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Sample records for lattice gas simulations

  1. Lattice gas simulations of replicating domains

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, S.P.; Hasslacher, B.; Pearson, J.E.

    1993-12-31

    We use the lattice gas cellular automation (LGCA) developed to simulate a process of pattern-formation recently observed in reaction-diffusion systems. We study the reaction mechanism, which is an extension of the Selkov model for glycolytic oscillations. We are able to reproduce the self-replicating domains observed in this work. We use the LGCA simulation to estimate the smallest length-scale on which this process can occur under conditions encountered in the cell. These estimates are similar to those obtained for Turing patterns in the same setting.

  2. Lattice gas hydrodynamics: Theory and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hasslacher, B.

    1993-01-01

    The first successful application of a microscopic analogy to create a skeleton cellular automaton and analyze it with statistical mechanical tools, was the work of Frisch, Hasslacher and Pomeau on the Navier-Stokes equation in two and three dimensions. This has become a very large research area with lattice gas models and methods being used for both fundamental investigations into the foundations of statistical mechanics and a large number of diverse applications. This present research was devoted to enlarging the fundamental scope of lattice gas models and proved successful. Since the beginning of this proposal, cellular automata have been constructed for statistical mechanical models, fluids, diffusion and shock systems in fundamental investigations. In applied areas, there are now excellent lattice gas models for complex flows through porous media, chemical reaction and combustion dynamics, multiphase flow systems, and fluid mixtures with natural boundaries. With extended cellular fluid models, one can do problems with arbitrary pairwise potentials. Recently, these have been applied to such problems as non-newtonian or polymeric liquids and a mixture of immiscible fluids passing through fractal or spongelike media in two and three dimensions. This proposal has contributed to and enlarged the scope of this work.

  3. Lattice gas simulations of dynamical geometry in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klales, Anna; Cianci, Donato; Needell, Zachary; Meyer, David A.; Love, Peter J.

    2010-10-01

    We present a hydrodynamic lattice gas model for two-dimensional flows on curved surfaces with dynamical geometry. This model is an extension to two dimensions of the dynamical geometry lattice gas model previously studied in one dimension. We expand upon a variation of the two-dimensional flat space Frisch-Hasslacher-Pomeau (FHP) model created by Frisch [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 56, 1505 (1986)]10.1103/PhysRevLett.56.1505 and independently by Wolfram, and modified by Boghosian [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 360, 333 (2002)]10.1098/rsta.2001.0933. We define a hydrodynamic lattice gas model on an arbitrary triangulation whose flat space limit is the FHP model. Rules that change the geometry are constructed using the Pachner moves, which alter the triangulation but not the topology. We present results on the growth of the number of triangles as a function of time. Simulations show that the number of triangles grows with time as t1/3 , in agreement with a mean-field prediction. We also present preliminary results on the distribution of curvature for a typical triangulation in these simulations.

  4. Lattice gas simulations of dynamical geometry in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Klales, Anna; Cianci, Donato; Needell, Zachary; Meyer, David A; Love, Peter J

    2010-10-01

    We present a hydrodynamic lattice gas model for two-dimensional flows on curved surfaces with dynamical geometry. This model is an extension to two dimensions of the dynamical geometry lattice gas model previously studied in one dimension. We expand upon a variation of the two-dimensional flat space Frisch-Hasslacher-Pomeau (FHP) model created by Frisch [Phys. Rev. Lett. 56, 1505 (1986)] and independently by Wolfram, and modified by Boghosian [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 360, 333 (2002)]. We define a hydrodynamic lattice gas model on an arbitrary triangulation whose flat space limit is the FHP model. Rules that change the geometry are constructed using the Pachner moves, which alter the triangulation but not the topology. We present results on the growth of the number of triangles as a function of time. Simulations show that the number of triangles grows with time as t(1/3), in agreement with a mean-field prediction. We also present preliminary results on the distribution of curvature for a typical triangulation in these simulations.

  5. A heterogeneous lattice gas model for simulating pedestrian evacuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiwei; Chen, Jianqiao; Zheng, Yaochen; Wei, Junhong

    2012-02-01

    Based on the cellular automata method (CA model) and the mobile lattice gas model (MLG model), we have developed a heterogeneous lattice gas model for simulating pedestrian evacuation processes in an emergency. A local population density concept is introduced first. The update rule in the new model depends on the local population density and the exit crowded degree factor. The drift D, which is one of the key parameters influencing the evacuation process, is allowed to change according to the local population density of the pedestrians. Interactions including attraction, repulsion, and friction between every two pedestrians and those between a pedestrian and the building wall are described by a nonlinear function of the corresponding distance, and the repulsion forces increase sharply as the distances get small. A critical force of injury is introduced into the model, and its effects on the evacuation process are investigated. The model proposed has heterogeneous features as compared to the MLG model or the basic CA model. Numerical examples show that the model proposed can capture the basic features of pedestrian evacuation, such as clogging and arching phenomena.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of a strongly interacting two-dimensional Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Jasmine; Mendoza, Miller; Young, Ryan E.; Romatschke, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We present fully nonlinear dissipative fluid dynamics simulations of a strongly interacting trapped two-dimensional Fermi gas using a lattice Boltzmann algorithm. We are able to simulate nonharmonic trapping potentials, temperature-dependent viscosities, as well as a discretized version of the ballistic (noninteracting) behavior. Our approach lends itself to direct comparison with experimental data, opening up the possibility of a precision determination of transport coefficients in the strongly interacting Fermi gas. Furthermore, we predict the presence of a strongly damped ("nonhydrodynamic") component in the quadrupole mode, which should be observable experimentally.

  7. Discrete effects on boundary conditions for the lattice Boltzmann equation in simulating microscale gas flows.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaoli; Shi, Baochang; Zhao, T S; Zheng, Chuguang

    2007-11-01

    The lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) has shown its promise in the simulation of microscale gas flows. One of the critical issues with this advanced method is to specify suitable slip boundary conditions to ensure simulation accuracy. In this paper we study two widely used kinetic boundary conditions in the LBE: the combination of the bounce-back and specular-reflection scheme and the discrete Maxwell's scheme. We show that (i) both schemes are virtually equivalent in principle, and (ii) there exist discrete effects in both schemes. A strategy is then proposed to adjust the parameters in the two kinetic boundary conditions such that an accurate slip boundary condition can be implemented. The numerical results demonstrate that the corrected boundary conditions are robust and reliable.

  8. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of shale gas transport in organic nano-pores.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Xiao, Lizhi; Shan, Xiaowen; Guo, Long

    2014-01-01

    Permeability is a key parameter for investigating the flow ability of sedimentary rocks. The conventional model for calculating permeability is derived from Darcy's law, which is valid only for continuum flow in porous rocks. We discussed the feasibility of simulating methane transport characteristics in the organic nano-pores of shale through the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). As a first attempt, the effects of high Knudsen number and the associated slip flow are considered, whereas the effect of adsorption in the capillary tube is left for future work. Simulation results show that at small Knudsen number, LBM results agree well with Poiseuille's law, and flow rate (flow capacity) is proportional to the square of the pore scale. At higher Knudsen numbers, the relaxation time needs to be corrected. In addition, velocity increases as the slip effect causes non negligible velocities on the pore wall, thereby enhancing the flow rate inside the pore, i.e., the permeability. Therefore, the LBM simulation of gas flow characteristics in organic nano-pores provides an effective way of evaluating the permeability of gas-bearing shale. PMID:24784022

  9. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of shale gas transport in organic nano-pores.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Xiao, Lizhi; Shan, Xiaowen; Guo, Long

    2014-01-01

    Permeability is a key parameter for investigating the flow ability of sedimentary rocks. The conventional model for calculating permeability is derived from Darcy's law, which is valid only for continuum flow in porous rocks. We discussed the feasibility of simulating methane transport characteristics in the organic nano-pores of shale through the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). As a first attempt, the effects of high Knudsen number and the associated slip flow are considered, whereas the effect of adsorption in the capillary tube is left for future work. Simulation results show that at small Knudsen number, LBM results agree well with Poiseuille's law, and flow rate (flow capacity) is proportional to the square of the pore scale. At higher Knudsen numbers, the relaxation time needs to be corrected. In addition, velocity increases as the slip effect causes non negligible velocities on the pore wall, thereby enhancing the flow rate inside the pore, i.e., the permeability. Therefore, the LBM simulation of gas flow characteristics in organic nano-pores provides an effective way of evaluating the permeability of gas-bearing shale.

  10. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of the gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L; Qu, Z G; Ding, T; Miao, J Y

    2016-04-01

    The gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media is numerically studied with the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method at the pore scale with consideration of interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer performances. Adsorbent structures are reconstructed in two dimensions by employing the quartet structure generation set approach. To implement boundary conditions accurately, all the porous interfacial nodes are recognized and classified into 14 types using a proposed universal program called the boundary recognition and classification program. The multiple-relaxation-time LB model and single-relaxation-time LB model are adopted to simulate flow and mass transport, respectively. The interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer capacities are evaluated with the permeability factor and interparticle transfer coefficient, Langmuir adsorption kinetics, and the solid diffusion model, respectively. Adsorption processes are performed in two groups of adsorbent media with different porosities and particle sizes. External and internal mass transfer resistances govern the adsorption system. A large porosity leads to an early time for adsorption equilibrium because of the controlling factor of external resistance. External and internal resistances are dominant at small and large particle sizes, respectively. Particle size, under which the total resistance is minimum, ranges from 3 to 7 μm with the preset parameters. Pore-scale simulation clearly explains the effect of both external and internal mass transfer resistances. The present paper provides both theoretical and practical guidance for the design and optimization of adsorption systems. PMID:27176384

  11. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of the gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Qu, Z. G.; Ding, T.; Miao, J. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media is numerically studied with the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method at the pore scale with consideration of interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer performances. Adsorbent structures are reconstructed in two dimensions by employing the quartet structure generation set approach. To implement boundary conditions accurately, all the porous interfacial nodes are recognized and classified into 14 types using a proposed universal program called the boundary recognition and classification program. The multiple-relaxation-time LB model and single-relaxation-time LB model are adopted to simulate flow and mass transport, respectively. The interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer capacities are evaluated with the permeability factor and interparticle transfer coefficient, Langmuir adsorption kinetics, and the solid diffusion model, respectively. Adsorption processes are performed in two groups of adsorbent media with different porosities and particle sizes. External and internal mass transfer resistances govern the adsorption system. A large porosity leads to an early time for adsorption equilibrium because of the controlling factor of external resistance. External and internal resistances are dominant at small and large particle sizes, respectively. Particle size, under which the total resistance is minimum, ranges from 3 to 7 μm with the preset parameters. Pore-scale simulation clearly explains the effect of both external and internal mass transfer resistances. The present paper provides both theoretical and practical guidance for the design and optimization of adsorption systems.

  12. Simulation of pore scale porous media flow using lattice gas methods

    SciTech Connect

    Eggert, K.; Chen, Shiyi; Travis, B.; Grunau, D. ); Loh, E. ); Kovarik, F. . Inst. for Improved Oil Recovery Research)

    1991-01-01

    Carbon dioxide-foam injection is an important technique for improving the recovery of oil from porous rocks. Huh, et. al. (1989) recently presented results of two-dimensional laboratory micromodel studies conducted to better understand this process for improved oil recovery. These experimental results indicate that the introduction of CO{sub 2} foam may be expected to have a substantial effect on the relative permeability curves that would be used to model improved oil recovery in a reservoir. However, in order to determine expected changes in relative permeability a computational technique is require to quantify the experimental results, and to help determine the appropriate relative permeability curves for reservoir scale calculation. Two computational methodologies are needed to utilize the experimental information to improve reservoir simulations. First, a method is needed for quantitatively describing the phenomena observed in the micromodel geometry. Second, a method is needed to extend these effects to the different scales of heterogeneity that may be expected to exist between the laboratory and the field. This paper is focused on the first of these methods, and although it does not yet fully solve the problem of representing these fluid systems in the laboratory, it presents a promising approach to this problem. The paper briefly discusses the application of the lattice gas method for solution of the nondimensional Navier-Stokes equations for flow of fluids through the complex microscopic geometry of porous media. In particular, the approach presented herein allows the simulation not only of single fluids through the media, but of systems of two or more fluids ranging from fully miscible to completely immiscible. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Lattice gas hydrodynamics: Theory and simulations. Final report, [February 1, 1989--March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Hasslacher, B.

    1993-05-01

    The first successful application of a microscopic analogy to create a skeleton cellular automaton and analyze it with statistical mechanical tools, was the work of Frisch, Hasslacher and Pomeau on the Navier-Stokes equation in two and three dimensions. This has become a very large research area with lattice gas models and methods being used for both fundamental investigations into the foundations of statistical mechanics and a large number of diverse applications. This present research was devoted to enlarging the fundamental scope of lattice gas models and proved successful. Since the beginning of this proposal, cellular automata have been constructed for statistical mechanical models, fluids, diffusion and shock systems in fundamental investigations. In applied areas, there are now excellent lattice gas models for complex flows through porous media, chemical reaction and combustion dynamics, multiphase flow systems, and fluid mixtures with natural boundaries. With extended cellular fluid models, one can do problems with arbitrary pairwise potentials. Recently, these have been applied to such problems as non-newtonian or polymeric liquids and a mixture of immiscible fluids passing through fractal or spongelike media in two and three dimensions. This proposal has contributed to and enlarged the scope of this work.

  14. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of incompressible liquid-gas systems on partial wetting surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Wu, Cheng-Long; Chang, Li-Chen; Lin, Chao-An

    2011-06-28

    A three-dimensional Lattice Boltzmann two-phase model capable of dealing with large liquid and gas density ratios and with a partial wetting surface is introduced. This is based on a high density ratio model combined with a partial wetting boundary method. The predicted three-dimensional droplets at different partial wetting conditions at equilibrium are in good agreement with analytical solutions. Despite the large density ratio, the spurious velocity around the interface is not substantial, and is rather insensitive to the examined liquid and gas density and viscosity ratios. The influence of the gravitational force on the droplet shape is also examined through the variations of the Bond number, where the droplet shape migrates from spherical to flattened interface in tandem with the increase of the Bond number. The predicted interfaces under constant Bond number are also validated against measurements with good agreements.

  15. Numerical simulation of gas flow and heat transfer in a rough microchannel using the lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Dorari, Elaheh; Saffar-Avval, Majid; Mansoori, Zohreh

    2015-12-01

    In microfluidics, two important factors responsible for the differences between the characteristics of the flow and heat transfer in microchannels and conventional channels are rarefaction and surface roughness which are studied in the present work. An incompressible gas flow in a microchannel is simulated two dimensionally using the lattice Boltzmann method. The flow is in the slip regime and surface roughness is modeled by both regular and Gaussian random distribution of rectangular modules. The effects of relative surface roughness height and Knudsen number on gaseous flow and heat transfer are studied. It was shown that as the relative roughness height increases, the Poiseuille number increases and the Nusselt number has a decreasing or increasing trend, depending on the degree of rarefaction. A comparison between the flow and heat transfer characteristics in regular and random distribution of surface roughness demonstrates that in regular roughness, circular flows are more pronounced; Poiseuille number is higher and Nusselt number is lower than that of its equivalent random roughness.

  16. Lattice-Boltzmann Simulations of Multiphase Flows in Gas-Diffusion-Layer (GDL) of a PEM Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjeea, Shiladitya; Cole, J Vernon; Jainb, Kunal; Gidwania, Ashok

    2008-11-01

    Improved power density and freeze-thaw durability in automotive applications of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs) requires effective water management at the membrane. This is controlled by a porous hydrophobic gas-diffusion-layer (GDL) inserted between the membrane catalyst layer and the gas reactant channels. The GDL distributes the incoming gaseous reactants on the catalyst surface and removes excess water by capillary action. There is, however, limited understanding of the multiphase, multi-component transport of liquid water, vapor and gaseous reactants within these porous materials. This is due primarily to the challenges of in-situ diagnostics for such thin (200 -“ 300 {microns}), optically opaque (graphite) materials. Transport is typically analyzed by fitting Darcy's Law type expressions for permeability, in conjunction with capillary pressure relations based on formulations derived for media such as soils. Therefore, there is significant interest in developing predictive models for transport in GDLs and related porous media. Such models could be applied to analyze and optimize systems based on the interactions between cell design, materials, and operating conditions, and could also be applied to evaluating material design concepts. Recently, the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) has emerged as an effective tool in modeling multiphase flows in general, and flows through porous media in particular. This method is based on the solution of a discrete form of the well-known Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE) for molecular distribution, tailored to recover the continuum Navier-Stokes flow. The kinetic theory basis of the method allows simple implementation of molecular forces responsible for liquid-gas phase separation and capillary effects. The solution advances by a streaming and collision type algorithm that makes it suitable to implement for domains with complex boundaries. We have developed both single and multiphase LB models and applied them to

  17. Lattice Simulations and Infrared Conformality

    DOE PAGES

    Appelquist, Thomas; Fleming, George T.; Lin, Meifeng; Neil, Ethan T.; Schaich, David A

    2011-09-01

    We examine several recent lattice-simulation data sets, asking whether they are consistent with infrared conformality. We observe, in particular, that for an SU(3) gauge theory with 12 Dirac fermions in the fundamental representation, recent simulation data can be described assuming infrared conformality. Lattice simulations include a fermion mass m which is then extrapolated to zero, and we note that this data can be fit by a small-m expansion, allowing a controlled extrapolation. We also note that the conformal hypothesis does not work well for two theories that are known or expected to be confining and chirally broken, and that itmore » does work well for another theory expected to be infrared conformal.« less

  18. Observing dynamical SUSY breaking with lattice simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamori, Issaku

    2008-11-23

    On the basis of the recently developed lattice formulation of supersymmetric theories which keeps a part of the supersymmetry, we propose a method of observing dynamical SUSY breaking with lattice simulation. We use Hamiltonian as an order parameter and measure the ground state energy as a zero temperature limit of the finite temperature simulation. Our method provides a way of obtaining a physical result from the lattice simulation for supersymmetric theories.

  19. Comparison between finite volume and lattice-Boltzmann method simulations of gas-fluidised beds: bed expansion and particle-fluid interaction force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Third, J. R.; Chen, Y.; Müller, C. R.

    2016-07-01

    Lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) simulations of a gas-fluidised bed have been performed. In contrast to the current state-of-the-art coupled computational fluid dynamics-discrete element method (CFD-DEM) simulations, the LBM does not require a closure relationship for the particle-fluid interaction force. Instead, the particle-fluid interaction can be calculated directly from the detailed flow profile around the particles. Here a comparison is performed between CFD-DEM and LBM simulations of a small fluidised bed. Simulations are performed for two different values of the superficial gas velocity and it is found that the LBM predicts a larger bed expansion for both flowrates. Furthermore the particle-fluid interaction force obtained for LBM simulations is compared to the force which would be predicted by a CFD-DEM model under the same conditions. On average the force predicted by the CFD-DEM closure relationship is found to be significantly smaller than the force obtained from the LBM.

  20. Study of Particle Rotation Effect in Gas-Solid Flows using Direct Numerical Simulation with a Lattice Boltzmann Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Kyung; Fan, Liang-Shih; Zhou, Qiang; Yang, Hui

    2014-09-30

    A new and efficient direct numerical method with second-order convergence accuracy was developed for fully resolved simulations of incompressible viscous flows laden with rigid particles. The method combines the state-of-the-art immersed boundary method (IBM), the multi-direct forcing method, and the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). First, the multi-direct forcing method is adopted in the improved IBM to better approximate the no-slip/no-penetration (ns/np) condition on the surface of particles. Second, a slight retraction of the Lagrangian grid from the surface towards the interior of particles with a fraction of the Eulerian grid spacing helps increase the convergence accuracy of the method. An over-relaxation technique in the procedure of multi-direct forcing method and the classical fourth order Runge-Kutta scheme in the coupled fluid-particle interaction were applied. The use of the classical fourth order Runge-Kutta scheme helps the overall IB-LBM achieve the second order accuracy and provides more accurate predictions of the translational and rotational motion of particles. The preexistent code with the first-order convergence rate is updated so that the updated new code can resolve the translational and rotational motion of particles with the second-order convergence rate. The updated code has been validated with several benchmark applications. The efficiency of IBM and thus the efficiency of IB-LBM were improved by reducing the number of the Lagragian markers on particles by using a new formula for the number of Lagrangian markers on particle surfaces. The immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method (IBLBM) has been shown to predict correctly the angular velocity of a particle. Prior to examining drag force exerted on a cluster of particles, the updated IB-LBM code along with the new formula for the number of Lagrangian markers has been further validated by solving several theoretical problems. Moreover, the unsteadiness of the drag force is examined when a

  1. Solution of an associating lattice-gas model with density anomaly on a Husimi lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Tiago J.; Stilck, Jürgen F.; Barbosa, Marco Aurélio A.

    2010-11-01

    We study a model of a lattice gas with orientational degrees of freedom which resemble the formation of hydrogen bonds between the molecules. In this model, which is the simplified version of the Henriques-Barbosa model, no distinction is made between donors and acceptors in the bonding arms. We solve the model in the grand-canonical ensemble on a Husimi lattice built with hexagonal plaquettes with a central site. The ground state of the model, which was originally defined on the triangular lattice, is exactly reproduced by the solution on this Husimi lattice. In the phase diagram, one gas and two liquid [high density liquid (HDL) and low density liquid (LDL)] phases are present. All phase transitions (GAS-LDL, GAS-HDL, and LDL-HDL) are discontinuous, and the three phases coexist at a triple point. A line of temperatures of maximum density in the isobars is found in the metastable GAS phase, as well as another line of temperatures of minimum density appears in the LDL phase, part of it in the stable region and another in the metastable region of this phase. These findings are at variance with simulational results for the same model on the triangular lattice, which suggested a phase diagram with two critical points. However, our results show very good quantitative agreement with the simulations, both for the coexistence loci and the densities of particles and of hydrogen bonds. We discuss the comparison of the simulations with our results.

  2. Solution of an associating lattice-gas model with density anomaly on a Husimi lattice.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Tiago J; Stilck, Jürgen F; Barbosa, Marco Aurélio A

    2010-11-01

    We study a model of a lattice gas with orientational degrees of freedom which resemble the formation of hydrogen bonds between the molecules. In this model, which is the simplified version of the Henriques-Barbosa model, no distinction is made between donors and acceptors in the bonding arms. We solve the model in the grand-canonical ensemble on a Husimi lattice built with hexagonal plaquettes with a central site. The ground state of the model, which was originally defined on the triangular lattice, is exactly reproduced by the solution on this Husimi lattice. In the phase diagram, one gas and two liquid [high density liquid (HDL) and low density liquid (LDL)] phases are present. All phase transitions (GAS-LDL, GAS-HDL, and LDL-HDL) are discontinuous, and the three phases coexist at a triple point. A line of temperatures of maximum density in the isobars is found in the metastable GAS phase, as well as another line of temperatures of minimum density appears in the LDL phase, part of it in the stable region and another in the metastable region of this phase. These findings are at variance with simulational results for the same model on the triangular lattice, which suggested a phase diagram with two critical points. However, our results show very good quantitative agreement with the simulations, both for the coexistence loci and the densities of particles and of hydrogen bonds. We discuss the comparison of the simulations with our results.

  3. Neutral gas heating via non-resonant optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornella, Barry Michael

    The influence of intense optical lattices on atoms or molecules offers a particularly useful method for energy and momentum deposition into a non-resonant gas. In this investigation, a proof-of-concept experiment was conducted to validate high intensity pulsed optical lattices as a means of creating high temperature gases for a myriad of aerospace, basic physics, and nanotechnology applications. Traditional methods for creating these flows have either involved altering the chemical composition of the initial gas sample through combustion or ionization or relied on laser resonant interactions with internal energy modes through laser pyrolysis. Due to its non-resonant nature, the use of optical lattices might be beneficial compared to existing methods since it provides an arbitrary, localized, high temperature gas that is tunable and does not introduce unwanted chemical species or high ionization concentrations. As an intermediate step toward verifying optical lattice gas heating, a coherent Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering (CRBS) study was also performed to verify the presented methodology. CRBS is a gas diagnostic technique used for non-intrusive probing of gas thermodynamic properties. In addition to the experimental investigation, a complementary numerical study was conducted using a direct simulation Monte Carlo approach. The numerical study used a modified version of SMILE to predict the gas phenomena within the strong optical potential fields. The goal of substantiating optical lattice heating was accomplished by detecting the acoustic wave generated from the heated volume. The magnitude of the resulting acoustic wave was shown to vary with the optical lattice phase velocity, peaking on the order of the gas' most probable speed. The trend with lattice velocity is consistent with both theory and the numerical study and eliminates other possible heating mechanisms such as laser-induced ionization or molecular dissociation. Limitations for the investigated heating

  4. Lattice gas methods for computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, Victor W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the lattice gas solution to the category 1 problems of the ICASE/LaRC Workshop on Benchmark Problems in Computational Aeroacoustics. The first and second problems were solved for Delta t = Delta x = 1, and additionally the second problem was solved for Delta t = 1/4 and Delta x = 1/2. The results are striking: even for these large time and space grids the lattice gas numerical solutions are almost indistinguishable from the analytical solutions. A simple bug in the Mathematica code was found in the solutions submitted for comparison, and the comparison plots shown at the end of this volume show the bug. An Appendix to the present paper shows an example lattice gas solution with and without the bug.

  5. Multisite Interactions in Lattice-Gas Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einstein, T. L.; Sathiyanarayanan, R.

    For detailed applications of lattice-gas models to surface systems, multisite interactions often play at least as significant a role as interactions between pairs of adatoms that are separated by a few lattice spacings. We recall that trio (3-adatom, non-pairwise) interactions do not inevitably create phase boundary asymmetries about half coverage. We discuss a sophisticated application to an experimental system and describe refinements in extracting lattice-gas energies from calculations of total energies of several different ordered overlayers. We describe how lateral relaxations complicate matters when there is direct interaction between the adatoms, an issue that is important when examining the angular dependence of step line tensions. We discuss the connector model as an alternative viewpoint and close with a brief account of recent work on organic molecule overlayers.

  6. A lattice gas model for thermohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shiyi; Chen, Hudong; Doolen, G.D.; Gutman, S.; Lee, M.

    1990-05-03

    The FHP lattice gas model is extended to include a temperature variable in order to study thermohydrodynamics. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are derived using a Chapman-Enskog expansion. Heat conduction and convention problems are investigated, including Benard convention. It is shown that the usual FHP rescaling procedure can be avoided by controlling the temperature. 20 refs., 12 figs.

  7. A Lattice Boltzmann Method for Turbomachinery Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, A. T.; Lopez, I.

    2003-01-01

    Lattice Boltzmann (LB) Method is a relatively new method for flow simulations. The start point of LB method is statistic mechanics and Boltzmann equation. The LB method tries to set up its model at molecular scale and simulate the flow at macroscopic scale. LBM has been applied to mostly incompressible flows and simple geometry.

  8. Lattice gas dynamics under continuous measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Cheung, Hil F. H.; Madjarov, Ivaylo S.; Chen, Huiyao Y.; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2016-05-01

    The act of measurement has a profound consequences quantum systems. While this backaction has so far been discussed as being a limitation on the precision of measurements, it is increasingly being appreciated that measurement backaction is a powerful and versatile means of quantum control. We have previously demonstrated that backaction from position measurement can modify the coherent tunneling rate of a lattice gas through the Quantum Zeno effect. Here, we show how spatially designed measurement landscapes can be used to realize entropy segregation in lattice gases. This presents an alternate path to the longstanding challenge of realizing lattice gases with sufficiently low entropy to access regimes of correlated quantum behavior such as Néel ordered states. This work is supported by the ARO MURI on non-equilibrium dynamics.

  9. A quantum gas of polar molecules in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Steven A.

    Ultracold polar molecules, because of their long-range, spatially anisotropic interactions, are a new quantum system in which to study novel many-body phenomena. In our lab, we have produced the first quantum gas of 40K 87Rb polar molecules. These molecules were found to undergo exothermic chemical reactions, and this led to interesting studies of chemistry near absolute zero. By creating the molecules at individual sites of a 3D optical lattice, we completely suppress these chemical reactions, and the polar molecule gas becomes stable and lives for tens of seconds. This thesis documents our efforts to explore coherent, many-body phenomena resulting from long-range dipolar interactions in the lattice. By encoding a spin-1/2 system in the rotational states of the molecules, we were able to realize spin-exchange interactions based on a spin Hamiltonian, which is one of the first steps in studying quantum magnetism with polar molecules. While this study was the first realization of such coherent dipolar interactions with polar molecules in a lattice, its full potential was limited by the low lattice filling fractions. Using our ability to exquisitely control the initial atomic gas mixture, we loaded a Mott insulator of Rb and a band insulator of K into the lattice. This quantum synthesis approach led to significantly higher molecular filling fractions and represents the first fully connected system of polar molecules in an optical lattice. This low-entropy quantum gas of polar molecules opens the door to interesting quantum simulations, which should be attainable in the next generation of the experiment.

  10. Lattice-Boltzmann-based Simulations of Diffusiophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castigliego, Joshua; Kreft Pearce, Jennifer

    We present results from a lattice-Boltzmann-base Brownian Dynamics simulation on diffusiophoresis and the separation of particles within the system. A gradient in viscosity that simulates a concentration gradient in a dissolved polymer allows us to separate various types of particles by their deformability. As seen in previous experiments, simulated particles that have a higher deformability react differently to the polymer matrix than those with a lower deformability. Therefore, the particles can be separated from each other. This simulation, in particular, was intended to model an oceanic system where the particles of interest were zooplankton, phytoplankton and microplastics. The separation of plankton from the microplastics was achieved.

  11. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations of droplet evaporation.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo; Vella, Dominic; Yeomans, Julia M

    2014-11-01

    We study the utility and validity of lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulations to explore droplet evaporation driven by a concentration gradient. Using a binary-fluid lattice-Boltzmann algorithm based on Cahn-Hilliard dynamics, we study the evaporation of planar films and 3D sessile droplets from smooth solid surfaces. Our results show that LB simulations accurately reproduce the classical regime of quasi-static dynamics. Beyond this limit, we show that the algorithm can be used to explore regimes where the evaporative and diffusive timescales are not widely separated, and to include the effect of boundaries of prescribed driving concentration. We illustrate the method by considering the evaporation of a droplet from a solid surface that is chemically patterned with hydrophilic and hydrophobic stripes. PMID:25186667

  12. Driven lattice gas of dimers coupled to a bulk reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierobon, Paolo; Frey, Erwin; Franosch, Thomas

    2006-09-01

    We investigate the nonequilibrium steady state of a one-dimensional (1D) lattice gas of dimers. The dynamics is described by a totally asymmetric exclusion process (TASEP) supplemented by attachment and detachment processes, mimicking chemical equilibrium of the 1D driven transport with the bulk reservoir. The steady-state phase diagram and current and density profiles are calculated using both a refined mean-field theory and extensive stochastic simulations. As a consequence of the on-off kinetics, a phase coexistence region arises intervening between low and high density phases such that the discontinuous transition line of the TASEP splits into two continuous ones. The results of the mean-field theory and simulations are found to coincide. We show that the physical picture obtained in the corresponding lattice gas model with monomers is robust, in the sense that the phase diagram changes quantitatively, but the topology remains unaltered. The mechanism for phase separation is identified as generic for a wide class of driven 1D lattice gases.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann simulation on continuously regenerating diesel filter.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamauchi, Kazuki; Takada, Naoki; Misawa, Masaki; Furutani, Hirohide; Shinozaki, Osamu

    2011-06-28

    To reduce particulate matter (PM) including soot in diesel exhaust gas, a diesel particulate filter (DPF) has been developed. Since it is difficult to observe the phenomena in a DPF experimentally, we have conducted a lattice Boltzmann simulation. In this study, we simulated the flow in a metallic filter. An X-ray computed tomography (CT) technique was applied to obtain its inner structure. The processes of soot deposition and oxidation were included for a continuously regenerating diesel filter. By comparing experimental data, a parameter of soot deposition probability in the numerical model was determined.

  14. Measurement-based quantum lattice gas model of fluid dynamics in 2+1 dimensions.

    PubMed

    Micci, Michael M; Yepez, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Presented are quantum simulation results using a measurement-based quantum lattice gas algorithm for Navier-Stokes fluid dynamics in 2+1 dimensions. Numerical prediction of the kinematic viscosity was measured by the decay rate of an initial sinusoidal flow profile. Due to local quantum entanglement in the quantum lattice gas, the minimum kinematic viscosity in the measurement-based quantum lattice gas is lower than achievable in a classical lattice gas. The numerically predicted viscosities precisely match the theoretical predictions obtained with a mean field approximation. Uniform flow profile with double shear layers, on a 16K×8K lattice, leads to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, breaking up the shear layer into pairs of counter-rotating vortices that eventually merge via vortex fusion and dissipate because of the nonzero shear viscosity.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann equation for microscale gas flows of binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaoli; Asinari, Pietro; Zheng, Chuguang

    2009-02-01

    Modeling and simulating gas flows in and around microdevices are a challenging task in both science and engineering. In practical applications, a gas is usually a mixture made of different components. In this paper we propose a lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) model for microscale flows of a binary mixture based on a recently developed LBE model for continuum mixtures [P. Asinari and L.-S. Luo, J. Comput. Phys. 227, 3878 (2008)]. A consistent boundary condition for gas-solid interactions is proposed and analyzed. The LBE is validated and compared with theoretical results or other reported data. The results show that the model can serve as a potential method for flows of binary mixture in the microscale.

  16. One-dimensional lattices topologically equivalent to two-dimensional lattices within the context of the lattice gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanza, E. F.; Costanza, G.

    2016-10-01

    Continuum partial differential equations are obtained from a set of discrete stochastic evolution equations of both non-Markovian and Markovian processes and applied to the diffusion within the context of the lattice gas model. A procedure allowing to construct one-dimensional lattices that are topologically equivalent to two-dimensional lattices is described in detail in the case of a rectangular lattice. This example shows the general features that possess the procedure and extensions are also suggested in order to provide a wider insight in the present approach.

  17. Lattice location of deuterium in plasma and gas charged Mg doped GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Wampler, W.R.; Barbour, J.C.; Seager, C.H.; Myers, S.M. Jr.; Wright, A.F.; Han, J.

    1999-12-02

    The authors have used ion channeling to examine the lattice configuration of deuterium in Mg doped GaN grown by MOCVD. The deuterium is introduced both by exposure to deuterium gas and to ECR plasmas. A density functional approach including lattice relaxation, was used to calculate total energies for various locations and charge states of hydrogen in the wurtzite Mg doped GaN lattice. Computer simulations of channeling yields were used to compare results of channeling measurements with calculated yields for various predicted deuterium lattice configurations.

  18. Monte Carlo simulations of lattice gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Rebbi, C

    1980-02-01

    Monte Carlo simulations done for four-dimensional lattice gauge systems are described, where the gauge group is one of the following: U(1); SU(2); Z/sub N/, i.e., the subgroup of U(1) consisting of the elements e 2..pi..in/N with integer n and N; the eight-element group of quaternions, Q; the 24- and 48-element subgroups of SU(2), denoted by T and O, which reduce to the rotation groups of the tetrahedron and the octahedron when their centers Z/sub 2/, are factored out. All of these groups can be considered subgroups of SU(2) and a common normalization was used for the action. The following types of Monte Carlo experiments are considered: simulations of a thermal cycle, where the temperature of the system is varied slightly every few Monte Carlo iterations and the internal energy is measured; mixed-phase runs, where several Monte Carlo iterations are done at a few temperatures near a phase transition starting with a lattice which is half ordered and half disordered; measurements of averages of Wilson factors for loops of different shape. 5 figures, 1 table. (RWR)

  19. Theory of multicolor lattice gas - A cellular automaton Poisson solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Klein, L. W.

    1990-01-01

    The present class of models for cellular automata involving a quiescent hydrodynamic lattice gas with multiple-valued passive labels termed 'colors', the lattice collisions change individual particle colors while preserving net color. The rigorous proofs of the multicolor lattice gases' essential features are rendered more tractable by an equivalent subparticle representation in which the color is represented by underlying two-state 'spins'. Schemes for the introduction of Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions are described, and two illustrative numerical test cases are used to verify the theory. The lattice gas model is equivalent to a Poisson equation solution.

  20. Atom optics simulator of lattice transport phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Fangzhao; Meier, Eric; Gadway, Bryce

    2016-05-01

    We report on a novel scheme for studying lattice transport phenomena, based on the controlled momentum-space dynamics of ultracold atomic matter waves. In the effective tight binding models that can be simulated, we demonstrate that this technique allows for a local and time-dependent control over all system parameters, and additionally allows for single-site resolved detection of atomic populations. We demonstrate full control over site-to-site off-diagonal tunneling elements (amplitude and phase) and diagonal site-energies, through the observation of continuous time quantum walks, Bloch oscillations, and negative tunneling. These capabilities open up new prospects in the experimental study of disordered and topological systems.

  1. Dynamic behavior of multirobot systems using lattice gas automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Cameron, Stewart M.; Robinett, Rush D., III; Trahan, Michael W.; Wagner, John S.

    1999-07-01

    Recent attention has been given to the deployment of an adaptable sensor array realized by multi-robotic systems (or swarms). Our group has been studying the collective, autonomous behavior of these such systems and their applications in the area of remote-sensing and emerging threats. To accomplish such tasks, an interdisciplinary research effort at Sandia National Laboratories are conducting tests in the fields of sensor technology, robotics, and multi- agents architectures. Our goal is to coordinate a constellation of point sensors using unmanned robotic vehicles (e.g., RATLERs, Robotic All-Terrain Lunar Exploration Rover- class vehicles) that optimizes spatial coverage and multivariate signal analysis. An overall design methodology evolves complex collective behaviors realized through local interaction (kinetic) physics and artificial intelligence. Learning objectives incorporate real-time operational responses to environmental changes. This paper focuses on our recent work understanding the dynamics of many-body systems according to the physics-based hydrodynamic model of lattice gas automata. Three design features are investigated. One, for single-speed robots, a hexagonal nearest-neighbor interaction topology is necessary to preserve standard hydrodynamic flow. Two, adaptability, defined by the swarm's rate of deformation, can be controlled through the hydrodynamic viscosity term, which, in turn, is defined by the local robotic interaction rules. Three, due to the inherent nonlinearity of the dynamical equations describing large ensembles, stability criteria ensuring convergence to equilibrium states is developed by scaling information flow rates relative to a swarm's hydrodynamic flow rate. An initial test case simulates a swarm of twenty-five robots maneuvering past an obstacle while following a moving target. A genetic algorithm optimizes applied nearest-neighbor forces in each of five spatial regions distributed over the simulation domain. Armed with

  2. Study of hard core repulsive interactions in an hadronic gas from a comparison with lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alba, P.; Vovchenko, V.; Stoecker, H.

    2016-08-01

    We study the influence of hard-core repulsive interactions within the Hadron- Resonace Gas model in comparison to first principle calculation performed on a lattice. We check the effect of a bag-like parametrization for particle eigenvolume on flavor correlators, looking for an extension of the agreement with lattice simulations up to higher temperatures, as was yet pointed out in an analysis of hadron yields measured by the ALICE experiment. Hints for a flavor depending eigenvolume are present.

  3. Lattice Boltzmann Method for Spacecraft Propellant Slosh Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.; Powers, Joseph F.; Yang, Hong Q.

    2015-01-01

    A scalable computational approach to the simulation of propellant tank sloshing dynamics in microgravity is presented. In this work, we use the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) to approximate the behavior of two-phase, single-component isothermal flows at very low Bond numbers. Through the use of a non-ideal gas equation of state and a modified multiple relaxation time (MRT) collision operator, the proposed method can simulate thermodynamically consistent phase transitions at temperatures and density ratios consistent with typical spacecraft cryogenic propellants, for example, liquid oxygen. Determination of the tank forces and moments relies upon the global momentum conservation of the fluid domain, and a parametric wall wetting model allows tuning of the free surface contact angle. Development of the interface is implicit and no interface tracking approach is required. Numerical examples illustrate the method's application to predicting bulk fluid motion including lateral propellant slosh in low-g conditions.

  4. Lattice Boltzmann Method for Spacecraft Propellant Slosh Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.; Powers, Joseph F.; Yang, Hong Q

    2015-01-01

    A scalable computational approach to the simulation of propellant tank sloshing dynamics in microgravity is presented. In this work, we use the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) to approximate the behavior of two-phase, single-component isothermal flows at very low Bond numbers. Through the use of a non-ideal gas equation of state and a modified multiple relaxation time (MRT) collision operator, the proposed method can simulate thermodynamically consistent phase transitions at temperatures and density ratios consistent with typical spacecraft cryogenic propellants, for example, liquid oxygen. Determination of the tank forces and moments is based upon a novel approach that relies on the global momentum conservation of the closed fluid domain, and a parametric wall wetting model allows tuning of the free surface contact angle. Development of the interface is implicit and no interface tracking approach is required. A numerical example illustrates the method's application to prediction of bulk fluid behavior during a spacecraft ullage settling maneuver.

  5. Quantum simulation of antiferromagnetic spin chains in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jonathan; Bakr, Waseem S; Ma, Ruichao; Tai, M Eric; Preiss, Philipp M; Greiner, Markus

    2011-04-21

    Understanding exotic forms of magnetism in quantum mechanical systems is a central goal of modern condensed matter physics, with implications for systems ranging from high-temperature superconductors to spintronic devices. Simulating magnetic materials in the vicinity of a quantum phase transition is computationally intractable on classical computers, owing to the extreme complexity arising from quantum entanglement between the constituent magnetic spins. Here we use a degenerate Bose gas of rubidium atoms confined in an optical lattice to simulate a chain of interacting quantum Ising spins as they undergo a phase transition. Strong spin interactions are achieved through a site-occupation to pseudo-spin mapping. As we vary a magnetic field, quantum fluctuations drive a phase transition from a paramagnetic phase into an antiferromagnetic phase. In the paramagnetic phase, the interaction between the spins is overwhelmed by the applied field, which aligns the spins. In the antiferromagnetic phase, the interaction dominates and produces staggered magnetic ordering. Magnetic domain formation is observed through both in situ site-resolved imaging and noise correlation measurements. By demonstrating a route to quantum magnetism in an optical lattice, this work should facilitate further investigations of magnetic models using ultracold atoms, thereby improving our understanding of real magnetic materials.

  6. A lattice gas cellular automaton approach to model volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, L.; Shcherbakov, R.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are the result of complex mechanisms that operate in a magma chamber within the crust. In a previous study, we showed that the dynamics of eruptions on Earth are the same and are quite independent of the location and type of volcanism. The goal of this study is to test the universality of volcanism by designing a simple, general model to simulate processes occurring within a magma chamber. We aim at reproducing the threshold behavior that operates in the magma chamber when pressure increase leads to an eruption. To simulate volcanic eruptions, we propose to use a lattice gas cellular automata (LGCA), which have been proven efficient to simulate fluid flow behavior. This type cellular automaton is a discrete dynamical model in space and time, where the fluid is represented at the microscopic level by discrete particles. We start with the simplest LGCA: the 2-dimensional HPP model (proposed in 1973 by Hardy, de Pazzis and Pomeau), which consists of a square lattice where particles interact with one another mimicking the fluid flow and conserving mass and momentum. We also consider the model on a hexagonal lattice to take anisotropy into account. In this model, magma propagates through a heterogeneous medium, and deformation and fracturing occurs on the walls of the chamber up until a pressure threshold is reached and an eruption or a cascade of eruptions occur. We record the size of each event and the number of time steps between consecutive events (or interevent time). The model simulation results for a large number of realizations are compared with observed data. The observations come from eruption records of 13 individual volcanoes located around the world as well as 11 groups of volcanoes located in various regions surrounded by different tectonic settings. From these, we computed the frequency-size distribution of eruptions and the interevent time distributions for a large number of active volcanoes on Earth. This model allows us to study a

  7. Transport of a lattice gas under continuous measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Hil F. H.; Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Madjarov, Ivaylo S.; Chen, Huiyao Y.; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2016-05-01

    The act of measurement has a profound consequence on a quantum system. While this backaction has hitherto been discussed as a limitation to the precision of measurements, it is increasingly being appreciated that measurement backaction is a powerful means of quantum control. We have previously demonstrated that backaction from position measurement can modify the coherent tunneling rate of a lattice gas through the Quantum Zeno effect. By suitably designing measurement landscapes we can control the transport properties of the lattice gas. We describe a quantitative study of lattice gas dynamics under continuous quantum measurement in the context of a quantum to classical transition where the atom dynamics goes from a quantum walk at low measurement strengths to classical diffusion at high measurement strengths. We further discuss the prospect of using disorder measurement landscapes to realize a new form of Anderson localization. This work is supported by the ARO MURI on non-equilibrium dynamics.

  8. Representation and simulation for pyrochlore lattice via Monte Carlo technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passos, André Luis; de Albuquerque, Douglas F.; Filho, João Batista Santos

    2016-05-01

    This work presents a representation of the Kagome and pyrochlore lattices using Monte Carlo simulation as well as some results of the critical properties. These lattices are composed corner sharing triangles and tetrahedrons respectively. The simulation was performed employing the Cluster Wolf Algorithm for the spin updates through the standard ferromagnetic Ising Model. The determination of the critical temperature and exponents was based on the Histogram Technique and the Finite-Size Scaling Theory.

  9. A lattice gas model for erosion and particles transport in a fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopard, Bastien; Masselot, Alexandre; Dupuis, Alexandre

    2000-07-01

    We consider a simple lattice gas model to simulate erosion, deposition and particle transport in a streaming fluid. In our approach, the fluid is described by a standard lattice Boltzmann model and the granular suspension by a multiparticle cellular automata. A good agreement is obtained between the predictions of the model and field measurements, as observed by analyzing the deposition patterns resulting from various snow and sand transport phenomena. In particular we study the case of ripples formation and simulate the scour appearing around a submarine pipe.

  10. Thermodynamics of a lattice gas with linear attractive potential

    SciTech Connect

    Pirjol, Dan; Schat, Carlos

    2015-01-15

    We study the equilibrium thermodynamics of a one-dimensional lattice gas with interaction V(|i−j|)=−1/(μn) (ξ−1/n |i−j|) given by the superposition of a universal attractive interaction with strength −1/(μn) ξ<0, and a linear attractive potential 1/(μn{sup 2}) |i−j|. The interaction is rescaled with the lattice size n, such that the thermodynamical limit n → ∞ is well-behaved. The thermodynamical properties of the system can be found exactly, both for a finite size lattice and in the thermodynamical limit n → ∞. The lattice gas can be mapped to a system of non-interacting bosons which are placed on known energy levels. The exact solution shows that the system has a liquid-gas phase transition for ξ > 0. In the large temperature limit T ≫ T{sub 0}(ρ) = ρ{sup 2}/(4μ) with ρ the density, the system becomes spatially homogeneous, and the equation of state is given to a good approximation by a lattice version of the van der Waals equation, with critical temperature T{sub c}{sup (vdW)}=1/(12μ) (3ξ−1)

  11. Simulation of Ultrasonic-driven Gas Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, David R.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Ahmed, Salahuddin; Doctor, Steven R.; Posakony, Gerald J.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.

    2007-06-01

    The separation of components in a gas mixture is important for a wide range of applications. One method for achieving this separation is by passing a traveling acoustic wave through the gas mixture, which creates a flux of the lighter components away from the transducer. A series of simulation were performed to assess the effectiveness of this method for separating a binary mixture of argon and helium using the lattice kinetics method. The energy transport equation was modified to account for adiabatic expansion and compression. The species transport equation was modified to include a barodiffusion term. Simulations were performed on two different scales; detailed acoustic wave simulations to determine the net component flux as a function of local concentration, pressure, etc., and device scale simulations to predict the gas composition as a function of time inside a gas separation cylinder. The method is first validated using data from literature and then applied to mixtures of argon and helium. Results are presented and discussed.

  12. Simulation of ultrasonic-driven gas separations.

    PubMed

    Rector, David R; Greenwood, Margaret S; Ahmed, Salahuddin; Doctor, Steven R; Posakony, Gerry J; Stenkamp, V Susan

    2007-06-01

    The separation of components in a gas mixture is important for a wide range of applications. One method for achieving this separation is by passing a traveling acoustic wave through the gas mixture, which creates a flux of the lighter components away from the transducer. A series of simulations was performed to assess the effectiveness of this method for separating a binary mixture of argon and helium using the lattice kinetics method. The energy transport equation was modified to account for adiabatic expansion and compression. The species transport equation was modified to include a barodiffusion term. Simulations were performed on two different scales; detailed acoustic wave simulations to determine the net component flux as a function of local concentration, pressure, etc. and device scale simulations to predict the gas composition as a function of time inside a gas separation cylinder. The method is first validated using data from literature and then applied to mixtures of argon and helium. Results are presented and discussed.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann model for simulation of magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shiyi; Chen, Hudong; Martinez, Daniel; Matthaeus, William

    1991-01-01

    A numerical method, based on a discrete Boltzmann equation, is presented for solving the equations of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The algorithm provides advantages similar to the cellular automaton method in that it is local and easily adapted to parallel computing environments. Because of much lower noise levels and less stringent requirements on lattice size, the method appears to be more competitive with traditional solution methods. Examples show that the model accurately reproduces both linear and nonlinear MHD phenomena.

  14. Lorentz lattice-gas and kinetic-walk model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziff, Robert M.; Kong, X. P.; Cohen, E. G. D.

    1991-08-01

    The Ruijgrok-Cohen (RC) mirror model [Phys. Lett. A 133, 415 (1988)] of a Lorentz lattice gas, in which particles are reflected by left and right diagonally oriented mirrors randomly placed on the sites of a square lattice, is further investigated. Extensive computer simulations of individual trajectories up to 224 steps in length, on a lattice of 65 536×65 536 sites, are carried out. This model generates particle trajectories that are related to a variety of kinetic growth and ``smart'' (nontrapping) walks, and provides a kinetic interpretation of them. When all sites are covered with mirrors of both orientations with equal probability, the trajectories are equivalent to smart kinetic walks that effectively generate the hulls of bond percolation clusters at criticality. For this case, 106 trajectories were generated, yielding with unprecedented accuracy an orbit size-distribution exponent of τ=2.1423+/-0.0003 and a fractal dimension of df=1.750 47+/-0.000 24 (without correcting for finite-size effects), compared with theoretical predictions of 15/7=2.142 857. . . and 7/4, respectively. When the total concentration of mirrors C is less than unity, so that the trajectories can cross, the size distribution of the closed orbits does not follow a power law, but appears to be described by a logarithmic function. This function implies that all trajectories eventually close. The geometry of the trajectories does not show clear self-similar or fractal behavior in that the dependence of the mean-square displacement upon the time also appears to follow a logarithmic function. These trajectories are related to the growing self-avoiding trail (GSAT) introduced by Lyklema [J. Phys. A 18, L617 (1985)], and the present work supports the conjecture of Bradley [Phys. Rev. A 41, 914 (1990)] that the GSAT (the RC model with C=2/3) is not at a critical point. It is observed that when C<1, the trajectories behave asymptotically like an unrestricted random walk, and so for comparison

  15. Dynamics of a lattice gas system of three species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanshi; Wu, Hong; Liang, Junhao

    2016-10-01

    This paper considers a mutualism system of three species in which each species provides resource for the next one in a one-directional loop, while there exists spatial competition among them. The system is characterized by a lattice gas model and the cases of obligate mutualisms, obligate-facultative mutualisms and facultative mutualisms are considered. Using dynamical systems theory, it is shown that (i) the mutualisms can lead to coexistence of species; (ii) A weak mutualism or an extremely strong mutualism will result in extinction of species, while even the superior facultative species will be driven into extinction by its over-strong mutualism on the next one; (iii) Initial population density plays a role in the coexistence of species. It is also shown that when there exists weak mutualism, an obligate species can survive by providing more benefit to the next one, and the inferior facultative species will not be driven into extinction if it can strengthen its mutualism on the next species. Moreover, Hopf bifurcation, saddle-node bifurcation and bifurcation of heteroclinic cycles are shown in the system. Projection method is extended to exhibit bistability in the three-dimensional model: when saddle-node bifurcation occurs, stable manifold of the saddle-node point divides intR+3 into two basins of attraction of two equilibria. Furthermore, Lyapunov method is applied to exhibit unstability of heteroclinic cycles. Numerical simulations confirm and extend our results.

  16. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of drops colliding with solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, X.; McLaughlin, J. B.; Kontomaris, K.

    2009-04-01

    Video images of drops colliding with solid surfaces shown by Rioboo et al. (2002) reveal that, for large drop velocities, the drops flatten and form a ring structure before receding and, in some cases, rebounding from the surface. They described the sequence of events in terms of four distinct regimes. During the initial kinematic phase, the dimensionless wetting radius of the drop follows a universal form if the drop Weber and Reynolds numbers are sufficiently large. In the second phase, the drop becomes highly flattened and the values of the Weber and Reynolds numbers influence the time evolution of the dimensionless wetting radius and its maximum value. This is followed by a third phase in which the wetting radius begins to decrease with time and the wettability of the surface influences the dynamics. This paper presents simulation results for the early stages of drop impact and spreading on a partially wetting solid surface. The simulations were performed with a modified version of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) developed by Inamuro et al. (2004) for a liquid-gas density ratio of 1000. The Inamuro et al. version of the LBM was modified by incorporating rigid, no-slip boundary conditions and incorporating a boundary condition on the normal derivative of the order parameter to impose the desired equilibrium contact angle.

  17. Multiple phase transitions in extended hard-core lattice gas models in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Nath, Trisha; Rajesh, R

    2014-07-01

    We study the k-NN hard-core lattice gas model in which the first k next-nearest-neighbor sites of a particle are excluded from occupation by other particles on a two-dimensional square lattice. This model is the lattice version of the hard-disk system with increasing k corresponding to decreasing lattice spacing. While the hard-disk system is known to undergo a two-step freezing process with increasing density, the lattice model has been known to show only one transition. Here, based on Monte Carlo simulations and high-density expansions of the free energy and density, we argue that for k = 4,10,11,14,⋯, the lattice model undergoes multiple transitions with increasing density. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm the same for k = 4,...,11. This, in turn, resolves an existing puzzle as to why the 4-NN model has a continuous transition against the expectation of a first-order transition.

  18. Multiple phase transitions in extended hard-core lattice gas models in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Nath, Trisha; Rajesh, R

    2014-07-01

    We study the k-NN hard-core lattice gas model in which the first k next-nearest-neighbor sites of a particle are excluded from occupation by other particles on a two-dimensional square lattice. This model is the lattice version of the hard-disk system with increasing k corresponding to decreasing lattice spacing. While the hard-disk system is known to undergo a two-step freezing process with increasing density, the lattice model has been known to show only one transition. Here, based on Monte Carlo simulations and high-density expansions of the free energy and density, we argue that for k = 4,10,11,14,⋯, the lattice model undergoes multiple transitions with increasing density. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm the same for k = 4,...,11. This, in turn, resolves an existing puzzle as to why the 4-NN model has a continuous transition against the expectation of a first-order transition. PMID:25122264

  19. Lattice Gas Modeling of Scour Formation under Submarine Pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Alexandre; Chopard, Bastien

    2002-05-01

    The so-called lattice Boltzmann method is used to implement a numerical model for erosion, transport, and deposition of sediment due to the action of a streaming fluid. This approach is applied to describe the formation of a scour under a submarine pipe. Both static and dynamic properties of the process are well reproduced by our computer simulations.

  20. Quest for More Information from Lattice QCD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Forcrand, P.; García Pérez, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Hioki, S.; Matsufuru, H.; Miyamura, O.; Umeda, T.; Nakamura, A.; Stamatescu, I.-O.; Tago, Y.; Takaishi, T.

    Lattice QCD is one of the most powerful tools to study the non-perturbative nature of the strong interaction. Although much information has been obtained so far to understand QCD, the computational cost becomes higher and higher as we calculate on finer lattices; simulations near the continuum are still far beyond. We report the progress on (1) renormalization group (RG) improved actions and (2) anisotropic lattice, which QCD-TARO group has developed and studied in order to get more information from the simulations on the present computers. RG improved actions were proposed and studied by Wilson and Iwasaki to remove discretization effects for long distance observables. We have studied 1× 1 + 1× 2 type actions, which includes Wilson, Symanzik and Iwasaki ones, by the strong and weak coupling expansions and Monte Carlo RG method. We have calculated RG flow and obtained a new effective β-function. Anisotropic lattice, where the temporal lattice spacing is smaller than that along the spatial one, makes us possible to perform finer resolution measurements in the temporal direction. This is especially useful at the finite temperature, where the temporal lattice size is limited. We have calculated meson pole and screening masses. We have found they behave in a different manner as a function of T.

  1. Simulating infinite vortex lattices in superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingarelli, Luca; Keaveny, Eric E.; Barnett, Ryan

    2016-07-01

    We present an efficient framework to numerically treat infinite periodic vortex lattices in rotating superfluids described by the Gross-Pitaevskii theory. The commonly used split-step Fourier (SSF) spectral methods are inapplicable to such systems as the standard Fourier transform does not respect the boundary conditions mandated by the magnetic translation group. We present a generalisation of the SSF method which incorporates the correct boundary conditions by employing the so-called magnetic Fourier transform. We test the method and show that it reduces to known results in the lowest-Landau-level regime. While we focus on rotating scalar superfluids for simplicity, the framework can be naturally extended to treat multicomponent systems and systems under more general ‘synthetic’ gauge fields.

  2. Lattice Boltzmann method for simulation of compressible flows on standard lattices.

    PubMed

    Prasianakis, Nikolaos I; Karlin, Iliya V

    2008-07-01

    The recently introduced lattice Boltzmann model for thermal flow simulation on a standard lattice [Prasianakis and Karlin, Phys. Rev. E 76, 016702 (2007)] is studied numerically in the case where compressibility effects are essential. It is demonstrated that the speed of sound and shock propagation are described correctly in a wide temperature range, and that it is possible to take into account additional physics such as heat sources and sinks. A remarkable simplicity of the model makes it viable for engineering applications in subsonic flows with large temperature and density variations. PMID:18764078

  3. Towards exciting a Rydberg gas in optical lattices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjappa, Manukumara; Han, Jingshan; Guo, Ruixiang; Vogt, Thibault; Li, Wenhui; Quantum Matter Group Team

    2013-05-01

    Rydberg atoms are highly excited atoms with principal quantum number n >10. They have exaggerated properties such as large dipole moment and high polarizability. Large dipole-dipole interactions between Rydberg atoms, which lead to Rydberg blockade and giant non linearity, provide unique opportunities for studying quantum many-body physics. Rydberg excitation of ground state quantum gas in optical lattices has already shown the formation of spatially organized structures and Rydberg dressed systems are promising for entering the strongly correlated regime. Our current project is to study the collective excitation to Rydberg states from a quantum gas of ground state atoms in an optical lattice. In this poster we present the latest development in building up the experimental apparatus and our plans on spectroscopic measurements and spatially imaging of Rydberg excitations. Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore.

  4. Adsorption of solutes at liquid-vapor interfaces: insights from lattice gas models.

    PubMed

    Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayanan; Shaffer, Patrick R; Geissler, Phillip L

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of ions at liquid-vapor interfaces exhibits several unexpected yet generic features. In particular, energy and entropy are both minimum when the solute resides near the surface, for a variety of ions in a range of polar solvents, contrary to predictions of classical theories. Motivated by this generality, and by the simple physical ingredients implicated by computational studies, we have examined interfacial solvation in highly schematic models, which resolve only coarse fluctuations in solvent density and cohesive energy. Here we show that even such lattice gas models recapitulate surprising thermodynamic trends observed in detailed simulations and experiments. Attention is focused on the case of two dimensions, for which approximate energy and entropy profiles can be calculated analytically. Simulations and theoretical analysis of the lattice gas highlight the role of capillary wave-like fluctuations in mediating adsorption. They further point to ranges of temperature and solute-solvent interaction strength where surface propensity is expected to be strongest.

  5. Lattice Boltzmann Simulations of Peristaltic Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connington, Kevin; Kang, Qinjun; Viswanathan, Hari; Chen, Shiyi; Abdel-Fattah, Amr

    2008-11-01

    A peristaltic flow occurs when a tube or channel with flexible walls transports the contained fluid by progressing a series of contraction or expansion waves along the length of those walls. It is a mechanism used to transport fluid and immersed solid particles when it is ineffective or impossible to impose a favorable pressure gradient or desirous to avoid contact between the transported mixture and mechanical moving parts. Peristaltic transport occurs in many physiological situations and has myriad industrial applications. We focus our study on the peristaltic transport of a macroscopic particle in a two dimensional channel using the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM). We systematically investigate the effect of variation of the relevant non-dimensional parameters of the system on the particle transport. We examine the particle behavior when the system exhibits the peculiar phenomenon of fluid ``trapping.'' Finally, we analyze how the particle presence affects stress, pressure, and dissipation in the fluid in hopes of determining preferred working conditions for peristaltic transport of shear-sensitive particles.

  6. Simulation of gaseous diffusion in partially saturated porous media under variable gravity with lattice Boltzmann methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chau, Jessica Furrer; Or, Dani; Sukop, Michael C.; Steinberg, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2005-01-01

    Liquid distributions in unsaturated porous media under different gravitational accelerations and corresponding macroscopic gaseous diffusion coefficients were investigated to enhance understanding of plant growth conditions in microgravity. We used a single-component, multiphase lattice Boltzmann code to simulate liquid configurations in two-dimensional porous media at varying water contents for different gravity conditions and measured gas diffusion through the media using a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann code. The relative diffusion coefficients (D rel) for simulations with and without gravity as functions of air-filled porosity were in good agreement with measured data and established models. We found significant differences in liquid configuration in porous media, leading to reductions in D rel of up to 25% under zero gravity. The study highlights potential applications of the lattice Boltzmann method for rapid and cost-effective evaluation of alternative plant growth media designs under variable gravity.

  7. Simulation of gaseous diffusion in partially saturated porous media under variable gravity with lattice Boltzmann methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Jessica Furrer; Or, Dani; Sukop, Michael C.

    2005-08-01

    Liquid distributions in unsaturated porous media under different gravitational accelerations and corresponding macroscopic gaseous diffusion coefficients were investigated to enhance understanding of plant growth conditions in microgravity. We used a single-component, multiphase lattice Boltzmann code to simulate liquid configurations in two-dimensional porous media at varying water contents for different gravity conditions and measured gas diffusion through the media using a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann code. The relative diffusion coefficients (Drel) for simulations with and without gravity as functions of air-filled porosity were in good agreement with measured data and established models. We found significant differences in liquid configuration in porous media, leading to reductions in Drel of up to 25% under zero gravity. The study highlights potential applications of the lattice Boltzmann method for rapid and cost-effective evaluation of alternative plant growth media designs under variable gravity.

  8. Residual entropy and waterlike anomalies in the repulsive one dimensional lattice gas.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Fernando Barbosa V; Oliveira, Fernando Albuquerque; Barbosa, Marco Aurélio A

    2015-04-14

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of the one dimensional lattice gas with repulsive interaction are investigated using transfer matrix technique and Monte Carlo simulations. This simple model is shown to exhibit waterlike anomalies in density, thermal expansion coefficient, and self-diffusion. An unified description for the thermodynamic anomalies in this model is achieved based on the ground state residual entropy which appears in the model due to mixing entropy in a ground state phase transition.

  9. Residual entropy and waterlike anomalies in the repulsive one dimensional lattice gas

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Fernando Barbosa V. da; Oliveira, Fernando Albuquerque; Barbosa, Marco Aurélio A.

    2015-04-14

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of the one dimensional lattice gas with repulsive interaction are investigated using transfer matrix technique and Monte Carlo simulations. This simple model is shown to exhibit waterlike anomalies in density, thermal expansion coefficient, and self-diffusion. An unified description for the thermodynamic anomalies in this model is achieved based on the ground state residual entropy which appears in the model due to mixing entropy in a ground state phase transition.

  10. Lattice Monte Carlo simulation of Galilei variant anomalous diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Gang; Bittig, Arne; Uhrmacher, Adelinde

    2015-05-01

    The observation of an increasing number of anomalous diffusion phenomena motivates the study to reveal the actual reason for such stochastic processes. When it is difficult to get analytical solutions or necessary to track the trajectory of particles, lattice Monte Carlo (LMC) simulation has been shown to be particularly useful. To develop such an LMC simulation algorithm for the Galilei variant anomalous diffusion, we derive explicit solutions for the conditional and unconditional first passage time (FPT) distributions with double absorbing barriers. According to the theory of random walks on lattices and the FPT distributions, we propose an LMC simulation algorithm and prove that such LMC simulation can reproduce both the mean and the mean square displacement exactly in the long-time limit. However, the error introduced in the second moment of the displacement diverges according to a power law as the simulation time progresses. We give an explicit criterion for choosing a small enough lattice step to limit the error within the specified tolerance. We further validate the LMC simulation algorithm and confirm the theoretical error analysis through numerical simulations. The numerical results agree with our theoretical predictions very well.

  11. Coupling lattice Boltzmann model for simulation of thermal flows on standard lattices.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Luo, K H; He, Y L; Gao, Y J; Tao, W Q

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a coupling lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for simulating thermal flows on the standard two-dimensional nine-velocity (D2Q9) lattice is developed in the framework of the double-distribution-function (DDF) approach in which the viscous heat dissipation and compression work are considered. In the model, a density distribution function is used to simulate the flow field, while a total energy distribution function is employed to simulate the temperature field. The discrete equilibrium density and total energy distribution functions are obtained from the Hermite expansions of the corresponding continuous equilibrium distribution functions. The pressure given by the equation of state of perfect gases is recovered in the macroscopic momentum and energy equations. The coupling between the momentum and energy transports makes the model applicable for general thermal flows such as non-Boussinesq flows, while the existing DDF LB models on standard lattices are usually limited to Boussinesq flows in which the temperature variation is small. Meanwhile, the simple structure and general features of the DDF LB approach are retained. The model is tested by numerical simulations of thermal Couette flow, attenuation-driven acoustic streaming, and natural convection in a square cavity with small and large temperature differences. The numerical results are found to be in good agreement with the analytical solutions and/or other numerical results reported in the literature.

  12. Slow relaxation and aging kinetics for the driven lattice gas.

    PubMed

    Daquila, George L; Täuber, Uwe C

    2011-05-01

    We numerically investigate the long-time behavior of the density-density autocorrelation function in driven lattice gases with particle exclusion and periodic boundary conditions in one, two, and three dimensions using precise Monte Carlo simulations. In the one-dimensional asymmetric exclusion process on a ring with half the lattice sites occupied, we find that correlations induce extremely slow relaxation to the asymptotic power law decay. We compare the crossover functions obtained from our simulations with various analytic results in the literature and analyze the characteristic oscillations that occur in finite systems away from half-filling. As expected, in three dimensions correlations are weak and consequently the mean-field description is adequate. We also investigate the relaxation toward the nonequilibrium steady state in the two-time density-density autocorrelations, starting from strongly correlated initial conditions. We obtain simple aging scaling behavior in one, two, and three dimensions, with the expected power laws.

  13. Lattice-Boltzmann simulation of coalescence-driven island coarsening

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Basagaoglu, H.; Green, C.T.; Meakin, P.; McCoy, B.J.

    2004-01-01

    The first-order phase separation in a thin fluid film was simulated using a two-dimensional lattice-Boltzman model (LBM) with fluid-fluid interactions. The effects of the domain size on the intermediate asymptotic island size distribution were also discussed. It was observed that the overall process is dominated by coalescence which is independent of island mass. The results show that the combined effects of growth, coalescence, and Ostwald ripening control the phase transition process in the LBM simulations.

  14. Microscopic reversibility and macroscopic irreversibility: A lattice gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Cárdenas, Fernando C.; Resca, Lorenzo; Pegg, Ian L.

    2016-09-01

    We present coarse-grained descriptions and computations of the time evolution of a lattice gas system of indistinguishable particles, whose microscopic laws of motion are exactly reversible, in order to investigate how or what kind of macroscopically irreversible behavior may eventually arise. With increasing coarse-graining and number of particles, relative fluctuations of entropy rapidly decrease and apparently irreversible behavior unfolds. Although that behavior becomes typical in those limits and within a certain range, it is never absolutely irreversible for any individual system with specific initial conditions. Irreversible behavior may arise in various ways. We illustrate one possibility by replacing detailed integer occupation numbers at lattice sites with particle probability densities that evolve diffusively.

  15. History dependent quantum random walks as quantum lattice gas automata

    SciTech Connect

    Shakeel, Asif E-mail: dmeyer@math.ucsd.edu Love, Peter J. E-mail: dmeyer@math.ucsd.edu; Meyer, David A. E-mail: dmeyer@math.ucsd.edu

    2014-12-15

    Quantum Random Walks (QRW) were first defined as one-particle sectors of Quantum Lattice Gas Automata (QLGA). Recently, they have been generalized to include history dependence, either on previous coin (internal, i.e., spin or velocity) states or on previous position states. These models have the goal of studying the transition to classicality, or more generally, changes in the performance of quantum walks in algorithmic applications. We show that several history dependent QRW can be identified as one-particle sectors of QLGA. This provides a unifying conceptual framework for these models in which the extra degrees of freedom required to store the history information arise naturally as geometrical degrees of freedom on the lattice.

  16. Quantum simulations of lattice gauge theories using ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohar, Erez; Cirac, J. Ignacio; Reznik, Benni

    2016-01-01

    Can high-energy physics be simulated by low-energy, non-relativistic, many-body systems such as ultracold atoms? Such ultracold atomic systems lack the type of symmetries and dynamical properties of high energy physics models: in particular, they manifest neither local gauge invariance nor Lorentz invariance, which are crucial properties of the quantum field theories which are the building blocks of the standard model of elementary particles. However, it turns out, surprisingly, that there are ways to configure an atomic system to manifest both local gauge invariance and Lorentz invariance. In particular, local gauge invariance can arise either as an effective low-energy symmetry, or as an exact symmetry, following from the conservation laws in atomic interactions. Hence, one could hope that such quantum simulators may lead to a new type of (table-top) experiments which will be used to study various QCD (quantum chromodynamics) phenomena, such as the confinement of dynamical quarks, phase transitions and other effects, which are inaccessible using the currently known computational methods. In this report, we review the Hamiltonian formulation of lattice gauge theories, and then describe our recent progress in constructing the quantum simulation of Abelian and non-Abelian lattice gauge theories in 1  +  1 and 2  +  1 dimensions using ultracold atoms in optical lattices.

  17. Quantum simulations of lattice gauge theories using ultracold atoms in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Zohar, Erez; Cirac, J Ignacio; Reznik, Benni

    2016-01-01

    Can high-energy physics be simulated by low-energy, non-relativistic, many-body systems such as ultracold atoms? Such ultracold atomic systems lack the type of symmetries and dynamical properties of high energy physics models: in particular, they manifest neither local gauge invariance nor Lorentz invariance, which are crucial properties of the quantum field theories which are the building blocks of the standard model of elementary particles. However, it turns out, surprisingly, that there are ways to configure an atomic system to manifest both local gauge invariance and Lorentz invariance. In particular, local gauge invariance can arise either as an effective low-energy symmetry, or as an exact symmetry, following from the conservation laws in atomic interactions. Hence, one could hope that such quantum simulators may lead to a new type of (table-top) experiments which will be used to study various QCD (quantum chromodynamics) phenomena, such as the confinement of dynamical quarks, phase transitions and other effects, which are inaccessible using the currently known computational methods. In this report, we review the Hamiltonian formulation of lattice gauge theories, and then describe our recent progress in constructing the quantum simulation of Abelian and non-Abelian lattice gauge theories in 1  +  1 and 2  +  1 dimensions using ultracold atoms in optical lattices. PMID:26684222

  18. Towards quantum simulation with two-electron 173Yb fermions in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bo; Zou, Yueyang; He, Chengdong; Haciyev, Elnur; Cai, Geyue; Chan, Wing Kin; Huang, Wei; Jo, Gyu-Boong

    2016-05-01

    Recent development of cooling and manipulating Ytterbium atoms opens a new avenue to investigate unprecedented atomic systems with SU(N) spin symmetry and orbital degrees of freedom. The available metastable states and narrow-line optical transitions of Ytterbium atoms allow for the versatile control of the system. Here, we first describe our apparatus for producing ultracold Ytterbium-173 quantum gases in an optical lattice. A gas of 3 ×104 Ytterbium-173 atoms is routinely produced at T /TF ~ 0 . 3 , and loaded into an optical lattice potential. Then we report our recent progress on the spin orbital (SO) coupling interaction realized in optical lattice. As a novel quantum simulator, cold Ytterbium atoms with SO coupling provide a platform to explore the intriguing topological physics. Funded by the Research Grants Council (RGC) of Hong Kong Project# 16300215.

  19. Simulation of swimming of a flexible filament using the generalized lattice-spring lattice-Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tai-Hsien; Guo, Rurng-Sheng; He, Guo-Wei; Liu, Ying-Ming; Qi, Dewei

    2014-05-21

    A generalized lattice-spring lattice-Boltzmann model (GLLM) is introduced by adding a three-body force in the traditional lattice-spring model. This method is able to deal with bending deformation of flexible biological bodies in fluids. The interactions between elastic solids and fluid are treated with the immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method. GLLM is validated by comparing the present results with the existing theoretical and simulation results. As an application of GLLM, swimming of flagellum in fluid is simulated and propulsive force as a function of driven frequency and fluid structures at various Reynolds numbers 0.15-5.1 are presented in this paper.

  20. Lattice Boltzmann model for the simulation of multicomponent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Arcidiacono, S; Karlin, I V; Mantzaras, J; Frouzakis, C E

    2007-10-01

    A lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for the simulation of realistic multicomponent mixtures is constructed. In the hydrodynamic limit, the LB model recovers the equations of continuum mechanics within the mixture-averaged diffusion approximation. The present implementation can be used to simulate realistic mixtures with arbitrary Schmidt numbers and molecular masses of the species. The model is applied to the mixing of two opposed jets of different concentrations and the results are in excellent agreement with a continuum model. An application to the simulation of mixtures in microflows is also presented. Results compare well with existing kinetic theory predictions of the slip coefficient for mixtures in a Couette flow.

  1. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of void lattice formation during irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinisch, H. L.; Singh, B. N.

    2003-11-01

    Over the last decade, molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades have revealed that glissile clusters of self-interstitial crowdions are formed directly in cascades and that they migrate one-dimensionally along close-packed directions with extremely low activation energies. Occasionally, under various conditions, a crowdion cluster can change its Burgers vector and glide along a different close-packed direction. The recently developed production bias model (PBM) of microstructure evolution under irradiation has been structured specifically to take into account the unique properties of the vacancy and interstitial clusters produced in the cascades. Atomic-scale kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations have played a useful role in understanding the defect reaction kinetics of one-dimensionally migrating crowdion clusters as a function of the frequency of direction changes. This has made it possible to incorporate the migration properties of crowdion clusters and changes in reaction kinetics into the PBM. In the present paper we utilize similar KMC simulations to investigate the significant role that crowdion clusters can play in the formation and stability of void lattices. The creation of stable void lattices, starting from a random distribution of voids, is simulated by a KMC model in which vacancies migrate three-dimensionally and self-interstitial atom (SIA) clusters migrate one-dimensionally, interrupted by directional changes. The necessity of both one-dimensional migration and Burgers vectors changes of SIA clusters for the production of stable void lattices is demonstrated, and the effects of the frequency of Burgers vector changes are described.

  2. Lattice gas automata for flow and transport in geochemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Janecky, D.R.; Chen, S.; Dawson, S.; Eggert, K.C.; Travis, B.J.

    1992-05-01

    Lattice gas automata models are described, which couple solute transport with chemical reactions at mineral surfaces within pore networks. Diffusion in a box calculations are illustrated, which compare directly with Fickian diffusion. Chemical reactions at solid surfaces, including precipitation/dissolution, sorption, and catalytic reaction, can be examined with the model because hydrodynamic transport, solute diffusion and mineral surface processes are all treated explicitly. The simplicity and flexibility of the approach provides the ability to study the interrelationship between fluid flow and chemical reactions in porous materials, at a level of complexity that has not previously been computationally possible.

  3. Lattice gas automata for flow and transport in geochemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Janecky, D.R.; Chen, S.; Dawson, S.; Eggert, K.C.; Travis, B.J.

    1992-01-01

    Lattice gas automata models are described, which couple solute transport with chemical reactions at mineral surfaces within pore networks. Diffusion in a box calculations are illustrated, which compare directly with Fickian diffusion. Chemical reactions at solid surfaces, including precipitation/dissolution, sorption, and catalytic reaction, can be examined with the model because hydrodynamic transport, solute diffusion and mineral surface processes are all treated explicitly. The simplicity and flexibility of the approach provides the ability to study the interrelationship between fluid flow and chemical reactions in porous materials, at a level of complexity that has not previously been computationally possible.

  4. Liquid polymorphism and density anomaly in a lattice gas model.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Vera B; Barbosa, Marcia C

    2005-03-01

    We present a simple model for an associating liquid in which polymorphism and density anomaly are connected. Our model combines a two dimensional lattice gas with particles interacting through a soft core potential and orientational degrees of freedom represented through thermal "ice variables." The competition between the directional attractive forces and the soft core potential leads to a phase diagram in which two liquid phases and a density anomaly are present. The coexistence line between the low density liquid and the high density liquid has a positive slope contradicting the surmise that the presence of a density anomaly implies that the high density liquid is more entropic than the low density liquid.

  5. Accuracy of non-Newtonian Lattice Boltzmann simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Daniel; Schneider, Andreas; Böhle, Martin

    2015-11-01

    This work deals with the accuracy of non-Newtonian Lattice Boltzmann simulations. Previous work for Newtonian fluids indicate that, depending on the numerical value of the dimensionless collision frequency Ω, additional artificial viscosity is introduced, which negatively influences the accuracy. Since the non-Newtonian fluid behavior is incorporated through appropriate modeling of the dimensionless collision frequency, a Ω dependent error EΩ is introduced and its influence on the overall error is investigated. Here, simulations with the SRT and the MRT model are carried out for power-law fluids in order to numerically investigate the accuracy of non-Newtonian Lattice Boltzmann simulations. A goal of this accuracy analysis is to derive a recommendation for an optimal choice of the time step size and the simulation Mach number, respectively. For the non-Newtonian case, an error estimate for EΩ in the form of a functional is derived on the basis of a series expansion of the Lattice Boltzmann equation. This functional can be solved analytically for the case of the Hagen-Poiseuille channel flow of non-Newtonian fluids. With the help of the error functional, the prediction of the global error minimum of the velocity field is excellent in regions where the EΩ error is the dominant source of error. With an optimal simulation Mach number, the simulation is about one order of magnitude more accurate. Additionally, for both collision models a detailed study of the convergence behavior of the method in the non-Newtonian case is conducted. The results show that the simulation Mach number has a major impact on the convergence rate and second order accuracy is not preserved for every choice of the simulation Mach number.

  6. Study of Gas Flow Characteristics in Tight Porous Media with a Microscale Lattice Boltzmann Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianlin; Yao, Jun; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Yongfei; Sun, Hai; An, Senyou; Li, Aifen

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the gas flow characteristics in tight porous media, a microscale lattice Boltzmann (LB) model with the regularization procedure is firstly adopted to simulate gas flow in three-dimensional (3D) digital rocks. A shale digital rock and a sandstone digital rock are reconstructed to study the effects of pressure, temperature and pore size on microscale gas flow. The simulation results show that because of the microscale effect in tight porous media, the apparent permeability is always higher than the intrinsic permeability, and with the decrease of pressure or pore size, or with the increase of temperature, the difference between apparent permeability and intrinsic permeability increases. In addition, the Knudsen numbers under different conditions are calculated and the results show that gas flow characteristics in the digital rocks under different Knudsen numbers are quite different. With the increase of Knudsen number, gas flow in the digital rocks becomes more uniform and the effect of heterogeneity of the porous media on gas flow decreases. Finally, two commonly used apparent permeability calculation models are evaluated by the simulation results and the Klinkenberg model shows better accuracy. In addition, a better proportionality factor in Klinkenberg model is proposed according to the simulation results.

  7. Study of Gas Flow Characteristics in Tight Porous Media with a Microscale Lattice Boltzmann Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianlin; Yao, Jun; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Yongfei; Sun, Hai; An, Senyou; Li, Aifen

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the gas flow characteristics in tight porous media, a microscale lattice Boltzmann (LB) model with the regularization procedure is firstly adopted to simulate gas flow in three-dimensional (3D) digital rocks. A shale digital rock and a sandstone digital rock are reconstructed to study the effects of pressure, temperature and pore size on microscale gas flow. The simulation results show that because of the microscale effect in tight porous media, the apparent permeability is always higher than the intrinsic permeability, and with the decrease of pressure or pore size, or with the increase of temperature, the difference between apparent permeability and intrinsic permeability increases. In addition, the Knudsen numbers under different conditions are calculated and the results show that gas flow characteristics in the digital rocks under different Knudsen numbers are quite different. With the increase of Knudsen number, gas flow in the digital rocks becomes more uniform and the effect of heterogeneity of the porous media on gas flow decreases. Finally, two commonly used apparent permeability calculation models are evaluated by the simulation results and the Klinkenberg model shows better accuracy. In addition, a better proportionality factor in Klinkenberg model is proposed according to the simulation results. PMID:27587293

  8. Study of Gas Flow Characteristics in Tight Porous Media with a Microscale Lattice Boltzmann Model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianlin; Yao, Jun; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Yongfei; Sun, Hai; An, Senyou; Li, Aifen

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the gas flow characteristics in tight porous media, a microscale lattice Boltzmann (LB) model with the regularization procedure is firstly adopted to simulate gas flow in three-dimensional (3D) digital rocks. A shale digital rock and a sandstone digital rock are reconstructed to study the effects of pressure, temperature and pore size on microscale gas flow. The simulation results show that because of the microscale effect in tight porous media, the apparent permeability is always higher than the intrinsic permeability, and with the decrease of pressure or pore size, or with the increase of temperature, the difference between apparent permeability and intrinsic permeability increases. In addition, the Knudsen numbers under different conditions are calculated and the results show that gas flow characteristics in the digital rocks under different Knudsen numbers are quite different. With the increase of Knudsen number, gas flow in the digital rocks becomes more uniform and the effect of heterogeneity of the porous media on gas flow decreases. Finally, two commonly used apparent permeability calculation models are evaluated by the simulation results and the Klinkenberg model shows better accuracy. In addition, a better proportionality factor in Klinkenberg model is proposed according to the simulation results. PMID:27587293

  9. Large-scale lattice-Boltzmann simulations over lambda networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saksena, R.; Coveney, P. V.; Pinning, R.; Booth, S.

    Amphiphilic molecules are of immense industrial importance, mainly due to their tendency to align at interfaces in a solution of immiscible species, e.g., oil and water, thereby reducing surface tension. Depending on the concentration of amphiphiles in the solution, they may assemble into a variety of morphologies, such as lamellae, micelles, sponge and cubic bicontinuous structures exhibiting non-trivial rheological properties. The main objective of this work is to study the rheological properties of very large, defect-containing gyroidal systems (of up to 10243 lattice sites) using the lattice-Boltzmann method. Memory requirements for the simulation of such large lattices exceed that available to us on most supercomputers and so we use MPICH-G2/MPIg to investigate geographically distributed domain decomposition simulations across HPCx in the UK and TeraGrid in the US. Use of MPICH-G2/MPIg requires the port-forwarder to work with the grid middleware on HPCx. Data from the simulations is streamed to a high performance visualisation resource at UCL (London) for rendering and visualisation. Lighting the Blue Touchpaper for UK e-Science - Closing Conference of ESLEA Project March 26-28 2007 The George Hotel, Edinburgh, UK

  10. (Discrete kinetic theory, lattice gas dynamics and foundations of hydrodynamics)

    SciTech Connect

    Protopopescu, V.

    1988-10-07

    The traveler participated successively in the Workshop of Discrete Kinetic Theory, Lattice Gas Dynamics and Foundations of Hydrodynamics, Villa Gualino-Torino, Italy, and in the Third International Workshop on Mathematical Aspects of Fluid and Plasma Dynamics, Salice Terme-Pavia, Italy, as a guest of the Italian CNR (National Council for Research, Mathematical Physics Group). At the first Workshop, there were approximately 65 participants among whom 35 were speakers. The topics discussed were discrete kinetic theory, cellular automata, and the relationship between microscopic/mesoscopic and macroscopic evolution equations. Cellular automata and lattice gas dynamics emerged as main areas of promising research and future applications. At the second Workshop, there were approximately 80 attendants, 20 contributed papers, and 15 invited papers. The main subjects of the papers were general methods to study nonlinear equations, advances in plasma theory, numerical methods, efficient computational schemes, and nonlinear transport problems. The Italian scientists expressed interest in strengthening the collaboration with ORNL in the areas of nonlinear partial differential equations, and discrete dynamics with applications to competitive systems.

  11. Proposals for quantum simulating simple lattice gauge theory models using optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Unmuth-Yockey, Judah; Bazavov, Alexei; Meurice, Yannick; Tsai, Shan-Wen

    We derive an effective spin Hamiltonian for the (1 +1)-dimensional Abelian Higgs model in the strongly coupled region by integrating out the link variables. With finite spin truncations, the Hamiltonian can be matched with a 1-dimensional two-species Bose Hubbard model in the strong-coupling limit that can be implemented with cold atoms on an optical lattice. We study the phase diagram of the original Abelian Higgs model with Monte Carlo simulation and Tensor Renormalization Group methods. The results show a crossover line which terminates near the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition point. The effective quantum Hamiltonian is also studied with the DMRG method, and we find that they have a similar behavior. We discuss practical experimental implementations for our quantum simulator. Species-dependent optical lattices and ladder systems with double-well potentials are considered. We show how to obtain each of the interaction parameters required in the Bose-Hubbard model that we obtained, and confirm the possibility of tuning these interactions to the region in which our mapping is valid. We emphasize that this proposal for quantum simulating a gauge theory uses a manifestly gauge-invariant formulation and Gauss's Law is therefore automatically satisfied. Supported by DoD ARO under Grant No. W911NF-13-1-0119 and by the NSF under Grants No. DMR-1411345.

  12. Monte Carlo simulations of lattice models for single polymer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping

    2014-10-28

    Single linear polymer chains in dilute solutions under good solvent conditions are studied by Monte Carlo simulations with the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method up to the chain length N∼O(10{sup 4}). Based on the standard simple cubic lattice model (SCLM) with fixed bond length and the bond fluctuation model (BFM) with bond lengths in a range between 2 and √(10), we investigate the conformations of polymer chains described by self-avoiding walks on the simple cubic lattice, and by random walks and non-reversible random walks in the absence of excluded volume interactions. In addition to flexible chains, we also extend our study to semiflexible chains for different stiffness controlled by a bending potential. The persistence lengths of chains extracted from the orientational correlations are estimated for all cases. We show that chains based on the BFM are more flexible than those based on the SCLM for a fixed bending energy. The microscopic differences between these two lattice models are discussed and the theoretical predictions of scaling laws given in the literature are checked and verified. Our simulations clarify that a different mapping ratio between the coarse-grained models and the atomistically realistic description of polymers is required in a coarse-graining approach due to the different crossovers to the asymptotic behavior.

  13. Charmed tetraquarks Tcc and Tcs from dynamical lattice QCD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Yoichi; Charron, Bruno; Aoki, Sinya; Doi, Takumi; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Inoue, Takashi; Ishii, Noriyoshi; Murano, Keiko; Nemura, Hidekatsu; Sasaki, Kenji

    2014-02-01

    Charmed tetraquarks Tcc=(ccubardbar) and Tcs=(csubardbar) are studied through the S-wave meson-meson interactions, D-D, Kbar-D, D-D* and Kbar-D*, on the basis of the (2+1)-flavor lattice QCD simulations with the pion mass mπ≃410, 570 and 700 MeV. For the charm quark, the relativistic heavy quark action is employed to treat its dynamics on the lattice. Using the HAL QCD method, we extract the S-wave potentials in lattice QCD simulations, from which the meson-meson scattering phase shifts are calculated. The phase shifts in the isospin triplet (I=1) channels indicate repulsive interactions, while those in the I=0 channels suggest attraction, growing as mπ decreases. This is particularly prominent in the Tcc (JP=1+,I=0) channel, though neither bound state nor resonance are found in the range mπ=410-700 MeV. We make a qualitative comparison of our results with the phenomenological diquark picture.

  14. Simulations of Quantum Spin Models on 2D Frustrated Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melko, Roger

    2006-03-01

    Algorithmic advances in quantum Monte Carlo techniques have opened up the possibility of studying models in the general class of the S=1/2 XXZ model (equivalent to hard-core bosons) on frustrated lattices. With an antiferromagnetic diagonal interaction (Jz), these models can be solved exactly with QMC, albeit with some effort required to retain ergodicity in the near-degenerate manifold of states that exists for large Jz. The application of the quantum (ferromagnetic off-diagonal) interaction to this classically degenerate manifold produces a variety of intriguing physics, including an order-by-disorder supersolid phase, novel insulating states, and possible exotic quantum critical phenomena. We discuss numerical results for the triangular and kagome lattices with nearest and next-nearest neighbor exchange interactions, and focus on the relevance of the simulations to related areas of physics, such as experiments of cold trapped atomic gasses and the recent theory of deconfined quantum criticality.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of chemical dissolution in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Qinjun; Zhang, Dongxiao; Chen, Shiyi; He, Xiaoyi

    2002-03-01

    In this paper, we develop a lattice Boltzmann model for simulating the transport and reaction of fluids in porous media. To simulate such a system, we account for the interaction of forced convection, molecular diffusion, and surface reaction. The problem is complicated by the evolution of the porous media geometry due to chemical reactions, which may significantly and continuously modify the hydrologic properties of the media. The particular application that motivates the present study is acid stimulation, a common technique used to increase production from petroleum reservoirs. This technique involves the injection of acid (e.g., hydrochloric acid, HCl, acetic acid, HAc) into the formation to dissolve minerals comprising the rock. As acid is injected, highly conductive channels or ``wormholes'' may be formed. The dissolution of carbonate rocks in 0.5M HCl and 0.5M HAc is simulated with the lattice Boltzmann model developed in this study. The dependence of dissolution process and the geometry of the final wormhole pattern on the acid type and the injection rate is studied. The results agree qualitatively with the experimental and theoretical analyses of others and substantiate the previous finding that there exists an optimal injection rate at which the wormhole is formed as well as the number of pore volumes of the injected fluid to break through is minimized. This study also confirms the experimentally observed phenomenon that the optimal injection rate decreases and the corresponding minimized number of pore volumes to break through increases as the acid is changed from HCl to HAc. Simulations suggest that the proposed lattice Boltzmann model may serve as an alternative reliable quantitative approach to study chemical dissolution in porous media.

  16. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of chemical dissolution in porous media.

    PubMed

    Kang, Qinjun; Zhang, Dongxiao; Chen, Shiyi; He, Xiaoyi

    2002-03-01

    In this paper, we develop a lattice Boltzmann model for simulating the transport and reaction of fluids in porous media. To simulate such a system, we account for the interaction of forced convection, molecular diffusion, and surface reaction. The problem is complicated by the evolution of the porous media geometry due to chemical reactions, which may significantly and continuously modify the hydrologic properties of the media. The particular application that motivates the present study is acid stimulation, a common technique used to increase production from petroleum reservoirs. This technique involves the injection of acid (e.g., hydrochloric acid, HCl, acetic acid, HAc) into the formation to dissolve minerals comprising the rock. As acid is injected, highly conductive channels or "wormholes" may be formed. The dissolution of carbonate rocks in 0.5M HCl and 0.5M HAc is simulated with the lattice Boltzmann model developed in this study. The dependence of dissolution process and the geometry of the final wormhole pattern on the acid type and the injection rate is studied. The results agree qualitatively with the experimental and theoretical analyses of others and substantiate the previous finding that there exists an optimal injection rate at which the wormhole is formed as well as the number of pore volumes of the injected fluid to break through is minimized. This study also confirms the experimentally observed phenomenon that the optimal injection rate decreases and the corresponding minimized number of pore volumes to break through increases as the acid is changed from HCl to HAc. Simulations suggest that the proposed lattice Boltzmann model may serve as an alternative reliable quantitative approach to study chemical dissolution in porous media.

  17. Phase diagram of a bulk 1d lattice Coulomb gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Démery, V.; Monsarrat, R.; Dean, D. S.; Podgornik, R.

    2016-01-01

    The exact solution, via transfer matrix, of the simple one-dimensional lattice Coulomb gas (1d LCG) model can reproduce peculiar features of ionic liquid capacitors, such as overscreening, layering, and camel- and bell-shaped capacitance curves. Using the same transfer matrix method, we now compute the bulk properties of the 1d LCG in the constant voltage ensemble. We unveil a phase diagram with rich structure exhibiting low-density disordered and high-density ordered phases, separated by a first-order phase transition at low temperature; the solid state at full packing can be ordered or not, depending on the temperature. This phase diagram, which is strikingly similar to its three-dimensional counterpart, also sheds light on the behaviour of the confined system.

  18. Spontaneous formation of large clusters in a lattice gas above the critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khain, Evgeniy; Khasin, Michael; Sander, Leonard M.

    2014-12-01

    We consider clustering of particles in the lattice gas model above the critical point. We find the probability for large density fluctuations over scales much larger than the correlation length. This fundamental problem is of interest in various biological contexts such as quorum sensing and clustering of motile, adhesive, cancer cells. In the latter case, it may give a clue to the problem of growth of recurrent tumors. We develop a formalism for the analysis of this rare event employing a phenomenological master equation and measuring the transition rates in numerical simulations. The spontaneous clustering is treated in the framework of the eikonal approximation to the master equation.

  19. Accounting for adsorption and desorption in lattice Boltzmann simulations.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Maximilien; Duvail, Magali; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Frenkel, Daan; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2013-07-01

    We report a Lattice-Boltzmann scheme that accounts for adsorption and desorption in the calculation of mesoscale dynamical properties of tracers in media of arbitrary complexity. Lattice Boltzmann simulations made it possible to solve numerically the coupled Navier-Stokes equations of fluid dynamics and Nernst-Planck equations of electrokinetics in complex, heterogeneous media. With the moment propagation scheme, it became possible to extract the effective diffusion and dispersion coefficients of tracers, or solutes, of any charge, e.g., in porous media. Nevertheless, the dynamical properties of tracers depend on the tracer-surface affinity, which is not purely electrostatic and also includes a species-specific contribution. In order to capture this important feature, we introduce specific adsorption and desorption processes in a lattice Boltzmann scheme through a modified moment propagation algorithm, in which tracers may adsorb and desorb from surfaces through kinetic reaction rates. The method is validated on exact results for pure diffusion and diffusion-advection in Poiseuille flows in a simple geometry. We finally illustrate the importance of taking such processes into account in the time-dependent diffusion coefficient in a more complex porous medium. PMID:23944584

  20. Accounting for adsorption and desorption in lattice Boltzmann simulations.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Maximilien; Duvail, Magali; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Frenkel, Daan; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2013-07-01

    We report a Lattice-Boltzmann scheme that accounts for adsorption and desorption in the calculation of mesoscale dynamical properties of tracers in media of arbitrary complexity. Lattice Boltzmann simulations made it possible to solve numerically the coupled Navier-Stokes equations of fluid dynamics and Nernst-Planck equations of electrokinetics in complex, heterogeneous media. With the moment propagation scheme, it became possible to extract the effective diffusion and dispersion coefficients of tracers, or solutes, of any charge, e.g., in porous media. Nevertheless, the dynamical properties of tracers depend on the tracer-surface affinity, which is not purely electrostatic and also includes a species-specific contribution. In order to capture this important feature, we introduce specific adsorption and desorption processes in a lattice Boltzmann scheme through a modified moment propagation algorithm, in which tracers may adsorb and desorb from surfaces through kinetic reaction rates. The method is validated on exact results for pure diffusion and diffusion-advection in Poiseuille flows in a simple geometry. We finally illustrate the importance of taking such processes into account in the time-dependent diffusion coefficient in a more complex porous medium.

  1. Simulating Electric Double Layer Capacitance by Using Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ning; Gersappe, Dilip

    2015-03-01

    By using the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) we studied diffuse-charge dynamics in electrochemical systems. We use the LBM to solve Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations (PNP) and Modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations (MPNP). The isotropic permittivity of electrolyte is modeled using the Booth model. The results show that both steric effect (MPNP) and isotropic permittivity (Booth model) can have large influence on diffuse-charge dynamics, especially when electrolyte concentration or applied potential is high. This model can be applied to simulate electric double layer capacitance of super capacitors with complex geometry and also incorporate other effects such as heat convection in a modular manner.

  2. Discontinuous phase transition in a dimer lattice gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, Ronald

    2012-05-01

    I study a dimer model on the square lattice with nearest neighbor exclusion as the only interaction. Detailed simulations using tomographic entropic sampling show that as the chemical potential is varied, there is a strongly discontinuous phase transition, at which the particle density jumps by about 18% of its maximum value, 1/4. The transition is accompanied by the onset of orientational order, to an arrangement corresponding to the {1/2, 0, 1/2} structure identified by Phares et al. [Physica B 409, 1096 (2011)] in a dimer model with finite repulsion at fixed density. Using finite-size scaling and Binder's cumulant, the expected scaling behavior at a discontinuous transition is verified in detail. The discontinuous transition can be understood qualitatively given that the model possesses eight equivalent maximum-density configurations, so that its coarse-grained description corresponds to that of the q = 8 Potts model.

  3. G2 Gas Cloud Simulation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This simulation shows the future behavior of the G2 gas cloud now approaching Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way. X-ray emission from the cloud's tidal interaction w...

  4. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of directional wetting: comparing simulations to experiments.

    PubMed

    Jansen, H Patrick; Sotthewes, Kai; van Swigchem, Jeroen; Zandvliet, Harold J W; Kooij, E Stefan

    2013-07-01

    Lattice Boltzmann Modeling (LBM) simulations were performed on the dynamic behavior of liquid droplets on chemically striped patterned surfaces, ultimately with the aim to develop a predictive tool enabling reliable design of future experiments. The simulations accurately mimic experimental results, which have shown that water droplets on such surfaces adopt an elongated shape due to anisotropic preferential spreading. Details of the contact line motion such as advancing of the contact line in the direction perpendicular to the stripes exhibit pronounced similarities in experiments and simulations. The opposite of spreading, i.e., evaporation of water droplets, leads to a characteristic receding motion first in the direction parallel to the stripes, while the contact line remains pinned perpendicular to the stripes. Only when the aspect ratio is close to unity, the contact line also starts to recede in the perpendicular direction. Very similar behavior was observed in the LBM simulations. Finally, droplet movement can be induced by a gradient in surface wettability. LBM simulations show good semiquantitative agreement with experimental results of decanol droplets on a well-defined striped gradient, which move from high- to low-contact angle surfaces. Similarities and differences for all systems are described and discussed in terms of the predictive capabilities of LBM simulations to model direction wetting. PMID:23944550

  5. Monte Carlo simulations of kagome lattices with magnetic dipolar interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumer, Martin; Holden, Mark; Way, Andrew; Saika-Voivod, Ivan; Southern, Byron

    Monte Carlo simulations of classical spins on the two-dimensional kagome lattice with only dipolar interactions are presented. In addition to revealing the sixfold-degenerate ground state, the nature of the finite-temperature phase transition to long-range magnetic order is discussed. Low-temperature states consisting of mixtures of degenerate ground-state configurations separated by domain walls can be explained as a result of competing exchange-like and shape-anisotropy-like terms in the dipolar coupling. Fluctuations between pairs of degenerate spin configurations are found to persist well into the ordered state as the temperature is lowered until locking in to a low-energy state. Results suggest that the system undergoes a continuous phase transition at T ~ 0 . 43 in agreement with previous MC simulations but the nature of the ordering process differs. Preliminary results which extend this analysis to the 3D fcc ABC-stacked kagome systems will be presented.

  6. Simulation of non-Abelian gauge theories with optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Tagliacozzo, L; Celi, A; Orland, P; Mitchell, M W; Lewenstein, M

    2013-01-01

    Many phenomena occurring in strongly correlated quantum systems still await conclusive explanations. The absence of isolated free quarks in nature is an example. It is attributed to quark confinement, whose origin is not yet understood. The phase diagram for nuclear matter at general temperatures and densities, studied in heavy-ion collisions, is not settled. Finally, we have no definitive theory of high-temperature superconductivity. Though we have theories that could underlie such physics, we lack the tools to determine the experimental consequences of these theories. Quantum simulators may provide such tools. Here we show how to engineer quantum simulators of non-Abelian lattice gauge theories. The systems we consider have several applications: they can be used to mimic quark confinement or to study dimer and valence-bond states (which may be relevant for high-temperature superconductors). PMID:24162080

  7. Simulation of non-Abelian gauge theories with optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliacozzo, L.; Celi, A.; Orland, P.; Mitchell, M. W.; Lewenstein, M.

    2013-10-01

    Many phenomena occurring in strongly correlated quantum systems still await conclusive explanations. The absence of isolated free quarks in nature is an example. It is attributed to quark confinement, whose origin is not yet understood. The phase diagram for nuclear matter at general temperatures and densities, studied in heavy-ion collisions, is not settled. Finally, we have no definitive theory of high-temperature superconductivity. Though we have theories that could underlie such physics, we lack the tools to determine the experimental consequences of these theories. Quantum simulators may provide such tools. Here we show how to engineer quantum simulators of non-Abelian lattice gauge theories. The systems we consider have several applications: they can be used to mimic quark confinement or to study dimer and valence-bond states (which may be relevant for high-temperature superconductors).

  8. Do lattice protein simulations exhibit self-organized criticality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisthoff, Addison; Murray, Joelle

    2014-03-01

    Proteins are known to fold into tertiary structures that determine their functionality in living organisms. The goal of my research is to better understand the protein folding process through a lattice Monte-Carlo simulation. Specifically, amino acids in the chain at each time step are allowed to fold to certain locations according to two main criteria: folds must maintain bond length and should be thermally and energetically favorable. This simulation will then be used to examine whether the folding process can be viewed through the lens of self-organized criticality (SOC). In particular I am interested in whether there are features of the folding process that are independent of the size of the protein. Student

  9. Towards Full Aircraft Airframe Noise Prediction: Lattice Boltzmann Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Fares, Ehab; Casalino, Damiano

    2014-01-01

    Computational results for an 18%-scale, semi-span Gulfstream aircraft model are presented. Exa Corporation's lattice Boltzmann PowerFLOW(trademark) solver was used to perform time-dependent simulations of the flow field associated with this high-fidelity aircraft model. The simulations were obtained for free-air at a Mach number of 0.2 with the flap deflected at 39 deg (landing configuration). We focused on accurately predicting the prominent noise sources at the flap tips and main landing gear for the two baseline configurations, namely, landing flap setting without and with gear deployed. Capitalizing on the inherently transient nature of the lattice Boltzmann formulation, the complex time-dependent flow features associated with the flap were resolved very accurately and efficiently. To properly simulate the noise sources over a broad frequency range, the tailored grid was very dense near the flap inboard and outboard tips. Extensive comparison of the computed time-averaged and unsteady surface pressures with wind tunnel measurements showed excellent agreement for the global aerodynamic characteristics and the local flow field at the flap inboard and outboard tips and the main landing gear. In particular, the computed fluctuating surface pressure field for the flap agreed well with the measurements in both amplitude and frequency content, indicating that the prominent airframe noise sources at the tips were captured successfully. Gear-flap interaction effects were remarkably well predicted and were shown to affect only the inboard flap tip, altering the steady and unsteady pressure fields in that region. The simulated farfield noise spectra for both baseline configurations, obtained using a Ffowcs-Williams and Hawkings acoustic analogy approach, were shown to be in close agreement with measured values.

  10. A new lattice Monte Carlo method for simulating dielectric inhomogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiaozheng; Wang, Zhen-Gang; Nakamura, Issei

    We present a new lattice Monte Carlo method for simulating systems involving dielectric contrast between different species by modifying an algorithm originally proposed by Maggs et al. The original algorithm is known to generate attractive interactions between particles that have different dielectric constant than the solvent. Here we show that such attractive force is spurious, arising from incorrectly biased statistical weight caused by the particle motion during the Monte Carlo moves. We propose a new, simple algorithm to resolve this erroneous sampling. We demonstrate the application of our algorithm by simulating an uncharged polymer in a solvent with different dielectric constant. Further, we show that the electrostatic fields in ionic crystals obtained from our simulations with a relatively small simulation box correspond well with results from the analytical solution. Thus, our Monte Carlo method avoids the need for the Ewald summation in conventional simulation methods for charged systems. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (21474112 and 21404103). We are grateful to Computing Center of Jilin Province for essential support.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann for Simulation of Gases Mixture in Fruit Storage Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabero, J. C.; Barreiro, P.; Casasús, L.

    2003-04-01

    Fluid Dynamics can be modelled through the Navier-Stokes equations. This description corresponds to a macroscopic definition of the fluid motion phenomena. During the past 20 year new simulation procedures are emerging from Statistical Physics and Computer Science domains. One of them is the Lattice Gas Cellular Automata (LGCA) method. This approach, which is considered to be a microscopic description of the world, in spite of its intuitiveness and numerical efficiency, fails to simulate the real Navier-Stokes equations. Another classical simulation procedure for the fluid motion phenomena is the so called Lattice Boltzmann method [1]. This corresponds to a meso-scale description of the world [2]. Simulation of laminar and turbulent motions of fluids, specially when considering several gas species is still an ongoing research [3]. Nowadays, the use of Low Oxygen and Ultra Low Oxygen Controlled Atmospheres has been recognized as a reliable method to extend the storage life of fruits an vegetables. However, small spatial gradients in gas concentration during storage may generate internal disorders in the commodities. In this work, four different gases will be considered: oxygen, carbon dioxide, water vapor and ethylene. Physiological effects such as transpiration, which affects the level of water vapor, respiration, which modifies both oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations, and ethylene emission, must be taken into account in the hole model. The numerical model, based on that proposed by Shan and Chen, is implemented, being able to consider the behavior of multiple mixable gas species. Forced air motion, needed to obtain a correct ventilation of the chamber, has also been modelled.

  12. Saltwater Intrusion Simulation in Heterogeneous Aquifer Using Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servan-Camas, B.; Tsai, F. T.

    2006-12-01

    This study develops a saltwater intrusion simulation model using a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) in a two- dimensional coastal confined aquifer. The saltwater intrusion phenomenon is described by density-varied groundwater flow and mass transport equations, where a freshwater-saltwater mixing zone is considered. Although primarily developed using the mesoscopic approach to solve macroscopic fluid dynamic problems (e.g. Navier-Stoke equation), LBM is able to be adopted to solve physical-based diffusion-type governing equations as for the groundwater flow and mass transport equations. The challenge of using LBM in saltwater intrusion modeling is to recover hydraulic conductivity heterogeneity. In this study, the Darcy equation and the advection-dispersion equation (ADE) are recovered in the lattice Boltzmann modeling. Specifically, the hydraulic conductivity heterogeneity is represented by the speed of sound in LBM. Under the consideration on the steady-state groundwater flow due to low storativity, in each time step the flow problem is modified to be a Poisson equation and solved by LBM. Nevertheless, the groundwater flow is still a time-marching problem with spatial-temporal variation in salinity concentration as well as density. The Henry problem is used to compare the LBM results against the Henry analytic solution and SUTRA result. Also, we show that LBM is capable of handling the Dirichlet, Neumann, and Cauchy concentration boundary conditions at the sea side. Finally, we compare the saltwater intrusion results using LBM in the Henry problem when heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity is considered.

  13. Volumetric lattice Boltzmann simulation for blood flow in aorta arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deep, Debanjan; Yu, Huidan (Whitney); Teague, Shawn

    2012-11-01

    Complicated moving boundaries pose a major challenge in computational fluid dynamics for complex flows, especially in the biomechanics of both blood flow in the cardiovascular system and air flow in the respiratory system where the compliant nature of the vessels can have significant effects on the flow rate and wall shear stress. We develop a computation approach to treat arbitrarily moving boundaries using a volumetric representation of lattice Boltzmann method, which distributes fluid particles inside lattice cells. A volumetric bounce-back procedure is applied in the streaming step while momentum exchange between the fluid and moving solid boundary are accounted for in the collision sub-step. Additional boundary-induced migration is introduced to conserve fluid mass as the boundary moves across fluid cells. The volumetric LBM (VLBM) is used to simulate blood flow in both normal and dilated aorta arteries. We first compare flow structure and pressure distribution in steady state with results from Navier-Stokes based solver and good agreements are achieved. Then we focus on wall stress within the aorta for different heart pumping condition and present quantitative measurement of wall shear and normal stress.

  14. Lattice simulations of real-time quantum fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berges, J.; Borsányi, Sz.; Sexty, D.; Stamatescu, I.-O.

    2007-02-01

    We investigate lattice simulations of scalar and non-Abelian gauge fields in Minkowski space-time. For SU(2) gauge-theory expectation values of link variables in 3+1 dimensions are constructed by a stochastic process in an additional (5th) “Langevin-time.” A sufficiently small Langevin step size and the use of a tilted real-time contour leads to converging results in general. All fixed point solutions are shown to fulfil the infinite hierarchy of Dyson-Schwinger identities, however, they are not unique without further constraints. For the non-Abelian gauge theory the thermal equilibrium fixed point is only approached at intermediate Langevin-times. It becomes more stable if the complex time path is deformed towards Euclidean space-time. We analyze this behavior further using the real-time evolution of a quantum anharmonic oscillator, which is alternatively solved by diagonalizing its Hamiltonian. Without further optimization stochastic quantization can give accurate descriptions if the real-time extent of the lattice is small on the scale of the inverse temperature.

  15. Simulating VIIRS Observed Gas Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, F. C.

    2015-12-01

    VIIRS Nightfire (VNF) had been proved being able to effectively detect gas flares at night, and characterize their temperature and source size. [1] However, limited access to generally confidential gas flare operation measurements made it difficult to verify the output. Although flared gas volume is occasionally available, it is not common to log the temperature and flames size which directly links to VNF output. To understand the mechanism of gas flare and how VIIRS perceives the event, a platform is proposed to simulate the gas flare being observed by VIIRS. The methodology can be described in three steps. (1) Use CFD simulation software ISIS-3D to simulate a simple gas flare. [2] Scalar fields of temperature and species concentration related to combustion are extracted from the simulation. The instantaneous scalar can be determined from time-averaging or guess by stochastic time and space series (TASS) from single-point statistics [3]. (2) Model spectral radiance intensity of simulated gas flare using RADCAL. [4] RADCAL developed by NIST can accurately model the spectral radiance emitted on the direction of lineof-sight given the spatial profile of temperature and concentration of species. (3) Use radiative transfer modeling to calculate the energy propagated to VIIRS. The modeled radiation will then be weighted by the MODTRAN [5] modeled transmissivity over predefined atmosphere to the satellite, with geometrical effects considered. Such platform can help understanding how exactly VNF is measuring gas flares, and thus lead to more precise characterization of combustion events. [1] C. D. Elvidge et al, Remote Sensing, 2013[2] IRSN ISIS-3D[3] M. E. Kounalakis et al, ASME J. Heat Transfer, 1991 [4] W. L. Grosshandler, NIST Technical Note 1402, 1993 [5] A. Berk et al, MODTRAN 5.2.0.0 User's Manual

  16. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of a viscoelastic shear-thinning fluid.

    PubMed

    Papenkort, S; Voigtmann, Th

    2015-07-28

    We present a hybrid lattice Boltzmann algorithm for the simulation of flow glass-forming fluids, characterized by slow structural relaxation, at the level of the Navier-Stokes equation. The fluid is described in terms of a nonlinear integral constitutive equation, relating the stress tensor locally to the history of flow. As an application, we present results for an integral nonlinear Maxwell model that combines the effects of (linear) viscoelasticity and (nonlinear) shear thinning. We discuss the transient dynamics of velocities, shear stresses, and normal stress differences in planar pressure-driven channel flow, after switching on (startup) and off (cessation) of the driving pressure. This transient dynamics depends nontrivially on the channel width due to an interplay between hydrodynamic momentum diffusion and slow structural relaxation. PMID:26233150

  17. Atom-optics simulator of lattice transport phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Eric J.; An, Fangzhao Alex; Gadway, Bryce

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally investigate a scheme for studying lattice transport phenomena, based on the controlled momentum-space dynamics of ultracold atomic matter waves. In the effective tight-binding models that can be simulated, we demonstrate that this technique allows for a local and time-dependent control over all system parameters, and additionally allows for single-site resolved detection of atomic populations. We demonstrate full control over site-to-site off-diagonal tunneling elements (amplitude and phase) and diagonal site energies, through the observation of continuous-time quantum walks, Bloch oscillations, and negative tunneling. These capabilities open up new prospects in the experimental study of disordered and topological systems.

  18. Monte Carlo simulations of ABC stacked kagome lattice films.

    PubMed

    Yerzhakov, H V; Plumer, M L; Whitehead, J P

    2016-05-18

    Properties of films of geometrically frustrated ABC stacked antiferromagnetic kagome layers are examined using Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations. The impact of having an easy-axis anisotropy on the surface layers and cubic anisotropy in the interior layers is explored. The spin structure at the surface is shown to be different from that of the bulk 3D fcc system, where surface axial anisotropy tends to align spins along the surface [1 1 1] normal axis. This alignment then propagates only weakly to the interior layers through exchange coupling. Results are shown for the specific heat, magnetization and sub-lattice order parameters for both surface and interior spins in three and six layer films as a function of increasing axial surface anisotropy. Relevance to the exchange bias phenomenon in IrMn3 films is discussed.

  19. Monte Carlo simulations of ABC stacked kagome lattice films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerzhakov, H. V.; Plumer, M. L.; Whitehead, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    Properties of films of geometrically frustrated ABC stacked antiferromagnetic kagome layers are examined using Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations. The impact of having an easy-axis anisotropy on the surface layers and cubic anisotropy in the interior layers is explored. The spin structure at the surface is shown to be different from that of the bulk 3D fcc system, where surface axial anisotropy tends to align spins along the surface [1 1 1] normal axis. This alignment then propagates only weakly to the interior layers through exchange coupling. Results are shown for the specific heat, magnetization and sub-lattice order parameters for both surface and interior spins in three and six layer films as a function of increasing axial surface anisotropy. Relevance to the exchange bias phenomenon in IrMn3 films is discussed.

  20. Simulating the Wess-Zumino Supersymmetry Model in Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Yue; Yang Kun

    2010-10-08

    We study a cold atom-molecule mixture in two-dimensional optical lattices. We show that, by fine-tuning the atomic and molecular interactions, the Wess-Zumino supersymmetry (SUSY) model in 2+1 dimensions emerges in the low-energy limit and can be simulated in such mixtures. At zero temperature, SUSY is not spontaneously broken, which implies identical relativistic dispersions of the atom and its superpartner, a bosonic diatom molecule. This defining signature of SUSY can be probed by single-particle spectroscopies. Thermal breaking of SUSY at a finite temperature is accompanied by a thermal Goldstone fermion, i.e., phonino excitation. This and other signatures of broken SUSY can also be probed experimentally.

  1. Computer simulation study of a simple tetrahedratic mesogenic lattice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Silvano

    2008-02-01

    Over the last 12 years, the possible existence of a tetrahedratic mesophase, involving a third-rank orientational order parameter and no positional order, has been addressed theoretically and predicted in some cases; no experimental realizations of a purely tetrahedratic phase are known at the time being, but various pieces of evidence suggest that interactions of tetrahedral symmetry do play a significant role in the macroscopic properties of mesophases resulting from banana-shaped (bent-core) mesogens. We address a very simple tetrahedratic mesogenic lattice model, involving continuous interactions; we consider particles possessing Td symmetry, whose centers of mass are associated with a three-dimensional simple-cubic lattice; the pair potential is taken to be isotropic in orientation space and restricted to nearest-neighboring sites; we let the two orthonormal triads {uα,α=1,2,3} and {vγ,γ=1,2,3} define the orientations of a pair of interacting particles; we let the unit vectors uα be combined to yield four unit vectors {ej,j=1,2,3,4} , arranged in a tetrahedral fashion; we let the unit vectors vγ be similarly combined to yield the four unit vectors {fk,k=1,2,3,4} ; and finally we let hjk=(ejṡfk) . The interaction model studied here is defined by the simplest nontrivial (cubic) polynomial in the scalar products hjk , consistent with the assumed symmetry and favoring orientational order; it is, so to speak, the tetrahedratic counterpart of the Lebwohl-Lasher model for uniaxial nematics. The model was investigated by molecular field (MF) theory and Monte Carlo simulations; MF theory predicts a low-temperature, tetrahedrically ordered phase, undergoing a second-order transition to the isotropic phase at higher temperature; on the other hand, available theoretical treatments point to the transition being driven first order by thermal fluctuations. Simulations showed evidence of a first-order transition.

  2. Accuracy analysis of high-order lattice Boltzmann models for rarefied gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jianping; Zhang, Yonghao

    2011-02-01

    In this work, we have theoretically analyzed and numerically evaluated the accuracy of high-order lattice Boltzmann (LB) models for capturing non-equilibrium effects in rarefied gas flows. In the incompressible limit, the LB equation is shown to be able to reduce to the linearized Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) equation. Therefore, when the same Gauss-Hermite quadrature is used, LB method closely resembles the discrete velocity method (DVM). In addition, the order of Hermite expansion for the equilibrium distribution function is found not to be directly correlated with the approximation order in terms of the Knudsen number to the BGK equation for incompressible flows. Meanwhile, we have numerically evaluated the LB models for a standing-shear-wave problem, which is designed specifically for assessing model accuracy by excluding the influence of gas molecule/surface interactions at wall boundaries. The numerical simulation results confirm that the high-order terms in the discrete equilibrium distribution function play a negligible role in capturing non-equilibrium effect for low-speed flows. By contrast, appropriate Gauss-Hermite quadrature has the most significant effect on whether LB models can describe the essential flow physics of rarefied gas accurately. Our simulation results, where the effect of wall/gas interactions is excluded, can lead to conclusion on the LB modeling capability that the models with higher-order quadratures provide more accurate results. For the same order Gauss-Hermite quadrature, the exact abscissae will also modestly influence numerical accuracy. Using the same Gauss-Hermite quadrature, the numerical results of both LB and DVM methods are in excellent agreement for flows across a broad range of the Knudsen numbers, which confirms that the LB simulation is similar to the DVM process. Therefore, LB method can offer flexible models suitable for simulating continuum flows at the Navier-Stokes level and rarefied gas flows at the linearized

  3. Treatment of moving boundaries in lattice-Boltzmann simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indireshkumar, K.; Pal, A.; Brasseur, J. G.

    2000-11-01

    We consider the treatment of moving boundaries with the lattice-Boltzmann (LB) technique, where the treatment of the boundary often does not precisely conserve mass and spurious fluctuations in density/pressure result from boundary motion through fixed grids. First, we applied the extrapolation method proposed by Chen et. al.(S. Y. Chen, D. Martinez, and R Mei, Phys. Fluids) 8, 2527 (1996) to incompressible flow induced by the movement of a piston in a 2D ``cylinder'' with mass flow out of or into the cylinder. In these simulations, the velocity of the boundary nodes is set equal to the (known) velocity of the boundary (piston) in the equilibrium distribution function (Method I). In a second set of simulations, the boundary node velocities are obtained by interpolating between interior nodes and the boundary, thus including the effect of boundary position more precisely (Method II). Comparison of LB predictions with simulations using FIDAP show pressure agreement to witnin 2 %. The total mass is conserved to within 0.1% with Method I and improves to within 0.02 % using method II. Spurious fluctuations in density/pressure due to boundary movement is about 0.9% with Method I, which improves significantly to about 0.3% with Method II. The application of these simple techniques to more complex geometries and wall (and fluid) motions in a stomach during gastric emptying will be presented.

  4. Dynamic behaviors of liquid droplets on a gas diffusion layer surface: Hybrid lattice Boltzmann investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jie; Huang, Jun-Jie

    2015-07-01

    Water management is one of the key issues in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Fundamentally, it is related to dynamic behaviors of droplets on a gas diffusion layer (GDL) surface, and consequently they are investigated in this work. A two-dimensional hybrid method is employed to implement numerical simulations, in which the flow field is solved by using the lattice Boltzmann method and the interface between droplet and gas is captured by solving the Cahn-Hilliard equation directly. One or two liquid droplets are initially placed on the GDL surface of a gas channel, which is driven by the fully developed Poiseuille flow. At a fixed channel size, the effects of viscosity ratio of droplet to gas ( μ ∗ ), Capillary number (Ca, ratio of gas viscosity to surface tension), and droplet interaction on the dynamic behaviors of droplets are systematically studied. By decreasing viscosity ratio or increasing Capillary number, the single droplet can detach from the GDL surface easily. On the other hand, when two identical droplets stay close to each other or a larger droplet is placed in front of a smaller droplet, the removal of two droplets is promoted.

  5. Critical dynamics of the jamming transition in one-dimensional nonequilibrium lattice-gas models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyanka; Jain, Kavita

    2016-04-01

    We consider several one-dimensional driven lattice-gas models that show a phase transition in the stationary state between a high-density fluid phase in which the typical length of a hole cluster is of order unity and a low-density jammed phase where a hole cluster of macroscopic length forms in front of a particle. Using a hydrodynamic equation for an interface growth model obtained from the driven lattice-gas models of interest here, we find that in the fluid phase, the roughness exponent and the dynamic exponent that, respectively, characterize the scaling of the saturation width and the relaxation time of the interface with the system size are given by the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang exponents. However, at the critical point, we show analytically that when the equal-time density-density correlation function decays slower than inverse distance, the roughness exponent varies continuously with a parameter in the hop rates, but it is one-half otherwise. Using these results and numerical simulations for the density-density autocorrelation function, we further find that the dynamic exponent z =3 /2 in all cases.

  6. Critical dynamics of the jamming transition in one-dimensional nonequilibrium lattice-gas models.

    PubMed

    Priyanka; Jain, Kavita

    2016-04-01

    We consider several one-dimensional driven lattice-gas models that show a phase transition in the stationary state between a high-density fluid phase in which the typical length of a hole cluster is of order unity and a low-density jammed phase where a hole cluster of macroscopic length forms in front of a particle. Using a hydrodynamic equation for an interface growth model obtained from the driven lattice-gas models of interest here, we find that in the fluid phase, the roughness exponent and the dynamic exponent that, respectively, characterize the scaling of the saturation width and the relaxation time of the interface with the system size are given by the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang exponents. However, at the critical point, we show analytically that when the equal-time density-density correlation function decays slower than inverse distance, the roughness exponent varies continuously with a parameter in the hop rates, but it is one-half otherwise. Using these results and numerical simulations for the density-density autocorrelation function, we further find that the dynamic exponent z=3/2 in all cases. PMID:27176251

  7. A Unified Theory of Non-Ideal Gas Lattice Boltzmann Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Li-Shi

    1998-01-01

    A non-ideal gas lattice Boltzmann model is directly derived, in an a priori fashion, from the Enskog equation for dense gases. The model is rigorously obtained by a systematic procedure to discretize the Enskog equation (in the presence of an external force) in both phase space and time. The lattice Boltzmann model derived here is thermodynamically consistent and is free of the defects which exist in previous lattice Boltzmann models for non-ideal gases. The existing lattice Boltzmann models for non-ideal gases are analyzed and compared with the model derived here.

  8. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of settling behaviors of irregularly shaped particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pei; Galindo-Torres, S. A.; Tang, Hongwu; Jin, Guangqiu; Scheuermann, A.; Li, Ling

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the settling dynamics of irregularly shaped particles in a still fluid under a wide range of conditions with Reynolds numbers Re varying between 1 and 2000, sphericity ϕ and circularity c both greater than 0.5, and Corey shape factor (CSF) less than 1. To simulate the particle settling process, a modified lattice Boltzmann model combined with a turbulence module was adopted. This model was first validated using experimental data for particles of spherical and cubic shapes. For irregularly shaped particles, two different types of settling behaviors were observed prior to particles reaching a steady state: accelerating and accelerating-decelerating, which could be distinguished by a critical CSF value of approximately 0.7. The settling dynamics were analyzed with a focus on the projected areas and angular velocities of particles. It was found that a minor change in the starting projected area, an indicator of the initial particle orientation, would not strongly affect the settling velocity for low Re. Periodic oscillations developed for all simulated particles when Re>100 . The amplitude of these oscillations increased with Re. However, the periods were not sensitive to Re. The critical Re that defined the transition between the steady and periodically oscillating behaviors depended on the inertia tensor. In particular, the maximum eigenvalue of the inertia tensor played a major role in signaling this transition in comparison to the intermediate and minimum eigenvalues.

  9. Dynamical Behavior of Multi-Robot Systems Using Lattice Gas Automata

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, S.M.; Robinett, R.; Stantz, K.M.; Trahan, M.W.; Wagner, J.S.

    1999-03-11

    Recent attention has been given to the deployment of an adaptable sensor array realized by multi-robotic systems. Our group has been studying the collective behavior of autonomous, multi-agent systems and their applications in the area of remote-sensing and emerging threats. To accomplish such tasks, an interdisciplinary research effort at Sandia National Laboratories are conducting tests in the fields of sensor technology, robotics, and multi-robotic and multi-agents architectures. Our goal is to coordinate a constellation of point sensors that optimizes spatial coverage and multivariate signal analysis using unmanned robotic vehicles (e.g., RATLERs, Robotic All-ten-sin Lunar Exploration Rover-class vehicles). Overall design methodology is to evolve complex collective behaviors realized through simple interaction (kinetic) physics and artificial intelligence to enable real-time operational responses to emerging threats. This paper focuses on our recent work understanding the dynamics of many-body systems using the physics-based hydrodynamic model of lattice gas automata. Three design features are investigated. One, for single-speed robots, a hexagonal nearest-neighbor interaction topology is necessary to preserve standard hydrodynamic flow. Two, adaptability, defined by the swarm's deformation rate, can be controlled through the hydrodynamic viscosity term, which, in turn, is defined by the local robotic interaction rules. Three, due to the inherent non-linearity of the dynamical equations describing large ensembles, development of stability criteria ensuring convergence to equilibrium states is developed by scaling information flow rates relative to a swarm's hydrodynamic flow rate. An initial test case simulates a swarm of twenty-five robots that maneuvers past an obstacle while following a moving target. A genetic algorithm optimizes applied nearest-neighbor forces in each of five spatial regions distributed over the simulation domain. Armed with knowledge, the

  10. Monte Carlo tests of nucleation concepts in the lattice gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Fabian; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2013-05-01

    The conventional theory of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation in a supersaturated vapor is tested by Monte Carlo simulations of the lattice gas (Ising) model with nearest-neighbor attractive interactions on the simple cubic lattice. The theory considers the nucleation process as a slow (quasistatic) cluster (droplet) growth over a free energy barrier ΔF*, constructed in terms of a balance of surface and bulk term of a critical droplet of radius R*, implying that the rates of droplet growth and shrinking essentially balance each other for droplet radius R=R*. For heterogeneous nucleation at surfaces, the barrier is reduced by a factor depending on the contact angle. Using the definition of physical clusters based on the Fortuin-Kasteleyn mapping, the time dependence of the cluster size distribution is studied for quenching experiments in the kinetic Ising model and the cluster size ℓ* where the cluster growth rate changes sign is estimated. These studies of nucleation kinetics are compared to studies where the relation between cluster size and supersaturation is estimated from equilibrium simulations of phase coexistence between droplet and vapor in the canonical ensemble. The chemical potential is estimated from a lattice version of the Widom particle insertion method. For large droplets it is shown that the physical clusters have a volume consistent with the estimates from the lever rule. Geometrical clusters (defined such that each site belonging to the cluster is occupied and has at least one occupied neighbor site) yield valid results only for temperatures less than 60% of the critical temperature, where the cluster shape is nonspherical. We show how the chemical potential can be used to numerically estimate ΔF* also for nonspherical cluster shapes.

  11. Abnormal incorporation of amino acids into the gas hydrate crystal lattice.

    PubMed

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Lee, Bo Ram; Ahn, Docheon; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2014-12-28

    Gas hydrates are crystalline ice-like solid materials enclosing gas molecules inside. The possibility of the presence of gas hydrates with amino acids in the universe is of interest when revealing the potential existence of life as they are evidence of a source of water and organic precursors, respectively. However, little is known about how they can naturally coexist, and their crystallization behavior would become far more complex as both crystallize with formation of hydrogen bonds. Here, we report abnormal incorporation of amino acids into the gas hydrate crystal lattice that is contrary to the generally accepted crystallization mode, and this resulted in lattice distortion and expansion. The present findings imply the potential for their natural coexistence by sharing the crystal lattice, and will be helpful for understanding the role of additives in the gas hydrate crystallization.

  12. Pore-scale Numerical Simulation Using Lattice Boltzmann Method for Mud Erosion in Methane Hydrate Bearing Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Sato, T.; Oyama, H.

    2014-12-01

    Methane hydrates in subsea environments near Japan are believed to new natural gas resources. These methane hydrate crystals are very small and existed in the intergranular pores of sandy sediments in sand mud alternate layers. For gas production, several processes for recovering natural gas from the methane hydrate in a sedimentary reservoir have been proposed, but almost all technique are obtain dissociated gas from methane hydrates. When methane hydrates are dissociated, gas and water are existed. These gas and water are flown in pore space of sand mud alternate layers, and there is a possibility that the mud layer is eroded by these flows. It is considered that the mad erosion causes production trouble such as making skins or well instability. In this study, we carried out pore scale numerical simulation to represent mud erosion. This research aims to develop a fundamental simulation method based on LBM (Lattice Boltzmann Method). In the simulation, sand particles are generated numerically in simulation area which is approximately 200x200x200μm3. The periodic boundary condition is used except for mud layers. The water/gas flow in pore space is calculated by LBM, and shear stress distribution is obtained at the position flow interacting mud surface. From this shear stress, we consider that the driving force of mud erosion. As results, mud erosion can be reproduced numerically by adjusting the parameters such as critical shear stress. We confirmed that the simulation using LBM is appropriate for mud erosion.

  13. Electrostatic modulation of periodic potentials in a two-dimensional electron gas: From antidot lattice to quantum dot lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Srijit; Aamir, Mohammed Ali; Shamim, Saquib; Ghosh, Arindam; Siegert, Christoph; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A.; Pepper, Michael

    2013-12-04

    We use a dual gated device structure to introduce a gate-tuneable periodic potential in a GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron gas (2DEG). Using only a suitable choice of gate voltages we can controllably alter the potential landscape of the bare 2DEG, inducing either a periodic array of antidots or quantum dots. Antidots are artificial scattering centers, and therefore allow for a study of electron dynamics. In particular, we show that the thermovoltage of an antidot lattice is particularly sensitive to the relative positions of the Fermi level and the antidot potential. A quantum dot lattice, on the other hand, provides the opportunity to study correlated electron physics. We find that its current-voltage characteristics display a voltage threshold, as well as a power law scaling, indicative of collective Coulomb blockade in a disordered background.

  14. On the transverse-traceless projection in lattice simulations of gravitational wave production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, Daniel G.; García-Bellido, Juan; Rajantie, Arttu

    2011-11-01

    It has recently been pointed out that the usual procedure employed in order to obtain the transverse-traceless (TT) part of metric perturbations in lattice simulations was inconsistent with the fact that those fields live in the lattice and not in the continuum. It was claimed that this could lead to a larger amplitude and a wrong shape for the gravitational wave (GW) spectra obtained in numerical simulations of (p)reheating. In order to address this issue, we have defined a consistent prescription in the lattice for extracting the TT part of the metric perturbations. We demonstrate explicitly that the GW spectra obtained with the old continuum-based TT projection only differ marginally in amplitude and shape with respect to the new lattice-based ones. We conclude that one can therefore trust the predictions appearing in the literature on the spectra of GW produced during (p)reheating and similar scenarios simulated on a lattice.

  15. Analysis of droplet jumping phenomenon with lattice Boltzmann simulation of droplet coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Benli; Wang, Sifang; Lan, Zhong; Xu, Wei; Wen, Rongfu; Ma, Xuehu

    2013-04-01

    Droplet jumping from condensing surfaces induced by droplet coalescence during dropwise condensation of mixed steam on a superhydrophobic surface can significantly enhance condensation heat transfer of mixed steam with non-condensable gas. This phenomenon was visually observed and theoretically analyzed in the present paper. The dynamic evolution of droplet and the velocity distribution inside the droplet during coalescence were simulated using multiphase lattice Boltzmann method. The energy distribution released by droplet coalescence was calculated statistically, and the jumping height induced by droplet coalescence on a superhydrophobic surface was predicted based on the energy conservation method. The theoretical predictions obtained by the modified model proposed in this paper agree well with the experimental observations.

  16. Metastable States of a Gas of Dipolar Bosons in a 2D Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Menotti, C.; Trefzger, C.; Lewenstein, M.

    2007-06-08

    We investigate the physics of dipolar bosons in a two-dimensional optical lattice. It is known that due to the long-range character of dipole-dipole interaction, the ground state phase diagram of a gas of dipolar bosons in an optical lattice presents novel quantum phases, like checkerboard and supersolid phases. In this Letter, we consider the properties of the system beyond its ground state, finding that it is characterized by a multitude of almost degenerate metastable states, often competing with the ground state. This makes dipolar bosons in a lattice similar to a disordered system and opens possibilities of using them as quantum memories.

  17. Phase transitions and damage spreading in a nonequilibrium lattice gas model with mixed dynamic rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio Puzzo, M. Leticia; Saracco, Gustavo P.; Bab, Marisa A.

    2016-02-01

    Phase transitions and damage spreading for a lattice gas model with mixed driven lattice gas (DLG)-Glauber dynamics are studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations. In order to control the number of sites updated according to the nonconservative Glauber dynamics, a parameter pɛ [ 0 , 1 ] is defined. In this way, for p = 0 the system corresponds to the DLG model with biased Kawasaki conservative dynamics, while for p = 1 it corresponds to the Ising model with Glauber dynamics. The results obtained show that the introduction of nonconservative dynamics dramatically affects the behavior of the DLG model, leading to the existence of Ising-like phase transitions from fully occupied to disordered states. The short-time dynamics results suggest that this transition is second order for values of p = 0.1 and p > 0.6 and first order for 0.1 < p ≤ 0.6. On the other hand, damage always spreads within the investigated temperature range and reaches a saturation value Dsat that depends on the system size, the temperature, and p. The value of Dsat in the thermodynamic limit is estimated by performing a finite-size analysis. For p < 0.6 the results show a change in the behavior of Dsat with temperature, similar to those reported for the pure (p = 0) DLG model. However, for p ≥ 0.6 the data remind us of the Ising (p = 1) curves. In each case, a damage temperature TD(p) can be defined as the value where either Dsat reaches a maximum or it becomes nonzero. This temperature is, within error bars, similar to the reported values of the temperatures that characterize the mentioned phase transitions.

  18. Lattice-fluid model for gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tao, Y; Wells, P S; Yi, X; Yun, K S; Parcher, J F

    1999-11-01

    Lattice-fluid models describe molecular ensembles in terms of the number of lattice sites occupied by molecular species (r-mers) and the interactions between neighboring molecules. The lattice-fluid model proposed by Sanchez and Lacombe (Macromolecules, 1978;11:1145-1156) was used to model specific retention volume data for a series of n-alkane solutes with n-alkane, polystyrene, and poly(dimethylsiloxane) stationary liquid phases. Theoretical equations were derived for the specific retention volume and also for the temperature dependence and limiting (high temperature) values for the specific retention volume. The model was used to predict retention volumes within 10% for the n-alkanes phases; 22% for polystyrene; and from 20 to 70% for PDMS using no adjustable parameters. The temperature derivative (enthalpy) could be calculated within 5% for all of the solutes in nine stationary liquid phases. The limiting value for the specific retention volume at high temperature (entropy controlled state) could be calculated within 10% for all of the systems. The limiting data also provided a new chromatographic method to measure the size parameter, r, for any chromatographic solute using characteristic and size parameters for the stationary phase only. The calculated size parameters of the solutes were consistent, i.e. independent of the stationary phase and agreed within experimental error with the size parameters previously reported from saturated vapor pressure, latent heat of vaporization or density data.

  19. Evaluation of the unstructured lattice Boltzmann method in porous flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misztal, Marek; Matin, Rastin; Hernandez, Anier; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2015-11-01

    Flows in porous media are among the most challenging to simulate using the computational fluid dynamics methods, primarily due to the complex boundaries, often characterized by a very broad distribution of pore sizes. The standard (regular grid based) lattice Boltzmann method with the multi-relaxation time (MRT) collision operator is often used to simulate such flows. However, due to the lack of coupling between the positions of the computational grid nodes and the solid boundaries, the properties of the simulated flow might unnaturally vary with the fluid's viscosity, depending on the parameters of the MRT operator. This is, for instance, the case with the otherwise popular, single-relaxation time Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) collision operator. Our focus has been on the unstructured grid based, finite element variant of the LBM. By using such approach, we can place the computational grid nodes precisely at the solid boundary. Since there is no prior work on the accuracy of this method in simulating porous flows, we perform a thorough permeability study using both BGK and MRT operators at a wide range of viscosities. We benchmark these models on artificial samples with known solutions, and further, we demonstrate the findings of our studies in the porous networks of real rocks. Predicting Petrophysical Parameters: A Project Sponsored by HTF and Maersk Oil and Gas.

  20. Coarse-grained Simulations of Chemical Oscillation in Lattice Brusselator System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Ting; Zhang, Zhen; Hou, Zhong-huai; Xin, Hou-wen

    2011-08-01

    The oscillation behavior of a two-dimension lattice-gas Brusselator model was investigated. We have adopted a coarse-grained kinetic Monte Carlo (CG-KMC) procedure, where m×m microscopic lattice sites are grouped together to form a CG cell, upon which CG processes take place with well-defined CG rates. Such a CG approach almost fails if the CG rates are obtained by a simple local mean field (s-LMF) approximation, due to the ignorance of correlation among adjcent cells resulting from the trimolecular reaction in this nonlinear system. By proper incorporating such boundary effects, thus introduce the so-called b-LMF CG approach. Extensive numerical simulations demonstrate that the b-LMF method can reproduce the oscillation behavior of the system quite well, given that the diffusion constant is not too small. In addition, the deviation from the KMC results reaches a nearly zero minimum level at an intermediate cell size, which lies in between the effective diffusion length and the minimal size required to sustain a well-defined temporal oscillation.

  1. Phase diagrams of adsorption systems and calibration functions in the lattice-gas model.

    PubMed

    Tovbin, Yuriy K; Rabinovich, Alexander B

    2004-07-01

    Using the calibration function is suggested to increase the accuracy of approximate equations in the lattice-gas model at calculating various concentration dependences of equilibrium characteristics for nonideal adsorption systems in the vicinity of the critical point. This function should provide a shift of the approximate result to the exact one, when the lattice-gas model equations are used in the quality of the interpolation tool between the exact solutions. A comparison of approximate equations with Onsager's exact solution preferrably allows a use of the quasi-chemical approximation as the interpolation procedure and the exact information on the critical point. The modified lattice-gas model takes into account next the molecular properties of the Lennard-Jones fluid: the long-range potential of adsorbate-adsorbate, an excluded volume of the adsorption site, and a contribution of the triple interactions, as well as a softness of the lattice structure. The modified lattice-gas model with the calibration function is used for the phase diagram descriptions for argon adsorption on the homogeneous (111) CdCl2 face (two-dimensional systems) and for methane adsorption in carbon slitlike pores (three-dimensional system) as well as the other equilibrium characteristics of mentioned systems.

  2. Self-similarity of phase-space networks of frustrated spin models and lattice gas models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yi; Wang, Feng; Han, Yilong

    2013-03-01

    We studied the self-similar properties of the phase-spaces of two frustrated spin models and two lattice gas models. The frustrated spin models included (1) the anti-ferromagnetic Ising model on a two-dimensional triangular lattice (1a) at the ground states and (1b) above the ground states and (2) the six-vertex model. The two lattice gas models were (3) the one-dimensional lattice gas model and (4) the two-dimensional lattice gas model. The phase spaces were mapped to networks so that the fractal analysis of complex networks could be applied, i.e. the box-covering method and the cluster-growth method. These phase spaces, in turn, establish new classes of networks with unique self-similar properties. Models 1a, 2, and 3 with long-range power-law correlations in real space exhibit fractal phase spaces, while models 1b and 4 with short-range exponential correlations in real space exhibit nonfractal phase spaces. This behavior agrees with one of untested assumptions in Tsallis nonextensive statistics. Hong Kong GRC grants 601208 and 601911

  3. Nanoscale simulation of shale transport properties using the lattice Boltzmann method: Permeability and diffusivity

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Li; Zhang, Lei; Kang, Qinjun; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Yao, Jun; Tao, Wenquan

    2015-01-28

    Here, porous structures of shales are reconstructed using the markov chain monte carlo (MCMC) method based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of shale samples from Sichuan Basin, China. Characterization analysis of the reconstructed shales is performed, including porosity, pore size distribution, specific surface area and pore connectivity. The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is adopted to simulate fluid flow and Knudsen diffusion within the reconstructed shales. Simulation results reveal that the tortuosity of the shales is much higher than that commonly employed in the Bruggeman equation, and such high tortuosity leads to extremely low intrinsic permeability. Correction of the intrinsicmore » permeability is performed based on the dusty gas model (DGM) by considering the contribution of Knudsen diffusion to the total flow flux, resulting in apparent permeability. The correction factor over a range of Knudsen number and pressure is estimated and compared with empirical correlations in the literature. We find that for the wide pressure range investigated, the correction factor is always greater than 1, indicating Knudsen diffusion always plays a role on shale gas transport mechanisms in the reconstructed shales. Specifically, we found that most of the values of correction factor fall in the slip and transition regime, with no Darcy flow regime observed.« less

  4. Nanoscale simulation of shale transport properties using the lattice Boltzmann method: permeability and diffusivity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Zhang, Lei; Kang, Qinjun; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Yao, Jun; Tao, Wenquan

    2015-01-01

    Porous structures of shales are reconstructed using the markov chain monte carlo (MCMC) method based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of shale samples from Sichuan Basin, China. Characterization analysis of the reconstructed shales is performed, including porosity, pore size distribution, specific surface area and pore connectivity. The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is adopted to simulate fluid flow and Knudsen diffusion within the reconstructed shales. Simulation results reveal that the tortuosity of the shales is much higher than that commonly employed in the Bruggeman equation, and such high tortuosity leads to extremely low intrinsic permeability. Correction of the intrinsic permeability is performed based on the dusty gas model (DGM) by considering the contribution of Knudsen diffusion to the total flow flux, resulting in apparent permeability. The correction factor over a range of Knudsen number and pressure is estimated and compared with empirical correlations in the literature. For the wide pressure range investigated, the correction factor is always greater than 1, indicating Knudsen diffusion always plays a role on shale gas transport mechanisms in the reconstructed shales. Specifically, we found that most of the values of correction factor fall in the slip and transition regime, with no Darcy flow regime observed. PMID:25627247

  5. Nanoscale simulation of shale transport properties using the lattice Boltzmann method: Permeability and diffusivity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Li; Zhang, Lei; Kang, Qinjun; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Yao, Jun; Tao, Wenquan

    2015-01-28

    Here, porous structures of shales are reconstructed using the markov chain monte carlo (MCMC) method based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of shale samples from Sichuan Basin, China. Characterization analysis of the reconstructed shales is performed, including porosity, pore size distribution, specific surface area and pore connectivity. The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is adopted to simulate fluid flow and Knudsen diffusion within the reconstructed shales. Simulation results reveal that the tortuosity of the shales is much higher than that commonly employed in the Bruggeman equation, and such high tortuosity leads to extremely low intrinsic permeability. Correction of the intrinsic permeability is performed based on the dusty gas model (DGM) by considering the contribution of Knudsen diffusion to the total flow flux, resulting in apparent permeability. The correction factor over a range of Knudsen number and pressure is estimated and compared with empirical correlations in the literature. We find that for the wide pressure range investigated, the correction factor is always greater than 1, indicating Knudsen diffusion always plays a role on shale gas transport mechanisms in the reconstructed shales. Specifically, we found that most of the values of correction factor fall in the slip and transition regime, with no Darcy flow regime observed.

  6. Nanoscale simulation of shale transport properties using the lattice Boltzmann method: permeability and diffusivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Zhang, Lei; Kang, Qinjun; Viswanathan, Hari S; Yao, Jun; Tao, Wenquan

    2015-01-01

    Porous structures of shales are reconstructed using the markov chain monte carlo (MCMC) method based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of shale samples from Sichuan Basin, China. Characterization analysis of the reconstructed shales is performed, including porosity, pore size distribution, specific surface area and pore connectivity. The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is adopted to simulate fluid flow and Knudsen diffusion within the reconstructed shales. Simulation results reveal that the tortuosity of the shales is much higher than that commonly employed in the Bruggeman equation, and such high tortuosity leads to extremely low intrinsic permeability. Correction of the intrinsic permeability is performed based on the dusty gas model (DGM) by considering the contribution of Knudsen diffusion to the total flow flux, resulting in apparent permeability. The correction factor over a range of Knudsen number and pressure is estimated and compared with empirical correlations in the literature. For the wide pressure range investigated, the correction factor is always greater than 1, indicating Knudsen diffusion always plays a role on shale gas transport mechanisms in the reconstructed shales. Specifically, we found that most of the values of correction factor fall in the slip and transition regime, with no Darcy flow regime observed. PMID:25627247

  7. A numerical theory of lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann methods in the computation of solutions to nonlinear advective-diffusive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, A.B.H.

    1990-09-24

    A numerical theory for the massively parallel lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann methods for computing solutions to nonlinear advective-diffusive systems is introduced. The convergence theory is based on consistency and stability arguments that are supported by the discrete Chapman-Enskog expansion (for consistency) and conditions of monotonicity (in establishing stability). The theory is applied to four lattice methods: Two of the methods are for some two-dimensional nonlinear diffusion equations. One of the methods is for the one-dimensional lattice method for the one-dimensional viscous Burgers equation. And one of the methods is for a two-dimensional nonlinear advection-diffusion equation. Convergence is formally proven in the L{sub 1}-norm for the first three methods, revealing that they are second-order, conservative, conditionally monotone finite difference methods. Computational results which support the theory for lattice methods are presented. In addition, a domain decomposition strategy using mesh refinement techniques is presented for lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann methods. The strategy allows concentration of computational resources on regions of high activity. Computational evidence is reported for the strategy applied to the lattice gas method for the one-dimensional viscous Burgers equation. 72 refs., 19 figs., 28 tabs.

  8. The high density phase of the k-NN hard core lattice gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Trisha; Rajesh, R.

    2016-07-01

    The k-NN hard core lattice gas model on a square lattice, in which the first k next nearest neighbor sites of a particle are excluded from being occupied by another particle, is the lattice version of the hard disc model in two dimensional continuum. It has been conjectured that the lattice model, like its continuum counterpart, will show multiple entropy-driven transitions with increasing density if the high density phase has columnar or striped order. Here, we determine the nature of the phase at full packing for k up to 820 302 . We show that there are only eighteen values of k, all less than k  =  4134, that show columnar order, while the others show solid-like sublattice order.

  9. Multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann simulations of turbulent channel and pipe flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opadrishta, Harish; Peng, Cheng; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2015-11-01

    The mesoscopic Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has become a reliable alternative for solving incompressible turbulent flows. However, the statistics of a simulated turbulent flow near a curved boundary may deviate from the physical rotational invariance (RI) of lattice coordinates. The main objective of this study is to compare the effects of different lattice models on the simulation results of turbulent flows, and explore ways to restore RI near a curved boundary. We will apply D3Q19 and D3Q27 multiple-relaxation-time LBM models to simulate turbulent pipe and channel flows. The statistics of the simulated flows are examined to quantify the nature of departures from RI. To help understand whether the departure is originated from the bounce-back scheme at the solid wall, we will perform simulations of a turbulent channel flow with walls orientated at an angle from the lattice grid, and test the use of an overset lattice grid near a pipe wall. The Chapman-Enskog analysis of these models will be performed to probe RI errors near a boundary. Our goal is to eventually perform an accurate direct numerical simulation of a turbulent pipe flow, and compare the results to previous simulations based on the Navier-Stokes equations.

  10. Creation of a low-entropy quantum gas of polar molecules in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Moses, Steven A; Covey, Jacob P; Miecnikowski, Matthew T; Yan, Bo; Gadway, Bryce; Ye, Jun; Jin, Deborah S

    2015-11-01

    Ultracold polar molecules, with their long-range electric dipolar interactions, offer a unique platform for studying correlated quantum many-body phenomena. However, realizing a highly degenerate quantum gas of molecules with a low entropy per particle is challenging. We report the synthesis of a low-entropy quantum gas of potassium-rubidium molecules (KRb) in a three-dimensional optical lattice. We simultaneously load into the optical lattice a Mott insulator of bosonic Rb atoms and a single-band insulator of fermionic K atoms. Then, using magnetoassociation and optical state transfer, we efficiently produce ground-state molecules in the lattice at those sites that contain one Rb and one K atom. The achieved filling fraction of 25% should enable future studies of transport and entanglement propagation in a many-body system with long-range dipolar interactions. PMID:26542566

  11. Virial and high-density expansions for the Lee-Yang lattice gas.

    PubMed

    Ushcats, M V; Bulavin, L A; Sysoev, V M; Ushcats, S J

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of the recently established "hole-particle" symmetry of the lattice-gas Hamiltonian, the high-density equation of state has been derived in a form of pressure and density expansions in powers of activity. This equation is proposed as an alternative and complementary to the previously obtained pressure expansion in powers of density. For the well-known Lee-Yang lattice-gas model (a two-dimensional square lattice with a square-well interaction potential), the power coefficients (i.e., cluster and irreducible cluster integrals) up to the seventh order have been evaluated as accurate functions of temperature. The convergence of the expansions in powers of both density and activity to the exact Lee-Yang solution is investigated. PMID:27575112

  12. Simulating Photons and Plasmons in a Three-dimensional Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Pletzer, A.; Shvets, G.

    2002-09-03

    Three-dimensional metallic photonic structures are studied using a newly developed mixed finite element-finite difference (FE-FD) code, Curly3d. The code solves the vector Helmholtz equation as an eigenvalue problem in the unit cell of a triply periodic lattice composed of conductors and/or dielectrics. The mixed FE-FD discretization scheme ensures rapid numerical convergence of the eigenvalue and allows the code to run at low resolution. Plasmon and photonic band structure calculations are presented.

  13. Lattice gas dynamics: application to driven vortices in two dimensional superconductors.

    PubMed

    Gotcheva, Violeta; Wang, Albert T J; Teitel, S

    2004-06-18

    A continuous time Monte Carlo lattice gas dynamics is developed to model driven steady states of vortices in two dimensional superconducting networks. Dramatic differences are found when compared to a simpler Metropolis dynamics. Subtle finite size effects are found at low temperature, with a moving smectic that becomes unstable to an anisotropic liquid on sufficiently large length scales.

  14. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Multiphase Transport in Nanostructured PEM Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiles, Christopher D.

    As the fossil fuel crisis becomes more critical, it is imperative to develop renewable sources of power generation. Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are considered a viable option. However, the cost of the platinum catalyst has hindered their commercialization. PEM fuel cells with platinum loading of >0.4 mg cm2 are common. Efforts towards further reducing this loading are currently underway utilizing nanostructured electrodes. A consequence of increased platinum utilization per unit area and thinner nanostructured electrodes is flooding, which is detrimental to fuel cell performance. Flooding causes a two-fold impact on cell performance: a drop in cell voltage and a rise in parasitic pumping power to overcome the increased pressure drop, which together result in a significant reduction in system efficiency. Proper water management is therefore crucial for optimum performance of the fuel cell and also for enhancing membrane durability. The goal of this thesis is to simulate the multiphase fluid transport in the nanostructured PEMFC of H2O in air with realistic density ratios. In order to pursue this goal, the ability of the pseudopotential based multiphase lattice Boltzmann method to realistically model the coexistence of the gas and liquid phases of H2O at low temperatures is explored. This method is expanded to include a gas mixture of O2 and N 2 into the multiphase H2O systems. Beginning with the examination of the phase transition region described by the current implementation of the multiphase pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann model. Following this, a modified form of the pressure term with the use of a scalar multiplier kappa for the Peng-Robinson equation of state is thoroughly investigated. This method proves to be very effective at enabling numerically stable simulations at low temperatures with large density ratios. It is found that for decreasing values of kappa, this model leads to an increase in multiphase interface thickness and a

  15. Lattice model theory of the equation of state covering the gas, liquid, and solid phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonavito, N. L.; Tanaka, T.; Chan, E. M.; Horiguchi, T.; Foreman, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The three stable states of matter and the corresponding phase transitions were obtained with a single model. Patterned after Lennard-Jones and Devonshires's theory, a simple cubic lattice model containing two fcc sublattices (alpha and beta) is adopted. The interatomic potential is taken to be the Lennard-Jones (6-12) potential. Employing the cluster variation method, the Weiss and the pair approximations on the lattice gas failed to give the correct phase diagrams. Hybrid approximations were devised to describe the lattice term in the free energy. A lattice vibration term corresponding to a free volume correction is included semi-phenomenologically. The combinations of the lattice part and the free volume part yield the three states and the proper phase diagrams. To determine the coexistence regions, the equalities of the pressure and Gibbs free energy per molecule of the coexisting phases were utilized. The ordered branch of the free energy gives rise to the solid phase while the disordered branch yields the gas and liquid phases. It is observed that the triple point and the critical point quantities, the phase diagrams and the coexistence regions plotted are in good agreement with the experimental values and graphs for argon.

  16. Population dynamics of intraguild predation in a lattice gas system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanshi; Wu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    In the system of intraguild predation (IGP) we are concerned with, species that are in a predator-prey relationship, also compete for shared resources (space or food). While several models have been established to characterize IGP, mechanisms by which IG prey and IG predator can coexist in IGP systems with spatial competition, have not been shown. This paper considers an IGP model, which is derived from reactions on lattice and has a form similar to that of Lotka-Volterra equations. Dynamics of the model demonstrate properties of IGP and mechanisms by which the IGP leads to coexistence of species and occurrence of alternative states. Intermediate predation is shown to lead to persistence of the predator, while extremely big predation can lead to extinction of one/both species and extremely small predation can lead to extinction of the predator. Numerical computations confirm and extend our results. While empirical observations typically exhibit coexistence of IG predator and IG prey, theoretical analysis in this work demonstrates exact conditions under which this coexistence can occur.

  17. Population dynamics of intraguild predation in a lattice gas system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanshi; Wu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    In the system of intraguild predation (IGP) we are concerned with, species that are in a predator-prey relationship, also compete for shared resources (space or food). While several models have been established to characterize IGP, mechanisms by which IG prey and IG predator can coexist in IGP systems with spatial competition, have not been shown. This paper considers an IGP model, which is derived from reactions on lattice and has a form similar to that of Lotka-Volterra equations. Dynamics of the model demonstrate properties of IGP and mechanisms by which the IGP leads to coexistence of species and occurrence of alternative states. Intermediate predation is shown to lead to persistence of the predator, while extremely big predation can lead to extinction of one/both species and extremely small predation can lead to extinction of the predator. Numerical computations confirm and extend our results. While empirical observations typically exhibit coexistence of IG predator and IG prey, theoretical analysis in this work demonstrates exact conditions under which this coexistence can occur. PMID:25447811

  18. Lattice-Boltzmann simulation of solvent diffusion into oil-saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Hatiboglu, Can Ulas; Babadagli, Tayfun

    2007-12-01

    We simulated the diffusion process into oil-saturated porous media using the modified diffusion-limited aggregation and the lattice Boltzmann method algorithms. The results were matched to visual experiments for cocurrent (two sides of the model open to flow) and countercurrent (only one side of the model open to flow) diffusion for horizontally and vertically positioned samples. The model saturated with oil was exposed to pentane in order for a miscible interaction to take place. These experiments mimic the transfer between the rock matrix and fracture during gas or liquid solvent injection for enhanced oil recovery, underground waste disposal, groundwater contamination, and CO2 sequestration in naturally fractured reservoirs. Finger development at the early stages of the process was controlled by oil viscosity and the interaction type dictated by the boundary conditions. The convective transport driven by the buoyancy that was experimentally observed on vertically oriented samples and transfer driven by diffusion on the horizontal ones were captured in the LBM simulation of the process.

  19. Numerical modeling of carrier gas flow in atomic layer deposition vacuum reactor: A comparative study of lattice Boltzmann models

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Dongqing; Chien Jen, Tien; Li, Tao; Yuan, Chris

    2014-01-15

    This paper characterizes the carrier gas flow in the atomic layer deposition (ALD) vacuum reactor by introducing Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) to the ALD simulation through a comparative study of two LBM models. Numerical models of gas flow are constructed and implemented in two-dimensional geometry based on lattice Bhatnagar–Gross–Krook (LBGK)-D2Q9 model and two-relaxation-time (TRT) model. Both incompressible and compressible scenarios are simulated and the two models are compared in the aspects of flow features, stability, and efficiency. Our simulation outcome reveals that, for our specific ALD vacuum reactor, TRT model generates better steady laminar flow features all over the domain with better stability and reliability than LBGK-D2Q9 model especially when considering the compressible effects of the gas flow. The LBM-TRT is verified indirectly by comparing the numerical result with conventional continuum-based computational fluid dynamics solvers, and it shows very good agreement with these conventional methods. The velocity field of carrier gas flow through ALD vacuum reactor was characterized by LBM-TRT model finally. The flow in ALD is in a laminar steady state with velocity concentrated at the corners and around the wafer. The effects of flow fields on precursor distributions, surface absorptions, and surface reactions are discussed in detail. Steady and evenly distributed velocity field contribute to higher precursor concentration near the wafer and relatively lower particle velocities help to achieve better surface adsorption and deposition. The ALD reactor geometry needs to be considered carefully if a steady and laminar flow field around the wafer and better surface deposition are desired.

  20. Vortex lattices in strongly interacting Fermi gas with crossed-beam dipole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuping; Yao, Xingcan; Chen, Haoze; Liu, Xiangpei; Wang, Xiaoqiong

    2016-05-01

    We have built an experiment system to explore the dynamic and vortex in quantum degenerate Li6 gas. By using UV MOT and crossed-beam dipole trap, we obtained BEC of 2* 105 molecules. With a tightly focused 532nm laser beam as rotating bucket wall, We observed vortex formation in strongly interacting fermi superfluid. At suitable stirring frequency we produced the condensate of fermi pairs for which up to 10 vortices were simultaneously present. We produced vortex lattices in different magnetic fields (from BEC side to BCS side). Also we measured the lifetime of vortex lattices in different interaction region. This work was funded by CAS and USTC.

  1. Retained Gas Sampler Calibration and Simulant Tests

    SciTech Connect

    CRAWFORD, B.A.

    2000-01-05

    This test plan provides a method for calibration of the retained gas sampler (RGS) for ammonia gas analysis. Simulant solutions of ammonium hydroxide at known concentrations will be diluted with isotopically labeled 0.04 M ammonium hydroxide solution. Sea sand solids will also be mixed with ammonium hydroxide solution and diluent to determine the accuracy of the system for ammonia gas analysis.

  2. Morphology of Gas Release in Physical Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Richard C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Crawford, Amanda D.; Hylden, Laura R.; Bryan, Samuel A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

    2014-07-03

    This report documents testing activities conducted as part of the Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Project (DSGREP). The testing described in this report focused on evaluating the potential retention and release mechanisms of hydrogen bubbles in underground radioactive waste storage tanks at Hanford. The goal of the testing was to evaluate the rate, extent, and morphology of gas release events in simulant materials. Previous, undocumented scoping tests have evidenced dramatically different gas release behavior from simulants with similar physical properties. Specifically, previous gas release tests have evaluated the extent of release of 30 Pa kaolin and 30 Pa bentonite clay slurries. While both materials are clays and both have equivalent material shear strength using a shear vane, it was found that upon stirring, gas was released immediately and completely from bentonite clay slurry while little if any gas was released from the kaolin slurry. The motivation for the current work is to replicate these tests in a controlled quality test environment and to evaluate the release behavior for another simulant used in DSGREP testing. Three simulant materials were evaluated: 1) a 30 Pa kaolin clay slurry, 2) a 30 Pa bentonite clay slurry, and 3) Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) Simulant (a simulant designed to support DSGREP RT instability testing. Entrained gas was generated in these simulant materials using two methods: 1) application of vacuum over about a 1-minute period to nucleate dissolved gas within the simulant and 2) addition of hydrogen peroxide to generate gas by peroxide decomposition in the simulants over about a 16-hour period. Bubble release was effected by vibrating the test material using an external vibrating table. When testing with hydrogen peroxide, gas release was also accomplished by stirring of the simulant.

  3. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of leukocyte rolling and deformation in a three-dimensional shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ye; Qi, Dewei; He, Guowei

    2013-11-01

    Lattice Boltzmann simulation is used to simulate the motion of a leukocyte in fluid. The cell membrane is built by lattice spring model. The interaction between the fluid flow and the solid surface is treated by immersed boundary method. Stochastic Monte Carlo method is used to deal with receptor/ligand interaction. It is shown that the model can correctly predict the characteristic ``stop-and-g'' motion of rolling leukocytes. Effects of cell deformation, shear rates, bonding force, microvilli distribution on rolling are studied and compared with experiments.

  4. Fracture flow simulation using a finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Kim, I; Lindquist, W B; Durham, W B

    2003-04-01

    We present numerical computations for single phase flow through three-dimensional digitized rock fractures under varied simulated confining pressures appropriate to midcrustal depths. The computations are performed using a finite difference, lattice Boltzmann method and thus simulate Navier-Stokes flow. The digitized fracture data sets come from profiled elevations taken on tensile induced fractures in Harcourt granite. Numerical predictions of fracture permeability are compared with laboratory measurements performed on the same fractures. Use of the finite difference lattice Boltzmann method allows computation on nonuniform grid spacing, enabling accurate resolution across the aperture width without extensive refinement in the other two directions.

  5. Quantum Field Theories on the Lattice : Concepts behind their Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang

    2011-09-01

    We review the basic ideas behind numerical simulations of quantum field theory, which lead to non-perturbative results in particle physics. We first sketch the functional integral formulation of quantum mechanics, its transition to Euclidean time and the link to statistical mechanics. Then we proceed to quantum field theory in the lattice regularization, and its applications to scalar fields, gauge fields and fermions. In particular we address the treatment of chiral symmetry. At last we describe the formulation of lattice QCD and comment on simulations and results.

  6. Micromagnetic simulations of interacting dipoles on an fcc lattice: application to nanoparticle assemblies.

    PubMed

    Plumer, M L; van Lierop, J; Southern, B W; Whitehead, J P

    2010-07-28

    Micromagnetic simulations are used to examine the effects of cubic and axial anisotropy, magnetostatic interactions and temperature on M-H loops for a collection of magnetic dipoles on fcc and sc lattices. We employ a simple model of interacting dipoles that represent single-domain particles in an attempt to explain recent experimental data on ordered arrays of magnetoferritin nanoparticles that demonstrate the crucial role of interactions between particles in an fcc lattice. Significant agreement between the simulation and experimental results is achieved, and the impact of intra-particle degrees of freedom and surface effects on thermal fluctuations is investigated.

  7. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of a fluid flow around a triangular unit of three isothermal cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alinejad, J.

    2016-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method is employed to simulate heat transfer in the flow past three arrangements of elliptical and circular cylinders under an isothermal boundary condition. The lattice Boltzmann equations and the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model are used to simulate two-dimensional forced convection at 30 ≤ Re ≤ 100 and Pr = 0.71. Pressure distributions, isotherms, and streamlines are obtained. Vortex shedding maps are observed in detail for several cases. The present results are in good agreement with available experimental and numerical data.

  8. Atom-molecular oscillations of a Bose gas in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzen, Daniel

    2005-05-01

    A Bose gas in an optical lattice can undergo a quantum phase transition between a superfluid and a ``Mott insulator'' state [1]. We have created a Mott insulator state of ^87Rb atoms in an optical lattice with a controllable number of atoms per site, and measured its stimulated Raman photoassociation spectrum. We found that higher density samples exhibited a two-peaked spectrum arising from photoassociation in sites with two and three atoms, respectively. The splitting between these peaks provides a measurement of the atom-molecule scattering length. Raman photoassociation of a sample with a central core of Mott insulator with two atoms per site induced macroscopic coherent oscillations between an atomic and a molecular gas, as predicted by Jaksch et al. [2]. Our result implies that at the point of minimum atom number, we have created a molecular quantum gas with one molecule in each lattice site. In addition, we have carried out Bragg spectroscopy of the gas [3], and found evidence of a gap in the excitation spectrum of the insulating state. This work was carried out in collaboration with C. Ryu, Emek Yesilada, Xu Du, and Shoupu Wan. We acknowledge the support of the R.A. Welch Foundation, the N.S.F., and the D.O.E Quantum Optics Initiative. [1] Markus Greiner et al., Nature 415, 39 (2002). [2] D. Jaksch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 040402 (2002). [3] D. Van Oosten et al., cond-mat/0405492 (2004).

  9. Interface width and bulk stability: requirements for the simulation of deeply quenched liquid-gas systems.

    PubMed

    Wagner, A J; Pooley, C M

    2007-10-01

    Simulations of liquid-gas systems with interface terms evaluated by central difference discretizations are observed to fail to give accurate results for two reasons: the interface can get "stuck" on the lattice or a density overshoot develops around the interface. In the first case, the bulk densities can take a range of values, dependent on the initial conditions. In the second case, inaccurate bulk densities are found. We derived the minimum interface width required for the accurate simulation of liquid-gas systems with a diffuse interface. This criterion is demonstrated for lattice Boltzmann simulations of a van der Waals gas. Combining this criterion with predictions for the bulk stability defines the parameter range for stable and accurate simulation results even for high density ratios of over 1000.

  10. Multiple period states of the superfluid Fermi gas in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sukjin; Dalfovo, Franco; Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Watanabe, Gentaro

    2016-02-01

    We study multiple period states of a two-component unpolarized superfluid Fermi gas in an optical lattice along the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) to Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) crossover. The existence of states whose period is a multiple of the lattice spacing is a direct consequence of the nonlinear behavior of the gas, which is due to the presence of the order parameter associated with superfluidity. By solving Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations for a superfluid flow with finite quasimomentum, we find that, in the BCS side of the crossover, the multiple period states can be energetically favorable compared to the normal Bloch states and their survival time against dynamical instability drastically increases, suggesting that these states can be accessible in current experiments, in sharp contrast to the situation in BECs.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation Optimization on Leading Multicore Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Samuel; Carter, Jonathan; Oliker, Leonid; Shalf, John; Yelick, Katherine

    2008-02-01

    We present an auto-tuning approach to optimize application performance on emerging multicore architectures. The methodology extends the idea of search-based performance optimizations, popular in linear algebra and FFT libraries, to application-specific computational kernels. Our work applies this strategy to a lattice Boltzmann application (LBMHD) that historically has made poor use of scalar microprocessors due to its complex data structures and memory access patterns. We explore one of the broadest sets of multicore architectures in the HPC literature, including the Intel Clovertown, AMD Opteron X2, Sun Niagara2, STI Cell, as well as the single core Intel Itanium2. Rather than hand-tuning LBMHD for each system, we develop a code generator that allows us identify a highly optimized version for each platform, while amortizing the human programming effort. Results show that our auto-tuned LBMHD application achieves up to a 14x improvement compared with the original code. Additionally, we present detailed analysis of each optimization, which reveal surprising hardware bottlenecks and software challenges for future multicore systems and applications.

  12. Bias-free simulation of diffusion-limited aggregation on a square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Yen Lee

    We identify sources of systematic error in traditional simulations of the Witten-Sander model of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) on a square lattice. Based on semi-analytic solutions of the walk-to-line and walk-to-square first-passage problems, we develop an algorithm that reduces the simulation bias to below 10-12. We grow clusters of 108 particles on 65536 × 65536 lattices. We verify that lattice DLA clusters inevitably grow into anisotropic shapes, dictated by the anisotropy of the aggregation process. We verify that the fractal dimension evolves from the continuum DLA value, D = 1 . 71 , for small disk-shaped clusters, towards Kesten's bound of D = 3 / 2 for highly anisotropic clusters with long protruding arms.

  13. Collective Excitations of an Imbalanced Fermion Gas in a 1D Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, R.; Fortes, M.; Solís, M. A.

    2014-04-01

    The collective excitations that minimize the Helmholtz free energy of a population-imbalanced mixture of a 6Li gas loaded in a quasi one-dimensional optical lattice are obtained. These excitations reveal a rotonic branch after solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation under a generalized random phase approximation based on a single-band Hubbard Hamiltonian. The phase diagram describing stability regions of Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov and Sarma phases is also analyzed.

  14. Cold-atom quantum simulation of U(1) lattice gauge-Higgs model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasamatsu, Kenichi; Kuno, Yoshihito; Takahashi, Yoshiro; Ichinose, Ikuo; Matsui, Tetsuo

    2015-03-01

    We discuss the possible methods to construct a quantum simulator of the U(1) lattice gauge-Higgs model using cold atoms in an optical lattice. These methods require no severe fine tunings of parameters of atomic-interactions in contrast with the other previous literature. We propose some realistic experimental setups to realize the atomic quantum simulator of the U(1) lattice gauge-Higgs model in a two-dimensional optical lattice. Our target gauge-Higgs model has a nontrivial phase structure, i.e., existence of the phase boundary between confinement and Higgs phases, and this phase boundary is to be observed by cold-atom experiments. As a reference to such experiments, we make numerical simulations of the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation and observe the real-time dynamics of the atomic simulators. Clarification of the dynamics of this gauge-Higgs model sheds some lights upon various unsolved problems including the inflation process of the early universe.

  15. Concurrent numerical simulation of flow and blood clotting using the lattice Boltzmann technique.

    PubMed

    Bernsdorf, Jorg; Harrison, Sarah E; Smith, Stephen M; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a novel approach for a concurrent numerical simulation of the unsteady flow within an idealised stenosed artery and a simplified blood clotting process based on a residence time model. The applied numerical scheme is the lattice Boltzmann technique, which proved to be highly efficient particularly for transient flows and complex or varying geometries.

  16. Thermal Lattice Boltzmann Simulations for Vapor-Liquid Two-Phase Flows in Two Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yikun; Qian, Yuehong

    2011-11-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model with double distribution functions is developed to simulate thermal vapor-liquid two-phase flows. In this model, the so-called mesoscopic inter-particle pseudo-potential for the single component multi-phase lattice Boltzmann model is used to simulate the fluid dynamics and the internal energy field is simulated by using a energy distribution function. Theoretical results for large-scale dynamics including the internal energy equation can be derived and numerical results for the coexistence curve of vapor-liquid systems are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions. It is shown from numerical simulations that the model has the ability to mimic phase transitions, bubbly flows and slugging flows. This research is support in part by the grant of Education Ministry of China IRT0844 and the grant of Shanghai CST 11XD1402300.

  17. Three-dimensional, off-lattice Monte-Carlo kinetics simulations of interstellar grain chemistry and ice structure

    SciTech Connect

    Garrod, Robin T.

    2013-12-01

    The first off-lattice Monte Carlo kinetics model of interstellar dust grain surface chemistry is presented. The positions of all surface particles are determined explicitly, according to the local potential minima resulting from the pair-wise interactions of contiguous atoms and molecules, rather than by a pre-defined lattice structure. The model is capable of simulating chemical kinetics on any arbitrary dust grain morphology, as determined by the user-defined positions of each individual dust grain atom. A simple method is devised for the determination of the most likely diffusion pathways and their associated energy barriers for surface species. The model is applied to a small, idealized dust grain, adopting various gas densities and using a small chemical network. Hydrogen and oxygen atoms accrete onto the grain to produce H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The off-lattice method allows the ice structure to evolve freely; the ice mantle porosity is found to be dependent on the gas density, which controls the accretion rate. A gas density of 2 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}, appropriate for dark interstellar clouds, is found to produce a fairly smooth and non-porous ice mantle. At all densities, H{sub 2} molecules formed on the grains collect within the crevices that divide nodules of ice and within micropores (whose extreme inward curvature produces strong local potential minima). The larger pores produced in the high-density models are not typically filled with H{sub 2}. Direct deposition of water molecules onto the grain indicates that amorphous ices formed in this way may be significantly more porous than interstellar ices that are formed by surface chemistry.

  18. Colloidal nanoparticles trapped by liquid-crystal defect lines: A lattice Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Regina; Skačej, Gregor; Sastry, V. S. S.; Žumer, Slobodan

    2014-09-01

    Lattice-based Monte Carlo simulations are performed to study a confined liquid crystal system with a topological disclination line entangling a colloidal nanoparticle. In our microscopic study the disclination line is stretched by moving the colloid, as in laser tweezing experiments, which results in a restoring force attempting to minimize the disclination length. From constant-force simulations we extract the corresponding disclination line tension, estimated as ˜50 pN, and observe its decrease with increasing temperature.

  19. Polarization simulations in the RHIC run 15 lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Meot, F.; Huang, H.; Luo, Y.; Ranjbar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; White, S.

    2015-05-03

    RHIC polarized proton Run 15 uses a new acceleration ramp optics, compared to RHIC Run 13 and earlier runs, in relation with electron-lens beam-beam compensation developments. The new optics induces different strengths in the depolarizing snake resonance sequence, from injection to top energy. As a consequence, polarization transport along the new ramp has been investigated, based on spin tracking simulations. Sample results are reported and discussed.

  20. Classical Simulation of Relativistic Zitterbewegung in Photonic Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Dreisow, Felix; Heinrich, Matthias; Keil, Robert; Tuennermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan; Longhi, Stefano; Szameit, Alexander

    2010-10-01

    We present the first experimental realization of an optical analog for relativistic quantum mechanics by simulating the Zitterbewegung (trembling motion) of a free Dirac electron in an optical superlattice. Our photonic setting enables a direct visualization of Zitterbewegung as a spatial oscillatory motion of an optical beam. Direct measurements of the wave packet expectation values in superlattices with tuned miniband gaps clearly show the transition from weak-relativistic to relativistic and far-relativistic regimes.

  1. Effects of lateral diffusion on morphology and dynamics of a microscopic lattice-gas model of pulsed electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Stefan; Roberts, Daniel E.; Rikvold, Per Arne

    2005-02-01

    The influence of nearest-neighbor diffusion on the decay of a metastable low-coverage phase (monolayer adsorption) in a square lattice-gas model of electrochemical metal deposition is investigated by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The phase-transformation dynamics are compared to the well-established Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami theory. The phase transformation is accelerated by diffusion, but remains in accord with the theory for continuous nucleation up to moderate diffusion rates. At very high diffusion rates the phase-transformation kinetic shows a crossover to instantaneous nucleation. Then, the probability of medium-sized clusters is reduced in favor of large clusters. Upon reversal of the supersaturation, the adsorbate desorbs, but large clusters still tend to grow during the initial stages of desorption. Calculation of the free energy of subcritical clusters by enumeration of lattice animals yields a quasiequilibrium distribution which is in reasonable agreement with the simulation results. This is an improvement relative to classical droplet theory, which fails to describe the distributions, since the macroscopic surface tension is a bad approximation for small clusters.

  2. 2D Lattice Boltzmann Simulation Of Chemical Reactions Within Rayleigh-Bénard And Poiseuille-Bénard Convection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaya-Ventura, Gilberto; Rodríguez-Romo, Suemi

    2011-09-01

    This paper deals with the computational simulation of the reaction-diffusion-advection phenomena emerging in Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) and Poiseuille-Bénard reactive convection systems. We use the Boussinesq's approximation for buoyancy forces and the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The first kinetic mesoscopic model proposed here is based on the discrete Boltzmann equation needed to solve the momentum balance coupled with buoyancy forces. Then, a second lattice Boltzmann algorithm is applied to solve the reaction-diffusion-advection equation to calculate the evolution of the chemical species concentration. We use a reactive system composed by nitrous oxide (so call laughing gas) in air as an example; its spatio-temporal decomposition is calculated. Two cases are considered, a rectangular enclosed cavity and an open channel. The simulations are performed at low Reynolds numbers and in a steady state between the first and second thermo-hydrodynamic instabilities. The results presented here, for the thermo-hydrodynamic behavior, are in good agreement with experimental data; while our| chemical kinetics simulation yields expected results. Some applications of our approach are related to chemical reactors and atmospheric phenomena, among others.

  3. Field-wide flow simulation in fractured porous media within lattice Boltzmann framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benamram, Z.; Tarakanov, A.; Nasrabadi, H.; Gildin, E.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a generalized lattice Boltzmann model for simulating fluid flow in porous media at the representative volume element scale is extended towards applications of hydraulically and naturally fractured reservoirs. The key element within the model is the development of boundary conditions for a vertical well and horizontal fracture with minimal node usage. In addition, the governing non-dimensional equations are derived and a new set of dimensionless numbers are presented for the simulation of a fractured reservoir system. Homogenous and heterogeneous vertical well and fracture systems are simulated and verified against commercial reservoir simulation suites. Results are in excellent agreement to analytical and finite difference solutions.

  4. GPU phase-field lattice Boltzmann simulations of growth and motion of a binary alloy dendrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaki, T.; Rojas, R.; Ohno, M.; Shimokawabe, T.; Aoki, T.

    2015-06-01

    A GPU code has been developed for a phase-field lattice Boltzmann (PFLB) method, which can simulate the dendritic growth with motion of solids in a dilute binary alloy melt. The GPU accelerated PFLB method has been implemented using CUDA C. The equiaxed dendritic growth in a shear flow and settling condition have been simulated by the developed GPU code. It has been confirmed that the PFLB simulations were efficiently accelerated by introducing the GPU computation. The characteristic dendrite morphologies which depend on the melt flow and the motion of the dendrite could also be confirmed by the simulations.

  5. Simulation of Blood Flow at Vessel Bifurcation by Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Xiu-Ying; Liu, Da-He; Zhou, Jing; Jin, Yong-Juan

    2005-11-01

    The application of the lattice Boltzmann method to the large vessel bifurcation blood flow is investigated in a wide range of Reynolds numbers. The velocity, shear stress and pressure distributions at the bifurcation are presented in detail. The flow separation zones revealed with increase of Reynolds number are located in the areas of the daughter branches distal to the outer corners of the bifurcation where some deposition of particular blood components might occur to form arteriosclerosis. The results also demonstrate that the lattice Boltzmann method is adaptive to simulating the flow in larger vessels under a high Reynolds number.

  6. Simulating and detecting the quantum spin Hall effect in the kagome optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Guocai; Jiang Shaojian; Sun Fadi; Liu, W. M.; Zhu Shiliang

    2010-11-15

    We propose a model which includes a nearest-neighbor intrinsic spin-orbit coupling and a trimerized Hamiltonian in the kagome lattice and promises to host the transition from the quantum spin Hall insulator to the normal insulator. In addition, we design an experimental scheme to simulate and detect this transition in the ultracold atom system. The lattice intrinsic spin-orbit coupling is generated via the laser-induced-gauge-field method. Furthermore, we establish the connection between the spin Chern number and the spin-atomic density which enables us to detect the quantum spin Hall insulator directly by the standard density-profile technique used in atomic systems.

  7. Off-Lattice Monte Carlo Simulation of Supramolecular Polymer Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amuasi, H. E.; Storm, C.

    2010-12-01

    We introduce an efficient, scalable Monte Carlo algorithm to simulate cross-linked architectures of freely jointed and discrete wormlike chains. Bond movement is based on the discrete tractrix construction, which effects conformational changes that exactly preserve fixed-length constraints of all bonds. The algorithm reproduces known end-to-end distance distributions for simple, analytically tractable systems of cross-linked stiff and freely jointed polymers flawlessly, and is used to determine the effective persistence length of short bundles of semiflexible wormlike chains, cross-linked to each other. It reveals a possible regulatory mechanism in bundled networks: the effective persistence of bundles is controlled by the linker density.

  8. Developing extensible lattice-Boltzmann simulators for general-purpose graphics-processing units

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, S C; Saar, M O

    2011-12-21

    Lattice-Boltzmann methods are versatile numerical modeling techniques capable of reproducing a wide variety of fluid-mechanical behavior. These methods are well suited to parallel implementation, particularly on the single-instruction multiple data (SIMD) parallel processing environments found in computer graphics processing units (GPUs). Although more recent programming tools dramatically improve the ease with which GPU programs can be written, the programming environment still lacks the flexibility available to more traditional CPU programs. In particular, it may be difficult to develop modular and extensible programs that require variable on-device functionality with current GPU architectures. This paper describes a process of automatic code generation that overcomes these difficulties for lattice-Boltzmann simulations. It details the development of GPU-based modules for an extensible lattice-Boltzmann simulation package - LBHydra. The performance of the automatically generated code is compared to equivalent purpose written codes for both single-phase, multiple-phase, and multiple-component flows. The flexibility of the new method is demonstrated by simulating a rising, dissolving droplet in a porous medium with user generated lattice-Boltzmann models and subroutines.

  9. Lattice gauge theory simulations in the quantum information era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmonte, M.; Montangero, S.

    2016-07-01

    The many-body problem is ubiquitous in the theoretical description of physical phenomena, ranging from the behaviour of elementary particles to the physics of electrons in solids. Most of our understanding of many-body systems comes from analysing the symmetric properties of Hamiltonian and states: the most striking examples are gauge theories such as quantum electrodynamics, where a local symmetry strongly constrains the microscopic dynamics. The physics of such gauge theories is relevant for the understanding of a diverse set of systems, including frustrated quantum magnets and the collective dynamics of elementary particles within the standard model. In the last few years, several approaches have been put forward to tackle the complex dynamics of gauge theories using quantum information concepts. In particular, quantum simulation platforms have been put forward for the realisation of synthetic gauge theories, and novel classical simulation algorithms based on quantum information concepts have been formulated. In this review, we present an introduction to these approaches, illustrating the basics concepts and highlighting the connections between apparently very different fields, and report the recent developments in this new thriving field of research.

  10. Towards the reliable calculation of residence time for off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Kathleen C.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2016-08-01

    Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) methods have the potential to extend the accessible timescales of off-lattice atomistic simulations beyond the limits of molecular dynamics by making use of transition state theory and parallelization. However, it is a challenge to identify a complete catalog of events accessible to an off-lattice system in order to accurately calculate the residence time for KMC. Here we describe possible approaches to some of the key steps needed to address this problem. These include methods to compare and distinguish individual kinetic events, to deterministically search an energy landscape, and to define local atomic environments. When applied to the ground state  ∑5(2 1 0) grain boundary in copper, these methods achieve a converged residence time, accounting for the full set of kinetically relevant events for this off-lattice system, with calculable uncertainty.

  11. Martian environmental simulation for a deployable lattice mast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warden, Robert M.

    1994-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission (formerly Mars Environmental Survey or MESUR) is scheduled for launch in December 1996 and is designed to place a small lander on the surface of Mars. After impact, the lander unfolds to expose its solar panels and release a miniature rover. Also on board is the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) binocular camera which is elevated by a deployable mast to obtain a panoramic view of the landing area. The design of this deployable mast is based on similar designs which have a long and successful flight history. In the past when this type of self-deployable mast has been used, a rate limiter has been incorporated to control the speed of deployment. In this application, to reduce weight and complexity, it was proposed to eliminate the rate limiter so that the mast would deploy without restraint. Preliminary tests showed that this type of deployment was possible especially if the deployed length was relatively short, as in this application. Compounding the problem, however, was the requirement to deploy the mast at an angle of up to 30 degrees from vertical. The deployment process was difficult to completely analyze due to the effects of gravitational and inertial loads on the mast and camera during rapid extension. Testing in a realistic manner was imperative to verify the system performance. A deployment test was therefore performed to determine the maximum tilt angle at which the mast could reliably extend and support the camera on Mars. The testing of the deployable mast requires partial gravity compensation to simulate the smaller force of Martian gravity. During the test, mass properties were maintained while weight properties were reduced. This paper describes the testing of a deployable mast in a simulated Martian environment as well as the results of the tests.

  12. Rossby vortex simulation on a paraboloidal coordinate system using the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huidan; Zhao, Kaihua

    2001-11-01

    In this paper, we apply our compressible lattice Boltzmann model to a rotating parabolic coordinate system to simulate Rossby vortices emerging in a layer of shallow water flowing zonally in a rotating paraboloidal vessel. By introducing a scaling factor, nonuniform curvilinear mesh can be mapped to a flat uniform mesh and then normal lattice Boltzmann method works. Since the mass per unit area on the two-dimensional (2D) surface varies with the thickness of the water layer, the 2D flow seems to be ``compressible'' and our compressible model is applied. Simulation solutions meet with the experimental observations qualitatively. Based on this research, quantitative solutions and many natural phenomena simulations in planetary atmospheres, oceans, and magnetized plasma, such as the famous Jovian Giant Red Spot, the Galactic Spiral-vortex, the Gulf Stream, and the Kuroshio Current, etc., can be expected.

  13. Rossby vortex simulation on a paraboloidal coordinate system using the lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Yu, H; Zhao, K

    2001-11-01

    In this paper, we apply our compressible lattice Boltzmann model to a rotating parabolic coordinate system to simulate Rossby vortices emerging in a layer of shallow water flowing zonally in a rotating paraboloidal vessel. By introducing a scaling factor, nonuniform curvilinear mesh can be mapped to a flat uniform mesh and then normal lattice Boltzmann method works. Since the mass per unit area on the two-dimensional (2D) surface varies with the thickness of the water layer, the 2D flow seems to be "compressible" and our compressible model is applied. Simulation solutions meet with the experimental observations qualitatively. Based on this research, quantitative solutions and many natural phenomena simulations in planetary atmospheres, oceans, and magnetized plasma, such as the famous Jovian Giant Red Spot, the Galactic Spiral-vortex, the Gulf Stream, and the Kuroshio Current, etc., can be expected. PMID:11736137

  14. Multiple Period States of the Superfluid Fermi Gas in an Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Gentaro; Yoon, Sukjin; Dalfovo, Franco; Nakatsukasa, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    We study multiple period states (i.e., states whose period is a multiple of the lattice constant) of a two-component unpolarized superfluid Fermi gas in an optical lattice along the crossover between the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) and Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) states. By solving Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations for a superfluid flow with finite quasimomentum, we find that, in the BCS side of the crossover, the multiple period states can be energetically favorable compared to the normal Bloch states and their survival time against dynamical instability drastically increases, suggesting that these states can be accessible in current experiments. This is in sharp contrast to the situation in BECs.

  15. Superconductivity from long-range interaction: A crossover between the electron gas and the lattice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onari, Seiichiro; Arita, Ryotaro; Kuroki, Kazuhiko; Aoki, Hideo

    2006-01-01

    We explore how the superconductivity arising from the on-site electron-electron repulsion changes when the repulsion is made long-ranged, 1/r -like interaction by introducing an extended Hubbard model with the repulsion extended to distant (12th) neighbors. With a simplified fluctuation-exchange approximation, we have found for the square lattice that: (i) As the band filling becomes dilute enough, the charge susceptibility becomes comparable with the spin susceptibility, where p - and then s -wave pairings become relatively dominant, in agreement with the result for the electron gas by Takada, while (ii) the d wave, which reflects the lattice structure, dominates well away from the half-filling. All of these can be understood in terms of the spin and charge structures along with the shape and size of the Fermi surface.

  16. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Particle Laden Flows in Microfluidic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Clague, D S; Weisgraber, T; Wheeler, E; Hon, G; Radford, J; Gascoyne, P; Smity, R; Liepmann, D; Meinhart, C; Santiago, J; Krulevitch, P

    2003-07-22

    The goal of this effort was to develop dynamic simulation tools to study and characterize particulate transport in Microfluidic devices. This includes the effects of external fields and near-field particle-particle, particle-surface interactions. The unique aspect of this effort is that we focused on the particles in suspension and rigorously accounted for all of the interactions that they experienced in solution. In contrast, other numerical methods within the program, finite element and finite volume approaches, typically treat the suspended species as non-interacting point particles. Later in the program, some of these approaches incorporated approximations to begin to account for particle-particle interactions. Through the programs (BioFlips and SIMBIOSYS), we developed collaborative relationships with device-oriented efforts. More specifically and at the request of the SIMBIOSYS program manager, we allowed our efforts/milestones to be more guided by the needs of our BioFlips colleagues; therefore, our efforts were focused on the needs of the MD Anderson Cancer Center (Peter Gascoyne), UCDavis (Rosemary Smith), and UC Berkeley (Dorian Liepmann). The first two collaborations involved the development of Dielectrophoresis analysis tools and the later involved the development of suspension and fluid modeling tools for microneedles.

  17. Lattice simulations with Nf=2 +1 improved Wilson fermions at a fixed strange quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, Gunnar S.; Scholz, Enno E.; Simeth, Jakob; Söldner, Wolfgang; RQCD Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    The explicit breaking of chiral symmetry of the Wilson fermion action results in additive quark mass renormalization. Moreover, flavor singlet and nonsinglet scalar currents acquire different renormalization constants with respect to continuum regularization schemes. This complicates keeping the renormalized strange quark mass fixed when varying the light quark mass in simulations with Nf=2 +1 sea quark flavors. Here we present and validate our strategy within the CLS (coordinated lattice simulations) effort to achieve this in simulations with nonperturbatively order-a improved Wilson fermions. We also determine various combinations of renormalization constants and improvement coefficients.

  18. Entropic lattice Boltzmann model for gas dynamics: Theory, boundary conditions, and implementation.

    PubMed

    Frapolli, N; Chikatamarla, S S; Karlin, I V

    2016-06-01

    We present in detail the recently introduced entropic lattice Boltzmann model for compressible flows [N. Frapolli et al., Phys. Rev. E 92, 061301(R) (2015)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.92.061301]. The model is capable of simulating a wide range of laminar and turbulent flows, from thermal and weakly compressible flows to transonic and supersonic flows. The theory behind the construction of the model is laid out and its thermohydrodynamic limit is discussed. Based on this theory and the hydrodynamic limit thereof, we also construct the boundary conditions necessary for the simulation of solid walls. We present the inlet and outlet boundary conditions as well as no-slip and free-slip boundary conditions. Details necessary for the implementation of the compressible lattice Boltzmann model are also reported. Finally, simulations of compressible flows are presented, including two-dimensional supersonic and transonic flows around a diamond and a NACA airfoil, the simulation of the Schardin problem, and the three-dimensional simulation of the supersonic flow around a conical geometry. PMID:27415382

  19. Entropic lattice Boltzmann model for gas dynamics: Theory, boundary conditions, and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frapolli, N.; Chikatamarla, S. S.; Karlin, I. V.

    2016-06-01

    We present in detail the recently introduced entropic lattice Boltzmann model for compressible flows [N. Frapolli et al., Phys. Rev. E 92, 061301(R) (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.92.061301]. The model is capable of simulating a wide range of laminar and turbulent flows, from thermal and weakly compressible flows to transonic and supersonic flows. The theory behind the construction of the model is laid out and its thermohydrodynamic limit is discussed. Based on this theory and the hydrodynamic limit thereof, we also construct the boundary conditions necessary for the simulation of solid walls. We present the inlet and outlet boundary conditions as well as no-slip and free-slip boundary conditions. Details necessary for the implementation of the compressible lattice Boltzmann model are also reported. Finally, simulations of compressible flows are presented, including two-dimensional supersonic and transonic flows around a diamond and a NACA airfoil, the simulation of the Schardin problem, and the three-dimensional simulation of the supersonic flow around a conical geometry.

  20. Entropic lattice Boltzmann model for gas dynamics: Theory, boundary conditions, and implementation.

    PubMed

    Frapolli, N; Chikatamarla, S S; Karlin, I V

    2016-06-01

    We present in detail the recently introduced entropic lattice Boltzmann model for compressible flows [N. Frapolli et al., Phys. Rev. E 92, 061301(R) (2015)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.92.061301]. The model is capable of simulating a wide range of laminar and turbulent flows, from thermal and weakly compressible flows to transonic and supersonic flows. The theory behind the construction of the model is laid out and its thermohydrodynamic limit is discussed. Based on this theory and the hydrodynamic limit thereof, we also construct the boundary conditions necessary for the simulation of solid walls. We present the inlet and outlet boundary conditions as well as no-slip and free-slip boundary conditions. Details necessary for the implementation of the compressible lattice Boltzmann model are also reported. Finally, simulations of compressible flows are presented, including two-dimensional supersonic and transonic flows around a diamond and a NACA airfoil, the simulation of the Schardin problem, and the three-dimensional simulation of the supersonic flow around a conical geometry.

  1. On anisotropy function in crystal growth simulations using Lattice Boltzmann equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younsi, Amina; Cartalade, Alain

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present the ability of the Lattice Boltzmann (LB) equation, usually applied to simulate fluid flows, to simulate various shapes of crystals. Crystal growth is modeled with a phase-field model for a pure substance, numerically solved with a LB method in 2D and 3D. This study focuses on the anisotropy function that is responsible for the anisotropic surface tension between the solid phase and the liquid phase. The anisotropy function involves the unit normal vectors of the interface, defined by gradients of phase-field. Those gradients have to be consistent with the underlying lattice of the LB method in order to avoid unwanted effects of numerical anisotropy. Isotropy of the solution is obtained when the directional derivatives method, specific for each lattice, is applied for computing the gradient terms. With the central finite differences method, the phase-field does not match with its rotation and the solution is not any more isotropic. Next, the method is applied to simulate simultaneous growth of several crystals, each of them being defined by its own anisotropy function. Finally, various shapes of 3D crystals are simulated with standard and nonstandard anisotropy functions which favor growth in <100>-, <110>- and <111>-directions.

  2. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of immiscible fluid displacement in porous media: Homogeneous versus heterogeneous pore network

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haihu; Zhang, Yonghao; Valocchi, Albert J.

    2015-05-15

    Injection of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into geological formations is a promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. Predicting the amount of CO{sub 2} that can be captured and its long-term storage stability in subsurface requires a fundamental understanding of multiphase displacement phenomena at the pore scale. In this paper, the lattice Boltzmann method is employed to simulate the immiscible displacement of a wetting fluid by a non-wetting one in two microfluidic flow cells, one with a homogeneous pore network and the other with a randomly heterogeneous pore network. We have identified three different displacement patterns, namely, stable displacement, capillary fingering, and viscous fingering, all of which are strongly dependent upon the capillary number (Ca), viscosity ratio (M), and the media heterogeneity. The non-wetting fluid saturation (S{sub nw}) is found to increase nearly linearly with logCa for each constant M. Increasing M (viscosity ratio of non-wetting fluid to wetting fluid) or decreasing the media heterogeneity can enhance the stability of the displacement process, resulting in an increase in S{sub nw}. In either pore networks, the specific interfacial length is linearly proportional to S{sub nw} during drainage with equal proportionality constant for all cases excluding those revealing considerable viscous fingering. Our numerical results confirm the previous experimental finding that the steady state specific interfacial length exhibits a linear dependence on S{sub nw} for either favorable (M ≥ 1) or unfavorable (M < 1) displacement, and the slope is slightly higher for the unfavorable displacement.

  3. Second-principles method for materials simulations including electron and lattice degrees of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Fernández, Pablo; Wojdeł, Jacek C.; Íñiguez, Jorge; Junquera, Javier

    2016-05-01

    We present a first-principles-based (second-principles) scheme that permits large-scale materials simulations including both atomic and electronic degrees of freedom on the same footing. The method is based on a predictive quantum-mechanical theory—e.g., density functional theory—and its accuracy can be systematically improved at a very modest computational cost. Our approach is based on dividing the electron density of the system into a reference part—typically corresponding to the system's neutral, geometry-dependent ground state—and a deformation part—defined as the difference between the actual and reference densities. We then take advantage of the fact that the bulk part of the system's energy depends on the reference density alone; this part can be efficiently and accurately described by a force field, thus avoiding explicit consideration of the electrons. Then, the effects associated to the difference density can be treated perturbatively with good precision by working in a suitably chosen Wannier function basis. Further, the electronic model can be restricted to the bands of interest. All these features combined yield a very flexible and computationally very efficient scheme. Here we present the basic formulation of this approach, as well as a practical strategy to compute model parameters for realistic materials. We illustrate the accuracy and scope of the proposed method with two case studies, namely, the relative stability of various spin arrangements in NiO (featuring complex magnetic interactions in a strongly-correlated oxide) and the formation of a two-dimensional electron gas at the interface between band insulators LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 (featuring subtle electron-lattice couplings and screening effects). We conclude by discussing ways to overcome the limitations of the present approach (most notably, the assumption of a fixed bonding topology), as well as its many envisioned possibilities and future extensions.

  4. Liquid polymorphism and density anomaly in a three-dimensional associating lattice gas.

    PubMed

    Girardi, Mauricio; Balladares, Aline L; Henriques, Vera B; Barbosa, Marcia C

    2007-02-14

    The authors investigate the phase diagram of a three-dimensional associating lattice gas (ALG) model. This model combines orientational icelike interactions and "van der Waals" that might be repulsive, representing, in this case, a penalty for distortion of hydrogen bonds. These interactions can be interpreted as two competing distances, making the connection between this model and continuous isotropic soft-core potentials. The authors present Monte Carlo studies of the ALG model showing the presence of two liquid phases, two critical points, and density anomaly.

  5. Simulating T cell motility in the lymph node paracortex with a packed lattice geometry

    PubMed Central

    Bogle, Gib; Dunbar, P. Rod

    2009-01-01

    Agent-based simulation modeling of T cell trafficking, activation and proliferation in the lymph node paracortex requires a model for cell motility. Such a model must be able to reproduce the observed random-walk behaviour of T cells, while accommodating large numbers of tightly packed cells, and must be computationally efficient. We report the development of a motility model, based on a 3-D lattice geometry, that meets these objectives. Cells make discrete jumps between neighbouring lattice sites in directions that are randomly determined from specified discrete probability distributions, which are defined by a small number of parameters. It is shown that the main characteristics of the random motion of T cells as typically observed in vivo can be reproduced by suitable specification of model parameters. The model is computationally highly efficient, and provides a suitable engine for a model capable of simulating the full T cell population of the paracortex. PMID:18711399

  6. Simulating Anomalous Dispersion and Multiphase Segregation in Porous Media with the Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matin, Rastin; Misztal, Marek K.; Hernandez-Garcia, Anier; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2015-11-01

    Many hydrodynamic phenomena such as flows at micron scale in porous media, large Reynolds numbers flows, non-Newtonian and multiphase flows have been simulated numerically using the lattice Boltzmann method. By solving the Lattice Boltzmann Equation on three-dimensional unstructured meshes, we efficiently model single-phase fluid flow in real rock samples. We use the flow field to estimate the permeability and further investigate the anomalous dispersion of passive tracers in porous media. By extending our single-phase model with a free-energy based method, we are able to simulate binary systems with moderate density ratios in a thermodynamically consistent way. In this presentation we will present our recent results on both anomalous transport and multiphase segregation.

  7. Momentum-exchange method in lattice Boltzmann simulations of particle-fluid interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Cai, Qingdong; Xia, Zhenhua; Wang, Moran; Chen, Shiyi

    2013-07-01

    The momentum exchange method has been widely used in lattice Boltzmann simulations for particle-fluid interactions. Although proved accurate for still walls, it will result in inaccurate particle dynamics without corrections. In this work, we reveal the physical cause of this problem and find that the initial momentum of the net mass transfer through boundaries in the moving-boundary treatment is not counted in the conventional momentum exchange method. A corrected momentum exchange method is then proposed by taking into account the initial momentum of the net mass transfer at each time step. The method is easy to implement with negligible extra computation cost. Direct numerical simulations of a single elliptical particle sedimentation are carried out to evaluate the accuracy for our method as well as other lattice Boltzmann-based methods by comparisons with the results of the finite element method. A shear flow test shows that our method is Galilean invariant.

  8. The Linked Neighbour List (LNL) method for fast off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations of fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzeo, M. D.; Ricci, M.; Zannoni, C.

    2010-03-01

    We present a new algorithm, called linked neighbour list (LNL), useful to substantially speed up off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations of fluids by avoiding the computation of the molecular energy before every attempted move. We introduce a few variants of the LNL method targeted to minimise memory footprint or augment memory coherence and cache utilisation. Additionally, we present a few algorithms which drastically accelerate neighbour finding. We test our methods on the simulation of a dense off-lattice Gay-Berne fluid subjected to periodic boundary conditions observing a speedup factor of about 2.5 with respect to a well-coded implementation based on a conventional link-cell. We provide several implementation details of the different key data structures and algorithms used in this work.

  9. PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM A SIMULATION OF QUENCHED QCD WITH OVERL AP FERMIONS ON A LARGE LATTICE.

    SciTech Connect

    BERRUTO,F.GARRON,N.HOELBLING,D.LELLOUCH,L.REBBI,C.SHORESH,N.

    2003-07-15

    We simulate quenched QCD with the overlap Dirac operator. We work with the Wilson gauge action at {beta} = 6 on an 18{sup 3} x 64 lattice. We calculate quark propagators for a single source point and quark mass ranging from am{sub 4} = 0.03 to 0.75. We present here preliminary results based on the propagators for 60 gauge field configurations.

  10. Spin tracking simulations in AGS based on ray-tracing methods - bare lattice, no snakes -

    SciTech Connect

    Meot, F.; Ahrens, L.; Gleen, J.; Huang, H.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W. W.; Roser, T.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-09-01

    This Note reports on the first simulations of and spin dynamics in the AGS using the ray-tracing code Zgoubi. It includes lattice analysis, comparisons with MAD, DA tracking, numerical calculation of depolarizing resonance strengths and comparisons with analytical models, etc. It also includes details on the setting-up of Zgoubi input data files and on the various numerical methods of concern in and available from Zgoubi. Simulations of crossing and neighboring of spin resonances in AGS ring, bare lattice, without snake, have been performed, in order to assess the capabilities of Zgoubi in that matter, and are reported here. This yields a rather long document. The two main reasons for that are, on the one hand the desire of an extended investigation of the energy span, and on the other hand a thorough comparison of Zgoubi results with analytical models as the 'thin lens' approximation, the weak resonance approximation, and the static case. Section 2 details the working hypothesis : AGS lattice data, formulae used for deriving various resonance related quantities from the ray-tracing based 'numerical experiments', etc. Section 3 gives inventories of the intrinsic and imperfection resonances together with, in a number of cases, the strengths derived from the ray-tracing. Section 4 gives the details of the numerical simulations of resonance crossing, including behavior of various quantities (closed orbit, synchrotron motion, etc.) aimed at controlling that the conditions of particle and spin motions are correct. In a similar manner Section 5 gives the details of the numerical simulations of spin motion in the static case: fixed energy in the neighboring of the resonance. In Section 6, weak resonances are explored, Zgoubi results are compared with the Fresnel integrals model. Section 7 shows the computation of the {rvec n} vector in the AGS lattice and tuning considered. Many details on the numerical conditions as data files etc. are given in the Appendix Section

  11. METC CFD simulations of hot gas filtration

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, T.J.

    1995-06-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of the fluid/particle flow in several hot gas filtration vessels will be presented. These simulations have been useful in designing filtration vessels and in diagnosing problems with filter operation. The simulations were performed using the commercial code FLUENT and the METC-developed code MFIX. Simulations of the initial configuration of the Karhula facility indicated that the dirty gas flow over the filter assemblage was very non-uniform. The force of the dirty gas inlet flow was inducing a large circulation pattern that caused flow around the candles to be in opposite directions on opposite sides of the vessel. By introducing a system of baffles, a more uniform flow pattern was developed. This modification may have contributed to the success of the project. Several simulations of configurations proposed by Industrial Filter and Pump were performed, varying the position of the inlet. A detailed resolution of the geometry of the candles allowed determination of the flow between the individual candles. Recent simulations in support of the METC/CeraMem Cooperative Research and Development Agreement have analyzed the flow in the vessel during the cleaning back-pulse. Visualization of experiments at the CeraMem cold-flow facility provided confidence in the use of CFD. Extensive simulations were then performed to assist in the design of the hot test facility being built by Ahlstrom/Pyropower. These tests are intended to demonstrate the CeraMem technology.

  12. Three Dimensional Simulations of Multiphase Flows Using a Lattice Boltzmann Method Suitable for High Density Ratios - 12126

    SciTech Connect

    Gokaltun, Seckin; McDaniel, Dwayne; Roelant, David

    2012-07-01

    Multiphase flows involving gas and liquid phases can be observed in engineering operations at various Department of Energy sites, such as mixing of slurries using pulsed-air mixers and hydrogen gas generation in liquid waste tanks etc. The dynamics of the gas phase in the liquid domain play an important role in the mixing effectiveness of the pulsed-air mixers or in the level of gas pressure build-up in waste tanks. To understand such effects, computational fluid dynamics methods (CFD) can be utilized by developing a three-dimensional computerized multiphase flow model that can predict accurately the behavior of gas motion inside liquid-filled tanks by solving the governing mathematical equations that represent the physics of the phenomena. In this paper, such a CFD method, lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), is presented that can model multiphase flows accurately and efficiently. LBM is favored over traditional Navier-Stokes based computational models since interfacial forces are handled more effectively in LBM. The LBM is easier to program, more efficient to solve on parallel computers, and has the ability to capture the interface between different fluid phases intrinsically. The LBM used in this paper can solve for the incompressible and viscous flow field in three dimensions, while at the same time, solve the Cahn-Hillard equation to track the position of the gas-liquid interface specifically when the density and viscosity ratios between the two fluids are high. This feature is of primary importance since the previous LBM models proposed for multiphase flows become unstable when the density ratio is larger than 10. The ability to provide stable and accurate simulations at large density ratios becomes important when the simulation case involves fluids such as air and water with a density ratio around 1000 that are common to many engineering problems. In order to demonstrate the capability of the 3D LBM method at high density ratios, a static bubble simulation is

  13. Antiferromagnetism and superfluidity of a dipolar Fermi gas in a two-dimensional optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Bo; Yin Lan

    2011-10-15

    In a dipolar Fermi gas, the dipole-dipole interaction between fermions can be turned into a dipolar Ising interaction between pseudospins in the presence of an ac electric field. When trapped in a two-dimensional optical lattice, this dipolar Fermi gas has a very rich phase diagram at zero temperature, due to the competition between antiferromagnetism and superfluidity. At half-filling, the antiferromagnetic state is the favored ground state. The superfluid state appears as the ground state at a smaller filling factor. In between there is a phase-separated region. The order parameter of the superfluid state can display different symmetries depending on the filling factor and interaction strength, including the d-wave (d), the extended s-wave (xs), or their linear combination (xs+id). Implications for the current experiment are discussed.

  14. New lattice Boltzmann method for the simulation of three-dimensional radiation transfer in turbid media.

    PubMed

    McHardy, Christopher; Horneber, Tobias; Rauh, Cornelia

    2016-07-25

    Based on the kinetic theory of photons, a new lattice Boltzmann method for the simulation of 3D radiation transport is presented. The method was successfully validated with Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport in optical thick absorbing and non-absorbing turbid media containing either isotropic or anisotropic scatterers. Moreover, for the approximation of Mie-scattering, a new iterative algebraic approach for the discretization of the scattering phase function was developed, ensuring full conservation of energy and asymmetry after discretization. It was found that the main error sources of the method are caused by linearization and ray effects and suggestions for further improvement of the method are made. PMID:27464152

  15. Simulations of two-phase flow through the pharynx with moving boundaries using the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Anupam; Brasseur, James G.; Shaker, Reza

    2000-11-01

    Transport of food through the human pharynx involves rapidly moving boundaries and liquid-vapor flow within highly complex geometries. Conventional continuum models are limited in their ability to handle two-phase flows with complex moving boundaries. We used the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method to simulate liquid flow in the air-filled pharynx with boundary motions which approximate those of anatomical structures from the mouth to the esophagus. The two phases in the LB simulation were separated using an interparticle interaction force based on a non-ideal gas equation of state. A moving boundary condition was applied by augmenting the `bounce-back' rule with added/subtracted mass and momentum for the displaced fluid due to boundary movement. Simulations predicted liquid movement in the pharynx which resembled closely actual movement of food boluses observed radiographically. Pressures along a simulated manometric catheter show similar transient and quasi-steady periods as measured pressures. Pressure gradient within the liquid is sensitive to the geometric constriction suggesting its potential application as a clinical parameter in diagnosing restrictive pharyngo-esophageal disorders.

  16. Predictive wind turbine simulation with an adaptive lattice Boltzmann method for moving boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deiterding, Ralf; Wood, Stephen L.

    2016-09-01

    Operating horizontal axis wind turbines create large-scale turbulent wake structures that affect the power output of downwind turbines considerably. The computational prediction of this phenomenon is challenging as efficient low dissipation schemes are necessary that represent the vorticity production by the moving structures accurately and that are able to transport wakes without significant artificial decay over distances of several rotor diameters. We have developed a parallel adaptive lattice Boltzmann method for large eddy simulation of turbulent weakly compressible flows with embedded moving structures that considers these requirements rather naturally and enables first principle simulations of wake-turbine interaction phenomena at reasonable computational costs. The paper describes the employed computational techniques and presents validation simulations for the Mexnext benchmark experiments as well as simulations of the wake propagation in the Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWIFT) array consisting of three Vestas V27 turbines in triangular arrangement.

  17. Simulating and exploring Weyl semimetal physics with cold atoms in a two-dimensional optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan-Wei; Zhu, Shi-Liang; Wang, Z. D.

    2015-07-01

    We propose a scheme to simulate and explore Weyl semimetal physics with ultracold fermionic atoms in a two-dimensional square optical lattice subjected to experimentally realizable spin-orbit coupling and an artificial dimension from an external parameter space, which may increase experimental feasibility compared with the cases in three-dimensional optical lattices. It is shown that this system with a tight-binding model is able to describe essentially three-dimensional Weyl semimetals with tunable Weyl points. The relevant topological properties are also addressed by means of the Chern number and the gapless edge states. Furthermore, we illustrate that the mimicked Weyl points can be experimentally detected by measuring the atomic transfer fractions in a Bloch-Zener oscillation, and the characteristic topological invariant can be measured with the particle pumping approach.

  18. Confinement and Lattice Quantum-Electrodynamic Electric Flux Tubes Simulated with Ultracold Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zohar, Erez; Reznik, Benni

    2011-12-30

    We propose a method for simulating (2+1)D compact lattice quantum-electrodynamics, using ultracold atoms in optical lattices. In our model local Bose-Einstein condensates' (BECs) phases correspond to the electromagnetic vector potential, and the local number operators represent the conjugate electric field. The well-known gauge-invariant Kogut-Susskind Hamiltonian is obtained as an effective low-energy theory. The field is then coupled to external static charges. We show that in the strong coupling limit this gives rise to ''electric flux tubes'' and to confinement. This can be observed by measuring the local density deviations of the BECs, and is expected to hold even, to some extent, outside the perturbative calculable regime.

  19. Quantum Simulation with Circuit-QED Lattices: from Elementary Building Blocks to Many-Body Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guanyu

    Recent experimental and theoretical progress in superconducting circuits and circuit QED (quantum electrodynamics) has helped to develop high-precision techniques to control, manipulate, and detect individual mesoscopic quantum systems. A promising direction is hence to scale up from individual building blocks to form larger-scale quantum many-body systems. Although realizing a scalable fault-tolerant quantum computer still faces major barriers of decoherence and quantum error correction, it is feasible to realize scalable quantum simulators with state-of-the-art technology. From the technological point of view, this could serve as an intermediate stage towards the final goal of a large-scale quantum computer, and could help accumulating experience with the control of quantum systems with a large number of degrees of freedom. From the physical point of view, this opens up a new regime where condensed matter systems can be simulated and studied, here in the context of strongly correlated photons and two-level systems. In this thesis, we mainly focus on two aspects of circuit-QED based quantum simulation. First, we discuss the elementary building blocks of the quantum simulator, in particular a fluxonium circuit coupled to a superconducting resonator. We show the interesting properties of the fluxonium circuit as a qubit, including the unusual structure of its charge matrix elements. We also employ perturbation theory to derive the effective Hamiltonian of the coupled system in the dispersive regime, where qubit and the photon frequencies are detuned. The observables predicted with our theory, including dispersive shifts and Kerr nonlinearity, are compared with data from experiments, such as homodyne transmission and two-tone spectroscopy. These studies also relate to the problem of detection in a circuit-QED quantum simulator. Second, we study many-body physics of circuit-QED lattices, serving as quantum simulators. In particular, we focus on two different

  20. Numerical simulation of synthesis gas incineration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, A. V.; Khaustov, S. A.; Tabakaev, R. B.; Belousova, Y. A.

    2016-04-01

    The authors have analysed the expediency of the suggested low-grade fuels application method. Thermal processing of solid raw materials in the gaseous fuel, called synthesis gas, is investigated. The technical challenges concerning the applicability of the existing gas equipment developed and extensively tested exclusively for natural gas were considered. For this purpose computer simulation of three-dimensional syngas-incinerating flame dynamics was performed by means of the ANSYS Multiphysics engineering software. The subjects of studying were: a three-dimensional aerodynamic flame structure, heat-release and temperature fields, a set of combustion properties: a flare range and the concentration distribution of burnout reagents. The obtained results were presented in the form of a time-averaged pathlines with color indexing. The obtained results can be used for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of complex multicomponent gas incineration singularities.

  1. A parallel implementation of the Lattice Solid Model for large scale simulation of earthquake dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, S.; Place, D.; Mora, P.

    2001-12-01

    The particle based lattice solid model has been used successfully as a virtual laboratory to simulate the dynamics of faults, earthquakes and gouge processes. The phenomena investigated with the lattice solid model range from the stick-slip behavior of faults, localization phenomena in gouge and the evolution of stress correlation in multi-fault systems, to the influence of rate and state-dependent friction laws on the macroscopic behavior of faults. However, the results from those simulations also show that in order to make a next step towards more realistic simulations it will be necessary to use three-dimensional models containing a large number of particles with a range of sizes, thus requiring a significantly increased amount of computing resources. Whereas the computing power provided by a single processor can be expected to double every 18 to 24 months, parallel computers which provide hundreds of times the computing power are available today and there are several efforts underway to construct dedicated parallel computers and associated simulation software systems for large-scale earth science simulation (e.g. The Australian Computational Earth Systems Simulator[1] and Japanese Earth Simulator[2])". In order to use the computing power made available by those large parallel computers, a parallel version of the lattice solid model has been implemented. In order to guarantee portability over a wide range of computer architectures, a message passing approach based on MPI has been used in the implementation. Particular care has been taken to eliminate serial bottlenecks in the program, thus ensuring high scalability on systems with a large number of CPUs. Measures taken to achieve this objective include the use of asynchronous communication between the parallel processes and the minimization of communication with and work done by a central ``master'' process. Benchmarks using models with up to 6 million particles on a parallel computer with 128 CPUs show that the

  2. Monte Carlo studies of a driven lattice gas. I. Growth and asymmetry during phase segregation

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, F.J.; Laberge, C.A.; Lebowitz, J.L.

    1996-02-01

    We investigate the effects of an external field on the kinetics of phase segregation in systems with conservative diffusive dynamics. We find that, in contrast to the situation without a field, there are now qualitative differences between the results of microscopic simulations of a 2D lattice model with biased Kawasaki exchanges and those obtained from various modifications of the macroscopic Cahn-Hilliard equation (mCH). While both microscopic simulations and numerical solutions of MCH yield triangular domains, we find that in the former the triangles mainly point opposite to the field, while in the latter and in new calculations with the mCH they point along the field. On the other hand, the rate of growth of the clusters and their final state, bands parallel to the field, are similar. This issue and the question of the mesoscopic behavior of cell dynamical systems is discussed but not resolved.

  3. Simulation of subsea gas hydrate exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2014-05-01

    The recovery of methane from gas hydrate layers that have been detected in several subsea sediments and permafrost regions around the world is a promising perspective to overcome future shortages in natural gas supply. Being aware that conventional natural gas resources are limited, research is going on to develop technologies for the production of natural gas from such new sources. Thus various research programs have started since the early 1990s in Japan, USA, Canada, India, and Germany to investigate hydrate deposits and develop required technologies. In recent years, intensive research has focussed on the capture and storage of CO2 from combustion processes to reduce climate impact. While different natural or man-made reservoirs like deep aquifers, exhausted oil and gas deposits or other geological formations are considered to store gaseous or liquid CO2, the storage of CO2 as hydrate in former methane hydrate fields is another promising alternative. Due to beneficial stability conditions, methane recovery may be well combined with CO2 storage in the form of hydrates. Regarding technological implementation many problems have to be overcome. Especially mixing, heat and mass transfer in the reservoir are limiting factors causing very long process times. Within the scope of the German research project »SUGAR« different technological approaches for the optimized exploitation of gas hydrate deposits are evaluated and compared by means of dynamic system simulations and analysis. Detailed mathematical models for the most relevant chemical and physical processes are developed. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into simulation programs. Simulations based on geological field data have been carried out. The studies focus on the potential of gas production from turbidites and their fitness for CO2 storage. The effects occurring during gas production and CO2 storage within

  4. Circuit quantum electrodynamics simulator of flat band physics in a Lieb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zi-He; Wang, Yan-Pu; Xue, Zheng-Yuan; Yang, Wan-Li; Hu, Yong; Gao, Jin-Hua; Wu, Ying

    2016-06-01

    The concept of flat band plays an important role in strongly correlated many-body physics. However, the demonstration of the flat band physics is highly nontrivial due to intrinsic limitations in conventional condensed-matter materials. Here we propose a circuit quantum electrodynamics simulator of the two-dimensional (2D) Lieb lattice exhibiting a flat middle band. By exploiting the parametric conversion method, we design a photonic Lieb lattice with in situ tunable hopping strengths in a 2D array of coupled superconducting transmissionline resonators. Moreover, the flexibility of our proposal enables the incorporation of both the artificial gauge field and the strong photon-photon interaction in a time- and site-resolved manner. To unambiguously demonstrate the synthesized flat band, we further investigate the observation of the flat band localization of microwave photons through the pumping and the steady-state measurements of only a few sites on the lattice. Requiring only current level of technique and being robust against imperfections in realistic circuits, our scheme can be readily tested in experiment and may pave a new way towards the realization of exotic photonic quantum Hall fluids including anomalous quantum Hall effect and bosonic fractional quantum Hall effect without magnetic field.

  5. Quantum simulation of a topological Mott insulator with Rydberg atoms in a Lieb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphin, A.; Müller, M.; Martin-Delgado, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    We propose a realistic scheme to quantum simulate the so-far experimentally unobserved topological Mott insulator phase—an interaction-driven topological insulator—using cold atoms in an optical Lieb lattice. To this end, we study a system of spinless fermions in a Lieb lattice, exhibiting repulsive nearest- and next-to-nearest-neighbor interactions and derive the associated zero-temperature phase diagram within mean-field approximation. In particular, we analyze how the interactions can dynamically generate a charge density wave ordered, a nematic, and a topologically nontrivial quantum anomalous Hall phase. We characterize the topology of the different phases by the Chern number and discuss the possibility of phase coexistence. Based on the identified phases, we propose a realistic implementation of this model using cold Rydberg-dressed atoms in an optical lattice. The scheme, which allows one to access, in particular, the topological Mott insulator phase, robustly and independently of its exact position in parameter space, merely requires global, always-on off-resonant laser coupling to Rydberg states and is feasible with state-of-the-art experimental techniques that have already been demonstrated in the laboratory.

  6. Simulation study of anisotropic random sequential adsorption of extended objects on a triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinski-Petković, Lj.; Lončarević, I.; Jakšić, Z. M.; Vrhovac, S. B.; Švrakić, N. M.

    2011-11-01

    The properties of the anisotropic random sequential adsorption (RSA) of objects of various shapes on a two-dimensional triangular lattice are studied numerically by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The depositing objects are formed by self-avoiding lattice steps, whereby the first step determines the orientation of the object. Anisotropy is introduced by positing unequal probabilities for orientation of depositing objects along different directions of the lattice. This probability is equal p or (1-p)/2, depending on whether the randomly chosen orientation is horizontal or not, respectively. Approach of the coverage θ(t) to the jamming limit θjam is found to be exponential θjam-θ(t)∝exp(-t/σ), for all probabilities p. It was shown that the relaxation time σ increases with the degree of anisotropy in the case of elongated and asymmetrical shapes. However, for rounded and symmetrical shapes, values of σ and θjam are not affected by the presence of anisotropy. We finally analyze the properties of the anisotropic RSA of polydisperse mixtures of k-mers. Strong dependencies of the parameter σ and the jamming coverage θjam on the degree of anisotropy are obtained. It is found that anisotropic constraints lead to the increased contribution of the longer k-mers in the total coverage fraction of the mixture.

  7. Lattice models for large-scale simulations of coherent wave scattering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shumin; Teixeira, Fernando L

    2004-01-01

    Lattice approximations for partial differential equations describing physical phenomena are commonly used for the numerical simulation of many problems otherwise intractable by pure analytical approaches. The discretization inevitably leads to many of the original symmetries to be broken or modified. In the case of Maxwell's equations for example, invariance and isotropy of the speed of light in vacuum is invariably lost because of the so-called grid dispersion. Since it is a cumulative effect, grid dispersion is particularly harmful for the accuracy of results of large-scale simulations of scattering problems. Grid dispersion is usually combated by either increasing the lattice resolution or by employing higher-order schemes with larger stencils for the space and time derivatives. Both alternatives lead to increased computational cost to simulate a problem of a given physical size. Here, we introduce a general approach to develop lattice approximations with reduced grid dispersion error for a given stencil (and hence at no additional computational cost). The present approach is based on first obtaining stencil coefficients in the Fourier domain that minimize the maximum grid dispersion error for wave propagation at all directions (minimax sense). The resulting coefficients are then expanded into a Taylor series in terms of the frequency variable and incorporated into time-domain (update) equations after an inverse Fourier transformation. Maximally flat (Butterworth) or Chebyshev filters are subsequently used to minimize the wave speed variations for a given frequency range of interest. The use of such filters also allows for the adjustment of the grid dispersion characteristics so as to minimize not only the local dispersion error but also the accumulated phase error in a frequency range of interest.

  8. Finite volume TVD formulation of lattice Boltzmann simulation on unstructured mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Dhiraj V.; Lakshmisha, K. N.

    2009-08-01

    A numerical scheme is presented for accurate simulation of fluid flow using the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) on unstructured mesh. A finite volume approach is adopted to discretize the LBE on a cell-centered, arbitrary shaped, triangular tessellation. The formulation includes a formal, second order discretization using a Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) scheme for the terms representing advection of the distribution function in physical space, due to microscopic particle motion. The advantage of the LBE approach is exploited by implementing the scheme in a new computer code to run on a parallel computing system. Performance of the new formulation is systematically investigated by simulating four benchmark flows of increasing complexity, namely (1) flow in a plane channel, (2) unsteady Couette flow, (3) flow caused by a moving lid over a 2D square cavity and (4) flow over a circular cylinder. For each of these flows, the present scheme is validated with the results from Navier-Stokes computations as well as lattice Boltzmann simulations on regular mesh. It is shown that the scheme is robust and accurate for the different test problems studied.

  9. Phase-field-based lattice Boltzmann finite-difference model for simulating thermocapillary flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haihu; Valocchi, Albert J.; Zhang, Yonghao; Kang, Qinjun

    2013-01-01

    A phase-field-based hybrid model that combines the lattice Boltzmann method with the finite difference method is proposed for simulating immiscible thermocapillary flows with variable fluid-property ratios. Using a phase field methodology, an interfacial force formula is analytically derived to model the interfacial tension force and the Marangoni stress. We present an improved lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) method to capture the interface between different phases and solve the pressure and velocity fields, which can recover the correct Cahn-Hilliard equation (CHE) and Navier-Stokes equations. The LBE method allows not only use of variable mobility in the CHE, but also simulation of multiphase flows with high density ratio because a stable discretization scheme is used for calculating the derivative terms in forcing terms. An additional convection-diffusion equation is solved by the finite difference method for spatial discretization and the Runge-Kutta method for time marching to obtain the temperature field, which is coupled to the interfacial tension through an equation of state. The model is first validated against analytical solutions for the thermocapillary driven convection in two superimposed fluids at negligibly small Reynolds and Marangoni numbers. It is then used to simulate thermocapillary migration of a three-dimensional deformable droplet and bubble at various Marangoni numbers and density ratios, and satisfactory agreement is obtained between numerical results and theoretical predictions.

  10. Phase-field-based lattice Boltzmann finite-difference model for simulating thermocapillary flows.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haihu; Valocchi, Albert J; Zhang, Yonghao; Kang, Qinjun

    2013-01-01

    A phase-field-based hybrid model that combines the lattice Boltzmann method with the finite difference method is proposed for simulating immiscible thermocapillary flows with variable fluid-property ratios. Using a phase field methodology, an interfacial force formula is analytically derived to model the interfacial tension force and the Marangoni stress. We present an improved lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) method to capture the interface between different phases and solve the pressure and velocity fields, which can recover the correct Cahn-Hilliard equation (CHE) and Navier-Stokes equations. The LBE method allows not only use of variable mobility in the CHE, but also simulation of multiphase flows with high density ratio because a stable discretization scheme is used for calculating the derivative terms in forcing terms. An additional convection-diffusion equation is solved by the finite difference method for spatial discretization and the Runge-Kutta method for time marching to obtain the temperature field, which is coupled to the interfacial tension through an equation of state. The model is first validated against analytical solutions for the thermocapillary driven convection in two superimposed fluids at negligibly small Reynolds and Marangoni numbers. It is then used to simulate thermocapillary migration of a three-dimensional deformable droplet and bubble at various Marangoni numbers and density ratios, and satisfactory agreement is obtained between numerical results and theoretical predictions. PMID:23410429

  11. Numerical homogenization of electrokinetic equations in porous media using lattice-Boltzmann simulations.

    PubMed

    Obliger, Amaël; Duvail, Magali; Jardat, Marie; Coelho, Daniel; Békri, Samir; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2013-07-01

    We report the calculation of all the transfer coefficients which couple the solvent and ionic fluxes through a charged pore under the effect of pressure, electrostatic potential, and concentration gradients. We use a combination of analytical calculations at the Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Navier-Stokes levels of description and mesoscopic lattice simulations based on kinetic theory. In the absence of added salt, i.e., when the only ions present in the fluid are the counterions compensating the charge of the surface, exact analytical expressions for the fluxes in cylindrical pores allow us to validate a new lattice-Boltzmann electrokinetics (LBE) scheme which accounts for the osmotic contribution to the transport of all species. The influence of simulation parameters on the numerical accuracy is thoroughly investigated. In the presence of an added salt, we assess the range of validity of approximate expressions of the fluxes computed from the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation by a systematic comparison with LBE simulations. PMID:23944561

  12. Competition of coarsening and shredding of clusters in a driven diffusive lattice gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunwar, Ambarish; Chowdhury, Debashish; Schadschneider, Andreas; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2006-06-01

    We investigate a driven diffusive lattice gas model with two oppositely moving species of particle. The model is motivated by bidirectional traffic of ants on a pre-existing trail. A third species, corresponding to pheromones used by the ants for communication, is not conserved and mediates interactions between the particles. Here we study the spatio-temporal organization of the particles. In the unidirectional variant of this model it is known to be determined by the formation and coarsening of 'loose clusters'. For our bidirectional model, we show that the interaction of oppositely moving clusters is essential. In the late stages of evolution the cluster size oscillates because of a competition between their 'shredding' during encounters with oppositely moving counterparts and subsequent 'coarsening' during collision-free evolution. We also establish a nontrivial dependence of the spatio-temporal organization on the system size.

  13. Simulation of residual oil displacement in a sinusoidal channel with the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otomo, Hiroshi; Fan, Hongli; Hazlett, Randy; Li, Yong; Staroselsky, Ilya; Zhang, Raoyang; Chen, Hudong

    2015-10-01

    We simulate oil slug displacement in a sinusoidal channel in order to validate computational models and algorithms for multi-component flow. This case fits in the gap between fully realistic cases characterized by complicated geometry and academic cases with simplistic geometry. Our computational model is based on the lattice Boltzmann method and allows for variation of physical parameters such as wettability and viscosity. The effect of variation of model parameters is analyzed, in particular via comparison with analytical solutions. We discuss the requirements for accurate solution of the oil slug displacement problem.

  14. O(a{sup 2}) cutoff effects in lattice Wilson fermion simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, P.; Frezzotti, R.; Rossi, G. C.; Michael, C.; Urbach, C.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper we propose to interpret the large discretization artifacts affecting the neutral pion mass in maximally twisted lattice QCD simulations as O(a{sup 2}) effects, whose magnitude is roughly proportional to the modulus square of the (continuum) matrix element of the pseudoscalar density operator between vacuum and one-pion state. The numerical size of this quantity is determined by the dynamical mechanism of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking and turns out to be substantially larger than its natural magnitude set by the value of {Lambda}{sub QCD}.

  15. Large-scale simulations of spin-density-wave order in frustrated lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Kipton; Batista, Cristian; Chern, Gia-Wei

    We investigate spin-density-wave (SDW) phases within a generalized mean-field approximation. This approach incorporates the thermal fluctuations of SDW order and the development of short-range order above magnetic ordering temperatures Tc. Using a new Langevin dynamics method, we study mesoscale structures associated with triple- Q SDW states that are induced by Fermi surface nesting in triangular and kagome lattice Hubbard models. The core of our linear-scaling Langevin dynamics simulations is an efficient stochastic kernel polynomial method for computing the electron density matrix. We also investigate exotic phases above Tc arising from preformed magnetic moments.

  16. Kinetics of diffusion-controlled oxygen ordering in a lattice-gas model of YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus. delta

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, J.V. ); Bohr, H. ); Mouritsen, O.G. )

    1990-07-01

    Nonequilibrium properties of oxygen ordering in high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductors of the Y-Ba-Cu-O type are studied via computer simulation of an anisotropic two-dimensional lattice-gas model in which the ordering processes are controlled by diffusion across the sample edges. With a view to designing optimal annealing strategies, various quenches and annealing schedules through the phase diagram are investigated. The ordering kinetics and the grain morphology are found to have a characteristic dependence on the thermal treatment of the system.

  17. Simulations of gas clouds in interacting galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomasson, Magnus

    1990-01-01

    A companion can induce a variety of morphological changes in a galaxy. The author uses N-body simulations to study the effects of different kinds of perturbations on the dynamics of a disk galaxy. The model is two-dimensional, with a disk consisting of about 60,000 particles. Most of the particles (80%) represent the old stellar population with a high velocity dispersion, while the rest (20%) represent gas clouds with a low velocity dispersion. Initially, the velocity dispersion corresponds to Q = 1 for the star particles, and Q = O for the gas particles, where Q is Toomre's (1964) stability parameter. The gas clouds can collide inelastically. The disk is stabilized by a rigid halo potential, and by the random motions of the old star particles. To simulate the effect of an encounter on the disk, a companion galaxy, modelled as a point mass, can move in a co-planar orbit around the disk. A complete description of the N-body code is found in Thomasson (1989). The spiral structures caused by a companion in first a direct and then a retrograde (with respect to the rotation of the disk) parabolic orbit are presented. The associated velocity fields suggest a way to observationally distinguish between leading and trailing spiral arms. The stability of the gas component in a disk in which tidally triggered infall of gas to the center occurs is studied. Finally, the author shows how a ring of gas can form in a disk as a result of a co-planar encounter with another galaxy.

  18. SPILADY: A parallel CPU and GPU code for spin-lattice magnetic molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Pui-Wai; Dudarev, S. L.; Woo, C. H.

    2016-10-01

    Spin-lattice dynamics generalizes molecular dynamics to magnetic materials, where dynamic variables describing an evolving atomic system include not only coordinates and velocities of atoms but also directions and magnitudes of atomic magnetic moments (spins). Spin-lattice dynamics simulates the collective time evolution of spins and atoms, taking into account the effect of non-collinear magnetism on interatomic forces. Applications of the method include atomistic models for defects, dislocations and surfaces in magnetic materials, thermally activated diffusion of defects, magnetic phase transitions, and various magnetic and lattice relaxation phenomena. Spin-lattice dynamics retains all the capabilities of molecular dynamics, adding to them the treatment of non-collinear magnetic degrees of freedom. The spin-lattice dynamics time integration algorithm uses symplectic Suzuki-Trotter decomposition of atomic coordinate, velocity and spin evolution operators, and delivers highly accurate numerical solutions of dynamic evolution equations over extended intervals of time. The code is parallelized in coordinate and spin spaces, and is written in OpenMP C/C++ for CPU and in CUDA C/C++ for Nvidia GPU implementations. Temperatures of atoms and spins are controlled by Langevin thermostats. Conduction electrons are treated by coupling the discrete spin-lattice dynamics equations for atoms and spins to the heat transfer equation for the electrons. Worked examples include simulations of thermalization of ferromagnetic bcc iron, the dynamics of laser pulse demagnetization, and collision cascades. Catalogue identifier: AFAN_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AFAN_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Apache License, Version 2.0 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1611165 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 367246683

  19. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of separation phenomenon in a binary gaseous flow through a microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Xu, Zimian; Guo, Zhaoli

    2016-10-01

    Gas separation of a binary gaseous mixture is one of the characteristic phenomena in the micro-scale flows that differ from the conventional size flows. In this work, the separation in binary gas mixture flows through a microchannel is investigated by the lattice Boltzmann method with a diffuse-bounce-back boundary condition, where the wall function approach with effective relaxation time is combined in consideration of the high Knudsen numbers. The separation degree and rate are measured in the He-Ar and Ne-Ar systems for different mole fractions, pressure ratios, and Knudsen numbers. The results show that the separation phenomenon in the He-Ar mixture is more obvious than that in the Ne-Ar mixture at the same mole fraction owing to the larger molecular mass ratio. In addition, the increase in the pressure ratio reduces the difference in the molecular velocities between the two species, and the separation phenomenon becomes weaker. However, the gas separation is reduced with an increase in the Knudsen number. This is because the resulting rarefaction effect reduces the interactions between the gas molecules of the two species and thus increases the difference in the molecular velocity.

  20. Quantitative study of fluctuation effects by fast lattice Monte Carlo simulations: Compression of grafted homopolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengfei; Wang, Qiang

    2014-01-28

    Using fast lattice Monte Carlo (FLMC) simulations [Q. Wang, Soft Matter 5, 4564 (2009)] and the corresponding lattice self-consistent field (LSCF) calculations, we studied a model system of grafted homopolymers, in both the brush and mushroom regimes, in an explicit solvent compressed by an impenetrable surface. Direct comparisons between FLMC and LSCF results, both of which are based on the same Hamiltonian (thus without any parameter-fitting between them), unambiguously and quantitatively reveal the fluctuations/correlations neglected by the latter. We studied both the structure (including the canonical-ensemble averages of the height and the mean-square end-to-end distances of grafted polymers) and thermodynamics (including the ensemble-averaged reduced energy density and the related internal energy per chain, the differences in the Helmholtz free energy and entropy per chain from the uncompressed state, and the pressure due to compression) of the system. In particular, we generalized the method for calculating pressure in lattice Monte Carlo simulations proposed by Dickman [J. Chem. Phys. 87, 2246 (1987)], and combined it with the Wang-Landau–Optimized Ensemble sampling [S. Trebst, D. A. Huse, and M. Troyer, Phys. Rev. E 70, 046701 (2004)] to efficiently and accurately calculate the free energy difference and the pressure due to compression. While we mainly examined the effects of the degree of compression, the distance between the nearest-neighbor grafting points, the reduced number of chains grafted at each grafting point, and the system fluctuations/correlations in an athermal solvent, the θ-solvent is also considered in some cases.

  1. [Numerical simulations of pulsating flow in intracranial blood vessels with aneurysms using Lattice Boltzmann methods].

    PubMed

    Beronov, Kamen N; Durst, Franz

    2005-01-01

    A major prerequisite for successful planning and control of the medical treatment of blood vessels with stenoses or aneurysms is the detailed knowledge of the individual situation in the damaged vessels. Modern tomography methods provide good spatial resolution, so that vessel walls as well as prostheses can be easily and rapidly identified. However, the mechanical loads of the walls remain largely unknown. In the past few years, tomography data have been used for spatial and temporal simulations of the blood flow in such vessels and to predict the mechanical loads of the vessel walls. The methodologies used so far, however, involve elaborate grid generation and simulation steps, most often relying on commercial software suited for engineering projects. These require specific knowledge and experience in mechanics and numerical simulation, and are therefore inappropriate for clinical applications. It is now shown, by example of an intracranial aneurysm, that employing a Lattice Boltzmann method for the flow simulation allows to avoid all mentioned drawbacks and to simulate blood flows in a fast and simple way that is also appropriate for clinical use. The practical relevance of such simulations will be enhanced by a better understanding of the correlations between pathology and specific mechanical loads. The paper discusses also some aspects of fluid mechanics that are relevant for the study of aneurysms.

  2. Simulation of three-component fluid flows using the multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y.; Tang, G. H.; Wang, Y.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we extend the multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver, which was proposed in [1] for simulating incompressible flows of binary fluids based on two-component Cahn-Hilliard model, to three-component fluid flows. In the present method, the multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver is applied to solve for the flow field and the three-component Cahn-Hilliard model is used to predict the evolution of the interfaces. The proposed method is first validated through the classical problem of simulation of partial spreading of a liquid lens between the other two components. Numerical results of interface shapes and contact angles agree well with theoretical solutions. After that, to further demonstrate the capability of the present method, several numerical examples of three-component fluid flows are presented, including a bubble rising across a fluid-fluid interface, single droplet falling through a fluid-fluid interface, the collision-coalescence of two droplets, and the non-contact collision of two droplets. It is shown that the present method can successfully handle complex interactions among three components.

  3. Pore-scale simulation of miscible displacement in porous media using the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ming

    2016-03-01

    A numerical model based on the lattice Boltzmann method is presented to investigate the viscous fingering phenomena of miscible displacement processes in porous media, which involves the fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transport. Especially, temperature- and concentration-dependent pore-fluid viscosity is considered. A complete list is derived and given for the conversion of relevant physical variables to lattice units to facilitate the understanding and implementation of the coupled problems involving fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transport using the LBM. To demonstrate the proposed model capacity, two different complex geometry microstructures using high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) images of core sample have been obtained and incorporated as computation geometries for modeling miscible displacement processes in porous media. The viscous fingering phenomena of miscible displacement processes are simulated in two different cases, namely in a channel and a porous medium respectively. Some influencing factors on the miscible displacement process, such as the pore-scale microstructure, Le number and Re number, are studied in great detail. The related simulation results have demonstrated that: (1) the existence of the pore-scale microstructure can have a significant effect on the front morphologies and front propagation speed in the miscible displacement process; (2) as the Le number increases, the fluid front and thermal front evolve differently, with the thermal front being less unstable due to more diffusion; (3) a larger Re number can lead to an increase in the propagation speed of the front.

  4. Non-Newtonian particulate flow simulation: A direct-forcing immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri Delouei, A.; Nazari, M.; Kayhani, M. H.; Kang, S. K.; Succi, S.

    2016-04-01

    In the current study, a direct-forcing immersed boundary-non-Newtonian lattice Boltzmann method (IB-NLBM) is developed to investigate the sedimentation and interaction of particles in shear-thinning and shear-thickening fluids. In the proposed IB-NLBM, the non-linear mechanics of non-Newtonian particulate flows is detected by combination of the most desirable features of immersed boundary and lattice Boltzmann methods. The noticeable roles of non-Newtonian behavior on particle motion, settling velocity and generalized Reynolds number are investigated by simulating benchmark problem of one-particle sedimentation under the same generalized Archimedes number. The effects of extra force due to added accelerated mass are analyzed on the particle motion which have a significant impact on shear-thinning fluids. For the first time, the phenomena of interaction among the particles, such as Drafting, Kissing, and Tumbling in non-Newtonian fluids are investigated by simulation of two-particle sedimentation and twelve-particle sedimentation. The results show that increasing the shear-thickening behavior of fluid leads to a significant increase in the kissing time. Moreover, the transverse position of particles for shear-thinning fluids during the tumbling interval is different from Newtonian and the shear-thickening fluids. The present non-Newtonian particulate study can be applied in several industrial and scientific applications, like the non-Newtonian sedimentation behavior of particles in food industrial and biological fluids.

  5. Program package for multicanonical simulations of U(1) lattice gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazavov, Alexei; Berg, Bernd A.

    2009-11-01

    We document our Fortran 77 code for multicanonical simulations of 4D U(1) lattice gauge theory in the neighborhood of its phase transition. This includes programs and routines for canonical simulations using biased Metropolis heatbath updating and overrelaxation, determination of multicanonical weights via a Wang-Landau recursion, and multicanonical simulations with fixed weights supplemented by overrelaxation sweeps. Measurements are performed for the action, Polyakov loops and some of their structure factors. Many features of the code transcend the particular application and are expected to be useful for other lattice gauge theory models as well as for systems in statistical physics. Catalogue identifier: AEET_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEET_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 18 376 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 205 183 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 Computer: Any capable of compiling and executing Fortran code Operating system: Any capable of compiling and executing Fortran code Classification: 11.5 Nature of problem: Efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation of U(1) lattice gauge theory close to its phase transition. Measurements and analysis of the action per plaquette, the specific heat, Polyakov loops and their structure factors. Solution method: Multicanonical simulations with an initial Wang-Landau recursion to determine suitable weight

  6. Macropore Flow in Soil Columns: Investigations with Computer Tomography and Lattice Boltzmann Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaap, M. G.; Tuller, M.; Guber, A.; Martin, M. A.; Martinez, F. S.; Pachepsky, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Soil structure greatly affects the ability of soil to transmit and to retain water, chemicals, and colloidal particles that can carry contaminants or be contaminants themselves, e.g. pathogenic microorganisms. No theory or empirical relationships have been developed to date to quantitatively relate parameters of soil structure and parameters of the contaminant transport in soils. The absence of theoretical advances in this area seriously hampers the ability to address issues of public concern, e.g. spread of contaminants introduced in the environment by agricultural activities. Recently, computer tomography of soils has become available to generate detailed images of soil pore space with high resolution and density. Successful applications of computer tomography in medical and material sciences show the great potential of this technique to create an exhaustive characterization of soil structure heterogeneity. In this presentation we investigate saturated flow through twelve undisturbed macroporous soil columns (7.62- cm sample diameter and 18-cm length) with lattice Boltzmann simulations. Saturated flow was measured for the complete columns, as well as on 2 cm sections for selected columns. Computed X-Ray tomography was performed on each of the columns, using the 420 kV X-ray source of a HYTEC FlashCT high-speed industrial CT scanner. The resolution was 116 microns per voxel, yielding a final tomography image of 656x656x1482 (~ 6.3 10E8) voxels. X-Ray CT observations typically provide "gray-scale" representations of the imaged object that must be segmented to yield discrete pore and particle geometry. Many segmentation algorithms are available, each yielding different final pore geometries thus potentially creating uncertainties in subsequent flow analyses. Lattice Boltzmann (LB) simulations will be presented only for some of the columns as the simulations are extremely computationally intensive (each simulation requires ~ 60 GB of computer RAM at the observed

  7. Supercomputer applications in gas turbine flowfield simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.; Kelaita, Paul; Gavali, Sharad

    1990-01-01

    The numerical simulation of the unsteady three-dimensional viscous flow in a gas turbine stage is considered. Results from a three-dimensional time-accurate Navier-Stokes simulation of rotor-stator interaction in an axial turbine stage are presented. The present study uses a fine grid in the spanwise direction to better resolve the complex three-dimensional flowfield, and complements earlier reported coarse-grid calculations. Several different features of the flowfield are analyzed and compared to earlier calculations and to experimental data whenever possible. Computer animation techniques are used to visualize various unsteady three-dimensional features of the flow. The results demonstrate the capabilities of current computing hardware in obtaining accurate simulations of unsteady flows in turbomachines.

  8. Simulation of the many-body dynamical quantum Hall effect in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan-Wei; Yang, Xu-Chen

    2016-05-01

    We propose an experimental scheme to simulate the many-body dynamical quantum Hall effect with ultra-cold bosonic atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice. We first show that the required model Hamiltonian of a spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain with an effective magnetic field and tunable parameters can be realized in this system. For dynamical response to ramping the external fields, the quantized plateaus emerge in the Berry curvature of the interacting atomic spin chain as a function of the effective spin-exchange interaction. The quantization of this response in the parameter space with the interaction-induced topological transition characterizes the many-body dynamical quantum Hall effect. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this phenomenon can be observed in practical cold atom experiments with numerical simulations.

  9. The Lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of Atomic Diffusion and Structural Transition for Gold.

    PubMed

    He, Xiang; Cheng, Feng; Chen, Zhao-Xu

    2016-01-01

    For the kinetic simulation of metal nanoparticles, we developed a self-consistent coordination-averaged energies for Au atoms based on energy properties of gold bulk phases. The energy barrier of the atom pairing change is proposed and holds for the microscopic reversibility principle. By applying the lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulation on gold films, we found that the atomic diffusion of Au on the Au(111) surface undergoes a late transition state with an energy barrier of about 0.2 eV and a prefactor between 40~50 Å(2)/ps. This study also investigates the structural transition from spherical to faceted gold nanoparticles upon heating. The temperatures of structural transition are in agreement with the experimental melting temperatures of gold nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 2 nm to 8 nm. PMID:27629538

  10. Computer code for the atomistic simulation of lattice defects and dynamics. [COMENT code

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffgens, J.O.; Graves, N.J.; Oster, C.A.

    1980-04-01

    This document has been prepared to satisfy the need for a detailed, up-to-date description of a computer code that can be used to simulate phenomena on an atomistic level. COMENT was written in FORTRAN IV and COMPASS (CDC assembly language) to solve the classical equations of motion for a large number of atoms interacting according to a given force law, and to perform the desired ancillary analysis of the resulting data. COMENT is a dual-purpose intended to describe static defect configurations as well as the detailed motion of atoms in a crystal lattice. It can be used to simulate the effect of temperature, impurities, and pre-existing defects on radiation-induced defect production mechanisms, defect migration, and defect stability.

  11. Simulation of Droplets Collisions Using Two-Phase Entropic Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazloomi Moqaddam, A.; Chikatamarla, S. S.; Karlin, I. V.

    2015-12-01

    The recently introduced entropic lattice Boltzmann model for multiphase flows (Mazloomi et al. in Phys Rev Lett 114:174502, 2015) is used to simulate binary droplet collisions. The entropy-based stabilization, together with a new polynomial equation of state, enhances performance of the model and allow us to simulate droplet collision for various Weber and Reynolds numbers and large liquid to vapor density ratio. Different types of droplet collision outcomes, namely coalescence, stretching separation and reflexive separation are recovered in a range of impact parameter for two equal sized droplets. The results demonstrated the essential role played by the surface tension, kinematic viscosity, impact parameter and relative velocity in the droplet collision dynamics leading to coalescence or separation collision outcomes. Comparison between numerical results and experiments in both coalescence and separation collisions demonstrate viability of the presented model.

  12. The Lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of Atomic Diffusion and Structural Transition for Gold

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiang; Cheng, Feng; Chen, Zhao-Xu

    2016-01-01

    For the kinetic simulation of metal nanoparticles, we developed a self-consistent coordination-averaged energies for Au atoms based on energy properties of gold bulk phases. The energy barrier of the atom pairing change is proposed and holds for the microscopic reversibility principle. By applying the lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulation on gold films, we found that the atomic diffusion of Au on the Au(111) surface undergoes a late transition state with an energy barrier of about 0.2 eV and a prefactor between 40~50 Å2/ps. This study also investigates the structural transition from spherical to faceted gold nanoparticles upon heating. The temperatures of structural transition are in agreement with the experimental melting temperatures of gold nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 2 nm to 8 nm. PMID:27629538

  13. Simulating regolith ejecta due to gas impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Wesley Allen; Metzger, Philip; Dove, Adrienne; Britt, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Space missions operating at or near the surface of a planet or small body must consider possible gas-regolith interactions, as they can cause hazardous effects or, conversely, be employed to accomplish mission goals. They are also directly related to a body's surface properties; thus understanding these interactions could provide an additional tool to analyze mission data. The Python Regolith Interaction Calculator (PyRIC), built upon a computational technique developed in the Apollo era, was used to assess interactions between rocket exhaust and an asteroid's surface. It focused specifically on threshold conditions for causing regolith ejecta. To improve this model, and learn more about the underlying physics, we have begun ground-based experiments studying the interaction between gas impingement and regolith simulant. Compressed air, initially standing in for rocket exhaust, is directed through a rocket nozzle at a bed of simulant. We assess the qualitative behavior of various simulants when subjected to a known maximum surface pressure, both in atmosphere and in a chamber initially at vacuum. These behaviors are compared to prior computational results, and possible flow patterns are inferred. Our future work will continue these experiments in microgravity through the use of a drop tower. These will use several simulant types and various pressure levels to observe the effects gas flow can have on target surfaces. Combining this with a characterization of the surface pressure distribution, tighter bounds can be set on the cohesive threshold necessary to maintain regolith integrity. This will aid the characterization of actual regolith distributions, as well as informing the surface operation phase of mission design.

  14. Simulation by using the lattice Boltzmann method of microscopic particle motion induced by artificial cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alapati, Suresh; Che, Woo Seong; Mannoor, Madhusoodanan; Suh, Yong Kweon

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present the results obtained from the simulation of particle motion induced by the fluid flow driven by an array of beating artificial cilia inside a micro-channel. A worm-like-chain model is used to simulate the elastic cilia, and the lattice Boltzmann equation is used to compute the fluid flow. We employ a harmonic force at the extreme tip of each cilium to actuate it. Our simulation methods are first validated by applying them to the motion of a single cilium and a freely falling sphere. After validation, we simulate the fluid flow generated by an array of beating cilia and find that a maximum flow rate is achieved at an optimum sperm number. Next, we simulate the motion of a neutrally buoyant spherical particle at this optimum sperm number by tracking the particle motion with a smoothed profile method. We address the effect of the following parameters on the particle velocity: the gap between cilia and particle, the particle size, the cilia density, and the presence of an array of intermediate particles.

  15. Micro Blowing Simulations Using a Coupled Finite-Volume Lattice-Boltzman n L ES Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, S.; Feiz, H.

    1990-01-01

    Three dimensional large-eddy simulations (LES) of single and multiple jet-in-cross-flow (JICF) are conducted using the 19-bit Lattice Boltzmann Equation (LBE) method coupled with a conventional finite-volume (FV) scheme. In this coupled LBE-FV approach, the LBE-LES is employed to simulate the flow inside the jet nozzles while the FV-LES is used to simulate the crossflow. The key application area is the use of this technique is to study the micro blowing technique (MBT) for drag control similar to the recent experiments at NASA/GRC. It is necessary to resolve the flow inside the micro-blowing and suction holes with high resolution without being restricted by the FV time-step restriction. The coupled LBE-FV-LES approach achieves this objectives in a computationally efficient manner. A single jet in crossflow case is used for validation purpose and the results are compared with experimental data and full LBE-LES simulation. Good agreement with data is obtained. Subsequently, MBT over a flat plate with porosity of 25% is simulated using 9 jets in a compressible cross flow at a Mach number of 0.4. It is shown that MBT suppresses the near-wall vortices and reduces the skin friction by up to 50 percent. This is in good agreement with experimental data.

  16. Simulation of Two Phase Fluid Flow With Various Kinds of Barriers Using Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijaya, Imam; Purqon, Acep

    2016-08-01

    Multiphase fluid flow in a pore medium is a problem that is very interesting to be learned. In its flow, the fluid can experience a few of barriers / obstacles like the exsisting of things in the flow medium. The existence of the barriers can detain the rate speed of the fluid flow. The barries that its form is different will provide influence to the speed of of fluid flow that is different as well. To know the influence of barriers form twards the profile of fluid speed rate, is conducted by the simulation by using Lattice Boltzmann Methode (LBM). In this simulation, the barriers is varied in the form of circle, square, and ellips. From simulation that is conducted, to known the influence of barriers variations twards the fluid speed, ploted by the graph of the fluid speed relations along simulation time and plotted by the fluid speed vector in each posisition. From the simulation, it is obtained that the barriers with square formed produced the higest speed rate of the fluid flow, with the speed rate 0.26 lu/ts, then circle formed with the speed rate 0.24 lu/ts, and the last square formed with speed rate 0.24 lu/ts.

  17. Large eddy simulation applications in gas turbines.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Kevin

    2009-07-28

    The gas turbine presents significant challenges to any computational fluid dynamics techniques. The combination of a wide range of flow phenomena with complex geometry is difficult to model in the context of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solvers. We review the potential for large eddy simulation (LES) in modelling the flow in the different components of the gas turbine during a practical engineering design cycle. We show that while LES has demonstrated considerable promise for reliable prediction of many flows in the engine that are difficult for RANS it is not a panacea and considerable application challenges remain. However, for many flows, especially those dominated by shear layer mixing such as in combustion chambers and exhausts, LES has demonstrated a clear superiority over RANS for moderately complex geometries although at significantly higher cost which will remain an issue in making the calculations relevant within the design cycle. PMID:19531505

  18. Chebyshev collocation spectral lattice Boltzmann method for simulation of low-speed flows.

    PubMed

    Hejranfar, Kazem; Hajihassanpour, Mahya

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the Chebyshev collocation spectral lattice Boltzmann method (CCSLBM) is developed and assessed for the computation of low-speed flows. Both steady and unsteady flows are considered here. The discrete Boltzmann equation with the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook approximation based on the pressure distribution function is considered and the space discretization is performed by the Chebyshev collocation spectral method to achieve a highly accurate flow solver. To provide accurate unsteady solutions, the time integration of the temporal term in the lattice Boltzmann equation is made by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme. To achieve numerical stability and accuracy, physical boundary conditions based on the spectral solution of the governing equations implemented on the boundaries are used. An iterative procedure is applied to provide consistent initial conditions for the distribution function and the pressure field for the simulation of unsteady flows. The main advantage of using the CCSLBM over other high-order accurate lattice Boltzmann method (LBM)-based flow solvers is the decay of the error at exponential rather than at polynomial rates. Note also that the CCSLBM applied does not need any numerical dissipation or filtering for the solution to be stable, leading to highly accurate solutions. Three two-dimensional (2D) test cases are simulated herein that are a regularized cavity, the Taylor vortex problem, and doubly periodic shear layers. The results obtained for these test cases are thoroughly compared with the analytical and available numerical results and show excellent agreement. The computational efficiency of the proposed solution methodology based on the CCSLBM is also examined by comparison with those of the standard streaming-collision (classical) LBM and two finite-difference LBM solvers. The study indicates that the CCSLBM provides more accurate and efficient solutions than these LBM solvers in terms of CPU and memory usage and an exponential

  19. Chebyshev collocation spectral lattice Boltzmann method for simulation of low-speed flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejranfar, Kazem; Hajihassanpour, Mahya

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the Chebyshev collocation spectral lattice Boltzmann method (CCSLBM) is developed and assessed for the computation of low-speed flows. Both steady and unsteady flows are considered here. The discrete Boltzmann equation with the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook approximation based on the pressure distribution function is considered and the space discretization is performed by the Chebyshev collocation spectral method to achieve a highly accurate flow solver. To provide accurate unsteady solutions, the time integration of the temporal term in the lattice Boltzmann equation is made by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme. To achieve numerical stability and accuracy, physical boundary conditions based on the spectral solution of the governing equations implemented on the boundaries are used. An iterative procedure is applied to provide consistent initial conditions for the distribution function and the pressure field for the simulation of unsteady flows. The main advantage of using the CCSLBM over other high-order accurate lattice Boltzmann method (LBM)-based flow solvers is the decay of the error at exponential rather than at polynomial rates. Note also that the CCSLBM applied does not need any numerical dissipation or filtering for the solution to be stable, leading to highly accurate solutions. Three two-dimensional (2D) test cases are simulated herein that are a regularized cavity, the Taylor vortex problem, and doubly periodic shear layers. The results obtained for these test cases are thoroughly compared with the analytical and available numerical results and show excellent agreement. The computational efficiency of the proposed solution methodology based on the CCSLBM is also examined by comparison with those of the standard streaming-collision (classical) LBM and two finite-difference LBM solvers. The study indicates that the CCSLBM provides more accurate and efficient solutions than these LBM solvers in terms of CPU and memory usage and an exponential

  20. Chebyshev collocation spectral lattice Boltzmann method for simulation of low-speed flows.

    PubMed

    Hejranfar, Kazem; Hajihassanpour, Mahya

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the Chebyshev collocation spectral lattice Boltzmann method (CCSLBM) is developed and assessed for the computation of low-speed flows. Both steady and unsteady flows are considered here. The discrete Boltzmann equation with the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook approximation based on the pressure distribution function is considered and the space discretization is performed by the Chebyshev collocation spectral method to achieve a highly accurate flow solver. To provide accurate unsteady solutions, the time integration of the temporal term in the lattice Boltzmann equation is made by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme. To achieve numerical stability and accuracy, physical boundary conditions based on the spectral solution of the governing equations implemented on the boundaries are used. An iterative procedure is applied to provide consistent initial conditions for the distribution function and the pressure field for the simulation of unsteady flows. The main advantage of using the CCSLBM over other high-order accurate lattice Boltzmann method (LBM)-based flow solvers is the decay of the error at exponential rather than at polynomial rates. Note also that the CCSLBM applied does not need any numerical dissipation or filtering for the solution to be stable, leading to highly accurate solutions. Three two-dimensional (2D) test cases are simulated herein that are a regularized cavity, the Taylor vortex problem, and doubly periodic shear layers. The results obtained for these test cases are thoroughly compared with the analytical and available numerical results and show excellent agreement. The computational efficiency of the proposed solution methodology based on the CCSLBM is also examined by comparison with those of the standard streaming-collision (classical) LBM and two finite-difference LBM solvers. The study indicates that the CCSLBM provides more accurate and efficient solutions than these LBM solvers in terms of CPU and memory usage and an exponential

  1. Evaluation of Airframe Noise Reduction Concepts via Simulations Using a Lattice Boltzmann Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fares, Ehab; Casalino, Damiano; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2015-01-01

    Unsteady computations are presented for a high-fidelity, 18% scale, semi-span Gulfstream aircraft model in landing configuration, i.e. flap deflected at 39 degree and main landing gear deployed. The simulations employ the lattice Boltzmann solver PowerFLOW® to simultaneously capture the flow physics and acoustics in the near field. Sound propagation to the far field is obtained using a Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings acoustic analogy approach. In addition to the baseline geometry, which was presented previously, various noise reduction concepts for the flap and main landing gear are simulated. In particular, care is taken to fully resolve the complex geometrical details associated with these concepts in order to capture the resulting intricate local flow field thus enabling accurate prediction of their acoustic behavior. To determine aeroacoustic performance, the farfield noise predicted with the concepts applied is compared to high-fidelity simulations of the untreated baseline configurations. To assess the accuracy of the computed results, the aerodynamic and aeroacoustic impact of the noise reduction concepts is evaluated numerically and compared to experimental results for the same model. The trends and effectiveness of the simulated noise reduction concepts compare well with measured values and demonstrate that the computational approach is capable of capturing the primary effects of the acoustic treatment on a full aircraft model.

  2. Different Scalable Implementations of Collision and Streaming for Optimal Computational Performance of Lattice Boltzmann Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geneva, Nicholas; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2015-11-01

    In the past 25 years, the mesoscopic lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has become an increasingly popular approach to simulate incompressible flows including turbulent flows. While LBM solves more solution variables compared to the conventional CFD approach based on the macroscopic Navier-Stokes equation, it also offers opportunities for more efficient parallelization. In this talk we will describe several different algorithms that have been developed over the past 10 plus years, which can be used to represent the two core steps of LBM, collision and streaming, more effectively than standard approaches. The application of these algorithms spans LBM simulations ranging from basic channel to particle laden flows. We will cover the essential detail on the implementation of each algorithm for simple 2D flows, to the challenges one faces when using a given algorithm for more complex simulations. The key is to explore the best use of data structure and cache memory. Two basic data structures will be discussed and the importance of effective data storage to maximize a CPU's cache will be addressed. The performance of a 3D turbulent channel flow simulation using these different algorithms and data structures will be compared along with important hardware related issues.

  3. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of liquid crystal particulate flow in a channel with finite anchoring boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Roberts, Tyler; de Pablo, Juan; dePablo Team

    2014-11-01

    Liquid crystals (LC) posses anisotropic viscoelastic properties, and, as such, LC flow can be incredibly complicated. Here we employ a hybrid lattice Boltzmann method (pioneered by Deniston, Yeomans and Cates) to systematically study the hydrodynamics of nematic liquid crystals (LCs) with and without solid particles. This method evolves the velocity field through lattice Boltzmann and the LC-order parameter via a finite-difference solver of the Beris-Edwards equation. The evolution equation of the boundary points with finite anchoring is obtained through Poisson bracket formulation. Our method has been validated by matching the Ericksen-Leslie theory. We demonstrate two applications in the flow alignment regime. We first investigate a hybrid channel flow in which the top and bottom walls have different anchoring directions. By measuring the apparent shear viscosity in terms of Couette flow, we achieve a viscosity inhomogeneous system which may be applicable to nano particle processing. In the other example, we introduce a homeotropic spherical particle to the channel, and focus on the deformations of the defect ring due to anchorings and flow. The results are then compared to the molecular dynamics simulations of a colloid particle in an LC modeled by a Gay-Berne potential.

  4. Parallel lattice Boltzmann simulation of bubble rising and coalescence in viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Dongyan; Wang, Zhikai

    2015-07-01

    A parallel three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann scheme for multicomponent immiscible fluids is proposed to simulate bubble rising and coalescence process in viscous flows. The lattice Boltzmann scheme is based on the free-energy model and is parallelized in the share-memory model by using the OpenMP. Bubble interface is described by a diffusion interface method solving the Cahn-Hilliard equation and both the surface tension force and the buoyancy are introduced in a form of discrete body force. To avoid the numerical instability caused by the interface deformation, the 18 point finite difference scheme is utilized to calculate the first- and second-order space derivative. The correction of the parallel scheme handling three-dimensional interfaces is verified by the Laplace law and the dynamic characteristics of an isolated bubble in stationary flows. Subsequently, effects of the initially relative position, accompanied by the size ratio on bubble-bubble interaction are studied. The results show that the present scheme can effectively describe the bubble interface dynamics, even if rupture and restructure occurs. In addition to the repulsion and coalescence phenomenon due to the relative position, the size ratio also plays an insignificant role in bubble deformation and trajectory.

  5. Simulation of arrested salt wedges with a multi-layer Shallow Water Lattice Boltzmann model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestininzi, P.; Montessori, A.; La Rocca, M.; Sciortino, G.

    2016-10-01

    The ability to accurately and efficiently model the intrusion of salt wedges into river beds is crucial to assay its interaction with human activities and the natural environment. We present a 2D multi-layer Shallow Water Lattice Boltzmann (SWLB) model able to predict the salt wedge intrusion in river estuaries. The formulation usually employed for the simulation of gravity currents is here equipped with proper boundary conditions to handle both the downstream seaside outlet and the upstream river inlet. Firstly, the model is validated against highly accurate semi-analytical solutions of the steady state 1D two-layer Shallow Water model. Secondly, the model is applied to a more complex, fully 3D geometry, to assess its capability to handle realistic cases. The simple formulation proposed for the shear interlayer stress is proven to be consistent with the general 3D viscous solution. In addition to the accuracy, the model inherits the efficiency of the Lattice Boltzmann approach to fluid dynamics problems.

  6. Discretization effects and the scalar meson correlator in mixed-action lattice simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, C.; Laiho, Jack; Van de Water, Ruth S.

    2008-06-01

    We study discretization effects in a mixed-action lattice theory with domain-wall valence quarks and Asqtad-improved staggered sea quarks. At the level of the chiral effective Lagrangian, discretization effects in the mixed-action theory give rise to two new parameters as compared to the lowest order Lagrangian for rooted-staggered fermions - the residual quark mass m{sub res} and the mixed valence-sea meson mass splitting {delta}{sub mix}. We find that m{sub res}, which parametrizes explicit chiral symmetry breaking in the mixed-action theory, is approximately one-quarter the size of our lightest valence quark mass on our coarser lattice spacing and of comparable size to that of simulations by the RBC and UKQCD Collaborations. We also find that the size of {delta}{sub mix} is comparable to the size of the smallest of the staggered meson taste splittings measured by the MILC Collaboration. Because lattice artifacts are different in the valence and sea sectors of the mixed-action theory, they give rise to unitarity-violating effects that disappear in the continuum limit, some of which should be described by mixed-action chiral perturbation theory (MA{chi}PT). Such effects are expected to be mild for many quantities of interest but are expected to be significant in the case of the isovector scalar (a{sub 0}) correlator. Specifically, once the parameters m{sub res}, {delta}{sub mix}, and two others that can be determined from the light pseudoscalar meson spectrum are known, the two-particle intermediate state 'bubble' contribution to the scalar correlator is completely predicted within MA{chi}PT. We find that the behavior of the scalar meson correlator is quantitatively consistent with the MA{chi}PT prediction; this supports the claim that MA{chi}PT describes the dominant unitarity-violating effects in the mixed-action theory and can therefore be used to remove lattice artifacts and recover physical quantities.

  7. Lattice Boltzmann method simulating hemodynamics in the three-dimensional stenosed and recanalized human carotid bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, XiuYing

    2015-01-01

    By using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) pulsatile blood flows were simulated in three-dimensional moderate stenosed and recanalized carotid bifurcations to understand local hemodynamics and its relevance in arterial atherosclerosis formation and progression. The helical flow patterns, secondary flow and wall dynamical pressure spatiotemporal distributions were investigated, which leads to the disturbed shear forces in the carotid artery bifurcations. The wall shear stress distributions indicated by time-averaged wall shear stress (TAWSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI), and the relative residence time (RRT) in a cardiac cycle revealed the regions where atherosclerotic plaques are prone to form, extend or rupture. This study also illustrates the point that locally disturbed flow may be considered as an indicator for early atherosclerosis diagnosis. Additionally the present work demonstrates the robust and highly efficient advantages of the LBM for the hemodynamics study of the human blood vessel system.

  8. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of One Particle Migrating in a Pulsating Flow in Microvessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Bing; Tan, Hui-Li; Li, Hua-Bing

    2011-10-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model of two dimensions is used to simulate the movement of a single rigid particle suspended in a pulsating flow in micro vessel. The particle is as big as a red blood cell, and the micro vessel is four times as wide as the diameter of the particle. It is found that Segré—Silberberg effect will not respond to the pulsation of the flow when the Reynolds number is relatively high. However, when the Reynolds number is low enough, Segré—Silberberg effect disappears. In the steady flow, different initial position leads to different equilibrium positions. In a pulsating flow, different frequencies of pulsation also cause different equilibrium positions. Particularly, when the frequency of pulsation is closed to the human heart rate, Segré—Silberberg effect presents again. The evolutions of velocity, rotation, and trajectory of the particle are investigated to find the dynamics of such abnormal phenomenon.

  9. Site-bond percolation on simple cubic lattices: numerical simulation and analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M. I.; Centres, P. M.; Lebrecht, W.; Ramirez-Pastor, A. J.

    2016-09-01

    The site-percolation problem on simple cubic lattices has been studied by means of numerical simulation and analytical calculations based on exact counting of configurations on finite cells. Motivated by considerations of cluster connectivity, two distinct schemes (denoted as S{\\cap}B and S{\\cup}B ) have been considered. In S{\\cap}B (S{\\cup}B ), two points are said to be connected if a sequence of occupied sites and (or) bonds joins them. Theoretical and numerical results, supplemented by analysis using finite-size scaling theory, were used to calculate the complete phase diagram of the system in the ({{p}s},{{p}b} ) space. Our study allowed us also to determine the critical exponents (and universality) characterizing the phase transition occurring in the system.

  10. Grad's approximation for moving and stationary walls in entropic lattice Boltzmann simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorschner, B.; Chikatamarla, S. S.; Bösch, F.; Karlin, I. V.

    2015-08-01

    We introduce a new generalized wall boundary condition for the entropic lattice Boltzmann method (ELBM) that is capable of handling complex flow geometries including moving walls. The Grad's ten moments approximation is employed to approximate the missing populations at the boundary nodes. The new boundary condition significantly improves accuracy, stability and sub-grid features of LBM and in particular of its entropic variant, ELBM. The proposed boundary condition is tested for a range of flows in two dimensions, including planar channel flow, Couette flow, flow past a circular cylinder and sedimenting circular particles. Further simulations involving complex geometries such as flapping wing and transversely oscillating cylinder demonstrate superior stability and accuracy of the new wall boundary condition.

  11. Spin-lattice dynamics simulation of external field effect on magnetic order of ferromagnetic iron

    SciTech Connect

    Chui, C. P.; Zhou, Yan

    2014-03-15

    Modeling of field-induced magnetization in ferromagnetic materials has been an active topic in the last dozen years, yet a dynamic treatment of distance-dependent exchange integral has been lacking. In view of that, we employ spin-lattice dynamics (SLD) simulations to study the external field effect on magnetic order of ferromagnetic iron. Our results show that an external field can increase the inflection point of the temperature. Also the model provides a better description of the effect of spin correlation in response to an external field than the mean-field theory. An external field has a more prominent effect on the long range magnetic order than on the short range counterpart. Furthermore, an external field allows the magnon dispersion curves and the uniform precession modes to exhibit magnetic order variation from their temperature dependence.

  12. Laboratory simulation of cometary neutral gas ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, T.-F.; Rahman, H. U.; White, R. S.

    1989-05-01

    The laboratory simulation of the interaction of the solar wind with a comet is used to study the cometary neural gas ionization. The experiment is carried out in the UCR T-1 facility with an ice ball as the comet model. Photographs and data are taken with a variety of values of the solar wind velocity, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), and comet configurations. The results show that the cometary neutral gas ionization depends on both the velocity of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field. The plasma cloud surrounding the comet is visible only when the solar wind velocity and IMF are both above certain minimum values. This velocity dependent phenomena is explained by Alfven's critical ionization velocity effect. The critical magnetic field may be explained by assuming two stream lower hybrid instability as a triggering mechanism for the ionization of the neutral gas by plasma flow. Critical upper and lower limits for the magnetic field, required by anomalous ionization, are also derived that satisfy the experimental observations.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann method simulations of Stokes number effects on particle motion in a channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lenan; Jebakumar, Anand Samuel; Abraham, John

    2016-06-01

    In a recent experimental study by Lau and Nathan ["Influence of Stokes number on the velocity and concentration distributions in particle-laden jets," J. Fluid Mech. 757, 432 (2014)], it was found that particles in a turbulent pipe flow tend to migrate preferentially toward the wall or the axis depending on their Stokes number (St). Particles with a higher St (>10) are concentrated near the axis while those with lower St (<1) move toward the walls. Jebakumar et al. ["Lattice Boltzmann method simulations of Stokes number effects on particle trajectories in a wall-bounded flow," Comput. Fluids 124, 208 (2016)] have carried out simulations of a particle in a laminar channel flow to investigate this behavior. In their work, they report a similar behavior where particles with low St migrate toward the wall and oscillate about a mean position near the wall while those with high St oscillate about the channel center plane. They have explained this behavior in terms of the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, and wall repulsion forces acting on the particle. The present work extends the previous work done by Jebakumar et al. and aims to study the behavior of particles at intermediate St ranging from 10 to 20. It is in this range where the equilibrium position of the particle changes from near the wall to the axis and the particle starts oscillating about the axis. The Lattice Boltzmann method is employed to carry out this study. It is shown that the change in mean equilibrium position is related to increasing oscillations of the particle with mean position near the wall which results in the particle moving past the center plane to the opposite side. The responsible mechanisms are explained in detail.

  14. Three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model for immiscible two-phase flow simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haihu; Valocchi, Albert J; Kang, Qinjun

    2012-04-01

    We present an improved three-dimensional 19-velocity lattice Boltzmann model for immisicible binary fluids with variable viscosity and density ratios. This model uses a perturbation step to generate the interfacial tension and a recoloring step to promote phase segregation and maintain surfaces. A generalized perturbation operator is derived using the concept of a continuum surface force together with the constraints of mass and momentum conservation. A theoretical expression for the interfacial tension is determined directly without any additional analysis and assumptions. The recoloring algorithm proposed by Latva-Kokko and Rothman is applied for phase segregation, which minimizes the spurious velocities and removes lattice pinning. This model is first validated against the Laplace law for a stationary bubble. It is found that the interfacial tension is predicted well for density ratios up to 1000. The model is then used to simulate droplet deformation and breakup in simple shear flow. We compute droplet deformation at small capillary numbers in the Stokes regime and find excellent agreement with the theoretical Taylor relation for the segregation parameter β=0.7. In the limit of creeping flow, droplet breakup occurs at a critical capillary number 0.35simulations and experiments. Droplet breakup can also be promoted by increasing the Reynolds number. Finally, we numerically investigate a single bubble rising under buoyancy force in viscous fluids for a wide range of Eötvös and Morton numbers. Numerical results are compared with theoretical predictions and experimental results, and satisfactory agreement is shown.

  15. Variance-reduced simulation of lattice discrete-time Markov chains with applications in reaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maginnis, P. A.; West, M.; Dullerud, G. E.

    2016-10-01

    We propose an algorithm to accelerate Monte Carlo simulation for a broad class of stochastic processes. Specifically, the class of countable-state, discrete-time Markov chains driven by additive Poisson noise, or lattice discrete-time Markov chains. In particular, this class includes simulation of reaction networks via the tau-leaping algorithm. To produce the speedup, we simulate pairs of fair-draw trajectories that are negatively correlated. Thus, when averaged, these paths produce an unbiased Monte Carlo estimator that has reduced variance and, therefore, reduced error. Numerical results for three example systems included in this work demonstrate two to four orders of magnitude reduction of mean-square error. The numerical examples were chosen to illustrate different application areas and levels of system complexity. The areas are: gene expression (affine state-dependent rates), aerosol particle coagulation with emission and human immunodeficiency virus infection (both with nonlinear state-dependent rates). Our algorithm views the system dynamics as a "black-box", i.e., we only require control of pseudorandom number generator inputs. As a result, typical codes can be retrofitted with our algorithm using only minor changes. We prove several analytical results. Among these, we characterize the relationship of covariances between paths in the general nonlinear state-dependent intensity rates case, and we prove variance reduction of mean estimators in the special case of affine intensity rates.

  16. Predictive simulation of wind turbine wake interaction with an adaptive lattice Boltzmann method for moving boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deiterding, Ralf; Wood, Stephen L.

    2015-11-01

    Operating horizontal axis wind turbines create large-scale turbulent wake structures that affect the power output of downwind turbines considerably. The computational prediction of this phenomenon is challenging as efficient low dissipation schemes are necessary that represent the vorticity production by the moving structures accurately and are able to transport wakes without significant artificial decay over distances of several rotor diameters. We have developed the first version of a parallel adaptive lattice Boltzmann method for large eddy simulation of turbulent weakly compressible flows with embedded moving structures that considers these requirements rather naturally and enables first principle simulations of wake-turbine interaction phenomena at reasonable computational costs. The presentation will describe the employed algorithms and present relevant verification and validation computations. For instance, power and thrust coefficients of a Vestas V27 turbine are predicted within 5% of the manufacturer's specifications. Simulations of three Vestas V27-225kW turbines in triangular arrangement analyze the reduction in power production due to upstream wake generation for different inflow conditions.

  17. Extended lattice Boltzmann method for numerical simulation of thermal phase change in two-phase fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Safari, Hesameddin; Rahimian, Mohammad Hassan; Krafczyk, Manfred

    2013-07-01

    In this article, a method based on the multiphase lattice Boltzmann framework is presented which is applicable to liquid-vapor phase-change phenomena. Both liquid and vapor phases are assumed to be incompressible. For phase changes occurring at the phase interface, the divergence-free condition of the velocity field is no longer satisfied due to the gas volume generated by vaporization or fluid volume generated by condensation. Thus, we extend a previous model by a suitable equation to account for the finite divergence of the velocity field within the interface region. Furthermore, the convective Cahn-Hilliard equation is extended to take into account vaporization effects. In a first step, a D1Q3 LB model is constructed and validated against the analytical solution of a one-dimensional Stefan problem for different density ratios. Finally the model is extended to two dimensions (D2Q9) to simulate droplet evaporation. We demonstrate that the results obtained by this approach are in good agreement with theory. PMID:23944580

  18. Hydrodynamic simulations of relativistic heavy-ion collisions with different lattice quantum chromodynamics calculations of the equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreland, J. Scott; Soltz, Ron A.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrodynamic calculations of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions are performed using the iebe-vishnu 2+1-dimensional code with fluctuating initial conditions and three different parametrizations of the lattice QCD equations of state: continuum extrapolations for stout and HISQ/tree actions, as well as the s95p-v1 parametrization based upon calculations using the p4 action. All parametrizations are matched to a hadron resonance gas equation of state at T =155 MeV, at which point the calculations are continued using the urqmd hadronic cascade. Simulations of √{sN N}=200 GeV Au+Au collisions in three centrality classes are used to quantify anisotropic flow developed in the hydrodynamic phase of the collision as well as particle spectra and pion Hanbury-Brown-Twiss (HBT) radii after hadronic rescattering, which are compared with experimental data. Experimental observables for the stout and HISQ/tree equations of state are observed to differ by less than a few percent for all observables, while the s95p-v1 equation of state generates spectra and flow coefficients which differ by ˜10 -20 % . Calculations in which the HISQ/tree equation of state is sampled from the published error distribution are also observed to differ by less than a few percent.

  19. Extended lattice Boltzmann method for numerical simulation of thermal phase change in two-phase fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safari, Hesameddin; Rahimian, Mohammad Hassan; Krafczyk, Manfred

    2013-07-01

    In this article, a method based on the multiphase lattice Boltzmann framework is presented which is applicable to liquid-vapor phase-change phenomena. Both liquid and vapor phases are assumed to be incompressible. For phase changes occurring at the phase interface, the divergence-free condition of the velocity field is no longer satisfied due to the gas volume generated by vaporization or fluid volume generated by condensation. Thus, we extend a previous model by a suitable equation to account for the finite divergence of the velocity field within the interface region. Furthermore, the convective Cahn-Hilliard equation is extended to take into account vaporization effects. In a first step, a D1Q3 LB model is constructed and validated against the analytical solution of a one-dimensional Stefan problem for different density ratios. Finally the model is extended to two dimensions (D2Q9) to simulate droplet evaporation. We demonstrate that the results obtained by this approach are in good agreement with theory.

  20. A Lattice Boltzmann model for simulating water flow at pore scale in unsaturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxian; Crawford, John W.; Young, Iain M.

    2016-07-01

    The Lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is an established prominent model for simulating water flow at pore scale in saturated porous media. However, its application in unsaturated soil is less satisfactory because of the difficulties associated with most two-phase LB models in simulating immiscible fluids, such as water and air, which have contrasting densities and viscosities. While progress has been made in developing LB models for fluids with high density ratio, they are still prone to numerical instability and cannot accurately describe the interfacial friction on water-air interface in unsaturated media. Considering that one important application of the LB model in porous materials is to calculate their hydraulic properties when flow is at steady state, we develop a simple LB model to simulate steady water flow at pore scale in unsaturated soils. The method consists of two steps. The first one is to determine water distribution within the soil structure using a morphological model; once the water distribution is known, its interfaces with air are fixed. The second step is to use a single-phase LB model to simulate water flow by treating the water-air interfaces as free-flow boundaries where the shear resistance of air to water flow is assumed to be negligible. We propose a method to solve such free-flow boundaries, and validate the model against analytical solutions of flows of water film over non-slip walls in both two and three dimensions. We then apply the model to calculate water retention and hydraulic properties of a medium acquired using X-ray computed tomography at resolution of 6 μm. The model is quasi-static, similar to the porous network model, but is an improvement as it directly simulates water flow in the pore geometries acquired by tomography without making any further simplifications.

  1. Shape changes of bioprinted tissue constructs simulated by the Lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Cristea, Artur; Neagu, Adrian

    2016-03-01

    Tissue engineers seek to build living tissue constructs for replacing or repairing damaged tissues. Computational methods foster tissue engineering by pointing out dominant mechanisms involved in shaping multicellular systems. Here we apply the Lattice Boltzmann (LB) method to study the fusion of multicellular constructs. This process is of interest in bioprinting, in which multicellular spheroids or cylinders are embedded in a supportive hydrogel by a computer-controlled device. We simulated post-printing rearrangements of cells, aiming to predict the shape and stability of certain printed structures. To this end, we developed a two-dimensional LB model of a multicellular system in a hydrogel. Our parallel computing code was implemented using the Portable Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc). To validate the LB model, we simulated the fusion of multicellular cylinders in a contiguous, hexagonal arrangement. Our two-dimensional LB simulation describes the evolution of the transversal cross section of the construct built from three-dimensional multicellular cylinders whose length is much larger than their diameter. Fusion eventually gave rise to a tubular construct, in qualitative agreement with bioprinting experiments. Then we simulated the time course of a defect in a bioprinted tube. To address practical problems encountered in tissue engineering, we also simulated the evolution of a planar construct, as well as of a bulky, perfusable construct made of multicellular cylinders. The agreement with experiments indicates that our LB model captures certain essential features of morphogenesis, and, therefore, it may be used to test new working hypotheses faster and cheaper than in the laboratory.

  2. Absorbing phase transition in a conserved lattice gas model with next-nearest-neighbor hopping in one dimension.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Bub

    2015-12-01

    The absorbing phase transition of the modified conserved lattice gas (m-CLG) model was investigated in one dimension. The m-CLG model was modified from the conserved lattice gas (CLG) model in such a way that each active particle hops to one of the nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor empty sites. The order parameter exponent, the dynamic exponent, and the correlation length exponent were estimated from the power-law behavior and finite-size scaling of the active particle densities. The exponents were found to differ considerably from those of the ordinary CLG model and were also distinct from those of the Manna model, suggesting that next-nearest-neighbor hopping is a relevant factor that alters the critical behavior in the one-dimensional CLG model. PMID:26764627

  3. Lattice Kinetic Theory in a Comoving Galilean Reference Frame.

    PubMed

    Frapolli, N; Chikatamarla, S S; Karlin, I V

    2016-07-01

    We prove that the fully discrete lattice Boltzmann method is invariant with respect to Galilean transformation. Based on this finding, a novel class of shifted lattices is proposed which dramatically increases the operating range of lattice Boltzmann simulations, in particular, for gas dynamics applications. A simulation of vortex-shock interaction is used to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed lattices. With one single algorithm it is now possible to simulate a broad range of applications, from low Mach number flows to transonic and supersonic flow regimes. PMID:27419555

  4. Lattice Kinetic Theory in a Comoving Galilean Reference Frame.

    PubMed

    Frapolli, N; Chikatamarla, S S; Karlin, I V

    2016-07-01

    We prove that the fully discrete lattice Boltzmann method is invariant with respect to Galilean transformation. Based on this finding, a novel class of shifted lattices is proposed which dramatically increases the operating range of lattice Boltzmann simulations, in particular, for gas dynamics applications. A simulation of vortex-shock interaction is used to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed lattices. With one single algorithm it is now possible to simulate a broad range of applications, from low Mach number flows to transonic and supersonic flow regimes.

  5. Lattice Kinetic Theory in a Comoving Galilean Reference Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frapolli, N.; Chikatamarla, S. S.; Karlin, I. V.

    2016-07-01

    We prove that the fully discrete lattice Boltzmann method is invariant with respect to Galilean transformation. Based on this finding, a novel class of shifted lattices is proposed which dramatically increases the operating range of lattice Boltzmann simulations, in particular, for gas dynamics applications. A simulation of vortex-shock interaction is used to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed lattices. With one single algorithm it is now possible to simulate a broad range of applications, from low Mach number flows to transonic and supersonic flow regimes.

  6. Gas turbine system simulation: An object-oriented approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Colin K.; Follen, Gregory J.; Putt, Charles W.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype gas turbine engine simulation has been developed that offers a generalized framework for the simulation of engines subject to steady-state and transient operating conditions. The prototype is in preliminary form, but it successfully demonstrates the viability of an object-oriented approach for generalized simulation applications. Although object oriented programming languages are-relative to FORTRAN-somewhat austere, it is proposed that gas turbine simulations of an interdisciplinary nature will benefit significantly in terms of code reliability, maintainability, and manageability. This report elucidates specific gas turbine simulation obstacles that an object-oriented framework can overcome and describes the opportunity for interdisciplinary simulation that the approach offers.

  7. Miscibility of polyolefin blends from a Born-Green-Yvon lattice model in conjunction with small scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luettmer-Strathmann, J.; Lipson, J. E. G.

    1999-02-01

    The large variation in miscibility of blends of polyolefins is related to the architecture of the chain molecules. In this paper we present first results of an approach in which small scale simulations of local interactions are combined with an analytical model for the thermodynamics, the Born-Green-Yvon lattice model, to predict phase diagrams of polyolefin blends from the pure component properties.

  8. The Repulsive Lattice Gas, the Independent-Set Polynomial, and the Lovász Local Lemma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Alexander D.; Sokal, Alan D.

    2005-03-01

    We elucidate the close connection between the repulsive lattice gas in equilibrium statistical mechanics and the Lovász local lemma in probabilistic combinatorics. We show that the conclusion of the Lovász local lemma holds for dependency graph G and probabilities { p x } if and only if the independent-set polynomial for G is nonvanishing in the polydisc of radii { p x }. Furthermore, we show that the usual proof of the Lovász local lemma - which provides a sufficient condition for this to occur - corresponds to a simple inductive argument for the nonvanishing of the independent-set polynomial in a polydisc, which was discovered implicitly by Shearer(98) and explicitly by Dobrushin.(37,38) We also present some refinements and extensions of both arguments, including a generalization of the Lovász local lemma that allows for ``soft'' dependencies. In addition, we prove some general properties of the partition function of a repulsive lattice gas, most of which are consequences of the alternating-sign property for the Mayer coefficients. We conclude with a brief discussion of the repulsive lattice gas on countably infinite graphs.

  9. Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwald, Ken

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility project is to provide a microgravity laboratory to facilitate research relevant to exobiology (the study of the origin and evolution of life in the universe). Such a facility will also be useful in other areas of study important to NASA including planetary science, biology, atmospheric science, astrophysics, chemistry, and physics. To achieve this goal, the project will develop and support the GGSF, a modular facility-class payload planned for inclusion on Space Station Freedom. The GGSF will consist of the following: an experiment chamber(s) supported by subsystems that provide chamber environment regulation and monitoring capabilities; sample generation, injection, positioning, and retrieval capabilities; and computer control, data acquisition, and housekeeping capabilities. The facility will also provide analytical tools such as light-scattering measurement systems, aerosol size-spectrum measurement devices, and optical imaging systems.

  10. The computer simulation of 3d gas dynamics in a gas centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borman, V. D.; Bogovalov, S. V.; Borisevich, V. D.; Tronin, I. V.; Tronin, V. N.

    2016-09-01

    We argue on the basis of the results of 2D analysis of the gas flow in gas centrifuges that a reliable calculation of the circulation of the gas and gas content in the gas centrifuge is possible only in frameworks of 3D numerical simulation of gas dynamics in the gas centrifuge (hereafter GC). The group from National research nuclear university, MEPhI, has created a computer code for 3D simulation of the gas flow in GC. The results of the computer simulations of the gas flows in GC are presented. A model Iguassu centrifuge is explored for the simulations. A nonaxisymmetric gas flow is produced due to interaction of the hypersonic rotating flow with the scoops for extraction of the product and waste flows from the GC. The scoops produce shock waves penetrating into a working camera of the GC and form spiral waves there.

  11. Simulations of Bingham plastic flows with the multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, SongGui; Sun, QiCheng; Jin, Feng; Liu, JianGuo

    2014-03-01

    Fresh cement mortar is a type of workable paste, which can be well approximated as a Bingham plastic and whose flow behavior is of major concern in engineering. In this paper, Papanastasiou's model for Bingham fluids is solved by using the multiplerelaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model (MRT-LB). Analysis of the stress growth exponent m in Bingham fluid flow simulations shows that Papanastasiou's model provides a good approximation of realistic Bingham plastics for values of m > 108. For lower values of m, Papanastasiou's model is valid for fluids between Bingham and Newtonian fluids. The MRT-LB model is validated by two benchmark problems: 2D steady Poiseuille flows and lid-driven cavity flows. Comparing the numerical results of the velocity distributions with corresponding analytical solutions shows that the MRT-LB model is appropriate for studying Bingham fluids while also providing better numerical stability. We further apply the MRT-LB model to simulate flow through a sudden expansion channel and the flow surrounding a round particle. Besides the rich flow structures obtained in this work, the dynamics fluid force on the round particle is calculated. Results show that both the Reynolds number Re and the Bingham number Bn affect the drag coefficients C D , and a drag coefficient with Re and Bn being taken into account is proposed. The relationship of Bn and the ratio of unyielded zone thickness to particle diameter is also analyzed. Finally, the Bingham fluid flowing around a set of randomly dispersed particles is simulated to obtain the apparent viscosity and velocity fields. These results help simulation of fresh concrete flowing in porous media.

  12. Simulating the dynamics of a single polymer chain in solution: Lattice Boltzmann vs Brownian dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duenweg, Burkhard

    2010-03-01

    Two well--established and complementary methodologies to simulate the dynamics of polymers in solution are (i) Brownian Dynamics (BD), and (ii) Molecular Dynamics coupled dissipatively to a lattice Boltzmann background (MD/LB). The talk gives a brief introduction into both methods, and then presents results of a recent comparative study that applied both methods to the same model of a single chain that moves in a solvent under the influence of thermal noise. Emphasis is put on the question how to map the parameters onto each other, in particular those that are crucial for the dynamics. The agreement of static properties is perfect, as it must be. The dynamic properties agree very well, if for the MD/LB case the effects of finite box size are eliminated by extrapolation. We also find that proper thermalization of all MD/LB degrees of freedom (including the so--called ``kinetic modes'') is necessary. Small deviations between BD and MD/LB remain as a result of the different simulation methodologies. Finally, the computational efficiency of the two methods is compared. For the single--chain system, BD is clearly much faster, while scaling estimates suggest that the opposite is true for semidilute solutions. References: *Tri T. Pham, Ulf D. Schiller, J. Ravi Prakash, and B. D"unweg, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 164114 (2009). *B. D"unweg and A. J. C. Ladd, Adv. Polym. Sci. 221, 89 (2009).

  13. KMCLib: A general framework for lattice kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leetmaa, Mikael; Skorodumova, Natalia V.

    2014-09-01

    KMCLib is a general framework for lattice kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations. The program can handle simulations of the diffusion and reaction of millions of particles in one, two, or three dimensions, and is designed to be easily extended and customized by the user to allow for the development of complex custom KMC models for specific systems without having to modify the core functionality of the program. Analysis modules and on-the-fly elementary step diffusion rate calculations can be implemented as plugins following a well-defined API. The plugin modules are loosely coupled to the core KMCLib program via the Python scripting language. KMCLib is written as a Python module with a backend C++ library. After initial compilation of the backend library KMCLib is used as a Python module; input to the program is given as a Python script executed using a standard Python interpreter. We give a detailed description of the features and implementation of the code and demonstrate its scaling behavior and parallel performance with a simple one-dimensional A-B-C lattice KMC model and a more complex three-dimensional lattice KMC model of oxygen-vacancy diffusion in a fluorite structured metal oxide. KMCLib can keep track of individual particle movements and includes tools for mean square displacement analysis, and is therefore particularly well suited for studying diffusion processes at surfaces and in solids. Catalogue identifier: AESZ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AESZ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 49 064 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 575 172 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python and C++. Computer: Any computer that can run a C++ compiler and a Python interpreter. Operating system: Tested on Ubuntu 12

  14. Capillary filling and Haines jump dynamics using free energy Lattice Boltzmann simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharoudiou, Ioannis; Boek, Edo S.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate numerically the dynamics of capillary filling and Haines jump events using free energy Lattice Boltzmann (LB) simulations. Both processes are potentially important multi-phase pore-scale flow processes for geological CO2 sequestration and oil recovery. We first focus on capillary filling and demonstrate that the numerical method can capture the correct dynamics in the limit of long times for both high and low viscosity ratios, i.e. the method gives the correct scaling for the length of the penetrating fluid column as a function of time. Examining further the early times of capillary filling, three consecutive length vs. time regimes have been observed, in agreement with available experimental work in the literature. In addition, we carry out simulations of Haines jump events in idealised and realistic rock pore geometries. We observe that the Haines jump events are cooperative, non-local and associated with both drainage and imbibition dynamics. Our observations show that the pore filling dynamics is controlled by the Ohnesorge number, associated with the balance between viscous forces and inertial / surface tension forces. Using this concept, we are able to identify the type of pore filling dynamics that will occur.

  15. Knotted Vortices: Entropic Lattice Boltzmann Method for Simulation of Vortex dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesch, Fabian; Chikatamarla, Shyam; Karlin, Ilya

    2013-11-01

    Knotted and interlinked vortex structures in real fluids are conjectured to play a major role in hydrodynamic flow dissipation. Much interest lies in determining their temporal stability and the mechanism through which knots dissolve. Kleckner and Irvine recently have shown the existence of such knotted vortices experimentally by accelerating hydrofoils in water. In the present work we employ the entropic lattice Boltzmann method (ELBM) to perform DNS simulations of the creation and dynamics of knotted vortex rings inspired by the experimental setup in. ELBM renders LBM scheme unconditionally stable by restoring the second law of thermodynamics (the Boltzmann H-theorem), and thus enables simulations of large domains and high Reynolds numbers with DNS quality. The results presented in this talk provide an in-depth study of the dynamics of knotted vortices and vortex reconnection events and confirm the existence of trefoil knots in silicio for the first time. This work was supported by a grant from the Swiss National Supercomputing Centre (CSCS) under project ID s347.

  16. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of thermofluidic transport phenomena in a DC magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Dipankar; Amiroudine, Sakir

    2011-02-01

    A comprehensive non-isothermal Lattice Boltzmann (LB) algorithm is proposed in this article to simulate the thermofluidic transport phenomena encountered in a direct-current (DC) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump. Inside the pump, an electrically conducting fluid is transported through the microchannel by the action of an electromagnetic Lorentz force evolved out as a consequence of the interaction between applied electric and magnetic fields. The fluid flow and thermal characteristics of the MHD micropump depend on several factors such as the channel geometry, electromagnetic field strength and electrical property of the conducting fluid. An involved analysis is carried out following the LB technique to understand the significant influences of the aforementioned controlling parameters on the overall transport phenomena. In the LB framework, the hydrodynamics is simulated by a distribution function, which obeys a single scalar kinetic equation associated with an externally imposed electromagnetic force field. The thermal history is monitored by a separate temperature distribution function through another scalar kinetic equation incorporating the Joule heating effect. Agreement with analytical, experimental and other available numerical results is found to be quantitative.

  17. Continuous surface force based lattice Boltzmann equation method for simulating thermocapillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lin; Zheng, Song; Zhai, Qinglan

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we extend a lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) with continuous surface force (CSF) to simulate thermocapillary flows. The model is designed on our previous CSF LBE for athermal two phase flow, in which the interfacial tension forces and the Marangoni stresses as the results of the interface interactions between different phases are described by a conception of CSF. In this model, the sharp interfaces between different phases are separated by a narrow transition layers, and the kinetics and morphology evolution of phase separation would be characterized by an order parameter via Cahn-Hilliard equation which is solved in the frame work of LBE. The scalar convection-diffusion equation for temperature field is resolved by thermal LBE. The models are validated by thermal two layered Poiseuille flow, and two superimposed planar fluids at negligibly small Reynolds and Marangoni numbers for the thermocapillary driven convection, which have analytical solutions for the velocity and temperature. Then thermocapillary migration of two/three dimensional deformable droplet are simulated. Numerical results show that the predictions of present LBE agreed with the analytical solution/other numerical results.

  18. Simulation of binary droplet collisions with the entropic lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazloomi Moqaddam, Ali; Chikatamarla, Shyam S.; Karlin, Ilya V.

    2016-02-01

    The recently introduced entropic lattice Boltzmann method (ELBM) for multiphase flows is extended here to simulation of droplet collisions. Thermodynamically consistent, non-linearly stable ELBM together with a novel polynomial equation of state is proposed for simulation large Weber and Reynolds number collisions of two droplets. Extensive numerical investigations show that ELBM is capable of accurately capturing the dynamics and complexity of droplet collision. Different types of the collision outcomes such as coalescence, reflexive separation, and stretching separation are identified. Partition of the parameter plane is compared to the experiments and excellent agreement is observed. Moreover, the evolution of the shape of a stable lamella film is quantitatively compared with experimental results. The end pinching and the capillary-wave instability are shown to be the main mechanisms behind formation of satellite droplets for near head-on and off-center collisions with high impact parameter, respectively. It is shown that the number of satellite drops increases with increasing Weber number, as predicted by experiments. Also, it is demonstrated that the rotational motion due to angular momentum and elongation of the merged droplet play essential roles in formation of satellite droplets in off-center collisions with an intermediate impact parameter.

  19. Lattice Thermal Conductivity from Atomistic Simulations: ZrB2 and HfB2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, John W.; Daw, Murray S.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    Ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC) including ZrB2 and HfB2 have a number of properties that make them attractive for applications in extreme environments. One such property is their high thermal conductivity. Computational modeling of these materials will facilitate understanding of fundamental mechanisms, elucidate structure-property relationships, and ultimately accelerate the materials design cycle. Progress in computational modeling of UHTCs however has been limited in part due to the absence of suitable interatomic potentials. Recently, we developed Tersoff style parameterizations of such potentials for both ZrB2 and HfB2 appropriate for atomistic simulations. As an application, Green-Kubo molecular dynamics simulations were performed to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity for single crystals of ZrB2 and HfB2. The atomic mass difference in these binary compounds leads to oscillations in the time correlation function of the heat current, in contrast to the more typical monotonic decay seen in monoatomic materials such as Silicon, for example. Results at room temperature and at elevated temperatures will be reported.

  20. LBM-EP: Lattice-Boltzmann method for fast cardiac electrophysiology simulation from 3D images.

    PubMed

    Rapaka, S; Mansi, T; Georgescu, B; Pop, M; Wright, G A; Kamen, A; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-01-01

    Current treatments of heart rhythm troubles require careful planning and guidance for optimal outcomes. Computational models of cardiac electrophysiology are being proposed for therapy planning but current approaches are either too simplified or too computationally intensive for patient-specific simulations in clinical practice. This paper presents a novel approach, LBM-EP, to solve any type of mono-domain cardiac electrophysiology models at near real-time that is especially tailored for patient-specific simulations. The domain is discretized on a Cartesian grid with a level-set representation of patient's heart geometry, previously estimated from images automatically. The cell model is calculated node-wise, while the transmembrane potential is diffused using Lattice-Boltzmann method within the domain defined by the level-set. Experiments on synthetic cases, on a data set from CESC'10 and on one patient with myocardium scar showed that LBM-EP provides results comparable to an FEM implementation, while being 10 - 45 times faster. Fast, accurate, scalable and requiring no specific meshing, LBM-EP paves the way to efficient and detailed models of cardiac electrophysiology for therapy planning. PMID:23286029

  1. Simulation Study of Micro Particles Behavior in Fluid Flow Using Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, T.; Yamada, Y.; Matsuoka, T.

    2004-12-01

    Evaluation of underground hydraulic characteristics has been a key issue not only for hydrogeology but for various fields of geo-engineering. We have been investigating hydraulic properties, such as permeability, of fractures and porous rocks using a 3D lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for recent several years. In this paper, we propose a coupling method of LBM and DEM (distinct element method) to incorporate dynamic interaction of fluid flow and particles. This coupling technique brings new insights into the effect of micro particles in the hydraulic properties, such that migration and sedimentation of solid particles remarkably decreases permeability. We present two simulation examples; I) sedimentation of micro particles by the gravity in dead water, II) behaviour of micro particles in fluid flow through a porous media. In the simulation-I, surface geometry of the particle assembly shows a gentle 'sag' with a subtle subsidence at its center, suggesting that the upward fluid expulsion causes slightly uplifted geometry. Such geometry of particles can be commonly seen in natural sedimentary rocks that deformed due to fluid expulsion at its unconsolidated stages. The simulation-II clearly showed some conditions of pore throat plugging by the micro particles. The fluid flow pattern should be significantly affected by the moving particles, as well as the pressure difference (an input parameter). The percolation distance of solid particles was well controlled with the pressure difference and throat geometries. We concluded that the coupling simulation of LBM and DEM has extremely high potential to investigate the behavior of solid and fluid interactions. The technique can simulate permeability changes precisely, that are affected by dynamic or physical factors such as compaction. Fluid flow simulations with the technique can be directly applied for plugging of solid particles within a reservoir, which is significant for petroleum production and drill-hole completion. The

  2. Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics ZrB2 and HfB2 from Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, John W.; Murray, Daw S.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Atomistic Green-Kubo simulations are performed to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity for single crystals of the ultra high temperature ceramics ZrB2 and HfB2 for a range of temperatures. Recently developed interatomic potentials are used for these simulations. Heat current correlation functions show rapid oscillations which can be identified with mixed metal-Boron optical phonon modes. Agreement with available experimental data is good.

  3. KMCLib: A general framework for lattice kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leetmaa, Mikael; Skorodumova, Natalia V.

    2014-09-01

    KMCLib is a general framework for lattice kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations. The program can handle simulations of the diffusion and reaction of millions of particles in one, two, or three dimensions, and is designed to be easily extended and customized by the user to allow for the development of complex custom KMC models for specific systems without having to modify the core functionality of the program. Analysis modules and on-the-fly elementary step diffusion rate calculations can be implemented as plugins following a well-defined API. The plugin modules are loosely coupled to the core KMCLib program via the Python scripting language. KMCLib is written as a Python module with a backend C++ library. After initial compilation of the backend library KMCLib is used as a Python module; input to the program is given as a Python script executed using a standard Python interpreter. We give a detailed description of the features and implementation of the code and demonstrate its scaling behavior and parallel performance with a simple one-dimensional A-B-C lattice KMC model and a more complex three-dimensional lattice KMC model of oxygen-vacancy diffusion in a fluorite structured metal oxide. KMCLib can keep track of individual particle movements and includes tools for mean square displacement analysis, and is therefore particularly well suited for studying diffusion processes at surfaces and in solids. Catalogue identifier: AESZ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AESZ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 49 064 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 575 172 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python and C++. Computer: Any computer that can run a C++ compiler and a Python interpreter. Operating system: Tested on Ubuntu 12

  4. Modeling of gas transport with electrochemical reaction in nickel-yttria-stabilized zirconia anode during thermal cycling by Lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Pengfei; Guan, Yong; Liu, Gang; Liang, Zhiting; Liu, Jianhong; Zhang, Xiaobo; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Yangchao

    2016-09-01

    This work reports an investigation of the impact of microstructure on the performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) composed of nickel yttria-stabilized zirconia (Ni YSZ). X-ray nano computed tomography (nano-CT) was used to obtain three-dimensional (3D) models of Ni-YSZ composite anode samples subjected to different thermal cycles. Key parameters, such as triple phase boundary (TPB) density, were calculated using 3D reconstructions. The electrochemical reaction occurring at active-TPB was modeled by the Lattice Boltzmann Method for simulation of multi-component mass transfer in porous anodes. The effect of different electrode geometries on the mass transfer and the electrochemical reaction in anodes was studied by TPB distributions measured by nano CT for samples subjected to different thermal cycles. The concentration polarization and the activation polarization were estimated respectively. The results demonstrate that a combined approach involving nano-CT experiments in conjunction with simulations of gas transport and electrochemical reactions using the Lattice Boltzmann method can be used to better understand the relationship between electrode microstructure and performance of nickel yttria-stabilized zirconia anodes.

  5. Microscale boundary conditions of the lattice Boltzmann equation method for simulating microtube flows.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lin; Guo, Zhaoli; Shi, Baochang

    2012-07-01

    The lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) method has been shown to be a promising tool for microscale gas flows. However, few works focus on the microtube flows, and there still are some fundamental problems for the LBE to such flows. In this paper, a recently proposed axisymmetric LBE with three kinetic boundary conditions, i.e., the combination of bounceback and specular reflection scheme, the combination of the Maxwell and specular-reflection scheme, and the combination of the Maxwell and bounceback scheme, have been investigated in detail. By analyzing the micro-Hagen-Poiseuille flow, we observed the discrete boundary condition effect and provided a revised boundary scheme to overcome such effect near the slip flow regime. Some numerical tests for the micro-Hagen-Poiseuille have been carried out to validate the analysis, and the numerical results of the revised boundary schemes agree well with the analytic solutions which confirmed our theoretical analysis. In addition, we also applied the revised combination of the Maxwell and bounceback scheme to microtube flow with sudden expansion and contraction, the numerical results of the pressure distribution and normalized slip velocity agree well with the theoretical ones. PMID:23005568

  6. Particle-Resolved Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Suspension Flow Using the Lattice Boltzmann Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lian-Ping

    2010-03-01

    Particle-laden turbulent flow is of importance to many engineering applications and natural phenomena, such as aerosol and pollutant transport, interaction of cloud droplets, spay combustion, and chemical processes. In general, the dynamics of dispersed phase and that of the carrier fluid phase are closely coupled. Most previous studies utilize the point particle approach to study the effects of particles on the carrier turbulence, under the assumptions that the particle size is significantly smaller than the smallest turbulence length scale and the particle volume fraction is low. The present study focuses on the motion and hydrodynamic interactions of finite-size freely moving particles in a turbulent background flow. To simulate carrier fluid turbulence, a mesoscopic lattice Boltzmann approach is applied with the multiple relaxation-time collision model, which yields a more robust viscous flow simulation method than the single-relaxation collision model. The no-slip boundary condition on the moving surface of each particle is implemented using an interpolated bounce-back scheme. The refill problem resulting from the moving boundary is handled by a non-equilibrium correction method to reduce the unphysical force fluctuations acting on the particles. The short-range lubrication force not resolved by the simulation is represented by a physical model involving particle relative location and velocity. For the carrier fluid phase, computational results are discussed in terms of the change of energy spectrum compared with the particle-free turbulence, the time evolution of the turbulent kinetic energy and the dissipation rate. For the dispersed phase, the focus will be on the particle-pair statistics such as the relative velocity and radial distribution function as well as particle-particle collision rate. The effects of varying particle size, volume fraction, and particle-to-fluid density ratio will be examined. The results will be compared to those from the previous

  7. Void lattice formation in electron irradiated CaF2: Statistical analysis of experimental data and cellular automata simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvejnieks, G.; Merzlyakov, P.; Kuzovkov, V. N.; Kotomin, E. A.

    2016-02-01

    Calcium fluoride (CaF2) is an important optical material widely used in both microlithography and deep UV windows. It is known that under certain conditions electron beam irradiation can create therein a superlattice consisting of vacancy clusters (called a void lattice). The goal of this paper is twofold. Firstly, to perform a quantitative analysis of experimental TEM images demonstrating void lattice formation, we developed two distinct image filters. As a result, we can easily calculate vacancy concentration, vacancy cluster distribution function as well as average distances between defect clusters. The results for two suggested filters are similar and demonstrate that experimental void cluster growth is accompanied by a slight increase of the void lattice constant. Secondly, we proposed a microscopic model that allows us to reproduce a macroscopic void ordering, in agreement with experimental data, and to resolve existing theoretical and experimental contradictions. Our computer simulations demonstrate that macroscopic void lattice self-organization can occur only in a narrow parameter range. Moreover, we studied the kinetics of a void lattice ordering, starting from an initial disordered stage, in a good agreement with the TEM experimental data.

  8. Performance Evaluation of Lattice-Boltzmann MagnetohydrodynamicsSimulations on Modern Parallel Vector Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Jonathan; Oliker, Leonid

    2006-01-09

    The last decade has witnessed a rapid proliferation of superscalarcache-based microprocessors to build high-end computing (HEC) platforms, primarily because of their generality, scalability, and cost effectiveness. However, the growing gap between sustained and peak performance for full-scale scientific applications on such platforms has become major concern in high performance computing. The latest generation of custom-built parallel vector systems have the potential to address this concern for numerical algorithms with sufficient regularity in their computational structure. In this work, we explore two and three dimensional implementations of a lattice-Boltzmann magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) physics application, on some of today's most powerful supercomputing platforms. Results compare performance between the vector-based Cray X1, Earth Simulator, and newly-released NEC SX-8, with the commodity-based superscalar platforms of the IBM Power3, IntelItanium2, and AMD Opteron. Overall results show that the SX-8 attains unprecedented aggregate performance across our evaluated applications.

  9. Red blood cell aggregation and dissociation in shear flows simulated by lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junfeng; Johnson, Paul C; Popel, Aleksander S

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we develop a lattice Boltzmann algorithm to simulate red blood cell (RBC) behavior in shear flows. The immersed boundary method is employed to incorporate the fluid-membrane interaction between the flow field and deformable cells. The cell membrane is treated as a neo-Hookean viscoelastic material and a Morse potential is adopted to model the intercellular interaction. Utilizing the available mechanical properties of RBCs, multiple cells have been studied in shear flows using a two-dimensional approximation. These cells aggregate and form a rouleau under the action of intercellular interaction. The equilibrium configuration is related to the interaction strength. The end cells exhibit concave shapes under weak interaction and convex shapes under strong interaction. In shear flows, such a rouleau-like aggregate will rotate or be separated, depending on the relative strengths of the intercellular interaction and hydrodynamic viscous forces. These behaviors are qualitatively similar to experimental observations and show the potential of this numerical scheme for future studies of blood flow in microvessels. PMID:17888442

  10. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Healthy and Defective Red Blood Cell Settling in Blood Plasma.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Z; Rahnama, M; Jafari, S

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an attempt has been made to study sedimentation of a red blood cell (RBC) in a plasma-filled tube numerically. Such behaviors are studied for a healthy and a defective cell which might be created due to human diseases, such as diabetes, sickle-cell anemia, and hereditary spherocytosis. Flow-induced deformation of RBC is obtained using finite-element method (FEM), while flow and fluid-membrane interaction are handled using lattice Boltzmann (LB) and immersed boundary methods (IBMs), respectively. The effects of RBC properties as well as its geometry and orientation on its sedimentation rate are investigated and discussed. The results show that decreasing frontal area of an RBC and/or increasing tube diameter results in a faster settling. Comparison of healthy and diabetic cells reveals that less cell deformability leads to slower settling. The simulation results show that the sicklelike and spherelike RBCs have lower settling velocity as compared with a biconcave discoid cell. PMID:26926169

  11. Red Blood Cell Aggregation and Dissociation in Shear Flows Simulated by Lattice Boltzmann Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junfeng; Johnson, Paul C.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we develop a lattice Boltzmann algorithm to simulate red blood cell (RBC) behavior in shear flows. The immersed boundary method is employed to incorporate the fluid-membrane interaction between the flow field and deformable cells. The cell membrane is treated as a neo-Hookean viscoelastic material and a Morse potential is adopted to model the intercellular interaction. Utilizing the available mechanical properties of RBCs, multiple cells have been studied in shear flows using a two-dimensional approximation. These cells aggregate and form a rouleau under the action of intercellular interaction. The equilibrium configuration is related to the interaction strength. The end cells exhibit concave shapes under weak interaction and convex shapes under strong interaction. In shear flows, such a rouleau-like aggregate will rotate or be separated, depending on the relative strengths of the intercellular interaction and hydrodynamic viscous forces. These behaviors are qualitatively similar to experimental observations and show the potential of this numerical scheme for future studies of blood flow in microvessels. PMID:17888442

  12. Lattice Boltzmann method for fast patient-specific simulation of liver tumor ablation from CT images.

    PubMed

    Audigier, Chloé; Mansi, Tommaso; Delingette, Hervé; Rapaka, Saikiran; Mihalef, Viorel; Sharma, Puneet; Carnegie, Daniel; Boctor, Emad; Choti, Michael; Kamen, Ali; Comaniciu, Dorin; Ayache, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Radio-frequency ablation (RFA), the most widely used minimally invasive ablative therapy of liver cancer, is challenged by a lack of patient-specific planning. In particular, the presence of blood vessels and time-varying thermal diffusivity makes the prediction of the extent of the ablated tissue difficult. This may result in incomplete treatments and increased risk of recurrence. We propose a new model of the physical mechanisms involved in RFA of abdominal tumors based on Lattice Boltzmann Method to predict the extent of ablation given the probe location and the biological parameters. Our method relies on patient images, from which level set representations of liver geometry, tumor shape and vessels are extracted. Then a computational model of heat diffusion, cellular necrosis and blood flow through vessels and liver is solved to estimate the extent of ablated tissue. After quantitative verifications against an analytical solution, we apply our framework to 5 patients datasets which include pre- and post-operative CT images, yielding promising correlation between predicted and actual ablation extent (mean point to mesh errors of 8.7 mm). Implemented on graphics processing units, our method may enable RFA planning in clinical settings as it leads to near real-time computation: 1 minute of ablation is simulated in 1.14 minutes, which is almost 60x faster than standard finite element method.

  13. Topology Dependence in Lattice Simulations of Non-Linear Pdes on a Mimd Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valin, P.; Goulard, B.; Sanielevici, M.

    We tested the parallelization of explicit schemes for the solution of non-linear classical field theories of complex scalar fields which are capable of simulating hadronic collisions. Our attention focused on collisions in a fractional model with a particularly rich inelastic spectrum of final states. Relativistic collisions of all types were performed by computer on large lattices (64 to 256 sites per dimension). The stability and accuracy of the objects were tested by the use of two other methods of solutions: Pseudo-spectral and semi-implicit. Parallelization of the Fortran code on a 64-transputer MIMD Volvox machine revealed, for certain topologies, communication deadlock and less-than-optimum routing strategies when the number of transputers used was less than the maximum. The observed speedup, for N transputers in an appropriate topology, is shown to scale approximately as N, but the overall gain in execution speed, for physically interesting problems, is a modest 2-3 when compared to state-of-the-art workstations.

  14. Numerical simulation of the fatigue behavior of additive manufactured titanium porous lattice structures.

    PubMed

    Zargarian, A; Esfahanian, M; Kadkhodapour, J; Ziaei-Rad, S

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the effects of cell geometry and relative density on the high-cycle fatigue behavior of Titanium scaffolds produced by selective laser melting and electron beam melting techniques were numerically investigated by finite element analysis. The regular titanium lattice samples with three different unit cell geometries, namely, diamond, rhombic dodecahedron and truncated cuboctahedron, and the relative density range of 0.1-0.3 were analyzed under uniaxial cyclic compressive loading. A failure event based algorithm was employed to simulate fatigue failure in the cellular material. Stress-life approach was used to model fatigue failure of both bulk (struts) and cellular material. The predicted fatigue life and the damage pattern of all three structures were found to be in good agreement with the experimental fatigue investigations published in the literature. The results also showed that the relationship between fatigue strength and cycles to failure obeyed the power law. The coefficient of power function was shown to depend on relative density, geometry and fatigue properties of the bulk material while the exponent was only dependent on the fatigue behavior of the bulk material. The results also indicated the failure surface at an angle of 45° to the loading direction. PMID:26706539

  15. Quantum simulation of correlated-hopping models with fermions in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Liberto, M.; Creffield, C. E.; Japaridze, G. I.; Morais Smith, C.

    2014-03-01

    By using a modulated magnetic field in a Feshbach resonance for ultracold fermionic atoms in optical lattices, we show that it is possible to engineer a class of models usually referred to as correlated-hopping models. These models differ from the Hubbard model in exhibiting additional density-dependent interaction terms that affect the hopping processes. In addition to the spin-SU(2) symmetry, they also possess a charge-SU(2) symmetry, which opens the possibility of investigating the η-pairing mechanism for superconductivity introduced by Yang for the Hubbard model. We discuss the known solution of the model in 1D (where η states have been found in the degenerate manifold of the ground state) and show that, away from the integrable point, quantum Monte Carlo simulations at half filling predict the emergence of a phase with coexisting incommensurate spin and charge order. This work was supported by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) and by the Spanish MICINN through Grant No. FIS-2010-21372 (CEC).

  16. Development of a Lattice Boltzmann Framework for Numerical Simulation of Thrombosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, S. E.; Bernsdorf, J.; Hose, D. R.; Lawford, P. V.

    The interacting factors relating to thrombogenesis were defined by Virchow in 1856 to be abnormalities of blood chemistry, the vessel wall and haemodynamics. Together, these factors are known as Virchow's triad. Many attempts have been made to simulate numerically certain aspects of the complex phenomena of thrombosis, but a comprehensive model, which includes the biochemical and physical aspects of Virchow's triad, and is capable of predicting thrombus development within physiological geometries has not yet been developed. Such a model would consider the role of platelets and the coagulation cascade along with the properties of the flow in the chosen vessel. A lattice Boltzmann thrombosis framework has been developed, on top of an existing flow solver, to model the formation of thrombi resulting from platelet activation and initiation of the coagulation cascade by one or more of the strands of Virchow's triad. Both processes then act in parallel, to restore homeostasis as the deposited thrombus disturbs the flow. Results are presented in a model of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), resulting from hypoxia and associated endothelial damage.

  17. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of asymmetric flow in nematic liquid crystals with finite anchoring.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Roberts, Tyler; Aranson, Igor S; de Pablo, Juan J

    2016-02-28

    Liquid crystals (LCs) display many of the flow characteristics of liquids but exhibit long range orientational order. In the nematic phase, the coupling of structure and flow leads to complex hydrodynamic effects that remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we consider the hydrodynamics of a nematic LC in a hybrid cell, where opposite walls have conflicting anchoring boundary conditions, and we employ a 3D lattice Boltzmann method to simulate the time-dependent flow patterns that can arise. Due to the symmetry breaking of the director field within the hybrid cell, we observe that at low to moderate shear rates, the volumetric flow rate under Couette and Poiseuille flows is different for opposite flow directions. At high shear rates, the director field may undergo a topological transition which leads to symmetric flows. By applying an oscillatory pressure gradient to the channel, a net volumetric flow rate is found to depend on the magnitude and frequency of the oscillation, as well as the anchoring strength. Taken together, our findings suggest several intriguing new applications for LCs in microfluidic devices.

  18. Numerical simulation of the fatigue behavior of additive manufactured titanium porous lattice structures.

    PubMed

    Zargarian, A; Esfahanian, M; Kadkhodapour, J; Ziaei-Rad, S

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the effects of cell geometry and relative density on the high-cycle fatigue behavior of Titanium scaffolds produced by selective laser melting and electron beam melting techniques were numerically investigated by finite element analysis. The regular titanium lattice samples with three different unit cell geometries, namely, diamond, rhombic dodecahedron and truncated cuboctahedron, and the relative density range of 0.1-0.3 were analyzed under uniaxial cyclic compressive loading. A failure event based algorithm was employed to simulate fatigue failure in the cellular material. Stress-life approach was used to model fatigue failure of both bulk (struts) and cellular material. The predicted fatigue life and the damage pattern of all three structures were found to be in good agreement with the experimental fatigue investigations published in the literature. The results also showed that the relationship between fatigue strength and cycles to failure obeyed the power law. The coefficient of power function was shown to depend on relative density, geometry and fatigue properties of the bulk material while the exponent was only dependent on the fatigue behavior of the bulk material. The results also indicated the failure surface at an angle of 45° to the loading direction.

  19. Lattice Simulations in MOM v.s. Schroedinger Functional Scheme and Triality

    SciTech Connect

    Furui, Sadataka

    2011-10-21

    The QCD beta function extracted from polarized electron proton scattering data obtained at JLab and the lattice simulation in the MOM scheme suggest that the critical flavor number for the presence of IR fixed point is about three. In analyses of Schroedinger functional scheme, however, critical flavor number for the presence of IR fixed point and the conformality is larger than nine.In the QCD analysis, when quarks are expressed in quaternion basis, the product of quaternions are expressed by octonions and the octonion posesses the triality symmetry. Since the triality has the effect of multiplying the falvor number, it could explain the apparent large critical flavor number in the Schroedinger functinal scheme. In this scheme, larger degrees of freedom in adjusting data of different scales on the boundary are necessary than in the MOM scheme.In weak interaction, there is no clear lepton-flavor violation except in the neutrino oscillation. If the triality is assigned to the lepton flavors(e,{mu} and {tau}) and they are assumed to be exact symmetry, or the electro-magnetic interaction preserves tiality, but the strong interaction is triality blind, there is a possibility of explaining the neutrino oscillation through triality mixing of the matter field.The self energy of gluons, ghost and gauge bosons due to self-dual gauge fields and leptonic decays of B,D and D{sub s} mesons are discussed.

  20. Lattice Boltzmann method for fast patient-specific simulation of liver tumor ablation from CT images.

    PubMed

    Audigier, Chloé; Mansi, Tommaso; Delingette, Hervé; Rapaka, Saikiran; Mihalef, Viorel; Sharma, Puneet; Carnegie, Daniel; Boctor, Emad; Choti, Michael; Kamen, Ali; Comaniciu, Dorin; Ayache, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Radio-frequency ablation (RFA), the most widely used minimally invasive ablative therapy of liver cancer, is challenged by a lack of patient-specific planning. In particular, the presence of blood vessels and time-varying thermal diffusivity makes the prediction of the extent of the ablated tissue difficult. This may result in incomplete treatments and increased risk of recurrence. We propose a new model of the physical mechanisms involved in RFA of abdominal tumors based on Lattice Boltzmann Method to predict the extent of ablation given the probe location and the biological parameters. Our method relies on patient images, from which level set representations of liver geometry, tumor shape and vessels are extracted. Then a computational model of heat diffusion, cellular necrosis and blood flow through vessels and liver is solved to estimate the extent of ablated tissue. After quantitative verifications against an analytical solution, we apply our framework to 5 patients datasets which include pre- and post-operative CT images, yielding promising correlation between predicted and actual ablation extent (mean point to mesh errors of 8.7 mm). Implemented on graphics processing units, our method may enable RFA planning in clinical settings as it leads to near real-time computation: 1 minute of ablation is simulated in 1.14 minutes, which is almost 60x faster than standard finite element method. PMID:24505777

  1. Molecular simulations and lattice dynamics determination of Stillinger-Weber GaN thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Zhi; Jain, Ankit; McGaughey, Alan J. H.; Keblinski, Pawel

    2015-09-28

    The bulk thermal conductivity of Stillinger-Weber (SW) wurtzite GaN in the [0001] direction at a temperature of 300 K is calculated using equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD), non-equilibrium MD (NEMD), and lattice dynamics (LD) methods. While the NEMD method predicts a thermal conductivity of 166 ± 11 W/m·K, both the EMD and LD methods predict thermal conductivities that are an order of magnitude greater. We attribute the discrepancy to significant contributions to thermal conductivity from long-mean free path phonons. We propose that the Grüneisen parameter for low-frequency phonons is a good predictor of the severity of the size effects in NEMD thermal conductivity prediction. For weakly anharmonic crystals characterized by small Grüneisen parameters, accurate determination of thermal conductivity by NEMD is computationally impractical. The simulation results also indicate the GaN SW potential, which was originally developed for studying the atomic-level structure of dislocations, is not suitable for prediction of its thermal conductivity.

  2. Artificial Gauge Field and Topological Phase in a Conventional Two-dimensional Electron Gas with Antidot Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Likun; Lou, Wenkai; Cheng, F.; Zou, Y. L.; Yang, Wen; Chang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Based on the Born-Oppemheimer approximation, we divide the total electron Hamiltonian in a spin-orbit coupled system into the slow orbital motion and the fast interband transition processes. We find that the fast motion induces a gauge field on the slow orbital motion, perpendicular to the electron momentum, inducing a topological phase. From this general designing principle, we present a theory for generating artificial gauge field and topological phase in a conventional two-dimensional electron gas embedded in parabolically graded GaAs/InxGa1−xAs/GaAs quantum wells with antidot lattices. By tuning the etching depth and period of the antidot lattices, the band folding caused by the antidot potential leads to the formation of minibands and band inversions between neighboring subbands. The intersubband spin-orbit interaction opens considerably large nontrivial minigaps and leads to many pairs of helical edge states in these gaps. PMID:26471126

  3. Summary of HTGR (high-temperature gas-cooled reactor) benchmark data from the high temperature lattice test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, D.F.

    1989-10-01

    The High Temperature Lattice Test Reactor (HTLTR) was a unique critical facility specifically built and operated to measure variations in neutronic characteristics of high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) lattices at temperatures up to 1000{degree}C. The Los Alamos National Laboratory commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to prepare this summary reference report on the HTLTR benchmark data and its associated documentation. In the initial stages of the program, the principle of the measurement of k{sub {infinity}} using the unpoisoned technique (developed by R.E. Heineman of PNL) was subjected to extensive peer review within PNL and the General Atomic Company. A number of experiments were conducted at PNL in the Physical Constants Testing Reactor (PCTR) using both the unpoisoned technique and the well-established null reactivity technique that substantiated the equivalence of the measurements by direct comparison. Records of all data from fuel fabrication, the reactor experiments, and the analytical results were compiled and maintained to meet applicable quality assurance standards in place at PNL. Sensitivity of comparisons between measured and calculated k{sub {infinity}}(T) data for various HTGR lattices to changes in neutron cross section data, graphite scattering kernel models, and fuel block loading variations, were analyzed by PNL for the Electric Power Research Institute. As a part of this effort, the fuel rod composition in the dilute {sup 233}UO{sub 2}-ThO{sub 2} HTGR central cell (HTLTR Lattice {number sign}3) was sampled and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Values of k{sub {infinity}} calculated for that lattice were about 5% higher than those measured. Trace quantities of sodium chloride were found in the fuel rod that were equivalent to 22 atom parts-per-million of natural boron.

  4. A hierarchical lattice spring model to simulate the mechanics of 2-D materials-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brely, Lucas; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola

    2015-07-01

    In the field of engineering materials, strength and toughness are typically two mutually exclusive properties. Structural biological materials such as bone, tendon or dentin have resolved this conflict and show unprecedented damage tolerance, toughness and strength levels. The common feature of these materials is their hierarchical heterogeneous structure, which contributes to increased energy dissipation before failure occurring at different scale levels. These structural properties are the key to exceptional bioinspired material mechanical properties, in particular for nanocomposites. Here, we develop a numerical model in order to simulate the mechanisms involved in damage progression and energy dissipation at different size scales in nano- and macro-composites, which depend both on the heterogeneity of the material and on the type of hierarchical structure. Both these aspects have been incorporated into a 2-dimensional model based on a Lattice Spring Model, accounting for geometrical nonlinearities and including statistically-based fracture phenomena. The model has been validated by comparing numerical results to continuum and fracture mechanics results as well as finite elements simulations, and then employed to study how structural aspects impact on hierarchical composite material properties. Results obtained with the numerical code highlight the dependence of stress distributions on matrix properties and reinforcement dispersion, geometry and properties, and how failure of sacrificial elements is directly involved in the damage tolerance of the material. Thanks to the rapidly developing field of nanocomposite manufacture, it is already possible to artificially create materials with multi-scale hierarchical reinforcements. The developed code could be a valuable support in the design and optimization of these advanced materials, drawing inspiration and going beyond biological materials with exceptional mechanical properties.

  5. Calibrating Lattice Boltzmann flow simulations and estimating uncertainty in the permeability of complex porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosa, Aleksandra; Curtis, Andrew; Wood, Rachel

    2016-08-01

    A common way to simulate fluid flow in porous media is to use Lattice Boltzmann (LB) methods. Permeability predictions from such flow simulations are controlled by parameters whose settings must be calibrated in order to produce realistic modelling results. Herein we focus on the simplest and most commonly used implementation of the LB method: the single-relaxation-time BGK model. A key parameter in the BGK model is the relaxation time τ which controls flow velocity and has a substantial influence on the permeability calculation. Currently there is no rigorous scheme to calibrate its value for models of real media. We show that the standard method of calibration, by matching the flow profile of the analytic Hagen-Poiseuille pipe-flow model, results in a BGK-LB model that is unable to accurately predict permeability even in simple realistic porous media (herein, Fontainebleau sandstone). In order to reconcile the differences between predicted permeability and experimental data, we propose a method to calibrate τ using an enhanced Transitional Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, which is suitable for parallel computer architectures. We also propose a porosity-dependent τ calibration that provides an excellent fit to experimental data and which creates an empirical model that can be used to choose τ for new samples of known porosity. Our Bayesian framework thus provides robust predictions of permeability of realistic porous media, herein demonstrated on the BGK-LB model, and should therefore replace the standard pipe-flow based methods of calibration for more complex media. The calibration methodology can also be extended to more advanced LB methods.

  6. Fast discontinuous Galerkin lattice-Boltzmann simulations on GPUs via maximal kernel fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzeo, Marco D.

    2013-03-01

    A GPU implementation of the discontinuous Galerkin lattice-Boltzmann method with square spectral elements, and highly optimised for speed and precision of calculations is presented. An extensive analysis of the numerous variants of the fluid solver unveils that best performance is obtained by maximising CUDA kernel fusion and by arranging the resulting kernel tasks so as to trigger memory coherent and scattered loads in a specific manner, albeit at the cost of introducing cross-thread load unbalancing. Surprisingly, any attempt to vanish this, to maximise thread occupancy and to adopt conventional work tiling or distinct custom kernels highly tuned via ad hoc data and computation layouts invariably deteriorate performance. As such, this work sheds light into the possibility to hide fetch latencies of workloads involving heterogeneous loads in a way that is more effective than what is achieved with frequently suggested techniques. When simulating the lid-driven cavity on a NVIDIA GeForce GTX 480 via a 5-stage 4th-order Runge-Kutta (RK) scheme, the first four digits of the obtained centreline velocity values, or more, converge to those of the state-of-the-art literature data at a simulation speed of 7.0G primitive variable updates per second during the collision stage and 4.4G ones during each RK step of the advection by employing double-precision arithmetic (DPA) and a computational grid of 642 4×4-point elements only. The new programming engine leads to about 2× performance w.r.t. the best programming guidelines in the field. The new fluid solver on the above GPU is also 20-30 times faster than a highly optimised version running on a single core of a Intel Xeon X5650 2.66 GHz.

  7. Analysis of polytype stability in PVT grown silicon carbide single crystal using competitive lattice model Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hui-Jun; Huang, Wei; Liu, Xi; Gao, Pan; Zhuo, Shi-Yi; Xin, Jun; Yan, Cheng-Feng; Zheng, Yan-Qing; Yang, Jian-Hua; Shi, Er-Wei

    2014-09-01

    Polytype stability is very important for high quality SiC single crystal growth. However, the growth conditions for the 4H, 6H and 15R polytypes are similar, and the mechanism of polytype stability is not clear. The kinetics aspects, such as surface-step nucleation, are important. The kinetic Monte Carlo method is a common tool to study surface kinetics in crystal growth. However, the present lattice models for kinetic Monte Carlo simulations cannot solve the problem of the competitive growth of two or more lattice structures. In this study, a competitive lattice model was developed for kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of the competition growth of the 4H and 6H polytypes of SiC. The site positions are fixed at the perfect crystal lattice positions without any adjustment of the site positions. Surface steps on seeds and large ratios of diffusion/deposition have positive effects on the 4H polytype stability. The 3D polytype distribution in a physical vapor transport method grown SiC ingot showed that the facet preserved the 4H polytype even if the 6H polytype dominated the growth surface. The theoretical and experimental results of polytype growth in SiC suggest that retaining the step growth mode is an important factor to maintain a stable single 4H polytype during SiC growth.

  8. Minimizing nonadiabaticities in optical-lattice loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolfi, Michele; Kantian, Adrian; Bauer, Bela; Troyer, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    In the quest to reach lower temperatures of ultracold gases in optical-lattice experiments, nonadiabaticities during lattice loading represent one of the limiting factors that prevent the same low temperatures being reached as in experiments without lattices. Simulating the loading of a bosonic quantum gas into a one-dimensional optical lattice with and without a trap, we find that the redistribution of atomic density inside a global confining potential is by far the dominant source of heating. Based on these results we propose adjusting the trapping potential during loading to minimize changes to the density distribution. Our simulations confirm that a very simple linear interpolation of the trapping potential during loading already significantly decreases the heating of a quantum gas, and we discuss how loading protocols minimizing density redistributions can be designed.

  9. Classical nucleation theory with a radius-dependent surface tension: a two-dimensional lattice-gas automata model.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Joseph; L'Heureux, Ivan

    2013-02-01

    The constant surface tension assumption of the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT) is known to be flawed. In order to probe beyond this limitation, we consider a microscopic, two-dimensional Lattice-Gas Automata (LGA) model of nucleation in a supersaturated system, with model input parameters E(ss) (solid particle-to-solid particle bonding energy), E(sw) (solid particle-to-water bonding energy), η (next-to-nearest-neighbor bonding coefficient in solid phase), and C(in) (initial solute concentration). The LGA method has the advantages of easy implementation, low memory requirements, and fast computation speed. Analytical results for the system's concentration and the crystal radius as functions of time are derived and the former is fit to the simulation data in order to determine the equilibrium concentration. The "Mean First-Passage Time" technique is used to obtain the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size from the simulation data. The nucleation rate and supersaturation data are evaluated using a modification to the CNT that incorporates a two-dimensional radius-dependent surface tension term. The Tolman parameter, δ, which controls the radius dependence of the surface tension, decreases (increases) as a function of the magnitude of E(ss) (E(sw)), at fixed values of η and E(sw) (E(ss)). On the other hand, δ increases as η increases while E(ss) and E(sw) are held constant. The constant surface tension term of the CNT, Σ(0), increases (decreases) with increasing magnitudes of E(ss) (E(sw)) at fixed values of E(sw) (E(ss)) and increases as η is increased. Σ(0) increases linearly as a function of the change in energy during an attachment or detachment reaction, |ΔE|, however, with a slope less than that predicted for a crystal that is uniformly packed at maximum density. These results indicate an increase in the radius-dependent surface tension, Σ, with respect to increasing magnitude of the difference between E(ss) and E(sw).

  10. Large-Eddy/Lattice Boltzmann Simulations of Micro-blowing Strategies for Subsonic and Supersonic Drag Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress made in the first 8 to 9 months of this research. The Lattice Boltzmann Equation (LBE) methodology for Large-eddy Simulations (LES) of microblowing has been validated using a jet-in-crossflow test configuration. In this study, the flow intake is also simulated to allow the interaction to occur naturally. The Lattice Boltzmann Equation Large-eddy Simulations (LBELES) approach is capable of capturing not only the flow features associated with the flow, such as hairpin vortices and recirculation behind the jet, but also is able to show better agreement with experiments when compared to previous RANS predictions. The LBELES is shown to be computationally very efficient and therefore, a viable method for simulating the injection process. Two strategies have been developed to simulate multi-hole injection process as in the experiment. In order to allow natural interaction between the injected fluid and the primary stream, the flow intakes for all the holes have to be simulated. The LBE method is computationally efficient but is still 3D in nature and therefore, there may be some computational penalty. In order to study a large number or holes, a new 1D subgrid model has been developed that will simulate a reduced form of the Navier-Stokes equation in these holes.

  11. Lattice constants and expansivities of gas hydrates from 10 K up to the stability limit.

    PubMed

    Hansen, T C; Falenty, A; Kuhs, W F

    2016-02-01

    The lattice constants of hydrogenated and deuterated CH4-, CO2-, Xe- (clathrate structure type I) and N2-hydrates (clathrate structure type II) from 10 K up to the stability limit were established in neutron- and synchrotron diffraction experiments and were used to derive the related thermal expansivities. The following results emerge from this analysis: (1) The differences of expansivities of structure type I and II hydrates are fairly small. (2) Despite the larger guest-size of CO2 as compared to methane, CO2-hydrate has the smaller lattice constants at low temperatures, which is ascribed to the larger attractive guest-host interaction of the CO2-water system. (3) The expansivity of CO2-hydrate is larger than for CH4-hydrate which leads to larger lattice constants for the former at temperatures above ∼150 K; this is likely due to the higher motional degrees of freedom of the CO2 guest molecules. (4) The cage occupancies of Xe- and CO2-hydrates affect significantly the lattice constants. (5) Similar to ice Ih, the deuterated compounds have generally slightly larger lattice constants which can be ascribed to the somewhat weaker H-bonding. (6) Compared to ice Ih, the high temperature expansivities are about 50% larger; in contrast to ice Ih and the empty hydrate, there is no negative thermal expansion at low temperature. (7) A comparison of the experimental results with lattice dynamical work, with models based on an Einstein oscillator model, and results from inelastic neutron scattering suggest that the contribution of the guest atoms' vibrational energy to thermal expansion is important, most prominently for CO2- and Xe-hydrates. PMID:26851915

  12. Lattice constants and expansivities of gas hydrates from 10 K up to the stability limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, T. C.; Falenty, A.; Kuhs, W. F.

    2016-02-01

    The lattice constants of hydrogenated and deuterated CH4-, CO2-, Xe- (clathrate structure type I) and N2-hydrates (clathrate structure type II) from 10 K up to the stability limit were established in neutron- and synchrotron diffraction experiments and were used to derive the related thermal expansivities. The following results emerge from this analysis: (1) The differences of expansivities of structure type I and II hydrates are fairly small. (2) Despite the larger guest-size of CO2 as compared to methane, CO2-hydrate has the smaller lattice constants at low temperatures, which is ascribed to the larger attractive guest-host interaction of the CO2-water system. (3) The expansivity of CO2-hydrate is larger than for CH4-hydrate which leads to larger lattice constants for the former at temperatures above ˜150 K; this is likely due to the higher motional degrees of freedom of the CO2 guest molecules. (4) The cage occupancies of Xe- and CO2-hydrates affect significantly the lattice constants. (5) Similar to ice Ih, the deuterated compounds have generally slightly larger lattice constants which can be ascribed to the somewhat weaker H-bonding. (6) Compared to ice Ih, the high temperature expansivities are about 50% larger; in contrast to ice Ih and the empty hydrate, there is no negative thermal expansion at low temperature. (7) A comparison of the experimental results with lattice dynamical work, with models based on an Einstein oscillator model, and results from inelastic neutron scattering suggest that the contribution of the guest atoms' vibrational energy to thermal expansion is important, most prominently for CO2- and Xe-hydrates.

  13. Large-scale oil spill simulation using the lattice Boltzmann method, validation on the Lebanon oil spill case.

    PubMed

    Maslo, Aljaž; Panjan, Jože; Žagar, Dušan

    2014-07-15

    This paper tests the adequacy of using the lattice Boltzmann method in large-scale oil spill modelling, such as the Lebanon oil spill. Several numerical experiments were performed in order to select the most appropriate lattice and to decide between the single- and two-relaxation time models. Large-scale oil spills require simulations with short computational times. In order to speed up the computation and preserve adequate accuracy of the model, five different flux limiting interpolation techniques were compared and evaluated. The model was validated on the Lebanon oil spill with regard to the oil-slick position and concentrations in the sea, and the beaching area on the coast. Good agreement with satellite images of the slick and field data on beaching was achieved. The main advantages of the applied method are the capability of simulating very low oil concentrations and computational times that are by an order of magnitude shorter compared to similar models.

  14. Dynamic mean field theory for lattice gas models of fluids confined in porous materials: Higher order theory based on the Bethe-Peierls and path probability method approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Edison, John R.; Monson, Peter A.

    2014-07-14

    Recently we have developed a dynamic mean field theory (DMFT) for lattice gas models of fluids in porous materials [P. A. Monson, J. Chem. Phys. 128(8), 084701 (2008)]. The theory can be used to describe the relaxation processes in the approach to equilibrium or metastable states for fluids in pores and is especially useful for studying system exhibiting adsorption/desorption hysteresis. In this paper we discuss the extension of the theory to higher order by means of the path probability method (PPM) of Kikuchi and co-workers. We show that this leads to a treatment of the dynamics that is consistent with thermodynamics coming from the Bethe-Peierls or Quasi-Chemical approximation for the equilibrium or metastable equilibrium states of the lattice model. We compare the results from the PPM with those from DMFT and from dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the predictions from PPM are qualitatively similar to those from DMFT but give somewhat improved quantitative accuracy, in part due to the superior treatment of the underlying thermodynamics. This comes at the cost of greater computational expense associated with the larger number of equations that must be solved.

  15. Simulation of diffusion of hydrogen atoms in the lattice of tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyarenko, N. N.; Pisarev, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    Results of DFT calculations of the activation energy for diffusion and vibrational spectra of interstitial hydrogen atoms in the lattice of tungsten are presented. The temperature dependences of the diffusion coefficient are calculated and compared with experimental data.

  16. Simulation of Mass Transfer of Calcium in Concrete by the Lattice Kinetic Scheme for a Binary Miscible Fluid Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Masato; Murayama, Toshiro; Matsuzaki, Akihiro; Hitomi, Takashi

    The lattice kinetic scheme (LKS) for a binary miscible fluid mixture was applied to the simulation of the mass transfer of calcium in concrete. Cement paste, a major component of concrete, is a porous medium with a complicated three-dimensional geometry. The structure of the model concrete was selected on the basis of experimental data obtained by high-intensity X-ray computed tomography. The LKS, an improved version of the original lattice Boltzmann method, was used to save computational memory and to maintain numerical stability. First, an unsteady convection-diffusion problem was examined, and the accuracy of the method and the error norms with various lattice resolutions were investigated. Next, the problem of the calcium current in concrete was simulated. Pressure drops in the concrete were calculated for various Reynolds numbers, and the results were compared with those of an empirical equation based on experimental data. Also, velocity fields and concentration profiles were obtained at a pore scale for a structure with inhomogeneous mass diffusivities. These simulations showed that the present method might be useful for predicting calcium leaching in concrete from the microscopic point of view.

  17. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of water isotope fractionation during ice crystal growth in clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guoping; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a lattice Boltzmann (LB) method for simulating water isotope fractionation during diffusion-limited ice crystal growth by vapor deposition from water-oversaturated air. These conditions apply to the growth of snow crystals in clouds where the vapor composition is controlled by the presence of both ice crystals and water droplets. Modeling of water condensation with the LB method has the advantage of allowing concentration fields to evolve based on local conditions so that the controls on grain shapes of the condensed phase can be studied simultaneously with the controls on isotopic composition and growth rate. Water isotope fractionation during snow crystal growth involves kinetic effects due to diffusion of water vapor in air, which requires careful consideration of the boundary conditions at the ice-vapor interface. The boundary condition is relatively simple for water isotopes because the molecular exchange rate for water at the interface is large compared to the crystal growth rate. Our results for the bulk crystal isotopic composition are consistent with simpler models using analytical solutions for radial geometry. However, the model results are sufficiently different for oxygen isotopes that they could affect the interpretation of D-excess values of snow and ice. The extent of vapor oversaturation plays a major role in determining the water isotope fractionation as well as the degree of dendritic growth. Departures from isotopic equilibrium increase at colder temperatures as diffusivity decreases. Dendritic crystals are isotopically heterogeneous. Isotopic variations within individual snow crystals could yield information on the microphysics of ice condensation as well as on the accommodation or sticking coefficient of water associated with vapor deposition. Our results are ultimately a first step in implementing LB models for kinetically controlled condensation or precipitation reactions, but needs to be extended also to cases where the

  18. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of three-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, H.; Li, Q. X.; Shi, B. C.; Chai, Z. H.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the three-dimensional (3D) Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) with low Atwood number (At=0.15 ) in a long square duct (12 W ×W ×W ) is studied by using a multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann (LB) multiphase model. The effect of the Reynolds number on the interfacial dynamics and bubble and spike amplitudes at late time is investigated in detail. The numerical results show that at sufficiently large Reynolds numbers, a sequence of stages in the 3D immiscible RTI can be observed, which includes the linear growth, terminal velocity growth, reacceleration, and chaotic development stages. At late stage, the RTI induces a very complicated topology structure of the interface, and an abundance of dissociative drops are also observed in the system. The bubble and spike velocities at late stage are unstable and their values have exceeded the predictions of the potential flow theory [V. N. Goncharov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 134502 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.88.134502]. The acceleration of the bubble front is also measured and it is found that the normalized acceleration at late time fluctuates around a constant value of 0.16. When the Reynolds number is reduced to small values, some later stages cannot be reached sequentially. The interface becomes relatively smoothed and the bubble velocity at late time is approximate to a constant value, which coincides with the results of the extended Layzer model [S.-I. Sohn, Phys. Rev. E 80, 055302(R) (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevE.80.055302] and the modified potential theory [R. Banerjee, L. Mandal, S. Roy, M. Khan, and M. R. Guptae, Phys. Plasmas 18, 022109 (2011), 10.1063/1.3555523]. In our simulations, the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) parallel computing is also used to relieve the massive computational cost.

  19. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of three-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

    PubMed

    Liang, H; Li, Q X; Shi, B C; Chai, Z H

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the three-dimensional (3D) Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) with low Atwood number (A(t)=0.15) in a long square duct (12W × W × W) is studied by using a multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann (LB) multiphase model. The effect of the Reynolds number on the interfacial dynamics and bubble and spike amplitudes at late time is investigated in detail. The numerical results show that at sufficiently large Reynolds numbers, a sequence of stages in the 3D immiscible RTI can be observed, which includes the linear growth, terminal velocity growth, reacceleration, and chaotic development stages. At late stage, the RTI induces a very complicated topology structure of the interface, and an abundance of dissociative drops are also observed in the system. The bubble and spike velocities at late stage are unstable and their values have exceeded the predictions of the potential flow theory [V. N. Goncharov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 134502 (2002)]. The acceleration of the bubble front is also measured and it is found that the normalized acceleration at late time fluctuates around a constant value of 0.16. When the Reynolds number is reduced to small values, some later stages cannot be reached sequentially. The interface becomes relatively smoothed and the bubble velocity at late time is approximate to a constant value, which coincides with the results of the extended Layzer model [S.-I. Sohn, Phys. Rev. E 80, 055302(R) (2009)] and the modified potential theory [R. Banerjee, L. Mandal, S. Roy, M. Khan, and M. R. Guptae, Phys. Plasmas 18, 022109 (2011)]. In our simulations, the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) parallel computing is also used to relieve the massive computational cost. PMID:27078453

  20. Incompressible states of a two-component Fermi gas in a double-well optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Crepin, Francois; Simon, Pascal; Citro, Roberta

    2010-07-15

    We propose a scheme to investigate the effect of frustration on the magnetic phase transitions of cold atoms confined in an optical lattice. We also demonstrate how to get two-leg spin ladders with frustrated spin-exchange coupling that display a phase transition from a spin liquid to a fully incompressible state. Further, various experimental quantities are analyzed for describing this phase.

  1. Phase dependent loading of Bloch bands and quantum simulation of relativistic wave equation predictions with ultracold atoms in variably shaped optical lattice potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossert, Christopher; Leder, Martin; Weitz, Martin

    2016-10-01

    The dispersion relation of ultracold atoms in variably shaped optical lattices can be tuned to resemble that of a relativistic particle, i.e. be linear instead of the usual nonrelativistic quadratic dispersion relation of a free atom. Cold atoms in such a lattice can be used to carry out quantum simulations of relativistic wave equation predictions. We begin this article by describing a Raman technique that allows to selectively load atoms into a desired Bloch band of the lattice near a band crossing. Subsequently, we review two recent experiments with quasirelativistic rubidium atoms in a bichromatic lattice, demonstrating the analogues of Klein tunnelling and Veselago lensing with ultracold atoms, respectively.

  2. Local membrane length conservation in two-dimensional vesicle simulation using a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, I.; Lishchuk, S. V.; Spencer, T. J.; Pontrelli, G.; Evans, P. C.

    2016-08-01

    We present a method for applying a class of velocity-dependent forces within a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann equation simulation that is designed to recover continuum regime incompressible hydrodynamics. This method is applied to the problem, in two dimensions, of constraining to uniformity the tangential velocity of a vesicle membrane implemented within a recent multicomponent lattice Boltzmann simulation method, which avoids the use of Lagrangian boundary tracers. The constraint of uniform tangential velocity is carried by an additional contribution to an immersed boundary force, which we derive here from physical arguments. The result of this enhanced immersed boundary force is to apply a physically appropriate boundary condition at the interface between separated lattice fluids, defined as that region over which the phase-field varies most rapidly. Data from this enhanced vesicle boundary method are in agreement with other data obtained using related methods [e.g., T. Krüger, S. Frijters, F. Günther, B. Kaoui, and J. Harting, Eur. Phys. J. 222, 177 (2013), 10.1140/epjst/e2013-01834-y] and underscore the importance of a correct vesicle membrane condition.

  3. Local membrane length conservation in two-dimensional vesicle simulation using a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann equation method.

    PubMed

    Halliday, I; Lishchuk, S V; Spencer, T J; Pontrelli, G; Evans, P C

    2016-08-01

    We present a method for applying a class of velocity-dependent forces within a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann equation simulation that is designed to recover continuum regime incompressible hydrodynamics. This method is applied to the problem, in two dimensions, of constraining to uniformity the tangential velocity of a vesicle membrane implemented within a recent multicomponent lattice Boltzmann simulation method, which avoids the use of Lagrangian boundary tracers. The constraint of uniform tangential velocity is carried by an additional contribution to an immersed boundary force, which we derive here from physical arguments. The result of this enhanced immersed boundary force is to apply a physically appropriate boundary condition at the interface between separated lattice fluids, defined as that region over which the phase-field varies most rapidly. Data from this enhanced vesicle boundary method are in agreement with other data obtained using related methods [e.g., T. Krüger, S. Frijters, F. Günther, B. Kaoui, and J. Harting, Eur. Phys. J. 222, 177 (2013)10.1140/epjst/e2013-01834-y] and underscore the importance of a correct vesicle membrane condition. PMID:27627411

  4. Simulation of diatomic gas-wall interaction and accommodation coefficients for negative ion sources and accelerators.

    PubMed

    Sartori, E; Brescaccin, L; Serianni, G

    2016-02-01

    Particle-wall interactions determine in different ways the operating conditions of plasma sources, ion accelerators, and beams operating in vacuum. For instance, a contribution to gas heating is given by ion neutralization at walls; beam losses and stray particle production-detrimental for high current negative ion systems such as beam sources for fusion-are caused by collisional processes with residual gas, with the gas density profile that is determined by the scattering of neutral particles at the walls. This paper shows that Molecular Dynamics (MD) studies at the nano-scale can provide accommodation parameters for gas-wall interactions, such as the momentum accommodation coefficient and energy accommodation coefficient: in non-isothermal flows (such as the neutral gas in the accelerator, coming from the plasma source), these affect the gas density gradients and influence efficiency and losses in particular of negative ion accelerators. For ideal surfaces, the computation also provides the angular distribution of scattered particles. Classical MD method has been applied to the case of diatomic hydrogen molecules. Single collision events, against a frozen wall or a fully thermal lattice, have been simulated by using probe molecules. Different modelling approximations are compared.

  5. Simulation of diatomic gas-wall interaction and accommodation coefficients for negative ion sources and accelerators.

    PubMed

    Sartori, E; Brescaccin, L; Serianni, G

    2016-02-01

    Particle-wall interactions determine in different ways the operating conditions of plasma sources, ion accelerators, and beams operating in vacuum. For instance, a contribution to gas heating is given by ion neutralization at walls; beam losses and stray particle production-detrimental for high current negative ion systems such as beam sources for fusion-are caused by collisional processes with residual gas, with the gas density profile that is determined by the scattering of neutral particles at the walls. This paper shows that Molecular Dynamics (MD) studies at the nano-scale can provide accommodation parameters for gas-wall interactions, such as the momentum accommodation coefficient and energy accommodation coefficient: in non-isothermal flows (such as the neutral gas in the accelerator, coming from the plasma source), these affect the gas density gradients and influence efficiency and losses in particular of negative ion accelerators. For ideal surfaces, the computation also provides the angular distribution of scattered particles. Classical MD method has been applied to the case of diatomic hydrogen molecules. Single collision events, against a frozen wall or a fully thermal lattice, have been simulated by using probe molecules. Different modelling approximations are compared. PMID:26931910

  6. Application of particle and lattice codes to simulation of hydraulic fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damjanac, Branko; Detournay, Christine; Cundall, Peter A.

    2016-04-01

    With the development of unconventional oil and gas reservoirs over the last 15 years, the understanding and capability to model the propagation of hydraulic fractures in inhomogeneous and naturally fractured reservoirs has become very important for the petroleum industry (but also for some other industries like mining and geothermal). Particle-based models provide advantages over other models and solutions for the simulation of fracturing of rock masses that cannot be assumed to be continuous and homogeneous. It has been demonstrated (Potyondy and Cundall Int J Rock Mech Min Sci Geomech Abstr 41:1329-1364, 2004) that particle models based on a simple force criterion for fracture propagation match theoretical solutions and scale effects derived using the principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). The challenge is how to apply these models effectively (i.e., with acceptable models sizes and computer run times) to the coupled hydro-mechanical problems of relevant time and length scales for practical field applications (i.e., reservoir scale and hours of injection time). A formulation of a fully coupled hydro-mechanical particle-based model and its application to the simulation of hydraulic treatment of unconventional reservoirs are presented. Model validation by comparing with available analytical asymptotic solutions (penny-shape crack) and some examples of field application (e.g., interaction with DFN) are also included.

  7. Recovery of the Navier-Stokes equations using a lattice-gas Boltzmann method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Hudong; Chen, Shiyi; Matthaeus, William H.

    1992-01-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model is presented which gives the complete Navier-Stokes equation and may provide an efficient parallel numerical method for solving various fluid problems. The model uses the single-time relaxation approximation and a particular Maxwell-type distribution. The model eliminates exactly (1) the non-Galilean invariance caused by a density-dependent coefficient in the convection term and (2) a velocity-dependent equation of state.

  8. Atomic quantum simulation of the lattice gauge-Higgs model: Higgs couplings and emergence of exact local gauge symmetry.

    PubMed

    Kasamatsu, Kenichi; Ichinose, Ikuo; Matsui, Tetsuo

    2013-09-13

    Recently, the possibility of quantum simulation of dynamical gauge fields was pointed out by using a system of cold atoms trapped on each link in an optical lattice. However, to implement exact local gauge invariance, fine-tuning the interaction parameters among atoms is necessary. In the present Letter, we study the effect of violation of the U(1) local gauge invariance by relaxing the fine-tuning of the parameters and showing that a wide variety of cold atoms is still a faithful quantum simulator for a U(1) gauge-Higgs model containing a Higgs field sitting on sites. The clarification of the dynamics of this gauge-Higgs model sheds some light upon various unsolved problems, including the inflation process of the early Universe. We study the phase structure of this model by Monte Carlo simulation and also discuss the atomic characteristics of the Higgs phase in each simulator.

  9. On moving contact lines simulated by the single-component two-phase lattice-Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Huang, J-J; Wu, J

    2016-04-01

    We studied moving contact lines (MCLs) simulated by the single-component two-phase lattice-Boltzmann method (TP-LBM) based on the free-energy theory. In TP-LBM simulations CL moves by evaporation and condensation, and they do not involve an explicit slip length. How the CL motion compares with those by other methods using a slip model is not well understood yet. By comparing the results for a benchmark problem with established analytical solutions, we found an effective slip length proportional to the interface thickness in TP-LBM simulations. Besides, it was found that a recently proposed simple method originally in the framework of LBM for binary fluids can also be applied to TP-LBM to regulate the CL motion, and this method can greatly enhance its capability to simulate realistic two-phase flows with very small slip lengths. PMID:27118536

  10. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of travelling pulses and spiral waves in the lattice Lotka-Volterra model.

    PubMed

    Makeev, Alexei G; Kurkina, Elena S; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G

    2012-06-01

    Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations are used to study the stochastic two-species Lotka-Volterra model on a square lattice. For certain values of the model parameters, the system constitutes an excitable medium: travelling pulses and rotating spiral waves can be excited. Stable solitary pulses travel with constant (modulo stochastic fluctuations) shape and speed along a periodic lattice. The spiral waves observed persist sometimes for hundreds of rotations, but they are ultimately unstable and break-up (because of fluctuations and interactions between neighboring fronts) giving rise to complex dynamic behavior in which numerous small spiral waves rotate and interact with each other. It is interesting that travelling pulses and spiral waves can be exhibited by the model even for completely immobile species, due to the non-local reaction kinetics.

  11. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of travelling pulses and spiral waves in the lattice Lotka-Volterra model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makeev, Alexei G.; Kurkina, Elena S.; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.

    2012-06-01

    Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations are used to study the stochastic two-species Lotka-Volterra model on a square lattice. For certain values of the model parameters, the system constitutes an excitable medium: travelling pulses and rotating spiral waves can be excited. Stable solitary pulses travel with constant (modulo stochastic fluctuations) shape and speed along a periodic lattice. The spiral waves observed persist sometimes for hundreds of rotations, but they are ultimately unstable and break-up (because of fluctuations and interactions between neighboring fronts) giving rise to complex dynamic behavior in which numerous small spiral waves rotate and interact with each other. It is interesting that travelling pulses and spiral waves can be exhibited by the model even for completely immobile species, due to the non-local reaction kinetics.

  12. Phase transitions in cooperative coinfections: Simulation results for networks and lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassberger, Peter; Chen, Li; Ghanbarnejad, Fakhteh; Cai, Weiran

    2016-04-01

    We study the spreading of two mutually cooperative diseases on different network topologies, and with two microscopic realizations, both of which are stochastic versions of a susceptible-infected-removed type model studied by us recently in mean field approximation. There it had been found that cooperativity can lead to first order transitions from spreading to extinction. However, due to the rapid mixing implied by the mean field assumption, first order transitions required nonzero initial densities of sick individuals. For the stochastic model studied here the results depend strongly on the underlying network. First order transitions are found when there are few short but many long loops: (i) No first order transitions exist on trees and on 2-d lattices with local contacts. (ii) They do exist on Erdős-Rényi (ER) networks, on d -dimensional lattices with d ≥4 , and on 2-d lattices with sufficiently long-ranged contacts. (iii) On 3-d lattices with local contacts the results depend on the microscopic details of the implementation. (iv) While single infected seeds can always lead to infinite epidemics on regular lattices, on ER networks one sometimes needs finite initial densities of infected nodes. (v) In all cases the first order transitions are actually "hybrid"; i.e., they display also power law scaling usually associated with second order transitions. On regular lattices, our model can also be interpreted as the growth of an interface due to cooperative attachment of two species of particles. Critically pinned interfaces in this model seem to be in different universality classes than standard critically pinned interfaces in models with forbidden overhangs. Finally, the detailed results mentioned above hold only when both diseases propagate along the same network of links. If they use different links, results can be rather different in detail, but are similar overall.

  13. A highly optimized vectorized code for Monte Carlo simulations of SU(3) lattice gauge theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkai, D.; Moriarty, K. J. M.; Rebbi, C.

    1984-01-01

    New methods are introduced for improving the performance of the vectorized Monte Carlo SU(3) lattice gauge theory algorithm using the CDC CYBER 205. Structure, algorithm and programming considerations are discussed. The performance achieved for a 16(4) lattice on a 2-pipe system may be phrased in terms of the link update time or overall MFLOPS rates. For 32-bit arithmetic, it is 36.3 microsecond/link for 8 hits per iteration (40.9 microsecond for 10 hits) or 101.5 MFLOPS.

  14. Microbranching in mode-I fracture using large-scale simulations of amorphous and perturbed-lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heizler, Shay I.; Kessler, David A.

    2015-07-01

    We study the high-velocity regime mode-I fracture instability wherein small microbranches start to appear near the main crack, using large-scale simulations. Some of the features of those microbranches have been reproduced qualitatively in smaller-scale studies [using O (104) atoms] on both a model of an amorphous material (via the continuous random network model) and using perturbed-lattice models. In this study, larger-scale simulations [ O (106) atoms] were performed using multithreading computing on a GPU device, in order to achieve more physically realistic results. First, we find that the microbranching pattern appears to be converging with the lattice width. Second, the simulations reproduce the growth of the size of a microbranch as a function of the crack velocity, as well as the increase of the amplitude of the derivative of the electrical-resistance root-mean square with respect to the time as a function of the crack velocity. In addition, the simulations yield the correct branching angle of the microbranches, and the power law exponent governing the shape of the microbranches seems to be lower than unity, so that the side cracks turn over in the direction of propagation of the main crack as seen in experiment.

  15. Prediction of hydraulic and electrical transport properties of sandstone with multiscale lattice Boltzmann/finite element simulation on microtomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, T.; Sun, W.

    2012-12-01

    Microcomputed tomography can be used to characterize the geometry of the pore space of a sedimentary rock, with resolution that is sufficiently refined for the realistic simulation of physical properties based on the 3D image. Significant advances have been made on the characterization of pore size distribution and connectivity, development of techniques such as lattice Boltzmann method to simulate permeability, and its upscaling. Sun, Andrade and Rudnicki (2011) recently introduced a multiscale method that dynamically links these three aspects, which were often treated separately in previous computational schemes. In this study, we improve the efficiency of this multiscale method by introducing a flood-fill algorithm to determine connectivity of the pores, followed by a multiscale lattice Boltzmann/finite element calculation to obtain homogenized effective anisotropic permeability. The improved multiscale method also includes new capacity to consistently determine electrical conductivity and formation factor from CT images. Furthermore, we also introduce a level set based method that transforms pore geometry to finite element mesh and thus enables direct simulation of pore-scale flow with finite element method. When applied to the microCT data acquired by Lindquist et al. (2000) for four Fontainebleau sandstone samples with porosities ranging from 7.5% to 22%, this multiscale method has proved to be computationally efficient and our simulations has provided new insights into the relation among permeability, pore geometry and connectivity.

  16. Hemodynamics and flow-vessel interaction in patient-specific aorta using unified lattice Boltzmann computation and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huidan (Whitney); Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Ye; Teague, Shawn D.

    2013-11-01

    Patient-specific blood flow simulation is mainly relying on the utilization of commercial software. Geometrical simplification and approximation are usually made thus weaken the capability to aid clinical diagnose and assessment. We develop a unified computing platform to simulate patient-specific hemodynamics and flow-vessel interaction using lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), which tightly integrates anatomical-structure extraction from imaging data and numerical simulation in one computation mesh structure, where the LBM solves level set equation for image segmentation and Navier-Stokes equation for fluid dynamics respectively. The patient-specific vessel geometry, volumetric ratio of solid versus fluid, and the orientation of the boundary obtained with high accuracy seamlessly feed to the numerical simulation needs. In order to better treat the complex geometry, we specifically develop volumetric lattice Boltzmann scheme which strictly satisfies mass conservation when boundary moves. Validation study is on hemodynamics and flow-vessel interaction in healthy and diseased aortas. Flow rate and structure, pressure and vorticity distribution, as well as wall normal and shear stresses, are revealed in both cases.

  17. Reassessing the single relaxation time Lattice Boltzmann method for the simulation of Darcy’s flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestininzi, Pietro; Montessori, Andrea; La Rocca, Michele; Succi, Sauro

    2016-09-01

    It is shown that the single relaxation time (SRT) version of the Lattice Boltzmann (LB) equation permits to compute the permeability of Darcy’s flows in porous media within a few percent accuracy. This stands in contrast with previous claims of inaccuracy, which we relate to the lack of recognition of the physical dependence of the permeability on the Knudsen number.

  18. Boundary condition for lattice Boltzmann modeling of microscale gas flows with curved walls in the slip regime.

    PubMed

    Tao, Shi; Guo, Zhaoli

    2015-04-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has been widely used to simulate microgaseous flows in recent years. However, it is still a challenging task for LBM to model that kind of microscale flow involving complex geometries, owing to the use of uniform Cartesian lattices in space. In this work, a boundary condition for microflows in the slip regime is developed for LBM in which the shape of a solid wall is well considered. The proposed treatment is a combination of the Maxwellian diffuse reflection scheme and the simple bounce-back method. A portion of each part is determined by the relative position between the boundary node and curved walls, which is the key point that distinguishes this method from some previous schemes where the smooth curved surface was assumed to be zigzag lines. The present curved boundary condition is implemented with the multiple-relaxation-times model and verified for several established cases, including the plane microchannel flow (aligned and inclined), microcylindrical Couette flow, and the flow over an inclined microscale airfoil. The numerical results agree well with those predicted by the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. PMID:25974610

  19. Boundary condition for lattice Boltzmann modeling of microscale gas flows with curved walls in the slip regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Shi; Guo, Zhaoli

    2015-04-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has been widely used to simulate microgaseous flows in recent years. However, it is still a challenging task for LBM to model that kind of microscale flow involving complex geometries, owing to the use of uniform Cartesian lattices in space. In this work, a boundary condition for microflows in the slip regime is developed for LBM in which the shape of a solid wall is well considered. The proposed treatment is a combination of the Maxwellian diffuse reflection scheme and the simple bounce-back method. A portion of each part is determined by the relative position between the boundary node and curved walls, which is the key point that distinguishes this method from some previous schemes where the smooth curved surface was assumed to be zigzag lines. The present curved boundary condition is implemented with the multiple-relaxation-times model and verified for several established cases, including the plane microchannel flow (aligned and inclined), microcylindrical Couette flow, and the flow over an inclined microscale airfoil. The numerical results agree well with those predicted by the direct simulation Monte Carlo method.

  20. Boundary condition for lattice Boltzmann modeling of microscale gas flows with curved walls in the slip regime.

    PubMed

    Tao, Shi; Guo, Zhaoli

    2015-04-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has been widely used to simulate microgaseous flows in recent years. However, it is still a challenging task for LBM to model that kind of microscale flow involving complex geometries, owing to the use of uniform Cartesian lattices in space. In this work, a boundary condition for microflows in the slip regime is developed for LBM in which the shape of a solid wall is well considered. The proposed treatment is a combination of the Maxwellian diffuse reflection scheme and the simple bounce-back method. A portion of each part is determined by the relative position between the boundary node and curved walls, which is the key point that distinguishes this method from some previous schemes where the smooth curved surface was assumed to be zigzag lines. The present curved boundary condition is implemented with the multiple-relaxation-times model and verified for several established cases, including the plane microchannel flow (aligned and inclined), microcylindrical Couette flow, and the flow over an inclined microscale airfoil. The numerical results agree well with those predicted by the direct simulation Monte Carlo method.

  1. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Kinetic Isotope Effect During Snow Crystal Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, G.; Depaolo, D. J.; Kang, Q.; Zhang, D.

    2007-12-01

    The isotopic composition of precipitation, especially that of snow, plays a special role in the global hydrological cycle and in reconstruction of past climates using polar ice cores. The fractionation of the major water isotope species (HHO, HDO, HHO-18) during ice crystal formation is critical to understanding the global distribution of isotopes in precipitation. Ice crystal growth in clouds is traditionally treated with a spherically-symmetric steady state diffusion model, with semi-empirical modifications added to account for ventilation and for complex crystal morphology. Although it is known that crystal growth rate, which depends largely on the degree of vapor over- saturation, determines crystal morphology, there are no quantitative models that relate morphology to the vapor saturation factor. Since kinetic (vapor phase diffusion-controlled) isotopic fractionation also depends on growth rate, there should be direct relationships between vapor saturation, crystal morphology, and crystal isotopic composition. We use a 2D lattice Boltzmann model to simulate diffusion-controlled ice crystal growth from vapor- oversaturated air. In the model, crystals grow solely according to the diffusive fluxes just above the crystal surfaces, and hence crystal morphology arises from the initial and boundary conditions in the model and does not need to be specified a priori. Crystal growth patterns can be varied between random growth and deterministic growth (along the maximum concentration gradient for example). The input parameters needed are the isotope- dependent vapor deposition rate constant (k) and the water vapor diffusivity in air (D). The values of both k and D can be computed from kinetic theory, and there are also experimentally determined values of D. The deduced values of k are uncertain to the extent that the condensation coefficient for ice is uncertain. The ratio D/k is a length (order 1 micron) that determines the minimum scale of dendritic growth features

  2. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Water Isotope Fractionation During Growth of Ice Crystals in Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, G.; Depaolo, D.; Kang, Q.; Zhang, D.

    2006-12-01

    The isotopic composition of precipitation, especially that of snow, plays a special role in the global hydrological cycle and in reconstruction of past climates using polar ice cores. The fractionation of the major water isotope species (HHO, HDO, HHO-18) during ice crystal formation is critical to understanding the global distribution of isotopes in precipitation. Ice crystal growth in clouds is traditionally treated with a spherically- symmetric steady state diffusion model, with semi-empirical modifications added to account for ventilation and for complex crystal morphology. Although it is known that crystal growth rate, which depends largely on the degree of vapor over-saturation, determines crystal morphology, there are no existing quantitative models that directly relate morphology to the vapor saturation factor. Since kinetic (vapor phase diffusion-controlled) isotopic fractionation also depends on growth rate, there should be a direct relationship between vapor saturation, crystal morphology, and crystal isotopic composition. We use a 2D Lattice-Boltzmann model to simulate diffusion-controlled ice crystal growth from vapor- oversaturated air. In the model, crystals grow solely according to the diffusive fluxes just above the crystal surfaces, and hence crystal morphology arises from the initial and boundary conditions in the model and does not need to be specified a priori. The input parameters needed are the isotope-dependent vapor deposition rate constant (k) and the water vapor diffusivity in air (D). The values of both k and D can be computed from kinetic theory, and there are also experimentally determined values of D. The deduced values of k are uncertain to the extent that the sticking coefficient (or accommodation coefficient) for ice is uncertain. The ratio D/k is a length that determines the minimum scale of dendritic growth features and allows us to scale the numerical calculations to atmospheric conditions using a dimensionless Damkohler number

  3. Transfer-matrix study of a hard-square lattice gas with two kinds of particles and density anomaly.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Tiago J; Stilck, Jürgen F

    2015-09-01

    Using transfer matrix and finite-size scaling methods, we study the thermodynamic behavior of a lattice gas with two kinds of particles on the square lattice. Only excluded volume interactions are considered, so that the model is athermal. Large particles exclude the site they occupy and its four first neighbors, while small particles exclude only their site. Two thermodynamic phases are found: a disordered phase where large particles occupy both sublattices with the same probability and an ordered phase where one of the two sublattices is preferentially occupied by them. The transition between these phases is continuous at small concentrations of the small particles and discontinuous at larger concentrations, both transitions are separated by a tricritical point. Estimates of the central charge suggest that the critical line is in the Ising universality class, while the tricritical point has tricritical Ising (Blume-Emery-Griffiths) exponents. The isobaric curves of the total density as functions of the fugacity of small or large particles display a minimum in the disordered phase.

  4. Periodic ordering of clusters and stripes in a two-dimensional lattice model. II. Results of Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Almarza, N G; Pȩkalski, J; Ciach, A

    2014-04-28

    The triangular lattice model with nearest-neighbor attraction and third-neighbor repulsion, introduced by Pȩkalski, Ciach, and Almarza [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 114701 (2014)] is studied by Monte Carlo simulation. Introduction of appropriate order parameters allowed us to construct a phase diagram, where different phases with patterns made of clusters, bubbles or stripes are thermodynamically stable. We observe, in particular, two distinct lamellar phases-the less ordered one with global orientational order and the more ordered one with both orientational and translational order. Our results concern spontaneous pattern formation on solid surfaces, fluid interfaces or membranes that is driven by competing interactions between adsorbing particles or molecules.

  5. WIPP panel simulations with gas generation

    SciTech Connect

    DeVries, K.L.; Callahan, G.D.

    1996-02-01

    An important issue in nuclear waste repository performance is the potential for fracture development resulting in pathways for release of radionuclides beyond the confines of the repository. A series of demonstration calculations using structural finite element analyses are presented here to examine the effect of internal gas generation on the response of a sealed repository. From the calculated stress fields, the most probable location for a fracture to develop was determined to be within the pillars interior to the repository for the range of parameter values considered. If a fracture interconnects the rooms and panels of the repository, fracture opening produces significant additional void volume to limit the excess gas pressure to less than 1.0 MPa above the overburden pressure. Consequently, the potential for additional fracture development into the barrier pillar is greatly reduced, which provides further confidence that the waste will be contained within the repository.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of the permeability and capillary adsorption of cement model microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Zalzale, M.; McDonald, P.J.

    2012-12-15

    The lattice Boltzmann method is used to investigate the permeability of microstructures of cement pastes generated using the numerical models CEMHYD3D (Bentz, 1997) and {mu}IC (Bishnoi and Scrivener, 2009). Results are reported as a function of paste water-to-cement ratio and degree of hydration. The permeability decreases with increasing hydration and decreasing water-to-cement ratio in agreement with experiment. However the permeability is larger than the experimental data recorded using beam bending methods (Vichit-Vadakan and Scherer, 2002). Notwithstanding, the lattice Boltzmann results compare favourably with alternate numerical methods of permeability calculation for cement model microstructures. In addition, we show early results for the liquid/vapour capillary adsorption and desorption isotherms in the same model {mu}IC structures. The broad features of the experimental capillary porosity isotherm are reproduced, although further work is required to adequately parameterise the model.

  7. Lattice QCD simulations on big cats, sea monsters and clock towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joó, Bálint; USQCD Collaboration; Hadron Spectrum Collaboration

    2009-07-01

    We present details of lattice QCD computations we are performing on the Cray XT series of computers, from BigBen - an XT3 hosted at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC) - through Jaguar (XT4) and Kraken (XT5) - which are hosted at the National Center for Computational Science (NCCS) and the National Institute of Computational Science (NICS), respectively, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). We discuss algorithmic tuning to make the computation more efficient and present some recent results.

  8. Gas-grain simulation experiment module conceptual design and gas-grain simulation facility breadboard development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamel, James M.; Petach, Michael; Gat, Nahum; Kropp, Jack; Luong, Christina; Wolff, Michael

    1993-01-01

    This report delineates the Option portion of the Phase A Gas-Grain Simulation Facility study. The conceptual design of a Gas-Grain Simulation Experiment Module (GGSEM) for Space Shuttle Middeck is discussed. In addition, a laboratory breadboard was developed during this study to develop a key function for the GGSEM and the GGSF, specifically, a solid particle cloud generating device. The breadboard design and test results are discussed and recommendations for further studies are included. The GGSEM is intended to fly on board a low earth orbit (LEO), manned platform. It will be used to perform a subset of the experiments planned for the GGSF for Space Station Freedom, as it can partially accommodate a number of the science experiments. The outcome of the experiments performed will provide an increased understanding of the operational requirements for the GGSF. The GGSEM will also act as a platform to accomplish technology development and proof-of-principle experiments for GGSF hardware, and to verify concepts and designs of hardware for GGSF. The GGSEM will allow assembled subsystems to be tested to verify facility level operation. The technology development that can be accommodated by the GGSEM includes: GGSF sample generation techniques, GGSF on-line diagnostics techniques, sample collection techniques, performance of various types of sensors for environmental monitoring, and some off-line diagnostics. Advantages and disadvantages of several LEO platforms available for GGSEM applications are identified and discussed. Several of the anticipated GGSF experiments require the deagglomeration and dispensing of dry solid particles into an experiment chamber. During the GGSF Phase A study, various techniques and devices available for the solid particle aerosol generator were reviewed. As a result of this review, solid particle deagglomeration and dispensing were identified as key undeveloped technologies in the GGSF design. A laboratory breadboard version of a solid

  9. The Role of Bottom Simulating Reflectors in Gas Hydrate Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, U.; Shedd, W. W.; Cook, A.; Frye, M.

    2015-12-01

    In this research we test the viability of using a bottom simulating reflector (BSR) to detect gas hydrate. Bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) occur at many gas hydrate sites near the thermodynamic base of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and are frequently used to identify possible presence of gas hydrate on a regional scale. To find if drilling a BSR actually increases the chances of finding gas hydrate, we combine an updated dataset of BSR distribution from the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management with a comprehensive dataset of natural gas hydrate distribution as appraised from well logs, covering an area of around 200,000 square kilometers in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The BSR dataset compiles industry 3-D seismic data, and includes mostly good-quality and high-confidence traditional and non-traditional BSRs. Resistivity well logs were used to identify the presence of gas hydrate from over 700 existing industry wells and we have found over 110 wells with likely gas hydrate occurrences. By integrating the two datasets, our results show that the chances of encountering gas hydrate when drilling through a BSR is ~ 42%, while that when drilling outside the BSR is ~15%. Our preliminary analysis indicates that a positive relationship exists between BSRs and gas hydrate accumulations, and the chances of encountering gas hydrate increases almost three-fold when drilling through a BSR. One interesting observation is that ~ 58% of the wells intersecting a BSR show no apparent evidence of gas hydrate. In this case, a BSR may occur at sites with no gas hydrate accumulations due to the presence of very low concentration of free gas that is not detected on resistivity logs. On the other hand, in a few wells, accumulations of gas hydrate were observed where no BSR is present. For example in a well in Atwater Valley Block 92, two intervals of gas hydrate accumulation in fractures have been identified on resistivity logs, of which, the deeper interval has 230 feet thick

  10. Simulation of Sound Waves Using the Lattice Boltzmann Method for Fluid Flow: Benchmark Cases for Outdoor Sound Propagation.

    PubMed

    Salomons, Erik M; Lohman, Walter J A; Zhou, Han

    2016-01-01

    Propagation of sound waves in air can be considered as a special case of fluid dynamics. Consequently, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for fluid flow can be used for simulating sound propagation. In this article application of the LBM to sound propagation is illustrated for various cases: free-field propagation, propagation over porous and non-porous ground, propagation over a noise barrier, and propagation in an atmosphere with wind. LBM results are compared with solutions of the equations of acoustics. It is found that the LBM works well for sound waves, but dissipation of sound waves with the LBM is generally much larger than real dissipation of sound waves in air. To circumvent this problem it is proposed here to use the LBM for assessing the excess sound level, i.e. the difference between the sound level and the free-field sound level. The effect of dissipation on the excess sound level is much smaller than the effect on the sound level, so the LBM can be used to estimate the excess sound level for a non-dissipative atmosphere, which is a useful quantity in atmospheric acoustics. To reduce dissipation in an LBM simulation two approaches are considered: i) reduction of the kinematic viscosity and ii) reduction of the lattice spacing.

  11. Simulation of Sound Waves Using the Lattice Boltzmann Method for Fluid Flow: Benchmark Cases for Outdoor Sound Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Salomons, Erik M.; Lohman, Walter J. A.; Zhou, Han

    2016-01-01

    Propagation of sound waves in air can be considered as a special case of fluid dynamics. Consequently, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for fluid flow can be used for simulating sound propagation. In this article application of the LBM to sound propagation is illustrated for various cases: free-field propagation, propagation over porous and non-porous ground, propagation over a noise barrier, and propagation in an atmosphere with wind. LBM results are compared with solutions of the equations of acoustics. It is found that the LBM works well for sound waves, but dissipation of sound waves with the LBM is generally much larger than real dissipation of sound waves in air. To circumvent this problem it is proposed here to use the LBM for assessing the excess sound level, i.e. the difference between the sound level and the free-field sound level. The effect of dissipation on the excess sound level is much smaller than the effect on the sound level, so the LBM can be used to estimate the excess sound level for a non-dissipative atmosphere, which is a useful quantity in atmospheric acoustics. To reduce dissipation in an LBM simulation two approaches are considered: i) reduction of the kinematic viscosity and ii) reduction of the lattice spacing. PMID:26789631

  12. Demonstration of landfill gas enhancement techniques in landfill simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. J.; Vogt, W. G.

    1982-02-01

    Various techniques to enhance gas production in sanitary landfills were applied to landfill simulators. These techniques include (1) accelerated moisture addition, (2) leachate recycling, (3) buffer addition, (4) nutrient addition, and (5) combinations of the above. Results are compiled through on-going operation and monitoring of sixteen landfill simulators. These test cells contain about 380 kg of municipal solid waste. Quantities of buffer and nutrient materials were placed in selected cells at the time of loading. Water is added to all test cells on a monthly basis; leachate is withdrawn from all cells (and recycled on selected cells) also on a monthly basis. Daily monitoring of gas volumes and refuse temperatures is performed. Gas and leachate samples are collected and analyzed on a monthly basis. Leachate and gas quality and quantity reslts are presented for the first 18 months of operation.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media with conduits to estimate macroscopic continuous time random walk model parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Anwar, S.; Cortis, A.; Sukop, M.

    2008-10-20

    Lattice Boltzmann models simulate solute transport in porous media traversed by conduits. Resulting solute breakthrough curves are fitted with Continuous Time Random Walk models. Porous media are simulated by damping flow inertia and, when the damping is large enough, a Darcy's Law solution instead of the Navier-Stokes solution normally provided by the lattice Boltzmann model is obtained. Anisotropic dispersion is incorporated using a direction-dependent relaxation time. Our particular interest is to simulate transport processes outside the applicability of the standard Advection-Dispersion Equation (ADE) including eddy mixing in conduits. The ADE fails to adequately fit any of these breakthrough curves.

  14. Beyond mean-field bistability in driven-dissipative lattices: Bunching-antibunching transition and quantum simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Arenas, J. J.; Clark, S. R.; Felicetti, S.; Romero, G.; Solano, E.; Angelakis, D. G.; Jaksch, D.

    2016-02-01

    In the present work we investigate the existence of multiple nonequilibrium steady states in a coherently driven X Y lattice of dissipative two-level systems. A commonly used mean-field ansatz, in which spatial correlations are neglected, predicts a bistable behavior with a sharp shift between low- and high-density states. In contrast one-dimensional matrix product methods reveal these effects to be artifacts of the mean-field approach, with both disappearing once correlations are taken fully into account. Instead, a bunching-antibunching transition emerges. This indicates that alternative approaches should be considered for higher spatial dimensions, where classical simulations are currently infeasible. Thus we propose a circuit QED quantum simulator implementable with current technology to enable an experimental investigation of the model considered.

  15. Simulation of gas particle flow in a HVOF torch

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.H.; Moore, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    A transient two-dimensional numerical simulation of Inconel spraying in an HVOF torch barrel has been performed. The gas flow is treated as a continuum multicomponent chemically reacting flow, while particles are modeled using a stochastic particle spray model, fully coupled to the gas flow. The calculated results agree well with experimental data, and show important statistical aspects of particle flow in the torch.

  16. Solvation dynamics in a Brownian dipolar lattice. Comparison between computer simulation and various molecular theories of solvation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komath, Sneha Sudha; Bagchi, Biman

    1993-06-01

    Several recent theoretical and computer simulation studies have considered solvation dynamics in a Brownian dipolar lattice which provides a simple model solvent for which detailed calculations can be carried out. In this article a fully microscopic calculation of the solvation dynamics of an ion in a Brownian dipolar lattice is presented. The calculation is based on the non-Markovian molecular hydrodynamic theory developed recently. The main assumption of the present calculation is that the two-particle orientational correlation functions of the solid can be replaced by those of the liquid state. It is shown that such a calculation provides an excellent agreement with the computer simulation results. More importantly, the present calculations clearly demonstrate that the frequency-dependent dielectric friction plays an important role in the long time decay of the solvation time correlation function. We also find that the present calculation provides somewhat better agreement than either the dynamic mean spherical approximation (DMSA) or the Fried-Mukamel theory which use the simulated frequency-dependent dielectric function. It is found that the dissipative kernels used in the molecular hydrodynamic approach and in the Fried-Mukamel theory are vastly different, especially at short times. However, in spite of this disagreement, the two theories still lead to comparable results in good agreement with computer simulation, which suggests that even a semiquantitatively accurate dissipative kernel may be sufficient to obtain a reliable solvation time correlation function. A new wave vector and frequency-dependent dissipative kernel (or memory function) is proposed which correctly goes over to the appropriate expressions in both the single particle and the collective limits. This form is expected to lead to better results than all the existing descriptions.

  17. Pore-scale simulation of liquid CO2 displacement of water using a two-phase lattice Boltzmann model

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haihu; Valocchi, Albert J.; Werth, Charles J.; Kang, Oinjun; Oostrom, Martinus

    2014-11-01

    A lattice Boltzmann color-fluid model, which was recently proposed by Liu et al. [H. Liu, A.J. Valocchi, and Q. Kang. Three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model for immiscible two-phase flow simulations. Phys. Rev. E, 85:046309, 2012.] based on a concept of continuum surface force, is improved to simulate immiscible two-phase flows in porous media. The new improvements allow the model to account for different kinematic viscosities of both fluids and to model fluid-solid interactions. The capability and accuracy of this model is first validated by two benchmark tests: a layered two-phase flow with a viscosity ratio, and a dynamic capillary intrusion. This model is then used to simulate liquid CO2 (LCO2) displacing water in a dual-permeability pore network. The extent and behavior of LCO2 preferential flow (i.e., fingering) is found to depend on the capillary number (Ca), and three different displacement patterns observed in previous micromodel experiments are reproduced. The predicted variation of LCO2 saturation with Ca, as well as variation of specific interfacial length with LCO2 saturation, are both in good agreement with the experimental observations. To understand the effect of heterogeneity on pore-scale displacement, we also simulate LCO2 displacing water in a randomly heterogeneous pore network, which has the same size and porosity as the dual-permeability pore network. In comparison to the dual-permeability case, the transition from capillary fingering to viscous fingering occurs at a higher Ca, and LCO2 saturation is higher at low Ca but lower at high Ca. In either pore network, the LCO2-water specific interfacial length is found to obey a power-law dependence on LCO2 saturation.

  18. Scattering in Quantum Lattice Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, Andrew; Love, Peter

    2009-03-01

    Quantum Lattice Gas Automata (QLGA) are of interest for their use in simulating quantum mechanics on both classical and quantum computers. QLGAs are an extension of classical Lattice Gas Automata where the constraint of unitary evolution is added. In the late 1990s, David A. Meyer as well as Bruce Boghosian and Washington Taylor produced similar models of QLGAs. We start by presenting a unified version of these models and study them from the point of view of the physics of wave-packet scattering. We show that the Meyer and Boghosian-Taylor models are actually the same basic model with slightly different parameterizations and limits. We then implement these models computationally using the Python programming language and show that QLGAs are able to replicate the analytic results of quantum mechanics (for example reflected and transmitted amplitudes for step potentials and the Klein paradox).

  19. Exciton-polaritons in lattices: A non-linear photonic simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amo, Alberto; Bloch, Jacqueline

    2016-10-01

    Microcavity polaritons are mixed light-matter quasiparticles with extraordinary nonlinear properties, which can be easily accessed in photoluminescence experiments. Thanks to the possibility of designing the potential landscape of polaritons, this system provides a versatile photonic platform to emulate 1D and 2D Hamiltonians. Polaritons allow transposing to the photonic world some of the properties of electrons in solid-state systems, and to engineer Hamiltonians for photons with novel transport properties. Here we review some experimental implementations of polariton Hamiltonians using lattice geometries.

  20. Volumetric Lattice Boltzmann Simulation for Fluid dynamics and Turbulence in Practical Syringes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Everton; Deep, Debanjan; Yu, Huidan (Whitney)

    2012-11-01

    We conduct numerical experiments to study fluid dynamics and turbulence in syringes using volumetric lattice Boltzmann method (VLBM) that is developed for dealing with arbitrary moving boundaries. Several common used medical syringes are used to predict the efficiency and safety of syringes experiencing low flow infusion rates. It is found that smaller size syringes reach a steady flow rate much sooner than larger ones, which are in quantitative agreement with experimental results. The relation between the syringe size and its steady flow rate is revealed. At low flow rates, corner vortices are observed. We explore conditions that lead to turbulent flow aiming to aid safer syringe application in nursing practices.

  1. Transport of an interacting Bose gas in 1D disordered lattices

    SciTech Connect

    D'Errico, C.; Chaudhuri, S.; Gori, L.; Kumar, A.; Lucioni, E.; Tanzi, L.; Inguscio, M.; Modugno, G.

    2014-08-20

    We use ultracold atoms in a quasiperiodic lattice to study two outstanding problems in the physics of disordered systems: a) the anomalous diffusion of a wavepacket in the presence of disorder, interactions and noise; b) the transport of a disordered superfluid. a) Our results show that the subdiffusion, observed when interaction alone is present, can be modelled with a nonlinear diffusion equation and the peculiar shape of the expanding density profiles can be connected to the microscopic nonlinear diffusion coefficients. Also when noise alone is present we can describe the observed normal diffusion dynamics by existing microscopic models. In the unexplored regime in which noise and interaction are combined, instead, we observe an anomalous diffusion, that we model with a generalized diffusion equation, where noise- and interaction-induced contributions add each other. b) We find that an instability appearing at relatively large momenta can be employed to locate the fluid-insulator crossover driven by disorder. By investigating the momentum-dependent transport, we observe a sharp crossover from a weakly dissipative regime to a strongly unstable one at a disorder-dependent critical momentum. The set of critical disorder and interaction strengths for which such critical momentum vanishes, can be identified with the separation between a fluid regime and an insulating one and can be related to the predicted zero-temperature superfluid-Bose glass transition.

  2. Raman gas self-organizing into deep nano-trap lattice

    PubMed Central

    Alharbi, M.; Husakou, A.; Chafer, M.; Debord, B.; Gérôme, F.; Benabid, F.

    2016-01-01

    Trapping or cooling molecules has rallied a long-standing effort for its impact in exploring new frontiers in physics and in finding new phase of matter for quantum technologies. Here we demonstrate a system for light-trapping molecules and stimulated Raman scattering based on optically self-nanostructured molecular hydrogen in hollow-core photonic crystal fibre. A lattice is formed by a periodic and ultra-deep potential caused by a spatially modulated Raman saturation, where Raman-active molecules are strongly localized in a one-dimensional array of nanometre-wide sections. Only these trapped molecules participate in stimulated Raman scattering, generating high-power forward and backward Stokes continuous-wave laser radiation in the Lamb–Dicke regime with sub-Doppler emission spectrum. The spectrum exhibits a central line with a sub-recoil linewidth as low as ∼14 kHz, more than five orders of magnitude narrower than conventional-Raman pressure-broadened linewidth, and sidebands comprising Mollow triplet, motional sidebands and four-wave mixing. PMID:27677451

  3. Raman gas self-organizing into deep nano-trap lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharbi, M.; Husakou, A.; Chafer, M.; Debord, B.; Gérôme, F.; Benabid, F.

    2016-09-01

    Trapping or cooling molecules has rallied a long-standing effort for its impact in exploring new frontiers in physics and in finding new phase of matter for quantum technologies. Here we demonstrate a system for light-trapping molecules and stimulated Raman scattering based on optically self-nanostructured molecular hydrogen in hollow-core photonic crystal fibre. A lattice is formed by a periodic and ultra-deep potential caused by a spatially modulated Raman saturation, where Raman-active molecules are strongly localized in a one-dimensional array of nanometre-wide sections. Only these trapped molecules participate in stimulated Raman scattering, generating high-power forward and backward Stokes continuous-wave laser radiation in the Lamb-Dicke regime with sub-Doppler emission spectrum. The spectrum exhibits a central line with a sub-recoil linewidth as low as ~14 kHz, more than five orders of magnitude narrower than conventional-Raman pressure-broadened linewidth, and sidebands comprising Mollow triplet, motional sidebands and four-wave mixing.

  4. Multiple-relaxation-time color-gradient lattice Boltzmann model for simulating two-phase flows with high density ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ba, Yan; Liu, Haihu; Li, Qing; Kang, Qinjun; Sun, Jinju

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we propose a color-gradient lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for simulating two-phase flows with high density ratio and high Reynolds number. The model applies a multirelaxation-time (MRT) collision operator to enhance the stability of the simulation. A source term, which is derived by the Chapman-Enskog analysis, is added into the MRT LB equation so that the Navier-Stokes equations can be exactly recovered. Also, a form of the equilibrium density distribution function is used to simplify the source term. To validate the proposed model, steady flows of a static droplet and the layered channel flow are first simulated with density ratios up to 1000. Small values of spurious velocities and interfacial tension errors are found in the static droplet test, and improved profiles of velocity are obtained by the present model in simulating channel flows. Then, two cases of unsteady flows, Rayleigh-Taylor instability and droplet splashing on a thin film, are simulated. In the former case, the density ratio of 3 and Reynolds numbers of 256 and 2048 are considered. The interface shapes and spike and bubble positions are in good agreement with the results of previous studies. In the latter case, the droplet spreading radius is found to obey the power law proposed in previous studies for the density ratio of 100 and Reynolds number up to 500.

  5. Multiple-relaxation-time color-gradient lattice Boltzmann model for simulating two-phase flows with high density ratio.

    PubMed

    Ba, Yan; Liu, Haihu; Li, Qing; Kang, Qinjun; Sun, Jinju

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we propose a color-gradient lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for simulating two-phase flows with high density ratio and high Reynolds number. The model applies a multirelaxation-time (MRT) collision operator to enhance the stability of the simulation. A source term, which is derived by the Chapman-Enskog analysis, is added into the MRT LB equation so that the Navier-Stokes equations can be exactly recovered. Also, a form of the equilibrium density distribution function is used to simplify the source term. To validate the proposed model, steady flows of a static droplet and the layered channel flow are first simulated with density ratios up to 1000. Small values of spurious velocities and interfacial tension errors are found in the static droplet test, and improved profiles of velocity are obtained by the present model in simulating channel flows. Then, two cases of unsteady flows, Rayleigh-Taylor instability and droplet splashing on a thin film, are simulated. In the former case, the density ratio of 3 and Reynolds numbers of 256 and 2048 are considered. The interface shapes and spike and bubble positions are in good agreement with the results of previous studies. In the latter case, the droplet spreading radius is found to obey the power law proposed in previous studies for the density ratio of 100 and Reynolds number up to 500. PMID:27627415

  6. The role of chromatin conformations in diffusional transport of chromatin-binding proteins: Cartesian lattice simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedemeier, Annika; Zhang, Ting; Merlitz, Holger; Wu, Chen-Xu; Langowski, Jörg

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, a lattice model for the diffusional transport of chromatin-binding particles in the interphase cell nucleus is proposed. Sliding effects are studied in dense networks of chromatin fibers created by three different methods: Randomly distributed, noninterconnected obstacles, a random walk chain model with an attractive step potential, and a self-avoiding random walk chain model with a hard repulsive core and attractive surroundings. By comparing a discrete and continuous version of the random walk chain model, we demonstrate that lattice discretization does not alter the diffusion of chromatin-binding particles. The influence of conformational properties of the fiber network on the particle sliding is investigated in detail while varying occupation volume, sliding probability, chain length, and persistence length. It is observed that adjacency of the monomers, the excluded volume effect incorporated in the self-avoiding random walk model, and the persistence length affect the chromatin-binding particle diffusion. It is demonstrated that sliding particles sense local chain structures. When plotting the diffusion coefficient as a function of the accessible volume for diffusing particles, the data fall onto master curves depending on the persistence length. However, once intersegment transfer is involved, chromatin-binding proteins no longer perceive local chain structures.

  7. Large-coordination-number expansion of a lattice Bose gas at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navez, Patrick; Queisser, Friedemann; Schützhold, Ralf

    2016-08-01

    The expansion of the partition function for large coordination number Z is a long-standing method and has formerly been used to describe the Ising model at finite temperatures. We extend this approach and study the interacting Bose gas at finite temperatures. An analytical expression for the free energy is derived which is valid for weakly interacting and strongly interacting bosons. The transition line which separates the superfluid phase from Mott insulating or normal gas phase is shown for fillings =1 and =2 . For unit filling, our findings agree qualitatively with quantum Monte Carlo results. Contrary to the well-known mean-field result, the shift of the critical temperature in the weakly interacting regime is apparent.

  8. Choice of boundary condition for lattice-Boltzmann simulation of moderate-Reynolds-number flow in complex domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, Rupert W.; Carver, Hywel B.; Bernabeu, Miguel O.; Hetherington, James; Groen, Derek; Krüger, Timm; Coveney, Peter V.

    2014-02-01

    Modeling blood flow in larger vessels using lattice-Boltzmann methods comes with a challenging set of constraints: a complex geometry with walls and inlets and outlets at arbitrary orientations with respect to the lattice, intermediate Reynolds (Re) number, and unsteady flow. Simple bounce-back is one of the most commonly used, simplest, and most computationally efficient boundary conditions, but many others have been proposed. We implement three other methods applicable to complex geometries [Guo, Zheng, and Shi, Phys. Fluids 14, 2007 (2002), 10.1063/1.1471914; Bouzidi, Firdaouss, and Lallemand, Phys. Fluids 13, 3452 (2001), 10.1063/1.1399290; Junk and Yang, Phys. Rev. E 72, 066701 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevE.72.066701] in our open-source application hemelb. We use these to simulate Poiseuille and Womersley flows in a cylindrical pipe with an arbitrary orientation at physiologically relevant Re number (1-300) and Womersley (4-12) numbers and steady flow in a curved pipe at relevant Dean number (100-200) and compare the accuracy to analytical solutions. We find that both the Bouzidi-Firdaouss-Lallemand (BFL) and Guo-Zheng-Shi (GZS) methods give second-order convergence in space while simple bounce-back degrades to first order. The BFL method appears to perform better than GZS in unsteady flows and is significantly less computationally expensive. The Junk-Yang method shows poor stability at larger Re number and so cannot be recommended here. The choice of collision operator (lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook vs multiple relaxation time) and velocity set (D3Q15 vs D3Q19 vs D3Q27) does not significantly affect the accuracy in the problems studied.

  9. Implicit temperature-correction-based immersed-boundary thermal lattice Boltzmann method for the simulation of natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seta, Takeshi

    2013-06-01

    In the present paper, we apply the implicit-correction method to the immersed-boundary thermal lattice Boltzmann method (IB-TLBM) for the natural convection between two concentric horizontal cylinders and in a square enclosure containing a circular cylinder. The Chapman-Enskog multiscale expansion proves the existence of an extra term in the temperature equation from the source term of the kinetic equation. In order to eliminate the extra term, we redefine the temperature and the source term in the lattice Boltzmann equation. When the relaxation time is less than unity, the new definition of the temperature and source term enhances the accuracy of the thermal lattice Boltzmann method. The implicit-correction method is required in order to calculate the thermal interaction between a fluid and a rigid solid using the redefined temperature. Simulation of the heat conduction between two concentric cylinders indicates that the error at each boundary point of the proposed IB-TLBM is reduced by the increment of the number of Lagrangian points constituting the boundaries. We derive the theoretical relation between a temperature slip at the boundary and the relaxation time and demonstrate that the IB-TLBM requires a small relaxation time in order to avoid temperature distortion around the immersed boundary. The streamline, isotherms, and average Nusselt number calculated by the proposed method agree well with those of previous numerical studies involving natural convection. The proposed IB-TLBM improves the accuracy of the boundary conditions for the temperature and velocity using an adequate discrete area for each of the Lagrangian nodes and reduces the penetration of the streamline on the surface of the body.

  10. Implicit temperature-correction-based immersed-boundary thermal lattice Boltzmann method for the simulation of natural convection.

    PubMed

    Seta, Takeshi

    2013-06-01

    In the present paper, we apply the implicit-correction method to the immersed-boundary thermal lattice Boltzmann method (IB-TLBM) for the natural convection between two concentric horizontal cylinders and in a square enclosure containing a circular cylinder. The Chapman-Enskog multiscale expansion proves the existence of an extra term in the temperature equation from the source term of the kinetic equation. In order to eliminate the extra term, we redefine the temperature and the source term in the lattice Boltzmann equation. When the relaxation time is less than unity, the new definition of the temperature and source term enhances the accuracy of the thermal lattice Boltzmann method. The implicit-correction method is required in order to calculate the thermal interaction between a fluid and a rigid solid using the redefined temperature. Simulation of the heat conduction between two concentric cylinders indicates that the error at each boundary point of the proposed IB-TLBM is reduced by the increment of the number of Lagrangian points constituting the boundaries. We derive the theoretical relation between a temperature slip at the boundary and the relaxation time and demonstrate that the IB-TLBM requires a small relaxation time in order to avoid temperature distortion around the immersed boundary. The streamline, isotherms, and average Nusselt number calculated by the proposed method agree well with those of previous numerical studies involving natural convection. The proposed IB-TLBM improves the accuracy of the boundary conditions for the temperature and velocity using an adequate discrete area for each of the Lagrangian nodes and reduces the penetration of the streamline on the surface of the body.

  11. Choice of boundary condition for lattice-Boltzmann simulation of moderate-Reynolds-number flow in complex domains.

    PubMed

    Nash, Rupert W; Carver, Hywel B; Bernabeu, Miguel O; Hetherington, James; Groen, Derek; Krüger, Timm; Coveney, Peter V

    2014-02-01

    Modeling blood flow in larger vessels using lattice-Boltzmann methods comes with a challenging set of constraints: a complex geometry with walls and inlets and outlets at arbitrary orientations with respect to the lattice, intermediate Reynolds (Re) number, and unsteady flow. Simple bounce-back is one of the most commonly used, simplest, and most computationally efficient boundary conditions, but many others have been proposed. We implement three other methods applicable to complex geometries [Guo, Zheng, and Shi, Phys. Fluids 14, 2007 (2002); Bouzidi, Firdaouss, and Lallemand, Phys. Fluids 13, 3452 (2001); Junk and Yang, Phys. Rev. E 72, 066701 (2005)] in our open-source application hemelb. We use these to simulate Poiseuille and Womersley flows in a cylindrical pipe with an arbitrary orientation at physiologically relevant Re number (1-300) and Womersley (4-12) numbers and steady flow in a curved pipe at relevant Dean number (100-200) and compare the accuracy to analytical solutions. We find that both the Bouzidi-Firdaouss-Lallemand (BFL) and Guo-Zheng-Shi (GZS) methods give second-order convergence in space while simple bounce-back degrades to first order. The BFL method appears to perform better than GZS in unsteady flows and is significantly less computationally expensive. The Junk-Yang method shows poor stability at larger Re number and so cannot be recommended here. The choice of collision operator (lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook vs multiple relaxation time) and velocity set (D3Q15 vs D3Q19 vs D3Q27) does not significantly affect the accuracy in the problems studied. PMID:25353601

  12. Lattice-gas model to understand voltage profiles of LiNixMn2-xO4/Li electrochemical cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Tao; Dahn, J. R.

    1997-08-01

    Lattice-gas models were used to study lithium intercalation in Ni-substituted spinel LiNixMn2-xO4 (0simulations have been used to calculate voltage profiles of LiNixMn2-xO4/Li electrochemical cells. Plateaus near 4.7 and 4.1 V in the voltage profiles are believed to be related to the removal of electrons from states on the Ni 3d eg level and from the Mn 3d eg level, respectively. The structure in the voltage profiles can be qualitatively explained using nearest-neighbor repulsive interactions between Li atoms in adjacent 8a sites, next-nearest-neighbor attractive interactions, and a binding energy to those sites that changes abruptly by 0.6 eV when all 1-2x available sites for electrons in Mn 3d levels are empty. Assuming that 2x specific sites have one binding energy and the other 1-2x sites have another is not successful in modeling the order-disorder transitions in the data. This implies that the either the Ni and Mn 3d bands are delocalized or that a specific localized Ni or Mn eg level can be reduced by a Li atom in any of a number of neighboring sites.

  13. Gas loss in simulated galaxies as they fall into clusters.

    PubMed

    Cen, Renyue; Pop, Ana Roxana; Bahcall, Neta A

    2014-06-01

    We use high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamic galaxy formation simulations to gain insights into how galaxies lose their cold gas at low redshift as they migrate from the field to the high-density regions of clusters of galaxies. We find that beyond three cluster virial radii, the fraction of gas-rich galaxies is constant, representing the field. Within three cluster-centric radii, the fraction of gas-rich galaxies declines steadily with decreasing radius, reaching <10% near the cluster center. Our results suggest galaxies start to feel the effect of the cluster environment on their gas content well beyond the cluster virial radius. We show that almost all gas-rich galaxies at the cluster virial radius are falling in for the first time at nearly radial orbits. Furthermore, we find that almost no galaxy moving outward at the cluster virial radius is gas-rich (with a gas-to-baryon ratio greater than 1%). These results suggest that galaxies that fall into clusters lose their cold gas within a single radial round-trip.

  14. Gas loss in simulated galaxies as they fall into clusters.

    PubMed

    Cen, Renyue; Pop, Ana Roxana; Bahcall, Neta A

    2014-06-01

    We use high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamic galaxy formation simulations to gain insights into how galaxies lose their cold gas at low redshift as they migrate from the field to the high-density regions of clusters of galaxies. We find that beyond three cluster virial radii, the fraction of gas-rich galaxies is constant, representing the field. Within three cluster-centric radii, the fraction of gas-rich galaxies declines steadily with decreasing radius, reaching <10% near the cluster center. Our results suggest galaxies start to feel the effect of the cluster environment on their gas content well beyond the cluster virial radius. We show that almost all gas-rich galaxies at the cluster virial radius are falling in for the first time at nearly radial orbits. Furthermore, we find that almost no galaxy moving outward at the cluster virial radius is gas-rich (with a gas-to-baryon ratio greater than 1%). These results suggest that galaxies that fall into clusters lose their cold gas within a single radial round-trip. PMID:24843167

  15. Gas loss in simulated galaxies as they fall into clusters

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Renyue; Pop, Ana Roxana; Bahcall, Neta A.

    2014-01-01

    We use high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamic galaxy formation simulations to gain insights into how galaxies lose their cold gas at low redshift as they migrate from the field to the high-density regions of clusters of galaxies. We find that beyond three cluster virial radii, the fraction of gas-rich galaxies is constant, representing the field. Within three cluster-centric radii, the fraction of gas-rich galaxies declines steadily with decreasing radius, reaching <10% near the cluster center. Our results suggest galaxies start to feel the effect of the cluster environment on their gas content well beyond the cluster virial radius. We show that almost all gas-rich galaxies at the cluster virial radius are falling in for the first time at nearly radial orbits. Furthermore, we find that almost no galaxy moving outward at the cluster virial radius is gas-rich (with a gas-to-baryon ratio greater than 1%). These results suggest that galaxies that fall into clusters lose their cold gas within a single radial round-trip. PMID:24843167

  16. Pockels-effect cell for gas-flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weimer, D.

    1982-01-01

    A Pockels effect cell using a 75 cu cm DK*P crystal was developed and used as a gas flow simulator. Index of refraction gradients were produced in the cell by the fringing fields of parallel plate electrodes. Calibration curves for the device were obtained for index of refraction gradients in excess of .00025 m.

  17. Simulation of Ferrofluid Flow for Magnetic Drug Targeting Using the Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandelousi, Mohsen Sheikholeslami; Ellahi, Rahmat

    2015-02-01

    Influence of a spatially varying magnetic field on Fe3O4-plasma nanofluid flow in a vessel as a targeted drug delivery system is investigated. Combined effects of ferrohydrodynamic (FHD) and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) are considered in mathematic models. The lattice Boltzmann method is applied to solve the governing equations. Effects of active parameters, such as the Reynolds number and magnetic number on the flow characteristics, have been examined. Results indicate that the presence of the magnetic field affects considerably the flow field. Back flow occurs near the region where the magnetic source is located. Also, it can be found that the skin friction coefficient is a decreasing function of the Reynolds number and magnetic number.

  18. Replica-exchange Wang-Landau simulations of the H0P lattice protein model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guangjie; Wüst, Thomas; Li, Ying Wai; Landau, David P.

    The hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice protein model has been the subject of intensive investigation in an effort to aid our understanding of protein folding. However, the high ground state degeneracies caused by its simplification stands in contrast to the generally unique native states of natural proteins. Here we proposed a simple modification, by introducing a new type of ``neutral'' monomer, 0, i.e. neither hydrophobic nor polar, thus rendering the model more realistic without increasing the difficulties of sampling significantly. With the replica exchange Wang-Landau (REWL) scheme we investigated several widely studied HP proteins and their H0P counterparts. Dramatic differences in both ground state and thermodynamic properties have been found. For example, the H0P version of Crambin shows more clear two-step folding and 3 order of magnitudes less ground state degeneracy than its HP counterpart. Supported by NSF.

  19. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of nanofluid free convection heat transfer in an L-shaped enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalteh, Mohammad; Hasani, Hossein

    2014-02-01

    In the present paper, fluid flow and free convection heat transfer of a nanofluid in an L-shaped enclosure is studied numerically using the Lattice Boltzmann Method. To consider the effects of Brownian motion, temperature and nanoparticle size on the nanofluid thermal conductivity, Patel et al. model is used. The effects of different parameters such as Rayleigh number (103-106), channel aspect ratio (0.2-0.6), nanoparticle volume concentration (0-0.05) and nanoparticle diameter (20-80 nm) on the flow and temperature fields are studied. The obtained results show that nanofluid enhances the heat transfer amount and reducing the channel aspect ratio improves this effect. Moreover, the average Nusselt number decreases with an increase in the nanoparticle diameter and this effect is more pronounced for higher volume concentrations.

  20. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of bubble formation in a microfluidic T-junction.

    PubMed

    Amaya-Bower, Luz; Lee, Taehun

    2011-06-28

    A lattice Boltzmann equation method based on the Cahn-Hilliard diffuse interface theory is developed to investigate the bubble formation process in a microchannel with T-junction mixing geometry. The bubble formation process has different regimes, namely, squeezing, dripping and jetting regimes, which correspond to the primary forces acting on the system. Transition from regime to regime is generally dictated by the capillary number Ca, volumetric flow ratio Q and viscosity ratio λ. A systematic analysis is performed to evaluate these effects. The computations are performed in the range of 10(-4)

  1. Fluctuating hydrodynamics of nematics for models of liquid-crystal based biosensors via lattice Boltzmann simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Orlando; Velez, Jose Antonio; Castañeda, David

    2008-03-01

    Experimental biosensors based on liquid crystals (LC) use nematics to detect the presence of specific analytes, via the optical textures exhibited by the LC at long times. Efforts to model the time evolution of these textures have relied on relaxational models, ignoring transport phenomena. In this work we include hydrodynamics into a model for these LC biosensors, using lattice Boltzmann (LB) methods and assess the effect on the lifetime of multidomain structures, characteristic of high concentrations of analyte. We apply Yeoman's et al. LB algorithm, which reproduces the hydrodynamic equations developed by Beris and Edwards for LCs. We also take into account thermal fluctuations, by adding random perturbations to the hydrodynamic modes. Following Adhikari et al., their amplitude is determined by the Fluctuation-Dissipation theorem and we excite both hydrodynamic and the sub-hydrodynamic modes (also called ghost modes). As a result, we analyze the influence of the fluctuations and hydrodynamics on the movement of topological defects.

  2. Review of strongly-coupled composite dark matter models and lattice simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kribs, Graham D.; Neil, Ethan T.

    2016-08-01

    We review models of new physics in which dark matter arises as a composite bound state from a confining strongly-coupled non-Abelian gauge theory. We discuss several qualitatively distinct classes of composite candidates, including dark mesons, dark baryons, and dark glueballs. We highlight some of the promising strategies for direct detection, especially through dark moments, using the symmetries and properties of the composite description to identify the operators that dominate the interactions of dark matter with matter, as well as dark matter self-interactions. We briefly discuss the implications of these theories at colliders, especially the (potentially novel) phenomenology of dark mesons in various regimes of the models. Throughout the review, we highlight the use of lattice calculations in the study of these strongly-coupled theories, to obtain precise quantitative predictions and new insights into the dynamics.

  3. Stochastic inflation lattice simulations - Ultra-large scale structure of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salopek, D. S.

    1991-01-01

    Non-Gaussian fluctuations for structure formation may arise in inflation from the nonlinear interaction of long wavelength gravitational and scalar fields. Long wavelength fields have spatial gradients, a (exp -1), small compared to the Hubble radius, and they are described in terms of classical random fields that are fed by short wavelength quantum noise. Lattice Langevin calculations are given for a toy model with a scalar field interacting with an exponential potential where one can obtain exact analytic solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation. For single scalar field models that are consistent with current microwave background fluctuations, the fluctuations are Gaussian. However, for scales much larger than our observable Universe, one expects large metric fluctuations that are non-Gaussian. This example illuminates non-Gaussian models involving multiple scalar fields which are consistent with current microwave background limits.

  4. Analyses of simulations of three-dimensional lattice proteins in comparison with a simplified statistical mechanical model of protein folding.

    PubMed

    Abe, H; Wako, H

    2006-07-01

    Folding and unfolding simulations of three-dimensional lattice proteins were analyzed using a simplified statistical mechanical model in which their amino acid sequences and native conformations were incorporated explicitly. Using this statistical mechanical model, under the assumption that only interactions between amino acid residues within a local structure in a native state are considered, the partition function of the system can be calculated for a given native conformation without any adjustable parameter. The simulations were carried out for two different native conformations, for each of which two foldable amino acid sequences were considered. The native and non-native contacts between amino acid residues occurring in the simulations were examined in detail and compared with the results derived from the theoretical model. The equilibrium thermodynamic quantities (free energy, enthalpy, entropy, and the probability of each amino acid residue being in the native state) at various temperatures obtained from the simulations and the theoretical model were also examined in order to characterize the folding processes that depend on the native conformations and the amino acid sequences. Finally, the free energy landscapes were discussed based on these analyses.

  5. Fueling galaxy growth through gas accretion in cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Dylan Rubaloff

    Despite significant advances in the numerical modeling of galaxy formation and evolution, it is clear that a satisfactory theoretical picture of how galaxies acquire their baryons across cosmic time remains elusive. In this thesis we present a computational study which seeks to address the question of how galaxies get their gas. We make use of new, more robust simulation techniques and describe the first investigations of cosmological gas accretion using a moving-mesh approach for solving the equations of continuum hydrodynamics. We focus first on a re-examination of past theoretical conclusions as to the relative importance of different accretion modes for galaxy growth. We study the rates and nature of gas accretion at z=2, comparing our new simulations run with the Arepo code to otherwise identical realizations run with the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code Gadget. We find significant physical differences in the thermodynamic history of accreted gas, explained in terms of numerical inaccuracies in SPH. In contrast to previous results, we conclude that hot mode accretion generally dominates galaxy growth, while cold gas filaments experience increased heating and disruption. Next, we consider the impact of feedback on our results, including models for galactic-scale outflows driven by stars as well as the energy released from supermassive black holes. We find that feedback strongly suppresses the inflow of "smooth" mode gas at all redshifts, regardless of its temperature history. Although the geometry of accretion at the virial radius is largely unmodified, strong galactic-fountain recycling motions dominate the inner halo. We measure a shift in the characteristic timescale of accretion, and discuss implications for semi-analytical models of hot halo gas cooling. To overcome the resolution limitations of cosmological volumes, we simulate a suite of eight individual 1012 solar mass halos down to z=2. We quantify the thermal and dynamical structure of the gas in

  6. Light noble gas dissolution into ring structure-bearing materials and lattice influences on noble gas recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Colin R. M.; Parman, Stephen W.; Kelley, Simon P.; Cooper, Reid F.

    2015-06-01

    Light noble gas (He-Ne-Ar) solubility has been experimentally determined in a range of materials with six-member, tetrahedral ring structures: beryl, cordierite, tourmaline, antigorite, muscovite, F-phlogopite, actinolite, and pargasite. Helium solubility in these materials is relatively high, 4 × 10-10 to 3 × 10-7 mol g-1 bar-1, which is ∼100 to 100,000× greater than He solubility in olivine, pyroxene, or spinel. Helium solubility broadly correlates with the topology of ring structures within different minerals. Distinctive He-Ne-Ar solubility patterns are associated with the different ring structure topologies. Combined, these observations suggest ring structures have a strong influence on noble gas solubility in materials and could facilitate the recycling of noble gases, along with other volatiles (i.e., water, chlorine, and fluorine), into the mantle. Measurements of Ne and Ar solubility in antigorite, however, are highly variable and correlated with each other, suggesting multiple factors contribute the solubility of noble gases in serpentine-rich materials.

  7. Toward the improved simulation of microscale gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNenly, Matthew James

    2007-12-01

    Recent interest in fluidic micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) in gaseous environments has increased the need for accurate simulation techniques to aid in their design process. Many fluidic MEMS operate in a low-speed non-equilibrium gas flow regime that is challenging to simulate both accurately and efficiently. Classic computational fluid dynamics techniques (e.g. Navier-Stokes simulation) are based on the assumption that the fluid behaves as a continuum. This assumption, however, becomes increasingly less accurate as the local flow conditions deviate further from local thermodynamic equilibrium. Alternatively, it is possible to achieve an accurate approximation of non-equilibrium gas flows using particle-based methods (e.g. DSMC), but the resulting simulations are much more computationally expensive than the continuum-based method. In fact, for the very low speeds commonly found in fluidic MEMS, the slow convergence of the DSMC solution can lead to intractably long computation times on all but the largest supercomputers. Two different approaches are pursued in this investigation, in an effort to design a physically accurate and computationally efficient simulation of low-speed, non-equilibrium flows. The first approach constructs new empirical models to correct the error in the Navier-Stokes simulation in the transition regime due to the appreciable deviation from local thermodynamic equilibrium. The empirically corrected Navier-Stokes simulation is not actually predicting strongly non-equilibrium gas flows; however, it is shown to be a useful analysis tool in certain design situations. The second more novel approach develops an original quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) particle simulation that retains the physical accuracy of the DSMC method while at the same time achieving a faster (near-linear) convergence rate. The design of a QMC method is far more complex in general than a Monte Carlo method for the same problem. Further, no known QMC particle simulation has

  8. Quantum statistics in the spin-lattice dynamics simulation of formation and migration of mono-vacancy in BCC iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Haohua; Woo, C. H.

    2016-03-01

    Contributions from the vibrational thermodynamics of phonons and magnons in the dynamic simulations of thermally activated atomic processes in crystalline materials were considered within the framework of classical statistics in conventional studies. The neglect of quantum effects produces the wrong lattice and spin dynamics and erroneous activation characteristics, sometimes leading to the incorrect results. In this paper, we consider the formation and migration of mono-vacancy in BCC iron over a large temperature range from 10 K to 1400 K, across the ferro/paramagnetic phase boundary. Entropies and enthalpies of migration and formation are calculated using quantum heat baths based on a Bose-Einstein statistical description of thermal excitations in terms of phonons and magnons. Corrections due to the use of classical heat baths are evaluated and discussed.

  9. Lattice Boltzmann simulation on liquid flow and mass transport in a bioreactor with cylinder bundle for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Qiang; Yang, Yan-Xia; Zhu, Xun; Wang, Hong; Ding, Yu-Dong

    2015-06-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method is adopted to simulate hydrodynamics and mass transfer accompanying with biochemical reaction in a channel with cylinder bundle, which is the scenario of biohydrogen production by photosynthetic bacteria in the biofilm attached on the surface of cylinder bundle in photobioreactor. The effects of cylinder spacing, Reynolds number and cylinder arrangement are investigated. The numerical results reveal that highest glucose concentration and the lowest hydrogen concentration are obtained at the front of the first row cylinders for all cases. The staggered arrangement leads to an increment in average drag coefficient, Sherwood number and consumption efficiency of substrate under a given condition, and the increment in Sherwood number reaches up to 30 %, while that in drag coefficient is around 1 %, moreover, the increment in consumption efficiency reaches the maximum value of 12 %. The results indicate that the staggered arrangement is beneficial to the mass transfer and biochemical reaction.

  10. Simulated flux-lattice melting and magnetic-field distributions in high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.W.; Schafroth, S.; Meier, P.F.

    1995-08-01

    Numerical calculations of the magnetic-field distribution {ital p}({ital B}) in high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductors have been performed for different regimes of the {ital B}-{ital T} phase diagram to provide a basis for the interpretation of results from muon spin rotation experiments, which measure {ital p}({ital B}) directly. Using a Monte Carlo approach, flux-lattice melting was simulated and the corresponding {ital p}({ital B}) was obtained. Both above and below the melting transition, we find excellent agreement with the line shapes measured in a recent experiment in Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} if in addition the shape of the sample is taken into account.

  11. Simulation of ion beam scattering in a gas stripper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxeiner, Sascha; Suter, Martin; Christl, Marcus; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2015-10-01

    Ion beam scattering in the gas stripper of an accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) enlarges the beam phase space and broadens its energy distribution. As the size of the injected beam depends on the acceleration voltage through phase space compression, the stripper becomes a limiting factor of the overall system transmission especially for low energy AMS system in the sub MV region. The spatial beam broadening and collisions with the accelerator tube walls are a possible source for machine background and energy loss fluctuations influence the mass resolution and thus isotope separation. To investigate the physical processes responsible for these effects, a computer simulation approach was chosen. Monte Carlo simulation methods are applied to simulate elastic two body scattering processes in screened Coulomb potentials in a (gas) stripper and formulas are derived to correctly determine random collision parameters and free path lengths for arbitrary (and non-homogeneous) gas densities. A simple parametric form for the underlying scattering cross sections is discussed which features important scaling behaviors. An implementation of the simulation was able to correctly model the data gained with the TANDY AMS system at ETH Zurich. The experiment covered transmission measurements of uranium ions in helium and beam profile measurements after the ion beam passed through the He-stripper. Beam profiles measured up to very high stripper densities could be understood in full system simulations including the relevant ion optics. The presented model therefore simulates the fundamental physics of the interaction between an ion beam and a gas stripper reliably. It provides a powerful and flexible tool for optimizing existing AMS stripper geometries and for designing new, state of the art low energy AMS systems.

  12. Off-gas Adsorption Model and Simulation - OSPREY

    SciTech Connect

    Veronica J Rutledge

    2013-10-01

    The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes is expected to provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. To support this capability, a modeling effort focused on the off-gas treatment system of a used nuclear fuel recycling facility is in progress. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and REcoverY (OSPREY) models the adsorption of offgas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas composition, sorbent and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data can be obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. In addition to concentration data, the model predicts temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. A description of the OSPREY model, results from krypton adsorption modeling and plans for modeling the behavior of iodine, xenon, and tritium will be discussed.

  13. A Modified LBM Model for Simulating Gas Seepage in Fissured Coal Considering Klinkenberg Effects and Adsorbability-Desorbability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yun-Liang; Teng, Gui-Rong; Zhang, Ze

    2010-01-01

    A modified Lattice-Boltzmann method is proposed by considering the Klinkenberg effect and adsorbability-desorbability for the purpose of simulating methane gas seepage in fissured coal. The results show that the Klinkenberg effect has a little influence on methane gas seepage in fissured coal, so it can be neglected in engineering computations for simplicity. If both the Klinkenberg effect and the adsorbability-desorbability are considered, the Klinkenberg influence on gas pressure decreases as the Darcy coefficient increases. It is found by gas drainage simulations that near a drainage hole, the effect of adsorption and desorption cannot be neglected, and the location of the drainage hole has a great influence on drainage efficient λ when the hole is just located at the mid-zone of the coal seam, λ is 0.691808; when the hole is excursion down to 1.0 m from the mid-zone of coal seam, λ decreases to 0.668631; when the hole is excursion up or down to 2.0 m from the mid-zone of coal seam, λ decreases to 0.632917. The simulations supply an effective approach for optimizing the gas drainage hole location.

  14. Atomistic-Scale Simulations of Defect Formation in Graphene under Noble Gas Ion Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Kichul; Rahnamoun, Ali; Swett, Jacob L; Iberi, Vighter; Cullen, David A; Vlassiouk, Ivan V; Belianinov, Alex; Jesse, Stephen; Sang, Xiahan; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Rondinone, Adam J; Unocic, Raymond R; van Duin, Adri C T

    2016-09-27

    Despite the frequent use of noble gas ion irradiation of graphene, the atomistic-scale details, including the effects of dose, energy, and ion bombardment species on defect formation, and the associated dynamic processes involved in the irradiations and subsequent relaxation have not yet been thoroughly studied. Here, we simulated the irradiation of graphene with noble gas ions and the subsequent effects of annealing. Lattice defects, including nanopores, were generated after the annealing of the irradiated graphene, which was the result of structural relaxation that allowed the vacancy-type defects to coalesce into a larger defect. Larger nanopores were generated by irradiation with a series of heavier noble gas ions, due to a larger collision cross section that led to more detrimental effects in the graphene, and by a higher ion dose that increased the chance of displacing the carbon atoms from graphene. Overall trends in the evolution of defects with respect to a dose, as well as the defect characteristics, were in good agreement with experimental results. Additionally, the statistics in the defect types generated by different irradiating ions suggested that the most frequently observed defect types were Stone-Thrower-Wales (STW) defects for He(+) irradiation and monovacancy (MV) defects for all other ion irradiations.

  15. Surface growth for molten silicon infiltration into carbon millimeter-sized channels: Lattice-Boltzmann simulations, experiments and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergi, Danilo; Camarano, Antonio; Molina, José Miguel; Ortona, Alberto; Narciso, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The process of liquid silicon (Si) infiltration is investigated for channels with radii from 0.25[mm] to 0.75[mm] drilled in compact carbon (C) preforms. The advantage of this setup is that the study of the phenomenon results can be simplified. For comparison purposes, attempts are made in order to work out a framework for evaluating the accuracy of simulations. The approach relies on dimensionless numbers involving the properties of the surface reaction. It turns out that complex hydrodynamic behavior derived from second Newton law can be made consistent with Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulations. The experiments give clear evidence that the growth of silicon carbide (SiC) proceeds in two different stages and basic mechanisms are highlighted. LB simulations prove to be an effective tool for the description of the growing phase. Namely, essential experimental constraints can be implemented. As a result, the existing models are useful to gain more insight on the process of reactive infiltration into porous media in the first stage of penetration, i.e. up to pore closure because of surface growth. A way allowing one to implement the resistance from chemical reaction in Darcy law is also proposed.

  16. Chemisorption of SO 2 on graphite surface: A theoretical ab initio and ideal lattice gas model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pliego, Josefredo R.; Resende, Stella M.; Humeres, Eduardo

    2005-07-01

    The first step of the reaction of SO 2 with the graphite surface, corresponding to the chemisorption process, was investigated at ab initio MP2/6-31G(d)//HF/6-31G(d) level of theory using pyrene and its dehydrogenated derivatives as models. We have considered three possible adsorption sites: the insaturation of the fused aromatic rings (basal plane), the benzyne structure of the armchair edge and the triplet biradical species of the zigzag edge. Our results show that the adsorption on the fused aromatic rings is very unfavorable, with adsorption energies positive by 80-90 kcal mol -1. On the other side, the adsorption on the armchair edge have energies in the range of -5 to -51 kcal mol -1, while the adsorption on the zigzag edge is the most favorable, with energies of -61 to -100 kcal mol -1. Adsorption thermodynamics data were obtained from ab initio calculations combined with an ideal lattice gas model, which leads to a Langmuir like adsorption isotherm. At 900 °C, corresponding to the experimental conditions, only the zigzag edge will be fully covered with SO 2 molecules, which bound to the surface through two C-O bonds, forming a five member ring, or one C-O and one C-S bond through a four member ring. The present study can be relevant for SO 2 adsorption on carbon nanotubes.

  17. Hysteresis phenomena of the two dimensional electron gas density in lattice-matched InAlN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Sang, Ling; Yang, Xuelin Cheng, Jianpeng; Guo, Lei; Hu, Anqi; Xiang, Yong; Yu, Tongjun; Xu, Fujun; Tang, Ning; Jia, Lifang; He, Zhi; Wang, Maojun; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, Bo; Ge, Weikun

    2015-08-03

    High-temperature transport properties in high-mobility lattice-matched InAlN/GaN heterostructures have been investigated. An interesting hysteresis phenomenon of the two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) density is observed in the temperature-dependent Hall measurements. After high-temperature thermal cycles treatment, the reduction of the 2DEG density is observed, which is more serious in thinner InAlN barrier samples. This reduction can then be recovered by light illumination. We attribute these behaviors to the shallow trap states with energy level above the Fermi level in the GaN buffer layer. The electrons in the 2DEG are thermal-excited when temperature is increased and then trapped by these shallow trap states in the buffer layer, resulting in the reduction and hysteresis phenomenon of their density. Three trap states are observed in the GaN buffer layer and C{sub Ga} may be one of the candidates responsible for the observed behaviors. Our results provide an alternative approach to assess the quality of InAlN/GaN heterostructures for applications in high-temperature electronic devices.

  18. Lattice-Boltzmann-based two-phase thermal model for simulating phase change.

    PubMed

    Kamali, M R; Gillissen, J J J; van den Akker, H E A; Sundaresan, Sankaran

    2013-09-01

    A lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is presented for solving the energy conservation equation in two phases when the phase change effects are included in the model. This approach employs multiple distribution functions, one for a pseudotemperature scalar variable and the rest for the various species. A nonideal equation of state (EOS) is introduced by using a pseudopotential LB model. The evolution equation for the pseudotemperature variable is constructed in such a manner that in the continuum limit one recovers the well known macroscopic energy conservation equation for the mixtures. Heats of reaction, the enthalpy change associated with the phase change, and the diffusive transport of enthalpy are all taken into account; but the dependence of enthalpy on pressure, which is usually a small effect in most nonisothermal flows encountered in chemical reaction systems, is ignored. The energy equation is coupled to the LB equations for species transport and pseudopotential interaction forces through the EOS by using the filtered local pseudotemperature field. The proposed scheme is validated against simple test problems for which analytical solutions can readily be obtained.

  19. Structure of a turbulent crossbar near-wake studied by means of lattice Boltzmann simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djenidi, Lyazid

    2008-03-01

    The turbulent near-wake of a crossbar is investigated numerically with the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The crossbar is made up of two perpendicular square bars arranged in a biplane configuration and is included in the computational domain. The Reynolds number based on a bar diameter is about 1600. The numerical results are first tested against results of both particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). The LBM data compare well with the PIV and LDV data. In particular, the LBM reproduces the generation of vortical structures at the crossbar as observed in the PIV data. The numerical results reveal the presence of intermittent lateral motions along the span of the two bars, yielding fingerlike structures. It is argued that these motions contribute to the formation of streamwise vortical structures just behind the crossbar. These streamwise structures interlace with lateral structures also generated at the crossbar. The region over which this activity takes place is about four diameters. Within this region, the turbulent kinetic energy at the crossbar centerline increases and reaches a maximum at a distance of about three diameters. As the downstream distance increases, the individual wakes merge to form a single wake with features, for x/D≥20 , similar to those observed in grid-generated turbulence.

  20. Hydrodynamic instabilities of near-critical CO2 flow in microchannels: Lattice Boltzmann simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdych, D. J.; Georgiadis, J. G.; Buckius, R. O.

    2004-05-01

    Motivated by systematic CO2 evaporation experiments which recently became available (J. Pettersen, "Flow vaporization of CO2 in microchannel tubes," Doctor technicae thesis, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 2002), the present work constitutes an exploratory investigation of isothermal flow of CO2 near its liquid-vapor critical point through a long 5 μm diameter microchannel. A modified van der Waals constitutive model—with properties closely approximating those of "real" near-critical CO2—is incorporated in a two-dimensional lattice Boltzmann hydrodynamics model by embedding a dimensionless parameter X, with X→1 denoting the "real" fluid. The hydrodynamic phenomena resulting by imposing a constant pressure gradient along a periodic channel are investigated by considering two regimes in tandem: (1) transition from bubbly to annular flow with a liquid film formed at the channel walls and (2) destabilization of the liquid film by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. Due to numerical constraints, intrinsic modeling errors are introduced and are shown to be associated with discrepancies in the relative vapor-liquid interfacial thickness, which is expressed by X. The effects of these errors are investigated both theoretically and numerically in the physical limit X→1. Numerically determined flow patterns compare qualitatively well with direct visualization results obtained by Pettersen. Overall, the characteristics of isothermal near-critical two-phase flow in microchannels can be reproduced by the appropriate modification of the thermophysical properties of CO2.

  1. Lattice Boltzmann kinetic modeling and simulation of thermal liquid-vapor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yanbiao; Xu, Aiguo; Zhang, Guangcai; Wang, Junqi; Yu, Xijun; Yang, Yang

    2014-04-01

    We present a highly efficient lattice Boltzmann (LB) kinetic model for thermal liquid-vapor system. Three key components are as below: (i) a discrete velocity model (DVM) by Kataoka et al. [Phys. Rev. E69, 035701(R) (2004)]; (ii) a forcing term Ii aiming to describe the interfacial stress and recover the van der Waals (VDW) equation of state (EOS) by Gonnella et al. [Phys. Rev. E76, 036703 (2007)] and (iii) a Windowed Fast Fourier Transform (WFFT) scheme and its inverse by our group [Phys. Rev. E84, 046715 (2011)] for solving the spatial derivatives, together with a second-order Runge-Kutta (RK) finite difference scheme for solving the temporal derivative in the LB equation. The model is verified and validated by well-known benchmark tests. The results recovered from the present model are well consistent with previous ones [Phys. Rev. E84, 046715 (2011)] or theoretical analysis. The usage of less discrete velocities, high-order RK algorithm and WFFT scheme with 16th-order in precision makes the model more efficient by about 10 times and more accurate than the original one.

  2. Consistent simulation of droplet evaporation based on the phase-field multiphase lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Safari, Hesameddin; Rahimian, Mohammad Hassan; Krafczyk, Manfred

    2014-09-01

    In the present article, we extend and generalize our previous article [H. Safari, M. H. Rahimian, and M. Krafczyk, Phys. Rev. E 88, 013304 (2013)] to include the gradient of the vapor concentration at the liquid-vapor interface as the driving force for vaporization allowing the evaporation from the phase interface to work for arbitrary temperatures. The lattice Boltzmann phase-field multiphase modeling approach with a suitable source term, accounting for the effect of the phase change on the velocity field, is used to solve the two-phase flow field. The modified convective Cahn-Hilliard equation is employed to reconstruct the dynamics of the interface topology. The coupling between the vapor concentration and temperature field at the interface is modeled by the well-known Clausius-Clapeyron correlation. Numerous validation tests including one-dimensional and two-dimensional cases are carried out to demonstrate the consistency of the presented model. Results show that the model is able to predict the flow features around and inside an evaporating droplet quantitatively in quiescent as well as convective environments. PMID:25314562

  3. Role of ions in thermal diffusion of DNA: Lattice Boltzmann based simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammack, Audrey; Rana, Daharsh; May, Karl; Bledsoe, Matthew; Kreft Pearce, Jennifer; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2008-11-01

    The Ludwig-Soret effect, the migrarion of a species as a consequence of a temperature gradient, has been a factor in the development of microfluidic laboratory instrumentation. In a system consisting of DNA in a buffered salt solution exposed to a temperature gradient in micro channels, it has previously been observed that DNA will migrate to the colder regions, yielding an irregular density profile. We present a computational model in order to quantify the motion of the particles and describe the causes of this migration. In this construct, the salt ions are modeled as charged point particles and DNA as charged beads connected by springs. The motions of particles is calculated by using a combination of Brownian dynamics and the lattice Boltzmann method. We observe that the salt are also affected by the temperature gradient, creating a density profile. By varying the number of ions, the charge of the ions and the length of the DNA chain, we observe that the accumulation of ions in the cold region enhances the migration of the DNA to those regions of the channel.

  4. Lattice-Boltzmann simulation of inertial particle-laden flow around an obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadi, Hamed; Shojaei-Zadeh, Shahab; Morris, Jeffrey F.

    2016-06-01

    The lattice-Boltzmann method is used to compute the flow of a particle suspension of dilute volume fraction ϕ ≤0.08 around obstacles. The work focuses on the interaction of particles with the obstacle and the flow behavior in and around the recirculating wake behind the obstacle. Motivated by microfluidic experiments of dilute suspension flow over obstacles of circular, square, and other shapes showing depletion of particles in the wake behind the obstacle, we focus on the entry and exit from the wake for isolated particles, small groups of particles, and a suspension of many particles. All work is at conditions well below the Reynolds number for the transition to unsteady flow and vortex shedding. The dynamics of an isolated particle inside the recirculating wake flow exhibits motion toward a limit cycle near the outer boundary of the wake. By increasing particle density above the fluid and increasing the size of the particle, we determine the upper limits of these variables yielding a limit cycle trajectory. Hydrodynamic interaction between particles in a many-particle suspension is shown to lead to exchange of particles between the wake zone and free stream.

  5. Effect of interfacial layer on water flow in nanochannels: Lattice Boltzmann simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yakang; Liu, Xuefeng; Liu, Zilong; Lu, Shuangfang; Xue, Qingzhong

    2016-04-01

    A novel interfacial model was proposed to understand water flow mechanism in nanochannels. Based on our pore-throat nanochannel model, the effect of interfacial layer on water flow in nanochannels was quantitatively studied using Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). It is found that both the permeability of nanochannel and water velocity in the nanochannel dramatically decrease with increasing the thickness of interfacial layer. The permeability of nanochannel with pore radius of 10 nm decreases by about three orders of magnitude when the thickness of interfacial layer is changed from 0 nm to 3 nm gradually. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that the cross-section shape has a great effect on the water flow inside nanochannel and the effect of interfacial layer on the permeability of nanochannel has a close relationship with cross-section shape when the pore size is smaller than 12 nm. Besides, both pore-throat ratio and throat length can greatly affect water flow in nanochannels, and the influence of interfacial layer on water flow in nanochannels becomes more evident with increasing pore-throat ratio and throat length. Our theoretical results provide a simple and effective method to study the flow phenomena in nano-porous media, particularly to quantitatively study the interfacial layer effect in nano-porous media.

  6. Solutions for correlations along the coexistence curve and at the critical point of a kagomé lattice gas with three-particle interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, J. H.; Muttalib, K. A.; Tanaka, T.

    2008-01-01

    We consider a two-dimensional (d=2) kagomé lattice gas model with attractive three-particle interactions around each triangular face of the kagomé lattice. Exact solutions are obtained for multiparticle correlations along the liquid and vapor branches of the coexistence curve and at criticality. The correlation solutions are also determined along the continuation of the curvilinear diameter of the coexistence region into the disordered fluid region. The method generates a linear algebraic system of correlation identities with coefficients dependent only upon the interaction parameter. Using a priori knowledge of pertinent solutions for the density and elementary triplet correlation, one finds a closed and linearly independent set of correlation identities defined upon a spatially compact nine-site cluster of the kagomé lattice. Resulting exact solution curves of the correlations are plotted and discussed as functions of the temperature and are compared with corresponding results in a traditional kagomé lattice gas having nearest-neighbor pair interactions. An example of application for the multiparticle correlations is demonstrated in cavitation theory.

  7. Finite-volume versus streaming-based lattice Boltzmann algorithm for fluid-dynamics simulations: A one-to-one accuracy and performance study.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Kalyan; Mompean, Gilmar; Calzavarini, Enrico

    2016-02-01

    A finite-volume (FV) discretization method for the lattice Boltzmann (LB) equation, which combines high accuracy with limited computational cost is presented. In order to assess the performance of the FV method we carry out a systematic comparison, focused on accuracy and computational performances, with the standard streaming lattice Boltzmann equation algorithm. In particular we aim at clarifying whether and in which conditions the proposed algorithm, and more generally any FV algorithm, can be taken as the method of choice in fluid-dynamics LB simulations. For this reason the comparative analysis is further extended to the case of realistic flows, in particular thermally driven flows in turbulent conditions. We report the successful simulation of high-Rayleigh number convective flow performed by a lattice Boltzmann FV-based algorithm with wall grid refinement.

  8. Dynamic correlation functions and Boltzmann-Langevin approach for driven one-dimensional lattice gas.

    PubMed

    Pierobon, Paolo; Parmeggiani, Andrea; von Oppen, Felix; Frey, Erwin

    2005-09-01

    We study the dynamics of the totally asymmetric exclusion process with open boundaries by phenomenological theories complemented by extensive Monte Carlo simulations. Upon combining domain wall theory with a kinetic approach known as Boltzmann-Langevin theory we are able to give a complete qualitative picture of the dynamics in the low- and high-density regimes and at the corresponding phase boundary. At the coexistence line between high- and low-density phases we observe a time scale separation between local density fluctuations and collective domain wall motion, which are well accounted for by the Boltzmann-Langevin and domain wall theory, respectively. We present Monte Carlo data for the correlation functions and power spectra in the full parameter range of the model.

  9. Statistical Simulation of Gas Flows through Short Rough Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markelov, G.; Stefanov, S.

    2011-11-01

    Rarefied gas flow though the rough microchannel is modeled using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). Deterministic and statistical methods of wall roughness deception have been applied. The well-known DSMC-based software, SMILE, allows one to model a flow through the channel with an arbitrary shape, here series of triangular obstacles has been modeled. A statistical approach is based on porous layer model of dusty gas and the model has been implemented in SMILE. Results obtained with two methods are compared and channel performance is presented for different pressure ratio and size of obstacles.

  10. Random walk on lattices: Graph-theoretic approach to simulating long-range diffusion-attachment growth models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limkumnerd, Surachate

    2014-03-01

    Interest in thin-film fabrication for industrial applications have driven both theoretical and computational aspects of modeling its growth. One of the earliest attempts toward understanding the morphological structure of a film's surface is through a class of solid-on-solid limited-mobility growth models such as the Family, Wolf-Villain, or Das Sarma-Tamborenea models, which have produced fascinating surface roughening behaviors. These models, however, restrict the motion of an incidence atom to be within the neighborhood of its landing site, which renders them inept for simulating long-distance surface diffusion such as that observed in thin-film growth using a molecular-beam epitaxy technique. Naive extension of these models by repeatedly applying the local diffusion rules for each hop to simulate large diffusion length can be computationally very costly when certain statistical aspects are demanded. We present a graph-theoretic approach to simulating a long-range diffusion-attachment growth model. Using the Markovian assumption and given a local diffusion bias, we derive the transition probabilities for a random walker to traverse from one lattice site to the others after a large, possibly infinite, number of steps. Only computation with linear-time complexity is required for the surface morphology calculation without other probabilistic measures. The formalism is applied, as illustrations, to simulate surface growth on a two-dimensional flat substrate and around a screw dislocation under the modified Wolf-Villain diffusion rule. A rectangular spiral ridge is observed in the latter case with a smooth front feature similar to that obtained from simulations using the well-known multiple registration technique. An algorithm for computing the inverse of a class of substochastic matrices is derived as a corollary.

  11. Gas hydrate, fluid flow and free gas: Formation of the bottom-simulating reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haacke, R. Ross; Westbrook, Graham K.; Hyndman, Roy D.

    2007-09-01

    Gas hydrate in continental margins is commonly indicated by a prominent bottom-simulating seismic reflector (BSR) that occurs a few hundred metres below the seabed. The BSR marks the boundary between sediments containing gas hydrate above and free gas below. Most of the reflection amplitude is caused by the underlying free gas. Gas hydrate can occur without a BSR, however, and the controls on its formation are not well understood. Here we describe two complementary mechanisms for free gas accumulation beneath the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). The first is the well-recognised hydrate recycling mechanism that generates gas from dissociating hydrate when the base of the GHSZ moves upward relative to hydrate-bearing sediment. The second is a recently identified mechanism in which the relationship between the advection and diffusion of dissolved gas with the local solubility curve allows the liquid phase to become saturated in a thick layer beneath the GHSZ when hydrate is present near its base. This mechanism for gas production (called the solubility-curvature mechanism) is possible in systems where the influence of diffusion becomes important relative to the influence of advection and where the gas-water solubility decreases to a minimum several hundred metres below the GHSZ. We investigate a number of areas in which gas hydrate occurs to determine where gas formation is dominated by the solubility-curvature mechanism and where it is dominated by hydrate recycling. We show that the former is dominant in areas with low rates of upward fluid flow (such as old, rifted continental margins), low rates of seafloor uplift, and high geothermal gradient and/or pressure. Conversely, free-gas formation is dominated by hydrate recycling where there are rapid rates of upward fluid flow and seabed uplift (such as in subduction zone accretionary wedges). Using these two mechanisms to investigate the formation of free gas beneath gas hydrate in continental margins, we are able

  12. Towards Direct Numerical Simulation of mass and energy fluxes at the soil-atmospheric interface with advanced Lattice Boltzmann methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Krafczyk, Manfred; Geier, Martin; Schönherr, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The quantification of soil evaporation and of soil water content dynamics near the soil surface are critical in the physics of land-surface processes on many scales and are dominated by multi-component and multi-phase mass and energy fluxes between the ground and the atmosphere. Although it is widely recognized that both liquid and gaseous water movement are fundamental factors in the quantification of soil heat flux and surface evaporation, their computation has only started to be taken into account using simplified macroscopic models. As the flow field over the soil can be safely considered as turbulent, it would be natural to study the detailed transient flow dynamics by means of Large Eddy Simulation (LES [1]) where the three-dimensional flow field is resolved down to the laminar sub-layer. Yet this requires very fine resolved meshes allowing a grid resolution of at least one order of magnitude below the typical grain diameter of the soil under consideration. In order to gain reliable turbulence statistics, up to several hundred eddy turnover times have to be simulated which adds up to several seconds of real time. Yet, the time scale of the receding saturated water front dynamics in the soil is on the order of hours. Thus we are faced with the task of solving a transient turbulent flow problem including the advection-diffusion of water vapour over the soil-atmospheric interface represented by a realistic tomographic reconstruction of a real porous medium taken from laboratory probes. Our flow solver is based on the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) [2] which has been extended by a Cumulant approach similar to the one described in [3,4] to minimize the spurious coupling between the degrees of freedom in previous LBM approaches and can be used as an implicit LES turbulence model due to its low numerical dissipation and increased stability at high Reynolds numbers. The kernel has been integrated into the research code Virtualfluids [5] and delivers up to 30% of the

  13. On Simulations of High-Density Ratio Flows Using Color-Gradient Multiphase Lattice Boltzmann Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haibo; Huang, Jun-Jie; Lu, Xi-Yun; Sukop, Michael C.

    2013-04-01

    Originally, the color-gradient model proposed by Rothman and Keller (R-K) was unable to simulate immiscible two-phase flows with different densities. Later, a revised version of the R-K model was proposed by Grunau et al. [D. Grunau, S. Chen and K. Eggert, Phys. Fluids A: Fluid Dyn. 5, 2557 (1993).] and claimed it was able to simulate two-phase flows with high-density contrast. Some studies investigate high-density contrast two-phase flows using this revised R-K model but they are mainly focused on the stationary spherical droplet and bubble cases. Through theoretical analysis of the model, we found that in the recovered Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations which are derived from the R-K model, there are unwanted extra terms. These terms disappear for simulations of two-phase flows with identical densities, so the correct N-S equations are fully recovered. Hence, the R-K model is able to give accurate results for flows with identical densities. However, the unwanted terms may affect the accuracy of simulations significantly when the densities of the two fluids are different. For the simulations of spherical bubbles and droplets immersed in another fluid (where the densities of the two fluids are different), the extra terms may not be important and hence, in terms of surface tension, accurate results can be obtained. However, generally speaking, the unwanted term may be significant in many flows and the R-K model is unable to obtain the correct results due to the effect of the extra terms. Through numerical simulations of parallel two-phase flows in a channel, we confirm that the R-K model is not appropriate for general two-phase flows with different densities. A scheme to eliminate the unwanted terms is also proposed and the scheme works well for cases of density ratios less than 10.

  14. Goal-oriented sensitivity analysis for lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Katsoulakis, Markos A.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we propose a new class of coupling methods for the sensitivity analysis of high dimensional stochastic systems and in particular for lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC). Sensitivity analysis for stochastic systems is typically based on approximating continuous derivatives with respect to model parameters by the mean value of samples from a finite difference scheme. Instead of using independent samples the proposed algorithm reduces the variance of the estimator by developing a strongly correlated-"coupled"- stochastic process for both the perturbed and unperturbed stochastic processes, defined in a common state space. The novelty of our construction is that the new coupled process depends on the targeted observables, e.g., coverage, Hamiltonian, spatial correlations, surface roughness, etc., hence we refer to the proposed method as goal-oriented sensitivity analysis. In particular, the rates of the coupled Continuous Time Markov Chain are obtained as solutions to a goal-oriented optimization problem, depending on the observable of interest, by considering the minimization functional of the corresponding variance. We show that this functional can be used as a diagnostic tool for the design and evaluation of different classes of couplings. Furthermore, the resulting KMC sensitivity algorithm has an easy implementation that is based on the Bortz-Kalos-Lebowitz algorithm's philosophy, where events are divided in classes depending on level sets of the observable of interest. Finally, we demonstrate in several examples including adsorption, desorption, and diffusion Kinetic Monte Carlo that for the same confidence interval and observable, the proposed goal-oriented algorithm can be two orders of magnitude faster than existing coupling algorithms for spatial KMC such as the Common Random Number approach. We also provide a complete implementation of the proposed sensitivity analysis algorithms, including various spatial KMC examples, in a supplementary MATLAB

  15. Goal-oriented sensitivity analysis for lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Katsoulakis, Markos A

    2014-03-28

    In this paper we propose a new class of coupling methods for the sensitivity analysis of high dimensional stochastic systems and in particular for lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC). Sensitivity analysis for stochastic systems is typically based on approximating continuous derivatives with respect to model parameters by the mean value of samples from a finite difference scheme. Instead of using independent samples the proposed algorithm reduces the variance of the estimator by developing a strongly correlated-"coupled"- stochastic process for both the perturbed and unperturbed stochastic processes, defined in a common state space. The novelty of our construction is that the new coupled process depends on the targeted observables, e.g., coverage, Hamiltonian, spatial correlations, surface roughness, etc., hence we refer to the proposed method as goal-oriented sensitivity analysis. In particular, the rates of the coupled Continuous Time Markov Chain are obtained as solutions to a goal-oriented optimization problem, depending on the observable of interest, by considering the minimization functional of the corresponding variance. We show that this functional can be used as a diagnostic tool for the design and evaluation of different classes of couplings. Furthermore, the resulting KMC sensitivity algorithm has an easy implementation that is based on the Bortz-Kalos-Lebowitz algorithm's philosophy, where events are divided in classes depending on level sets of the observable of interest. Finally, we demonstrate in several examples including adsorption, desorption, and diffusion Kinetic Monte Carlo that for the same confidence interval and observable, the proposed goal-oriented algorithm can be two orders of magnitude faster than existing coupling algorithms for spatial KMC such as the Common Random Number approach. We also provide a complete implementation of the proposed sensitivity analysis algorithms, including various spatial KMC examples, in a supplementary MATLAB

  16. Goal-oriented sensitivity analysis for lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Katsoulakis, Markos A.

    2014-03-28

    In this paper we propose a new class of coupling methods for the sensitivity analysis of high dimensional stochastic systems and in particular for lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC). Sensitivity analysis for stochastic systems is typically based on approximating continuous derivatives with respect to model parameters by the mean value of samples from a finite difference scheme. Instead of using independent samples the proposed algorithm reduces the variance of the estimator by developing a strongly correlated-“coupled”- stochastic process for both the perturbed and unperturbed stochastic processes, defined in a common state space. The novelty of our construction is that the new coupled process depends on the targeted observables, e.g., coverage, Hamiltonian, spatial correlations, surface roughness, etc., hence we refer to the proposed method as goal-oriented sensitivity analysis. In particular, the rates of the coupled Continuous Time Markov Chain are obtained as solutions to a goal-oriented optimization problem, depending on the observable of interest, by considering the minimization functional of the corresponding variance. We show that this functional can be used as a diagnostic tool for the design and evaluation of different classes of couplings. Furthermore, the resulting KMC sensitivity algorithm has an easy implementation that is based on the Bortz–Kalos–Lebowitz algorithm's philosophy, where events are divided in classes depending on level sets of the observable of interest. Finally, we demonstrate in several examples including adsorption, desorption, and diffusion Kinetic Monte Carlo that for the same confidence interval and observable, the proposed goal-oriented algorithm can be two orders of magnitude faster than existing coupling algorithms for spatial KMC such as the Common Random Number approach. We also provide a complete implementation of the proposed sensitivity analysis algorithms, including various spatial KMC examples, in a supplementary

  17. Improving Gas Storage Development Planning Through Simulation-Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, V.M.; Ammer, J.; Trick, M.D.

    2000-07-25

    This is the first of two papers describing the application of simulator-optimization methods to a natural gas storage field development planning problem. The results presented here illustrate the large gains in cost-effectiveness that can be made by employing the reservoir simulator as the foundation for a wide-ranging search for solutions to management problems. The current paper illustrates the application of these techniques given a deterministic view of the reservoir. A companion paper will illustrate adaptations needed to accommodate uncertainties regarding reservoir properties.

  18. Learning about the Unit Cell and Crystal Lattice with Computerized Simulations and Games: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luealamai, Sutha; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2012-01-01

    The authors have developed a computer-based learning module on the unit cell of various types of crystal. The module has two components: the virtual unit cell (VUC) part and the subsequent unit cell hunter part. The VUC is a virtual reality simulation for students to actively arrive at the unit cell from exploring, from a broad view, the crystal…

  19. Superfluidity and solid order in a two-component Bose gas with dipolar interactions in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuno, Yoshihito; Suzuki, Keita; Ichinose, Ikuo

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we study an extended bosonic t-J model in an optical lattice, which describes two-component hard-core bosons with nearest-neighbor pseudospin interactions and, also, inter- and intraspecies dipole-dipole interactions. In particular, we focus on the case in which two-component hard-core bosons have antiparallel polarized dipoles with each other. The global phase diagram is studied by means of the Gutzwiller variational method and also quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations. Both calculations show that a striped solid order, besides a checkerboard one, appears as a result of the dipole-dipole interactions. By QMC, we find that two kinds of supersolids (SSs) form, i.e., checkerboard SS and striped SS, and we also verify the existence of an exotic phase between the striped solid and the checkerboard SS. Finally, by QMC, we study the t-J-like model, which was recently realized experimentally by A. de Paz et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 185305 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.185305].

  20. Numerical simulation of the countercurrent flow in a gas centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.; Gentry, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    A finite difference method is presented for the numerical simulation of the axisymmetric countercurrent flows in gas centrifuge. A time-marching technique is used to relax an arbitrary initial condition to the desired steady-state solution. All boundary layers may be resolved, and nonlinear effects may be included. Numerical examples are presented. It is concluded that this technique is capable of accurately predicting the performance of a wide variety of machines under all operating conditions of interest.

  1. Off-gas adsorption model and simulation - OSPREY

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, V.J.

    2013-07-01

    A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes is expected to provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. To support this capability, a modeling effort focused on the off-gas treatment system of a used nuclear fuel recycling facility is in progress. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and Recovery (OSPREY) models the adsorption of offgas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas composition, sorbent and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data can be obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. In addition to concentration data, the model predicts temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. A description of the OSPREY model, results from krypton adsorption modeling and plans for modeling the behavior of iodine, xenon, and tritium will be discussed. (author)

  2. Investigation of the Effect of the Tortuous Pore Structure on Water Diffusion through a Polymer Film Using Lattice Boltzmann Simulations.

    PubMed

    Gebäck, Tobias; Marucci, Mariagrazia; Boissier, Catherine; Arnehed, Johan; Heintz, Alexei

    2015-04-23

    Understanding how the pore structure influences the mass transport through a porous material is important in several applications, not the least in the design of polymer film coatings intended to control drug release. In this study, a polymer film made of ethyl cellulose and hydroxypropyl cellulose was investigated. The 3D structure of the films was first experimentally characterized using confocal laser scanning microscopy data and then mathematically reconstructed for the whole film thickness. Lattice Boltzmann simulations were performed to compute the effective diffusion coefficient of water in the film and the results were compared to experimental data. The local porosities and pore sizes were also analyzed to determine how the properties of the internal film structure affect the water effective diffusion coefficient. The results show that the top part of the film has lower porosity, lower pore size, and lower connectivity, which results in a much lower effective diffusion coefficient in this part, largely determining the diffusion rate through the entire film. Furthermore, the local effective diffusion coefficients were not proportional to the local film porosity, indicating that the results cannot be explained by a single tortuosity factor. In summary, the proposed methodology of combining microscopy data, mass transport simulations, and pore space analysis can give valuable insights on how the film structure affects the mass transport through the film.

  3. Large eddy simulation of a high speed train geometry under cross-wind with an adaptive lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deiterding, Ralf; Fragner, Moritz M.

    2015-11-01

    Numerical investigations in order to determine the forces induced by side wind onto a train geometry are generally not sufficiently accurate to be used as a predictive tool for regulatory safety assessment. Especially for larger yaw angles, the turbulent cross-wind flow is characterized by highly instationary behavior, driven primarily by vortex shedding on the roof and underside geometric details, i.e., the bogie and wheel systems. While industry-typical Reynolds-averaged turbulence models are not well suited for this scenario, better results are obtained when large eddy simulation (LES) techniques are applied. Here, we employ a recently self-developed weakly compressible lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) with Smagorinsky LES model on hierarchically adaptive block-structured Cartesian meshes. Using a train front-car of 1:25 scale at yaw angle 30° and Re = 250 , 000 as main test case, we compare the LBM results with incompressible large eddy and detached eddy simulations on unstructured boundary-layer type meshes using the OpenFOAM package. It is found that time averaged force and moment predictions from our LBM code compare better to available wind tunnel data, while mesh adaptation and explicit nature of the LBM approach reduce the computational costs considerably.

  4. LBflow: An extensible lattice Boltzmann framework for the simulation of geophysical flows. Part II: usage and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellin, E. W.

    2010-02-01

    LBflow is a flexible, extensible implementation of the lattice Boltzmann method, developed with geophysical applications in mind. The theoretical basis for LBflow, and its implementation, are presented in the companion paper, 'Part I'. This article covers the practical usage of LBflow and presents guidelines for obtaining optimal results from available computing power. The relationships among simulation resolution, accuracy, runtime and memory requirements are investigated in detail. Particular attention is paid to the origin, quantification and minimization of errors. LBflow is validated against analytical, numerical and experimental results for a range of three-dimensional flow geometries. The fluid conductance of prismatic pipes with various cross sections is calculated with LBflow and found to be in excellent agreement with published results. Simulated flow along sinusoidally constricted pipes gives good agreement with experimental data for a wide range of Reynolds number. The permeability of packs of spheres is determined and shown to be in excellent agreement with analytical results. The accuracy of internal flow patterns within the investigated geometries is also in excellent quantitative agreement with published data. The development of vortices within a sinusoidally constricted pipe with increasing Reynolds number is shown, demonstrating the insight that LBflow can offer as a 'virtual laboratory' for fluid flow.

  5. Lattice Boltzmann Simulations of Skin-Friction Drag Reduction in Turbulent Channel Flow with Slip/No Slip Wall Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegari, Amirreza; Akhavan, Rayhaneh

    2011-11-01

    To gain a better understanding of the mechanisms at work in skin friction drag reduction with superhydrophobic surfaces, Lattice Boltzmann simulations were performed in turbulent channels with alternating slip/no slip ridges on the walls. Simulations were performed in turbulent channels of size 5 h × 2 . 5 × 2 h and 10 h × 5 h × 2 h at a base Reynolds number of Reτ ~ 230 . Alternating slip/no slip ridges of width 4 <= w + <= 140 , aligned in the streamwise direction, all with the same fractional area of slip boundary, were studied. Drag reductions of 4%, 8%, 21%, 33% and 47%, corresponding to slip velocities of Uslip /Ubulk = 0 . 05 , 0.1, 0.26, 0.31 and 0.36 were observed for w + = g + = 4, 8, 40, 70 and 140, respectively. The mean velocity profiles display the characteristics of combined slip described by Min and Kim [Min et al. 2004]. The streamwise and spanwise turbulence intensities show large slips at the wall, the magnitude of which increases with increasing drag reduction. Examination of the anisotropy invariant maps shows a shift of turbulence structure towards the one-dimensional turbulence limit near the wall with increasing drag reduction. For z+ > 25 , the turbulence structure returns to the isotropic limit.

  6. Unsteady Flow Simulation of a Sweeping Jet Actuator Using a Lattice-Boltzmann Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duda, B.; Wessels, M.; Fares, E.; Vatsa, V.

    2016-01-01

    Active flow control technology is increasingly used in aerospace applications to control flow separation and to improve aerodynamic performance. In this paper, PowerFLOW is used to simulate the flow through a sweeping jet actuator at two different pressure ratios. The lower pressure ratio leads to a high subsonic flow, whereas the high pressure ratio produces a choked flow condition. Comparison of numerical results with experimental data is shown, which includes qualitatively good agreement of pressure histories and spectra. PIV measurements are also available but the simulation overestimates mean and fluctuation quantities outside the actuator. If supply pressure is matched at one point inside the mixing chamber a good qualitative agreement is achieved at all other monitor points.

  7. Lattice thermal conductivity of ultra high temperature ceramics ZrB{sub 2} and HfB{sub 2} from atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, John W.; Daw, Murray S.; Bauschlicher, Charles W. Jr.

    2011-10-15

    Atomistic Green-Kubo simulations are performed to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity for single crystals of the ultra high temperature ceramics ZrB{sub 2} and HfB{sub 2}. Recently developed interatomic potentials are used for these simulations. Heat current correlation functions show rapid oscillations, which can be identified with mixed metal-Boron optical phonon modes. Results for temperatures from 300K to 1000K are presented.

  8. Lattice simulations of phase morphology on lipid bilayers: Renormalization, membrane shape, and electrostatic dipole interactions

    PubMed Central

    Amazon, Jonathan J.; Feigenson, Gerald W.

    2015-01-01

    When liquid phases coexist at equilibrium but are not driven to minimize domain interfacial contact energy, the resulting patterns of phase domains can have important implications for living cells. In this study we explore some of the interactions and conditions that produce the stable patterned phases that are observed in model lipid mixtures. By use of Monte Carlo simulations we find that background curvature is important for the formation of patterned (modulated) phases. The interactions that stabilize nanoscopic phase separation are still not well understood. We show that inclusion of an electrostatic dipole repulsion with decay lengths as short as two to four lipid diameters can break up domains at the nanometer scale and that the location of the miscibility critical point is sensitive to this interaction. The use of a coarse-grained simulation raises questions about comparing parameters in simulations performed at different length scales. Using renormalization group techniques we show how to reconcile this problem, treating line tension as a running coupling constant. PMID:25353504

  9. Simulations of molecular diffusion in lattices of cells: insights for NMR of red blood cells.

    PubMed Central

    Regan, David G; Kuchel, Philip W

    2002-01-01

    The pulsed field-gradient spin-echo (PGSE) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment, conducted on a suspension of red blood cells (RBC) in a strong magnetic field yields a q-space plot consisting of a series of maxima and minima. This is mathematically analogous to a classical optical diffraction pattern. The method provides a noninvasive and novel means of characterizing cell suspensions that is sensitive to changes in cell shape and packing density. The positions of the features in a q-space plot characterize the rate of exchange across the membrane, cell dimensions, and packing density. A diffusion tensor, containing information regarding the diffusion anisotropy of the system, can also be derived from the PGSE NMR data. In this study, we carried out Monte Carlo simulations of diffusion in suspensions of "virtual" cells that had either biconcave disc (as in RBC) or oblate spheroid geometry. The simulations were performed in a PGSE NMR context thus enabling predictions of q-space and diffusion tensor data. The simulated data were compared with those from real PGSE NMR diffusion experiments on RBC suspensions that had a range of hematocrit values. Methods that facilitate the processing of q-space data were also developed. PMID:12080109

  10. Lattice simulations of phase morphology on lipid bilayers: renormalization, membrane shape, and electrostatic dipole interactions.

    PubMed

    Amazon, Jonathan J; Feigenson, Gerald W

    2014-02-01

    When liquid phases coexist at equilibrium but are not driven to minimize domain interfacial contact energy, the resulting patterns of phase domains can have important implications for living cells. In this study we explore some of the interactions and conditions that produce the stable patterned phases that are observed in model lipid mixtures. By use of Monte Carlo simulations we find that background curvature is important for the formation of patterned (modulated) phases. The interactions that stabilize nanoscopic phase separation are still not well understood. We show that inclusion of an electrostatic dipole repulsion with decay lengths as short as two to four lipid diameters can break up domains at the nanometer scale and that the location of the miscibility critical point is sensitive to this interaction. The use of a coarse-grained simulation raises questions about comparing parameters in simulations performed at different length scales. Using renormalization group techniques we show how to reconcile this problem, treating line tension as a running coupling constant. PMID:25353504

  11. Lattice simulations of phase morphology on lipid bilayers: Renormalization, membrane shape, and electrostatic dipole interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amazon, Jonathan J.; Feigenson, Gerald W.

    2014-02-01

    When liquid phases coexist at equilibrium but are not driven to minimize domain interfacial contact energy, the resulting patterns of phase domains can have important implications for living cells. In this study we explore some of the interactions and conditions that produce the stable patterned phases that are observed in model lipid mixtures. By use of Monte Carlo simulations we find that background curvature is important for the formation of patterned (modulated) phases. The interactions that stabilize nanoscopic phase separation are still not well understood. We show that inclusion of an electrostatic dipole repulsion with decay lengths as short as two to four lipid diameters can break up domains at the nanometer scale and that the location of the miscibility critical point is sensitive to this interaction. The use of a coarse-grained simulation raises questions about comparing parameters in simulations performed at different length scales. Using renormalization group techniques we show how to reconcile this problem, treating line tension as a running coupling constant.

  12. Monte-Carlo simulations of methane/carbon dioxide and ethane/carbon dioxide mixture adsorption in zeolites and comparison with matrix treatment of statistical mechanical lattice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Lawrence J.; Furgani, Akrem; Jalili, Sayed; Manos, George

    2009-05-01

    Adsorption isotherms have been computed by Monte-Carlo simulation for methane/carbon dioxide and ethane/carbon dioxide mixtures adsorbed in the zeolite silicalite. These isotherms show remarkable differences with the ethane/carbon dioxide mixtures displaying strong adsorption preference reversal at high coverage. To explain the differences in the Monte-Carlo mixture isotherms an exact matrix calculation of the statistical mechanics of a lattice model of mixture adsorption in zeolites has been made. The lattice model reproduces the essential features of the Monte-Carlo isotherms, enabling us to understand the differing adsorption behaviour of methane/carbon dioxide and ethane/carbon dioxide mixtures in zeolites.

  13. Sensitivity of rarefied gas simulations of ground tests to gas surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, Jason A.; Deschenes, Timothy R.; Quenneville, Jason; Taylor, Ramona S.

    2014-09-01

    The space environment produces a number of performance challenges to satellite and spacecraft manufacturers that require measurements, including effects from hyperthermal atomic oxygen, charged particles, magnetic fields, spacecraft charging, ultraviolet radiation, micrometeoroids, and cryogenic temperatures. Ground tests involving a simulated space environment help explore these challenges, but also benefit from simulations that predict the anticipated physical phenomena, or help reconcile the measured observations to physical parameters. We present an update and application of a flexible multi-physics software simulation framework intended for predicting space environment performance and ground-test simulations of spacecraft. In this specific application we show how the energy dependent erosion yield may be applied with a rarefied gas dynamics simulation to aid comparison of terrestrial erosion rate measurements and on-orbit materials degradation. For the considered fluoropolymer material, we found that explicit consideration of the atomic oxygen energy distribution could potentially modify the expected correspondence between ground tests and space by 67%.

  14. Fast simulations of gas sloshing and cold front formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roediger, E.; Zuhone, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a simplified and fast method for simulating minor mergers between galaxy clusters. Instead of following the evolution of the dark matter haloes directly by the N-body method, we employ a rigid potential approximation for both clusters. The simulations are run in the rest frame of the more massive cluster and account for the resulting inertial accelerations in an optimized way. We test the reliability of this method for studies of minor merger induced gas sloshing by performing a one-to-one comparison between our simulations and hydro+N-body ones. We find that the rigid potential approximation reproduces the sloshing-related features well except for two artefacts: the temperature just outside the cold fronts is slightly overpredicted, and the outward motion of the cold fronts is delayed by typically 200 Myr. We discuss reasons for both artefacts.

  15. Process Simulation of Gas Metal Arc Welding Software

    2005-09-06

    ARCWELDER is a Windows-based application that simulates gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of steel and aluminum. The software simulates the welding process in an accurate and efficient manner, provides menu items for process parameter selection, and includes a graphical user interface with the option to animate the process. The user enters the base and electrode material, open circuit voltage, wire diameter, wire feed speed, welding speed, and standoff distance. The program computes the size andmore » shape of a square-groove or V-groove weld in the flat position. The program also computes the current, arc voltage, arc length, electrode extension, transfer of droplets, heat input, filler metal deposition, base metal dilution, and centerline cooling rate, in English or SI units. The simulation may be used to select welding parameters that lead to desired operation conditions.« less

  16. Fast Simulations of Gas Sloshing and Cold Front Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roediger, E.; ZuHone, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a simplified and fast method for simulating minor mergers between galaxy clusters. Instead of following the evolution of the dark matter halos directly by the N-body method, we employ a rigid potential approximation for both clusters. The simulations are run in the rest frame of the more massive cluster and account for the resulting inertial accelerations in an optimised way. We test the reliability of this method for studies of minor merger induced gas sloshing by performing a one-to-one comparison between our simulations and hydro+N-body ones. We find that the rigid potential approximation reproduces the sloshing-related features well except for two artifacts: the temperature just outside the cold fronts is slightly over-predicted, and the outward motion of the cold fronts is delayed by typically 200 Myr. We discuss reasons for both artifacts.

  17. Fast Simulations of Gas Sloshing and Cold Front Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roediger, E.; ZuHone, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a simplified and fast method for simulating minor mergers between galaxy clusters. Instead of following the evolution of the dark matter halos directly by the N-body method, we employ a rigid potential approximation for both clusters. The simulations are run in the rest frame of the more massive cluster and account for the resulting inertial accelerations in an optimised way. We test the reliability of this method for studies of minor merger induced gas sloshing by performing a one-to-one comparison between our simulations and hydro+N-body ones. We find that the rigid potential approximation reproduces the sloshing-related features well except for two artefacts: the temperature just outside the cold fronts is slightly over-predicted, and the outward motion of the cold fronts is delayed by typically 200 Myr. We discuss reasons for both artefacts.

  18. Process Simulation of Gas Metal Arc Welding Software

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Paul E.

    2005-09-06

    ARCWELDER is a Windows-based application that simulates gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of steel and aluminum. The software simulates the welding process in an accurate and efficient manner, provides menu items for process parameter selection, and includes a graphical user interface with the option to animate the process. The user enters the base and electrode material, open circuit voltage, wire diameter, wire feed speed, welding speed, and standoff distance. The program computes the size and shape of a square-groove or V-groove weld in the flat position. The program also computes the current, arc voltage, arc length, electrode extension, transfer of droplets, heat input, filler metal deposition, base metal dilution, and centerline cooling rate, in English or SI units. The simulation may be used to select welding parameters that lead to desired operation conditions.

  19. Two critical issues in Langevin simulation of gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Fan, Jing

    2014-12-09

    A stochastic algorithm based on the Langevin equation has been recently proposed to simulate rarefied gas flows. Compared with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, the Langevin method is more efficient in simulating small Knudsen number flows. While it is well-known that the cell sizes and time steps should be smaller than the mean free path and the mean collision time, respectively, in DSMC simulations, the Langevin equation uses a drift term and a diffusion term to describe molecule movements, so no direct molecular collisions have to be modeled. This enables the Langevin simulation to proceed with a much larger time step than that in the DSMC method. Two critical issues in Langevin simulation are addressed in this paper. The first issue is how to reproduce the transport properties as that described by kinetic theory. Transport coefficients predicted by Langevin equation are obtained by using Green-Kubo formulae. The second issue is numerical scheme with boundary conditions. We present two schemes corresponding to small time step and large time step, respectively. For small time step, the scheme is similar to DSMC method as the update of positions and velocities are uncoupled; for large time step, we present an analytical solution of the hitting time, which is the crucial factor for accurate simulation. Velocity-Couette flow, thermal-Couette flow, Rayleigh-Bénard flow and wall-confined problem are simulated by using these two schemes. Our study shows that Langevin simulation is a promising tool to investigate small Knudsen number flows.

  20. Numerical Simulation of the Proton Spin-Lattice Relaxation in Bimetallic Chain Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, S.

    In response to recent proton spin relaxation-time measurements on a bimetallic chain compound NiCu(C7H6N2O6) (H2O)3\\cdot2H2O, we simulate the Raman relaxation process in Heisenberg alternating-spin chains on the assumption of predominantly dipolar hyperfine interactions between protons and magnetic ions. The relaxation time T1 is formulated within the spin-wave theory and is estimated as a function of temperature and an applied field H by a quantum Monte Carlo method. The low-temperature behavior of the relaxation rate T1-1 qualitatively varies with (S,s), while T1-1 is almost proportional to H-1/2 due to the characteristic dispersion relations.

  1. Monte Carlo simulations of microgap gas-filled proportional counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Ashoke; Morton, Edward J.; Key, Martyn J.; Luggar, Russell D.

    1999-09-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have been widely employed to model the interactions of electrons and photons as they travel through and collide with matter. This approach has been applied with some success to the problem of simulating the response of gas-filled proportional counters, mapping out electron transport through the electric field on an interaction-by-interaction basis. These studies focus on the multiplication of electrons as they drift into the high electric field region of the detector and subsequently avalanche. We are using this technique in our new simulation code to depict avalanching in microgap gas-filled proportional counters, in order to investigate the variation of two principle detector properties with the anode pitch used in the detector. Spatial resolution information can be obtained by measuring the lateral diffusion distance of an electron from the point where it is liberated to the point in the detector where it initiates an avalanche. By also modeling the motion of the positive ions that are left behind from the initial avalanche, we are able to gauge the effect of space charge distortion on subsequent avalanches. This effect is particularly important at the high X-ray count rates that we are interested in for our ultimate aim, which is to use the detectors as part of a high-speed tomography system for imaging multiphase oil/water/gas flows.

  2. Simulation of natural gas production from submarine gas hydrate deposits combined with carbon dioxide storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2013-04-01

    The recovery of methane from gas hydrate layers that have been detected in several submarine sediments and permafrost regions around the world so far is considered to be a promising measure to overcome future shortages in natural gas as fuel or raw material for chemical syntheses. Being aware that natural gas resources that can be exploited with conventional technologies are limited, research is going on to open up new sources and develop technologies to produce methane and other energy carriers. Thus various research programs have started since the early 1990s in Japan, USA, Canada, South Korea, India, China and Germany to investigate hydrate deposits and develop technologies to destabilize the hydrates and obtain the pure gas. In recent years, intensive research has focussed on the capture and storage of carbon dioxide from combustion processes to reduce climate change. While different natural or manmade reservoirs like deep aquifers, exhausted oil and gas deposits or other geological formations are considered to store gaseous or liquid carbon dioxide, the storage of carbon dioxide as hydrate in former methane hydrate fields is another promising alternative. Due to beneficial stability conditions, methane recovery may be well combined with CO2 storage in form of hydrates. This has been shown in several laboratory tests and simulations - technical field tests are still in preparation. Within the scope of the German research project »SUGAR«, different technological approaches are evaluated and compared by means of dynamic system simulations and analysis. Detailed mathematical models for the most relevant chemical and physical effects are developed. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into simulation programs like CMG STARS and COMSOL Multiphysics. New simulations based on field data have been carried out. The studies focus on the evaluation of the gas production

  3. Coupled LBM-DEM Three-phase Simulation on Gas Flux Seeping from Marine Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Y.; Sato, T.

    2014-12-01

    One of the main issues of the geological storage of CO2 under the seabed is a risk of CO2 leakage. Once CO2seeps into the ocean, it rises in water column dissolving into seawater, which results in the acidification of seawater and/or returning to the air. Its behaviour significantly depends on flow rate and bubble size (Kano et al., 2009; Dewar et al., 2013). As for porous media, bubble size is generally predicted through simple force balance based on flow rate, surface tension and channel size which is estimated by porosity and grain size. However, in shallow marine sediments, grains could be mobilised and displaced by buoyant gas flow, which causes distinctive phenomena such as blow-out or formation of gas flow conduit. As a result, effective gas flux into seawater can be intermissive, and/or concentrated in narrow area (QICS, 2012; Kawada, 2013). Bubble size is also affected by these phenomena. To predict effective gas flux and bubble size into seawater, three-phase behaviour of gas-water-sediment grains should be revealed. In this presentation, we will report the results of gas-liquid-solid three-phase simulations and their comparisons with experimental and observation data. Size of solid particles is based on grain size composing marine sediments at some CCS project sites. Fluid-particle interactions are solved using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), while the particle-particle interactions are treated by coupling with the Discrete Element method (DEM). References: Dewar, M., Wei, W., McNeil, D., Chen, B., 2013. Small-scale modelling of the physiochemical impacts of CO2leaked from sub-seabed reservoirs or pipelines within the North Sea and surrounding waters. Marine Pollution Bulletin 73(2), 504-515. Kano, Y., Sato, T., Kita, J., Hirabayashi, S., Tabeta, S., 2009. Model prediction on the rise of pCO2 in uniform flows by leakage of CO2purposefully stored under the seabed. Int. J. Greenhouse Gas Control, Vol. 3(5), 617-625. Kawada, R. 2014. A study on the

  4. Optimizing Noble Gas-Water Interactions via Monte Carlo Simulations.

    PubMed

    Warr, Oliver; Ballentine, Chris J; Mu, Junju; Masters, Andrew

    2015-11-12

    In this work we present optimized noble gas-water Lennard-Jones 6-12 pair potentials for each noble gas. Given the significantly different atomic nature of water and the noble gases, the standard Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules produce inaccurate unlike molecular interactions between these two species. Consequently, we find simulated Henry's coefficients deviate significantly from their experimental counterparts for the investigated thermodynamic range (293-353 K at 1 and 10 atm), due to a poor unlike potential well term (εij). Where εij is too high or low, so too is the strength of the resultant noble gas-water interaction. This observed inadequacy in using the Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules is countered in this work by scaling εij for helium, neon, argon, and krypton by factors of 0.91, 0.8, 1.1, and 1.05, respectively, to reach a much improved agreement with experimental Henry's coefficients. Due to the highly sensitive nature of the xenon εij term, coupled with the reasonable agreement of the initial values, no scaling factor is applied for this noble gas. These resulting optimized pair potentials also accurately predict partitioning within a CO2-H2O binary phase system as well as diffusion coefficients in ambient water. This further supports the quality of these interaction potentials. Consequently, they can now form a well-grounded basis for the future molecular modeling of multiphase geological systems. PMID:26452070

  5. Optical lattice quantum simulator for quantum electrodynamics in strong external fields: spontaneous pair creation and the Sauter-Schwinger effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szpak, N.; Schützhold, R.

    2012-03-01

    The spontaneous creation of electron-positron pairs out of the vacuum due to a strong electric field is a spectacular manifestation of the relativistic energy-momentum relation for the Dirac fermions. This fundamental prediction of quantum electrodynamics has not yet been confirmed experimentally, as the generation of a sufficiently strong electric field extending over a large enough space-time volume still presents a challenge. Surprisingly, distant areas of physics may help us to circumvent this difficulty. In condensed matter and solid state physics (areas commonly considered as low-energy physics), one usually deals with quasi-particles instead of real electrons and positrons. Since their mass gap can often be freely tuned, it is much easier to create these light quasi-particles by an analogue of the Sauter-Schwinger effect. This motivates our proposal for a quantum simulator in which excitations of ultra-cold atoms moving in a bichromatic optical lattice represent particles and antiparticles (holes) satisfying a discretized version of the Dirac equation together with fermionic anti-commutation relations. Using the language of second quantization, we are able to construct an analogue of the spontaneous pair creation which can be realized in an (almost) table-top experiment.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of supercritical CO2-water drainage displacement in porous media: CO2 saturation and displacement mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yamabe, Hirotatsu; Tsuji, Takeshi; Liang, Yunfeng; Matsuoka, Toshifumi

    2015-01-01

    CO2 geosequestration in deep aquifers requires the displacement of water (wetting phase) from the porous media by supercritical CO2 (nonwetting phase). However, the interfacial instabilities, such as viscous and capillary fingerings, develop during the drainage displacement. Moreover, the burstlike Haines jump often occurs under conditions of low capillary number. To study these interfacial instabilities, we performed lattice Boltzmann simulations of CO2-water drainage displacement in a 3D synthetic granular rock model at a fixed viscosity ratio and at various capillary numbers. The capillary numbers are varied by changing injection pressure, which induces changes in flow velocity. It was observed that the viscous fingering was dominant at high injection pressures, whereas the crossover of viscous and capillary fingerings was observed, accompanied by Haines jumps, at low injection pressures. The Haines jumps flowing forward caused a significant drop of CO2 saturation, whereas Haines jumps flowing backward caused an increase of CO2 saturation (per injection depth). We demonstrated that the pore-scale Haines jumps remarkably influenced the flow path and therefore equilibrium CO2 saturation in crossover domain, which is in turn related to the storage efficiency in the field-scale geosequestration. The results can improve our understandings of the storage efficiency by the effects of pore-scale displacement phenomena.

  7. Lattice Monte Carlo simulations of phase separation and micellization in supercritical CO2/surfactant systems: effect of CO2 density.

    PubMed

    Scanu, Lauriane F; Gubbins, Keith E; Hall, Carol K

    2004-01-20

    Lattice Monte Carlo simulations are used to study the effect of nonionic surfactant concentration and CO2 density on the micellization and phase equilibria of supercritical CO2/surfactant systems. The interaction parameter for carbon dioxide is obtained by matching the critical temperature of the model fluid with the experimental critical temperature. Various properties such as the critical micelle concentration and the size, shape, and structure ofmicelles are calculated, and the phase diagram in the surfactant concentration-CO2 density space is constructed. On increasing the CO2 density, we find an increase in the critical micelle concentration and a decrease in the micellar size; this is consistent with existing experimental results. The variation of the micellar shape and structure with CO2 density shows that the micelles are spherical and that the extension of the micellar core increases with increasing micellar size, while the extension of the micellar corona increases with increasing CO2 density. The predicted phase diagram is in qualitative agreement with experimental phase diagrams for nonionic surfactants in carbon dioxide.

  8. Object-oriented approach for gas turbine engine simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlett, Brian P.; Felder, James L.

    1995-01-01

    An object-oriented gas turbine engine simulation program was developed. This program is a prototype for a more complete, commercial grade engine performance program now being proposed as part of the Numerical Propulsion System Simulator (NPSS). This report discusses architectural issues of this complex software system and the lessons learned from developing the prototype code. The prototype code is a fully functional, general purpose engine simulation program, however, only the component models necessary to model a transient compressor test rig have been written. The production system will be capable of steady state and transient modeling of almost any turbine engine configuration. Chief among the architectural considerations for this code was the framework in which the various software modules will interact. These modules include the equation solver, simulation code, data model, event handler, and user interface. Also documented in this report is the component based design of the simulation module and the inter-component communication paradigm. Object class hierarchies for some of the code modules are given.

  9. Lattice expansion by intrinsic defects in uranium by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yangzhong; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Kennedy, J. Rory; Sinnott, Susan B.; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2016-07-01

    A re-formulated and re-parameterized interatomic potential for uranium metal in the Charge-Optimized Many-Body (COMB) formalism is presented. Most physical properties of the orthorhombic α and bcc γ phases are accurately reproduced. In particular, this potential can reproduce the negative thermal expansion of the b axis in α-U while keeping this phase as the most stable phase at low temperatures, in accord with experiment. Most of the volume expansion in α-U by intrinsic defects is shown to come from the b axis, due to the formation of prismatic loops normal to this direction. Glide dislocation loops forming stacking faults are also observed. Structures of both loop types are analyzed. An expansion simulation is conducted and the results are verified by using the Norgett-Robinson-Torrens model. Rather than forming extended defect structures as in α-U, the γ phase forms only isolated defects and thus results in a much smaller and isotropic expansion.

  10. Modeling of composite latex particle morphology by off-lattice Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Duda, Yurko; Vázquez, Flavio

    2005-02-01

    Composite latex particles have shown a great range of applications such as paint resins, varnishes, water borne adhesives, impact modifiers, etc. The high-performance properties of this kind of materials may be explained in terms of a synergistical combination of two different polymers (usually a rubber and a thermoplastic). A great variety of composite latex particles with very different morphologies may be obtained by two-step emulsion polymerization processes. The formation of specific particle morphology depends on the chemical and physical nature of the monomers used during the synthesis, the process temperature, the reaction initiator, the surfactants, etc. Only a few models have been proposed to explain the appearance of the composite particle morphologies. These models have been based on the change of the interfacial energies during the synthesis. In this work, we present a new three-component model: Polymer blend (flexible and rigid chain particles) is dispersed in water by forming spherical cavities. Monte Carlo simulations of the model in two dimensions are used to determine the density distribution of chains and water molecules inside the suspended particle. This approach allows us to study the dependence of the morphology of the composite latex particles on the relative hydrophilicity and flexibility of the chain molecules as well as on their density and composition. It has been shown that our simple model is capable of reproducing the main features of the various morphologies observed in synthesis experiments.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of a Flow over a 3D Cube in a wind Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shock, Richard; Chen, Hudong; Yakhot, Victor

    2001-06-01

    It is argued that even a simplified version of the Boltzmann equation in a relaxation time approximation is equivalent to the hydrodynamic equations, involving infinite number of non-linear terms. Used for turbulence modelling, where the relaxation time and mean -free path are both space and field dependent, this equation is equivalent to the classic Navier-Stokes + turbulent model representations, provided the gradients are small. If, however, the non-equilibrium effects are strong, all higher non-linearities cannot be neglected. Thus, the Boltmann approximation can be extremely usefull for description of strongly non-equilibrium and time - dependent flows. This fact has been demonstrated on a wide variety of flows of both academic and industrial interest ranging from a simple 2D channel flow to 3D flows over various production cars. In this talk the quality of the approach is demonstrated on a simulation of the flow over a 3D cube in a wind tunnel. The predicted parameters of this strongly unsteady flow are compared with experimental data. The agreement is very good.

  12. Evaluation of dense-gas simulation models. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zapert, J.G.; Londergan, R.J.; Thistle, H.

    1991-05-01

    The report describes the approach and presents the results of an evaluation study of seven dense gas simulation models using data from three experimental programs. The models evaluated are two in the public domain (DEGADIS and SLAB) and five that are proprietary (AIRTOX, CHARM, FOCUS, SAFEMODE, and TRACE). The data bases used in the evaluation are the Desert Tortoise Pressurized Ammonia Releases, Burro Liquefied Natural Gas Spill Tests and the Goldfish Anhydrous Hydroflouric Acid Spill Experiments. A uniform set of performance statistics are calculated and tabulated to compare maximum observed concentrations and cloud half-width to those predicted by each model. None of the models demonstrated good performance consistently for all three experimental programs.

  13. On-lattice agent-based simulation of populations of cells within the open-source Chaste framework.

    PubMed

    Figueredo, Grazziela P; Joshi, Tanvi V; Osborne, James M; Byrne, Helen M; Owen, Markus R

    2013-04-01

    Over the years, agent-based models have been developed that combine cell division and reinforced random walks of cells on a regular lattice, reaction-diffusion equations for nutrients and growth factors; and ordinary differential equations for the subcellular networks regulating the cell cycle. When linked to a vascular layer, this multiple scale model framework has been applied to tumour growth and therapy. Here, we report on the creation of an agent-based multi-scale environment amalgamating the characteristics of these models within a Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) Exemplar Project. This project enables reuse, integration, expansion and sharing of the model and relevant data. The agent-based and reaction-diffusion parts of the multi-scale model have been implemented and are available for download as part of the latest public release of Chaste (Cancer, Heart and Soft Tissue Environment; http://www.cs.ox.ac.uk/chaste/), part of the VPH Toolkit (http://toolkit.vph-noe.eu/). The environment functionalities are verified against the original models, in addition to extra validation of all aspects of the code. In this work, we present the details of the implementation of the agent-based environment, including the system description, the conceptual model, the development of the simulation model and the processes of verification and validation of the simulation results. We explore the potential use of the environment by presenting exemplar applications of the 'what if' scenarios that can easily be studied in the environment. These examples relate to tumour growth, cellular competition for resources and tumour responses to hypoxia (low oxygen levels). We conclude our work by summarizing the future steps for the expansion of the current system. PMID:24427527

  14. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of gas and dust mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, R. A.; Sijacki, D.; Clarke, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    We present a `two-fluid' implementation of dust in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) in the test particle limit. The scheme is able to handle both short and long stopping times and reproduces the short friction time limit, which is not properly handled in other implementations. We apply novel tests to verify its accuracy and limitations, including multidimensional tests that have not been previously applied to the drag-coupled dust problem and which are particularly relevant to self-gravitating protoplanetary discs. Our tests demonstrate several key requirements for accurate simulations of gas-dust mixtures. First, in standard SPH particle jitter can degrade the dust solution, even when the gas density is well reproduced. The use of integral gradients, a Wendland kernel and a large number of neighbours can control this, albeit at a greater computational cost. Secondly, when it is necessary to limit the artificial viscosity we recommend using the Cullen & Dehnen switch, since the alternative, using α ˜ 0.1, can generate a large velocity noise up to σv ≲ 0.3cs in the dust particles. Thirdly, we find that an accurate dust density estimate requires >400 neighbours, since, unlike the gas, the dust particles do not feel regularization forces. This density noise applies to all particle-based two-fluid implementations of dust, irrespective of the hydro solver and could lead to numerically induced fragmentation. Although our tests show accurate dusty gas simulations are possible, care must be taken to minimize the contribution from numerical noise.

  15. Quantum simulation of exotic PT -invariant topological nodal loop bands with ultracold atoms in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan-Wei; Zhao, Y. X.; Liu, Rui-Bin; Xue, Zheng-Yuan; Zhu, Shi-Liang; Wang, Z. D.

    2016-04-01

    Since the well-known PT symmetry has its fundamental significance and implication in physics, where PT denotes a joint operation of space inversion P and time reversal T , it is important and intriguing to explore exotic PT -invariant topological metals and to physically realize them. Here we develop a theory for a different type of topological metals that are described by a two-band model of PT -invariant topological nodal loop states in a three-dimensional Brillouin zone, with the topological stability being revealed through the PT -symmetry-protected nontrivial Z2 topological charge even in the absence of both P and T symmetries. Moreover, the gapless boundary modes are demonstrated to originate from the nontrivial topological charge of the bulk nodal loop. Based on these exact results, we propose an experimental scheme to realize and to detect tunable PT -invariant topological nodal loop states with ultracold atoms in an optical lattice, in which atoms with two hyperfine spin states are loaded in a spin-dependent three-dimensional optical lattice and two pairs of Raman lasers are used to create out-of-plane spin-flip hopping with site-dependent phase. It is shown that such a realistic cold-atom setup can yield topological nodal loop states, having a tunable band-touching ring with the twofold degeneracy in the bulk spectrum and nontrivial surface states. The nodal loop states are actually protected by the combined PT symmetry and are characterized by a Z2-type invariant (or topological charge), i.e., a quantized Berry phase. Remarkably, we demonstrate with numerical simulations that (i) the characteristic nodal ring can be detected by measuring the atomic transfer fractions in a Bloch-Zener oscillation; (ii) the topological invariant may be measured based on the time-of-flight imaging; and (iii) the surface states may be probed through Bragg spectroscopy. The present proposal for realizing topological nodal loop states in cold-atom systems may provide a unique

  16. Space Station gas-grain simulation facility - Microgravity particle research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, Glenn C.; Fogleman, Guy; Huntington, Judith L.

    1988-01-01

    The proposed Space Station gas-grain simulation facility (GGSF) and the possibilities for research in the facility are discussed. The physics of particles in microgravity is reviewed. The proposed design of the GGSF is illustrated and examined. Examples of experiments which have been suggested for the GGSF are presented, including the formation of organic haze particles in Titan's atmosphere, organic compound synthesis on surfaces of growing particles, fractal particles, planetary ring particle dynamics, aggregation of fine geological particulates in planetary atmospheres, and dipolar grain coagulation and orientation.

  17. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF NATURAL GAS-SWIRL BURNER

    SciTech Connect

    Ala Qubbaj

    2005-03-01

    A numerical simulation of a turbulent natural gas jet diffusion flame at a Reynolds number of 9000 in a swirling air stream is presented. The numerical computations were carried out using the commercially available software package CFDRC. The instantaneous chemistry model was used as the reaction model. The thermal, composition, flow (velocity), as well as stream function fields for both the baseline and air-swirling flames were numerically simulated in the near-burner region, where most of the mixing and reactions occur. The results were useful to interpret the effects of swirl in enhancing the mixing rates in the combustion zone as well as in stabilizing the flame. The results showed the generation of two recirculating regimes induced by the swirling air stream, which account for such effects. The present investigation will be used as a benchmark study of swirl flow combustion analysis as a step in developing an enhanced swirl-cascade burner technology.

  18. Tensorial slip theory for gas flows and comparison with molecular dynamics simulations using an anisotropic gas-wall collision mechanism.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thanh Tung; To, Quy Dong; Lauriat, Guy; Léonard, Céline

    2013-05-01

    In this paper we examine the anisotropic slip theory for gas flows based on tangential accommodation coefficients and compare it with molecular dynamics (MD) results. A special gas-wall boundary condition is employed within MD simulations to mimic the anisotropic gas-wall collision mechanism. Results from MD simulations with different surface orientations show good agreement with the slip quantification proposed in this work.

  19. Curvature estimation from a volume-of-fluid indicator function for the simulation of surface tension and wetting with a free-surface lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Bogner, Simon; Rüde, Ulrich; Harting, Jens

    2016-04-01

    The free surface lattice Boltzmann method (FSLBM) is a combination of the hydrodynamic lattice Boltzmann method with a volume-of-fluid (VOF) interface capturing technique for the simulation of incompressible free surface flows. Capillary effects are modeled by extracting the curvature of the interface from the VOF indicator function and imposing a pressure jump at the free boundary. However, obtaining accurate curvature estimates from a VOF description can introduce significant errors. This article reports numerical results for three different surface tension models in standard test cases and compares the according errors in the velocity field (spurious currents). Furthermore, the FSLBM is shown to be suited to simulate wetting effects at solid boundaries. To this end, a new method is developed to represent wetting boundary conditions in a least-squares curvature reconstruction technique. The main limitations of the current FSLBM are analyzed and are found to be caused by its simplified advection scheme. Possible improvements are suggested. PMID:27176423

  20. Numerical simulation of turbulent gas flames in tubes.

    PubMed

    Salzano, E; Marra, F S; Russo, G; Lee, J H S

    2002-12-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is an emerging technique to predict possible consequences of gas explosion and it is often considered a powerful and accurate tool to obtain detailed results. However, systematic analyses of the reliability of this approach to real-scale industrial configurations are still needed. Furthermore, few experimental data are available for comparison and validation. In this work, a set of well documented experimental data related to the flame acceleration obtained within obstacle-filled tubes filled with flammable gas-air mixtures, has been simulated. In these experiments, terminal steady flame speeds corresponding to different propagation regimes were observed, thus, allowing a clear and prompt characterisation of the numerical results with respect to numerical parameters, as grid definition, geometrical parameters, as blockage ratio and to mixture parameters, as mixture reactivity. The CFD code AutoReagas was used for the simulations. Numerical predictions were compared with available experimental data and some insights into the code accuracy were determined. Computational results are satisfactory for the relatively slower turbulent deflagration regimes and became fair when choking regime is observed, whereas transition to quasi-detonation or Chapman-Jogouet (CJ) were never predicted. PMID:12423940

  1. Numerical simulation of turbulent gas flames in tubes.

    PubMed

    Salzano, E; Marra, F S; Russo, G; Lee, J H S

    2002-12-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is an emerging technique to predict possible consequences of gas explosion and it is often considered a powerful and accurate tool to obtain detailed results. However, systematic analyses of the reliability of this approach to real-scale industrial configurations are still needed. Furthermore, few experimental data are available for comparison and validation. In this work, a set of well documented experimental data related to the flame acceleration obtained within obstacle-filled tubes filled with flammable gas-air mixtures, has been simulated. In these experiments, terminal steady flame speeds corresponding to different propagation regimes were observed, thus, allowing a clear and prompt characterisation of the numerical results with respect to numerical parameters, as grid definition, geometrical parameters, as blockage ratio and to mixture parameters, as mixture reactivity. The CFD code AutoReagas was used for the simulations. Numerical predictions were compared with available experimental data and some insights into the code accuracy were determined. Computational results are satisfactory for the relatively slower turbulent deflagration regimes and became fair when choking regime is observed, whereas transition to quasi-detonation or Chapman-Jogouet (CJ) were never predicted.

  2. Integrated Turbine Tip Clearance and Gas Turbine Engine Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Jeffryes W.; Kratz, Jonathan; Guo, Ten-Huei; Litt, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Gas turbine compressor and turbine blade tip clearance (i.e., the radial distance between the blade tip of an axial compressor or turbine and the containment structure) is a major contributing factor to gas path sealing, and can significantly affect engine efficiency and operational temperature. This paper details the creation of a generic but realistic high pressure turbine tip clearance model that may be used to facilitate active tip clearance control system research. This model uses a first principles approach to approximate thermal and mechanical deformations of the turbine system, taking into account the rotor, shroud, and blade tip components. Validation of the tip clearance model shows that the results are realistic and reflect values found in literature. In addition, this model has been integrated with a gas turbine engine simulation, creating a platform to explore engine performance as tip clearance is adjusted. Results from the integrated model explore the effects of tip clearance on engine operation and highlight advantages of tip clearance management.

  3. Project ARGO: Gas phase formation in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Michael R.; Waligora, James M.; Norfleet, William T.; Kumar, K. Vasantha

    1993-01-01

    The ARGO study investigated the reduced incidence of joint pain decompression sickness (DCS) encountered in microgravity as compared with an expected incidence of joint pain DCS experienced by test subjects in Earth-based laboratories (unit gravity) with similar protocols. Individuals who are decompressed from saturated conditions usually acquire joint pain DCS in the lower extremities. Our hypothesis is that the incidence of joint pain DCS can be limited by a significant reduction in the tissue gas micronuclei formed by stress-assisted nucleation. Reductions in dynamic and kinetic stresses in vivo are linked to hypokinetic and adynamic conditions of individuals in zero g. We employed the Doppler ultrasound bubble detection technique in simulated microgravity studies to determine quantitatively the degree of gas phase formation in the upper and lower extremities of test subjects during decompression. We found no evidence of right-to-left shunting through pulmonary vasculature. The volume of gas bubble following decompression was examined and compared with the number following saline contrast injection. From this, we predict a reduced incidence of DCS on orbit, although the incidence of predicted mild DCS still remains larger than that encountered on orbit.

  4. Structural and physicochemical properties of liquid Al-Zn alloys: A combined study based on molecular dynamics simulations and the quasi-lattice theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trybula, M.; Jakse, N.; Gasior, W.; Pasturel, A.

    2014-12-01

    Ordering phenomena have been investigated in liquid Al-Zn alloys performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using "empirical oscillating pair potentials." The local structural order is studied by computing two microscopic functions, namely, the concentration fluctuation function and the Warren-Cowley short-range order parameter. We also study the influence of ordering phenomena on transport properties like diffusivity and viscosity. The MD results are confronted to those determined from measurements and in the framework of the quasi-lattice theory.

  5. Influence of surface roughness on nonlinear flow behaviors in 3D self-affine rough fractures: Lattice Boltzmann simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Chen, Yi-Feng; Ma, Guo-Wei; Zhou, Jia-Qing; Zhou, Chuang-Bing

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates the impacts of surface roughness on the nonlinear fluid flow through three-dimensional (3D) self-affine rock fractures, whose original surface roughness is decomposed into primary roughness (i.e. the large-scale waviness of the fracture morphology) and secondary roughness (i.e. the small-scale unevenness) with a wavelet analysis technique. A 3D Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is adopted to predict the flow physics in rock fractures numerically created with and without consideration of the secondary roughness, respectively. The simulation results show that the primary roughness mostly controls the pressure distribution and fracture flow paths at a large scale, whereas the secondary roughness determines the nonlinear properties of the fluid flow at a local scale. As the pressure gradient increases, the secondary roughness enhances the local complexity of velocity distribution by generating and expanding the eddy flow and back flow regions in the vicinity of asperities. It was found that the Forchheimer's law characterizes well the nonlinear flow behavior in fractures of varying roughness. The inertial effects induced by the primary roughness differ only marginally in fractures with the roughness exponent varying from 0.5 to 0.8, and it is the secondary roughness that significantly enhances the nonlinear flow and leads to earlier onset of nonlinearity. Further examined were the effects of surface roughness on the transmissivity, hydraulic aperture and the tortuosity of flow paths, demonstrating again the dominant role of the secondary roughness, especially for the apparent transmissivity and the equivalent hydraulic aperture at high pressure gradient or high Reynolds number. The results may enhance our understanding of the role of surface roughness in the nonlinear flow behaviors in natural rock fractures.

  6. Gas-deposit-alloy corrosion interactions in simulated combustion environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luer, Kevin Raymond

    High temperature corrosion in aggressive coal combustion environments involves simultaneous corrosion reactions between combustion gases, ash deposits, and alloys. This research investigated the behavior of a ferritic steel (SA387-Gr11) and three weld claddings (309L SS, Alloy 72, and Alloy 622) in five combustion environments beneath solid deposits at 500°C for up to 1000 hours. The synthetic gases consisted of N2-CO-CO-H2-H2O-H 2S-SO2 mixtures that simulated a range of fuel-rich or fuel-lean combustion environments with a constant sulfur content. The synthetic deposits contained FeS2, FeS, Fe3O4 and/or carbon. Reaction kinetics was studied in individual gas-metal, gas deposit, and deposit-alloy systems. A test method was developed to investigate simultaneous gas-deposit-metal corrosion reactions. The results showed reaction kinetics varied widely, depending on the gas-alloy system and followed linear, parabolic, and logarithmic rate laws. Under reducing conditions, the alloys exhibited a range of corrosion mechanisms including carburization-sulfidation, sulfidation, and sulfidation-oxidation. Most alloys were not resistant to the highly reducing gases but offered moderate resistance to mixed oxidation-sulfidation by demonstrating parabolic or logarithmic behavior. Under oxidizing conditions, all of the alloys were resistant. Under oxidizing-sulfating conditions, alloys with high Fe or Cr contents sulfated whereas an alloy containing Mo and W was resistant. In the gas-deposit-metal tests, FeS2-bearing deposits were extremely corrosive to low alloy steel under both reducing and oxidizing conditions but they had little influence on the weld claddings. Accelerated corrosion was attributed to rapid decomposition or oxidation of FeS2 particles that generated sulfur-rich gases above the alloy surface. In contrast, FeS-type deposits had no influence under reducing conditions but they were aggressive to low alloy steel under oxidizing conditions. The extent of damage

  7. Adapting a weather forecast model for greenhouse gas simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polavarapu, S. M.; Neish, M.; Tanguay, M.; Girard, C.; de Grandpré, J.; Gravel, S.; Semeniuk, K.; Chan, D.

    2015-12-01

    The ability to simulate greenhouse gases on the global domain is useful for providing boundary conditions for regional flux inversions, as well as for providing reference data for bias correction of satellite measurements. Given the existence of operational weather and environmental prediction models and assimilation systems at Environment Canada, it makes sense to use these tools for greenhouse gas simulations. In this work, we describe the adaptations needed to reasonably simulate CO2 with a weather forecast model. The main challenges were the implementation of a mass conserving advection scheme, and the careful implementation of a mixing ratio defined with respect to dry air. The transport of tracers through convection was also added, and the vertical mixing through the boundary layer was slightly modified. With all these changes, the model conserves CO2 mass well on the annual time scale, and the high resolution (0.9 degree grid spacing) permits a good description of synoptic scale transport. The use of a coupled meteorological/tracer transport model also permits an assessment of approximations needed in offline transport model approaches, such as the neglect of water vapour mass when computing a tracer mixing ratio with respect to dry air.

  8. Effects of simulated flue gas on components of Scenedesmus raciborskii WZKMT.

    PubMed

    Li, Xie-kun; Xu, Jing-liang; Guo, Ying; Zhou, Wei-zheng; Yuan, Zhen-hong

    2015-08-01

    Scenedesmus raciborskii WZKMT cultured with simulated flue gas was investigated. Cellular components, including total sugar, starch, chlorophyll, protein and lipid, were compared between simulated flue gas and 7% (v/v) CO2. Dissolution of SO2 and NO in simulated flue gas led to pH decrease and toxicity to microalgae cells. Furthermore, the death or aging of microalgae cells reduced the buffer capacity and caused decrease of simulated flue gas absorption. With 7% CO2, the highest total sugar and starch content could attain to 66.76% and 53.16%, respectively, which indicated S. raciborskii WZKMT is a desired feedstock candidate for bioethanol production. Microalgae growth and starch accumulation was inhibited, while cells produced more chlorophyll, protein and lipid when simulated flue gas was the carbon source. Fatty acids composition analysis indicated that there was no significant distinction on fatty acids relative content (fatty acid/TFA) between cells aerated using simulated flue gas and 7% CO2.

  9. Impurity Transport in a Simulated Gas Target Divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blush, L. M.; Luckhardt, S.; Seraydarian, R.; Whyte, D.; Conn, R. W.; Schmitz, L.

    1997-11-01

    Previous simulated gas target divertor experiments in the PISCES-A linear plasma device (n <= 3 × 10^19 m-3, kTe <= 20 eV) indicated enhanced impurity retention near the target in comparison to a high recycling divertor regime. A 1 1\\over2-D fluid modeling code suggested that impurities are impeded from transporting away from the target by friction with the neutral and ionized hydrogen. In recent experiments with a PISCES-A ``slot-type'' divertor configuration, we have implemented a spectroscopic detection system to measure the axial density profiles of several impurity charge states. Moreover, we envision adding two extended cylindrical baffles spanning a pumped vacuum section to achieve strong differential pumping. This arrangement will isolate the plasma source from the gas target region and allow us to seed the background hydrogen plasma with higher impurities concentrations and investigate a regime dominated by impurity radiation. In preliminary design experiments, PISCES-A was successfully operated with an electrically isolated, copper baffle (d=5 cm, l=33.5 cm) mounted to reduce the vacuum conductance between the source and target regions. This work supported by US-DoE contract DE-FG03-95ER-54301.

  10. Trash to Gas (TtG) Simulant Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, John D., II; Hintze, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    Space exploration in outer earths orbit is a long-term commitment, where the reuse of discarded materials is a critical component for its success. The Logistics Reduction and Repurposing (LRR) project under the NASA Advanced Exploration System Program is a project focused on technologies that reduce the amount of consumables that are needed to be sent into space, repurpose items sent to space, or convert wastes to commodities. In particular, Trash to Gas (TtG), part of the LRR project, is a novel space technology capable of converting raw elements from combustible waste including food waste and packaging, paper, wipes and towels, nitrile gloves, fecal matter, urine brine, maximum absorbency garments, and other organic wastes from human space exploration into useful gases. Trash to gas will ultimately reduce mission cost by producing a portion of important consumables in situ. This paper will discuss results of waste processing by steam reforming. Steam reforming is a thermochemical process developed as part of TtG, where waste is heated in the presence of oxygen and steam to produce carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, methane and water. The aim of this experiment is to investigate the processing of different waste simulants and their gaseous products. This will lay a foundation for understating and optimizing the production of useful gases for propulsion and recovery of water for life support.

  11. Gas stripping in galaxy clusters: a new SPH simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jáchym, P.; Palouš, J.; Köppen, J.; Combes, F.

    2007-09-01

    Aims:The influence of a time-varying ram pressure on spiral galaxies in clusters is explored with a new simulation method based on the N-body SPH/tree code GADGET. Methods: We have adapted the code to describe the interaction of two different gas phases, the diffuse hot intracluster medium (ICM) and the denser and colder interstellar medium (ISM). Both the ICM and ISM components are introduced as SPH particles. As a galaxy arrives on a highly radial orbit from outskirts to cluster center, it crosses the ICM density peak and experiences a time-varying wind. Results: Depending on the duration and intensity of the ISM-ICM interaction, early and late type galaxies in galaxy clusters with either a large or small ICM distribution are found to show different stripping efficiencies, amounts of reaccretion of the extra-planar ISM, and final masses. We compare the numerical results with analytical approximations of different complexity and indicate the limits of the Gunn & Gott simple stripping formula. Conclusions: Our investigations emphasize the role of the galactic orbital history to the stripping amount. We discuss the contribution of ram pressure stripping to the origin of the ICM and its metallicity. We propose gas accumulations like tails, filaments, or ripples to be responsible for stripping in regions with low overall ICM occurrence. Appendix A is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Comparing Natural Gas Leakage Detection Technologies Using an Open-Source "Virtual Gas Field" Simulator.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Chandler E; Ravikumar, Arvind P; Brandt, Adam R

    2016-04-19

    We present a tool for modeling the performance of methane leak detection and repair programs that can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of detection technologies and proposed mitigation policies. The tool uses a two-state Markov model to simulate the evolution of methane leakage from an artificial natural gas field. Leaks are created stochastically, drawing from the current understanding of the frequency and size distributions at production facilities. Various leak detection and repair programs can be simulated to determine the rate at which each would identify and repair leaks. Integrating the methane leakage over time enables a meaningful comparison between technologies, using both economic and environmental metrics. We simulate four existing or proposed detection technologies: flame ionization detection, manual infrared camera, automated infrared drone, and distributed detectors. Comparing these four technologies, we found that over 80% of simulated leakage could be mitigated with a positive net present value, although the maximum benefit is realized by selectively targeting larger leaks. Our results show that low-cost leak detection programs can rely on high-cost technology, as long as it is applied in a way that allows for rapid detection of large leaks. Any strategy to reduce leakage should require a careful consideration of the differences between low-cost technologies and low-cost programs. PMID:27007771

  13. Comparing Natural Gas Leakage Detection Technologies Using an Open-Source "Virtual Gas Field" Simulator.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Chandler E; Ravikumar, Arvind P; Brandt, Adam R

    2016-04-19

    We present a tool for modeling the performance of methane leak detection and repair programs that can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of detection technologies and proposed mitigation policies. The tool uses a two-state Markov model to simulate the evolution of methane leakage from an artificial natural gas field. Leaks are created stochastically, drawing from the current understanding of the frequency and size distributions at production facilities. Various leak detection and repair programs can be simulated to determine the rate at which each would identify and repair leaks. Integrating the methane leakage over time enables a meaningful comparison between technologies, using both economic and environmental metrics. We simulate four existing or proposed detection technologies: flame ionization detection, manual infrared camera, automated infrared drone, and distributed detectors. Comparing these four technologies, we found that over 80% of simulated leakage could be mitigated with a positive net present value, although the maximum benefit is realized by selectively targeting larger leaks. Our results show that low-cost leak detection programs can rely on high-cost technology, as long as it is applied in a way that allows for rapid detection of large leaks. Any strategy to reduce leakage should require a careful consideration of the differences between low-cost technologies and low-cost programs.

  14. Supersonic flow past a flat lattice of cylindrical rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guvernyuk, S. V.; Maksimov, F. A.

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional supersonic laminar ideal gas flows past a regular flat lattice of identical circular cylinders lying in a plane perpendicular to the free-stream velocity are numerically simulated. The flows are computed by applying a multiblock numerical technique with local boundary-fitted curvilinear grids that have finite regions overlapping the global rectangular grid covering the entire computational domain. Viscous boundary layers are resolved on the local grids by applying the Navier-Stokes equations, while the aerodynamic interference of shock wave structures occurring between the lattice elements is described by the Euler equations. In the overlapping grid regions, the functions are interpolated to the grid interfaces. The regimes of supersonic lattice flow are classified. The parameter ranges in which the steady flow around the lattice is not unique are detected, and the mechanisms of hysteresis phenomena are examined.

  15. Two Nucleons on a Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    S.R. Beane; P.F.Bedaque; A. Parreno; M.J. Savage

    2004-04-01

    The two-nucleon sector is near an infrared fixed point of QCD and as a result the S-wave scattering lengths are unnaturally large compared to the effective ranges and shape parameters. It is usually assumed that a lattice QCD simulation of the two-nucleon sector will require a lattice that is much larger than the scattering lengths in order to extract quantitative information. In this paper we point out that this does not have to be the case: lattice QCD simulations on much smaller lattices will produce rigorous results for nuclear physics.

  16. Gas and dust hydrodynamical simulations of massive lopsided transition discs - I. Gas distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhaohuan; Baruteau, Clément

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by lopsided structures observed in some massive transition discs, we have carried out 2D numerical simulations to study vortex structure in massive discs, including the effects of disc self-gravity and the indirect force which is due to the displacement of the central star from the barycentre of the system by the lopsided structure. When only the indirect force is included, we confirm the finding by Mittal & Chiang that the vortex becomes stronger and can be more than two pressure scale heights wide, as long as the disc-to-star mass ratio is ≳1 per cent. Such wide vortices can excite strong density waves in the disc and therefore migrate inwards rapidly. However, when disc self-gravity is also considered in simulations, self-gravity plays a more prominent role on the vortex structure. We confirm that when the disc Toomre Q parameter is smaller than π/(2h), where h is the disc's aspect ratio, the vortices are significantly weakened and their inward migration slows down dramatically. Most importantly, when the disc is massive enough (e.g. Q ˜ 3), we find that the lopsided gas structure orbits around the star at a speed significantly slower than the local Keplerian speed. This sub-Keplerian pattern speed can lead to the concentration of dust particles at a radius beyond the lopsided gas structure (as shown in Paper II). Overall, disc self-gravity regulates the vortex structure in massive discs and the radial shift between the gas and dust distributions in vortices within massive discs may be probed by future observations.

  17. LBflow: An extensible lattice Boltzmann framework for the simulation of geophysical flows. Part I: theory and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellin, E. W.

    2010-02-01

    This article presents LBflow, a flexible, extensible implementation of the lattice Boltzmann method. The code has been developed with geophysical applications in mind, and is designed to be usable by those with no specialist computational fluid dynamics expertise. LBflow provides a 'virtual laboratory' which can be used, rapidly and easily, to obtain accurate flow data for the geometrically complex, three-dimensional flows that abound in geophysical systems. Parameters can be 'steered' by the user at runtime to allow efficient and intuitive exploration of parameter space. LBflow is written in object-oriented C++ and adopts a modular approach. Lattice Boltzmann algorithms for distinct classes of material are encoded in separate modules, which implement a standard interface, and which are linked to LBflow dynamically at runtime. This allows users with programming skill and expertise in the lattice Boltzmann method to create and share new LBflow modules, extending functionality. A companion application, LBview, provides a graphical user interface to LBflow and renders a user-configurable visualization of the output. LBflow's output can be piped directly to LBview allowing realtime visualization of steered flow. LBview also facilitates analysis of the data generated by LBflow. This article presents an overview of the theory of the lattice Boltzmann method and describes the design and operation of LBflow. The companion paper, 'Part II', describes the practical usage of LBflow and presents detailed validation of its accuracy for a variety of flows.

  18. Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bornyakov, V.G.

    2005-06-01

    Possibilities that are provided by a lattice regularization of QCD for studying nonperturbative properties of QCD are discussed. A review of some recent results obtained from computer calculations in lattice QCD is given. In particular, the results for the QCD vacuum structure, the hadron mass spectrum, and the strong coupling constant are considered.

  19. Superradiance Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Da-Wei; Liu, Ren-Bao; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Scully, Marlan O.

    2015-01-01

    We show that the timed Dicke states of a collection of three-level atoms can form a tight-binding lattice in momentum space. This lattice, coined the superradiance lattice (SL), can be constructed based on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). For a one-dimensional SL, we need the coupling field of the EIT system to be a standing wave. The detuning between the two components of the standing wave introduces an effective uniform force in momentum space. The quantum lattice dynamics, such as Bloch oscillations, Wannier-Stark ladders, Bloch band collapsing, and dynamic localization can be observed in the SL. The two-dimensional SL provides a flexible platform for Dirac physics in graphene. The SL can be extended to three and higher dimensions where no analogous real space lattices exist with new physics waiting to be explored.

  20. Spatial signal amplification in cell biology: A lattice-gas model for self-tuned phase ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, T.; de Candia, A.; Gamba, A.; Coniglio, A.

    2008-09-01

    Experiments show that the movement of eukaryotic cells is regulated by a process of phase separation of two competing enzymes on the cell membrane, that effectively amplifies shallow external gradients of chemical attractant. Notably, the cell is able to self-tune the final enzyme concentrations to an equilibrium state of phase coexistence, for a wide range of the average attractant concentration. We propose a simple lattice model in which, together with a short-range attraction between enzymes, a long-range repulsion naturally arises from physical considerations, that easily explains such observed behavior.