the United States. Considering the significant risks teenage pregnancy and parenting pose to both the teenager and the child, and that social workers are already often working in communities with populations at risk, this is not only a major public health issue, but one that the field of social work is well positioned to actively address. This article synthesizes pertinent literature on some of the social and cultural influences important for understanding this phenomenon. Implications for social work practice are discussed.

  7. Perceptions of successful aging among older Latinos, in cross-cultural context.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Jeanne M; Gonzalez, Carlene A; Saleh, Mahasin; Maitoza, Robyn; Anngela-Cole, Linda

    2012-09-01

    Latinos are the largest and fastest growing minority group in the U.S. but they have been overlooked in studies of successful aging. This study used a multi-method approach with an open-ended question and Phelan et al.'s (Journal of American Geriatrics Society 52:211-216, 2004) Successful Aging Measure to determine whether the quantitative measure fully captured perceptions of successful aging of 60 older Latinos living in three Western states. Then, the findings were compared with other studies that had used the measure with Anglo, Japanese, Japanese-American, and Latin American samples. The results revealed that Latinos and Latin Americans responses are very similar to each other, and somewhat different from other cultural groups. Latinos focus on maintaining a positive outlook, living in the present, enjoying a sense of community, and relying on spirituality and family for comfort and meaning as they age, but they also worry about finances. There are several components of this study that professionals can use to guide their practice, including a summary of methodological challenges and ongoing conceptual debates in the successful aging literature.

  8. Influences on Healthy-Eating Decision Making in Latino Adolescent Children of Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Workers.

    PubMed

    Kilanowski, Jill F

    2016-01-01

    Latino children demonstrate high rates of unhealthy weight, and children of Latino migrant and seasonal agricultural workers are heavier than their Latino peers. This one-group, cross-sectional, mixed-methods pilot study explored healthy-eating decision making with 12- to 14-year-olds recruited from a Midwest summer migrant education program. Demographics, decision-making, self-efficacy, and social support survey instruments were used, along with gender-specific focus groups. In the convenience sample, which included 24 participants, students felt varying degrees of uncertainty when choosing healthy foods in social situations, and 67% made poor-quality decisions. Parents offered greater support for healthy eating compared with friends. Qualitative analyses identified three themes: healthy decision making includes fruits, vegetables, and physical activity; mothers have influence over health and healthy decisions; and friends encourage unhealthy food choices. Influences on healthy-eating decision making in Latino adolescent children of migrant and seasonal agricultural workers, which were previously missing from the literature, were identified. Future research includes development of interventions to assist these adolescents with healthy-eating decision making. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluating Latino WIC Mothers' Perceptions of Infant's Healthy Growth: A Formative Assessment.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Angela C; Thomson, Cynthia A; Duncan, Burris; Arthur, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    This article reports on a formative assessment with Latino mothers in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) evaluating knowledge, attitudes and behaviors regarding healthy growth for infants and their understanding of infant growth monitoring. Further, we explored the acceptability and feasibility of mothers' monitoring their infants' growth. This assessment includes healthy growth perceptions from mothers, caregivers and from WIC staff. Utilizing a mixed method approach, this assessment included qualitative focus groups with WIC mothers that included a growth chart plotting exercise and a quantitative survey. In-depth interviews with clinic staff discussing protocols used in assessing children's growth were also conducted in one WIC clinic. Focus group participants included 34 mothers and 19 caregivers with a mean age of 32 years; 90 % identified as Latino. Themes included concern for underweight status, and reports of limited conversations between mothers and healthcare providers regarding overweight status, and infant feeding practices/beliefs that may contribute to feeding behaviors associated with risk for excess weight gain during infancy. Growth charts were well received, mothers were able to plot with modest accuracy; but effectiveness of growth plotting might be limited without refinement for health literacy and the provision of culturally-sensitive education in relation to feeding behaviors to support healthy infant growth. This represents a first effort in evaluating Latino mothers' perceptions of infants' healthy growth and use growth charts as a potential tool that can help prevent excess weight gain in early infancy.

  10. The Latino Students' Attitudes, Perceptions, and Views on Bilingual Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Steven K.

    2006-01-01

    In light of the continuing debate surrounding bilingual education, there has been a renewed interest to examine the perceptions and views on the subject from various constituents. The purpose of this study was to examine the group who is the target of and most affected by this controversy--English language learners. The study surveyed 280 Latino…

  11. Immigrant Hispanic/Latinos Teachers' Perception of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Young Suk; Baek, Eun Ok; Vrongistinos, Konstantinos

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine five immigrant teachers' perceptions of education. This research, especially explored (a) participants' motivation of their teaching career choice, (b) their motivation to become a teacher in the USA, (c) challenges they faced in the USA, (d) how they overcame the obstacles they faced, and (e) suggestions…

  12. Same and Different: Latino College Students' Perceptions of Themselves and Others on Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Roger Geertz

    2013-01-01

    In this study, most Latino college students preferred the term "Hispanic" over "Latino" as a panethnic term. These Latino students also detailed their differences based on how they perceive other specific Latino ethnic groups, non-Latino groups, their political identity, and their immigration and citizenship status. (Contains 1 table and 1 note.)

  13. Same and Different: Latino College Students' Perceptions of Themselves and Others on Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Roger Geertz

    2013-01-01

    In this study, most Latino college students preferred the term "Hispanic" over "Latino" as a panethnic term. These Latino students also detailed their differences based on how they perceive other specific Latino ethnic groups, non-Latino groups, their political identity, and their immigration and citizenship status. (Contains 1 table and 1 note.)

  14. Risk screening for cardiovascular disease and diabetes in Latino migrant farmworkers: a role for the community health worker.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Reagan H; Snyder, Audrey E; Burt, David R; Greiner, Doris S; Luna, Max A

    2015-02-01

    Diabetes and heart disease are two of the leading causes of death for Hispanics living in the United States (American Heart Association [AHA] in Circulation 123:e18-e209. doi: 10.1161/CIR.0b013e3182009701 , 2010). As the Hispanic population continues to grow, the need for low-cost, non-invasive methods to detect at risk populations for such diseases becomes more important. Once at risk individuals are detected, prevention strategies can be implemented. Studies have shown that Latino community health workers (CHWs) are effective educators, patient advocates and health promotion motivators for patients with known heart disease or diabetes. This pilot study examined the accuracy with which Latino CHWs could determine migrant farmworkers at risk for diabetes or cardiovascular disease (CVD) in rural Virginia. This quasi-experimental study supports the hypothesis that Latino CHWs can use non-invasive diabetes and CVD screening tools with similar accuracy as a registered nurse. The screening tools used were the American Diabetes Association's diabetes risk calculator and a non-laboratory screening tool for CVD risk designed by Gaziano et al. (Lancet 371:923-931, 2008). The terms Latino and Hispanic will be used interchangeably.

  15. Adherence to Dietary Recommendations Is Associated with Acculturation among Latino Farm Workers12

    PubMed Central

    Matias, Susana L.; Stoecklin-Marois, Maria T.; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Schenker, Marc B.

    2013-01-01

    We examined adherence to dietary recommendations on fruit/vegetable and fat intake and identified correlates with acculturation indicators as well as with family, lifestyle, and occupational factors in a farm worker cohort in central California. Interviewer-administered questionnaires for this cross-sectional study were completed from January 2006 to April 2007. Participants were 18- to 55-y-old Latinos living in Mendota in a farm worker household. We assessed fruit/vegetable consumption and fat intake using the Block Fruit/Vegetable/Fiber Screener and the Block Dietary Fat Screener, respectively. Survey data analysis methods for contingency tables and logistic regression were used for assessing associations. The sample included 802 participants, reporting mean fruit and vegetable intake ( ± SD) of 5.0 ± 1.5 daily servings, and 47% reporting < 5 daily servings. Being born in Mexico or Central America and longer United States residency were associated with higher odds of consuming ≥ 5 daily fruit/vegetable servings and more frequent consumption of field products while working was associated with lower adherence to this recommendation. The average daily percent of calories from fat was 35.0 ± 4.1% and 53% of participants consumed > 35% of daily calories from fat. Men born in Mexico, women born in Central America, and participants who worked in fruit or vegetable crops had higher odds of consuming ≤ 35% of calories from fat. Higher acculturation level, United States school attendance, and having a child at home were associated with lower adherence to this recommendation. Acculturation, family, and occupational correlates of diet quality were identified in this underserved, immigrant population. Our findings may assist program targeting and intervention efforts. PMID:23864507

  16. Community health workers assisting Latinos manage stress and diabetes (CALMS-D): rationale, intervention design, implementation, and process outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Julie; Bermudez-Millan, Angela; Damio, Grace; Segura-Perez, Sofia; Chhabra, Jyoti; Vergara, Cunegundo; Perez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2015-12-01

    Latinos have high rates of diabetes and mental distress, but lack appropriate services. A study was designed to compare enhanced standard diabetes care with enhanced standard care plus community health worker (CHW) delivered stress management for Latinos with type 2 diabetes. This paper reports intervention design and process outcomes. A formative process was used to develop and implement an eight-session, group stress management intervention. One hundred twenty-one participants completed baseline assessments; n = 107 attended diabetes education and were then randomized. Recruits reported high credibility and treatment expectancies. Treatment fidelity was high. Participants reported high treatment satisfaction and therapeutic alliance and their diabetes knowledge and affect improved over the short term. Retention and attendance at group sessions was challenging but successful relative to similar trials. This comprehensive and culturally sensitive stress management intervention, delivered by a well-trained CHW, was successfully implemented.

  17. "Can't Afford To Lose a Bad Job": Latino Workers in Dane County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Center on Wisconsin Strategy.

    A study explored the quality of life of Latinos living in Dane County, Wisconsin. Data collection included door-to-door surveys, in-depth interviews, and analysis of government reports. Findings indicated Latinos often work in bad jobs, characterized by poverty-level wages, rare and inconsistent overtime pay, erratic and inflexible schedules, few…

  18. Perceptions of Challenges and Values of Higher Education between First Generation and Subsequent Generations on Male Latinos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Sylvia Andrea

    2012-01-01

    This research study focused on the perceptions of challenges and values of higher education between first-generation and subsequent-generation male Latinos and their factors affecting academic success. According to Gandara (2009), Latinas are making advancements in higher education, being committed to continue with college, and maintaining higher…

  19. This Test Is Unfair: African American and Latino High School Students' Perceptions of Standardized College Admission Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walpole, MaryBeth; McDonough, Patricia M.; Bauer, Constance J.; Gibson, Carolyn; Kanyi, Kamau T.; Toliver, Rita

    This qualitative study focused on African American and Latino high school students perceptions of standardized admission tests, including the Scholastic Assessment Tests (I and II) and the ACT Assessment. Students enrolled in college preparatory classes were interviewed about these tests individually and in focus groups in fall 1998 in their…

  20. The Perception of Belonging: Latino Undergraduate Students Participation in the Social and Academic Life at a Predominantly White Private University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdes Ingelmo, Jose Joaquin, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the perception of belonging by Latino undergraduate students attending a predominantly White private university by documenting, in their "own voices," the extent of their participation in the social and academic life of the campus. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of…

  1. Differences in Perceptions of Barriers to College Enrollment and the Completion of a Degree among Latinos in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becerra, David

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the differences in perceptions of barriers in education among Latinos in the United States based on the level of linguistic acculturation, generational status, academic achievement, and socioeconomic status of the participants. This study used data from the Pew Hispanic Research Center. Results indicated that later-generation…

  2. Self-Efficacy, Perceptions of Barriers, Vocational Identity, and the Career Exploration Behavior of Latino/a High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gushue, George V.; Clarke, Christine P.; Pantzer, Karen M.; Scanlan, Kolone R. L.

    2006-01-01

    This study explored the potential relationship between the social cognitive variables of career decision making self-efficacy and perceptions of barriers and the outcome variables of vocational identity and career exploration behaviors in a sample of 128 urban Latino/a high school students. The results indicated that higher levels of career…

  3. The Perception of Belonging: Latino Undergraduate Students Participation in the Social and Academic Life at a Predominantly White Private University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdes Ingelmo, Jose Joaquin, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the perception of belonging by Latino undergraduate students attending a predominantly White private university by documenting, in their "own voices," the extent of their participation in the social and academic life of the campus. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of…

  4. Prereferral Process with Latino English Language Learners with Specific Learning Disabilities: Perceptions of English-as-a-Second-Language Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferlis, Emily; Xu, Yaoying

    2016-01-01

    This study explored perceptions of English-as-a-second-language (ESL) teachers on the prereferral process for Latino English language learners (ELLs). Using Colaizzi's (1978) phenomenological approach, qualitative data were collected through interviews with four ESL teachers. Analyses of the data indicated that the ESL teachers used research-based…

  5. This Test Is Unfair: African American and Latino High School Students' Perceptions of Standardized College Admission Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walpole, MaryBeth; McDonough, Patricia M.; Bauer, Constance J.; Gibson, Carolyn; Kanyi, Kamau T.; Toliver, Rita

    This qualitative study focused on African American and Latino high school students perceptions of standardized admission tests, including the Scholastic Assessment Tests (I and II) and the ACT Assessment. Students enrolled in college preparatory classes were interviewed about these tests individually and in focus groups in fall 1998 in their…

  6. Do You See What I See?: Latino Adolescents' Perceptions of the Images on Television

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivadeneyra, Rocio

    2006-01-01

    The pervasiveness of harmful stereotypes about Latinos has led to concern over the effects of these on individuals. The mass media play a central role in perpetuating these stereotypes, yet we know very little about how Latinos perceive them. The purpose of this study was to examine how Latino adolescents view portrayals of Latino characters on…

  7. Self-Medication Practices among a Sample of Latino Migrant Workers in South Florida

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Although the literature on self-medication among Latino migrant workers (LMWs) is sparse, a few existing studies indicate that this practice is common in this community. The purpose of this paper is to estimate health status, access to health care, and patterns of self-medication practices of a cohort of LMWs in South Florida. Methods: A stratified network-based sample was utilized to recruit 278 LMWs in the Homestead area. After screening for eligibility, participants were administered a structured questionnaire that collected data on their health status, access to health care services, and self-medication practices. A convenience sample of 24 LMWs, who participated in the parent study were invited back to participate in 3 focus groups to look more in depth into self-medication practices in the LMW community. Results: Study findings indicate that LMWs are affected by a vast array of health problems yet lack access to health care services. Participants already engaged in self-medication practices in the countries of origin and, upon their arrival in the US, these practices continue and, in many cases, increase. Conclusion: Long-held traditions and lack of access to the formal health care system in the US contribute to the high prevalence of self-medication among LMWs. Self-medication practices such as the use of prescription medications without a prescription and lay injection are high risk practices that can have harmful consequences. Prevention interventions that address self-medication in the LMW community are likely to be most effective if they are culturally adapted to the community and facilitate access to health care services. PMID:25140297

  8. Project Salud: Using community-based participatory research to culturally adapt an HIV prevention intervention in the Latino migrant worker community.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Jesús; Serna, Claudia A; de La Rosa, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Despite the unique and challenging circumstances confronting Latino migrant worker communities in the U.S., debate still exists as to the need to culturally adapt evidence-based interventions for dissemination with this population. Project Salud adopted a community-based participatory research model and utilized focus group methodology with 83 Latino migrant workers to explore the relevance of culturally adapting an evidence-based HIV prevention intervention to be disseminated within this population. Findings from this study indicate that, despite early reservations, Latino migrant workers wanted to participate in the cultural adaptation that would result in an intervention that was culturally relevant, respectful, responsive to their life experiences, and aligned with their needs. This study contributes to the cultural adaptation/fidelity debate by highlighting the necessity of exploring ways to develop culturally adapted interventions characterized by high cultural relevance without sacrificing high fidelity to the core components that have established efficacy for evidence-based HIV prevention interventions.

  9. Employers' role in helping Latino workers obtain access to health care services: results of a community-based pilot demonstration project.

    PubMed

    Dembe, Allard E; Biehl, Jeffrey M; Smith, Alicia D; Garcia de Gutierrez, Teresa

    2013-06-01

    A coalition of employers in the hotel and restaurant industries collaborated with community-based organizations to undertake a unique demonstration project, called the Employed Latino Health Initiative, aimed at improving access to basic health care services for low-wage Latino workers in Columbus, Ohio. With grant funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the project developed and tested protocols allowing Latino workers from participating companies to obtain basic health care screenings, referrals to medical providers, health education training, and the services of a qualified community health navigator. Data from the pilot project indicated high screening participation rates, extensive referrals to providers for follow-up care, and a substantial need for facilitation services by community health navigators. The project provides a model for how employers can potentially promote their own interests in boosting work productivity through facilitating expanded access to basic medical services among vulnerable workers, despite the absence of conventional health insurance coverage.

  10. Taiwanese employees' justice perceptions of co-workers' punitive events.

    PubMed

    Chi, Shu-Cheng; Lo, Hsin-Hsin

    2003-02-01

    The authors examined justice perceptions of Taiwanese employees in response to co-workers' punitive events (punishment by a superior). They developed a hypothesis based on Chinese indigenous wu-lun principles and the concept of empathy. Results of the study showed that perceived vertical (between superior and subordinate) and horizontal (between subordinates) relationships jointly affected justice perceptions. Respondents who perceived low (negative) leader-member exchange with the superior and high (positive) liking of the punished person showed the lowest justice perceptions. In conclusion, the authors note that comparative analysis of organizational justice is a promising direction for future research.

  11. Escucheme Por Favor/Please Listen to Me: An Analysis of the Perceptions of Latino Students and Teachers in a High School Multilingual Teacher Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palacio, Peter Vincent

    2010-01-01

    This case study used photo elicitation interviewing (PEI) to analyze perceptions of Latino students and their teachers in a multilanguage high school academy. It examined student involvement in school, dropout rate, and pursuit of a college education. Ten academy teachers and 10 Latino senior students were interviewed. Observations obtained…

  12. Attitudes and perceptions of workers to sexual harassment.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Marita P; Hardman, Lisa

    2005-12-01

    The authors investigated how individual factors (age, gender, gender role, past experiences of sexual harassment) and organizational factors (gender ratio, sexual harassment policies, the role of employers) related to workers' attitudes toward and perceptions of sexual harassment. In Study 1, participants were 176 workers from a large, white-collar organization. In Study 2, participants were 75 workers from a smaller, blue-collar organization. Individuals from Study 2 experienced more sexual harassment, were more tolerant of sexual harassment, and perceived less behavior as sexual harassment than did individuals from Study 1. For both samples, organizational and individual factors predicted workers' attitudes toward and experiences of sexual harassment. Individual factors-such as age, gender, gender role, past experiences of sexual harassment, and perceptions of management's tolerance of sexual harassment-predicted attitudes toward sexual harassment. Workers' attitudes, the behavioral context, and the gender of the victim and perpetrator predicted perceptions of sexual harassment. The authors discussed the broader implications of these findings and suggested recommendations for future research.

  13. Violent Events: School Social Workers' Perception and Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cawood, Natalie Diane

    2013-01-01

    This article reports findings from a national web-based survey of 250 members of the School Social Work Association of America (SSWAA). This study examines the types of violent events reported by school social workers and the practitioner's perception of the problem of interpersonal violence in the school context. It identifies interventions being…

  14. Age and Workers' Perceptions of Workplace Safety: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gyekye, Seth Ayim; Salminen, Simo

    2009-01-01

    The study examined the relationship between age and I) safety perception; ii) job satisfaction; iii) compliance with safety management policies; and (iv) accident frequency. Participants were Ghanaian industrial workers (N = 320) categorized into 4 age groups: 19-29 years; 30-39 years; 40-50 years; and 51 years and above. Workplace safety…

  15. Violent Events: School Social Workers' Perception and Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cawood, Natalie Diane

    2013-01-01

    This article reports findings from a national web-based survey of 250 members of the School Social Work Association of America (SSWAA). This study examines the types of violent events reported by school social workers and the practitioner's perception of the problem of interpersonal violence in the school context. It identifies interventions being…

  16. School Social Workers' Perceptions of Graduate Education Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slovak, Karen; Joseph, Alfred Louis, Jr.; Broussard, Anne

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions of school social workers' (SSWers') graduate education training on contemporary issues facing students in schools as well as issues related to this host practice setting. SSWers who completed a specific school social work program were compared with those who did not on perceived graduate education preparation…

  17. Musculoskeletal and neurological injuries associated with work organization among immigrant Latino women manual workers in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Arcury, Thomas A; Cartwright, Michael S; Chen, Haiying; Rosenbaum, Daryl A; Walker, Francis O; Mora, Dana C; Quandt, Sara A

    2014-04-01

    This analysis examines the associations of work organization attributes among Latino women in manual occupations with musculoskeletal and neurological injuries. Participants included 234 women in western North Carolina. Outcome measures included epicondylitis, rotator cuff syndrome, back pain, and carpal tunnel syndrome. Independent measures included indicators of job demand, job control, and job support, as well as personal characteristics. Latina workers commonly experienced epicondylitis, rotator cuff syndrome, back pain, and CTS. Awkward posture and decision latitude were associated with epicondylitis. Rotator cuff syndrome was associated with awkward posture and psychological demand. Awkward posture and psychological demand, and decreased skill variety and job control were related to CTS. Work organization factors are potentially important for musculoskeletal and neurological injury among vulnerable workers. Research is required to understand the associations of work and health outcomes of these women. Policy initiatives need to consider how work organization affects health. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Puerto Rican adolescents' disclosure and lying to parents about peer and risky activities: associations with teens' perceptions of Latino values.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Myriam; Smetana, Judith G

    2012-08-01

    Disclosure and lying to mothers and fathers about different activities, as defined within social domain theory, were examined as a function of Latino family values in 109 Puerto Rican lower socioeconomic status middle adolescents (M=15.58 years, SD=1.18) living in the United States. Questionnaires revealed that teens sometimes disclosed to parents about their risky prudential (unhealthy or unsafe) and peer activities. Lying was infrequent, although greater for risky than for peer issues. In general, path analyses demonstrated that teens' greater adherence to Latino family values and trust in parents were associated with more disclosure and less lying to mothers. However, these findings were moderated by the type of issue considered and perceptions of parents' Latino family values.

  19. Construction workers' perceptions of management safety practices: a qualitative investigation.

    PubMed

    Gillen, Marion; Kools, Susan; Sum, Juliann; McCall, Cade; Moulden, Kelli

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify perceptions of management safety practices from the viewpoint of union and nonunion construction workers. A complementary investigation was conducted with construction managers. A semi-structured interview guide was used to elicit information from 64 workers (95% male) in ten focus groups. Questions were designed to elicit information about management practices that facilitate or discourage safe working conditions, including communication style, attitude, expectations, and unspoken messages. Data were analyzed using thematic content analysis. Workers identified management commitment to safety, concern for workers, congruence between spoken messages and practice, professionalism, and communication skills as key qualities in successful managers. Workers provided vivid examples of excellent and poor management strategies. Construction managers play a pivotal role in the definition and implementation of safety practices in the workplace and workers look to them for guidance and modeling. Given the high rates of injury in construction, deeply imbedded protective policies that rely on input from a broad range of stakeholders, including construction workers, should be developed.

  20. Knowledge and Risk Perception Regarding HPV Among Latino Alternative School Students in Houston, Texas.

    PubMed

    Markham, Christine M; Escobar-Chaves, Soledad Liliana; Addy, Robert C; Lewis, Holly; Tortolero-Luna, Guillermo; Tortolero, Susan R

    2009-06-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common STI among youth in the U.S. As alternative school students are at higher risk of acquiring STIs compared to regular high school students, this study examined HPV knowledge and risk perception among Latino youth attending 9 alternative high schools in Houston, Texas. HPV knowledge measures assessed prevalence, health consequences, symptoms, transmission, and risk reduction strategies. Three measures assessed perceived risk. The sample included 414 youth (58.4% female) with a mean age of 16.6 years (SD = 1.86); 63.8% were sexually experienced. Most (76.0%) were U.S.-born to parents from Mexico, Central or South America (70.8% of mothers and 77.8% of fathers, respectively); 61.7% had parents with less than a high school education. Results indicate that youth answered 1 out of 5 HPV knowledge items correctly (mean = 1.3, SD = 1.45); 35.8% identified skin-to-skin contact during sex as the most common mode of HPV transmission, and 72.5% selected condoms as an effective HPV risk reduction strategy followed by avoiding multiple partners (55.8%), abstinence (47.5%), monogamous relationships (26.8%) and HPV vaccination (22.3%). Only twenty-seven youth (6.5%) perceived themselves to be at high risk for contracting HPV. Regression analyses examining the association between demographic variables, sexual behavior, HPV knowledge, and HPV risk perception, showed significant associations for mothers' place of birth only - youth whose mothers were born outside of the U.S. had significantly lower HPV knowledge than those with American-born mothers (p < 0.007). Findings indicate the need for enhanced educational efforts among Latino alternative school youth regarding the prevalence of HPV and effective risk reduction strategies.

  1. Factors influencing restaurant worker perception of floor slipperiness.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Theodore K; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Verma, Santosh K; Chang, Wen-Ruey; Li, Kai Way; Filiaggi, Alfred J

    2006-11-01

    Falls are responsible for a substantial injury burden in the global workplace. Restaurant environments are particularly challenged by slips, trips, and falls. This study explored those factors that could influence workers' self-reports of slipperiness in U.S. fast-food restaurants. One hundred and twenty-six workers employed in 10 fast-food restaurants in the northeastern United States participated in the study representing a study-wide response rate of 87.5%. Participants' ratings of floor slipperiness and occupational slip history within the past 4 weeks were collected through written questionnaire. Additional factors collected by questionnaire included age, gender, shift length, and shoe type. Shoe condition (wear) and shoe contamination were visually assessed by the investigators. Floor friction was also measured. Lower restaurant mean coefficient of friction and the presence of contamination on workers' shoe soles were environmental factors significantly associated with workers reporting more slippery conditions. A recent workplace history of slipping with or without a subsequent fall was also significantly associated with workers reporting more slippery conditions. Workers over the age of 45 reported conditions to be significantly less slippery than younger workers. The results suggest that worker ratings of slipperiness are influenced not only by the actual level of friction but also by the other individual and environmental factors noted above. Recommendations for future studies would include a longitudinal design to better capture the temporal sequence between these variables. More field research is needed to better understand the association between workplace conditions, worker perception of slipperiness, and slipping at work.

  2. Nuestras Voces: (Our Voices): A Phenomenological Study of Latino Parents' Perceptions of Early Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Kathleen Mary

    2013-01-01

    There is a rise in the Latino population, a growing need to close the achievement gap, and yet there exists a paucity of research on Latino infant and child development. This phenomenological study of Latino parents explores the thoughts and feelings of a representative sample of parents pertaining to the early intervention services that their…

  3. Nuestras Voces: (Our Voices): A Phenomenological Study of Latino Parents' Perceptions of Early Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Kathleen Mary

    2013-01-01

    There is a rise in the Latino population, a growing need to close the achievement gap, and yet there exists a paucity of research on Latino infant and child development. This phenomenological study of Latino parents explores the thoughts and feelings of a representative sample of parents pertaining to the early intervention services that their…

  4. [Nursing workers' perceptions regarding the handling of hazardous chemical waste].

    PubMed

    Costa, Taiza Florêncio; Felli, Vanda Elisa Andres; Baptista, Patrícia Campos Pavan

    2012-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify the perceptions of nursing workers regarding the handling of hazardous chemical waste at the University of São Paulo University Hospital (HU-USP), and develop a proposal to improve safety measures. This study used a qualitative approach and a convenience sample consisting of eighteen nursing workers. Data collection was performed through focal groups. Thematic analysis revealed four categories that gave evidence of training deficiencies in terms of the stages of handling waste. Difficulties that emerged included a lack of knowledge regarding exposure and its impact, the utilization of personal protective equipment versus collective protection, and suggestions regarding measures to be taken by the institution and workers for the safe handling of hazardous chemical waste. The present data allowed for recommending proposals regarding the safe management of hazardous chemical waste by the nursing staff.

  5. Communication Experiences of Latina and Latino Immigrant Custodial Workers within a University Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Wilfredo

    2011-01-01

    The organizational communication subdiscipline has made great strides in theory and research in recent years, but little is known about the workplace communication experiences of Latinas and Latinos in the United States. Even less is known about these sociocultural group members' experiences when they work in lower status, blue-collar roles in…

  6. Communication Experiences of Latina and Latino Immigrant Custodial Workers within a University Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Wilfredo

    2011-01-01

    The organizational communication subdiscipline has made great strides in theory and research in recent years, but little is known about the workplace communication experiences of Latinas and Latinos in the United States. Even less is known about these sociocultural group members' experiences when they work in lower status, blue-collar roles in…

  7. HIV/STI Risk behaviors among Latino migrant workers in New Orleans post-Hurricane Katrina disaster.

    PubMed

    Kissinger, Patricia; Liddon, Nicole; Schmidt, Norine; Curtin, Erin; Salinas, Oscar; Narvaez, Alfredo

    2008-11-01

    A rapid influx of Latino migrant workers came to New Orleans after Hurricane-Katrina. Many of these men were unaccompanied by their primary sex partner potentially placing them at high-risk for HIV/STIs. The purpose of this study was to assess HIV/STI sexual risk behavior of these men. A venue-based sample of Latinos who came to New Orleans post-Hurricane Katrina were administered an anonymous, structured interview in Spanish in a mobile unit and urine tested for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhea (GC) using the nucleic acid amplification technique. Participants (n = 180) had a mean age of 33 (range, 18-79), did not speak or understand English very well (93.9%), were undocumented (91.2%), were married (63.5%), and had children (67.4%), though the percent living with spouse and children was 6.1% and 4.9%, respectively. Although most men were born in Honduras (49.7%) and Mexico (25.4%), 61.9% came to New Orleans from another US state. The majority drank alcohol in the past week (75.5%), and of those, 68.7% engaged in binge drinking. A lower percentage used marijuana (16.6%) and cocaine (5.5%) at least once in the prior week. No men reported injection drug use. Self-reported history of HIV was 10%. No men tested positive for GC and 5 (2.8%) tested positive for CT. In the last month, 68.9% engaged in sex with high-risk sex partners, 30.0% were in potential bridge position, 50.0% used condoms inconsistently, 30.6% did not use a condom the last time they had sex, and 21.1% were abstinent. Since arriving, 9.4% reported leaving and returning to New Orleans. Latino migrant workers in New Orleans reported risky sexual behaviors and low condom use within a potential bridge position. Although a low prevalence of CT and GC was found, there was a high percent of self-reported HIV infection. The cultural and contextual factors that place these migrant workers and their sex partner(s) at risk for HIV/STI need further investigation.

  8. Determinants of health insurance status for children of Latino immigrant and other US farm workers: findings from the National Agricultural Workers Survey.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Roberto L; Elliott, Marc N; Vestal, Katherine D; Suttorp, Marika J; Schuster, Mark A

    2008-12-01

    To characterize the health insurance status of farm workers' children, an understudied topic. A population-based multistage survey. Employer-based study conducted in the continental United States from 2000 to 2002. A total of 3136 parents with children younger than 18 years and no children residing outside of the United States who participated in the US Department of Labor's National Agricultural Workers Survey, which is administered to a national probability sample of US farm workers. Children's parent-reported health insurance status. Of the farm workers who were parents, 87% were Latino, 81% were foreign born, 15% were migrant workers, 55% had less than a sixth-grade education, and 68% reported little to no English language proficiency. Thirty-two percent of all farm-worker parents, including 45% of migrant-worker parents, reported that their children were uninsured. In multivariate analyses, older parental age (odds ratio [OR] for parents aged 30-39 years, 1.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-2.50; OR for parents aged >/=40 years, 3.07; 95% CI, 1.99-4.74), less parental education (OR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.09-2.10), less time in the United States (OR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.56-0.91 per 10 years in the United States), being a migrant worker (OR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.31-2.93), and living in the Southeast (OR, 3.17; 95% CI, 2.00-5.02) or Southwest (OR, 3.91; 95% CI, 2.32-6.57) were significantly associated with having uninsured children. Farm workers' children were uninsured at roughly 3 times the rate of all other children and almost twice the rate of those at or near the federal poverty level. Programs aimed at extending insurance coverage for children should consider the unique social barriers that characterize this vulnerable population of US children. Moreover, there is significant regional variation that may reflect varying levels of insurance resources and eligibility from state to state.

  9. Health Care Quality Perceptions among Foreign-Born Latinos and the Importance of Speaking the Same Language

    PubMed Central

    González, Hector M.; Vega, William A.; Tarraf, Wassim

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To examine the relationship between patients’ English proficiency, patient-provider language concordance, and health care quality among foreign-born Latinos in the United States. Methods National probability sample data (from the Pew Hispanic Center/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Latino Health Survey) were analyzed from telephone interviews with foreign-born Latino adults (n = 2921; aged 18 years and older). There were 3 main outcomes related to clinical experiences using self-reports of confusion, frustration, and perception of poor quality of care received because of English-speaking ability and accent bias, as well as an overall rating of care quality. Patients’ English proficiency and patient-provider language concordance were the chief predictors. Results Patients’ English proficiency was not significantly associated with the 3 clinical experiences measures and marginally so with overall care quality ratings. Language concordance was significantly associated with a lower likelihood of confusion, frustration, and language-related poor quality ratings, and was positively associated with patient-reported overall quality of care. In addition, providers’ language concordance attenuated the statistical significance of the effects of patients’ English proficiency when both were modeled simultaneously. Conclusion Patient-provider language concordance plays an important role in communication barriers among foreign-born Latino patients. Our findings indicate that although patients’ language proficiency is important to health care quality ratings, what may matter more is when patient and provider speak the same language. PMID:21057070

  10. Social workers and workplace bullying: perceptions, responses and implications.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    This non-experimental, cross-sectional study examined social workers' perceptions of bullying work relationships and their ability to construct effective coping responses to perceived workplace bullying. Quantitative data were gathered through the use of a mailed questionnaire, and qualitative data resulted from semi-structured individual interviews. The quantitative sample consisted of 111 social workers from the metropolitan, Washington, DC area, who were employed in organizations. Two self-identified targets of bullying participated in the interviews. Nearly three of five social workers (58%) in the sample reported being the targets of demeaning, rude, and hostile workplace interactions more than once in the previous year. Targets were more likely to work in government agencies/military and mental health outpatient organizations (19% and 18% respectively). More than a third of targets (35%) held a direct service role (clinical/direct practice), whereas almost a third (29%) identified their role as administration or management. The findings from this study suggest that workplace bullying may be a problem for social workers and that the social work profession may need to develop tools and guidelines to help practitioners identify, confront and extinguish these behaviors.

  11. Do post-migration perceptions of social mobility matter for Latino immigrant health?

    PubMed

    Alcántara, Carmela; Chen, Chih-Nan; Alegría, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    Latino immigrants exhibit health declines with increasing duration in the United States, which some attribute to a loss in social status after migration or downward social mobility. Yet, research into the distribution of perceived social mobility and patterned associations to Latino health is sparse, despite extensive research to show that economic and social advancement is a key driver of voluntary migration. We investigated Latino immigrant sub-ethnic group variation in the distribution of perceived social mobility, defined as the difference between respondents' perceived social status of origin had they remained in their country of origin and their current social status in the U.S. We also examined the association between perceived social mobility and past-year major depressive episode (MDE) and self-rated fair/poor physical health, and whether Latino sub-ethnicity moderated these associations. We computed weighted logistic regression analyses using the Latino immigrant subsample (N=1561) of the National Latino and Asian American Study. Puerto Rican migrants were more likely to perceive downward social mobility relative to Mexican and Cuban immigrants who were more likely to perceive upward social mobility. Perceived downward social mobility was associated with increased odds of fair/poor physical health and MDE. Latino sub-ethnicity was a statistically significant moderator, such that perceived downward social mobility was associated with higher odds of MDE only among Puerto Rican and Other Latino immigrants. In contrast, perceived upward social mobility was not associated with self-rated fair/poor physical health. Our findings suggest that perceived downward social mobility might be an independent correlate of health among Latino immigrants, and might help explain Latino sub-ethnic group differences in mental health status. Future studies on Latino immigrant health should use prospective designs to examine the physiological and psychological costs associated

  12. Do post-migration perceptions of social mobility matter for Latino immigrant health?

    PubMed Central

    Alcántara, Carmela; Chen, Chih-Nan; Alegría, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    Latino immigrants exhibit health declines with increasing duration in the United States, which some attribute to a loss in social status after migration or downward social mobility. Yet, research into the distribution of perceived social mobility and patterned associations to Latino health is sparse, despite extensive research to show that economic and social advancement is a key driver of voluntary migration. We investigated Latino immigrant sub-ethnic group variation in the distribution of perceived social mobility, defined as the difference between respondents’ perceived social status of origin had they remained in their country of origin and their current social status in the U.S. We also examined the association between perceived social mobility and past-year major depressive episode (MDE) and self-rated fair/poor physical health, and whether Latino sub-ethnicity moderated these associations. We computed weighted logistic regression analyses using subsample (N = 1561 the Latino immigrant) of the National Latino and Asian American Study. Puerto Rican migrants were more likely to perceive downward social mobility relative to Mexican and Cuban immigrants who were more likely to perceive upward social mobility. Perceived downward social mobility was associated with increased odds of fair/poor physical health and MDE. Latino sub-ethnicity was a statistically significant moderator, such that perceived downward social mobility was associated with higher odds of MDE only among Puerto Rican and Other Latino immigrants. In contrast, perceived upward social mobility was not associated with self-rated fair/poor physical health. Our findings suggest that perceived downward social mobility might be an independent correlate of health among Latino immigrants, and might help explain Latino sub-ethnic group differences in mental health status. Future studies on Latino immigrant health should use prospective designs to examine the physiological and psychological costs

  13. Latino Parent and Adolescent Perceptions of Hoped-for and Feared Possible Selves for Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halfond, Raquel; Corona, Rosalie; Moon, Anya

    2013-01-01

    The authors examined Latino parent and adolescent reports of hoped-for and feared possible selves for adolescents. Twenty-nine Latino parents (18 mothers, 11 fathers) and their 18 adolescents participated in semistructured individual interviews. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed, and coded for themes via content analysis. Themes that…

  14. Exploring Rural Latino/a Middle School Student Perceptions of Their Futures and Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Mollie Katherine

    2015-01-01

    The population of Latino/a individuals and students in the United States continues to rise (US Census Bureau, 2012). Moreover, Latino/a students have been shown to have increased concern for dropping out, and for not believing they can achieve positive career outcomes (Pew Hispanic Center Report, 2009). As a result of these concerns in this…

  15. The Voices of Latino Parents: An Insight into School Parental Involvement via Perceptions and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantu, Evangelina M.

    2013-01-01

    Significant evidence suggests that parent participation and involvement are beneficial for student success. Latino parents, however, have historically been portrayed negatively in their role in their children's education. Deficit thinking paradigms have framed much of the negative depictions about Latino parents. This study proposes that the…

  16. Exploring Rural Latino/a Middle School Student Perceptions of Their Futures and Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Mollie Katherine

    2015-01-01

    The population of Latino/a individuals and students in the United States continues to rise (US Census Bureau, 2012). Moreover, Latino/a students have been shown to have increased concern for dropping out, and for not believing they can achieve positive career outcomes (Pew Hispanic Center Report, 2009). As a result of these concerns in this…

  17. Latino Parent and Adolescent Perceptions of Hoped-for and Feared Possible Selves for Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halfond, Raquel; Corona, Rosalie; Moon, Anya

    2013-01-01

    The authors examined Latino parent and adolescent reports of hoped-for and feared possible selves for adolescents. Twenty-nine Latino parents (18 mothers, 11 fathers) and their 18 adolescents participated in semistructured individual interviews. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed, and coded for themes via content analysis. Themes that…

  18. Perceptions of Latino Parents Regarding Cultural and Linguistic Issues and Advocacy for Children with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lian, Ming-Gon John; Fontanez-Phelan, Sandra Maria

    2001-01-01

    A study of 100 Latino parents whose children participated in school programs for limited English proficient students with disabilities found they believed educators should increase their understanding of Latino culture. They recognized the importance of school personnel getting to know their children, but reported infrequent home-school contact or…

  19. An ethnographic study of salt use and humoral concepts in a Latino farm worker community in California's Central Valley.

    PubMed

    Barker, Judith C; Guerra, Claudia; Gonzalez-Vargas, M Judy; Hoeft, Kristin S

    2017-02-08

    This article reports on the use of domestic or table salt for its perceived health effects and healing properties in a Latino farmworker community. It explores how contemporary salt usage beliefs can be seen to have roots in long-standing humoral theories of medicine and health. This qualitative investigation comprised 30 in-depth individual interviews and five focus groups conducted in Spanish with Mexican and Central American immigrants in one small city in California's Central Valley (N = 61 total participants). Interviews and focus groups were audiotaped, translated into English and transcribed. Several researchers independently and iteratively read transcripts, developed and applied codes, and engaged in thematic analysis. Strongly emergent themes identified the importance of balance in health, and beliefs about the effects on salt on health. Valued for its culinary role, for bringing out the flavors in food, and used by people of all ages, salt use is part of a robust set of cultural practices. Salt was regularly mixed with foods in different combinations and ingested to restore balance, prevent disequilibrium or reduce vulnerability to diverse illnesses, promote rehydration, and address symptoms of exposure to extremes of temperature or physical or emotional stress. Statements made and practices engaged in by participants were highly suggestive of health and healing beliefs common to humoral belief systems based primarily on a hot-cold dichotomy in classifications of foods and healing behaviors. We evaluate these statements and practices in the context of the existing literature on historical and contemporary humoral beliefs in Latin American communities, in Mexico and Central America, and in the United States. Humoral theory is a useful framework for understanding contemporary rural Latino migrant farmworkers' perceptions of the importance of salt for their health.

  20. Knowledge Worker Perceptions of Telework Policy in the New York Metropolitan Area: A Qualitative Descriptive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaughter, Sandra Lorraine Hawks

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative descriptive case study, "Knowledge Worker Perceptions of Telework in the New York Metropolitan Area," was conducted to explore the perceptions of knowledge workers who commute to a physical workplace in the New York Metropolitan area (NYMA). In-depth interviews were conducted with fourteen NYMA commuters who are…

  1. Knowledge Worker Perceptions of Telework Policy in the New York Metropolitan Area: A Qualitative Descriptive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaughter, Sandra Lorraine Hawks

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative descriptive case study, "Knowledge Worker Perceptions of Telework in the New York Metropolitan Area," was conducted to explore the perceptions of knowledge workers who commute to a physical workplace in the New York Metropolitan area (NYMA). In-depth interviews were conducted with fourteen NYMA commuters who are…

  2. Linguistic acculturation and perceptions of quality, access, and discrimination in health care among Latinos in the United States.

    PubMed

    Becerra, David; Androff, David; Messing, Jill T; Castillo, Jason; Cimino, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between acculturation and Latinos' perceptions of health care treatment quality, discrimination, and access to health information. The results of this study indicated that participants who had lower levels of acculturation perceived: 1) greater discrimination in health care treatment; 2) a lower quality of health care treatment; 3) less confidence filling out health related forms; and 4) greater challenges understanding written information about their medical conditions. Participants who identified as immigrants also perceived that their poor quality of medical care was due to their inability to pay and to their race/ethnicity.

  3. Factors associated with blue-collar workers' risk perception of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Won Ju; Hong, Oisaeng; Kim, Mi Ja

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of actual cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, as well as, individual, psychosocial, and work-related factors as predictors of CVD risk perception among Korean blue-collar workers. The participants were 238 Korean blue-collar workers who worked in small companies. Data were collected through a survey; anthropometric and blood pressure measures; and blood sampling for lipid levels. Blue-collar workers had high actual CVD risk and low CVD risk perception. The significant predictors of risk perception included perceived health status, alcohol consumption, knowledge of CVD risk, actual CVD risk, decision latitude, and shift work. The model explained 26% of the variance in CVD risk perception. The result suggests when occupational health nurses are giving routine health examination in small companies, they can enhance CVD risk perception in blue-collar workers by providing essential information about CVD risk factors and personal counseling on the individual worker's CVD risk status.

  4. A Study of Perceptions, Attitudes and Behavior amongst Dislocated Workers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SMG Research, Rochester, NY.

    The Finger Lakes Dislocated Workers Project is a regionally oriented program that coordinates job retraining, career counseling, and placement services for workers whose positions have been terminated because of layoffs, skills obsolescence, and early retirement. The perceptions, attitudes, and behavior of those dislocated workers who had…

  5. Does Gender Influence Participation? Predictors of Participation in a Community Health Worker Diabetes Management Intervention with African-American and Latino Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Jaclynn; Kieffer, Edith; Sinco, Brandy; Spencer, Michael; Anderson, Michael; Rosland, Ann-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of gender on participation in a community-based, culturally tailored diabetes lifestyle intervention, led by trained community health workers (CHW), and conducted with African Americans and Latinos with type 2 diabetes. Methods This study utilized data collected from 180 participants. Multivariable binary and cumulative logistic regression models were used to analyze associations between gender and race/ethnicity with study completion and participation in three aspects of the intervention: group classes, CHW home visits, and CHW-accompanied doctor visits. Results Among Latinos, men were less likely than women to complete the study, attend >x classes, and complete # CHW home visits. There were no gender differences in participation seen among African-Americans. Conclusions Diabetes management interventions may need to adapt their designs to optimize retention and participation of Latino men. Among African American men, the CHW model may be promising. Reasons for low participation among Latino men should receive more study. Future studies should assess whether similar findings apply in other communities and populations. PMID:23859885

  6. Willingness to seek help for psychosocial problems among Latino and white American college students.

    PubMed

    De Melo, Janine A Tiago; Farber, Barry A

    2005-08-01

    This study compared 50 Latino and 50 White American students' perceptions of the severity of 25 psychological problems, their willingness to seek help for these problems, and their preferences for caregivers. Each group received a modified version of the Personal Problems Inventory. Latino students rated depression, financial concerns, and discrimination as more severe problems; their preference for mental health workers consistently significantly exceeded those of White students, although both groups preferred seeking help from family and community resources. Findings suggest the possibility of a greater role for therapists serving Latino students than currently exists.

  7. Support Systems for Injured Workers. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 5. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in an adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) course, focuses on support systems for injured workers. The following items are included: module overview; list of basic, thinking, interpersonal, information utilization, and other skills…

  8. Exploring African-American and Latino Teens’ Perceptions of Contraception and Access to Reproductive Health Care Services

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Charlotte T.; Duffy, Jennifer L.; Dixon, Rena P.; Fuller, Taleria R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Reducing disparities in teen pregnancy and birth rates among African American and Latina teens is a central focus of a community-wide teen pregnancy prevention initiative implemented by the South Carolina Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. Disparities in teen pregnancy and birth rates are driven, in part, by differential access to contraception and reproductive health care services. The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand African American and Latino teens’ 1) preferences for finding health information, 2) perceptions of accessing reproductive health services, and 3) beliefs about contraception. Methods As a part of this community-wide initiative, eight focus groups were conducted in the Fall of 2012 with African American and Latino male and female youth from two communities in South Carolina. Among eight focus groups of youth, teens most often reported parents, other trusted relatives, and the Internet as sources of health information. Results Participants discussed the value of social media and television advertisements for reaching young people and emphasized the importance of privacy, a desire for a teen-only clinic, and the need for friendly clinical staff. Participants’ comments often reflected inaccurate beliefs about the reliability and correct usage of contraceptive methods. Female participants also reported side effects of birth control as a potential barrier to use. Conclusions Ensuring that teens’ beliefs and perceptions are taken into account when developing, marketing, and implementing culturally competent reproductive health care services is important to improve access to care for all teens in Horry and Spartanburg Counties. PMID:28235437

  9. Teachers' and School Counselors' Perceptions of Their Cultural Competence in Working with Newly Arrived Latino Immigrant Students: A Mixed Methods Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guardiola Castillo, Irma V.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore teachers' and school counselors' perceptions of their cultural competence in working with newly arrived Latino immigrant students by using a mixed instrument with closed-ended and open-ended items. Multicultural Counseling Competencies (MCC) served as the theoretical framework for this study (Sue,…

  10. Teachers' and School Counselors' Perceptions of Their Cultural Competence in Working with Newly Arrived Latino Immigrant Students: A Mixed Methods Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guardiola Castillo, Irma V.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore teachers' and school counselors' perceptions of their cultural competence in working with newly arrived Latino immigrant students by using a mixed instrument with closed-ended and open-ended items. Multicultural Counseling Competencies (MCC) served as the theoretical framework for this study (Sue,…

  11. Peer workers' perceptions and experiences of barriers to implementation of peer worker roles in mental health services: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Vandewalle, Joeri; Debyser, Bart; Beeckman, Dimitri; Vandecasteele, Tina; Van Hecke, Ann; Verhaeghe, Sofie

    2016-08-01

    To identify peer workers' perceptions and experiences of barriers to implementation of peer worker roles in mental health services. Review of qualitative and quantitative studies. A comprehensive electronic database search was conducted between October 2014 and December 2015 in PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library, and PsycARTICLES. Additional articles were identified through handsearch. All articles were assessed on quality. A thematic analysis informed by a multi-level approach was adopted to identify and discuss the main themes in the individual studies. Reporting was in line with the 'Enhancing transparency in reporting the synthesis of qualitative research' statement. Eighteen articles met the inclusion criteria. All studies adopted qualitative research methods, of which three studies used additional quantitative methods. Peer workers' perceptions and experiences cover a range of themes including the lack of credibility of peer worker roles, professionals' negative attitudes, tensions with service users, struggles with identity construction, cultural impediments, poor organizational arrangements, and inadequate overarching social and mental health policies. This review can inform policy, practice and research from the unique perspective of peer workers. Mental health professionals and peer workers should enter into an alliance to address barriers in the integration of peer workers and to enhance quality of service delivery. Longitudinal research is needed to determine how to address barriers in the implementation of peer worker roles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Changes in Risk Perception following a Smoking Cessation Intervention: The Role of Acculturation in a Sample of Latino Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Wagener, Theodore L.; Busch, Andrew M.; Dunsiger, Shira I.; Chiang, Karl S.; Borrelli, Belinda

    2017-01-01

    The present exploratory study examined the role of acculturation in the perception of the risks of smoking following a smoking cessation induction intervention among Latino caregivers of children with asthma. The sample consisted of 131 Latino smokers (72.9% female; 18.3% born in the U.S.) who were caregivers of a child with asthma. Caregivers were randomized to one of two smoking cessation interventions that were part of a home-based asthma program. Self-report measures of risk-perception were assessed at baseline, end of treatment (2 months after baseline), and 2- and 3-months post-treatment. At baseline, caregivers, regardless of level of acculturation, reported moderate to high levels of concern about the effects of secondhand smoke on their child's health as well as perceived risk regarding the effect of smoking on their own health. However, caregivers who were low in acculturation had a greater increase in concern about the effects of smoking on their child from pre-to post treatment compared to those who were high in acculturation (p=.001). Lastly, level of acculturation moderated the association between caregivers' concern about smoking on their child's health and their motivation to quit smoking (p<.05), but not cessation rates or reduced secondhand smoke exposure (p>.05). Specifically, motivation to quit at 3 months was greater for those with low acculturation. Though exploratory, these findings suggest that risk perception may be more easily influenced in low versus high acculturated populations and this should be considered in the design of clinical interventions and potentially mass media campaigns seeking to influence risk of caregiver behavior on child health with ethnic and racial minorities. PMID:24504775

  13. Changes in risk perception following a smoking cessation intervention: the role of acculturation in a sample of Latino caregivers.

    PubMed

    Wagener, Theodore L; Busch, Andrew M; Dunsiger, Shira I; Chiang, Karl S; Borrelli, Belinda

    2014-10-01

    The present exploratory study examined the role of acculturation in the perception of the risks of smoking following a smoking cessation induction intervention among Latino caregivers of children with asthma. The sample consisted of 131 Latino smokers (72.9% female; 18.3% born in the U.S.) who were caregivers of a child with asthma. Caregivers were randomized to one of two smoking cessation interventions that were part of a home-based asthma program. Self-report measures of risk-perception were assessed at baseline, end of treatment (2 months after baseline), and 2- and 3-months post-treatment. At baseline, caregivers, regardless of level of acculturation, reported moderate to high levels of concern about the effects of secondhand smoke on their child's health as well as perceived risk regarding the effect of smoking on their own health. However, caregivers who were low in acculturation had a greater increase in concern about the effects of smoking on their child from pre-to post treatment compared to those who were high in acculturation (p = .001). Lastly, level of acculturation moderated the association between caregivers' concern about smoking on their child's health and their motivation to quit smoking (p < .05), but not cessation rates or reduced secondhand smoke exposure (p > .05). Specifically, motivation to quit at 3 months was greater for those with low acculturation. Though exploratory, these findings suggest that risk perception may be more easily influenced in low versus high acculturated populations and this should be considered in the design of clinical interventions and potentially mass media campaigns seeking to influence risk of caregiver behavior on child health with ethnic and racial minorities.

  14. Frontline worker perceptions of medication safety in India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sangeeta; Tabassum, Fauzia; Khurana, Sarbjeet; Kapoor, Kaveri

    2016-01-01

    Background: To explore interprofessionals’ perceptions about patient safety, particularly medication safety and associated factors and barriers. Methods: A total of 389 respondents were recruited using convenience sample in the cross sectional survey. Results: Medication safety was perceived as somewhat safe (60%). One-third of respondents witnessed 3–4 or more medication errors (MEs) within the past 1 year. Out of that, one quarter were reportedly, sentinel events. More sentinel events were witnessed in public hospitals and solo practice clinics compared with corporate hospitals and nursing homes (p < 0.02). No difference was observed in the occurrence of sentinel events in accredited and nonaccredited facilities (p = 0.30). Younger respondents witnessed more MEs, whereas accredited hospitals (mostly corporate hospitals) witnessed significantly fewer MEs and graded overall safety as ‘better’. However, most MEs go unreported particularly in solo practice clinics (88%) followed by nursing homes (67%), public hospitals (54%), and corporate hospitals (42%). Error identification and subsequent disclosure was inhibited by several system factors: fear of punitive action and lack of reporting systems. General surgical (46%), medical (42%), and paediatric units (36%), were the most error-prone places. Documentation diverted all healthcare workers from direct patient care. Many doctors and pharmacists from nursing homes, solo clinics and public hospitals reported working overtime. Staff shortages and poor training were overwhelming concerns to all healthcare workers and in public hospitals. Solo clinics and nursing homes perceived more barriers; lack of reporting systems, standard protocol, and resources for patient safety and unfamiliarity with prescribed medications was their overwhelming concern. Other factors threatening MEs were a lack of team approach and openness in interdisciplinary communications, illegible medical orders, and medicines prescribed by brand

  15. Pre-training to improve workshop performance in supervisor skills: an exploratory study of Latino agricultural workers.

    PubMed

    Austin, J; Alvero, A M; Fuchs, M M; Patterson, L; Anger, W K

    2009-07-01

    Employees with limited education may be excluded from advanced training due to assumptions that they might not learn rapidly. However, preparatory training may be able to overcome missing experience in education. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that computer-based training (CBT) in supervisor skills of Latino agricultural workers would improve subsequent performance in a workshop designed to teach supervisor skills. Ten men born and educated in Mexico participated in the study; all spoke Spanish, the language of the training. Five participants (mean 6.4 years of education) completed supervisor skills CBT, and five participants (mean 8.2 years of education) completed hazard communication (HazCom) CBT as a control condition. Following the CBT, all participants completed a two-day face-to-face workshop on supervisory skills conducted by an experienced behavior management consultant. Although the groups did not differ in their knowledge scores on a multiple-choice test before the face-to-face workshop, after the workshop the HazCom group had a mean test score of 51.2% (SD = 8.7) while the supervisor group had a higher mean test score of 65.2% (SD = 14.3). The difference was marginally significant by a t-test (p = 0.052), and the effect size was large (d = 1.16). The results suggest that computer-based training in supervisor skills can be effective in preparing participants with limited education to learn supervisor skills from a face-to-face workshop. This result suggests that limited educational attainment is not a barrier to learning the complex knowledge required to supervise employees, that pre-training may improve learning in a workshop format, and that training may be presented effectively in a computer-based format to employees with limited education.

  16. Agricultural work and chronic musculoskeletal pain among Latino farm workers: the MICASA Study

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Hong; McCurdy, Stephen A.; Stoecklin-Marois, Maria; Li, Chin-Shang; Schenker, Marc B

    2013-01-01

    Background Agriculture poses varied dangers to hired farm workers in the U.S., but little information exists on occupational risks for chronic musculoskeletal pain. We examined common work positions, such as kneeling, carrying heavy loads, and repetitive motion that may increase the risk for chronic musculoskeletal pain. Methods MICASA is a population-based study of occupational exposures and health in hired farm workers in California. This analysis includes 759 participants, 18–55 years old, engaged in farm work and residing in Mendota, CA. Chronic pain was defined as pain lasting six weeks or longer at specific body sites (back, knee, hip, etc.) over the entire farm work career. Results Mean age was 37.9 years. 65% participants were born in Mexico, 27.7% were born in El Salvador, and 4.2% were U.S-born. Chronic pain was associated with older age and female sex. After adjustment for age, years working in agriculture, and smoking, stooping/bending >30hrs/week among both men (OR=2.49, 95%CI:1.03–5.99) and women (OR=2.15, 95%CI:1.04–4.46) was associated with chronic hip pain. Driving tractors or other heavy farm equipment >60 hrs/week was associated with increased odds of chronic hip pain (OR=2.16 95%CI: 1.02–4.54) among men. We also observed significant associations with kneeling or crawling >35 hrs/week among women for both chronic back pain (OR=2.96 95%CI: 1.27–6.93) and knee pain (OR=3.02 95%CI: 1.07–8.50), respectively. Conclusions Chronic musculoskeletal pain is prevalent among farm workers and is associated with common work positions. Further research should focus on developing preventive interventions for tasks associated with increased pain risk. These interventions should be targeted to specific types of agricultural tasks. PMID:23023585

  17. Agricultural work and chronic musculoskeletal pain among Latino farm workers: the MICASA study.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hong; McCurdy, Stephen A; Stoecklin-Marois, Maria T; Li, Chin-Shang; Schenker, Marc B

    2013-02-01

    Agriculture poses varied dangers to hired farm workers in the U.S., but little information exists on occupational risks for chronic musculoskeletal pain. We examined common work positions, such as kneeling, carrying heavy loads, and repetitive motion that may increase the risk for chronic musculoskeletal pain. MICASA is a population-based study of occupational exposures and health in hired farm workers in California. This analysis includes 759 participants, 18-55 years old, engaged in farm work and residing in Mendota, CA. Chronic pain was defined as pain lasting 6 weeks or longer at specific body sites (back, knee, hip, etc.) over the entire farm work career. Mean age was 37.9 years. Sixty-five percent participants were born in Mexico, 27.7% were born in El Salvador, and 4.2% were U.S-born. Chronic pain was associated with older age and female sex. After adjustment for age, years working in agriculture, and smoking, stooping/bending >30 hr/week among both men (OR = 2.49, 95% CI: 1.03-5.99) and women (OR = 2.15, 95% CI: 1.04-4.46) was associated with chronic hip pain. Driving tractors or other heavy farm equipment >60 hr/week was associated with increased odds of chronic hip pain (OR = 2.16, 95% CI: 1.02-4.54) among men. We also observed significant associations with kneeling or crawling >35 hr/week among women for both chronic back pain (OR = 2.96, 95% CI: 1.27-6.93) and knee pain (OR = 3.02, 95% CI: 1.07-8.50), respectively. Chronic musculoskeletal pain is prevalent among farm workers and is associated with common work positions. Further research should focus on developing preventive interventions for tasks associated with increased pain risk. These interventions should be targeted to specific types of agricultural tasks. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Temperament and Young Children with Visual Impairments: Perceptions of Anglo and Latino Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dote-Kwan, Jamie; Chen, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the temperamental characteristics of 18 toddlers with visual impairments as reported by their Anglo and Latino (Mexican American) parents. Differences in the parents' ratings of the children's temperament were related to the children's level of visual functioning and development. No differences were related to the children's…

  19. "Martin Luther King Stopped Discrimination": Multi-Generational Latino Elementary Students' Perceptions of Social Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curwen, Margie Sauceda

    2011-01-01

    This study explored how multi-generational, middle-class, fifth-graders from Latino families responded to classroom discussions of social issues--particularly discrimination--and draws upon sociocultural views of culture, educational theory, and sociological perspectives of immigration to provide insight into the learning experiences of one group…

  20. Latino Adolescents Perception of Parenting Behaviors and Self-Esteem: Examining the Role of Neighborhood Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamaca, Mayra Y.; Umana-Taylor, Adriana J.; Shin, Nana; Alfaro, Edna C.

    2005-01-01

    We examined the relations among parenting behaviors, adolescents' self-esteem, and neighborhood risk with a Midwestern sample of 324 Latino adolescents. The findings suggest that boys' self-esteem is influenced by both mothers' and fathers' parenting behaviors, whereas girls' self-esteem is influenced by mothers' behaviors only. In addition, the…

  1. Latino Adolescents Perception of Parenting Behaviors and Self-Esteem: Examining the Role of Neighborhood Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamaca, Mayra Y.; Umana-Taylor, Adriana J.; Shin, Nana; Alfaro, Edna C.

    2005-01-01

    We examined the relations among parenting behaviors, adolescents' self-esteem, and neighborhood risk with a Midwestern sample of 324 Latino adolescents. The findings suggest that boys' self-esteem is influenced by both mothers' and fathers' parenting behaviors, whereas girls' self-esteem is influenced by mothers' behaviors only. In addition, the…

  2. Minority stress and college persistence attitudes among African American, Asian American, and Latino students: perception of university environment as a mediator.

    PubMed

    Wei, Meifen; Ku, Tsun-Yao; Liao, Kelly Yu-Hsin

    2011-04-01

    We examined whether perception of university environment mediated the association between minority status stress and college persistence attitudes after controlling for perceived general stress. Participants were 160 Asian American, African American, and Latino students who attended a predominantly White university. Results of a path model analysis showed that university environment was a significant mediator for the association between minority status stress and college persistence attitudes. Additionally, minority status stress was distinct from perceived general stress. Finally, the results from a multiple-group comparison indicated that the magnitude of the mediation effect was invariant across Asian American, African American, and Latino college students, thus supporting the generalizability of the mediation model.

  3. Parental perceptions of neighborhood effects in Latino Comunas: the script of "the Delinquent" in understanding drug use, violence, and social disorganization.

    PubMed

    Horner, Pilar; Sanchez, Ninive; Castillo, Marcela; Delva, Jorge

    2012-06-01

    To obtain rich information about how adult Latinos living in high-poverty/high-drug use neighborhoods perceive and negotiate their environment. In 2008, 13 adult caregivers in Santiago, Chile, were interviewed with open-ended questions to ascertain beliefs about neighborhood effects and drug use. Inductive analysis was used to develop the codebook/identify trends. Residents externalized their understanding of drug use and misuse by invoking the concept of delinquent youth. A typology of their perceptions is offered. Learning more about residents' circumstances may help focus on needs-based interventions. More research with Latino neighborhoods is needed for culturally competent models of interventions.

  4. The impact of drug use on perceptions of credibility in indigenous outreach workers.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Peterson, James A; Latkin, Carl A

    2006-10-01

    The authors conducted an investigation of perceptions of outreach worker credibility using the social network members (N = 20) of indigenous outreach workers in an HIV/AIDS prevention intervention. The network members included in the study received semistructured interviews following the program's completion. Outreach workers who were not actively using illicit drugs were more likely to be described as credible than were those who were using drugs. In general, drug use negatively affected perceptions of credibility via damaged trust in the outreach worker's relationship with his or her network member. Results indicate the complexity of using indigenous drug users as outreach workers, the potential negative perceptions concerning hypocritical behavior, and the need to evaluate social interventions from the standpoint of indirect participants.

  5. Child Welfare Worker Perception of the Implementation of Family-Centered Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalopoulos, Lynn; Ahn, Haksoon; Shaw, Terry V.; O'Connor, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore perceptions of Family-Centered Practice (FCP) among child welfare workers who are expected to use FCP principles in their work with children and families. Method: Nine focus groups were conducted among child welfare workers across seven different regions within one state to assess caseworker's…

  6. Exploring African-American and Latino Teens' Perceptions of Contraception and Access to Reproductive Health Care Services.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Charlotte T; Duffy, Jennifer L; Dixon, Rena P; Fuller, Taleria R

    2017-03-01

    Reducing disparities in teen pregnancy and birth rates among African American and Latina teens is a central focus of a community-wide teen pregnancy prevention initiative implemented by the South Carolina Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. Disparities in teen pregnancy and birth rates are driven, in part, by differential access to contraception and reproductive health care services. The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand African American and Latino teens' 1) preferences for finding health information, 2) perceptions of accessing reproductive health services, and 3) beliefs about contraception. As a part of this community-wide initiative, eight focus groups were conducted in the Fall of 2012 with African American and Latino male and female youth from two communities in South Carolina. Among eight focus groups of youth, teens most often reported parents, other trusted relatives, and the Internet as sources of health information. Participants discussed the value of social media and television advertisements for reaching young people and emphasized the importance of privacy, a desire for a teen-only clinic, and the need for friendly clinical staff. Participants' comments often reflected inaccurate beliefs about the reliability and correct usage of contraceptive methods. Female participants also reported side effects of birth control as a potential barrier to use. Ensuring that teens' beliefs and perceptions are taken into account when developing, marketing, and implementing culturally competent reproductive health care services is important to improve access to care for all teens in Horry and Spartanburg Counties. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Perceptions of emotion expression and sibling-parent emotion communication in Latino and non-Latino white siblings of children with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Long, Kristin A; Lobato, Debra; Kao, Barbara; Plante, Wendy; Grullón, Edicta; Cheas, Lydia; Houck, Christopher; Seifer, Ronald

    2013-06-01

    Examine general emotion expression and sibling-parent emotion communication among Latino and non-Latino white (NLW) siblings of children with intellectual disabilities (ID) and matched comparisons. 200 siblings (ages 8-15 years) completed the newly developed Sibling-Parent Emotion Communication Scale and existing measures of general emotion expression and psychosocial functioning. Preliminary analyses evaluated scale psychometrics across ethnicity. Structure and internal consistency of the emotion expression and communication measures differed by respondent ethnicity. Latino siblings endorsed more general emotion expression problems and marginally lower sibling-parent emotion communication than NLW siblings. Siblings of children with ID reported marginally more general emotion expression problems than comparisons. Emotion expression problems and lower sibling-parent emotion communication predicted more internalizing and somatic symptoms and poorer personal adjustment, regardless of ID status. Siblings of children with ID endorsed poorer personal adjustment. Cultural differences in emotion expression and communication may increase Latino siblings' risk for emotional adjustment difficulties.

  8. Factors influencing health care access perceptions and care-seeking behaviors of immigrant Latino sexual minority men and transgender individuals: baseline findings from the HOLA intervention study.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Amanda E; Reboussin, Beth A; Mann, Lilli; Ma, Alice; Song, Eunyoung; Alonzo, Jorge; Rhodes, Scott D

    2014-11-01

    Little is known about immigrant Latino sexual minorities’ health seeking behaviors. This study examined factors associated with perceptions of access and actual care behaviors among this population in North Carolina. A community-based participatory research partnership recruited 180 Latino sexual minority men and transgender individuals within preexisting social networks to participate in a sexual health intervention. Mixed-effects logistic regression models and GIS mapping examined factors influencing health care access perceptions and use of services (HIV testing and routine check-ups). Results indicate that perceptions of access and actual care behaviors are low and affected by individual and structural factors, including: years living in NC, reported poor general health, perceptions of discrimination, micro-, meso-, and macro-level barriers, and residence in a Medically Underserved Area. To improve Latino sexual minority health, focus must be placed on multiple levels, including: individual characteristics (e.g., demographics), clinic factors (e.g., provider competence and clinic environment), and structural factors (e.g., discrimination).

  9. Factors influencing health care access perceptions and care-seeking behaviors of immigrant Latino sexual minority men and transgender individuals: Baseline findings from the HOLA intervention study

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, AE; Reboussin, BA; Mann, L; Ma, A; Song, E; Alonzo, J; Rhodes, SD

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about immigrant Latino sexual minorities' health seeking behaviors. This study examined factors associated with perceptions of access and actual care behaviors among this population in North Carolina. Methods A community-based participatory research partnership recruited 180 Latino sexual minority men and transgender individuals within preexisting social networks to participate in a sexual health intervention. Mixed-effects logistic regression models examined factors influencing health care access perceptions and use of services (HIV testing and routine check-ups). Results Results indicate that perceptions of access and actual care behaviors are low and affected by individual and structural factors, including: years living in NC, reported poor general health, perceptions of discrimination, micro-, meso-, and macro-level barriers, and residence in a Medically Underserved Area. Discussion To improve Latino sexual minority health, focus must be placed on multiple levels, individual characteristics (e.g., demographics), clinic factors (e.g., provider competence and clinic environment), and structural factors (e.g., discrimination). PMID:25418235

  10. Perceptions of environmental and occupational health hazards among agricultural workers in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Jonathan N; Crowe, Jennifer; Postma, Julie; Ybarra, Vickie; Keifer, Matthew C

    2009-09-01

    This study describes agricultural workers' perceptions of environmental and occupational health issues. Interviews were conducted with 389 agricultural workers in the Yakima Valley of central Washington State in the summers of 2004 and 2005. Undergraduate students from the community conducted interviews in Spanish or English. Environmental and occupational health issues were ranked by frequency of concern, and differences by demographics were evaluated using multivariate analyses. In both 2004 and 2005, agricultural workers expressed high levels of concern about working in hot weather, agricultural injuries, pesticides, and pediatric asthma. Agricultural workers' perceptions of environmental and occupational health issues differed by specific demographics, particularly age and ethnicity. Consideration should be given to these issues when designing research studies, creating educational materials, and developing interventions related to environmental and occupational hazards among agricultural workers.

  11. Perceptions of Environmental and Occupational Health Hazards Among Agricultural Workers in Washington State

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Jonathan N.; Crowe, Jennifer; Postma, Julie; Ybarra, Vickie; Keifer, Matthew C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe perceptions of environmental and occupational health issues among agricultural workers. Interviews were conducted with 389 agricultural workers in the Yakima Valley in central Washington State in the summers of 2004 and 2005. Undergraduate students from the community conducted interviews in Spanish or English. Environmental and occupational health issues were ranked by frequency of concern, and differences by demographic characteristics were evaluated using multivariate analyses. In both 2004 and 2005, agricultural workers expressed high levels of concern about working in hot weather, agricultural injuries, pesticides, and pediatric asthma. Perceptions of environmental and occupational health issues among agricultural workers differed by certain demographic characteristics, particularly age and ethnicity. Consideration should be given to these issues when designing research studies, creating educational materials, and developing interventions related to environmental and occupational hazards among agricultural workers. PMID:19715263

  12. Impact of a community health workers-led structured program on blood glucose control among latinos with type 2 diabetes: the DIALBEST trial.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael; Damio, Grace; Chhabra, Jyoti; Fernandez, Maria L; Segura-Pérez, Sofia; Vega-López, Sonia; Kollannor-Samuel, Grace; Calle, Mariana; Shebl, Fatma M; D'Agostino, Darrin

    2015-02-01

    Latinos with type 2 diabetes (T2D) face major healthcare access and disease management disparities. We examined the impact of the Diabetes Among Latinos Best Practices Trial (DIALBEST), a community health worker (CHW)-led structured intervention for improving glycemic control among Latinos with T2D. A total of 211 adult Latinos with poorly controlled T2D were randomly assigned to a standard of healthcare (n = 106) or CHW (n = 105) group. The CHW intervention comprised 17 individual sessions delivered at home by CHWs over a 12-month period. Sessions addressed T2D complications, healthy lifestyles, nutrition, healthy food choices and diet for diabetes, blood glucose self-monitoring, and medication adherence. Demographic, socioeconomic, lifestyle, anthropometric, and biomarker (HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, and lipid profile) data were collected at baseline and 3, 6, 12, and 18 months (6 months postintervention). Groups were equivalent at baseline. Participants had high HbA1c at baseline (mean 9.58% [81.2 mmol/mol]). Relative to participants in the control group, CHWs had a positive impact on net HbA1c improvements at 3 months (-0.42% [-4.62 mmol/mol]), 6 months (-0.47% [-5.10 mmol/mol]), 12 months (-0.57% [-6.18 mmol/mol]), and 18 months (-0.55% [-6.01 mmol/mol]). The overall repeated-measures group effect was statistically significant (mean difference -0.51% [-5.57 mmol/mol], 95% CI -0.83, -0.19% [-9.11, -2.03 mmol/mol], P = 0.002). CHWs had an overall significant effect on fasting glucose concentration that was more pronounced at the 12- and 18-month visits. There was no significant effect on blood lipid levels, hypertension, and weight. DIALBEST is an effective intervention for improving blood glucose control among Latinos with T2D. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  13. Genetic Testing Awareness and Attitudes among Latinos: Exploring Shared Perceptions and Gender-Based Differences

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Jada G.; Shuk, Elyse; Arniella, Guedy; González, C. Javier; Gold, Geoffrey S.; Gany, Francesca; Robson, Mark E.; Hay, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Latinos, whose views are infrequently examined in genomic research, may be at risk of missing out on the benefits of genomic medicine. To explore this possibility, we conducted a qualitative study of awareness and attitudes about genetic testing among Latinos with lower acculturation in New York City. Methods We conducted four focus groups (English-speaking men, n=7; Spanish-speaking men, n=5; English-speaking women, n=13; and Spanish-speaking women, n=13) to explore factors that influence the adoption of new innovations through the discussion of genetic testing in general, and a hypothetical vignette describing a genetic test for skin cancer risk, in particular. Results Through inductive thematic text analysis of focus group transcripts, our multidisciplinary team identified themes within knowledge and attitudes; communication and sources of information; anticipated responses; factors that may increase adoption; and barriers to adoption of genetic testing. Specifically, a majority of participants expressed some degree of uncertainty regarding the purpose of genetic tests and information these tests provide, rarely discussed genetic testing with others in their social networks, and expressed concerns about the misuse of and possible adverse emotional responses to genetic information. However, participants also expressed high levels of interest in receiving a skin cancer genetic test in response to the vignette, and believed that receiving actionable health information was a primary reason to consider testing. Gender-based differences in perceived barriers to testing emerged. Conclusions Results highlight beliefs and barriers that future interventions could target to help ensure that Latinos have adequate understanding of and access to genomic medicine advances. PMID:26555145

  14. Caring for Individuals with Chronic Illness and Minor Depression: Latino Perceptions of Caregiver Burden.

    PubMed

    Corvin, Jaime; Chan, Isabella; Tezak, Ann; Carpenter, Kelly; Aguado Loi, Claudia; Gonzales, Junius; Hoare, Ismael

    2017-01-01

    Informal caregiving can be fundamental to disease management. Yet, the psychosocial, physical, and financial burden experienced by caregivers can be significant. In the US, Latinos experience increasing rates of chronic conditions, the highest uninsured rates in the country, and a growing dependence on informal caregivers. This article explores the impact of caregiving on caregivers of individuals with comorbid chronic disease and depression. Findings highlight the impact of caregiving on financial insecurity, balancing competing demands, increased emotional distress, and community supports. Findings support the inclusion of caregivers in disease management programs to enhance psychosocial outcomes for both caregivers and their patients.

  15. HIV-related risk perception among female sex workers in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ankomah, Augustine; Omoregie, Godpower; Akinyemi, Zacch; Anyanti, Jennifer; Ladipo, Olaronke; Adebayo, Samson

    2011-01-01

    Over one-third of sex workers in Nigeria are infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), yet there is a lack of understanding of sex workers' own perception of sexual risk-taking. Applying the theory of cognitive dissonance, this paper examined the personal HIV risk perception of brothel-based sex workers. The study is based on 24 focus group discussions held among brothel-based sex workers in four geographically and culturally dispersed cities in Nigeria. It was found that sex workers underestimated their risk of infection and rationalized, defended, or justified their behaviors, a typical psychological response to worry, threat, and anxiety arising from the apparent discrepancies between beliefs and behaviors. To reduce dissonance, many sex workers had a strong belief in fatalism, predestination, and faith-based invulnerability to HIV infection. Many believed that one will not die of acquired immune deficiency syndrome if it is not ordained by God. The sex workers also had a high level of HIV-related stigma. From these findings, most sex workers considered risk reduction and in particular condom use as far beyond their control or even unnecessary, as a result of their strong beliefs in fatalism and predestination. Therefore, one critical area of intervention is the need to assist sex workers to develop accurate means of assessing their personal vulnerability and self-appraisal of HIV-related risk.

  16. HIV-related risk perception among female sex workers in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ankomah, Augustine; Omoregie, Godpower; Akinyemi, Zacch; Anyanti, Jennifer; Ladipo, Olaronke; Adebayo, Samson

    2011-01-01

    Background Over one-third of sex workers in Nigeria are infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), yet there is a lack of understanding of sex workers’ own perception of sexual risk-taking. Applying the theory of cognitive dissonance, this paper examined the personal HIV risk perception of brothel-based sex workers. Methods The study is based on 24 focus group discussions held among brothel-based sex workers in four geographically and culturally dispersed cities in Nigeria. Results It was found that sex workers underestimated their risk of infection and rationalized, defended, or justified their behaviors, a typical psychological response to worry, threat, and anxiety arising from the apparent discrepancies between beliefs and behaviors. To reduce dissonance, many sex workers had a strong belief in fatalism, predestination, and faith-based invulnerability to HIV infection. Many believed that one will not die of acquired immune deficiency syndrome if it is not ordained by God. The sex workers also had a high level of HIV-related stigma. Conclusion From these findings, most sex workers considered risk reduction and in particular condom use as far beyond their control or even unnecessary, as a result of their strong beliefs in fatalism and predestination. Therefore, one critical area of intervention is the need to assist sex workers to develop accurate means of assessing their personal vulnerability and self-appraisal of HIV-related risk. PMID:22096411

  17. Perceptions of Emotion Expression and Sibling–Parent Emotion Communication in Latino and Non-Latino White Siblings of Children With Intellectual Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Lobato, Debra; Kao, Barbara; Plante, Wendy; Grullón, Edicta; Cheas, Lydia; Houck, Christopher; Seifer, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Objective Examine general emotion expression and sibling–parent emotion communication among Latino and non-Latino white (NLW) siblings of children with intellectual disabilities (ID) and matched comparisons. Methods 200 siblings (ages 8–15 years) completed the newly developed Sibling–Parent Emotion Communication Scale and existing measures of general emotion expression and psychosocial functioning. Preliminary analyses evaluated scale psychometrics across ethnicity. Results Structure and internal consistency of the emotion expression and communication measures differed by respondent ethnicity. Latino siblings endorsed more general emotion expression problems and marginally lower sibling–parent emotion communication than NLW siblings. Siblings of children with ID reported marginally more general emotion expression problems than comparisons. Emotion expression problems and lower sibling–parent emotion communication predicted more internalizing and somatic symptoms and poorer personal adjustment, regardless of ID status. Siblings of children with ID endorsed poorer personal adjustment. Conclusion Cultural differences in emotion expression and communication may increase Latino siblings’ risk for emotional adjustment difficulties. PMID:23459309

  18. Effects of Food Label Use on Diet Quality and Glycemic Control Among Latinos With Type 2 Diabetes in a Community Health Worker-Supported Intervention.

    PubMed

    Kollannoor-Samuel, Grace; Shebl, Fatma M; Segura-Pérez, Sofia; Chhabra, Jyoti; Vega-López, Sonia; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2016-06-01

    To determine the impact of an intervention led by community health workers (CHWs) on food label use and to assess whether food label use and diet quality mediate the intervention's impact on glycemic control. From 2006 to 2010, 203 Latinos (intervention group, n = 100; control group, n = 103) in Hartford County, Connecticut, with type 2 diabetes were randomized to an intervention that included 17 CHW-led home-based sessions over a 12-month period in addition to the standard of care available in both study arms. Data on food label use, diet quality, covariates, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were collected at baseline and at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months. Data were analyzed via mixed effects and multilevel structural equation modeling. Food label use in the intervention (vs control) group was significantly higher at 3, 12, and 18 months (odds ratio = 2.99; 95% confidence interval = 1.69, 5.29). Food label use and diet quality were positive mediators of improved HbA1c levels. Culturally tailored interventions led by CHWs could increase food label use. Also, CHW-delivered food label education may lead to better diet quality and improve glycemic control among Latinos with type 2 diabetes.

  19. A randomized, controlled trial of a stress management intervention for Latinos with type 2 diabetes delivered by community health workers: Outcomes for psychological wellbeing, glycemic control, and cortisol.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Julie Ann; Bermudez-Millan, Angela; Damio, Grace; Segura-Perez, Sofia; Chhabra, Jyoti; Vergara, Cunegundo; Feinn, Richard; Perez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2016-10-01

    To test the efficacy of a community health worker (CHW) delivered stress management (SM) intervention on psychosocial, glycemic, and cortisol outcomes among U.S. Latinos with type 2 diabetes. A randomized, controlled trial compared CHW-delivered diabetes education (DE; one group session) to DE plus CHW-delivered SM (DE+SM; 8 group sessions). Psychosocial variables and urinary cortisol were measured at baseline and posttreatment. HbA1c was measured at baseline, posttreatment, and 3-month follow-up. In intent to treat analysis, compared to DE (n=46), DE+SM (n=61) showed significantly improved symptoms of depression, anxiety, and self-reported health status. There were no significant group effects for HbA1c, diabetes distress, or urinary cortisol. However, there was a dose response effect for HbA1c and diabetes distress; increasing attendance at SM sessions was associated with greater improvements in HbA1c and diabetes distress. This is the first randomized, controlled trial demonstrating that CHWs can improve psychological symptoms and self-reported health among Latinos with type 2 diabetes. Efforts to increase intervention attendance may improve HbA1c and diabetes distress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Latino Parents' and Adolescents' Perceptions of the Needs and Issues of Adolescents in Their Community.

    PubMed

    de Anda, Diane; Franke, Todd M; Becerra, Rosina M

    2009-10-01

    Data from The Community Needs Assessment Survey were examined to understand the issues parents and adolescents felt were most important to address for the adolescents in their community. The sample of 1,784 Latino respondents consisted of 892 parent/adolescent dyads. Factor analyses found parents and adolescents identified and prioritized the same six factors: education and career planning, abuse and victimization, adolescent behavior problems, adolescent sexuality, socioeconomic stressors, and relationships. However, parent ratings for all factors were higher, indicating a higher level of concern. The article analyzes differences by age/generation (parents versus adolescents), by immigrant versus native status, and by type of dyad based on the latter (i.e., US born adolescent/US born parent, US born adolescent/immigrant parent, immigrant adolescent/immigrant parent). The authors discuss the complex interaction of these factors and the implications for practice and research.

  1. Perception of stress in Laotian migrant workers in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Nilvarangkul, Kessarawan; Rungreangkulkij, Somporn; Wongprom, Jaranya

    2010-10-01

    Globalization and the movement of workers across borders in search of a better life or employment are presenting healthcare systems and researchers with problems of increasing complexity. This study focused on how migrant workers in Thailand from the Lao People's Democratic Republic conceptualized their stress and stressing factors. Participant observation, in-depth interviews, and field notes were employed in the study, which analyzed data from seventy subjects through qualitative content analysis. The migrant workers in this sample perceived stress as a state of being unable to fulfill their preferences or expectations revolving around issues of: living with poverty, employment, loneliness, poor relationships, competition in the workplace combined with job uncertainty, and invisibility. To provide care for the minority migrant workers, nurses need to focus on identifying how these users perceive stress, and urgent action and further research are needed.

  2. Effectiveness of a Community Health Worker Intervention Among African American and Latino Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rosland, Ann-Marie; Kieffer, Edith C.; Sinco, Brandy R.; Valerio, Melissa; Palmisano, Gloria; Anderson, Michael; Guzman, J. Ricardo; Heisler, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We tested the effectiveness of a culturally tailored, behavioral theory–based community health worker intervention for improving glycemic control. Methods. We used a randomized, 6-month delayed control group design among 164 African American and Latino adult participants recruited from 2 health systems in Detroit, Michigan. Our study was guided by the principles of community-based participatory research. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level was the primary outcome measure. Using an empowerment-based approach, community health workers provided participants with diabetes self-management education and regular home visits, and accompanied them to a clinic visit during the 6-month intervention period. Results. Participants in the intervention group had a mean HbA1c value of 8.6% at baseline, which improved to a value of 7.8% at 6 months, for an adjusted change of -0.8 percentage points (P < .01). There was no change in mean HbA1c among the control group (8.5%). Intervention participants also had significantly greater improvements in self-reported diabetes understanding compared with the control group. Conclusions. This study contributes to the growing evidence for the effectiveness of community health workers and their role in multidisciplinary teams engaged in culturally appropriate health care delivery. PMID:21680932

  3. Depth perception, dark adaptation, vigilance and accident proneness of Chinese coal mine workers.

    PubMed

    Deng, Mingming; Chan, Alan H S; Wu, Feng; Sun, Linyan

    2016-09-02

    To explore the relationships between human factors and accident proneness of coal mine workers, the depth perception, dark adaptation and vigilance abilities of 239 Chinese coal mine workers were tested and their accident proneness was surveyed with an accident proneness questionnaire. The results indicated that dark adaptation and vigilance abilities of the mine workers declined with increasing age. Vigilance had a significant negative relationship with accident proneness. There were significant differences in vigilance between coal mine workers doing different types of work. Individual difference in vigilance was relevant to the type of work that an individual did in a coal mine. The dark adaptation index had a significant positive relationship with accident proneness. Coal mine workers with weaker dark adaptation ability were also more accident prone. Some ergonomics recommendations concerning coal mine safety management in China are proposed.

  4. The Maryland patient plan of care form: perceptions of physicians and social workers.

    PubMed

    Laje, Rene P; Wilks, Gary B; Marx, Marcia; Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska

    2007-11-01

    To assess nursing home physicians' and social workers' perceptions of the new Maryland Patient Plan of Care Form (PPOC). Mailed survey. Nursing homes in Maryland. Thirty-seven physicians and 60 social workers. Views of physicians and social workers were assessed through quantitative questions about the use of the PPOC form and qualitative questions about barriers in completing the form and recommendations to improve the form. The majority (79.2%) of physicians and social workers reported that completing the PPOC is somewhat of a major burden. An overwhelming majority (85.6%) reported that social workers are completing the form, while close to half of the physicians and a quarter of the social work respondents say that physicians are involved in completing the form. Moreover, significantly more social workers (63.3%) than physicians (36.7%) believe the form would be more useful as a physician's order (X(2) = 5.287; d f = 1; P = .021). Both physicians and social workers identify barriers to completing the form and offer recommendations to improve the form. Despite legislation requiring physicians to sign the PPOC, it is not a physician's order, thus shifting the burden of completing the PPOC to social workers. We conclude that most physicians and social workers view the PPOC as burdensome and do not feel that it is useful, but whether it is having an effect on patient care preferences merits further investigation.

  5. Stakeholders’ Perceptions on Shortage of Healthcare Workers in Primary Healthcare in Botswana: Focus Group Discussions

    PubMed Central

    Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Mash, Robert; Shaibu, Sheila; Phaladze, Nthabiseng

    2015-01-01

    Background An adequate health workforce force is central to universal health coverage and positive public health outcomes. However many African countries have critical shortages of healthcare workers, which are worse in primary healthcare. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of healthcare workers, policy makers and the community on the shortage of healthcare workers in Botswana. Method Fifteen focus group discussions were conducted with three groups of policy makers, six groups of healthcare workers and six groups of community members in rural, urban and remote rural health districts of Botswana. All the participants were 18 years and older. Recruitment was purposive and the framework method was used to inductively analyse the data. Results There was a perceived shortage of healthcare workers in primary healthcare, which was believed to result from an increased need for health services, inequitable distribution of healthcare workers, migration and too few such workers being trained. Migration was mainly the result of unfavourable personal and family factors, weak and ineffective healthcare and human resources management, low salaries and inadequate incentives for rural and remote area service. Conclusions Botswana has a perceived shortage of healthcare workers, which is worse in primary healthcare and rural areas, as a result of multiple complex factors. To address the scarcity the country should train adequate numbers of healthcare workers and distribute them equitably to sufficiently resourced healthcare facilities. They should be competently managed and adequately remunerated and the living conditions and rural infrastructure should also be improved. PMID:26284617

  6. Healthcare workers' perceptions of lean: a context-sensitive, mixed methods study in three Swedish hospitals.

    PubMed

    Holden, Richard J; Eriksson, Andrea; Andreasson, Jörgen; Williamsson, Anna; Dellve, Lotta

    2015-03-01

    As the application of lean in healthcare expands, further research is needed in at least two areas: first, on the role of context in shaping lean and its consequences and second, on how healthcare workers perceive lean. Accordingly, this context-sensitive, mixed methods study addressed how hospital workers' perceptions of lean varied across contexts in three Swedish hospitals. Registered nurses and physicians at the hospitals and across units differing in acuity completed standardized surveys (N = 236, 57% response rate) about their perceptions of hospital-wide lean implementation. Perceptions varied by: hospital context, with one hospital's employees reporting the least favorable perceptions; unit acuity, with higher-acuity units reporting more favorable perceptions; and professional role, with nurses reporting more favorable perceptions than physicians. Individual interviews, group interviews, and observations provided insight about these dissimilar contexts and possible explanations for context-specific variability. Findings are discussed with respect to strategies for implementing lean in healthcare; the importance of attending to levels, context, and worker consequences of lean; and directions for future research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Healthcare workers' perceptions of lean: A context-sensitive, mixed methods study in three Swedish hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Richard J.; Eriksson, Andrea; Andreasson, Jörgen; Williamsson, Anna; Dellve, Lotta

    2014-01-01

    As the application of lean in healthcare expands, further research is needed in at least two areas: first, on the role of context in shaping lean and its consequences and second, on how healthcare workers perceive lean. Accordingly, this context-sensitive, mixed methods study addressed how hospital workers' perceptions of lean varied across contexts in three Swedish hospitals. Registered nurses and physicians at the hospitals and across units differing in acuity completed standardized surveys (N=236, 57% response rate) about their perceptions of hospital-wide lean implementation. Perceptions varied by: hospital context, with one hospital's employees reporting the least favorable perceptions; unit acuity, with higher-acuity units reporting more favorable perceptions; and professional role, with nurses reporting more favorable perceptions than physicians. Individual interviews, group interviews, and observations provided insight about these dissimilar contexts and possible explanations for context-specific variability. Findings are discussed with respect to strategies for implementing lean in healthcare; the importance of attending to levels, context, and worker consequences of lean; and directions for future research. PMID:25479987

  8. Comparison of workers’ perceptions toward work climate and health symptoms between ceramic and iron foundry workers

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Joydeep; Bagepally, Bhavani S.; Shah, Priyanka; Kotadiya, Sanjay; Yadav, Suresh; Naha, Nibedita

    2016-01-01

    Background: Workers exposed to heavy manual material handling (MMH) in a hot working environment succumb to severe physical stress and psychological stress. Aims: (1) Recognize the heat load at workplaces of ceramic industry and iron industry, and (2) comparatively examine the characteristics of self-reported physiological responses and heat-health perception among these workers. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional prospective study. Materials and Methods: Workplace microclimate in the ceramic industry and iron industry was monitored. An ergonomic checklist and a questionnaire was used to record self-reported workers’ perceptions toward heat stress at workplace (ceramic workers N = 321, iron foundry workers N = 253). The prevalence rates of subjective symptoms among workers of both the industries were compared. Statistical Analysis: Chi-square test was used to examine the association between stressors and health complaints at a significance level set at P < 0.05. Results: Iron foundries recorded higher mean ambient temperature (43.4 ± 3.7°C) and wet-bulb globe temperature (WGBT) index (31.5 ± 0.7°C) as compared to ceramic industries (39.9 ± 3.3°C and 28 ± 1.5°C, respectively). Heavy sweating, elevated body temperature, sleeplessness, excessive thirst, muscular discomforts, and fatigue were prime symptoms recorded among workers of both industries. Skin-related disorders (red face, dry skin, bumps, itching) were significantly higher among iron foundry workers, whereas sleeplessness, high blood pressure, heavy sweating, kidney stone, decreased urination, muscular discomforts, and fatigue were significantly more among ceramic workers. Young workers reported more sweating and fatigue than older workers. Conclusions: A hot work climate and heavy manual labor designate ceramic and iron industries as arduous. Direct contact with hot surface and continuous MMH in tandem with the mechanical pace of production process makes work in ceramic industries more difficult

  9. Social Worker Perceptions of the Portrayal of the Profession in the News and Entertainment Media: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zugazaga, Carole B.; Surette, Raymond B.; Mendez, Monica; Otto, Charles W.

    2006-01-01

    This exploratory study describes social workers' perceptions of the depiction of the social work profession found in the news and entertainment media. A random sample of 665 MSW social workers who were members of the Florida Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers were surveyed regarding how they felt the profession was depicted in…

  10. ESL Teachers' Perceptions of the Process for Identifying Adolescent Latino English Language Learners with Specific Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferlis, Emily C.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the question "how do ESL teachers perceive the prereferral process for identifying adolescent Latino English language learners with specific learning disabilities?" The study fits within the Latino Critical Race Theory framework and employs an interpretive phenomenological qualitative research approach.…

  11. Latino Student's Perceptions of the University Campus Climate: Exploratory Study of First Generation Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    This study examines Latino student's impressions of the university campus climate. The over-arching question guiding this study asked: How do Latino first college generation students negotiate the psychosocial, cultural and environmental perspectives of the college experience? The conceptual framework integrates three major higher education…

  12. Championing the Latino Administrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    When the author worked as a vice principal at a K-8 school in Watsonville, California, a school predominantly filled with migrant workers' children, he felt a lack of support as a Latino as he began moving up into school administration. He also continued to see what he had seen as a teacher--which was how underserved minority students were. These…

  13. Professional Role Perceptions of School Social Workers, Psychologists, and Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agresta, Jacqueline

    2004-01-01

    School social workers, school psychologists, and school counselors were surveyed. They reported the actual proportion of their professional time that they devoted and would ideally dedicate to each of 21 professional roles. They rated the appropriateness of each role for members of the three professions and indicated how often they felt…

  14. Perceptions of Female Social Workers toward Administrative Positions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munson, Carlton E.

    This paper discusses a study to determine attitudes among women in the field of social work regarding opportunities for professional advancement. Specifically, the study investigated whether female social workers noticed differences in opportunity among males and females to be recruited to management positions and to hold management positions once…

  15. Occupational Safety and Health: A Report on Worker Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frenkel, Richard L.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Hazardous working conditions erode job satisfaction, say increasing numbers of workers. Especially threatened is the inexperienced employee, who is the most likely to be injured on the job but least willing to bring potential dangers to the attention of management. (CT)

  16. Customer Satisfaction Perceptions of Dislocated Workers Served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washburn, Dava Michelle

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of satisfaction of dislocated workers served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium. Four WIN Job Centers participated in this study: Northeast Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Corinth, Northwest Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Oxford,…

  17. Customer Satisfaction Perceptions of Dislocated Workers Served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washburn, Dava Michelle

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of satisfaction of dislocated workers served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium. Four WIN Job Centers participated in this study: Northeast Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Corinth, Northwest Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Oxford,…

  18. On-the-Job E-Learning: Workers' Attitudes and Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batalla-Busquets, Josep-Maria; Pacheco-Bernal, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    The use of e-learning for on-the-job training has grown exponentially in the last decade due to it being accepted by people in charge of businesses. Few papers have explored virtual training from the workers' standpoint, that is, the perception they have about the different training methodologies (face-to-face vs. virtual) and the attitudes they…

  19. Support Workers within Learning/Intellectual Disability Services Perception of Their Role, Training and Support Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windley, Debbie; Chapman, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the perceptions of support workers working with adults with learning/intellectual disabilities, training and support needs. Data was collected by focus group (n = 3) and semi-structured interviews (n = 5). Participants saw their key role as maximising quality of life, identified "Trial and error" as the main mode of skill…

  20. Support Workers within Learning/Intellectual Disability Services Perception of Their Role, Training and Support Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windley, Debbie; Chapman, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the perceptions of support workers working with adults with learning/intellectual disabilities, training and support needs. Data was collected by focus group (n = 3) and semi-structured interviews (n = 5). Participants saw their key role as maximising quality of life, identified "Trial and error" as the main mode of skill…

  1. [Knowledge and perception about tuberculosis among public transport workers in Lima, Peru].

    PubMed

    Lukac, Danitza; Garaycochea, Octavio; Taype-Rondan, Alvaro; Luque Bustamante, Laura; Mujica-Vasquez, André; Zamora, Dario

    2016-11-23

    To describe the level of knowledge and perception of tuberculosis among public transport workers attending Road Safety Education courses in Lima, Peru. An observational, cross-sectional, analytic study was conducted between July and August 2014 in public transport workers attending the courses of Road Safety education. In Lima, such courses are mandatory for workers in the public transport area. An anonymous and voluntary survey was applied to obtain the following variables: sociodemographic characteristics, history of tuberculosis, tuberculosis knowledge and attitudes towards the disease. The factors associated to the risk perception of Tuberculosis infection were analysed using Poisson regression. From 309 attendees, 216 surveys were analysed (69.9%). Of these, 88.4% were males, 3.2% had a history of tuberculosis. The most widely known symptom was cough with phlegm (44.4%), the most popular source of information was television (39.8%), and only 9.7% had any training about tuberculosis. A 41.2% of respondents believed that working in the public transport sector was an occupation with a high risk of tuberculosis infection. No significant association between risk perception of tuberculosis and sociodemographic characteristics was found. A considerable lack of knowledge about tuberculosis symptoms and a low perception of risk for tuberculosis exists among public transport workers in Lima. Education strategies directed to this population need to be implemented.

  2. [Accident risk perception in high-voltage electrical maintenance workers].

    PubMed

    Micheli, M; Zanaletti, W; Giorgi, I; Argentero, P; Candura, S M

    2006-01-01

    Promoting safety at work represents a fundamental task for achieving improvement in the quality of working life and preventing accidental injuries at work. Nevertheless, over the last few decades injuries at work have continued to constitute a significant problem. The aim of this study was to examine accident risk perception in a sample of 45 subjects employed in the electricity sector and to relate their risk perception to personality characteristics, cognitive functioning, and personal and professional history. The instruments used were: "Cognitive Behavioral Assessment 2.0", the "Workplace safety questionnaire" (an Italian questionnaire on safety at work), and a battery of neuropsychological tests. Findings show that electricity (current variability) was perceived as the most serious risk factor, while the most frequent perceived risk factors for accidents were accidental falls, cuts and bruises. The subjects of our sample showed a good awareness of risk perception, and good mood response and augmented psychophysiological activation during accidental injuries.

  3. Pesticides in the Homes of Farmworkers: Latino Mothers' Perceptions of Risk to Their Children's Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Pamela; Quandt, Sara A.; Doran, Alicia M.; Snively, Beverly M.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2007-01-01

    Pesticide exposure has been linked with immediate and delayed health effects. Anyone who lives in a farmworker household may be exposed to pesticides. Studies with farmworkers have found generally low levels of awareness of pesticide exposure and prevention. Less is known about the perceptions of nonfarmworkers living with farmworkers. This…

  4. Pesticides in the Homes of Farmworkers: Latino Mothers' Perceptions of Risk to Their Children's Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Pamela; Quandt, Sara A.; Doran, Alicia M.; Snively, Beverly M.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2007-01-01

    Pesticide exposure has been linked with immediate and delayed health effects. Anyone who lives in a farmworker household may be exposed to pesticides. Studies with farmworkers have found generally low levels of awareness of pesticide exposure and prevention. Less is known about the perceptions of nonfarmworkers living with farmworkers. This…

  5. WorkersPerceptions of Safety as a Predictor of Injury.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-10-01

    Jones Naval Health Research Center San Diego, California 92138 Safety Perceptions William M. Pugh Fleet Medicine Brauich Environmental and Social ... Medicine Division Naval Health Research Center P.O. Box 85122 San Diego, CA 92138 IThis document hca iiout for public reieqeq =d muse I dietrbution is

  6. The Legal System and Alzheimer's Disease: Social Workers and Lawyers' Perceptions and Experiences.

    PubMed

    Werner, Perla; Doron, Israel Issi

    2016-01-01

    The expected increase in the number of people living with Alzheimer's disease (AD) worldwide will be accompanied by an increase in the number of cases involving persons with AD brought up to the courts. This study examined the perceptions and experiences of social workers and lawyers regarding these cases. Three focus groups including social workers and lawyers (n = 26) were conducted. Two main themes were raised by the participants: (a) the role of social workers and lawyers in court cases regarding AD, and (b) the need for improving legal encounters involving persons with AD. Similarities and differences were found in both professionals' interpretations of these shared themes. Results of this study emphasize the need for increasing the knowledge and interprofessional training provided to social workers and lawyers involved in legal cases dealing with issues involving persons with Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Social hazards on the job: workplace abuse, sexual harassment, and racial discrimination--a study of Black, Latino, and White low-income women and men workers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Nancy; Waterman, Pamela D; Hartman, Cathy; Bates, Lisa M; Stoddard, Anne M; Quinn, Margaret M; Sorensen, Glorian; Barbeau, Elizabeth M

    2006-01-01

    This study documents the prevalence of workplace abuse, sexual harassment at work, and lifetime experiences of racial discrimination among the United for Health cohort of 1,202 predominantly black, Latino, and white women and men low-income union workers in the Greater Boston area. Overall, 85 percent of the cohort reported exposure to at least one of these three social hazards; exposure to all three reached 20 to 30 percent among black women and women and men in racial/ethnic groups other than white, black, or Latino. Workplace abuse in the past year, reported by slightly more than half the workers, was most frequently reported by the white men (69%). Sexual harassment at work in the past year was reported by 26 percent of the women and 22 percent of the men, with values of 20 percent or more in all racial/ ethnic-gender groups other than Latinas and white men. High exposure to racial discrimination was reported by 37 percent of the workers of color, compared with 10 percent of the white workers, with black workers reporting the greatest exposure (44%). Together, these findings imply that the lived--and combined-experiences of class, race, and gender inequities and their attendant assaults on human dignity are highly germane to analyses of workers' health.

  8. Does Racial/Ethnic Identity Influence the Effectiveness of a Community Health Worker Intervention for African American and Latino Adults With Type 2 Diabetes?

    PubMed

    Murayama, Hiroshi; Spencer, Michael S; Sinco, Brandy R; Palmisano, Gloria; Kieffer, Edith C

    2016-12-08

    Background Community health worker (CHW) interventions are known to be an effective strategy to improve health behaviors and outcomes in relation to diabetes, particularly for racial/ethnic communities. Although understanding the function of identity with same race/ethnicity among clients of CHW interventions could contribute to more effective program design, few studies have explored whether levels of racial/ethnic identity among participants can influence the effectiveness of CHW interventions. Aims We tested the relationship between level of racial/ethnic identity and changes in hemoglobin A1c and diabetes self-efficacy among low-income African American and Latino adults with type 2 diabetes who participated in a CHW intervention. Methods Data came from a randomized controlled trial of the CHW intervention with a 6-month delayed control group design for 164 African American and Latino adults in Detroit, Michigan. Racial/ethnic identity was created from two items and classified into high, moderate, and low. We combined the two arms (immediate and delayed) into one because there was no significant difference in baseline characteristics, other than age and postintervention self-efficacy, and multivariable linear regression models were applied in the analysis. Results Possession of high racial/ethnic identity was associated with greater improvement both in hemoglobin A1c and diabetes self-efficacy at 6 months. Moreover, among those with high hemoglobin A1c at preintervention, higher racial/ethnic identity had a greater impact on hemoglobin A1c improvement, compared with those with lower identity. Conclusions This study suggests the importance of considering racial/ethnic identity of the participants in designing and operating the CHW intervention for racial/ethnic minority population.

  9. Effect of a Community Health Worker Intervention Among Latinos With Poorly Controlled Type 2 Diabetes: The Miami Healthy Heart Initiative Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Carrasquillo, Olveen; Lebron, Cynthia; Alonzo, Yisel; Li, Hua; Chang, Aileen; Kenya, Sonjia

    2017-07-01

    Community health worker (CHW) intervention is a promising approach to address type 2 diabetes among Latinos. However, evidence from randomized clinical studies is limited. To compare a CHW intervention with enhanced usual care. This 52-week, single-blind, randomized clinical trial included 300 Latino adults aged 18 to 65 years who were treated in 2 public hospital outpatient clinics in Miami-Dade County, Florida, from July 1, 2010, through October 31, 2013. Eligible participants had a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level of 8.0 or greater. Follow-up was completed January 31, 2015, and data were analyzed from March 10, 2015, to June 6, 2016. A 1-year CHW intervention consisted of home visits, telephone calls, and group-level activities. Primary outcomes included systolic blood pressure (SBP), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC) levels, and HbA1c levels. Secondary outcomes included body mass index, medication regimen intensification, and self-reported measures of diet, physical activity, and medication regimen adherence. Of the 300 participants randomized (135 men [45%] and 165 women [55%]; mean [SD] age, 55.2 [7.0] years), we obtained follow-up data on 215 (71.7%). Participants in the CHW group received a median of 4 home visits and 20 telephone calls. After adjusting for baseline values and covariates, participants in the CHW group had an HbA1c level that was 0.51% lower (95% CI, -0.94% to -0.08%) than that of participants in the enhanced usual care group. The reduction in SBP of 4.62 mm Hg (95% CI, -9.01 to -0.24 mm Hg) did not meet the preplanned target of 8 mm Hg and was not statistically significant in unadjusted models. No significant differences in LDLC levels (mean difference, -8.2 mg/dL; 95% CI, -18.8 to 2.3 mg/dL) or any of the preplanned secondary outcomes were observed. Post hoc analyses suggest that the intervention may be more beneficial among those with worse control of their type 2 diabetes at baseline. Among Latinos with poorly controlled type 2

  10. Parental perception of built environment characteristics and built environment use among Latino families: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Heerman, William J; Mitchell, Stephanie J; Thompson, Jessica; Martin, Nina C; Sommer, Evan C; van Bakergem, Margaret; Taylor, Julie Lounds; Buchowski, Maciej S; Barkin, Shari L

    2016-11-22

    Perception of undesirable features may inhibit built environment use for physical activity among underserved families with children at risk for obesity. To examine the association of perceived availability, condition, and safety of the built environment with its self-reported use for physical activity, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis on baseline data from a randomized controlled trial. Adjusted Poisson regression was used to test the association between the primary independent variables (perceived availability, physical condition, and safety) with the primary outcome of self-reported use of built environment structures. Among 610 parents (90% Latino) of preschool-age children, 158 (26%) reported that there were no available built environment structures for physical activity in the neighborhood. The use of built environment structures was associated with the perceived number of available structures (B = 0.34, 95% CI 0.31, 0.37, p < 0.001) and their perceived condition (B = 0.19, 95% CI 0.12, 0.27, p = 0.001), but not with perceived safety (B = 0.00, 95% CI -0.01, 0.01, p = 0.7). In this sample of underserved families, perceived availability and condition of built environment structures were associated with use rather than perceived safety. To encourage physical activity among underserved families, communities need to invest in the condition and availability of built environment structures. Registered at ClinicalTrials.gov ( NCT01316653 ) on March 11, 2011.

  11. Risk perception and safety in Norwegian offshore workers

    SciTech Connect

    Rundmo, T.

    1996-12-31

    The relationships between perception of risk, behavior and involvement in accidents are receiving increased attention in the offshore oil industry. How employees perceive the risk they are exposed to during the conduct of their work may contribute to an understanding of risk management and thereby to the safety of their working conditions. A self-completion questionnaire survey was carried out among employees on a representative sample of offshore oil installations in the Norwegian part of the North Sea in 1990. In 1994 a follow-up study was carried out. A total of 915 respondents replied to our questionnaire in 1990 and 1138 in 1994. The studies were financed by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate. There were significantly fewer of the personnel who felt at risk in 1994 compared to 1990 and a greater percentage of the personnel were satisfied with the safety and contingency measures and experienced job stress to a greater extent in 1990 than they did in 1994. Emotional reactions caused by potentially-hazardous risk sources were dependent on the respondents perceived controllability of the risk sources. The study also showed that there were significant positive correlations between organizational factors, safety status, perceived risk, and accidents. However, safety cannot be improved by changing risk perception. It is the factors that cause variations in risk perception as well as behavior and safety which should be the focus of safety promotion.

  12. Characterizing occupational risk perception: the case of biological, ergonomic and organizational hazards in Spanish healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Portell, Mariona; Gil, Rosa M; Losilla, Josep M; Vives, Jaume

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how risk is perceived by workers is necessary for effective risk communication and risk management. This study adapts key elements of the psychometric perspective to characterize occupational risk perception at a worker level. A total of 313 Spanish healthcare workers evaluated relevant hazards in their workplaces related to biological, ergonomic and organizational factors. A questionnaire elicited workers' ratings of 3 occupational hazards on 9 risk attributes along with perceived risk. Factor and regression analyses reveal regularities in how different risks are perceived, while, at the same time, the procedure helps to summarize specificities in the perception of each hazard. The main regularity is the weight of feeling of dread/severity in order to characterize the risk perceived (β ranges from .22 to .41; p < .001). Data also suggest an underestimation of expert knowledge in relation to the personal knowledge of risk. Thus, participants consider their knowledge of the risk related to biological, ergonomic, and organizational hazards to be higher than the knowledge attributed to the occupational experts (mean differences 95% CIs [.10, .30], [.54, .94], and [0.52, 1.05]). We demonstrate the application of a feasible and systematic procedure to capture how workers perceive hazards in their immediate work environment.

  13. Low-Income Housing Rental Assistance, Perceptions of Neighborhood Food Environment, and Dietary Patterns among Latino Adults: the AHOME Study.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Rivera, Marlene; Rosenbaum, Emily; Yama, Cecile; Chambers, Earle

    2017-06-01

    Federal rental assistance programs, in the form of the traditional public housing program and the Housing Choice Voucher Program (HCVP-formerly known as Section 8), are designed to reduce the economic rental burden for low-income residents. While residents using federal housing vouchers, which allow low-income residents in public housing to move out of public housing to rent-subsidized homes, have been found to be have better cardiovascular outcomes compared to the cardiovascular outcomes of low-income public housing residents, the mechanisms explaining these associations remains an understudied area. The aim of this study is to assess whether residents participating in HCVP or unassisted residents had greater access to healthy foods such as fruits and vegetables, and less access to unhealthy foods such as fast food and sugar sweetened beverages, when compared to residents living in public housing (referent group). The Affordable Housing as an Obesity Mediating Environment (AHOME) study is a cross-sectional study of Latinos residing in low-income housing in the Bronx, NY (n = 362). Participants were interviewed to assess food patterns and perceptions of neighborhood environment. The analytic sample was primarily female (74.5 %) with a mean age of 46.4 years (SD = 14.68). Residents participating in HCVP had similar availability of fruits and vegetables in the home compared to residents receiving no assistance or public housing residents. HCVP participants consumed more fast food (β = 0.34; CI = 0.10-0.58) but had similar sugar sweetened beverage consumption compared to public housing residents. Unassisted residents had more fast food consumption (β = 0.25; CI = 0.01-0.49) but less sugar sweetened beverage consumption (β = -0.52; CI = -0.76--0.28) than public housing residents. Perceptions of neighborhood food environment were not significantly associated with dietary patterns. This study shows variability in consumption of sugar sweetened

  14. Social Workers' Perceptions of the Association Between Role Playing Games and Psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ezra, Menachem; Lis, Eric; Błachnio, Agata; Ring, Lia; Lavenda, Osnat; Mahat-Shamir, Michal

    2017-08-15

    Whereas role-playing and table-top role-play games (RPGs) have been proven to have potential as therapeutic tools, playing RPGs is often stereotypically associated with social incompetence and psychiatric disorders. Knowledge regarding the stereotype and its implications is very scarce specifically among mental health practitioners. Therefore the present study aimed to narrow this gap in knowledge by examining the perception of Social Workers that are considered to be the forefront of mental health-care, in regard to the association between playing RPGs and mental health. A convenience sample of 130 Social Workers, recruited through social networks (e.g. Facebook, WhatsApp etc.), responded to an on-line survey dealing with their perception of their own knowledge on RPGs, the importance of such knowledge and the association between playing RPGs and mental illness. Results indicated an association between having higher knowledge of RPGs and lower perception of a link between playing RPGs and psychopathology. The study's findings emphasize the false stigma and its potential harmful implication on professionals' practice, especially in the context of intake process and primary diagnostic. The effect of familiarity is also discussed in light of the study's findings. • The perception of mental health professionals toward role playing games such as Dungeons and Dragons is understudied. • Social Workers' perception was measured in regard to the connection between use of RPGs and DSM-IV-TR psychopathology. • Greater knowledge of RPGs was found to be associated with lower perception of the connection between use of RPGs and DSM-IV-TR psychopathology.

  15. Laboratory Animal Workers' Attitudes and Perceptions Concerning Occupational Risk and Injury.

    PubMed

    Steelman, Eric D; Alexander, Jeffrey L

    2016-01-01

    Little is known regarding the risk perceptions and attitudes of laboratory animal care workers toward biologic safety. The purpose of this descriptive study was to assess the attitudes and perceptions of laboratory animal workers toward occupational and injury risk. Subscribers to the CompMed and TechLink listservs (n = 4808) were surveyed electronically, and 5.3% responded; data from 215 respondents were included in the final analysis. Primary variables of interest included AALAS certifications status, level of education, and responses to Likert-scale questions related to attitudes and perceptions of occupational risk and injury. Nonparametric (χ(2)) testing and measures of central tendency and dispersion were used to analyze and describe the data. According to 88.6% of respondents, biologic safety training is provided with information about zoonotic diseases of laboratory animals. Level of education was significantly related to perception of importance regarding wearing personal protective equipment. Participants indicated that appropriate support from coworkers and management staff is received, especially when performance and perception are hindered due to stress and fatigue. Laboratory animal staff are susceptible to injury and exposure to dangerous organisms and toxic substances. For this reason, to maximize safety, yearly biologic safety training should be provided, the importance of protective equipment adherence strengthened, and the culture of safety made a priority within the institution.

  16. Risk Perception and Occupational Accidents: A Study of Gas Station Workers in Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; Rocha, Laurelize Pereira; Bonow, Clarice Alves; da Silva, Mara Regina Santos; Vaz, Joana Cezar; Cardoso, Letícia Silveira

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the perceptions of gas station workers about physical, chemical, biological and physiological risk factors to which they are exposed in their work environment; identify types of occupational accidents involving gas station workers and; report the development of a socioenvironmental intervention as a tool for risk communication to gas station workers. A quantitative study was performed with 221 gas station workers in southern Brazil between October and December 2010. Data collection was performed between October to December 2010 via structured interviews. The data were analyzed using SPSS 19.0. The participants identified the following risk types: chemical (93.7%), physical (88.2%), physiological (64.3%) and biological (62.4%). In this sample, 94.1% of gas station workers reported occupational accidents, and 74.2% reported fuel contact with the eyes (p < 0.05). It is concluded that workers perceive risks, and that they tend to relate risks with the occurrence of occupational accidents as an indicator of the dangerous nature of their work environment. PMID:22851948

  17. Support workers as agents for health behavior change: An Australian study of the perceptions of clients with complex needs, support workers, and care coordinators.

    PubMed

    Lawn, Sharon; Westwood, Tania; Jordans, Sarah; O'Connor, Julianne

    2016-04-06

    An expanding aging population has placed increased demands on health care resources in many countries. Enhancing community aged care support workers' role to support greater client self-management and reablement is therefore timely. This article presents perceptions of the impact of an Australian practice change initiative designed to enhance knowledge, skills, and confidence of support workers to support behavior change in clients with complex health care needs. A comprehensive training program was delivered in 2013. Methods included thematic analysis of interviews with clients, focus groups with support workers and coordinators, and collection of case studies of client/support worker behavior change interactions. Client, support worker, and coordinator responses were highly positive, reporting improvement in the quality of interactions with clients, client health outcomes, care coordination, communication, and teamwork. Mental health literacy remained the biggest knowledge gap. This research showed that support workers are ideally placed to be more actively involved in motivating clients to achieve behavior change goals.

  18. Perception of epilepsy among public workers: perspectives from a developing country.

    PubMed

    Ekenze, O S; Ndukuba, A C

    2013-01-01

    A cross-sectional survey of health-care workers and other public servants was undertaken to determine the perception of epilepsy and attitudes towards persons with epilepsy (PWE) in Eastern Nigeria. Response rate was 89.4% (161/180) comprising 95 (59%) health-care workers (Group A) and 66 (41%) other public servants (Group B). Epilepsy was considered a mental disorder by 16 (16.8%) of Group A and 16 (24.2%) of Group B, while 74 (77.9%) of Group A and 20 (30.3%) of Group B considered it a brain disorder. It was thought to occur following head injury by 60 (63.2%) of Group A and 11 (16.7%) of Group B, while 6 (6.3%) of Group A and 1 (1.5%) of Group B considered it to be contagious. Twelve (12.6%) and 33 (34.7%) of Group A and 8 (12.1%) and 27 (40.9%) of Group B will marry or hire PWE. Health-care workers have better perceptions of epilepsy, but stigma against PWE is still prevalent. Perception of epilepsy and attitudes towards PWE may improve with public enlightenment programs.

  19. Local public health workers' perceptions toward responding to an influenza pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Balicer, Ran D; Omer, Saad B; Barnett, Daniel J; Everly, George S

    2006-01-01

    Background Current national preparedness plans require local health departments to play an integral role in responding to an influenza pandemic, a major public health threat that the World Health Organization has described as "inevitable and possibly imminent". To understand local public health workers' perceptions toward pandemic influenza response, we surveyed 308 employees at three health departments in Maryland from March – July 2005, on factors that may influence their ability and willingness to report to duty in such an event. Results The data suggest that nearly half of the local health department workers are likely not to report to duty during a pandemic. The stated likelihood of reporting to duty was significantly greater for clinical (Multivariate OR: 2.5; CI 1.3–4.7) than technical and support staff, and perception of the importance of one's role in the agency's overall response was the single most influential factor associated with willingness to report (Multivariate OR: 9.5; CI 4.6–19.9). Conclusion The perceived risk among public health workers was shown to be associated with several factors peripheral to the actual hazard of this event. These risk perception modifiers and the knowledge gaps identified serve as barriers to pandemic influenza response and must be specifically addressed to enable effective local public health response to this significant threat. PMID:16620372

  20. Health workers' perceptions of obstetric critical incident audit in Thyolo District, Malawi.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Wouter; van den Akker, Thomas; Mwagomba, Beatrice; Khukulu, Rex; van Elteren, Marianne; van Roosmalen, Jos

    2011-10-01

    To assess perceptions held by health workers in a Malawian district about obstetric critical incident audit. Insight into factors contributing to participation and endorsement may help to improve the audit process and reduce facility-based maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity. This study involves semi-structured interviews with 25 district health workers, a focus group discussion and observation of audit sessions in health facilities in Thyolo District, Malawi, between August 2009 and January 2010. Data were analysed with maxqda 2010. Findings were categorized into four major areas: (i) general knowledge of audit, (ii) participation in local audit and feedback sessions, (iii) the ability to reproduce the local audit cycle and (iv) effects and outcomes of audit and feedback. All health workers were familiar with the concept of audit and could reproduce the local cycle. Most health workers classified audit as an instructive and helpful tool to improve the quality of their work, provided that it is performed in a manner that enhances motivation and on-the-job learning. Contradictory to recent reports from other African settings, which showed negative effects of audit on health workers' motivation, staff in this district considered audit and feedback valuable tools to enhance the quality of the care they provide. Audit has become part of the professional routine in the district, and its educational value was considered its most important appeal. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Emergency department workers' perceptions of security officers' effectiveness during violent events.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Gordon Lee; Gates, Donna M; Miller, Margaret; Howard, Patricia Kunz

    2012-01-01

    The emergency department (ED) is among the most at-risk settings for violence by patients and visitors against ED workers. A first response to potential or actual events of workplace violence is often contacting hospital security officers for assistance. The purpose of this study is to describe ED workers' views of security officers' effectiveness during actual events of verbal and/or physical violence. Healthcare workers (n=31) from an urban pediatric ED in the Midwest United States. Participants were interviewed regarding their experiences with workplace violence. Verbatim transcripts were qualitatively analyzed. Six themes were identified: (1) a need for security officers, (2) security officers' availability and response, (3) security officers' presence or involvement, (4) security officers' ability to handle violent situations, (5) security officers' role with restraints, and (6) security officers' role with access. It is important that early communication between security officers and ED workers takes place before violent events occur. A uniform understanding of the roles and responsibilities of security officers should be clearly communicated to ED workers. Future research needs to be conducted with hospital-based security officers to describe their perceptions about their role in the prevention and management of workplace violence.

  2. A Comparison of Protective Service Workers' Perceptions of Ritual and Sexual Abuse in Children: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewandowski, Cathleen A.

    1995-01-01

    Compares child protective service workers' perceptions of sexual abuse to their perceptions of ritual abuse. Perceptual elements examined include the type of problem the abuse is for the victims, difficulties encountered in investigating an allegation, treatment and assessment resources, and definitions of sexual and ritual abuse. The professional…

  3. Examining Perceptions about Mandatory Influenza Vaccination of Healthcare Workers through Online Comments on News Stories.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yang; Pereira, Jennifer A; Quach, Susan; Bettinger, Julie A; Kwong, Jeffrey C; Corace, Kimberly; Garber, Gary; Feinberg, Yael; Guay, Maryse

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand online public perceptions of the debate surrounding the choice of annual influenza vaccinations or wearing masks as a condition of employment for healthcare workers, such as the one enacted in British Columbia in August 2012. Four national and 82 local (British Columbia) Canadian online news sites were searched for articles posted between August 2012 and May 2013 containing the words "healthcare workers" and "mandatory influenza vaccinations/immunizations" or "mandatory flu shots and healthcare workers." We included articles from sources that predominantly concerned our topic of interest and that generated reader comments. Two researchers coded the unedited comments using thematic analysis, categorizing codes to allow themes to emerge. In addition to themes, the comments were categorized by: 1) sentiment towards influenza vaccines; 2) support for mandatory vaccination policies; 3) citing of reference materials or statistics; 4) self-identified health-care worker status; and 5) sharing of a personal story. 1163 comments made by 648 commenters responding to 36 articles were analyzed. Popular themes included concerns about freedom of choice, vaccine effectiveness, patient safety, and distrust in government, public health, and the pharmaceutical industry. Almost half (48%) of commenters expressed a negative sentiment toward the influenza vaccine, 28% were positive, 20% were neutral, and 4% expressed mixed sentiment. Of those who commented on the policy, 75% did not support the condition to work policy, while 25% were in favour. Of the commenters, 11% self-identified as healthcare workers, 13% shared personal stories, and 18% cited a reference or statistic. The perception of the influenza vaccine in the comment sections of online news sites is fairly poor. Public health agencies should consider including online forums, comment sections, and social media sites as part of their communication channels to correct misinformation

  4. Perceptions of the School Social Context across the Transition to Middle School: Heightened Sensitivity among Latino Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinoza, Guadalupe; Juvonen, Jaana

    2011-01-01

    The current study was designed to examine the ways in which perceived behavioral norms among grade mates and school social climate vary across the transition to middle school. The main goals of the study were to test whether Latino students may be more sensitive to the school social climate than White students and whether perceived behavioral…

  5. Puerto Rican Adolescents' Disclosure and Lying to Parents about Peer and Risky Activities: Associations with Teens' Perceptions of Latino Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villalobos, Myriam; Smetana, Judith G.

    2012-01-01

    Disclosure and lying to mothers and fathers about different activities, as defined within social domain theory, were examined as a function of Latino family values in 109 Puerto Rican lower socioeconomic status middle adolescents (M = 15.58 years, SD = 1.18) living in the United States. Questionnaires revealed that teens sometimes disclosed to…

  6. Maternal Perceptions of Agency in Intergenerational Transmission of Spanish: The Case of Latinos in the U.S. Midwest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velázquez, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the ways in which a group of first-generation Latino immigrants to the U.S. Midwest conceptualized their role in their children's bilingual development. Respondents were asked to identify the individuals or institutions on which their children's language and academic development depended, as well as household practices…

  7. Latino and Asian Students' Perceptions of the Quality of Their Educators: The Role of Generational Status and Language Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Adam M.; Melde, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Extant research has primarily assessed the quality of the American school experience for immigrant students by focusing on performance-based outcomes (e.g., grade point average [GPA]). Unlike such research, the current study examines the impact of generational status and language proficiency on Latino and Asian students' (n = 2,261) attitudes…

  8. Puerto Rican Adolescents' Disclosure and Lying to Parents about Peer and Risky Activities: Associations with Teens' Perceptions of Latino Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villalobos, Myriam; Smetana, Judith G.

    2012-01-01

    Disclosure and lying to mothers and fathers about different activities, as defined within social domain theory, were examined as a function of Latino family values in 109 Puerto Rican lower socioeconomic status middle adolescents (M = 15.58 years, SD = 1.18) living in the United States. Questionnaires revealed that teens sometimes disclosed to…

  9. A Study of Teachers, Students, and Parents' Perceptions of How School Climate Affects African-American and Latino Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    Nationally, educational disparities have resulted in a significant achievement gap among African American and Latino students compared to European American students. Cognitive theorists including Piaget, Bruner, and Vygotsky believe that one's environment has an effect on learning. This qualitative case study examined teacher, student, and parent…

  10. Maternal Perceptions of Agency in Intergenerational Transmission of Spanish: The Case of Latinos in the U.S. Midwest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velázquez, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the ways in which a group of first-generation Latino immigrants to the U.S. Midwest conceptualized their role in their children's bilingual development. Respondents were asked to identify the individuals or institutions on which their children's language and academic development depended, as well as household practices…

  11. Examining Latino Representation on California's School Boards: Their Impact on Perceptions about District Problems, Priorities and Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraga, Luis; Krimm, Daniel; Neiman, Max; Reyes, Belinda

    2010-01-01

    The California Voting Rights Act of 2001 had the effect, among others, of granting standing for "protected classes" disadvantaged by at-large school board elections to sue their school districts for lack of appropriate representation. This has generated increased legal action along these lines, particularly among Latino communities that…

  12. ‘Their Type of Drugs: ’ Perceptions of Substance Use, Sex, and Social Boundaries among Young African American and Latino Gay and Bisexual Men

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Tara; McDavitt, Bryce; George, Sheba; Mutchler, Matt G.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of sexuality have increasingly shifted their attention towards understanding the social contexts that inform and organise sexual behaviour. Building on this work, we examine how substance use and sex are socially organised and meaningful activities for young African American and Latino gay and bisexual men who use substances with sex. Drawing on 30 qualitative interviews in Los Angeles and New York, we identify the ways in which social boundaries inform substance use among these young men. We find that many of them view the gay and racial/ethnic communities they belong to as differentiated by patterns of substance use. Further, they see these communities as actively constructing group boundaries through substance use, sanctioning the use of particular substances while simultaneously discouraging the use or discussion of others. For these young men, racial/ethnic and gay communities provide salient contexts in which the use of certain substances and not others is socially meaningful. Findings demonstrate the important and heretofore unrecognised ways that perceived social boundaries inform these young men’s use of substances. As both protective and marginalising influences, perceptions of communities and social identities have real consequences for the sexual health of young African American and Latino gay and bisexual men. PMID:23013278

  13. Effective communication approaches in tuberculosis control: Health workers' perceptions and experiences.

    PubMed

    Arulchelvan, Sriram; Elangovan, Rengan

    2017-10-01

    Health workers' experiences and understanding of the myths, misconceptions, beliefs about TB, and patients in the community (and effective communication methods) can be useful in designing effective IEC materials and strategies. To study the perceptions and experiences of health workers regarding TB disease, patients, and effective communication strategies in TB control. A survey was conducted among health workers involved in Directly Observed Treatment Short (DOTS) course. Data regarding general health beliefs, prevalent myths and misconceptions about TB in their respective localities, knowledge level among patients, and utilization of various communication strategies were collected. There is a significant increase in knowledge about TB during DOTS among patients, as observed by about half of the health workers. TB patients are aware about how TB spreads to others and their responsibilities. Regular interaction with patients is required for treatment adherence. Two thirds of the health workers believe that media-mix strategy can be very effective in creating awareness among the patients as well as the public. Health workers realized that the video player facility on their mobile phones is useful for showing health-related videos. A combination of mass media and interpersonal communication could be effective for TB control. Face-to-face communication with community members, patient-provider discussions, and information through television could be very effective techniques. Exclusive communication materials should be designed for family members of the patients. Smart phones can be used for effective implementation of TB control programs. Copyright © 2016 Tuberculosis Association of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Health worker perceptions of integrating mobile phones into community case management of malaria in Saraya, Senegal.

    PubMed

    Blanas, Demetri A; Ndiaye, Youssoupha; MacFarlane, Matthew; Manga, Isaac; Siddiqui, Ammar; Velez, Olivia; Kanter, Andrew S; Nichols, Kim; Hennig, Nils

    2015-05-01

    Although community case management of malaria increases access to life-saving care in isolated settings, it contends with many logistical challenges. Mobile phone health information technology may present an opportunity to address a number of these barriers. Using the wireless adaptation of the technology acceptance model, this study assessed availability, ease of use, usefulness, and job relevance of mobile phones by health workers in Saraya, Senegal. This study conducted seven key informant interviews with government health workers, and three focus groups and 76 surveys with lay health workers. Principal findings included that mobile phones are already widely available and used, and that participants valued using phones to address training, stock management, programme reporting, and transportation challenges. By documenting widespread use of mobile phones and health worker perceptions of their most useful applications, this paper provides a framework for their integration into the community case management of malaria programme in Saraya, Senegal. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. [Perceptions of female immigrant domestic workers on the effects of the sector regulation in Spain].

    PubMed

    Briones Vozmediano, Erica; Agudelo Suárez, Andrés A; López Jacob, María José; Vives Cases, Carmen; Ballester Laguna, Fernando; Ronda Pérez, Elena

    2014-01-01

    To examine the perceptions of female immigrant domestic workers of the effect of Royal Decree 1620/2011, which regulates the relationship of domestic workers in the family home and their employment conditions in Spain. An exploratory study was performed using qualitative content analysis of three focus group discussions with immigrant women from Colombia, Ecuador and Morocco. Immigrant women positively assessed the theoretical benefits of the new regulation, but identified legal and economic barriers to obtaining a contract and being registered in the social security system by their employers, and to employers accepting the cost of these measures, especially for workers hired by the hour. These difficulties affected their possibilities of legalizing their status. The economic crisis posed a serious challenge to compliance with the new regulation. Although the new regime encourages job creation with stronger working rights for these workers, immigrant women perceived that its implementation has been hampered by the current financial crisis and has not, therefore, improved their employment conditions. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Return to work perceptions and actual return to work in workers with common mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Noordik, Erik; van Dijk, Frank J H; van der Klink, Jac J

    2013-06-01

    Return to work (RTW) perceptions have been found to predict actual RTW of workers with common mental disorders. This study aims to (1) assess the relative value of RTW self-efficacy (RTW-SE) and RTW expectation in predicting actual RTW and (2) explore the role of mental health symptoms, work characteristics and their interaction as determinants of these RTW perceptions at baseline and over time. Workers (N = 179) with common mental disorders were included at the start of their sick leave and followed-up at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. RTW self-efficacy, RTW expectation, mental health and RTW were assessed by self-report. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to test the predictive value of RTW-SE and RTW expectation against the actual RTW. Linear regression was used to study the associations of mental health symptoms, work characteristics and their interaction with RTW-SE at baseline. Mental health symptoms in relation to RTW-SE over the first 6 months were analyzed using Linear Mixed Models. Compared to RTW expectation, differences in RTW-SE were more predictive of actual RTW. At baseline, lower fatigue, depressive symptoms, and work pace- and load were associated with higher RTW-SE. Decreasing levels of fatigue and depressive symptoms over time were associated with parallel improvements in RTW-SE. Workers with high work pace and workload at baseline showed lower levels of RTW-SE at all time points. We recommend the use of the RTW-SE scale to detect workers with common mental disorders at risk of a late RTW. Work characteristics and changes in mental health symptoms were associated with RTW-SE over time.

  17. Examining Perceptions about Mandatory Influenza Vaccination of Healthcare Workers through Online Comments on News Stories

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yang; Pereira, Jennifer A.; Quach, Susan; Bettinger, Julie A.; Kwong, Jeffrey C.; Corace, Kimberly; Garber, Gary; Feinberg, Yael; Guay, Maryse

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to understand online public perceptions of the debate surrounding the choice of annual influenza vaccinations or wearing masks as a condition of employment for healthcare workers, such as the one enacted in British Columbia in August 2012. Methods Four national and 82 local (British Columbia) Canadian online news sites were searched for articles posted between August 2012 and May 2013 containing the words “healthcare workers” and “mandatory influenza vaccinations/immunizations” or “mandatory flu shots and healthcare workers.” We included articles from sources that predominantly concerned our topic of interest and that generated reader comments. Two researchers coded the unedited comments using thematic analysis, categorizing codes to allow themes to emerge. In addition to themes, the comments were categorized by: 1) sentiment towards influenza vaccines; 2) support for mandatory vaccination policies; 3) citing of reference materials or statistics; 4) self-identified health-care worker status; and 5) sharing of a personal story. Results 1163 comments made by 648 commenters responding to 36 articles were analyzed. Popular themes included concerns about freedom of choice, vaccine effectiveness, patient safety, and distrust in government, public health, and the pharmaceutical industry. Almost half (48%) of commenters expressed a negative sentiment toward the influenza vaccine, 28% were positive, 20% were neutral, and 4% expressed mixed sentiment. Of those who commented on the policy, 75% did not support the condition to work policy, while 25% were in favour. Of the commenters, 11% self-identified as healthcare workers, 13% shared personal stories, and 18% cited a reference or statistic. Interpretation The perception of the influenza vaccine in the comment sections of online news sites is fairly poor. Public health agencies should consider including online forums, comment sections, and social media sites as part of their

  18. HIV Risk Perception and Behavior among Sex Workers in Three Major Urban Centers of Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Langa, Judite; Sousa, César; Sidat, Mohsin; Kroeger, Karen; McLellan-Lemal, Eleanor; Belani, Hrishikesh; Patel, Shama; Shodell, Daniel; Shodell, Michael; Benech, Irene; Needle, Richard

    2014-01-01

    HIV risk perceptions and behaviors of 236 commercial sex workers from three major Mozambican urban centers were studied using the International Rapid Assessment, Response and Evaluation (I-RARE) methodology. All were offered HIV testing and, in Maputo, syphilis testing was offered as well. Sixty-three of the 236 opted for HIV testing, with 30 (48%) testing positive for HIV. In Maputo, all 30 receiving HIV tests also had syphilis testing, with 6 (20%) found to be positive. Results include interview excerpts and qualitative results using I-RARE methodology and AnSWR-assisted analyses of the interviews and focus group sessions. PMID:24736653

  19. Touch-typing VDU operation: workstation adjustment, working posture and workers' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Delleman, Nico J; Berndsen, Marion B

    2002-06-10

    At a VDU workstation professional touch-typing operators worked at eight different combined adjustments of visual target height and chair backrest inclination. Working posture, workers' perceptions and work performance were measured. Two conclusions were drawn. First, in order to minimize the load on the musculoskeletal system for touch-typing VDU operators, the gaze inclination to a visual target (screen, document) should be 6-9 degrees (range 0-15 degrees ) below the horizontal and, second, the gaze inclination recommended is independent of sitting posture (that is with the backrest between upright and 15 degrees inclined backwards).

  20. Women's perception of adolescent marijuana use in a hispanic seasonal farm worker community: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Mariano; Weissman, Jessica; De La Rosa, Mario; Melton, James; Sanchez, Mariana; Rojas, Patria; Trekpa, Mary Jo

    2016-12-16

    We examined the perception of adolescent children's marijuana use and its consequences in the Hispanic seasonal farmworking community of South Florida via three focus groups with Hispanic adult female seasonal workers (n = 29). The women described how adolescents' marijuana use increased over the past five years. Social networks for marijuana use were reported near schools and bus stations. Although participants expressed concern over adolescent marijuana use and involvement in selling marijuana, they reported that their job demands preclude their ability to supervise their children. Participants do not report unlawful marijuana use due to fear of deportation.

  1. Health Care Workers' Knowledge, Perceptions, and Behaviors Regarding Antineoplastic Drugs: Survey From British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Hon, Chun-Yip; Teschke, Kay; Shen, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Although nurses are knowledgeable regarding the risk of exposure to antineoplastic drugs, they often do not adhere with safe work practices. However, the knowledge, perceptions, and behavior of other health care job categories at risk of exposure has yet to be determined. This study aimed to survey a range of health care workers from British Columbia, Canada about their knowledge, perceptions, and behaviors regarding antineoplastic drugs. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to participants querying the degree of contact with antineoplastics, knowledge of risks associated with antineoplastics, perceptions of personal risk, previous training with respect to antineoplastics, and safe work practices. Subjects were recruited from health care facilities in and around Vancouver. Fisher's exact tests were performed to ascertain whether there were differences in responses between job categories. We received responses from 120 participants representing seven different job categories. Pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, and nurses were more knowledgeable regarding risks than other job categories examined (statistically significant difference). Although 80% of respondents were not afraid of working with or near antineoplastics, there were concerns about the suitability of current control measures and practices employed by co-workers. Only half of respondents felt confident that they could handle all situations where there was a potential for exposure. Only one of the perception questions, self-perceived risk of exposure to antineoplastic drugs, differed significantly between job categories. Not all respondents always wore gloves when directly handling antineoplastic drugs. Further, hand hygiene was not regularly practiced after glove usage or after being in an area where antineoplastic drugs are handled. The majority of responses to questions related to safe work practices differed significantly between job categories. Our results suggest that knowledge regarding risks

  2. Community perceptions and attitudes on malaria case management and the role of community health workers.

    PubMed

    Owek, Collins J; Oluoch, Elizabeth; Wachira, Juddy; Estambale, Benson; Afrane, Yaw A

    2017-07-04

    Community Case Management of malaria (CCMm) is one of the new approaches adopted by the World Health Organization for malaria endemic countries to reduce the burden of malaria for vulnerable populations. It is based on the evidence that well-trained and supervised community health workers (CHWs) can provide prompt and adequate treatment to fever cases within 24 h to help reduce morbidity and mortality associated with malaria among under-five children. The perception and attitudes of the community members on the CHWs' role is of greater importance for acceptance of their services. The aim of the study was to assess community's perception and attitude towards CCMm and on CHWs who undertake it. This study was conducted in five districts in western Kenya where Community Case Management was being undertaken. This was a qualitative cross-sectional study in which in-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with mothers of under-five children and key stakeholders. Overall, there were more positive expressions of perceptions and attitudes of the community members towards the CCMm programme and the role of CHWs. The positive perceptions included among others; recognition and appreciation of services of CHWs, bringing health services to close proximity to the community, avoiding long queues in the health facilities, provision of health education that encourages good health practices, and promotion of positive health-seeking behaviour from within the communities. This programme is not without challenges as some of the negative perceptions expressed by the community members included the fact that some clinicians doubt the capacity of CHWs on dispensing drugs in the community, some CHWs do not keep client's secrets and mistrust of CHWs due to conflicting information by government. It was evident that the community had more positive perceptions and attitudes towards the role of CHWs in CCMm than negative ones. There should however, be deliberate efforts

  3. Health workers' perceptions of Italian female adolescents: a qualitative study about sexuality, contraception, and caring practices in family health centers.

    PubMed

    Olivari, Maria Giulia; Santoro, Elena; Stagni Brenca, Elisa; Confalonieri, Emanuela; Di Blasio, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to explore health workers' perceptions of providing sexuality and contraception care for female adolescents within family health centers. We interviewed 26 volunteer health workers and analyzed the interviews using thematic analysis. We identified three main themes: (a) "adolescents and sexuality," with the subthemes "initiation rite," "me like the others," and "just for fun"; (b) "adolescents and contraception," with the subthemes "omnipotent adolescents," "aware adolescents," and "women's responsibility"; and

  4. Risk perception about zoonoses in immigrants and Italian workers in Northwestern Italy.

    PubMed

    Cediel, Natalia; Conte, Valeria; Tomassone, Laura; Tiberti, Donatella; Guiso, Paolo; Romero, Jaime; Villamil, Luis Carlos; De Meneghi, Daniele

    2012-10-01

    To assess factors associated with a low risk perception of zoonoses and to identify the gaps in knowledge about transmission and prevention of zoonoses in immigrant and Italian workers. A cross-sectional study with 175 workers in the agro-livestock and agro-food industry in Piemonte, Italy, was carried out. Data were collected with a semi-structured questionnaire based on knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) survey. We calculated proportions and used chi-square tests and odds ratios to assess associations. Eight individual interviews with key informants on immigration and public health in Piemonte were carried out. Participants were 82 (47%) Italians and 93 (53%) immigrants. Immigrants were from Romania, Morocco, Albania, India, China, Argentina, Peru, Macedonia, Ivory Coast, Ukraine and Colombia. The study revealed significant differences in risk perception at work (p = 0.001). We found associations between "not having correct knowledge about zoonoses" and the following variables: i. "being immigrant" OR = 4.1 (95%CI 1.7;9.8 p ≤ 0.01); ii. "working in the livestock industry" OR = 2.9 (95%CI 1.2;15.4 p = 0.01); and iii. "being an unqualified worker" OR = 4.4 (95%CI 2.9;15.4 p ≤ 0.01). Another strong association was found between being immigrant and having a low job qualification OR = 6.7 (IC95% 2.9 - 15.4 p ≤ 0.01). Asian immigrants were the group with the highest frequency of risky behaviours and the lowest level of knowledge about zoonoses. Our results indicate that there were differences in risk perception of zoonoses between the groups participating in our study. These results suggest that immigrant status can be considered a risk factor for having lower risk perception and lower level of knowledge of zoonoses at work. There is a relationship between this specific knowledge of zoonoses and lack of training and instruction among migrant populations. Our results stress the need for developing education programs on zoonoses prevention among the immigrant

  5. [Adolescents' access to contraception: perceptions of health workers in Huechuraba, Chile].

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Giovanna Rojas; Bravo, Pamela Eguiguren; Vivaldi, María Isabel Matamala; Manríquez, Irma Palma; Pérez, Thelma Gálvez

    2017-06-08

    Identify difficulties in adolescents' access to contraceptive care and information, based on perceptions and experiences of health workers in Huechuraba, in the Metropolitan Region of Chile. This qualitative, descriptive study incorporated principles of participatory action research, involving health care teams in the survey and data analysis, and generating proposals for improvement. Seventeen (17) semi-structured individual interviews and one group interview were conducted with professionals and technical personnel involved in adolescent care in the commune's health centers. Health workers perceived that adolescents were having difficulties reaching the centers due to cultural factors, lack of information, lack of health activities in the community, while administrative requirements and procedures hindered access to care. Shortcomings were evident in the management and interpretation of fertility regulation standards and of current legislation, and in the absence of explanatory frameworks recognizing adolescents' gender, sexual, and reproductive rights. Adolescents and their needs have a low profile and there are conflicts between theory and practice regarding access to contraception and counseling, with a lack of definitions or agreements that take into account social and cultural contexts. It is urgent to provide health workers with training on gender and sexual and reproductive rights, together with opportunities for reflection in order to generate coordinated and effective approaches. Efforts are required to disseminate the program and organize activities in community spaces, together with other community sectors.

  6. Supervisors' perceptions of organizational policies are associated with their likelihood to accommodate back-injured workers.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Connor; Kristman, Vicki L; Shaw, William S; Loisel, Patrick; Reguly, Paula; Williams-Whitt, Kelly; Soklaridis, Sophie

    2017-02-01

    Background Low back pain (LBP) is a major concern among North American workplaces and little is known regarding a supervisor's decision to support job accommodation for workers with LBP. The extent to which supervisors are included in a company's effort to institute disability management policies and practices and workplace safety climate are two factors that may influence a supervisor's decision to accommodate workers with LBP. Objective Determine the association between supervisors' perceptions of disability management policies, corporate safety culture and their likelihood of supporting job accommodations for workers with LBP. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of supervisors (N=796) recruited from a non-random, convenience sample of 19 Canadian and US employers. The outcome was supervisors' likeliness to support job accommodation and the exposure was global work safety culture and disability management policies and practices. A multivariable generalized linear modelling strategy was used and final models for each exposure were obtained after assessing potential effect modifiers and confounders. Results In the study, 796 eligible supervisors from 19 employers participated. Disability management policies and practices were positively associated with supervisors' likeliness to accommodate (β=0.19; 95% CI: 0.13; 0.24) while no significant association was found between corporate safety culture (β= -0.084; 95% CI: -0.19; 0.027) and supervisors' likeliness to accommodate. Conclusions Employers should ensure that proactive disability management policies and practices are clearly communicated to supervisors in order to improve job modification and return to work efforts. Implications for Rehabilitation Low back pain (LBP) is a major workplace concern and little is known regarding what factors are associated with a supervisor's likelihood to support job accommodation for workers with LBP. The objective of this article was to determine the association

  7. Stressors and Sources of Support: The Perceptions and Experiences of Newly Diagnosed Latino Youth Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Diana; Hosek, Sybil

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Little is known of the experience of Latino youth with HIV infection in the United States, especially with respect to stressors and how these youth cope with said stressors. This study reports on a subset (Latino/Hispanic self-identified youth, n=14) of qualitatively interviewed youth (n=30), both in individual interviews and in focus group discussion settings, aware of their HIV diagnosis for 12–24 months (mean: 16.7 months; standard deviation [SD], 4.89) Youth were 16–24 years old (M=21.5 years), female (43%) and males (57%). Youth were recruited from three cities: Chicago, New York, and San Juan (Puerto Rico). Interviews of Latinos (n=14) were reviewed for sources of stressors and support. Seven themes emerged in analyzing stated sources of stressors: (1) initial psychosocial responses to HIV diagnosis, (2) disclosure to family and friends, (3) stigma related to receiving an HIV diagnosis, (4) body image and concerns of the physical changes associated with HIV and antiretroviral medications, (5) taking antiretroviral medications and side effects, (6) the disruption of their future life goals, and (7) reproductive health concerns. Identified sources of support and coping were described including; gaining appreciation for what matters in life, adapting and developing achievable goals, reordering priorities and relying on religion and spiritual beliefs for health outcomes. The information gathered is from individual interviews and from focus group discussions can be used to increase the understanding of this understudied population while improving services to engage and retain these youth in care. PMID:22536931

  8. Injured workers' perception of loss and gain in the return to work process.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hon Sun; Szeto, Grace Py; Chan, Chetwyn Ch

    2017-01-01

    When a worker is injured at work, he has to face a tough decision-making process about when and how to return to work (RTW). This study tests how the prospect theory can be applied to influence the injured workers' perceptions about this important choice. One hundred forty-one injured workers were presented with wage- and pain-related information in four different message framing (negatively or positively) and precision (smaller or larger number) conditions. After exposure to the specific combination of this wage and pain information, the participants were asked to express intentions to RTW in terms of perceived chance, confidence, and anticipated sick leave duration. When asked to predict their RTW outcome, 101 participants (72.3%) responded favorably, whereas only 40 (27.7%) indicated an expectation for staying on sick leave. The present results did not show significant differences in the participants' responses to the positively and negatively framed information about wage and pain. However, it was noted that the control group that was presented with positive framing for both "wage" and "pain" information showed higher scores in expectation and confidence for RTW, whereas the Ambivalent Group that had both negative messages showed lower scores. Seventy-nine participants who had ≥60% perceived improvement in condition were selected for further analysis, and those who were presented with "wage loss" information rated significantly higher perceived chance of RTW than those in the "pain gain" group. More in-depth investigation is warranted on this topic, with a larger sample of injured workers to investigate the effects of message framing on the decision-making process about RTW.

  9. [Caregivers and health workers' perceptions of neonatal disease alarm signals in Guapi, Colombia].

    PubMed

    Delgado-Noguera, Mario F; Calvache-España, José A; Tabares-Trujillo, Rosa E; Del Cairo-Silva, Carolina; Bedoya-Idrobo, Luz M

    2007-01-01

    Exploring caregivers (CG) and health workers' (HW) perceptions of danger signals in the newborn and establishing the type of medical attention they require in rural and urban areas of Guapi on Colombia's Pacific coast. A descriptive design was used combining qualitative and quantitative methods. Three focus groups, three semi-structured interviews and two case-studies were employed. Some signals obtained from these data were used for constructing a structured interview. A survey was carried out with 200 CGs (mothers with newborn, grandmothers, community mothers, housewives) and 40 HWs (general practitioners, health promoters, nursing auxiliaries, traditional medicine healers, midwifes and FAMI-mothers). The data was analysed using MaxQDA 2.0 qualitative data software and ethnographic analysis. The first 5 signs of illness (in order of importance) perceived by CGs and HWs were: diarrhoea, dehydration, fever, vomiting and breathing problems. They coincided in their perceptions of the need for emergency consultation for convulsions, tetanus and dehydration. Significant differences were found between HW and CG perceptions regarding "type of consultation" for dehydration, fever, convulsions, breathing problems and tetanus (p<0.05). Cultural illnesses (i.e. the evil eye and ghosts) also emerged. CGs and HWs in Guapi were good at recognising danger signals for neonatal illness; however, there were differences regarding the search for attention. The finding of cultural illnesses must be taken into account in newborn attention strategies. This acceptable level of recognition was hindered by the lack of quality medical care services for the newborn encountering health problems.

  10. Supervisor vs. employee safety perceptions and association with future injury in US limited-service restaurant workers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Verma, Santosh K; Chang, Wen-Ruey; Courtney, Theodore K; Lombardi, David A; Brennan, Melanye J; Perry, Melissa J

    2012-07-01

    Many studies have found management commitment to safety to be an important construct of safety climate. This study examined the association between supervisor and employee (shared and individual) perceptions of management commitment to safety and the rate of future injuries in limited-service restaurant workers. A total of 453 participants (34 supervisors/managers and 419 employees) from 34 limited-service restaurants participated in a prospective cohort study. Employees' and managers' perceptions of management commitment to safety and demographic variables were collected at the baseline. The survey questions were made available in three languages: English, Spanish, and Portuguese. For the following 12 weeks, participants reported their injury experience and weekly work hours. A multivariate negative binomial generalized estimating equation model with compound symmetry covariance structure was used to assess the association between the rate of self-reported injuries and measures of safety perceptions. There were no significant relationships between supervisor and either individual or shared employee perceptions of management commitment to safety. Only individual employee perceptions were significantly associated with future employee injury experience but not supervisor safety perceptions or shared employee perceptions. Individual employee perception of management commitment to safety is a significant predictor for future injuries in restaurant environments. A study focusing on employee perceptions would be more predictive of injury outcomes than supervisor/manager perceptions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Measurement of worker perceptions of trust and safety climate in managers and supervisors at commercial grain elevators.

    PubMed

    Mosher, G A; Keren, N; Freeman, S A; Hurburgh, C R

    2013-04-01

    The safety climate of an agricultural workplace may be affected by several things, including the level of trust that workers have in their work group supervisor and organizational management. Safety climate has been used by previous safety researchers as a measure of worker perceptions of the relative importance of safety as compared with other operational goals. Trust has been linked to several positive safety outcomes, particularly in hazardous work environments, but has not been examined relative to safety climate in the perennially hazardous work environment of a commercial grain elevator. In this study, 177 workers at three Midwest grain elevator companies completed online surveys measuring their perceptions of trust and safety at two administrative levels: organizational management and work group supervisors. Positive and significant relationships were noted between trust and safety climate perceptions for organizational managers and for work group supervisors. Results from this research suggest that worker trust in organizational management and work group supervisors has a positive influence on the employees' perceptions of safety climate at the organizational and work group levels in an agricultural workplace.

  12. Work-Family Supportiveness Organizational Perceptions: Important for the Well-Being of Male Blue-Collar Hourly Workers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grandey, Alicia A.; Cordeiro, Bryanne L.; Michael, Judd H.

    2007-01-01

    The current study questions whether organizational perceptions of family supportiveness predict work-family conflict (WFC) and job satisfaction for an atypical sample of male hourly workers in a manufacturing organization, and whether those relationships depend on work (number of work hours) and family (number of family roles) demands. A…

  13. [Perception of risk of biological agents among a group of health workers].

    PubMed

    Cardoni, F; Ceccarelli, L; Simonazzi, S

    2012-01-01

    In the context of "direct" or "indirect" patient care, residual risk of biological agents exposure constitute a hazard for health and safety, that cross and affects all health care workers. For the development and implementation of effective "prevention and control" actions, even against nosocomial infections, it is nevertheless most important to acquire objective information on the level of risk perception demonstrated by relevant staff for assistance. The aim of this contribution was therefore to study the attitudes and behaviours of health sector workers in relation to the specific "biological agents risk". The survey was carried out in a italian hospital, and 25 in the study adhered responsible for the safety and 219 nurses, identified as exposed to biological agents (244 subjects), who were given a specially designed questionnaire. The results of the study, which will be described in detail, has helped to identify critical issues related to the management of "biological agents risk", and at the same time to set up a program for improvement of prevention and protection, aimed at a substantial reduction of the same risk factor.

  14. Perceptions and experiences in higher education: a national study of multiracial Asian American and Latino/a students in psychology.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tara D; Maton, Kenneth I

    2015-01-01

    Demographic trends suggest increasing numbers of multiple racial heritage students attending U.S. campuses and universities, a change reflected within psychology. However, there is little empirical investigation into the educational experiences and needs of multiracials. The current study (the second in a series of studies to use data from a national survey of psychology graduate and undergraduate students) compared 2 multiracial groups, Asian American/European American and Latino/a/European Americans, with their single-heritage counterparts on several variables of interest-academic supports and barriers, linkage between barriers faced and ethnicity, and perceived cultural diversity. Results indicated that multiracial groups reported more of a link between academic barriers experienced and their ethnicity than European American students, but less of a link than their monoracial minority peers. No differences between groups were found related to academic supports, academic barriers, and perceived cultural diversity. Study limitations, future research, and implications are discussed.

  15. Perceptions & Experiences in Higher Education: A National Study of Multiracial Asian American and Latino/a Students in Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tara D.; Maton, Kenneth I.

    2014-01-01

    Demographic trends suggest increasing numbers of multiple racial heritage students attending US campuses and universities, a change reflected within psychology. However, there is little empirical investigation into the educational experiences and needs of multiracials. The current study (the second in a series of studies to utilize data from a national survey of psychology graduate and undergraduate students) compared two multiracial groups, Asian American/European American and Latino/a/European Americans, to their single heritage counterparts on several variables of interest – academic supports and barriers; linkage between barriers faced and ethnicity; and perceived cultural diversity. Results indicated that multiracial groups reported more of a link between academic barriers experienced and their ethnicity than European American students, but less of a link than their monoracial minority peers. No differences between groups were found related to academic supports, academic barriers, and perceived cultural diversity. Study limitations, future research and implications are discussed. PMID:25111546

  16. Health literacy and interpersonal interactions as predictors of maternal perception of ambulatory care for low-income, Latino children.

    PubMed

    Fry-Bowers, Eileen K; Maliski, Sally; Lewis, Mary Ann; Macabasco-O'Connell, Aurelia; Dimatteo, Robin

    2013-05-01

    This study explores whether maternal HL (MHL) and maternal perception of health care provider (HCP) interpersonal interactions predict maternal perception of quality of pediatric ambulatory care received. This cross-sectional study included 124 low-income Latina mothers of children 3 months to 4 years. Maternal HL, perception of maternal-HCP interpersonal interactions, and perception of pediatric ambulatory care were measured using well-validated surveys. In adjusted hierarchical regression models, HCP fail to speak clearly (β=-.225, 95% CI -13.998, -1.960, p=.01) and explain results (β=.344, 95% CI 3.480, 13.010, p=.001) predicted perception of quality of developmental guidance received. Explaining results (β=.422, 95% CI 5.700, 14.089, p=<.001), working out treatment together (β=.441, 95% CI 6.657, 13.624, p<.001) and MHL (β=-.301, 95% CI -7.161, -2.263, p<.001) predicted perception of family centeredness of care. Speaking with clarity, explaining results fully and working with the mother to determine a child's plan of care is most predictive of whether she feels her child is receiving high quality pediatric ambulatory care services. Interventions that target mother and provider interaction may improve perception of care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hand hygiene perception among health care workers in Hungarian hospitals: prior to a nationwide microbiological survey.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Rita; Böröcz, Karolina; Nagy, Orsolya; Takács, Mária; Szomor, Katalin N

    2013-03-01

    Transmission of pathogens via healthcare workers' (HCWs) hands is one of the most frequent means of spreading multi-resistant organisms and occurring healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) in hospitals. The role of contaminated hands in pathogen transmission was recognized by Hungarian physician, Ignác Semmelweis. Hand hygiene prevents cross-infections in hospitals, but numerous epidemiological and microbiology-based studies have documented low compliance of HCWs with this simple procedure. Furthermore, hand hygiene perception of HCWs plays an important role in determining hand hygiene compliance. Our aim was to describe the opinion of HCWs about their perception regarding hand hygiene practice. Our further goal was to strengthen a laboratory basis for bacterial backup control of nosocomial pathogens. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted between December 2010 and February 2011 in 13 participating hospitals in Hungary. HCWs know that there is correlation between contaminated hands and HAIs (83%), but neither the frequency (62%) nor the implementation (73%) of their hand hygiene performance are satisfying.We recommend that multimodal interventions - highlighted active microbiological surveillance of HCWs' hands - are the most suitable strategies to reduce the occurrence of HAIs and to determine their impact on cross-transmission of microorganisms and to overcome barriers of HCWs.

  18. Use of hearing protection and perceptions of noise exposure and hearing loss among construction workers.

    PubMed

    Lusk, S L; Kerr, M J; Kauffman, S A

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe construction workers' use of hearing protection devices (HPDs) and determine their perceptions of noise exposure and hearing loss. Operating engineers, carpenters, and plumbers/pipe fitters in the Midwest (n = 400) completed a written questionnaire regarding their use of HPDs and their perceptions of noise exposure and hearing loss. Subjects were recruited through their trade union groups. Mean reported use of HPDs and mean perceived noise exposure were compared across trade groups. Bivariate and multivariate analysis techniques were used to assess relationships between use of HPDs and trade category, education, age, years of employment, noise exposure, and hearing loss. Bivariate analyses identified significant differences in mean use of HPDs by age, years of employment, and trade group. Multivariate logistic regression assessing the independent effects of these variables found significant differences only by trade group. Results indicate a need for significant improvement in all three trade groups' use of HPDs, and suggest a need to consider use and exposure levels, demographics, and trade group membership in designing hearing conservation programs.

  19. The reliability and validity of the Brief Sensation Seeking Scale (BSSS-8) with young adult Latino workers: implications for tobacco and alcohol disparity research

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Michael T.; Velez, Luis F.; Chalela, Patricia; Ramirez, Amelie; Hoyle, Rick H.

    2009-01-01

    Aim This study investigated the reliability and validity of the Brief Sensation Seeking Scale (BSSS-8) in both English and Spanish with Latinos, the fastest-growing minority group in the United States, and the correlation between sensation seeking and tobacco and alcohol use. Design Cross-sectional survey, computer-assisted telephone interviews (CATI). Setting Dallas and Houston, Texas. Participants A total of 789 Latinos participated in this study. Participants were currently in the work-force, not enrolled in college, and between the ages of 18 and 30 years. Measurements Participants completed a self-report questionnaire (in either English or Spanish) consisting of items measuring tobacco and alcohol use as well as the eight-item Brief Sensation Seeking Scale. Findings and conclusions For English-speaking Latino participants, the BSSS factor structure was second-order unidimensional and correlated positively with life-time cigarette use, intention to smoke in the future and amount and frequency of alcohol consumption. For Spanish-speaking Latino participants, a four-subfactor solution for the BSSS provided the best fit to the data although correlations between the four subscales and cigarette use were small. PMID:17850617

  20. Differences in Hospital Managers', Unit Managers', and Health Care Workers' Perceptions of the Safety Climate for Respiratory Protection.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kristina; Rogers, Bonnie M E; Brosseau, Lisa M; Payne, Julianne; Cooney, Jennifer; Joe, Lauren; Novak, Debra

    2016-07-01

    This article compares hospital managers' (HM), unit managers' (UM), and health care workers' (HCW) perceptions of respiratory protection safety climate in acute care hospitals. The article is based on survey responses from 215 HMs, 245 UMs, and 1,105 HCWs employed by 98 acute care hospitals in six states. Ten survey questions assessed five of the key dimensions of safety climate commonly identified in the literature: managerial commitment to safety, management feedback on safety procedures, coworkers' safety norms, worker involvement, and worker safety training. Clinically and statistically significant differences were found across the three respondent types. HCWs had less positive perceptions of management commitment, worker involvement, and safety training aspects of safety climate than HMs and UMs. UMs had more positive perceptions of management's supervision of HCWs' respiratory protection practices. Implications for practice improvements indicate the need for frontline HCWs' inclusion in efforts to reduce safety climate barriers and better support effective respiratory protection programs and daily health protection practices. © 2016 The Author(s).

  1. The Settlement Experience of Latinos in Chicago: Segregation, Speculation, and the Ecology Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betancur, John J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes Latino settlement in Chicago, 1910-90. Latino immigration (frequently "importation" of low-skill, low-wage workers) reflects U.S. domination of Latin America; consequent Latino vulnerability and low status allow real estate speculation exploiting their quasi-racial status through exclusion and market manipulation. Questions…

  2. The Latino Workforce at Mid-Decade. CSRC Research Report. Number 10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catanzarite, Lisa; Trimble, Lindsey

    2007-01-01

    The Latino workforce is increasingly critical to the vitality of the U.S. economy. Despite the importance of Latinos in the labor market, their economic contributions are limited by significant disadvantages. This research report provides an overview of Latino workers in the United States at mid-decade. We provide background information on labor…

  3. Factors that May Contribute to the Placement of Latino English Language Learners in Special Education: Perceptions of Directors of Special Education in California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Dante

    2010-01-01

    The problem: Research indicates that Latino English language learners in California are placed in special education classes at a higher rate than other states. The factors that determine placement of Latino English learners such as language barriers, transiency, poverty, and teacher training may create challenges for Directors of Special…

  4. Factors that May Contribute to the Placement of Latino English Language Learners in Special Education: Perceptions of Directors of Special Education in California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Dante

    2010-01-01

    The problem: Research indicates that Latino English language learners in California are placed in special education classes at a higher rate than other states. The factors that determine placement of Latino English learners such as language barriers, transiency, poverty, and teacher training may create challenges for Directors of Special…

  5. Exploring the perceptions and experiences of community health workers using role identity theory.

    PubMed

    Mlotshwa, Langelihle; Harris, Bronwyn; Schneider, Helen; Moshabela, Mosa

    2015-01-01

    Background Community health workers (CHWs) are an integral resource in many health systems, particularly in resource-poor settings. Their identities - 'who' they are - play an important role in their hiring, training, and retention. We explore the perceptions, experiences, and identities of CHWs as they adopt a CHW role in rural South Africa, using 'role identity theory'. Design From April to December 2010, we conducted 18 semi-structured interviews with CHWs volunteering in non-governmental home-based care (HBC) organisations in one rural sub-district in South Africa. The role identity theory framework was used to understand the work of CHWs within their communities, addressing themes, such as entry into, and nature of, caring roles, organisational support, state resourcing, and community acceptability. A thematic content analysis was used to analyse the collected data. Results The study found that CHWs usually begin their 'caring work' before they formally join HBC organisations, by caring for children, neighbours, mothers, fathers, friends, and the community in some way. CHWs felt that becoming a health worker provided an elevated status within the community, but that it often led community members to believe they were able to control resources. The key role identities assumed by CHWs, as they sought to meet patients' and their own needs, were a complex mix of community 'insider', 'outsider', and 'broker'. Each of these role identities served as a unique way to position, from the CHW's perspective, themselves and the community, given the diversity of needs and expectations. Conclusions These role identities reveal the tensions CHWs face as 'insider' members of the community and yet at times being treated as 'outsiders', who might be regarded with suspicion, and at the same time, appreciated for the resources that they might possess. Understanding role identities, and how best to support them, may contribute to strategies of retention and sustainability of CHW

  6. Exploring the perceptions and experiences of community health workers using role identity theory.

    PubMed

    Mlotshwa, Langelihle; Harris, Bronwyn; Schneider, Helen; Moshabela, Mosa

    2015-01-01

    Community health workers (CHWs) are an integral resource in many health systems, particularly in resource-poor settings. Their identities--'who' they are--play an important role in their hiring, training, and retention. We explore the perceptions, experiences, and identities of CHWs as they adopt a CHW role in rural South Africa, using 'role identity theory'. From April to December 2010, we conducted 18 semi-structured interviews with CHWs volunteering in non-governmental home-based care (HBC) organisations in one rural sub-district in South Africa. The role identity theory framework was used to understand the work of CHWs within their communities, addressing themes, such as entry into, and nature of, caring roles, organisational support, state resourcing, and community acceptability. A thematic content analysis was used to analyse the collected data. The study found that CHWs usually begin their 'caring work' before they formally join HBC organisations, by caring for children, neighbours, mothers, fathers, friends, and the community in some way. CHWs felt that becoming a health worker provided an elevated status within the community, but that it often led community members to believe they were able to control resources. The key role identities assumed by CHWs, as they sought to meet patients' and their own needs, were a complex mix of community 'insider', 'outsider', and 'broker'. Each of these role identities served as a unique way to position, from the CHW's perspective, themselves and the community, given the diversity of needs and expectations. These role identities reveal the tensions CHWs face as 'insider' members of the community and yet at times being treated as 'outsiders', who might be regarded with suspicion, and at the same time, appreciated for the resources that they might possess. Understanding role identities, and how best to support them, may contribute to strategies of retention and sustainability of CHW programmes, as their formalisation in

  7. “Culture Is So Interspersed”: Child-Minders' and Health Workers' Perceptions of Childhood Obesity in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Saltzman, Jaclyn; Jarick Metcalfe, Jessica; Wiley, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Forty-one million children globally are overweight or obese, with most rapid rate increases among low- and middle-income nations. Child-minders and health workers play a crucial role in obesity prevention efforts, but their perceptions of childhood obesity in low- and middle-income countries are poorly understood. This study aims to (1) explore child-minders and health workers' perceptions of the causes, consequences, potential strategies, and barriers for childhood obesity prevention and intervention in Cape Town, South Africa and (2) to provisionally test the fit of a socioecological framework to explain these perceptions. Methods. Twenty-one interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed through analytic induction. Results. Participants identified multilevel factors and contexts, as well as potential consequences and priorities of interest in addressing childhood obesity. An adapted childhood obesity perceptions model was generated, which introduces an overarching cultural dimension embedded across levels of the socioecological framework. Conclusions. Culture plays a pivotal role in explaining obesogenic outcomes, and the results of this study demonstrate the need for further research investigating how obesity perceptions are shaped by cultural frames (e.g., social, political, and historical). Understanding the causes, consequences, and potential interventions to address obesity through a cultural lens is critical for promoting health in low- and middle-income nations. PMID:28367326

  8. "Culture Is So Interspersed": Child-Minders' and Health Workers' Perceptions of Childhood Obesity in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Roger; Saltzman, Jaclyn; Jarick Metcalfe, Jessica; Wiley, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Forty-one million children globally are overweight or obese, with most rapid rate increases among low- and middle-income nations. Child-minders and health workers play a crucial role in obesity prevention efforts, but their perceptions of childhood obesity in low- and middle-income countries are poorly understood. This study aims to (1) explore child-minders and health workers' perceptions of the causes, consequences, potential strategies, and barriers for childhood obesity prevention and intervention in Cape Town, South Africa and (2) to provisionally test the fit of a socioecological framework to explain these perceptions. Methods. Twenty-one interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed through analytic induction. Results. Participants identified multilevel factors and contexts, as well as potential consequences and priorities of interest in addressing childhood obesity. An adapted childhood obesity perceptions model was generated, which introduces an overarching cultural dimension embedded across levels of the socioecological framework. Conclusions. Culture plays a pivotal role in explaining obesogenic outcomes, and the results of this study demonstrate the need for further research investigating how obesity perceptions are shaped by cultural frames (e.g., social, political, and historical). Understanding the causes, consequences, and potential interventions to address obesity through a cultural lens is critical for promoting health in low- and middle-income nations.

  9. Building market share in the Latino Community.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Paul B; Elzey, Thomas J; Romagoza, Juan

    2002-05-01

    Within the next few years, the Latino community will become the largest cultural segment in the United States. Hospitals face many barriers in addressing the needs of the Latino community, including language, cultural influences, and perception of health care. Economics, demographics, and regulations dictate the need to take action, but concerns over costs, lack of skills, and negative attitudes create barriers to success. A unique partnership in Washington, D.C., between La Clinica de Pueblo, a grassroots clinic serving the Latino community, and Howard University Hospital offers insight into an effective strategy that hospitals can adopt to meet the needs of this community appropriately.

  10. Information needs of Botswana health care workers and perceptions of wikipedia.

    PubMed

    Park, Elizabeth; Masupe, Tiny; Joseph, Joseph; Ho-Foster, Ari; Chavez, Afton; Jammalamadugu, Swetha; Marek, Andrew; Arumala, Ruth; Ketshogileng, Dineo; Littman-Quinn, Ryan; Kovarik, Carrie

    2016-11-01

    Since the UN Human Rights Council's recognition on the subject in 2011, the right to access the Internet and information is now considered one of the most basic human rights of global citizens [1,2]. Despite this, an information gap between developed and resource-limited countries remains, and there is scant research on actual information needs of workers themselves. The Republic of Botswana represents a fertile ground to address existing gaps in research, policy, and practice, due to its demonstrated gap in access to information and specialists among rural health care workers (HCWs), burgeoning mHealth capacity, and a timely offer from Orange Telecommunications to access Wikipedia for free on mobile platforms for Botswana subscribers. In this study, we sought to identify clinical information needs of HCWs of Botswana and their perception of Wikipedia as a clinical tool. Twenty-eight facilitated focus groups, consisting of 113 HCWs of various cadres based at district hospitals, clinics, and health posts around Botswana, were employed. Transcription and thematic analysis were performed for those groups. Access to the Internet is limited at most facilities. Most HCWs placed high importance upon using Botswana Ministry of Health (MoH) resources for obtaining credible clinical information. However, the clinical applicability of these materials was limited due to discrepancies amongst sources, potentially outdated information, and poor optimization for time-sensitive circumstances. As a result, HCWs faced challenges, such as loss of patient trust and compromises in patient care. Potential solutions posed by HCWs to address these issues included: multifaceted improvements in Internet infrastructure, access to up-to-date information, transfer of knowledge from MoH to HCW, and improving content and applicability of currently available information. Topics of clinical information needs were broad and encompassed: HIV, TB (Tuberculosis), OB/GYN (Obstetrics and Gynecology

  11. The Features and Roles of Rural Latinos: Cross-National Perspectives. JSRI Occasional Paper No. 26. Latino Studies Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochin, Refugio I.

    In rural America, Latinos are the fastest growing population, increasing by 30 percent between 1980 and 1990. Rural Latinos are a large and growing share of the labor hired on farms, but earn only 60 cents for each dollar earned by nonfarm hired workers. This trend is largely due to the restructuring of agriculture in general, and the meatpacking…

  12. Knowledge and Perceptions About Community-acquired Staphylococcal Infections Among Health Care Workers in Hawai‘i

    PubMed Central

    Tice, Alan D; Hurwitz, Eric L; Katz, Alan R

    2013-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, national rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections have increased dramatically.1,2 Initially identified in health care settings, community-acquired MRSA is now a major public health concern. With Hawai‘i's expanding S. aureus and MRSA epidemic closely approximating the national trend in inpatient and outpatient settings,7,8 a high level of knowledge and awareness among health care workers is essential to successfully control this evolving epidemic. Health care and related workers were surveyed to assess their knowledge and perceptions about staphylococcal and MRSA infections. Knowledge was estimated by demonstrated ability to correctly identify risk factors including diabetes and obesity, as well as to demonstrate awareness of a growing staphylococcal and MRSA epidemic.9,10 Perceptions were estimated by level of concern of antibiotic resistance as well as of the severity of the staphylococcal and MRSA epidemic. Variations in knowledge and perception concerning basic principles associated with S. aureus infections as well as characteristics of the evolving S. aureus and MRSA epidemic were observed among various occupations (advance clinical practitioners, nurses, public health professionals, athletic trainers, and non-medical workers) as well as work locations (hospital, community, and non-clinical community). Overall, health care and related workers in community settings demonstrated disparities in knowledge regarding S. aureus and MRSA infections. They were also more likely to misperceive this growing threat. These findings provide support for focused educational interventions targeting community health care and related workers to improve awareness of staphylococcal infections in order to successfully address and combat this evolving epidemic. PMID:24069572

  13. Knowledge and perceptions about community-acquired staphylococcal infections among health care workers in Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Brandyn S; Tice, Alan D; Hurwitz, Eric L; Katz, Alan R

    2013-09-01

    Since the early 1990s, national rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections have increased dramatically.1,2 Initially identified in health care settings, community-acquired MRSA is now a major public health concern. With Hawai'i's expanding S. aureus and MRSA epidemic closely approximating the national trend in inpatient and outpatient settings,7,8 a high level of knowledge and awareness among health care workers is essential to successfully control this evolving epidemic. Health care and related workers were surveyed to assess their knowledge and perceptions about staphylococcal and MRSA infections. Knowledge was estimated by demonstrated ability to correctly identify risk factors including diabetes and obesity, as well as to demonstrate awareness of a growing staphylococcal and MRSA epidemic.9,10 Perceptions were estimated by level of concern of antibiotic resistance as well as of the severity of the staphylococcal and MRSA epidemic. Variations in knowledge and perception concerning basic principles associated with S. aureus infections as well as characteristics of the evolving S. aureus and MRSA epidemic were observed among various occupations (advance clinical practitioners, nurses, public health professionals, athletic trainers, and non-medical workers) as well as work locations (hospital, community, and non-clinical community). Overall, health care and related workers in community settings demonstrated disparities in knowledge regarding S. aureus and MRSA infections. They were also more likely to misperceive this growing threat. These findings provide support for focused educational interventions targeting community health care and related workers to improve awareness of staphylococcal infections in order to successfully address and combat this evolving epidemic.

  14. Policy Implications of Latino Poverty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enchautegui, Maria E.

    The growing Latino presence in the United States underscores the need to address Latino poverty, previously overlooked in public policy discussions. Latinos are the fastest growing U.S. minority group, and Latino poverty is also rising. In 1990, one in every four Latinos was poor, and 40 percent of Latino children lived in poverty. Latino poverty…

  15. Workers' perceptions of climate change related extreme heat exposure in South Australia: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jianjun; Hansen, Alana; Pisaniello, Dino; Bi, Peng

    2016-07-11

    Occupational exposure to extreme heat without sufficient protection may not only increase the risk of heat-related illnesses and injuries but also compromise economic productivity. With predictions of more frequent and intense bouts of hot weather, workplace heat exposure is presenting a growing challenge to workers' health and safety. This study aims to investigate workers' perceptions and behavioural responses towards extreme heat exposure in a warming climate. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted in 2012 in South Australia among selected outdoor industries. Workers' heat risk perceptions were measured in the following five aspects: concerns about heat exposure, attitudes towards more training, policy and guideline support, the adjustment of work habits, and degree of satisfaction of current preventive measures. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors significantly associated with workers' heat perceptions. A total of 749 respondents participated in this survey, with a response rate of 50.9 %. A little more than half (51.2 %) of respondents were moderately or very much concerned about workplace heat exposure. Factors associated with workers' heat concerns included age, undertaking very physically demanding work, and the use of personal protective equipment, heat illness history, and injury experience during hot weather. Less than half (43.4 %) of the respondents had received heat-related training. Workers aged 25-54 years and those with previous heat-related illness/injury history showed more supportive attitudes towards heat-related training. The provision of cool drinking water was the most common heat prevention measure. A little more than half (51.4 %) of respondents were satisfied with the current heat prevention measures. About two-thirds (63.8 %) of respondents agreed that there should be more heat-related regulations and guidelines for working during very hot weather. More than two

  16. Patient and staff perceptions of social worker counseling before surgical therapy for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Yarlagadda, Bharat Bhushan; Hatton, Elissa; Huettig, Janet; Deschler, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Patients who undergo surgical therapy for head and neck cancer often face a tremendous challenge involving considerable psychological distress and impaired social functioning. These difficulties are often compounded by logistical difficulties such as transportation, financial assistance, and continuity of care after the acute hospitalization. Social workers have a unique opportunity to address the psychosocial and logistical issues facing these patients through preadmission counseling and coordination. The study reported in this article aimed to assess the effect of preadmission counseling for patients planning to undergo major surgical therapy for head and neck cancer. Ten patients who received preadmission counseling were surveyed to ascertain the utility of it in regard to multiple social and logistical factors. Comparisons were made with patients who did not receive such counseling. Staff perceptions were likewise obtained. The surveys indicated that preadmission counseling helped in regard to improving peri-admission support and access to financial and logistical resources, and lowered levels of anxiety during admission. Areas of potential improvement were identified, including addressing substance abuse issues in a timely manner.

  17. Stereotypes of Latinos and Whites: do they guide evaluations in diverse work groups?

    PubMed

    Jimeno-Ingrum, Diana; Berdahl, Jennifer L; Lucero-Wagoner, Brennis

    2009-04-01

    We examined whether stereotypes of Latinos as less warm and less competent than Whites guided perceptions of individuals in interacting work groups. Both Whites and Latinos rated Latino group members as lower in competence and warmth than White group members. This occurred in work groups with a majority of White members as well as in work groups with a majority of Latino members. The most favorable ratings were received by solo Whites in majority Latino groups, whereas the least favorable ratings were received by solo Latinos in majority White groups. Implications and future directions for research are discussed.

  18. Crowding out Latinos: Mexican Americans in the Public Consciousness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portales, Marco

    Despite efforts to improve perceptions about Mexican Americans and other Spanish-speaking people in the United States, Chicanos and other Latinos are not yet seen as typical American citizens. Latinos continue to receive poor educations, and the media continue to represent them in ways unaffected by the emergence of Chicano literature. This book…

  19. Crowding out Latinos: Mexican Americans in the Public Consciousness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portales, Marco

    Despite efforts to improve perceptions about Mexican Americans and other Spanish-speaking people in the United States, Chicanos and other Latinos are not yet seen as typical American citizens. Latinos continue to receive poor educations, and the media continue to represent them in ways unaffected by the emergence of Chicano literature. This book…

  20. Latino Teachers: Well Educated but Not Prepared. An Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monsivais, George I.

    This report summarizes perceptions of Latino teachers concerning their professional preparation, their working environment, and school/community characteristics that affect the achievement and attainment of Latino students. A mailing of 1,252 survey questionnaires to members of the Association of Mexican American Educators was conducted. Of the…

  1. Dispelling Myths about Latino Parent Participation in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quiocho, Alice M. L.; Daoud, Annette M.

    2006-01-01

    This qualitative study was conducted to discuss and dispel commonly held myths about Latino parents' involvement in their children's education. Differences between teacher perceptions of Latino parent involvement and parents' understanding of their roles in supporting their children's education--including the learning and use of the English…

  2. Supporting High School Graduation Aspirations among Latino Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lys, Diana B.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceptions Latino eighth grade students have of school and schooling factors as they transition to high school and the factors that may influence their self-perceived likelihood of graduating from high school. Middle schools are poised to help Latino students prepare themselves for a smoother…

  3. Exploring the perceptions and experiences of community health workers using role identity theory

    PubMed Central

    Mlotshwa, Langelihle; Harris, Bronwyn; Schneider, Helen; Moshabela, Mosa

    2015-01-01

    Background Community health workers (CHWs) are an integral resource in many health systems, particularly in resource-poor settings. Their identities – ‘who’ they are – play an important role in their hiring, training, and retention. We explore the perceptions, experiences, and identities of CHWs as they adopt a CHW role in rural South Africa, using ‘role identity theory’. Design From April to December 2010, we conducted 18 semi-structured interviews with CHWs volunteering in non-governmental home-based care (HBC) organisations in one rural sub-district in South Africa. The role identity theory framework was used to understand the work of CHWs within their communities, addressing themes, such as entry into, and nature of, caring roles, organisational support, state resourcing, and community acceptability. A thematic content analysis was used to analyse the collected data. Results The study found that CHWs usually begin their ‘caring work’ before they formally join HBC organisations, by caring for children, neighbours, mothers, fathers, friends, and the community in some way. CHWs felt that becoming a health worker provided an elevated status within the community, but that it often led community members to believe they were able to control resources. The key role identities assumed by CHWs, as they sought to meet patients’ and their own needs, were a complex mix of community ‘insider’, ‘outsider’, and ‘broker’. Each of these role identities served as a unique way to position, from the CHW's perspective, themselves and the community, given the diversity of needs and expectations. Conclusions These role identities reveal the tensions CHWs face as ‘insider’ members of the community and yet at times being treated as ‘outsiders’, who might be regarded with suspicion, and at the same time, appreciated for the resources that they might possess. Understanding role identities, and how best to support them, may contribute to strategies of

  4. Vibration perception thresholds in workers with long term exposure to lead.

    PubMed

    Chuang, H Y; Schwartz, J; Tsai, S Y; Lee, M L; Wang, J D; Hu, H

    2000-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of long term occupational exposure to lead on function of the peripheral nervous system as reflected by vibration perception threshold (VPT), measured with a portable vibrameter. 217 Workers in a lead battery factory were required to have an annual blood lead measurement during each of the 5 years preceding this study. All were invited to take the VPT test. A total of 206 workers were studied. The associations were analysed between VPTs and current blood lead concentration, mean concentration of blood lead over the past 5 years, maximum blood lead concentration during the past 5 years, index of cumulative blood lead (ICL), time weighted index of cumulative blood lead (TWICL), and percentage of lifespan spent at work in the plant, as well as the other potential confounders. Ordinary multiple regressions, generalised additive models, and hockey stick regression analyses were used to explore the potential existence of a threshold effect of blood lead variables on VPT. VPT at a frequency of 220 Hz ranged from 6 to 100 (10(-2) g, or 0.098 m/s(2)) with a mean (SD) of 19.8 (14.2) for the feet and from 4 to 43 with a mean (SD) of 10.2 (6.1) for the hands. The five variables of exposure to lead were all significantly correlated with VPT of the feet but not the hands. In multiple linear regression analyses, the mean of the blood lead concentrations and the TWICL were significantly associated with VPT of the feet. The relation between VPT of the feet and mean blood lead was shown to be a J shaped curve with a generalised additive model and local smoothing technique. In the hockey stick regression, evidence was found of a threshold effect at a mean blood lead concentration of 31 microgram/dl. Above this threshold it was estimated that each increase of 1 microgram/dl mean blood lead over 5 years would increase VPT of the feet by 0.29 (10(-2) g) or 0.028 m/s(2) (at a frequency of 220 Hz) with other potential confounders held constant. This study suggests

  5. Risk perception of sexually transmitted infections and HIV in Nigerian commercial sex workers living in Barcelona: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Coma Auli, Núria; Mejía-Lancheros, Cília; Berenguera, Anna; Mayans, Martí Vall; Lasagabaster, Maider Arando; Pujol-Ribera, Enriqueta

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV are a serious global public health issue. These diseases are largely preventable, as they are directly and indirectly associated with potentially modifiable factors, including socioeconomic conditions. Sexual transmission is responsible for over 75% of new HIV infections worldwide. Moreover, commercial sex workers and their clients are two of the groups at the highest risk of acquiring and transmitting these infectious diseases, due to an extensive number of sexual encounters and the various factors related to commercial sex situations. This qualitative study aims to deepen the understanding of the risk perception of STIs and HIV and their associated factors in Nigerian commercial sex workers in the city of Barcelona. Methods and analysis This is a qualitative, descriptive, interpretive study based on a social constructivist and phenomenological perspective conducted on a saturated sample of Nigerian commercial sex workers in the city of Barcelona. Data will be collected through semistructured individual and triangular group interviews. Information will be examined using a sociological discourse analysis, allowing us to understand the social and individual factors related to the risk perception of STIs and HIV in commercial sex workers. Discussion Qualitative studies are an important element in identifying individual, social and contextual factors directly or indirectly related to the health/disease process. This qualitative study will provide essential knowledge to improve health promotion, prevention strategies and effective management of STIs both for commercial sex workers and their clients. Ethics This study has been approved by the clinical research ethics committee (CEIC) of IDIAP Jordi Gol in Barcelona, 2012. PMID:23901029

  6. Vibration perception thresholds in workers with long term exposure to lead

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, H.; Schwartz, J.; Tsai, S.; Lee, M.; Wang, J.; Hu, H.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To evaluate the impact of long term occupational exposure to lead on function of the peripheral nervous system as reflected by vibration perception threshold (VPT), measured with a portable vibrameter.
METHODS—217 Workers in a lead battery factory were required to have an annual blood lead measurement during each of the 5 years preceding this study. All were invited to take the VPT test. A total of 206 workers were studied. The associations were analysed between VPTs and current blood lead concentration, mean concentration of blood lead over the past 5 years, maximum blood lead concentration during the past 5 years, index of cumulative blood lead (ICL), time weighted index of cumulative blood lead (TWICL), and percentage of lifespan spent at work in the plant, as well as the other potential confounders. Ordinary multiple regressions, generalised additive models, and hockey stick regression analyses were used to explore the potential existence of a threshold effect of blood lead variables on VPT.
RESULTS—VPT at a frequency of 220 Hz ranged from 6 to 100 (10-2 g, or 0.098 m/s2) with a mean (SD) of 19.8 (14.2) for the feet and from 4 to 43 with a mean (SD) of 10.2 (6.1) for the hands. The five variables of exposure to lead were all significantly correlated with VPT of the feet but not the hands. In multiple linear regression analyses, the mean of the blood lead concentrations and the TWICL were significantly associated with VPT of the feet. The relation between VPT of the feet and mean blood lead was shown to be a J shaped curve with a generalised additive model and local smoothing technique. In the hockey stick regression, evidence was found of a threshold effect at a mean blood lead concentration of 31 µg/dl. Above this threshold it was estimated that each increase of 1 µg/dl mean blood lead over 5 years would increase VPT of the feet by 0.29 (10-2 g) or 0.028 m/s2 (at a frequency of 220 Hz) with other potential confounders

  7. Community Health Workers perceptions in relation to speech and language disorders.

    PubMed

    Knochenhauer, Carla Cristina Lins Santos; Vianna, Karina Mary de Paiva

    2016-01-01

    To know the perception of the Community Health Workers (CHW) about the speech and language disorders. Cross-sectional study, which involved a questionnaire with questions related to the knowledge of CHW on speech and language disorders. The research was carried out with CHW allocated in the Centro Sanitary District of Florianópolis. We interviewed 35 CHW, being mostly (80%) female gender, with a average age of 47 years (standard deviation = 2.09 years). From the total number of interviewed professionals, 57% said that they knew the work of the speech therapist, 57% believe that there is no relationship between chronic diseases and speech therapy and 97% who think the participation of Speech, Hearing and Language Sciences is important in primary care. As for capacity development, 88% of CHW claim not to have had any training performed by a speech therapist, 75% of professionals stated they had done the training Estratégia Amamenta e Alimenta Brasil, 57% of the Programa Capital Criança and 41% of the Programa Capital Idoso. The knowledge of CHW about the work of a speech therapist is still limited, but the importance of speech and language disorders is recognized in primary care. The lack of knowledge, with regard to speech and language disorders, may be related to lack of qualification of the CHW in actions and/or continuing education courses that could clarify and educate these professionals to identify and better educate the population in their home visits. This study highlights the need for further research on training actions of these professionals.

  8. [Perception of nosocomial risk among healthcare workers at "Hopital Principal" in Dakar, Senegal (survey 2004)].

    PubMed

    Chevalier, B; Margery, J; Wade, B; Ka, S; Diatta, B; Gueye, M; Mbaye, P S; Debonne, J M

    2008-12-01

    Nosocomial Infection (NI) is also observed in healthcare facilities in non-Western countries. The purpose of this report is to describe the findings of a survey undertaken to evaluate hygiene procedures implemented at the "Hopital Principal" in Dakar, Senegal and to assess perception and awareness of nosocomial risk among the hospital staff. A total of 264 healthcare workers were interviewed. Mean age was 39 years (range, 18-60) and the sex ratio was 1.3 (150 men/114 women). Sixty (22.7%) had university degrees, 106 (40.2%) had secondary school diplomas, 50 (18.9%) had attended middle school, and 13 (4.9%) had no schooling. Analysis of interview data showed that 56.1% (157/264) defined NI as infection acquired at the hospital but that only 9.8% (n=26) knew that a minimum 48-hour delay was necessary to distinguish nosocomial from community acquired infection. While understanding about NI was correlated with education level, data showed that 1 out of 3 physicians (13/39) failed to give the exact definition. Hand contact was cited as the second route of transmission. Isolation precautions were understood by 22.7% of personnel (60/264). Systematic handwashing was reported by 363% (96/264) but observation demonstrated that it was not performed properly regardless of the category of personnel. Care protocols were understood by 54.6% of persons interviewed (144/264). A hygiene-training course had been attended by 52.2% (n=138). Two thirds of the staff (69.7%: 54/264) was able to identify the hygiene nurse. Ninety-eight health care providers (37.1%) were familiar with the CLIN (Comités de Lutte contre les Infections Nosocomiales).

  9. User Perceptions of an mHealth Medicine Dosing Tool for Community Health Workers.

    PubMed

    Palazuelos, Daniel; Diallo, Assiatou B; Palazuelos, Lindsay; Carlile, Narath; Payne, Jonathan D; Franke, Molly F

    2013-04-04

    Mobile health (mHealth) technologies provide many potential benefits to the delivery of health care. Medical decision support tools have shown particular promise in improving quality of care and provider workflow. Frontline health workers such as Community Health Workers (CHWs) have been shown to be effective in extending the reach of care, yet only a few medicine dosing tools are available to them. We developed an mHealth medicine dosing tool tailored to the skill level of CHWs to assist in the delivery of care. The mHealth tool was created for CHWs with primary school education working in rural Mexico and Guatemala. Perceptions and impressions of this tool were collected and compared to an existing paper-based medicine dosing tool. Seventeen Partners In Health CHWs in rural Mexico and Guatemala completed a one-day training in the mHealth medicine dosing tool. Following the training, a prescription dosing test was administered, and CHWs were given the choice to use the mHealth or paper-based tool to answer 7 questions. Subsequently, demographic and qualitative data was collected using a questionnaire and an in-person interview conducted in Spanish, then translated into English. The qualitative questions captured data on 4 categories: comfort, acceptability, preference, and accuracy. Qualitative responses were analyzed for major themes and quantitative variables were analyzed using SAS. 82% of the 17 CHWs chose the mHealth tool for at least 1 of 7 questions compared to 53% (9/17) who chose to use the paper-based tool. 93% (13/14) rated the phone as being easy or very easy to use, and 56% (5/9) who used the paper-based tool rated it as easy or very easy. Dosing accuracy was generally higher among questions answered using the mHealth tool relative to questions answered using the paper-based tool. Analysis of major qualitative themes indicated that the mHealth tool was perceived as being quick, easy to use, and as having complete information. The mHealth tool was seen

  10. [Are tick medications pesticides? Implications for health and risk perception for workers in the dairy cattle sector].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Tatiana Pastorello Pereira; Moreira, Josino Costa; Peres, Frederico

    2012-02-01

    This article seeks to characterize the risks related to the use of pesticides in dairy production, in terms of legislation, health and perception of risk for workers involved in this activity. It is based on methodological articulation that included: a) systematic review of the reference literature on the research topic; b) analysis of related legislation (veterinary products and pesticides); c) risk identification regarding the use of veterinary products formulated using active ingredients listed as pesticides; d) and risk perception analysis of a group of dairy production workers. Results indicate a situation of particular interest to Public Health. Regarding dairy production workers, the invisibility of risks associated with handling pesticides for veterinary use, increases their exposure and is related to several health problems, especially for women. This same invisibility leads to a neglect of the prohibition period between pesticide use and consumption of other products. Part of the problem may be associated with the non-classification of pesticides for veterinary use as 'pesticides' (they are classified as veterinary products), which highlights the importance and the urgency of discussion of the theme.

  11. The perceptions of the personal and professional factors influencing social workers in Saudi hospitals: a qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Yalli, Nadir; Albrithen, Abdulaziz

    2011-01-01

    The perceptions of 10 social workers regarding the personal and professional characteristics influencing their practice at Saudi hospitals were examined using semi-structured interviews. A qualitative analysis employing a thematic approach informed by grounded theory was undertaken and produced three broad interrelated themes: "skills upgrading," "departmental support," and "personal experience in the workplace," which subsequently informed the development of the overarching theme of "personal and professional factors." The discussion illustrates social work practitioners are inhibited from effectively performing their roles. These include: (a) Deficiencies related to job training and professional skills updating where there is a lack of efficient and accessible inservice training programs, especially in relation to practical issues. Further, these perceptions relate to a lack of long-term educational opportunities that impact on individual practitioner's currency of skills, techniques and pedagogy enabling/disenabling him/her to excel at his/her job, (b) Obvious bureaucracy within the controlling hierarchy and difficulty with the dissemination of information between the social workers were perceived to detrimentally impact on a practitioner's ability to attend to one's work demands, and (c) Personal day to day work experiences, including counterproductive emotional feelings (high stress), increased dissatisfaction with the job, and ineffective communication within the workplace were seen as limiting the social workers' professional potential. This article will focus on how these themes were addressed in terms of qualitative interview data.

  12. Immigrant dairy workers' perceptions of health and safety on the farm in America's Heartland.

    PubMed

    Liebman, Amy King; Juarez-Carrillo, Patricia Margarita; Reyes, Iris Anne Cruz; Keifer, Matthew Charles

    2016-03-01

    Dairy farming is dangerous. Yearly, farms grow fewer and larger by employing immigrant workers, who have limited industrial agriculture experience and safety and health training. We examined results of five focus groups with 37 Hispanic, immigrant dairy workers. Analysis followed a grounded theory approach and employed ATLAS.ti. Reported injury experience affirmed the hazardous nature of dairy. Some workers received appropriate worker compensation benefits, whereas others were instructed to deny work-relatedness. Some employers covered medical injury costs out-of-pocket, whereas others did not. Cows were a major injury source. Pressure to work and weather were noted as injury risk factors. Worker compensation was poorly understood, and immigration status and fear of deportation influenced injury and hazard reporting. Injury management practices range from benevolent to threatening. Workers compensation is poorly understood and undocumented status is an occupational hazard. We underscore the need for further research and immigration policy change. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. HIV risk perceptions, knowledge and behaviours among female sex workers in two cities in Turkmenistan.

    PubMed

    Chariyeva, Z; Colaco, R; Maman, S

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes HIV risk behaviour patterns among street- and bar-based female sex workers in the Turkmenistan cities of Ashgabat and Mary. Street-based sex workers had little to no knowledge of HIV and primarily used condoms when condom use was initiated by clients. Bar-based sex workers had HIV knowledge and reported regularly using condoms mainly with first-time clients. While sex workers perceived themselves to be at low risk for acquiring HIV, they were aware of other sexually transmitted infections (STI) and expressed a strong desire for free STI testing and treatment services.

  14. Complex patients: social workers' perceptions of complexity in health and rehabilitation services.

    PubMed

    McAlinden, Fiona; McDermott, Fiona; Morris, Jo

    2013-01-01

    We report on a qualitative study exploring health social workers' understanding of complexity in relation to inpatients in subacute wards at three sites across a large health network in Melbourne, Australia. Findings indicate that social workers' understanding of complexity refers to five interrelated themes: multiple competing demands; uncertainty; patient and family characteristics; pending breakdown; systems challenges. Social workers with less practice experience report that complex clients present more challenges than do social workers with greater experience. Implications of these findings for advancing practitioners' capacities in working with complex patients are discussed, as are the limitations of the study.

  15. Perception and prevalence of work-related health hazards among health care workers in public health facilities in southern India

    PubMed Central

    Senthil, Arasi; Anandh, Balasubramanian; Jayachandran, Palsamy; Thangavel, Gurusamy; Josephin, Diana; Yamini, Ravindran; Kalpana, Balakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health care workers (HCWs) are exposed to occupational related health hazards. Measuring worker perception and the prevalence of these hazards can help facilitate better risk management for HCWs, as these workers are envisaged to be the first point of contact, especially in resource poor settings. Objective: To describe the perception of occupational health hazards and self-reported exposure prevalence among HCWs in Southern India. Methods: We used cross sectional design with stratified random sampling of HCWs from different levels of health facilities and categories in a randomly selected district in Southern India. Data on perception and exposure prevalence were collected using a structured interview schedule developed by occupational health experts and administered by trained investigators. Results: A total of 482 HCWs participated. Thirty nine percent did not recognize work-related health hazards, but reported exposure to at least one hazard upon further probing. Among the 81·5% who reported exposure to biological hazard, 93·9% had direct skin contact with infectious materials. Among HCWs reporting needle stick injury, 70·5% had at least one in the previous three months. Ergonomic hazards included lifting heavy objects (42%) and standing for long hours (37%). Psychological hazards included negative feelings (20·3%) and verbal or physical abuse during work (20·5%). Conclusion: More than a third of HCWs failed to recognize work-related health hazards. Despite training in handling infectious materials, HCWs reported direct skin contact with infectious materials and needle stick injuries. Results indicate the need for training oriented toward behavioral change and provision of occupational health services. PMID:25482656

  16. MAT@USC Candidates and Latino English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lomeli, Cynthia Leticia

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to further understand the perceptions of MAT@USC teacher candidates and how their perceptions and previous experiences affect the educational experiences of Latino English language learners. Three questions were developed to guide this study: (1) What are the perceptions of MAT@USC candidates in selected courses…

  17. Older Persons' Perceptions of the Frequency and Meaning of Elderspeak from Family, Friends, and Service Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Brian P.; St. Pierre, Edouard S.

    2004-01-01

    Older persons (N = 159) were surveyed for their impressions of and experiences with elderspeak from friends, same-age family members, younger family members, familiar service workers, and unfamiliar service workers. Two dimensions, "warmth" and "superiority," emerged in the judgments of elderspeak from all five speaker types. Respondents perceived…

  18. School Social Worker's Perceptions of the Frequency of Actual and Preferred Engagement in Role Related Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to determine the frequency in which school social workers in Virginia engage in and prefer to engage in social work related activities and (2) to determine if the frequency in which the social work related activities the school social workers engage in is related to select variables. After a comprehensive review…

  19. Frontline Worker Perceptions of the Empowerment Process in Community-Based Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett, Joyce E.; Homstead, Kerry; Drisko, James

    2007-01-01

    Although many in the social work profession have written about empowerment, few have offered a description of the empowerment process from the perspective of clients and workers in high-risk communities. This qualitative study presents a model of empowerment practice from the perspective of frontline workers, the challenges they faced, and the…

  20. Health workers' perceptions of facilitators of and barriers to institutional delivery in Tigray, Northern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Gebrehiwot, Tesfay; San Sebastian, Miguel; Edin, Kerstin; Goicolea, Isabel

    2014-04-10

    Evidence shows that the three delays, delay in 1) deciding to seek medical care, 2) reaching health facilities and 3) receiving adequate obstetric care, are still contributing to maternal deaths in low-income countries. Ethiopia is a major contributor to the worldwide death toll of mothers with a maternal mortality ratio of 676 per 100,000 live births. The Ethiopian Ministry of Health launched a community-based health-care system in 2003, the Health Extension Programme (HEP), to tackle maternal mortality. Despite strong efforts, universal access to services remains limited, particularly skilled delivery attendance. With the help of 'the three delays' framework, this study explores health-service providers' perceptions of facilitators and barriers to the utilization of institutional delivery in Tigray, a northern region of Ethiopia. Twelve in-depth interviews were carried out with eight health extension workers (HEWs) and four midwives. Each interview lasted between 90 and 120 minutes. Data were analysed through a thematic analysis approach. Three themes emerged from the analysis: the struggle between tradition and newly acquired knowledge, community willingness to deal with geographical barriers, and striving to do a good job with insufficient resources. These themes represent the three steps in the path towards receiving adequate institutional delivery care at a health facility. Of the themes, 'increased community awareness', 'organization of the community' and 'hospital with specialized staff' were recognized as facilitators. On the other hand, 'delivery as a natural event', 'cultural tradition and rituals', 'inaccessible transport', 'unmet community expectation' and 'shortage of skilled human resources' were represented as barriers to institutional delivery. The participants in this study gave emphasis to the major barriers to institutional delivery that are closely connected with the three delays model. Despite the initiatives being implemented by the Tigray

  1. The influence of risk perception on biosafety level-2 laboratory workers' hand-to-face contact behaviors.

    PubMed

    Johnston, James D; Eggett, Dennis; Johnson, Michele J; Reading, James C

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen transmission in the laboratory is thought to occur primarily through inhalation of infectious aerosols or by direct contact with mucous membranes on the face. While significant research has focused on controlling inhalation exposures, little has been written about hand contamination and subsequent hand-to-face contact (HFC) transmission. HFC may present a significant risk to workers in biosafety level-2 (BSL-2) laboratories where there is typically no barrier between the workers' hands and face. The purpose of this study was to measure the frequency and location of HFC among BSL-2 workers, and to identify psychosocial factors that influence the behavior. Research workers (N = 93) from 21 BSL-2 laboratories consented to participate in the study. Two study personnel measured workers' HFC behaviors by direct observation during activities related to cell culture maintenance, cell infection, virus harvesting, reagent and media preparation, and tissue processing. Following observations, a survey measuring 11 psychosocial predictors of HFC was administered to participants. Study personnel recorded 396 touches to the face over the course of the study (mean = 2.6 HFCs/hr). Of the 93 subjects, 67 (72%) touched their face at least once, ranging from 0.2-16.0 HFCs/hr. Among those who touched their face, contact with the nose was most common (44.9%), followed by contact with the forehead (36.9%), cheek/chin (12.5%), mouth (4.0%), and eye (1.7%). HFC rates were significantly different across laboratories F(20, 72) = 1.85, p = 0.03. Perceived severity of infection predicted lower rates of HFC (p = 0.03). For every one-point increase in the severity scale, workers had 0.41 fewer HFCs/hr (r = -.27, P < 0.05). This study suggests HFC is common among BSL-2 laboratory workers, but largely overlooked as a major route of exposure. Workers' risk perceptions had a modest impact on their HFC behaviors, but other factors not considered in this study, including social modeling and

  2. Health and safety perception of workers in Turkey: a survey of construction sites.

    PubMed

    Ulubeyli, Serdar; Kazaz, Aynur; Er, Bayram

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the general health and safety (HS) conditions in the Turkish construction industry from the perspective of construction labor. Toward this aim, a questionnaire survey was carried out with 800 workers employed in 32 construction projects in Turkey. Contractors were found to neglect their legal liabilities in paying workers' insurance premiums. Also, they overlooked safety training and were reluctant to hiring physicians at construction sites and investing in personal protective equipment (PPE). As the real constructors of projects, workers did not attach adequate importance to occupational training. In addition, they were not willing to use some PPE. Key participants of HS affairs such as workers, contractors, unions, and government should comprehend their drawbacks to overcome the current dangerous view of the industry. In this regard, related government bodies should compel contractors and workers to adapt to the relatively new regulations on occupational HS.

  3. A comparative analysis of homosexual behaviors, sex role preferences, and anal sex proclivities in Latino and non-Latino men.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, William L

    2009-10-01

    Machismo prescribes that homosexual encounters among Latino men are conducted along highly gendered lines: men tend to be anally insertive or receptive over the lifecourse, but not both. Some have argued that Latino men have more lifecourse homosexual behaviors in comparison to other racial/ethnic groups. This is often due to the perception that Latin America has quasi-institutionalized homosexuality, which sharply contrasts it with the United States. Although scholars suggest that sex role preferences and greater likelihoods for homosexual behaviors exist among Latino men in the United States, limited empirical data validate these claims. Latino/non-Latino differences in male homosexual behaviors and sex role preferences were analyzed by using the 2002 cycle of the National Survey of Family Growth, a nationally representative, probability sample of 4,928 men. Findings revealed that non-Mexican Latino, but not Mexican, men had increased likelihoods of ever having anal sex than non-Latino Whites and oral sex than non-Latino Blacks. These relationships remained after controlling for age, education, and foreign birth. Latino men preferred insertive or receptive sex in comparison to non-Latino Blacks and Whites, but this difference disappeared after education was controlled. In full and reduced models, Mexican men tended to be orifice-specific (oral or anal), while non-Mexican Latinos were more oriented to both oral and anal sex. Controlling for other factors, all Latinos were more likely than non-Latino Blacks and Whites to refuse to answer male homosexual behavior questions. The implications of race/ethnicity are discussed for homosexual behavior patterns among U.S. men.

  4. Job satisfaction: rural versus urban primary health care workers' perception in Ogun State of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Campbell, P C; Ebuehi, O M

    2011-01-01

    Job satisfaction implies doing a job one enjoys, doing it well, and being suitably rewarded for one' efforts. Several factors affect job satisfaction. To compare factors influencing job satisfaction amongst rural and urban primary health care workers in southwestern Nigeria. A cross sectional comparative study recruited qualified health workers selected by multi stage sampling technique from rural and urban health facilities in four local government areas (LGAs) of Ogun State in Southwestern Nigeria. Data were collected and analysed using Epi info V 3.5.1 RESULTS: The response rates were 88(88%) and 91(91%) respectively in the rural and urban areas. While urban workers derived satisfaction from availability of career development opportunities, materials and equipment, in their current job, rural workers derived satisfaction from community recognition of their work and improved staff relationship. Major de-motivating factors common to both groups were lack of supportive supervision, client-provider relationship and lack of in-service training. However more rural 74(84.1%) than urban 62(68.1%) health workers would prefer to continue working in their present health facilities (p=0.04). There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups in job satisfaction with respect to tools availability and career development opportunities (p<0.05). There is dissimilarity in factors influencing job satisfaction between rural and urban healthcare workers. There is need for human resource policy to be responsive to the diverse needs of health workers particularly at the primary level.

  5. Does Racial/Ethnic Identity Influence the Effectiveness of a Community Health Worker Intervention for African American and Latino Adults with Type 2 Diabetes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murayama, Hiroshi; Spencer, Michael S.; Sinco, Brandy R.; Palmisano, Gloria; Kieffer, Edith C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Community health worker (CHW) interventions are known to be an effective strategy to improve health behaviors and outcomes in relation to diabetes, particularly for racial/ethnic communities. Although understanding the function of identity with same race/ethnicity among clients of CHW interventions could contribute to more effective…

  6. Culturally Responsive School Counseling for Hispanic/Latino Students and Families: The Need for Bilingual School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Adcock, Sondra; Daniels, M. Harry; Lee, Sang Min; Villalba, Jose Arley; Indelicato, Natalie Arce

    2006-01-01

    Hispanic/Latino students are the largest minority school-age population (Pew Hispanic Center, 2005). In this study, pupil services administrators in Florida identified concerns about Hispanic/Latino children and families and the need for bilingual school counselors for growing numbers of Hispanic/Latino students. Administrators' perceptions of…

  7. High-Achieving, Low Income, First-Generation Latino Community College Students: Cultural Capital, Social Capital, Self-Perceptions, and College Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Veronica Ventura

    2013-01-01

    Though an increasing number of Latino students is attending college upon graduation from high school, the vast majority of these students, even if they are high-achieving students who could attend a four-year college or university, choose to enroll into two-year community colleges. This study discusses the process by which high-achieving,…

  8. Self-Determination and Goal Aspirations: African American and Latino Males' Perceptions of Their Persistence in Community College Basic and Transfer-Level Writing Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villarreal, María de Lourdes; García, Hugo A.

    2016-01-01

    This Grounded Theory study utilized Self-determination Theory to analyze the interview results of 18 community college African American and Latino males. The goal was to learn what helped participants to succeed and persist in developmental and transfer-level writing courses despite the obstacles that they faced. Three major themes emerged: (a)…

  9. Self-Determination and Goal Aspirations: African American and Latino Males' Perceptions of Their Persistence in Community College Basic and Transfer-Level Writing Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villarreal, María de Lourdes; García, Hugo A.

    2016-01-01

    This Grounded Theory study utilized Self-determination Theory to analyze the interview results of 18 community college African American and Latino males. The goal was to learn what helped participants to succeed and persist in developmental and transfer-level writing courses despite the obstacles that they faced. Three major themes emerged: (a)…

  10. Latino/a Students' Perceptions of Their Sense of Belonging at Kansas State University: Mi Casa Es Su Casa... or Is It Really?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esquivel, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative multiple case study explored the campus climate and sense of belonging of Latino/a undergraduate student participants at a predominately White university. Guided by the work of Hurtado and Carter (1997), relationships among several aspects of the college environment and sense of belonging were examined. In depth interviews…

  11. Latino/a Students' Perceptions of Their Sense of Belonging at Kansas State University: Mi Casa Es Su Casa... or Is It Really?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esquivel, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative multiple case study explored the campus climate and sense of belonging of Latino/a undergraduate student participants at a predominately White university. Guided by the work of Hurtado and Carter (1997), relationships among several aspects of the college environment and sense of belonging were examined. In depth interviews…

  12. Prevalence of bifid median nerves and persistent median arteries and their association with carpal tunnel syndrome in a sample of latino poultry processors and other manual workers

    PubMed Central

    WALKER, FRANCIS O.; CARTWRIGHT, MICHAEL S.; BLOCKER, JILL N.; ARCURY, THOMAS A.; SUK, JUNG IM; CHEN, HAIYING; SCHULTZ, MARK R.; GRZYWACZ, JOSEPH G.; MORA, DANA C.; QUANDT, SARA A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of bifid median nerves and persistent median arteries, their co-occurrence, and their relationship to carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) are only understood partially. Methods We screened 1026 wrists of 513 Latino manual laborers in North Carolina for bifid median nerves and persistent median arteries using electrodiagnosis and ultrasound. Results A total of 8.6% of wrists had a bifid median nerve, and 3.7% of wrists had a persistent median artery independent of subgroup ethnicity, age, gender, or type of work. An association with definite carpal tunnel syndrome was not found. The presence of either anatomic variant was associated with a high likelihood of co-occurrence of another variant in the same or the contralateral wrist. Conclusions The occurrence of median anatomic variants can be determined in field studies using ultrasound. Persistent median arteries and bifid median nerves tend to co-occur but do not put manual laborers at additional risk of developing CTS. PMID:24037717

  13. Prevalence of bifid median nerves and persistent median arteries and their association with carpal tunnel syndrome in a sample of Latino poultry processors and other manual workers.

    PubMed

    Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S; Blocker, Jill N; Arcury, Thomas A; Suk, Jung I M; Chen, Haiying; Schulz, Mark R; Schultz, Mark R; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Mora, Dana C; Quandt, Sara A

    2013-10-01

    The prevalence of bifid median nerves and persistent median arteries, their co-occurrence, and their relationship to carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) are only understood partially. We screened 1026 wrists of 513 Latino manual laborers in North Carolina for bifid median nerves and persistent median arteries using electrodiagnosis and ultrasound. A total of 8.6% of wrists had a bifid median nerve, and 3.7% of wrists had a persistent median artery independent of subgroup ethnicity, age, gender, or type of work. An association with definite carpal tunnel syndrome was not found. The presence of either anatomic variant was associated with a high likelihood of co-occurrence of another variant in the same or the contralateral wrist. The occurrence of median anatomic variants can be determined in field studies using ultrasound. Persistent median arteries and bifid median nerves tend to co-occur but do not put manual laborers at additional risk of developing CTS. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Involving Latino Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quezada, Reyes L.; Diaz, Delia M.; Sanchez, Maria

    2003-01-01

    Describes barriers to Latino parent involvement in educational activities, factors to consider when involving Latino parents, and two examples of Latino involvement programs in California: Family Literacy Workshop at James Monroe Elementary School, Madera Unified School District, and Parents Take P.A.R.T. (Parent Assisted Reading Training) at…

  15. Knowledge of Hepatitis B Virus Infection, Immunization with Hepatitis B Vaccine, Risk Perception, and Challenges to Control Hepatitis among Hospital Workers in a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Adekanle, Olusegun; Ndububa, Dennis A.; Olowookere, Samuel Anu; Ijarotimi, Oluwasegun; Ijadunola, Kayode Thaddeus

    2015-01-01

    Background. Studies had reported high rate of hepatitis B infection among hospital workers with low participation in vaccination programmes, especially those whose work exposes them to the risk of HBV infection. The study assessed knowledge of hepatitis B virus infection, risk perception, vaccination history, and challenges to control hepatitis among health workers. Methods. A descriptive cross-sectional study. Consenting health care workers completed a self-administered questionnaire that assessed respondents' general knowledge of HBV, vaccination history and HBsAg status, risk perception, and challenges to control hepatitis. Data was analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results. Three hundred and eighty-two health care workers participated in the study. There were 182 males and 200 females. The respondents comprised 94 (25%) medical doctors, 168 (44%) nurses, 68 (18%) medical laboratory technologists, and 52 (14%) pharmacists. Over 33% had poor knowledge with 35% not immunized against HBV. Predictors of good knowledge include age less than 35 years, male sex, being a medical doctor, previous HBsAg test, and complete HBV immunisation. Identified challenges to control hepatitis include lack of hospital policy (91.6%), poor orientation of newly employed health workers (75.9%), and low risk perception (74.6%). Conclusion. Hospital policy issues and low risk perception of HBV transmission have grave implications for the control of HBV infection. PMID:25685549

  16. [Temporary workers' perceptions of occupational risks in the port of Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Soares, Jorgana Fernanda de Souza; Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; Mendoza-Sassi, Raul Andrés; Almeida, Tabajara Lucas de; Muccillo-Baisch, Ana Luiza; Soares, Maria Cristina Flores; Costa, Valdecir Zavarese da

    2008-06-01

    This was a cross-sectional, descriptive, quantitative study in the port of Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, aimed at identifying occupational risk perceptions in a sample of 306 temporary dockworkers. Most temporary dockworkers (93.46%) acknowledged the existence of health risks on the job, independently of schooling (p = 0.44) and job activity (p = 0.47). Risks identified by temporary workers as a whole included falling of suspended objects (8.43 +/- 2.47), noise (8.06 +/- 2.32), and bad weather conditions (8.05 +/- 2.48). Risks that varied significantly between jobs were: noise (p = 0.00), lifting loads manually (p = 0.00), work tools (p = 0,00), insufficient number of work team members (p = 0.03), extra wages based on productivity (p = 0.00), work pace (p = 0.01), working on scaffolding and other high areas (p = 0.00), workers moving on top of cargo (p = 0.00), and ship's ladders and gangways (p = 0.00). The study corroborated that temporary dock work is unhealthy and hazardous, and that the risks affect workers according to the specific jobs they perform.

  17. Implementation of the integrated management of childhood illness with parasitological diagnosis of malaria in rural Ghana: health worker perceptions.

    PubMed

    Febir, Lawrence G; Baiden, Frank E; Agula, Justina; Delimini, Rupert K; Akpalu, Bright; Tivura, Mathilda; Amanfo, Nelson; Chandramohan, Daniel; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Webster, Jayne

    2015-04-23

    Timely and appropriate management of febrile illness among children under five years of age will contribute to achieving Millennium Development Goal-4. The revised World Health Organization-Global Malaria Programme's policy on test-based management of malaria must integrate effectively into the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI). This study reports on perceptions of health workers on the health system factors influencing effective delivery of test-based diagnosis of malaria with IMCI. A qualitative study was conducted among a range of health workers at different levels of the health system in the Brong Ahafo Region of Ghana. Interview transcripts were transferred into Nvivo 8 software for data management and analysis. A frame-work approach at two levels was used in the analysis, which included the processes required for implementation of test-based management of malaria and the health systems context. Forty-nine in-depth interviews were conducted. The National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) was perceived to have led to an increase in health facility attendance, thereby increasing the workload of health workers. Workload was reported as the main reason that health workers were not able to complete all of the examinations included in the IMCI algorithm. The NHIS financing guidelines were seen to be determining diagnosis and treatment practices by health-care givers. Concern was expressed about the erratic supply of malaria rapid diagnostic test kits (RDTs), the quality of RDTs related to potential false negative results when clinical symptoms were consistent with malaria. IMCI was seen as important but practically impossible to fully implement due to workload. Implementation of the WHO-revised IMCI guideline is confronted with a myriad of health systems challenges. The perceptions of front-line health workers on the accuracy and need for RDTs together with the capacity of health systems to support implementation plays a crucial role. The NHIS financing

  18. Physical activity initiatives for male factory workers: gatekeepers' perceptions of potential motivators and barriers.

    PubMed

    Veitch, J; Clavisi, O; Owen, N

    1999-10-01

    Worksites have been argued to be a key setting for physical activity promotion, particularly for lower-paid, less-skilled workers. These occupational groups are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. There is no strong evidence in support of the efficacy of worksite fitness and physical activity interventions. This study assessed potential motivators and barriers to worksite physical activity initiatives for less-skilled workers. We conducted telephone interviews with 13 Victorian WorkCover insurance providers and 30 manufacturing industry worksite managers. The manufacturing industry was selected as it contains a substantial portion of workers from this high-risk occupational group. Most insurers incorporated physical activity elements into injury-prevention programs. Few worksite managers reported programs to encourage workers to be more active; they identified reduced premiums and lower-cost programs through insurers as possible motivators. Both groups identified workers' reluctance to participate in physical activity, lack of awareness of potential benefits and program cost as major barriers for worksite physical activity. Other barriers included potential adverse effects on productivity and increased injury risk. Broader occupational health and safety policies and joint initiatives between insurers and worksite managers may have the potential to provide more opportunities for workers to be more active. However, the barriers identified outweighed the perceived benefits. Without structural and regulatory changes or new incentives, the adoption of physical activity initiatives in Australian manufacturing-industry workplaces is unlikely.

  19. Perceptions of pesticides exposure risks by operators, workers, residents and bystanders in Greece, Italy and the UK.

    PubMed

    Remoundou, K; Brennan, M; Sacchettini, G; Panzone, L; Butler-Ellis, M C; Capri, E; Charistou, A; Chaideftou, E; Gerritsen-Ebben, M G; Machera, K; Spanoghe, P; Glass, R; Marchis, A; Doanngoc, K; Hart, A; Frewer, L J

    2015-02-01

    The EU Directive on the sustainable use of pesticides (EU128/2009/EC) requires European Member States to develop training activities targeting occupational exposure to pesticides, and communication material aimed at residents and bystanders. Risk perceptions, knowledge and attitudes associated with passive and occupational exposure to pesticide potentially influence the extent to which different stakeholders adopt self-protective behaviour. A methodology for assessing the link between attitudes, adoption of self-protective behaviours and exposure was developed and tested. A survey was implemented in the Greece, Italy and the UK, and targeted stakeholders associated with pesticide exposure linked to orchards, greenhouse crops and arable crops respectively. The results indicated that the adoption of protective measures is low for residents and bystanders, with the exception of residents in Greece, when compared to operators and workers, who tend to follow recommended safety practices. A regression analysis was used to examine the factors affecting the probability of adopting protective measures as well the as the level of exposure in the case of operators and workers where data are available. The results indicate that the likelihood of engaging in self-protective behaviour is not significantly affected by perceptions of own health being affected by pesticides for residents and bystanders. However, operators who perceive that their heath has been negatively affected by the use of pesticides are found to be more likely to adopt self-protective behaviours. Gender and country differences, in perceptions, attitudes and self-protection are also observed. Recommendations for improved communication, in particular for vulnerable groups, are provided.

  20. Community Perceptions of Community Health Workers (CHWs) and Their Roles in Management for HIV, Tuberculosis and Hypertension in Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Koech, Beatrice; Kamene, Regina; Akinyi, Jackie

    2016-01-01

    Given shortages of health care providers and a rise in the number of people living with both communicable and non-communicable diseases, Community Health Workers (CHWs) are increasingly incorporated into health care programs. We sought to explore community perceptions of CHWs including perceptions of their roles in chronic disease management as part of the Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare Program (AMPATH) in western Kenya. In depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted between July 2012 and August 2013. Study participants were purposively sampled from three AMPATH sites: Chulaimbo, Teso and Turbo, and included patients within the AMPATH program receiving HIV, tuberculosis (TB), and hypertension (HTN) care, as well as caregivers of children with HIV, community leaders, and health care workers. Participants were asked to describe their perceptions of AMPATH CHWs, including identifying the various roles they play in engagement in care for chronic diseases including HIV, TB and HTN. Data was coded and various themes were identified. We organized the concepts and themes generated using the Andersen-Newman Framework of Health Services Utilization and considering CHWs as a potential enabling resource. A total of 207 participants including 110 individuals living with HIV (n = 50), TB (n = 39), or HTN (n = 21); 24 caregivers; 10 community leaders; and 34 healthcare providers participated. Participants identified several roles for CHWs including promoting primary care, encouraging testing, providing education and facilitating engagement in care. While various facilitating aspects of CHWs were uncovered, several barriers of CHW care were raised, including issues with training and confidentiality. Suggested resources to help CHWs improve their services were also described. Our findings suggest that CHWs can act as catalysts and role models by empowering members of their communities with increased knowledge and support. PMID:26901854

  1. Comparison of community health worker-led diabetes medication decision-making support for low-income Latino and African American adults with diabetes using e-health tools versus print materials: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Heisler, Michele; Choi, Hwajung; Palmisano, Gloria; Mase, Rebecca; Richardson, Caroline; Fagerlin, Angela; Montori, Victor M; Spencer, Michael; An, Laurence C

    2014-11-18

    Health care centers serving low-income communities have scarce resources to support medication decision making among patients with poorly controlled diabetes. To compare outcomes between community health worker use of a tailored, interactive, Web-based, tablet computer-delivered tool (iDecide) and use of print educational materials. Randomized, 2-group trial conducted from 2011 to 2013 (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01427660). Community health center in Detroit, Michigan, serving a Latino and African American low-income population. 188 adults with a hemoglobin A1c value greater than 7.5% (55%) or those who reported questions, concerns, or difficulty taking diabetes medications. Participants were randomly assigned to receive a 1- to 2-hour session with a community health worker who used iDecide or printed educational materials and 2 follow-up calls. Primary outcomes were changes in knowledge about antihyperglycemic medications, patient-reported medication decisional conflict, and satisfaction with antihyperglycemic medication information. Also examined were changes in diabetes distress, self-efficacy, medication adherence, and hemoglobin A1c values. Ninety-four percent of participants completed 3-month follow-up. Both groups improved across most measures. iDecide participants reported greater improvements in satisfaction with medication information (helpfulness, P = 0.007; clarity, P = 0.03) and in diabetes distress compared with the print materials group (P < 0.001). The other outcomes did not differ between the groups. The study was conducted at 1 health center during a short period. The community health workers were experienced in behavioral counseling, thereby possibly mitigating the need for additional support tools. Most outcomes were similarly improved among participants receiving both types of decision-making support for diabetes medication. Longer-term evaluations are necessary to determine whether the greater improvements in satisfaction with medication

  2. [Relationship between perceptions of safety climate at workplace and depressive disorders in manufacturing workers].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu-hua; Xiao, Ya-ni; Huang, Zhi-xiong; Huang, Shao-bin; Cao, Xiao-ou; Guan, Dong-bo; Chen, Wei-qing

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the risk factors for depressive disorders in manufacturing workers and to provide a basis for developing health promotion measures at workplace. A questionnaire survey was performed in 8085 front-line production workers from 33 manufacturing enterprises in Nanhai District of Foshan, Guangdong Province, China. The questionnaire contained a survey of demographic characteristics, the Safety Climate Scale, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, etc. The multilevel logistic regression analysis was applied to investigate the risk factors for depressive disorders in workers. A total of 6260 workers completed the survey; their mean age was 31.1 ± 8.6 years, and 53.2% of them were males. The multilevel logistic regression analysis showed that after adjustment for sociodemographic factors such as age, sex, and martial status, more depressive disorders were reported in the enterprises with higher score of "production safety training" than in those with lower score (OR = 1.46, 95%CI = 1.07 ∼ 1.97); fewer depressive disorders were reported in the enterprises with higher score of "colleagues concerned about production safety" than in those with lower score (OR = 0.08, 95%CI = 0.03 ∼ 0.26); the relationships of "safety warnings and precautions" and "managers concerned about production safety" with workers' depressive disorders were not statistically significant (OR = 0.78, 95%CI = 0.48 ∼ 1.28; OR = 1.08, 95%CI = 0.68 ∼ 1.72). Depressive disorders in manufacturing workers are related to the safety climate at workplace, which indicates that a good safety climate at workplace should be created to prevent and control depressive disorders in workers.

  3. Listening to Chinese Immigrant Restaurant Workers in the Midwest: Application of the Culture-Centered Approach (CCA) to Explore Perceptions of Health and Health Care.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haijuan; Dutta, Mohan; Okoror, Titilayo

    2016-01-01

    This study engages with the culture-centered approach (CCA) to explore Chinese immigrant restaurant workers' perception of the U.S. health care system and their interactions with the health care system in interpreting meanings of health. Chinese restaurant workers are marginalized because of their struggles on the job, their immigrant identity, and their negotiations with the structural contexts of occupation, migration status, and culture. In-depth interviews were conducted with 18 Chinese immigrant restaurant workers that lasted an average of 1.5 hours each, and were audiotaped. Interviews with participants highlighted critical issues in access to health care and the struggles experienced by restaurant workers in securing access to health, understood in the context of work. Critical to the workers' discourse is the acknowledgment of structural constraints such as lack of insurance coverage, immigration status, and lack of understanding of how the U.S. health care system works.

  4. Perceptions of community-based field workers on the effect of a longitudinal biomedical research project on their sustainable livelihoods.

    PubMed

    Moyo, Christabelle S; Francis, Joseph; Bessong, Pascal O

    2017-03-17

    Researchers involved in biomedical community-based projects rarely seek the perspectives of community fieldworkers, who are the 'foot soldiers' in such projects. Understanding the effect of biomedical research on community-based field workers could identify benefits and shortfalls that may be crucial to the success of community-based studies. The present study explored the perceptions of community-based field workers on the effect of the Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development Project" (MAL-ED) South Africa on their tangible and intangible capital which together comprise sustainable livelihoods. The study was conducted in Dzimauli community in Limpopo Province of South Africa between January-February 2016. The sustainable livelihoods framework was used to query community-based field workers' perspectives of both tangible assets such as income and physical assets and intangible assets such as social capital, confidence, and skills. Data were collected through twenty one individual in-depth interviews and one focus group discussion. Data were analysed using the Thematic Content Analysis approach supported by ATLAS.ti, version 7.5.10 software. All the field workers indicated that they benefitted from the MAL-ED South Africa project. The benefits included intangible assets such as acquisition of knowledge and skills, stronger social capital and personal development. Additionally, all indicated that MAL-ED South Africa provided them with the tangible assets of increased income and physical assets. Observations obtained from the focus group discussion and the community-based leaders concurred with the findings from the in-depth interviews. Additionally, some field workers expressed the desire for training in public relations, communication, problem solving and confidence building. The MAL-ED South Africa, biomedical research project, had positive effects on tangible and

  5. Workers' perceptions of how jobs affect health: a social ecological perspective.

    PubMed

    Ettner, S L; Grzywacz, J G

    2001-04-01

    A national sample of 2,048 workers was asked to rate the impact of their job on their physical and mental health. Ordered logistic regression analyses based on social ecology theory showed that the workers' responses were significantly correlated with objective and subjective features of their jobs, in addition to personality characteristics. Workers who had higher levels of perceived constraints and neuroticism, worked nights or overtime, or reported serious ongoing stress at work or higher job pressure reported more negative effects. Respondents who had a higher level of extraversion, were self-employed, or worked part time or reported greater decision latitude or use of skills on the job reported more positive effects. These findings suggest that malleable features of the work environment are associated with perceived effects of work on health, even after controlling for personality traits and other sources of reporting bias.

  6. Salud Para Su Corazon (health for your heart) community health worker model: community and clinical approaches for addressing cardiovascular disease risk reduction in Hispanics/Latinos.

    PubMed

    Balcazar, H; Alvarado, M; Ortiz, G

    2011-01-01

    This article describes 6 Salud Para Su Corazon (SPSC) family of programs that have addressed cardiovascular disease risk reduction in Hispanic communities facilitated by community health workers (CHWs) or Promotores de Salud (PS). A synopsis of the programs illustrates the designs and methodological approaches that combine community-based participatory research for 2 types of settings: community and clinical. Examples are provided as to how CHWs can serve as agents of change in these settings. A description is presented of a sustainability framework for the SPSC family of programs. Finally, implications are summarized for utilizing the SPSC CHW/PS model to inform ambulatory care management and policy.

  7. Perceptions of the hospital ethical environment among hospital social workers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Greg L

    2015-01-01

    Hospital social workers are in a unique context of practice, and one where the ethical environment has a profound influence on the ethical behavior. This study determined the ratings of ethical environment by hospital social workers in large nationwide sample. Correlates suggest by and compared to studies of ethical environment with nurses are explored. Positive ratings of the ethical environment are primarily associated with job satisfaction, as well as working in a centralized social work department and for a non-profit hospital. Religiosity and MSW education were not predictive. Implications and suggestions for managing the hospital ethical environment are provided.

  8. Social Workers' Stigmatic Perceptions of Individuals with Disabilities: A Focus on Three Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Shirli; Araten-Bergman, Tal

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: People with disabilities often identify professionals' stigmatic views as significant barriers to accessing mainstream services. This study aimed to examine differences in stigmatic attitudes held by social workers toward individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID), mental illness (MI), or dual diagnosis (DD) of ID and MI.…

  9. Mothers' Perceptions of Social Work Helpgiving Practices: Implications for the Role of the School Social Worker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Kristina S.

    2012-01-01

    The Individual with Disabilities Act has strengthened the role of parents in their children's special education. School social workers are one of the educational professionals in attendance at IEP staffings, yet their role definition continues to be poorly articulated. This qualitative study investigated school social work helpgiving practices…

  10. Healthcare workers' perceptions of mandatory vaccination: results of an anonymous survey in a German University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Wicker, Sabine; Marckmann, Georg; Poland, Gregory A; Rabenau, Holger F

    2010-10-01

    Despite decades of effort to encourage healthcare workers (HCWs) to be immunized, vaccination rates remain insufficient. Among German HCWs, 831 (68.4%) of 1,215 respondents supported mandatory vaccinations for HCWs in general. However, acceptance of mandatory vaccination varied significantly between physicians and nurses and also depended on the targeted disease.

  11. Mothers' Perceptions of Social Work Helpgiving Practices: Implications for the Role of the School Social Worker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Kristina S.

    2012-01-01

    The Individual with Disabilities Act has strengthened the role of parents in their children's special education. School social workers are one of the educational professionals in attendance at IEP staffings, yet their role definition continues to be poorly articulated. This qualitative study investigated school social work helpgiving practices…

  12. Evaluating auditory perception and communication demands required to carry out work tasks and complimentary hearing resources and skills for older workers with hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Jennings, M B; Shaw, L; Hodgins, H; Kuchar, D A; Bataghva, L Poost-Foroosh

    2010-01-01

    For older workers with acquired hearing loss, this loss as well as the changing nature of work and the workforce, may lead to difficulties and disadvantages in obtaining and maintaining employment. Currently there are very few instruments that can assist workplaces, employers and workers to prepare for older workers with hearing loss or with the evaluation of auditory perception demands of work, especially those relevant to communication, and safety sensitive workplaces that require high levels of communication. This paper introduces key theoretical considerations that informed the development of a new framework, The Audiologic Ergonomic (AE) Framework to guide audiologists, work rehabilitation professionals and workers in developing tools to support the identification and evaluation of auditory perception demands in the workplace, the challenges to communication and the subsequent productivity and safety in the performance of work duties by older workers with hearing loss. The theoretical concepts underpinning this framework are discussed along with next steps in developing tools such as the Canadian Hearing Demands Tool (C-HearD Tool) in advancing approaches to evaluate auditory perception and communication demands in the workplace.

  13. Latino Immigrants’ Intentions to Seek Depression Care

    PubMed Central

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Zayas, Luis H.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the role that illness perceptions, attitudes toward depression treatments, and subjective norms played in Latino immigrants’ intentions to seek depression care. Ninety-five Latino immigrant patients were presented a vignette depicting an individual with major depression and interviewed about their intentions to seek care if confronted with a similar situation. Patients’ preferences were to rely on informal sources of care first, and then turn to formal sources to cope with depression. Findings showed Latinos immigrants’ help-seeking intentions for depression were a function of their views of depression, attitudes toward their doctors’ interpersonal skills, and social norms related to seeking professional care after controlling for demographics, health insurance status, acculturation, clinical characteristics, perceived barriers to care, and past service use. PMID:17535121

  14. Engaging Latino audiences in informal science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfield, Susan B.

    Environment for the Americas (EFTA), a non-profit organization, developed a four-year research project to establish a baseline for Latino participation and to identify practical tools that would enable educators to overcome barriers to Latino participation in informal science education (ISE). Its national scope and broad suite of governmental and non-governmental, Latino and non-Latino partners ensured that surveys and interviews conducted in Latino communities reflected the cosmopolitan nature of the factors that influence participation in ISE programs. Information about economic and education levels, country of origin, language, length of residence in the US, and perceptions of natural areas combined with existing demographic information at six study sites and one control site provided a broader understanding of Latino communities. The project team's ability to work effectively in these communities was strengthened by the involvement of native, Spanish-speaking Latino interns in the National Park Service's Park Flight Migratory Bird Program. The project also went beyond data gathering by identifying key measures to improve participation in ISE and implementing these measures at established informal science education programs, such as International Migratory Bird Day, to determine effectiveness. The goals of Engaging Latino Audiences in Informal Science Education (ISE) were to 1) identify and reduce the barriers to Latino participation in informal science education; 2) provide effective tools to assist educators in connecting Latino families with science education, and 3) broadly disseminate these tools to agencies and organizations challenged to engage this audience in informal science education (ISE). The results answer questions and provide solutions to a challenge experienced by parks, refuges, nature centers, and other informal science education sites across the US. Key findings from this research documented low participation rates in ISE by Latinos, and that

  15. Educating Latino Immigrant Students: The Phenomenon of Teaching Latino Immigrant Elementary Students in Indiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solorzano, Sara Georgina

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore one Indiana elementary teacher's perceptions of her Latino immigrant students as they become English-language proficient by providing an in-depth analysis of a 4th and 5th grade teacher at a local school. Findings are based on interviews with the focus teacher and with the personnel she works with such as…

  16. Direct care worker's perceptions of job satisfaction following implementation of work-based learning.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Cynthia; White, Diana L; Carder, Paula C

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the impact of a work-based learning program on the work lives of Direct Care Workers (DCWs) at assisted living (AL) residences. The research questions were addressed using focus group data collected as part of a larger evaluation of a work-based learning (WBL) program called Jobs to Careers. The theoretical perspective of symbolic interactionism was used to frame the qualitative data analysis. Results indicated that the WBL program impacted DCWs' job satisfaction through the program curriculum and design and through three primary categories: relational aspects of work, worker identity, and finding time. This article presents a conceptual model for understanding how these categories are interrelated and the implications for WBL programs. Job satisfaction is an important topic that has been linked to quality of care and reduced turnover in long-term care settings.

  17. A Qualitative Inquiry of Latino Immigrants' Work Experiences in the Midwest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Lisa Y.; Mendoza, Monique M.; Ojeda, Lizette; He, Yuhong; Meza, Rocio Rosales; Medina, Veronica; Ladehoff, Julie Wagner; Jordan, Shiloh

    2011-01-01

    Latino immigrants are the largest source of immigrant workers in the United States. In this study, 11 first-generation Latino immigrants (8 men, 3 women) living in the Midwest were interviewed about their work experiences. Interview data were analyzed using consensual qualitative research methods (Hill, Thompson, & Williams, 1997). Five…

  18. Increasing Melanoma Screening among Hispanic/Latino Americans: A Community-Based Educational Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Grace Y.; Brown, Gina; Gibson, Desmond

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma incidence is increasing among Hispanics/Latinos in California. This community-based project reached out to a rural Hispanic/Latino community in North San Diego County to provide melanoma prevention and screening education. At a local community health fair, bilingual volunteer lay health workers led 10- to 15-minute-long information…

  19. Increasing Melanoma Screening among Hispanic/Latino Americans: A Community-Based Educational Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Grace Y.; Brown, Gina; Gibson, Desmond

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma incidence is increasing among Hispanics/Latinos in California. This community-based project reached out to a rural Hispanic/Latino community in North San Diego County to provide melanoma prevention and screening education. At a local community health fair, bilingual volunteer lay health workers led 10- to 15-minute-long information…

  20. A Qualitative Inquiry of Latino Immigrants' Work Experiences in the Midwest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Lisa Y.; Mendoza, Monique M.; Ojeda, Lizette; He, Yuhong; Meza, Rocio Rosales; Medina, Veronica; Ladehoff, Julie Wagner; Jordan, Shiloh

    2011-01-01

    Latino immigrants are the largest source of immigrant workers in the United States. In this study, 11 first-generation Latino immigrants (8 men, 3 women) living in the Midwest were interviewed about their work experiences. Interview data were analyzed using consensual qualitative research methods (Hill, Thompson, & Williams, 1997). Five…

  1. Occupational Injuries on Thoroughbred Horse Farms: A Description of Latino and Non-Latino Workers’ Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Swanberg, Jennifer E.; Clouser, Jessica M.; Westneat, Susan C.; Marsh, Mary W.; Reed, Deborah B.

    2013-01-01

    Animal production is a dangerous industry and increasingly reliant on a Latino workforce. Within animal production, little is known about the risks or the occupational hazards of working on farms involved in various aspects of thoroughbred horse breeding. Extant research suggests that horse workers are at risk of musculoskeletal and respiratory symptoms, kicks, and other injuries. However, limited known research has examined the experiences of the industry’s workers, including immigrant workers, despite their prominence and increased vulnerability. Using data collected from thoroughbred farm representatives via a phone-administered survey, a 2-hour face-to-face semi-structured interview, and farm injury logs, this article identifies and describes types of injuries experienced by workers (N = 284) and their surrounding circumstances. Results indicate that general injuries and musculoskeletal strains, sprains, and tears account for a majority of injuries among workers on thoroughbred farms. Upper limbs and extremities are most frequently injured, while direct contact with the horse accounted for over half of all injuries. No differences in the diagnoses or distribution of injury were found by ethnicity; however, Latinos were more often struck by or trampled by a horse while non-Latinos were more often injured by an insect or plant. Implications and opportunities for future research are discussed. PMID:24351785

  2. Perceptions of Value: A Study of Worker Characteristics and Performance Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Corey M.

    2013-01-01

    This study addressed the need of human performance technology (HPT) practitioners to make the most cost-effective performance intervention decisions, introducing a new instrument, the Intervention Value Survey, as a possible tool to provide a clearer profile of an audience's perceptions of what provides them value. Using a mixed methods…

  3. Future Law Enforcement Officers and Social Workers: Perceptions of Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMullan, Elizabeth C.; Carlan, Philip E.; Nored, Lisa S.

    2010-01-01

    This study compares perceptions of domestic violence for college students planning to work in law enforcement with students aspiring to careers in social work and non-law-enforcement criminal justice (N = 491). The study involves students attending four public universities across one Southern state who completed a survey (spring of 2006) measuring…

  4. Future Law Enforcement Officers and Social Workers: Perceptions of Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMullan, Elizabeth C.; Carlan, Philip E.; Nored, Lisa S.

    2010-01-01

    This study compares perceptions of domestic violence for college students planning to work in law enforcement with students aspiring to careers in social work and non-law-enforcement criminal justice (N = 491). The study involves students attending four public universities across one Southern state who completed a survey (spring of 2006) measuring…

  5. Workplace and HIV-related sexual behaviours and perceptions among female migrant workers.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Li, X; Stanton, B; Fang, X; Lin, D; Mao, R; Liu, H; Chen, X; Severson, R

    2005-10-01

    Data from 1,543 female migrants working in eight occupational clusters in Beijing and Nanjing, China were analysed to examine the association of workplace with HIV-related behaviours and perceptions. For sexually experienced women (n = 666, 43.2%), those working in entertainment establishments or personal service (e.g., nightclubs, dancing halls, barbershops, beauty salons, massage parlours, etc.) engaged in risky sexual practices twice as frequently as those working in non-entertainment establishments (e.g. restaurants, stalls, domestic service, factories, etc.). About 10% of women in the entertainment establishments reported having sold sex, 30% having multiple sexual partners and 40% having sex with men with multiple sexual partners. The rate of consistent condom use was less than 15%. They also tended to have a higher level of perceptions of both peer risk involvement and positive expectancy of risk behaviours, and lower perceptions of severity of STDs and HIV. For women who were not sexually experienced, those working in 'stalls' or 'domestic service' tended to perceive higher peer risk involvement, less severity of HIV infection, and less effectiveness of protective behaviour. The occupational pattern of sexual risk behaviours and perceptions observed in the current study indicates employment conditions are associated with HIV risk. Intervention strategies should be tailored to address occupational-related factors.

  6. Workplace and HIV-related sexual behaviours and perceptions among female migrant workers

    PubMed Central

    YANG, H.; LI, X.; STANTON, B.; FANG, X.; LIN, D.; MAO, R.; LIU, H.; CHEN, X.; SEVERSON, R.

    2007-01-01

    Data from 1,543 female migrants working in eight occupational clusters in Beijing and Nanjing, China were analysed to examine the association of workplace with HIV-related behaviours and perceptions. For sexually experienced women (n = 666, 43.2%), those working in entertainment establishments or personal service (e.g., nightclubs, dancing halls, barbershops, beauty salons, massage parlours, etc.) engaged in risky sexual practices twice as frequently as those working in non-entertainment establishments (e.g. restaurants, stalls, domestic service, factories, etc.). About 10% of women in the entertainment establishments reported having sold sex, 30% having multiple sexual partners and 40% having sex with men with multiple sexual partners. The rate of consistent condom use was less than 15%. They also tended to have a higher level of perceptions of both peer risk involvement and positive expectancy of risk behaviours, and lower perceptions of severity of STDs and HIV. For women who were not sexually experienced, those working in ‘stalls’ or ‘domestic service’ tended to perceive higher peer risk involvement, less severity of HIV infection, and less effectiveness of protective behaviour. The occupational pattern of sexual risk behaviours and perceptions observed in the current study indicates employment conditions are associated with HIV risk. Intervention strategies should be tailored to address occupational-related factors. PMID:16120499

  7. Perceptions of team workers in youth care of what makes teamwork effective.

    PubMed

    Buljac-Samardzic, M; van Wijngaarden, J D H; van Wijk, K P; van Exel, N J A

    2011-05-01

    In youth care, little is known about what makes teamwork effective. What is known mostly reflects the view of managers in care organisations, as objective outcome measures are lacking. The objective of this article was to explore the views of youth care workers in different types of teams on the relative importance of characteristics of teamwork for its effectiveness. Q methodology was used. Fifty-one respondents rank-order 34 opinion statements regarding characteristics of teamwork. Individual Q sorts were analysed using by-person factor analysis. The resulting factors, which represented team workers' views of what is important for effective teamwork, were interpreted and described using composite rankings of the statements for each factor and corresponding team workers' explanations. We found three views of what makes teamwork effective. One view emphasised interaction between team members as most important for team effectiveness. A second view pointed to team characteristics that help sustain communication within teams as being most important. In the third view, the team characteristics that facilitate individuals to perform as a team member were put forward as most important for teamwork to be effective. In conclusion, different views exist on what makes a team effective in youth care. These views correspond with the different types of teams active in youth care as well as in other social care settings. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Violence and unsafety in a major Italian hospital: experience and perceptions of health care workers.

    PubMed

    Terzoni, S; Ferrara, P; Cornelli, R; Ricci, C; Oggioni, Chiara; Destrebecq, Anne

    2015-11-22

    Workers' experience of violence and perceived unsafety can have a profound impact on job satisfaction, job performance, and workers' decision to leave. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of physical and non-physical violence among hospital workers, explore the complaints and reactions of victims, assess the relationship between violence and psychosocial/work factors and analyze the levels of perceived unsafety. A cross-sectional study was conducted, via a structured self-administered questionnaire given to all the employees of a major hospital in Italy. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was used to assess the internal consistency of the questionnaire. A logistic regression model was used for data analysis. 903 questionnaires out of 1853 (48.7%) were correctly returned; 11.5% had experience of physical violence and 40.2% had been victims of verbal violence in the previous 12 months. The most common consequences were fear, anger, frustration, and anxiety. Verbal violence was influenced by age, role, department, night/holiday shift work and experience in the current ward. Experiences of physical violence were related to gender, role, and department; 469 responders (51.9%) reported feelings of unsafety, which were related to their professional role, department, shift work, experience of physical or psychological violence, having seen episodes of violence and having received specific training. Our findings suggest that several factors are associated with workplace violence in health care settings and some of these also influenced the levels of perceived unsafety.

  9. Perceptions, attitudes and challenges about obesity and adopting a healthy lifestyle among health workers in Pietermaritzburg, KwaZulu-Natal province

    PubMed Central

    Simfukwe, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Background The prevalence of obesity is reported to be high and increasing among health workers, in both high-income and low-income countries, which in turn is a common risk factor for all non-communicable diseases. This is alarming, as health workers not only serve the community’s health needs but should also serve as role models for a healthy lifestyle. It is therefore important that obesity among health workers is addressed and prevented. Objective The aim of the study was to explore perceptions and attitudes about obesity among health workers in three selected hospitals in Pietermaritzburg, and to identify the barriers to adopting a healthy lifestyle. Methods An explorative and descriptive qualitative study design was used, utilising in-depth interviews for data collection. A total of 18 health workers from the three selected hospitals in the metropolitan were individually interviewed. Thematic analysis was done, using a priori themes that were derived from the Health Belief Model. Results All health workers were aware of the negative consequences of being overweight or obese. However, only a few of the participants chose to adopt a healthy lifestyle. Barriers to adopting a healthy lifestyle included institutional as well as attitudinal factors. Conclusion Public healthcare facilities need to invest in their work force by giving health workers access to physical exercise facilities and affordable healthy food within the hospital. Health organisations should introduce health behaviour change programmes to combat negative established cultural norms among health staff. PMID:28697616

  10. Hospital workers' perceptions of waste: a qualitative study involving photo-elicitation

    PubMed Central

    Goff, Sarah L.; Kleppel, Reva; Lindenauer, Peter K.; Rothberg, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To elicit sources of waste as viewed by hospital workers Design Qualitative study using photo-elicitation, an ethnographic technique for prompting in-depth discussion Setting U.S. academic tertiary care hospital Participants Physicians, nurses, pharmacists, administrative support personnel, administrators and respiratory therapists Methods A purposive sample of personnel at an academic tertiary care hospital was invited to take up to 10 photos of waste. Participants discussed their selections using photos as prompts during in-depth interviews. Transcripts were analyzed in an iterative process using grounded theory; open and axial coding was performed, followed by selective and thematic coding to develop major themes and sub-themes. Results Twenty-one participants (9 women, average number of years in field=19.3) took 159 photos. Major themes included types of waste and recommendations to reduce waste. Types of waste comprised four major categories: Time, Materials, Energy and Talent. Participants emphasized time wastage (50% of photos) over other types of waste such as excess utilization (2.5%). Energy and Talent were novel categories of waste. Recommendations to reduce waste included interventions at the micro-level (e.g. individual/ward), meso-level (e.g. institution) and macro-level (e.g., payor/public policy). Conclusions The waste hospital workers identified differed from previously described waste both in the types of waste described and the emphasis placed on wasted time. The findings of this study represent a possible need for education of hospital workers about known types of waste, an opportunity to assess the impact of novel types of waste described and an opportunity to intervene to reduce the waste identified. PMID:23748192

  11. Hospital workers' perceptions of waste: a qualitative study involving photo-elicitation.

    PubMed

    Goff, Sarah L; Kleppel, Reva; Lindenauer, Peter K; Rothberg, Michael B

    2013-10-01

    To elicit sources of waste as viewed by hospital workers. Qualitative study using photo-elicitation, an ethnographic technique for prompting in-depth discussion. U.S. academic tertiary care hospital. Physicians, nurses, pharmacists, administrative support personnel, administrators and respiratory therapists. A purposive sample of personnel at an academic tertiary care hospital was invited to take up to 10 photos of waste. Participants discussed their selections using photos as prompts during in-depth interviews. Transcripts were analysed in an iterative process using grounded theory; open and axial coding was performed, followed by selective and thematic coding to develop major themes and subthemes. Twenty-one participants (nine women, average number of years in field=19.3) took 159 photos. Major themes included types of waste and recommendations to reduce waste. Types of waste comprised four major categories: Time, Materials, Energy and Talent. Participants emphasised time wastage (50% of photos) over other types of waste such as excess utilisation (2.5%). Energy and Talent were novel categories of waste. Recommendations to reduce waste included interventions at the micro-level (eg, individual/ward), meso-level (eg, institution) and macro-level (eg, payor/public policy). The waste hospital workers identified differed from previously described waste both in the types of waste described and the emphasis placed on wasted time. The findings of this study represent a possible need for education of hospital workers about known types of waste, an opportunity to assess the impact of novel types of waste described and an opportunity to intervene to reduce the waste identified.

  12. The inverse hazard law: blood pressure, sexual harassment, racial discrimination, workplace abuse and occupational exposures in US low-income black, white and Latino workers.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Nancy; Chen, Jarvis T; Waterman, Pamela D; Hartman, Cathy; Stoddard, Anne M; Quinn, Margaret M; Sorensen, Glorian; Barbeau, Elizabeth M

    2008-12-01

    Research on societal determinants of health suggests the existence of an "inverse hazard law," which we define as: "The accumulation of health hazards tends to vary inversely with the power and resources of the populations affected." Yet, little empirical research has systematically investigated this topic, including in relation to workplace exposures. We accordingly designed the United for Health study (Greater Boston Area, Massachusetts, 2003-2004) to investigate the joint distribution and health implications of workplace occupational hazards (dust, fumes, chemical, noise, ergonomic strain) and social hazards (racial discrimination, sexual harassment, workplace abuse). Focusing on blood pressure as our health outcome, we found that among the 1202 low-income multi-racial/ethnic working class participants in our cohort - of whom 40% lived below the US poverty line - 79% reported exposure to at least one social hazard and 82% to at least one high-exposure occupational hazard. Only sexual harassment, the least common social hazard, was associated with elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP) among the women workers. By contrast, no statistically significant associations were detectable between the other additional highly prevalent social and occupational hazards and SBP; we did, however, find suggestive evidence of an association between SBP and response to unfair treatment, implying that in a context of high exposure, differential susceptibility to the exposure matters. These results interestingly contrast to our prior findings for this same cohort, in which we found associations between self-reported experiences of racial discrimination and two other health outcomes: psychological distress and cigarette smoking. Likely explanations for these contrasting findings include: (a) the differential etiologic periods and pathways involving somatic health, mental health, and health behaviors, and (b) the high prevalence of adverse exposures, limiting the ability to detect

  13. Changes over a workshift in aesthesiometric and vibrotactile perception thresholds of workers exposed to intermittent hand transmitted vibration from impact wrenches.

    PubMed Central

    Bovenzi, M; Apostoli, P; Alessandro, G; Vanoni, O

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the changes over a workshift in fingertip tactile perception thresholds in users of impact wrenches exposed to intermittent hand transmitted vibration. A further aim was to assess the relation between acute changes in tactile sensation, sensorineural disorders, and vibration dose. METHODS: The study populations consisted of 30 workers exposed to vibration (16 men and 14 women) and 25 control manual workers (10 men and 15 women). Sensorineural disorders in the fingers and hands were graded according to the staging system of the Stockholm workshop scale. Tactile function was tested by measuring aesthesiometric thresholds (two point discrimination and depth sense perception) and vibrotactile perception thresholds at 16, 31.5, and 125 Hz before and after a workshift. Temporary threshold shift was then calculated as the difference between threshold measures before and after the shift. The measurement and assessment of exposure to vibration were made according to the international standard ISO 5349. The vibration dose accumulated over a workshift (m2s-4h) was estimated for each user of impact wrenches. Daily exposure to vibration was also expressed in terms of eight hour energy equivalent frequency weighted acceleration ((ahw)eq(8) in ms-2 rms). RESULTS: After adjustment for age and alcohol consumption, vibrotactile perception thresholds before exposure were greater in the workers exposed to vibration than in the controls. No differences in aesthesiometric thresholds before the shift were found between the study groups. Sensorineural disorders were mild in the workers exposed to vibration and minor neurological abnormalities were detected at the physical examination. Owing to the intermittent use of impact wrenches, the estimated mean (ahw)eq(8) for the subjects exposed to vibration was low (1.3 ms-2 rms). A significant temporary threshold shift in vibration perception at all test frequencies was found in the workers exposed to vibration but

  14. Computer-telephone interactive tasks: predictors of musculoskeletal disorders according to work analysis and workers' perception.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Mario; Saldiva, Paulo H N

    2002-03-01

    Sixty-two workers engaged in computer-telephone interactive tasks in an active telemarketing center and a telephone call center of an international bank subsidiary in São Paulo. Brazil, were assessed by means of a work analysis and a self-administered questionnaire aiming to determine the statistical relationship of ergonomic, organizational and psychosocial characteristics of their jobs with the report of symptoms in neck-shoulder and hand-wrist for more than 7 consecutive days and any time away from work during the current job due to musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). According to chi-square univariate tests and multiple logistic regression models, active telemarketing operations, duration in the job and the low level of satisfaction with the physical arrangement of the workstation emerged as the factors most related to neck-shoulder and hand-wrist MSD and MSD-induced time away from work. This study emphasizes the role of psychosocial factors and duration in the job in MSD occurrence and induced absenteeism among workers engaged in computer-telephone interactive tasks.

  15. Latino College Completion: Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  16. Latino College Completion: Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  17. Latino College Completion: Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  18. Latino College Completion: Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  19. Latino College Completion: Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  20. Latino College Completion: Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  1. Latino College Completion: Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  2. Latino College Completion: Vermont

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  3. Latino College Completion: Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  4. Latino College Completion: Alaska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  5. Latino College Completion: Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  6. Latino College Completion: Wisconsin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  7. Latino College Completion: Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  8. Latino College Completion: Delaware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  9. Latino College Completion: Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  10. Latino College Completion: Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  11. Latino College Completion: California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  12. Latino College Completion: Arkansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  13. Latino College Completion: Connecticut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  14. Latino College Completion: Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  15. Latino College Completion: Nebraska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  16. Latino College Completion: Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  17. Latino College Completion: Indiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  18. Latino College Completion: Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  19. Latino College Completion: Wyoming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  20. Latino College Completion: Washington

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  1. Latino College Completion: Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  2. Latino College Completion: Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  3. Latino College Completion: Kentucky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  4. Latino College Completion: Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  5. Fair Housing and Latinos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cubillos, Herminia L.

    Latinos need the protection of the proposed Fair Housing Amendments of 1987 and the active support of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to overcome housing discrimination. Latinos are both disproportionately poor and inadequately housed, but low income alone cannot fully explain the poor housing conditions under which many…

  6. Latino College Completion: Maine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  7. Latino College Completion: Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  8. Latino College Completion: Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  9. Latinos: Remaking America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suarez-Orozco, Marcelo M., Ed.; Paez, Mariela M., Ed.

    This book brings together leading scholars in the study of the Latino population in the United States. The papers include: "Introduction: The Research Agenda" (Marcelo M. Suarez-Orozco and Mariela M. Paez); (1) "`Y tu que?' (Y2K): Latino History in the New Millennium" (George J. Sanchez); (2) "Islands and Enclaves:…

  10. Latino College Completion: Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  11. Latino College Completion: Iowa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  12. Latino College Completion: Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  13. Latinos and Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz-Franco, Luis

    An historical perspective reveals that sophisticated mathematical activity has been going on in the Latino culture for thousands of years. This paper provides a general definition of the area of mathematics education that deals with issues of culture and mathematics (ethnomathematics) and defines what is meant by the term Latino in this essay.…

  14. The Latino Vote

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davila, Arlene M.

    2008-01-01

    Latinos are the largest ethnic minority group in the United States; they are taking resources and jobs from Americans; they are "browning" their racial makeup--among other scenarios of doom that have accompanied the immigration debate. But with the 2008 presidential campaign season, Latinos have suddenly become the belles of the ball.…

  15. Latinos: Remaking America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suarez-Orozco, Marcelo M., Ed.; Paez, Mariela M., Ed.

    This book brings together leading scholars in the study of the Latino population in the United States. The papers include: "Introduction: The Research Agenda" (Marcelo M. Suarez-Orozco and Mariela M. Paez); (1) "`Y tu que?' (Y2K): Latino History in the New Millennium" (George J. Sanchez); (2) "Islands and Enclaves:…

  16. Latino College Completion: Mississippi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  17. Latino College Completion: Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  18. Latino College Completion: Montana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  19. Latino College Completion: Nevada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  20. Web-Based Training for Primary Healthcare Workers in Rural China: A Qualitative Exploration of Stakeholders’ Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhixia; Zhan, Xingxin; Li, Yingxue; Hu, Rong; Yan, Weirong

    2015-01-01

    Background Equitable access to basic public health services is a priority in China. However, primary healthcare workers’ competence to deliver public health services is relatively poor because they lack professional training. Since the availability of web-based training has increased in China, the current study explored stakeholders’ perceptions of a web-based training program on basic public health services to understand their thoughts, experiences, and attitudes about it. Methods Six focus group discussions with primary healthcare workers and three with directors of township hospitals, county-level Health Bureaus, and county-level Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were conducted in Yichang City during 2013. Semi-structured topic guides were used to facilitate qualitative data collection. Audio recordings of the sessions were transcribed verbatim and theme analysis was performed. Results Most of the study’s participants, especially the village doctors, had insufficient knowledge of basic public health services. The existing training program for primary healthcare workers consisted of ineffective traditional face-to-face sessions and often posed accessibility problems for the trainees. Most of the study’s participants had a positive attitude about web-based learning and expressed a strong desire to receive this novel training approach because of its flexibility and convenience. The perceived barriers to utilizing the web-based training method included poor computer literacy, lack of personal interaction, inadequate infrastructure, and lack of time and motivation. The facilitators of this approach included the training content applicability, the user-friendly and interactive learning format, and policy support. Conclusions Web-based training on basic public health services is a promising option in rural China. The findings of the study will contribute knowledge to implementation of web-based training in similar settings. PMID:25961727

  1. [Health care workers' perception of the Internet and mobile technologies in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, José Ignacio; Camacho, Juan Camilo; Argüello, Arturo; Cendales, Juan Gabriel; Fajardo, Roosevelt

    2009-04-01

    In July 2007 in Medellín, Colombia, 1,200 health care professionals were asked to complete a questionnaire: of the 493 who participated, the mean age was 31.2 years; 58.8% were physicians; and 97.6% had Internet access, 60.5% on a daily basis and 27.7%, weekly. The preferred place to access the Internet was from home (58%) or from the work place (12.5%); 98% reported having a cell phone, and of those, 80% were interested in using health education tools via cell phone. These are the first data published regarding Internet and cellular phone penetration among health care workers in Colombia. Acceptance of the Internet and mobile systems as health information tools is gaining, and as such, creating a new opportunity for training and harnessing of these new technologies.

  2. Managers' perceptions of the value and impact of HAZWOPER worker health and safety training.

    PubMed

    Riley, Kevin; Slatin, Craig; Rice, Carol; Rosen, Mitchel; Weidner, B Louise; Fleishman, Jane; Alerding, Linda; Delp, Linda

    2015-07-01

    Worker training is a core component of the OSHA Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) standard, but few studies have considered what motivates managers to provide HAZWOPER training to employees or what they value in that training. In 2012, four university-based programs conducted an exploratory survey of managers who sent employees to HAZWOPER courses. Results from 109 respondents were analyzed. Forty-two percent of respondents cited regulations as the most important reason to provide HAZWOPER training; many indicated they would provide less training if there were no standard in place. Three-quarters (74%) reported training had improved workplace conditions. Fewer than half said they were likely to involve trained employees in aspects of the organization's H&S program. Compliance with regulatory requirements is an important factor shaping managers' training delivery decisions. Managers recognize positive impacts of training. These impacts could be enhanced by further leveraging employee H&S knowledge and skills. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Stacked stigma: oncology social workers' perceptions of the lung cancer experience.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Annemarie; Gilbert, Dorie; Jones, Barbara; Aldredge, Patti

    2010-01-01

    This study explores stigma in the lung cancer experience by interviewing 18 oncology social workers employed at cancer centers across the United States who provide care to people diagnosed with lung cancer and their family members. A content analysis of the interviews suggests stacked stigma exists with respect to cigarette smoking. Poor prognosis and disparity in advocacy efforts emerged as stigmatizing events that are linked with smoking stigma, particularly in the arenas of support groups, patient-matching programs, availability of resources, and the lung cancer population itself. Emotional phenomenon resulting from this stigma experience may increase the illness burden for people with lung cancer and explain the variance in distress levels among people with different cancer diagnoses.

  4. Perceived Opportunity, Ethnic Identity, and Achievement Motivation among Latinos at a Selective Public University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivas-Drake, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Using in-depth interview data, this study explored perceptions of opportunity, ethnic identity beliefs, and motivation orientations among Latino students at a selective university. One profile is characterized by individualistic achievement motivations, feelings of exemption from social barriers, and a sense of alienation from other Latinos.…

  5. Finding a Civic Voice: Latino Immigrant Youths' Experiences in High School Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Rebecca; Obenchain, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Socialization into the dominant civic and political discourse lies at the heart of social studies. As they become proficient in the discourse of home and school, Latino immigrant youth demonstrate the potential to uniquely benefit from this socialization. This qualitative study explores ten Latino immigrant young adults' perceptions of how their…

  6. Factors Affecting the Job Satisfaction of Latino/a Immigrants in the Midwest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdivia, Corinne; Flores, Lisa Y.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the job satisfaction of 253 Latino/a newcomers in three rural communities in the Midwest. Specifically, the authors explored the effects of ethnic identity, Anglo acculturation, Latino/a acculturation, perceptions of the community (social relations, discrimination/racism, and language pressures), job tenure, work hours, and…

  7. Finding a Civic Voice: Latino Immigrant Youths' Experiences in High School Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Rebecca; Obenchain, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Socialization into the dominant civic and political discourse lies at the heart of social studies. As they become proficient in the discourse of home and school, Latino immigrant youth demonstrate the potential to uniquely benefit from this socialization. This qualitative study explores ten Latino immigrant young adults' perceptions of how their…

  8. "We Want to Learn": Middle School Latino/a Students Discuss Social Studies Curriculum and Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busey, Christopher L.; Russell, William B., III

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the perceptions that Latino students have of middle school social studies. Twelve Latino/a middle school students provided written narratives recounting their experiences in social studies and participated in two semi-structured phenomenological interviews. Findings indicate that social studies teachers rely heavily…

  9. Factors Affecting the Job Satisfaction of Latino/a Immigrants in the Midwest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdivia, Corinne; Flores, Lisa Y.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the job satisfaction of 253 Latino/a newcomers in three rural communities in the Midwest. Specifically, the authors explored the effects of ethnic identity, Anglo acculturation, Latino/a acculturation, perceptions of the community (social relations, discrimination/racism, and language pressures), job tenure, work hours, and…

  10. Perceived Opportunity, Ethnic Identity, and Achievement Motivation among Latinos at a Selective Public University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivas-Drake, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Using in-depth interview data, this study explored perceptions of opportunity, ethnic identity beliefs, and motivation orientations among Latino students at a selective university. One profile is characterized by individualistic achievement motivations, feelings of exemption from social barriers, and a sense of alienation from other Latinos.…

  11. [Perception of knowledge in palliative care housing for the elderly workers in a basic health zone].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Holgado, J; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, J; Torijano-Casalengua, M L

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the level of knowledge in palliative care that health and non health housing for the elderly workers refer, to study the differences between professional categories and to detect their interest in receiving palliative care training. Cross-sectional study conducted among physicians, nurses, physiotherapists, nursing assistant and occupational therapists applying a questionnaire assisting terminal patients with 22 items grouped into four sections: generalities palliative care, physical care, psycho-emotional and spiritual. Each question is answered using a four point scale in much-regulate-little-nothing. 86.8% of respondents know quite what they mean or regular palliative care. 3.8% consider themselves sufficiently trained in palliative care. We found significant differences in non-pharmacological management of dyspnea and insomnia where concerns have less knowledge worker. Medicine and nursing reported having more knowledge in the recognition of a tumor ulcer. There is a very high interest in receiving palliative care training and these are considered very useful. Required impact on the acquisition of knowledge in the medical staff not optional as to non-pharmacological management of major symptoms It also emphasizes the need to approach not to question the patient's pain by physicians. The test to detect cognitive impairment are not well known for nursing assistants. The spiritual realm is the acceptable level of knowledge on the part of all professional categories surveyed. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of community health worker-led diabetes medication decision-making support for low-income Latino and African American adults with diabetes using e-Health tools versus print materials: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Heisler, Michele; Choi, Hwajung; Palmisano, Gloria; Mase, Rebecca; Richardson, Caroline; Fagerlin, Angela; Montori, Victor M.; Spencer, Michael; An, Laurence C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care centers serving low-income communities have scarce resources to support medication decision-making among patients with poorly controlled diabetes. Objective We compared outcomes between community health worker (CHW) use of a tailored, interactive web-based tablet-delivered tool (iDecide) versus use of print educational materials. Design A randomized two-arm trial from 2011-2013. Trial Registration NCT01427660. Setting Community health center in Detroit serving a Latino and African American low-income population. Participants 188 adults with a hemoglobinA1c >7.5% (55%) or who reported questions, concerns, or difficulty taking diabetes medications Primary Funding Sources Agency for Health Care Quality and Research (1R18HS019256-01) and P30DK092926 (MCDTR) Measurements Primary outcomes were changes in knowledge about anti-hyperglycemic medications, patient-reported medication decisional conflict, and satisfaction with anti-hyperglycemic medication information. We also examined changes in diabetes distress, self-efficacy, medication adherence, and A1c. Intervention Participants were randomized to receive a 1-2 hour session with a CHW using either iDecide or printed educational materials and two follow-up calls. Results 94% of participants completed three-month follow-up. Both groups improved across most measures. iDecide participants reported greater improvements in satisfaction with medication information (helpfulness, p=.007; clarity, p=.03) and in diabetes distress compared to the print materials group (p<0.001). There were no differences between groups in other outcomes. Limitations The study was conducted at one health center over a short period, and the CHWs were experienced in behavioral counseling, thus possibly mitigating the need for additional support tools. Conclusions Most outcomes were similarly improved among participants receiving both types of diabetes medication decision-making support. Longer-term evaluations are necessary to

  13. "Sometimes they used to whisper in our ears": health care workers' perceptions of the effects of abortion legalization in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Puri, Mahesh; Lamichhane, Prabhat; Harken, Tabetha; Blum, Maya; Harper, Cynthia C; Darney, Philip D; Henderson, Jillian T

    2012-04-20

    Unsafe abortion has been a significant cause of maternal morbidity and mortality in Nepal. Since legalization in 2002, more than 1,200 providers have been trained and 487 sites have been certified for the provision of safe abortion services. Little is known about health care workers' views on abortion legalization, such as their perceptions of women seeking abortion and the implications of legalization for abortion-related health care. To complement a quantitative study of the health effects of abortion legalization in Nepal, we conducted 35 in-depth interviews with physicians, nurses, counsellors and hospital administrators involved in abortion care and post-abortion complication treatment services at four major government hospitals. Thematic analysis techniques were used to analyze the data. Overall, participants had positive views of abortion legalization - many believed the severity of abortion complications had declined, contributing to lower maternal mortality and morbidity in the country. A number of participants indicated that the proportion of women obtaining abortion services from approved health facilities was increasing; however, others noted an increase in the number of women using unregulated medicines for abortion, contributing to rising complications. Some providers held negative judgments about abortion patients, including their reasons for abortion. Unmarried women were subject to especially strong negative perceptions. A few of the health workers felt that the law change was encouraging unmarried sexual activity and carelessness around pregnancy prevention and abortion, and that repeat abortion was becoming a problem. Many providers believed that although patients were less fearful than before legalization, they remained hesitant to disclose a history of induced abortion for fear of judgment or mistreatment. Providers were generally positive about the implications of abortion legalization for the country and for women. A focus on family planning

  14. Risk perception of sexually transmitted infections and HIV in Nigerian commercial sex workers in Barcelona: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Coma Auli, Núria; Mejía-Lancheros, Cília; Berenguera, Anna; Pujol-Ribera, Enriqueta

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to determine in detail the risk perception of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV, and the contextual circumstances, in Nigerian commercial sex workers (CSWs) in Barcelona. Design A qualitative study with a phenomenological approach. Setting Raval area in Barcelona. Participants 8 CSWs working in Barcelona. Methods A phenomenological study was carried out with Nigerian CSWs in Barcelona. Sampling was theoretical, taking into account: different age ranges; women with and without a partner; women with and without children; and women participating or not in STI/HIV-prevention workshops. Information was obtained by means of eight semistructured individual interviews. An interpretative content analysis was conducted by four analysts. Results Illegal immigrant status, educational level, financial situation and work, and cultural context had mixed effects on CSW knowledge of, exposure to, and prevention and treatment of STI and HIV. CSWs were aware of the higher risk of STI associated with their occupation. They identified condoms as the best preventive method and used them during intercourse with clients. They also implemented other preventive behaviours such as personal hygiene after intercourse. Control of sexual services provided, health education and healthcare services had a positive effect on decreasing exposure and better management of STI/HIV. Conclusions Nigerian CSWs are a vulnerable group because of their poor socioeconomic status. The perception of risk in this group and their preventive behaviours are based on personal determinants, beliefs and experiences from their home country and influences from the host country. Interventions aimed at CSWs must address knowledge gaps, risk behaviours and structural elements. PMID:26078307

  15. Perceptions of Community Health Workers (CHWs/PS) in the U.S.-Mexico border HEART CVD study.

    PubMed

    Balcazar, Hector G; Wise, Sherrie; Redelfs, Alisha; Rosenthal, E Lee; de Heer, Hendrik D; Burgos, Ximena; Duarte-Gardea, Maria

    2014-02-10

    Although prior research has shown that Community Health Workers/Promotores de Salud (CHW/PS) can facilitate access to care, little is known about how CHW/PS are perceived in their community. The current study reports the findings of a randomized telephone survey conducted in a high-risk urban community environment along the U.S.-Mexico border. In preparation for a community-based CHW/PS intervention called the HEART ecological study, the survey aimed to assess perceptions of CHW/PS, availability and utilization of community resources (recreational and nutrition related) and health behaviors and intentions. A total of 7,155 calls were placed to complete 444 surveys in three zip codes in El Paso, Texas. Results showed that participants felt that healthful community resources were available, but utilization was low and variable: 35% reported going to a park, 20% reported having taken a health class, few reported using a gym (12%), recreation center (8%), or YMCA/YWCA (0.9%). Awareness and utilization of CHW/PS services were low: 20% of respondents had heard of CHW/PS, with 8% reporting previous exposure to CHW/PS services. Upon review of a definition of CHW/PS, respondents expressed positive views of CHW/PS and their value in the healthcare system. Respondents who had previous contact with a CHW/PS reported a significantly more positive perception of the usefulness of CHW/PS (p = 0.006), were more likely to see CHW/PS as an important link between providers and patients (p = 0.008), and were more likely to ask a CHW/PS for help (p = 0.009). Participants who utilized CHW/PS services also had significantly healthier intentions to reduce fast food intake. Future research is needed to evaluate if CHW/PS can facilitate utilization of available community resources such as recreational facilities among Hispanic border residents at risk for CVD.

  16. Is There a Role for Community Health Workers in Tobacco Cessation Programs? Perceptions of Administrators and Health Care Professionals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Studies have shown that with appropriate training, Community Health Workers (CHWs) can be actively involved in health promotion and disease prevention (including tobacco cessation). This study examined the perceptions of administrators and health care professionals regarding the actual and potential role(s) of CHWs in a tobacco cessation program (TCP) within a universal health care system. Methods: This study was part of a larger exploratory, cross-sectional comprehensive assessment of the implementation of the TCP through the primary care public health system in 7 towns in the state of Paraná, Brazil. Questionnaires were administered to 84 administrators at different levels (regional, municipal, and health units) and 80 health care professionals who were directly involved in the TCP. For this study, we assessed the perceptions of administrators and health care professionals on the actual and potential role(s) of CHWs in the TCP. Results: The overall response rate was 56.2%. Although 48.4% of respondents indicated that CHWs already participated in the TCP, there was a wide range in the participants’ responses regarding their involvement (33.3% among regional administrators and 65% among health care professionals). Identification/referral of patients and promotion of the TCP in the community were the most frequent CHWs’ activities reported. Overall, respondents were very receptive about trained CHWs having multiple roles in the TCP, except for delivery of a brief intervention. Conclusion: With appropriate training, health care administrators and health care professionals are very receptive regarding the involvement of CHWs in a TCP delivered through a public health system. PMID:24420327

  17. Profiles, perceptions and motivations of Community Health Workers of NGOs in a border city of US-Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alfaro-Trujillo, Beatriz; Valles-Medina, Ana M; Vargas-Ojeda, Adriana C

    2012-06-01

    To analyze the profile, perceptions and motivations of Community Health Workers (CHWs) from non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the border city of US-Mexico and to describe the type of community interventions they perform. we surveyed 121 CHWs from 9 NGOs participating in a monthly meeting between May and July of 2009. Each participating CHW answered a structured questionnaire. Furthermore, two focus groups were held, in which 10 and 8 CHWs participated, respectively. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were carried out on the data obtained. 70% of the CHWs had 9 years or less of formal education. With respect to community work, 61% volunteered between 1 and 5 h weekly; only 40% received some form of economic support. The most commonly reported activities were distribution of informational materials (59.5%) and promotion of health fairs (52.9%). Analysis of focus group discussions lead to the development of four conceptual categories: personal development, motivation, perception of their community participation and institutional relationship, some of the testimonies are "…just because the people do not respond does not mean we give up. No, we must work, persist, promote and raise awareness of the people…", "…when they compensate us, it is not really a payment. We are there because we get results, we do it happily… It is voluntary…" CHWs are an important human resource for communities. Institutions focusing on primary care should view these community players as social capital, which could improve the effectiveness of prevention strategies and achieve greater coverage of health services.

  18. Avian Influenza Risk Perception and Preventive Behavior among Traditional Market Workers and Shoppers in Taiwan: Practical Implications for Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Der

    2011-01-01

    Background Avian influenza (AI) can be highly pathogenic and fatal. Preventive behavior such as handwashing and wearing face masks has been recommended. However, little is known about what psychosocial factors might influence people's decision to adopt such preventive behavior. This study aims to explore risk perception and other factors associated with handwashing and wearing face masks to prevent AI. Methodology/Principal Findings An interviewer-administered survey was conducted among 352 traditional market workers and shoppers in Taiwan between December 2009 and January 2010. Factors associated with the recommended AI preventive behavior (i.e., when in a traditional market, wearing a face mask and also washing hands after any contact with poultry) included: having correct knowledge about the fatality rate of AI (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 4.18), knowing of severe cases of AI (AOR = 2.13), being informed of local AI outbreaks (AOR = 2.24), living in northeastern Taiwan (AOR = 6.01), having a senior high-school education (AOR = 3.33), and having a university or higher education (AOR = 6.86). Gender interactive effect was also found among participants with a senior high-school education, with males being less likely to engage in the recommended AI preventive behavior than their female counterparts (AOR = 0.34). Conclusions/Significance Specific information concerning AI risk perception was associated with the recommended AI preventive behavior. In particular, having correct knowledge about the fatality rate of AI and being informed of severe cases and local outbreaks of AI were linked to increased AI preventive behavior. These findings underscore the importance of transparency in dealing with epidemic information. These results also have practical implications for prevention and policy-making to more effectively promote the recommended AI preventive behavior in the public. PMID:21912667

  19. Risk perception of sexually transmitted infections and HIV in Nigerian commercial sex workers in Barcelona: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Coma Auli, Núria; Mejía-Lancheros, Cília; Berenguera, Anna; Pujol-Ribera, Enriqueta

    2015-06-15

    This study aimed to determine in detail the risk perception of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV, and the contextual circumstances, in Nigerian commercial sex workers (CSWs) in Barcelona. A qualitative study with a phenomenological approach. Raval area in Barcelona. 8 CSWs working in Barcelona. A phenomenological study was carried out with Nigerian CSWs in Barcelona. Sampling was theoretical, taking into account: different age ranges; women with and without a partner; women with and without children; and women participating or not in STI/HIV-prevention workshops. Information was obtained by means of eight semistructured individual interviews. An interpretative content analysis was conducted by four analysts. Illegal immigrant status, educational level, financial situation and work, and cultural context had mixed effects on CSW knowledge of, exposure to, and prevention and treatment of STI and HIV. CSWs were aware of the higher risk of STI associated with their occupation. They identified condoms as the best preventive method and used them during intercourse with clients. They also implemented other preventive behaviours such as personal hygiene after intercourse. Control of sexual services provided, health education and healthcare services had a positive effect on decreasing exposure and better management of STI/HIV. Nigerian CSWs are a vulnerable group because of their poor socioeconomic status. The perception of risk in this group and their preventive behaviours are based on personal determinants, beliefs and experiences from their home country and influences from the host country. Interventions aimed at CSWs must address knowledge gaps, risk behaviours and structural elements. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Before and after study of bar workers' perceptions of the impact of smoke-free workplace legislation in the Republic of Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Pursell, Lisa; Allwright, Shane; O'Donovan, Diarmuid; Paul, Gillian; Kelly, Alan; Mullally, Bernie J; D'Eath, Maureen

    2007-01-01

    Background Objectives: To compare support for, and perceptions of, the impacts of smoke-free workplace legislation among bar workers in the Republic of Ireland (ROI) pre- and post-implementation, and to identify predictors of support for the legislation. Methods Setting: Public houses (pubs) in three areas of the ROI. Design: Comparisons pre- and post-implementation of smoke-free workplace legislation. Participants: From a largely non-random selection, 288 bar workers volunteered for the baseline survey; 220 were followed up one year later (76.4%). Outcome measures: Level of support for the legislation, attitude statements concerning potential impacts of the law and modelled predictors of support for the legislation. Results Pre-implementation 59.5% of participants supported the legislation, increasing to 76.8% post-implementation. Support increased among smokers by 27.3 percentage points from 39.4% to 66.7% (p < 0.001) and among non-smokers by 12.4% percentage points from 68.8% to 81.2% (p = 0.003). Pre-legislation three-quarters of participants agreed that the legislation would make bars more comfortable and was needed to protect workers' health. Post-legislation these proportions increased to over 90% (p < 0.001). However, negative perceptions also increased, particularly for perceptions that the legislation has a negative impact on business (from 50.9% to 62.7%, p = 0.008) and that fewer people would visit pubs (41.8% to 62.7%, p < 0.001). After adjusting for relevant covariates, including responses to the attitude statements, support for the ban increased two to three-fold post-implementation. Regardless of their views on the economic impact, most participants agreed, both pre- and post-implementation, that the legislation was needed to protect bar workers' health. Conclusion Smoke-free legislation had the support of three-quarters of a large sample of bar workers in the ROI. However, this group holds complex sets of both positive and negative perspectives on

  1. Healthcare workers' perceptions of the duty to work during an influenza pandemic.

    PubMed

    Damery, S; Draper, H; Wilson, S; Greenfield, S; Ives, J; Parry, J; Petts, J; Sorell, T

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) are often assumed to have a duty to work, even if faced with personal risk. This is particularly so for professionals (doctors and nurses). However, the health service also depends on non-professionals, such as porters, cooks and cleaners. The duty to work is currently under scrutiny because of the ongoing challenge of responding to pandemic influenza, where an effective response depends on most uninfected HCWs continuing to work, despite personal risk. This paper reports findings of a survey of HCWs (n = 1032) conducted across three National Health Service trusts in the West Midlands, UK, to establish whether HCWs' likelihood of working during a pandemic is associated with views about the duty to work. The sense that HCWs felt that they had a duty to work despite personal risk emerged strongly regardless of professional status. Besides a strong sense that everyone should pull together, all kinds of HCWs recognised a duty to work even in difficult circumstances, which correlated strongly with their stated likelihood of working. This suggests that HCWs' decisions about whether or not they are prepared to work during a pandemic are closely linked to their sense of duty. However, respondents' sense of the duty to work may conflict with their sense of duty to family, as well as other factors such as a perceived lack of reciprocity from their employers. Interestingly, nearly 25% of doctors did not consider that they had a duty to work where doing so would pose risks to themselves or their families.

  2. Enhancing hardiness among health-care workers: the perceptions of senior managers.

    PubMed

    Hague, Ann; Leggat, Sandra G

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to understand 'hardiness' as defined and operationalized by senior health executives, and to explore the options for increasing the hardiness of the health-care workforce. Previous research has shown that hardiness is important in the workplace as a means to reduce or avoid the negative impact of stress, which then has an association with the maintenance of individual health. Hardiness has been thought to play an important role in assisting health-care workers deal with emotional and stressful work environments. In depth interviews were conducted with senior managers in a Victorian health service to explore hardiness and determine whether the senior executives had identified hardiness as a factor related to performance, how they recognized it within their staff and how hardiness might be enhanced within the organization. The senior managers were able to identify hardy members of their staff, whom they largely described as high performers. We argue that there is opportunity to strengthen health-care organizations by identifying and supporting hardy staff members. Our findings suggest that health-care organizations can teach the concept of hardiness, select hardy employees and develop strategies to assist employees to increase their levels of hardiness in the workplace.

  3. Second-hand smoke at work: the exposure, perceptions and attitudes of bar and restaurant workers to environmental tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Jones, S; Love, C; Thomson, G; Green, R; Howden-Chapman, P

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the knowledge of, and perceptions, attitudes and exposure to second-hand smoke (SHS) of staff in the New Zealand hospitality industry. Face-to-face interviews with bar staff, waiters, and bar and eating-place managers and owners in Wellington during the 1999-2000 summer. An analysis was made of the 1999 New Zealand Electoral Roll to find the number of those most exposed to SHS. 435 interviews with full data recovery were completed at 364 locations; 59% of interviewees were exposed to SHS, including 77% of those at licensed premises. More than half of those exposed to workplace smoke reported irritation from SHS to their throat or lungs. Less than a third were aware of the risk of strokes from SHS. Three-quarters of interviewees wanted some sort of smoking restriction in bars. The majority of interviewees were at risk of premature death and disease because of exposure to workplace smoke, and had an incomplete knowledge of the dangers to which they were exposed. More than 5,000 similar workers in New Zealand appear to share this risk. This industry needs legislation to make it smoke free.

  4. Perceptions about HIV and condoms and consistent condom use among male clients of commercial sex workers in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Regan, Rotrease; Morisky, Donald E

    2013-04-01

    Because consistent condom use is an effective strategy in the prevention of sexually transmitted infections and HIV transmission, it is important to examine social cognitive influences of consistent condom use not only among female sex workers (FSWs) but also among their male clients, for whom less is known. Because little is known about how HIV knowledge and condom attitudes affect condom use among male clients of FSWs in the Philippines, the main objective was to determine what characteristics (age, education, HIV knowledge, marital status) as well as attributes taken from protection motivation theory (perceived vulnerability, perceived severity, response efficacy) are significantly associated with consistent condom use among male clients of FSWs. Logistic regression analyses showed that the odds of using condoms consistently with an FSW are 13% higher for those with more years of education (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03, 1.23), higher versus lower perception of severity of HIV/AIDS (AOR = 1.97; 95% CI = 1.04, 3.73), and had a higher score for response efficacy of condoms (AOR = 1.14; 95% CI = 1.03, 1.27). Future HIV/AIDS prevention interventions that address condom use among male clients should promote educational attainment and focus on awareness of the enduring negative health consequences of acquiring HIV/AIDS, as well as cultivate positive attitudes toward the efficacy of condom use, using creative social marketing strategies.

  5. Exploring the Role of Community Health Workers in Providing Cancer Navigation: Perceptions of African American Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Jennifer; Jones, Randy; Klimmek, Rachel; Szanton, Sarah; Krumm, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To obtain experiential data regarding African American older adult survivors’ perceptions of and recommendations on the role of community health workers (CHWs) in providing a cancer navigation intervention. Research Approach Focus groups. Setting Rural Virginia and urban Maryland. Participants 48 African American solid-tumor cancer survivors, aged 65 years or older, with Medicare insurance. Methodologic Approach Analysis was accomplished through a reflexive process of transcript review, categorization, and interpretation. Findings Themes and accompanying categories identified were uneasiness surrounding the CHW role (disconnect between identified support needs and CHW role, essential CHW characteristics, and potential application of CHWs), recommendations to adequately address cancer needs (coordinating cancer treatment and unmet needs during cancer), and the importance of individualized interventions. Participants provided specific recommendations regarding the role of the CHW and how to develop supportive interventions. Conclusions Study participants had surprisingly limited prior exposure to the CHW role. However, they stated that, in certain circumstances, CHWs could effectively assist older adult African Americans undergoing cancer diagnosis or treatment. Interpretation Study findings can be helpful to researchers and to healthcare providers engaged in assisting older African Americans during cancer diagnosis and treatment. The results lay a foundation for developing culturally appropriate interventions to assist this at-risk population. PMID:22543400

  6. "Even if you know everything you can forget": health worker perceptions of mobile phone text-messaging to improve malaria case-management in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Jones, Caroline O H; Wasunna, Beatrice; Sudoi, Raymond; Githinji, Sophie; Snow, Robert W; Zurovac, Dejan

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a qualitative study to investigate the perceptions and experiences of health workers involved in a a cluster-randomized controlled trial of a novel intervention to improve health worker malaria case-management in 107 government health facilities in Kenya. The intervention involved sending text-messages about paediatric outpatient malaria case-management accompanied by "motivating" quotes to health workers' mobile phones. Ten malaria messages were developed reflecting recommendations from the Kenyan national guidelines. Two messages were delivered per day for 5 working days and the process was repeated for 26 weeks (May to October 2009). The accompanying quotes were unique to each message. The intervention was delivered to 119 health workers and there were significant improvements in correct artemether-lumefantrine (AL) management both immediately after the intervention (November 2009) and 6 months later (May 2010). In-depth interviews with 24 health workers were undertaken to investigate the possible drivers of this change. The results suggest high acceptance of all components of the intervention, with the active delivery of information in an on the job setting, the ready availability of new and stored text messages and the perception of being kept 'up to date' as important factors influencing practice. Applying the construct of stages of change we infer that in this intervention the SMS messages were operating primarily at the action and maintenance stages of behaviour change achieving their effect by creating an enabling environment and providing a prompt to action for the implementation of case management practices that had already been accepted as the clinical norm by the health workers. Future trials testing the effectiveness of SMS reminders in creating an enabling environment for the establishment of new norms in clinical practice as well as in providing a prompt to action for the implementation of the new case

  7. Danger signs of neonatal illnesses: perceptions of caregivers and health workers in northern India.

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Shally; Verma, Tuhina; Agarwal, Monica

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess household practices that can affect neonatal health, from the perspective of caregivers and health workers; to identify signs in neonates leading either to recognition of illness or health-care seeking; and to ascertain the proportion of caregivers who recognize the individual items of the integrated management of neonatal and childhood illnesses (IMNCI) programme. METHODS: The study was carried out in a rural community in Sarojininagar Block, Uttar Pradesh, India, using qualitative and quantitative research designs. Study participants were mothers, grandmothers, grandfathers, fathers or "nannies" (other female relatives) caring for infants younger than 6 months of age and recognized health-care providers serving the area. Focus group discussions (n = 7), key informant interviews (n = 35) and structured interviews (n = 210) were conducted with these participants. FINDINGS: Many household practices were observed which could adversely affect maternal and neonatal health. Among 200 caregivers, 70.5% reported home deliveries conducted by local untrained nurses or relatives, and most mothers initiated breastfeeding only on day 3. More than half of the caregivers recognized fever, irritability, weakness, abdominal distension/vomiting, slow breathing and diarrhoea as danger signs in neonates. Seventy-nine (39.5%) of the caregivers had seen a sick neonate in the family in the past 2 years, with 30.38% in whom illness manifested as continuous crying. Health care was sought for 46 (23%) neonates. Traditional medicines were used for treatment of bulging fontanelle, chest in-drawing and rapid breathing. CONCLUSION: Because there is no universal recognition of danger signs in neonates, and potentially harmful antenatal and birthing practices are followed, there is a need to give priority to implementing IMNCI, and possible incorporation of continuous crying as an additional danger sign. PMID:17128362

  8. Future law enforcement officers and social workers: perceptions of domestic violence.

    PubMed

    McMullan, Elizabeth C; Carlan, Philip E; Nored, Lisa S

    2010-08-01

    This study compares perceptions of domestic violence for college students planning to work in law enforcement with students aspiring to careers in social work and non-law-enforcement criminal justice (N = 491). The study involves students attending four public universities across one Southern state who completed a survey (spring of 2006) measuring whether various scenarios were (1) related to domestic violence, and (2) worthy of being reported to law enforcement. Findings indicate that all student groups (law enforcement, non-law-enforcement criminal justice, and social work) tended to identify the various scenarios as domestic violence (and worthy of being reported) regardless of the person's sexual orientation, violence severity, and offender's or victim's gender. However, law enforcement students are less sensitive to domestic violence when compared with social work and non-law enforcement criminal justice students. Findings reveal that (1) graduate students, (2) female students, and (3) White students (compared with African American students in general) attending majority White universities were more likely to identify domestic violence and its worthiness of being reported.The data in this study indicate that criminal justice programs produce graduates who are reasonably sensitive toward the importance of appropriate domestic violence response but could still improve using the techniques employed within social work programs.

  9. Employer perceptions of the employability of workers in a social business.

    PubMed

    Krupa, Terry; Howell-Moneta, Angela; Lysaght, Rosemary; Kirsh, Bonnie

    2016-06-01

    This study examined employer perceptions of employability of job candidates working in a social business for people with mental illnesses. Using an analogue research design, 99 employers participated in a simulated job hiring process, rating 2 applicants on potential to do the job, fit with workplace culture and likelihood of hiring. One job applicant worked in a social business, and the second was either (a) working in a conventional business, (b) with employment lapse attributable to mental health issues, or (c) with an unexplained employment lapse. Paired samples t tests were used to compare ratings. Qualitative data were collected regarding the rationale for rankings and a content analysis was conducted. Employer rankings were significantly higher for the applicant working in a social business compared to either applicant with an employment lapse. Employers rated the candidate working in a conventional business significantly higher compared with the candidate in a social business only on ratings of likelihood to hire. Employers valued the recency of work experience in the social business, citing concerns about risks associated with employment lapses. Their comments suggested a lack of understanding of the nature of social business. Experience in a social business appears to lessen the disadvantage of unemployment in the job hiring process, but does not appear to be ranked on par with experience in the conventional workforce. The social business sector could benefit from considering ways to publically portray these work opportunities to enhance acceptance and inclusion. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. No soy welferero: undocumented Latino laborers in the crosshairs of legitimation maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Quesada, James

    2011-07-01

    California urban and agricultural centers rely heavily on Latino migrant laborers, regardless of their legal documented status. In the delivery of social services, and in the mass media, popular consciousness, and formal legal understandings and arrangements, Latino laborers are viewed as either legitimate voluntary low-wage workers or illegitimate undocumented workers not entitled to the same civil rights as US citizens. Their de facto second-class status becomes a central component of their social identity, with the structural conditions of their lives internalized, resulting in limited agency and poor social and health outcomes. The lived experience of structural vulnerability prefigures the actions and efforts of undocumented Latino contingent workers. In this article, the capacity for Latino laborers to maneuver and negotiate the travails of everyday life is explored.

  11. Cultural Considerations in Advising Latino/a Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Negroni-Rodriguez, Lirio K.; Dicks, Barbara A.; Morales, Julio

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a model for advising Latino/a students in graduate social work programs. The model is based on ecological-systemic and empowerment theory and ascribes to the social work values and cultural competence standards proposed by the National Association of Social Workers. It has been developed within an institution that has sought…

  12. Pediatrician Identification of Latino Children at Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mattox, Kimber; Donelan, Karen; Batbayar, Oyundari; Baghaee, Anita; Bethell, Christina

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Latino–white disparities in age at autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis may be modified by primary care pediatrician (PCP) practices and beliefs. The objectives of this study were to assess ASD and developmental screening practices, attitudes toward ASD identification in Latino children, and barriers to ASD identification for Latino children, in a sample of 267 California PCPs. METHODS: In mail-based PCP survey, we assessed rates of bilingual general developmental and ASD screening, perceptions of parent ASD knowledge in Latino and white families, reports of difficulty assessing for ASDs in Latino and white children, and perceptions of barriers to early ASD identification for Latinos. RESULTS: Although 81% of PCPs offered some form of developmental screening, 29% of PCPs offered Spanish ASD screening per American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines, and only 10% offered both Spanish general developmental and Spanish ASD screening per American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines. Most PCPs thought that Latino (English and Spanish primary family language) parents were less knowledgeable about ASDs than white parents. PCPs had more difficulty assessing ASD risk for Latino children with Spanish primary family language than for white children, even when the PCP conducted recommended ASD screening or had >25% Latino patients. The most frequent barrier to ASD identification in Latinos was access to developmental specialists. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple factors in the primary care setting may contribute to delayed ASD identification for Latinos. Promoting language-appropriate screening, disseminating culturally appropriate ASD materials to Latino families, improving the specialist workforce, and providing PCP support in screening and referral of Latino children may be important ways to reduce racial and ethnic differences in care. PMID:23958770

  13. Latino Voting Participation: Explaining and Differentiating Latino Voting Turnout.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arvizu, John R.; Garcia, F. Chris

    1996-01-01

    Examines low levels of Latino political participation using data from the Latino National Political Survey. Emphasizes differences among Latino subgroups (Mexican, Puerto Rican, and Cuban) when analyzing voter participation. Shows that socioeconomic factors, such as education and income, may be mitigated by life-cycle effect variables, and all are…

  14. Families and medication use and adherence among Latinos with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Mercedes; Barrio, Concepción

    2017-02-01

    Medication nonadherence among Latinos with schizophrenia represents a significant treatment obstacle. Although some studies have examined patient and family perceptions of adherence, few have examined these perceptions together. However, such knowledge can provide a deeper understanding of how family processes may contribute to or impede adherence among underserved groups such as Latinos. This study explored perceptions of medication and adherence among Latinos with schizophrenia and key family members. Purposive sampling was used to collect data from 34 participants: 14 patients with schizophrenia receiving community-based mental health services in an urban public setting and 20 key family members. Informed by grounded theory, semistructured interviews were analyzed by bilingual-bicultural team members. Salient themes emerged indicating facilitators of and obstacles to medication use. Specifically, challenges centered on medication side effects, autonomy and choice, and illness insight, whereas facilitators focused on family support and holistic views of treatment and empowerment. Because the majority of Spanish-speaking Latinos with schizophrenia live with family, it is important to examine family factors that may influence medication use. Findings suggest that patient and family perceptions of medication should be examined as part of the treatment process, particularly regarding issues of autonomy and choice.

  15. Families and medication use and adherence among Latinos with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Mercedes; Barrio, Concepción

    2017-01-01

    Background Medication nonadherence among Latinos with schizophrenia represents a significant treatment obstacle. Although some studies have examined patient and family perceptions of adherence, few have examined these perceptions together. However, such knowledge can provide a deeper understanding of how family processes may contribute to or impede adherence among underserved groups such as Latinos. Aims This study explored perceptions of medication and adherence among Latinos with schizophrenia and key family members. Method Purposive sampling was used to collect data from 34 participants: 14 patients with schizophrenia receiving community-based mental health services in an urban public setting and 20 key family members. Informed by grounded theory, semistructured interviews were analyzed by bilingual–bicultural team members. Results Salient themes emerged indicating facilitators of and obstacles to medication use. Specifically, challenges centered on medication side effects, autonomy and choice, and illness insight, whereas facilitators focused on family support and holistic views of treatment and empowerment. Conclusions Because the majority of Spanish-speaking Latinos with schizophrenia live with family, it is important to examine family factors that may influence medication use. Findings suggest that patient and family perceptions of medication should be examined as part of the treatment process, particularly regarding issues of autonomy and choice. PMID:27690706

  16. School Psychologists' Family-School Partnering Experiences with Latinos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vega, Desireé; Lasser, Jon; Fernandez, Sarah E.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to identify the beliefs, perceptions, and actions of school psychologists toward family-school partnering (FSP) with Latino families in the public school system. Existing research in this area is extremely limited; therefore, the present study has significant implications for pre- and in-service…

  17. The Voices of Latino Families Raising Children with Special Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Marie Tejero; Valle-Riestra, Diana Martinez; Arguelles, Maria Elena

    2008-01-01

    In this study we examined the perceptions of 16 Latino families regarding their views and experiences raising a child with special needs and their involvement in their child's schooling. Families talked about treating their child like a "normal child" regardless of the child's unique needs, but they also stated that their level of involvement was…

  18. School Psychologists' Family-School Partnering Experiences with Latinos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vega, Desireé; Lasser, Jon; Fernandez, Sarah E.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to identify the beliefs, perceptions, and actions of school psychologists toward family-school partnering (FSP) with Latino families in the public school system. Existing research in this area is extremely limited; therefore, the present study has significant implications for pre- and in-service…

  19. The Library in the Lives of Latino College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adkins, Denice; Hussey, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Libraries share a perception of embracing and providing for all users. However, they also share a common philosophical stance shaped by librarians' individual discursive formations and the dominant cultural hegemony that values some users over others. Latinos constitute one of the fastest-growing, nondominant populations in the United States, and…

  20. Culture, Disease, and Stress among Latino Immigrants. RIIES Special Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Lucy M.

    This study examines culture and illness among Latino immigrants living in Washington, D.C. Both newcomers and established residents with Latin American origins are included in three levels of inquiry: (1) a study of beliefs and perceptions about disease and the practices followed in the management of illness; (2) the identification of levels of…

  1. Individual employee's perceptions of " Group-level Safety Climate" (supervisor referenced) versus " Organization-level Safety Climate" (top management referenced): Associations with safety outcomes for lone workers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Lee, Jin; McFadden, Anna C; Rineer, Jennifer; Robertson, Michelle M

    2017-01-01

    Research has shown that safety climate is among the strongest predictors of safety behavior and safety outcomes in a variety of settings. Previous studies have established that safety climate is a multi-faceted construct referencing multiple levels of management within a company, most generally: the organization level (employee perceptions of top management's commitment to and prioritization of safety) and group level (employee perceptions of direct supervisor's commitment to and prioritization of safety). Yet, no research to date has examined the potential interaction between employees' organization-level safety climate (OSC) and group-level safety climate (GSC) perceptions. Furthermore, prior research has mainly focused on traditional work environments in which supervisors and workers interact in the same location throughout the day. Little research has been done to examine safety climate with regard to lone workers. The present study aims to address these gaps by examining the relationships between truck drivers' (as an example of lone workers) perceptions of OSC and GSC, both potential linear and non-linear relationships, and how these predict important safety outcomes. Participants were 8095 truck drivers from eight trucking companies in the United States with an average response rate of 44.8%. Results showed that employees' OSC and GSC perceptions are highly correlated (r= 0.78), but notable gaps between the two were observed for some truck drivers. Uniquely, both OSC and GSC scores were found to have curvilinear relationships with safe driving behavior, and both scores were equally predictive of safe driving behavior. Results also showed the two levels of climate significantly interacted with one another to predict safety behavior such that if either the OSC or GSC scores were low, the other's contribution to safety behavior became stronger. These findings suggest that OSC and GSC may function in a compensatory manner and promote safe driving behavior even

  2. The Politics of Latino Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leal, David L., Ed.; Meier, Kenneth J., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Education is one of the most important public policy issues facing Latinos in the United States today, but the political dynamics behind Latino school achievement and failure are often misunderstood--and at times, overlooked altogether. In twelve revealing essays, "The Politics of Latino Education" brings together 23 accomplished and…

  3. Latino Males in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This 2016 fact sheet profiles the status of Latino males in higher education, providing information on population, college enrollment, and educational attainment. While college enrollment among Latino males continues to increase, they still lag behind Latino females in college enrollment--a disparity that increases as the level of higher education…

  4. Recruiting and Supporting Latino Volunteers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Beverly B.

    This booklet is intended to help volunteer recruiters better understand characteristics of the Latino community that might impact volunteering. It also suggests strategies or steps to use in successfully recruiting and supporting Latino volunteers. Information is based on a study of Latinos and volunteerism conducted in Oregon in 1999. The…

  5. The Politics of Latino Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leal, David L., Ed.; Meier, Kenneth J., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Education is one of the most important public policy issues facing Latinos in the United States today, but the political dynamics behind Latino school achievement and failure are often misunderstood--and at times, overlooked altogether. In twelve revealing essays, "The Politics of Latino Education" brings together 23 accomplished and…

  6. Health status and needs of Latino dairy farmworkers in Vermont.

    PubMed

    Baker, Daniel; Chappelle, David

    2012-01-01

    Vermont is a new Latino destination where many Spanish-speaking migrants have found work on dairy farms. One hundred twenty Latino workers were surveyed on 59 Vermont dairy farms to develop a demographic profile and evaluate their self-assessed health status and barriers to care. The study found, similar to other studies, the majority of workers were young, male Mexicans. However, the workers in this study, as compared to others, originated farther south in Mexico and there were significant regional differences in educational attainment. Workers defined health in terms of their ability to work and the majority believed themselves to be in good health. The majority felt that moving to the United States has not changed their health status. The most common health issue reported was back/neck pain, followed by dental and mental health issues. Workers are both physically and linguistically isolated and reported isolation as the most challenging aspect of dairy farm work. Fear of immigration law enforcement was the primary barrier to care. Community-based initiatives, including partnerships with colleges and universities, outreach to farm employers and the adoption of "bias-free policing" are strategies that can increase access to health care for Latino dairy farmworkers in the United States.

  7. Deciphering the Lived Experience of Latinos with Diabetes and Depression: A Qualitative Interpretive Meta-Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Erika; Praetorius, Regina T

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand Latinos' experiences with diabetes and depression. The authors conducted a qualitative interpretive meta-synthesis of studies describing Latinos' experiences with diabetes and depression. Themes included (a) perceptions of diabetes, (b) bidirectional relationship between emotions and diabetes, (c) perceptions of depression, (d) perceptions of depression treatment, and (e) religion as strength. Additionally, a negative case was identified and is discussed. Practice implications are that Latinos are in need of psychoeducation to improve diabetes literacy, understand the comorbidity of depression and diabetes, and understand depression and diabetes treatment. Also, there is a need for policies removing barriers to health care and promoting depression assessment among Latinos who have a high prevalence of diabetes. Finally, there is a need for further research on spirituality and health.

  8. Exploratory Fieldwork on Latino Migrants and Indochinese Refugees. Refugees. RIIES Research Notes No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryce-Laporte, Roy S., Ed.; Couch, Stephen R., Ed.

    This book presents six papers on Latino migrant workers and recent Indochinese refugees in the United States, most of which focus on problems of fieldwork. The book's three sections, "Migrant Workers,""Indochinese Refugees" and "Research Summaries and Reports," each contains two papers and an introduction. (1)…

  9. 'Sometimes they fail to keep their faith in us': community health worker perceptions of structural barriers to quality of care and community utilisation of services in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Puett, Chloe; Alderman, Harold; Sadler, Kate; Coates, Jennifer

    2015-10-01

    Community health workers (CHWs) have strong potential to extend health and nutrition services to underserved populations. However, CHWs face complex challenges when working within weak health systems and among communities with limited abilities to access and utilise CHW services. It is crucial to understand these challenges to improve programme support mechanisms. This study describes the results of qualitative investigations into CHW perceptions of barriers to quality of care among two groups of workers implementing community case management of acute respiratory infection, diarrhoea and severe acute malnutrition in southern Bangladesh. We explored systemic barriers to service delivery, pertaining to communities and health systems, which limited the usefulness and effectiveness of CHW services. Focus group discussions (n = 10) were conducted in March 2010. Discussions were analysed for themes related to CHWs' work challenges. Findings highlight several perceived barriers to effective service provision, including community poverty constraining uptake of recommended practices, irregular supplies of medicine from the health facility and poor quality of care for CHW referrals sent there. This study further documents interactions between demand-side and supply-side constraints including the influence of health system resource constraints on community trust in CHW services, and the influence of community resource constraints on the utilisation and effectiveness of CHW services. By documenting service delivery challenges from the perspective of the frontline workers themselves, this article contributes evidence to help identify appropriate support mechanisms for these workers, in order to develop scalable and sustainable CHW programmes in countries with under-resourced public health care infrastructure.

  10. Culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) families dealing with dementia: an examination of the experiences and perceptions of multicultural community link workers.

    PubMed

    Boughtwood, Desiree; Shanley, Chris; Adams, Jon; Santalucia, Yvonne; Kyriazopoulos, Helena; Pond, Dimity; Rowland, Jeffery

    2011-12-01

    Dementia is a chronic illness involving increasing levels of care, often provided by family members, particularly in culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities. Multicultural community link workers are often the primary service providers assisting families to access health and welfare services and as such have extensive experience of, and possess in-depth knowledge about, CALD family care-giving for dementia. While research has been undertaken on dementia in CALD communities, this research has not focused on the experiences and perceptions of these multicultural workers with regards to CALD family care-giving. In response to this gap in the research, this paper presents the results of an empirical investigation of multicultural workers' perspectives with regard to the cultural traditions informing CALD family care-giving, CALD families' understandings of the term 'carer' and family arrangements regarding care. Due to their close relationship and knowledge of families, multicultural workers can offer an important perspective that is invaluable in informing the provision of carer education and support within CALD communities.

  11. Caring for Latino patients.

    PubMed

    Juckett, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Latinos comprise nearly 16 percent of the U.S. population, and this proportion is anticipated to increase to 30 percent by 2050. Latinos are a diverse ethnic group that includes many different cultures, races, and nationalities. Barriers to care have resulted in striking disparities in quality of health care for these patients. These barriers include language, lack of insurance, different cultural beliefs, and in some cases, illegal immigration status, mistrust, and illiteracy. The National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services address these concerns with recommendations for culturally competent care, language services, and organizational support. Latinos have disproportionately higher rates of obesity and diabetes mellitus. Other health problems include stress, neurocysticercosis, and tuberculosis. It is important to explore the use of alternative therapies and belief in traditional folk illnesses, recognizing that health beliefs are dependent on education, socioeconomic status, and degree of acculturation. Many-but not all-folk and herbal treatments can be safely accommodated with conventional therapy. Physicians must be sensitive to Latino cultural values of simpatia (kindness), personalismo (relationship), respeto (respect), and modestia (modesty). The LEARN technique can facilitate cross-cultural interviews. Some cultural barriers may be overcome by using the "teach back" technique to ensure that directions are correctly understood and by creating a welcoming health care environment for Latino patients.

  12. On the effects of a workplace fitness program upon pain perception: a case study encompassing office workers in a Portuguese context.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Angela C; Trindade, Carla S; Brito, Ana P; Socorro Dantas, M

    2011-06-01

    INTRODUCTION Office workers share several behavioural patterns: they work seated without moving for long times, they use only a few specific muscles of their arms, wrists and hands, and they keep an overall poor body posture. These working patterns generate musculoskeletal disorders, and produce discomfort or pain. Implementation of a work fitness program is thus a low-cost strategy to reduce/prevent body pain derived from work. The aim of this study was to test the benefits of a workplace fitness program, specifically applied to an administrative department of a Portuguese enterprise. Recall that this type of primary prevention level of musculoskeletal disorders has been seldom applied in Portugal, so this research effort materialized an important contribution to overcome such a gap. METHODS The participants in this study were office workers (n = 29 in the study group, and n = 21 in the control group)-who consistently had reported pain mostly on their back side (neck, posterior back, and dorsal and lumbar zones), wrists and posterior legs. The workplace fitness program consisted of three sessions per week during an 8-month period, with 15 min per session; emphasis was on stretching exercises for the body regions most affected by workers' pain perception. Each participant was requested to point out the injured region, as well as the intensity of pain felt, by using a visual analogue scale. Statistical analyses of the perceived pain data from control and study groups resort to non-parametric hypothesis tests. RESULTS There was a strong evidence that the workplace fitness program applied was effective in reducing workers' pain perception for their posterior back, dorsal and lumbar zones, and for their right wrist (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS These results generated are rather promising, so they may efficiently serve as an example for other enterprises in that country-while raising awareness on the important issue of quality of life at the workplace.

  13. Percept

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-26

    The Percept software package is a collection of libraries and executables that provide tools for verifying computer simulations of engineering components and systems. Percept is useful for simulations using the finite element or finite volume methods on unstructured meshes. Percept includes API's for adaptive mesh refinement, geometry representation, the method of manufactured solutions, analysis of convergence including the convergence of vibrational eigenmodes, and metrics for analyzing the difference between fields represented on two different overlapping unstructured grids.

  14. Spatial distribution, work patterns, and perception towards malaria interventions among temporary mobile/migrant workers in artemisinin resistance containment zone.

    PubMed

    Wai, Khin Thet; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Oo, Tin; Zaw, PeThet; Nyunt, Myat Htut; Thida, Moe; Kyaw, Thar Tun

    2014-05-17

    Mobile populations are at a high risk of malaria infection and suspected to carry and spread resistant parasites. The Myanmar National Malaria Control Programme focuses on preventive interventions and vector control measures for the temporary mobile/migrant workers in Myanmar Artemisinin Resistance Containment Zones. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 in Kawthaung and Bokepyin townships of Tanintharyi Region, Myanmar, covering 192 mobile/migrant aggregates. The objectives were to identify the spatial distribution of the mobile/migrant populations, and to assess knowledge, attitudes, perceptions, and practices concerning malaria prevention and control, and their preferred methods of interventions. The structure of the 192 migrant aggregates was investigated using a migrant mapping tool. Individual and household information was collected by structured interviews of 408 respondents from 39 aggregates, supplemented by 12 in-depth interviews of health care providers, authorities, volunteers, and employers. Data were analyzed by triangulating quantitative and qualitative data. The primary reasons for the limitation in access to formal health services for suspected malaria within 24 hours were identified to be scattered distribution of migrant aggregates, variable working hours and the lack of transportation. Only 19.6% of respondents reported working at night from dusk to dawn. Among study populations, 73% reported a perceived risk of contracting malaria and 60% reported to know how to confirm a suspected case of malaria. Moreover, only 15% was able to cite correct antimalarial drugs, and less than 10% believed that non-compliance with antimalarial treatment may be related to the risk of drug resistance. About 50% of study population reported to seeking health care from the public sector, and to sleep under ITNs/LLINs the night before the survey. There was a gap in willingness to buy ITNs/LLINs and affordability (88.5% vs. 60.2%) which may affect

  15. Latino Adolescent Reproductive and Sexual Health Behaviors and Outcomes: Research Informed Guidance for Agency-based Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Goldberg, Vincent; Lee, Jane; McCarthy, Katherine; Leavitt, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Latinos are the largest and fastest growing minority youth group in the United States. Currently, Latino adolescents experience higher rates of teen pregnancy compared to any other racial or ethnic group and have disproportionately high levels of sexually transmitted infections and HIV. Latino teens are also affected by a number of social problems such as school dropout, poverty, depression and limited access to healthcare, which contributes to disparities in reproductive health outcomes for this population. Relatively few intervention research studies and programs have been dedicated to reducing sexual risk among Latino youth, despite their particular vulnerabilities in experiencing negative reproductive health outcomes. We provide recommendations for identifying the unique reproductive health needs of Latino youth and specific applied strategies so that agency-based social workers and other providers can develop family-based interventions that improve adolescent Latino sexual and reproductive health. PMID:23279981

  16. Attitudes and perceptions of eye care workers and health administrators regarding task sharing in screening and detection for management of diabetic retinopathy in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mufarriq; Noor, Ayesha; Ormsby, Gail M; Chakrabarti, Rahul; Harper, C Alex; Islam, Fakir Amirul; Keeffe, Jill

    2017-10-04

    The shortage of ophthalmologists in many countries is a major barrier to timely provision of eye care. A team work approach to screen, detect and manage diabetic retinopathy (DR) could achieve greater screening coverage of people with diabetes to prevent vision loss. This study aimed to assess the attitudes and perceptions of eye care workers and health administrators regarding task sharing for management of DR. Using purposive sampling, 121 eye and health care workers in five selected hospitals in two provinces in Pakistan were recruited. A cross-sectional survey explored the possibility for involvement of optometrists and mid-level eye care workers to share tasks with ophthalmologists for DR management and the potential outcomes of task sharing, through multiple choice and open-ended questions. Ninety-six (79%) participants-doctors (n = 56), optometrists (n = 29) and mid-level eye care workers (n = 11) responded to the survey. All participants supported task sharing in screening and detection for management of DR. There was no significant difference among the groups with respect to their positive attitude towards task sharing (p = 0.22). The majority in each group believed that the task sharing would not degrade the quality of care (p = 0.48). Two potential major outcomes of task sharing in the eye care system included the benefits for people with diabetes and potential DR and the strengthening of the health care system. Task sharing among various cadres of eye care workers has the potential to improve screening coverage of people with diabetes to prevent visual loss from DR.

  17. No te entiendo y tú no me entiendes: Language Barriers Among Immigrant Latino Adolescents Seeking Health Care

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Immigrant Latino adolescents experience health disparities and barriers to accessing health care. The purpose of this study is to describe barriers experienced by immigrant Latino adolescents seeking U.S. health care. Design Focused ethnography using one-to-one interviews. Results Participants identified language barriers to accessing care at all stages in the process. Discussion Immigrant Latino youth experience barriers when accessing U.S. health care, resulting in negative perceptions and likelihood of reduced health seeking. Implications for practice Health care providers can lead positive change in health care delivery resulting in minimized language barriers and improved culturally relevant care for immigrant Latino youth and their families. PMID:19824291

  18. Latino beliefs about biomedical research participation: a qualitative study on the U.S.-Mexico border.

    PubMed

    Ceballos, Rachel M; Knerr, Sarah; Scott, Mary Alice; Hohl, Sarah D; Malen, Rachel C; Vilchis, Hugo; Thompson, Beti

    2014-10-01

    Latinos are under-represented in biomedical research conducted in the United States, impeding disease prevention and treatment efforts for this growing demographic group. We gathered perceptions of biomedical research and gauged willingness to participate through elicitation interviews and focus groups with Latinos living on the U.S.-Mexico border. Themes that emerged included a strong willingness to participate in biomedical studies and suggested that Latinos may be under-represented due to limited formal education and access to health information, not distrust. The conflation of research and clinical care was common and motivated participation. Outreach efforts and educational interventions to inform Latinos of participation opportunities and clarify harms and benefits associated with biomedical research participation will be essential to maintain trust within Latino communities. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Perceptions of Community Members and Healthcare Workers on Male Involvement in Prevention of Mother-To-Child Transmission Services in Khayelitsha, Cape Town, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Ladur, Alice Norah; Colvin, Christopher J; Stinson, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Involving male partners of pregnant women accessing PMTCT programs has the potential to improve health outcomes for women and children. This study explored community members' (men and women) and healthcare workers' perceptions of male involvement in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Khayelitsha, South Africa. Two focus group discussions were held with 25 men of unknown HIV status and one focus group discussion held with 12 HIV-positive women in the community. In depth interviews were conducted with four HIV-positive couples and five service providers purposely sampled from the community and a health facility, respectively. Both men and women interviewed in this study were receptive towards male involvement in PMTCT. However, men were reluctant to engage with health services due to stigma and negative attitudes from nurses. This study also found HIV testing, disclosure and direct health worker engagement with men increases male involvement in PMTCT. Using men in the media and community to reach out to fellow men with prevention messages tailored to suit specific audiences may reduce perceptions of antenatal care as being a woman`s domain.

  20. Partnering with Latino Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Amy Aparicio; Dorris, Amanda

    2007-01-01

    A growing body of research confirms that parents have a profound impact on their children's educational attainment, particularly in the secondary grades. Yet many Latino parents, particularly those of first-generation college students, lack information and knowledge about what their children need to prepare for college and are less likely to help…

  1. Improving Latino Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ETS Policy Notes, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This issue of the Educational Testing Service (ETS) "Policy Notes" highlights some of the viewpoints, research, and data presented at the 1996 ETS Invitational Conference on Latino Education Issues. The meeting brought together four presenters who are nationally recognized scholars with experience with issues related to the educational…

  2. The Latino Education Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandara, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Latinos now constitute the largest minority group in the United States and the fastest growing segment of its school-age population. Yet they are the least educated of all major ethnic groups. Poverty, lack of access to high-quality preschool, low levels of parental education attainment, and hypersegregated schools all play a crucial role. The…

  3. Latino College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivas, Michael A., Ed.

    The condition of higher education for Hispanic Americans and Latin Americans is addressed in 12 papers from the 1983 Conference on Latino College Students. Attention is directed to the transition from high school to college, Hispanic student achievement, and economics and stratification. In addition to forewords by Gregory R. Anrig and Arturo…

  4. Latino Families Learning Together.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterling, Jorge P.; Violand-Sanchez, Emma; von Vacano, Marcela

    1999-01-01

    The push for the English-only literacy approach sends the wrong message to language-minority families. The Arlington (Virginia) Public Schools have established first-language pilot programs to accelerate Latino students' academic achievement and have welcomed community-based educational initiatives. A family-literacy program motivates parents to…

  5. Latinos in the South.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Emily Elliott, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue contains five articles about the growing Latino population in the South and its impact on communities, particularly in rural areas. "Social Capital of Mexican Communities in the South" (Ruben Hernandez-Leon, Victor Zuniga) argues that, to understand and advocate for Mexican newcomer communities in the South,…

  6. The Latino Education Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandara, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Latinos now constitute the largest minority group in the United States and the fastest growing segment of its school-age population. Yet they are the least educated of all major ethnic groups. Poverty, lack of access to high-quality preschool, low levels of parental education attainment, and hypersegregated schools all play a crucial role. The…

  7. Weaving latino cultural concepts into Preparedness Core Competency training.

    PubMed

    Riley-Jacome, Mary; Parker, Blanca Angelica Gonzalez; Waltz, Edward C

    2014-01-01

    The New York • New Jersey Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center (NY•NJ PERLC) is one of 14 Centers funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention designed to address the preparedness and response training and education needs of the public health workforce. One of the important niches, or focus areas for the Center, is training to improve the capacity of public health workers to respond with competence to the needs of vulnerable populations. During every phase of a disaster, racial and ethnic minorities, including Latinos, suffer worse outcomes than the general population. Communities with diverse cultural origins and limited English speakers often present more complex issues during public health emergencies. Training that incorporates cultural concepts into the Preparedness Core Competencies may improve the ability of public health workers to engage the Latino community in preparedness activities and ultimately improve outcomes during disasters. This article describes initiatives undertaken by the NY•NJ PERLC to improve the capacity of the public health workforce to respond competently to the needs of Latino populations. In 2012, the Center collaborated with national, state, and local partners to develop a nationwide broadcast founded on the Preparedness Core Competencies, Latinos During Emergencies: Cultural Considerations Impacting Disaster Preparedness. The widely viewed broadcast (497 sites in 47 states and 13 nations) highlighted the commonalities and differences within Latino culture that can impact emergency preparedness and response and outlined practical strategies to enhance participation. The success of the broadcast spurred a number of partner requests for training and technical assistance. Lessons learned from these experiences, including our "undercover" work at local Points of Dispensing, are incorporated into subsequent interactive trainings to improve the competency of public health workers. Participants recommended

  8. Health workers' perceptions of access to care for children and pregnant women with precarious immigration status: health as a right or a privilege?

    PubMed

    Vanthuyne, Karine; Meloni, Francesca; Ruiz-Casares, Monica; Rousseau, Cécile; Ricard-Guay, Alexandra

    2013-09-01

    The Canadian government's recent cuts to healthcare coverage for refugee claimants has rekindled the debate in Canada about what medical services should be provided to individuals with precarious immigration status, and who should pay for these services. This article further explores this debate, focussing on the perceptions of healthcare workers in Montreal, a large multiethnic Canadian city. In April-June 2010, an online survey was conducted to assess how clinicians, administrators, and support staff in Montreal contend with the ethical and professional dilemmas raised by the issue of access to healthcare services for pregnant women and children who are partially or completely uninsured. Drawing on qualitative analysis of answers (n = 237) to three open-ended survey questions, we identify the discursive frameworks that our respondents mobilized when arguing for, or against, universal access to healthcare for uninsured patients. In doing so, we highlight how their positions relate to their self-evaluations of Canada's socioeconomic situation, as well as their ideological representations of, and sense of social connection to, precarious status immigrants. Interestingly, while abstract values lead some healthcare workers to perceive uninsured immigrants as "deserving" of universal access to healthcare, negative perceptions of these migrants, coupled with pragmatic considerations, pushed most workers to view the uninsured as "underserving" of free care. For a majority of our respondents, the right to healthcare of precarious status immigrants has become a "privilege", that as taxpayers, they are increasingly less willing to contribute to. We conclude by arguing for a reconsideration of access to healthcare as a right, and offer recommendations to move in this direction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Latino Farmworkers in Saskatchewan: Language Barriers and Health and Safety.

    PubMed

    Viveros-Guzmán, Arcadio; Gertler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    As part of a study focused on the experiences of Latino migrant farmworkers in Saskatchewan, Canada, we have attempted to understand how language barriers (LBs) broadly understood may affect farmworkers and their employers, workplace communications, and occupational health and safety (OHS). Drawing on critical ethnography and intercultural communication theory, qualitative interviews were conducted with 39 Latino migrant farmworkers, 11 farmer-employers, two OHS civil servants, and two former Canadian farmworkers. Our findings suggest that LBs interfere with the establishment of effective communications between Latino farmworkers, other farm enterprise personnel, civil servants, and health services providers. LBs impede establishment of the kinds of sustained two-way communications needed for maintaining safe and healthy working environments. All of the stakeholders involved were found to contribute in some manner to the propagation of LBs. The risks for the physical and psychological well-being of migrant farmworkers are substantial, but despite the fact that LBs are generally recognized as a challenge and as a source of risk, they are not widely seen as warranting any systematic response. It is critical that Latino migrant workers learn more English and that their Canadian employers and supervisors learn more Spanish. Beyond that, there is an urgent need for a multistakeholder coalition that moves to address LBs by training certified interpreters and liaison personnel who can facilitate better communications between migrant workers, their employers, and other stakeholders.

  10. A Comparison of Workers Employed in Hazardous Jobs in Terms of Job Satisfaction, Perceived Job Risk and Stress: Turkish Jean Sandblasting Workers, Dock Workers, Factory Workers and Miners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunal, Ayda Buyuksahin; Sunal, Onur; Yasin, Fatma

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare job satisfaction, perception of job risk, stress symptoms and vulnerability to stress of miners, dock workers, jean sandblasting workers and factory workers. A job satisfaction scale and stress audit scale were applied to 220 workers. Results revealed that dock and jean sandblasting workers perceived their…

  11. A Comparison of Workers Employed in Hazardous Jobs in Terms of Job Satisfaction, Perceived Job Risk and Stress: Turkish Jean Sandblasting Workers, Dock Workers, Factory Workers and Miners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunal, Ayda Buyuksahin; Sunal, Onur; Yasin, Fatma

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare job satisfaction, perception of job risk, stress symptoms and vulnerability to stress of miners, dock workers, jean sandblasting workers and factory workers. A job satisfaction scale and stress audit scale were applied to 220 workers. Results revealed that dock and jean sandblasting workers perceived their…

  12. The Longitudinal Relation between Academic Support and Latino Adolescents' Academic Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfaro, Edna C.; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether longitudinal trajectories of academic support from mothers, fathers, and teachers predicted trajectories of Latino adolescents' (N = 323) academic motivation. Findings indicated those boys' perceptions of mothers' and fathers' academic support and girls' perceptions of mothers' academic support declined throughout high…

  13. The Longitudinal Relation between Academic Support and Latino Adolescents' Academic Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfaro, Edna C.; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether longitudinal trajectories of academic support from mothers, fathers, and teachers predicted trajectories of Latino adolescents' (N = 323) academic motivation. Findings indicated those boys' perceptions of mothers' and fathers' academic support and girls' perceptions of mothers' academic support declined throughout high…

  14. Who Will Teach Our Children? Building a Qualified Early Childhood Workforce to Teach English-Language Learners. New Journalism on Latino Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Margaret; Dagys, Natasha

    2012-01-01

    Latinos accounted for three in five new workers in Metro Chicago's workforce over the last decade--representing a national trend that will intensify as the growing count of young Latinos in the U.S. comes of age (U.S. Census, 1980, 2010). To address this increasing diversity and invest in the future, Illinois passed a mandate designed to foster…

  15. BARRIERS TO DRUG ABUSE TREATMENT FOR LATINO MIGRANTS: TREATMENT PROVIDERS’ PERSPECTIVES1

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This paper disseminates findings from a pilot study undertaken to learn more about treatment providers’ perceptions of treatment access barriers faced by Latino migrants with substance use disorders (SUDs) in Northern California. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with treatment providers (n=11) at 7 residential treatment programs with Spanish-language services. Interviewees identified and described three primary types of treatment barriers: language, legal, and gender-based. In response to these barriers, Latino migrants with SUDs have opened their own residential recovery houses called anexos (annexes). Collaborative efforts by community clinics and public health agencies are needed to facilitate Latino migrants’ access to SUD treatment. PMID:25176120

  16. Signs of change in Turkey's working class: workers' age-related perceptions in the modern manufacturing sector.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Theo

    2003-12-01

    This paper explores the possible effects of the increasing exposure to modernity on younger workers in some sectors of developing countries with special reference to those employed in advanced manufacturing in Turkey. In recent decades Turkey has undergone considerable urbanization, improvements in literacy and rising levels of formal education. The paper systematically examines differences in the work-related attitudes and expectations, commitment and aspirations of younger and older workers, who have been exposed to these processes to different degrees. It is broadly confirmed that younger workers have higher expectations and aspirations that make them relatively less satisfied with a number of aspects of their work and which are likely to make for a less committed more critical workforce.

  17. Promoting Academic Success Among Latino Youth

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Charles R.; DeGarmo, David S.; Eddy, J. Mark

    2009-01-01

    This article describes results from the Oregon Latino Youth Survey, which was designed to identify factors that promoted or hindered academic success for Latino middle- and high-school youngsters. The study samples included a total of 564 Latino and non-Latino students and parents. Analyses showed that Latino students reported a high frequency of discriminatory experiences and institutional barriers at school, and that they and their parents were more likely to experience institutional barriers compared to non-Latinos. Further, Latino students and parents reported that they/their youngsters were more likely to dropout of school compared to non-Latinos. Path models showed lower acculturation and more institutional barriers were related to less academic success for Latino students. More parent academic encouragement and staff extracurricular encouragement were associated with better academic outcomes for Latino students. Finally, family socioeconomic disadvantage had an indirect effect on Latino youngster academic success, through effects on parent monitoring and school involvement. PMID:20011681

  18. Promoting Community Preparedness and Resilience: A Latino Immigrant Community–Driven Project Following Hurricane Sandy

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Les; Baron, Sherry

    2017-01-01

    As community residents and recovery workers, Latino immigrants play important roles after disasters, yet are rarely included in preparedness planning. A community–university–labor union partnership created a demonstration project after Hurricane Sandy to strengthen connections to disaster preparedness systems to increase community resilience among Latino immigrant communities in New York and New Jersey. Building ongoing ties that connect workers and community-based organizations with local disaster preparedness systems provided mutual benefits to disaster planners and local immigrant communities, and also had an impact on national disaster-related initiatives. PMID:28892443

  19. Promoting Community Preparedness and Resilience: A Latino Immigrant Community-Driven Project Following Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    Cuervo, Isabel; Leopold, Les; Baron, Sherry

    2017-09-01

    As community residents and recovery workers, Latino immigrants play important roles after disasters, yet are rarely included in preparedness planning. A community-university-labor union partnership created a demonstration project after Hurricane Sandy to strengthen connections to disaster preparedness systems to increase community resilience among Latino immigrant communities in New York and New Jersey. Building ongoing ties that connect workers and community-based organizations with local disaster preparedness systems provided mutual benefits to disaster planners and local immigrant communities, and also had an impact on national disaster-related initiatives.

  20. Negotiating Emotional Support: Sober Gay Latinos and their Families.

    PubMed

    Del Pino, Homero E; Moore, Mignon R; McCuller, William J; Zaldívar, Richard; Moore, Alison A

    2014-04-01

    This study explores how sober gay Latino men obtain support from their families. Familial ties can be a protective health factor, yet many gay Latinos experience rejection from family members because of their sexuality. There are very few studies that examine the extent and quality of emotional support from kin for this population. Understanding family dynamics within the context of recovery and sexuality can increase our understanding of how to leverage family ties to develop alcohol abuse interventions. The study was conducted semi-structured interviews with 30 sober gay Latinos using a grounded theory approach. Analyses of the qualitative data identified the following themes: Family values shaped the participants' perception of their range of choices and emotional responses; participants reported feeling loved and supported even when sexuality was not discussed with parents; and family support for sobriety is essential. Findings suggest that familial ties shape perceptions of support and importance of disclosing sexual identity. Family support often results from agreements about sexual identity disclosure, and some families can overcome cultural and religious taboos on sexuality. Future studies should investigate families that negotiate acceptance with their gay members, and whether they exhibit heterosexual biases that may influence the psychological stress of gay Latino men who wish to be sober.

  1. Negotiating Emotional Support: Sober Gay Latinos and their Families

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Mignon R.; McCuller, William J.; Zaldívar, Richard; Moore, Alison A.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores how sober gay Latino men obtain support from their families. Familial ties can be a protective health factor, yet many gay Latinos experience rejection from family members because of their sexuality. There are very few studies that examine the extent and quality of emotional support from kin for this population. Understanding family dynamics within the context of recovery and sexuality can increase our understanding of how to leverage family ties to develop alcohol abuse interventions. The study was conducted semi-structured interviews with 30 sober gay Latinos using a grounded theory approach. Analyses of the qualitative data identified the following themes: Family values shaped the participants’ perception of their range of choices and emotional responses; participants reported feeling loved and supported even when sexuality was not discussed with parents; and family support for sobriety is essential. Findings suggest that familial ties shape perceptions of support and importance of disclosing sexual identity. Family support often results from agreements about sexual identity disclosure, and some families can overcome cultural and religious taboos on sexuality. Future studies should investigate families that negotiate acceptance with their gay members, and whether they exhibit heterosexual biases that may influence the psychological stress of gay Latino men who wish to be sober. PMID:25057235

  2. Perceptions about HIV and Condoms and Consistent Condom Use among Male Clients of Commercial Sex Workers in the Philippines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Rotrease; Morisky, Donald E.

    2013-01-01

    Because consistent condom use is an effective strategy in the prevention of sexually transmitted infections and HIV transmission, it is important to examine social cognitive influences of consistent condom use not only among female sex workers (FSWs) but also among their male clients, for whom less is known. Because little is known about how HIV…

  3. Perceptions about HIV and Condoms and Consistent Condom Use among Male Clients of Commercial Sex Workers in the Philippines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Rotrease; Morisky, Donald E.

    2013-01-01

    Because consistent condom use is an effective strategy in the prevention of sexually transmitted infections and HIV transmission, it is important to examine social cognitive influences of consistent condom use not only among female sex workers (FSWs) but also among their male clients, for whom less is known. Because little is known about how HIV…

  4. Job Perceptions and Intent to Leave among Direct Care Workers: Evidence from the Better Jobs Better Care Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannon, Dianne; Barry, Teta; Kemper, Peter; Schreiner, Andrea; Vasey, Joe

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We assess how perceived rewards and problems with caregiving work and supervision relate to intent to leave among direct care workers who are employed in provider organizations participating in the Better Jobs Better Care (BJBC) demonstration; we also examine how these relationships vary by provider type. Design and Methods: Direct care…

  5. Perception of the importance of human-animal interactions on cattle flow and worker safety on Minnesota dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Sorge, U S; Cherry, C; Bender, J B

    2014-07-01

    Proper cattle-handling techniques (stockmanship) are important to ensure calm animals and a safe work environment for dairy workers on farm. The objectives of this study were to (1) assess Minnesota dairy herd owners' attitudes toward stockmanship, its perceived importance for cow comfort and worker health, and the establishment of calm cattle movement; and (2) identify current resources and methods of stockmanship training on Minnesota dairy farms. A stratified-random sample of Minnesota dairy farmers were contacted via mail to participate in a 28-question survey. One hundred eight bovine dairy producers participated. Most commonly, respondents learned their cattle handling skills from family members (42.6%) and 29.9% of producers had participated in previous stockmanship training. Producers thought that the skill of the human handler was the most important factor in establishing good cattle flow. Cattle-handling techniques was the third most common topic for new-employee orientation after training in milking parlor protocols and milking parlor disinfection. Time limitations and language barrier were considered serious challenges for worker training. Work-related injuries were responsible for lost work days in the previous year in 13.3% of dairy herds and 73.3% of those injuries occurred while working with cattle. Producers perceived that cattle-related injuries were predominantly the handler's fault: either because of not paying enough attention to the animal or due to poor cattle handling skills. Facility design was considered the least important for the occurrence of worker injuries. Although no causal inference can be made, herds that had workers who had previously participated in stockmanship training had a 810 ± 378 kg (mean ± standard error of the mean) higher rolling herd average than those that did not, even after adjusting for herd size and bulk tank somatic cell count. However, 50% of respondents were not interested in attending future stockmanship

  6. "Sobresalir": Latino Parent Perspectives on New Latino Diaspora Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallo, Sarah; Wortham, Stanton

    2012-01-01

    Although many have documented the high value Latino families place on education, prevalent discourses nonetheless characterize Latino immigrant parents as not caring about their children's education. This paper describes the practice-based components of a participatory action research project in which we created a collaborative film, intended for…

  7. Culture or No Culture? A Latino Critical Research Analysis of Latino Persistence Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Roger Geertz; Morrison, Jeaná

    2016-01-01

    The recent literature on Latino persistence does not take into account these students' distinct cultural backgrounds. Most researchers of Latino persistence use the self-designation "Latino" as a proxy variable representing Latino culture. A Latino Critical Theory (LatCrit) lens is applied to the persistence literature to demonstrate the…

  8. Culture or No Culture? A Latino Critical Research Analysis of Latino Persistence Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Roger Geertz; Morrison, Jeaná

    2016-01-01

    The recent literature on Latino persistence does not take into account these students' distinct cultural backgrounds. Most researchers of Latino persistence use the self-designation "Latino" as a proxy variable representing Latino culture. A Latino Critical Theory (LatCrit) lens is applied to the persistence literature to demonstrate the…

  9. Negotiating respectability: migrant women workers' perceptions of relationships and sexuality in free trade zones in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Jordal, Malin; Wijewardena, Kumudu; Ohman, Ann; Essén, Birgitta; Olsson, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Migration has implications for women's sexual and reproductive health and rights. Our purpose with this study was to explore unmarried migrant women's perceptions of relationships and sexuality in the context of Sri Lankan Free Trade Zones. Sixteen semi-structured qualitative interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis. We found that the women's perceptions were influenced by gendered hegemonic notions of respectability and virginity. Complex gender relations both worked in favor of and against women's sexual and reproductive health and rights. Programs for improvement of migrant women's health should be informed by contextualized analysis of gender relations with its various dimensions and levels.

  10. Less germs, less mucus, less snot: teachers' and health workers' perceptions of the benefits and barriers of ear health programs in lower primary school classes.

    PubMed

    Doyle, June; Ristevski, Eli

    2010-01-01

    This study explored health and education professionals' perceptions of the health benefits and barriers of different ear health programs used in lower primary school classes in two district education areas in the Goldfields South East Health Region, Western Australia. Health and education staff providing services to children in kindergarten to year three primary school classes were sent a questionnaire about ear health programs provided in their school. Sixty-one questionnaires were returned from 43 teachers, 14 community health nurses, three Aboriginal health workers and one teacher's assistant. Some schools implemented all the ear health programs examined at all year levels while others implemented only one of the programs. Teachers, community health nurses and Aboriginal health workers identified that all ear health programs were beneficial to students. Reported physical health benefits included reduced ear infections, early detection of ear infections and improved hearing. Behavioural benefits included improved concentration, alertness and attention in the classroom. Barriers to implementing the programs were obtaining consent from parents/carers, student transience and attendance, time to implement and conduct the programs and human and physical resources. Evaluation methods used varied from no evaluation for the Breathe Blow Cough and tissue spearing programs to limited data collection for audiometry, otoscopy and ear toilet programs. Respondents perceived that ear health programs were effective in improving health and behavioural outcomes for children. A formal pre-post evaluation to provide objective data to confirm this is needed to inform policy around this important health issue.

  11. In Their Own Voices: Latino Student Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longerbeam, Susan D.; Sedlacek, William E.; Alatorre, Helen M.

    2004-01-01

    In a study of 2,991 college students, researchers found significant differences between Latino and non-Latino students using MANOVA and chi-square statistics. Latino students were more likely to embrace diversity than non-Latino students, and were more likely to be concerned about financing their college educations. In addition, they were more…

  12. Barriers to School Success for Latino Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marrero, Floralba Arbelo

    2016-01-01

    Academic achievement among Latino high school students is a pressing issue as data consistently demonstrates that Latino students underperform and are at higher risk of dropping out of high school than their non-Latino peers. This paper reviews nonacademic barriers to the success of Latino students focusing on sociocultural issues that influence…

  13. Gender and Power: Reconstructing Latino Ethnography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zavella, Patricia; Takash, Paule Cruz

    1993-01-01

    Introduces selected papers delivered at the 91st Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association. Papers explore gender as experienced by Latinas and Latinos, examine gendered relationships between Latino men and women, and discern how Latino gender norms in Latin America are perpetrated and negotiated by Latinos within the U.S.…

  14. Latino College Completion: South Dakota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  15. Latino College Completion: New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  16. Latino College Completion: New York

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  17. Latino College Completion: North Dakota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  18. Latino College Completion: New Jersey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  19. Latino College Completion: New Hampshire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  20. Latino College Completion: South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…