Science.gov

Sample records for lattice site location

  1. Effect of AlN content on the lattice site location of terbium ions in Al x Ga1-x N compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialho, M.; Rodrigues, J.; Magalhães, S.; Correia, M. R.; Monteiro, T.; Lorenz, K.; Alves, E.

    2016-03-01

    Terbium lattice site location and optical emission in Tb implanted Al x Ga1-x N (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) samples grown by halide vapour phase epitaxy on (0001) sapphire substrates are investigated as a function of AlN content. The samples were implanted with a fluence of 5 × 1014 cm-2 of terbium ions and an energy of 150 keV. Lattice implantation damage is reduced using channelled ion implantation performed along the <0001> axis, normal to the sample surface. Afterwards, thermal annealing treatments at 1400 °C for GaN and 1200 °C for samples with x > 0 were performed to reduce the damage and to activate the optical emission of Tb3+ ions. The study of lattice site location is achieved measuring detailed angular ion channelling scans across the <0001>, < 10\\bar{1}1> and < \\bar{2}113> axial directions. The precise location of the implanted Tb ions is obtained by combining the information of these angular scans with simulations using the Monte Carlo code FLUX. In addition to a Ga/Al substitutional fraction and a random fraction, a fraction of Tb ions occupying a site displaced by 0.2 Å along c-axis from the Ga/Al substitutional site was considered, giving a good agreement between the experimental results and the simulation. Photoluminescence studies proved the optical activation of Tb3+ after thermal annealing and the enhancement of the 5D4 to 7F6 transition intensity with increasing AlN content.

  2. Coso MT Site Locations

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2011-05-04

    This data includes the locations of the MT data collected in and around the Coso Geothermal field that covered the West Flank area. These are the data that the 3D MT models were created from that were discussed in Phase 1 of the West Flank FORGE project. The projected coordinate system is NAD 1927 State Plane California IV FIPS 0404 and the Projection is Lambert Conformal Conic. Units are in feet.

  3. Location of the adsorption transition for lattice polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madras, Neal

    2017-02-01

    We consider various lattice models of polymers: lattice trees, lattice animals, and self-avoiding walks. The polymer interacts with a surface (hyperplane), receiving an energy reward of β for each site in the surface. It is known that there is an adsorption transition at a critical value of β. We present a new proof of the result of Hammersley et al (1982 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 15 539-71) that the transition occurs at a strictly positive value of β when the surface is impenetrable, i.e. when the polymer is restricted to a half-space. In contrast, for a penetrable surface, it is an open problem to prove that the transition occurs at β =0 . We reduce this problem to proving that the fraction of N-site polymers whose span is less than N/{{log}2}N is not too small.

  4. statement of significance, location map, site plan, landscape plan, site ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    statement of significance, location map, site plan, landscape plan, site sections, evolution of cemetery landscape. - San Francisco National Cemetery, 1 Lincoln Boulevard, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  5. Unity Occupation of Sites in a 3D Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depue, Marshall T.; McCormick, Colin; Winoto, S. Lukman; Oliver, Steven; Weiss, David S.

    1999-03-01

    An average filling factor of one atom per lattice site has been obtained in a submicron scale far-off-resonance optical lattice (FORL). High site occupation is obtained through a compression sequence that includes laser cooling in a 3D FORL and adiabatic toggling between the 3D FORL and a 1D FORL trap. After the highest filling factor is achieved, laser cooling causes collisional loss from lattice sites with more than one atom. Ultimately 44% of the sites have a single atom cooled to near its vibrational ground state. A theoretical model of site occupation based on Poisson statistics agrees well with the experimental results.

  6. Precise lattice location of substitutional and interstitial Mg in AlN

    SciTech Connect

    Amorim, L. M.; Pereira, L. M. C.; Decoster, S.; Temst, K.; Vantomme, A.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.; Silva, D. J.; Silva, M. R. da; Gottberg, A.

    2013-12-23

    The lattice site location of radioactive {sup 27}Mg implanted in AlN was determined by means of emission channeling. The majority of the {sup 27}Mg was found to substitute for Al, yet significant fractions (up to 33%) were also identified close to the octahedral interstitial site. The activation energy for interstitial Mg diffusion is estimated to be between 1.1 eV and 1.7 eV. Substitutional Mg is shown to occupy ideal Al sites within a 0.1 Å experimental uncertainty. We discuss the absence of significant displacements from ideal Al sites, in the context of the current debate, on Mg doped nitride semiconductors.

  7. Lattice location of O18 in ion implanted Fe crystals by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, channeling and nuclear reaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vairavel, Mathayan; Sundaravel, Balakrishnan; Panigrahi, Binaykumar

    2016-09-01

    There are contradictory theoretical predictions of lattice location of oxygen interstitial atom at tetrahedral and octahedral interstices in bcc Fe. For validating these predictions, 300 keV O18 ions with fluence of 5 × 1015 ions/cm2 are implanted into bcc Fe single crystals at room temperature and annealed at 400 °C. The Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA)/channeling measurements are carried out with 850 keV protons. The lattice location of implanted O18 is analysed using the α-particles yield from O18(p,α)N15 nuclear reaction. The tilt angular scans of α-particle yield along <110> and <100> axial directions are performed at room temperature. Lattice location of O18 is found to be at tetrahedral interstitial site by comparing the experimental scan with simulated scans using FLUX7 software.

  8. Lattice location and thermal stability of implanted Fe in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Rita, E.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J.G.; Alves, E.; Soares, J.C.

    2004-11-22

    The emission channeling technique was applied to evaluate the lattice location of implanted {sup 59}Fe in single-crystalline ZnO. The angular distribution of {beta}{sup -} particles emitted by {sup 59}Fe was monitored with a position-sensitive electron detector, following 60 keV low dose (2.0x10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}) room-temperature implantation of the precursor isotope {sup 59}Mn. The emission patterns around the [0001], [1102],[1101], and [2113] directions revealed that following annealing at 800 deg. C, 95(8)% of the Fe atoms occupy ideal substitutional Zn sites with rms displacements of 0.06-0.09 A.

  9. Dimer site-bond percolation on a triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, L. S.; De la Cruz Félix, N.; Centres, P. M.; Ramirez-Pastor, A. J.

    2017-02-01

    A generalization of the site-percolation problem, in which pairs of neighbor sites (site dimers) and bonds are independently and randomly occupied on a triangular lattice, has been studied by means of numerical simulations. Motivated by considerations of cluster connectivity, two distinct schemes (denoted as S{\\cap}B and S{\\cup}B ) have been considered. In S{\\cap}B (S{\\cup}B ), two points are said to be connected if a sequence of occupied sites and (or) bonds joins them. Numerical data, supplemented by analysis using finite-size scaling theory, were used to determine (i) the complete phase diagram of the system (phase boundary between the percolating and nonpercolating regions), and (ii) the values of the critical exponents (and universality) characterizing the phase transition occurring in the system.

  10. Near coincidence site lattice misorientations in monoclinic zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsman, V.Y. |; Zhilyaev, A.P. |; Szpunar, J.

    1996-12-01

    Zirconium dioxide, ZrO{sub 2}, exists in three crystalline phases: monoclinic, tetragonal, and cubic. Calculations of the coincidence site lattice (CSL) misorientations for the last two lattices and for hexagonal ones using the methods developed represent little difficulty. However, no procedure for the determination of the CSL misorientations in the monoclinic system has been reported so far. Monoclinic zirconia has the crystallographic space group P2{sub 1}/c and the following parameters of the unit cell (e.g., 5, 6): a = 5.1490 {angstrom}, b = 5.2133 {angstrom}, c = 5.3161 {angstrom}, and {beta} = 99.228{degree}. Before discussing possible CSL misorientations in zirconia, consider a simple example based on geometric considerations. In any monoclinic crystal (with any lattice parameters) the two symmetrical boundaries along the (001) and (100) planes must have highly ordered atomic structure. The misorientation of the first boundary is descried as a rotation of either 180{degree} around the [100] direction or 180{degree} around the normal to the (001) plane. The misorientation of the second boundary is 180{degree} [001] or 180{degree} around the normal to the (100) plane. It can be shown that three-dimensional CSLs will exist in both cases if (c/a)cos{beta} is a rational number. This example justifies the following approximation of the unit cell in the monoclinic zirconia: a = b = c and cos{beta} = {minus}1/6 (i.e., {beta} = 99.594{degree}). Consider the following prismatic cell in the monoclinic crystal structure: ([1 0 1], [{bar 1} 0 1], [0 1 0]). With the above approximation, this cell is orthogonal with the ratios of the squares of the edge lengths expressed as 5:7:3. Therefore, one can apply the algorithm for calculations of the CSL misorientations in orthorhombic lattices with rational ratios of squares of the lattice periods, which is based on the general vector-quaternion method of misorientation representation.

  11. Lattice location of phosphorus in n-type homoepitaxial diamond films grown by chemical-vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Masataka; Teraji, Tokuyuki; Koizumi, Satoshi

    2001-11-01

    The lattice location of phosphorus dopant atoms in n-type homoepitaxial diamond {111} films grown by chemical-vapor deposition has been investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and particle-induced x-ray emission under ion-channeling conditions. It is found that phosphorus dopant atoms occupy the substitutional sites almost completely in the host diamond lattice. The substitutional fraction of phosphorus was more than 0.9 for <011> and <111> directions. Present observation implies that the deep ground-state energy level of phosphorus in diamond, which is at 0.6 eV below the bottom of the conduction band, is attributed to the relaxation of surrounding carbon atoms.

  12. 23. VIEW OF DOG KENNELS LOCATED AT LAUNCH SITE, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW OF DOG KENNELS LOCATED AT LAUNCH SITE, LOOKING NORTH Marilyn Ziemer, photographer, March 1988 - Mount Gleason Nike Missile Site, Angeles National Forest, South of Soledad Canyon, Sylmar, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. Interaction in equilibrium plasmas of charged macroparticles located in nodes of cubic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    Interaction of two charged pointlike macroparticles located at nodes of simple cubic (sc), body-centered cubic (bcc) and face-centered cubic (fcc) lattices in an equilibrium plasma is studied within the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann model. It is shown that the boundary shape has a strong influence on the electrostatic interaction between two macroparticles, which switches from repulsion at small interparticle distances to attraction as it approaches the halflength of a computational cell. It is found that in a case of dust particles arranged in the nodes of the sc, bcc and fcc lattices, the electrostatic force acting on them is equal to zero and the nature of the interaction changes from repulsion to attraction; hence, the infinite sc, bcc and fcc lattices of charged dust particles are thermodynamically stable at rather low temperatures.

  14. Effect of Single-Site Mutations on HP Lattice Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Guangjie; Vogel, Thomas; Wuest, Thomas; Li, Ying Wai; Landau, David P

    2014-01-01

    We developed a heuristic method for determining the ground-state degeneracy of hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice proteins, based on Wang-Landau and multicanonical sampling. It is applied during comprehensive studies of single-site mutations in specific HP proteins with different sequences. The effects in which we are interested include structural changes in ground-states, changes of ground-state energy, degeneracy, and thermodynamic properties of the system. With respect to mutations, both extremely sensitive and insensitive positions in the HP sequence have been found. That is, ground state energies and degeneracies, as well as other thermodynamic and structural quantities may be either largely unaffected or may change significantly due to mutation.

  15. Site survey for optimum location of Optical Communication Experimental Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Site survey was made to determine the optimum location for an Optical Communication Experimental Facility /OCEF/ and to recommend several sites, graded according to preference. A site was desired which could perform two-way laser communication with a spacecraft and laser tracking with a minimum of interruption by weather effects.

  16. Supporting the search for the CEP location with nonlocal PNJL models constrained by lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contrera, Gustavo A.; Grunfeld, A. Gabriela; Blaschke, David

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the possible location of the critical endpoint in the QCD phase diagram based on nonlocal covariant PNJL models including a vector interaction channel. The form factors of the covariant interaction are constrained by lattice QCD data for the quark propagator. The comparison of our results for the pressure including the pion contribution and the scaled pressure shift Δ P/ T 4 vs. T/ T c with lattice QCD results shows a better agreement when Lorentzian form factors for the nonlocal interactions and the wave function renormalization are considered. The strength of the vector coupling is used as a free parameter which influences results at finite baryochemical potential. It is used to adjust the slope of the pseudocritical temperature of the chiral phase transition at low baryochemical potential and the scaled pressure shift accessible in lattice QCD simulations. Our study, albeit presently performed at the mean-field level, supports the very existence of a critical point and favors its location within a region that is accessible in experiments at the NICA accelerator complex.

  17. The Structure of the Cubic Coincident Site Lattice Rotation Group

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, B W; Minich, R W; Rudd, R E; Kumar, M

    2004-01-13

    This work is intended to be a mathematical underpinning for the field of grain boundary engineering and its relatives. The interrelationships within the set of rotations producing coincident site lattices in cubic crystals are examined in detail. Besides combining previously established but widely scattered results into a unified context, the present work details newly developed representations of the group structure in terms of strings of generators (based on quaternionic number theory, and including uniqueness proofs and rules for algebraic manipulation) as well as an easily visualized topological network model. Important results that were previously obscure or not universally understood (e.g. the {Sigma} combination rule governing triple junctions) are clarified in these frameworks. The methods also facilitate several general observations, including the very different natures of twin-limited structures in two and three dimensions, the inadequacy of the {Sigma} combination rule to determine valid quadruple nodes, and a curious link between allowable grain boundary assignments and the four-color map theorem. This kind of understanding is essential to the generation of realistic statistical models of grain boundary networks (particularly in twin-dominated systems) and is especially applicable to the field of grain boundary engineering.

  18. Statement of significance, site location graphic, mantle elevation, section through ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Statement of significance, site location graphic, mantle elevation, section through decorative wall element, and terra cotta details - Boston Architectural College, Terra Cotta Mantel, 951 Boylston Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  19. A GIS approach for predicting prehistoric site locations.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiper, J. A.; Wescott, K. L.

    1999-08-04

    Use of geographic information system (GIS)-based predictive mapping to locate areas of high potential for prehistoric archaeological sites is becoming increasingly popular among archaeologists. Knowledge of the environmental variables influencing activities of original inhabitants is used to produce GIS layers representing the spatial distribution of those variables. The GIS layers are then analyzed to identify locations where combinations of environmental variables match patterns observed at known prehistoric sites. Presented are the results of a study to locate high-potential areas for prehistoric sites in a largely unsurveyed area of 39,000 acres in the Upper Chesapeake Bay region, including details of the analysis process. The project used environmental data from over 500 known sites in other parts of the region and the results corresponded well with known sites in the study area.

  20. Environmental assessment overview, Reference repository location, Hanford site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a reference repository location at the Hanford Site in Washington as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Columbia Plateau, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Hanford site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Hanford site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Hanford site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. 3 figs.

  1. Spatial metrology of dopants in silicon with exact lattice site precision.

    PubMed

    Usman, M; Bocquel, J; Salfi, J; Voisin, B; Tankasala, A; Rahman, R; Simmons, M Y; Rogge, S; Hollenberg, L C L

    2016-09-01

    Scaling of Si-based nanoelectronics has reached the regime where device function is affected not only by the presence of individual dopants, but also by their positions in the crystal. Determination of the precise dopant location is an unsolved problem in applications from channel doping in ultrascaled transistors to quantum information processing. Here, we establish a metrology combining low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) imaging and a comprehensive quantum treatment of the dopant-STM system to pinpoint the exact coordinates of the dopant in the Si crystal. The technique is underpinned by the observation that STM images contain atomic-sized features in ordered patterns that are highly sensitive to the STM tip orbital and the absolute dopant lattice site. The demonstrated ability to determine the locations of P and As dopants to 5 nm depths will provide critical information for the design and optimization of nanoscale devices for classical and quantum computing applications.

  2. Spatial metrology of dopants in silicon with exact lattice site precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, M.; Bocquel, J.; Salfi, J.; Voisin, B.; Tankasala, A.; Rahman, R.; Simmons, M. Y.; Rogge, S.; Hollenberg, L. C. L.

    2016-09-01

    Scaling of Si-based nanoelectronics has reached the regime where device function is affected not only by the presence of individual dopants, but also by their positions in the crystal. Determination of the precise dopant location is an unsolved problem in applications from channel doping in ultrascaled transistors to quantum information processing. Here, we establish a metrology combining low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) imaging and a comprehensive quantum treatment of the dopant-STM system to pinpoint the exact coordinates of the dopant in the Si crystal. The technique is underpinned by the observation that STM images contain atomic-sized features in ordered patterns that are highly sensitive to the STM tip orbital and the absolute dopant lattice site. The demonstrated ability to determine the locations of P and As dopants to 5 nm depths will provide critical information for the design and optimization of nanoscale devices for classical and quantum computing applications.

  3. Growth of coincident site lattice matched semiconductor layers and devices on crystalline substrates

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew G; Ptak, Aaron J

    2013-08-13

    Methods of fabricating a semiconductor layer or device and said devices are disclosed. The methods include but are not limited to providing a substrate having a crystalline surface with a known lattice parameter (a). The method further includes growing a crystalline semiconductor layer on the crystalline substrate surface by coincident site lattice matched epitaxy, without any buffer layer between the crystalline semiconductor layer and the crystalline surface of the substrate. The crystalline semiconductor layer will be prepared to have a lattice parameter (a') that is related to the substrate lattice parameter (a). The lattice parameter (a') maybe related to the lattice parameter (a) by a scaling factor derived from a geometric relationship between the respective crystal lattices.

  4. Site-Resolved Quantum Simulation of Fermion Lattice Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    magnetism and superfluidity in square lattices. En route to this goal, we have constructed an ultra-high vacuum system, assembled laser cooling...in square lattices. En route to this goal, we have constructed an ultra-high vacuum system, assembled laser cooling systems, tested high-resolution...a dedicated vacuum architecture with sub-millimeter working distances; the use of ultraviolet light to image atom, instead of standard infrared

  5. A Simple Spreadsheet Program for the Calculation of Lattice-Site Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaffrey, John G.

    2009-01-01

    A simple spreadsheet program is presented that can be used by undergraduate students to calculate the lattice-site distributions in solids. A major strength of the method is the natural way in which the correct number of ions or atoms are present, or absent, at specific lattice distances. The expanding-cube method utilized is straightforward to…

  6. Environmental assessment: Reference repository location, Hanford site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a reference repository location at the Hanford Site in Washington as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Columbia Plateau, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Hanford Site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Hanford site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that it is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Hanford site as one of five sites suitable for characterization.

  7. Environmental assessment: Reference repository location, Hanford site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a reference repository location at the Hanford Site in Washington as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Columbia Plateau, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Hanford site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Hanford site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that is is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Hanford site as one of five sites available for characterization.

  8. 13. "CIVIL, SITE PLAN AND VICINITY MAP, AREA LOCATIONS." Test ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. "CIVIL, SITE PLAN AND VICINITY MAP, AREA LOCATIONS." Test Area 1-125. Specifications No. ENG (NASA)-04-35363-1; Drawing No. 60-09-34; sheet 11. Ref. No. C-l. D.O. SERIES 1597/1. Approved for siting on 24 April 1962. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

  9. Lattice Location of Mg in GaN: A Fresh Look at Doping Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, U.; Amorim, L. M.; Augustyns, V.; Costa, A.; David-Bosne, E.; Lima, T. A. L.; Lippertz, G.; Correia, J. G.; da Silva, M. R.; Kappers, M. J.; Temst, K.; Vantomme, A.; Pereira, L. M. C.

    2017-03-01

    Radioactive 27Mg (t1 /2=9.5 min ) was implanted into GaN of different doping types at CERN's ISOLDE facility and its lattice site determined via β- emission channeling. Following implantations between room temperature and 800 °C , the majority of 27Mg occupies the substitutional Ga sites; however, below 350 °C significant fractions were also found on interstitial positions ˜0.6 Å from ideal octahedral sites. The interstitial fraction of Mg was correlated with the GaN doping character, being highest (up to 31%) in samples doped p type with 2 ×1019 cm-3 stable Mg during epilayer growth, and lowest in Si-doped n -GaN, thus giving direct evidence for the amphoteric character of Mg. Implanting above 350 °C converts interstitial 27Mg to substitutional Ga sites, which allows estimating the activation energy for migration of interstitial Mg as between 1.3 and 2.0 eV.

  10. Collagen telopeptides (cross-linking sites) play a role in collagen gel lattice contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodley, D. T.; Yamauchi, M.; Wynn, K. C.; Mechanic, G.; Briggaman, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Solubilized interstitial collagens will form a fibrillar, gel-like lattice when brought to physiologic conditions. In the presence of human dermal fibroblasts the collagen lattice will contract. The rate of contraction can be determined by computer-assisted planemetry. The mechanisms involved in contraction are as yet unknown. Using this system it was found that the rate of contraction was markedly decreased when collagen lacking telopeptides was substituted for native collagen. Histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL) is a major stable trifunctional collagen cross-link in mature skin that involves a carboxyl terminal, telopeptide site 16c, the sixteenth amino acid residue from the carboxy terminal of the telopeptide region of alpha 1 (I) in type I collagen. Little, if any, HHL was present in native, purified, reconstituted, soluble collagen fibrils from 1% acetic acid-extracted 2-year-old bovine skin. In contrast, HHL cross-links were present (0.22 moles of cross-link per mole of collagen) in lattices of the same collagen contracted by fibroblasts. However, rat tail tendon does not contain HHL cross-links, and collagen lattices made of rat tail tendon collagen are capable of contraction. This suggests that telopeptide sites, and not mature HHL cross-links per se, are essential for fibroblasts to contract collagen lattices. Beta-aminopropionitrile fumarate (BAPN), a potent lathyrogen that perturbs collagen cross-linking by inhibition of lysyl oxidase, also inhibited the rate of lattice cell contraction in lattices composed of native collagen. However, the concentrations of BAPN that were necessary to inhibit the contraction of collagen lattices also inhibited fibroblast growth suggestive of cellular toxicity. In accordance with other studies, we found no inhibition of the rate of lattice contraction when fibronectin-depleted serum was used. Electron microscopy of contracted gels revealed typical collagen fibers with a characteristic axial periodicity. The data

  11. Mars Pathfinder First Anniversary Special -- Refined Landing Site Location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    It has been one year since NASA's Return to the Red Planet began with the spectacular landing of Mars Pathfinder and its microrover, Sojourner. The spacecraft bounced onto a flood-washed landscape on July 4, 1997.

    Mars Pathfinder was soon joined by the orbiting Mars Global Surveyor on September 11, 1997 (PDT). Mars Global Surveyor's high resolution camera, MOC, took a picture of the Mars Pathfinder landing site region during its 256th orbit on April 22, 1998. This picture--at about 5 meters (11 feet) per pixel--is the best available for the site. The previous best images were from the Viking 1 Orbiter in 1976, and had resolutions of about 38 meters (125 feet) per pixel.

    The MOC image has allowed scientists to determine the exact location of the Mars Pathfinder lander. Unfortunately, the image resolution is not good enough to actually see the lander--nor can any of the familiar boulders (e.g., 'Yogi') be seen at this resolution.

    Using the MOC image, the landing site location has been refined by Dr. Michael Malin, Principal Investigator for the Mars Global Surveyor MOC Team and a Participating Scientist on the Mars Pathfinder mission. The images above illustrate how the landing site was located by using the 'sight lines' published by T. Parker (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA) and topographic map provided by R. Kirk (U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ).

    Left image: MOC image 25603 subframe, shown at 15 meters (about 50 feet) per pixel resolution. Small, colored box is a topographic map of the Mars Pathfinder landing site produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (Flagstaff, AZ) from Mars Pathfinder stereographic images . Dark, heavy lines are 'sight lines' to various landmarks seen along the horizon in Mars Pathfinder camera images, measured by T. Parker and matched to features seen in Viking Orbiter images. These lines were published in Science, v. 278, p. 1746, December 5, 1997. The lighter, thinner sightlines are the same lines, adjusted to

  12. 14 CFR 420.21 - Launch site location review-launch site boundary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the debris dispersion radius of the largest launch vehicle type and weight class proposed for the... largest distance provided by table 2 for the type and weight class of any launch vehicle proposed for the... Requirements for Obtaining a License § 420.21 Launch site location review—launch site boundary. (a)...

  13. 14 CFR 420.21 - Launch site location review-launch site boundary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Launch site location review-launch site boundary. 420.21 Section 420.21 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION... travels given a worst-case launch vehicle failure in the launch area. An applicant must clearly...

  14. Definition of a quality factor for single site location estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coetzee, Petrus J.; Plessis, Warren P.

    2016-06-01

    A technique to estimate the performance of single site location (SSL) based on high-frequency direction finding for reigning ionospheric propagation conditions is described. This technique is based on classic propagation information (maximum useable frequency, frequency for optimum traffic, optimum working frequency, highest possible frequency, lowest possible frequency, etc.) which can be deduced by ray tracing through an ionospheric model such as the International Reference Ionosphere. The correlation between the elevation angle measured by an interferometric direction finder and the angles corresponding to the propagation conditions is used to assign a quality factor to the calculated SSL ground range result.

  15. Site occupancy and lattice parameters in sigma-phase Co-Cr alloys.

    PubMed

    Cieslak, Jakub; Dubiel, Stanislaw M; Reissner, Michael

    2012-04-01

    Neutron powder diffraction was used to study the distribution of Co and Cr atoms over different lattice sites as well as the lattice parameters of sigma-phase compounds Co(100 - x)Cr(x) with x = 57.0, 62.7 and 65.8. From the diffractograms recorded in the temperature range of 4.2-300 K it was found for the five crystallographically independent sites that A (2a) and D (8i) are predominantly occupied by Co atoms, while sites B (4f), C (8i) and E (8j) mainly accommodate Cr atoms. The lattice parameters a and c exhibit linear temperature dependencies, with different expansion coefficients in the temperature ranges of 4.2-100 and 100-300 K.

  16. Directed alternating lattices and the site-to-bond ratio for animals and trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruskin, H. J.; Cadilhe, A. M. R.; Carvalho, J. A. G. S. M.

    1992-08-01

    We present here a brief summary of results on so-called ``exotic'' directed lattices having nonregular periodicity. Such lattices, e.g., the Archimedean nets, are characterized by different site types and a spread of coordination numbers. The evidence adduced here shows that the exponent structure for the growth of animals and trees on such lattices is of the form predicted, with θ0 for trees equivalent to θ for unrestricted animals, independent of the periodicity property. This supports the general form θc=θ0-c, for cycles c=0. We quote values for the growth parameter (or inverse critical fugacity) λ for bond trees and animal growth on selected directed lattices. The convergence of such series is well known to be subject to the influence of subdominant singularities in addition to θ, and we report on results obtained using the second-log-derivative scheme for the lattices of interest. Recent results from percolation studies for the alternating nets [H. J. Ruskin, Phys. Lett. A 162, 215 (1992)] have proved particularly encouraging for the Archimedean lattices, with z~=2.498+-0.010, but uncertainties for the honeycomb were found to be large. Investigation of the site-to-bond ratios for animals and trees on the honeycomb gives somewhat smoother series behavior, which, though subject to confluence effects, supports a much lower value of the effective coordination number. We quote z~=1.450+-0.050.

  17. Exploiting protein flexibility to predict the location of allosteric sites

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Allostery is one of the most powerful and common ways of regulation of protein activity. However, for most allosteric proteins identified to date the mechanistic details of allosteric modulation are not yet well understood. Uncovering common mechanistic patterns underlying allostery would allow not only a better academic understanding of the phenomena, but it would also streamline the design of novel therapeutic solutions. This relatively unexplored therapeutic potential and the putative advantages of allosteric drugs over classical active-site inhibitors fuel the attention allosteric-drug research is receiving at present. A first step to harness the regulatory potential and versatility of allosteric sites, in the context of drug-discovery and design, would be to detect or predict their presence and location. In this article, we describe a simple computational approach, based on the effect allosteric ligands exert on protein flexibility upon binding, to predict the existence and position of allosteric sites on a given protein structure. Results By querying the literature and a recently available database of allosteric sites, we gathered 213 allosteric proteins with structural information that we further filtered into a non-redundant set of 91 proteins. We performed normal-mode analysis and observed significant changes in protein flexibility upon allosteric-ligand binding in 70% of the cases. These results agree with the current view that allosteric mechanisms are in many cases governed by changes in protein dynamics caused by ligand binding. Furthermore, we implemented an approach that achieves 65% positive predictive value in identifying allosteric sites within the set of predicted cavities of a protein (stricter parameters set, 0.22 sensitivity), by combining the current analysis on dynamics with previous results on structural conservation of allosteric sites. We also analyzed four biological examples in detail, revealing that this simple coarse

  18. Coincident site lattice-matched growth of semiconductors on substrates using compliant buffer layers

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew

    2016-08-23

    A method of producing semiconductor materials and devices that incorporate the semiconductor materials are provided. In particular, a method is provided of producing a semiconductor material, such as a III-V semiconductor, on a silicon substrate using a compliant buffer layer, and devices such as photovoltaic cells that incorporate the semiconductor materials. The compliant buffer material and semiconductor materials may be deposited using coincident site lattice-matching epitaxy, resulting in a close degree of lattice matching between the substrate material and deposited material for a wide variety of material compositions. The coincident site lattice matching epitaxial process, as well as the use of a ductile buffer material, reduce the internal stresses and associated crystal defects within the deposited semiconductor materials fabricated using the disclosed method. As a result, the semiconductor devices provided herein possess enhanced performance characteristics due to a relatively low density of crystal defects.

  19. Apodized structures for the integration of defect sites into photonic lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Boguslawski, Martin Kelberer, Andreas; Rose, Patrick; Denz, Cornelia

    2014-09-15

    We introduce a versatile concept to optically induce photonic structures of local refractive index modulations as well as photonic lattices holding single defect sites. For a given structure, we develop a set of nondiffracting beams obtained by fractionalizing the corresponding spatial spectrum. By combining this set in a multiplexing procedure, we achieve an incoherent combination of all individual structures of the set resulting in a locally addressable refractive index manipulation. We exemplarily present experimental results for apodized, meaning locally confined index changes in a photorefractive crystal resembling a sixfold and a circular symmetric structure. By an additional multiplexing step, we furthermore create periodic photonic lattices featuring embedded defects.

  20. 43 CFR 3832.10 - Procedures for locating mining claims or sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures for locating mining claims or sites. 3832.10 Section 3832.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued... OR SITES Locating Mining Claims or Sites § 3832.10 Procedures for locating mining claims or sites....

  1. Channelling experiments on the lattice location of hydrogen in metals using the nuclear reaction 1H(11B, α)αα

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Eiichi

    1992-03-01

    In order to locate hydrogen dissolved in metals a nuclear reaction 1H(11B, α)αα was applied to a channelling method. As an example of this application the results of the following two experiments were briefly reported. (1) The lattice location of H in V was investigated under a <001> compressive stress of 7 kg/mm2 below the elastic limit. The configuration of hydrogen is extremely sensitive to compressive stress and changes from a tetrahedral (T) site to a diplaced-T or 4T configuration. On release of this stress the hydrogen atoms returned to T-sites. (2) To elucidate the mechanism of the enhancement of the terminal solubility for hydrogen (TSH) in Nb on alloying with undersized Mo atoms, the state of hydrogen was studied in Nb-based Nb-Mo dilute alloys. It was demonstrated that H atoms are trapped by Mo atoms and located at sites displaced from T-sites by about 0.6 Å. This result supports the trapping model for the enhancement of the TSH in the region of low Mo concentration.

  2. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors: location of the ligand binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Hulme, E.; Wheatley, M.; Curtis, C.; Birdsall, N.

    1987-05-01

    The key to understanding the pharmacological specificity of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR's) is the location within the receptor sequence of the amino acid residues responsible for ligand binding. To approach this problem, they have purified mAChR's from rat brain to homogeneity by sequential ion-exchange chromatography, affinity chromatography and molecular weight fractionation. Following labelling of the binding site with an alkylating affinity label, /sup 3/H-propylbenzilycholine mustard aziridinium ion (/sup 3/H-PrBCM), the mAChR was digested with a lysine-specific endoproteinase, and a ladder of peptides of increasing molecular weight, each containing the glycosylated N-terminus, isolated by chromatography on wheat-germ agglutinin sepharose. The pattern of labelling showed that a residue in the peptides containing transmembrane helices 2 and/or 3 of the mAChR was alkylated. The linkage was cleaved by 1 M hydroxylamine, showing that /sup 3/H-PrBCM was attached to an acidic residue, whose properties strongly suggested it to be embedded in a hydrophobic intramembrane region of the mAChR. Examination of the cloned sequence of the mAChR reveals several candidate residues, the most likely of which is homologous to an aspartic acid residue thought to protonate the retinal Schiff's base in the congeneric protein rhodopsin.

  3. GIS modeling of archaeological site locations: A low-tech approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Futato, Eugene M.

    1991-01-01

    A Geographic Information System (GIS)-type analysis of archaeological site locations using a dBase III plus program and a desk top computer is presented. A previously developed model of site locations in the Sequatchie Valley of northeastern Alabama is tested against known site locations in another large survey area there. The model fails to account for site locations in the test area. A model is developed for the test area and indicates the site locations are indeed different. Whether this is due to differences in site locations on a sub-regional level, or to sample error in the original model is unknown.

  4. Site dependent hardening of the lanthanum metal lattice by hydrogen absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, A.; Watanuki, T.; Ohmura, A.; Ikeda, T.; Aoki, K.; Nakano, S.; Takemura, K.

    2011-03-01

    The compressibility of lanthanum (La) metal and its hydrides were measured at room temperature by high pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction. La metal pressurized in a hydrogen medium forms a hydride with an fcc metal lattice, which likely contains hydrogen at a concentration close to 3.0 and persists over the measured pressure span up to 21 GPa. Equations of state have been determined by helium compression experiments for LaH 2 with tetrahedral interstitial sites fully occupied with hydrogen atoms and for LaH 2.46 with octahedral interstitial sites partially occupied with hydrogen atoms and tetrahedral sites fully occupied. Both hydrides possess fcc metal lattices. The bulk modulus values B0 are 66.7 ± 1.2 GPa for LaH 2 and 68.4±1.0 GPa for LaH 2.46. These values are three times larger than that of La metal and are very close to each other despite the difference in hydrogen occupation states. The hardening of the metal lattice by hydrogenation is attributed predominantly to hydrogen-metal interactions at the tetrahedral sites and is most pronounced for La, which has the largest ionic radius among rare-earth metals.

  5. Nonlinear instabilities of multi-site breathers in Klein-Gordon lattices

    DOE PAGES

    Cuevas-Maraver, Jesus; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.; Pelinovsky, Dmitry E.

    2016-08-01

    Here, we explore the possibility of multi-site breather states in a nonlinear Klein–Gordon lattice to become nonlinearly unstable, even if they are found to be spectrally stable. The mechanism for this nonlinear instability is through the resonance with the wave continuum of a multiple of an internal mode eigenfrequency in the linearization of excited breather states. For the nonlinear instability, the internal mode must have its Krein signature opposite to that of the wave continuum. This mechanism is not only theoretically proposed, but also numerically corroborated through two concrete examples of the Klein–Gordon lattice with a soft (Morse) and amore » hard (Φ4) potential. Compared to the case of the nonlinear Schrödinger lattice, the Krein signature of the internal mode relative to that of the wave continuum may change depending on the period of the multi-site breather state. For the periods for which the Krein signatures of the internal mode and the wave continuum coincide, multi-site breather states are observed to be nonlinearly stable.« less

  6. Nonlinear instabilities of multi-site breathers in Klein-Gordon lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Cuevas-Maraver, Jesus; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.; Pelinovsky, Dmitry E.

    2016-08-01

    Here, we explore the possibility of multi-site breather states in a nonlinear Klein–Gordon lattice to become nonlinearly unstable, even if they are found to be spectrally stable. The mechanism for this nonlinear instability is through the resonance with the wave continuum of a multiple of an internal mode eigenfrequency in the linearization of excited breather states. For the nonlinear instability, the internal mode must have its Krein signature opposite to that of the wave continuum. This mechanism is not only theoretically proposed, but also numerically corroborated through two concrete examples of the Klein–Gordon lattice with a soft (Morse) and a hard (Φ4) potential. Compared to the case of the nonlinear Schrödinger lattice, the Krein signature of the internal mode relative to that of the wave continuum may change depending on the period of the multi-site breather state. For the periods for which the Krein signatures of the internal mode and the wave continuum coincide, multi-site breather states are observed to be nonlinearly stable.

  7. 43 CFR 3832.1 - What does it mean to locate mining claims or sites?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What does it mean to locate mining claims or sites? 3832.1 Section 3832.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... CLAIMS OR SITES Locating Mining Claims or Sites § 3832.1 What does it mean to locate mining claims...

  8. 43 CFR 3832.1 - What does it mean to locate mining claims or sites?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What does it mean to locate mining claims or sites? 3832.1 Section 3832.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... CLAIMS OR SITES Locating Mining Claims or Sites § 3832.1 What does it mean to locate mining claims...

  9. 43 CFR 3832.1 - What does it mean to locate mining claims or sites?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What does it mean to locate mining claims or sites? 3832.1 Section 3832.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... CLAIMS OR SITES Locating Mining Claims or Sites § 3832.1 What does it mean to locate mining claims...

  10. 43 CFR 3832.1 - What does it mean to locate mining claims or sites?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What does it mean to locate mining claims or sites? 3832.1 Section 3832.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... CLAIMS OR SITES Locating Mining Claims or Sites § 3832.1 What does it mean to locate mining claims...

  11. 43 CFR 3832.11 - How do I locate mining claims or sites?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... claim or site. The notice must include: (i) The name or names of the locators; (ii) The date of the location; and (iii) A description of the claim or site; (iv) The name or number of the claim or site, or... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How do I locate mining claims or...

  12. 43 CFR 3832.11 - How do I locate mining claims or sites?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... claim or site. The notice must include: (i) The name or names of the locators; (ii) The date of the location; and (iii) A description of the claim or site; (iv) The name or number of the claim or site, or... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How do I locate mining claims or...

  13. 43 CFR 3832.11 - How do I locate mining claims or sites?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... claim or site. The notice must include: (i) The name or names of the locators; (ii) The date of the location; and (iii) A description of the claim or site; (iv) The name or number of the claim or site, or... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How do I locate mining claims or...

  14. A GIS typology to locate sites of submarine groundwater discharge.

    PubMed

    Rapaglia, John; Grant, Carley; Bokuniewicz, Henry; Pick, Tsvi; Scholten, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Although many researchers agree on the importance of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD), it remains difficult to locate and quantify this process. A groundwater typology was developed based on local digital elevation models and compared to concurrent radon mapping indicative of SGD in the Niantic River, CT USA. Areas of high radon activity were located near areas of high flow accumulation lending evidence to the utility of this approach to locate SGD. The benefits of this approach are three-fold: fresh terrestrial SGD may be quickly located through widely-available digital elevation models at little or no cost to the investigator; fresh SGD may also be quantified through the GIS approach by multiplying pixelated flow accumulation with the expected annual recharge; and, as these data necessarily quantify only fresh SGD, a comparison of these data with SGD as calculated by Rn activity may allow for the separation of the fresh and circulated fractions of SGD. This exercise was completed for the Niantic River where SGD as calculated by the GIS model is 1.2 m(3)/s, SGD as calculated by Rn activity is 0.73-5.5 m(3)/s, and SGD as calculated via a theoretical approach is 1.8-4.3 m(3)/s. Therefore fresh, terrestrial SGD accounts for 22-100% of total SGD in the Niantic River.

  15. 43 CFR 3832.11 - How do I locate mining claims or sites?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... within the boundaries of the claim. (c) To locate a claim or site, you must— (1) Make certain that the land on which you are locating the claim or site is Federal land that is open to mineral entry (2... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How do I locate mining claims or...

  16. 14 CFR 420.30 - Launch site location review for permitted launch vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Launch site location review for permitted... AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A LAUNCH SITE Criteria and Information Requirements for Obtaining a License § 420.30 Launch site location review...

  17. 14 CFR 420.29 - Launch site location review for unproven launch vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Launch site location review for unproven... AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A LAUNCH SITE Criteria and Information Requirements for Obtaining a License § 420.29 Launch site location review for...

  18. 14 CFR 420.27 - Launch site location review-information requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Launch site location review-information... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A LAUNCH SITE Criteria and Information Requirements for Obtaining a License § 420.27 Launch site location review—information requirements....

  19. 14 CFR 420.25 - Launch site location review-risk analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Launch site location review-risk analysis... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A LAUNCH SITE Criteria and Information Requirements for Obtaining a License § 420.25 Launch site location review—risk analysis. (a) If a...

  20. 14 CFR 420.25 - Launch site location review-risk analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Launch site location review-risk analysis... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A LAUNCH SITE Criteria and Information Requirements for Obtaining a License § 420.25 Launch site location review—risk analysis. (a) If a...

  1. Universality class of site and bond percolation on multifractal scale-free planar stochastic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M. K.; Rahman, M. M.

    2016-10-01

    In this article, we investigate both site and bond percolation on a weighted planar stochastic lattice (WPSL), which is a multifractal and whose dual is a scale-free network. The characteristic property of percolation is that it exhibits threshold phenomena as we find sudden or abrupt jump in spanning probability across pc accompanied by the divergence of some other observable quantities, which is reminiscent of a continuous phase transition. Indeed, percolation is characterized by the critical behavior of percolation strength P (p ) ˜(pc-p ) β , mean cluster size S ˜(pc-p ) -γ , and the system size L ˜(pc-p ) -ν , which are known as the equivalent counterpart of the order parameter, susceptibility, and correlation length, respectively. Moreover, the cluster size distribution function ns(pc) ˜s-τ and the mass-length relation M ˜Ldf of the spanning cluster also provide useful characterization of the percolation process. We numerically obtain a value for pc and for all the exponents such as β ,ν ,γ ,τ , and df. We find that, except for pc, all the exponents are exactly the same in both bond and site percolation despite the significant difference in the definition of cluster and other quantities. Our results suggest that the percolation on WPSL belongs to a new universality class, as its exponents do not share the same value as for all the existing planar lattices. Besides, like all other cases, its site and bond type belong to the same universality class.

  2. Locating Air Force Base Sites History’s Legacy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    Pierre Newly built sub-base Watertown Newly built sub-base Tennessee Dyersburg Field, Halls Transferred from other AAF use Texas Dalhart Newly...Sam Houston, Texas , where the weather was warmer and more favorable for winter flying. Foulois and his crew of mechanics arrived with the airplane in...airplanes, and equipment in Augusta to move to Texas City, Texas . Meantime, the Signal Corps tried to purchase the College Park site, but Congress failed to

  3. 43 CFR 3832.42 - How do I locate a tunnel site?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How do I locate a tunnel site? 3832.42 Section 3832.42 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES Tunnel Sites § 3832.42 How do I locate a tunnel...

  4. 43 CFR 3832.42 - How do I locate a tunnel site?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How do I locate a tunnel site? 3832.42 Section 3832.42 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES Tunnel Sites § 3832.42 How do I locate a tunnel...

  5. 43 CFR 3832.42 - How do I locate a tunnel site?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How do I locate a tunnel site? 3832.42 Section 3832.42 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES Tunnel Sites § 3832.42 How do I locate a tunnel...

  6. 43 CFR 3832.42 - How do I locate a tunnel site?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How do I locate a tunnel site? 3832.42 Section 3832.42 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES Tunnel Sites § 3832.42 How do I locate a tunnel...

  7. Locations of Roberge-Weiss transition endpoints in lattice QCD with Nf=2 improved Kogut-Susskind quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Liang-Kai; Meng, Xiang-Fei

    2017-03-01

    Result on locations of the tricritical points of Nf=2 lattice QCD with imaginary chemical potential is presented. Simulations are carried out with Symanzik improved gauge action and Asqtad fermion action. With imaginary chemical potential i μI=i π T , previous studies show that the Roberge-Weiss (RW) transition endpoints are triple points at both large and small quark masses, and second order transition points at intermediate quark masses. The triple and second order endpoints are separated by two tricritical ones. Our simulations are carried out at 7 values of quark mass a m ranging from 0.024 to 0.070 on lattice volume 1 23×4 , 1 63×4 , 2 03×4 . The susceptibility and Binder cumulant of the imaginary part of the Polyakov loop are employed to determine the nature of RW transition endpoints. The simulations suggest that the two tricritical points are within the range 0.024-0.026 and 0.040-0.050, respectively.

  8. Effect of forward looking sites on a multi-phase lattice hydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redhu, Poonam; Gupta, Arvind Kumar

    2016-03-01

    A new multi-phase lattice hydrodynamic traffic flow model is proposed by considering the effect of multi-forward looking sites on a unidirectional highway. We examined the qualitative properties of proposed model through linear as well as nonlinear stability analysis. It is shown that the multi-anticipation effect can significantly enlarge the stability region on the phase diagram and exhibit three-phase traffic flow. It is also observed that the multi-forward looking sites have prominent influence on traffic flow when driver senses the relative flux of leading vehicles. Theoretical findings are verified using numerical simulation which confirms that the traffic jam is suppressed efficiently by considering the information of leading vehicles in unidirectional multi-phase traffic flow.

  9. Twinning in fcc lattice creates low-coordinated catalytically active sites in porous gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajčí, Marian; Kameoka, Satoshi; Tsai, An-Pang

    2016-08-01

    We describe a new mechanism for creation of catalytically active sites in porous gold. Samples of porous gold prepared by de-alloying Al2Au exhibit a clear correlation between the catalytic reactivity towards CO oxidation and structural defects in the fcc lattice of Au. We have found that on the stepped {211} surfaces quite common twin boundary defects in the bulk structure of porous gold can form long close-packed rows of atoms with the coordination number CN = 6. DFT calculations confirm that on these low-coordinated Au sites dioxygen chemisorbs and CO oxidation can proceed via the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism with the activation energy of 37 kJ/mol or via the CO-OO intermediate with the energy barrier of 19 kJ/mol. The existence of the twins in porous gold is stabilized by the surface energy.

  10. Twinning in fcc lattice creates low-coordinated catalytically active sites in porous gold.

    PubMed

    Krajčí, Marian; Kameoka, Satoshi; Tsai, An-Pang

    2016-08-28

    We describe a new mechanism for creation of catalytically active sites in porous gold. Samples of porous gold prepared by de-alloying Al2Au exhibit a clear correlation between the catalytic reactivity towards CO oxidation and structural defects in the fcc lattice of Au. We have found that on the stepped {211} surfaces quite common twin boundary defects in the bulk structure of porous gold can form long close-packed rows of atoms with the coordination number CN = 6. DFT calculations confirm that on these low-coordinated Au sites dioxygen chemisorbs and CO oxidation can proceed via the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism with the activation energy of 37 kJ/mol or via the CO-OO intermediate with the energy barrier of 19 kJ/mol. The existence of the twins in porous gold is stabilized by the surface energy.

  11. 25 CFR 214.28 - Location of sites for mines and buildings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Location of sites for mines and buildings. 214.28 Section... and buildings. In event of disagreement between two or more mineral lessees regarding sites for the location of wells, mines, buildings, plants, etc., the same shall be determined by the superintendent...

  12. 25 CFR 214.28 - Location of sites for mines and buildings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Location of sites for mines and buildings. 214.28 Section... and buildings. In event of disagreement between two or more mineral lessees regarding sites for the location of wells, mines, buildings, plants, etc., the same shall be determined by the superintendent...

  13. Geometric frustration on a 1/9th site depleted triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkinson, John; Beck, Jarrett

    2013-03-01

    In the searches both for new spin liquid and spin ice (artificial and macroscopic) candidates, geometrically frustrated two-dimensional spin systems have played a prominent role. Here we present a study of the classical antiferromagnetic Ising (AFI) model on the sorrel net, a 1/9th site depleted and 1/7th bond depleted triangular lattice. The AFI model on this corner-shared triangle net is found to have a large residual entropy per spin S/N = 0 . 48185 +/- 0 . 00008 , indicating the sorrel net is highly geometrically frustrated. Anticipating that it may be difficult to achieve perfect bond depletion, we investigate the physics resulting from turning back on the depleted bonds (J2). We present the phase diagram, analytic expressions for the long range partially ordered ground state spin structure for antiferromagnetic J2 and the short range ordered ground state spin structure for ferromagnetic J2, the magnetic susceptibility and the static structure factor. We briefly comment on the possibility that artificial spin ice on the sorrel lattice could by made, and on a recent report [T. D. Keene et al., Dalton Trans. 40 2983 (2011)] of the creation of a 1/9th depleted cobalt hydroxide oxalate. This work was supported by NSERC (JMH) and NSERC USRA (JJB)

  14. Feasibility study for locating archaeological village sites by satellite remote sensing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. P. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. As a result of ground truth activities, the accurate geographic location of an old fish camp was established as 64 deg 12 min 38 sec N, 158 deg 30 min 42 sec W. Previously the location of this very large abandoned village site was given only on a map sketched in 1935. This location and two other nearby sites will be used as ERTS training areas.

  15. Effect of single-site mutations on hydrophobic-polar lattice proteins.

    PubMed

    Shi, Guangjie; Vogel, Thomas; Wüst, Thomas; Li, Ying Wai; Landau, David P

    2014-09-01

    We developed a heuristic method for determining the ground-state degeneracy of hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice proteins, based on Wang-Landau and multicanonical sampling. It is applied during comprehensive studies of single-site mutations in specific HP proteins with different sequences. The effects in which we are interested include structural changes in ground states, changes of ground-state energy, degeneracy, and thermodynamic properties of the system. With respect to mutations, both extremely sensitive and insensitive positions in the HP sequence have been found. That is, ground-state energies and degeneracies, as well as other thermodynamic and structural quantities, may be either largely unaffected or may change significantly due to mutation.

  16. Effect of single-site mutations on hydrophobic-polar lattice proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guangjie; Vogel, Thomas; Wüst, Thomas; Li, Ying Wai; Landau, David P.

    2014-09-01

    We developed a heuristic method for determining the ground-state degeneracy of hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice proteins, based on Wang-Landau and multicanonical sampling. It is applied during comprehensive studies of single-site mutations in specific HP proteins with different sequences. The effects in which we are interested include structural changes in ground states, changes of ground-state energy, degeneracy, and thermodynamic properties of the system. With respect to mutations, both extremely sensitive and insensitive positions in the HP sequence have been found. That is, ground-state energies and degeneracies, as well as other thermodynamic and structural quantities, may be either largely unaffected or may change significantly due to mutation.

  17. Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld model on the square site-percolation lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, M. N.

    2016-08-01

    The Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld (BTW) model is considered on the site-diluted square lattice, tuned by the occupancy probability p. Various statistical observables of the avalanches are analyzed in terms of p, e.g. the fractal dimension of their exterior frontiers, gyration radius, loop lengths and Green’s function. The model exhibits critical behavior for all amounts of p, and the exponents of the statistical observables are analyzed. We find a distinct universality class at p={p}c, which is unstable towards a p = 1 (BTW) fixed point. This universality class displays some common features such as a two-dimensional (2D) Ising universality class, e.g. the fractal dimension of loops in the thermodynamic limit is {D}Fp={pc}=1.38\\mp 0.01 which is compatible with the fractal dimension of geometrical spin clusters of the 2D critical Ising model (with {D}F{{Ising}}=\\tfrac{11}{8}).

  18. How Inhomogeneous Site Percolation Works on Bethe Lattices: Theory and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jingli; Zhang, Liying; Siegmund, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Inhomogeneous percolation, for its closer relationship with real-life, can be more useful and reasonable than homogeneous percolation to illustrate the critical phenomena and dynamical behaviour of complex networks. However, due to its intricacy, the theoretical framework of inhomogeneous percolation is far from being complete and many challenging problems are still open. In this paper, we first investigate inhomogeneous site percolation on Bethe Lattices with two occupation probabilities, and then extend the result to percolation with m occupation probabilities. The critical behaviour of this inhomogeneous percolation is shown clearly by formulating the percolation probability with given occupation probability p, the critical occupation probability , and the average cluster size where p is subject to . Moreover, using the above theory, we discuss in detail the diffusion behaviour of an infectious disease (SARS) and present specific disease-control strategies in consideration of groups with different infection probabilities.

  19. Quantum phase transition of a Bose gas in a lattice with a controlled number of atoms per site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xu

    2005-05-01

    We have studied the superfluid-Mott insulator quantum phase transition [1] of a gas of ^87Rb atoms in an optical lattice. We are able to prepare the gas with a controllable number of one, two, or three atoms per lattice site, as verified with photoassociation spectroscopy. We measure momentum distributions using standard time-of-flight imaging techniques. These are similar to those of ref. [1], and exhibit narrow peaks at moderate lattice strengths. We find that the width of these peaks increases for lattice heights greater than about 13 times the recoil energy [2], and we observe interesting differences in this behavior, depending on the number of atoms per site. The data suggest that the quantum phase transition occurs at higher lattice strength with larger site occupation. We acknowledge the support of this work by the R. A. Welch Foundation, The N. S. F., and the D.O.E. Quantum Optics Initiative. [1] Markus Greiner et al., Nature 415, 39 (2002). [2] Thilo St"oferle et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 130403 (2004).

  20. 15 CFR 970.405 - Appropriate exploration site size and location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.405 Appropriate exploration site size and location. Before the Administrator may certify an application, he must approve the size and location of the exploration area selected...

  1. 15 CFR 970.405 - Appropriate exploration site size and location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.405 Appropriate exploration site size and location. Before the Administrator may certify an application, he must approve the size and location of the exploration area selected...

  2. 15 CFR 970.405 - Appropriate exploration site size and location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.405 Appropriate exploration site size and location. Before the Administrator may certify an application, he must approve the size and location of the exploration area selected...

  3. 15 CFR 970.405 - Appropriate exploration site size and location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.405 Appropriate exploration site size and location. Before the Administrator may certify an application, he must approve the size and location of the exploration area selected...

  4. 15 CFR 970.405 - Appropriate exploration site size and location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.405 Appropriate exploration site size and location. Before the Administrator may certify an application, he must approve the size and location of the exploration area selected...

  5. 25 CFR 214.28 - Location of sites for mines and buildings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Location of sites for mines and buildings. 214.28 Section 214.28 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF... location of wells, mines, buildings, plants, etc., the same shall be determined by the superintendent...

  6. Vertical view of Apollo 16 landing site located Descartes area lunar nearside

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A vertical view of the Apollo 16 landing site located in the Descartes area lunar nearside. The overlay indicates the location of the proposed touchdown point for the Apollo 16 Lunar Module. Descartes is located west of the Sea of Nectar and southwest of the Sea of Tranquility. This photograph was taken with a 500mm lens camera from lunar orbit by the Apollo 14 crew.

  7. Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Drill Site Location Map 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, Todd

    2012-01-01

    Newberry seeks to explore "blind" (no surface evidence) convective hydrothermal systems associated with a young silicic pluton on the flanks of Newberry Volcano. This project will employ a combination of innovative and conventional techniques to identify the location of subsurface geothermal fluids associated with the hot pluton. Newberry project drill site location map 2010. Once the exploration mythology is validated, it can be applied throughout the Cascade Range and elsewhere to locate and develop “blind” geothermal resources.

  8. 76 FR 64943 - Proposed Cercla Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; ACM Smelter and Refinery Site, Located...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ... AGENCY Proposed Cercla Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; ACM Smelter and Refinery Site, Located in..., Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCLA), 42 U.S.C. 9622(i), notice is hereby given of a proposed... portions of Operable Unit 1 of the Site, and to pay $1,050,000.00 to the Hazardous Substance Superfund...

  9. 14 CFR 420.30 - Launch site location review for permitted launch vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Launch site location review for permitted launch vehicles. 420.30 Section 420.30 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A LAUNCH SITE...

  10. 14 CFR 420.29 - Launch site location review for unproven launch vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Launch site location review for unproven launch vehicles. 420.29 Section 420.29 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A LAUNCH SITE...

  11. 43 CFR 3832.33 - How do I locate a mill site?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... mill site to be valid. (b) If the United States does not own the surface estate of a particular parcel... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How do I locate a mill site? 3832.33 Section 3832.33 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF...

  12. Lattice site specific diffusion properties for substitutional and interstitial impurity atoms in ZnO crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaqoob, Faisal; Huang, Mengbing

    2016-09-01

    Fundamental understanding of impurity diffusion in crystals remains a challenge due to lack of experimental capabilities for measuring the diffusion properties of atoms according to their substitutional and interstitial lattice locations. With examples of indium and silver in ZnO crystals, we demonstrate an ion beam based method to experimentally determine the energetics and entropy changes in diffusion of substitutional and interstitial impurity atoms. While the interstitial Ag diffuses much faster than the substitutional Ag, as normally expected, the interstitial In migrates slower than the substitutional In, which is attributed to a large negative entropy change (˜-10 kB), possibly caused by the large atomic size of In. The activation energy and the diffusivity pre-exponential factor for the interstitial Ag are significantly enhanced, being more than a factor of two and ˜13 orders of magnitude, respectively, relative to the case for the interstitial In. This implies two different diffusion mechanisms between these two types of interstitial atoms in ZnO crystals: the direct interstitial diffusion mechanism for the interstitial In and the kick-out diffusion mechanism for the interstitial Ag. In addition, the activation energies and the diffusivity prefactors follow the Meyer-Neldel relationship with an excitation energy of ˜92 meV.

  13. Stratigraphic Profiles for Selected Hanford Site Seismometer Stations and Other Locations

    SciTech Connect

    Last, George V.

    2014-02-01

    Stratigraphic profiles were constructed for eight selected Hanford Site seismometer stations, five Hanford Site facility reference locations, and seven regional three-component broadband seismometer stations. These profiles provide interpretations of the subsurface layers to support estimation of ground motions from past earthquakes, and the prediction of ground motions from future earthquakes. In most cases these profiles terminated at the top of the Wanapum Basalt, but at selected sites profiles were extended down to the top of the crystalline basement. The composite one-dimensional stratigraphic profiles were based primarily on previous interpretations from nearby boreholes, and in many cases the nearest deep borehole is located kilometers away.

  14. Charge states and lattice sites of dilute implanted Sn in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mølholt, T. E.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Johnston, K.; Mantovan, R.; Röder, J.; Adoons, V.; Mokhles Gerami, A.; Masenda, H.; Matveyev, Y. A.; Ncube, M.; Unzueta, I.; Bharuth-Ram, K.; Gislason, H. P.; Krastev, P.; Langouche, G.; Naidoo, D.; Ólafsson, S.; Zenkevich, A.; ISOLDE Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    The common charge states of Sn are 2+  and 4+. While charge neutrality considerations favour 2+  to be the natural charge state of Sn in ZnO, there are several reports suggesting the 4+  state instead. In order to investigate the charge states, lattice sites, and the effect of the ion implantation process of dilute Sn atoms in ZnO, we have performed 119Sn emission Mössbauer spectroscopy on ZnO single crystal samples following ion implantation of radioactive 119In (T ½  =  2.4 min) at temperatures between 96 K and 762 K. Complementary perturbed angular correlation measurements on 111mCd implanted ZnO were also conducted. Our results show that the 2+  state is the natural charge state for Sn in defect free ZnO and that the 4+  charge state is stabilized by acceptor defects created in the implantation process.

  15. Early prediction of eruption site using lightning location data: Estimates of accuracy during past eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nína Petersen, Guðrún; Arason, Þórður; Bjornsson, Halldór

    2013-04-01

    Eruption of subglacial volcanoes may lead to catastrophic floods and therefore early determination of the exact eruption site may be critical to civil protection evacuation plans. Poor visibility due to weather or darkness often inhibit positive identification of exact eruption location for many hours. However, because of the proximity and abundance of water in powerful subglacial volcanic eruptions, they are probably always accompanied by early lightning activity in the volcanic column. Lightning location systems, designed for weather thunderstorm monitoring, based on remote detection of electromagnetic waves from lightning, can provide valuable real-time information on location of eruption site. Important aspect of such remote detection is its independence of weather, apart from thunderstorms close to the volcano. Individual lightning strikes can be 5-10 km in length and are sometimes tilted and to the side of the volcanic column. This adds to the lightning location uncertainty, which is often a few km. Furthermore, the volcanic column may be swayed by the local wind to one side. Therefore, location of a single lightning can be misleading but by calculating average location of many lightning strikes and applying wind correction a more accurate eruption site location can be obtained. In an effort to assess the expected accuracy, the average lightning locations during the past five volcanic eruptions in Iceland (1998-2011) were compared to the exact site of the eruption vent. Simultaneous weather thunderstorms might have complicated this analysis, but there were no signs of ordinary thunderstorms in Iceland during these eruptions. To identify a suitable wind correction, the vector wind at the 500 hPa pressure level (5-6 km altitude) was compared to mean lightning locations during the eruptions. The essential elements of a system, which predicts the eruption site during the first hour(s) of an eruption, will be described.

  16. Male mate location behaviour and encounter sites in a community of tropical butterflies: taxonomic and site associations and distinctions.

    PubMed

    Tiple, Ashish D; Padwad, Sonali V; Dapporto, Leonardo; Dennis, Roger L H

    2010-12-01

    Male mate location behaviour and encounter sites have been studied in 72 butterfly species at Nagpur, India, and related to taxonomy, morphology, habitat and population parameters. Species can be placed in three broad classes of mate location behaviour: invariant patrolling, invariant perching, and perch-patrol, the latter associated with increasing site fidelity, territorial defence and male assemblages. Significant taxonomic differences occur, closely related species tending to share mate location behaviours. Morphological differences are found with heavier and larger butterflies displaying greater site fidelity and territorial defence, and differences occur between individuals of species which both perch and patrol. Invariant patrolling is particularly associated with tracks through vegetation, host planttrack distributions, and high female to male numbers observed on transects; invariant perching is linked more to edge features than patrolling, and to lower population counts on transects. Species which perch-patrol, defend territories and establish male assemblages are associated with more complex vegetation structures, and have encounter sites at vegetation edges, landforms and predictable resource (host plant) concentrations. Attention is drawn to the importance of distinctive mate encounter sites for the conservation of butterfly species' habitats.

  17. Finding erotic oases: locating the sites of men's same-sex anonymous sexual encounters.

    PubMed

    Tewksbury, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Because anonymous sexual relations between two men are widely considered deviant many men seeking such activities look to erotic oases-natural environments appropriated for covert, often furtive sexual purposes. Previous research on erotic oases has focused on characteristics of involved men and processes of locating, negotiating with, and consummating sexual relations with others. This study draws on one major Web site listing of "cruising places" in the United States to identify common locations for erotic oases. Results show that the most common locations identified as erotic oases by users are public parks, adult bookstores, health clubs, and college campuses. Locations most likely to be listed as believed to be under law enforcement surveillance are outdoor, high traffic locations. Based on these results existing research has only begun to examine the most common locations for this highly stigmatized, deviant behavior and subculture.

  18. Charge-patterning phase transition on a surface lattice of titratable sites adjacent to an electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, Joel; Thurston, George

    We discuss a model for a charge-patterning phase transition on a two-dimensional square lattice of titratable sites, here regarded as protonation sites, placed on a square lattice in a dielectric medium just below the planar interface between this medium and an aqueous salt solution. Within Debye-Huckel theory, the analytical form of the electrostatic repulsion between protonated sites exhibits an approximate inverse cubic power-law decrease beyond short distances. The problem can thus be mapped onto the two-dimensional antiferromagnetic Ising model with this longer-range interaction, which we study with Monte Carlo simulations. As we increase pH, the occupation probability of a site decreases from 1 at low pH to 0 at high pH. For sufficiently-strong interaction strengths, a phase transition occurs as the occupation probability of 1/2 is approached: the charges arrange themselves into a checkerboard pattern. This ordered phase persists over a range of pH until a transition occurs back to a disordered state. This state is the analogue of the Neel state in the antiferromagnetic Ising spin model. More complicated ordered phases are expected for sufficiently strong interactions (with occupation probabilities of 1/4 and 3/4) and if the lattice is triangular rather than square. This work was supported by NIH EY018249 (GMT).

  19. 78 FR 66746 - Medical Device User Fee and Modernization Act; Notice to Public of Web Site Location of Fiscal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... Public of Web Site Location of Fiscal Year 2014 Proposed Guidance Development AGENCY: Food and Drug... the Web site location where the Agency will post two lists of guidance documents the Center for... updates to the A-list and B-list announced in this notice. This notice announces the Web site location...

  20. DNase II digestion of the nucleosome core: precise locations and relative exposures of sites.

    PubMed

    Lutter, L C

    1981-09-11

    The precise locations and relative exposures of the DNase II-accessible sites in the nucleosome core DNA are determined using techniques previously employed for the enzyme DNase I. It is found that there are a number of similarities between the site exposure patterns for the two enzymes but that in general the DNase II seems to discriminate less among adjacent sites' accessibilities than does DNase I. The two enzymes attack essentially the same positions in the DNA, the average difference between the precise location of the site being less than one-half base for the two enzymes. Such close similarities in the digestion patterns of two enzymes with such different mechanisms of scission show that the patterns reflect the structure of the nucleosome core and not merely the properties of the particular enzyme used.

  1. On the CSL grain boundary distributions in polycrystals. [Coincidence site lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Yu . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Adams, B.L. . Dept. of Manufacturing Engineering)

    1994-04-15

    CSL (Coincidence Site Lattice) grain boundaries are considered to be special for polycrystals. Compared to non-special, random grain boundaries, they are believed to be low-energy, and they are observed to be resistant to intergranular fracture, creep cavitation, etc. Thus the frequencies of CSL distribution are important in Grain Boundary Characteristics Design (GBCD). In a previous paper, the influence of crystallographic texture on the frequencies of CSL grain boundary distributions in polycrystals was discussed. The authors draw the conclusion that the frequency of CSL-boundaries depends upon texture, but that this frequency is weak for textures which are not sharp. However, the potential for spatial correlations between neighboring grain orientations was not considered in this earlier work, and some recent experimental measurements in real polycrystals are in contradiction with this conclusion. Recent experimental advances make it possible to determine the crystallographic characteristics of a large number of grain boundaries in a short time. This paper illustrates two examples for fcc cubic materials: Inconel 600 alloy with a weak rolling texture, and a highly fiber-textured aluminum thin film. It is demonstrated that the occurrence of CSL boundaries is very strong in the weakly textured Inconel 600 alloy, in disagreement with theoretical estimates. For the aluminum thin film, it is shown that experimental measurements and theoretical predictions are in reasonable agreement. In the next section the numerical results of theoretical and computer simulated CSL grain boundary distributions are described. Section 3 details the OIM experimental measurements. Section 4 provides a more complete discussion of the comparison between theoretical predictions and experimental measurements.

  2. Site location optimization of regional air quality monitoring network in China: methodology and case study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Junyu; Feng, Xiaoqiong; Liu, Panwei; Zhong, Liuju; Lai, Senchao

    2011-11-01

    Regional air quality monitoring networks (RAQMN) are urgently needed in China due to increasing regional air pollution in city clusters, arising from rapid economic development in recent decades. This paper proposes a methodological framework for site location optimization in designing a RAQMN adapting to air quality management practice in China. The framework utilizes synthetic assessment concentrations developed from simulated data from a regional air quality model in order to simplify the optimal process and to reduce costs. On the basis of analyzing various constraints such as cost and budget, terrain conditions, administrative district, population density and spatial coverage, the framework takes the maximum approximate degree as an optimization objective to achieve site location optimization of a RAQMN. An expert judgment approach was incorporated into the framework to help adjust initial optimization results in order to make the network more practical and representative. A case study was used to demonstrate the application of the framework, indicating that it is feasible to conduct site optimization for a RAQMN design in China. The effects of different combinations of primary and secondary pollutants on site location optimization were investigated. It is suggested that the network design considering both primary and secondary pollutants could better represent regional pollution characteristics and more extensively reflect temporal and spatial variations of regional air quality. The work shown in this study can be used as a reference to guide site location optimization of a RAQMN design in China or other regions of the world.

  3. Effects of Vegetation Structure on the Location of Lion Kill Sites in African Thicket

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Andrew B.; Tambling, Craig J.; Kerley, Graham I. H.; Asner, Gregory P.

    2016-01-01

    Predator-prey relationships are integral to ecosystem stability and functioning. These relationships are, however, difficult to maintain in protected areas where large predators are increasingly being reintroduced and confined. Where predators make kills has a profound influence on their role in ecosystems, but the relative importance of environmental variables in determining kill sites, and how these might vary across ecosystems is poorly known. We investigated kill sites for lions in South Africa’s thicket biome, testing the importance of vegetation structure for kill site locations compared to other environmental variables. Kill sites were located over four years using GPS telemetry and compared to non-kill sites that had been occupied by lions, as well as to random sites within lion ranges. Measurements of 3D vegetation structure obtained from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) were used to calculate the visible area (viewshed) around each site and, along with wind and moonlight data, used to compare kill sites between lion sexes, prey species and prey sexes. Viewshed area was the most important predictor of kill sites (sites in dense vegetation were twice as likely to be kill sites compared to open areas), followed by wind speed and, less so, moonlight. Kill sites for different prey species varied with vegetation structure, and male prey were killed when wind speeds were higher compared to female prey of the same species. Our results demonstrate that vegetation structure is an important component of predator-prey interactions, with varying effects across ecosystems. Such differences require consideration in terms of the ecological roles performed by predators, and in predator and prey conservation. PMID:26910832

  4. Effects of Vegetation Structure on the Location of Lion Kill Sites in African Thicket.

    PubMed

    Davies, Andrew B; Tambling, Craig J; Kerley, Graham I H; Asner, Gregory P

    2016-01-01

    Predator-prey relationships are integral to ecosystem stability and functioning. These relationships are, however, difficult to maintain in protected areas where large predators are increasingly being reintroduced and confined. Where predators make kills has a profound influence on their role in ecosystems, but the relative importance of environmental variables in determining kill sites, and how these might vary across ecosystems is poorly known. We investigated kill sites for lions in South Africa's thicket biome, testing the importance of vegetation structure for kill site locations compared to other environmental variables. Kill sites were located over four years using GPS telemetry and compared to non-kill sites that had been occupied by lions, as well as to random sites within lion ranges. Measurements of 3D vegetation structure obtained from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) were used to calculate the visible area (viewshed) around each site and, along with wind and moonlight data, used to compare kill sites between lion sexes, prey species and prey sexes. Viewshed area was the most important predictor of kill sites (sites in dense vegetation were twice as likely to be kill sites compared to open areas), followed by wind speed and, less so, moonlight. Kill sites for different prey species varied with vegetation structure, and male prey were killed when wind speeds were higher compared to female prey of the same species. Our results demonstrate that vegetation structure is an important component of predator-prey interactions, with varying effects across ecosystems. Such differences require consideration in terms of the ecological roles performed by predators, and in predator and prey conservation.

  5. Number and locations of agonist binding sites required to activate homomeric Cys-loop receptors.

    PubMed

    Rayes, Diego; De Rosa, María José; Sine, Steven M; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2009-05-06

    Homo-pentameric Cys-loop receptors contain five identical agonist binding sites, each formed at a subunit interface. To determine the number and locations of binding sites required to generate a stable active state, we constructed a receptor subunit with a mutation that disables the agonist binding site and a reporter mutation that alters unitary conductance and coexpressed mutant and nonmutant subunits. Although receptors with a range of different subunit compositions are produced, patch-clamp recordings reveal that the amplitude of each single-channel opening event reports the number and, for certain subunit combinations, the locations of subunits with intact binding sites. We find that receptors with three binding sites at nonconsecutive subunit interfaces exhibit maximal mean channel open time, receptors with binding sites at three consecutive or two nonconsecutive interfaces exhibit intermediate open time, and receptors with binding sites at two consecutive or one interface exhibit brief open time. Macroscopic recordings after rapid application of agonist reveal that channel activation slows and the extent of desensitization decreases as the number of binding sites per receptor decreases. The overall results provide a framework for defining mechanisms of activation and drug modulation for homo-pentameric Cys-loop receptors.

  6. Foraging location and site fidelity of the Double-crested Cormorant on Oneida Lake, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, J.T.H.; Richmond, M.E.; Rudstam, L. G.; Mattison, P.M.

    2005-01-01

    We studied the foraging behavior of the Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) on Oneida Lake, New York, by monitoring the activities of 27 radio-tagged birds in July and August of 1999 and 2000. A total of 224 locations were obtained of cormorants actively diving, and presumed foraging, at the time of detection. A geographic information system was used to examine foraging distances from the nesting island, the water depth and type of substrate at preferred foraging sites, and to estimate kernel home ranges for analysis of individual foraging site fidelity. An explanatory model was developed to determine parameters affecting the distance to cormorant foraging sites. The mean distance to foraging locations of tagged cormorants from the colony site was 2,920 m (SE ?? 180 m, max = 14,190 m), and 52% of the locations were within 2,000 m of the nesting island. No cormorant was observed making daily foraging trips to outside water bodies. Mean foraging distance was greater during morning than in the afternoon, and there was a significant effect of the time of day on distance. There was no significant effect of sex date, a seasonal measure on distance to foraging location. Individual cormorants exhibited fidelity to specific foraging sites. Most cormorants foraged in close proximity to the nesting island much of the time, while those detected further from the island tended to return repeatedly to the same locations. Ninety percent of the foraging locations were in water depths ???7.5 m, and most were in water 2.5-5 m deep. Compositional analysis of habitat use revealed a preference for these depths, along with substrates of cobble with rubble, and silt with clay.

  7. A permanent ion binding site located between two gates of the Shaker K+ channel.

    PubMed

    Harris, R E; Larsson, H P; Isacoff, E Y

    1998-04-01

    K+ channels can be occupied by multiple permeant ions that appear to bind at discrete locations in the conduction pathway. Neither the molecular nature of the binding sites nor their relation to the activation or inactivation gates that control ion flow are well understood. We used the permeant ion Ba2+ as a K+ analog to probe for K+ ion binding sites and their relationship to the activation and inactivation gates. Our data are consistent with the existence of three single-file permeant-ion binding sites: one deep site, which binds Ba2+ with high affinity, and two more external sites whose occupancy influences Ba2+ movement to and from the deep site. All three sites are accessible to the external solution in channels with a closed activation gate, and the deep site lies between the activation gate and the C-type inactivation gate. We identify mutations in the P-region that disrupt two of the binding sites, as well as an energy barrier between the sites that may be part of the selectivity filter.

  8. A permanent ion binding site located between two gates of the Shaker K+ channel.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, R E; Larsson, H P; Isacoff, E Y

    1998-01-01

    K+ channels can be occupied by multiple permeant ions that appear to bind at discrete locations in the conduction pathway. Neither the molecular nature of the binding sites nor their relation to the activation or inactivation gates that control ion flow are well understood. We used the permeant ion Ba2+ as a K+ analog to probe for K+ ion binding sites and their relationship to the activation and inactivation gates. Our data are consistent with the existence of three single-file permeant-ion binding sites: one deep site, which binds Ba2+ with high affinity, and two more external sites whose occupancy influences Ba2+ movement to and from the deep site. All three sites are accessible to the external solution in channels with a closed activation gate, and the deep site lies between the activation gate and the C-type inactivation gate. We identify mutations in the P-region that disrupt two of the binding sites, as well as an energy barrier between the sites that may be part of the selectivity filter. PMID:9545043

  9. Locating Sites of Negations and Denegating "Negative Essentializing": Rereading Virginia Woolf's "A Room of One's Own"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adhikari, Manahari

    2014-01-01

    This essay examines how Virginia Woolf uses writing as a tool to locate sites of negations, such as women's exclusion from places of power and knowledge, and to expose negative essentializing that permeates patriarchal structure in "A Room of One's Own." Whereas scholarship on the book has explored a wide range of issues including sex,…

  10. 14 CFR 420.23 - Launch site location review-flight corridor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Requirements for Obtaining a License § 420.23 Launch site location review—flight corridor. (a) Guided orbital expendable launch vehicle. For a guided orbital expendable launch vehicle, an applicant shall define a flight... this part, to contain debris with a ballistic coefficient of ≥ 3 pounds per square foot, from any...

  11. 14 CFR 420.23 - Launch site location review-flight corridor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Requirements for Obtaining a License § 420.23 Launch site location review—flight corridor. (a) Guided orbital expendable launch vehicle. For a guided orbital expendable launch vehicle, an applicant shall define a flight... this part, to contain debris with a ballistic coefficient of ≥ 3 pounds per square foot, from any...

  12. 14 CFR 420.23 - Launch site location review-flight corridor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Requirements for Obtaining a License § 420.23 Launch site location review—flight corridor. (a) Guided orbital expendable launch vehicle. For a guided orbital expendable launch vehicle, an applicant shall define a flight... this part, to contain debris with a ballistic coefficient of ≥ 3 pounds per square foot, from any...

  13. 14 CFR 420.23 - Launch site location review-flight corridor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Requirements for Obtaining a License § 420.23 Launch site location review—flight corridor. (a) Guided orbital expendable launch vehicle. For a guided orbital expendable launch vehicle, an applicant shall define a flight... this part, to contain debris with a ballistic coefficient of ≥3 pounds per square foot, from any...

  14. 14 CFR 420.23 - Launch site location review-flight corridor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Requirements for Obtaining a License § 420.23 Launch site location review—flight corridor. (a) Guided orbital expendable launch vehicle. For a guided orbital expendable launch vehicle, an applicant shall define a flight... this part, to contain debris with a ballistic coefficient of ≥ 3 pounds per square foot, from any...

  15. Water Quality Sampling Locations Along the Shoreline of the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Robert E.; Patton, Gregory W.

    2009-12-14

    As environmental monitoring evolved on the Hanford Site, several different conventions were used to name or describe location information for various sampling sites along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. These methods range from handwritten descriptions in field notebooks to the use of modern electronic surveying equipment, such as Global Positioning System receivers. These diverse methods resulted in inconsistent archiving of analytical results in various electronic databases and published reports because of multiple names being used for the same site and inaccurate position data. This document provides listings of sampling sites that are associated with groundwater and river water sampling. The report identifies names and locations for sites associated with sampling: (a) near-river groundwater using aquifer sampling tubes; (b) riverbank springs and springs areas; (c) pore water collected from riverbed sediment; and (d) Columbia River water. Included in the listings are historical names used for a particular site and the best available geographic coordinates for the site, as of 2009. In an effort to create more consistency in the descriptive names used for water quality sampling sites, a naming convention is proposed in this document. The convention assumes that a unique identifier is assigned to each site that is monitored and that this identifier serves electronic database management requirements. The descriptive name is assigned for the convenience of the subsequent data user. As the historical database is used more intensively, this document may be revised as a consequence of discovering potential errors and also because of a need to gain consensus on the proposed naming convention for some water quality monitoring sites.

  16. Random site dilution properties of frustrated magnets on a hierarchical lattice.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Jean-Yves

    2013-07-24

    We present a method to analyze the magnetic properties of frustrated Ising spin models on specific hierarchical lattices with random dilution. Disorder is induced by dilution and geometrical frustration rather than randomness in the internal couplings of the original Hamiltonian. The two-dimensional model presented here possesses a macroscopic entropy at zero temperature in the large size limit, very close to the Pauling estimate for spin-ice on the pyrochlore lattice, and a crossover towards a paramagnetic phase. The disorder due to dilution is taken into account by considering a replicated version of the recursion equations between partition functions at different lattice sizes. An analysis to first order in replica number allows a systematic reorganization of the disorder configurations, leading to a recurrence scheme. This method is numerically implemented to evaluate thermodynamical quantities such as specific heat and susceptibility in an external field.

  17. Capacitated location of collection sites in an urban waste management system

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiani, Gianpaolo; Lagana, Demetrio; Manni, Emanuele; Triki, Chefi

    2012-07-15

    Urban waste management is becoming an increasingly complex task, absorbing a huge amount of resources, and having a major environmental impact. The design of a waste management system consists in various activities, and one of these is related to the location of waste collection sites. In this paper, we propose an integer programming model that helps decision makers in choosing the sites where to locate the unsorted waste collection bins in a residential town, as well as the capacities of the bins to be located at each collection site. This model helps in assessing tactical decisions through constraints that force each collection area to be capacitated enough to fit the expected waste to be directed to that area, while taking into account Quality of Service constraints from the citizens' point of view. Moreover, we propose an effective constructive heuristic approach whose aim is to provide a good solution quality in an extremely reduced computational time. Computational results on data related to the city of Nardo, in the south of Italy, show that both exact and heuristic approaches provide consistently better solutions than that currently implemented, resulting in a lower number of activated collection sites, and a lower number of bins to be used.

  18. Factors affecting the location and shape of face seal leak sites on half-mask respirators.

    PubMed

    Oestenstad, Riedar Kent; Bartolucci, Alfred A

    2010-06-01

    While there have been a number of studies on the effect of leak site and shape on the magnitude of measured leakage through respirator face seals, there have been very few studies to identify the location and size of these leaks. In a previous study we used a method of identifying the location and shape of respirator leaks on a half-mask respirator by the deposition of a fluorescent tracer during a fit test, and testing for their association with facial dimensions. The purpose of this study was to apply that methodology to conduct multiple fit tests to determine if gender, respirator brand, repeated fit tests, and test exercises affected the location and shape of face seal leak sites. Categorical analysis found that none of these factors had a significant effect on the location and shape of leaks. General linear model analysis found some significant effects of the study factors on leaks, but facial dimensions had a greater effect, and there were significant differences between facial dimensions of subjects with a leak and those without. Significant differences in leak site distributions between this and the previous study may have been due to differences in facial dimensions and racial/ethnic composition. Twice as many diffuse leaks as point leaks were observed in both studies, indicating that slit-like leaks would be most appropriate on mannequins used in laboratory respirator leakage studies, and in respirator flow and penetration models. That the study factors had no significant effects in the categorical analysis, significant effects for facial dimensions were found in the linear analysis, and leak site distribution differences between this and our previous study may have been affected by differences in facial dimensions, indicate that, in addition to size, the shape of an individual's face may be an important determinant of leak sites on a half-mask respirator. This would have implications for the design of respirator facepieces and in the selection of

  19. Feasibility study for locating archaeological village sites by satellite remote sensing techniques. [multispectral photography of Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. P. (Principal Investigator); Stringer, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The objective is to determine the feasibility of detecting large Alaskan archaeological sites by satellite remote sensing techniques and mapping such sites. The approach used is to develop digital multispectral signatures of dominant surface features including vegetation, exposed soils and rock, hydrological patterns and known archaeological sites. ERTS-1 scenes are then printed out digitally in a map-like array with a letter reflecting the most appropriate classification representing each pixel. Preliminary signatures were developed and tested. It was determined that there was a need to tighten up the archaeological site signature by developing accurate signatures for all naturally-occurring vegetation and surface conditions in the vicinity of the test area. These second generation signatures have been tested by means of computer printouts and classified tape displays on the University of Alaska CDU-200 and by comparison with aerial photography. It has been concluded that the archaeological signatures now in use are as good as can be developed. Plans are to print out signatures for the entire test area and locate on topographic maps the likely locations of archaeological sites within the test area.

  20. 75 FR 60761 - Medical Device User Fee and Modernization Act; Notice to Public of Web site Location of Fiscal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... Public of Web site Location of Fiscal Year 2011 Proposed Guidance Development AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. ] SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the Web site... topics, or suggestions for new or different guidances. This notice announces the Web site location of...

  1. 76 FR 61367 - Medical Device User Fee and Modernization Act; Notice to Public of Web Site Location of Fiscal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ... Public of Web Site Location of Fiscal Year 2012 Proposed Guidance Development AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the Web site... announces the Web site location of the list of guidances on which CDRH is intending to work over the...

  2. Determining Optimal Location and Numbers of Sample Transects for Characterization of UXO Sites

    SciTech Connect

    BILISOLY, ROGER L.; MCKENNA, SEAN A.

    2003-01-01

    Previous work on sample design has been focused on constructing designs for samples taken at point locations. Significantly less work has been done on sample design for data collected along transects. A review of approaches to point and transect sampling design shows that transects can be considered as a sequential set of point samples. Any two sampling designs can be compared through using each one to predict the value of the quantity being measured on a fixed reference grid. The quality of a design is quantified in two ways: computing either the sum or the product of the eigenvalues of the variance matrix of the prediction error. An important aspect of this analysis is that the reduction of the mean prediction error variance (MPEV) can be calculated for any proposed sample design, including one with straight and/or meandering transects, prior to taking those samples. This reduction in variance can be used as a ''stopping rule'' to determine when enough transect sampling has been completed on the site. Two approaches for the optimization of the transect locations are presented. The first minimizes the sum of the eigenvalues of the predictive error, and the second minimizes the product of these eigenvalues. Simulated annealing is used to identify transect locations that meet either of these objectives. This algorithm is applied to a hypothetical site to determine the optimal locations of two iterations of meandering transects given a previously existing straight transect. The MPEV calculation is also used on both a hypothetical site and on data collected at the Isleta Pueblo to evaluate its potential as a stopping rule. Results show that three or four rounds of systematic sampling with straight parallel transects covering 30 percent or less of the site, can reduce the initial MPEV by as much as 90 percent. The amount of reduction in MPEV can be used as a stopping rule, but the relationship between MPEV and the results of excavation versus no

  3. Plume mapping and shipboard chemical data used to locate new vent sites in the Lau Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, H. N.; German, C. R.; Breier, J. A.; Connelly, D. P.; Townsend-Small, A.; Resing, J. A.; Aumack, C.; Baker, E. T.; Langmuir, C. H.

    2004-12-01

    A central goal of the second Ridge2000 cruise (September-October 2004) to the Lau backarc basin in the southwest Pacific is to locate, map, and image new vent sites on the East Lau Spreading Center and the northern portion of the Valu Fa Ridge. Our primary tool for plume mapping and vent location is the Autonomous Benthic Explorer (ABE), including novel in situ chemical sensors (see abstracts by Yoerger et al. and German et al. in this session). In addition, we are using MAPRs (Miniature Autonomous Plume Recorders) to measure profiles of temperature and optical backscatter on dredge and rock core lowerings, and shipboard analysis of methane, hydrogen, pH, iron, and manganese from CTD casts, to locate and characterize the plumes. This presentation will focus on the profile data and chemical analyses, which we use to provide a preliminary comparison of chemical characteristics between vent fields.

  4. Quantum Computation with Neutral Atoms at Addressable Optical Lattice Sites and Atoms in Confined Geometries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-13

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: We have performed a set of experiments using arrays of 1D Bose gases in various configurations. Uncoupled 1D gases have been...used to study the limits of statistical mechanics near integrable points. We have shown that nearly integrable gases thermalize at an even slower...NAME(S) AND ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 ultracold atoms, optical lattices, 1D gases

  5. Migration and Residential Location of Workers at Nuclear Power Plant Construction Sites Forecasting Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Malhotra, S.; Manninen, D.

    1981-04-01

    The primary objective of this study was to improve the accuracy of socioeconomic impact assessments by providing an improved methodology for predicting the number of inmigrating workers and their residential location patterns at future nuclear power plant construction projects. Procedures for estimating several other variables which have important implications with respect to socioeconomic impact assessment (i.e., relocation of dependents, intention to remain in the area, type of housing selected, marital status, and average family size) were also developed. The analysis was based on worker survey data from 28 surveys which were conducted at 13 nuclear power plant construction sites. These survey data were examined to identify patterns of variation in variables of interest across sites as well as across various worker groups. In addition, considerable secondary data reflecting various regional and project characteristics were gathered for each site. These data were used to estimate the effects of factors underlying the observed variation in craft-specific migrant proportions and the residential location patterns of inmigrating workers across sites and surveys. The results of these analyses were then used as a basis for the specification of the forecasting procedures.

  6. Thermal rectification in one-dimensional mass-graded lattices with an on-site potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Bastida, M.; Ramírez-Jarquín, Marcelino

    2017-01-01

    In this work we perform a systematic analysis of various structural parameters that have influence on the thermal rectification effect, i.e. asymmetrical heat flow, and the negative differential thermal resistance present in a one-dimensional anharmonic lattice with mass gradient and coupled to a substrate potential. For two different mass profiles (linear and exponential) we compute the thermal conductivity as a function of the system size and determined that its value, computed with the system coupled to the substrate potential, is lower than the corresponding one without such potential for each system size, with a highest value of the divergence exponent corresponding to the exponential mass profile. The rectification efficiency is always higher for the linear mass-graded lattice in all the studied cases, whereas that of the exponential mass-graded one is largely insensitive to the variation, in the considered range of values, of the studied parameters. This latter type of lattice presents no negative differential thermal resistance in the low temperature regime whatsoever.

  7. Analytical studies on a new lattice hydrodynamic traffic flow model with consideration of traffic current cooperation among three consecutive sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhipeng; Zhong, Chenjie; Chen, Lizhu; Xu, Shangzhi; Qian, Yeqing

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the original lattice hydrodynamic model of traffic flow is extended to take into account the traffic current cooperation among three consecutive sites. The basic idea of the new consideration is that the cooperative traffic current of the considered site is determined by the traffic currents of the site itself, the immediately preceding site and the immediately following one. The stability criterion of the extended model is obtained by applying the linear stability analysis. The result reveals the traffic current cooperation of the immediately preceding site is positive correlation with the stability of traffic system, while negative correlation is found between the traffic stability and the traffic current cooperation of the nearest follow site. To describe the phase transition, the modified KdV equation near the critical point is derived by using the reductive perturbation method, with obtaining the dependence of the propagation kink solution for traffic jams on the traffic current cooperation among three consecutive sites. The direct numerical are conducted to verify the results of theoretical analysis, and explore the effects of the traffic current cooperation on the traffic flux of the vehicle flow system.

  8. Location and site characteristics of the ambient ground-water-quality-monitoring network in West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kozar, M.D.; Brown, D.P.

    1995-01-01

    Ground-water-quality-monitoring sites have been established in compliance with the 1991 West Virginia "Groundwater Protection Act." One of the provisions of the "Groundwater Protection Act" is to conduct ground-water sampling, data collection, analyses, and evaluation with sufficient frequency so as to ascertain the characteristics and quality of ground water and the sufficiency of the ground- water protection programs established pursuant to the act (Chapter 20 of the code of West Virginia, 1991, Article 5-M). Information for 26 monitoring sites (wells and springs) which comprise the Statewide ambient ground-water-quality-monitoring network is presented. Areas in which monitoring sites were needed were determined by the West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection, Office of Water Resources in consultation with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Initial sites were chosen on the basis of recent hydrogeologic investigations conducted by the USGS and from data stored in the USGS Ground Water Site Inventory database. Land use, aquifer setting, and areal coverage of the State are three of the more important criteria used in site selection. A field reconnaissance was conducted to locate and evaluate the adequacy of selected wells and springs. Descriptive information consisting of site, geologic, well construction, and aquifer-test data has been compiled. The 26 sites will be sampled periodically for iron, manganese, most common ions (for example, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, sulfate, chloride, bicarbonate), volatile and semivolatile organic compounds (for example, pesticides and industrial solvents), and fecal coliform and fecal streptococcus bacteria. Background information explaining ground-water systems and water quality within the State has been included.

  9. Locating the binding sites of Pb(II) ion with human and bovine serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Belatik, Ahmed; Hotchandani, Surat; Carpentier, Robert; Tajmir-Riahi, Heidar-Ali

    2012-01-01

    Lead is a potent environmental toxin that has accumulated above its natural level as a result of human activity. Pb cation shows major affinity towards protein complexation and it has been used as modulator of protein-membrane interactions. We located the binding sites of Pb(II) with human serum (HSA) and bovine serum albumins (BSA) at physiological conditions, using constant protein concentration and various Pb contents. FTIR, UV-visible, CD, fluorescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) methods were used to analyse Pb binding sites, the binding constant and the effect of metal ion complexation on HSA and BSA stability and conformations. Structural analysis showed that Pb binds strongly to HSA and BSA via hydrophilic contacts with overall binding constants of K(Pb-HSA) = 8.2 (±0.8)×10(4) M(-1) and K(Pb-BSA) = 7.5 (±0.7)×10(4) M(-1). The number of bound Pb cation per protein is 0.7 per HSA and BSA complexes. XPS located the binding sites of Pb cation with protein N and O atoms. Pb complexation alters protein conformation by a major reduction of α-helix from 57% (free HSA) to 48% (metal-complex) and 63% (free BSA) to 52% (metal-complex) inducing a partial protein destabilization.

  10. Location of Si vacancies and [Ti(OSi)4] and [Ti(OSi)3OH] sites in the MFI framework: a large cluster and full ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuping; Si, Hongzong; Fu, Aiping; Chu, Tianshu; Tian, Fenghui; Duan, Yun-Bo; Wang, Jianguo

    2011-02-10

    Titanium silicalite-1 (TS-1) is an important catalyst for selective oxidation reactions. However, the nature and structure of the active sites and the mechanistic details of the catalytic reactions over TS-1 have not been well-understood, leaving a continuous debate on the genesis of active sites on the TS-1 surface in the literature. In this work, the location of Si vacancies and [Ti(OSi)(4)] and [Ti(OSi)(3)OH] sites in the MFI (Framework Type Code of ZSM-5 (Zeolite Socony Mobile-Five)) framework has been studied using a full ab initio method with 40T clusters with a Si:Ti molar ratio of 39:1. It was shown that the former four energetically favorable sites for Si vacancies are T6, T12, T4, and T8 and for Ti centers of [Ti(OSi)(4)] are T10, T4, T8 and T11, being partially the same sites. Whether by replacing Si vacancies or substituting the fully coordinated Si sites, the most preferential site for Ti is T10, which indicates that the insertion mechanism does not affect the favorable sites of Ti in the MFI lattice. For the defective [Ti(OSi)(3)OH] sites, it was found that the Si vacancy at T6 with a Ti at its neighboring T9 site (T6-def-T9-Ti pair) is the most energetically favorable one, followed by a T6-def-T5-Ti pair with a small energy gap. These findings are significant to elucidate the nature of the active sites and the mechanism of reactions catalyzed by TS-1 and to design the TS-1 catalyst.

  11. ZFNGenome: A comprehensive resource for locating zinc finger nuclease target sites in model organisms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) have tremendous potential as tools to facilitate genomic modifications, such as precise gene knockouts or gene replacements by homologous recombination. ZFNs can be used to advance both basic research and clinical applications, including gene therapy. Recently, the ability to engineer ZFNs that target any desired genomic DNA sequence with high fidelity has improved significantly with the introduction of rapid, robust, and publicly available techniques for ZFN design such as the Oligomerized Pool ENgineering (OPEN) method. The motivation for this study is to make resources for genome modifications using OPEN-generated ZFNs more accessible to researchers by creating a user-friendly interface that identifies and provides quality scores for all potential ZFN target sites in the complete genomes of several model organisms. Description ZFNGenome is a GBrowse-based tool for identifying and visualizing potential target sites for OPEN-generated ZFNs. ZFNGenome currently includes a total of more than 11.6 million potential ZFN target sites, mapped within the fully sequenced genomes of seven model organisms; S. cerevisiae, C. reinhardtii, A. thaliana, D. melanogaster, D. rerio, C. elegans, and H. sapiens and can be visualized within the flexible GBrowse environment. Additional model organisms will be included in future updates. ZFNGenome provides information about each potential ZFN target site, including its chromosomal location and position relative to transcription initiation site(s). Users can query ZFNGenome using several different criteria (e.g., gene ID, transcript ID, target site sequence). Tracks in ZFNGenome also provide "uniqueness" and ZiFOpT (Zinc Finger OPEN Targeter) "confidence" scores that estimate the likelihood that a chosen ZFN target site will function in vivo. ZFNGenome is dynamically linked to ZiFDB, allowing users access to all available information about zinc finger reagents, such as the effectiveness of a given

  12. Large Scale Helium Liquefaction and Considerations for Site Services for a Plant Located in Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froehlich, P.; Clausen, J. J.

    2008-03-01

    The large-scale liquefaction of helium extracted from natural gas is depicted. Based on a block diagram the process chain, starting with the pipeline downstream of the natural-gas plant to the final storage of liquid helium, is explained. Information will be provided about the recent experiences during installation and start-up of a bulk helium liquefaction plant located in Skikda, Algeria, including part-load operation based on a reduced feed gas supply. The local working and ambient conditions are described, including challenging logistic problems like shipping and receiving of parts, qualified and semi-qualified subcontractors, basic provisions and tools on site, and precautions to sea water and ambient conditions. Finally, the differences in commissioning (technically and evaluation of time and work packages) to European locations and standards will be discussed.

  13. Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome: Muscles Located at the Site of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ato Ampomah

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the location of the MTSS pain (posteromedial border of tibia) and the muscles that originate from that site. Method. The study was conducted in the Department of Anatomy of the School of Medical Sciences, University of Cape Coast, and involved the use of 22 cadaveric legs (9 paired and 4 unpaired) from 11 males and 2 females. Findings. The structures that were thus observed to attach directly to the posteromedial border of the tibia were the soleus, the flexor digitorum longus, and the deep crural fascia. The soleus and flexor digitorum longus muscles were observed to attach directly to the posteromedial border of the tibia. The tibialis posterior muscle had no attachment to this site. Conclusion. The findings of this study suggest that if traction is the cause of MTSS then soleus and the flexor digitorum muscles and not the tibialis posterior muscle are the likely cause of MTSS. PMID:27066291

  14. MPL-Net Measurements of Aerosol and Cloud Vertical Distributions at Co-Located AERONET Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Campbell, James R.; Berkoff, Timothy A.; Spinhirne, James D.; Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In the early 1990s, the first small, eye-safe, and autonomous lidar system was developed, the Micropulse Lidar (MPL). The MPL acquires signal profiles of backscattered laser light from aerosols and clouds. The signals are analyzed to yield multiple layer heights, optical depths of each layer, average extinction-to-backscatter ratios for each layer, and profiles of extinction in each layer. In 2000, several MPL sites were organized into a coordinated network, called MPL-Net, by the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar Group at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) using funding provided by the NASA Earth Observing System. tn addition to the funding provided by NASA EOS, the NASA CERES Ground Validation Group supplied four MPL systems to the project, and the NASA TOMS group contributed their MPL for work at GSFC. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) also agreed to make their data available to the MPL-Net project for processing. In addition to the initial NASA and ARM operated sites, several other independent research groups have also expressed interest in joining the network using their own instruments. Finally, a limited amount of EOS funding was set aside to participate in various field experiments each year. The NASA Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) project also provides funds to deploy their MPL during ocean research cruises. All together, the MPL-Net project has participated in four major field experiments since 2000. Most MPL-Net sites and field experiment locations are also co-located with sunphotometers in the NASA Aerosol Robotic Network. (AERONET). Therefore, at these locations data is collected on both aerosol and cloud vertical structure as well as column optical depth and sky radiance. Real-time data products are now available from most MPL-Net sites. Our real-time products are generated at times of AERONET aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements. The AERONET AOD is used as input to our

  15. Performance analysis of high frequency single-site-location antenna arrays using numerical electromagnetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiantarelli, Harry T.

    1990-09-01

    Electronic support measures (ESM) systems play an increasingly important role in modern warfare and can influence the outcome of a military engagement. The application of ESM can be extended to anti-guerrilla and anti-drug operations where law enforcement agencies can exploit the fact that their presence is inducing the outlaw to depend more on radio communications to coordinate their activities. When a propagation path of no more than one reflection at the ionosphere (1-hop) can be assumed, position of an HF emitter can be determined by a single observing site using vertical triangulation, provided that the height of the ionosphere at the point where the radio wave is reflected, can be determined. This technique is known as high frequency direction finding single-site-location (HFDF SSL). This thesis analyzes the HFDF SSL error in measuring the direction of arrival of the signal, how this error is generated by the antenna array and its effect on emitter location. The characteristics of the two antenna arrays used by a specific HFDF SSL system that implements the phase-interferometer techniques were studied using electromagnetic modeling.

  16. The location of sites and effect of semiconductor diode transscleral cyclophotocoagulation on the buphthalmic equine globe

    PubMed Central

    Gemensky-Metzler, Anne J.; Wilkie, David A.; Weisbrode, Steven E.; Kuhn, Sonia E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine appropriate location and energy settings for transscleral cyclophotocoagulation (TSCPC) for buphthalmic equine globes. Animals Eleven horses with a buphthalmic eye blinded by glaucoma presented for enucleation. Methods Globe and corneal dimensions were measured via ultrasonography and calipers and TSCPC was performed under general anesthesia immediately prior to enucleation. Part 1: In 9 globes, sixty sites were lasered 4 mm posterior to the limbus in the dorsotemporal and ventrotemporal quadrants at settings of 1500 milliwatts and 1500 milliseconds. Globes were processed and sectioned sagitally over the temporal aspect in two blocks, each with 5 histologic sections examined by light microscopy. A digital imaging system was used to determine the location and length of the pars plicata on one slide from each block. Part 2: Based on results in Part 1, two globes were measured and lasered using the same time and energy settings at the following distances posterior to the limbus: 8 mm dorsally, 6 mm dorsotemporally, 5 mm ventrotemporally, 5 mm ventrally. Results Globe and corneal dimensions exceeded normal values in all globes. Part 1: In all 9 globes photocoagulation affected the anterior ciliary processes and iris base and in 8/9 coagulation of the pectinate ligaments was noted. Part 2: In both globes, coagulation was confined to the pars plicata. Conclusions The previously recommended TSCPC sites are located too far anteriorly for a buphthalmic globe. Buphthalmic equine globes should have TSCPC performed at the following distances posterior to the limbus: 6-8 mm dorsally, 5-6 mm dorsotemporally, 4-5 mm ventrotemporally and 4-5 mm ventrally. PMID:24697980

  17. Records for the number of distinct sites visited by a random walk on the fully connected lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turban, Loïc

    2015-11-01

    We consider a random walk on the fully connected lattice with N sites and study the time evolution of the number of distinct sites s visited by the walker on a subset with n sites. A record value v is obtained for s at a record time t when the walker visits a site of the subset for the first time. The record time t is a partial covering time when v\\lt n and a total covering time when v = n. The probability distributions for the number of records s, the record value v and the record (covering) time t, involving r-Stirling numbers, are obtained using generating function techniques. The mean values, variances and skewnesses are deduced from the generating functions. In the scaling limit the probability distributions for s and v lead to the same Gaussian density. The fluctuations of the record time t are also Gaussian at partial covering, when n-v={{O}}(n). They are distributed according to the type-I Gumbel extreme-value distribution at total covering, when v = n. A discrete sequence of generalized Gumbel distributions, indexed by n-v, is obtained at almost total covering, when n-v={{O}}(1). These generalized Gumbel distributions are crossing over to the Gaussian distribution when n - v increases.

  18. Iodine-129 in forage and deer on the Hanford site and other Pacific Northwest locations

    SciTech Connect

    Price, K.R.; Cadwell, L.L.; Schreckhise, R.G.; Brauer, F.P.

    1981-02-01

    Samples of surface soil, litter, forage, and deer (rumen content, muscle, liver, and thyroid gland) were collected from Bend, Oregon; Centralia, Washington; Wenatchee, Washington; the Wooten Game Range near Dayton, Washington; and on or near the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The concentrations of /sup 129/I and /sup 127/I were determined using neturon activation techniques. The purpose of the study was to establish the current levels of /sup 129/I in the environs of the Hanford Site prior to the proposed restart of fuel reprocessing at the PUREX plant. The results of this study clearly demonstrated the longevity of /sup 129/I in the biosphere following gaseous release from a nuclear facility. Analyses of thyroid glands showed that deer living within 160 km (Wooten Game Range) of Hanford had elevated levels of /sup 129/I when compared to the more distant Pacific Northwest locations (Centralia, or Bend). Levels of /sup 129/I in deer thyroid from Bend, or Centralia, (15 fCi/g wet weight), were about five times higher than values reported for the central United States, while, Hanford samples were about 2,700 times higher. The average concentration of /sup 129/I in deer thyroids collected at Hanford in 1978 was similar to samples collected 14 years earlier. The concentrations of /sup 129/I in soil, litter, forage, and other deer samples generally decrease in the order: Hanford > Wooten > Wenatchee > Centralia approx. = Bend. This corresponds to an increase in distance from the Hanford Site.

  19. Fine structure of the spectra of the Kondo lattice model: Two-site cellular dynamical mean-field theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osolin, Žiga; Žitko, Rok

    2017-01-01

    We study the antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic Kondo insulator phases of the Kondo lattice model on the cubic lattice at half filling using the cellular dynamical mean-field theory (CDMFT) with the numerical renormalization group (NRG) as the impurity solver, focusing on the fine details of the spectral function and self-energy. We find that the nonlocal correlations increase the gap in both the antiferromagnetic and Kondo insulator phases and shrink the extent of the antiferromagnetic phase in the phase diagram but do not alter any properties qualitatively. The agreement between the numerical CDMFT results and those within a simple hybridization picture, which adequately describes the overall band structure of the system but neglects all effects on the inelastic-scattering processes, is similar to that of the single-site DMFT results; there are deviations that are responsible for the additional fine structure, in particular for the asymmetric spectral resonances or dips that become more pronounced in the strong-coupling regime close to the antiferromagnet-paramagnetic quantum phase transition. These features appear broader in the CDMFT mostly due to numerical artifacts linked to more aggressive state truncation required in the NRG.

  20. Superstable cycles for antiferromagnetic Q-state Potts and three-site interaction Ising models on recursive lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananikian, N.; Artuso, R.; Chakhmakhchyan, L.

    2014-10-01

    We consider the superstable cycles of the Q-state Potts (QSP) and the three-site interaction antiferromagnetic Ising (TSAI) models on recursive lattices. The rational mappings describing the models’ statistical properties are obtained via the recurrence relation technique. We provide analytical solutions for the superstable cycles of the second order for both models. A particular attention is devoted to the period three window. Here we present an exact result for the third order superstable orbit for the QSP and a numerical solution for the TSAI model. Additionally, we point out a non-trivial connection between bifurcations and superstability: in some regions of parameters a superstable cycle is not followed by a doubling bifurcation. Furthermore, we use symbolic dynamics to understand the changes taking place at points of superstability and to distinguish areas between two consecutive superstable orbits.

  1. Quasiparticle Scattering in the Rashba Semiconductor BiTeBr: The Roles of Spin and Defect Lattice Site.

    PubMed

    Butler, Christopher John; Yang, Po-Ya; Sankar, Raman; Lien, Yen-Neng; Lu, Chun-I; Chang, Luo-Yueh; Chen, Chia-Hao; Wei, Ching-Ming; Chou, Fang-Cheng; Lin, Minn-Tsong

    2016-09-28

    Observations of quasiparticle interference have been used in recent years to examine exotic carrier behavior at the surfaces of emergent materials, connecting carrier dispersion and scattering dynamics to real-space features with atomic resolution. We observe quasiparticle interference in the strongly Rashba split 2DEG-like surface band found at the tellurium termination of BiTeBr and examine two mechanisms governing quasiparticle scattering: We confirm the suppression of spin-flip scattering by comparing measured quasiparticle interference with a spin-dependent elastic scattering model applied to the calculated spectral function. We also use atomically resolved STM maps to identify point defect lattice sites and spectro-microscopy imaging to discern their varying scattering strengths, which we understand in terms of the calculated orbital characteristics of the surface band. Defects on the Bi sublattice cause the strongest scattering of the predominantly Bi 6p derived surface band, with other defects causing nearly no scattering near the conduction band minimum.

  2. Superfluidity of fermions with repulsive on-site interaction in an anisotropic optical lattice near a Feshbach resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Duan, Luming

    2008-03-01

    We present numerical analysis of ground state properties of the one-dimensional general Hubbard model (GHM) with particle assisted tunnelling rates and repulsive on-site interaction (positive-U), which describes fermionic atoms in an anisotropic optical lattice near a wide Feshbach resonance. Our calculation uses the time evolving block decimation algorithm, which is an extension of the density matrix renormalization group and provides a well controlled method for one-dimensional systems. We show that the positive-U GHM, when hole doped from half-filling, shows up a phase with coexistence of quasi-long-range superfluid and charge-density-wave orders. This feature is different from the property of the conventional Hubbard model with positive-U, indicting the particle assisted tunneling in the GHM could bring in qualitatively new physics.

  3. Superfluidity of fermions with repulsive on-site interaction in an anisotropic optical lattice near a Feshbach resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Duan, L.-M.

    2008-07-01

    We present a numerical study on ground state properties of a one-dimensional (1D) general Hubbard model (GHM) with particle-assisted tunnelling rates and repulsive on-site interaction (positive-U), which describes fermionic atoms in an anisotropic optical lattice near a wide Feshbach resonance. For our calculation, we utilize the time evolving block decimation (TEBD) algorithm, which is an extension of the density matrix renormalization group and provides a well-controlled method for 1D systems. We show that the positive-U GHM, when hole-doped from half-filling, exhibits a phase with coexistence of quasi-long-range superfluid and charge-density-wave orders. This feature is different from the property of the conventional Hubbard model with positive-U, indicating the particle-assisted tunnelling mechanism in GHM brings in qualitatively new physics.

  4. A stochastic method for optimal location of groundwater monitoring sites at aquifer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barca, E.; Passarella, G.

    2009-04-01

    With the growth of public environmental awareness and the improvement in national and EU legislation regarding the environment, monitoring assumed great importance in the frame of all managerial activities related to territories. In particular, recently, a number of public environmental agencies have invested great resources in planning and operating improvements on existing monitoring networks within their regions. In this framework, and, at the light of the Water Framework Directive, the optimal monitoring of the qualitative and quantitative state of groundwater becomes a priority, particularly, when severe economic constraints must be imposed and the territory to be monitored is quite wide. There are a lot of reasons justifying the optimal extension of a monitoring network. In fact, a modest coverage of the monitored area often makes impossible to provide the manager with a sufficient knowledge for decision-making processes. In general, monitoring networks are characterized by a scarce number of existing wells, irregularly spread over the considered area. This is a typical case of optimization and it may be solved seeking among existing, but unused, wells, all and only those able to make the monitoring network coverage, the most uniform among any arrangement. Using existing wells as new monitoring sites, allows one to drastically reduce the needed budget. In this paper, a four step method, based on simulated annealing, has been implemented with the aim of identifying scarcely monitored zones within the groundwater system boundaries. The steps are the following: I. Define aquifer boundaries, number and location of the existing monitoring sites and number and location of candidate new monitoring sites. Any constraint about the network size, and wells' location and characteristics need also to be identified at this step; II. Carry out stochastic simulations producing a large number of possible realizations of the improved monitoring network and choose the transient

  5. Preliminary geohydrologic site characterization and proposed water quality well locations for WAG 4, WAG 5, WAG 3, and SWSA 1

    SciTech Connect

    Baughn, D.C.

    1987-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to assess general site conditions and to recommend water quality well locations at Waste Area Groupings (WAGs) 4, 5 and 3 and Solid Waste Storage Area 1 (SWSA 1) within the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) complex. The subject sites are identified on the general site location map. For reference, the relationship of the subject sites to other WAGs are shown. WAGs are regions prescribed by Martin Marietta throughout the ORNL complex that require environmental assessment which will include design and installation of ground water monitoring systems. WAGs contain solid waste management units such as SWSAs, as well as pipelines, spill sites, buildings, ponds and experimental test sites. These solid waste management units are considered to be potential sources of contamination requiring further evaluation. This report recommends locations for water quality wells which will be installed at WAG boundaries in order to gather water quality data.

  6. Selected stratigraphic data for drill holes located in Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site. Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Drellack, S.L. Jr.

    1997-02-01

    Stratigraphic data are presented in tabular form for 72 holes drilled in Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, between 1950 and 1993. Three pairs of data presentations are included for each hole: depth to formation tops, formation thicknesses, and formation elevations are presented in both field (English) and metric units. Also included for each hole, where available, are various construction data (hole depth, hole diameter, surface location coordinates) and certain information of hydrogeologic significance (depth to water level, top of zeolitization). The event name is given for holes associated with a particular nuclear test. An extensive set of footnotes is included, which indicates data sources and provides other information. The body of the report describes the stratigraphic setting of Frenchman Flat, gives drill-hole naming conventions and database terminology, and provides other background and reference material.

  7. Temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of one-dimensional nonlinear Klein-Gordon lattices with a soft on-site potential.

    PubMed

    Yang, Linlin; Li, Nianbei; Li, Baowen

    2014-12-01

    The temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of one-dimensional nonlinear Klein-Gordon lattices with soft on-site potential (soft-KG) are investigated systematically. Similarly to the previously studied hard-KG lattices, the existence of renormalized phonons is also confirmed in soft-KG lattices. In particular, the temperature dependence of the renormalized phonon frequency predicted by a classical field theory is verified by detailed numerical simulations. However, the thermal conductivities of soft-KG lattices exhibit the opposite trend in temperature dependence in comparison with those of hard-KG lattices. The interesting thing is that the temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of both soft- and hard-KG lattices can be interpreted in the same framework of effective phonon theory. According to the effective phonon theory, the exponents of the power-law dependence of the thermal conductivities as a function of temperature are only determined by the exponents of the soft or hard on-site potentials. These theoretical predictions are consistently verified very well by extensive numerical simulations.

  8. Location of femoral artery puncture site and the risk of postcatheterization pseudoaneurysm formation.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Marcin; Pawlaczyk, Katarzyna; Waliszewski, Krzysztof; Krasiński, Zbigniew; Majewski, Wacław

    2007-08-21

    Iatrogenic causes constitute increasingly frequent sources of pseudoaneurysms due to endovascular interventions. However, till now, all analyses focused on evaluating different risk factors contributing to the development of pseudoaneurysm, overlooking the issue of localization of femoral puncture. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of position of femoral artery puncture on the risk of pseudoaneurysm formation. 116 patients were evaluated for the site of catheter insertion into femoral arteries. Another group of 273 patients, suspected of vascular complications after endovascular procedures, were diagnosed with pseudoaneurysms which were analyzed for the location of arterial wall disruption. Puncture sites of groin arteries, i.e. EIA (2.7%), CFA (77.5%), SFA and DFA (19.8%), correlated with pseudoaneurysm location reaching 7.6% (EIA), 54.3% (CFA) and 38.1% (SFA, DFA). Type of procedure influenced these values. Duplex ultrasound mapping of CFA before the endovascular intervention eliminated discrepancies between the incidence of pseudoaneurysm formation and the frequency of arterial puncture in the selected vascular segments. Pseudoaneurysms formed in 4.5% of patients undergoing traditional palpation-guided vessel cannulation and in 2.6% of patients after ultrasound-guided puncture of the femoral artery. Upon further analysis, we concluded that the likelihood of the development of pseudoaneurysm depends on the artery punctured in the groin. This risk increases dramatically for external iliac artery, superficial and deep femoral arteries. A simple means of prevention of this dangerous complication of femoral artery puncture is duplex ultrasound mapping of the groin arteries.

  9. On the development of a model predicting the recrystallization texture of aluminum using the Taylor model for rolling textures and the coincidence lattice site theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T, Morimoto; F, Yoshida; A, Yanagida; J, Yanagimoto

    2015-04-01

    First, hardening model in f.c.c. metals was formulated with collinear interactions slips, Hirth slips and Lomer-Cottrell slips. Using the Taylor and the Sachs rolling texture prediction model, the residual dislocation densities of cold-rolled commercial pure aluminum were estimated. Then, coincidence site lattice grains were investigated from observed cold rolling texture. Finally, on the basis of oriented nucleation theory and coincidence site lattice theory, the recrystallization texture of commercial pure aluminum after low-temperature annealing was predicted.

  10. Intrasite motions and monument instabilities at Medicina ITRF co-location site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarti, Pierguido; Abbondanza, Claudio; Legrand, Juliette; Bruyninx, Carine; Vittuari, Luca; Ray, Jim

    2013-03-01

    We process the total-station surveys performed at the ITRF co-location site Medicina (Northern Italy) over the decade (2001-2010) with the purpose of determining the extent of local intrasite motions and relating them to local geophysical processes, the geological setting and the design of the ground pillars. In addition, continuous observations acquired by two co-located GPS stations (MEDI and MSEL separated by ≈27 m) are analysed and their relative motion is cross-checked with the total-station results. The local ground control network extends over a small area (<100 × 100 m) but the results demonstrate significant anisotropic deformations with rates up to 1.6 mm a-1, primarily horizontal, a value comparable to intraplate tectonic deformations. The results derived from GPS and total-station observations are consistent and point to the presence of horizontal intrasite motions over very short distances possibly associated with varying environmental conditions in a very unfavourable local geological setting and unsuitable monument design, these latter being crucial aspects of the realization and maintenance of global permanent geodetic networks and the global terrestrial reference frame.

  11. Locating the binding sites of antioxidants resveratrol, genistein and curcumin with tRNA.

    PubMed

    N'soukpoé-Kossi, C N; Bourassa, P; Mandeville, J S; Bekale, L; Bariyanga, J; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2015-09-01

    We located the binding sites of antioxidants resveratrol, genistein and curcumin on tRNA in aqueous solution at physiological conditions using constant tRNA concentration and various polyphenol contents. FTIR, UV-visible, CD spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling were used to determine polyphenol binding sites, the binding constant and the effects of polyphenol complexation on tRNA conformation and particle formation. Structural analysis showed that polyphenols bind tRNA via G-C and A-U base pairs through hydrophilic, hydrophobic and H-bonding contacts with overall binding constants of K(res-tRNA)=8.95(±0.80)×10(3) M(-1), K(gen-tRNA)=3.07(±0.5)×10(3) M(-1) and K(cur-tRNA)=1.55(±0.3)×10(4) M(-1). Molecular modeling showed the participation of several nucleobases in polyphenol-tRNA adduct formation with free binding energy of -4.43 for resveratrol, -4.26 kcal/mol for genistein and -4.84 kcal/mol for curcumin, indicating that the interaction process is spontaneous at room temperature. While tRNA remains in A-family structure, major biopolymer aggregation and particle formation occurred at high polyphenol contents.

  12. Location Capability and Site Characterization Installing a Borehole VBB Seismometer: the OGS Experience in Ferrara (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesaresi, D.; Barnaba, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Centro di Ricerche Sismologiche (CRS, Seismological Research Centre) of the Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale (OGS, Italian National Institute for Oceanography and Experimental Geophysics) in Udine (Italy) after the strong earthquake of magnitude M=6.4 occurred in 1976 in the Italian Friuli-Venezia Giulia region, started to operate the Northeastern Italy Seismic Network: it currently consists of 19 very sensitive broad band and 17 simpler short period seismic stations, all telemetered to and acquired in real time at the OGS CRS data centre in Udine. The southwestern edge of the OGS seismic network stands on the Po alluvial basin: earthquake localization and characterization in this area is affected by the presence of soft alluvial deposits. Following the ML=5.9 earthquake that struck the Emilia region around Ferrara in Northern Italy on May 20, 2012, a cooperation of Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, OGS, the Comune di Ferrara and the University of Ferrara lead to the reinstallation of a previously existing very broad band (VBB) borehole seismic station in Ferrara and to the deployment of a temporary seismographic network consisting of eight portable seismological stations, to record the local earthquakes that occurred during the seismic sequence. The aim of the OGS intervention was on one hand to extend its real time seismic monitoring capabilities toward South-West, including Ferrara and its surroundings, and on the other hand to evaluate seismic site responses in the area. We will introduce details of the Ferrara VBB borehole station and the OGS temporary seismographic network configuration and installation. We will then illustrate the location capability performances, and finally we will shortly describe seismic site characterization with surface/borehole comparisons in terms of seismic noise, site amplification and resonance frequencies.

  13. Locating the binding sites of folic acid with milk α- and β-caseins.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, P; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2012-01-12

    We located the binding sites of folic acid with milk α- and β-caseins at physiological conditions, using constant protein concentration and various folic acid contents. FTIR, UV-visible, and fluorescence spectroscopic methods as well as molecular modeling were used to analyze folic acid binding sites, the binding constant, and the effect of folic acid interaction on the stability and conformation of caseins. Structural analysis showed that folic acid binds caseins via both hydrophilic and hydrophobic contacts with overall binding constants of K(folic acid-α-caseins) = 4.8 (±0.6) × 10(4) M(-1) and K(folic acid-β-caseins) = 7.0 (±0.9) × 10(4) M(-1). The number of bound acid molecules per protein was 1.5 (±0.4) for α-casein and 1.4 (±0.3) for β-casein complexes. Molecular modeling showed different binding sites for folic acid on α- and β-caseins. The participation of several amino acids in folic acid-protein complexes was observed, which was stabilized by hydrogen bonding network and the free binding energy of -7.7 kcal/mol (acid-α-casein) and -8.1 kcal/mol (acid-β-casein). Folic acid complexation altered protein secondary structure by the reduction of α-helix from 35% (free α-casein) to 33% (acid-complex) and 32% (free β-casein) to 26% (acid-complex) indicating a partial protein destabilization. Caseins might act as carriers for transportation of folic acid to target molecules.

  14. Spin models for two-site resonant tunnelling dynamics of bosons in a tilted optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyskikh, Anton; Pekker, David; Daley, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    We study the non-equilibrium dynamics of a one dimensional tilted Bose-Hubbard model, beginning from unit filling in the Mott insulator regime. Studying a quench to the resonance point for tunnelling of the particles over two sites, we show how in the presence of a superlattice, a spin model emerges involving two subchains described by an Ising model that are then coupled by interaction terms. Using this model, we study the behaviour of the system near the quantum critical point in the vicinity of the tunnelling resonance, especially looking at the out-of-equilibrium dynamics after the quench. We compare the dephasing of local observables corresponding to the number of doubly occupied sites, which were measured in recent experiments, to the dynamics expected in the presence of noise and decoherence. These results should be directly measurable in experiments, and provide a diagnostic tool for investigating decoherence in such out-of-equilibrium dynamics.

  15. Use of Loran-C navigation system to accurately determine sampling site location in an above ground cooling reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, R.E.; Blankinship, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    Environmental monitoring programs often require accurate determination of sampling site locations in aquatic environments. This is especially true when a {open_quotes}picture{close_quotes} of high resolution is needed for observing a changing variable in a given area and location is assumed to be important to the distribution of that variable. Sample site location can be difficult if few visible land marks are available for reference on a large body of water. The use of navigational systems such as Global Positioning System (GPS) and its predecessor, Loran-C, provide an excellent method for sample site location. McFarland (1992) discusses the practicality of GPS for location determination. This article discusses the use of Loran-C in a sampling scheme implemented at the South Texas Project Electrical Generating Station (STPEGS), Wadsworth, Texas.

  16. Identification of sites within the Palo Duro Basin. Volume 1. Palo Duro Location A. [Contains glossary, Deaf Smith site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-01

    This three-volume document narrows to two sites for continued investigations for potential nuclear waste repository sites in the Palo Duro Basin of the Texas Panhandle. Volume 1 narrows a site previously identified in Deaf Smith County, Texas; Volume 2 narrows a site previously identified in Swisher County, Texas; and Volume 3 contains responses to comments received regarding the drafts of Volumes 1 and 2 (BMI/ONWI-531). These volumes discuss the methodology and logic used as well as the results that narrowed these sites. Each of the 10 site performance criteria was divided into descriptors related to site performance characteristics. Each descriptor was evaluated by a systematic logic to determine if it could be used as a discriminator. Then more- and less-preferred areas for groups of discriminators were defined and composite maps were prepared and evaluated to identify the sites.

  17. Optimal Locations for Siting Wind Energy Projects: Technical Challenges, Economics, and Public Preferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, Julian V.

    Increasing the percentage of wind power in the United States electricity generation mix would facilitate the transition towards a more sustainable, low-pollution, and environmentally-conscious electricity grid. However, this effort is not without cost. Wind power generation is time-variable and typically not synchronized with electricity demand (i.e., load). In addition, the highest-output wind resources are often located in remote locations, necessitating transmission investment between generation sites and load. Furthermore, negative public perceptions of wind projects could prevent widespread wind development, especially for projects close to densely-populated communities. The work presented in my dissertation seeks to understand where it's best to locate wind energy projects while considering these various factors. First, in Chapter 2, I examine whether energy storage technologies, such as grid-scale batteries, could help reduce the transmission upgrade costs incurred when siting wind projects in distant locations. For a case study of a hypothetical 200 MW wind project in North Dakota that delivers power to Illinois, I present an optimization model that estimates the optimal size of transmission and energy storage capacity that yields the lowest average cost of generation and transmission (/MWh). I find that for this application of storage to be economical, energy storage costs would have to be 100/kWh or lower, which is well below current costs for available technologies. I conclude that there are likely better ways to use energy storage than for accessing distant wind projects. Following from this work, in Chapter 3, I present an optimization model to estimate the economics of accessing high quality wind resources in remote areas to comply with renewable energy policy targets. I include temporal aspects of wind power (variability costs and correlation to market prices) as well as total wind power produced from different farms. I assess the goal of providing

  18. 43 CFR 3838.11 - How do I locate and record mining claims or tunnel sites on SRHA lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How do I locate and record mining claims or tunnel sites on SRHA lands? 3838.11 Section 3838.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) SPECIAL PROCEDURES FOR LOCATING...

  19. 43 CFR 3838.11 - How do I locate and record mining claims or tunnel sites on SRHA lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How do I locate and record mining claims or tunnel sites on SRHA lands? 3838.11 Section 3838.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) SPECIAL PROCEDURES FOR LOCATING...

  20. 43 CFR 3838.11 - How do I locate and record mining claims or tunnel sites on SRHA lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How do I locate and record mining claims or tunnel sites on SRHA lands? 3838.11 Section 3838.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) SPECIAL PROCEDURES FOR LOCATING...

  1. 43 CFR 3838.11 - How do I locate and record mining claims or tunnel sites on SRHA lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How do I locate and record mining claims or tunnel sites on SRHA lands? 3838.11 Section 3838.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) SPECIAL PROCEDURES FOR LOCATING...

  2. Trapping of diffusing particles by clusters of absorbing disks on a reflecting wall with disk centers on sites of a square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Dagdug, Leonardo; Vazquez, Marco-Vinicio; Lizunov, Vladimir A.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2013-02-01

    A simple approximate formula is derived for the rate constant that describes steady-state flux of diffusing particles through a cluster of perfectly absorbing disks on the otherwise reflecting flat wall, assuming that the disk centers occupy neighboring sites of a square lattice. A distinctive feature of trapping by a disk cluster is that disks located at the cluster periphery shield the disks in the center of the cluster. This competition of the disks for diffusing particles makes it impossible to find an exact analytical solution for the rate constant in the general case. To derive the approximate formula, we use a recently suggested approach [A. M. Berezhkovskii, L. Dagdug, V. A. Lizunov, J. Zimmerberg, and S. M. Bezrukov, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 211102 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4726015, which is based on the replacement of the disk cluster by an effective uniform partially absorbing spot. The formula shows how the rate constant depends on the size and shape of the cluster. To check the accuracy of the formula, we compare its predictions with the values of the rate constant obtained from Brownian dynamics simulations. The comparison made for 18 clusters of various shapes and sizes shows good agreement between the theoretical predictions and numerical results.

  3. Lattice-site-specific spin dynamics in double perovskite Sr2CoOsO6.

    PubMed

    Yan, Binghai; Paul, Avijit Kumar; Kanungo, Sudipta; Reehuis, Manfred; Hoser, Andreas; Többens, Daniel M; Schnelle, Walter; Williams, Robert C; Lancaster, Tom; Xiao, Fan; Möller, Johannes S; Blundell, Stephen J; Hayes, William; Felser, Claudia; Jansen, Martin

    2014-04-11

    Magnetic properties and spin dynamics have been studied for the structurally ordered double perovskite Sr2CoOsO6. Neutron diffraction, muon-spin relaxation, and ac-susceptibility measurements reveal two antiferromagnetic (AFM) phases on cooling from room temperature down to 2 K. In the first AFM phase, with transition temperature TN1=108  K, cobalt (3d7, S=3/2) and osmium (5d2, S=1) moments fluctuate dynamically, while their average effective moments undergo long-range order. In the second AFM phase below TN2=67  K, cobalt moments first become frozen and induce a noncollinear spin-canted AFM state, while dynamically fluctuating osmium moments are later frozen into a randomly canted state at T≈5  K. Ab initio calculations indicate that the effective exchange coupling between cobalt and osmium sites is rather weak, so that cobalt and osmium sublattices exhibit different ground states and spin dynamics, making Sr2CoOsO6 distinct from previously reported double-perovskite compounds.

  4. A statistical approach for site error correction in lightning location networks with DF/TOA technique and its application results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; Chen, Mingli; Du, Yaping; Qiu, Zongxu

    2017-02-01

    Lightning location network (LLN) with DF/TOA (direction-finder/time-of-arrival) combined technique has been widely used in the world. However, the accuracy of the lightning data from such LLNs has still been restricted by "site error", especially for those detected only by two DF/TOA sensors. In this paper we practice a statistical approach for evaluation and correction of "site error" for DF/TOA type LLN based on its lightning data. By comparing lightning locations recorded by at least 4 sensors between DF and TOA techniques, the spatial characteristics of "site error" for each sensor in the network can be obtained. The obtained "site error" then can be used to improve the accuracy of lightning locations especially those recorded by only 2 sensors. With this approach, the "site error" patterns for 23 sensors in Yunnan LLN are obtained. The features of these site error patterns are in good consistency with those in literature. Significant differences in lightning locations before and after "site error" corrections indicate that the proposed approach works effectively.

  5. Motif types, motif locations and base composition patterns around the RNA polyadenylation site in microorganisms, plants and animals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The polyadenylation of RNA is critical for gene functioning, but the conserved sequence motifs (often called signal or signature motifs), motif locations and abundances, and base composition patterns around mRNA polyadenylation [poly(A)] sites are still uncharacterized in most species. The evolutionary tendency for poly(A) site selection is still largely unknown. Results We analyzed the poly(A) site regions of 31 species or phyla. Different groups of species showed different poly(A) signal motifs: UUACUU at the poly(A) site in the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi; UGUAAC (approximately 13 bases upstream of the site) in the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii; UGUUUG (or UGUUUGUU) at mainly the fourth base downstream of the poly(A) site in the parasite Blastocystis hominis; and AAUAAA at approximately 16 bases and approximately 19 bases upstream of the poly(A) site in animals and plants, respectively. Polyadenylation signal motifs are usually several hundred times more abundant around poly(A) sites than in whole genomes. These predominant motifs usually had very specific locations, whether upstream of, at, or downstream of poly(A) sites, depending on the species or phylum. The poly(A) site was usually an adenosine (A) in all analyzed species except for B. hominis, and there was weak A predominance in C. reinhardtii. Fungi, animals, plants, and the protist Phytophthora infestans shared a general base abundance pattern (or base composition pattern) of “U-rich—A-rich—U-rich—Poly(A) site—U-rich regions”, or U-A-U-A-U for short, with some variation for each kingdom or subkingdom. Conclusion This study identified the poly(A) signal motifs, motif locations, and base composition patterns around mRNA poly(A) sites in protists, fungi, plants, and animals and provided insight into poly(A) site evolution. PMID:25052519

  6. Preliminary geohydrologic site characterization and proposed water quality well locations for WAG 7, WAG 8 and WAG 9

    SciTech Connect

    Baughn, D.C.

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to assess general site conditions and to recommend water quality well locations at three Waste Area Groupings (WAGS) within the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) complex. The subject sites are WAGs 7, 8 and 9 each of which is identified on the general site location map. For reference, the relationship of the subject sites to other WAGs are shown. WAGs are regions prescribed by Martin Marietta throughout the ORNL complex that require environmental assessment. WAGs contain solid waste management units such as Solid Waste Storage Areas (SWSAs), as well as pipelines, spill sites, buildings, ponds and experimental test sites. These solid waste management units are considered to be potential sources of contamination. The WAG boundaries describe the areal limits of specific waste management operations as well as currently known areas of waste constituent migration. Because solid waste management units within WAGs 7, 8 and 9 may continue to release waste constituents to the environment, the existing groundwater monitoring systems is being upgraded. This report recommends locations for water quality wells which will be installed at these three WAG boundaries in order to gather water quality data. The proposed well locations are shown. Water quality well design coordinates (ORNL grid) and estimated completion depths are given.

  7. The impact of an efficient collection sites location on the zoning phase in municipal solid waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiani, Gianpaolo Manni, Andrea Manni, Emanuele Toraldo, Massimiliano

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We study the problems of locating collection areas and zoning the service territory in a municipal waste management system. • We investigate the impact that an efficient collection sites location has on the subsequent zoning phase. • On a real-world test case, we show that the proposed approach could allow achieving significant monetary savings. - Abstract: In this paper, we study two decisional problems arising when planning the collection of solid waste, namely the location of collection sites (together with bin allocation) and the zoning of the service territory, and we assess the potential impact that an efficient location has on the subsequent zoning phase. We first propose both an exact and a heuristic approach to locate the unsorted waste collection bins in a residential town, and to decide the capacities and characteristics of the bins to be located at each collection site. A peculiar aspect we consider is that of taking into account the compatibility between the different types of bins when allocating them to collection areas. Moreover, we propose a fast and effective heuristic approach to identify homogeneous zones that can be served by a single collection vehicle. Computational results on data related to a real-life instance show that an efficient location is fundamental in achieving consistent monetary savings, as well as a reduced environmental impact. These reductions are the result of one vehicle less needed to perform the waste collection operations, and an overall traveled distance reduced by about 25% on the average.

  8. Environmental status of algal mat sites located at the east coast of Saudi Arabia following the Gulf War

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Thukair, A. )

    1993-06-01

    Remote sensing techniques and ground truth verification were used to provide information on algal mat locations and damage intensity caused by the oil spill. Pre and post oil spill satellite images, ground truth assessment were compared for damage evaluation. Locations and sites status (heavily oiled, recovering, and no algal mats) were conveyed in maps. Recovered sites are found in Abu Ali and Tanajib areas. However, recovery seems to be slower in Abu Ali area as compared to Tanajib. Different types and formations of algal mats were found in both areas. This differentiation is more likely to be attributable to coastal topography and tide regimes.

  9. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) pollination in California's Central Valley is limited by native bee nest site location.

    PubMed

    Sardiñas, Hillary S; Tom, Kathleen; Ponisio, Lauren Catherine; Rominger, Andrew; Kremen, Claire

    2016-03-01

    The delivery of ecosystem services by mobile organisms depends on the distribution of those organisms, which is, in turn, affected by resources at local and landscape scales. Pollinator-dependent crops rely on mobile animals like bees for crop production, and the spatial relationship between floral resources and nest location for these central-place foragers influences the delivery of pollination services. Current models that map pollination coverage in agricultural regions utilize landscape-level estimates of floral availability and nesting incidence inferred from expert opinion, rather than direct assessments. Foraging distance is often derived from proxies of bee body size, rather than direct measurements of foraging that account for behavioral responses to floral resource type and distribution. The lack of direct measurements of nesting incidence and foraging distances may lead to inaccurate mapping of pollination services. We examined the role of local-scale floral resource presence from hedgerow plantings on nest incidence of ground-nesting bees in field margins and within monoculture, conventionally managed sunflower fields in California's Central Valley. We tracked bee movement into fields using fluorescent powder. We then used these data to simulate the distribution of pollination services within a crop field. Contrary to expert opinion, we found that ground-nesting native bees nested both in fields and edges, though nesting rates declined with distance into field. Further, we detected no effect of field-margin floral enhancements on nesting. We found evidence of an exponential decay rate of bee movement into fields, indicating that foraging predominantly occurred in less than 1% of medium-sized bees' predicted typical foraging range. Although we found native bees nesting within agricultural fields, their restricted foraging movements likely centralize pollination near nest sites. Our data thus predict a heterogeneous distribution of pollination services

  10. Controls of surface topography on submarine and subaerial hydrothermal fluid flow and vent-site location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bani Hassan, N.; Rupke, L.; Iyer, K. H.; Borgia, A.

    2010-12-01

    flanks or even topographic lows (submarine case). Amplitude also has a first-order effect of focusing the vent sites on topographic highs and lows. Another observation is that the wavelength of the topography affects the number of plumes generated in the model. These findings are confirmed in two case studies for the submarine Lucky Strike hydrothermal field on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the subaerial geothermal field of Amiata, Italy. In both case studies the predicted vent locations fit well with the observed ones.

  11. Modeling a tracer test at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) using a lattice Boltzmann method and transmissivity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. W.; Lanyon, G. W.; Baik, M. H.; Blechschmidt, I.

    2015-12-01

    A series of tracer tests have been conducted in the Migration (MI) Shear Zone at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) for the Colloid Formation and Migration Project (CFM). As a part of the series, a dipole test (Tracer Test Run 13-05) using radionuclides, colloids and conservative tracers was performed to determine the breakthrough between CRR99.002-i2 and BOMI87.010-i2. To date, the breakthrough data of only the conservative dye tracer (Amino-G acid) are available. In the preceding project, the Colloid and Radionuclide Retardation Project (CRR), a transmissivity field for the MI shear zone was obtained by the geostatistical inverse modeling approach. In this study, the breakthrough of the tracer was computed by a gray lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The transmissivity field with finite elements grid was transformed to the effective fracture aperture or flow porosity according to the cubic law, and the grid was uniformalized by the interpolation. The uniform mesh of the effective aperture was utilized as the model domain of the gray LBM. In the gray LBM, the heterogeneity of the aperture was dealt with a partial-bounceback scheme. The profiles of hydraulic heads monitored at the boreholes nearby were used as the reference values in the calculation of the pressure distribution in the model domain. The modeling results could reveal a dominant pathway of tracers in the dipole test. The developed model can be utilized in the calculation of the reactive transports of radionuclides and colloids by coupling with a geochemical model, such as Phreeqc, the Geochemist's Workbench, etc.

  12. Location, Location, Location!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsdell, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    Of prime importance in real estate, location is also a key element in the appeal of romances. Popular geographic settings and historical periods sell, unpopular ones do not--not always with a logical explanation, as the author discovered when she conducted a survey on this topic last year. (Why, for example, are the French Revolution and the…

  13. Stabilization of the chiral phase of the SU (6 m ) Heisenberg model on the honeycomb lattice with m particles per site for m larger than 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Jérôme; Mila, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    We show that, when N is a multiple of 6 (N =6 m , where m is an integer), the SU (N) Heisenberg model on the honeycomb lattice with m particles per site has a clear tendency toward chiral order as soon as m ≥2 . This conclusion has been reached by a systematic variational Monte Carlo investigation of Gutzwiller projected wave functions as a function of m between the case of one particle per site (m =1 ), for which the ground state has recently been shown to be in a plaquette singlet state, and the m →∞ limit, where a mean-field approach has established that the ground state has chiral order. This demonstrates that the chiral phase can indeed be stabilized for not too large values of m , opening the way to its experimental realizations in other lattices.

  14. Atomistic study on the site preference and lattice vibration of Gd3-xYxCo29T4B10 (T=Al and Ge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hai-Xia; Wang, Xiao-Xu; Hu, Yao-Wen; Zhang, Guo-Hua; Shen, Jiang; Qian, Ping; Chen, Nan-Xian

    2015-04-01

    The effects of the Y substitution for Gd on the structural stability and the site preference of intermetallics Gd3-xYxCo29T4B10 (T=Al and Ge) are studied by using a series of interatomic pair potentials. The calculated results show Y can stabilize Gd3-xYxCo29T4B10 with the tetragonal structure, and Y substitute for Gd with a strong preference for the 2b sites. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the experimental data. Furthermore, the total and partial phonon densities of states are evaluated for the Gd3-xYxCo29T4B10 compounds with the tetragonal structure. A qualitative analysis is carried out with the relevant potentials for the vibrational modes, which makes it possible to predict some properties related to lattice vibration.

  15. 43 CFR 3838.10 - Procedures for locating and recording a mining claim or tunnel site on SRHA lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Procedures for locating and recording a mining claim or tunnel site on SRHA lands. 3838.10 Section 3838.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) SPECIAL PROCEDURES FOR...

  16. 43 CFR 3838.10 - Procedures for locating and recording a mining claim or tunnel site on SRHA lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Procedures for locating and recording a mining claim or tunnel site on SRHA lands. 3838.10 Section 3838.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) SPECIAL PROCEDURES FOR...

  17. 43 CFR 3838.10 - Procedures for locating and recording a mining claim or tunnel site on SRHA lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures for locating and recording a mining claim or tunnel site on SRHA lands. 3838.10 Section 3838.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) SPECIAL PROCEDURES FOR...

  18. 43 CFR 3838.10 - Procedures for locating and recording a mining claim or tunnel site on SRHA lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Procedures for locating and recording a mining claim or tunnel site on SRHA lands. 3838.10 Section 3838.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) SPECIAL PROCEDURES FOR...

  19. Co-doping of (Bi(0.5)Na(0.5))TiO(3): secondary phase formation and lattice site preference of Co.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, V; Staab, T E M

    2012-11-14

    Bismuth sodium titanate (Bi(0.5)Na(0.5))TiO(3) (BNT) is considered to be one of the most promising lead-free alternatives to piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT). However, the effect of dopants on the material has so far received little attention from an atomic point of view. In this study we investigated the effects of cobalt-doping on the formation of additional phases and determined the preferred lattice site of cobalt in BNT. The latter was achieved by comparing the measured x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra to numerically calculated spectra of cobalt on various lattice sites in BNT. (Bi(0.5)Na(0.5))TiO(3) + x mol% Co (x = 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.6) was synthesized via solid state reaction. As revealed by SEM backscattering images, a secondary phase formed in all doped specimens. Using both XRD and SEM-EDX, it was identified as Co(2)TiO(4) for dopant levels >0.5 mol%. In addition, a certain amount of cobalt was incorporated into BNT, as shown by electron probe microanalysis. This amount increased with increasing dopant levels, suggesting that an equilibrium forms together with the secondary phase. The XANES experiments revealed that cobalt occupies the octahedral B-site in the BNT perovskite lattice, substituting Ti and promoting the formation of oxygen vacancies in the material.

  20. Location analysis and strontium-90 concentrations in deer antlers on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, B L; Eberhardt, L E; Poston, T M

    1995-05-01

    The primary objective of this study was to examine the levels of strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr) in deer antlers collected from near previously active reactor sites and distant from the reactor sites along that portion of the Columbia River which borders the Hanford Site. A second objective was to analyze the movements and home-ranges of mule deer residing within these areas and determine to what extent this information contributes to the observed {sup 90}Sr concentrations. {sup 90}Sr is a long-lived radionuclide (29.1 year half life) produced by fission in irradiated fuel in plutonium production reactors on the Hanford Site. It is also a major component of atmospheric fallout from weapons testing. Concentrations of radionuclides found in the developed environment onsite do not pose a health concern to humans or various wildlife routinely monitored. However, elevated levels of radionuclides in found biota may indicate routes of exposure requiring attention.

  1. Tables of co-located geothermal-resource sites and BLM Wilderness Study Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, D.; Dorscher, M.

    1982-11-01

    Matched pairs of known geothermal wells and springs with BLM proposed Wilderness Study Areas (WSAs) were identified by inspection of WSA and Geothermal resource maps for the states of Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington and Wyoming. A total of 3952 matches, for geothermal sites within 25 miles of a WSA, were identified. Of these, only 71 (1.8%) of the geothermal sites are within one mile of a WSA, and only an additional 100 (2.5%) are within one to three miles. Approximately three-fourths of the matches are at distances greater than ten miles. Only 12 of the geothermal sites within one mile of a WSA have surface temperatures reported above 50/sup 0/C. It thus appears that the geothermal potential of WSAs overall is minimal, but that evaluation of geothermal resources should be considered in more detail for some areas prior to their designation as Wilderness.

  2. Conversion of Hanford site well locations to Washington coordinate system of 1983, South Zone 1991 (WCS83S)

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, R.A.; Tzemos, S.; Dietz, L.A.

    1993-12-01

    Past construction and survey practices have resulted in the use of multiple local coordinate systems for measuring and reporting the horizontal position of wells and other facilities and locations on the Hanford Site. This report describes the development of a coordinate transformation process and algorithm and its application to the conversion of the horizontal coordinates of Hanford site wells from the various local coordinate systems and datums to a single standard coordinate system, the Washington Coordinate system of 1983, South Zone 1991 (WCS83S). The coordinate transformation algorithm, implemented as a computer program called CTRANS, uses standard two-dimensional translation, rotation, and scaling transformation equations and can be applied to any set of horizontal point locations. For each point to be transformed, the coefficients of the transformation equations are calculated locally, using the coordinates of the three nearest registration points (points with known locations in both coordinate systems). The report contains a discussion of efforts to verify and validate both the software and the well location data, a description of the methods used to estimate transformation and registration point accuracy, instructions for using the computer program, and a summary of the Hanford well conversion results for each local coordinate system and datum. Also included are the results of using recent U.S. Army Corps of Engineers survey data to obtain estimated measures of location errors in wells for which the local coordinate data source is undocumented, unverified, and therefore of unknown accuracy.

  3. The impact of an efficient collection sites location on the zoning phase in municipal solid waste management.

    PubMed

    Ghiani, Gianpaolo; Manni, Andrea; Manni, Emanuele; Toraldo, Massimiliano

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we study two decisional problems arising when planning the collection of solid waste, namely the location of collection sites (together with bin allocation) and the zoning of the service territory, and we assess the potential impact that an efficient location has on the subsequent zoning phase. We first propose both an exact and a heuristic approach to locate the unsorted waste collection bins in a residential town, and to decide the capacities and characteristics of the bins to be located at each collection site. A peculiar aspect we consider is that of taking into account the compatibility between the different types of bins when allocating them to collection areas. Moreover, we propose a fast and effective heuristic approach to identify homogeneous zones that can be served by a single collection vehicle. Computational results on data related to a real-life instance show that an efficient location is fundamental in achieving consistent monetary savings, as well as a reduced environmental impact. These reductions are the result of one vehicle less needed to perform the waste collection operations, and an overall traveled distance reduced by about 25% on the average.

  4. Perform Initial Measurements to Investigate Microwave Detection for Location of Hemorrhage Sites Within the Body

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    ISSUES Intracranial hemorrhage can present itself in many different contexts, from the 85 year old woman on anticoagulation to the infant shaken...etiology for intracranial bleeds. Individuals with high blood pressure, atherosclerotic disease, atrial fibrillation, and a myriad other medical conditions...suffered an intracranial bleed involves many members of the medical community, including paramedics on site, emergency room physicians, neurologists

  5. Computational detection and location of transcription start sites in mammalian genomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Down, Thomas A; Hubbard, Tim J P

    2002-03-01

    Transcription, the process whereby RNA copies are made from sections of the DNA genome, is directed by promoter regions. These define the transcription start site, and also the set of cellular conditions under which the promoter is active. At least in more complex species, it appears to be common for genes to have several different transcription start sites, which may be active under different conditions. Eukaryotic promoters are complex and fairly diffuse structures, which have proven hard to detect in silico. We show that a novel hybrid machine-learning method is able to build useful models of promoters for >50% of human transcription start sites. We estimate specificity to be >70%, and demonstrate good positional accuracy. Based on the structure of our learned models, we conclude that a signal resembling the well known TATA box, together with flanking regions of C-G enrichment, are the most important sequence-based signals marking sites of transcriptional initiation at a large class of typical promoters.

  6. Charge-regulation phase transition on surface lattices of titratable sites adjacent to electrolyte solutions: An analog of the Ising antiferromagnet in a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Shore, Joel D; Thurston, George M

    2015-12-01

    We report a charge-patterning phase transition on two-dimensional square lattices of titratable sites, here regarded as protonation sites, placed in a low-dielectric medium just below the planar interface between this medium and a salt solution. We calculate the work-of-charging matrix of the lattice with use of a linear Debye-Hückel model, as input to a grand-canonical partition function for the distribution of occupancy patterns. For a large range of parameter values, this model exhibits an approximate inverse cubic power-law decrease of the voltage produced by an individual charge, as a function of its in-lattice separation from neighboring titratable sites. Thus, the charge coupling voltage biases the local probabilities of proton binding as a function of the occupancy of sites for many neighbors beyond the nearest ones. We find that even in the presence of these longer-range interactions, the site couplings give rise to a phase transition in which the site occupancies exhibit an alternating, checkerboard pattern that is an analog of antiferromagnetic ordering. The overall strength W of this canonical charge coupling voltage, per unit charge, is a function of the Debye length, the charge depth, the Bjerrum length, and the dielectric coefficients of the medium and the solvent. The alternating occupancy transition occurs above a curve of thermodynamic critical points in the (pH-pK,W) plane, the curve representing a charge-regulation analog of variation of the Néel temperature of an Ising antiferromagnet as a function of an applied, uniform magnetic field. The analog of a uniform magnetic field in the antiferromagnet problem is a combination of pH-pK and W, and 1/W is the analog of the temperature in the antiferromagnet problem. We use Monte Carlo simulations to study the occupancy patterns of the titratable sites, including interactions out to the 37th nearest-neighbor category (a distance of √74 lattice constants), first validating simulations through

  7. Charge-regulation phase transition on surface lattices of titratable sites adjacent to electrolyte solutions: An analog of the Ising antiferromagnet in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, Joel D.; Thurston, George M.

    2015-12-01

    We report a charge-patterning phase transition on two-dimensional square lattices of titratable sites, here regarded as protonation sites, placed in a low-dielectric medium just below the planar interface between this medium and a salt solution. We calculate the work-of-charging matrix of the lattice with use of a linear Debye-Hückel model, as input to a grand-canonical partition function for the distribution of occupancy patterns. For a large range of parameter values, this model exhibits an approximate inverse cubic power-law decrease of the voltage produced by an individual charge, as a function of its in-lattice separation from neighboring titratable sites. Thus, the charge coupling voltage biases the local probabilities of proton binding as a function of the occupancy of sites for many neighbors beyond the nearest ones. We find that even in the presence of these longer-range interactions, the site couplings give rise to a phase transition in which the site occupancies exhibit an alternating, checkerboard pattern that is an analog of antiferromagnetic ordering. The overall strength W of this canonical charge coupling voltage, per unit charge, is a function of the Debye length, the charge depth, the Bjerrum length, and the dielectric coefficients of the medium and the solvent. The alternating occupancy transition occurs above a curve of thermodynamic critical points in the (p H-p K ,W ) plane, the curve representing a charge-regulation analog of variation of the Néel temperature of an Ising antiferromagnet as a function of an applied, uniform magnetic field. The analog of a uniform magnetic field in the antiferromagnet problem is a combination of p H-p K and W , and 1 /W is the analog of the temperature in the antiferromagnet problem. We use Monte Carlo simulations to study the occupancy patterns of the titratable sites, including interactions out to the 37th nearest-neighbor category (a distance of √{74 } lattice constants), first validating simulations

  8. Location of the unique integration site on an Escherichia coli chromosome by bacteriophage lambda DNA in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Asaf; Arbel-Goren, Rinat; Costantino, Nina; Court, Donald L.; Stavans, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The search for specific sequences on long genomes is a key process in many biological contexts. How can specific target sequences be located with high efficiency, within physiologically relevant times? We addressed this question for viral integration, a fundamental mechanism of horizontal gene transfer driving prokaryotic evolution, using the infection of Escherichia coli bacteria with bacteriophage λ and following the establishment of a lysogenic state. Following the targeting process in individual live E. coli cells in real time revealed that λ DNA remains confined near the entry point of a cell following infection. The encounter between the 15-bp-long target sequence on the chromosome and the recombination site on the viral genome is facilitated by the directed motion of bacterial DNA generated during chromosome replication, in conjunction with constrained diffusion of phage DNA. Moving the native bacterial integration site to different locations on the genome and measuring the integration frequency in these strains reveals that the frequencies of the native site and a site symmetric to it relative to the origin are similar, whereas both are significantly higher than when the integration site is moved near the terminus, consistent with the replication-driven mechanism we propose. This novel search mechanism is yet another example of the exquisite coevolution of λ with its host. PMID:24799672

  9. Bird use of reforestation sites: Influence of location and vertical structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twedt, Daniel J.; Cooper, Robert

    2005-01-01

    In the Lower Mississippi Valley, more than 300,000 acres of agricultural land have been reforested in the last 10 years. Planning decisions on how and where to restore forest are complex and usually reflect landowner objectives. However, initial planning decisions may have a large influence on the value of restored stands for birds and other wildlife.Reforestation of small, isolated tracts will likely result in mature forests where reproductive output of breeding birds does not compensate for adult mortality (sink habitats). This may be due to factors such as lower reproductive success near edges (edge effects), insufficient area of habitat to attract colonizing birds (area effects), or restricted population mixing and mating opportunities because of limited dispersal among tracts (isolation effects).Conversely, reforestation adjacent to existing forest increases contiguous forest area and provides areas buffered from agricultural or urban habitats (interior forest core).Bottomland reforestation has historically focused on planting relatively slow-growing tree species, particularly oaks (Quercus spp.). Thus, restoration sites are often dominated by grasses and forbs for up to a decade after tree planting. Grassland birds are the first birds to colonize reforested sites. However, abundance and productivity of grassland birds is generally poor on sites associated with woody vegetation, such as sites adjacent to mature forest.As woody vegetation develops on reforested sites, birds preferring shrub-scrub habitat displace grassland species (Twedt et al. 2002) (fig. 1). Planting faster-growing trees compresses the time for colonization by shrub-scrub birds and the increased vertical stature of these trees attracts forest birds (Twedt and Portwood 1996). Additionally, planting next to existing mature forests creates transitional edges that reduce the detrimental effects of abrupt forest-agriculture interfaces.

  10. Evaluation of sites for the location of WEEE recycling plants in Spain.

    PubMed

    Queiruga, Dolores; Walther, Grit; González-Benito, Javier; Spengler, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    As a consequence of new European legal regulations for treatment of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), recycling plants have to be installed in Spain. In this context, this contribution describes a method for ranking of Spanish municipalities according to their appropriateness for the installation of these plants. In order to rank the alternatives, the discrete multi-criteria decision method PROMETHEE (Preference Ranking Organisation METHod for Enrichment Evaluations), combined with a surveys of experts, is applied. As existing plants are located in North and East Spain, a significant concentration of top ranking municipalities can be observed in South and Central Spain. The method does not present an optimal structure of the future recycling system, but provides a selection of good alternatives for potential locations of recycling plants.

  11. Location selection criteria for a second data center or off-site storage of materials.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Mitchell; Witman, Paul

    2013-01-01

    As organizations develop secondary data centers, it is critical that they be placed in locations that serve the organization yet do not have a shared risk with the primary data center. The organization needs to consider factors or guidelines which mitigate potential issues that could affect both the primary and secondary data center. It is impossible to eliminate all risk to a single data center but an organization needs to ensure that at least one data center remains operable. The article will propose that data centers be located 50 km or approximately 30 miles apart. The proposal is supported by evaluating earthquake intensity maps that will show that earthquakes damage drops to relatively safe levels after the 30 miles from the epicenter. The article will show that other environmental factors such as power, floods, fire, transportation, fire, and soil are also mitigated by a 30-mile separation guideline.

  12. Site Fidelity and Individual Variation in Winter Location in Partially Migratory European Shags

    PubMed Central

    Grist, Hannah; Daunt, Francis; Wanless, Sarah; Nelson, Emily J.; Harris, Mike P.; Newell, Mark; Burthe, Sarah; Reid, Jane M.

    2014-01-01

    In partially migratory populations, individuals from a single breeding area experience a range of environments during the non-breeding season. If individuals show high within- and among- year fidelity to specific locations, any annual environmental effect on individual life histories could be reinforced, causing substantial demographic heterogeneity. Quantifying within- and among- individual variation and repeatability in non-breeding season location is therefore key to predicting broad-scale environmental impacts on the dynamics of partially migratory populations. We used field resightings of colour-ringed adult European shags known to have bred on the Isle of May, Scotland, to quantify individual variation and repeatability in winter location within and among three consecutive winters. In total, 3797 resightings of 882 individuals were recorded over 622 km of coastline, including the Isle of May. These individuals comprised over 50% of the known breeding population, and encompassed representative distributions of ages and sexes. The distances from the Isle of May at which individuals were resighted during winter varied substantially, up to 486 km and 136 km north and south respectively and including the breeding colony on the Isle of May. However, resighting distances were highly repeatable within individuals; within- and among-winter repeatabilities were >0.72 and >0.59 respectively across the full September-March observation period, and >0.95 and >0.79 respectively across more restricted mid-winter periods. Repeatability did not differ significantly between males and females or among different age classes, either within or among winters. These data demonstrate that the focal shag population is partially migratory, and moreover that individuals show highly repeatable variation in winter location and hence migration strategy across consecutive winters. Such high among-individual variation and within-individual repeatability, both within and among winters, could

  13. Theoretical description of two ultracold atoms in a single site of a three-dimensional optical lattice using realistic interatomic interaction potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Grishkevich, Sergey; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-07-15

    A theoretical approach was developed for an exact numerical description of a pair of ultracold atoms interacting via a central potential, which is trapped in a three-dimensional optical lattice. The coupling of center-of-mass and relative-motion coordinates is explicitly considered using a configuration-interaction (exact-diagonalization) technique. Deviations from the harmonic approximation are discussed for several heteronuclear alkali-metal atom pairs trapped in a single site of an optical lattice. The consequences are discussed for the analysis of a recent experiment [C. Ospelkaus et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 120402 (2006)] in which radio-frequency association was used to create diatomic molecules from a fermionic and a bosonic atom and to measure their binding energies close to a magnetic Feshbach resonance.

  14. Chronic toxicity evaluation of the Savannah River Site DETF discharges and three locations on Tims Branch

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    Chronic toxicity tests with Ceriodaphnia dubia were conducted June 6--August 1, 1990, on the Savannah River Site M-Area supernate discharge effluent (M-004), the A-014 effluent discharge with and without DETF process flow, and for stream samples collected in Tims Branch upstream and downstream from A-014. A secondary objective of the study was to determine what DETF flow rate would not cause instream impact to the aquatic community. 2 figs., 68 tabs.

  15. Femur, tibia and fibula bone templates to estimate subject-specific knee ligament attachment site locations.

    PubMed

    Pillet, Hélène; Bergamini, Elena; Rochcongar, Goulven; Camomilla, Valentina; Thoreux, Patricia; Rouch, Philippe; Cappozzo, Aurelio; Skalli, Wafa

    2016-10-03

    In-vivo estimates of the positions of knee ligament attachment sites are crucial for subject-specific knee modelling. The present study provides template digital models of femur, tibia and fibula that embed the positions of centroids of the origins and insertions of cruciate and collateral ligaments, along with information on their dispersion related to inter-individual variability. By using a shape transformation procedure of choice, these templates can be made to match anatomical information measured on a subject under analysis. Generic bone digital models of the femur, tibia and fibula were first chosen as bone templates. Ligament attachment areas were accurately identified through dissection on the bones of 11 knee specimens, and marked using radio opaque paint. Digital models of these bones embedding the positions of the centroids of the identified ligament attachment areas were thereafter obtained using medical imaging techniques. These centroids were mapped onto the relevant bone template, thus obtaining a cloud of 11 points for each attachment site, and descriptive statistics of the position of these points were thereafter determined. Dispersion of these positions, essentially due to inter-individual variability, was below 6mm for all attachment areas. The accuracy with which subject-specific ligament attachment site positions may be estimated using the bone template models provided in this paper was also assessed using the above-mentioned 11 specimens data set, and a leave-one-out cross validation approach. Average accuracy was found to be 3.3±1.5mm and 5.8±2.9mm for femoral and tibial/fibular attachment sites, respectively.

  16. Real-time safety risk assessment based on a real-time location system for hydropower construction sites.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hanchen; Lin, Peng; Fan, Qixiang; Qiang, Maoshan

    2014-01-01

    The concern for workers' safety in construction industry is reflected in many studies focusing on static safety risk identification and assessment. However, studies on real-time safety risk assessment aimed at reducing uncertainty and supporting quick response are rare. A method for real-time safety risk assessment (RTSRA) to implement a dynamic evaluation of worker safety states on construction site has been proposed in this paper. The method provides construction managers who are in charge of safety with more abundant information to reduce the uncertainty of the site. A quantitative calculation formula, integrating the influence of static and dynamic hazards and that of safety supervisors, is established to link the safety risk of workers with the locations of on-site assets. By employing the hidden Markov model (HMM), the RTSRA provides a mechanism for processing location data provided by the real-time location system (RTLS) and analyzing the probability distributions of different states in terms of false positives and negatives. Simulation analysis demonstrated the logic of the proposed method and how it works. Application case shows that the proposed RTSRA is both feasible and effective in managing construction project safety concerns.

  17. Real-Time Safety Risk Assessment Based on a Real-Time Location System for Hydropower Construction Sites

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qixiang; Qiang, Maoshan

    2014-01-01

    The concern for workers' safety in construction industry is reflected in many studies focusing on static safety risk identification and assessment. However, studies on real-time safety risk assessment aimed at reducing uncertainty and supporting quick response are rare. A method for real-time safety risk assessment (RTSRA) to implement a dynamic evaluation of worker safety states on construction site has been proposed in this paper. The method provides construction managers who are in charge of safety with more abundant information to reduce the uncertainty of the site. A quantitative calculation formula, integrating the influence of static and dynamic hazards and that of safety supervisors, is established to link the safety risk of workers with the locations of on-site assets. By employing the hidden Markov model (HMM), the RTSRA provides a mechanism for processing location data provided by the real-time location system (RTLS) and analyzing the probability distributions of different states in terms of false positives and negatives. Simulation analysis demonstrated the logic of the proposed method and how it works. Application case shows that the proposed RTSRA is both feasible and effective in managing construction project safety concerns. PMID:25114958

  18. Integrating smart-phone based momentary location tracking with fixed site air quality monitoring for personal exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Su, Jason G; Jerrett, Michael; Meng, Ying-Ying; Pickett, Melissa; Ritz, Beate

    2015-02-15

    Epidemiological studies investigating relationships between environmental exposures from air pollution and health typically use residential addresses as a single point for exposure, while environmental exposures in transit, at work, school or other locations are largely ignored. Personal exposure monitors measure individuals' exposures over time; however, current personal monitors are intrusive and cannot be operated at a large scale over an extended period of time (e.g., for a continuous three months) and can be very costly. In addition, spatial locations typically cannot be identified when only personal monitors are used. In this paper, we piloted a study that applied momentary location tracking services supplied by smart phones to identify an individual's location in space-time for three consecutive months (April 28 to July 28, 2013) using available Wi-Fi networks. Individual exposures in space-time to the traffic-related pollutants Nitrogen Oxides (NOX) were estimated by superimposing an annual mean NOX concentration surface modeled using the Land Use Regression (LUR) modeling technique. Individual's exposures were assigned to stationary (including home, work and other stationary locations) and in-transit (including commute and other travel) locations. For the individual, whose home/work addresses were known and the commute route was fixed, it was found that 95.3% of the time, the individual could be accurately identified in space-time. The ambient concentration estimated at the home location was 21.01 ppb. When indoor/outdoor infiltration, indoor sources of air pollution and time spent outdoors were taken into consideration, the individual's cumulative exposures were 28.59 ppb and 96.49 ppb, assuming a respective indoor/outdoor ratio of 1.33 and 5.00. Integrating momentary location tracking services with fixed-site field monitoring, plus indoor-outdoor air exchange calibration, makes exposure assessment of a very large population over an extended time period

  19. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 2. Assessing Charge Site Location and Isotope Scrambling.

    PubMed

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Donohoe, Gregory C; Valentine, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) and molecular dynamic simulations (MDS) has been used for structural investigation of anions produced by electrospraying a sample containing a synthetic peptide having the sequence KKDDDDDIIKIIK. In these experiments the potential of the analytical method for locating charge sites on ions as well as for utilizing collision-induced dissociation (CID) to reveal the degree of deuterium uptake within specific amino acid residues has been assessed. For diffuse (i.e., more elongated) [M - 2H](2-) ions, decreased deuterium content along with MDS data suggest that the D4 and D6 residues are charge sites, whereas for the more diffuse [M - 3H](3-) ions, the data suggest that the D4, D7, and the C-terminus are deprotonated. Fragmentation of mobility-selected, diffuse [M - 2H](2-) ions to determine deuterium uptake at individual amino acid residues reveals a degree of deuterium retention at incorporation sites. Although the diffuse [M - 3H](3-) ions may show more HD scrambling, it is not possible to clearly distinguish HD scrambling from the expected deuterium uptake based on a hydrogen accessibility model. The capability of the IMS-HDX-MS/MS approach to provide relevant details about ion structure is discussed. Additionally, the ability to extend the approach for locating protonation sites on positively-charged ions is presented.

  20. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 2. Assessing Charge Site Location and Isotope Scrambling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Donohoe, Gregory C.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) and molecular dynamic simulations (MDS) has been used for structural investigation of anions produced by electrospraying a sample containing a synthetic peptide having the sequence KKDDDDDIIKIIK. In these experiments the potential of the analytical method for locating charge sites on ions as well as for utilizing collision-induced dissociation (CID) to reveal the degree of deuterium uptake within specific amino acid residues has been assessed. For diffuse (i.e., more elongated) [M - 2H]2- ions, decreased deuterium content along with MDS data suggest that the D4 and D6 residues are charge sites, whereas for the more diffuse [M - 3H]3- ions, the data suggest that the D4, D7, and the C-terminus are deprotonated. Fragmentation of mobility-selected, diffuse [M - 2H]2- ions to determine deuterium uptake at individual amino acid residues reveals a degree of deuterium retention at incorporation sites. Although the diffuse [M - 3H]3- ions may show more HD scrambling, it is not possible to clearly distinguish HD scrambling from the expected deuterium uptake based on a hydrogen accessibility model. The capability of the IMS-HDX-MS/MS approach to provide relevant details about ion structure is discussed. Additionally, the ability to extend the approach for locating protonation sites on positively-charged ions is presented.

  1. The location of the site of energy release in a solar X-ray subflare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasso, R. D.; Kahler, S. W.; Krieger, A. S.; Silk, J. K.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    A rapid sequence of high-resolution X-ray photographs was obtained by the S-054 X-ray Telescope Experiment on Skylab on 1973 September 1. During the course of this observation, photographs were obtained of a flarelike brightening in a simple, bipolar active region. Analysis reveals the following facts. The event had the form of a small, elongated bright feature whose narrowest dimension was less than seconds of arc. The brightness peak of the flarelike brightening was located within seconds of arc of the center of brightness of a preexisting loop structure that crossed the magnetic neutral line. This loop was observed to brighten gradually beginning approximately 10 minutes prior to the flarelike event. During the rise of the event, the 2-17 A X-ray brightness of the center of the subflare core rose by over a factor of 10 in a time period of 196 seconds or less.

  2. Comparison of Magnetospheric Multiscale Ion Jet Signatures with Predicted Reconnection Site Locations at the Magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrinec, S. M.; Burch, J. L.; Fuselier, S. A.; Gomez, R. G.; Lewis, W.; Trattner, K. J.; Ergun, R.; Mauk, B.; Pollock, C. J.; Schiff, C.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Phan, T.-D.; Young, D.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection at the Earths magnetopause is the primary process by which solar wind plasma and energy gains access to the magnetosphere. One indication that magnetic reconnection is occurring is the observation of accelerated plasma as a jet tangential to the magnetopause. The direction of ion jets along the magnetopause surface as observed by the Fast Plasma Instrument (FPI) and the Hot Plasma Composition Analyzer (HPCA) instrument on board the recently launched Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) set of spacecraft is examined. For those cases where ion jets are clearly discerned, the direction of origin compares well statistically with the predicted location of magnetic reconnection using convected solar wind observations in conjunction with the Maximum Magnetic Shear model.

  3. The effectiveness of ground-penetrating radar surveys in the location of unmarked burial sites in modern cemeteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Sabine; Illich, Bernhard; Berger, Jochen; Graw, Matthias

    2009-07-01

    Ground-penetration radar (GPR) is a geophysical method that is commonly used in archaeological and forensic investigations, including the determination of the exact location of graves. Whilst the method is rapid and does not involve disturbance of the graves, the interpretation of GPR profiles is nevertheless difficult and often leads to incorrect results. Incorrect identifications could hinder criminal investigations and complicate burials in cemeteries that have no information on the location of previously existing graves. In order to increase the number of unmarked graves that are identified, the GPR results need to be verified by comparing them with the soil and vegetation properties of the sites examined. We used a modern cemetery to assess the results obtained with GPR which we then compared with previously obtained tachymetric data and with an excavation of the graves where doubt existed. Certain soil conditions tended to make the application of GPR difficult on occasions, but a rough estimation of the location of the graves was always possible. The two different methods, GPR survey and tachymetry, both proved suitable for correctly determining the exact location of the majority of graves. The present study thus shows that GPR is a reliable method for determining the exact location of unmarked graves in modern cemeteries. However, the method did not allow statements to be made on the stage of decay of the bodies. Such information would assist in deciding what should be done with graves where ineffective degradation creates a problem for reusing graves following the standard resting time of 25 years.

  4. Surface wave site characterization at 27 locations near Boston, Massachusetts, including 2 strong-motion stations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Eric M.; Carkin, Bradley A.; Baise, Laurie G.; Kayen, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    The geotechnical properties of the soils in and around Boston, Massachusetts, have been extensively studied. This is partly due to the importance of the Boston Blue Clay and the extent of landfill in the Boston area. Although New England is not a region that is typically associated with seismic hazards, there have been several historical earthquakes that have caused significant ground shaking (for example, see Street and Lacroix, 1979; Ebel, 1996; Ebel, 2006). The possibility of strong ground shaking, along with heightened vulnerability from unreinforced masonry buildings, motivates further investigation of seismic hazards throughout New England. Important studies that are pertinent to seismic hazards in New England include source-parameter studies (Somerville and others, 1987; Boore and others, 2010), wave-propagation studies (Frankel, 1991; Viegas and others, 2010), empirical ground-motion prediction equations (GMPE) for computing ground-motion intensity (Tavakoli and Pezeshk, 2005; Atkinson and Boore, 2006), site-response studies (Hayles and others, 2001; Ebel and Kim, 2006), and liquefaction studies (Brankman and Baise, 2008). The shear-wave velocity (VS) profiles collected for this report are pertinent to the GMPE, site response, and liquefaction aspects of seismic hazards in the greater Boston area. Besides the application of these data for the Boston region, the data may be applicable throughout New England, through correlations with geologic units (similar to Ebel and Kim, 2006) or correlations with topographic slope (Wald and Allen, 2007), because few VS measurements are available in stable tectonic regions.Ebel and Hart (2001) used felt earthquake reports to infer amplification patterns throughout the greater Boston region and noted spatial correspondence with the dominant period and amplification factors obtained from ambient noise (horizontal-to-vertical ratios) by Kummer (1998). Britton (2003) compiled geotechnical borings in the area and produced a

  5. Site Characterization of the Source Physics Experiment Phase II Location Using Seismic Reflection Data

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, Emily; Snelson, Catherine M; Chipman, Veraun D; Emer, Dudley; White, Bob; Emmit, Ryan; Wright, Al; Drellack, Sigmund; Huckins-Gang, Heather; Mercadante, Jennifer; Floyd, Michael; McGowin, Chris; Cothrun, Chris; Bonal, Nedra

    2013-12-05

    An objective of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is to identify low-yield nuclear explosions from a regional distance. Low-yield nuclear explosions can often be difficult to discriminate among the clutter of natural and man-made explosive events (e.g., earthquakes and mine blasts). The SPE is broken into three phases. Phase I has provided the first of the physics-based data to test the empirical models that have been used to discriminate nuclear events. The Phase I series of tests were placed within a highly fractured granite body. The evolution of the project has led to development of Phase II, to be placed within the opposite end member of geology, an alluvium environment, thereby increasing the database of waveforms to build upon in the discrimination models. Both the granite and alluvium sites have hosted nearby nuclear tests, which provide comparisons for the chemical test data. Phase III of the SPE is yet to be determined.

  6. Oligosaccharyltransferase directly binds to ribosome at a location near the translocon-binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Y.; Li, H.; Li, Hua; Lennarz, W. J.

    2009-04-28

    Oligosaccharyltransferase (OT) transfers high mannose-type glycans to the nascent polypeptides that are translated by the membrane-bound ribosome and translocated into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum through the Sec61 translocon complex. In this article, we show that purified ribosomes and OT can form a binary complex with a stoichiometry of {approx}1 to 1 in the presence of detergent. We present evidence that OT may bind to the large ribosomal subunit near the site where nascent polypeptides exit. We further show that OT and the Sec61 complex can simultaneously bind to ribosomes in vitro. Based on existing data and our findings, we propose that cotranslational translocation and N-glycosylation of nascent polypeptides are mediated by a ternary supramolecular complex consisting of OT, the Sec61 complex, and ribosomes.

  7. Risk assessment of soil-based exposures to plutonium at experimental sites located on the Nevada Test Site and adjoining areas

    SciTech Connect

    Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Bogen, K.T.; Straume, T.

    1993-06-01

    In the late 1950s and early 1960s, a series of tests was conducted at or near the Nevada Test Site to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of {sup 239,240}Pu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Access to the sites is strictly controlled; therefore, it does not constitute a threat to human health at the present time. However, because the residual {sup 239} Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), the sites could indeed represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, we defined three basic exposure scenarios that could bring individuals in contact with {sup 239,240}Pu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision located at a test site, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility. Our screening analyses indicated that doses to organs are dominated by the intemal deposition of Pu via the inhalation pathway, and thus our risk assessment focused on those factors that affect inhalation exposures and associated doses, including inhalation rates, activity patterns, tenure at a residence or occupation, indoor/outdoor air relationships, and resuspension outdoors. Cancer risks were calculated as a function of lifetime cumulative doses to the key target organs (i.e., bone surface, liver, and lungs) and risk factors for those organs. Uncertainties in the predicted cancer risks were analyzed using Monte-Carlo simulations of the probability distributions used to represent assessment parameters. The principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung.

  8. Quantum Monte Carlo study of hard-core bosons in a pyrochlore lattice with six-site ring-exchange interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tieman, Catherine; Rousseau, Valery

    Highly frustrated quantum systems on lattices can exhibit a wide variety of phases. In addition to the usual Mott insulating and superfluid phases, these systems can also produce some so-called ``exotic phases'', such as super-solid and valence-bond-solid phases. An example of particularly frustrated lattice is the pyrochlore structure, which is formed by corner-sharing tetrahedrons. Many real materials adopt this structure, for instance the crystal Cd2 Re2O7 , which exhibits superconducting properties. However, the complex structure of these materials combined with the complexity of the dominant interactions that describe them makes their analytical study difficult. Also, approximate methods, such as mean-field theory, fail to give a correct description of these systems. In this work, we report on the first exact quantum Monte Carlo study of a model of hard-core bosons in a pyrochlore lattice with six-site ring-exchange interactions, using the Stochastic Green Function (SGF) algorithm. We analyze the superfluid density and the structure factor as functions of the filling and ring-exchange interaction strength, and we map out the ground state phase diagram.

  9. Location of Promoter and Operator Sites in the Biotin Gene Cluster of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Paul P.; Campbell, Allan; Chang, Robin

    1972-01-01

    Biotin independence in E. coli requires five closely linked genes, bioA, bioB, bioF, bioC, and bioD. The residual gene activity of deletion mutants has been studied by complementation and enzyme assays. Deletion of the left end of the bioA gene does not impair expression of the remaining genes, but deletions from the left extending into bioB abolish all gene expression. Nonsense mutations in bioB reduce expression of bioC, bioF, and bioD. Therefore, the four genes, bioB, bioF, bioC, and bioD, are transcribed as a unit from left to right, from a promotor located between bioA and bioB. Expression of the bio genes is repressible by added biotin. Deletions removing the left end of bioA do not affect repressibility of bioD. Therefore the operator, as well as the promoter, lie to the right of bioA. One deletion that removes bioA, bioB, and bioF renders the bioD gene constitutive, presumably by fusion to an unknown operon. Therefore, the operator lies to the left of bioC. PMID:4559599

  10. Symmetries of migration related segments of all [001] coincidence site lattice tilt boundaries in (001) projections for all holohedral cubic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Moeck, Peter; York, Bryant W.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2014-09-11

    Utilizing bicrystallography in two dimensions (2D), the symmetries of migration related segments of Coincidence Site Lattice (CSL) boundaries are derived for projections along their [001] tilt axis in grain boundaries of crystalline materials that possess the holohedral point symmetry of the cubic system (i.e. m3m). These kinds of “edge-on” projections are typical for atomic resolution imaging of such tilt boundaries with Transmission Electron Microscopes (TEM). This fact facilitates the visual confirmation of our predictions by recently published Zcontrast scanning TEM investigations [H. Yang et al., Phil. Mag. 93 (2013) 1219] and many other TEM studies.

  11. An Experiment to Locate the Site of TeV Flaring in M87

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.E.; Massaro, F.; Cheung, C.C.; Horns, D.; Raue, M.; Stawarz, L.; Wagner, S.; Colin, P.; Mazin, D.; Wagner, R.; Beilicke, M.; LeBohec, S.; Hui, M.; Mukherjee, R.; /Barnard Coll.

    2012-05-18

    We describe a Chandra X-ray target-of-opportunity project designed to isolate the site of TeV flaring in the radio galaxy M87. To date, we have triggered the Chandra observations only once (2010 April) and by the time of the first of our nine observations, the TeV flare had ended. However, we found that the X-ray intensity of the unresolved nucleus was at an elevated level for our first observation. Of the more than 60 Chandra observations we have made of the M87 jet covering nine years, the nucleus was measured at a comparably high level only three times. Two of these occasions can be associated with TeV flaring, and at the time of the third event, there were no TeV monitoring activities. From the rapidity of the intensity drop of the nucleus, we infer that the size of the emitting region is of order a few light days x the unknown beaming factor; comparable to the same sort of estimate for the TeV emitting region. We also find evidence of spectral evolution in the X-ray band which seems consistent with radiative losses affecting the non-thermal population of the emitting electrons within the unresolved nucleus.

  12. Engineering study of 50 miscellaneous inactive underground radioactive waste tanks located at the Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1994-03-02

    This engineering study addresses 50 inactive underground radioactive waste tanks. The tanks were formerly used for the following functions associated with plutonium and uranium separations and waste management activities in the 200 East and 200 West Areas of the Hanford Site: settling solids prior to disposal of supernatant in cribs and a reverse well; neutralizing acidic process wastes prior to crib disposal; receipt and processing of single-shell tank (SST) waste for uranium recovery operations; catch tanks to collect water that intruded into diversion boxes and transfer pipeline encasements and any leakage that occurred during waste transfer operations; and waste handling and process experimentation. Most of these tanks have not been in use for many years. Several projects have, been planned and implemented since the 1970`s and through 1985 to remove waste and interim isolate or interim stabilize many of the tanks. Some tanks have been filled with grout within the past several years. Responsibility for final closure and/or remediation of these tanks is currently assigned to several programs including Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS), Environmental Restoration and Remedial Action (ERRA), and Decommissioning and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure (D&RCP). Some are under facility landlord responsibility for maintenance and surveillance (i.e. Plutonium Uranium Extraction [PUREX]). However, most of the tanks are not currently included in any active monitoring or surveillance program.

  13. Microwave and X-ray observations of delayed brightenings at sites remote from the primary flare locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakajima, H.; Dennis, B. R.; Hoyng, P.; Nelson, G.; Kosugi, T.; Kai, K.

    1984-01-01

    Five examples of solar flares observed with the 17-GHz interferometer at Nobeyama in which a secondary microwave burst occurred at a distance of 100,000 km to 1,000,000 km from the primary flare site are presented. The secondary microwave burst in all five cases had a similar time profile to the primary burst with a delay of 2 to 25 s. The velocity of a triggering agent inferred from this delay and spatial separation is 10,000 km to 100,000 km/s. The intensity of the secondary burst was a factor of 3 to 25 smaller than that of the primary burst in all events except for one case in which it was a factor of 2 larger. The polarization degree of the secondary burst at 17 GHz was 35%, significantly higher than the average value for typical impulsive bursts. Two of the events were accompanied by meterwave type III/V bursts located high in the corona between the primary and secondary sites. For two of the other events, X-ray images of he secondary source were obtained with the hard-X-ray imaging spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission. These observations strongly suggest that the distant microwave bursts were produced by electrons with energies of 10 keV to 100 keV which were channeled along a huge loop from the main flare site to the remote location.

  14. Microwave and X-ray observations of delayed brightenings at sites remote from the primary flare locations

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, H.; Dennis, B.R.; Hoyng, P.; Nelson, G.; Kosugi, T.; Kai, K.

    1984-08-01

    Five examples of solar flares observed with the 17-GHz interferometer at Nobeyama in which a secondary microwave burst occurred at a distance of 100,000 km to 1,000,000 km from the primary flare site are presented. The secondary microwave burst in all five cases had a similar time profile to the primary burst with a delay of 2 to 25 s. The velocity of a triggering agent inferred from this delay and spatial separation is 10,000 km to 100,000 km/s. The intensity of the secondary burst was a factor of 3 to 25 smaller than that of the primary burst in all events except for one case in which it was a factor of 2 larger. The polarization degree of the secondary burst at 17 GHz was 35%, significantly higher than the average value for typical impulsive bursts. Two of the events were accompanied by meterwave type III/V bursts located high in the corona between the primary and secondary sites. For two of the other events, X-ray images of he secondary source were obtained with the hard-X-ray imaging spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission. These observations strongly suggest that the distant microwave bursts were produced by electrons with energies of 10 keV to 100 keV which were channeled along a huge loop from the main flare site to the remote location.

  15. Metal levels in southern leopard frogs from the Savannah River Site: location and body compartment effects.

    PubMed

    Burger, J; Snodgrass, J

    2001-06-01

    Tadpoles have been proposed as useful bioindicators of environmental contamination; yet, recently it has been shown that metal levels vary in different body compartments of tadpoles. Metals levels are higher in the digestive tract of bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) tadpoles, which is usually not removed during such analysis. In this paper we examine the heavy metal levels in southern leopard frog (R. utricularia) tadpoles from several wetlands at the Savannah River Site and test the null hypotheses that (1) there are no differences in metal levels in different body compartments of the tadpoles, including the digestive tract; (2) there are no differences in heavy metal levels among different wetlands; and (3) there are no differences in the ratio of metals in the tail/body and in the digestive tract/body as a function of metal or developmental stage as indicated by body weight. Variations in heavy metal levels were explained by wetland and body compartment for all metals and by tadpole weight for selenium and manganese. In all cases, levels of metals were higher in the digestive tract than in the body or tail of tadpoles. Metal levels were highest in a wetland that had been remediated and lowest in a wetland that was never a pasture or remediated (i.e., was truly undisturbed). Although tadpoles are sometimes eaten by fish and other aquatic predators, leopard frogs usually avoid laying their eggs in ponds with such predators. However, avian predators will eat them. These data suggest that tadpoles can be used as bioindicators of differences in metal levels among wetlands and as indicators of potential exposure for higher-trophic-level organisms, but that to assess effects on the tadpoles themselves, digestive tracts should be removed before analysis.

  16. On the Location of the Acceleration Site for Energetic Helium-3 and Implications for Flare Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simnett, G. M.

    2008-12-01

    The wide variation in the 3He/4He ratio in solar energetic particle events is most plausibly interpreted in terms of two distinct acceleration mechanisms for helium nuclei, one of which favors 3He. 3He-rich events are associated with impulsive energetic electron events which have (at least) two distinct acceleration mechanisms. Logically one of these should accelerate both 3He and electrons. Based on the electron energy spectrum from 3He-rich events Kahler et al (1987) proposed that the acceleration region should be the high corona, possibly as high as 2 solar radii. Two further observations provide information on where the 3He acceleration might occur. First is the remarkable upper limit on the total 3He fluence (Ho et al, 2005, 2008) which strongly suggests a model where the acceleration process accelerates the majority of 3He ions within a finite reservoir, which can only be a high coronal loop structure. The second is that at quiet times, at 1AU, the 3He/4He ratio is 6-60 times enhanced over the corresponding slow solar wind value (Desai et al, 2006). Both observations indicate that the acceleration, which favors 3He, is occurring quasi-continuously in the high coronal structure, with some leakage into the interplanetary medium. Eventually the coronal structure is disrupted and the trapped population is either released into the interplanetary medium or dumped into the "flare" site to provide both energy and seed particles for further acceleration, but by a different process which does not preferentially accelerate 3He. In the former case there will not be a significant flare, but a 3He-rich event, an impulsive electron event, and perhaps a fast jet from one of the footpoints of the trapping structure. In the latter case there will be a significant flare, with a major coronal mass ejection, probably driving a shock, which produces a non-3He-rich event and a much longer and larger energetic particle event.

  17. Soil data for a vegetation gradient located at Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research Site, interior Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manies, Kristen L.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Xu, Xiaomei; McGeehin, John P.

    2016-07-28

    Boreal soils play an important role in the global carbon cycle owing to the large amount of carbon stored within this northern region. To understand how carbon and nitrogen storage varied among different ecosystems, a vegetation gradient was established in the Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site, located in interior Alaska. The ecosystems represented are a black spruce (Picea mariana)–feather moss (for example, Hylocomium sp.) forest ecosystem, a shrub-dominated ecosystem, a tussock-grass-dominated ecosystem, a sedge-dominated ecosystem, and a rich fen ecosystem. Here, we report the physical, chemical, and descriptive properties for the soil cores collected at these sites. These data have been used to calculate carbon and nitrogen accumulation rates on a long-term (decadal and century) basis (Manies and others, in press).

  18. 43 CFR 2806.38 - Can I combine multiple grants or leases for facilities located on one site into a single grant or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Can I combine multiple grants or leases for facilities located on one site into a single grant or lease? 2806.38 Section 2806.38 Public Lands... Communication Site Rights-Of-Way § 2806.38 Can I combine multiple grants or leases for facilities located on...

  19. On the location of the H+-extruding steps in site 2 of the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, A; Galiazzo, F; Lehninger, A L

    1980-11-25

    The location of the H+-translocating reactions within energy-conserving Site 2 of the mitochondrial electron transport chain was evaluated from two sets of data. In the first, the H+/2e- ejection ratios and Ca2+/2e- uptake ratios were compared for electron flow from succinate dehydrogenase, whose active site is on the matrix side of the inner membrane and from glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase, whose active site is on the cytosolic side. In intact rat liver mitochondria both substrates yielded H+/2e- ejection ratios close to 4.0 and Ca2+/2e- uptake ratios close to 1.0 during antimycin-sensitive reduction of ferricyanide. With rat liver mitoplasts and ferricytochrome c as electron acceptor, both substrates again gave the same stoichiometric ratios. The second approach involved determination of the sidedness of H+ formation during electron flow from succinate to ferricyanide via bypass of the antimycin block of the cytochrome b.c1 complex provided by N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD), under conditions in which the TMPD-TMPD+ couple does not act as a membrane-penetrating protonophore. Electron flow in this system was inhibited by 2-then-oyltrifluoroacetone, indicating that TMPD probably accepts electrons from ubiquinol. The 2 H+ formed in this system were not delivered into the matrix but appeared directly in the medium in the absence of a protonophore. To accommodate the available evidence on Site 2 substrates, it is concluded that the substrate hydrogens are first transferred to ubiquinone, 2 H+ per 2e then appear in the medium by protolytic dehydrogenation of a species of ubiquinol or ubiquinol-protein having the appropriate sidedness (designated Site 2A), and the other 2 H+ are translocated from the matrix to the medium on passage of 2e- through the cytochrome b x c1 complex (designated Site 2B).

  20. Transient Protein-Protein Interaction of the SH3-Peptide Complex via Closely Located Multiple Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Seungsoo; Kim, Dongsup

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play an essential role in cellular processes. Certain proteins form stable complexes with their partner proteins, whereas others function by forming transient complexes. The conventional protein-protein interaction model describes an interaction between two proteins under the assumption that a protein binds to its partner protein through a single binding site. In this study, we improved the conventional interaction model by developing a Multiple-Site (MS) model in which a protein binds to its partner protein through closely located multiple binding sites on a surface of the partner protein by transiently docking at each binding site with individual binding free energies. To test this model, we used the protein-protein interaction mediated by Src homology 3 (SH3) domains. SH3 domains recognize their partners via a weak, transient interaction and are therefore promiscuous in nature. Because the MS model requires large amounts of data compared with the conventional interaction model, we used experimental data from the positionally addressable syntheses of peptides on cellulose membranes (SPOT-synthesis) technique. From the analysis of the experimental data, individual binding free energies for each binding site of peptides were extracted. A comparison of the individual binding free energies from the analysis with those from atomistic force fields gave a correlation coefficient of 0.66. Furthermore, application of the MS model to 10 SH3 domains lowers the prediction error by up to 9% compared with the conventional interaction model. This improvement in prediction originates from a more realistic description of complex formation than the conventional interaction model. The results suggested that, in many cases, SH3 domains increased the protein complex population through multiple binding sites of their partner proteins. Our study indicates that the consideration of general complex formation is important for the accurate description of

  1. Wigner Crystalization of a two dimensional electron gas in a magnetic field: single electrons versus electron pairs at the lattice sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taut, M. G.

    2001-03-01

    The ground state energy and the lowest excitations of a two dimensional Wigner crystal with one -- and two electrons per cell are investigated. In case of two electrons per lattice site, the interaction of the electrons within each cell is taken into account exactly (including exchange and the full Coulomb correlation effects). The interaction between the cells is in second order (dipole) van der Waals approximation. No further approximations are made, in particular Landau level mixing is accounted for. Therefore, our calculation comprises a supplementary description of the bubble phase in the special case of one and two electrons per bubble, as proposed by Koulakov, Fogler and Shklovskii in Phys.Rev.Lett. 76, 499 (1996) on the basis of a Hartree Fock calculation. The phase diagram shows for which filling factors and densities which phase: single electrons versus singlet or triplet pairs on the Wigner crystal lattice sites, is energetically favored. Comparison with other approximations for the Wigner crystal and with the Laughlin liquid is made as well.

  2. E-ELT Site Chosen - World's Biggest Eye on the Sky to be Located on Armazones, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-04-01

    pollution and mining activities. Notes [1] The independent E-ELT Site Selection Advisory Committee (SSAC) has been analysing results from several possible sites worldwide in great detail. Similar efforts have been carried out by the Thirty-Meter Telescope (TMT) site selection team from the US. For the sake of efficiency, the sites pre-selected by the TMT team (all in North and South America) were not studied by the SSAC, as the TMT team shared their data with the SSAC. Two of the sites on the SSAC short list, including Armazones, were on the TMT list. [2] The full ESO Council Resolution reads as follow: Resolution of ESO Council on the Baseline Site for the E-ELT Recognising * the very clear recommendation from the Site Selection Advisory Committee that the E-ELT should be located on Cerro Armazones in Northern Chile * the considerable scientific synergy that would result between the E-ELT and future facilities in the Southern Hemisphere, most notably ALMA and SKA * the operational and scientific synergies with Paranal that would result and expressing its warmest appreciation for * the very generous offers from Spain and Chile to host the E-ELT * the very considerable contributions to the quality and depth of the discussion on the siting of the E-ELT made by Chile and Spain in the course of developing their offers; Council has concluded that the overriding driver for the decision on the location of the E-ELT should be the scientific quality of the site. The scientific qualities of Cerro Armazones and the positive impact that locating the E-ELT there will have on the future scientific leadership of ESO are sufficiently compelling to outweigh the very substantial offer made by Spain. Council has therefore resolved to approve the recommendation of the Director General to adopt Cerro Armazones in Chile as the baseline site for the E-ELT. Council noted that this decision is essential for the completion of the construction proposal for decision at a later date. More information

  3. 43 CFR 3832.91 - How do I amend a mining claim or site location if it exceeds the size limitations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... location if it exceeds the size limitations? 3832.91 Section 3832.91 Public Lands: Interior Regulations... or site location if it exceeds the size limitations? (a) You may correct defects in your location of... public lands. It was developed to determine maximum allowable acreage for land entries (placer claims...

  4. 43 CFR 3832.91 - How do I amend a mining claim or site location if it exceeds the size limitations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... location if it exceeds the size limitations? 3832.91 Section 3832.91 Public Lands: Interior Regulations... or site location if it exceeds the size limitations? (a) You may correct defects in your location of... public lands. It was developed to determine maximum allowable acreage for land entries (placer claims...

  5. An Inter-Comparison of Two Independent Site Test Interferometers Located in Goldstone, California: Initial Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morabito, David; D'Addario, Larry; Acosta, Roberto J.; Nessel, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Site Test Interferometers (STIs) have been deployed at two different locations at the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) tracking complex in Goldstone, California. An STI measures the difference in path length between a geostationary satellite and two antennas on the Earth, producing a measure of atmospheric phase fluctuations over spatial distances comparable to those between elements of possible microwave phased arrays. The purposes of the Goldstone STIs are to assess the suitability of Goldstone as an array site and to statistically characterize atmospheric induced delay fluctuations for application to future array scenarios.The two STI's are separated by 13 km across the Goldstone complex. Each instrument is composed of two small-diameter antennas and associated electronics separated by approx. 200 meters in a principally east-west configuration. The antennas continuously observe signals emitted by geo-stationary satellites and produce data that contain information on the phase difference between signals received by both antennas. The fluctuation in delay (or path length difference) statistics derived from these data sets can be used to infer power loss for particular array configurations.We report on a comparison of the root mean square (RMS) phase delay statistics estimated over 10-minute intervals between the two Goldstone STIs. We have achieved good statistical agreement between the data acquired from the two STIs, given that each instrument is observing different satellites, at different frequencies, over different baseline lengths, with very different implementations, and are located 13 km apart in widely separated terrain at different geodetic altitudes.

  6. Multi-technique comparison of atmospheric parameters at the DORIS co-location sites during CONT14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinkelmann, Robert; Willis, Pascal; Deng, Zhiguo; Dick, Galina; Nilsson, Tobias; Soja, Benedikt; Zus, Florian; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2016-12-01

    The atmospheric parameters, zenith delays and gradients, obtained by the DORIS, GPS, VLBI, and numerical weather models, ECMWF and NCEP, are compared at five DORIS co-located sites during the 15 days of the CONT14 campaign from 2014-05-06 until 2014-05-20. Further examined are two different solutions of GPS, VLBI and NCEP: for GPS, a network solution comparable to the TIGA reprocessing analysis strategy and a precise point positioning solution, for VLBI, a least squares and a Kalman filtered and smoothed solution, and for NCEP two spatial resolutions, 0.5° and 1.0°, are tested. The different positions of the antenna reference points at co-location sites affect the atmospheric parameters and have to be considered prior to the comparison. We assess and discuss these differences, tropospheric ties, by comparing ray-traced atmospheric parameters obtained at the positions of the various antenna reference points. While ray-traced ZHD and ZWD at the co-located antennas significantly differ, the ray-traced gradients show only very small differences. Weather events can introduce larger disagreement between atmospheric parameters obtained at co-location sites. The various weather model solutions in general agree very well in providing tropospheric ties. The atmospheric parameters are compared using statistical methods, such as the mean difference and standard deviations with repect to a weighted mean value. While GPS and VLBI atmospheric parameters agree very well in general, the DORIS observations are in several cases not dense enough to achieve a comparable level of agreement. The estimated zenith delays from DORIS, however, are competitive with the other space geodetic techniques. If the DORIS observation geometry is insufficient for the estimation of an atmospheric gradient, less than three satellites observed during the definition interval, the DORIS atmospheric parameters degrade and show small quasi-periodic variations that correlate with the number of observations

  7. Organochlorine compounds in Purple Heron eggs (Ardea purpurea) nesting in sites located around a chlor-alkali plant (Ebro River).

    PubMed

    Huertas, David; Grimalt, Joan O; Jover, Lluís; Sanpera, Carola; Ruiz, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Eggs of Purple Heron (Ardea purpurea) were collected from three sampled sites inside the Ebro River basin in years 2006 and 2007. These sites were located besides (Flix), upstream (Aiguabarreig) and downstream (Delta) a chlor-alkali plant. Organochlorine compounds (OCs) such as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), polychlorostyrenes (PCSs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), pentachlorobenzene (PeCB) and hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) were analysed to assess what are the accumulation patterns of these compounds in aquatic migratory birds breeding in the area of influence of the emissions from this industrial installation. Comparison of the egg concentrations between the three sites show higher concentrations of compounds manufactured in the past in the factory (PCBs, p,p'-DDT) or by-products of OC synthesis (HCB, PeCB and PCSs) in Flix than in Aiguabarreig reflecting a clear influence from the emissions of the chlor-alkali plant. The eggs collected in the Ebro Delta showed higher concentrations of total DDTs (mainly p,p'-DDE) than in the reference site (Aiguabarreig) which could reflect past applications of this insecticide in the area for agriculture. In contrast, HCHs were found in higher concentrations in the Delta and Aiguabarreig than in the Flix Reservoir. These compounds have been used as insecticides in agriculture and were not manufactured in the chlor-alkali plant. The present results show that despite Purple Herons are migratory birds, the food web transfer of OCs during the breeding season is sufficient for the accumulation of these compounds in the eggs, leading to statistically significant concentration differences between sites. These differences are consistent with the emissions of these pollutants from industrial or agricultural sources to the aquatic environments. Some of the p,p'-DDE concentrations observed in the area nearby the chlor-alkali plant are above the threshold effects for reproductive impairment.

  8. Efficient chain moves for Monte Carlo simulations of a wormlike DNA model: excluded volume, supercoils, site juxtapositions, knots, and comparisons with random-flight and lattice models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhirong; Chan, Hue Sun

    2008-04-14

    We develop two classes of Monte Carlo moves for efficient sampling of wormlike DNA chains that can have significant degrees of supercoiling, a conformational feature that is key to many aspects of biological function including replication, transcription, and recombination. One class of moves entails reversing the coordinates of a segment of the chain along one, two, or three axes of an appropriately chosen local frame of reference. These transformations may be viewed as a generalization, to the continuum, of the Madras-Orlitsky-Shepp algorithm for cubic lattices. Another class of moves, termed T+/-2, allows for interconversions between chains with different lengths by adding or subtracting two beads (monomer units) to or from the chain. Length-changing moves are generally useful for conformational sampling with a given site juxtaposition, as has been shown in previous lattice studies. Here, the continuum T+/-2 moves are designed to enhance their acceptance rate in supercoiled conformations. We apply these moves to a wormlike model in which excluded volume is accounted for by a bond-bond repulsion term. The computed autocorrelation functions for the relaxation of bond length, bond angle, writhe, and branch number indicate that the new moves lead to significantly more efficient sampling than conventional bead displacements and crankshaft rotations. A close correspondence is found in the equilibrium ensemble between the map of writhe computed for pair of chain segments and the map of site juxtapositions or self-contacts. To evaluate the more coarse-grained freely jointed chain (random-flight) and cubic lattice models that are commonly used in DNA investigations, twisting (torsional) potentials are introduced into these models. Conformational properties for a given superhelical density sigma may then be sampled by computing the writhe and using White's formula to relate the degree of twisting to writhe and sigma. Extensive comparisons of contact patterns and knot

  9. Serine 71 of the glycoprotein HEF is located at the active site of the acetylesterase of influenza C virus.

    PubMed

    Herrler, G; Multhaup, G; Beyreuther, K; Klenk, H D

    1988-01-01

    The acetylesterase of influenza C virus has been reported recently to be inhibited by diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) [Muchmore EA, Varki A (1987) Science 236: 1293-1295]. As this inhibitor is known to bind covalently to the serine in the active site of serine esterases, we attempted to determine the serine in the active site of the influenza C acetylesterase. Incubation of purified influenza C virus with 3H-DFP resulted in the selective labelling of the influenza C glycoprotein HEF. The labelled glycoprotein was isolated from a SDS-polyacrylamide gel. Following reduction and carboxymethylation, tryptic peptides of HEF were prepared and analyzed by reversed phase HPLC. The peptide containing the 3H-DFP was subjected to sequence analysis. The amino acids determined from the NH2-terminus were used to locate the peptide on the HEF polypeptide. Radiosequencing revealed that 3H-DFP is attached to amino acid 17 of the tryptic peptide. These results indicate that serine 71 is the active-site serine of the acetylesterase of influenza C virus.

  10. Pattern Recognition of Adsorbing HP Lattice Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Matthew S.; Shi, Guangjie; Wüst, Thomas; Landau, David P.; Schmid, Friederike

    2015-03-01

    Protein adsorption is relevant in fields ranging from medicine to industry, and the qualitative behavior exhibited by course-grained models could shed insight for further research in such fields. Our study on the selective adsorption of lattice proteins utilizes the Wang-Landau algorithm to simulate the Hydrophobic-Polar (H-P) model with an efficient set of Monte Carlo moves. Each substrate is modeled as a square pattern of 9 lattice sites which attract either H or P monomers, and are located on an otherwise neutral surface. The fully enumerated set of 102 unique surfaces is simulated with each protein sequence. A collection of 27-monomer sequences is used- each of which is non-degenerate and protein-like. Thermodynamic quantities such as the specific heat and free energy are calculated from the density of states, and are used to investigate the adsorption of lattice proteins on patterned substrates. Research supported by NSF.

  11. Location of smooth-muscle myosin and tropomyosin binding sites in the C-terminal 288 residues of human caldesmon.

    PubMed Central

    Huber, P A; Fraser, I D; Marston, S B

    1995-01-01

    We have produced nine recombinant fragments, H1 to H9, from a human cDNA that codes for the C-terminal 288 residues of caldesmon. The fragment H1, encompassing the 288 residues, is equivalent to domains 3 and 4 of caldesmon (amino acids 506-793 in human, 476-737 in the chicken gizzard sequence). It has been shown [Huber, Redwood, Avent, Tanner and Marston (1993) J. Muscle Res. Cell Motil. 14, 385-391] to bind to actin, Ca(2+)-calmodulin, tropomyosin and myosin. The fragments, H2 to H9, differ in length between 60 and 176 residues and cover the whole of domains 3 and 4 with many of the fragments overlapping. We have characterized the myosin and tropomyosin binding of these fragments. The binding of both tropomyosin and myosin is highly dependent on salt concentration, indicating the ionic nature of these interactions. The location of the myosin binding is an extended region encompassing the junction of domains 3/4 and domain 4a (residues 622-714, human; 566-657, chicken gizzard). Tropomyosin binds in a smaller region within domain 4a of caldesmon (residues 663-714, human; 606-657 chicken gizzard). We confirmed predictions based on sequence similarities of a tropomyosin binding site in domain 3 of caldesmon; however, this site bound to skeletal-muscle tropomyosin and had little affinity for the smooth-muscle tropomyosin isoform. None of the protein fragments H2-H9 retained the affinity of the parent fragment H1 for either myosin or tropomyosin. This indicates the need for several interaction sites scattered over an extended region to attain higher affinity. The regions interacting with caldesmon in both tropomyosin and myosin are coiled-coil structures. This is probably the reason for their shared interaction sites on caldesmon and their similar natures of binding. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 9 PMID:8526878

  12. Geographic information system-based healthcare waste management planning for treatment site location and optimal transportation routeing.

    PubMed

    Shanmugasundaram, Jothiganesh; Soulalay, Vongdeuane; Chettiyappan, Visvanathan

    2012-06-01

    In Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR), a growth of healthcare centres, and the environmental hazards and public health risks typically accompanying them, increased the need for healthcare waste (HCW) management planning. An effective planning of an HCW management system including components such as the treatment plant siting and an optimized routeing system for collection and transportation of waste is deemed important. National government offices at developing countries often lack the proper tools and methodologies because of the high costs usually associated with them. However, this study attempts to demonstrate the use of an inexpensive GIS modelling tool for healthcare waste management in the country. Two areas were designed for this study on HCW management, including: (a) locating centralized treatment plants and designing optimum travel routes for waste collection from nearby healthcare facilities; and (b) utilizing existing hospital incinerators and designing optimum routes for collecting waste from nearby healthcare facilities. Spatial analysis paved the way to understand the spatial distribution of healthcare wastes and to identify hotspots of higher waste generating locations. Optimal route models were designed for collecting and transporting HCW to treatment plants, which also highlights constraints in collecting and transporting waste for treatment and disposal. The proposed model can be used as a decision support tool for the efficient management of hospital wastes by government healthcare waste management authorities and hospitals.

  13. [Sop proteins can cause transcriptional silencing of genes located close to the centromere sites of linear plasmid N15].

    PubMed

    Mardanov, A V; Lane, D; Ravin, N V

    2010-01-01

    Stable inheritance of bacterial chromosomes and low copy number plasmids is ensured by accurate partitioning of replicated molecules between the daughter cells at division. Partitioning of the prophage of the temperate bacteriophage N15, which exists as a linear plasmid molecule with covalently closed ends, depends on the sop locus, comprising genes sopA and sopB, as well as four centromere sites located in different regions of the N15 genome essential for replication and the control of lysogeny. We found that binding of SopB to the centromere can silence centromere-proximal promoters, presumably due to subsequent polymerizing of SopB along the DNA. Close to the IR4 centromere site we identified a promoter, P59, able to drive expression of phage late genes encoding the structural proteins of virion. We found that following binding to IR4 the N15 Sop proteins can cause repression of this promoter. The repression depends on SopB and became stronger in the presence of SopA. Sop-dependent silencing of centromere-proximal promoters control gene expression in phage N15, particularly preventing undesired expression of late genes in the N15 prophage. Thus, the phage N15 sop system not only ensures plasmid partitioning but is also involved in the genetic network controlling prophage replication and the maintenance of lysogeny.

  14. LONG-TERM STABILITY OF THE LOCAL GROUND CONTROL NETWORK AT THE CO-LOCATION SITE OF MEDICINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbondanza, C.; Sarti, P.; Legrand, J.

    2009-12-01

    ITRF combinations rely on the availability of accurate tie vectors linking reference points of space geodetic techniques. Co-located instruments are assumed to move consistently and no local relative motion is taken into account. Instabilities may degrade the quality of the co-location itself and perturb the result of ITRF combinations. This work aims to determine the stability of the local ground control network at Medicina (Italy) with independent surveying methods. The observatory hosts a co-location between a VLBI telescope and two GPS antennas, MEDI and MSEL. It is located in the Po Plain where thick layers of clays are the prevalent soil characteristics. Hence, provision of long term stability of geodetic monuments is a challenge and monitoring their stability is an issue. MEDI and the VLBI station regularly contribute to the determination of ITRF, while MSEL is part of the EUREF network. A set of five tie vectors observations linking the VLBI and MEDI reference points was acquired between 2001 and 2007. It is our main tool for performing local deformation analysis. Additionally, the GPS time series of MEDI and MSEL were used to cross check and confirm the local instability detected by terrestrial methods. To achieve a rigorous and reliable investigation of the local stability, multi-epoch terrestrial observations were homogeneously processed according to common parameterizations in a consistent reference frame. Similarly, continuous GPS observations from MEDI and MSEL were analysed according to the new EPN reprocessing strategy in order to monitor the short baseline between MEDI and MSEL; to spotlight any change in its length. Both approaches confirm differential motions at the site which can be related to monument instabilities originated by the particularly unfavourable local geological setting and the inapt design of the monuments foundation. The monuments move non homogeneously at rates reaching up to 1.6 mm/year, this value being comparable to intra

  15. Cystatin D Locates in the Nucleus at Sites of Active Transcription and Modulates Gene and Protein Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer-Mayorga, Gemma; Alvarez-Díaz, Silvia; Valle, Noelia; De Las Rivas, Javier; Mendes, Marta; Barderas, Rodrigo; Canals, Francesc; Tapia, Olga; Casal, J. Ignacio; Lafarga, Miguel; Muñoz, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Cystatin D is an inhibitor of lysosomal and secreted cysteine proteases. Strikingly, cystatin D has been found to inhibit proliferation, migration, and invasion of colon carcinoma cells indicating tumor suppressor activity that is unrelated to protease inhibition. Here, we demonstrate that a proportion of cystatin D locates within the cell nucleus at specific transcriptionally active chromatin sites. Consistently, transcriptomic analysis show that cystatin D alters gene expression, including that of genes encoding transcription factors such as RUNX1, RUNX2, and MEF2C in HCT116 cells. In concordance with transcriptomic data, quantitative proteomic analysis identified 292 proteins differentially expressed in cystatin D-expressing cells involved in cell adhesion, cytoskeleton, and RNA synthesis and processing. Furthermore, using cytokine arrays we found that cystatin D reduces the secretion of several protumor cytokines such as fibroblast growth factor-4, CX3CL1/fractalkine, neurotrophin 4 oncostatin-M, pulmonary and activation-regulated chemokine/CCL18, and transforming growth factor B3. These results support an unanticipated role of cystatin D in the cell nucleus, controlling the transcription of specific genes involved in crucial cellular functions, which may mediate its protective action in colon cancer. PMID:26364852

  16. Anaerobic co-digestion plants for the revaluation of agricultural waste: Sustainable location sites from a GIS analysis.

    PubMed

    Villamar, Cristina Alejandra; Rivera, Diego; Aguayo, Mauricio

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to establish sustainably feasible areas for the implementation of anaerobic co-digestion plants for agricultural wastes (cattle/swine slurries and cereal crop wastes). The methodology was based on the use of geographic information systems (GIS), the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) and map algebra generated from hedges related to environmental, social and economic constraints. The GIS model obtained was applied to a region of Chile (Bío Bío Region) as a case study showing the energy potential (205 MW-h) of agricultural wastes (swine/cattle manures and cereal crop wastes) and thereby assessing its energy contribution (3.5%) at country level (Chile). From this model, it was possible to spatially identify the influence of each factor (environmental, economic and social) when defining suitable areas for the siting of anaerobic co-digestion plants. In conclusion, GIS-based models establish appropriate areas for the location of anaerobic co-digestion plants in the revaluation of agricultural waste from the production of energy through biogas production.

  17. LIDAR-based coastal landscape reconstruction and harbour location: The Viking-age royal burial site of Borre (Norway)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draganits, Erich; Doneus, Michael; Gansum, Terje

    2013-04-01

    Airborne light detection and ranging (LIDAR) has found wide application in archaeological research for the detection and documentation of archaeological and palaeo-environmental features. In this study we demonstrate the analysis of an LIDAR derived 1x1 m digital elevation model (DTM) combined with geoarchaeological research of the coastal Viking-age burial site in Borre, Olso Fjord (Norway). Borre is an exceptional burial site in Scandinavia, containing burial mounds up to 40 m in diameter and 6 m height, mentioned in Nordic Sagas, especially in the skaldic poem Ynglingatal, as the burial place of one or two kings of the Ynglinga dynasty. Archaeological findings and radiocarbon ages indicate that the Borre burial ground had been in use broadly between 600-1000 AD. Despite the reasonable expectation that a coastal site connected with the Viking kings of Vestfold, with hall buildings and ship graves demands a harbour, up to now no harbour has not been found with traditional archaeological surveys. Since the area of Borre is affected by a continuous land uplift related to glacial rebound of Scandinavia, any former harbour site is expected to be exposed to the land surface today. The present day vertical crustal uplift is calculated around 2.5 mm/yr in the area of Borre. Burial mounds and surrounding borrow pits as well as geomorphological features of the uplifted coast of Borre have been analysed by the 1x1 m LIDAR-DTM, using hillshade, slope and local relief model for visualisation. Altogether, 41 burial mounds and further 6 potential mounds are visible in the high-resolution DTM. A succession of more than 14 beach ridges, cross-cut by the burial mounds, is visible from the present shore line up to 18 m asl. They are more or less parallel and similar in size, except between at ca. 4-6 m asl, where the most prominent ridge is located, which probably has been enforced artificially. Using published shoreline displacement curves from nearby areas, the shore-line at

  18. Modeling long-range time-resolved charge-transfer within TDDFT: Insights from a 2-site lattice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuks, Johanna; Maitra, Neepa

    2014-03-01

    It has been shown that approximate adiabatic TDDFT functionals dramatically fail to reproduce time-resolved long-range charge-transfer dynamics (LR-CTD). In order to decouple the impact of the adiabatic approximation and the choice of ground state (gs) functional it would be instructive to propagate using the adiabatically-exact (adia-ex) functional. Numerically this involves an iterative process at each time-step to find the gs potential for a given density, which converges badly for CTD due to regions of low density. To circumvent this, we use as model system an asymmetric 2-site Hubbard model with small hopping parameter, its small Hilbert space allows to perform a Levy-Lieb constrained search and find the exact gs Hartree-exchange-correlation (Hxc) functional. The later develops a sharp step feature in the long-range limit (limit of small hopping parameter). Both closed-shell to closed-shell and open-shell to open-shell LR-CT are investigated. By propagating the Kohn-Sham system in the presence of the exact gs Hxc functional under a resonant laser we are able to perform, for the first time, a fully self-consistent adia-ex propagation for CTD. We aknowledge financial support from the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences ans Biosciences under Award DE-SC0008623 and NSF Grants CNS-0855217 and CNS-0958379.

  19. Brominated flame retardants and polychlorinated biphenyls in human breast milk from several locations in India: potential contaminant sources in a municipal dumping site.

    PubMed

    Devanathan, Gnanasekaran; Subramanian, Annamalai; Sudaryanto, Agus; Takahashi, Shin; Isobe, Tomohiko; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2012-02-01

    This study investigated the status of contamination of organohalogen compounds (OCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and brominated flame retardant (BFRs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) in human milk samples from several locations in India. The levels of OCs were significantly higher in the milk of mothers living in and near municipal dumping site than other locations indicating that the open dumping sites for municipal wastes act as potential sources of these contaminants in India. The PCB concentrations observed in this study tended to decrease compared to those in the matched locations reported previously, probably due to the restriction of technical PCB usage in India. PBDE levels in human milk were two to three folds lower than those of PCBs in all the sampling locations investigated. Congener profiles of PCBs and PBDEs were different between samples from the dumping site mothers and general populations in other areas suggesting the presence of region-specific sources and pathways. HBCDs were detected in human milk from only two sites, with much lower concentrations and detection frequencies compared to PCBs and PBDEs. When hazard quotients (HQs) of PCBs and PBDEs were estimated for infant health risk, the HQs in some milk samples from the dumping site exceeded the threshold value (HQ>1) of PCBs, indicating the potential risk for infants in the specific site.

  20. Gulf Watch Alaska nearshore component: Monitoring site locations from Prince William Sound, Katmai National Park and Preserve, and Kenai Fjords National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coletti, Heather A.; Kloecker, Kim; Bodkin, James L.; Dean, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    These data are part of the Gulf Watch Alaska (GWA) long term monitoring program, nearshore monitoring component. Specifically, these data describe site locations for rocky intertidal, mussel sampling, soft sediment bivalve sampling, and eelgrass bed sampling in the northern Gulf of Alaska within the GWA program. The dataset consists of two comma separated files exported from a Microsoft Excel workbook. The data consists of 1. rocky intertidal, mussel sampling, and soft sediment site location information, and 2. eelgrass bed locations. Sampling will be conducted in Katmai National Park and Preserve (KATM), Kenai Fjords National Park (KEFJ), Prince William Sound (PWS) and to a lesser extent on the Lake Clark National Park and Preserve (LACL). Sites from a related project that provides similar data from Kachemak Bay (KBAY) are included here.

  1. Frustration in an exactly solvable mixed-spin Ising model with bilinear and three-site four-spin interactions on a decorated square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaščur, M.; Štubňa, V.; Szałowski, K.; Balcerzak, T.

    2016-11-01

    Competitive effects of so-called three-site four-spin interactions, single ion anisotropy and bilinear interactions is studied in the mixed spin-1/2 and spin-1 Ising model on a decorated square lattice. Exploring the decoration-iteration transformation, we have obtained exact closed-form expressions for the partition function and other thermodynamic quantities of the model. From these relations, we have numerically determined ground-state and finite-temperature phase diagrams of the system. We have also investigated temperature variations of the correlation functions, internal energy, entropy, specific heat and Helmholtz free energy of the system. From the physical point of view, the most interesting result represents our observation of a partially ordered ferromagnetic or phase in the system with zero bilinear interactions. It is remarkable, that due to strong frustrations disordered spins survive in the system even at zero temperature, so that the ground state of the system becomes macroscopically degenerate with non-zero entropy. Introduction of arbitrarily small bilinear interaction completely removes degeneracy and the entropy always goes to zero at the ground state.

  2. Wigner crystallization of a two-dimensional electron gas in a magnetic field: Single electrons versus electron pairs at the lattice sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taut, M.

    2001-10-01

    The ground state energy and the lowest excitations of a two-dimensional Wigner crystal in a perpendicular magnetic field with one and two electrons per cell is investigated. In the case of two electrons per lattice site, the interaction of the electrons within each cell is taken into account exactly (including exchange and correlation effects), and the interaction between the cells is in second order (dipole) van der Waals approximation. No further approximations are made, in particular Landau level mixing and incomplete spin polarization are accounted for. Therefore, our calculation comprises a, roughly speaking, complementary description of the bubble phase (in the special case of one and two electrons per bubble), which was proposed by Koulakov, Fogler, and Shklovskii on the basis of a Hartree Fock calculation. The phase diagram shows that in GaAs the paired phase is energetically more favorable than the single electron phase for, roughly speaking, filling factor f larger than 0.3 and density parameter rs smaller than 19 effective Bohr radii (for a more precise statement see Figs. 3 and 4). If we start within the paired phase and increase magnetic field or decrease density, the pairs first undergo some singlet-triplet transitions before they break.

  3. Targeted survey of Newcastle disease virus in backyard poultry flocks located in wintering site for migratory birds from Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Marks, Fernanda S; Rodenbusch, Carla R; Okino, Cíntia H; Hein, Héber E; Costa, Eduardo F; Machado, Gustavo; Canal, Cláudio W; Brentano, Liana; Corbellini, Luís G

    2014-09-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) causes a fast-spreading, highly contagious infectious disease in several bird species. Commercial poultry farms in Brazil were considered free of virulent NDV. Data on NDV infection levels in backyard poultry flocks and the epidemiology of the disease are limited. The aim of this study was to perform a NDV survey in backyard poultry from households flocks located around one of the main wintering sites for migratory wild birds in Brazil, and to identify potential risk factors associated with NDV. Backyard poultry may be sentinels and a source of infection for commercial poultry, since they may have as much contact with these birds as with migratory wild birds. Data were collected from 48 randomly selected households using an epidemiological questionnaire. Serum samples from poultry were tested for NDV antibodies using an ELISA, and tracheal and cloacal swabs were collected for NDV molecular detection. The risk factors were assessed using a multivariate Poisson regression with robust variance. The ELISA showed that 33.8% of the serum samples were positive for anti-NDV antibodies and in 42 households (87.5%) at least one NDV-positive bird was found. Tracheal and cloacal swabs were negative for NDV by real time RT-PCR, possible because within this region there might flow a low pathogenicity NDV strain, which can induce seroconversion with innaparent clinical findings. The prevalence ratio (PR) increased when farmers used their own replacement poultry to restock their flock (PR=1.64; 95% CI: 1.11-2.42). Furthermore, the increasing distance of the household flock from the "Laguna do Peixe" estuary was associated with decreasing NDV seropositivity (PR=0.94; 95% CI: 0.90-0.99). This is the first study in Brazil evaluating the presence of NDV and the associated risk factors in households with backyard poultry flocks. The great number of farms with seropositive birds indicates that the virus circulates in backyard flocks, and this breeding

  4. 75 FR 28657 - Dell Products LP-Parmer North Location, a Subsidiary of Dell, Inc., Including On-Site Leased...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ...., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Belcan Services Group, Hawkins Associates, Inc., Integrated Human Capital, MagRabbit, Manpower and Spherion Corporation; Round Rock, TX; Dell Products LP--Parmer North One...., including on-site leased workers from Belcan Services Group, Hawkins Associates Inc., Integrated...

  5. Are Business-Oriented Social Networking Web Sites Useful Resources for Locating Passive Jobseekers? Results of a Recent Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeKay, Sam

    2009-01-01

    The assumption that members of business-oriented social networking Web sites are passive jobseekers has never been validated. The purpose of this study is to examine the accuracy of this assumption. The study concludes that this claim is questionable and that the majority of members registered at one major site, and possibly others, are currently…

  6. A GIS based screening tool for locating and ranking of suitable stormwater harvesting sites in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Inamdar, P M; Cook, S; Sharma, A K; Corby, N; O'Connor, J; Perera, B J C

    2013-10-15

    There is the need to re-configure current urban water systems to achieve the objective of sustainable water sensitive cities. Stormwater represents a valuable alternative urban water source to reduce pressure on fresh water resources, and to mitigate the environmental impact of urban stormwater runoff. The selection of suitable urban stormwater harvesting sites is generally based on the judgement of water planners, who are faced with the challenge of considering multiple technical and socio-economic factors that influence the site suitability. To address this challenge, the present study developed a robust GIS based screening methodology for identifying potentially suitable stormwater harvesting sites in urban areas as a first pass for then more detailed investigation. The study initially evaluated suitability based on the match between harvestable runoff and demand through a concept of accumulated catchments. Drainage outlets of these accumulated catchments were considered as potential stormwater harvesting sites. These sites were screened and ranked under screening parameters namely demand, ratio of runoff to demand and weighted demand distance. The methodology described in this paper was successfully applied to a case study in Melbourne, Australia in collaboration with the local water utility. The methodology was found to be effective in supporting the selection of priority sites for stormwater harvesting schemes, as it provided the basis to identify, short-list and rank sites for further detailed investigation. The rapid identification of suitable sites for stormwater harvesting can assist planners in prioritising schemes in areas that will have the most impact on reducing potable water demand.

  7. 43 CFR 3830.25 - When do I pay for recording a new notice or certificate of location for a mining claim or site?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... maintenance fee, in full, as provided in § 3830.21 of this chapter, at the time you record new notices or... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false When do I pay for recording a new notice... MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING, RECORDING, AND MAINTAINING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES; GENERAL...

  8. NIMBY, CLAMP, and the location of new nuclear-related facilities: U.S. national and 11 site-specific surveys.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Michael R

    2009-09-01

    Public and political opposition have made finding locations for new nuclear power plants, waste management, and nuclear research and development facilities a challenge for the U.S. government and the nuclear industry. U.S. government-owned properties that already have nuclear-related activities and commercial nuclear power generating stations are logical locations. Several studies and utility applications to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission suggest that concentrating locations at major plants (CLAMP) has become an implicit siting policy. We surveyed 2,101 people who lived within 50 miles of 11 existing major nuclear sites and 600 who lived elsewhere in the United States. Thirty-four percent favored CLAMP for new nuclear power plants, 52% for waste management facilities, and 50% for new nuclear laboratories. College educated, relatively affluent male whites were the strongest CLAMP supporters. They disproportionately trusted those responsible for the facilities and were not worried about existing nuclear facilities or other local environmental issues. Notably, they were concerned about continuing coal use. Not surprisingly, CLAMP proponents tended to be familiar with their existing local nuclear site. In short, likely CLAMP sites have a large and politically powerful core group to support a CLAMP policy. The challenge to proponents of nuclear technologies will be to sustain this support and expand the base among those who clearly are less connected and receptive to new nearby sites.

  9. Final environmental impact statement for the Nevada Test Site and off-site locations in the state of Nevada: Mitigation action plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    The DOE Notice of Availability for this environmental impact statement was published in the Federal Register on Friday, October 18, 1996 (61 FR 54437). The final environmental impact statement identifies potential adverse effects resulting from the four use alternatives evaluated and discusses measures that DOE considered for the mitigation of these potential adverse effects. The Secretary of Energy signed the Record of Decision on the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site and other DOE sites in the state of Nevada on December 9, 1996. These decisions will result in the continuation of the multipurpose, multi-program use of the Nevada Test Site, under which DOE will pursue a further diversification of interagency, private industry, and public-education uses while meeting its Defense Program, Waste Management, and Environmental Restoration mission requirements at the Nevada Test Site and other Nevada sites, including the Tonopah Test Range, the Project Shoal Site, the Central Nevada Test Area, and on the Nellis Air Force Range Complex. The Record of Decision also identifies specific mitigation actions beyond the routine day-to-day physical and administrative controls needed for implementation of the decisions. These specific mitigation actions are focused on the transportation of waste and on groundwater availability. This Mitigation Action Plan elaborates on these mitigation commitments.

  10. Three-year summary report of biological monitoring at the Southwest Ocean dredged-material disposal site and additional locations off Grays Harbor, Washington, 1990--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Antrim, L.D.; Shreffler, D.K.; Pearson, W.H.; Cullinan, V.I. )

    1992-12-01

    The Grays Harbor Navigation Improvement Project was initiated to improve navigation by widening and deepening the federal channel at Grays Harbor. Dredged-material disposal sites were selected after an extensive review process that included inter-agency agreements, biological surveys, other laboratory and field studies, and preparation of environmental impact statements The Southwest Site, was designated to receive materials dredged during annual maintenance dredging as well as the initial construction phase of the project. The Southwest Site was located, and the disposal operations designed, primarily to avoid impacts to Dungeness crab. The Final Environmental Impact Statement Supplement for the project incorporated a Site Monitoring Plan in which a tiered approach to disposal site monitoring was recommended. Under Tier I of the Site Monitoring Plan, Dungeness crab densities are monitored to confirm that large aggregations of newly settled Dungeness crab have not moved onto the Southwest Site. Tier 2 entails an increased sampling effort to determine whether a change in disposal operations is needed. Four epibenthic surveys using beam trawls were conducted in 1990, 1991, and 1992 at the Southwest Site and North Reference area, where high crab concentrations were found in the spring of 1985. Survey results during these three years prompted no Tier 2 activities. Epibenthic surveys were also conducted at two nearshore sites where construction of sediment berms has been proposed. This work is summarized in an appendix to this report.

  11. Using radial basis function on the general form of Chou's pseudo amino acid composition and PSSM to predict subcellular locations of proteins with both single and multiple sites.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Yuan, Jingqi

    2013-07-01

    Prediction of protein subcellular location is a meaningful task which attracted much attention in recent years. A lot of protein subcellular location predictors which can only deal with the single-location proteins were developed. However, some proteins may belong to two or even more subcellular locations. It is important to develop predictors which will be able to deal with multiplex proteins, because these proteins have extremely useful implication in both basic biological research and drug discovery. Considering the circumstance that the number of methods dealing with multiplex proteins is limited, it is meaningful to explore some new methods which can predict subcellular location of proteins with both single and multiple sites. Different methods of feature extraction and different models of predict algorithms using on different benchmark datasets may receive some general results. In this paper, two different feature extraction methods and two different models of neural networks were performed on three benchmark datasets of different kinds of proteins, i.e. datasets constructed specially for Gram-positive bacterial proteins, plant proteins and virus proteins. These benchmark datasets have different number of location sites. The application result shows that RBF neural network has apparently superiorities against BP neural network on these datasets no matter which type of feature extraction is chosen.

  12. Nucleosomes Selectively Inhibit Cas9 Off-target Activity at a Site Located at the Nucleosome Edge.

    PubMed

    Hinz, John M; Laughery, Marian F; Wyrick, John J

    2016-11-25

    Nucleosomes affect Cas9 binding and activity at on-target sites, but their impact at off-target sites is unknown. To investigate how nucleosomes affect Cas9 cleavage at off-target sites in vitro, we used a single guide RNA (sgRNA) that has been previously shown to efficiently direct Cas9 cleavage at the edge of the strongly positioned 601 nucleosome. Our data indicate that single mismatches between the sgRNA and DNA target have relatively little effect on Cas9 cleavage of naked DNA substrates, but strongly inhibit cleavage of nucleosome substrates, particularly when the mismatch is in the sgRNA "seed" region. These findings indicate that nucleosomes may enhance Cas9 specificity by inhibiting cleavage of off-target sites at the nucleosome edge.

  13. Ventricular catheter entry site and not catheter tip location predicts shunt survival: a secondary analysis of 3 large pediatric hydrocephalus studies.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, William E; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Wellons, John C; Rozzelle, Curtis J; Tamber, Mandeep S; Limbrick, David D; Browd, Samuel R; Naftel, Robert P; Shannon, Chevis N; Simon, Tamara D; Holubkov, Richard; Illner, Anna; Cochrane, D Douglas; Drake, James M; Luerssen, Thomas G; Oakes, W Jerry; Kestle, John R W

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Accurate placement of ventricular catheters may result in prolonged shunt survival, but the best target for the hole-bearing segment of the catheter has not been rigorously defined. The goal of the study was to define a target within the ventricle with the lowest risk of shunt failure. METHODS Five catheter placement variables (ventricular catheter tip location, ventricular catheter tip environment, relationship to choroid plexus, catheter tip holes within ventricle, and crosses midline) were defined, assessed for interobserver agreement, and evaluated for their effect on shunt survival in univariate and multivariate analyses. De-identified subjects from the Shunt Design Trial, the Endoscopic Shunt Insertion Trial, and a Hydrocephalus Clinical Research Network study on ultrasound-guided catheter placement were combined (n = 858 subjects, all first-time shunt insertions, all patients < 18 years old). The first postoperative brain imaging study was used to determine ventricular catheter placement for each of the catheter placement variables. RESULTS Ventricular catheter tip location, environment, catheter tip holes within the ventricle, and crosses midline all achieved sufficient interobserver agreement (κ > 0.60). In the univariate survival analysis, however, only ventricular catheter tip location was useful in distinguishing a target within the ventricle with a survival advantage (frontal horn; log-rank, p = 0.0015). None of the other catheter placement variables yielded a significant survival advantage unless they were compared with catheter tips completely not in the ventricle. Cox regression analysis was performed, examining ventricular catheter tip location with age, etiology, surgeon, decade of surgery, and catheter entry site (anterior vs posterior). Only age (p < 0.001) and entry site (p = 0.005) were associated with shunt survival; ventricular catheter tip location was not (p = 0.37). Anterior entry site lowered the risk of shunt failure compared

  14. Location of high-affinity metal binding sites in the profile structure of the Ca+2-ATPase in the sarcoplasmic reticulum by resonance x-ray diffraction.

    PubMed Central

    Asturias, F J; Blasie, J K

    1991-01-01

    Resonance x-ray diffraction measurements on the lamellar diffraction from oriented multilayers of isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membranes containing a small concentration of lanthanide (III) ions (lanthanide/protein molar ratio approximately 4) have allowed us to calculate both the electron density profile of the SR membrane and the separate electron density profile of the resonant lanthanide atoms bound to the membrane to a relatively low spatial resolution of approximately 40 A. Analysis of the membrane electron density profile and modeling of the separate low resolution lanthanide atom profile, using step-function electron density models based on the assumption that metal binding sites in the membrane profile are discrete and localized, resulted in the identification of a minimum of three such binding sites in the membrane profile. Two of these sites are low-affinity, low-occupancy sites identified with the two phospholipid polar headgroup regions of the lipid bilayer within the membrane profile. Up to 20% of the total lanthanide (III) ions bind to these low-affinity sites. The third site has relatively high affinity for lanthanide ion binding; its Ka is roughly an order of magnitude larger than that for the lower affinity polar headgroup sites. Approximately 80% of the total lanthanide ions present in the sample are bound to this high-affinity site, which is located in the "stalk" portion of the "headpiece" within the profile structure of the Ca+2 ATPase protein, approximately 12 A outside of the phospholipid polar headgroups on the extravesicular side of the membrane profile. Based on the nature of our results and on previous reports in the literature concerning the ability of lanthanide (III) ions to function as Ca+2 analogues for the Ca+2 ATPase we suggest that we have located a high-affinity metal binding site in the membrane profile which is involved in the active transport of Ca+2 ions across the SR membrane by the Ca+2 ATPase. PMID:1826221

  15. Random Tagging Genotyping by Sequencing (rtGBS), an Unbiased Approach to Locate Restriction Enzyme Sites across the Target Genome

    PubMed Central

    Hilario, Elena; Barron, Lorna; Deng, Cecilia H.; Datson, Paul M.; Davy, Marcus W.; Storey, Roy D.

    2015-01-01

    Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) is a restriction enzyme based targeted approach developed to reduce the genome complexity and discover genetic markers when a priori sequence information is unavailable. Sufficient coverage at each locus is essential to distinguish heterozygous from homozygous sites accurately. The number of GBS samples able to be pooled in one sequencing lane is limited by the number of restriction sites present in the genome and the read depth required at each site per sample for accurate calling of single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Loci bias was observed using a slight modification of the Elshire et al. method: some restriction enzyme sites were represented in higher proportions while others were poorly represented or absent. This bias could be due to the quality of genomic DNA, the endonuclease and ligase reaction efficiency, the distance between restriction sites, the preferential amplification of small library restriction fragments, or bias towards cluster formation of small amplicons during the sequencing process. To overcome these issues, we have developed a GBS method based on randomly tagging genomic DNA (rtGBS). By randomly landing on the genome, we can, with less bias, find restriction sites that are far apart, and undetected by the standard GBS (stdGBS) method. The study comprises two types of biological replicates: six different kiwifruit plants and two independent DNA extractions per plant; and three types of technical replicates: four samples of each DNA extraction, stdGBS vs. rtGBS methods, and two independent library amplifications, each sequenced in separate lanes. A statistically significant unbiased distribution of restriction fragment size by rtGBS showed that this method targeted 49% (39,145) of BamH I sites shared with the reference genome, compared to only 14% (11,513) by stdGBS. PMID:26633193

  16. Lattice overview

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1984-01-01

    After reviewing some recent developments in supercomputer access, the author discusses a few areas where perturbation theory and lattice gauge simulations make contact. The author concludes with a brief discussion of a deterministic dynamics for the Ising model. This may be useful for numerical studies of nonequilibrium phenomena. 13 references.

  17. Genetically encoded photocrosslinkers locate the high-affinity binding site of antidepressant drugs in the human serotonin transporter

    PubMed Central

    Rannversson, Hafsteinn; Andersen, Jacob; Sørensen, Lena; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Park, Minyoung; Huber, Thomas; Sakmar, Thomas P.; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Despite the well-established role of the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) in the treatment of depression, the molecular details of antidepressant drug binding are still not fully understood. Here we utilize amber codon suppression in a membrane-bound transporter protein to encode photocrosslinking unnatural amino acids (UAAs) into 75 different positions in hSERT. UAAs are incorporated with high specificity, and functionally active transporters have similar transport properties and pharmacological profiles compared with wild-type transporters. We employ ultraviolet-induced crosslinking with p-azido-L-phenylalanine (azF) at selected positions in hSERT to map the binding site of imipramine, a prototypical tricyclic antidepressant, and vortioxetine, a novel multimodal antidepressant. We find that the two antidepressants crosslink with azF incorporated at different positions within the central substrate-binding site of hSERT, while no crosslinking is observed at the vestibular-binding site. Taken together, our data provide direct evidence for defining the high-affinity antidepressant binding site in hSERT. PMID:27089947

  18. A Single-Site Platinum CO Oxidation Catalyst in Zeolite KLTL: Microscopic and Spectroscopic Determination of the Locations of the Platinum Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Kistler, Joseph D.; Chotigkrai, Nutchapon; Xu, Pinghong; Enderle, Bryan; Praserthdam, Piyasan; Chen, Cong-Yan; Browning, Nigel D.; Gates, Bruce C.

    2014-07-01

    A stable site-isolated mononuclear platinum catalyst with a well-defined structure is presented. Platinum complexes supported in zeolite KLTL were synthesized from [Pt(NH3)4](NO3)2, oxidized at 633 K, and used to catalyze CO oxidation. Finally, IR and X-ray absorption spectra and electron micrographs determine the structures and locations of the platinum complexes in the zeolite pores, demonstrate the platinum-support bonding, and show that the platinum remained site isolated after oxidation and catalysis.

  19. Soil data for a thermokarst bog and the surrounding permafrost plateau forest, located at Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research Site, Interior Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manies, Kristen L.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Jones, Miriam C.; Waldrop, Mark P.; McGeehin, John P.

    2017-01-19

    Peatlands play an important role in boreal ecosystems, storing a large amount of soil organic carbon. In northern ecosystems, collapse-scar bogs (also known as thermokarst bogs) often form as the result of ground subsidence following permafrost thaw. To examine how ecosystem carbon balance changes with the loss of permafrost, we measured carbon and nitrogen storage within a thermokarst bog and the surrounding forest, which continues to have permafrost. These sites are a part of the Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site and are located within Interior Alaska. Here, we report on methods used for core collection analysis as well as the cores’ physical, chemical, and descriptive properties.

  20. Nocturnal Plant Bugs Use cis-Jasmone to Locate Inflorescences of an Araceae as Feeding and Mating Site.

    PubMed

    Etl, Florian; Berger, Andreas; Weber, Anton; Schönenberger, Jürg; Dötterl, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Inflorescences of Araceae pollinated by cyclocephaline scarab beetles are visited frequently by a wide array of other arthropods that exploit floral resources without taking part in pollination, including earwigs, flies, and true bugs. To date, nothing is known about the cues these insect visitors use to locate the inflorescences and whether or to what extent floral scents play a role. An aroid visited by large numbers of plant bugs (Miridae) in addition to cyclocephaline scarab beetle pollinators is the Neotropical species Dieffenbachia aurantiaca. We identified the plant bug species and investigated their behavior and arrival time on the inflorescences. To test the importance of olfactory cues in locating their host we conducted experiments with open and gauze-bagged inflorescences as well as natural scent samples of D. aurantiaca. Inflorescence scents were analyzed by gas chromatography linked to mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and the attractive potential of the main scent compound was determined by behavioral assays. Three species of Neella, the most common one being N. floridula, visited the inflorescences at nightfall, shortly after the beginning of scent emission, and showed feeding and copulation activity. Bagged inflorescences as well as natural scent samples attracted similar numbers of plant bugs as the non-bagged inflorescences, showing that olfactory cues are sufficient for them to locate their host. Cis-jasmone was the major component within the inflorescence scent bouquet. In two-choice field bioassays, this compound proved to be highly attractive to Neella, and thus obviously plays a key role in finding host plants.

  1. The location of the high- and low-affinity bilirubin-binding sites on serum albumin: ligand-competition analysis investigated by circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Iryna; Orlov, Sergey; Urbanová, Marie

    2013-01-01

    The locations of three bilirubin (BR)-binding sites with different affinities were identified as subdomains IB, IIA and IIIA for five mammalian serum albumins (SAs): human (HSA), bovine (BSA), rat, (RSA), rabbit (RbSA) and sheep (SSA). The stereoselectivity of a high-affinity BR-binding site was identified in the BR/SA=1/1 system by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, the sites with low affinity to BR were analyzed using difference CD. Site-specific ligand-competition experiments with ibuprofen (marker for subdomain IIIA) and hemin (marker for subdomain IB) did not reveal any changes for the BR/SA=1/1 system and showed a decrease of the bound BR at BR/SA=3/1. Both sites were identified as sites with low affinity to BR. The correlation between stereoselectivity and the arrangement of Arg-Lys residues indicated similarity between the BR-binding sites in subdomain IIIA for all of the SAs studied. Subdomain IB in HSA, BSA, SSA and RbSA has P-stereoselectivity while in RSA it has M-selectivity toward BR. A ligand-competition experiment with gossypol shows a decrease of the CD signal of bound BR for the BR/SA=1/1 system as well as for BR/SA=3/1. Subdomain IIA was assigned as a high-affinity BR-binding site. The P-stereoselectivity of this site in HSA (and RSA, RbSA) was caused by the right-hand localization of charged residues R257/R218-R222, whereas the left-hand orientation of R257/R218-R199 led to the M-stereoselectivity of the primary binding site in BSA (and SSA).

  2. Statistics of lattice animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping; Nadler, Walder; Grassberger, Peter

    2005-07-01

    The scaling behavior of randomly branched polymers in a good solvent is studied in two to nine dimensions, modeled by lattice animals on simple hypercubic lattices. For the simulations, we use a biased sequential sampling algorithm with re-sampling, similar to the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method (PERM) used extensively for linear polymers. We obtain high statistics of animals with up to several thousand sites in all dimension 2⩽d⩽9. The partition sum (number of different animals) and gyration radii are estimated. In all dimensions we verify the Parisi-Sourlas prediction, and we verify all exactly known critical exponents in dimensions 2, 3, 4, and ⩾8. In addition, we present the hitherto most precise estimates for growth constants in d⩾3. For clusters with one site attached to an attractive surface, we verify the superuniversality of the cross-over exponent at the adsorption transition predicted by Janssen and Lyssy.

  3. Floridas Miami Tequesta Indian Site, Its Calusa Indian Locations, the Matacumbe Keys, and Orlandos Wikiwa Springs Generate Environmentally Significant EMFs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Dougall, Jean S.; Mc Leod, Roger D.; Mc Leod, David M.

    2003-10-01

    Florida purchased the Tequesta ([Langue] doc Christ Spirit-signal) Indian site along the Miami River site that vigorously pulsates with even minor rainstorms entering or leaving the area. Although there is a laughable chimera of a fountain of youth associated with Ponce de Leons discovery of the Florida peninsula in about AD 1513, the Calusa (Royal Christ Jesus Spirit-signal) Indian Nation has an associated significance with EMF signals they possibly monitored throughout their area of activity. Our efforts have also led to the investigation of cultural and other influences implied by the Matacumbe Keys that indicate a shared commonality of awareness with Native Americans of the northeast such as Metacomet, or regions like Maines Grand Lake Matagamon and its associated electromagnetic Spirit Signal. Wikiwa Springs near Orlando shares much with Massachusetts (adherent of serpent Jesus Christ Spirit-signal) Natick, and New Hampshires Naticook Island. These are the locales of environmentally sensitive instrumentation.

  4. Evaluation of Potential Locations for Siting Small Modular Reactors near Federal Energy Clusters to Support Federal Clean Energy Goals

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, Randy J.; Omitaomu, Olufemi A.

    2014-09-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was applied to analyze federal energy demand across the contiguous US. Several federal energy clusters were previously identified, including Hampton Roads, Virginia, which was subsequently studied in detail. This study provides an analysis of three additional diverse federal energy clusters. The analysis shows that there are potential sites in various federal energy clusters that could be evaluated further for placement of an integral pressurized-water reactor (iPWR) to support meeting federal clean energy goals.

  5. Location of Release Sites and Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels Relative to Calcium Channels at the Photoreceptor Ribbon Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, A. J.; Rabl, K.; Riccardi, G. E.; Brecha, N. C.; Stella, S. L.

    2011-01-01

    Vesicle release from photoreceptor ribbon synapses is regulated by L-type Ca2+ channels, which are in turn regulated by Cl− moving through calcium-activated chloride [Cl(Ca)] channels. We assessed the proximity of Ca2+ channels to release sites and Cl(Ca) channels in synaptic terminals of salamander photoreceptors by comparing fast (BAPTA) and slow (EGTA) intracellular Ca2+ buffers. BAPTA did not fully block synaptic release, indicating some release sites are <100 nm from Ca2+ channels. Comparing Cl(Ca) currents with predicted Ca2+ diffusion profiles suggested that Cl(Ca) and Ca2+ channels average a few hundred nanometers apart, but the inability of BAPTA to block Cl(Ca) currents completely suggested some channels are much closer together. Diffuse immunolabeling of terminals with an antibody to the putative Cl(Ca) channel TMEM16A supports the idea that Cl(Ca) channels are dispersed throughout the presynaptic terminal, in contrast with clustering of Ca2+ channels near ribbons. Cl(Ca) currents evoked by intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) elevation through flash photolysis of DM-nitrophen exhibited EC50 values of 556 and 377 nM with Hill slopes of 1.8 and 2.4 in rods and cones, respectively. These relationships were used to estimate average submembrane [Ca2+]i in photoreceptor terminals. Consistent with control of exocytosis by [Ca2+] nanodomains near Ca2+ channels, average submembrane [Ca2+]i remained below the vesicle release threshold (∼400 nM) over much of the physiological voltage range for cones. Positioning Ca2+ channels near release sites may improve fidelity in converting voltage changes to synaptic release. A diffuse distribution of Cl(Ca) channels may allow Ca2+ influx at one site to influence relatively distant Ca2+ channels. PMID:21084687

  6. Thermal tolerance in the Andean toad Rhinella spinulosa (Anura: Bufonidae) at three sites located along a latitudinal gradient in Chile.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Nicza Alveal; Díaz-Páez, Helen; Ortiz, Juan Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Rhinella spinulosa is one of the anuran species with the greatest presence in Chile. This species mainly inhabits mountain habitats and is distributed latitudinally along the western slope of the Andes Range. These habitats undergo great temperature fluctuations, exerting pressure on the amphibian. To identify the physiological strategies and thermal behavior of this species, we analyzed the temperature variables CTmin, CTmax, TTR, τheat, and τcool in individuals of three sites from a latitudinal gradient (22°S to 37°S). The amphibians were acclimated to 10°C and 20°C and fed ad libitum. The results indicate that the species has a high thermal tolerance range, with a mean of 38.14±1.34°C, a critical thermal maxima of 34.6-41.4°C, and a critical thermal minima of 2.6-0.8°C, classifying the species as eurythermic. Furthermore, there were significant differences in CTmáx and TTR only in the northern site. The differences in thermal time constants between sites are due to the effects of size and body mass. For example, those from the central site had larger size and greater thermal inertia; therefore, they warmed and cooled in a slower manner. The wide thermal limits determined in R. spinulosa confirm that it is a thermo-generalist species, a characteristic that allows the species to survive in adverse microclimatic conditions. The level of plasticity in critical temperatures seems ecologically relevant and supports the acclimatization of thermal limits as an important factor for ectothermic animals to adapt to climate change.

  7. Diluted manganese on the bond-centered site in germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Decoster, S.; Vantomme, A.; Cottenier, S.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.; Pereira, L. M. C.; Lacasta, C.; Da Silva, M. R.

    2010-10-11

    The functional properties of Mn-doped Ge depend to large extent on the lattice location of the Mn impurities. Here, we present a lattice location study of implanted diluted Mn by means of electron emission channeling. Surprisingly, in addition to the expected substitutional lattice position, a large fraction of the Mn impurities occupies the bond-centered site. Corroborated by ab initio calculations, the bond-centered Mn is related to Mn-vacancy complexes. These unexpected results call for a reassessment of the theoretical studies on the electrical and magnetic behavior of Mn-doped Ge, hereby including the possible role of Mn-vacancy complexes.

  8. Using chloride and chlorine-36 as soil-water tracers to estimate deep percolation at selected locations on the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Prych, E.A.

    1998-12-31

    This report presents the results of a study of the use of a chloride mass-balance method and a chlorine-36 isotope bomb-pulse method for estimating local long-term average rates of deep percolation of water from precipitation at selected locations at the Hanford Site. Deep percolation was estimated using the mass-balance method at a total of 13 locations in 6 areas. The bomb-pulse method was used for estimates at one location in each of four of the areas. The report describes the theory and assumptions upon which the two methods are based. The different areas at Hanford where soil samples were collected to obtain data for making estimates are described along with the methods used to collect and analyze the samples.

  9. Effect of gene location, mRNA secondary structures, and RNase sites on expression of two genes in an engineered operon.

    PubMed

    Smolke, Christina D; Keasling, Jay D

    2002-12-30

    The effects of endoribonuclease sites, secondary structures in mRNA, and gene placement on protein production and mRNA stability and steady-state levels were tested in a dual-gene operon containing the genes encoding beta-galactosidase (lacZ) from Escherichia coli and green fluorescent protein (gfp) from Aequorea victoria. Two previously identified RNase E sites were placed separately between the coding regions to direct cleavage in this area and produce two secondary transcripts, each containing a single-gene coding region. Novel secondary structures were engineered into the 3' and 5' ends of each of the coding regions to protect the transcript from inactivation by endoribonucleases (5' hairpins) and degradation by exoribonucleases (3' hairpins). In addition, the effects of relative gene placement were examined by switching the locations of the two coding regions. Depending on the particular secondary structures and RNase E sites placed between the genes the relative steady-state transcript and protein levels encoded by the two reporter genes could be changed up to 2.5-fold and 4-fold, respectively. By changing gene location and incorporating secondary structures and RNase E sites the relative steady-state transcript and protein levels encoded by the two reporter genes could be changed up to 100-fold and 750-fold, respectively.

  10. Lattice fermions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczek, Frank

    1987-01-01

    A simple heuristic proof of the Nielsen-Ninomaya theorem is given. A method is proposed whereby the multiplication of fermion species on a lattice is reduced to the minimal doubling, in any dimension, with retention of appropriate chiral symmetries. Also, it is suggested that use of spatially thinned fermion fields is likely to be a useful and appropriate approximation in QCD - in any case, it is a self-checking one.

  11. Location of the epidermal growth factor binding site on the EGF receptor. A resonance energy transfer study.

    PubMed

    Carraway, K L; Koland, J G; Cerione, R A

    1990-09-18

    As a first step toward developing a structural map of key sites on the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, we have used resonance energy transfer to measure the distance of closest approach between the receptor-bound growth factor molecule and lipid molecules at the surface of the plasma membrane. EGF, specifically labeled at its amino terminus with fluorescein 5-isothiocyanate, was used as an energy donor in these experiments, while either octadecylrhodamine B or octadecylrhodamine 101, inserted into plasma membranes isolated from human epidermoid carcinoma (A431) cells, served as the energy acceptors. The energy transfer measurements indicate that the amino terminus of the bound growth factor is about 67 A away from the plasma membrane. On the basis of the dimensions of the EGF molecule, this suggests that EGF binds to a site on its receptor that is a considerable distance (52-82 A) from the surface of these cells. Identical results were obtained under conditions where the receptor functions as an active tyrosine kinase, suggesting that the relative juxtaposition of the EGF binding domain to the membrane surface does not change with receptor autophosphorylation or with the activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase activity.

  12. Isolation and characterisation of mineral-oxidising "Acidibacillus" spp. from mine sites and geothermal environments in different global locations.

    PubMed

    Holanda, Roseanne; Hedrich, Sabrina; Ňancucheo, Ivan; Oliveira, Guilherme; Grail, Barry M; Johnson, D Barrie

    2016-09-01

    Eight strains of acidophilic bacteria, isolated from mine-impacted and geothermal sites from different parts of the world, were shown to form a distinct clade (proposed genus "Acidibacillus") within the phylum Firmicutes, well separated from the acidophilic genera Sulfobacillus and Alicyclobacillus. Two of the strains (both isolated from sites in Yellowstone National Park, USA) were moderate thermophiles that oxidised both ferrous iron and elemental sulphur, while the other six were mesophiles that also oxidised ferrous iron, but not sulphur. All eight isolates reduced ferric iron to varying degrees. The two groups shared <95% similarity of their 16S rRNA genes and were therefore considered to be distinct species: "Acidibacillus sulfuroxidans" (moderately thermophilic isolates) and "Acidibacillus ferrooxidans" (mesophilic isolates). Both species were obligate heterotrophs; none of the eight strains grew in the absence of organic carbon. "Acidibacillus" spp. were generally highly tolerant of elevated concentrations of cationic transition metals, though "A. sulfuroxidans" strains were more sensitive to some (e.g. nickel and zinc) than those of "A. ferrooxidans". Initial annotation of the genomes of two strains of "A. ferrooxidans" revealed the presence of genes (cbbL) involved in the RuBisCO pathway for CO2 assimilation and iron oxidation (rus), though with relatively low sequence identities.

  13. Identical Location Transmission Electron Microscopy Imaging of Site-Selective Pt Nanocatalysts: Electrochemical Activation and Surface Disordering.

    PubMed

    Arán-Ais, Rosa M; Yu, Yingchao; Hovden, Robert; Solla-Gullón, Jose; Herrero, Enrique; Feliu, Juan M; Abruña, Héctor D

    2015-12-02

    We have employed identical location transmission electron microscopy (IL-TEM) to study changes in the shape and morphology of faceted Pt nanoparticles as a result of electrochemical cycling; a procedure typically employed for activating platinum surfaces. We find that the shape and morphology of the as-prepared hexagonal nanoparticles are rapidly degraded as a result of potential cycling up to +1.3 V. As few as 25 potential cycles are sufficient to cause significant degradation, and after about 500-1000 cycles the particles are dramatically degraded. We also see clear evidence of particle migration during potential cycling. These finding suggest that great care must be exercised in the use and study of shaped Pt nanoparticles (and related systems) as electrocatlysts, especially for the oxygen reduction reaction where high positive potentials are typically employed.

  14. Foraging locations of double-crested cormorants on western Lake Erie: Site characteristics and spatial associations with prey fish densities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Bur, Michael T.; Tyson, Jeffrey T.; Seamans, Thomas W.; Blackwell, Bradley F.

    2002-01-01

    Radio-tagged double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) nesting on Middle Island, Ontario and unmarked cormorants in the western basin of Lake Erie were monitored in 1999. Radio-tagged cormorants were located by aircraft and by boat along regular survey routes. In addition, foraging flocks of radio-tagged and unmarked cormorants were located during the boat surveys. Approximately 79% of foraging radio-tagged individuals, and approximately 65% of all foraging flocks were observed within 2.5 km of shore. These percentages were greater than expected, based on the percentage of the area of water within 2.5 km of shore. All size classes of flocks examined were found more frequently than expected on water ≤10 m deep. Trawling data collected annually from 1988 to 1999 during the month of August were used to determine the historical distributions of the four fish species found to comprise the majority of the diet of cormorants in the area. August corresponded to a period when there is maximal overlap in the diets of cormorants and walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) in the area and when the number of foraging cormorants in the area is large. Flocks of cormorants of all size classes examined were not found proportionately more in regions that contained higher than the historical median annual catches of any of the four prey species. These results, coupled with previous bioenergetics studies, suggest that the impact of cormorants on the fishery of the western basin of Lake Erie is localized with respect to depth and distance from shore.

  15. Mixed Inhibition of cPEPCK by Genistein, Using an Extended Binding Site Located Adjacent to Its Catalytic Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Dhanjal, Jaspreet Kaur; Sundar, Durai

    2015-01-01

    Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (cPEPCK) is a critical enzyme involved in gluconeogenesis, glyceroneogenesis and cataplerosis. cPEPCK converts oxaloacetic acid (OAA) into phosphoenol pyruvate (PEP) in the presence of GTP. cPEPCK is known to be associated with type 2 diabetes. Genistein is an isoflavone compound that shows anti-diabetic and anti-obesitic properties. Experimental studies have shown a decrease in the blood glucose level in the presence of genistein by lowering the functional activity of cPEPCK, an enzyme of gluconeogenesis. Using computational techniques such as molecular modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation and binding free energy calculations, we identified cPEPCK as a direct target of genistein. We studied the molecular interactions of genistein with three possible conformations of cPEPCK—unbound cPEPCK (u_cPEPCK), GTP bound cPEPCK (GTP_cPEPCK) and GDP bound cPEPCK (GDP_cPEPCK). Binding of genistein was also compared with an already known cPEPCK inhibitor. We analyzed the interactions of genistein with cPEPCK enzyme and compared them with its natural substrate (OAA), product (PEP) and known inhibitor (3-MPA). Our results demonstrate that genistein uses the mechanism of mixed inhibition to block the functional activity of cPEPCK and thus can serve as a potential anti-diabetic and anti-obesity drug candidate. We also identified an extended binding site in the catalytic cleft of cPEPCK which is used by 3-MPA to inhibit cPEPCK non-competitively. We demonstrate that extended binding site of cPEPCK can further be exploited for designing new drugs against cPEPCK. PMID:26528723

  16. Using chloride and chlorine-36 as soil-water tracers to estimate deep percolation at selected locations on the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford site, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prych, Edmund A.

    1995-01-01

    Long-term average deep-percolation rates of water from precipitation on the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site in semiarid south-central Washington, as estimated by a chloride mass-balance method, range from 0.008 to 0.30 mm/yr (millimeters per year) at nine locations covered by a variety of fine-grain soils and vegetated with sagebrush and other deep-rooted plants plus sparse shallow-rooted grasses. Deep-percolation rates estimated using a chlorine-36 bomb-pulse method at three of the nine locations range from 2.1 to 3.4 mm/yr. Because the mass-balance method may underestimate percolation rates and the bomb-pulse method probably overestimates percolation rates, estimates by the two methods probably bracket actual rates. These estimates, as well as estimates by previous investigators who used different methods, are a small fraction of mean annual precipitation, which ranges from about 160 to 210 mm/yr at the different test locations. Estimates by the mass-balance method at four locations in an area that is vegetated only with sparse shallow-rooted grasses range from 0.39 to 2.0 mm/yr. Chlorine-36 data at one location in this area were sufficient only to determine that the upper limit of deep percolation is more than 5.1 mm/yr. Although estimates for locations in this area are larger than the estimates for locations with deep-rooted plants, they are at the lower end of the range of estimates for this area made by previous investigators.

  17. Effect of impurities on the vortex lattice in Bose-Einstein condensates on optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mithun, T.; Porsezian, K.; Dey, Bishwajyoti

    2015-06-01

    We numerically solve the Gross-Pitaeveskii equation to study the Bose-Einstein condensate in the rotating harmonical tarp and co-rotating optical lattice. The effect of a pinning site or impurity shows that it is able to move the vortex lattice center to either left or right depending on the position of the impurity. Also, it is observed that the impurity at the random positions can destroy the vortex lattice and the resulting disordered lattice has more energy.

  18. Thermodynamic and structural properties of finely discretized on-lattice hard-sphere fluids: Virial coefficients, free energies, and direct correlation functions.

    PubMed

    Siderius, Daniel W; Gelb, Lev D

    2009-08-28

    Using both molecular simulation and theory, we examine fluid-phase thermodynamic and structural properties of on-lattice hard-sphere fluids. Our purpose in this work is to provide reference data for on-lattice density functional theories [D. W. Siderius and L. D. Gelb, Langmuir 25, 1296 (2009)] and related perturbation theories. In this model, hard spheres are located at sites on a finely discretized cubic lattice where the spacing between lattice sites is between one-tenth and one-third the hard-sphere diameter. We calculate exactly the second, third, and fourth virial coefficients as functions of the lattice spacing. Via Monte Carlo simulation, we measure the excess chemical potential as a function of density for several lattice spacings. These results are then parametrized with a convenient functional form and can immediately be used in on-lattice density functional theories. Of particular interest is to identify those lattice spacings that yield properties similar to those of the off-lattice fluid. We find that the properties of the on-lattice fluid are strongly dependent on lattice spacing, generally approaching those of the off-lattice fluid with increasing lattice resolution, but not smoothly. These observations are consistent with results for larger lattice spacings [A. Z. Panagiotopoulos, J. Chem. Phys. 123, 104504 (2005)]. Certain lattice spacings are found to yield fluid properties in particularly good agreement with the off-lattice fluid. We also find that the agreement of many different on- and off-lattice hard-sphere fluid properties is predicted quite well by that of the virial coefficients, suggesting that they may be used to identify favorable lattice spacings. The direct correlation function at a few lattice spacings and a single density is obtained from simulation. The on-lattice fluid is structurally anisotropic, exhibiting spherical asymmetry in correlation functions. Interestingly, the anisotropies are properly captured in the Percus

  19. Sequence preferences of DNA interstrand crosslinking agents: quantitation of interstrand crosslink locations in DNA duplex fragments containing multiple crosslinkable sites.

    PubMed Central

    Millard, J T; Weidner, M F; Kirchner, J J; Ribeiro, S; Hopkins, P B

    1991-01-01

    A general approach to the quantitative study of the sequence specificity of DNA interstrand crosslinking agents in synthetic duplex DNA fragments is described. In the first step, a DNA fragment previously treated with an interstrand crosslinking agent is subjected to denaturing PAGE. Not only does this distinguish crosslinked from native or monoadducted DNA, it is shown herein that isomeric crosslinked DNAs differing in position of the crosslink can in some cases be separated. In the second stage, the now fractionated crosslinked DNAs isolated from denaturing PAGE are subjected to fragmentation using iron(II)/EDTA. For those fractions which are structurally homogeneous, analysis of the resulting fragment distribution has previously been shown to reveal the crosslink position at nucleotide resolution. It is shown herein that in fractions which are structurally heterogeneous due to differences in position of crosslink, this analysis quantifies the relative extent of crosslinking at distinct sites. Using this method it is shown that reductively activated mitomycin C crosslinks the duplex sequences 5'-GCGC and 5'-TCGA with 3 +/- 1:1 relative efficiency. Images PMID:1903204

  20. The importance of location and orientation of male specific lethal complex binding sites of differing affinities on reporter gene dosage compensation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Schiemann, Anja H; Weake, Vikki M; Li, Fang; Laverty, Corey; Belikoff, Esther J; Scott, Maxwell J

    2010-11-26

    The male specific lethal (MSL) complex is required for X chromosome dosage compensation in Drosophila. The complex binds to most actively transcribed X-linked genes in males and upregulates expression. High resolution chromatin immunoprecipitation assays have identified over one hundred high affinity binding sites on the X chromosome. One of the first high affinity sites discovered is at cytological location 18D11. The MSL complex binds weakly to a single copy of a 510bp fragment from 18D11 but strongly to a tetramer of the fragment. Here we have investigated the effect of insertion of sites of differing affinities, either upstream or within the transcribed gene, on complex binding and transcription upregulation. Insertion of four copies of the 18D11 fragment upstream or at the 3' end of a reporter gene led to strong MSL complex binding and increased expression in males. In contrast, the MSL complex did not bind consistently to autosomal transgenes that contained a single copy of the 18D11 site upstream of the gene promoter. However, MSL complex binding was observed in all lines if the single 18D11 fragment was inserted into the 3' end of the reporter gene in either orientation. This is consistent with previous studies that showed gene transcription facilitates MSL complex binding. Surprisingly, transcription elevation in males was only observed if the 18D11 fragment was in the forward orientation and only in some lines. Our results suggest that MSL complex binding to weaker sites and transcription enhancement is influenced by gene transcription, binding site orientation and the local chromatin environment. In contrast, strong binding sites do not need to be transcribed to recruit sufficient complex to cause transcription elevation of nearby genes.

  1. Probing the location of the substrate binding site of ascorbate oxidase near type 1 copper: an investigation through spectroscopic, inhibition and docking studies.

    PubMed

    Santagostini, Laura; Gullotti, Michele; De Gioia, Luca; Fantucci, Piercarlo; Franzini, Elena; Marchesini, Augusto; Monzani, Enrico; Casella, Luigi

    2004-05-01

    The present investigation addresses the problem of the binding mode of phenolic inhibitors and the substrate ascorbate to the active site of ascorbate oxidase. The results from both types of compounds indicate that the binding site is located in a pocket near the type 1 copper center. This information is of general interest for blue multicopper oxidases. Docking calculations performed on the ascorbate oxidase-ascorbate complex show that binding of the substrate occurs in a pocket near type 1 Cu, and is stabilized by at least five hydrogen bonding interactions with protein residues, one of which involves the His512 Cu ligand. Similar docking studies show that the isomeric fluorophenols, which act as competitive inhibitors toward ascorbate, bind to the enzyme in a manner similar to ascorbate. The docking calculations are supported by 19F NMR relaxation measurements performed on fluorophenols in the presence of the enzyme, which show that the bound inhibitors undergo enhanced relaxation by the paramagnetic effect of a nearby Cu center. Unambiguous support to the location of the inhibitor close to type 1 Cu was obtained by comparative relaxation measurements of the fluorophenols in the presence of the ascorbate oxidase derivative where a Zn atom selectively replaces the paramagnetic type 2 Cu. The latter experiments show that contribution to relaxation of the bound inhibitors by the type 2 Cu site is negligible.

  2. Discrete vortices on anisotropic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gui-Hua; Wang, Hong-Cheng; Chen, Zi-Fa

    2015-08-01

    We consider the effects of anisotropy on two types of localized states with topological charges equal to 1 in two-dimensional nonlinear lattices, using the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation as a paradigm model. We find that on-site-centered vortices with different propagation constants are not globally stable, and that upper and lower boundaries of the propagation constant exist. The region between these two boundaries is the domain outside of which the on-site-centered vortices are unstable. This region decreases in size as the anisotropy parameter is gradually increased. We also consider off-site-centered vortices on anisotropic lattices, which are unstable on this lattice type and either transform into stable quadrupoles or collapse. We find that the transformation of off-sitecentered vortices into quadrupoles, which occurs on anisotropic lattices, cannot occur on isotropic lattices. In the quadrupole case, a propagation-constant region also exists, outside of which the localized states cannot stably exist. The influence of anisotropy on this region is almost identical to its effects on the on-site-centered vortex case.

  3. Physical Map of the Channel Catfish Virus Genome: Location of Sites for Restriction Endonucleases EcoRI, HindIII, HpaI, and XbaI

    PubMed Central

    Chousterman, Suzanne; Lacasa, Michel; Sheldrick, Peter

    1979-01-01

    The overall arrangement of nucleotide sequences in the DNA of channel catfish virus has been studied by cleavage with four restriction endonucleases. Physical maps have been developed for the location of sites for EcoRI, HindIII, HpaI, and XbaI. The sum of the molecular weights of fragments generated by each restriction enzyme indicates a molecular weight of approximately 86 × 106 for the channel catfish virus genome. Fragments corresponding to the molecular ends of channel catfish virus DNA have been identified by their sensitivity to exonuclease treatment. The distribution of restriction sites in the genome shows that sequences included in a 12 × 106-molecular weight region at one end are repeated with direct polarity at the other end, and that the overall genomic sequence order is nonpermuted. Images PMID:16789182

  4. A-to-I RNA editing occurs at over a hundred million genomic sites, located in a majority of human genes.

    PubMed

    Bazak, Lily; Haviv, Ami; Barak, Michal; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Deng, Patricia; Zhang, Rui; Isaacs, Farren J; Rechavi, Gideon; Li, Jin Billy; Eisenberg, Eli; Levanon, Erez Y

    2014-03-01

    RNA molecules transmit the information encoded in the genome and generally reflect its content. Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing by ADAR proteins converts a genomically encoded adenosine into inosine. It is known that most RNA editing in human takes place in the primate-specific Alu sequences, but the extent of this phenomenon and its effect on transcriptome diversity are not yet clear. Here, we analyzed large-scale RNA-seq data and detected ∼1.6 million editing sites. As detection sensitivity increases with sequencing coverage, we performed ultradeep sequencing of selected Alu sequences and showed that the scope of editing is much larger than anticipated. We found that virtually all adenosines within Alu repeats that form double-stranded RNA undergo A-to-I editing, although most sites exhibit editing at only low levels (<1%). Moreover, using high coverage sequencing, we observed editing of transcripts resulting from residual antisense expression, doubling the number of edited sites in the human genome. Based on bioinformatic analyses and deep targeted sequencing, we estimate that there are over 100 million human Alu RNA editing sites, located in the majority of human genes. These findings set the stage for exploring how this primate-specific massive diversification of the transcriptome is utilized.

  5. The -14010*C variant associated with lactase persistence is located between an Oct-1 and HNF1α binding site and increases lactase promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Tine G K; Liebert, Anke; Lewinsky, Rikke; Swallow, Dallas M; Olsen, Jørgen; Troelsen, Jesper T

    2011-10-01

    In most people worldwide intestinal lactase expression declines in childhood. In many others, particularly in Europeans, lactase expression persists into adult life. The lactase persistence phenotype is in Europe associated with the -13910*T single nucleotide variant located 13,910 bp upstream the lactase gene in an enhancer region that affects lactase promoter activity. This variant falls in an Oct-1 binding site and shows greater Oct-1 binding than the ancestral variant and increases enhancer activity. Several other variants have been identified very close to the -13910 position, which are associated with lactase persistence in the Middle East and Africa. One of them, the -14010*C, is associated with lactase persistence in Africa. Here we show by deletion analysis that the -14010 position is located in a 144 bp region that reduces the enhancer activity. In transfections the -14010*C allele shows a stronger enhancer effect than the ancestral -4010*G allele. Binding sites for Oct-1 and HNF1α surrounding the -14010 position were identified by gel shift assays, which indicated that -14010*C has greater binding affinity to Oct-1 than -14010*G.

  6. Accurately mapping the location of the binding site for the interaction between hepatitis B virus X protein and cytochrome c oxidase III

    PubMed Central

    LI, DAN; DING, JIAN; CHEN, ZHIXIN; CHEN, YUN; LIN, NA; CHEN, FENGLIN; WANG, XIAOZHONG

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein (HBx) plays an important pathogenetic role in hepatocarcinoma tumorigenesis. As HBx does not have the ability to bind to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), protein-protein interaction is crucial for HBx functions. In a previous study, we screened a novel HBx-interacting protein, the cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (COXIII). In the present study, we aimed to accurately map the location of the binding site for the interaction of HBx with COXIII. Two fragments of HBx mutants (X1 aa1-72 and X2 aa1-117) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and separately inserted into the pAS2-1 plasmid. PCR and gene sequencing confirmed the correct insertion of the mutant fragments in the plasmid. The tanscription of the mutant fragments in yeast cells was demonstrated by RT-PCR and western blot analysis confirmed that they were accurately translated into fusion proteins. Hybridization on solid medium and the detection of β-galactosidase (β-gal) activity indicated that the binding site for the interaction between HBx and COXIII was located between aa72 and aa117. Specific interactions between the HBxX2 protein and COXIII were verified by co-immunoprecipitation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing to demonstrate that aa72-117 in HBx is the key region for binding with COXIII. PMID:25483779

  7. A single-use site selection technique, using GIS, for aquaculture planning: choosing locations for mangrove oyster raft culture in Margarita Island, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Joaquín; Rada, Martín; Hernández, Hernando; Buitrago, Esperanza

    2005-05-01

    Oyster culture has a potential to generate income for coastal communities and to lessen pressure on natural overexploited populations. A project to transfer mangrove oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae raft culture technology to selected coastal communities in Margarita Island, Venezuela is being developed, and an optimum location selection technique was devised. To pick the variables or factors that determine site suitability, a bibliographic database was made, aspects of interest chosen, and the most comprehensive ones singled out, eliminating redundant ones. Twenty variables were grouped in criteria based on the way they influence the project. Variables were classified as intrinsic environmental, environmental extrinsic, logistic, and socioeconomic criteria. Thirty-five experts were asked to evaluate the factors and to score each according to their suitability weight. Logistic criterion received the highest values, followed by environmental extrinsic issues. A Geographic Information System using a base map compiled from 1:25,000 scale maps was developed. A thematic map for each factor was completed, dividing graphically the 3896-km2 study area into polygons of equal weight for each factor. The Multi-Criteria Evaluation (MCE) was used to combine the variables. Resultant vectors in thematic maps were added to obtain smaller polygons with the same value sum. Finally, MCE was used to generate a final output: the optimum sites for oyster aquaculture resulting from the added values of over 3000 polygons in the maps, for the 20 criteria. Higher scores were reached in 13 areas covering 4.1 km2, those places having the optimum conditions for oyster raft aquaculture in the region. Additional locations meeting 75% to 70% of the demanded criteria for a final suitable selection cover 137 sites encompassing 37.5 km2.

  8. Location of protein S1 of Escherichia coli ribosomes at the 'A'-site of the codon binding site. Affinity labeling studies with a 3'-modified A-U-G analog.

    PubMed Central

    Pongs, O; Stöffler, G; Bald, R W

    1976-01-01

    An affinity analog with a 5-bromoacetamido uridine 5'-phosphate moiety bonded to the 3' end of A-U-G has been prepared with the aid of polynucleotide phosphorylase. This 3'-modified, chemically reactive A-U-G analog was used to probe the ribosomal codon binding site. The yield of the reaction depended strongly on the ribosomal source and was sensitive to salt-washing ribosomes. The major crosslinking product was identified to be protein S1. Since the reaction of this 3'-modified A-U-G programmed ribosomes for Met-tRNA-Met-M binding, it is concluded that protein S1 is located at or near the 3'-side of the ribosomal codon binding site. Images PMID:823527

  9. Polarization response of RHIC electron lens lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, V. H.; Méot, F.; Bai, M.; Abell, D. T.; Meiser, D.

    2016-10-01

    Depolarization response for a system of two orthogonal snakes at irrational tunes is studied in depth using lattice independent spin integration. In particular we consider the effect of overlapping spin resonances in this system, to understand the impact of phase, tune, relative location and threshold strengths of the spin resonances. These results are benchmarked and compared to two dimensional direct tracking results for the RHIC e-lens lattice and the standard lattice. Finally we consider the effect of longitudinal motion via chromatic scans using direct six dimensional lattice tracking.

  10. Assessment of the environmental impact of landfill sites with open combustion located in arid regions by combined chemical and ecotoxicological studies.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, H; Kolb, M; Jopke, P; Schmidt, C; Alawi, M; Bahadir, M

    2006-12-01

    Two different waste disposal sites in Jordan were investigated in order to determine the environmental situation in context with waste disposal techniques. One landfill, located at Marka/Amman, had been closed about 25 years ago and covered with soil. Here, the waste had been actively open combusted and openings in the cover, still emitting smoke, indicated that waste was still smoldering inside the landfill's body. The second disposal site close to Ekeeder/Irbid is still operated. On this ground, the solid waste is not intentionally burned, although spontaneous fires frequently come up. Samples of waste, soil, and entrained dust were collected and analyzed. From the solid samples, respectively, their eluates, sum parameters, ecotoxicological effects as well as contents of elements/heavy metals and organic pollutants (PAH, PCDD/F) were determined. In general, the Ekeeder-samples were low-contaminated. The investigation of the Marka-samples showed higher contamination of the site's center, clearly being influenced by combustion processes. A significant contamination of the landfill's vicinity by its emissions could not be derived from the analytical data. Ecotoxicological investigations, applying a bio-test battery, revealed correlations with the sum parameters but not with the trace pollutants. Thus, the Marka-samples with the highest measured values of sum parameters caused adverse effects on three different test species, whereas other samples from Marka and Ekeeder had small or no effects. The results of these investigations depict the influence of different disposal techniques on the contamination situation of a landfill and they shall contribute to assess the conditions of other disposal sites in (semi)arid regions.

  11. Physics development of web-based tools for use in hardware clusters doing lattice physics

    SciTech Connect

    P. Dreher; Walt Akers; Jian-ping Chen; Y. Chen; William A. Watson III

    2002-03-01

    Jefferson Lab and MIT are developing a set of web-based tools within the Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration to allow lattice QCD theorists to treat the computational facilities located at the two sites as a single meta-facility. The prototype Lattice Portal provides researchers the ability to submit jobs to the cluster, browse data caches, and transfer files between cache and off-line storage. The user can view the configuration of the PBS servers and to monitor both the status of all batch queues as well as the jobs in each queue. Work is starting on expanding the present system to include job submissions at the meta-facility level (shared queue), as well as multi-site file transfers and enhanced policy-based data management capabilities.

  12. Correlation Effects in One-Dimensional Quasiperiodic Anderson-Lattice Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Fuyuki; Tezuka, Masaki; Kawakami, Norio

    We consider the one-dimensional (1D) quasiperiodic Anderson-lattice model, which has quasiperiodically ordered impurities. The sites with an f-orbital are ordered as a "Fibonacci word", one way to form 1D quasiperiodic orderings. To treat the correlation effect precisely, we use the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method. We show that the spin correlation function in the quasiperiodic system gives a characteristic pattern. Also, by analyzing the f-electron number and its fluctuation, we find that a valence transition, which usually occurs in the periodic Anderson model when the on-site interorbital interaction is large, is not sharp in the quasiperiodic system. Finally, we discuss the properties of the quasiperiodic Anderson-lattice model, comparing them against the Anderson-lattice model with randomly located f-orbitals. We find that the quasiperiodic Anderson-lattice model has a similar property to the periodic Anderson model for spin correlation, but also has a similar property to the Anderson-lattice model with randomly located f-orbitals for the valence fluctuation.

  13. VA Health Care Facilities Locator

    MedlinePlus

    ... VA » Locations » Find Locations Locations Find Locations The javascript used here is for validation purpose only. Your browser doesn't seem to support javascript or has it disabled. This site is a ...

  14. Analysis of the effects of ionospheric sampling of reflection points near-path, for high-frequency single-site-location direction finding systems. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Filho, C.A.

    1990-12-01

    This thesis suggests a method to estimate the current value of an ionospheric parameter. The proposed method is based on the known variability of the observed current values near path and utilizes data derived from ionospheric sampling measurements. Analysis of errors is provided in Single-Site-Location High-Frequency Direction Finding (SSL-HFDF), arising from ionospheric irregularities such as Es (sporadic E), ionospheric tilts, and traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). The characteristics of Es, tilts and TIDs for mid-latitudes are summarized in tables. The spatial and temporal coherence of ionospheric variabilities and irregularities is analyzed over the electron density. Practical results, measurements, and studies are presented on SSL-HFDF. A survey of characteristics of the ionosphere in the equatorial region is also provided. Finally, some recommendations are given to maximize the applicability of the proposed method.

  15. Evaluation of National Atmospheric Deposition Program measurements for co-located Sites CO89 and CO98 at Rocky Mountain National Park, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2013-01-01

    Median weekly absolute percent differences for selected parameters including: sample volume, 8.0 percent; ammonium concentration, 9.1 percent; nitrate concentration, 8.5 percent; sulfate concentration, 10.2 percent. Annual precipitation-weighted mean concentrations were higher for CO98 compared to CO89 for all analytes. The chemical concentration record for CO98 contains more valid samples than the CO89 record. Therefore, the CO98 record is more representative of 2012 total annual deposition at Loch Vale. Daily precipitation-depth records for the co-located precipitation gages were 100 percent complete, and the total annual precipitation depths between the sites differed by 0.1 percent for the year (91.5 and 91.4 cm).

  16. Probing the location and function of the conserved histidine residue of phosphoglucose isomerase by using an active site directed inhibitor N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Meng, M.; Chane, T. L.; Sun, Y. J.; Hsiao, C. D.

    1999-01-01

    Phosphoglucose isomerase (EC 5.3.1.9) catalyzes the interconversion of D-glucopyranose-6-phosphate and D-fructofuranose-6-phosphate by promoting an intrahydrogen transfer between C1 and C2. A conserved histidine exists throughout all phosphoglucose isomerases and was hypothesized to be the base catalyzing the isomerization reaction. In the present study, this conserved histidine, His311, of the enzyme from Bacillus stearothermophilus was subjected to mutational analysis, and the mutational effect on the inactivation kinetics by N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate was investigated. The substitution of His311 with alanine, asparagine, or glutamine resulted in the decrease of activity, in k(cat)/K(M), by a factor of 10(3), indicating the importance of this residue. N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate inactivated irreversibly the activity of wild-type phosphoglucose isomerase; however, His311 --> Ala became resistant to this inhibitor, indicating that His311 is located in the active site and is responsible for the inactivation of the enzyme by this active site-directed inhibitor. The pKa of His311 was estimated to be 6.31 according to the pH dependence of the inactivation. The proximity of this value with the pKa value of 6.35, determined from the pH dependence of k(cat)/K(M), supports a role of His311 as a general base in the catalysis. PMID:10595547

  17. Sourcebook of locations of geophysical surveys in tunnels and horizontal holes, including results of seismic refraction surveys, Rainier Mesa, Aqueduct Mesa, and Area 16, Nevada Test Site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carroll, R.D.; Kibler, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Seismic refraction surveys have been obtained sporadically in tunnels in zeolitized tuff at the Nevada Test Site since the late 1950's. Commencing in 1967 and continuing to date (1982), .extensive measurements of shear- and compressional-wave velocities have been made in five tunnel complexes in Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas and in one tunnel complex in Shoshone Mountain. The results of these surveys to 1980 are compiled in this report. In addition, extensive horizontal drilling was initiated in 1967 in connection with geologic exploration in these tunnel complexes for sites for nuclear weapons tests. Seismic and electrical surveys were conducted in the majority of these holes. The type and location of these tunnel and borehole surveys are indexed in this report. Synthesis of the seismic refraction data indicates a mean compressional-wave velocity near the nuclear device point (WP) of 23 tunnel events of 2,430 m/s (7,970 f/s) with a range of 1,846-2,753 m/s (6,060-9,030 f/s). The mean shear-wave velocity of 17 tunnel events is 1,276 m/s (4,190 f/s) with a range of 1,140-1,392 m/s (3,740-4,570 f/s). Experience indicates that these velocity variations are due chiefly to the extent of fracturing and (or) the presence of partially saturated rock in the region of the survey.

  18. Unbiased sampling of lattice Hamilton path ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Marc L.

    2006-10-01

    Hamilton paths, or Hamiltonian paths, are walks on a lattice which visit each site exactly once. They have been proposed as models of globular proteins and of compact polymers. A previously published algorithm [Mansfield, Macromolecules 27, 5924 (1994)] for sampling Hamilton paths on simple square and simple cubic lattices is tested for bias and for efficiency. Because the algorithm is a Metropolis Monte Carlo technique obviously satisfying detailed balance, we need only demonstrate ergodicity to ensure unbiased sampling. Two different tests for ergodicity (exact enumeration on small lattices, nonexhaustive enumeration on larger lattices) demonstrate ergodicity unequivocally for small lattices and provide strong support for ergodicity on larger lattices. Two other sampling algorithms [Ramakrishnan et al., J. Chem. Phys. 103, 7592 (1995); Lua et al., Polymer 45, 717 (2004)] are both known to produce biases on both 2×2×2 and 3×3×3 lattices, but it is shown here that the current algorithm gives unbiased sampling on these same lattices. Successive Hamilton paths are strongly correlated, so that many iterations are required between statistically independent samples. Rules for estimating the number of iterations needed to dissipate these correlations are given. However, the iteration time is so fast that the efficiency is still very good except on extremely large lattices. For example, even on lattices of total size 10×10×10 we are able to generate tens of thousands of uncorrelated Hamilton paths per hour of CPU time.

  19. Quantum theory of cold bosonic atoms in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Tilahun, Dagim; Duine, R. A.; MacDonald, A. H.

    2011-09-15

    Ultracold atoms in optical lattices undergo a quantum phase transition from a superfluid to a Mott insulator as the lattice potential depth is increased. We describe an approximate theory of interacting bosons in optical lattices which provides a qualitative description of both superfluid and insulator states. The theory is based on a change of variables in which the boson coherent state amplitude is replaced by an effective potential which promotes phase coherence between different number states on each lattice site. It is illustrated here by applying it to uniform and fully frustrated lattice cases but is simple enough that it can be applied to spatially inhomogeneous lattice systems.

  20. Influence of season and site location on European cultured sea bass parasites in Corsican fish farms using indicator species analysis (IndVal).

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Laetitia; Foata, Joséphine; Quilichini, Yann; Marchand, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    The parasites of 536 European sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax, were studied between January 2012 and December 2013 in six Corsican fish farms. The indicator value (IndVal) method, which combines measures of fidelity and specificity, has been used in this study. Because of its resilience to changes in abundance, IndVal is a particularly effective tool for ecological bioindicator. The IndVal method showed how season can influence the occurrence of parasite species in cultured sea bass and also identified parasites as bioindicators relative to fish farm location. The combination of specificity and fidelity highlighted several parasite species as significant indicators. A randomization test identified five parasite species as having a significant indicator value for season (the monogenean Diplectanum aequans; the copepods Lernanthropus kroyeri and Caligus minimus; the isopod Ceratothoa oestroides, and the myxosporidian Ceratomyxa labracis). If gills parasites are compared, they can be seen to be indicator species for two different seasons. The only Monogenea species D. aequans had fidelity and specificity more pronounced in winter, whereas both copepod species and the Isopoda revealed highest rates of infestation corresponding with an increase of water temperature. Four species have a significant indicator value for site location (D. aequans, L. kroyeri, C. minimus, and C. oestroides). The fact that the farm 6 was isolated on the east coast of Corsica may not have allowed the parasite to infect other farms. The presence of copepods on a single farm can also be explained according to salinity variations. Data for species composition and infection levels should help to improve the monitoring and management of parasitism in cultured sea bass populations.

  1. Random sequential adsorption on imprecise lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privman, Vladimir; Yan, Han

    2016-06-01

    We report a surprising result, established by numerical simulations and analytical arguments for a one-dimensional lattice model of random sequential adsorption, that even an arbitrarily small imprecision in the lattice-site localization changes the convergence to jamming from fast, exponential, to slow, power-law, with, for some parameter values, a discontinuous jump in the jamming coverage value. This finding has implications for irreversible deposition on patterned substrates with pre-made landing sites for particle attachment. We also consider a general problem of the particle (depositing object) size not an exact multiple of the lattice spacing, and the lattice sites themselves imprecise, broadened into allowed-deposition intervals. Regions of exponential vs. power-law convergence to jamming are identified, and certain conclusions regarding the jamming coverage are argued for analytically and confirmed numerically.

  2. Subwavelength Lattice Optics by Evolutionary Design

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new class of structured optical materials—lattice opto-materials—that can manipulate the flow of visible light into a wide range of three-dimensional profiles using evolutionary design principles. Lattice opto-materials are based on the discretization of a surface into a two-dimensional (2D) subwavelength lattice whose individual lattice sites can be controlled to achieve a programmed optical response. To access a desired optical property, we designed a lattice evolutionary algorithm that includes and optimizes contributions from every element in the lattice. Lattice opto-materials can exhibit simple properties, such as on- and off-axis focusing, and can also concentrate light into multiple, discrete spots. We expanded the unit cell shapes of the lattice to achieve distinct, polarization-dependent optical responses from the same 2D patterned substrate. Finally, these lattice opto-materials can also be combined into architectures that resemble a new type of compound flat lens. PMID:25380062

  3. Structural acceptance criteria for the evaulation of existing double-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Julyk, L.J.; Day, A.D.; Dyrness, A.D.; Moore, C.J.; Peterson, W.S.; Scott, M.A.; Shrivastava, H.P.; Sholman, J.S.; Watts, T.N.

    1995-09-01

    The structural acceptance criteria contained herein for the evaluation of existing underground double-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford Site is part of the Life Management/Aging Management Program of the Tank Waste Remediation System. The purpose of the overall life management program is to ensure that confinement of the waste is maintained over the required service life of the tanks. Characterization of the present condition of the tanks, understanding and characterization of potential degradation mechanisms, and development of tank structural acceptance criteria based on previous service and projected use are prerequisites to assessing tank integrity, to projecting the length of tank service, and to developing and applying prudent fixes or repairs. The criteria provided herein summarize the requirements for the analysis and structural qualification of the existing double-shell tanks for continued operation. Code reconciliation issues and material degradation under aging conditions are addressed. Although the criteria were developed for double-shell tanks, many of the provisions are equally applicable to single-shell tanks. However, the criteria do not apply to the evaluation of tank appurtenances and buried piping.

  4. Ecological conditions of ponds situated on blast furnace slag deposits located in South Gare Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), Teesside, UK.

    PubMed

    Raper, E; Davies, S; Perkins, B; Lamb, H; Hermanson, M; Soares, A; Stephenson, T

    2015-06-01

    Slag, a by-product from the iron and steel industry, has a range of applications within construction and is used in wastewater treatment. Historically considered a waste material, little consideration was given to the environmental impacts of its disposal. South Gare (a Site of Special Scientific Interest) located at the mouth of the Tees estuary, UK, formed on slag deposits used to create a sea wall and make the land behind permanent. Over time, ponds formed in depressions with the water chemistry, being significantly impacted by the slag deposits. Calcium levels reached 504 mg/L, nitrate 49.0 mg/L and sulphate 1,698 mg/L. These levels were also reflected in the composition of the sediment. pH (5.10-9.90) and electrical conductivity (2,710-3,598 µS/cm) were variable but often notably high. Pb, Cu and Cd were not present within the water, whilst Zn ranged from 0.027 to 0.37 mg/L. Heavy metal levels were higher in surface sediments. Zinc was most dominant (174.3-1,310.2 mg/L) followed by Pb (9.9-431 mg/L), Cu (8.4-41.8 mg/L) and Cd (0.4-1.1 mg/L). A sediment core provided a historical overview of the ponds. The ponds were unfavourable for aquatic biodiversity and unsuitable for drinking water abstraction.

  5. Site- and bond-percolation thresholds in Kn ,n-based lattices: Vulnerability of quantum annealers to random qubit and coupler failures on chimera topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchert, O.; Katzgraber, Helmut G.; Novotny, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    We estimate the critical thresholds of bond and site percolation on nonplanar, effectively two-dimensional graphs with chimeralike topology. The building blocks of these graphs are complete and symmetric bipartite subgraphs of size 2 n , referred to as Kn ,n graphs. For the numerical simulations we use an efficient union-find-based algorithm and employ a finite-size scaling analysis to obtain the critical properties for both bond and site percolation. We report the respective percolation thresholds for different sizes of the bipartite subgraph and verify that the associated universality class is that of standard two-dimensional percolation. For the canonical chimera graph used in the D-Wave Systems Inc. quantum annealer (n =4 ), we discuss device failure in terms of network vulnerability, i.e., we determine the critical fraction of qubits and couplers that can be absent due to random failures prior to losing large-scale connectivity throughout the device.

  6. LATTICE QCD AT FINITE DENSITY.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHMIDT, C.

    2006-07-23

    I discuss different approaches to finite density lattice QCD. In particular, I focus on the structure of the phase diagram and discuss attempts to determine the location of the critical end-point. Recent results on the transition line as function of the chemical potential (T{sub c}({mu}{sub q})) are reviewed. Along the transition line, hadronic fluctuations have been calculated; which can be used to characterize properties of the Quark Gluon plasma and eventually can also help to identify the location of the critical end-point in the QCD phase diagram on the lattice and in heavy ion experiments. Furthermore, I comment on the structure of the phase diagram at large {mu}{sub q}.

  7. Discrete breathers in hexagonal dusty plasma lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Koukouloyannis, V.; Kourakis, I.

    2009-08-15

    The occurrence of single-site or multisite localized vibrational modes, also called discrete breathers, in two-dimensional hexagonal dusty plasma lattices is investigated. The system is described by a Klein-Gordon hexagonal lattice characterized by a negative coupling parameter epsilon in account of its inverse dispersive behavior. A theoretical analysis is performed in order to establish the possibility of existence of single as well as three-site discrete breathers in such systems. The study is complemented by a numerical investigation based on experimentally provided potential forms. This investigation shows that a dusty plasma lattice can support single-site discrete breathers, while three-site in phase breathers could exist if specific conditions, about the intergrain interaction strength, would hold. On the other hand, out of phase and vortex three-site breathers cannot be supported since they are highly unstable.

  8. Spin-Lattice-Coupled Order in Heisenberg Antiferromagnets on the Pyrochlore Lattice.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Kazushi; Kawamura, Hikaru

    2016-06-24

    Effects of local lattice distortions on the spin ordering are investigated for the antiferromagnetic classical Heisenberg model on the pyrochlore lattice. It is found by Monte Carlo simulations that the spin-lattice coupling (SLC) originating from site phonons induces a first-order transition into two different types of collinear magnetic ordered states. The state realized at the stronger SLC is cubic symmetric characterized by the magnetic (1/2,1/2,1/2) Bragg peaks, while that at the weaker SLC is tetragonal symmetric characterized by the (1,1,0) ones, each accompanied by the commensurate local lattice distortions. Experimental implications to chromium spinels are discussed.

  9. Spin-Lattice-Coupled Order in Heisenberg Antiferromagnets on the Pyrochlore Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Kazushi; Kawamura, Hikaru

    2016-06-01

    Effects of local lattice distortions on the spin ordering are investigated for the antiferromagnetic classical Heisenberg model on the pyrochlore lattice. It is found by Monte Carlo simulations that the spin-lattice coupling (SLC) originating from site phonons induces a first-order transition into two different types of collinear magnetic ordered states. The state realized at the stronger SLC is cubic symmetric characterized by the magnetic (1/2 ,1/2 ,1/2 ) Bragg peaks, while that at the weaker SLC is tetragonal symmetric characterized by the (1,1,0) ones, each accompanied by the commensurate local lattice distortions. Experimental implications to chromium spinels are discussed.

  10. Spin Chains with Dynamical Lattice Supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagendorf, Christian

    2013-02-01

    Spin chains with exact supersymmetry on finite one-dimensional lattices are considered. The supercharges are nilpotent operators on the lattice of dynamical nature: they change the number of sites. A local criterion for the nilpotency on periodic lattices is formulated. Any of its solutions leads to a supersymmetric spin chain. It is shown that a class of special solutions at arbitrary spin gives the lattice equivalents of the {N}=(2,2) superconformal minimal models. The case of spin one is investigated in detail: in particular, it is shown that the Fateev-Zamolodchikov chain and its off-critical extension possess a lattice supersymmetry for all its coupling constants. Its supersymmetry singlets are thoroughly analysed, and a relation between their components and the weighted enumeration of alternating sign matrices is conjectured.

  11. Exotic damping ring lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    This paper looks at, and compares three types of damping ring lattices: conventional, wiggler lattice with finite ..cap alpha.., wiggler lattice with ..cap alpha.. = 0, and observes the attainable equilibrium emittances for the three cases assuming a constraint on the attainable longitudinal impedance of 0.2 ohms. The emittance obtained are roughly in the ratio 4:2:1 for these cases.

  12. rs2735383, located at a microRNA binding site in the 3’UTR of NBS1, is not associated with breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingjing; Lončar, Ivona; Collée, J. Margriet; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Andrulis, Irene L.; Barile, Monica; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Behrens, Sabine; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Boeckx, Bram; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Shou-Tung; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Cheng, Ching Y.; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Cuk, Katarina; Czene, Kamila; Dörk, Thilo; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G.; Glendon, Gord; Goldberg, Mark S.; González-Neira, Anna; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hart, Steven N.; Hartman, Mikael; Hatse, Sigrid; Hopper, John L.; Ito, Hidemi; Jakubowska, Anna; Kabisch, Maria; Kang, Daehee; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Eunjung; Li, Jingmei; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Jan Lubinski; Mannermaa, Arto; Matsuo, Keitaro; Milne, Roger L.; Sahlberg, Kristine K.; Ottestad, Lars; Kåresen, Rolf; Langerød, Anita; Schlichting, Ellen; Holmen, Marit Muri; Sauer, Toril; Haakensen, Vilde; Engebråten, Olav; Naume, Bjørn; Kiserud, Cecile E.; Reinertsen, Kristin V.; Helland, åslaug; Riis, Margit; Bukholm, Ida; Lønning, Per Eystein; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe I.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Orr, Nick; Perez, Jose I. A.; Peto, Julian; Putti, Thomas C.; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Shen, Chen-Yang; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Simard, Jacques; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Teo, Soo H.; Tessier, Daniel C.; Thanasitthichai, Somchai; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Vachon, Celine; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna H.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hooning, Maartje J.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Martens, John W. M.; Hollestelle, Antoinette

    2016-01-01

    NBS1, also known as NBN, plays an important role in maintaining genomic stability. Interestingly, rs2735383 G > C, located in a microRNA binding site in the 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of NBS1, was shown to be associated with increased susceptibility to lung and colorectal cancer. However, the relation between rs2735383 and susceptibility to breast cancer is not yet clear. Therefore, we genotyped rs2735383 in 1,170 familial non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer cases and 1,077 controls using PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP-PCR) analysis, but found no association between rs2735383CC and breast cancer risk (OR = 1.214, 95% CI = 0.936–1.574, P = 0.144). Because we could not exclude a small effect size due to a limited sample size, we further analyzed imputed rs2735383 genotypes (r2 > 0.999) of 47,640 breast cancer cases and 46,656 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). However, rs2735383CC was not associated with overall breast cancer risk in European (OR = 1.014, 95% CI = 0.969–1.060, P = 0.556) nor in Asian women (OR = 0.998, 95% CI = 0.905–1.100, P = 0.961). Subgroup analyses by age, age at menarche, age at menopause, menopausal status, number of pregnancies, breast feeding, family history and receptor status also did not reveal a significant association. This study therefore does not support the involvement of the genotype at NBS1 rs2735383 in breast cancer susceptibility. PMID:27845421

  13. Investigation of relationships between Aedes aegypti egg, larvae, pupae, and adult density indices where their main breeding sites were located indoors.

    PubMed

    Romero-Vivas, Claudia M E; Falconar, Andrew K I

    2005-03-01

    Aedes aegypti (L.) density indices obtained in a dengue fever (DF) endemic area were compared. One hundred and twenty premises, in an urban area of Colombia where dengue type-1 and type-2 virus cocirculated, were randomly selected and sampled for 7 months. The geometric mean monthly numbers (density index, DI) of Ae. aegypti eggs (ODI), 4th instar larvae (LDI), pupae (PDI), and adults (ADI) were calculated based on the use of ovitraps, nets, and manual aspirators, respectively. A negative temporal correlation was observed between the LDI and the ODI (r = -0.83, df = 5, and P < 0.01). Positive temporal correlations were only observed between the LDI and the PDI (r = 0.90, df = 5, and P < 00.5) and the Breteau and House indices (r = 0.86, df = 5, and P < 0.01). No other correlations were found between these indices and any of the other density indices or the incidence of suspected DF cases in residents, the temperature, the rainfall, or seasonal fluctuations. Our results were, therefore, probably due to the most productive Ae. aegypti breeding sites (large water containers) being located indoors within this study area. The number of adult female Ae. aegypti/person (n = 0.5) and pupae/person (n = 11) in our study area were lower and dramatically higher than the transmission thresholds previously reported for adult and pupae, respectively. Because there were confirmed DF cases during the study period, the transmission threshold based on the Ae. aegypti pupae was clearly more reliable. We found that the mean ovitrap premise index (OPI) was 98.2% during this study and that the mean larval (L-4th instars) premise index (LPI) was 59.2%, and therefore we suggest that the OPI and LPI would be more sensitive methods to gauge the effectiveness of A. aegypti control programs.

  14. Comparison of CAP88 PC Ver. 3.0 and MAXDOSE dose assessment models involving co-located stack releases at the Savannah River site.

    PubMed

    Farfán, Eduardo; Jannik, G Timothy; Lee, Patricia; Powell, Aaron

    2013-08-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory's Environmental Dosimetry Group performs dosimetry assessments for Savannah River Site (SRS) radionuclide air emissions utilizing the Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988 (CAP88) code (CAP88 PC Ver. 3.0) and the MAXDOSE-SR Ver. 2011 code, which is an SRS-specific version of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's MAXIGASP code. CAP88 PC and MAXDOSE-SR are used at SRS for demonstrating compliance with Environmental Protection Agency dose standards for radionuclide emissions to the atmosphere and Department of Energy Order 458.1 dose standards, respectively. During a routine comparison of these two assessment models, it was discovered that CAP88 PC Ver. 3.0 was not producing the expected results when using multiple co-located stacks in a single run. Specifically, if the stack heights are considered separately, the results for several radionuclides (but not all) differ from the combined run [i.e., 1 + 2 does not equal (1+2)]. Additionally, when two or more stack heights are considered in a run, the results depend on the order of the selected stack heights. For example, for a two stack-height run of 0 meter and 61 m input produces different results from a 61 m and 0 m input run. This study presents a comparison of CAP88 PC Ver. 3.0 and MAXDOSE-SR Ver. 2011 based on SRS input data and on two-stack release scenarios. The selected radionuclides for this study included gases/vapors (H, C, Kr, and I) and particulates (Sr, Cs, Pu, and Am) commonly encountered at SRS.

  15. rs2735383, located at a microRNA binding site in the 3'UTR of NBS1, is not associated with breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingjing; Lončar, Ivona; Collée, J Margriet; Bolla, Manjeet K; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Andrulis, Irene L; Barile, Monica; Beckmann, Matthias W; Behrens, Sabine; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Boeckx, Bram; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Shou-Tung; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Cheng, Ching Y; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cuk, Katarina; Czene, Kamila; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Goldberg, Mark S; González-Neira, Anna; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hart, Steven N; Hartman, Mikael; Hatse, Sigrid; Hopper, John L; Ito, Hidemi; Jakubowska, Anna; Kabisch, Maria; Kang, Daehee; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela N; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Eunjung; Li, Jingmei; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Jan Lubinski; Mannermaa, Arto; Matsuo, Keitaro; Milne, Roger L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Orr, Nick; Perez, Jose I A; Peto, Julian; Putti, Thomas C; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Shen, Chen-Yang; Shrubsole, Martha J; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Simard, Jacques; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony; Teo, Soo H; Tessier, Daniel C; Thanasitthichai, Somchai; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Vachon, Celine; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna H; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; Hooning, Maartje J; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Martens, John W M; Hollestelle, Antoinette

    2016-11-15

    NBS1, also known as NBN, plays an important role in maintaining genomic stability. Interestingly, rs2735383 G > C, located in a microRNA binding site in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of NBS1, was shown to be associated with increased susceptibility to lung and colorectal cancer. However, the relation between rs2735383 and susceptibility to breast cancer is not yet clear. Therefore, we genotyped rs2735383 in 1,170 familial non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer cases and 1,077 controls using PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP-PCR) analysis, but found no association between rs2735383CC and breast cancer risk (OR = 1.214, 95% CI = 0.936-1.574, P = 0.144). Because we could not exclude a small effect size due to a limited sample size, we further analyzed imputed rs2735383 genotypes (r(2) > 0.999) of 47,640 breast cancer cases and 46,656 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). However, rs2735383CC was not associated with overall breast cancer risk in European (OR = 1.014, 95% CI = 0.969-1.060, P = 0.556) nor in Asian women (OR = 0.998, 95% CI = 0.905-1.100, P = 0.961). Subgroup analyses by age, age at menarche, age at menopause, menopausal status, number of pregnancies, breast feeding, family history and receptor status also did not reveal a significant association. This study therefore does not support the involvement of the genotype at NBS1 rs2735383 in breast cancer susceptibility.

  16. Exon 10 skipping in ACAT1 caused by a novel c.949G>A mutation located at an exonic splice enhancer site.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Hiroki; Sasai, Hideo; Nakama, Mina; Aoyama, Yuka; Abdelkreem, Elsayed; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Konstantopoulou, Vassiliki; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2016-11-01

    Beta-ketothiolase deficiency, also known as mitochondrial acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (T2) deficiency, is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the acetyl‑CoA acetyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) gene. A German T2‑deficient patient that developed a severe ketoacidotic episode at the age of 11 months, was revealed to be a compound heterozygote of a previously reported null mutation, c.472A>G (p.N158D) and a novel mutation, c.949G>A (p.D317N), in ACAT1. The c.949G>A mutation was suspected to cause aberrant splicing as it is located within an exonic splicing enhancer sequence (c. 947CTGACGC) that is a potential binding site for serine/arginine‑rich splicing factor 1. A mutation in this sequence, c.951C>T, results in exon 10 skipping. A minigene construct was synthesized that included exon 9‑truncated intron 9‑exon 10‑truncated intron 10‑exon 11, and the splicing of this minigene revealed that the c.949G>A mutant construct caused exon 10 skipping in a proportion of the transcripts. Furthermore, additional substitution of G for C at the first nucleotide of exon 10 (c.941G>C) abolished the effect of the c.949G>A mutation. Transient expression analysis of the c.949G>A mutant cDNA revealed no residual T2 activity in the mutated D317N enzyme. Therefore, c.949G>A (D317N) is a pathogenic missense mutation, and diminishes the effect of an exonic splicing enhancer and causes exon 10 skipping. The present study demonstrates that a missense mutation, or even a synonymous substitution, may disrupt enzyme function by interference with splicing.

  17. Location Privacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaofeng; Chen, Jidong

    With rapid development of sensor and wireless mobile devices, it is easy to access mobile users' location information anytime and anywhere. On one hand, LBS is becoming more and more valuable and important. On the other hand, location privacy issues raised by such applications have also gained more attention. However, due to the specificity of location information, traditional privacy-preserving techniques in data publishing cannot be used. In this chapter, we will introduce location privacy, and analyze the challenges of location privacy-preserving, and give a survey of existing work including the system architecture, location anonymity and query processing.

  18. The effect of a spinal cord hemisection on changes in nitric oxide synthase pools in the site of injury and in regions located far away from the injured site.

    PubMed

    Lukácová, Nadezda; Kolesárová, Mária; Kuchárová, Karolína; Pavel, Jaroslav; Kolesár, Dalibor; Radonák, Jozef; Marsala, Martin; Chalimoniuk, Malgorzata; Langfort, Jozef; Marsala, Jozef

    2006-01-01

    1. The present study was designed to examine the nitric oxide synthase activities (constitutive and inducible) in the site of injury in response to Th10-Th11 spinal cord hemisection and, to determine whether unilateral disconnection of the spinal cord influences the NOS pools on the contra- and ipsilateral sides in segments located far away from the epicentre of injury. 2. A radioassay detection was used to determine Ca(2+)-dependent and inducible nitric oxide synthase activities. Somal, axonal and neuropil neuronal nitric oxide synthase was assessed by immunocytochemical study. A quantitative assessment of neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity was made by an image analyser. The level of neuronal nitric oxide synthase protein was measured by the Western blot analysis. 3. Our data show the increase of inducible nitric oxide synthase activity and a decrease of Ca(2+)-dependent nitric oxide synthase activity in the injured site analysed 1 and 7 days after surgery. In segments remote from the epicentre of injury the inducible nitric oxide synthase activity was increased at both time points. Ca(2+)-dependent nitric oxide synthase activity had decreased in L5-S1 segments in a group of animals surviving for 7 days. A hemisection performed at thoracic level did not cause significant difference in the nitric oxide synthase activities and in the level of neuronal nitric oxide synthase protein between the contra- and ipsilateral sides in C6-Th1 and L5-S1 segments taken as a whole. Significant differences were observed, but only when the spinal cord was analysed segment by segment, and/or was divided into dorsal and ventral parts. The cell counts in the cervicothoracic (C7-Th1) and lumbosacral (L5-S1) enlargements revealed changes in neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity on the ipsilateral side of the injury. The densitometric area measurements confirmed the reduction of somal, neuropil and axonal neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactive staining in

  19. Cultural Resources Investigation of the Reservoir Shorelines: Gull Lake, Leech Lake, Pine River and Lake Pokegama. Volume 2. Site Location Data.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    affiliation Malmo (Middle Woodland ); Blackduck 4. Location: Sec. 4 Twp. 135N R. 29W Verbal description E NWk north end Upper Gull; just east of bridge over...affiliation Woodland 4. Location: Sec. 25 Twp. 134N R. 30W Verbal description NWk SEk on the southeast arm of the southwest part of Wilson Bay, Gull...mound, village, etc.) mound? burial? 2. Map reference USGS Gull Lake 3. Cultural affiliation Woodland and Historic 4. Location: Sec. 21 Tp. 135N R. 29W

  20. We are in need of sampling the sedimentary cover and bedrock in the Amerasia Basin. (Suggested site locations in the Makarov Basin, the Mendeleev and Lomonosov ridges and adjacent areas.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedeva-Ivanova, N. N.

    2010-12-01

    The Amerasia Basin has a complex origin; alone, the geophysical data can support very different hypotheses. For understanding the tectonic evolution of the Basin and origin of the ridges and troughs it is important to collect geological samples. Based on analyzed seismic data (NP-28 and 26, HOTRAX, Arctic-2000 and TransArctic) over the Makarov Basin, the Mendeleev and Lomonosov ridges and adjacent areas, numbers of key drill sites are proposed. All proposed sites in combinations with other geophysical research of the area are fit well with most of the Site Survey Data Requirements (IODP) for a drilling site. Bedrock samples from key locations are especially needed, with full video or photo documentation of the sampling for avoiding later debates about whether bedrock or ice-drift was collected. Due to close locations to a sea bottom, bedrock can be sampled by gravity piston-cores or shallow drilling. Full stratigraphic sections though the Cenozoic and older sedimentary successions are needed at other proposed key locations for understanding the tectonic evolution of the Amerasia Basin. The depositional environment of the key reflections related to Cenozoic shallow water environments, as recorded in the ACEX drillholes, needs to be investigated in other locations. We will then be able to define better the nature of particular morphological features and construct more reliable tectonic models of the Amerasia Basin, in general.

  1. Ising antiferromagnet on the 2-uniform lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Unjong

    2016-08-01

    The antiferromagnetic Ising model is investigated on the twenty 2-uniform lattices using the Monte Carlo method based on the Wang-Landau algorithm and the Metropolis algorithm to study the geometric frustration effect systematically. Based on the specific heat, the residual entropy, and the Edwards-Anderson freezing order parameter, the ground states of them were determined. In addition to the long-range-ordered phase and the spin ice phase found in the Archimedean lattices, two more phases were found. The partial long-range order is long-range order with exceptional disordered sites, which give extensive residual entropy. In the partial spin ice phase, the partial freezing phenomenon appears: A majority of sites are frozen without long-range order, but the other sites are fluctuating even at zero temperature. The spin liquid ground state was not found in the 2-uniform lattices.

  2. Discrete vector solitons in one-dimensional lattices in photorefractive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitrakis, E. P.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Malomed, B. A.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.

    2006-08-01

    We construct families of two-component spatial solitons in a one-dimensional lattice with saturable on-site nonlinearity (focusing or defocusing) in a photorefractive crystal. We identify 14 species of vector solitons, depending on their type (bright/dark), phase (in-phase/staggered), and location on the lattice (on/off-site). Two species of the bright/bright type form entirely stable soliton families, four species are partially stable (depending on the value of the propagation constant), while the remaining eight species are completely unstable. “Symbiotic” soliton pairs (of the bright/dark type), which contain components that cannot exist in isolation in the same model, are found as well.

  3. Lattice location and local magnetism of recoil implanted Fe impurities in wide and narrow band semiconductors CdTe, CdSe, and InSb: Experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanta, S. K.; Mishra, S. N.

    2014-05-07

    Employing the time differential perturbed angular distribution method, we have measured local susceptibility and spin relaxation rate of {sup 54}Fe nuclei implanted in III-V and II-VI semiconductors, CdTe, CdSe, and InSb. The magnetic response of Fe, identified to occupy the metal as well as the semi-metal atom sites, exhibit Curie-Weiss type susceptibility and Korringa like spin relaxation rate, revealing the existence of localized moments with small spin fluctuation temperature. The experimental results are supported by first principle electronic structure calculations performed within the frame work of density functional theory.

  4. Enumerations of Lattice Animals and Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Iwan

    2001-02-01

    We have developed an improved algorithm that allows us to enumerate the number of site animals on the square lattice up to size 46. We also calculate the number of lattice trees up to size 44 and the radius of gyration of both lattice animals and trees up to size 42. Analysis of the resulting series yields an improved estimate, λ=4.062570(8), for the growth constant of lattice animals, and, λ0=3.795254(8), for the growth constant of trees, and confirms to a very high degree of certainty that both the animal and tree generating functions have a logarithmic divergence. Analysis of the radius of gyration series yields the estimate, ν=0.64115(5), for the size exponent.

  5. Renormalization transformation of periodic and aperiodic lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Macia, Enrique; Rodriguez-Oliveros, Rogelio

    2006-10-01

    In this work we introduce a similarity transformation acting on transfer matrices describing the propagation of elementary excitations through either periodic or Fibonacci lattices. The proposed transformation can act at two different scale lengths. At the atomic scale the transformation allows one to express the systems' global transfer matrix in terms of an equivalent on-site model one. Correlation effects among different hopping terms are described by a series of local phase factors in that case. When acting on larger scale lengths, corresponding to short segments of the original lattice, the similarity transformation can be properly regarded as describing an effective renormalization of the chain. The nature of the resulting renormalized lattice significantly depends on the kind of order (i.e., periodic or quasiperiodic) of the original lattice, expressing a delicate balance between chemical complexity and topological order as a consequence of the renormalization process.

  6. Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Ground Penetrating Radar for locating buried petrified wood sites: a case study in the natural monument of the Petrified Forest of Evros, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargemezis, George; Diamanti, Nectaria; Tsourlos, Panagiotis; Fikos, Ilias

    2014-05-01

    A geophysical survey was carried out in the Petrified Forest of Evros, the northernmost regional unit of Greece. This collection of petrified wood has an age of approximately 35 million years and it is the oldest in Greece (i.e., older than the well-known Petrified Forest of Lesvos island located in the North Aegean Sea and which is possibly the largest of the petrified forests worldwide). Protection, development and maintenance projects still need to be carried out at the area despite all fears regarding the forest's fate since many petrified logs remain exposed both in weather conditions - leading to erosion - and to the public. This survey was conducted as part of a more extensive framework regarding the development and protection of this natural monument. Geophysical surveying has been chosen as a non-destructive investigation method since the area of application is both a natural ecosystem and part of cultural heritage. Along with electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys have been carried out for investigating possible locations of buried fossilized tree trunks. The geoelectrical sections derived from ERT data in combination with the GPR profiles provided a broad view of the subsurface. Two and three dimensional subsurface geophysical images of the surveyed area have been constructed, pointing out probable locations of petrified logs. Regarding ERT, petrified trunks have been detected as high resistive bodies, while lower resistivity values were more related to the surrounding geological materials. GPR surveying has also indicated buried petrified log locations. As these two geophysical methods are affected in different ways by the subsurface conditions, the combined use of both techniques enhanced our ability to produce more reliable interpretations of the subsurface. After the completion of the geophysical investigations of this first stage, petrified trunks were revealed after a subsequent excavation at indicated

  7. Dissipative photonic lattice solitons.

    PubMed

    Ultanir, Erdem A; Stegeman, George I; Christodoulides, Demetrios N

    2004-04-15

    We show that discrete dissipative optical lattice solitons are possible in waveguide array configurations that involve periodically patterned semiconductor optical amplifiers and saturable absorbers. The characteristics of these low-power soliton states are investigated, and their propagation constant eigenvalues are mapped on Floquet-Bloch band diagrams. The prospect of observing such low-power dissipative lattice solitons is discussed in detail.

  8. Determination of structure of the MinD-ATP complex reveals the orientation of MinD on the membrane and the relative location of the binding sites for MinE and MinC

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Park, Kyung-Tae; Holyoak, Todd; Lutkenhaus, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Summary The three Min proteins spatially regulate Z ring positioning in E. coli and are dynamically associated with the membrane. MinD binds to vesicles in the presence of ATP and can recruit MinC or MinE. Biochemical and genetic evidence indicate the binding sites for these two proteins on MinD overlap. Here we solved the structure of a hydrolytic-deficient mutant of MinD truncated for the C-terminal amphipathic helix involved in binding to the membrane. The structure solved in the presence of ATP is a dimer and reveals the face of MinD abutting the membrane. Using a combination of random and extensive site-directed mutagenesis additional residues important for MinE and MinC binding were identified. The location of these residues on the MinD structure confirms that the binding sites overlap and reveals that the binding sites are at the dimer interface and exposed to the cytosol. The location of the binding sites at the dimer interface offers a simple explanation for the ATP-dependency of MinC and MinE binding to MinD. PMID:21231967

  9. Use of a novel Förster resonance energy transfer method to identify locations of site-bound metal ions in the U2-U6 snRNA complex.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Faqing; Griffin, Laura; Phelps, LauraJane; Buschmann, Volker; Weston, Kenneth; Greenbaum, Nancy L

    2007-01-01

    U2 and U6 snRNAs pair to form a phylogenetically conserved complex at the catalytic core of the spliceosome. Interactions with divalent metal ions, particularly Mg(II), at specific sites are essential for its folding and catalytic activity. We used a novel Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) method between site-bound luminescent lanthanide ions and a covalently attached fluorescent dye, combined with supporting stoichiometric and mutational studies, to determine locations of site-bound Tb(III) within the human U2-U6 complex. At pH 7.2, we detected three metal-ion-binding sites in: (1) the consensus ACACAGA sequence, which forms the internal loop between helices I and III; (2) the four-way junction, which contains the conserved AGC triad; and (3) the internal loop of the U6 intra-molecular stem loop (ISL). Binding at each of these sites is supported by previous phosphorothioate substitution studies and, in the case of the ISL site, by NMR. Binding of Tb(III) at the four-way junction and the ISL sites was found to be pH-dependent, with no ion binding observed below pH 6 and 7, respectively. This pH dependence of metal ion binding suggests that the local environment may play a role in the binding of metal ions, which may impact on splicing activity.

  10. A realistic lattice example

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Garren, A.A.

    1985-10-01

    A realistic, distributed interaction region (IR) lattice has been designed that includes new components discussed in the June 1985 lattice workshop. Unlike the test lattices, the lattice presented here includes utility straights and the mechanism for crossing the beams in the experimental straights. Moreover, both the phase trombones and the dispersion suppressors contain the same bending as the normal cells. Vertically separated beams and 6 Tesla, 1-in-1 magnets are assumed. Since the cells are 200 meters long, and have 60 degree phase advance, this lattice has been named RLD1, in analogy with the corresponding test lattice, TLD1. The quadrupole gradient is 136 tesla/meter in the cells, and has similar values in other quadrupoles except in those in the IR`s, where the maximum gradient is 245 tesla/meter. RLD1 has distributed IR`s; however, clustered realistic lattices can easily be assembled from the same components, as was recently done in a version that utilizes the same type of experimental and utility straights as those of RLD1.

  11. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Nathal, M. V.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kraus, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    In their simplest form, lattice block panels are produced by direct casting and result in lightweight, fully triangulated truss-like configurations which provide strength and stiffness [2]. The earliest realizations of lattice block were made from A1 and steels, primarily under funding from the US Navy [3]. This work also showed that the mechanical efficiency (eg., specific stiffness) of lattice block structures approached that of honeycomb structures [2]. The lattice architectures are also less anisotropic, and the investment casting route should provide a large advantage in cost and temperature capability over honeycombs which are limited to alloys that can be processed into foils. Based on this early work, a program was initiated to determine the feasibility of extending the high temperature superalloy lattice block [3]. The objective of this effort was to provide an alternative to intermetallics and composites in achieving a lightweight high temperature structure without sacrificing the damage tolerance and moderate cost inherent in superalloys. To establish the feasibility of the superalloy lattice block concept, work was performed in conjunction with JAMCORP, Inc. Billerica, MA, to produce a number of lattice block panels from both IN71 8 and Mar-M247.

  12. Quasicrystallography from Bn lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koca, M.; Koca, N. O.; Al-Mukhaini, A.; Al-Qanabi, A.

    2014-11-01

    We present a group theoretical analysis of the hypercubic lattice described by the affine Coxeter-Weyl group Wa (Bn). An h-fold symmetric quasicrystal structure follows from the hyperqubic lattice whose point group is described by the Coxeter-Weyl group W (Bn) with the Coxeter number h=2n. Higher dimensional cubic lattices are explicitly constructed for n = 4,5,6 by identifying their rank-3 Coxeter subgroups and maximal dihedral subgroups. Decomposition of their Voronoi cells under the respective rank-3 subgroups W (A3), W (H2)×W (A1) and W (H3)lead to the rhombic dodecahedron, rhombic icosahedron and rhombic triacontahedron respectively. Projection of the lattice B4 describes a quasicrystal structure with 8-fold symmetry. The B5 lattice leads to quasicrystals with both 5fold and 10 fold symmetries. The lattice B6 projects on a 12-fold symmetric quasicrystal as well as a 3D icosahedral quasicrystal depending on the choice of subspace of projections. The projected sets of lattice points are compatible with the available experimental data.

  13. kmos: A lattice kinetic Monte Carlo framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Max J.; Matera, Sebastian; Reuter, Karsten

    2014-07-01

    Kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) simulations have emerged as a key tool for microkinetic modeling in heterogeneous catalysis and other materials applications. Systems, where site-specificity of all elementary reactions allows a mapping onto a lattice of discrete active sites, can be addressed within the particularly efficient lattice kMC approach. To this end we describe the versatile kmos software package, which offers a most user-friendly implementation, execution, and evaluation of lattice kMC models of arbitrary complexity in one- to three-dimensional lattice systems, involving multiple active sites in periodic or aperiodic arrangements, as well as site-resolved pairwise and higher-order lateral interactions. Conceptually, kmos achieves a maximum runtime performance which is essentially independent of lattice size by generating code for the efficiency-determining local update of available events that is optimized for a defined kMC model. For this model definition and the control of all runtime and evaluation aspects kmos offers a high-level application programming interface. Usage proceeds interactively, via scripts, or a graphical user interface, which visualizes the model geometry, the lattice occupations and rates of selected elementary reactions, while allowing on-the-fly changes of simulation parameters. We demonstrate the performance and scaling of kmos with the application to kMC models for surface catalytic processes, where for given operation conditions (temperature and partial pressures of all reactants) central simulation outcomes are catalytic activity and selectivities, surface composition, and mechanistic insight into the occurrence of individual elementary processes in the reaction network.

  14. Using chloride and chlorine-36 as soil-water tracers to estimate deep percolation at selected locations on the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prych, Edmund A.

    1998-01-01

    A chloride mass-balance method and a chlorine-36 isotope bomb-pulse method were used to estimate long-term average rates of deep percolation at at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. Because the bomb-pulse method typically gives an upper limit and the mass-balance method may underestimate, estimates from both methods probably bracket actual rates.

  15. REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST: PROPOSING A NEW STRATEGICALLY LOCATED AMERIFLUX TOWER SITE IN MISSOURI

    SciTech Connect

    Pallardy, Stephen G

    2013-04-19

    by June 14, 2004, the MOFLUX site was fully instrumented and data streams started to flow. A primary accomplished deliverable for the project period was the data streams of CO{sub 2} and water vapor fluxes and numerous meteorological variables (from which prepared datasets have been submitted to the AmeriFlux data archive for 2004-2006, Additionally, measurements of leaf biochemistry and physiology, biomass inventory, tree allometry, successional trends other variables were obtained.

  16. Chromatin studies reveal that an ERE is located far upstream of a vitellogenin gene and that a distal tissue-specific hypersensitive site is conserved for two coordinately regulated vitellogenin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Burch, J B; Fischer, A H

    1990-01-01

    Estrogen induces the expression of three vitellogenin genes in chicken hepatocytes. To survey the vitellogenin III (VTGIII) gene region for possible distal regulatory sequences, we identified tissue-specific hypersensitive (HS) sites within a 45 kb chromatin region spanning this gene. Five constitutive HS sites were found to mark the VTGIII gene region in hormone-naive hepatocytes. Strikingly, the constitutive HS site located 5.5 kb upstream of the VTGIII gene and a previously identified HS site located within the coordinately regulated VTGII gene mapped to nearly identical copies of a 72 bp sequence. Moreover, it would appear that there has been evolutionary pressure to retain specifically this 72 bp of VTGII-like sequence near the VTGIII gene subsequent to the VTGIII and VTGII genes becoming unlinked approximately 16 Myr ago. Two additional sets of HS sites were induced in the VTGIII gene region in response to estrogen. One set mapped immediately upstream of the gene in the vicinity of what we show to be a functional estrogen response element (ERE). The other induced HS site mapped 7.5 kb upstream of the gene. This far-upstream region was sequenced and was found to contain two imperfect ERE consensus sequences spaced 88 bp apart. In transient expression assays neither of these individual imperfect ERE sequences was functional, but a fragment spanning both sequences behaved as a strong ERE. In contrast to this synergism between imperfect ERE sequences, the presence of an NF-1 binding site 23 bp away from the more distal imperfect ERE sequence was not sufficient to render the latter a functional ERE in our assays. Images PMID:2377458

  17. The ACE inhibitor ( sup 3 H)SQ29,852 identifies a high affinity recognition site located in the human temporal cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, N.M.; Costall, B.; Egli, P.; Horovitz, Z.P.; Ironside, J.W.; Naylor, R.J.; Williams, T.J. )

    1990-07-01

    The angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor ({sup 3}H)SQ29,852 identified a single high affinity recognition site (defined by 10.0 microM captopril) in the human temporal cortex (pKD 8.62 +/- 0.03; Bmax 248 +/- 24 fmol mg-1 protein, mean +/- S.E.M., n = 4). ACE inhibitors and thiorphan competed to a similar level for the ({sup 3}H)SQ29,852 binding site in the human temporal cortex with a rank order of affinity (pKi values mean +/- S.E.M., n = 3), lisinopril (9.49 +/- 0.02), captopril (9.16 +/- 0.08), SQ29,852 (8.58 +/- 0.04), epicaptopril (7.09 +/- 0.08), fosinopril (7.08 +/- 0.05) and thiorphan (6.40 +/- 0.04). Since this rank order of affinity is similar to the affinity of these compounds to inhibit brain ACE activity it is concluded that ({sup 3}H)SQ29,852 selectively labels the inhibitor recognition site of ACE in the human temporal cortex.

  18. Nearest-neighbor detection of atoms in a 1D optical lattice by fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Karski, M; Förster, L; Choi, J M; Alt, W; Widera, A; Meschede, D

    2009-02-06

    We overcome the diffraction limit in fluorescence imaging of neutral atoms in a sparsely filled one-dimensional optical lattice. At a periodicity of 433 nm, we reliably infer the separation of two atoms down to nearest neighbors. We observe light induced losses of atoms occupying the same lattice site, while for atoms in adjacent lattice sites, no losses due to light induced interactions occur. Our method points towards characterization of correlated quantum states in optical lattice systems with filling factors of up to one atom per lattice site.

  19. Jammed lattice sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallus, Yoav; Marcotte, Étienne; Torquato, Salvatore

    2013-12-01

    We generate and study an ensemble of isostatic jammed hard-sphere lattices. These lattices are obtained by compression of a periodic system with an adaptive unit cell containing a single sphere until the point of mechanical stability. We present detailed numerical data about the densities, pair correlations, force distributions, and structure factors of such lattices. We show that this model retains many of the crucial structural features of the classical hard-sphere model and propose it as a model for the jamming and glass transitions that enables exploration of much higher dimensions than are usually accessible.

  20. Lattice effects on Laughlin wave functions and parent Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, Ivan; Cirac, J. Ignacio; Sierra, Germán; Nielsen, Anne E. B.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate lattice effects on wave functions that are lattice analogs of bosonic and fermionic Laughlin wave functions with number of particles per flux ν =1 /q in the Landau levels. These wave functions are defined analytically on lattices with μ particles per lattice site, where μ may be different than ν . We give numerical evidence that these states have the same topological properties as the corresponding continuum Laughlin states for different values of q and for different fillings μ . These states define, in particular, particle-hole symmetric lattice fractional quantum Hall states when the lattice is half filled. On the square lattice it is observed that for q ≤4 this particle-hole symmetric state displays the topological properties of the continuum Laughlin state at filling fraction ν =1 /q , while for larger q there is a transition towards long-range ordered antiferromagnets. This effect does not persist if the lattice is deformed from a square to a triangular lattice, or on the kagome lattice, in which case the topological properties of the state are recovered. We then show that changing the number of particles while keeping the expression of these wave functions identical gives rise to edge states that have the same correlations in the bulk as the reference lattice Laughlin states but a different density at the edge. We derive an exact parent Hamiltonian for which all these edge states are ground states with different number of particles. In addition this Hamiltonian admits the reference lattice Laughlin state as its unique ground state of filling factor 1 /q . Parent Hamiltonians are also derived for the lattice Laughlin states at other fillings of the lattice, when μ ≤1 /q or μ ≥1 -1 /q and when q =4 also at half filling.

  1. Percolation threshold of a class of correlated lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, Kenneth S.

    1997-12-01

    Investigations have been made of the percolation threshold of correlated site percolation lattices based on the convolution of a smoothing function with random white noise as suggested by Crossley, Schwartz, and Banavar. The dependence of percolation threshold on correlation length has been studied for several smoothing functions, lattice types, and lattice sizes. All results can be fit by a Gaussian function of the correlation length w, pc=p∞c+(p0c-p∞c)e-αw2. For two-dimensional, matching lattices the thresholds satisfy the Sykes-Essam relation pc(L)+pc(L*)=1.

  2. Lattice matched semiconductor growth on crystalline metallic substrates

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew G; Ptak, Aaron J; McMahon, William E

    2013-11-05

    Methods of fabricating a semiconductor layer or device and said devices are disclosed. The methods include but are not limited to providing a metal or metal alloy substrate having a crystalline surface with a known lattice parameter (a). The methods further include growing a crystalline semiconductor alloy layer on the crystalline substrate surface by coincident site lattice matched epitaxy. The semiconductor layer may be grown without any buffer layer between the alloy and the crystalline surface of the substrate. The semiconductor alloy may be prepared to have a lattice parameter (a') that is related to the lattice parameter (a). The semiconductor alloy may further be prepared to have a selected band gap.

  3. Use of remote sensing and geographic information systems to predict locations of Anopheles darlingi-positive breeding sites within the Sibun River in Belize, Central America.

    PubMed

    Achee, Nicole L; Grieco, John P; Masuoka, Penny; Andre, Richard G; Roberts, Donald R; Thomas, James; Briceno, Ireneo; King, Russell; Rejmankova, Eliska

    2006-03-01

    Previous studies have identified several anopheline species integral to the transmission of malaria in Belize. The highly efficient vector, Anopheles darlingi Root, is currently considered the most important. The preferred larval habitat of An. darlingi has been described as floating detritus patches, which are commonly associated with overhanging spiny bamboo, Guadua longifolia (E. Fourn.), along river margins. The objectives of this study were to use remote sensing and geographic information system (GIS) tools to 1) define the landscape features (i.e., river curvature, land cover, and house locations) associated with An. darlingi-positive breeding habitats and 2) determine the association between cleared land cover and the growth of spiny bamboo. A systematic survey was conducted in which all detritus patches of at least 1 m2 were sampled, mapped using GPS, and characterized by cause of habitat lodging. Bamboo stretches growing along the river margins also were mapped. Spatial analyses of satellite imagery found no associations between river characteristics or land cover with positive An. darlingi habitats. In addition, there was no significant difference in cleared versus forested land cover in relation to the presence or absence of bamboo. Results indicate that the average distance from homes to negative habitats was significantly greater than from positive detritus mats. Based on the land cover and river characteristics used, our results do not support the use of remote sensing as a predictive tool to locate specific areas within rivers positive for An. darlingi habitats.

  4. Estimating Groundwater Concentrations from Mass Releases to the Aquifer at Integrated Disposal Facility and Tank Farm Locations Within the Central Plateau of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, Marcel P.; Freeman, Eugene J.

    2005-06-09

    This report summarizes groundwater-related numerical calculations that will support groundwater flow and transport analyses associated with the scheduled 2005 performance assessment of the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at the Hanford Site. The report also provides potential supporting information to other ongoing Hanford Site risk analyses associated with the closure of single-shell tank farms and related actions. The IDF 2005 performance assessment analysis is using well intercept factors (WIFs), as outlined in the 2001 performance assessment of the IDF. The flow and transport analyses applied to these calculations use both a site-wide regional-scale model and a local-scale model of the area near the IDF. The regional-scale model is used to evaluate flow conditions, groundwater transport, and impacts from the IDF in the central part of the Hanford Site, at the core zone boundary around the 200 East and 200 West Areas, and along the Columbia River. The local-scale model is used to evaluate impacts from transport of contaminants to a hypothetical well 100 m downgradient from the IDF boundaries. Analyses similar to the regional-scale analysis of IDF releases are also provided at individual tank farm areas as additional information. To gain insight on how the WIF approach compares with other approaches for estimating groundwater concentrations from mass releases to the unconfined aquifer, groundwater concentrations were estimated with the WIF approach for two hypothetical release scenarios and compared with similar results using a calculational approach (the convolution approach). One release scenario evaluated with both approaches (WIF and convolution) involved a long-term source release from immobilized low-activity waste glass containing 25,550 Ci of technetium-99 near the IDF; another involved a hypothetical shorter-term release of {approx}0.7 Ci of technetium over 600 years from the S-SX tank farm area. In addition, direct simulation results for both release

  5. An experimental study of the impact of location on the effectiveness of recruitment clusters for red-cockaded woodpeckers at the Savannah River Site.

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, J., R.; Taylor, T., B.; Daniels, S., J.

    2003-05-29

    This report summarizes results of research on red-cockaded woodpeckers (Picoides borealis) conducted by personnel from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) and the Duke Marine Laboratory at the Savannah River Site (SRS), South Carolina, from September 29, 2000 through September 28, 2002. This period represents the first two years of a five-year Cooperative Agreement between Virginia Tech and the USDA Forest Service, Savannah River. This report serves as an Interim Project Report with respect to the Cooperative Agreement (No. OO-CA-ll 083600-010), and a Final Project Report for the initial award to Virginia Tech (FRS No.428911).

  6. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kantzos, P. T.; Krause, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Initial investigations of investment cast superalloy lattice block suggest that this technology will yield a low cost approach to utilize the high temperature strength and environmental resistance of superalloys in lightweight, damage tolerant structural configurations. Work to date has demonstrated that relatively large superalloy lattice block panels can be successfully investment cast from both IN-718 and Mar-M247. These castings exhibited mechanical properties consistent with the strength of the same superalloys measured from more conventional castings. The lattice block structure also accommodates significant deformation without failure, and is defect tolerant in fatigue. The potential of lattice block structures opens new opportunities for the use of superalloys in future generations of aircraft applications that demand strength and environmental resistance at elevated temperatures along with low weight.

  7. Root lattices and quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baake, M.; Joseph, D.; Kramer, P.; Schlottmann, M.

    1990-10-01

    It is shown that root lattices and their reciprocals might serve as the right pool for the construction of quasicrystalline structure models. All noncrystallographic symmetries observed so far are covered in minimal embedding with maximal symmetry.

  8. Root lattices and quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baake, M.; Joseph, D.; Kramer, P.; Schlottmann, M.

    1990-10-01

    It is shown how root lattices and their reciprocals might serve as the right pool for the construction of quasicrystalline structure models. All non-periodic symmetries observed so far are covered in minimal embedding with maximal symmetry.

  9. SPIN ON THE LATTICE.

    SciTech Connect

    ORGINOS,K.

    2003-01-07

    I review the current status of hadronic structure computations on the lattice. I describe the basic lattice techniques and difficulties and present some of the latest lattice results; in particular recent results of the RBC group using domain wall fermions are also discussed. In conclusion, lattice computations can play an important role in understanding the hadronic structure and the fundamental properties of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). Although some difficulties still exist, several significant steps have been made. Advances in computer technology are expected to play a significant role in pushing these computations closer to the chiral limit and in including dynamical fermions. RBC has already begun preliminary dynamical domain wall fermion computations [49] which we expect to be pushed forward with the arrival of QCD0C. In the near future, we also expect to complete the non-perturbative renormalization of the relevant derivative operators in quenched QCD.

  10. Shaken lattice interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, Carrie; Yu, Hoon; Anderson, Dana

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we report on progress towards performing interferometry using atoms trapped in an optical lattice. That is, we start with atoms in the ground state of an optical lattice potential V(x) =V0cos [ 2 kx + ϕ(t) ] , and by a prescribed phase function ϕ(t) , transform from one atomic wavefunction to another. In this way, we implement the standard interferometric sequence of beam splitting, propagation, reflection, reverse propagation, and recombination. Through the use of optimal control techniques, we have computationally demonstrated a scalable accelerometer that provides information on the sign of the applied acceleration. Extension of this idea to a two-dimensional shaken-lattice-based gyroscope is discussed. In addition, we report on the experimental implementation of the shaken lattice system.

  11. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  12. The Laminin 511/521 Binding Site on the Lutheran Blood Group Glycoprotein is Located at theFlexible Junction of Ig Domains 2 and 3

    SciTech Connect

    Mankelow, Tosti J.; Burton, Nicholas; Stedansdottir, Fanney O.; Spring, Frances A.; Parsons, Stephen F.; Pesersen, Jan S.; Oliveira, Cristiano L.P.; Lammie, Donna; Wess, Timothy; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel A.; Brady, R. Leo; Anstee, David J.

    2007-07-01

    The Lutheran blood group glycoprotein, first discovered on erythrocytes, is widely expressed in human tissues. It is a ligand for the {alpha}5 subunit of Laminin 511/521, an extracellular matrix protein. This interaction may contribute to vasocclusive events that are an important cause of morbidity in sickle cell disease. Using X-ray crystallography, small angle X-ray scattering and site directed mutagenesis we show that the extracellular region of Lutheran forms an extended structure with a distinctive bend between the second and third immunoglobulin-like domains. The linker between domains 2 and 3 appears to be flexible and is a critical determinant in maintaining an overall conformation for Lutheran that is capable of binding to Laminin. Mutagenesis studies indicate that Asp312 of Lutheran and the surrounding cluster of negatively charged residues in this linker region form the Laminin binding site. Unusually, receptor binding is therefore not a function of the domains expected to be furthermost from the plasma membrane. These studies imply that structural flexibility of Lutheran may be essential for its interaction with Laminin and present a novel opportunity for the development of therapeutics for sickle cell disease.

  13. Additive lattice kirigami.

    PubMed

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D

    2016-09-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes.

  14. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes. PMID:27679822

  15. Ultracold Quantum Gases in Hexagonal Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengstock, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    Hexagonal structures occur in a vast variety of systems, ranging from honeycombs of bees in life sciences to carbon nanotubes in material sciences. The latter, in particular its unfolded two-dimensional layer -- Graphene -- has rapidly grown to one of the most discussed topics in condensed-matter physics. Not only does it show proximity to various carbon-based materials but also exceptional properties owing to its unusual energy spectrum. In quantum optics, ultracold quantum gases confined in periodic light fields have shown to be very general and versatile instruments to mimic solid state systems. However, so far nearly all experiments were performed in cubic lattice geometries only. Here we report on the first experimental realization of ultracold quantum gases in a state-dependent, two-dimensional, Graphene-like optical lattice with hexagonal symmetry. The lattice is realized via a spin-dependent optical lattice structure with alternating σ^+ and σ^- -sites and thus constitutes a so called `magnetic'-lattice with `antiferromagnetic'-structure. Atoms with different spin orientation can be loaded to specific lattice sites or -- depending on the parameters -- to the whole lattice. As a consequence e.g. superpositions of a superfluid spin component with a different spin component in the Mott-insulating phase can be realized as well as spin-dependent transport properties, disorder etc. After preparing an antiferromagnetically ordered state we e.g. measure sustainable changes of the transport properties of the atoms. This manifests in a significant reduction of the tunneling as compared to a single-component system. We attribute this observation to a partial tunneling blockade for one spin component induced by population in another spin component localized at alternating lattice sites. Within a Gutzwiller-Ansatz we calculate the phase diagrams for the mixed spin-states and find very good agreement with our experimental results. Moreover, by state-resolved recording

  16. Stratigraphic correlation of the Awahab and Tafelberg Formations, Etendeka Group, Namibia, and location of an eruptive site for flood basalt volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, J. S.; Milner, S. C.

    2007-08-01

    Detailed field and geochemical investigations in the vicinity of the type section of the Tafelberg Formation of the early Cretaceous Etendeka Group, NW Namibia, have revealed the existence of a large eruptive vent in the lower part of the regional volcanic sequence produced by Strombolian and Vulcanian eruptions. The vent is filled with the thick, differentiated, ponded Kudu-Run olivine-rich basaltic flow, which has a distinctive low Zr/Y geochemical signature as well as a Tafelberg-type tabular basalt and the Nil Desperandum latite. Field evidence indicates that the Kudu-Run basalt and the latite were erupted from fissures located within the vent. Associated with the vent is an extensive pyroclastic apron extending from the vent edge and which is interbedded with the regional stratigraphy. Blocks of Precambrain basement lithologies occur within this deposit and indicate that the vent was excavated to a depth of at least 350 m below the palaeosurface at that time. The original Tafelberg Formation type section described by Erlank et al. [Erlank, A.J., Marsh, J.S., Duncan, A.R., Miller, R.McG., Hawkesworth, C.H., Betton, P.J., Rex, D.C. 1984. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of the Etendeka volcanic rocks from SWA/Namibia, 195-247. In: Erlank, A.J. (Ed.), Petrogenesis of Volcanic Rocks of the Karoo province. Special Publication of the Geological Society of South Africa, vol. 13, 395 p.] the Tafelberg Gully section, crosses from the lower part of the regional sequence into the intra-vent sequence and returns to the regional sequence higher up. In doing so it includes some of the localized intra-vent flows and excludes a number of flows which are part of the regional sequence in its lower part, thus rendering it inappropriate as a type section. A revised type section for the Tafelberg Formation is described by combining the upper part of the Tafelberg Gully section with a new section of 14 flows at the base of the regional sequence in the Tafelberg North (TBN) section

  17. Cytochrome c peroxidase-cytochrome c complex: locating the second binding domain on cytochrome c peroxidase with site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Leesch, V W; Bujons, J; Mauk, A G; Hoffman, B M

    2000-08-22

    Cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) can bind as many as two cytochrome c (Cc) molecules in an electrostatic complex. The location of the two binding domains on CcP has been probed by photoinduced interprotein electron transfer (ET) between zinc-substituted horse cytochrome c (ZnCc) and CcP with surface charge-reversal mutations and by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). These results, which are the first experimental evidence for the location of domain 2, indicate that the weak-binding domain includes residues 146-150 on CcP. CcP(E290K) has a charge-reversal mutation in the tight-binding domain, which should weaken binding, and it weakens the 1:1 complex; K(1) decreases 20-fold at 18 mM ionic strength. We have employed two mutations to probe the proposed location for the weak-binding domain on the CcP surface: (i) D148K, a "detrimental" mutation with a net (+2) change in the charge of CcP, and (ii) K149E, a "beneficial" mutation with a net (-2) change in the charge. The interactions between FeCc and CcP(WT and K149E) also have been studied with ITC. The CcP(D148K) mutation causes no substantial change in the 2:1 binding but an increase in the reactivity of the 2:1 complex. The latter can be interpreted as a long-range influence on the heme environment or, more likely, the enhancement of a minority subset of binding conformations with favorable pathways for ET. CcP(K149E) has a charge-reversal mutation in the weak-binding domain that produces a substantial increase in the 2:1 binding constant as measured by both quenching and ITC. For the 1:1 complex of CcP(WT), DeltaG(1) = -8.2 kcal/mol (K(1) = 1.3 x 10(6) M(-)(1)), DeltaH(1) = +2.7 kcal/mol, and DeltaS(1) = +37 cal/K.mol at 293 K; for the second binding stage, K(2) < 5 x 10(3) M(-)(1), but accurate thermodynamic parameters were not obtained. For the 1:1 complex of CcP(K149E), DeltaG(1) = -8.5 kcal/mol (K(1) = 2 x 10(6) M(-)(1)), DeltaH(1) = +2. 0 kcal/mol, and DeltaS(1) = +36 cal/K.mol; for the second stage, Delta

  18. Local Lattice Structure and Dopant Occupancy of Doped Lithium Niobate Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhigang; Xue, Dongfeng

    We present a systematic study of the local distortions produced upon doping metal ions to lithium niobate (LiNbO3, LN) single crystals. The impurity bond length can be predicted by a radial force constant model, when the dopant ions substitute for Li+ or Nb5+ ions in the LN crystallographic frame. From the viewpoint of constituent chemical bonds, the lattice energy can be described as the function of bond valence on the basis of Born-Haber cycle for the formation of an ionic oxide MmOn. The dopant occupancy in the LN matrix can be determined by comparing the deviation of its lattice energy in different locations at both Li+ and Nb5+ sites, on the basis of the bond length relaxation of impurity ions, which can agree well with the experiment results. The effect of impurity ions on the property modification of LN crystals is also discussed according to our calculated results.

  19. Co-location of eruption sites of the Siberian Traps and North Atlantic Igneous Province: Implications for the nature of hotspots and mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Aleksey V.; Tarduno, John A.

    2010-09-01

    One of the striking exceptions to the mantle plume head-tail hypothesis that seeks to explain magmatism of large igneous provinces (LIPs) and hotspot tracks is the ~250 million-year-old Siberian Traps. The lack of a clear hotspot track linked to this LIP has been one motivation to explore non-plume alternative mechanisms. Here, we use a paleomagnetic Euler pole analysis to constrain the location of the Siberian Traps at the time of their eruption. The reconstructed position coincides with the mantle region that also saw eruption of the ~ 61-58 million year-old North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP). Together with LIP volume estimates, this reconstruction poses a dilemma for some non-plume models: the partial-melts needed to account for the Siberian Traps should have depleted the enriched upper mantle source that is in turn crucial for the later formation of the NAIP. The observations instead suggest the existence of a long-lived (>250 million-year-long) lower mantle chemical and/or thermal anomaly, and significant temporal changes in mantle plume flux.

  20. Geophysical techniques in detection to river embankments - A case study: To locate sites of potential leaks using surface-wave and electrical methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, C.; Liu, J.; Xu, S.; Xia, J.; ,

    2004-01-01

    Geophysical technologies are very effective in environmental, engineering and groundwater applications. Parameters of delineating nature of near-surface materials such as compressional-wave velocity, shear-wave velocity can be obtained using shallow seismic methods. Electric methods are primary approaches for investigating groundwater and detecting leakage. Both of methods are applied to detect embankment in hope of obtaining evidences of the strength and moisture inside the body. A technological experiment has done for detecting and discovering the hidden troubles in the embankment of Yangtze River, Songzi, Hubei, China in 2003. Surface-wave and DC multi-channel array resistivity sounding techniques were used to detect hidden trouble inside and under dike like pipe-seeps. This paper discusses the exploration strategy and the effect of geological characteristics. A practical approach of combining seismic and electric resistivity measurements was applied to locate potential pipe-seeps in embankment in the experiment. The method presents a potential leak factor based on the shear-wave velocity and the resistivity of the medium to evaluate anomalies. An anomaly found in a segment of embankment detected was verified, where occurred a pipe-seep during the 98' flooding.

  1. An internal ribosome entry site located upstream of the crucifer-infecting tobamovirus coat protein (CP) gene can be used for CP synthesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dorokhov, Yu L; Ivanov, P A; Komarova, T V; Skulachev, M V; Atabekov, J G

    2006-09-01

    It was previously shown that, unlike the type member of the genus Tobamovirus (TMV U1), a crucifer-infecting tobamovirus (crTMV) contains a 148 nt internal ribosome entry site (IRES)(CP,148)(CR) upstream of the coat protein (CP) gene. Here, viral vectors with substitutions in the stem-loop (SL) region of CP subgenomic promoters (TMV U1-CP-GFP/SL-mut and crTMV-CP-GFP/SL-mut) were constructed and the levels of CP synthesis in agroinoculation experiments were compared. No CP-GFP (green fluorescent protein) synthesis was detected in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves inoculated with TMV U1-CP-GFP/SL-mut, whereas a small amount of CP-GFP synthesis was obtained in crTMV-CP-GFP/SL-mut-injected leaves. Northern blots proved that both promoters were inactive. It could be hypothesized that IRES-mediated early production of the CP by crTMV is needed for realization of its crucifer-infecting capacity.

  2. Block of current through single calcium channels by Fe, Co, and Ni. Location of the transition metal binding site in the pore

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The blocking actions of Fe2+, Co2+, and Ni2+ on unitary currents carried by Ba2+ through single dihydropyridine-sensitive Ca2+ channels were recorded from cell-attached patches on myotubes from the mouse C2 cell line. Adding millimolar concentrations of blocker to patch electrodes containing 110 mM BaCl2 produced discrete excursions to the closed channel level. The kinetics of blocking and unblocking were well described with a simple model of open channel block. Hyperpolarization speeded the exit of all of the blockers from the channel, as expected if the blocking site resides within the pore. The block by Ni2+ differs from that produced by Fe2+ and Co2+ because Ni2+ enters the channel approximately 20 times more slowly and exits approximately 50 times more slowly. Ni2+ also differs from the other transition metals because at millimolar concentrations it reduces the amplitude of the unitary current in a concentration-dependent manner. The results are consistent with the idea that the rate-limiting step for ion entry into the channel is water loss at its inner coordination sphere; unblocking, on the other hand, cannot be explained in terms of simple coulombic interactions arising from differences in ion size. PMID:1849961

  3. Decommissioning of the Dragon High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Located at the Former United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) Research Site at Winfrith - 13180

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Anthony A.

    2013-07-01

    The Dragon Reactor was constructed at the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Winfrith in Dorset through the late 1950's and into the early 1960's. It was a High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTR) with helium gas coolant and graphite moderation. It operated as a fuel testing and demonstration reactor at up to 20 MW (Thermal) from 1964 until 1975, when international funding for this project was terminated. The fuel was removed from the core in 1976 and the reactor was put into Safestore. To meet the UK's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) objective to 'drive hazard reduction' [1] it is necessary to decommission and remediate all the Research Sites Restoration Ltd (RSRL) facilities. This includes the Dragon Reactor where the activated core, pressure vessel and control rods and the contaminated primary circuit (including a {sup 90}Sr source) still remain. It is essential to remove these hazards at the appropriate time and return the area occupied by the reactor to a safe condition. (author)

  4. A THEMIS Survey of Flux Ropes and Traveling Compression Regions: Location of the Near-Earth Reconnection Site During Solar Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imber, S. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Auster, H. U.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2011-01-01

    A statistical study of flux ropes and traveling compression regions (TCRs) during the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) second tail season has been performed. A combined total of 135 flux ropes and TCRs in the range GSM X approx -14 to -31 R(sub E) were identified, many of these occurring in series of two or more events separated by a few tens of seconds. Those occurring within 10 min of each other were combined into aggregated reconnection events. For the purposes of this survey, these are most likely the products of reconnect ion occurring simultaneously at multiple, closely spaced x-lines as opposed to statistically independent episodes of reconnection. The 135 flux ropes and TCRs were grouped into 87 reconnection events; of these, 28 were moving tailward and 59 were moving Earthward. The average location of the near-Earth x-line determined from statistical analysis of these reconnection events is (X(sub GSM), Y*(sub GSM)) = (-30R(sub E), 5R(sub E)), where Y* includes a correction for the solar aberration angle. A strong east-west asymmetry is present in the tailward events, with >80% being observed at GSM Y* > O. Our results indicate that the Earthward flows are similarly asymmetric in the midtail region, becoming more symmetric inside - 18 R(sub E). Superposed epoch analyses indicate that the occurrence of reconnection closer to the Earth, i.e., X > -20 R(sub E), is associated with elevated solar wind velocity and enhanced negative interplanetary magnetic field B(sub z). Reconnection events taking place closer to the Earth are also far more effective in producing geomagnetic activity, judged by the AL index, than reconnection initiated beyond X approx -25 R(sub E).

  5. Influence of geographic location in modeling blood pesticide levels in a community surrounding a U.S. Environmental protection agency superfund site.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Shannon H; Curriero, Frank C; Strickland, Paul T; Glass, Gregory E; Helzlsouer, Kathy J; Breysse, Patrick N

    2005-12-01

    In this study we evaluated residential location as a potential determinant for exposure to organochlorine compounds. We investigated the geographic distribution characteristics of organochlorine levels in approximately 1,374 blood samples collected in 1974 from residents of a community with a potential organochlorine source. Street addresses of Washington County, Maryland, residents were obtained and geocoded in a geographic information system. We used multivariate linear regression models to characterize the blood organochlorine levels of these residents that had been analyzed as part of previous studies using both environmental- and individual-level covariates. This was done to evaluate if the geographic distribution of blood levels in participants was related to the environmental source in the community. Model inference was based on generalized least squares to account for residual spatial variation. A significant inverse relationship was found between blood dieldrin levels and residential distance from the potential source. For every mile of distance from the source, blood dieldrin levels decreased 1.6 ng/g in study participants (p-value = 0.042), adjusting for age, sex, education level, smoking status, and drinking water source. 1,1-Dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (DDE) levels in the blood did not change significantly based on residential distance from the source, taking the same covariates into account. However, these results are limited by the inability to account for several potential confounders. This study demonstrates that spatially distributed covariates may play an important role in individual exposure patterns. Spatial information may enable researchers to detect a potential exposure pattern that may not be revealed with only nonspatial variables.

  6. Biases encountered in long-term monitoring studies of invertebrates and microflora: Australian examples of protocols, personnel, tools and site location.

    PubMed

    Greenslade, Penelope; Florentine, Singarayer K; Hansen, Brigita D; Gell, Peter A

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring forms the basis for understanding ecological change. It relies on repeatability of methods to ensure detected changes accurately reflect the effect of environmental drivers. However, operator bias can influence the repeatability of field and laboratory work. We tested this for invertebrates and diatoms in three trials: (1) two operators swept invertebrates from heath vegetation, (2) four operators picked invertebrates from pyrethrum knockdown samples from tree trunk and (3) diatom identifications by eight operators in three laboratories. In each trial, operators were working simultaneously and their training in the field and laboratory was identical. No variation in catch efficiency was found between the two operators of differing experience using a random number of net sweeps to catch invertebrates when sequence, location and size of sweeps were random. Number of individuals and higher taxa collected by four operators from tree trunks varied significantly between operators and with their 'experience ranking'. Diatom identifications made by eight operators were clustered together according to which of three laboratories they belonged. These three tests demonstrated significant potential bias of operators in both field and laboratory. This is the first documented case demonstrating the significant influence of observer bias on results from invertebrate field-based studies. Examples of two long-term trials are also given that illustrate further operator bias. Our results suggest that long-term ecological studies using invertebrates need to be rigorously audited to ensure that operator bias is accounted for during analysis and interpretation. Further, taxonomic harmonisation remains an important step in merging field and laboratory data collected by different operators.

  7. Resting and injury-induced inflamed periosteum contain multiple macrophage subsets that are located at sites of bone growth and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Kylie Anne; Raggatt, Liza-Jane; Millard, Susan; Batoon, Lena; Chiu-Ku Wu, Andy; Chang, Ming-Kang; Hume, David Arthur; Pettit, Allison Robyn

    2017-01-01

    Better understanding of bone growth and regeneration mechanisms within periosteal tissues will improve understanding of bone physiology and pathology. Macrophage contributions to bone biology and repair have been established but specific investigation of periosteal macrophages has not been undertaken. We used an immunohistochemistry approach to characterize macrophages in growing murine bone and within activated periosteum induced in a mouse model of bone injury. Osteal tissue macrophages (osteomacs) and resident macrophages were distributed throughout resting periosteum. In tissues collected from 4-week-old mice, osteomacs were observed intimately associated with sites of periosteal diaphyseal and metaphyseal bone dynamics associated with normal growth. This included F4/80(+)Mac-2(-/low) osteomac association with extended tracks of bone formation (modeling) on diphyseal periosteal surfaces. Although this recapitulated endosteal osteomac characteristics, there was subtle variance in the morphology and spatial organization of periosteal modeling-associated osteomacs, which likely reflects the greater structural complexity of periosteum. Osteomacs, resident macrophages and inflammatory macrophages (F4/80(+)Mac-2(hi)) were associated with the complex bone dynamics occurring within the periosteum at the metaphyseal corticalization zone. These three macrophage subsets were also present within activated native periosteum after bone injury across a 9-day time course that spanned the inflammatory through remodeling bone healing phases. This included osteomac association with foci of endochondral ossification within the activated native periosteum. These observations confirm that osteomacs are key components of both osteal tissues, in spite of salient differences between endosteal and periosteal structure and that multiple macrophage subsets are involved in periosteal bone dynamics.

  8. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices

    PubMed Central

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-01-01

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose—Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid. PMID:26345721

  9. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-09-08

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose-Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid.

  10. Measuring on Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, Kevin H.

    2009-12-01

    Previous derivations of the sum and product rules of probability theory relied on the algebraic properties of Boolean logic. Here they are derived within a more general framework based on lattice theory. The result is a new foundation of probability theory that encompasses and generalizes both the Cox and Kolmogorov formulations. In this picture probability is a bi-valuation defined on a lattice of statements that quantifies the degree to which one statement implies another. The sum rule is a constraint equation that ensures that valuations are assigned so as to not violate associativity of the lattice join and meet. The product rule is much more interesting in that there are actually two product rules: one is a constraint equation arises from associativity of the direct products of lattices, and the other a constraint equation derived from associativity of changes of context. The generality of this formalism enables one to derive the traditionally assumed condition of additivity in measure theory, as well introduce a general notion of product. To illustrate the generic utility of this novel lattice-theoretic foundation of measure, the sum and product rules are applied to number theory. Further application of these concepts to understand the foundation of quantum mechanics is described in a joint paper in this proceedings.

  11. Renormalization of aperiodic model lattices: spectral properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, Lars; Riklund, Rolf

    2003-04-01

    Many of the published results for one-dimensional deterministic aperiodic systems treat rather simplified electron models with either a constant site energy or a constant hopping integral. Here we present some rigorous results for more realistic mixed tight-binding systems with both the site energies and the hopping integrals having an aperiodic spatial variation. It is shown that the mixed Thue-Morse, period-doubling and Rudin-Shapiro lattices can be transformed to on-site models on renormalized lattices maintaining the individual order between the site energies. The character of the energy spectra for these mixed models is therefore the same as for the corresponding on-site models. Furthermore, since the study of electrons on a lattice governed by the Schrödinger tight-binding equation maps onto the study of elastic vibrations on a harmonic chain, we have proved that the vibrational spectra of aperiodic harmonic chains with distributions of masses determined by the Thue-Morse sequence and the period-doubling sequence are purely singular continuous.

  12. Gap solitons in Rabi lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhaopin; Malomed, Boris A.

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a two-component one-dimensional system, which is based on two nonlinear Schrödinger or Gross-Pitaevskii equations (GPEs) with spatially periodic modulation of linear coupling ("Rabi lattice") and self-repulsive nonlinearity. The system may be realized in a binary Bose-Einstein condensate, whose components are resonantly coupled by a standing optical wave, as well as in terms of the bimodal light propagation in periodically twisted waveguides. The system supports various types of gap solitons (GSs), which are constructed, and their stability is investigated, in the first two finite bandgaps of the underlying spectrum. These include on- and off-site-centered solitons (the GSs of the off-site type are additionally categorized as spatially even and odd ones), which may be symmetric or antisymmetric, with respect to the coupled components. The GSs are chiefly stable in the first finite bandgap and unstable in the second one. In addition to that, there are narrow regions near the right edge of the first bandgap, and in the second one, which feature intricate alternation of stability and instability. Unstable solitons evolve into robust breathers or spatially confined turbulent modes. On-site-centered GSs are also considered in a version of the system that is made asymmetric by the Zeeman effect, or by birefringence of the optical waveguide. A region of alternate stability is found in the latter case too. In the limit of strong asymmetry, GSs are obtained in a semianalytical approximation, which reduces two coupled GPEs to a single one with an effective lattice potential.

  13. The SuperB Accelerator: Overview and Lattice Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Drago, A.; Guiducci, S.; Preger, M.; Raimondi, P.; Tomassini, S.; Vaccarezza, C.; Zobov, M.; Cai, Y.; Fisher, A.; Heifets, S.; Novokhatski, A.; Pivi, M.T.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; Paoloni, E.; Marchiori, G.; Koop, I.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /Daresbury /LBL, Berkeley /CERN /Orsay, LAL /KEK, Tsukuba

    2011-11-22

    SuperB aims at the construction of a very high luminosity (10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} Flavour Factory, with possible location at the campus of the University of Rome Tor Vergata, near the INFN Frascati National Laboratory. In this paper the basic principles of the design and details on the lattice are given. SuperB is a new machine that can exploit novel very promising design approaches: (1) large Piwinski angle scheme will allow for peak luminosity of the order of 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, well beyond the current state-of-the-art, without a significant increase in beam currents or shorter bunch lengths; (2) 'crab waist' sextupoles will be used for suppression of dangerous resonances; (3) the low beam currents design presents reduced detector and background problems, and affordable operating costs; (4) a polarized electron beam can produce polarized {tau} leptons, opening an entirely new realm of exploration in lepton flavor physics. SuperB studies are already proving useful to the accelerator and particle physics communities. The principle of operation is being tested at DAFNE. The baseline lattice, based on the reuse of all PEP-II hardware, fits in the Tor Vergata University campus site, near Frascati. A CDR is being reviewed by an International Review Committee, chaired by J. Dainton (UK). A Technical Design Report will be prepared to be ready by beginning of 2010.

  14. Crossing on hyperbolic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hang; Ziff, Robert M.

    2012-05-01

    We divide the circular boundary of a hyperbolic lattice into four equal intervals and study the probability of a percolation crossing between an opposite pair as a function of the bond occupation probability p. We consider the {7,3} (heptagonal), enhanced or extended binary tree (EBT), the EBT-dual, and the {5,5} (pentagonal) lattices. We find that the crossing probability increases gradually from 0 to 1 as p increases from the lower pl to the upper pu critical values. We find bounds and estimates for the values of pl and pu for these lattices and identify the self-duality point p* corresponding to where the crossing probability equals 1/2. Comparison is made with recent numerical and theoretical results.

  15. Lattice gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Peter; Majumdar, Pushan

    2012-03-01

    Lattice gauge theory is a formulation of quantum field theory with gauge symmetries on a space-time lattice. This formulation is particularly suitable for describing hadronic phenomena. In this article we review the present status of lattice QCD. We outline some of the computational methods, discuss some phenomenological applications and a variety of non-perturbative topics. The list of references is severely incomplete, the ones we have included are text books or reviews and a few subjectively selected papers. Kronfeld and Quigg (2010) supply a reasonably comprehensive set of QCD references. We apologize for the fact that have not covered many important topics such as QCD at finite density and heavy quark effective theory adequately, and mention some of them only in the last section "In Brief". These topics should be considered in further Scholarpedia articles.

  16. Lattice studies of baryons

    SciTech Connect

    David Richards

    2004-10-01

    This talk describes progress at understanding the properties of the nucleon and its excitations from lattice QCD. I begin with a review of recent lattice results for the lowest-lying states of the excited baryon spectrum. The need to approach physical values of the light quark masses is emphasized, enabling the effects of the pion cloud to be revealed. I then outline the development of techniques that will enable the extraction of the masses of the higher resonances, and describe how such calculations provide insight into the structure of the hadrons. Finally, I discuss direct probes of the quark and gluon structure of baryons through the lattice measurement of the moments of quark distributions and of Generalized Parton Distributions.

  17. Fractional scaling of quantum walks on two-dimensional percolation lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendon, Viv; Leung, Godfrey; Knott, Paul; Bailey, Joe

    2011-10-01

    We study the spreading behaviour of coined quantum walks on percolation lattices for both bond and site percolation on two-dimensional Cartesian lattices. Using numerical simulation, we observe fractional scaling of the spreading with the number of steps of the walk. The exponent varies from zero at the critical percolation probability through to unity for the full lattice. For the lattices we simulate, up to 140×140, we observe faster than classical scaling for percolation probabilities above about 0.85.

  18. [Recent myocardial infarction, cardiogenic shock and unsuccessful coronary angioplasty--the pattern of cooperation between a centre without on-site surgical back-up and a distantly located clinical cardiosurgery centre].

    PubMed

    Janiak, Bartłomiej; Jakubaszko, Jacek; Gorski, Małgorzata; Pelczar, Marek; Szełemej, Roman; Kustrzycki, Wojciech

    2007-03-01

    The case of a 66-year-old male with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) complicated by cardiogenic shock is presented. Because of failed primary PCI, after stabilisation of ischaemia and haemodynamics by medication and IABP he was transferred to a distantly located cardiosurgery unit. This patient underwent successful emergency CABG on the second day after infarction. The problem of transporting a patient with AMI and cardiogenic shock to a distant site and the problem of emergency CABG in such high-risk patients is discussed.

  19. Exact Lattice Supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Catterall, Simon; Kaplan, David B.; Unsal, Mithat

    2009-03-31

    We provide an introduction to recent lattice formulations of supersymmetric theories which are invariant under one or more real supersymmetries at nonzero lattice spacing. These include the especially interesting case of N = 4 SYM in four dimensions. We discuss approaches based both on twisted supersymmetry and orbifold-deconstruction techniques and show their equivalence in the case of gauge theories. The presence of an exact supersymmetry reduces and in some cases eliminates the need for fine tuning to achieve a continuum limit invariant under the full supersymmetry of the target theory. We discuss open problems.

  20. Optical Lattice Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oates, Chris

    2012-06-01

    Since they were first proposed in 2003 [1], optical lattice clocks have become one of the leading technologies for the next generation of atomic clocks, which will be used for advanced timing applications and in tests of fundamental physics [2]. These clocks are based on stabilized lasers whose frequency is ultimately referenced to an ultra-narrow neutral atom transition (natural linewidths << 1 Hz). To suppress the effects of atomic motion/recoil, the atoms in the sample (˜10^4 atoms) are confined tightly in the potential wells of an optical standing wave (lattice). The wavelength of the lattice light is tuned to its ``magic'' value so as to yield a vanishing net AC Stark shift for the clock transition. As a result lattice clocks have demonstrated the capability of generating high stability clock signals with small absolute uncertainties (˜ 1 part in 10^16). In this presentation I will first give an overview of the field, which now includes three different atomic species. I will then use experiments with Yb performed in our laboratory to illustrate the key features of a lattice clock. Our research has included the development of state-of-the-art optical cavities enabling ultra-high-resolution optical spectroscopy (1 Hz linewidth). Together with the large atom number in the optical lattice, we are able to achieve very low clock instability (< 0.3 Hz in 1 s) [3]. Furthermore, I will show results from some of our recent investigations of key shifts for the Yb lattice clock, including high precision measurements of ultracold atom-atom interactions in the lattice and the dc Stark effect for the Yb clock transition (necessary for the evaluation of blackbody radiation shifts). [4pt] [1] H. Katori, M. Takamoto, V. G. Pal'chikov, and V. D. Ovsiannikov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 173005 (2003). [0pt] [2] Andrei Derevianko and Hidetoshi Katori, Rev. Mod. Phys. 83, 331 (2011). [0pt] [3] Y. Y. Jiang, A. D. Ludlow, N. D. Lemke, R. W. Fox, J. A. Sherman, L.-S. Ma, and C. W. Oates

  1. Realizing Parafermions in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fangli; Gorshkov, Alexey

    2016-05-01

    Parafermions, which are the fractional versions of Majorana fermions, possess more exotic braiding statistics than Majorana fermions and are therefore more powerful from the point of view of topological quantum computing. We propose a scheme to realize parafermionic zero modes in optical lattices, without the use of superconductive paring. With the help of laser assisted tunneling and on-site interactions, two layers of ultracold atoms in distinct hyperfine states can be engineered to host +/- 1 / m fractional quantum Hall states. We then introduce a finite-extent potential barrier that pierces both layers - this gives rise to two counter-propagating edge states that sit on top of each other. Finally, laser induced coupling is used to introduce backscattering between the two edge states and to gap them out. We show that the resulting defects give rise to the topological degeneracy associated with parafermions. We also discuss methods for preparation and detection.

  2. Entropy of Open Lattice Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, B.; Lebowitz, J. L.; Speer, E. R.

    2007-03-01

    We investigate the behavior of the Gibbs-Shannon entropy of the stationary nonequilibrium measure describing a one-dimensional lattice gas, of L sites, with symmetric exclusion dynamics and in contact with particle reservoirs at different densities. In the hydrodynamic scaling limit, L → ∞, the leading order ( O( L)) behavior of this entropy has been shown by Bahadoran to be that of a product measure corresponding to strict local equilibrium; we compute the first correction, which is O(1). The computation uses a formal expansion of the entropy in terms of truncated correlation functions; for this system the k th such correlation is shown to be O( L - k+1). This entropy correction depends only on the scaled truncated pair correlation, which describes the covariance of the density field. It coincides, in the large L limit, with the corresponding correction obtained from a Gaussian measure with the same covariance.

  3. Moving embedded lattice solitons.

    PubMed

    Malomed, B A; Fujioka, J; Espinosa-Cerón, A; Rodríguez, R F; González, S

    2006-03-01

    It was recently proved that solitons embedded in the spectrum of linear waves may exist in discrete systems, and explicit solutions for isolated unstable embedded lattice solitons (ELS) of a differential-difference version of a higher-order nonlinear Schrodinger equation were found [Gonzalez-Perez-Sandi, Fujioka, and Malomed, Physica D 197, 86 (2004)]. The discovery of these ELS gives rise to relevant questions such as the following: (1) Are there continuous families of ELS? (2) Can ELS be stable? (3) Is it possible for ELS to move along the lattice? (4) How do ELS interact? The present work addresses these questions by showing that a novel equation (a discrete version of a complex modified Korteweg-de Vries equation that includes next-nearest-neighbor couplings) has a two-parameter continuous family of exact ELS. These solitons can move with arbitrary velocities across the lattice, and the numerical simulations demonstrate that these ELS are completely stable. Moreover, the numerical tests show that these ELS are robust enough to withstand collisions, and the result of a collision is only a shift in the positions of the solitons. The model may apply to the description of a Bose-Einstein condensate with dipole-dipole interactions between the atoms, trapped in a deep optical-lattice potential.

  4. Generalizing Word Lattice Translation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    demonstrate substantial gains for Chinese -English and Arabic -English translation. Keywords: word lattice translation, phrase-based and hierarchical...introduce in reordering models. Our experiments evaluating the approach demonstrate substantial gains for Chinese -English and Arabic -English translation. 15...Section 4 presents two applications of the noisier channel paradigm, demonstrating substantial performance gains in Arabic -English and Chinese -English

  5. Supersymmetry on the Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaich, David

    2016-03-01

    Lattice field theory provides a non-perturbative regularization of strongly interacting systems, which has proven crucial to the study of quantum chromodynamics among many other theories. Supersymmetry plays prominent roles in the study of physics beyond the standard model, both as an ingredient in model building and as a tool to improve our understanding of quantum field theory. Attempts to apply lattice techniques to supersymmetric field theories have a long history, but until recently these efforts have generally encountered insurmountable difficulties related to the interplay of supersymmetry with the lattice discretization of spacetime. In recent years these difficulties have been overcome for a class of theories that includes the particularly interesting case of maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills (N = 4 SYM) in four dimensions, which is a cornerstone of AdS/CFT duality. In combination with computational advances this progress enables practical numerical investigations of N = 4 SYM on the lattice, which can address questions that are difficult or impossible to handle through perturbation theory, AdS/CFT duality, or the conformal bootstrap program. I will briefly review some of the new ideas underlying this recent progress, and present some results from ongoing large-scale numerical calculations, including comparisons with analytic predictions.

  6. Random lattice superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Haidong; Siegel, Warren

    2006-08-15

    We propose some new simplifying ingredients for Feynman diagrams that seem necessary for random lattice formulations of superstrings. In particular, half the fermionic variables appear only in particle loops (similarly to loop momenta), reducing the supersymmetry of the constituents of the type IIB superstring to N=1, as expected from their interpretation in the 1/N expansion as super Yang-Mills.

  7. Progress in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2002-09-30

    After reviewing some of the mathematical foundations and numerical difficulties facing lattice QCD, I review the status of several calculations relevant to experimental high-energy physics. The topics considered are moments of structure functions, which may prove relevant to search for new phenomena at the LHC, and several aspects of flavor physics, which are relevant to understanding CP and flavor violation.

  8. Phenomenology Using Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R.

    2005-08-01

    This talk provides a brief summary of the status of lattice QCD calculations of the light quark masses and the kaon bag parameter BK. Precise estimates of these four fundamental parameters of the standard model, i.e., mu, md, ms and the CP violating parameter η, help constrain grand unified models and could provide a window to new physics.

  9. Phenomenology Using Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R.

    This talk provides a brief summary of the status of lattice QCD calculations of the light quark masses and the kaon bag parameter BK. Precise estimates of these four fundamental parameters of the standard model, i.e., mu, md, ms and the CP violating parameter η, help constrain grand unified models and could provide a window to new physics.

  10. Rigidity of lattice domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savelyev, V. A.

    1979-01-01

    The means of ensuring total rigidity of lattice domes, using comparison with solid shells of 1-3 layers are discussed. Irregularities of manufacture, processing, and other factors are considered, as they relate to diminution of rigidity. The discussion uses the concepts of upper and lower critical loads on the structure in question.

  11. Marine cable location system

    SciTech Connect

    Zachariadis, R.G.

    1984-05-01

    An acoustic positioning system locates a marine cable at an exploration site, such cable employing a plurality of hydrophones at spaced-apart positions along the cable. A marine vessel measures water depth to the cable as the vessel passes over the cable and interrogates the hydrophones with sonar pulses along a slant range as the vessel travels in a parallel and horizontally offset path to the cable. The location of the hydrophones is determined from the recordings of water depth and slant range.

  12. Localization oscillation in antidot lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uryu, S.; Ando, T.

    1998-06-01

    The Anderson localization in square and hexagonal antidot lattices is numerically studied with the use of a Thouless number method. It is revealed that localization is very sensitive to the aspect ratio between the antidot diameter and the lattice constant. In a hexagonal lattice, both the Thouless number and the localization length oscillate with the period equal to the Al’tshuler-Aronov-Spivak oscillation. The oscillation is quite weak in a square lattice.

  13. Adsorption of HP Lattice Proteins on Patterned Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Matthew; Shi, Guangjie; Landau, David P.; Li, Ying Wai; Wuest, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The HP lattice model[2] is a course-grained, yet useful tool for modeling protein sequences where amino acids are treated as either hydrophobic (H) or polar (P) monomers. With the use of Wang-Landau sampling and an efficient set of Monte-Carlo moves[3], HP lattice proteins adsorbed on patterned surfaces are studied. Each substrate is modeled as a periodically bounded pattern of lattice sites that interact with either H or P monomers in the lattice protein, where the energy contributions of the surface are determined by assigned coupling strengths. By analyzing energy degeneracies, along with the thermodynamic and structural quantities of the protein, both the protein folding and surface adsorption can be observed. The adsorption behavior of the lattice proteins on patterned surfaces will be compared to those interacting with uniform surfaces. Research supported by NSF.

  14. Percolation threshold of correlated two-dimensional lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, Kenneth S.

    1999-12-01

    Previous simulations of percolation on correlated square and cubic lattices [Phys. Rev. E 56, 6586 (1997)] have been extended to all of the common two-dimensional lattices, including triangular, square 1-2, honeycomb, and kagome. Simulations were performed on lattices of up to 1024×1024 sites. The results are independent of lattice size except, possibly, for a weak dependence at large correlation lengths. As in the previous studies, all results can be fit by a Gaussian function of the correlation length w, pc=p∞c+(p0c-p∞c)e-αw2. However, there is some evidence that this fit is not theoretically significant. For the self-matching triangular and the matching square and square 1-2 lattices, the percolation thresholds satisfy the Sykes-Essam relation pc(L)+pc(L*)=1.

  15. Stationary and traveling solitons via local dissipation in Bose-Einstein condensates in ring optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Russell; Oppo, Gian-Luca

    2016-10-01

    A model of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a ring optical lattice with atomic dissipations applied at a stationary or at a moving location on the ring is presented. The localized dissipation is shown to generate and stabilize both stationary and traveling lattice solitons. Among many localized solutions, we have generated spatially stationary quasiperiodic lattice solitons and a family of traveling lattice solitons with two intensity peaks per potential well with no counterpart in the discrete case. Collisions between traveling and stationary lattice solitons as well as between two traveling lattice solitons display a critical dependence from the lattice depth. Stable counterpropagating solitons in ring lattices can find applications in gyroscope interferometers with ultracold gases.

  16. Direct observation of a sub-Poissonian number distribution of atoms in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Itah, Amir; Veksler, Hagar; Lahav, Oren; Blumkin, Alex; Moreno, Coral; Gordon, Carmit; Steinhauer, Jeff

    2010-03-19

    We report single-site resolution in a lattice with tunneling between sites, allowing for an in situ study of stochastic losses. The ratio of the loss rate to the tunneling rate is seen to determine the number fluctuations, and the overall profile of the lattice. Sub-Poissonian number fluctuations are observed. Deriving the lattice beams from a microlens array results in perfect relative stability between beams.

  17. Collapsing lattice animals and lattice trees in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping; Grassberger, Peter

    2005-06-01

    We present high statistics simulations of weighted lattice bond animals and lattice trees on the square lattice, with fugacities for each non-bonded contact and for each bond between two neighbouring monomers. The simulations are performed using a newly developed sequential sampling method with resampling, very similar to the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method (PERM) used for linear chain polymers. We determine with high precision the line of second-order transitions from an extended to a collapsed phase in the resulting two-dimensional phase diagram. This line includes critical bond percolation as a multicritical point, and we verify that this point divides the line into different universality classes. One of them corresponds to the collapse driven by contacts and includes the collapse of (weakly embeddable) trees. There is some evidence that the other is subdivided again into two parts with different universality classes. One of these (at the far side from collapsing trees) is bond driven and is represented by the Derrida-Herrmann model of animals having bonds only (no contacts). Between the critical percolation point and this bond-driven collapse seems to be an intermediate regime, whose other end point is a multicritical point P* where a transition line between two collapsed phases (one bond driven and the other contact driven) sparks off. This point P* seems to be attractive (in the renormalization group sense) from the side of the intermediate regime, so there are four universality classes on the transition line (collapsing trees, critical percolation, intermediate regime, and Derrida-Herrmann). We obtain very precise estimates for all critical exponents for collapsing trees. It is already harder to estimate the critical exponents for the intermediate regime. Finally, it is very difficult to obtain with our method good estimates of the critical parameters of the Derrida-Herrmann universality class. As regards the bond-driven to contact-driven transition in the

  18. Interactions of protons with single open L-type calcium channels. Location of protonation site and dependence of proton-induced current fluctuations on concentration and species of permeant ion

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We further investigated the rapid fluctuations between two different conductance levels promoted by protons when monovalent ions carry current through single L-type Ca channels. We tested for voltage dependence of the proton-induced current fluctuations and for accessibility of the protonation site from both sides of the membrane patch. The results strongly suggest an extracellular location of the protonation site. We also studied the dependence of the kinetics of the fluctuations and of the two conductance levels on the concentration of permeant ion and on external ionic strength. We find that saturation curves of channel conductance vs. [K] are similar for the two conductance levels. This provides evidence that protonation does not appreciably change the surface potential near the entry of the permeation pathway. The proton-induced conduction change must therefore result from an indirect interaction between the protonation site and the ion-conducting pathway. Concentration of permeant ion and ionic strength also affect the kinetics of the current fluctuations, in a manner consistent with our previous hypothesis that channel occupancy destabilizes the low conductance channel conformation. We show that the absence of measurable fluctuations with Li and Ba as charge carriers can be explained by significantly higher affinities of these ions for permeation sites. Low concentrations of Li reduce the Na conductance and abbreviate the lifetimes of the low conductance level seen in the presence of Na. We use whole-cell recordings to extrapolate our findings to the physiological conditions of Ca channel permeation and conclude that in the presence of 1.8 mM Ca no proton-induced fluctuations occur between pH 7.5 and 6.5. Finally, we propose a possible physical interpretation of the formal model of the protonation cycle introduced in the companion paper. PMID:2553858

  19. Fractional lattice charge transport

    PubMed Central

    Flach, Sergej; Khomeriki, Ramaz

    2017-01-01

    We consider the dynamics of noninteracting quantum particles on a square lattice in the presence of a magnetic flux α and a dc electric field E oriented along the lattice diagonal. In general, the adiabatic dynamics will be characterized by Bloch oscillations in the electrical field direction and dispersive ballistic transport in the perpendicular direction. For rational values of α and a corresponding discrete set of values of E(α) vanishing gaps in the spectrum induce a fractionalization of the charge in the perpendicular direction - while left movers are still performing dispersive ballistic transport, the complementary fraction of right movers is propagating in a dispersionless relativistic manner in the opposite direction. Generalizations and the possible probing of the effect with atomic Bose-Einstein condensates and photonic networks are discussed. Zak phase of respective band associated with gap closing regime has been computed and it is found converging to π/2 value. PMID:28102302

  20. Entangling the lattice clock: Towards Heisenberg-limited timekeeping

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, Jonathan D.; Beloy, Kyle; Derevianko, Andrei

    2010-03-15

    A scheme is presented for entangling the atoms of an optical lattice to reduce the quantum projection noise of a clock measurement. The divalent clock atoms are held in a lattice at a 'magic' wavelength that does not perturb the clock frequency - to maintain clock accuracy - while an open-shell J=1/2 'head' atom is coherently transported between lattice sites via the lattice polarization. This polarization-dependent 'Archimedes' screw' transport at magic wavelength takes advantage of the vanishing vector polarizability of the scalar, J=0, clock states of bosonic isotopes of divalent atoms. The on-site interactions between the clock atoms and the head atom are used to engineer entanglement and for clock readout.

  1. Charmonium from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek

    2007-08-05

    Charmonium is an attractive system for the application of lattice QCD methods. While the sub-threshold spectrum has been considered in some detail in previous works, it is only very recently that excited and higher-spin states and further properties such as radiative transitions and two-photon decays have come to be calculated. I report on this recent progress with reference to work done at Jefferson Lab.

  2. Equivalence of deterministic walks on regular lattices on the plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechtman, Ana; Rechtman, Raúl

    2017-01-01

    We consider deterministic walks on square, triangular and hexagonal two dimensional lattices. In each case, there is a scatterer at every lattice site that can be in one of two states that forces the walker to turn either to his/her immediate right or left. After the walker is scattered, the scatterer changes state. A lattice with an arrangement of scatterers is an environment. We show that there are only two environments for which the scattering rules are injective, mirrors or rotators, on the three lattices. On hexagonal lattices Webb and Cohen (2014), proved that if a walker with a given initial position and velocity moves through an environment of mirrors (rotators) then there is an environment of rotators (mirrors) through which the walker would move with the same trajectory. We refer to these trajectories on mirror and rotator environments as equivalent walks. We prove the equivalence of walks on square and triangular lattices and include a proof of the equivalence of walks on hexagonal lattices. The proofs are based both on the geometry of the lattice and the structure of the scattering rule.

  3. Collisional shifts in optical-lattice atom clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Band, Y. B.; Vardi, A.

    2006-09-15

    We theoretically study the effects of elastic collisions on the determination of frequency standards via Ramsey-fringe spectroscopy in optical-lattice atom clocks. Interparticle interactions of bosonic atoms in multiply occupied lattice sites can cause a linear frequency shift, as well as generate asymmetric Ramsey-fringe patterns and reduce fringe visibility due to interparticle entanglement. We propose a method of reducing these collisional effects in an optical lattice by introducing a phase difference of {pi} between the Ramsey driving fields in adjacent sites. This configuration suppresses site-to-site hopping due to interference of two tunneling pathways, without degrading fringe visibility. Consequently, the probability of double occupancy is reduced, leading to cancellation of collisional shifts.

  4. Crystallographic Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namburi, Manjusha; Krithivasan, Siddharth; Ansumali, Santosh

    2016-06-01

    Current approaches to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) are computationally quite expensive for most realistic scientific and engineering applications of Fluid Dynamics such as automobiles or atmospheric flows. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), with its simplified kinetic descriptions, has emerged as an important tool for simulating hydrodynamics. In a heterogeneous computing environment, it is often preferred due to its flexibility and better parallel scaling. However, direct simulation of realistic applications, without the use of turbulence models, remains a distant dream even with highly efficient methods such as LBM. In LBM, a fictitious lattice with suitable isotropy in the velocity space is considered to recover Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics in macroscopic limit. The same lattice is mapped onto a cartesian grid for spatial discretization of the kinetic equation. In this paper, we present an inverted argument of the LBM, by making spatial discretization as the central theme. We argue that the optimal spatial discretization for LBM is a Body Centered Cubic (BCC) arrangement of grid points. We illustrate an order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency for LBM and thus a significant progress towards feasibility of DNS for realistic flows.

  5. Digital lattice gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohar, Erez; Farace, Alessandro; Reznik, Benni; Cirac, J. Ignacio

    2017-02-01

    We propose a general scheme for a digital construction of lattice gauge theories with dynamical fermions. In this method, the four-body interactions arising in models with 2 +1 dimensions and higher are obtained stroboscopically, through a sequence of two-body interactions with ancillary degrees of freedom. This yields stronger interactions than the ones obtained through perturbative methods, as typically done in previous proposals, and removes an important bottleneck in the road towards experimental realizations. The scheme applies to generic gauge theories with Lie or finite symmetry groups, both Abelian and non-Abelian. As a concrete example, we present the construction of a digital quantum simulator for a Z3 lattice gauge theory with dynamical fermionic matter in 2 +1 dimensions, using ultracold atoms in optical lattices, involving three atomic species, representing the matter, gauge, and auxiliary degrees of freedom, that are separated in three different layers. By moving the ancilla atoms with a proper sequence of steps, we show how we can obtain the desired evolution in a clean, controlled way.

  6. Crystallographic Lattice Boltzmann Method

    PubMed Central

    Namburi, Manjusha; Krithivasan, Siddharth; Ansumali, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Current approaches to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) are computationally quite expensive for most realistic scientific and engineering applications of Fluid Dynamics such as automobiles or atmospheric flows. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), with its simplified kinetic descriptions, has emerged as an important tool for simulating hydrodynamics. In a heterogeneous computing environment, it is often preferred due to its flexibility and better parallel scaling. However, direct simulation of realistic applications, without the use of turbulence models, remains a distant dream even with highly efficient methods such as LBM. In LBM, a fictitious lattice with suitable isotropy in the velocity space is considered to recover Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics in macroscopic limit. The same lattice is mapped onto a cartesian grid for spatial discretization of the kinetic equation. In this paper, we present an inverted argument of the LBM, by making spatial discretization as the central theme. We argue that the optimal spatial discretization for LBM is a Body Centered Cubic (BCC) arrangement of grid points. We illustrate an order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency for LBM and thus a significant progress towards feasibility of DNS for realistic flows. PMID:27251098

  7. Topological lattice actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bietenholz, W.; Gerber, U.; Pepe, M.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2010-12-01

    We consider lattice field theories with topological actions, which are invariant against small deformations of the fields. Some of these actions have infinite barriers separating different topological sectors. Topological actions do not have the correct classical continuum limit and they cannot be treated using perturbation theory, but they still yield the correct quantum continuum limit. To show this, we present analytic studies of the 1-d O(2) and O(3) model, as well as Monte Carlo simulations of the 2-d O(3) model using topological lattice actions. Some topological actions obey and others violate a lattice Schwarz inequality between the action and the topological charge Q. Irrespective of this, in the 2-d O(3) model the topological susceptibility {χ_t} = {{{left< {{Q^2}} rightrangle }} left/ {V} right.} is logarithmically divergent in the continuum limit. Still, at non-zero distance the correlator of the topological charge density has a finite continuum limit which is consistent with analytic predictions. Our study shows explicitly that some classically important features of an action are irrelevant for reaching the correct quantum continuum limit.

  8. Rural-Urban Migration in D-Dimensional Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espíndola, Aquino L.; Penna, T. J. P.; Silveira, Jaylson J.

    The rural-urban migration phenomenon is analyzed by using an agent-based computational model. Agents are placed on lattices which dimensions varying from d =2 up to d =7. The localization of the agents in the lattice defines that their social neighborhood (rural or urban) is not related to their spatial distribution. The effect of the dimension of lattice is studied by analyzing the variation of the main parameters that characterizes the migratory process. The dynamics displays strong effects even for around one million of sites, in higher dimensions (d =6, 7).

  9. Ising model simulation in directed lattices and networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, F. W. S.; Stauffer, D.

    2006-01-01

    On directed lattices, with half as many neighbours as in the usual undirected lattices, the Ising model does not seem to show a spontaneous magnetisation, at least for lower dimensions. Instead, the decay time for flipping of the magnetisation follows an Arrhenius law on the square and simple cubic lattice. On directed Barabási-Albert networks with two and seven neighbours selected by each added site, Metropolis and Glauber algorithms give similar results, while for Wolff cluster flipping the magnetisation decays exponentially with time.

  10. Visualization Tools for Lattice QCD - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Massimo Di Pierro

    2012-03-15

    Our research project is about the development of visualization tools for Lattice QCD. We developed various tools by extending existing libraries, adding new algorithms, exposing new APIs, and creating web interfaces (including the new NERSC gauge connection web site). Our tools cover the full stack of operations from automating download of data, to generating VTK files (topological charge, plaquette, Polyakov lines, quark and meson propagators, currents), to turning the VTK files into images, movies, and web pages. Some of the tools have their own web interfaces. Some Lattice QCD visualization have been created in the past but, to our knowledge, our tools are the only ones of their kind since they are general purpose, customizable, and relatively easy to use. We believe they will be valuable to physicists working in the field. They can be used to better teach Lattice QCD concepts to new graduate students; they can be used to observe the changes in topological charge density and detect possible sources of bias in computations; they can be used to observe the convergence of the algorithms at a local level and determine possible problems; they can be used to probe heavy-light mesons with currents and determine their spatial distribution; they can be used to detect corrupted gauge configurations. There are some indirect results of this grant that will benefit a broader audience than Lattice QCD physicists.

  11. Mobile Alternative Fueling Station Locator

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-04-01

    The Department of Energy's Alternative Fueling Station Locator is available on-the-go via cell phones, BlackBerrys, or other personal handheld devices. The mobile locator allows users to find the five closest biodiesel, electricity, E85, hydrogen, natural gas, and propane fueling sites using Google technology.

  12. Solution of an associating lattice-gas model with density anomaly on a Husimi lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Tiago J.; Stilck, Jürgen F.; Barbosa, Marco Aurélio A.

    2010-11-01

    We study a model of a lattice gas with orientational degrees of freedom which resemble the formation of hydrogen bonds between the molecules. In this model, which is the simplified version of the Henriques-Barbosa model, no distinction is made between donors and acceptors in the bonding arms. We solve the model in the grand-canonical ensemble on a Husimi lattice built with hexagonal plaquettes with a central site. The ground state of the model, which was originally defined on the triangular lattice, is exactly reproduced by the solution on this Husimi lattice. In the phase diagram, one gas and two liquid [high density liquid (HDL) and low density liquid (LDL)] phases are present. All phase transitions (GAS-LDL, GAS-HDL, and LDL-HDL) are discontinuous, and the three phases coexist at a triple point. A line of temperatures of maximum density in the isobars is found in the metastable GAS phase, as well as another line of temperatures of minimum density appears in the LDL phase, part of it in the stable region and another in the metastable region of this phase. These findings are at variance with simulational results for the same model on the triangular lattice, which suggested a phase diagram with two critical points. However, our results show very good quantitative agreement with the simulations, both for the coexistence loci and the densities of particles and of hydrogen bonds. We discuss the comparison of the simulations with our results.

  13. Solution of an associating lattice-gas model with density anomaly on a Husimi lattice.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Tiago J; Stilck, Jürgen F; Barbosa, Marco Aurélio A

    2010-11-01

    We study a model of a lattice gas with orientational degrees of freedom which resemble the formation of hydrogen bonds between the molecules. In this model, which is the simplified version of the Henriques-Barbosa model, no distinction is made between donors and acceptors in the bonding arms. We solve the model in the grand-canonical ensemble on a Husimi lattice built with hexagonal plaquettes with a central site. The ground state of the model, which was originally defined on the triangular lattice, is exactly reproduced by the solution on this Husimi lattice. In the phase diagram, one gas and two liquid [high density liquid (HDL) and low density liquid (LDL)] phases are present. All phase transitions (GAS-LDL, GAS-HDL, and LDL-HDL) are discontinuous, and the three phases coexist at a triple point. A line of temperatures of maximum density in the isobars is found in the metastable GAS phase, as well as another line of temperatures of minimum density appears in the LDL phase, part of it in the stable region and another in the metastable region of this phase. These findings are at variance with simulational results for the same model on the triangular lattice, which suggested a phase diagram with two critical points. However, our results show very good quantitative agreement with the simulations, both for the coexistence loci and the densities of particles and of hydrogen bonds. We discuss the comparison of the simulations with our results.

  14. Coupled matter-wave solitons in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Golam Ali, Sk; Talukdar, B.

    2009-06-15

    We make use of a potential model to study the dynamics of two coupled matter-wave or Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) solitons loaded in optical lattices. With separate attention to linear and nonlinear lattices we find some remarkable differences for response of the system to effects of these lattices. As opposed to the case of linear optical lattice (LOL), the nonlinear lattice (NOL) can be used to control the mutual interaction between the two solitons. For a given lattice wave number k, the effective potentials in which the two solitons move are such that the well (V{sub eff}(NOL)), resulting from the juxtaposition of soliton interaction and nonlinear lattice potential, is deeper than the corresponding well V{sub eff}(LOL). But these effective potentials have opposite k dependence in the sense that the depth of V{sub eff}(LOL) increases as k increases and that of V{sub eff}(NOL) decreases for higher k values. We verify that the effectiveness of optical lattices to regulate the motion of the coupled solitons depends sensitively on the initial locations of the motionless solitons as well as values of the lattice wave number. For both LOL and NOL the two solitons meet each other due to mutual interaction if their initial locations are taken within the potential wells with the difference that the solitons in the NOL approach each other rather rapidly and take roughly half the time to meet as compared with the time needed for such coalescence in the LOL. In the NOL, the soliton profiles can move freely and respond to the lattice periodicity when the separation between their initial locations are as twice as that needed for a similar free movement in the LOL. We observe that, in both cases, slow tuning of the optical lattices by varying k with respect to a time parameter {tau} drags the oscillatory solitons apart to take them to different locations. In our potential model the oscillatory solitons appear to propagate undistorted. But a fully numerical calculation

  15. Coupled matter-wave solitons in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golam Ali, Sk; Talukdar, B.

    2009-06-01

    We make use of a potential model to study the dynamics of two coupled matter-wave or Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) solitons loaded in optical lattices. With separate attention to linear and nonlinear lattices we find some remarkable differences for response of the system to effects of these lattices. As opposed to the case of linear optical lattice (LOL), the nonlinear lattice (NOL) can be used to control the mutual interaction between the two solitons. For a given lattice wave number k, the effective potentials in which the two solitons move are such that the well (Veff(NOL)), resulting from the juxtaposition of soliton interaction and nonlinear lattice potential, is deeper than the corresponding well Veff(LOL). But these effective potentials have opposite k dependence in the sense that the depth of Veff(LOL) increases as k increases and that of Veff(NOL) decreases for higher k values. We verify that the effectiveness of optical lattices to regulate the motion of the coupled solitons depends sensitively on the initial locations of the motionless solitons as well as values of the lattice wave number. For both LOL and NOL the two solitons meet each other due to mutual interaction if their initial locations are taken within the potential wells with the difference that the solitons in the NOL approach each other rather rapidly and take roughly half the time to meet as compared with the time needed for such coalescence in the LOL. In the NOL, the soliton profiles can move freely and respond to the lattice periodicity when the separation between their initial locations are as twice as that needed for a similar free movement in the LOL. We observe that, in both cases, slow tuning of the optical lattices by varying k with respect to a time parameter τ drags the oscillatory solitons apart to take them to different locations. In our potential model the oscillatory solitons appear to propagate undistorted. But a fully numerical calculation indicates that during evolution

  16. Sequence-specific sup 1 H NMR assignments, secondary structure, and location of the calcium binding site in the first epidermal growth factor like domain of blood coagulation factor IX

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.H.; Cheng, H.; Sweeney, W.V. ); Pardi, A. ); Tam, J.P. )

    1991-07-30

    Factor IX is a blood clotting protein that contains three regions, including a {gamma}-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain, two tandemly connected epidermal growth factor like (EGF-like) domains, and a serine protease region. The protein exhibits a high-affinity calcium binding site in the first EGF0like domain, in addition to calcium binding in the Gla domain. The first EGF-like domain, factor IX (45-87), has been synthesized. Sequence-specific resonance assignment of the peptide has been made by using 2D NMR techniques, and its secondary structure has been determined. The protein is found to have two antiparallel {beta}-sheets, and preliminary distance geometry calculations indicate that the protein has two domains, separated by Trp{sup 28}, with the overall structure being similar to that of EGF. An NMR investigation of the calcium-bound first EGF-like domain indicates the presence and location of a calcium binding site involving residues on both strands of one of the {beta}-sheets as well as the N-terminal region of the peptide. These results suggest that calcium binding in the first EGF-like domain could induce long-range (possibly interdomain) conformational changes in factor IX, rather than causing structural alterations in the EGF-like domain itself.

  17. Degradation pattern of photosystem II reaction center protein D1 in intact leaves. The major photoinhibition-induced cleavage site in D1 polypeptide is located amino terminally of the DE loop.

    PubMed Central

    Kettunen, R; Tyystjärvi, E; Aro, E M

    1996-01-01

    Photoinhibition-induced degradation of the D1 protein of the photosystem II reaction center was studied in intact pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L.) leaves. Photoinhibition was observed to cause the cleavage of the D1 protein at two distinct sites. The main cleavage generated an 18-kD N-terminal and a 20-kD C-terminal degradation fragment of the D1 protein. this cleavage site was mapped to be located clearly N terminally of the DE loop. The other, less-frequent cleavage occurred at the DE loop and produced the well-documented 23-kD, N-terminal D1 degradation product. Furthermore, the 23-kD, N-terminal D1 fragment appears to be phosphorylated and can be detected only under severe photoinhibition in vivo. Comparison of the D1 degradation pattern after in vivo photoinhibition to that after in vitro acceptor-side and donor-side photoinhibition, performed with isolated photosystem II core particles, gives indirect evidence in support of donor-side photoinhibition in intact leaves. PMID:8756500

  18. Lattice-induced nonadiabatic frequency shifts in optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Beloy, K.

    2010-09-15

    We consider the frequency shift in optical lattice clocks which arises from the coupling of the electronic motion to the atomic motion within the lattice. For the simplest of three-dimensional lattice geometries this coupling is shown to affect only clocks based on blue-detuned lattices. We have estimated the size of this shift for the prospective strontium lattice clock operating at the 390-nm blue-detuned magic wavelength. The resulting fractional frequency shift is found to be on the order of 10{sup -18} and is largely overshadowed by the electric quadrupole shift. For lattice clocks based on more complex geometries or other atomic systems, this shift could potentially be a limiting factor in clock accuracy.

  19. Multiple binding sites for nuclear proteins of the anterior pituitary are located in the 5'-flanking region of the porcine follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) beta-subunit gene.

    PubMed

    Kato, Y; Tomizawa, K; Kato, T

    1999-12-20

    Gonadotropins, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH), are synthesized specifically in the gonadotropes of the anterior pituitary. The aim of this study was to investigate nuclear factors that bind specifically to the porcine FSH beta-subunit gene. We examined nuclear protein binding to 2.75 kilobase pairs (kbp) of DNA adjacent to the porcine FSH beta-subunit gene: about 2.32 kbp of upstream DNA and 0.43 kbp of downstream DNA. The upstream region contains only TATA box, CACCC element, and some imperfect sequences of cAMP-responsive element, activator protein-1 binding site, and activator protein-2 binding site. Gel mobility shift assay using nuclear proteins extracted from the porcine anterior pituitary revealed that the proteins bound to a limited region of DNA, 107 bp long (designated as Fd2), located about -800 bp upstream from the transcription initiation site. Competitive binding assays demonstrated that the protein binding was sequence specific; the addition of excess amounts of several putative regulatory sequences and plasmid (non-homologous) DNA fragments did not reduce the binding. Furthermore, all five subfragments of Fd2 were also bound by the pituitary nuclear proteins, showing that the entire region of Fd2 is involved in this interaction. Southwestern blotting demonstrated that at least seven protein species of 110, 98, 78, 63, 52, 42, and 35 kDa recognize Fd2. Nuclear proteins from several other porcine tissues were also able to bind to the Fd2 fragment but the gel shift patterns were different and the bindings were weak, although only the cerebellum showed a pattern of binding that was similar to that of the anterior pituitary. These data suggest that multiple proteins of the anterior pituitary recognize a specific region of the porcine FSH beta-subunit gene.

  20. Single identities for lattice theory and for weakly associative lattices

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, W.; Padmanabhan, R.

    1995-03-13

    We present a single identity for the variety of all lattices that is much simpler than those previously known to us. We also show that the variety of weakly associative lattices is one-based, and we present a generalized one-based theorem for subvarieties of weakly associative lattices that can be defined with absorption laws. The automated theorem-proving program OTTER was used in substantial way to obtain the results.

  1. Nature of size-dependent lattice distortions in doped CeO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhmatullin, R. M.; Aminov, L. K.; Kurkin, I. N.; Böttcher, R.; Pöppl, A.; Sen, S.

    2013-11-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of Gd3+ probe ions is used to investigate the nature of size dependent lattice distortions in bulk and nanocrystalline CeO2 with crystallite sizes of 600 and 10 nm, respectively, and doped with 0.5 and 1 cation% Y. The Gd3+ ions in bulk CeO2 are primarily located in almost perfect cubic crystal field, and the presence of the nearest neighbor vacancies results in trigonal distortion of this crystal field. In contrast, for nanocrystalline ceria, although the long-range symmetry remains unchanged, decreasing size results in local distortion of the crystal-field that is significantly different than that induced by the presence of nearest-neighbor oxygen vacancies. Different types of distortions are observed for the cation sites in the core and the surface regions of the nanocrystallites. Such lattice distortions at short-range are fundamental to the nanocrystalline state, being related to the increased ratio of the surface:bulk energy at nanometer length scales and provides mechanistic understanding of previously reported lattice parameter changes and phase transitions in nanocrystalline oxides.

  2. Thermodynamics of the Relationship between Lattice Energy and Lattice Enthalpy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, H. Donald B.

    2005-06-01

    Incorporation of lattice potential energy, U POT , within a Born Fajans Haber thermochemical cycle based on enthalpy changes necessitates correction of the energy of the lattice to an enthalpy term, Δ H L . For a lattice containing p i ions of type i in the formula unit, the lattice enthalpy is given by Δ H L = U POT + ∑ s i [( c i /2) - 2] RT where R is the gas constant (= 8.314 J K -1 mol -1 ), T is the absolute temperature, and c i is defined according as to whether the ion i is monatomic ( c i = 3), linear polyatomic ( c i = 5), or polyatomic ( c i = 6), respectively.

  3. Lattice QCD for nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beane, Silas

    2016-09-01

    Over the last several decades, theoretical nuclear physics has been evolving from a very-successful phenomenology of the properties of nuclei, to a first-principles derivation of the properties of visible matter in the Universe from the known underlying theories of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) and Electrodynamics. Many nuclear properties have now been calculated using lattice QCD, a method for treating QCD numerically with large computers. In this talk, some of the most recent results in this frontier area of nuclear theory will be reviewed.

  4. Interdependent lattice networks in high dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowinger, Steven; Cwilich, Gabriel A.; Buldyrev, Sergey V.

    2016-11-01

    We study the mutual percolation of two interdependent lattice networks ranging from two to seven dimensions, denoted as D . We impose that the length (measured as chemical distance) of interdependency links connecting nodes in the two lattices be less than or equal to a certain value, r . For each value of D and r , we find the mutual percolation threshold, pc[D ,r ] , below which the system completely collapses through a cascade of failures following an initial destruction of a fraction (1 -p ) of the nodes in one of the lattices. We find that for each dimension, D <6 , there is a value of r =rI>1 such that for r ≥rI the cascading failures occur as a discontinuous first-order transition, while for r lattices reach maximal vulnerability (maximal pc[D ,r ] ) at a distance r =rmax>rI , and for r >rmax the vulnerability starts to decrease as r →∞ . However, the decrease becomes less significant as D increases, and pc[D ,rmax] -pc[D ,∞ ] decreases exponentially with D . We also investigate the dependence of pc[D ,r ] on the system size as well as how the nature of the transition changes as the number of lattice sites, N →∞ .

  5. Ocean Disposal Site Monitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is responsible for managing all designated ocean disposal sites. Surveys are conducted to identify appropriate locations for ocean disposal sites and to monitor the impacts of regulated dumping at the disposal sites.

  6. Generalized thermalization in an integrable lattice system.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Amy C; Clark, Charles W; Rigol, Marcos

    2011-04-08

    After a quench, observables in an integrable system may not relax to the standard thermal values, but can relax to the ones predicted by the generalized Gibbs ensemble (GGE) [M. Rigol et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 050405 (2007)]. The GGE has been shown to accurately describe observables in various one-dimensional integrable systems, but the origin of its success is not fully understood. Here we introduce a microcanonical version of the GGE and provide a justification of the GGE based on a generalized interpretation of the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis, which was previously introduced to explain thermalization of nonintegrable systems. We study relaxation after a quench of one-dimensional hard-core bosons in an optical lattice. Exact numerical calculations for up to 10 particles on 50 lattice sites (≈10(10) eigenstates) validate our approach.

  7. Lattice harmonics expansion revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontrym-Sznajd, G.; Holas, A.

    2017-04-01

    The main subject of the work is to provide the most effective way of determining the expansion of some quantities into orthogonal polynomials, when these quantities are known only along some limited number of sampling directions. By comparing the commonly used Houston method with the method based on the orthogonality relation, some relationships, which define the applicability and correctness of these methods, are demonstrated. They are verified for various sets of sampling directions applicable for expanding quantities having the full symmetry of the Brillouin zone of cubic and non-cubic lattices. All results clearly show that the Houston method is always better than the orthogonality-relation one. For the cubic symmetry we present a few sets of special directions (SDs) showing how their construction and, next, a proper application depend on the choice of various sets of lattice harmonics. SDs are important mainly for experimentalists who want to reconstruct anisotropic quantities from their measurements, performed at a limited number of sampling directions.

  8. Orthocomplemented complete lattices and graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollech, Astrid

    1995-08-01

    The problem I consider originates from Dörfler, who found a construction to assign an Orthocomplemented lattice H(G) to a graph G. By Dörfler it is known that for every finite Orthocomplemented lattice L there exists a graph G such that H(G)=L. Unfortunately, we can find more than one graph G with this property, i.e., orthocomplemented lattices which belong to different graphs can be isomorphic. I show some conditions under which two graphs have the same orthocomplemented lattice.

  9. Two Nucleons on a Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    S.R. Beane; P.F.Bedaque; A. Parreno; M.J. Savage

    2004-04-01

    The two-nucleon sector is near an infrared fixed point of QCD and as a result the S-wave scattering lengths are unnaturally large compared to the effective ranges and shape parameters. It is usually assumed that a lattice QCD simulation of the two-nucleon sector will require a lattice that is much larger than the scattering lengths in order to extract quantitative information. In this paper we point out that this does not have to be the case: lattice QCD simulations on much smaller lattices will produce rigorous results for nuclear physics.

  10. Simulations of lattice animals and trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping; Nadler, Walter; Grassberger, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The scaling behaviour of randomly branched polymers in a good solvent is studied in two to nine dimensions, using as microscopic models lattice animals and lattice trees on simple hypercubic lattices. As a stochastic sampling method we use a biased sequential sampling algorithm with re-sampling, similar to the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method (PERM) used extensively for linear polymers. Essentially we start simulating percolation clusters (either site or bond), re-weigh them according to the animal (tree) ensemble, and prune or branch the further growth according to a heuristic fitness function. In contrast to previous applications of PERM, this fitness function is not the weight with which the actual configuration would contribute to the partition sum, but is closely related to it. We obtain high statistics of animals with up to several thousand sites in all dimension 2 <= d <= 9. In addition to the partition sum (number of different animals) we estimate gyration radii and numbers of perimeter sites. In all dimensions we verify the Parisi-Sourlas prediction, and we verify all exactly known critical exponents in dimensions 2, 3, 4 and >=8. In addition, we present the hitherto most precise estimates for growth constants in d >= 3. For clusters with one site attached to an attractive surface, we verify for d >= 3 the superuniversality of the cross-over exponent phgr at the adsorption transition predicted by Janssen and Lyssy, but not for d = 2. There, we find phgr = 0.480(4) instead of the conjectured phgr = 1/2. Finally, we discuss the collapse of animals and trees, arguing that our present version of the algorithm is also efficient for some of the models studied in this context, but showing that it is not very efficient for the 'classical' model for collapsing animals.

  11. Wave packet dynamics in one-dimensional linear and nonlinear generalized Fibonacci lattices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenjun; Tong, Peiqing; Gong, Jiangbin; Li, Baowen

    2011-05-01

    The spreading of an initially localized wave packet in one-dimensional linear and nonlinear generalized Fibonacci (GF) lattices is studied numerically. The GF lattices can be classified into two classes depending on whether or not the lattice possesses the Pisot-Vijayaraghavan property. For linear GF lattices of the first class, both the second moment and the participation number grow with time. For linear GF lattices of the second class, in the regime of a weak on-site potential, wave packet spreading is close to ballistic diffusion, whereas in the regime of a strong on-site potential, it displays stairlike growth in both the second moment and the participation number. Nonlinear GF lattices are then investigated in parallel. For the first class of nonlinear GF lattices, the second moment of the wave packet still grows with time, but the corresponding participation number does not grow simultaneously. For the second class of nonlinear GF lattices, an analogous phenomenon is observed for the weak on-site potential only. For a strong on-site potential that leads to an enhanced nonlinear self-trapping effect, neither the second moment nor the participation number grows with time. The results can be useful in guiding experiments on the expansion of noninteracting or interacting cold atoms in quasiperiodic optical lattices.

  12. Elimination of spurious lattice fermion solutions and noncompact lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.D.

    1997-09-22

    It is well known that the Dirac equation on a discrete hyper-cubic lattice in D dimension has 2{sup D} degenerate solutions. The usual method of removing these spurious solutions encounters difficulties with chiral symmetry when the lattice spacing l {ne} 0, as exemplified by the persistent problem of the pion mass. On the other hand, we recall that in any crystal in nature, all the electrons do move in a lattice and satisfy the Dirac equation; yet there is not a single physical result that has ever been entangled with a spurious fermion solution. Therefore it should not be difficult to eliminate these unphysical elements. On a discrete lattice, particle hop from point to point, whereas in a real crystal the lattice structure in embedded in a continuum and electrons move continuously from lattice cell to lattice cell. In a discrete system, the lattice functions are defined only on individual points (or links as in the case of gauge fields). However, in a crystal the electron state vector is represented by the Bloch wave functions which are continuous functions in {rvec {gamma}}, and herein lies one of the essential differences.

  13. Theory of lattice effects on magnetic interactions in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meskine, Hakim

    This dissertation focuses on studying the effect of lattice distortions on the magnetic properties of nickelates and manganites. These two families of materials have great potential in industrial applications in the fields of magnetic (superdense hard-drives, fast memory) and charge storage (batteries). The introduction and methods sections present the main ideas of the dissertation and discuss the various techniques used. Electron-lattice coupling is first examined in chapter three for a two-site model where we estimate the magnitude of the isotope effect on the critical temperature and show that it decreases magnetic exchange. In the next part we study electronic structure and magnetism of NaNiO2 and show that inter-planar exchange is reduced by lattice coupling. In the fifth chapter we examine the magnetic polaron and discuss the effect of static lattice coupling on its binding energy, and find it to further stabilize the polaron.

  14. Optical Abelian lattice gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Tagliacozzo, L.; Celi, A.; Zamora, A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2013-03-15

    We discuss a general framework for the realization of a family of Abelian lattice gauge theories, i.e., link models or gauge magnets, in optical lattices. We analyze the properties of these models that make them suitable for quantum simulations. Within this class, we study in detail the phases of a U(1)-invariant lattice gauge theory in 2+1 dimensions, originally proposed by P. Orland. By using exact diagonalization, we extract the low-energy states for small lattices, up to 4 Multiplication-Sign 4. We confirm that the model has two phases, with the confined entangled one characterized by strings wrapping around the whole lattice. We explain how to study larger lattices by using either tensor network techniques or digital quantum simulations with Rydberg atoms loaded in optical lattices, where we discuss in detail a protocol for the preparation of the ground-state. We propose two key experimental tests that can be used as smoking gun of the proper implementation of a gauge theory in optical lattices. These tests consist in verifying the absence of spontaneous (gauge) symmetry breaking of the ground-state and the presence of charge confinement. We also comment on the relation between standard compact U(1) lattice gauge theory and the model considered in this paper. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the quantum simulation of dynamical gauge theories in optical lattices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We focus on digital simulation of abelian lattice gauge theory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We rediscover and discuss the puzzling phase diagram of gauge magnets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We detail the protocol for time evolution and ground-state preparation in any phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide two experimental tests to validate gauge theory quantum simulators.

  15. Recent progress in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, S.R.

    1992-12-01

    A brief overview of the status of lattice QCD is given, with emphasis on topics relevant to phenomenology. The calculation of the light quark spectrum, the lattice prediction of {alpha} {sub {ovr MS}} (M {sub Z}), and the calculation of f{sub B} are discussed. 3 figs., 3 tabs., 40 refs.

  16. Introduction to lattice gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R.

    The lattice formulation of Quantum Field Theory (QFT) can be exploited in many ways. We can derive the lattice Feynman rules and carry out weak coupling perturbation expansions. The lattice then serves as a manifestly gauge invariant regularization scheme, albeit one that is more complicated than standard continuum schemes. Strong coupling expansions: these give us useful qualitative information, but unfortunately no hard numbers. The lattice theory is amenable to numerical simulations by which one calculates the long distance properties of a strongly interacting theory from first principles. The observables are measured as a function of the bare coupling g and a gauge invariant cut-off approx. = 1/alpha, where alpha is the lattice spacing. The continuum (physical) behavior is recovered in the limit alpha yields 0, at which point the lattice artifacts go to zero. This is the more powerful use of lattice formulation, so in these lectures the author focuses on setting up the theory for the purpose of numerical simulations to get hard numbers. The numerical techniques used in Lattice Gauge Theories have their roots in statistical mechanics, so it is important to develop an intuition for the interconnection between quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics.

  17. Study of lattice defect vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, R. J.

    1969-01-01

    Report on the vibrations of defects in crystals relates how defects, well localized in a crystal but interacting strongly with the other atoms, change the properties of a perfect crystal. The methods used to solve defect problems relate the properties of an imperfect lattice to the properties of a perfect lattice.

  18. Branes and integrable lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Junya

    2017-01-01

    This is a brief review of my work on the correspondence between four-dimensional 𝒩 = 1 supersymmetric field theories realized by brane tilings and two-dimensional integrable lattice models. I explain how to construct integrable lattice models from extended operators in partially topological quantum field theories, and elucidate the correspondence as an application of this construction.

  19. Buckling modes in pantographic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgio, Ivan; Della Corte, Alessandro; dell'Isola, Francesco; Steigmann, David J.

    2016-07-01

    We study buckling patterns in pantographic sheets, regarded as two-dimensional continua consisting of lattices of continuously distributed fibers. The fibers are modeled as beams endowed with elastic resistance to stretching, shearing, bending and twist. Included in the theory is a non-standard elasticity due to geodesic bending of the fibers relative to the lattice surface. xml:lang="fr"

  20. Lattice Boltzmann method and channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stensholt, Sigvat; Mongstad Hope, Sigmund

    2016-07-01

    Lattice Boltzmann methods are presented at an introductory level with a focus on fairly simple simulations that can be used to test and illustrate the model’s capabilities. Two scenarios are presented. The first is a simple laminar flow in a straight channel driven by a pressure gradient (Poiseuille flow). The second is a more complex, including a wedge where Moffatt vortices may be induced if the wedge is deep enough. Simulations of the Poiseuille flow scenario accurately capture the theoretical velocity profile. The experiment shows the location of the fluid-wall boundary and the effects viscosity has on the velocity and convergence time. The numerical capabilities of the lattice Boltzmann model are tested further by simulating the more complex Moffatt vortex scenario. The method reproduces with high accuracy the theoretical predction that Moffat vortices will not form in a wedge if the vertex angle exceeds 146°. Practical issues limitations of the lattice Boltzmann method are discussed. In particular the accuracy of the bounce-back boundary condition is first order dependent on the grid resolution.

  1. Lattice models of ionic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobelev, Vladimir; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Fisher, Michael E.

    2002-05-01

    A theoretical analysis of Coulomb systems on lattices in general dimensions is presented. The thermodynamics is developed using Debye-Hückel theory with ion-pairing and dipole-ion solvation, specific calculations being performed for three-dimensional lattices. As for continuum electrolytes, low-density results for simple cubic (sc), body-centered cubic (bcc), and face-centered cubic (fcc) lattices indicate the existence of gas-liquid phase separation. The predicted critical densities have values comparable to those of continuum ionic systems, while the critical temperatures are 60%-70% higher. However, when the possibility of sublattice ordering as well as Debye screening is taken into account systematically, order-disorder transitions and a tricritical point are found on sc and bcc lattices, and gas-liquid coexistence is suppressed. Our results agree with recent Monte Carlo simulations of lattice electrolytes.

  2. Locating the stranger rapist.

    PubMed

    Davies, A; Dale, A

    1996-04-01

    As part of a larger project evaluating aspects of offender profiling, an initial study was undertaken of the geographic aspects of approximately 300 sexual offences carried out by 79 stranger rapists. The objective was to focus further research on the topic into potentially useful channels, but information thought to be of immediate use to investigating officers was also produced. It was ascertained that at least one-fifth of the sample of stranger rapists were itinerant to a greater or lesser extent. Analysis of the cases where both the offender's address and the location where he approached the victim were known, indicated that the majority of attacks (75 per cent) were initiated within five miles of the offenders' homes. The apparent reasons for victims being approached unusually far away included targeting of locations where numbers of suitable victims were available; raping during relatively sophisticated property offences; 'prowling' or 'hunting' over large areas by subjects who spent considerable amounts of time so doing; access to transport; and familiarity with widely dispersed neighbourhoods, often due to the offender having lived in two or more locations. As a result of this work, future research on the geography of rape will be directed towards those aspects of the offences which have been identified as relevant to the distance between an offender's base and the site where he approached his victim.

  3. Integer lattice dynamics for Vlasov-Poisson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocz, Philip; Succi, Sauro

    2017-03-01

    We revisit the integer lattice (IL) method to numerically solve the Vlasov-Poisson equations, and show that a slight variant of the method is a very easy, viable, and efficient numerical approach to study the dynamics of self-gravitating, collisionless systems. The distribution function lives in a discretized lattice phase-space, and each time-step in the simulation corresponds to a simple permutation of the lattice sites. Hence, the method is Lagrangian, conservative, and fully time-reversible. IL complements other existing methods, such as N-body/particle mesh (computationally efficient, but affected by Monte Carlo sampling noise and two-body relaxation) and finite volume (FV) direct integration schemes (expensive, accurate but diffusive). We also present improvements to the FV scheme, using a moving-mesh approach inspired by IL, to reduce numerical diffusion and the time-step criterion. Being a direct integration scheme like FV, IL is memory limited (memory requirement for a full 3D problem scales as N6, where N is the resolution per linear phase-space dimension). However, we describe a new technique for achieving N4 scaling. The method offers promise for investigating the full 6D phase-space of collisionless systems of stars and dark matter.

  4. Graphene, Lattice Field Theory and Symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Drissi, L. B.; Bousmina, M.; Saidi, E. H.

    2011-02-15

    Borrowing ideas from tight binding model, we propose a board class of lattice field models that are classified by non simply laced Lie algebras. In the case of A{sub N-1{approx_equal}}su(N) series, we show that the couplings between the quantum states living at the first nearest neighbor sites of the lattice L{sub suN} are governed by the complex fundamental representations N-bar and N of su(N) and the second nearest neighbor interactions are described by its adjoint N-bar x N. The lattice models associated with the leading su(2), su(3), and su(4) cases are explicitly studied and their fermionic field realizations are given. It is also shown that the su(2) and su(3) models describe the electronic properties of the acetylene chain and the graphene, respectively. It is established as well that the energy dispersion of the first nearest neighbor couplings is completely determined by the A{sub N} roots {alpha} through the typical dependence N/2+{Sigma}{sub roots} cos(k.{alpha} with k the wave vector.Other features such as the SO(2N) extension and other applications are also discussed.

  5. National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, Richard C.

    2014-04-15

    SciDAC-2 Project The Secret Life of Quarks: National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory, from March 15, 2011 through March 14, 2012. The objective of this project is to construct the software needed to study quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the theory of the strong interactions of sub-atomic physics, and other strongly coupled gauge field theories anticipated to be of importance in the energy regime made accessible by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It builds upon the successful efforts of the SciDAC-1 project National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory, in which a QCD Applications Programming Interface (QCD API) was developed that enables lattice gauge theorists to make effective use of a wide variety of massively parallel computers. This project serves the entire USQCD Collaboration, which consists of nearly all the high energy and nuclear physicists in the United States engaged in the numerical study of QCD and related strongly interacting quantum field theories. All software developed in it is publicly available, and can be downloaded from a link on the USQCD Collaboration web site, or directly from the github repositories with entrance linke http://usqcd-software.github.io

  6. Unidirectional Transition Waves in Bistable Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadkarni, Neel; Arrieta, Andres F.; Chong, Christopher; Kochmann, Dennis M.; Daraio, Chiara

    2016-06-01

    We present a model system for strongly nonlinear transition waves generated in a periodic lattice of bistable members connected by magnetic links. The asymmetry of the on-site energy wells created by the bistable members produces a mechanical diode that supports only unidirectional transition wave propagation with constant wave velocity. We theoretically justify the cause of the unidirectionality of the transition wave and confirm these predictions by experiments and simulations. We further identify how the wave velocity and profile are uniquely linked to the double-well energy landscape, which serves as a blueprint for transition wave control.

  7. Nonlinear dust-lattice waves: a modified Toda lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, N. F.

    2008-09-07

    Charged dust grains in a plasma interact with a Coulomb potential, but also with an exponential component to the potential, due to Debye shielding in the background plasma. Here we investigate large-amplitude oscillations and waves in dust-lattices, employing techniques used in Toda lattice analysis. The lattice consists of a linear chain of particles, or a periodic ring as occurs in experimentally observed dust particle clusters. The particle motion has a triangular waveform, and chaotic motion for large amplitude motion of a grain.

  8. Implementation: Preparing the Site.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Susan Baerg

    1983-01-01

    Considers site requirements that should be specified by the library and the vendor for a library automated system located at a central site away from the library, including size of site, the environment, cleanliness, electrical power, security/safety (fire, restricted access), site certification, telecommunications, and terminal sites. (EJS)

  9. Localized structures in Kagome lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Avadh B; Bishop, Alan R; Law, K J H; Kevrekidis, P G

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the existence and stability of gap vortices and multi-pole gap solitons in a Kagome lattice with a defocusing nonlinearity both in a discrete case and in a continuum one with periodic external modulation. In particular, predictions are made based on expansion around a simple and analytically tractable anti-continuum (zero coupling) limit. These predictions are then confirmed for a continuum model of an optically-induced Kagome lattice in a photorefractive crystal obtained by a continuous transformation of a honeycomb lattice.

  10. Lattice QCD: Status and Prospect

    SciTech Connect

    Ukawa, Akira

    2006-02-08

    A brief review is given of the current status and near-future prospect of lattice QCD studies of the Standard Model. After summarizing a bit of history, we describe current attempts toward inclusion of dynamical up, down and strange quarks. Recent results on the light hadron mass spectrum as well as those on the heavy quark quantities are described. Recent work on lattice pentaquark search is summarized. We touch upon the PACS-CS Project for building our next machine for lattice QCD, and conclude with a summary of computer situation and the physics possibilities over the next several years.

  11. Scaling the Kondo lattice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-feng; Fisk, Zachary; Lee, Han-Oh; Thompson, J D; Pines, David

    2008-07-31

    The origin of magnetic order in metals has two extremes: an instability in a liquid of local magnetic moments interacting through conduction electrons, and a spin-density wave instability in a Fermi liquid of itinerant electrons. This dichotomy between 'local-moment' magnetism and 'itinerant-electron' magnetism is reminiscent of the valence bond/molecular orbital dichotomy present in studies of chemical bonding. The class of heavy-electron intermetallic compounds of cerium, ytterbium and various 5f elements bridges the extremes, with itinerant-electron magnetic characteristics at low temperatures that grow out of a high-temperature local-moment state. Describing this transition quantitatively has proved difficult, and one of the main unsolved problems is finding what determines the temperature scale for the evolution of this behaviour. Here we present a simple, semi-quantitative solution to this problem that provides a basic framework for interpreting the physics of heavy-electron materials and offers the prospect of a quantitative determination of the physical origin of their magnetic ordering and superconductivity. It also reveals the difference between the temperature scales that distinguish the conduction electrons' response to a single magnetic impurity and their response to a lattice of local moments, and provides an updated version of the well-known Doniach diagram.

  12. Lattice hydrodynamic model based traffic control: A transportation cyber-physical system approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Sun, Dihua; Liu, Weining

    2016-11-01

    Lattice hydrodynamic model is a typical continuum traffic flow model, which describes the jamming transition of traffic flow properly. Previous studies in lattice hydrodynamic model have shown that the use of control method has the potential to improve traffic conditions. In this paper, a new control method is applied in lattice hydrodynamic model from a transportation cyber-physical system approach, in which only one lattice site needs to be controlled in this control scheme. The simulation verifies the feasibility and validity of this method, which can ensure the efficient and smooth operation of the traffic flow.

  13. Emergent lattices with geometrical frustration in doped extended Hubbard models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Ryui; Tocchio, Luca F.; Valentí, Roser; Gros, Claudius

    2016-11-01

    Spontaneous charge ordering occurring in correlated systems may be considered as a possible route to generate effective lattice structures with unconventional couplings. For this purpose we investigate the phase diagram of doped extended Hubbard models on two lattices: (i) the honeycomb lattice with on-site U and nearest-neighbor V Coulomb interactions at 3 /4 filling (n =3 /2 ) and (ii) the triangular lattice with on-site U , nearest-neighbor V , and next-nearest-neighbor V' Coulomb interactions at 3 /8 filling (n =3 /4 ). We consider various approaches including mean-field approximations, perturbation theory, and variational Monte Carlo. For the honeycomb case (i), charge order induces an effective triangular lattice at large values of U /t and V /t , where t is the nearest-neighbor hopping integral. The nearest-neighbor spin exchange interactions on this effective triangular lattice are antiferromagnetic in most of the phase diagram, while they become ferromagnetic when U is much larger than V . At U /t ˜(V/t ) 3 , ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange interactions nearly cancel out, leading to a system with four-spin ring-exchange interactions. On the other hand, for the triangular case (ii) at large U and finite V', we find no charge order for small V , an effective kagome lattice for intermediate V , and one-dimensional charge order for large V . These results indicate that Coulomb interactions induce [case (i)] or enhance [case(ii)] emergent geometrical frustration of the spin degrees of freedom in the system, by forming charge order.

  14. Enantiomeric phase separation in a lattice gas model: Guggenheim approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huckaby, Dale A.; Shinmi, Masato; Ausloos, Marcel; Clippe, Paulette

    1986-05-01

    We consider a lattice gas in which the two enantiomeric forms of a tetrahedral molecule, consisting of a central carbon atom bonded to four different groups A, B, G, and H, are adsorbed onto a triangular lattice, such that the carbon atom is above a lattice site, the three bonds to A, B, and G point toward neighboring lattice sites, and the bond to H points perpendicular to and away from the plane of the lattice. For a certain choice of intermolecular interactions, such as may exist between the zwitterion forms of an amino acid, the phase diagram was investigated using a Guggenheim approximation with two order parameters. Enantiomeric phase separation into two symmetric condensed phases occurs at low temperatures. These condensed phases become a single racemic condensed phase at a critical line, and they are in equilibrium with a racemic gas phase along a line of triple points. These two lines coincide at a critical endpoint. The racemic condensed and gas phases are in equilibrium along a two phase coexistence line which begins at the critical endpoint and ends at a critical point. No tricritical point was found in the model for the special choice of interactions studied.

  15. Counting Lattice-Gas Invariants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Dominique d’Humières, Brosl Hasslacher, Pierre Lallemand, Yves Pomeau, and Jean-Pierre Rivet . Lattice gas hydrodynamics in two and three dimensions...177. Springer -Verlag, Februrary 1989. Proceedings of the Winter School, Les Houches, France. 6

  16. LATTICE QCD AT FINITE TEMPERATURE.

    SciTech Connect

    PETRECZKY, P.

    2005-03-12

    I review recent progress in lattice QCD at finite temperature. Results on the transition temperature will be summarized. Recent progress in understanding in-medium modifications of interquark forces and quarkonia spectral functions at finite temperatures is discussed.

  17. Lattice Multiplication: Old and New.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Givan, Betty; Karr, Rosemary

    1988-01-01

    The author presents two examples of lattice multiplication followed by a computer algorithm to perform this multiplication. The algorithm is given in psuedocode but could easily be given in Pascal. (PK)

  18. Heavy quarks and lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2003-11-05

    This paper is a review of heavy quarks in lattice gauge theory, focusing on methodology. It includes a status report on some of the calculations that are relevant to heavy-quark spectroscopy and to flavor physics.

  19. Lattice Studies of Hyperon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, David G.

    2016-04-01

    I describe recent progress at studying the spectrum of hadrons containing the strange quark through lattice QCD calculations. I emphasise in particular the richness of the spectrum revealed by lattice studies, with a spectrum of states at least as rich as that of the quark model. I conclude by prospects for future calculations, including in particular the determination of the decay amplitudes for the excited states.

  20. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    John Bulava; Robert Edwards; George Fleming; K. Jimmy Juge; Adam C. Lichtl; Nilmani Mathur; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Stephen J. Wallace

    2007-06-16

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  1. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtl, Adam C.; Bulava, John; Morningstar, Colin; Edwards, Robert; Mathur, Nilmani; Richards, David; Fleming, George; Juge, K. Jimmy; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2007-10-26

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  2. Lattice QCD in rotating frames.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata; Hirono, Yuji

    2013-08-23

    We formulate lattice QCD in rotating frames to study the physics of QCD matter under rotation. We construct the lattice QCD action with the rotational metric and apply it to the Monte Carlo simulation. As the first application, we calculate the angular momenta of gluons and quarks in the rotating QCD vacuum. This new framework is useful to analyze various rotation-related phenomena in QCD.

  3. Berry Phase in Lattice QCD.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata

    2016-07-29

    We propose the lattice QCD calculation of the Berry phase, which is defined by the ground state of a single fermion. We perform the ground-state projection of a single-fermion propagator, construct the Berry link variable on a momentum-space lattice, and calculate the Berry phase. As the first application, the first Chern number of the (2+1)-dimensional Wilson fermion is calculated by the Monte Carlo simulation.

  4. Lattice QCD: A Brief Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, H. B.

    A general introduction to lattice QCD is given. The reader is assumed to have some basic familiarity with the path integral representation of quantum field theory. Emphasis is placed on showing that the lattice regularization provides a robust conceptual and computational framework within quantum field theory. The goal is to provide a useful overview, with many references pointing to the following chapters and to freely available lecture series for more in-depth treatments of specifics topics.

  5. Emergent three-brane lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Mashile, Grant; Park, Nicholas

    2010-05-15

    In this article the anomalous dimension of a class of operators with a bare dimension of O(N) is studied. The operators considered are dual to excited states of a two giant graviton system. In the Yang-Mills theory they are described by restricted Schur polynomials, labeled with Young diagrams that have at most two columns. In a certain limit the dilatation operator looks like a lattice version of a second derivative, with the lattice emerging from the Young diagram itself.

  6. Lattice gauge theory for QCD

    SciTech Connect

    DeGrand, T.

    1997-06-01

    These lectures provide an introduction to lattice methods for nonperturbative studies of Quantum Chromodynamics. Lecture 1: Basic techniques for QCD and results for hadron spectroscopy using the simplest discretizations; lecture 2: Improved actions--what they are and how well they work; lecture 3: SLAC physics from the lattice-structure functions, the mass of the glueball, heavy quarks and {alpha}{sub s} (M{sub z}), and B-{anti B} mixing. 67 refs., 36 figs.

  7. Advances in Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlynn, Greg

    In this thesis we make four contributions to the state of the art in numerical lattice simulations of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). First, we present the most detailed investigation yet of the autocorrelations of topological observations in hybrid Monte Carlo simulations of QCD and of the effects of the boundary conditions on these autocorrelations. This results in a numerical criterion for deciding when open boundary conditions are useful for reducing these autocorrelations, which are a major barrier to reliable calculations at fine lattice spacings. Second, we develop a dislocation-enhancing determinant, and demonstrate that it reduces the autocorrelation time of the topological charge. This alleviates problems with slow topological tunneling at fine lattice spacings, enabling simulations on fine lattices to be completed with much less computational effort. Third, we show how to apply the recently developed zMobius technique to hybrid Monte Carlo evolutions with domain wall fermions, achieving nearly a factor of two speedup in the light quark determinant, the single most expensive part of the calculation. The dislocation-enhancing determinant and the zMobius technique have enabled us to begin simulations of fine ensembles with four flavors of dynamical domain wall quarks. Finally, we show how to include the previously-neglected G1 operator in nonperturbative renormalization of the DeltaS = 1 effective weak Hamiltonian on the lattice. This removes an important systematic error in lattice calculations of weak matrix elements, in particular the important K → pipi decay.

  8. Optimal lattice-structured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messner, Mark C.

    2016-11-01

    This work describes a method for optimizing the mesostructure of lattice-structured materials. These materials are periodic arrays of slender members resembling efficient, lightweight macroscale structures like bridges and frame buildings. Current additive manufacturing technologies can assemble lattice structures with length scales ranging from nanometers to millimeters. Previous work demonstrates that lattice materials have excellent stiffness- and strength-to-weight scaling, outperforming natural materials. However, there are currently no methods for producing optimal mesostructures that consider the full space of possible 3D lattice topologies. The inverse homogenization approach for optimizing the periodic structure of lattice materials requires a parameterized, homogenized material model describing the response of an arbitrary structure. This work develops such a model, starting with a method for describing the long-wavelength, macroscale deformation of an arbitrary lattice. The work combines the homogenized model with a parameterized description of the total design space to generate a parameterized model. Finally, the work describes an optimization method capable of producing optimal mesostructures. Several examples demonstrate the optimization method. One of these examples produces an elastically isotropic, maximally stiff structure, here called the isotruss, that arguably outperforms the anisotropic octet truss topology.

  9. Optimal lattice-structured materials

    DOE PAGES

    Messner, Mark C.

    2016-07-09

    This paper describes a method for optimizing the mesostructure of lattice-structured materials. These materials are periodic arrays of slender members resembling efficient, lightweight macroscale structures like bridges and frame buildings. Current additive manufacturing technologies can assemble lattice structures with length scales ranging from nanometers to millimeters. Previous work demonstrates that lattice materials have excellent stiffness- and strength-to-weight scaling, outperforming natural materials. However, there are currently no methods for producing optimal mesostructures that consider the full space of possible 3D lattice topologies. The inverse homogenization approach for optimizing the periodic structure of lattice materials requires a parameterized, homogenized material model describingmore » the response of an arbitrary structure. This work develops such a model, starting with a method for describing the long-wavelength, macroscale deformation of an arbitrary lattice. The work combines the homogenized model with a parameterized description of the total design space to generate a parameterized model. Finally, the work describes an optimization method capable of producing optimal mesostructures. Several examples demonstrate the optimization method. One of these examples produces an elastically isotropic, maximally stiff structure, here called the isotruss, that arguably outperforms the anisotropic octet truss topology.« less

  10. Optimal lattice-structured materials

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, Mark C.

    2016-07-09

    This paper describes a method for optimizing the mesostructure of lattice-structured materials. These materials are periodic arrays of slender members resembling efficient, lightweight macroscale structures like bridges and frame buildings. Current additive manufacturing technologies can assemble lattice structures with length scales ranging from nanometers to millimeters. Previous work demonstrates that lattice materials have excellent stiffness- and strength-to-weight scaling, outperforming natural materials. However, there are currently no methods for producing optimal mesostructures that consider the full space of possible 3D lattice topologies. The inverse homogenization approach for optimizing the periodic structure of lattice materials requires a parameterized, homogenized material model describing the response of an arbitrary structure. This work develops such a model, starting with a method for describing the long-wavelength, macroscale deformation of an arbitrary lattice. The work combines the homogenized model with a parameterized description of the total design space to generate a parameterized model. Finally, the work describes an optimization method capable of producing optimal mesostructures. Several examples demonstrate the optimization method. One of these examples produces an elastically isotropic, maximally stiff structure, here called the isotruss, that arguably outperforms the anisotropic octet truss topology.

  11. Locating the quantum critical point of the Bose-Hubbard model through singularities of simple observables

    PubMed Central

    Łącki, Mateusz; Damski, Bogdan; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    We show that the critical point of the two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model can be easily found through studies of either on-site atom number fluctuations or the nearest-neighbor two-point correlation function (the expectation value of the tunnelling operator). Our strategy to locate the critical point is based on the observation that the derivatives of these observables with respect to the parameter that drives the superfluid-Mott insulator transition are singular at the critical point in the thermodynamic limit. Performing the quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model, we show that this technique leads to the accurate determination of the position of its critical point. Our results can be easily extended to the three-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model and different Hubbard-like models. They provide a simple experimentally-relevant way of locating critical points in various cold atomic lattice systems. PMID:27910915

  12. Locating the quantum critical point of the Bose-Hubbard model through singularities of simple observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łącki, Mateusz; Damski, Bogdan; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2016-12-01

    We show that the critical point of the two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model can be easily found through studies of either on-site atom number fluctuations or the nearest-neighbor two-point correlation function (the expectation value of the tunnelling operator). Our strategy to locate the critical point is based on the observation that the derivatives of these observables with respect to the parameter that drives the superfluid-Mott insulator transition are singular at the critical point in the thermodynamic limit. Performing the quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model, we show that this technique leads to the accurate determination of the position of its critical point. Our results can be easily extended to the three-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model and different Hubbard-like models. They provide a simple experimentally-relevant way of locating critical points in various cold atomic lattice systems.

  13. Locating the quantum critical point of the Bose-Hubbard model through singularities of simple observables.

    PubMed

    Łącki, Mateusz; Damski, Bogdan; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2016-12-02

    We show that the critical point of the two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model can be easily found through studies of either on-site atom number fluctuations or the nearest-neighbor two-point correlation function (the expectation value of the tunnelling operator). Our strategy to locate the critical point is based on the observation that the derivatives of these observables with respect to the parameter that drives the superfluid-Mott insulator transition are singular at the critical point in the thermodynamic limit. Performing the quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model, we show that this technique leads to the accurate determination of the position of its critical point. Our results can be easily extended to the three-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model and different Hubbard-like models. They provide a simple experimentally-relevant way of locating critical points in various cold atomic lattice systems.

  14. 43 CFR 3830.10 - Locatable minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locatable minerals. 3830.10 Section 3830..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING, RECORDING, AND MAINTAINING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES; GENERAL PROVISIONS Mining Law Minerals § 3830.10 Locatable minerals....

  15. 43 CFR 3830.10 - Locatable minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Locatable minerals. 3830.10 Section 3830..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING, RECORDING, AND MAINTAINING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES; GENERAL PROVISIONS Mining Law Minerals § 3830.10 Locatable minerals....

  16. 43 CFR 3830.10 - Locatable minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Locatable minerals. 3830.10 Section 3830..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING, RECORDING, AND MAINTAINING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES; GENERAL PROVISIONS Mining Law Minerals § 3830.10 Locatable minerals....

  17. 43 CFR 3830.10 - Locatable minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Locatable minerals. 3830.10 Section 3830..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING, RECORDING, AND MAINTAINING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES; GENERAL PROVISIONS Mining Law Minerals § 3830.10 Locatable minerals....

  18. Quantum dynamics of charge transfer on the one-dimensional lattice: Wave packet spreading and recurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    V, N. Likhachev; O, I. Shevaleevskii; G, A. Vinogradov

    2016-01-01

    The wave function temporal evolution on the one-dimensional (1D) lattice is considered in the tight-binding approximation. The lattice consists of N equal sites and one impurity site (donor). The donor differs from other lattice sites by the on-site electron energy E and the intersite coupling C. The moving wave packet is formed from the wave function initially localized on the donor. The exact solution for the wave packet velocity and the shape is derived at different values E and C. The velocity has the maximal possible group velocity v = 2. The wave packet width grows with time ˜ t1/3 and its amplitude decreases ˜ t-1/3. The wave packet reflects multiply from the lattice ends. Analytical expressions for the wave packet front propagation and recurrence are in good agreement with numeric simulations.

  19. Phyllotaxis of flux lattices in layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Levitov, L.S. )

    1991-01-14

    The geometry of a flux lattice pinned by superconducting layers is studied. Under variation of magnetic field the lattice undergoes an infinite sequence of continuous transitions corresponding to different ways of selection of shortest distances. All possible lattices form a hierarchical structure identified as the hierarchy of Farey numbers. It is shown that dynamically accessible lattices are characterized by pairs of consecutive Fibonacci numbers.

  20. Unexpected location of pilonidal sinuses.

    PubMed

    Sion-Vardy, N; Osyntsov, L; Cagnano, E; Osyntsov, A; Vardy, D; Benharroch, D

    2009-12-01

    Pilonidal sinuses usually occur in the sacrococcygeal area in young men, and occasionally can be found in other ectopic sites. We present a retrospective case review on unusual locations of pilonidal sinuses in the past 4 years. The lesion sites were as follows: one on the penis, two on the scalp, two on the abdomen, one on the neck, two in the groin and two in the axilla. Abdominal and penile lesions are uncommon, but the other locations reported are unusually rare. To our knowledge, the groin has not been reported previously as a site of a pilonidal sinus, although the histological appearance of hidradenitis suppurativa may well resemble it. When trying to clarify the pathogenesis of these occurrences, we found that recurrent hair removal was a common characteristic of the patients we contacted, and this may have been the initiating trauma.

  1. Strongly Interacting Atom Lasers in Three-Dimensional Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Hen, Itay; Rigol, Marcos

    2010-10-29

    We show that the dynamical melting of a Mott insulator in a three-dimensional lattice leads to condensation at nonzero momenta, a phenomenon that can be used to generate strongly interacting atom lasers in optical lattices. For infinite on-site repulsion, the case considered here, the momenta at which bosons condense are determined analytically and found to have a simple dependence on the hopping amplitudes. The occupation of the condensates is shown to scale linearly with the total number of atoms in the initial Mott insulator. Our results are obtained by using a Gutzwiller-type mean-field approach, gauged against exact-diagonalization solutions of small systems.

  2. Lattice statistical theory of random walks on a fractal-like geometry.

    PubMed

    Kozak, John J; Garza-López, Roberto A; Abad, Enrique

    2014-03-01

    We have designed a two-dimensional, fractal-like lattice and explored, both numerically and analytically, the differences between random walks on this lattice and a regular, square-planar Euclidean lattice. We study the efficiency of diffusion-controlled processes for flows from external sites to a centrosymmetric reaction center and, conversely, for flows from a centrosymmetric source to boundary sites. In both cases, we find that analytic expressions derived for the mean walk length on the fractal-like lattice have an algebraic dependence on system size, whereas for regular Euclidean lattices the dependence can be transcendental. These expressions are compared with those derived in the continuum limit using classical diffusion theory. Our analysis and the numerical results quantify the extent to which one paradigmatic class of spatial inhomogeneities can compromise the efficiency of adatom diffusion on solid supports and of surface-assisted self-assembly in metal-organic materials.

  3. Thermodynamics and Phase Transitions of Electrolytes on Lattices with Different Discretization Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly; Artyomov, Maxim; Kobelev, Vladimir

    2004-03-01

    Lattice models are crucial for understanding the thermodynamics and phase transitions in many biological and chemical systems. We investigate Lattice Restricted Primitive Model (LRPM) of ionic systems with different discretization parameters in order to understand the deviations from continuum description of charged systems. Discretization parameter is defined as a number of lattice sites occupied by every ion. Explicit analytic and numerical calculations are performed using Debye-Hückel approach, which takes into account dipole formations, dipole-ion interactions and correct lattice Coulomb potentials. The gas-liquid phase separation is found at low densities. The increase in the discretization parameter lowers the critical temperature and increases the critical density, in agreement with Monte Carlo simulations results. In the limit of infinitely large discretization, our results approach the predictions from continuum RPM of electrolytes. However, when every particle can only occupy one lattice site, the gas-liquid phase transitions are suppressed by order-disorder phase transformations.

  4. Path integral Monte Carlo on a lattice. II. Bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Callaghan, Mark; Miller, Bruce N.

    2016-07-01

    The equilibrium properties of a single quantum particle (qp) interacting with a classical gas for a wide range of temperatures that explore the system's behavior in the classical as well as in the quantum regime is investigated. Both the qp and the atoms are restricted to sites on a one-dimensional lattice. A path integral formalism developed within the context of the canonical ensemble is utilized, where the qp is represented by a closed, variable-step random walk on the lattice. Monte Carlo methods are employed to determine the system's properties. To test the usefulness of the path integral formalism, the Metropolis algorithm is employed to determine the equilibrium properties of the qp in the context of a square well potential, forcing the qp to occupy bound states. We consider a one-dimensional square well potential where all atoms on the lattice are occupied with one atom with an on-site potential except for a contiguous set of sites of various lengths centered at the middle of the lattice. Comparison of the potential energy, the energy fluctuations, and the correlation function are made between the results of the Monte Carlo simulations and the numerical calculations.

  5. How robust will the RHIC lattice be during commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuma, S. )

    1991-09-01

    The question raised here is whether the RHIC lattice is robust enough to make all these commissioning manipulations possible. There are of course many factors involved in answering this question in a definitive manner. The purpose of this note is to see if there are any fundamental and serious shortcomings basic to the lattice. The lattice considered here is the one presented to the workshop by Steve Tepikian and called RHIC91. More specifically, we fix nine quadrupole parameters in all insertions except in the 6 o'clock insertion where the independent parameters is sixteen. The so-called perfect matching may require fourteen parameters instead of nine but the difference is insignificant. On the other hand, if the number of parameters is reduced from sixteen to nine in the 6 o'clock insertion, the mismatch in the arc beta function becomes non-trivial. For example, the horizontal beta may vary between 40m to 60m at QF locations.

  6. Site selection

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, C.W.

    1983-07-01

    The conditions and criteria for selecting a site for a nuclear weapons test at the Nevada Test Site are summarized. Factors considered are: (1) scheduling of drill rigs, (2) scheduling of site preparation (dirt work, auger hole, surface casing, cementing), (3) schedule of event (when are drill hole data needed), (4) depth range of proposed W.P., (5) geologic structure (faults, Pz contact, etc.), (6) stratigraphy (alluvium, location of Grouse Canyon Tuff, etc.), (7) material properties (particularly montmorillonite and CO/sub 2/ content), (8) water table depth, (9) potential drilling problems (caving), (10) adjacent collapse craters and chimneys, (11) adjacent expended but uncollapsed sites, (12) adjacent post-shot or other small diameter holes, (13) adjacent stockpile emplacement holes, (14) adjacent planned events (including LANL), (15) projected needs of Test Program for various DOB's and operational separations, and (16) optimal use of NTS real estate.

  7. Thermal characterization of nanoscale phononic crystals using supercell lattice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Bruce L.; Hussein, Mahmoud I.

    2011-12-01

    The concept of a phononic crystal can in principle be realized at the nanoscale whenever the conditions for coherent phonon transport exist. Under such conditions, the dispersion characteristics of both the constitutive material lattice (defined by a primitive cell) and the phononic crystal lattice (defined by a supercell) contribute to the value of the thermal conductivity. It is therefore necessary in this emerging class of phononic materials to treat the lattice dynamics at both periodicity levels. Here we demonstrate the utility of using supercell lattice dynamics to investigate the thermal transport behavior of three-dimensional nanoscale phononic crystals formed from silicon and cubic voids of vacuum. The periodicity of the voids follows a simple cubic arrangement with a lattice constant that is around an order of magnitude larger than that of the bulk crystalline silicon primitive cell. We consider an atomic-scale supercell which incorporates all the details of the silicon atomic locations and the void geometry. For this supercell, we compute the phonon band structure and subsequently predict the thermal conductivity following the Callaway-Holland model. Our findings dictate that for an analysis based on supercell lattice dynamics to be representative of the properties of the underlying lattice model, a minimum supercell size is needed along with a minimum wave vector sampling resolution. Below these minimum values, a thermal conductivity prediction of a bulk material based on a supercell will not adequately recover the value obtained based on a primitive cell. Furthermore, our results show that for the relatively small voids and void spacings we consider (where boundary scattering is dominant), dispersion at the phononic crystal unit cell level plays a noticeable role in determining the thermal conductivity.

  8. High-density equation of state for a lattice gas.

    PubMed

    Ushcats, M V

    2015-05-01

    For the lattice gas models of arbitrary geometry and dimensions with absolute repulsion between particles at zero distance (a hard core identical to a single lattice site) and arbitrary repulsion or attraction at other distances, the "hole-particle" symmetry of the system potential energy has been stated and an equation of state has been derived on the basis of the classical Gibbs statistics. The equation is completely analogous to the well-known virial equation of state, except that it is more accurate at high-density states, while the virial equation has the low-density limitation. Both equations contain the common set of the so-called irreducible integrals, related to the corresponding virial coefficients, and can be used together to describe the behavior of a lattice gas in a wide range of densities.

  9. Variational calculation of transport coefficients in diffusive lattice gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Chikashi; Krapivsky, P. L.; Mallick, Kirone

    2017-03-01

    A diffusive lattice gas is characterized by the diffusion coefficient depending only on the density. The Green-Kubo formula for diffusivity can be represented as a variational formula, but even when the equilibrium properties of a lattice gas are analytically known, the diffusion coefficient can be computed only in the exceptional situation when the lattice gas is gradient. In the general case, minimization over an infinite-dimensional space is required. We propose an approximation scheme based on minimizing over finite-dimensional subspaces of functions. The procedure is demonstrated for one-dimensional generalized exclusion processes in which each site can accommodate at most two particles. Our analytical predictions provide upper bounds for the diffusivity that are very close to simulation results throughout the entire density range. We also analyze nonequilibrium density profiles for finite chains coupled to reservoirs. The predictions for the profiles are in excellent agreement with simulations.

  10. Multiple species of noninteracting molecules adsorbed on a Bethe lattice.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael; Harris, A B

    2008-10-01

    A simple method, previously used to calculate the equilibrium concentration of dimers adsorbed on a Bethe lattice as a function of the dimer activity, is generalized to solve the problem of a Bethe lattice in contact with a reservoir containing a mixture of molecules. The molecules may have arbitrary sizes and shapes consistent with the geometry of the lattice and the molecules do not interact with one another except for the hard-core restriction that two molecules cannot touch the same site. We obtain a set of simultaneous nonlinear equations, one equation for each species of molecule, which determines the equilibrium concentration of each type of molecule as a function of the (arbitrary) activities of the various species. Surprisingly, regardless of the number of species, the equilibrium concentrations are given explicitly in terms of the solution of a single equation in one unknown which can be solved numerically, if need be. Some numerical examples show that increasing the activity of one species need not necessarily decrease the equilibrium concentration of all other species. We also calculate the adsorption isotherm of an "annealed" Bethe lattice consisting of two types of sites which differently influence the activity of an adsorbed molecule. We prove that if the reservoir contains a finite number of molecular species, regions of two different polymer densities cannot simultaneously exist on the lattice. The widely used Guggenheim theory of mixtures, which can also be construed as a theory of adsorption, assumes for simplicity that the molecules in the mixture are composed of elementary units, which occupy sites of a lattice of coordination number q . Guggenheim's analysis relies on approximate combinatorial formulas which become exact on a Bethe lattice of the same coordination number, as we show in an appendix. Our analysis involves no combinatorics and relies only on recognizing the statistical independence of certain quantities. Despite the nominal

  11. Ion channeling study of lattice distortions in chromium-doped SrTiO3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentiev, V.; Vacik, J.; Dejneka, A.; Trepakov, V.; Jastrabik, L.

    2013-07-01

    The results of ion channeling studies of lattice distortions in SrTiO3: Cr single crystals are presented. Two types of single crystals containing the same amount of Cr impurities but differing in stoichiometry have been investigated. The single crystals grown by the Verneuil method have the compositions of standard-grown SrTiO3: Cr (0.05 at % Cr), whereas the single crystals grown with a strontium deficiency and a chromium compensating amount have the composition Sr0.9995TiO3 (0.05 at % Cr). Analysis of the angular channeling spectra indicates that, in crystals of both types, the main defects are Cr impurities located in octahedral sites. In the SrTiO3: Cr crystals, impurity atoms manifest themselves as Cr4+ with tetragonal Jahn-Teller distortions of the surrounding lattice. In the Sr0.9995TiO3: Cr crystals grown with a Sr deficiency, the characteristic displacements of Ti ions in the third coordination sphere of the Jahn-Teller center Cr4+ exhibit the effect of interaction of the center with a neighboring vacancy in the Sr sublattice.

  12. LBNE lattice & optics for proton extraction at MI-10 and transport to a target above grade

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, John A.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    For the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) at Fermilab 120 GeV/c protons will be transported from the Main Injector (MI) to an on-site production target. The lattice design and optics discussed here has the beam extracted vertically upwards from MI-10 and the keeps the majority of the line at an elevation above the glacial till/rock interface and terminates on a target at 10 ft above grade. The LBNE beamline discussed here is a modular optics design comprised of 3 distinct lattice configurations, including the specialized MI {yields} LBNE matching section and Final Focus. The remainder of the line is defined by six FODO cells, in which the length and phase advance are chosen specifically such that beam size does not exceed that of the MI while also making the most efficient use of space for achromatic insertions. Dispersion generated by variations in the beam trajectory are corrected locally and can not bleed out to corrupt the optics elsewhere in the line. Aperture studies indicate that the line should be able to transport the worst quality beam that the Main Injector might provide. New IDS dipole correctors located at every focusing center provide high-quality orbit control and further ensure that LBNE meets the stringent requirements for environmental protection.

  13. Candidate locations for SPS rectifying antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, A. W.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of placing 120 Satellite Power System (SPS) rectifying antenna (rectenna) sites across the U.S. was studied. An initial attempt is made to put two land sites in each state using several land site selection criteria. When only 69 land sites are located, it is decided to put the remaining sites in the sea and sea site selection criteria are identified. An estimated projection of electrical demand distribution for the year 2000 is then used to determine the distribution of these sites along the Pacific, Atlantic, and Gulf Coasts. A methodology for distributing rectenna sites across the country and for fine-tuning exact locations is developed, and recommendations on rectenna design and operations are made.

  14. Lattice Structures For Aerospace Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Olmo, E.; Grande, E.; Samartin, C. R.; Bezdenejnykh, M.; Torres, J.; Blanco, N.; Frovel, M.; Canas, J.

    2012-07-01

    The way of mass reduction improving performances in the aerospace structures is a constant and relevant challenge in the space business. The designs, materials and manufacturing processes are permanently in evolution to explore and get mass optimization solutions at low cost. In the framework of ICARO project, EADS CASA ESPACIO (ECE) has designed, manufactured and tested a technology demonstrator which shows that lattice type of grid structures is a promising weight saving solution for replacing some traditional metallic and composite structures for space applications. A virtual testing methodology was used in order to support the design of a high modulus CFRP cylindrical lattice technology demonstrator. The manufacturing process, based on composite Automatic Fiber Placement (AFP) technology developed by ECE, allows obtaining high quality low weight lattice structures potentially applicable to a wide range of aerospace structures. Launcher payload adaptors, satellite platforms, antenna towers or instrument supports are some promising candidates.

  15. Algebraic Lattices in QFT Renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borinsky, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The structure of overlapping subdivergences, which appear in the perturbative expansions of quantum field theory, is analyzed using algebraic lattice theory. It is shown that for specific QFTs the sets of subdivergences of Feynman diagrams form algebraic lattices. This class of QFTs includes the standard model. In kinematic renormalization schemes, in which tadpole diagrams vanish, these lattices are semimodular. This implies that the Hopf algebra of Feynman diagrams is graded by the coradical degree or equivalently that every maximal forest has the same length in the scope of BPHZ renormalization. As an application of this framework, a formula for the counter terms in zero-dimensional QFT is given together with some examples of the enumeration of primitive or skeleton diagrams.

  16. Superfluid qubit systems with ring shaped optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Amico, Luigi; Aghamalyan, Davit; Auksztol, Filip; Crepaz, Herbert; Dumke, Rainer; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2014-03-06

    We study an experimentally feasible qubit system employing neutral atomic currents. Our system is based on bosonic cold atoms trapped in ring-shaped optical lattice potentials. The lattice makes the system strictly one dimensional and it provides the infrastructure to realize a tunable ring-ring interaction. Our implementation combines the low decoherence rates of neutral cold atoms systems, overcoming single site addressing, with the robustness of topologically protected solid state Josephson flux qubits. Characteristic fluctuations in the magnetic fields affecting Josephson junction based flux qubits are expected to be minimized employing neutral atoms as flux carriers. By breaking the Galilean invariance we demonstrate how atomic currents through the lattice provide an implementation of a qubit. This is realized either by artificially creating a phase slip in a single ring, or by tunnel coupling of two homogeneous ring lattices. The single qubit infrastructure is experimentally investigated with tailored optical potentials. Indeed, we have experimentally realized scaled ring-lattice potentials that could host, in principle, n ~ 10 of such ring-qubits, arranged in a stack configuration, along the laser beam propagation axis. An experimentally viable scheme of the two-ring-qubit is discussed, as well. Based on our analysis, we provide protocols to initialize, address, and read-out the qubit.

  17. Doublon dynamics and polar molecule production in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Covey, Jacob P; Moses, Steven A; Gärttner, Martin; Safavi-Naini, Arghavan; Miecnikowski, Matthew T; Fu, Zhengkun; Schachenmayer, Johannes; Julienne, Paul S; Rey, Ana Maria; Jin, Deborah S; Ye, Jun

    2016-04-14

    Polar molecules in an optical lattice provide a versatile platform to study quantum many-body dynamics. Here we use such a system to prepare a density distribution where lattice sites are either empty or occupied by a doublon composed of an interacting Bose-Fermi pair. By letting this out-of-equilibrium system evolve from a well-defined, but disordered, initial condition, we observe clear effects on pairing that arise from inter-species interactions, a higher partial-wave Feshbach resonance and excited Bloch-band population. These observations facilitate a detailed understanding of molecule formation in the lattice. Moreover, the interplay of tunnelling and interaction of fermions and bosons provides a controllable platform to study Bose-Fermi Hubbard dynamics. Additionally, we can probe the distribution of the atomic gases in the lattice by measuring the inelastic loss of doublons. These techniques realize tools that are generically applicable to studying the complex dynamics of atomic mixtures in optical lattices.

  18. Superfluid qubit systems with ring shaped optical lattices

    PubMed Central

    Amico, Luigi; Aghamalyan, Davit; Auksztol, Filip; Crepaz, Herbert; Dumke, Rainer; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2014-01-01

    We study an experimentally feasible qubit system employing neutral atomic currents. Our system is based on bosonic cold atoms trapped in ring-shaped optical lattice potentials. The lattice makes the system strictly one dimensional and it provides the infrastructure to realize a tunable ring-ring interaction. Our implementation combines the low decoherence rates of neutral cold atoms systems, overcoming single site addressing, with the robustness of topologically protected solid state Josephson flux qubits. Characteristic fluctuations in the magnetic fields affecting Josephson junction based flux qubits are expected to be minimized employing neutral atoms as flux carriers. By breaking the Galilean invariance we demonstrate how atomic currents through the lattice provide an implementation of a qubit. This is realized either by artificially creating a phase slip in a single ring, or by tunnel coupling of two homogeneous ring lattices. The single qubit infrastructure is experimentally investigated with tailored optical potentials. Indeed, we have experimentally realized scaled ring-lattice potentials that could host, in principle, n ~ 10 of such ring-qubits, arranged in a stack configuration, along the laser beam propagation axis. An experimentally viable scheme of the two-ring-qubit is discussed, as well. Based on our analysis, we provide protocols to initialize, address, and read-out the qubit. PMID:24599096

  19. Doublon dynamics and polar molecule production in an optical lattice

    PubMed Central

    Covey, Jacob P.; Moses, Steven A.; Gärttner, Martin; Safavi-Naini, Arghavan; Miecnikowski, Matthew T.; Fu, Zhengkun; Schachenmayer, Johannes; Julienne, Paul S.; Rey, Ana Maria; Jin, Deborah S.; Ye, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Polar molecules in an optical lattice provide a versatile platform to study quantum many-body dynamics. Here we use such a system to prepare a density distribution where lattice sites are either empty or occupied by a doublon composed of an interacting Bose-Fermi pair. By letting this out-of-equilibrium system evolve from a well-defined, but disordered, initial condition, we observe clear effects on pairing that arise from inter-species interactions, a higher partial-wave Feshbach resonance and excited Bloch-band population. These observations facilitate a detailed understanding of molecule formation in the lattice. Moreover, the interplay of tunnelling and interaction of fermions and bosons provides a controllable platform to study Bose-Fermi Hubbard dynamics. Additionally, we can probe the distribution of the atomic gases in the lattice by measuring the inelastic loss of doublons. These techniques realize tools that are generically applicable to studying the complex dynamics of atomic mixtures in optical lattices. PMID:27075831

  20. Locative Inversion in Cantonese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mok, Sui-Sang

    This study investigates the phenomenon of "Locative Inversion" in Cantonese. The term "Locative Inversion" indicates that the locative phrase (LP) syntactic process in Cantonese and the appears at the sentence-initial position and its logical subject occurs postverbally. It is demonstrated that this Locative Inversion is a…