Science.gov

Sample records for lattices iii baryon-baryon

  1. High Statistics Analysis using Anisotropic Clover Lattices: (III) Baryon-Baryon Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Silas Beane; Detmold, William; Lin, Huey-Wen; Luu, Thomas C.; Orginos, Kostas; Savage, Martin; Torok, Aaron M.; Walker-Loud, Andre

    2010-03-01

    Low-energy baryon-baryon interactions are calculated in a high-statistics lattice QCD study on a single ensemble of anisotropic clover gauge-field configurations at a pion mass of m_pi ~ 390 MeV, a spatial volume of L^3 ~ (2.5 fm)^3, and a spatial lattice spacing of b ~ 0.123 fm. Luscher’s method is used to extract nucleon-nucleon, hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-hyperon scattering phase shifts at one momentum from the one- and two-baryon ground-state energies in the lattice volume. The N-Sigma interactions are found to be highly spin-dependent, and the interaction in the ^3 S _1 channel is found to be strong. In contrast, the N-Lambda interactions are found to be spin-independent, within the uncertainties of the calculation, consistent with the absence of one-pion-exchange. The only channel for which a negative energy-shift is found is Lambda-Lambda, indicating that the Lambda-Lambda interaction is attractive, as anticipated from model-dependent discussions regarding the H-dibaryon. The NN scattering lengths are found to be small, clearly indicating the absence of any fine-tuning in the NN-sector at this pion mass. This is consistent with our previous Lattice QCD calculation of the NN interactions. The behavior of the signal-to-noise ratio in the baryon-baryon correlation functions, and in the ratio of correlation functions that yields the ground-state energy splitting

  2. High statistics analysis using anisotropic clover lattices: (III) Baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S; Detmold, W; Lin, H; Luu, T; Orginos, K; Savage, M; Torok, A; Walker-Loud, A

    2010-01-19

    Low-energy baryon-baryon interactions are calculated in a high-statistics lattice QCD study on a single ensemble of anisotropic clover gauge-field configurations at a pion mass of m{sub {pi}} {approx} 390 MeV, a spatial volume of L{sup 3} {approx} (2.5 fm){sup 3}, and a spatial lattice spacing of b {approx} 0.123 fm. Luescher's method is used to extract nucleon-nucleon, hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-hyperon scattering phase shifts at one momentum from the one- and two-baryon ground-state energies in the lattice volume. The isospin-3/2 N{Sigma} interactions are found to be highly spin-dependent, and the interaction in the {sup 3}S{sub 1} channel is found to be strong. In contrast, the N{Lambda} interactions are found to be spin-independent, within the uncertainties of the calculation, consistent with the absence of one-pion-exchange. The only channel for which a negative energy-shift is found is {Lambda}{Lambda}, indicating that the {Lambda}{Lambda} interaction is attractive, as anticipated from model-dependent discussions regarding the H-dibaryon. The NN scattering lengths are found to be small, clearly indicating the absence of any fine-tuning in the NN-sector at this pion mass. This is consistent with our previous Lattice QCD calculation of NN interactions. The behavior of the signal-to-noise ratio in the baryon-baryon correlation functions, and in the ratio of correlation functions that yields the ground-state energy splitting is explored. In particular, focus is placed on the window of time slices for which the signal-to-noise ratio does not degrade exponentially, as this provides the opportunity to extract quantitative information about multi-baryon systems.

  3. Mirage in temporal correlation functions for baryon-baryon interactions in lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iritani, T.; Doi, T.; Aoki, S.; Gongyo, S.; Hatsuda, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Inoue, T.; Ishii, N.; Murano, K.; Nemura, H.; Sasaki, K.

    2016-10-01

    Single state saturation of the temporal correlation function is a key condition to extract physical observables such as energies and matrix elements of hadrons from lattice QCD simulations. A method commonly employed to check the saturation is to seek for a plateau of the observables for large Euclidean time. Identifying the plateau in the cases having nearby states, however, is non-trivial and one may even be misled by a fake plateau. Such a situation takes place typically for a system with two or more baryons. In this study, we demonstrate explicitly the danger from a possible fake plateau in the temporal correlation functions mainly for two baryons (ΞΞ and N N ), and three and four baryons (3He and 4He) as well, employing (2+1)-flavor lattice QCD at m π = 0 .51GeV on four lattice volumes with L = 2.9, 3.6, 4.3 and 5.8 fm. Caution is required when drawing conclusions about the bound N N , 3 N and 4 N systems based only on the standard plateau fitting of the temporal correlation functions. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Strangeness S = -3 and -4 baryon-baryon interactions in chiral EFT

    SciTech Connect

    Haidenbauer, Johann

    2011-10-24

    I report on recent progress in the description of baryon-baryon systems within chiral effective field theory. In particular, I discuss results for the strangeness S = -3 to -4 baryon-baryon systems, obtained to leading order.

  5. Strangeness S = -3 and -4 baryon-baryon interactions in chiral EFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidenbauer, Johann

    2011-10-01

    I report on recent progress in the description of baryon-baryon systems within chiral effective field theory. In particular, I discuss results for the strangeness S = -3 to -4 baryon-baryon systems, obtained to leading order.

  6. Baryon-Baryon {8} \\otimes {8}-Channels Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, Th. A.; Nagels, M. M.; Yamamoto, Y.

    The extended-soft-core model ESC08 is presented. The ESC-models are at present the most complete meson-exchange models for the baryon-baryon interactions. The ESC-model describes the nucleon-nucleon (NN), hyperon-nucleon (YN), and hyperon-hyperon (YY), in terms of meson-exchanges using (broken) SU(3)f-symmetry. In this approach to baryon-baryon (BB) the dynamics is derived from (i) one-boson-exchanges (OBE), (ii) two-meson-exchanges (TME), and (iii) meson-pair-exchanges (MPE), (iv) gluon-exchanges in the form of the pomeron and odderon potentials, and (v) quark-core effects. In the OBE-sector, special features are: (a) the inclusion of a zero in the scalar- and axial- meson form-factors, (b) the odderon-exchage representing the exchange of the odd-number gluons-exchange, whereas the pomeron represents the even-number gluon-exchange, and (c) special pronounced effects of the appearance of forbidden six-quark configurations. With these ingredients a rather flexible dynamical framework is constructed. Namely, it appeared feasible to keep the parameters of the model in reasonable accordance with the predictions of the 3P0 quark-pair-creation model (QPC), although in ESC08a,b,c an admixture of 3S1 quark-pair creation is present. This is the case for the meson- and meson-pair-baryon coupling constants and the F/(F+D)-ratio's as well. The NN, YN, and YY results for this model are excellent. This is marked in particularly by the NN-results, namely χ p.d.p.2 = 1.08 for ESC08a,b,c. Also, we improved the ΛN spin-orbit interaction greatly by the inclusion of (a) the Brown, Downs, and Iddings anti-symmetric spin-orbit potentials, and (b) new corrections to the MPE-potentials. Also, the special quark-core effects provide extra repulsion in the Σ+p(3S1, T = 3/2)- and ΣN(1S0, T = 1/2)-channels, although the strength is constrained by SU(3) symmetry and the Σ+p experimental X-sections. In the S = -2 sector the ΛΛ-interaction is weak, which is in accordance with the NAGARA

  7. Meson-baryon-baryon vertex function and the Ward-Takahashi identity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Siwen; Banerjee, Manoj K.

    1996-12-01

    Ohta proposed a solution for the well-known difficulty of satisfying the Ward-Takahashi identity for a photo-meson-baryon-baryon amplitude (γMBB) when a dressed meson-baryon-baryon (MBB) vertex function is present. He obtained a form for the γMBB amplitude which contained, in addition to the usual pole terms, longitudinal seagull terms which were determined entirely by the MBB vertex function. He arrived at his result by using a Lagrangian which yields the MBB vertex function at tree level. We show that such a Lagrangian can be neither Hermitian nor charge conjugation invariant. We have been able to reproduce Ohta's result for the γMBB amplitude using the Ward-Takahashi identity and no other assumption, dynamical or otherwise, and the most general form for the MBB and γMBB vertices. However, contrary to Ohta's finding, we find that the seagull terms are not robust. The seagull terms extracted from the γMBB vertex occur unchanged in tree graphs, such as in an exchange current amplitude. But the seagull terms which appear in a loop graph, as in the calculation of an electromagnetic form factor, are, in general, different. The whole procedure says nothing about the transverse part of the (γMBB) vertex and its contributions to the amplitudes in question.

  8. Meson-baryon-baryon vertex function and the Ward-Takahashi identity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Banerjee, M.K.

    1996-12-01

    Ohta proposed a solution for the well-known difficulty of satisfying the Ward-Takahashi identity for a photo-meson-baryon-baryon amplitude ({gamma}MBB) when a dressed meson-baryon-baryon (MBB) vertex function is present. He obtained a form for the {gamma}MBB amplitude which contained, in addition to the usual pole terms, longitudinal seagull terms which were determined entirely by the MBB vertex function. He arrived at his result by using a Lagrangian which yields the MBB vertex function at tree level. We show that such a Lagrangian can be neither Hermitian nor charge conjugation invariant. We have been able to reproduce Ohta{close_quote}s result for the {gamma}MBB amplitude using the Ward-Takahashi identity and no other assumption, dynamical or otherwise, and the most general form for the MBB and {gamma}MBB vertices. However, contrary to Ohta{close_quote}s finding, we find that the seagull terms are not robust. The seagull terms extracted from the {gamma}MBB vertex occur unchanged in tree graphs, such as in an exchange current amplitude. But the seagull terms which appear in a loop graph, as in the calculation of an electromagnetic form factor, are, in general, different. The whole procedure says nothing about the transverse part of the ({gamma}MBB) vertex and its contributions to the amplitudes in question. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. nd Scattering Observables Derived from the Quark-Model Baryon-Baryon Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y.; Fukukawa, K.

    2010-05-12

    We solve the nd scattering in the Faddeev formalism, employing the NN sector of the quark-model baryon-baryon interaction fss2. The energy-dependence of the NN interaction, inherent to the (3q)-(3q) resonating-group formulation, is eliminated by the standard off-shell transformation utilizing the 1/sq root(N) factor, where N is the normalization kernel for the (3q)-(3q) system. This procedure yields an extra nonlocality, whose effect is very important to reproduce all the scattering observables below E{sub n}<=65 MeV. The different off-shell properties from the standard meson-exchange potentials, related to the non-locality of the quark-exchange kernel, yields appreciable effects to the differential cross sections and polarization observables of the nd elastic scattering, which are usually attributed to the specific properties of three-body forces.

  10. Density-dependent effective baryon-baryon interaction from chiral three-baryon forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petschauer, Stefan; Haidenbauer, Johann; Kaiser, Norbert; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Weise, Wolfram

    2017-01-01

    A density-dependent effective potential for the baryon-baryon interaction in the presence of the (hyper)nuclear medium is constructed, based on the leading (irreducible) three-baryon forces derived within SU(3) chiral effective field theory. We evaluate the contributions from three classes: contact terms, one-pion exchange and two-pion exchange. In the strangeness-zero sector we recover the known result for the in-medium nucleon-nucleon interaction. Explicit expressions for the ΛN in-medium potential in (asymmetric) nuclear matter are presented. Our results are suitable for implementation into calculations of (hyper)nuclear matter. In order to estimate the low-energy constants of the leading three-baryon forces we introduce the decuplet baryons as explicit degrees of freedom and construct the relevant terms in the minimal non-relativistic Lagrangian. With these, the constants are estimated through decuplet saturation. Utilizing this approximation we provide numerical results for the effect of the three-body force in symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter on the ΛN interaction. A moderate repulsion that increases with density is found in comparison to the free ΛN interaction.

  11. Baryon-baryon spin-orbit interaction in a quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimatsu, O.; Ohta, S.; Shimizu, K.; Yazaki, K.

    1984-06-01

    The baryon-baryon spin-orbit interactions are studied within the framework of a nonrelativistic quark-cluster model. The origin of the spin-orbit interactions is taken to be the Galilei-invariant part of the spin-orbit term in the one-gluon-exchange potential between quarks. It gives, for example, the NN spin-orbit interaction which is qualitatively similar to the empirical ones. The baryon-nucleus spin-orbit interactions are also considered along this line. The N- and Σ-nucleus spin-orbit interactions are of comparable strength, while the Λ-nucleus spin-orbit interaction is weak. The main origin of the difference between the Λ -nucleus and Σ-nucleus spin-orbit interactions is the presence of the comparatively strong antisymmetric LS (ALS) terms for both NΛ and NΣ interactions but with opposite signs. Other sources of the spin-orbit interactions are briefly discussed in connection with the problem of the spin-orbit effect in the excited baryon spectra.

  12. Localized N, {lambda}, {sigma}, and {xi} single-particle potentials in finite nuclei calculated with SU{sub 6} quark-model baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kohno, M.; Fujiwara, Y.

    2009-05-15

    Localized single-particle potentials for all octet baryons, N, {lambda}, {sigma}, and {xi}, in finite nuclei, {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, {sup 28}Si, {sup 40}Ca, {sup 56}Fe, and {sup 90}Zr, are calculated using the quark-model baryon-baryon interactions. G matrices evaluated in symmetric nuclear matter in the lowest order Brueckner theory (LOBT) are applied to finite nuclei in local density approximation. Nonlocal potentials are localized by a zero-momentum Wigner transformation. Empirical single-particle properties of the nucleon and the {lambda} hyperon in a nuclear medium have been known to be explained semiquantitatively in the LOBT framework. Attention is focused in the present consideration on predictions for the {sigma} and {xi} hyperons. The unified description for the octet baryon-baryon interactions by the SU{sub 6} quark model enables us to obtain less ambiguous extrapolation to the S=-1 and S=-2 sectors based on the knowledge in the NN sector than other potential models. The {sigma} mean field is shown to be weakly attractive at the surface, but turns out to be repulsive inside, which is consistent with the experimental evidence. The {xi} hyperon s.p. potential is also attractive at the nuclear surface region, and inside it fluctuates around zero. Hence {xi} hypernuclear bound states are unlikely. We also evaluate energy shifts of the {sigma}{sup -} and {xi}{sup -} atomic levels in {sup 28}Si and {sup 56}Fe, using the calculated s.p. potentials.

  13. Extracting scattering phase shifts in higher partial waves from lattice QCD calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Luu, Thomas; Savage, Martin J.

    2011-06-01

    Lüscher’s method is routinely used to determine meson-meson, meson-baryon, and baryon-baryon s-wave scattering amplitudes below inelastic thresholds from lattice QCD calculations—presently at unphysical light-quark masses. In this work we review the formalism and develop the requisite expressions to extract phase shifts describing meson-meson scattering in partial waves with angular momentum l≤6 and l=9. The implications of the underlying cubic symmetry, and strategies for extracting the phase shifts from lattice QCD calculations, are presented, along with a discussion of the signal-to-noise problem that afflicts the higher partial waves.

  14. One-dimensional lattices topologically equivalent to two-dimensional lattices within the context of the lattice gas model, III. The hexagonal lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanza, E. F.; Costanza, G.

    2017-02-01

    Continuum partial differential equations are obtained from a set of discrete stochastic evolution equations of both non-Markovian and Markovian processes and applied to the diffusion within the context of the lattice gas model. A procedure allowing to construct one-dimensional lattices that are topologically equivalent to two-dimensional lattices is described in detail in the case of a hexagonal lattice which has the particular feature that need four types of dynamical variables. This example shows additional features to the general procedure and some extensions are also suggested in order to provide a wider insight in the present approach.

  15. III-V Solar Cells Based on a Lattice Parameter near that of InP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mahony, Donagh; Mathews, Ian; Gocalinska, Agnieszka; Pelucchi, Emanuele; Thomas, Kevin; Morrison, Alan P.; Corbett, Brian

    2014-08-01

    Multi-junction cells based on a lattice constant of 5.816 Å using InAlAs - InGaAsP - InGaAs alloys can theoretically outperform those based on the GaAs lattice parameter by 3%. This lattice constant is close to that of InP (5.86 Å) but ultimately requires growth on a lower cost substrate such as Ge or Si for cost effectiveness. This paper presents an overview of our group's progress on the development of the essential sub-elements of this novel configuration, namely: (i) single-junction In0.52Al0.48As and In0.53Ga0.47As solar cells lattice matched to InP substrates with measured 1-Sun PV efficiencies of 13.8% and 9.3% respectively, (ii) a compositionally-graded InxGa1-xAs/InP metamorphic buffer layer (MBL) that alters the lattice constant from 5.65 Å (GaAs) to 5.87 Å (InP) and (iii) the growth of In0.52Al0.48As and In0.53Ga0.47As single junction cells on GaAs substrates.

  16. Impact of Rotational Twin Boundaries and Lattice Mismatch on III-V Nanowire Growth.

    PubMed

    Steidl, Matthias; Koppka, Christian; Winterfeld, Lars; Peh, Katharina; Galiana, Beatriz; Supplie, Oliver; Kleinschmidt, Peter; Runge, Erich; Hannappel, Thomas

    2017-09-26

    Pseudomorphic planar III-V transition layers greatly facilitate the epitaxial integration of vapor-liquid-solid grown III-V nanowires (NW) on Si(111) substrates. Heteroepitaxial (111) layer growth, however, is commonly accompanied by the formation of rotational twins. We find that rotational twin boundaries (RTBs), which intersect the surface of GaP/Si(111) heterosubstrates, generally cause horizontal NW growth and may even suppress NW growth entirely. Away from RTBs, the NW growth direction switches from horizontal to vertical in the case of homoepitaxial GaP NWs, whereas heteroepitaxial GaAs NWs continue growing horizontally. To understand this rich phenomenology, we develop a model based on classical nucleation theory. Independent of the occurrence of RTBs and specific transition layers, our model can generally explain the prevalent observation of horizontal III-V NW growth in lattice mismatched systems and the high crystal quality of horizontal nanowires.

  17. Case for exotic baryon-baryon states

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.H.

    1980-01-01

    Three main points are presented. (1) Current theoretical prejudices are presented for why dibaryon states are interesting, and why they should be expected. (2) A review is given of some of the unsettled experimental issues which have emerged during this conference concerning dibaryons. (3) Phenomenological issues are raised which are critical to understanding whether dibaryon states are observable in the medium energy NN system.

  18. Lattice-Mismatched III-V Epilayers for High-Efficiency Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrenkiel, Scott Phillip

    2013-06-30

    The project focused on development of new approaches and materials combinations to expand and improve the quality and versatility of lattice-mismatched (LMM) III-V semiconductor epilayers for use in high-efficiency multijunction photovoltaic (PV) devices. To address these goals, new capabilities for materials synthesis and characterization were established at SDSM&T that have applications in modern opto- and nano-electronics, including epitaxial crystal growth and transmission electron microscopy. Advances were made in analyzing and controlling the strain profiles and quality of compositional grades used for these technologies. In particular, quaternary compositional grades were demonstrated, and a quantitative method for characteristic X-ray analysis was developed. The project allowed enhanced collaboration between scientists at NREL and SDSM&T to address closely related research goals, including materials exchange and characterization.

  19. Bound H dibaryon in flavor SU(3) limit of lattice QCD.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takashi; Ishii, Noriyoshi; Aoki, Sinya; Doi, Takumi; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Ikeda, Yoichi; Murano, Keiko; Nemura, Hidekatsu; Sasaki, Kenji

    2011-04-22

    The flavor-singlet H dibaryon, which has strangeness -2 and baryon number 2, is studied by the approach recently developed for the baryon-baryon interactions in lattice QCD. The flavor-singlet central potential is derived from the spatial and imaginary-time dependence of the Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter wave function measured in N(f)=3 full QCD simulations with the lattice size of L≃2,3,4  fm. The potential is found to be insensitive to the volume, and it leads to a bound H dibaryon with the binding energy of 30-40 MeV for the pseudoscalar meson mass of 673-1015 MeV.

  20. Bound H Dibaryon in Flavor SU(3) Limit of Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Takashi; Ishii, Noriyoshi; Aoki, Sinya; Doi, Takumi; Sasaki, Kenji; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Ikeda, Yoichi; Murano, Keiko; Nemura, Hidekatsu

    2011-04-22

    The flavor-singlet H dibaryon, which has strangeness -2 and baryon number 2, is studied by the approach recently developed for the baryon-baryon interactions in lattice QCD. The flavor-singlet central potential is derived from the spatial and imaginary-time dependence of the Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter wave function measured in N{sub f}=3 full QCD simulations with the lattice size of L{approx_equal}2,3,4 fm. The potential is found to be insensitive to the volume, and it leads to a bound H dibaryon with the binding energy of 30-40 MeV for the pseudoscalar meson mass of 673-1015 MeV.

  1. Determination of lattice parameters, strain state and composition in semipolar III-nitrides using high resolution X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frentrup, Martin; Hatui, Nirupam; Wernicke, Tim; Stellmach, Joachim; Bhattacharya, Arnab; Kneissl, Michael

    2013-12-01

    In group-III-nitride heterostructures with semipolar or nonpolar crystal orientation, anisotropic lattice and thermal mismatch with the buffer or substrate lead to a complex distortion of the unit cells, e.g., by shearing of the lattice. This makes an accurate determination of lattice parameters, composition, and strain state under assumption of the hexagonal symmetry impossible. In this work, we present a procedure to accurately determine the lattice constants, strain state, and composition of semipolar heterostructures using high resolution X-ray diffraction. An analysis of the unit cell distortion shows that four independent lattice parameters are sufficient to describe this distortion. Assuming only small deviations from an ideal hexagonal structure, a linear expression for the interplanar distances dhkl is derived. It is used to determine the lattice parameters from high resolution X-ray diffraction 2ϑ-ω-scans of multiple on- and off-axis reflections via a weighted least-square fit. The strain and composition of ternary alloys are then evaluated by transforming the elastic parameters (using Hooke's law) from the natural crystal-fixed coordinate system to a layer-based system, given by the in-plane directions and the growth direction. We illustrate our procedure taking an example of (112¯2) AlκGa1-κN epilayers with Al-contents over the entire composition range. We separately identify the in-plane and out-of-plane strains and discuss origins for the observed anisotropy.

  2. Determination of lattice parameters, strain state and composition in semipolar III-nitrides using high resolution X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Frentrup, Martin Wernicke, Tim; Stellmach, Joachim; Kneissl, Michael; Hatui, Nirupam; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2013-12-07

    In group-III-nitride heterostructures with semipolar or nonpolar crystal orientation, anisotropic lattice and thermal mismatch with the buffer or substrate lead to a complex distortion of the unit cells, e.g., by shearing of the lattice. This makes an accurate determination of lattice parameters, composition, and strain state under assumption of the hexagonal symmetry impossible. In this work, we present a procedure to accurately determine the lattice constants, strain state, and composition of semipolar heterostructures using high resolution X-ray diffraction. An analysis of the unit cell distortion shows that four independent lattice parameters are sufficient to describe this distortion. Assuming only small deviations from an ideal hexagonal structure, a linear expression for the interplanar distances d{sub hkl} is derived. It is used to determine the lattice parameters from high resolution X-ray diffraction 2ϑ-ω-scans of multiple on- and off-axis reflections via a weighted least-square fit. The strain and composition of ternary alloys are then evaluated by transforming the elastic parameters (using Hooke's law) from the natural crystal-fixed coordinate system to a layer-based system, given by the in-plane directions and the growth direction. We illustrate our procedure taking an example of (112{sup ¯}2) Al{sub κ}Ga{sub 1−κ}N epilayers with Al-contents over the entire composition range. We separately identify the in-plane and out-of-plane strains and discuss origins for the observed anisotropy.

  3. Chemical trends of stability and band alignment of lattice-matched II-VI/III-V semiconductor interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hui-Xiong; Luo, Jun-Wei; Wei, Su-Huai

    2015-02-01

    Using the first-principles density functional theory method, we systematically investigate the structural and electronic properties of heterovalent interfaces of the lattice-matched II-VI/III-V semiconductors, i.e., ZnTe/GaSb, ZnSe/GaAs, ZnS/GaP, and ZnO/GaN. We find that, independent of the orientations, the heterovalent superlattices with period n =6 are energetically more favorable to form nonpolar interfaces. For the [001] interface, the stable nonpolar interfaces are formed by mixing 50% group-III with 50% group-II atoms or by mixing 50% group-V with 50% group-VI atoms; for the [111] nonpolar interfaces, the mixings are 25% group-III (II) and 75% group-II (III) atoms or 25% group-V (VI) and 75% group-VI (V) atoms. For all the nonpolar interfaces, the [110] interface has the lowest interfacial energy because it has the minimum number of II-V or III-VI "wrong bonds" per unit interfacial area. The interfacial energy increases when the atomic number of the elements decreases, except for the ZnO/GaN system. The band alignments between the II-VI and III-V compounds are drastically different depending on whether they have mixed-cation or mixed-anion interfaces, but the averaged values are nearly independent of the orientations. Similarly, other than ZnO/GaN, the valence-band offsets also increase as the atomic number of the elements decreases. The abnormal trends in interfacial energy and band alignment for ZnO/GaN are primarily attributed to the very short bond lengths in this system. The underlying physics behind these trends are explained.

  4. Two 3D network complexes of Y(III) and Ce(III) with 2-fold interpenetration and reversible desorption-adsorption behavior of lattice water

    SciTech Connect

    Chu Wenjuan; He Yong; Zhao Qinghuan; Fan Yaoting; Hou Hongwei

    2010-10-15

    Two novel inorganic-organic 3D network, namely{l_brace}[Ln(L){sub 1.5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].5H{sub 2}O{r_brace}n [Ln=Y (1), Ce (2); Ln(L){sub 1.5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].5H{sub 2}O [Ln=Y (1), Ce (2)], have been prepared through the assembly of the ligand 1,2-bis[3-(1,2,4-triazolyl)-4-amino-5-carboxylmethylthio]ethane (H{sub 2}L) and lanthanide (III) salts under hydrothermal condition and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffractions. In complexes 1 and 2, the L{sup 2-} anions adopt three different coordination fashions (bidentate chelate, bidentate bridging and bidentate chelate bridging) connecting Ln(III) ions via the oxygen atoms from carboxylate moieties. Both 1 and 2 exhibit 3D network structures with 2-fold interpenetration. Interestingly, the reversible desorption-adsorption behavior of lattice water is significantly observed in the two compounds. The result shows their potential application as late-model water absorbent in the field of adsorption material. - Graphical abstract: Two inorganic-organic 3D network, namely {l_brace}[Ln(L){sub 1.5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].5H{sub 2}O{r_brace}n [Ln=Y (1), Ce (2)], have been prepared under hydrothermal condition and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffractions. Both 1 and 2 exhibit 3D network structures with 2-fold interpenetration. Interestingly, the reversible desorption-adsorption behavior of lattice water is significantly observed in the two compounds. The result shows their potential application as late-model water absorbent in the field of adsorption material.

  5. Nucleation, Growth, and Strain Relaxation of Lattice-Mismatched III-V Semiconductor Epitaxial Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welser, R. E.; Guido, L. J.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the early stages of evolution of highly strained 2-D InAs layers and 3-D InAs islands grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on (100) and (111) B GaAs substrates. The InAs epilayer / GaAs substrate combination has been chosen because the lattice-mismatch is severe (approx. 7.20%), yet these materials are otherwise very similar. By examining InAs-on-GaAs composites Instead of the more common In(x)Ga(1-x)As alloy, we remove an additional degree of freedom (x) and thereby simplify data interpretation. A matrix of experiments is described in which the MOCVD growth parameters -- susceptor temperature, TMIn flux, and AsH3 flux -- have been varied over a wide range. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis have been employed to observe the thin film surface morphology. In the case of 3-D growth, we have extracted activation energies and power-dependent exponents that characterize the nucleation process. As a consequence, optimized growth conditions have been identified for depositing approx. 250 A thick (100) and (111)B oriented InAs layers with relatively smooth surfaces. Together with preliminary data on the strain relaxation of these layers, the above results on the evolution of thin InAs films indicate that the (111)B orientation is particularly promising for yielding lattice-mismatched films that are fully relaxed with only misfit dislocations at the epilayer / substrate interface.

  6. Phyllotaxis or the properties of spiral lattices. III. An algebraic model of morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, M.; Rothen, F.

    1992-11-01

    A phyllotactical pattern such as the arrangement of the scales of a fir-cone originates along a thin ring surrounding a local center of growth. We study a simple model of the morphogenesis of such a botanical structure by considering algebraic relations between permutations of the n first natural numbers, each number corresponding to the birth order of a given scale or leaf. This model allows to define a divergence angle in a natural way. The possible values of the divergence can be classified according to a hierarchical structure which places the noble numbers in a prominent position. This construction is similar to the Farey-tree obtained in the study of lattices of tangent circles aligned along equiangular spirals. Une structure phyllotactique comme celles que constituent les écailles d'une pomme de pin prend naissance sur un étroit anneau apical qui entoure un centre local de croissance. On étudie un modèle simple de la morphogenèse d'une telle formation en établissant des relations algébriques entre permutations des n premiers nombres naturels, chaque nombre correspondant à l'ordre d'apparition d'une écaille ou d'une feuille. Ce modèle conduit à la définition naturelle d'une divergence. Les valeurs que peut prendre cette divergence s'ordonnent en une structure hiérarchique qui met en évidence le rôle des nombres nobles. Il y a parenté évidente avec l'arbre de Farey que l'on obtient en classant les réseaux de cercles tangents alignés le long de spirales équiangulaires.

  7. Importance of Baryon-Baryon Coupling in Hypernuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, B. F.; Afnan, I. R.; Carlson, J. A.; Lehman, D. R.

    The Λ N-Σ N coupling in Λ-hypernuclei and ΛΛ-Ξ N coupling in ΛΛ-hypernuclei produce novel physics not observed in the conventional, non-strange sector. Effects of ΛleftrightarrowΣ conversion in ^3_ΛH are reviewed. The role of Λ N-Σ N coupling suppression in the A=4, 5 Λ-hypernuclei due to Pauli blocking is highlighted, and the implications for the structure of ^{10}_ΛB are explored. Suppression of ΛΛ-Ξ N conversion in ^6_ΛΛHe is hypothesized as the reason that the < V_ΛΛ> matrix element is small. Measurement of ^4_ΛΛH is proposed to investigate the full ΛΛ-Ξ N interaction. The implication for ΛΛ analog states is discussed.

  8. Epitaxial growth of group III nitrides on silicon substrates via a reflective lattice-matched zirconium diboride buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolle, J.; Roucka, R.; Tsong, I. S. T.; Ritter, C.; Crozier, P. A.; Chizmeshya, A. V. G.; Kouvetakis, J.

    2003-04-01

    Growth of metallic and reflecting ZrB2 films is conducted on Si(111) substrates at 900 °C using a single-source unimolecular precursor Zr(BH4)4 in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber. Epitaxial growth of ZrB2(0001) is accomplished despite the very large lattice mismatch between ZrB2 and Si(111). High-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images of the sharp ZrB2/Si(111) interface show a heteroepitaxial relationship involving a "magic mismatch" of coincidence lattices. The GaN films grown on the ZrB2/Si(111) template is virtually homoepitaxy because of the very small lattice mismatch, 0.6%, between the in-plane lattice parameters of ZrB2(0001) and GaN(0001).

  9. Interchange between coordinated and lattice solvents generates the highest energy barrier within nine-coordinated Dy(III) single molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lin; Zhang, Sheng; Jiang, Zhijie; Yang, Qi; Chen, Sanping; Zhang, Yiquan; Wang, Wenyuan; Wei, Qing; Xie, Gang

    2017-08-29

    It is crucial to promote axiality to enhance easy-axis magnetic anisotropy. Two mononuclear Dy(III) compounds, in which each Dy(III) is nine-coordinated, namely, [(C12H10N5O)Dy(NO3)2(H2O)2]·C2H5OH (1) and [(C12H10N5O)Dy(NO3)2(C2H5OH)2]·H2O (2) (HL = N(3)-(2-pyridoyl)-4-pyridinecarboxamidrazone), have been prepared through controlling the amount of C2H5OH and H2O solvents. Geometry modulations were realized by interchanging coordinated and lattice solvents, thus achieving a structure closer to the configuration of a capped square antiprism for 2 compared to that for 1. Notably, magnetic studies revealed that compound 1 displays no slow relaxation of magnetization while compound 2 exhibits single-molecule magnet (SMM) behaviour in the absence of a static magnetic field, with the highest energy barrier (203.11 K) of nine-coordinated Dy(III) SMMs. Ab initio calculations were performed to elucidate such a distinct performance, demonstrating that the combination of the larger charge distribution along the magnetic axis and the lower charge distribution in the equatorial plane generates a strong easy-axis ligand field to enhance magnetic properties, which is further associated with the structural symmetry. In addition, a possible coordination mode is proposed to realize high axis anisotropy for nine-coordinated Dy(III) compounds. This work presents an effective method to modulate the dynamic magnetic relaxation of the Dy(III) SMMs through interchange between coordinated and lattice solvents.

  10. Lattice Dynamical, Elastic and Thermodynamical Properties of III-V Semiconductor AlSb, GaSb and Their Mixed Semiconductor Ga_{1-x}AlxSb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, A. K.

    2017-07-01

    A proposed eleven-parameter three-body shell model is used to study the lattice dynamical properties such as phonon dispersion relations along high symmetry directions, phonon density of states, variation of specific heat and Debye characteristic temperature with absolute temperature, elastic constants and related properties for III-V semiconductor AlSb, GaSb and their mixed semiconductor Ga_{1-x}AlxSb having zinc-blende structure. We found an overall good agreement with the available experimental and theoretical results available in the literature.

  11. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization of 1H, 13C, and 59Co in a Tris(ethylenediamine)cobalt(III) Crystalline Lattice Doped with Cr(III)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The study of inorganic crystalline materials by solid-state NMR spectroscopy is often complicated by the low sensitivity of heavy nuclei. However, these materials often contain or can be prepared with paramagnetic dopants without significantly affecting the structure of the crystalline host. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is generally capable of enhancing NMR signals by transferring the magnetization of unpaired electrons to the nuclei. Therefore, the NMR sensitivity in these paramagnetically doped crystals might be increased by DNP. In this paper we demonstrate the possibility of efficient DNP transfer in polycrystalline samples of [Co(en)3Cl3]2·NaCl·6H2O (en = ethylenediamine, C2H8N2) doped with Cr(III) in varying concentrations between 0.1 and 3 mol %. We demonstrate that 1H, 13C, and 59Co can be polarized by irradiation of Cr(III) with 140 GHz microwaves at a magnetic field of 5 T. We further explain our findings on the basis of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of the Cr(III) site and analysis of its temperature-dependent zero-field splitting, as well as the dependence of the DNP enhancement factor on the external magnetic field and microwave power. This first demonstration of DNP transfer from one paramagnetic metal ion to its diamagnetic host metal ion will pave the way for future applications of DNP in paramagnetically doped materials or metalloproteins. PMID:25069794

  12. Dynamic nuclear polarization of (1)H, (13)C, and (59)Co in a tris(ethylenediamine)cobalt(III) crystalline lattice doped with Cr(III).

    PubMed

    Corzilius, Björn; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Penzel, Susanne A; Ravera, Enrico; Smith, Albert A; Luchinat, Claudio; Griffin, Robert G

    2014-08-20

    The study of inorganic crystalline materials by solid-state NMR spectroscopy is often complicated by the low sensitivity of heavy nuclei. However, these materials often contain or can be prepared with paramagnetic dopants without significantly affecting the structure of the crystalline host. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is generally capable of enhancing NMR signals by transferring the magnetization of unpaired electrons to the nuclei. Therefore, the NMR sensitivity in these paramagnetically doped crystals might be increased by DNP. In this paper we demonstrate the possibility of efficient DNP transfer in polycrystalline samples of [Co(en)3Cl3]2·NaCl·6H2O (en = ethylenediamine, C2H8N2) doped with Cr(III) in varying concentrations between 0.1 and 3 mol %. We demonstrate that (1)H, (13)C, and (59)Co can be polarized by irradiation of Cr(III) with 140 GHz microwaves at a magnetic field of 5 T. We further explain our findings on the basis of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of the Cr(III) site and analysis of its temperature-dependent zero-field splitting, as well as the dependence of the DNP enhancement factor on the external magnetic field and microwave power. This first demonstration of DNP transfer from one paramagnetic metal ion to its diamagnetic host metal ion will pave the way for future applications of DNP in paramagnetically doped materials or metalloproteins.

  13. Lattice Dynamical Properties of Group-III Nitrides AN (A = B, Al, Ga and In) in Zinc-Blende Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, A. K.

    2016-03-01

    In the present paper, we have calculated the phonon dispersion relations, phonon density of states, Debye characteristic temperature and the zone boundary phonons for group-III nitrides AN (A = B, Al, Ga and In) using eleven-parameter three-body shell model with both the ions being polarizable. Our calculated results are in good agreement with experimental results available in the literature.

  14. III-V Multijunction Solar Cells—New Lattice-Matched Products And Development Of Upright Metamorphic 3J Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guter, W.; Kern, R.; Köstler, W.; Kubera, T.; Löckenhoff, R.; Meusel, M.; Shirnow, M.; Strobl, G.

    2011-12-01

    AZUR SPACE's current CPV product 3C40C is an advanced lattice-matched In0.50Ga0.50P/In0.01Ga0.99As/Ge triple junction (3J) solar cell. Recently, efficiencies up to 41.2% (450-600×AM1.5d) have been confirmed for this 40%-class product. This kind of solar cell structure has now reached its practical efficiency limit and went into production in 2010. AZUR offers customized cell structures, regarding size and grid design, as well as anti-reflection coatings adapted to the individual CPV system. Integration grades from diced wafers up to assemblies, such as dense arrays, are available. Special features and production results for the 3C40C structure are presented in this work. In order to further push efficiencies beyond 42% AZUR has successfully transferred the upright metamorphic cell from Fraunhofer ISE and advances this concept now for production. First results on metamorphic 3J solar cells at AZUR SPACE and the actual potential of this concept will be discussed. A target efficiency of 42% seems to be realistic.

  15. Multicolor (UV-IR) Photodetectors Based on Lattice-Matched 6.1 A II/VI and III/V Semiconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-27

    effect is present in the device. The EQE was determined by measuring the photocurrent under a 633 nm laser light confined onto the pixel under test...photodetector for visible light detection and a well- developed InSb PIN sub-photodetector for MWIR detection, which are electrically connected by a...the desire to use III-V substrates for II-VI material epitaxial growth, and the possibility of developing novel optoelectronic devices utilizing III-V

  16. Neutron star structure from a quark-model baryon-baryon interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukukawa, K.; Baldo, M.; Burgio, G. F.; Schulze, H.-J.

    2016-05-01

    We derive the equation of state (EOS) of nuclear matter from are alistic constituent quark model for the nucleon-nucleon interaction. We use the Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone approach with the inclusion of the three hole-line contribution. We find that the resulting EOS reproduces correctly the saturation point, moreover the symmetry energy at low density, its slope, and the incompressibility turn out to be compatible with phenomenology. We calculate the mass-radius relation for neutron stars, and find maximum values close to two solar masses, in agreement with recent observational data.

  17. Baryon-Baryon Interaction in a Chiral-Quark Mean - Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, Fernando Javier

    The nontopological soliton solution of a chirally invariant Lagrangian which incorporates the linear (sigma) -model BB84,KR84 is used as a model for Baryons. The nucleon-nucleon interaction is modeled by the interaction of two such solitons. The soliton-soliton interaction is calculated adiabatically by extremizing the energy of the two-soliton system subject to the constraint that the inter-soliton separation is fixed. The fields and wavefunctions are expanded in a two-center harmonic oscillator basis thus permitting essentially arbitrary tri-axial deformations. The hedgehog form is imposed on the spin-isospin wavefunction of the solitons. The isospin (or spin) of the two solitons may be quantized along different directions thus introducing a dependence in the energy on the relative orientation of the quantization axes. This permits the extraction of a low energy effective NN potential by an approximate method. An OBE calculation between identical undeformed solitons shows that the pion form factor is quite soft. It also suggests that the mass ((TURN)550 MeV) of the (sigma) -meson, responsible for intermediate range attraction in the central potential of phenomenological meson-exchange models, is a consequence of the coupling of a heavier (sigma) -meson with lighter pions. The Euler-Lagrange equations for the six-quark system are solved approximately using a variational method. The solutions exhibit a dynamical boundary which divides the NN interaction into two domains, an exterior domain where the solitons maintain their identity and the six-quark system is appropriately described as two distinct solitons, and an interior domain where the system is more appropriately described as a single highly deformed soliton. The boundary occurs sharply for critical inter-soliton separations in the range 0.8 - 0.1 fm. The even parity interior solution and the critical separation are shown to be consistent with the energy independence of the F-matrix at low energy in the Feshbach-Lomon boundary condition model. In the exterior domain the energy as a function of R is identified with an effective soliton-soliton potential. This potential qualitatively reproduces many of the features of physical phenomenological potentials. The central potential exhibits an intermediate range attraction and short range repulsion. The attraction is a direct consequence of the polarizability of the quark orbitals.

  18. High-loop perturbative renormalization constants for Lattice QCD (III): three-loop quark currents for Iwasaki gauge action and Wilson fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambilla, M.; Di Renzo, F.; Hasegawa, M.

    2014-07-01

    This is the third of a series of papers on three-loop computation of renormalization constants for Lattice QCD. Our main points of interest are results for the regularization defined by the Iwasaki gauge action and Wilson fermions. Our results for quark bilinears renormalized according to the RI'-MOM scheme can be compared to non-perturbative results. The latter are available for twisted mass QCD: being defined in the chiral limit, the renormalization constants must be the same. We also address more general problems. In particular, we discuss a few methodological issues connected to summing the perturbative series such as the effectiveness of boosted perturbation theory and the disentanglement of irrelevant and finite-volume contributions. Discussing these issues we consider not only the new results of this paper, but also those for the regularization defined by the tree-level Symanzik improved gauge action and Wilson fermions, which we presented in a recent paper of ours. We finally comment on the extent to which the techniques we put at work in the NSPT context can provide a fresher look into the lattice version of the RI'-MOM scheme.

  19. Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bornyakov, V.G.

    2005-06-01

    Possibilities that are provided by a lattice regularization of QCD for studying nonperturbative properties of QCD are discussed. A review of some recent results obtained from computer calculations in lattice QCD is given. In particular, the results for the QCD vacuum structure, the hadron mass spectrum, and the strong coupling constant are considered.

  20. EXAMINATION OF DISLOCATIONS IN LATTICE-MISMATCHED GaInAs/BUFFER LAYER/GaAs FOR III-V PHOTOVOLTAICS

    SciTech Connect

    Levander, A.; Geisz, J.

    2007-01-01

    Dislocations act as sites for nonradiative electron/hole pair recombination, which reduces the effi ciency of photovoltaics. Lattice-matched materials can be grown on top of one another without forming a high density of dislocations. However, when the growth of lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials is attempted, many dislocations result from the relaxation of strain in the crystal structure. In an attempt to reduce the number of dislocations that propagate into a solar device when using LMM materials, a compositionally step-graded buffer is placed between the two LMM materials. In order to confi ne the dislocations to the buffer layer and therefore increase material quality and device effi ciency, the growth temperature and thickness of the buffer layer were varied. A GaInP compositionally graded buffer and GaInAs p-n junction were grown on a GaAs substrate in a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system. A multibeam optical stress sensor (MOSS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the strain in the epilayers. Electrical and optoelectronic properties were measured using a probe station and multimeter setup, solar simulator, and a quantum effi ciency instrument. It was determined that device functionality was highly dependent on the growth temperature of the graded buffer. As growth temperature increased, so did the dislocation density in the device despite an increase in the dislocation velocity, which should have increased the dislocation annihilation rate and the diffusion of dislocations to the edge of the crystal. The thickness of the graded buffer also affected device effi ciency with thinner samples performing poorly. The thinner graded buffer layers had high internal resistances from reduced carrier concentrations. In terms of effi ciency, the empirically derived recipe developed by the scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) produced the highest quality cells.

  1. Heating of carriers as controlled by the combined interactions with acoustic and piezoelectric phonons in degenerate III-V semiconductors at low lattice temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, D. P.; Das, J.; Basu, A.; Das, B.

    2017-09-01

    In compound semiconductors which lack inversion symmetry, the combined interaction of the electrons with both acoustic and piezoelectric phonons is dominant at low lattice temperatures ( 20 K). The field dependence of the effective electron temperature under these conditions, has been calculated by solving the modified energy balance equation that takes due account of the degeneracy. The traditionally used heated Fermi-Dirac (F.D.) function for the non-equilibrium distribution function is approximated by some well tested model distribution. This makes it possible to carry out the integrations quite easily and, thus to obtain some more realistic results in a closed form, without taking recourse to any oversimplified approximations. The numerical results that follow for InSb, InAs and GaN, from the present analysis, are then compared with the available theoretical and experimental data. The degeneracy and the piezoelectric interaction, both are seen to bring about significant changes in the electron temperature characteristics. The scope for further refinement is discussed.

  2. Lattice cluster theory of associating telechelic polymers. III. Order parameter and average degree of self-assembly, transition temperature, and specific heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Freed, Karl F.; Douglas, Jack F.

    2012-05-01

    The lattice cluster theory of strongly interacting, structured polymer fluids is applied to determine the thermodynamic properties of solutions of telechelic polymers that may associate through bifunctional end groups. Hence, this model represents a significant albeit natural extension of a diverse array of prior popular equilibrium polymerization models in which structureless "bead" monomers associate into chain-like clusters under equilibrium conditions. In particular, the thermodynamic description of the self-assembly of linear telechelic chains in small molecule solvents (initiated in Paper II) is systematically extended through calculations of the order parameter Φ and average degree ⟨N⟩ of self-assembly, the self-assembly transition temperature Tp, and the specific heat CV of solutions of telechelic molecules. Special focus is placed on examining how molecular and thermodynamic parameters, such as the solution composition ϕ, temperature T, microscopic interaction energies (ɛs and ɛ), and length M of individual telechelic chains, influence the computed thermodynamic quantities that are commonly used to characterize self-assembling systems.

  3. Optical properties of InAsBi and optimal designs of lattice-matched and strain-balanced III-V semiconductor superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, P. T. Riordan, N. A.; Gogineni, C.; Liang, H.; Sharma, A. R.; Johnson, S. R.; Shalindar, A. J.

    2016-06-14

    The optical properties of bulk InAs{sub 0.936}Bi{sub 0.064} grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a (100)-oriented GaSb substrate are measured using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The index of refraction and absorption coefficient are measured over photon energies ranging from 44 meV to 4.4 eV and are used to identify the room temperature bandgap energy of bulk InAs{sub 0.936}Bi{sub 0.064} as 60.6 meV. The bandgap of InAsBi is expressed as a function of Bi mole fraction using the band anticrossing model and a characteristic coupling strength of 1.529 eV between the Bi impurity state and the InAs valence band. These results are programmed into a software tool that calculates the miniband structure of semiconductor superlattices and identifies optimal designs in terms of maximizing the electron-hole wavefunction overlap as a function of transition energy. These functionalities are demonstrated by mapping the design spaces of lattice-matched GaSb/InAs{sub 0.911}Sb{sub 0.089} and GaSb/InAs{sub 0.932}Bi{sub 0.068} and strain-balanced InAs/InAsSb, InAs/GaInSb, and InAs/InAsBi superlattices on GaSb. The absorption properties of each of these material systems are directly compared by relating the wavefunction overlap square to the absorption coefficient of each optimized design. Optimal design criteria are provided for key detector wavelengths for each superlattice system. The optimal design mid-wave infrared InAs/InAsSb superlattice is grown using molecular beam epitaxy, and its optical properties are evaluated using spectroscopic ellipsometry and photoluminescence spectroscopy.

  4. Lattice overview

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1984-01-01

    After reviewing some recent developments in supercomputer access, the author discusses a few areas where perturbation theory and lattice gauge simulations make contact. The author concludes with a brief discussion of a deterministic dynamics for the Ising model. This may be useful for numerical studies of nonequilibrium phenomena. 13 references.

  5. Lattice fermions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczek, Frank

    1987-01-01

    A simple heuristic proof of the Nielsen-Ninomaya theorem is given. A method is proposed whereby the multiplication of fermion species on a lattice is reduced to the minimal doubling, in any dimension, with retention of appropriate chiral symmetries. Also, it is suggested that use of spatially thinned fermion fields is likely to be a useful and appropriate approximation in QCD - in any case, it is a self-checking one.

  6. Lattice QCD production on commodity clusters at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    D. Holmgren et al.

    2003-09-30

    We describe the construction and results to date of Fermilab's three Myrinet-networked lattice QCD production clusters (an 80-node dual Pentium III cluster, a 48-node dual Xeon cluster, and a 128-node dual Xeon cluster). We examine a number of aspects of performance of the MILC lattice QCD code running on these clusters.

  7. Addendum to triton and hypertriton binding energies calculated from SU{sub 6} quark-model baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Kohno, M.; Miyagawa, K.

    2008-02-15

    Previously we calculated the binding energies of the triton and hypertriton, using an SU{sub 6} quark-model interaction obtained by a resonating-group method of two baryon clusters. In contrast to the previous calculations employing the energy-dependent interaction kernel, we present new results using a renormalized interaction that is energy-independent and still preserves all the two-baryon data. The new binding energies are slightly smaller than the previous values. In particular the triton binding energy turns out to be 8.14 MeV with a charge-dependence correction of the two-nucleon force, 190 keV, being included. This indicates that the energy to be accounted for by three-body forces is about 350 keV.

  8. Triton and hypertriton binding energies with SU{sub 6} quark-model baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Kohno, M.; Miyagawa, K.

    2008-04-29

    Previously we calculated the binding energies of the triton and hypertriton, using an SU{sub 6} quark-model interaction which is obtained by a resonating-group method for two baryon clusters. In contrast to the previous calculations employing the energy-dependent interaction kernel, we present new results using a renormalized interaction which is energy-independent and still preserves all the two-baryon data. The new binding energies are slightly smaller than the previous values. In particular the triton binding energy turns out to be 8.14 MeV with a charge-dependence correction of the two-nucleon force, 190 keV, being included. This indicates that the energy to be accounted for by three-body forces is about 350 keV.

  9. Lattice damage during ion implantation of semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, T.E.

    1993-08-01

    The temperature dependence of the lattice damage created during ion implantation of Si, Ge, Si-Ge alloys, and various III-V compounds is reviewed and interpreted in terms of a transition between two different damage formation mechanisms. Implications of this transition for control of damage, annealing, and electrical activation are discussed, particularly in GaAs.

  10. Exotic damping ring lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    This paper looks at, and compares three types of damping ring lattices: conventional, wiggler lattice with finite ..cap alpha.., wiggler lattice with ..cap alpha.. = 0, and observes the attainable equilibrium emittances for the three cases assuming a constraint on the attainable longitudinal impedance of 0.2 ohms. The emittance obtained are roughly in the ratio 4:2:1 for these cases.

  11. Lattice invariants for knots

    SciTech Connect

    Janse Van Rensburg, E.J.

    1996-12-31

    The geometry of polygonal knots in the cubic lattice may be used to define some knot invariants. One such invariant is the minimal edge number, which is the minimum number of edges necessary (and sufficient) to construct a lattice knot of given type. In addition, one may also define the minimal (unfolded) surface number, and the minimal (unfolded) boundary number; these are the minimum number of 2-cells necessary to construct an unfolded lattice Seifert surface of a given knot type in the lattice, and the minimum number of edges necessary in a lattice knot to guarantee the existence of an unfolded lattice Seifert surface. In addition, I derive some relations amongst these invariants. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. The EMMA Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, J. Scott

    2008-02-01

    EMMA is a 10 to 20 MeV electron ring designed to test our understanding of beam dynamics in a relativistic linear non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator (FFAG). I will give a basic review of the EMMA lattice parameters. Then I will review the different lattice configurations that we would like to have for EMMA. Finally, I will briefly discuss the process of commissioning each lattice configuration.

  13. Lattice matched crystalline substrates for cubic nitride semiconductor growth

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew G; Ptak, Aaron J; McMahon, William E

    2015-02-24

    Disclosed embodiments include methods of fabricating a semiconductor layer or device and devices fabricated thereby. The methods include, but are not limited to, providing a substrate having a cubic crystalline surface with a known lattice parameter and growing a cubic crystalline group III-nitride alloy layer on the cubic crystalline substrate by coincident site lattice matched epitaxy. The cubic crystalline group III-nitride alloy may be prepared to have a lattice parameter (a') that is related to the lattice parameter of the substrate (a). The group III-nitride alloy may be a cubic crystalline In.sub.xGa.sub.yAl.sub.1-x-yN alloy. The lattice parameter of the In.sub.xGa.sub.yAl.sub.1-x-yN or other group III-nitride alloy may be related to the substrate lattice parameter by (a')= 2(a) or (a')=(a)/ 2. The semiconductor alloy may be prepared to have a selected band gap.

  14. Dissipative photonic lattice solitons.

    PubMed

    Ultanir, Erdem A; Stegeman, George I; Christodoulides, Demetrios N

    2004-04-15

    We show that discrete dissipative optical lattice solitons are possible in waveguide array configurations that involve periodically patterned semiconductor optical amplifiers and saturable absorbers. The characteristics of these low-power soliton states are investigated, and their propagation constant eigenvalues are mapped on Floquet-Bloch band diagrams. The prospect of observing such low-power dissipative lattice solitons is discussed in detail.

  15. Quasicrystallography from Bn lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koca, M.; Koca, N. O.; Al-Mukhaini, A.; Al-Qanabi, A.

    2014-11-01

    We present a group theoretical analysis of the hypercubic lattice described by the affine Coxeter-Weyl group Wa (Bn). An h-fold symmetric quasicrystal structure follows from the hyperqubic lattice whose point group is described by the Coxeter-Weyl group W (Bn) with the Coxeter number h=2n. Higher dimensional cubic lattices are explicitly constructed for n = 4,5,6 by identifying their rank-3 Coxeter subgroups and maximal dihedral subgroups. Decomposition of their Voronoi cells under the respective rank-3 subgroups W (A3), W (H2)×W (A1) and W (H3)lead to the rhombic dodecahedron, rhombic icosahedron and rhombic triacontahedron respectively. Projection of the lattice B4 describes a quasicrystal structure with 8-fold symmetry. The B5 lattice leads to quasicrystals with both 5fold and 10 fold symmetries. The lattice B6 projects on a 12-fold symmetric quasicrystal as well as a 3D icosahedral quasicrystal depending on the choice of subspace of projections. The projected sets of lattice points are compatible with the available experimental data.

  16. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Nathal, M. V.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kraus, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    In their simplest form, lattice block panels are produced by direct casting and result in lightweight, fully triangulated truss-like configurations which provide strength and stiffness [2]. The earliest realizations of lattice block were made from A1 and steels, primarily under funding from the US Navy [3]. This work also showed that the mechanical efficiency (eg., specific stiffness) of lattice block structures approached that of honeycomb structures [2]. The lattice architectures are also less anisotropic, and the investment casting route should provide a large advantage in cost and temperature capability over honeycombs which are limited to alloys that can be processed into foils. Based on this early work, a program was initiated to determine the feasibility of extending the high temperature superalloy lattice block [3]. The objective of this effort was to provide an alternative to intermetallics and composites in achieving a lightweight high temperature structure without sacrificing the damage tolerance and moderate cost inherent in superalloys. To establish the feasibility of the superalloy lattice block concept, work was performed in conjunction with JAMCORP, Inc. Billerica, MA, to produce a number of lattice block panels from both IN71 8 and Mar-M247.

  17. A realistic lattice example

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Garren, A.A.

    1985-10-01

    A realistic, distributed interaction region (IR) lattice has been designed that includes new components discussed in the June 1985 lattice workshop. Unlike the test lattices, the lattice presented here includes utility straights and the mechanism for crossing the beams in the experimental straights. Moreover, both the phase trombones and the dispersion suppressors contain the same bending as the normal cells. Vertically separated beams and 6 Tesla, 1-in-1 magnets are assumed. Since the cells are 200 meters long, and have 60 degree phase advance, this lattice has been named RLD1, in analogy with the corresponding test lattice, TLD1. The quadrupole gradient is 136 tesla/meter in the cells, and has similar values in other quadrupoles except in those in the IR`s, where the maximum gradient is 245 tesla/meter. RLD1 has distributed IR`s; however, clustered realistic lattices can easily be assembled from the same components, as was recently done in a version that utilizes the same type of experimental and utility straights as those of RLD1.

  18. Symmetry of semi-reduced lattices.

    PubMed

    Stróż, Kazimierz

    2015-05-01

    The main result of this work is extension of the famous characterization of Bravais lattices according to their metrical, algebraic and geometric properties onto a wide class of primitive lattices (including Buerger-reduced, nearly Buerger-reduced and a substantial part of Delaunay-reduced) related to low-restricted semi-reduced descriptions (s.r.d.'s). While the `geometric' operations in Bravais lattices map the basis vectors into themselves, the `arithmetic' operators in s.r.d. transform the basis vectors into cell vectors (basis vectors, face or space diagonals) and are represented by matrices from the set {\\bb V} of all 960 matrices with the determinant ±1 and elements {0, ±1} of the matrix powers. A lattice is in s.r.d. if the moduli of off-diagonal elements in both the metric tensors M and M(-1) are smaller than corresponding diagonal elements sharing the same column or row. Such lattices are split into 379 s.r.d. types relative to the arithmetic holohedries. Metrical criteria for each type do not need to be explicitly given but may be modelled as linear derivatives {\\bb M}(p,q,r), where {\\bb M} denotes the set of 39 highest-symmetry metric tensors, and p,q,r describe changes of appropriate interplanar distances. A sole filtering of {\\bb V} according to an experimental s.r.d. metric and subsequent geometric interpretation of the filtered matrices lead to mathematically stable and rich information on the Bravais-lattice symmetry and deviations from the exact symmetry. The emphasis on the crystallographic features of lattices was obtained by shifting the focus (i) from analysis of a lattice metric to analysis of symmetry matrices [Himes & Mighell (1987). Acta Cryst. A43, 375-384], (ii) from the isometric approach and invariant subspaces to the orthogonality concept {some ideas in Le Page [J. Appl. Cryst. (1982), 15, 255-259]} and splitting indices [Stróż (2011). Acta Cryst. A67, 421-429] and (iii) from fixed cell transformations to transformations

  19. Jammed lattice sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallus, Yoav; Marcotte, Étienne; Torquato, Salvatore

    2013-12-01

    We generate and study an ensemble of isostatic jammed hard-sphere lattices. These lattices are obtained by compression of a periodic system with an adaptive unit cell containing a single sphere until the point of mechanical stability. We present detailed numerical data about the densities, pair correlations, force distributions, and structure factors of such lattices. We show that this model retains many of the crucial structural features of the classical hard-sphere model and propose it as a model for the jamming and glass transitions that enables exploration of much higher dimensions than are usually accessible.

  20. III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor are disclosed. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V materials varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V material can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  1. SPIN ON THE LATTICE.

    SciTech Connect

    ORGINOS,K.

    2003-01-07

    I review the current status of hadronic structure computations on the lattice. I describe the basic lattice techniques and difficulties and present some of the latest lattice results; in particular recent results of the RBC group using domain wall fermions are also discussed. In conclusion, lattice computations can play an important role in understanding the hadronic structure and the fundamental properties of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). Although some difficulties still exist, several significant steps have been made. Advances in computer technology are expected to play a significant role in pushing these computations closer to the chiral limit and in including dynamical fermions. RBC has already begun preliminary dynamical domain wall fermion computations [49] which we expect to be pushed forward with the arrival of QCD0C. In the near future, we also expect to complete the non-perturbative renormalization of the relevant derivative operators in quenched QCD.

  2. Root lattices and quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baake, M.; Joseph, D.; Kramer, P.; Schlottmann, M.

    1990-10-01

    It is shown that root lattices and their reciprocals might serve as the right pool for the construction of quasicrystalline structure models. All noncrystallographic symmetries observed so far are covered in minimal embedding with maximal symmetry.

  3. Root lattices and quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baake, M.; Joseph, D.; Kramer, P.; Schlottmann, M.

    1990-10-01

    It is shown how root lattices and their reciprocals might serve as the right pool for the construction of quasicrystalline structure models. All non-periodic symmetries observed so far are covered in minimal embedding with maximal symmetry.

  4. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kantzos, P. T.; Krause, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Initial investigations of investment cast superalloy lattice block suggest that this technology will yield a low cost approach to utilize the high temperature strength and environmental resistance of superalloys in lightweight, damage tolerant structural configurations. Work to date has demonstrated that relatively large superalloy lattice block panels can be successfully investment cast from both IN-718 and Mar-M247. These castings exhibited mechanical properties consistent with the strength of the same superalloys measured from more conventional castings. The lattice block structure also accommodates significant deformation without failure, and is defect tolerant in fatigue. The potential of lattice block structures opens new opportunities for the use of superalloys in future generations of aircraft applications that demand strength and environmental resistance at elevated temperatures along with low weight.

  5. Asymptotic energy of lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Weigen; Zhang, Zuhe

    2009-04-01

    The energy of a simple graph G arising in chemical physics, denoted by E(G), is defined as the sum of the absolute values of eigenvalues of G. As the dimer problem and spanning trees problem in statistical physics, in this paper we propose the energy per vertex problem for lattice systems. In general for a type of lattice in statistical physics, to compute the entropy constant with toroidal, cylindrical, Mobius-band, Klein-bottle, and free boundary conditions are different tasks with different hardness and may have different solutions. We show that the energy per vertex of plane lattices is independent of the toroidal, cylindrical, Mobius-band, Klein-bottle, and free boundary conditions. In particular, the asymptotic formulae of energies of the triangular, 33.42, and hexagonal lattices with toroidal, cylindrical, Mobius-band, Klein-bottle, and free boundary conditions are obtained explicitly.

  6. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  7. Additive lattice kirigami.

    PubMed

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D

    2016-09-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes.

  8. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes. PMID:27679822

  9. Legless locomotion in lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Perrin; Dai, Jin; Gong, Chaohui; Serrano, Miguel M.; Mendelson, Joseph R., III; Choset, Howie; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2015-03-01

    By propagating waves from head to tail, limbless organisms like snakes can traverse terrain composed of rocks, foliage, soil and sand. Previous research elucidated how rigid obstacles influence snake locomotion by studying a model terrain-symmetric lattices of pegs placed in hard ground. We want to understand how different substrate-body interaction modes affect performance in desert-adapted snakes during transit of substrates composed of both rigid obstacles and granular media (GM). We tested Chionactis occipitalis, the Mojave shovel-nosed snake, in two laboratory treatments: lattices of 0 . 64 cm diameter obstacles arrayed on both a hard, slick substrate and in a GM of ~ 0 . 3 mm diameter glass particles. For all lattice spacings, d, speed through the hard ground lattices was less than that in GM lattices. However, maximal undulation efficiencies ηu (number of body lengths advanced per undulation cycle) in both treatments were comparable when d was intermediate. For other d, ηu was lower than this maximum in hard ground lattices, while on GM, ηu was insensitive to d. To systematically explore such locomotion, we tested a physical robot model of the snake; performance depended sensitively on base substrate, d and body wave parameters.

  10. Solitons in spiraling Vogel lattices.

    PubMed

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Vysloukh, Victor A; Torner, Lluis

    2013-01-15

    We address light propagation in Vogel optical lattices and show that such lattices support a variety of stable soliton solutions in both self-focusing and self-defocusing media, whose propagation constants belong to domains resembling gaps in the spectrum of a truly periodic lattice. The azimuthally rich structure of Vogel lattices allows generation of spiraling soliton motion.

  11. SAGE III

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-01-13

    SAGE III Data and Information The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas ... on the spacecraft. SAGE III produced L1 and L2 scientific data from 5/07/2002 until 12/31/2005. The flight of the second instrument is as ... Additional Info:  Data Format: HDF-EOS or Big Endian/IEEE Binary SCAR-B Block:  ...

  12. Measuring on Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, Kevin H.

    2009-12-01

    Previous derivations of the sum and product rules of probability theory relied on the algebraic properties of Boolean logic. Here they are derived within a more general framework based on lattice theory. The result is a new foundation of probability theory that encompasses and generalizes both the Cox and Kolmogorov formulations. In this picture probability is a bi-valuation defined on a lattice of statements that quantifies the degree to which one statement implies another. The sum rule is a constraint equation that ensures that valuations are assigned so as to not violate associativity of the lattice join and meet. The product rule is much more interesting in that there are actually two product rules: one is a constraint equation arises from associativity of the direct products of lattices, and the other a constraint equation derived from associativity of changes of context. The generality of this formalism enables one to derive the traditionally assumed condition of additivity in measure theory, as well introduce a general notion of product. To illustrate the generic utility of this novel lattice-theoretic foundation of measure, the sum and product rules are applied to number theory. Further application of these concepts to understand the foundation of quantum mechanics is described in a joint paper in this proceedings.

  13. Lattice studies of baryons

    SciTech Connect

    David Richards

    2004-10-01

    This talk describes progress at understanding the properties of the nucleon and its excitations from lattice QCD. I begin with a review of recent lattice results for the lowest-lying states of the excited baryon spectrum. The need to approach physical values of the light quark masses is emphasized, enabling the effects of the pion cloud to be revealed. I then outline the development of techniques that will enable the extraction of the masses of the higher resonances, and describe how such calculations provide insight into the structure of the hadrons. Finally, I discuss direct probes of the quark and gluon structure of baryons through the lattice measurement of the moments of quark distributions and of Generalized Parton Distributions.

  14. Crossing on hyperbolic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hang; Ziff, Robert M.

    2012-05-01

    We divide the circular boundary of a hyperbolic lattice into four equal intervals and study the probability of a percolation crossing between an opposite pair as a function of the bond occupation probability p. We consider the {7,3} (heptagonal), enhanced or extended binary tree (EBT), the EBT-dual, and the {5,5} (pentagonal) lattices. We find that the crossing probability increases gradually from 0 to 1 as p increases from the lower pl to the upper pu critical values. We find bounds and estimates for the values of pl and pu for these lattices and identify the self-duality point p* corresponding to where the crossing probability equals 1/2. Comparison is made with recent numerical and theoretical results.

  15. Lattice gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Peter; Majumdar, Pushan

    2012-03-01

    Lattice gauge theory is a formulation of quantum field theory with gauge symmetries on a space-time lattice. This formulation is particularly suitable for describing hadronic phenomena. In this article we review the present status of lattice QCD. We outline some of the computational methods, discuss some phenomenological applications and a variety of non-perturbative topics. The list of references is severely incomplete, the ones we have included are text books or reviews and a few subjectively selected papers. Kronfeld and Quigg (2010) supply a reasonably comprehensive set of QCD references. We apologize for the fact that have not covered many important topics such as QCD at finite density and heavy quark effective theory adequately, and mention some of them only in the last section "In Brief". These topics should be considered in further Scholarpedia articles.

  16. Lattice Boltzmann Stokesian dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ding, E J

    2015-11-01

    Lattice Boltzmann Stokesian dynamics (LBSD) is presented for simulation of particle suspension in Stokes flows. This method is developed from Stokesian dynamics (SD) with resistance and mobility matrices calculated using the time-independent lattice Boltzmann algorithm (TILBA). TILBA is distinguished from the traditional lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) in that a background matrix is generated prior to the calculation. The background matrix, once generated, can be reused for calculations for different scenarios, thus the computational cost for each such subsequent calculation is significantly reduced. The LBSD inherits the merits of the SD where both near- and far-field interactions are considered. It also inherits the merits of the LBM that the computational cost is almost independent of the particle shape.

  17. Exact Lattice Supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Catterall, Simon; Kaplan, David B.; Unsal, Mithat

    2009-03-31

    We provide an introduction to recent lattice formulations of supersymmetric theories which are invariant under one or more real supersymmetries at nonzero lattice spacing. These include the especially interesting case of N = 4 SYM in four dimensions. We discuss approaches based both on twisted supersymmetry and orbifold-deconstruction techniques and show their equivalence in the case of gauge theories. The presence of an exact supersymmetry reduces and in some cases eliminates the need for fine tuning to achieve a continuum limit invariant under the full supersymmetry of the target theory. We discuss open problems.

  18. Optical Lattice Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oates, Chris

    2012-06-01

    Since they were first proposed in 2003 [1], optical lattice clocks have become one of the leading technologies for the next generation of atomic clocks, which will be used for advanced timing applications and in tests of fundamental physics [2]. These clocks are based on stabilized lasers whose frequency is ultimately referenced to an ultra-narrow neutral atom transition (natural linewidths << 1 Hz). To suppress the effects of atomic motion/recoil, the atoms in the sample (˜10^4 atoms) are confined tightly in the potential wells of an optical standing wave (lattice). The wavelength of the lattice light is tuned to its ``magic'' value so as to yield a vanishing net AC Stark shift for the clock transition. As a result lattice clocks have demonstrated the capability of generating high stability clock signals with small absolute uncertainties (˜ 1 part in 10^16). In this presentation I will first give an overview of the field, which now includes three different atomic species. I will then use experiments with Yb performed in our laboratory to illustrate the key features of a lattice clock. Our research has included the development of state-of-the-art optical cavities enabling ultra-high-resolution optical spectroscopy (1 Hz linewidth). Together with the large atom number in the optical lattice, we are able to achieve very low clock instability (< 0.3 Hz in 1 s) [3]. Furthermore, I will show results from some of our recent investigations of key shifts for the Yb lattice clock, including high precision measurements of ultracold atom-atom interactions in the lattice and the dc Stark effect for the Yb clock transition (necessary for the evaluation of blackbody radiation shifts). [4pt] [1] H. Katori, M. Takamoto, V. G. Pal'chikov, and V. D. Ovsiannikov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 173005 (2003). [0pt] [2] Andrei Derevianko and Hidetoshi Katori, Rev. Mod. Phys. 83, 331 (2011). [0pt] [3] Y. Y. Jiang, A. D. Ludlow, N. D. Lemke, R. W. Fox, J. A. Sherman, L.-S. Ma, and C. W. Oates

  19. BIOPLUME III

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BIOPLUME III is a two-dimensional finite difference model for simulating the natural attenuation of organic contaminants in groundwater due to the processes of advection, dispersion, sorption, and biodegradation.

  20. Investigations on Schottky Barrier Structures in Compound Semiconductors: I. Mercuric-Telluride on Cadmium-Telluride a Lattice-Matched Schottky Barrier. I. Gold - Barriers to Cadmium-Telluride III. Gold Barriers on INDIUM(X)GALLIUM(1-X)PHOSPHIDE.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuech, Thomas Francis

    (i)The Au Schottky barrier height to n-In(,x)Ga(,1 -x)P was measured as a function of alloy composition. The Au barrier, (phi)(,p), to p-In(,x)Ga(,1-x)P was found to be independent of composition. The barrier, (phi)(,p), was determined by the relation (phi)(,p) + (phi)(,n) = (phi)(,g) where (phi)(,g) is the band gap energy and (phi)(,n) is the measured barrier height to n-In(,x)Ga(,1-x)P. It has been observed that the Au barrier height to p-type material for most compound semiconductors is determined by the anion. This dependence on the anion of the compound has now been seen to extend to the alloy system In(,x)Ga(,1 -x)P measured here. (ii)The Schottky barrier height of Cd, Au, and Au-Cd alloys was determined on vacuum cleaved surfaces of n-CdTe. A large barrier of 0.92 eV was found in the case of the Au-Cd alloy contacts. Contacts made with elemental Cd or Au gave barrier heights of 0.45 and 0.65 eV, respectively. The increased barrier height found on Au-Cd alloy contacts may be related to recent UHV observations on Schottky barrier formation where crystal defects play a role in determining the observed barrier height. (iii)HgTe-CdTe lattice matched heterojunctions were formed by the epitaxial growth of HgTe on CdTe substrates using a new low temperature metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique. These heterojunctions combine features of the Schottky barrier structure, due to the high carrier concentrations found in the semi-metallic HgTe, with the structural perfection present in a lattice matched heterojunction. The measured Schottky barrier height varied from 0.65 to 0.90 eV depending on the details of the HgTe growth procedure used. Two models of the HgTe -CdTe heterojunction are presented which account for the observed variation in barrier height.

  1. Supersymmetry on the Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaich, David

    2016-03-01

    Lattice field theory provides a non-perturbative regularization of strongly interacting systems, which has proven crucial to the study of quantum chromodynamics among many other theories. Supersymmetry plays prominent roles in the study of physics beyond the standard model, both as an ingredient in model building and as a tool to improve our understanding of quantum field theory. Attempts to apply lattice techniques to supersymmetric field theories have a long history, but until recently these efforts have generally encountered insurmountable difficulties related to the interplay of supersymmetry with the lattice discretization of spacetime. In recent years these difficulties have been overcome for a class of theories that includes the particularly interesting case of maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills (N = 4 SYM) in four dimensions, which is a cornerstone of AdS/CFT duality. In combination with computational advances this progress enables practical numerical investigations of N = 4 SYM on the lattice, which can address questions that are difficult or impossible to handle through perturbation theory, AdS/CFT duality, or the conformal bootstrap program. I will briefly review some of the new ideas underlying this recent progress, and present some results from ongoing large-scale numerical calculations, including comparisons with analytic predictions.

  2. Fibonacci Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kevin; Geiger, Zachary; Senaratne, Ruwan; Rajagopal, Shankari; Fujiwara, Kurt; Weld, David; Weld Group Team

    2015-05-01

    Quasiperiodicity is intimately involved in quantum phenomena from localization to the quantum Hall effect. Recent experimental investigation of quasiperiodic quantum effects in photonic and electronic systems have revealed intriguing connections to topological phenomena. However, such experiments have been limited by the absence of techniques for creating tunable quasiperiodic structures. We propose a new type of quasiperiodic optical lattice, constructed by intersecting a Gaussian beam with a 2D square lattice at an angle with an irrational tangent. The resulting potential, a generalization of the Fibonacci lattice, is a physical realization of the mathematical ``cut-and-project'' construction which underlies all quasiperiodic structures. Calculation of the energies and wavefunctions of atoms loaded into the proposed quasiperiodic lattice demonstrate a fractal energy spectrum and the existence of edge states. We acknowledge support from the ONR (award N00014-14-1-0805), the ARO and the PECASE program (award W911NF-14-1-0154), the AFOSR (award FA9550-12-1-0305), and the Alfred P. Sloan foundation (grant BR2013-110).

  3. Generalizing Word Lattice Translation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    demonstrate substantial gains for Chinese -English and Arabic -English translation. Keywords: word lattice translation, phrase-based and hierarchical...introduce in reordering models. Our experiments evaluating the approach demonstrate substantial gains for Chinese -English and Arabic -English translation. 15...Section 4 presents two applications of the noisier channel paradigm, demonstrating substantial performance gains in Arabic -English and Chinese -English

  4. Moving embedded lattice solitons.

    PubMed

    Malomed, B A; Fujioka, J; Espinosa-Cerón, A; Rodríguez, R F; González, S

    2006-03-01

    It was recently proved that solitons embedded in the spectrum of linear waves may exist in discrete systems, and explicit solutions for isolated unstable embedded lattice solitons (ELS) of a differential-difference version of a higher-order nonlinear Schrodinger equation were found [Gonzalez-Perez-Sandi, Fujioka, and Malomed, Physica D 197, 86 (2004)]. The discovery of these ELS gives rise to relevant questions such as the following: (1) Are there continuous families of ELS? (2) Can ELS be stable? (3) Is it possible for ELS to move along the lattice? (4) How do ELS interact? The present work addresses these questions by showing that a novel equation (a discrete version of a complex modified Korteweg-de Vries equation that includes next-nearest-neighbor couplings) has a two-parameter continuous family of exact ELS. These solitons can move with arbitrary velocities across the lattice, and the numerical simulations demonstrate that these ELS are completely stable. Moreover, the numerical tests show that these ELS are robust enough to withstand collisions, and the result of a collision is only a shift in the positions of the solitons. The model may apply to the description of a Bose-Einstein condensate with dipole-dipole interactions between the atoms, trapped in a deep optical-lattice potential.

  5. Career Ladders and Lattices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dory, Fran

    1975-01-01

    The first part of this report discusses the career lattice concept in the Career Opportunities Program (COP), a concept which represents the marriage of two career development ideas--upward mobility and task differentiation at separate levels. It explains that by combining task differentiation and upward mobility, a system can effectively reduce a…

  6. Convex Lattice Polygons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Paul

    2006-01-01

    A "convex" polygon is one with no re-entrant angles. Alternatively one can use the standard convexity definition, asserting that for any two points of the convex polygon, the line segment joining them is contained completely within the polygon. In this article, the author provides a solution to a problem involving convex lattice polygons.

  7. Progress in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2002-09-30

    After reviewing some of the mathematical foundations and numerical difficulties facing lattice QCD, I review the status of several calculations relevant to experimental high-energy physics. The topics considered are moments of structure functions, which may prove relevant to search for new phenomena at the LHC, and several aspects of flavor physics, which are relevant to understanding CP and flavor violation.

  8. Random lattice superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Haidong; Siegel, Warren

    2006-08-15

    We propose some new simplifying ingredients for Feynman diagrams that seem necessary for random lattice formulations of superstrings. In particular, half the fermionic variables appear only in particle loops (similarly to loop momenta), reducing the supersymmetry of the constituents of the type IIB superstring to N=1, as expected from their interpretation in the 1/N expansion as super Yang-Mills.

  9. Phenomenology Using Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R.

    2005-08-01

    This talk provides a brief summary of the status of lattice QCD calculations of the light quark masses and the kaon bag parameter BK. Precise estimates of these four fundamental parameters of the standard model, i.e., mu, md, ms and the CP violating parameter η, help constrain grand unified models and could provide a window to new physics.

  10. Phenomenology Using Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R.

    This talk provides a brief summary of the status of lattice QCD calculations of the light quark masses and the kaon bag parameter BK. Precise estimates of these four fundamental parameters of the standard model, i.e., mu, md, ms and the CP violating parameter η, help constrain grand unified models and could provide a window to new physics.

  11. Rigidity of lattice domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savelyev, V. A.

    1979-01-01

    The means of ensuring total rigidity of lattice domes, using comparison with solid shells of 1-3 layers are discussed. Irregularities of manufacture, processing, and other factors are considered, as they relate to diminution of rigidity. The discussion uses the concepts of upper and lower critical loads on the structure in question.

  12. Localization oscillation in antidot lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uryu, S.; Ando, T.

    1998-06-01

    The Anderson localization in square and hexagonal antidot lattices is numerically studied with the use of a Thouless number method. It is revealed that localization is very sensitive to the aspect ratio between the antidot diameter and the lattice constant. In a hexagonal lattice, both the Thouless number and the localization length oscillate with the period equal to the Al’tshuler-Aronov-Spivak oscillation. The oscillation is quite weak in a square lattice.

  13. Biological Lattice Gas Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alber, Mark S.; Kiskowski, Maria; Jiang, Yi; Newman, Stuart

    Modelling pattern formation and morphogenesis are fundamental problems in biology. One useful approach is lattice gas cellular automata (LGCA) model. This paper reviews several stochastic lattice gas models for pattern formation in myxobacteria fruiting body morphogenesis and vertebrate limb skeletogenesis. The fruiting body formation in myxobacteria is a complex morphological process that requires the organized, collective effort of tens of thousands of cells. It provides new insight into collective microbial behavior since myxobacteria morphogenic pattern formation is governed by cell-cell interactions rather than chemotaxis. We describe LGCA models for the aggregation stage of the fruiting body formation. Limb bud precartilage mesenchymal cells in micromass culture undergo chondrogenic pattern formation, which results in the formation of regularly-spaced "islands" of cartilage analogous to the cartilage primordia of the developing limb skeleton. An LGCA model, based on reaction-diffusion coupling and cell-matrix adhesion, is described for this process.

  14. Statistics of lattice animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping; Nadler, Walder; Grassberger, Peter

    2005-07-01

    The scaling behavior of randomly branched polymers in a good solvent is studied in two to nine dimensions, modeled by lattice animals on simple hypercubic lattices. For the simulations, we use a biased sequential sampling algorithm with re-sampling, similar to the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method (PERM) used extensively for linear polymers. We obtain high statistics of animals with up to several thousand sites in all dimension 2⩽d⩽9. The partition sum (number of different animals) and gyration radii are estimated. In all dimensions we verify the Parisi-Sourlas prediction, and we verify all exactly known critical exponents in dimensions 2, 3, 4, and ⩾8. In addition, we present the hitherto most precise estimates for growth constants in d⩾3. For clusters with one site attached to an attractive surface, we verify the superuniversality of the cross-over exponent at the adsorption transition predicted by Janssen and Lyssy.

  15. Parametric lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Jae Wan

    2017-06-01

    The discretized equilibrium distributions of the lattice Boltzmann method are presented by using the coefficients of the Lagrange interpolating polynomials that pass through the points related to discrete velocities and using moments of the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. The ranges of flow velocity and temperature providing positive valued distributions vary with regulating discrete velocities as parameters. New isothermal and thermal compressible models are proposed for flows of the level of the isothermal and thermal compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Thermal compressible shock tube flows are simulated by only five on-lattice discrete velocities. Two-dimensional isothermal and thermal vortices provoked by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability are simulated by the parametric models.

  16. Fractional lattice charge transport

    PubMed Central

    Flach, Sergej; Khomeriki, Ramaz

    2017-01-01

    We consider the dynamics of noninteracting quantum particles on a square lattice in the presence of a magnetic flux α and a dc electric field E oriented along the lattice diagonal. In general, the adiabatic dynamics will be characterized by Bloch oscillations in the electrical field direction and dispersive ballistic transport in the perpendicular direction. For rational values of α and a corresponding discrete set of values of E(α) vanishing gaps in the spectrum induce a fractionalization of the charge in the perpendicular direction - while left movers are still performing dispersive ballistic transport, the complementary fraction of right movers is propagating in a dispersionless relativistic manner in the opposite direction. Generalizations and the possible probing of the effect with atomic Bose-Einstein condensates and photonic networks are discussed. Zak phase of respective band associated with gap closing regime has been computed and it is found converging to π/2 value. PMID:28102302

  17. Introduction to lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.

    1998-12-31

    The goal of the lectures on lattice QCD (LQCD) is to provide an overview of both the technical issues and the progress made so far in obtaining phenomenologically useful numbers. The lectures consist of three parts. The author`s charter is to provide an introduction to LQCD and outline the scope of LQCD calculations. In the second set of lectures, Guido Martinelli will discuss the progress they have made so far in obtaining results, and their impact on Standard Model phenomenology. Finally, Martin Luescher will discuss the topical subjects of chiral symmetry, improved formulation of lattice QCD, and the impact these improvements will have on the quality of results expected from the next generation of simulations.

  18. Global Positioning System III (GPS III)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) As of FY 2015 President’s Budget...00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Responsible Office References Program Name Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) DoD Component Air Force

  19. Instantons on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fucito, F.; Solomon, S.

    By modifying the lattice action of spin and gauge models we insure that the system cannot tunnel between topological sectors by local Monte Carlo (MC) steps. We insure the correct weight of the topological sectors in the statistical sum by considering global MC steps. This strategy permits us to study the effects of topological objects in ϑ-vacua, < Q2> scaling and chiral symmetry breaking in a straightforward way.

  20. Charmonium from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek

    2007-08-05

    Charmonium is an attractive system for the application of lattice QCD methods. While the sub-threshold spectrum has been considered in some detail in previous works, it is only very recently that excited and higher-spin states and further properties such as radiative transitions and two-photon decays have come to be calculated. I report on this recent progress with reference to work done at Jefferson Lab.

  1. Multipole plasmonic lattice solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Kou Yao; Ye Fangwei; Chen Xianfeng

    2011-09-15

    We theoretically demonstrate a variety of multipole plasmonic lattice solitons, including dipoles, quadrupoles, and necklaces, in two-dimensional metallic nanowire arrays with Kerr-type nonlinearities. Such solitons feature complex internal structures with an ultracompact mode size approaching or smaller than one wavelength. Their mode sizes and the stability characteristics are studied in detail within the framework of coupled mode theory. The conditions to form and stabilize these highly confined solitons are within the experimentally achievable range.

  2. Lattice dynamics of coesite.

    PubMed

    Wehinger, Björn; Bosak, Alexeï; Chumakov, Aleksandr; Mirone, Alessandro; Winkler, Björn; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Brazhkin, Vadim; Dyuzheva, Tatiana; Krisch, Michael

    2013-07-10

    The lattice dynamics of coesite has been studied by a combination of diffuse x-ray scattering, inelastic x-ray scattering and ab initio lattice dynamics calculations. The combined technique gives access to the full lattice dynamics in the harmonic description and thus eventually provides detailed information on the elastic properties, the stability and metastability of crystalline systems. The experimentally validated calculation was used for the investigation of the eigenvectors, mode character and their contribution to the density of vibrational states. High-symmetry sections of the reciprocal space distribution of diffuse scattering and inelastic x-ray scattering spectra as well as the density of vibrational states and the dispersion relation are reported and compared to the calculation. A critical point at the zone boundary is found to contribute strongly to the main peak of the low-energy part in the density of vibrational states. Comparison with the most abundant SiO2 polymorph--α-quartz--reveals similarities and distinct differences in the low-energy vibrational properties.

  3. Digital lattice gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohar, Erez; Farace, Alessandro; Reznik, Benni; Cirac, J. Ignacio

    2017-02-01

    We propose a general scheme for a digital construction of lattice gauge theories with dynamical fermions. In this method, the four-body interactions arising in models with 2 +1 dimensions and higher are obtained stroboscopically, through a sequence of two-body interactions with ancillary degrees of freedom. This yields stronger interactions than the ones obtained through perturbative methods, as typically done in previous proposals, and removes an important bottleneck in the road towards experimental realizations. The scheme applies to generic gauge theories with Lie or finite symmetry groups, both Abelian and non-Abelian. As a concrete example, we present the construction of a digital quantum simulator for a Z3 lattice gauge theory with dynamical fermionic matter in 2 +1 dimensions, using ultracold atoms in optical lattices, involving three atomic species, representing the matter, gauge, and auxiliary degrees of freedom, that are separated in three different layers. By moving the ancilla atoms with a proper sequence of steps, we show how we can obtain the desired evolution in a clean, controlled way.

  4. Crystallographic Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namburi, Manjusha; Krithivasan, Siddharth; Ansumali, Santosh

    2016-06-01

    Current approaches to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) are computationally quite expensive for most realistic scientific and engineering applications of Fluid Dynamics such as automobiles or atmospheric flows. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), with its simplified kinetic descriptions, has emerged as an important tool for simulating hydrodynamics. In a heterogeneous computing environment, it is often preferred due to its flexibility and better parallel scaling. However, direct simulation of realistic applications, without the use of turbulence models, remains a distant dream even with highly efficient methods such as LBM. In LBM, a fictitious lattice with suitable isotropy in the velocity space is considered to recover Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics in macroscopic limit. The same lattice is mapped onto a cartesian grid for spatial discretization of the kinetic equation. In this paper, we present an inverted argument of the LBM, by making spatial discretization as the central theme. We argue that the optimal spatial discretization for LBM is a Body Centered Cubic (BCC) arrangement of grid points. We illustrate an order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency for LBM and thus a significant progress towards feasibility of DNS for realistic flows.

  5. Topological lattice actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bietenholz, W.; Gerber, U.; Pepe, M.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2010-12-01

    We consider lattice field theories with topological actions, which are invariant against small deformations of the fields. Some of these actions have infinite barriers separating different topological sectors. Topological actions do not have the correct classical continuum limit and they cannot be treated using perturbation theory, but they still yield the correct quantum continuum limit. To show this, we present analytic studies of the 1-d O(2) and O(3) model, as well as Monte Carlo simulations of the 2-d O(3) model using topological lattice actions. Some topological actions obey and others violate a lattice Schwarz inequality between the action and the topological charge Q. Irrespective of this, in the 2-d O(3) model the topological susceptibility {χ_t} = {{{left< {{Q^2}} rightrangle }} left/ {V} right.} is logarithmically divergent in the continuum limit. Still, at non-zero distance the correlator of the topological charge density has a finite continuum limit which is consistent with analytic predictions. Our study shows explicitly that some classically important features of an action are irrelevant for reaching the correct quantum continuum limit.

  6. Hadroquarkonium from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Maurizio; Bali, Gunnar S.; Collins, Sara; Knechtli, Francesco; Moir, Graham; Söldner, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    The hadroquarkonium picture [S. Dubynskiy and M. B. Voloshin, Phys. Lett. B 666, 344 (2008), 10.1016/j.physletb.2008.07.086] provides one possible interpretation for the pentaquark candidates with hidden charm, recently reported by the LHCb Collaboration, as well as for some of the charmoniumlike "X , Y , Z " states. In this picture, a heavy quarkonium core resides within a light hadron giving rise to four- or five-quark/antiquark bound states. We test this scenario in the heavy quark limit by investigating the modification of the potential between a static quark-antiquark pair induced by the presence of a hadron. Our lattice QCD simulations are performed on a Coordinated Lattice Simulations (CLS) ensemble with Nf=2 +1 flavors of nonperturbatively improved Wilson quarks at a pion mass of about 223 MeV and a lattice spacing of about a =0.0854 fm . We study the static potential in the presence of a variety of light mesons as well as of octet and decuplet baryons. In all these cases, the resulting configurations are favored energetically. The associated binding energies between the quarkonium in the heavy quark limit and the light hadron are found to be smaller than a few MeV, similar in strength to deuterium binding. It needs to be seen if the small attraction survives in the infinite volume limit and supports bound states or resonances.

  7. Crystallographic Lattice Boltzmann Method

    PubMed Central

    Namburi, Manjusha; Krithivasan, Siddharth; Ansumali, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Current approaches to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) are computationally quite expensive for most realistic scientific and engineering applications of Fluid Dynamics such as automobiles or atmospheric flows. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), with its simplified kinetic descriptions, has emerged as an important tool for simulating hydrodynamics. In a heterogeneous computing environment, it is often preferred due to its flexibility and better parallel scaling. However, direct simulation of realistic applications, without the use of turbulence models, remains a distant dream even with highly efficient methods such as LBM. In LBM, a fictitious lattice with suitable isotropy in the velocity space is considered to recover Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics in macroscopic limit. The same lattice is mapped onto a cartesian grid for spatial discretization of the kinetic equation. In this paper, we present an inverted argument of the LBM, by making spatial discretization as the central theme. We argue that the optimal spatial discretization for LBM is a Body Centered Cubic (BCC) arrangement of grid points. We illustrate an order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency for LBM and thus a significant progress towards feasibility of DNS for realistic flows. PMID:27251098

  8. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  9. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  10. Lattice-induced nonadiabatic frequency shifts in optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Beloy, K.

    2010-09-15

    We consider the frequency shift in optical lattice clocks which arises from the coupling of the electronic motion to the atomic motion within the lattice. For the simplest of three-dimensional lattice geometries this coupling is shown to affect only clocks based on blue-detuned lattices. We have estimated the size of this shift for the prospective strontium lattice clock operating at the 390-nm blue-detuned magic wavelength. The resulting fractional frequency shift is found to be on the order of 10{sup -18} and is largely overshadowed by the electric quadrupole shift. For lattice clocks based on more complex geometries or other atomic systems, this shift could potentially be a limiting factor in clock accuracy.

  11. Lattice topology dictates photon statistics.

    PubMed

    Kondakci, H Esat; Abouraddy, Ayman F; Saleh, Bahaa E A

    2017-08-21

    Propagation of coherent light through a disordered network is accompanied by randomization and possible conversion into thermal light. Here, we show that network topology plays a decisive role in determining the statistics of the emerging field if the underlying lattice is endowed with chiral symmetry. In such lattices, eigenmode pairs come in skew-symmetric pairs with oppositely signed eigenvalues. By examining one-dimensional arrays of randomly coupled waveguides arranged on linear and ring topologies, we are led to a remarkable prediction: the field circularity and the photon statistics in ring lattices are dictated by its parity while the same quantities are insensitive to the parity of a linear lattice. For a ring lattice, adding or subtracting a single lattice site can switch the photon statistics from super-thermal to sub-thermal, or vice versa. This behavior is understood by examining the real and imaginary fields on a lattice exhibiting chiral symmetry, which form two strands that interleave along the lattice sites. These strands can be fully braided around an even-sited ring lattice thereby producing super-thermal photon statistics, while an odd-sited lattice is incommensurate with such an arrangement and the statistics become sub-thermal.

  12. Single identities for lattice theory and for weakly associative lattices

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, W.; Padmanabhan, R.

    1995-03-13

    We present a single identity for the variety of all lattices that is much simpler than those previously known to us. We also show that the variety of weakly associative lattices is one-based, and we present a generalized one-based theorem for subvarieties of weakly associative lattices that can be defined with absorption laws. The automated theorem-proving program OTTER was used in substantial way to obtain the results.

  13. Dynamics of lattice kinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevrekidis, P. G.; Weinstein, M. I.

    2000-08-01

    We consider a class of Hamiltonian nonlinear wave equations governing a field defined on a spatially discrete one-dimensional lattice, with discreteness parameter, d= h-1, where h>0 is the lattice spacing. The specific cases we consider in detail are the discrete sine-Gordon (SG) and discrete φ4 models. For finite d and in the continuum limit ( d→∞) these equations have static kink-like (heteroclinic) states which are stable. In contrast to the continuum case, due to the breaking of Lorentz invariance, discrete kinks cannot be “Lorentz boosted” to obtain traveling discrete kinks. Peyrard and Kruskal pioneered the study of how a kink, initially propagating in the lattice, dynamically adjusts in the absence of an available family of traveling kinks. We study in detail the final stages of the discrete kink’s evolution during which it is pinned to a specified lattice site (equilibrium position in the Peierls-Nabarro barrier). We find the following: For d sufficiently large (sufficiently small lattice spacing), the state of the system approaches an asymptotically stable ground state static kink (centered between lattice sites). For d sufficiently small, d< d*, the static kink bifurcates to one or more time-periodic states. For the discrete φ4 we have wobbling kinks which have the same spatial symmetry as the static kink as well as “ g-wobblers” and “ e-wobblers”, which have different spatial symmetry. In the discrete SG case, the “ e-wobbler” has the spatial symmetry of the kink, whereas the “ g-wobbler” has the opposite one. These time-periodic states may be regarded as a class of discrete breather/topological defect states; they are spatially localized and time-periodic oscillations mounted on a static kink background. The large time limit of solutions with initial data near a kink is marked by damped oscillation about one of these two types of asymptotic states. In case (1) we compute the characteristics of the damped oscillation

  14. Thermodynamics of the Relationship between Lattice Energy and Lattice Enthalpy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, H. Donald B.

    2005-06-01

    Incorporation of lattice potential energy, U POT , within a Born Fajans Haber thermochemical cycle based on enthalpy changes necessitates correction of the energy of the lattice to an enthalpy term, Δ H L . For a lattice containing p i ions of type i in the formula unit, the lattice enthalpy is given by Δ H L = U POT + ∑ s i [( c i /2) - 2] RT where R is the gas constant (= 8.314 J K -1 mol -1 ), T is the absolute temperature, and c i is defined according as to whether the ion i is monatomic ( c i = 3), linear polyatomic ( c i = 5), or polyatomic ( c i = 6), respectively.

  15. Lattice QCD for nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beane, Silas

    2016-09-01

    Over the last several decades, theoretical nuclear physics has been evolving from a very-successful phenomenology of the properties of nuclei, to a first-principles derivation of the properties of visible matter in the Universe from the known underlying theories of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) and Electrodynamics. Many nuclear properties have now been calculated using lattice QCD, a method for treating QCD numerically with large computers. In this talk, some of the most recent results in this frontier area of nuclear theory will be reviewed.

  16. Thermodynamics of lattice OCD

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, H.

    1985-01-01

    The thermodynamic consequences of QCD are explored in the framework of lattice gauge theory. Attention is focused upon the nature of the chiral symmetry restoration transition at finite temperature and at finite baryon density, and possible strategies for identifying relevant thermodynamic phases are discussed. Some numerical results are presented on the chiral symmetry restoration in the SU(2) gauge theory at high baryon density. The results suggest that with T approx. = 110 MeV there is a second order restoration transition at the critical baryon density n/sub B//sup c/ approx. = 0.62 fm/sup -3/.

  17. Lattice harmonics expansion revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontrym-Sznajd, G.; Holas, A.

    2017-04-01

    The main subject of the work is to provide the most effective way of determining the expansion of some quantities into orthogonal polynomials, when these quantities are known only along some limited number of sampling directions. By comparing the commonly used Houston method with the method based on the orthogonality relation, some relationships, which define the applicability and correctness of these methods, are demonstrated. They are verified for various sets of sampling directions applicable for expanding quantities having the full symmetry of the Brillouin zone of cubic and non-cubic lattices. All results clearly show that the Houston method is always better than the orthogonality-relation one. For the cubic symmetry we present a few sets of special directions (SDs) showing how their construction and, next, a proper application depend on the choice of various sets of lattice harmonics. SDs are important mainly for experimentalists who want to reconstruct anisotropic quantities from their measurements, performed at a limited number of sampling directions.

  18. Lattice Transparency of Graphene.

    PubMed

    Chae, Sieun; Jang, Seunghun; Choi, Won Jin; Kim, Youn Sang; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Tae Il; Lee, Jeong-O

    2017-03-08

    Here, we demonstrated the transparency of graphene to the atomic arrangement of a substrate surface, i.e., the "lattice transparency" of graphene, by using hydrothermally grown ZnO nanorods as a model system. The growth behaviors of ZnO nanocrystals on graphene-coated and uncoated substrates with various crystal structures were investigated. The atomic arrangements of the nucleating ZnO nanocrystals exhibited a close match with those of the respective substrates despite the substrates being bound to the other side of the graphene. By using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, we confirmed the energetic favorability of the nucleating phase following the atomic arrangement of the substrate even with the graphene layer present in between. In addition to transmitting information about the atomic lattice of the substrate, graphene also protected its surface. This dual role enabled the hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanorods on a Cu substrate, which otherwise dissolved in the reaction conditions when graphene was absent.

  19. Orthocomplemented complete lattices and graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollech, Astrid

    1995-08-01

    The problem I consider originates from Dörfler, who found a construction to assign an Orthocomplemented lattice H(G) to a graph G. By Dörfler it is known that for every finite Orthocomplemented lattice L there exists a graph G such that H(G)=L. Unfortunately, we can find more than one graph G with this property, i.e., orthocomplemented lattices which belong to different graphs can be isomorphic. I show some conditions under which two graphs have the same orthocomplemented lattice.

  20. Extreme lattices: symmetries and decorrelation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreanov, A.; Scardicchio, A.; Torquato, S.

    2016-11-01

    We study statistical and structural properties of extreme lattices, which are the local minima in the density landscape of lattice sphere packings in d-dimensional Euclidean space {{{R}}d} . Specifically, we ascertain statistics of the densities and kissing numbers as well as the numbers of distinct symmetries of the packings for dimensions 8 through 13 using the stochastic Voronoi algorithm. The extreme lattices in a fixed dimension of space d (d≥slant 8 ) are dominated by typical lattices that have similar packing properties, such as packing densities and kissing numbers, while the best and the worst packers are in the long tails of the distribution of the extreme lattices. We also study the validity of the recently proposed decorrelation principle, which has important implications for sphere packings in general. The degree to which extreme-lattice packings decorrelate as well as how decorrelation is related to the packing density and symmetry of the lattices as the space dimension increases is also investigated. We find that the extreme lattices decorrelate with increasing dimension, while the least symmetric lattices decorrelate faster.

  1. More on lattice BRST invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Wolfgang; Golterman, Maarten F. L.; Shamir, Yigal

    1998-11-01

    In the gauge-fixing approach to (chiral) lattice gauge theories, the action in the U(1) case implicitly contains a free ghost term, in accordance with the continuum Abelian theory. On the lattice there is no BRST symmetry and, without fermions, the partition function is strictly positive. Recently, Neuberger pointed out, Phys. Rev. D 58, 057502 (1998), that a different choice of the ghost term would lead to a BRST-invariant lattice model, which is ill defined nonperturbatively. We show that such a lattice model is inconsistent already in perturbation theory, and clearly different from the gauge-fixing approach.

  2. Nuclear Physics and Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, Silas

    2003-11-01

    Impressive progress is currently being made in computing properties and interac- tions of the low-lying hadrons using lattice QCD. However, cost limitations will, for the foreseeable future, necessitate the use of quark masses, Mq, that are signif- icantly larger than those of nature, lattice spacings, a, that are not significantly smaller than the physical scale of interest, and lattice sizes, L, that are not sig- nificantly larger than the physical scale of interest. Extrapolations in the quark masses, lattice spacing and lattice volume are therefore required. The hierarchy of mass scales is: L 1 j Mq j â ºC j a 1 . The appropriate EFT for incorporating the light quark masses, the finite lattice spacing and the lattice size into hadronic observables is C-PT, which provides systematic expansions in the small parame- ters e m L, 1/ Lâ ºC, p/â ºC, Mq/â ºC and aâ ºC . The lattice introduces other unphysical scales as well. Lattice QCD quarks will increasingly be artificially separated

  3. Two Nucleons on a Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    S.R. Beane; P.F.Bedaque; A. Parreno; M.J. Savage

    2004-04-01

    The two-nucleon sector is near an infrared fixed point of QCD and as a result the S-wave scattering lengths are unnaturally large compared to the effective ranges and shape parameters. It is usually assumed that a lattice QCD simulation of the two-nucleon sector will require a lattice that is much larger than the scattering lengths in order to extract quantitative information. In this paper we point out that this does not have to be the case: lattice QCD simulations on much smaller lattices will produce rigorous results for nuclear physics.

  4. Elimination of spurious lattice fermion solutions and noncompact lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.D.

    1997-09-22

    It is well known that the Dirac equation on a discrete hyper-cubic lattice in D dimension has 2{sup D} degenerate solutions. The usual method of removing these spurious solutions encounters difficulties with chiral symmetry when the lattice spacing l {ne} 0, as exemplified by the persistent problem of the pion mass. On the other hand, we recall that in any crystal in nature, all the electrons do move in a lattice and satisfy the Dirac equation; yet there is not a single physical result that has ever been entangled with a spurious fermion solution. Therefore it should not be difficult to eliminate these unphysical elements. On a discrete lattice, particle hop from point to point, whereas in a real crystal the lattice structure in embedded in a continuum and electrons move continuously from lattice cell to lattice cell. In a discrete system, the lattice functions are defined only on individual points (or links as in the case of gauge fields). However, in a crystal the electron state vector is represented by the Bloch wave functions which are continuous functions in {rvec {gamma}}, and herein lies one of the essential differences.

  5. Optical Abelian lattice gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Tagliacozzo, L.; Celi, A.; Zamora, A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2013-03-15

    We discuss a general framework for the realization of a family of Abelian lattice gauge theories, i.e., link models or gauge magnets, in optical lattices. We analyze the properties of these models that make them suitable for quantum simulations. Within this class, we study in detail the phases of a U(1)-invariant lattice gauge theory in 2+1 dimensions, originally proposed by P. Orland. By using exact diagonalization, we extract the low-energy states for small lattices, up to 4 Multiplication-Sign 4. We confirm that the model has two phases, with the confined entangled one characterized by strings wrapping around the whole lattice. We explain how to study larger lattices by using either tensor network techniques or digital quantum simulations with Rydberg atoms loaded in optical lattices, where we discuss in detail a protocol for the preparation of the ground-state. We propose two key experimental tests that can be used as smoking gun of the proper implementation of a gauge theory in optical lattices. These tests consist in verifying the absence of spontaneous (gauge) symmetry breaking of the ground-state and the presence of charge confinement. We also comment on the relation between standard compact U(1) lattice gauge theory and the model considered in this paper. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the quantum simulation of dynamical gauge theories in optical lattices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We focus on digital simulation of abelian lattice gauge theory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We rediscover and discuss the puzzling phase diagram of gauge magnets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We detail the protocol for time evolution and ground-state preparation in any phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide two experimental tests to validate gauge theory quantum simulators.

  6. Methods for forming group III-arsenide-nitride semiconductor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for forming Group III-arsenide-nitride semiconductor materials. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V crystals varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V crystals can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  7. Dynamics of Lattice Kinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevrekidis, P. G.; Weinstein, M. I.

    2000-03-01

    In this paper we consider two models of soliton dynamics (the sine Gordon and the \\phi^4 equations) on a 1-dimensional lattice. We are interested in particular in the behavior of their kink-like solutions inside the Peierls- Nabarro barrier and its variation as a function of the discreteness parameter. We find explicitly the asymptotic states of the system for any value of the discreteness parameter and the rates of decay of the initial data to these asymptotic states. We show that genuinely periodic solutions are possible and we identify the regimes of the discreteness parameter for which they are expected to persist. We also prove that quasiperiodic solutions cannot exist. Our results are verified by numerical simulations.

  8. The EMMA Main Ring Lattice.

    SciTech Connect

    Berg,J.S.

    2008-02-21

    I give a brief introduction to the purpose and goals of the EMMA experiment and describe how they will impact the design of the main EMMA ring. I then describe the mathematical model that is used to describe the EMMA lattice. Finally, I show how the different lattice configurations were obtained and list their parameters.

  9. Buckling modes in pantographic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgio, Ivan; Della Corte, Alessandro; dell'Isola, Francesco; Steigmann, David J.

    2016-07-01

    We study buckling patterns in pantographic sheets, regarded as two-dimensional continua consisting of lattices of continuously distributed fibers. The fibers are modeled as beams endowed with elastic resistance to stretching, shearing, bending and twist. Included in the theory is a non-standard elasticity due to geodesic bending of the fibers relative to the lattice surface. xml:lang="fr"

  10. Introduction to lattice gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R.

    The lattice formulation of Quantum Field Theory (QFT) can be exploited in many ways. We can derive the lattice Feynman rules and carry out weak coupling perturbation expansions. The lattice then serves as a manifestly gauge invariant regularization scheme, albeit one that is more complicated than standard continuum schemes. Strong coupling expansions: these give us useful qualitative information, but unfortunately no hard numbers. The lattice theory is amenable to numerical simulations by which one calculates the long distance properties of a strongly interacting theory from first principles. The observables are measured as a function of the bare coupling g and a gauge invariant cut-off approx. = 1/alpha, where alpha is the lattice spacing. The continuum (physical) behavior is recovered in the limit alpha yields 0, at which point the lattice artifacts go to zero. This is the more powerful use of lattice formulation, so in these lectures the author focuses on setting up the theory for the purpose of numerical simulations to get hard numbers. The numerical techniques used in Lattice Gauge Theories have their roots in statistical mechanics, so it is important to develop an intuition for the interconnection between quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics.

  11. Branes and integrable lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Junya

    2017-01-01

    This is a brief review of my work on the correspondence between four-dimensional 𝒩 = 1 supersymmetric field theories realized by brane tilings and two-dimensional integrable lattice models. I explain how to construct integrable lattice models from extended operators in partially topological quantum field theories, and elucidate the correspondence as an application of this construction.

  12. Recent progress in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, S.R.

    1992-12-01

    A brief overview of the status of lattice QCD is given, with emphasis on topics relevant to phenomenology. The calculation of the light quark spectrum, the lattice prediction of {alpha} {sub {ovr MS}} (M {sub Z}), and the calculation of f{sub B} are discussed. 3 figs., 3 tabs., 40 refs.

  13. Study of lattice defect vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, R. J.

    1969-01-01

    Report on the vibrations of defects in crystals relates how defects, well localized in a crystal but interacting strongly with the other atoms, change the properties of a perfect crystal. The methods used to solve defect problems relate the properties of an imperfect lattice to the properties of a perfect lattice.

  14. Anisotropic lattice models of electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobelev, Vladimir; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2002-11-01

    Systems of charged particles on anisotropic three-dimensional lattices are investigated theoretically using Debye-Huckel theory. It is found that the thermodynamics of these systems strongly depends on the degree of anisotropy. For weakly anisotropic simple cubic lattices, the results indicate the existence of order-disorder phase transitions and a tricritical point, while the possibility of low-density gas-liquid coexistence is suppressed. For strongly anisotropic lattices this picture changes dramatically: The low-density gas-liquid phase separation reappears and the phase diagram exhibits critical, tricritical, and triple points. For body-centered lattices, the low-density gas-liquid phase coexistence is suppressed for all degrees of anisotropy. These results show that the effect of anisotropy in lattice models of electrolytes amounts to reduction of spatial dimensionality.

  15. Lattice models of ionic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobelev, Vladimir; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Fisher, Michael E.

    2002-05-01

    A theoretical analysis of Coulomb systems on lattices in general dimensions is presented. The thermodynamics is developed using Debye-Hückel theory with ion-pairing and dipole-ion solvation, specific calculations being performed for three-dimensional lattices. As for continuum electrolytes, low-density results for simple cubic (sc), body-centered cubic (bcc), and face-centered cubic (fcc) lattices indicate the existence of gas-liquid phase separation. The predicted critical densities have values comparable to those of continuum ionic systems, while the critical temperatures are 60%-70% higher. However, when the possibility of sublattice ordering as well as Debye screening is taken into account systematically, order-disorder transitions and a tricritical point are found on sc and bcc lattices, and gas-liquid coexistence is suppressed. Our results agree with recent Monte Carlo simulations of lattice electrolytes.

  16. Shaping solitons by lattice defects

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Liangwei; Ye Fangwei

    2010-11-15

    We demonstrate the existence of shape-preserving self-localized nonlinear modes in a two-dimensional photonic lattice with a flat-topped defect that covers several lattice sites. The balance of diffraction, defocusing nonlinearity, and optical potential induced by lattices with various forms of defects results in novel families of solitons featuring salient properties. We show that the soliton shape can be controlled by varying the shape of lattice defects. The existence domains of fundamental and vortex solitons in the semi-infinite gap expand with the defect amplitude. Vortex solitons in the semi-infinite gap with rectangular intensity distributions will break into dipole solitons when the propagation constant exceeds a critical value. In the semi-infinite and first-finite gaps, we find that lattices with rectangular defects can support stable vortex solitons which exhibit noncanonical phase structure.

  17. Lattice-matched heteroepitaxy of wide gap ternary compound semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, Klaus J.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of applications are identified for heteroepitaxial structures of wide gap I-III-VI(sub 2) and II-IV-V(sub 2) semiconductors, and are assessed in comparison with ternary III-V alloys and other wide gap materials. Non-linear optical applications of the I-III-VI(sub 2) and II-IV-V(sub 2) compound heterostructures are discussed, which require the growth of thick epitaxial layers imposing stringent requirements on the conditions of heteroepitaxy. In particular, recent results concerning the MOCVD growth of ZnSi(x)Ge(1-x)P2 alloys lattice matching Si or GaP substrates are reviewed. Also, heterostructures of Cu(z)Ag(1-z)GaS2 alloys that lattice-match Si, Ge, GaP, or GaAs substrates are considered in the context of optoelectronic devices operating in the blue wavelength regime. Since under the conditions of MOCVD, metastable alloys of the II-IV-V(sub 2) compounds and group IV elements are realized, II-IV-V(sub 2) alloys may also serve as interlayers in the integration of silicon and germanium with exactly lattice-matched tetrahedrally coordinated compound semiconductors, e.g. ZnSi(x)Ge(1-x)P2.

  18. Lattice-matched heteroepitaxy of wide gap ternary compound semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, Klaus J.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of applications are identified for heteroepitaxial structures of wide gap I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 semiconductors, and are assessed in comparison with ternary III-V alloys and other wide gap materials. Non-linear optical applications of the I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 compound heterostructures are discussed, which require the growth of thick epitaxial layers imposing stringent requirements on the conditions of heteroepitaxy. In particular, recent results concerning the MOCVD growth of ZnSi(x)Ge(1-x)P2 alloys lattice-matching Si or GaP substrates are reviewed. Also, heterostructures of Cu(z)Ag(1-z)GaS2 alloys that lattice-match Si, Ge, GaP or GaAs substrates are considered in the context of optoelectronic devices operating in the blue wavelength regime. Since under the conditions of MOCVD, metastable alloys of the II-IV-V2 compounds and group IV elements are realized, II-IV-V2 alloys may also serve as interlayers in the integration of silicon and germanium with exactly lattice-matched tetrahedrally coordinated compound semiconductors, e.g. ZnSi(x)Ge(1-x)P2.

  19. Nonlinear dust-lattice waves: a modified Toda lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, N. F.

    2008-09-07

    Charged dust grains in a plasma interact with a Coulomb potential, but also with an exponential component to the potential, due to Debye shielding in the background plasma. Here we investigate large-amplitude oscillations and waves in dust-lattices, employing techniques used in Toda lattice analysis. The lattice consists of a linear chain of particles, or a periodic ring as occurs in experimentally observed dust particle clusters. The particle motion has a triangular waveform, and chaotic motion for large amplitude motion of a grain.

  20. Lattice QCD: Status and Prospect

    SciTech Connect

    Ukawa, Akira

    2006-02-08

    A brief review is given of the current status and near-future prospect of lattice QCD studies of the Standard Model. After summarizing a bit of history, we describe current attempts toward inclusion of dynamical up, down and strange quarks. Recent results on the light hadron mass spectrum as well as those on the heavy quark quantities are described. Recent work on lattice pentaquark search is summarized. We touch upon the PACS-CS Project for building our next machine for lattice QCD, and conclude with a summary of computer situation and the physics possibilities over the next several years.

  1. Localized structures in Kagome lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Avadh B; Bishop, Alan R; Law, K J H; Kevrekidis, P G

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the existence and stability of gap vortices and multi-pole gap solitons in a Kagome lattice with a defocusing nonlinearity both in a discrete case and in a continuum one with periodic external modulation. In particular, predictions are made based on expansion around a simple and analytically tractable anti-continuum (zero coupling) limit. These predictions are then confirmed for a continuum model of an optically-induced Kagome lattice in a photorefractive crystal obtained by a continuous transformation of a honeycomb lattice.

  2. Screened Wigner-lattice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Mirabeau; Chaba, A. N.

    1983-01-01

    Recently Medeiros e Silva and Mokross proposed the screened Wigner-lattice model which consists of negative point charges on a Bravais lattice interacting through the screened Coulomb potential -Qexp(-λr)r and the positive charge background with the density (QΩ)exp(-λr). We point out the drawbacks of this model and show that by modifying the background charge density to (Qλ24π)Στ-->exp(-λ|r-->-τ-->|)|r-->-τ-->| the screened Coloumb form of the potential emerges naturally as a consequence. Further, this modified screened Wigner-lattice model is free from the defects of the other model.

  3. Random topics in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Kilcup, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    The author studies the physics of fermions in lattice regularized QCD, both abstractly and numerically. The author presents four papers, in the first showing how one can in principle extract the ..pi../sup +/-..pi../sup 0/ mass difference, in the second using a Monte Carlo simulation to compute the hadron spectrum and certain matrix elements on a small lattice, and in the third analyzing the symmetries of the staggered formulation of lattice fermions. Finally, the author presents preliminary results for the spectrum from a relatively large scale Monte Carlo simulation.

  4. Bidirectional negative differential thermal resistance phenomenon and its physical mechanism in the Frenkel-Kontorova lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Jianqiang, Zhang; Linru, Nie Chongyang, Chen; Xinyu, Zhang

    2016-07-15

    Thermal conduction of the Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) lattices with interfacial coupling is investigated numerically. The results indicate that: (i) For appropriate lattice periods, as the system is symmetric, a bidirectional negative differential thermal resistance (NDTR) phenomenon will appear. If the system is asymmetric, the bidirectional NDTR is gradually converted into an unidirectional NDTR. (ii) The bidirectional NDTR phenomenon effect also depends on the period of the FK lattice as the other parameters remains unchanged. With the increment of the lattice period, the bidirectional NDTR will gradually disappear. (iii) From a stochastic dynamics point of view, thermal transport properties of the system are determined by the competition between the two types of thermal conduction: one comes from the collusion between atoms, the other is due to the elastic coupling between atoms. For the smaller lattice periods, the former type of thermal conduction occupies the dominating position and the NDTR effect will appear.

  5. Scaling the Kondo lattice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-feng; Fisk, Zachary; Lee, Han-Oh; Thompson, J D; Pines, David

    2008-07-31

    The origin of magnetic order in metals has two extremes: an instability in a liquid of local magnetic moments interacting through conduction electrons, and a spin-density wave instability in a Fermi liquid of itinerant electrons. This dichotomy between 'local-moment' magnetism and 'itinerant-electron' magnetism is reminiscent of the valence bond/molecular orbital dichotomy present in studies of chemical bonding. The class of heavy-electron intermetallic compounds of cerium, ytterbium and various 5f elements bridges the extremes, with itinerant-electron magnetic characteristics at low temperatures that grow out of a high-temperature local-moment state. Describing this transition quantitatively has proved difficult, and one of the main unsolved problems is finding what determines the temperature scale for the evolution of this behaviour. Here we present a simple, semi-quantitative solution to this problem that provides a basic framework for interpreting the physics of heavy-electron materials and offers the prospect of a quantitative determination of the physical origin of their magnetic ordering and superconductivity. It also reveals the difference between the temperature scales that distinguish the conduction electrons' response to a single magnetic impurity and their response to a lattice of local moments, and provides an updated version of the well-known Doniach diagram.

  6. LATTICE QCD AT FINITE TEMPERATURE.

    SciTech Connect

    PETRECZKY, P.

    2005-03-12

    I review recent progress in lattice QCD at finite temperature. Results on the transition temperature will be summarized. Recent progress in understanding in-medium modifications of interquark forces and quarkonia spectral functions at finite temperatures is discussed.

  7. Counting Lattice-Gas Invariants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Dominique d’Humières, Brosl Hasslacher, Pierre Lallemand, Yves Pomeau, and Jean-Pierre Rivet . Lattice gas hydrodynamics in two and three dimensions...177. Springer -Verlag, Februrary 1989. Proceedings of the Winter School, Les Houches, France. 6

  8. Lattice Multiplication: Old and New.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Givan, Betty; Karr, Rosemary

    1988-01-01

    The author presents two examples of lattice multiplication followed by a computer algorithm to perform this multiplication. The algorithm is given in psuedocode but could easily be given in Pascal. (PK)

  9. Heavy quarks and lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2003-11-05

    This paper is a review of heavy quarks in lattice gauge theory, focusing on methodology. It includes a status report on some of the calculations that are relevant to heavy-quark spectroscopy and to flavor physics.

  10. Lattice Studies of Hyperon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, David G.

    2016-04-01

    I describe recent progress at studying the spectrum of hadrons containing the strange quark through lattice QCD calculations. I emphasise in particular the richness of the spectrum revealed by lattice studies, with a spectrum of states at least as rich as that of the quark model. I conclude by prospects for future calculations, including in particular the determination of the decay amplitudes for the excited states.

  11. Lattice QCD in rotating frames.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata; Hirono, Yuji

    2013-08-23

    We formulate lattice QCD in rotating frames to study the physics of QCD matter under rotation. We construct the lattice QCD action with the rotational metric and apply it to the Monte Carlo simulation. As the first application, we calculate the angular momenta of gluons and quarks in the rotating QCD vacuum. This new framework is useful to analyze various rotation-related phenomena in QCD.

  12. Berry Phase in Lattice QCD.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata

    2016-07-29

    We propose the lattice QCD calculation of the Berry phase, which is defined by the ground state of a single fermion. We perform the ground-state projection of a single-fermion propagator, construct the Berry link variable on a momentum-space lattice, and calculate the Berry phase. As the first application, the first Chern number of the (2+1)-dimensional Wilson fermion is calculated by the Monte Carlo simulation.

  13. Lattice QCD: A Brief Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, H. B.

    A general introduction to lattice QCD is given. The reader is assumed to have some basic familiarity with the path integral representation of quantum field theory. Emphasis is placed on showing that the lattice regularization provides a robust conceptual and computational framework within quantum field theory. The goal is to provide a useful overview, with many references pointing to the following chapters and to freely available lecture series for more in-depth treatments of specifics topics.

  14. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    John Bulava; Robert Edwards; George Fleming; K. Jimmy Juge; Adam C. Lichtl; Nilmani Mathur; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Stephen J. Wallace

    2007-06-16

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  15. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtl, Adam C.; Bulava, John; Morningstar, Colin; Edwards, Robert; Mathur, Nilmani; Richards, David; Fleming, George; Juge, K. Jimmy; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2007-10-26

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  16. The EMMA main ring lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, J. Scott

    2008-11-01

    The EMMA experiment will study beam dynamics in a linear non-scaling fixed-field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator. I give a brief introduction to the purpose and goals of the EMMA experiment and describe how they will impact the design of the main EMMA ring. I then describe the mathematical model that is used to describe the EMMA lattice. Finally, I show how the different lattice configurations were obtained and list their parameters.

  17. Lattice gauge theory for QCD

    SciTech Connect

    DeGrand, T.

    1997-06-01

    These lectures provide an introduction to lattice methods for nonperturbative studies of Quantum Chromodynamics. Lecture 1: Basic techniques for QCD and results for hadron spectroscopy using the simplest discretizations; lecture 2: Improved actions--what they are and how well they work; lecture 3: SLAC physics from the lattice-structure functions, the mass of the glueball, heavy quarks and {alpha}{sub s} (M{sub z}), and B-{anti B} mixing. 67 refs., 36 figs.

  18. Emergent three-brane lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Mashile, Grant; Park, Nicholas

    2010-05-15

    In this article the anomalous dimension of a class of operators with a bare dimension of O(N) is studied. The operators considered are dual to excited states of a two giant graviton system. In the Yang-Mills theory they are described by restricted Schur polynomials, labeled with Young diagrams that have at most two columns. In a certain limit the dilatation operator looks like a lattice version of a second derivative, with the lattice emerging from the Young diagram itself.

  19. AgF: lattice constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hönerlage, B.

    This document is part of Volume 44 `Semiconductors', Subvolume A `New Data and Updates for I-VII, III-V, III-VI and IV-VI Compounds' of Landolt-Börnstein Group III `Condensed Matter'. It contains data on AgF (silver fluoride), Element System Ag-F.

  20. Optimal lattice-structured materials

    DOE PAGES

    Messner, Mark C.

    2016-07-09

    This paper describes a method for optimizing the mesostructure of lattice-structured materials. These materials are periodic arrays of slender members resembling efficient, lightweight macroscale structures like bridges and frame buildings. Current additive manufacturing technologies can assemble lattice structures with length scales ranging from nanometers to millimeters. Previous work demonstrates that lattice materials have excellent stiffness- and strength-to-weight scaling, outperforming natural materials. However, there are currently no methods for producing optimal mesostructures that consider the full space of possible 3D lattice topologies. The inverse homogenization approach for optimizing the periodic structure of lattice materials requires a parameterized, homogenized material model describingmore » the response of an arbitrary structure. This work develops such a model, starting with a method for describing the long-wavelength, macroscale deformation of an arbitrary lattice. The work combines the homogenized model with a parameterized description of the total design space to generate a parameterized model. Finally, the work describes an optimization method capable of producing optimal mesostructures. Several examples demonstrate the optimization method. One of these examples produces an elastically isotropic, maximally stiff structure, here called the isotruss, that arguably outperforms the anisotropic octet truss topology.« less

  1. Optimal lattice-structured materials

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, Mark C.

    2016-07-09

    This paper describes a method for optimizing the mesostructure of lattice-structured materials. These materials are periodic arrays of slender members resembling efficient, lightweight macroscale structures like bridges and frame buildings. Current additive manufacturing technologies can assemble lattice structures with length scales ranging from nanometers to millimeters. Previous work demonstrates that lattice materials have excellent stiffness- and strength-to-weight scaling, outperforming natural materials. However, there are currently no methods for producing optimal mesostructures that consider the full space of possible 3D lattice topologies. The inverse homogenization approach for optimizing the periodic structure of lattice materials requires a parameterized, homogenized material model describing the response of an arbitrary structure. This work develops such a model, starting with a method for describing the long-wavelength, macroscale deformation of an arbitrary lattice. The work combines the homogenized model with a parameterized description of the total design space to generate a parameterized model. Finally, the work describes an optimization method capable of producing optimal mesostructures. Several examples demonstrate the optimization method. One of these examples produces an elastically isotropic, maximally stiff structure, here called the isotruss, that arguably outperforms the anisotropic octet truss topology.

  2. Optimal lattice-structured materials

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, Mark C.

    2016-07-09

    This paper describes a method for optimizing the mesostructure of lattice-structured materials. These materials are periodic arrays of slender members resembling efficient, lightweight macroscale structures like bridges and frame buildings. Current additive manufacturing technologies can assemble lattice structures with length scales ranging from nanometers to millimeters. Previous work demonstrates that lattice materials have excellent stiffness- and strength-to-weight scaling, outperforming natural materials. However, there are currently no methods for producing optimal mesostructures that consider the full space of possible 3D lattice topologies. The inverse homogenization approach for optimizing the periodic structure of lattice materials requires a parameterized, homogenized material model describing the response of an arbitrary structure. This work develops such a model, starting with a method for describing the long-wavelength, macroscale deformation of an arbitrary lattice. The work combines the homogenized model with a parameterized description of the total design space to generate a parameterized model. Finally, the work describes an optimization method capable of producing optimal mesostructures. Several examples demonstrate the optimization method. One of these examples produces an elastically isotropic, maximally stiff structure, here called the isotruss, that arguably outperforms the anisotropic octet truss topology.

  3. Advances in Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlynn, Greg

    In this thesis we make four contributions to the state of the art in numerical lattice simulations of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). First, we present the most detailed investigation yet of the autocorrelations of topological observations in hybrid Monte Carlo simulations of QCD and of the effects of the boundary conditions on these autocorrelations. This results in a numerical criterion for deciding when open boundary conditions are useful for reducing these autocorrelations, which are a major barrier to reliable calculations at fine lattice spacings. Second, we develop a dislocation-enhancing determinant, and demonstrate that it reduces the autocorrelation time of the topological charge. This alleviates problems with slow topological tunneling at fine lattice spacings, enabling simulations on fine lattices to be completed with much less computational effort. Third, we show how to apply the recently developed zMobius technique to hybrid Monte Carlo evolutions with domain wall fermions, achieving nearly a factor of two speedup in the light quark determinant, the single most expensive part of the calculation. The dislocation-enhancing determinant and the zMobius technique have enabled us to begin simulations of fine ensembles with four flavors of dynamical domain wall quarks. Finally, we show how to include the previously-neglected G1 operator in nonperturbative renormalization of the DeltaS = 1 effective weak Hamiltonian on the lattice. This removes an important systematic error in lattice calculations of weak matrix elements, in particular the important K → pipi decay.

  4. Optimal lattice-structured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messner, Mark C.

    2016-11-01

    This work describes a method for optimizing the mesostructure of lattice-structured materials. These materials are periodic arrays of slender members resembling efficient, lightweight macroscale structures like bridges and frame buildings. Current additive manufacturing technologies can assemble lattice structures with length scales ranging from nanometers to millimeters. Previous work demonstrates that lattice materials have excellent stiffness- and strength-to-weight scaling, outperforming natural materials. However, there are currently no methods for producing optimal mesostructures that consider the full space of possible 3D lattice topologies. The inverse homogenization approach for optimizing the periodic structure of lattice materials requires a parameterized, homogenized material model describing the response of an arbitrary structure. This work develops such a model, starting with a method for describing the long-wavelength, macroscale deformation of an arbitrary lattice. The work combines the homogenized model with a parameterized description of the total design space to generate a parameterized model. Finally, the work describes an optimization method capable of producing optimal mesostructures. Several examples demonstrate the optimization method. One of these examples produces an elastically isotropic, maximally stiff structure, here called the isotruss, that arguably outperforms the anisotropic octet truss topology.

  5. Hadron interactions

    SciTech Connect

    K. Orginos

    2011-12-01

    In this talk I am reviewing recent calculations of properties of multi-hadron systems in lattice QCD. In particular, I am reviewing results of elastic scattering phase shifts in meson-meson, meson-baryon and baryon-baryon systems, as well as discussing results indicating possible existence of bound states in two baryon systems. Finally, calculations of properties of systems with more than two hadrons are presented.

  6. Recent progress on dense nuclear matter in skyrmion approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, YongLiang; Rho, Mannque

    2017-03-01

    The Skyrme model provides a novel unified approach to nuclear physics. In this approach, single baryon, baryonic matter and medium-modified hadron properties are treated on the same footing. Intrinsic density dependence (IDD) reflecting the change of vacuum by compressed baryonic matter figures naturally in the approach. In this article, we review the recent progress on accessing dense nuclear matter by putting baryons treated as solitons, namely, skyrmions, on crystal lattice with accents on the implications in compact stars.

  7. Recent progress on dense nuclear matter in skyrmion approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, YongLiang; Rho, Mannque

    2017-03-01

    The Skyrme model provides a novel unified approach to nuclear physics. In this approach, single baryon, baryonic matter and medium-modified hadron properties are treated on the same footing. Intrinsic density dependence (IDD) reflecting the change of vacuum by compressed baryonic matter figures naturally in the approach. In this article, we review the recent progress on accessing dense nuclear matter by putting baryons treated as solitons, namely, skyrmions, on crystal lattice with accents on the implications in compact stars.

  8. Instability of vibrational modes in hexagonal lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korznikova, Elena A.; Bachurin, Dmitry V.; Fomin, Sergey Yu.; Chetverikov, Alexander P.; Dmitriev, Sergey V.

    2017-02-01

    The phenomenon of modulational instability is investigated for all four delocalized short-wave vibrational modes recently found for the two-dimensional hexagonal lattice with the help of a group-theoretic approach. The polynomial pair potential with hard-type quartic nonlinearity ( β-FPU potential with β > 0) is used to describe interactions between atoms. As expected for the hard-type anharmonic interactions, for all four modes the frequency is found to increase with the amplitude. Frequency of the modes I and III bifurcates from the upper edge of the phonon spectrum, while that of the modes II and IV increases from inside the spectrum. It is also shown that the considered model supports spatially localized vibrational mode called discrete breather (DB) or intrinsic localized mode. DB frequency increases with the amplitude above the phonon spectrum. Two different scenarios of the mode decay were revealed. In the first scenario (for modes I and III), development of the modulational instability leads to a formation of long-lived DBs that radiate their energy slowly until thermal equilibrium is reached. In the second scenario (for modes II and IV) a transition to thermal oscillations of atoms is observed with no formation of DBs.

  9. Phyllotaxis of flux lattices in layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Levitov, L.S. )

    1991-01-14

    The geometry of a flux lattice pinned by superconducting layers is studied. Under variation of magnetic field the lattice undergoes an infinite sequence of continuous transitions corresponding to different ways of selection of shortest distances. All possible lattices form a hierarchical structure identified as the hierarchy of Farey numbers. It is shown that dynamically accessible lattices are characterized by pairs of consecutive Fibonacci numbers.

  10. Silver(II) Oxide or Silver(I,III) Oxide?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tudela, David

    2008-01-01

    The often called silver peroxide and silver(II) oxide, AgO or Ag[subscript 2]O[subscript 2], is actually a mixed oxidation state silver(I,III) oxide. A thermochemical cycle, with lattice energies calculated within the "volume-based" thermodynamic approach, explain why the silver(I,III) oxide is more stable than the hypothetical silver(II) oxide.…

  11. Silver(II) Oxide or Silver(I,III) Oxide?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tudela, David

    2008-01-01

    The often called silver peroxide and silver(II) oxide, AgO or Ag[subscript 2]O[subscript 2], is actually a mixed oxidation state silver(I,III) oxide. A thermochemical cycle, with lattice energies calculated within the "volume-based" thermodynamic approach, explain why the silver(I,III) oxide is more stable than the hypothetical silver(II) oxide.…

  12. Lattice vertex algebras on general even, self-dual lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinschmidt, Axel

    2003-07-01

    In this note we analyse the Lie algebras of physical states stemming from lattice constructions on general even, self-dual lattices Gammap,q with p geq q. It is known that if the lattice is at most lorentzian, the resulting Lie algebra is of generalized Kac-Moody type (or has a quotient that is). We show that this is not true as soon as q geq 1. By studying a certain sublattice in the case q > 1 we obtain results that lead to the conclusion that the resulting non-GKM Lie algebra cannot be described conveniently in terms of generators and relations and belongs to a new and qualitatively different class of Lie algebras.

  13. Hamiltonian tomography of photonic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ruichao; Owens, Clai; LaChapelle, Aman; Schuster, David I.; Simon, Jonathan

    2017-06-01

    In this paper we introduce an approach to Hamiltonian tomography of noninteracting tight-binding photonic lattices. To begin with, we prove that the matrix element of the low-energy effective Hamiltonian between sites α and β may be obtained directly from Sα β(ω ) , the (suitably normalized) two-port measurement between sites α and β at frequency ω . This general result enables complete characterization of both on-site energies and tunneling matrix elements in arbitrary lattice networks by spectroscopy, and suggests that coupling between lattice sites is a topological property of the two-port spectrum. We further provide extensions of this technique for measurement of band projectors in finite, disordered systems with good band flatness ratios, and apply the tool to direct real-space measurement of the Chern number. Our approach demonstrates the extraordinary potential of microwave quantum circuits for exploration of exotic synthetic materials, providing a clear path to characterization and control of single-particle properties of Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard lattices. More broadly, we provide a robust, unified method of spectroscopic characterization of linear networks from photonic crystals to microwave lattices and everything in between.

  14. Quantum lattice model solver HΦ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Mitsuaki; Yoshimi, Kazuyoshi; Misawa, Takahiro; Yamaji, Youhei; Todo, Synge; Kawashima, Naoki

    2017-08-01

    HΦ [aitch-phi ] is a program package based on the Lanczos-type eigenvalue solution applicable to a broad range of quantum lattice models, i.e., arbitrary quantum lattice models with two-body interactions, including the Heisenberg model, the Kitaev model, the Hubbard model and the Kondo-lattice model. While it works well on PCs and PC-clusters, HΦ also runs efficiently on massively parallel computers, which considerably extends the tractable range of the system size. In addition, unlike most existing packages, HΦ supports finite-temperature calculations through the method of thermal pure quantum (TPQ) states. In this paper, we explain theoretical background and user-interface of HΦ. We also show the benchmark results of HΦ on supercomputers such as the K computer at RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science (AICS) and SGI ICE XA (Sekirei) at the Institute for the Solid State Physics (ISSP).

  15. Algebraic Lattices in QFT Renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borinsky, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The structure of overlapping subdivergences, which appear in the perturbative expansions of quantum field theory, is analyzed using algebraic lattice theory. It is shown that for specific QFTs the sets of subdivergences of Feynman diagrams form algebraic lattices. This class of QFTs includes the standard model. In kinematic renormalization schemes, in which tadpole diagrams vanish, these lattices are semimodular. This implies that the Hopf algebra of Feynman diagrams is graded by the coradical degree or equivalently that every maximal forest has the same length in the scope of BPHZ renormalization. As an application of this framework, a formula for the counter terms in zero-dimensional QFT is given together with some examples of the enumeration of primitive or skeleton diagrams.

  16. Screened Wigner-lattice model

    SciTech Connect

    Dias, M.; Chaba, A.N.

    1983-01-15

    Recently Medeiros e Silva and Mokross proposed the screened Wigner-lattice model which consists of negative point charges on a Bravais lattice interacting through the screened Coulomb potential -Q exp(-lambdar)/r and the positive charge background with the density (Q/..cap omega..) exp(-lambdar). We point out the drawbacks of this model and show that by modifying the background charge density to (Qlambda/sup 2//4..pi..) summation/sub tau-arrow-right/ exp(-lambdaVertical Barr-tau-arrow-rightVertical Bar)/Vertical Barr-tau-arrow-rightVertical Bar the screened Coloumb form of the potential emerges naturally as a consequence. Further, this modified screened Wigner-lattice model is free from the defects of the other model.

  17. Lattice QCD Beyond Ground States

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin; Saul D. Cohen

    2007-09-11

    In this work, we apply black box methods (methods not requiring input) to find excited-state energies. A variety of such methods for lattice QCD were introduced at the 3rd iteration of the numerical workshop series. We first review a selection of approaches that have been used in lattice calculations to determine multiple energy states: multiple correlator fits, the variational method and Bayesian fitting. In the second half, we will focus on a black box method, the multi-effective mass. We demonstrate the approach on a toy model, as well as on real lattice data, extracting multiple states from single correlators. Without complicated operator construction or specialized fitting programs, the black box method shows good consistency with the traditional approaches.

  18. Subwavelength lattice optics by evolutionary design.

    PubMed

    Huntington, Mark D; Lauhon, Lincoln J; Odom, Teri W

    2014-12-10

    This paper describes a new class of structured optical materials--lattice opto-materials--that can manipulate the flow of visible light into a wide range of three-dimensional profiles using evolutionary design principles. Lattice opto-materials are based on the discretization of a surface into a two-dimensional (2D) subwavelength lattice whose individual lattice sites can be controlled to achieve a programmed optical response. To access a desired optical property, we designed a lattice evolutionary algorithm that includes and optimizes contributions from every element in the lattice. Lattice opto-materials can exhibit simple properties, such as on- and off-axis focusing, and can also concentrate light into multiple, discrete spots. We expanded the unit cell shapes of the lattice to achieve distinct, polarization-dependent optical responses from the same 2D patterned substrate. Finally, these lattice opto-materials can also be combined into architectures that resemble a new type of compound flat lens.

  19. Lattice Boltzmann method for the Saint-Venant equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haifei; Wang, Hongda; Liu, Shu; Hu, Changwei; Ding, Yu; Zhang, Jie

    2015-05-01

    The Saint-Venant equations represent the hydrodynamic principles of unsteady flows in open channel network through a set of non-linear partial differential equations. In this paper, a new lattice Boltzmann approach to solving the one-dimensional Saint-Venant equations (LABSVE) is developed, demonstrating the variation of discharge and sectional area with external forces, such as bed slope and bed friction. Our research recovers the Saint-Venant equations through deducing the Chapman-Enskog expansion on the lattice Boltzmann equation, which is a mesoscopic technique, bridging the molecular movement and macroscopic physical variables. It is also a fully explicit process, providing simplicity for programming. The model is verified by three benchmark tests: (i) a one-dimensional subcritical gradient flow; (ii) a dam-break wave flow; (iii) a flood event on the Yongding River. The results showed the accuracy of the proposed method and its good applicability in solving Saint-Venant problems.

  20. An Improved Lattice Kinetic Scheme for Incompressible Viscous Fluid Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kosuke; Inamuro, Takaji

    2014-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is an explicit numerical scheme for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations (INSE) without integrating the Poisson equation for the pressure. In spite of its merit, the LBM has some drawbacks in accuracy. First, we review drawbacks for three numerical methods based on the LBM. The three methods are the LBM with the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model (LBGK), the lattice kinetic scheme (LKS) and the link-wise artificial compressibility method (LWACM). Second, in order to remedy the drawbacks, we propose an improved LKS. The present method incorporates (i) the scheme used in the LWACM for determining the kinematic viscosity, (ii) an iterative calculation of the pressure and (iii) a semi-implicit algorithm, while preserving the simplicity of the algorithm of the original LKS. Finally, in simulations of test problems, we find that the improved LKS eliminates the drawbacks and gives more accurate and stable results than LBGK, LKS and LWACM.

  1. Tetraquark states from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Nilmani

    2011-10-24

    Recently there have been considerable interests in studying hadronic states beyond the usual two and three quark configurations. With the renewed experimental interests in {sigma}(600) and the inability of quark model to incorporate too many light scalar mesons, it is quite appropriate to study hadronic states with four quark configurations. Moreover, some of the newly observed charmed hadrons may well be described by four quark configurations. Lattice QCD is perhaps the most desirable tool to adjudicate the theoretical controversy of the scalar mesons and to interpret the structures of the newly observed charmed states. Here we briefly reviewed the lattice studies of four-quark hadrons.

  2. Lattice QCD and Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinos Orginos

    2007-03-01

    A steady stream of developments in Lattice QCD have made it possible today to begin to address the question of how nuclear physics emerges from the underlying theory of strong interactions. Central role in this understanding play both the effective field theory description of nuclear forces and the ability to perform accurate non-perturbative calculations in lo w energy QCD. Here I present some recent results that attempt to extract important low energy constants of the effective field theory of nuclear forces from lattice QCD.

  3. Nuclear Physics from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Silas Beane, Konstantinos Orginos, Martin Savage

    2011-01-01

    We review recent progress toward establishing lattice Quantum Chromodynamics as a predictive calculational framework for nuclear physics. A survey of the current techniques that are used to extract low-energy hadronic scattering amplitudes and interactions is followed by a review of recent two-body and few-body calculations by the NPLQCD collaboration and others. An outline of the nuclear physics that is expected to be accomplished with Lattice QCD in the next decade, along with estimates of the required computational resources, is presented.

  4. Continuous Lattices and Mathematical Morphology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    ARMY RESEARCH LABORATORY Continuous Lattices and Mathematical Morphology by Dennis W. McGuire ARL-TR-1548 ^»»».■■SiSIIIBRHH^ June 1998...Research Laboratory Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 ARL-TR-1548 June 1998 Continuous Lattices and Mathematical Morphology Dennis W. McGuire Sensors and...Washington DC 20301-7100 AMCOM MRDEC Atta AMSMI-RD W C McCorkle Redstone Arsenal AL 35898-5240 Army RsrchPhysics Div Atta AMXRO-EMCS Assoc Dir Math

  5. Nucleon Structure from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Haegler, Philipp

    2011-10-24

    Hadron structure calculations in lattice QCD have seen substantial progress during recent years. We illustrate the achievements that have been made by discussing latest lattice results for a limited number of important observables related to nucleon form factors and generalized parton distributions. A particular focus is placed on the decomposition of the nucleon spin 1/2 in terms of quark spin and orbital angular momentum contributions. Results and limitations of the necessary chiral extrapolations based on ChPT will be briefly discussed.

  6. Negative-viscosity lattice gases

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, D.H. )

    1989-08-01

    A new irreversible collision rule is introduced for lattice-gas automata. The rule maximizes the flux of momentum in the direction of the local momentum gradient, yielding a negative shear viscosity. Numerically results in 2D show that the negative viscosity leads to the spontaneous ordering of the velocity field, with vorticity resolvable down to one lattice-link length. The new rule may be used in conjunction with previously proposed collision rules to yield a positive shear viscosity lower than the previous rules provide. In particular, Poiseuille flow tests demonstrate a decrease in viscosity by more than a factor of 2.

  7. Kondo length in bosonic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliano, Domenico; Sodano, Pasquale; Trombettoni, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    Motivated by the fact that the low-energy properties of the Kondo model can be effectively simulated in spin chains, we study the realization of the effect with bond impurities in ultracold bosonic lattices at half filling. After presenting a discussion of the effective theory and of the mapping of the bosonic chain onto a lattice spin Hamiltonian, we provide estimates for the Kondo length as a function of the parameters of the bosonic model. We point out that the Kondo length can be extracted from the integrated real-space correlation functions, which are experimentally accessible quantities in experiments with cold atoms.

  8. Chiral symmetry on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1994-11-01

    The author reviews some of the difficulties associated with chiral symmetry in the context of a lattice regulator. The author discusses the structure of Wilson Fermions when the hopping parameter is in the vicinity of its critical value. Here one flavor contrasts sharply with the case of more, where a residual chiral symmetry survives anomalies. The author briefly discusses the surface mode approach, the use of mirror Fermions to cancel anomalies, and finally speculates on the problems with lattice versions of the standard model.

  9. Lattice Green's Function for the Body-Centered Cubic Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaji, A. J.

    2002-05-01

    An expression for the Green's function (GF) of Body-Centered Cubic (BCC) lat tice is evaluated analytically and numerically for a single impurity lattice. Th e density of states (DOS), phase shift, and scattering cross section are express ed in terms of complete elliptic integrals of the first kind.

  10. AgF: lattice constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hönerlage, B.

    This document is part of Subvolume D 'New Data and Updates for IV-IV; III-V; II-VI and I-VII Compounds; their Mixed Crystals and Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors' of Volume 44 'Semiconductors' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'.

  11. Lattice continuum and diffusional creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesarovic, Sinisa Dj.

    2016-04-01

    Diffusional creep is characterized by growth/disappearance of lattice planes at the crystal boundaries that serve as sources/sinks of vacancies, and by diffusion of vacancies. The lattice continuum theory developed here represents a natural and intuitive framework for the analysis of diffusion in crystals and lattice growth/loss at the boundaries. The formulation includes the definition of the Lagrangian reference configuration for the newly created lattice, the transport theorem and the definition of the creep rate tensor for a polycrystal as a piecewise uniform, discontinuous field. The values associated with each crystalline grain are related to the normal diffusional flux at grain boundaries. The governing equations for Nabarro-Herring creep are derived with coupled diffusion and elasticity with compositional eigenstrain. Both, bulk diffusional dissipation and boundary dissipation accompanying vacancy nucleation and absorption, are considered, but the latter is found to be negligible. For periodic arrangements of grains, diffusion formally decouples from elasticity but at the cost of a complicated boundary condition. The equilibrium of deviatorically stressed polycrystals is impossible without inclusion of interface energies. The secondary creep rate estimates correspond to the standard Nabarro-Herring model, and the volumetric creep is small. The initial (primary) creep rate is estimated to be much larger than the secondary creep rate.

  12. Hadronic Interactions from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinos Orginos

    2006-03-19

    In this talk I discuss a few recent results on lattice calculations of scattering lengths in hadronic processes. In particular, I present the scattering length of the pion-pion scattering in the I=2 channel and the nucleon-nucleon {sup 1}S{sub 0} channel and {sup 3}S{sub 1}-{sup 3}D{sub 1} coupled channels.

  13. On Some Periodic Toda Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Kac, M.; Van Moerbeke, Pierre

    1975-01-01

    A discrete version of Floquet's theory is developed and applied to a system of non-linear differential equations related to the periodic Toda lattice. A special solution previously found by Toda is thus seen to fit into the formalism of inverse scattering problems. PMID:16592244

  14. Subwavelength vortical plasmonic lattice solitons.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fangwei; Mihalache, Dumitru; Hu, Bambi; Panoiu, Nicolae C

    2011-04-01

    We present a theoretical study of vortical plasmonic lattice solitons, which form in two-dimensional arrays of metallic nanowires embedded into nonlinear media with both focusing and defocusing Kerr nonlinearities. Their existence, stability, and subwavelength spatial confinement are investigated in detail.

  15. Lattice continuum and diffusional creep

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diffusional creep is characterized by growth/disappearance of lattice planes at the crystal boundaries that serve as sources/sinks of vacancies, and by diffusion of vacancies. The lattice continuum theory developed here represents a natural and intuitive framework for the analysis of diffusion in crystals and lattice growth/loss at the boundaries. The formulation includes the definition of the Lagrangian reference configuration for the newly created lattice, the transport theorem and the definition of the creep rate tensor for a polycrystal as a piecewise uniform, discontinuous field. The values associated with each crystalline grain are related to the normal diffusional flux at grain boundaries. The governing equations for Nabarro–Herring creep are derived with coupled diffusion and elasticity with compositional eigenstrain. Both, bulk diffusional dissipation and boundary dissipation accompanying vacancy nucleation and absorption, are considered, but the latter is found to be negligible. For periodic arrangements of grains, diffusion formally decouples from elasticity but at the cost of a complicated boundary condition. The equilibrium of deviatorically stressed polycrystals is impossible without inclusion of interface energies. The secondary creep rate estimates correspond to the standard Nabarro–Herring model, and the volumetric creep is small. The initial (primary) creep rate is estimated to be much larger than the secondary creep rate. PMID:27274696

  16. Lattice continuum and diffusional creep.

    PubMed

    Mesarovic, Sinisa Dj

    2016-04-01

    Diffusional creep is characterized by growth/disappearance of lattice planes at the crystal boundaries that serve as sources/sinks of vacancies, and by diffusion of vacancies. The lattice continuum theory developed here represents a natural and intuitive framework for the analysis of diffusion in crystals and lattice growth/loss at the boundaries. The formulation includes the definition of the Lagrangian reference configuration for the newly created lattice, the transport theorem and the definition of the creep rate tensor for a polycrystal as a piecewise uniform, discontinuous field. The values associated with each crystalline grain are related to the normal diffusional flux at grain boundaries. The governing equations for Nabarro-Herring creep are derived with coupled diffusion and elasticity with compositional eigenstrain. Both, bulk diffusional dissipation and boundary dissipation accompanying vacancy nucleation and absorption, are considered, but the latter is found to be negligible. For periodic arrangements of grains, diffusion formally decouples from elasticity but at the cost of a complicated boundary condition. The equilibrium of deviatorically stressed polycrystals is impossible without inclusion of interface energies. The secondary creep rate estimates correspond to the standard Nabarro-Herring model, and the volumetric creep is small. The initial (primary) creep rate is estimated to be much larger than the secondary creep rate.

  17. Triangles in a Lattice Parabola.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sastry, K. R. S.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed are properties possessed by polygons inscribed in the lattice parabola y=x, including the area of a triangle, triangles of minimum area, conditions for right triangles, triangles whose area is the cube of an integer, and implications of Pick's Theorem. Further directions to pursue are suggested. (MDH)

  18. Decompressive craniectomy with lattice duraplasty.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, P; Tseng, M; Mendelow, A D

    2004-02-01

    A method of opening dura for decompressive craniectomies is described. Numerous cuts intersecting in a lattice pattern allow the dura to expand in a gradual and controlled manner minimising the chances of cortical laceration or venous kinking on the craniectomy edge.

  19. Lattice QCD in Background Fields

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Brian Tiburzi, Andre Walker-Loud

    2009-06-01

    Electromagnetic properties of hadrons can be computed by lattice simulations of QCD in background fields. We demonstrate new techniques for the investigation of charged hadron properties in electric fields. Our current calculations employ large electric fields, motivating us to analyze chiral dynamics in strong QED backgrounds, and subsequently uncover surprising non-perturbative effects present at finite volume.

  20. Confinement and lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M

    1980-06-01

    The motivation for formulating gauge theories on a lattice to study non-perturbative phenomena is reviewed, and recent progress supporting the compatibility of asymptotic freedom and quark confinement in the standard SU(3) Yang-Mills theory of the strong interaction is discussed.

  1. Chiral four-dimensional heterotic covariant lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beye, Florian

    2014-11-01

    In the covariant lattice formalism, chiral four-dimensional heterotic string vacua are obtained from certain even self-dual lattices which completely decompose into a left-mover and a right-mover lattice. The main purpose of this work is to classify all right-mover lattices that can appear in such a chiral model, and to study the corresponding left-mover lattices using the theory of lattice genera. In particular, the Smith-Minkowski-Siegel mass formula is employed to calculate a lower bound on the number of left-mover lattices. Also, the known relationship between asymmetric orbifolds and covariant lattices is considered in the context of our classification.

  2. Modeling pions on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecile, D. J.

    In Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the pions are the lightest bound states. Current lattice QCD calculations are not able to study pions at realistic masses due to algorithmic difficulties. Instead, lattice studies are limited to unphysically large pion masses, and Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT) is often relied upon to extrapolate lattice results to the phenomenological regime and to the chiral limit, where quarks are massless. One of the outstanding problems in the field is to determine the range of quark masses where ChPT is valid and to understand the nonperturbative physics that may cause ChPT to break down. Given the difficulty of studying QCD, it is interesting and useful to construct a lattice field theory model of pions, which would allow a direct lattice calculation without the need for chiral extrapolations. This model can be used to evaluate the reliability of chiral extrapolations as applied to lattice data in the context of a lattice field theory that is exactly solvable numerically even at small quark masses and in the chiral limit. In this light, to create a model of pions of two-flavor Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), a lattice field theory involving two flavors of staggered quarks interacting strongly with Abelian gauge fields is constructed. In the chiral limit, this theory exhibits a SUL(2) x SU R(2) x UA(1) symmetry. The UA(1) symmetry can be broken by introducing a four-fermion term into the action, thereby incorporating the physics of the QCD anomaly. To qualify as a meaningful model of QCD, this lattice model must exhibit spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking and confinement and must have a continuum limit. An interesting mechanism is introduced to address the continuum limit. In particular, an extra dimension allows one to tune a fictitious temperature in order to access a phase of broken symmetry and to find a range where the pion decay constant is much smaller than the lattice cutoff, i.e. Fpi ≪1a . Unlike lattice QCD, a major advantage of

  3. Lattice dynamics and lattice thermal conductivity of thorium dicarbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zongmeng; Huai, Ping; Qiu, Wujie; Ke, Xuezhi; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhu, Zhiyuan

    2014-11-01

    The elastic and thermodynamic properties of ThC2 with a monoclinic symmetry have been studied by means of density functional theory and direct force-constant method. The calculated properties including the thermal expansion, the heat capacity and the elastic constants are in a good agreement with experiment. Our results show that the vibrational property of the C2 dimer in ThC2 is similar to that of a free standing C2 dimer. This indicates that the C2 dimer in ThC2 is not strongly bonded to Th atoms. The lattice thermal conductivity for ThC2 was calculated by means of the Debye-Callaway model. As a comparison, the conductivity of ThC was also calculated. Our results show that the ThC and ThC2 contributions of the lattice thermal conductivity to the total conductivity are 29% and 17%, respectively.

  4. Global Positioning System III (GPS III)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    modernization of the constellation . GPS III complies with 10 United States Code (USC) § 2281, ensuring the continued sustainment and operation of GPS for... constellations , further increasing the accuracy and availability of user PNT solutions. GPS III December 2015 SAR March 23, 2016 16:15:29 UNCLASSIFIED

  5. Lattice Boltzmann solver of Rossler equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Guangwu; Ruan, Li

    2000-06-01

    We proposed a lattice Boltzmann model for the Rossler equation. Using a method of multiscales in the lattice Boltzmann model, we get the diffusion reaction as a special case. If the diffusion effect disappeared, we can obtain the lattice Boltzmann solution of the Rossler equation on the mesescopic scale. The numerical results show the method can be used to simulate Rossler equation.

  6. The CKM Matrix from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, Paul B.; /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    Lattice QCD plays an essential role in testing and determining the parameters of the CKM theory of flavor mixing and CP violation. Very high precisions are required for lattice calculations analyzing CKM data; I discuss the prospects for achieving them. Lattice calculations will also play a role in investigating flavor mixing and CP violation beyond the Standard Model.

  7. Long-Range Lattice-Gas Algorithm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    lattice-gases, and therefore inherits exact computabil- ity on a discrete spacetime lattice. Our contribution is the use of nonlocal interactions that...gases, and therefore inherits exact computability on a discrete spacetime lattice. Our contribution is the use of nonlocal interactions that allow us to

  8. Partial lattice participation in the spin-lattice relaxation of potassium chromium alum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overweg, J. A.; Flokstra, J.; ter Brake, H. J. M.; Gerritsma, G. J.

    1981-08-01

    We developed a SQUID-based frequency sweeping system for a.c. susceptibility measurements. Using this instrument we found that in Potassium Chromium Alum only a part of the lattice system is involved in the spin-lattice relaxation process. This partial lattice participation amounts 60-75% of the total lattice specific heat.

  9. Lattice gaugefixing and other optics in lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Ken.

    1992-06-01

    We present results from four projects. In the first, quark and gluon propagators and effective masses and {Delta}I = 1/2 Rule operator matching coefficients are computed numerically in gaugefixed lattice QCD. In the second, the same quantities are evaluated analytically in the strong coupling, N {yields} {infinity} limit. In the third project, the Schwinger model is studied in covariant gauges, where we show that the effective electron mass varies with the gauge parameter and that longitudinal gaugefixing ambiguities affect operator product expansion coefficients (analogous to {Delta}I = 1/2 Rule matching coefficients) determined by matching gauge variant matrix elements. However, we find that matching coefficients even if shifted by the unphysical modes are {xi} invariant. In the fourth project, we show that the strong coupling parallelogram lattice Schwinger model as a different thermodynamic limit than the weak coupling continuum limit. As a function of lattice skewness angle these models span the {Delta} = {minus}1 critical line of 6-vertex models which, in turn, have been identified as c = 1 conformal field theories.

  10. Limiting vibration in space lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Midturi, S.

    1997-12-01

    Using finite-element analysis and other methods, engineers are evaluating ways to control the vibrations and extend the use of flexible, deployable structures in space. The exploration of the universe by the United States has led to many technological innovations for space travel. Among them are lightweight lattice structures and booms, which have been used on the Voyager probes to the outer planets, the Hubble space telescope,m and many other missions. Typical applications of lattice structures in space include instrument booms, antennae, and solar-array deployers and supports. Booms are designed for automatic deployment to a controlled length and retraction into a very compact stowage volume. Deployable solar booms are often subjected to severe vibration while in orbit, and vibration must be limited or completely eliminated for safe and satisfactory performance.

  11. Form factors from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dru Renner

    2012-04-01

    Precision computation of hadronic physics with lattice QCD is becoming feasible. The last decade has seen precent-level calculations of many simple properties of mesons, and the last few years have seen calculations of baryon masses, including the nucleon mass, accurate to a few percent. As computational power increases and algorithms advance, the precise calculation of a variety of more demanding hadronic properties will become realistic. With this in mind, I discuss the current lattice QCD calculations of generalized parton distributions with an emphasis on the prospects for well-controlled calculations for these observables as well. I will do this by way of several examples: the pion and nucleon form factors and moments of the nucleon parton and generalized-parton distributions.

  12. Lattice QCD on nonorientable manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mages, Simon; Tóth, Bálint C.; Borsányi, Szabolcs; Fodor, Zoltán; Katz, Sándor D.; Szabó, Kálmán K.

    2017-05-01

    A common problem in lattice QCD simulations on the torus is the extremely long autocorrelation time of the topological charge when one approaches the continuum limit. The reason is the suppressed tunneling between topological sectors. The problem can be circumvented by replacing the torus with a different manifold, so that the connectivity of the configuration space is changed. This can be achieved by using open boundary conditions on the fields, as proposed earlier. It has the side effect of breaking translational invariance strongly. Here we propose to use a nonorientable manifold and show how to define and simulate lattice QCD on it. We demonstrate in quenched simulations that this leads to a drastic reduction of the autocorrelation time. A feature of the new proposal is that translational invariance is preserved up to exponentially small corrections. A Dirac fermion on a nonorientable manifold poses a challenge to numerical simulations: the fermion determinant becomes complex. We propose two approaches to circumvent this problem.

  13. Innovations in Lattice QCD Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinos Orginos

    2006-06-25

    Lattice QCD calculations demand a substantial amount of computing power in order to achieve the high precision results needed to better understand the nature of strong interactions, assist experiment to discover new physics, and predict the behavior of a diverse set of physical systems ranging from the proton itself to astrophysical objects such as neutron stars. However, computer power alone is clearly not enough to tackle the calculations we need to be doing today. A steady stream of recent algorithmic developments has made an important impact on the kinds of calculations we can currently perform. In this talk I am reviewing these algorithms and their impact on the nature of lattice QCD calculations performed today.

  14. The Fermilab lattice supercomputer project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischler, Mark; Atac, R.; Cook, A.; Deppe, J.; Gaines, I.; Husby, D.; Nash, T.; Pham, T.; Zmuda, T.; Hockney, George; Eichten, E.; Mackenzie, P.; Thacker, H. B.; Toussaint, D.

    1989-06-01

    The ACPMAPS system is a highly cost effective, local memory MIMD computer targeted at algorithm development and production running for gauge theory on the lattice. The machine consists of a compound hypercube of crates, each of which is a full crossbar switch containing several processors. The processing nodes are single board array processors based on the Weitek XL chip set, each with a peak power of 20 MFLOPS and supported by 8MBytes of data memory. The system currently being assembled has a peak power of 5 GFLOPS, delivering performance at approximately $250/MFLOP. The system is programmable in C and Fortran. An underpinning of software routines (CANOPY) provides an easy and natural way of coding lattice problems, such that the details of parallelism, and communication and system architecture are transparent to the user. CANOPY can easily be ported to any single CPU or MIMD system which supports C, and allows the coding of typical applications with very little effort.

  15. Tracking the SSC test lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, B.T.; Douglas, D.R.; Forest, E.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamic aperture and its determination emerged from the SSC reference design study as the single most important accelerator physics issue pertinent to the SSC. Beside the fundamental need of a finite dynamic aperture for any accelerator, it was considered to be a useful criterion for the magnet selection. An aperture workshop organized in November 1984 at LBL served the purpose to identify the various aspects of the aperture question and to organize the aperture task force accordingly. It was recognized that numerical models had to play an important role and the qualifications of several tracking codes were investigated. None of the existing codes could meet all of the criteria for an ideal tracking code and substantial program development became unavoidable. It was therefore decided to begin tracking SSC test lattices, which were provided by the aperture task force's lattice group and are described in an other paper to this conference, with existing tracking programs. 6 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Fluctuating multicomponent lattice Boltzmann model.

    PubMed

    Belardinelli, D; Sbragaglia, M; Biferale, L; Gross, M; Varnik, F

    2015-02-01

    Current implementations of fluctuating lattice Boltzmann equations (FLBEs) describe single component fluids. In this paper, a model based on the continuum kinetic Boltzmann equation for describing multicomponent fluids is extended to incorporate the effects of thermal fluctuations. The thus obtained fluctuating Boltzmann equation is first linearized to apply the theory of linear fluctuations, and expressions for the noise covariances are determined by invoking the fluctuation-dissipation theorem directly at the kinetic level. Crucial for our analysis is the projection of the Boltzmann equation onto the orthonormal Hermite basis. By integrating in space and time the fluctuating Boltzmann equation with a discrete number of velocities, the FLBE is obtained for both ideal and nonideal multicomponent fluids. Numerical simulations are specialized to the case where mean-field interactions are introduced on the lattice, indicating a proper thermalization of the system.

  17. A transportable optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Stefan; Häfner, Sebastian; Grotti, Jacopo; Koller, Silvio; Al-Masoudi, Ali; Sterr, Uwe; Lisdat, Christian

    2016-06-01

    We present the experimental setup and first results of PTB's transportable 87Sr clock. It consists of a physics package, several compact laser breadboards, and a transportable high finesse cavity for the clock laser. A comparison of the transportable system with our stationary optical lattice clock yields an instability of 2.2 x 10-15 √s/τ for the transportable clock. The current fractional uncertainty of 1 × 10-15 is still limited by the not yet fully evaluated light shift from the free running optical lattice laser operated near the magic wavelength. We are currently improving our transportable system to reach an uncertainty at or below the 10-17 level, which will finaly be limited by the uncertainty in blackbody radiation shift correction.

  18. LATTICE QCD AT FINITE DENSITY.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHMIDT, C.

    2006-07-23

    I discuss different approaches to finite density lattice QCD. In particular, I focus on the structure of the phase diagram and discuss attempts to determine the location of the critical end-point. Recent results on the transition line as function of the chemical potential (T{sub c}({mu}{sub q})) are reviewed. Along the transition line, hadronic fluctuations have been calculated; which can be used to characterize properties of the Quark Gluon plasma and eventually can also help to identify the location of the critical end-point in the QCD phase diagram on the lattice and in heavy ion experiments. Furthermore, I comment on the structure of the phase diagram at large {mu}{sub q}.

  19. Scattering in Quantum Lattice Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, Andrew; Love, Peter

    2009-03-01

    Quantum Lattice Gas Automata (QLGA) are of interest for their use in simulating quantum mechanics on both classical and quantum computers. QLGAs are an extension of classical Lattice Gas Automata where the constraint of unitary evolution is added. In the late 1990s, David A. Meyer as well as Bruce Boghosian and Washington Taylor produced similar models of QLGAs. We start by presenting a unified version of these models and study them from the point of view of the physics of wave-packet scattering. We show that the Meyer and Boghosian-Taylor models are actually the same basic model with slightly different parameterizations and limits. We then implement these models computationally using the Python programming language and show that QLGAs are able to replicate the analytic results of quantum mechanics (for example reflected and transmitted amplitudes for step potentials and the Klein paradox).

  20. Lattice Simulations and Infrared Conformality

    DOE PAGES

    Appelquist, Thomas; Fleming, George T.; Lin, Meifeng; ...

    2011-09-01

    We examine several recent lattice-simulation data sets, asking whether they are consistent with infrared conformality. We observe, in particular, that for an SU(3) gauge theory with 12 Dirac fermions in the fundamental representation, recent simulation data can be described assuming infrared conformality. Lattice simulations include a fermion mass m which is then extrapolated to zero, and we note that this data can be fit by a small-m expansion, allowing a controlled extrapolation. We also note that the conformal hypothesis does not work well for two theories that are known or expected to be confining and chirally broken, and that itmore » does work well for another theory expected to be infrared conformal.« less

  1. Apiary B Factory Lattice Design

    SciTech Connect

    Donald, M.H.R.; Garren, A.A.

    1991-05-03

    The Apiary B Factory is a proposed high-intensity electron-positron collider. This paper presents the lattice design for this facility, which envisions two rings with unequal energies in the PEP tunnel. The design has many interesting optical and geometrical features due to the needs to conform to the existing tunnel, and to achieve the necessary emittances, damping times and vacuum. Existing hardware is used to a maximum extent.

  2. Apiary B Factory lattice design

    SciTech Connect

    Donald, M.H.R. ); Garren, A.A. )

    1991-04-01

    The Apiary B Factory is a proposed high-intensity electron-positron collider. This paper will present the lattice design for this facility, which envisions two rings with unequal energies in the PEP tunnel. The design has many interesting optical and geometrical features due to the needs to conform to the existing tunnel, and to achieve the necessary emittances, damping times and vacuum. Existing hardware is used to a maximum extent. 8 figs. 1 tab.

  3. Hadron physics from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    We sketch the basic ideas of the lattice regularization in Quantum Field Theory, the corresponding Monte Carlo simulations, and applications to Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). This approach enables the numerical measurement of observables at the non-perturbative level. We comment on selected results, with a focus on hadron masses and the link to Chiral Perturbation Theory. At last, we address two outstanding issues: topological freezing and the sign problem.

  4. Scanning phononic lattices with ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Vines, R.E.; Wolfe, J.P.; Every, A.V.

    1999-11-01

    A method for probing the elastic properties of newly developed periodic structures using acoustic waves is introduced. Highly anisotropic transmission of surface acoustic waves is observed by continuously scanning the wave vector angle. Preliminary models of wave propagation through multilayers and two-dimensional lattices explain some of the experimental features, while other features can be attributed to the resonant excitation of interface waves. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Fuzzy lattice neurocomputing (FLN) models.

    PubMed

    Kaburlasos, V G; Petridis, V

    2000-12-01

    In this work it is shown how fuzzy lattice neurocomputing (FLN) emerges as a connectionist paradigm in the framework of fuzzy lattices (FL-framework) whose advantages include the capacity to deal rigorously with: disparate types of data such as numeric and linguistic data, intervals of values, 'missing' and 'don't care' data. A novel notation for the FL-framework is introduced here in order to simplify mathematical expressions without losing content. Two concrete FLN models are presented, namely 'sigma-FLN' for competitive clustering, and 'FLN with tightest fits (FLNtf)' for supervised clustering. Learning by the sigma-FLN, is rapid as it requires a single pass through the data, whereas learning by the FLNtf, is incremental, data order independent, polynomial theta(n3), and it guarantees maximization of the degree of inclusion of an input in a learned class as explained in the text. Convenient geometric interpretations are provided. The sigma-FLN is presented here as fuzzy-ART's extension in the FL-framework such that sigma-FLN widens fuzzy-ART's domain of application to (mathematical) lattices by augmenting the scope of both of fuzzy-ART's choice (Weber) and match functions, and by enhancing fuzzy-ART's complement coding technique. The FLNtf neural model is applied to four benchmark data sets of various sizes for pattern recognition and rule extraction. The benchmark data sets in question involve jointly numeric and nominal data with 'missing' and/or 'don't care' attribute values, whereas the lattices involved include the unit-hypercube, a probability space, and a Boolean algebra. The potential of the FL-framework in computing is also delineated.

  6. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-01-13

    In this study, one of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculationsmore » of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.« less

  7. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-01-13

    In this study, one of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.

  8. Quantised vortices in polariton lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berloff, Natalia

    2015-11-01

    The first comprehensive treatment of quantised vorticity in the light of research on vortices in modern fluid mechanics appeared in Russell Donnelly seminal research papers and summarized in his 1991 book ``Quantized Vortices in Helium II''. Recently quantized vortices have been studied in polariton condensates. Polaritons are the mixed light-matter quasi-particles that are formed in the strong exciton-photon coupling regime. Under non-resonant optical excitation rapid relaxation of carriers and bosonic stimulation result in the formation of a non-equilibrium polariton condensate characterized by a single many-body wave-function, therefore, naturally possessing quantized vortices. Polariton condensates can be imprinted into any two-dimensional lattice by spatial modulation of the pumping laser and form vortices via interacting outfows from the pumping sites. Optically pumped polariton condensates can be injected in lattice configurations with arbitrary density profiles offering the possibility to control the kinetics of the condensate and therefore the number and location of vortices. I will present some new developments in theoretical and experimental studies of quantized vortices in polariton condensates and discuss possible practical implementations of polariton lattices.

  9. Ectopic A-lattice seams destabilize microtubules.

    PubMed

    Katsuki, Miho; Drummond, Douglas R; Cross, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Natural microtubules typically include one A-lattice seam within an otherwise helically symmetric B-lattice tube. It is currently unclear how A-lattice seams influence microtubule dynamic instability. Here we find that including extra A-lattice seams in GMPCPP microtubules, structural analogues of the GTP caps of dynamic microtubules, destabilizes them, enhancing their median shrinkage rate by >20-fold. Dynamic microtubules nucleated by seeds containing extra A-lattice seams have growth rates similar to microtubules nucleated by B-lattice seeds, yet have increased catastrophe frequencies at both ends. Furthermore, binding B-lattice GDP microtubules to a rigor kinesin surface stabilizes them against shrinkage, whereas microtubules with extra A-lattice seams are stabilized only slightly. Our data suggest that introducing extra A-lattice seams into dynamic microtubules destabilizes them by destabilizing their GTP caps. On this basis, we propose that the single A-lattice seam of natural B-lattice MTs may act as a trigger point, and potentially a regulation point, for catastrophe.

  10. Ectopic A-lattice seams destabilize microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Katsuki, Miho; Drummond, Douglas R.; Cross, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Natural microtubules typically include one A-lattice seam within an otherwise helically symmetric B-lattice tube. It is currently unclear how A-lattice seams influence microtubule dynamic instability. Here we find that including extra A-lattice seams in GMPCPP microtubules, structural analogues of the GTP caps of dynamic microtubules, destabilizes them, enhancing their median shrinkage rate by >20-fold. Dynamic microtubules nucleated by seeds containing extra A-lattice seams have growth rates similar to microtubules nucleated by B-lattice seeds, yet have increased catastrophe frequencies at both ends. Furthermore, binding B-lattice GDP microtubules to a rigor kinesin surface stabilizes them against shrinkage, whereas microtubules with extra A-lattice seams are stabilized only slightly. Our data suggest that introducing extra A-lattice seams into dynamic microtubules destabilizes them by destabilizing their GTP caps. On this basis, we propose that the single A-lattice seam of natural B-lattice MTs may act as a trigger point, and potentially a regulation point, for catastrophe. PMID:24463734

  11. Lattice Truss Structural Response Using Energy Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenner, Winfred Scottson

    1996-01-01

    A deterministic methodology is presented for developing closed-form deflection equations for two-dimensional and three-dimensional lattice structures. Four types of lattice structures are studied: beams, plates, shells and soft lattices. Castigliano's second theorem, which entails the total strain energy of a structure, is utilized to generate highly accurate results. Derived deflection equations provide new insight into the bending and shear behavior of the four types of lattices, in contrast to classic solutions of similar structures. Lattice derivations utilizing kinetic energy are also presented, and used to examine the free vibration response of simple lattice structures. Derivations utilizing finite element theory for unique lattice behavior are also presented and validated using the finite element analysis code EAL.

  12. Finite temperature mechanical instability in disordered lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leyou; Mao, Xiaoming

    Mechanical instability takes different forms in various ordered and disordered systems, and little is known about how thermal fluctuations affect different classes of mechanical instabilities. We develop an analytic theory involving renormalization of rigidity and coherent potential approximation that can be used to understand finite-temperature mechanical stabilities in various disordered systems. We used this theory to study two disordered lattices: randomly diluted triangular lattice and randomly braced square lattice. These two lattices belong to two different universality classes as they approach mechanical instability at T = 0 . We show that thermal fluctuations stabilize both lattices. In particular, the triangular lattice displays a critical regime in which the shear modulus scales as G ~T 1 / 2 , whereas the square lattice shows G ~T 2 / 3 . We discuss generic scaling laws for finite T mechanical instabilities and relate to experimental systems including jamming and glass transitions.

  13. Texture dependent lattice strains and texture gradient in AI7020

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Zhong, Z.; Brokmeier, H.-G.; Maawad, E.; Schell, N.

    2015-04-01

    Firstly, an Al7020 block was characterized by the texture gradient, which was remarkably strong. Texture sharpness in the center with about 30 mrd (multiple random distribution) shows typical plain strain texture components. On the surface and close to the surface the texture sharpness is much weaker showing also shear components. Strongest shear was not directly at the surface but 4 mm deeper. The texture analysis at HEMS Beamline (Petra III/DESY-Hamburg) was done with continuous scanning mode to include all grains to improve the grain statistics. Secondly, with an in situ synchrotron experiment the texture dependent lattice strain behavior was investigated using flat tensile samples oriented 0°, 45° and 90° to the rolling direction (RD). Texture induced anisotropy influenced on the lattice dependent yield strength and the lattice dependent stress-strain behavior, which will be discussed in detail. Due to the high energy synchrotron beam complete Debye-Scherrer rings were obtained so that the patterns, parallel and perpendicular to loading direction (LD), were obtained simultaneously.

  14. From lattice Hamiltonians to tunable band structures by lithographic design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadjine, Athmane; Allan, Guy; Delerue, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    Recently, new materials exhibiting exotic band structures characterized by Dirac cones, nontrivial flat bands, and band crossing points have been proposed on the basis of effective two-dimensional lattice Hamiltonians. Here, we show using atomistic tight-binding calculations that these theoretical predictions could be experimentally realized in the conduction band of superlattices nanolithographed in III-V and II-VI semiconductor ultrathin films. The lithographed patterns consist of periodic lattices of etched cylindrical holes that form potential barriers for the electrons in the quantum well. In the case of honeycomb lattices, the conduction minibands of the resulting artificial graphene host several Dirac cones and nontrivial flat bands. Similar features, but organized in different ways, in energy or in k -space are found in kagome, distorted honeycomb, and Lieb superlattices. Dirac cones extending over tens of meV could be obtained in superlattices with reasonable sizes of the lithographic patterns, for instance in InAs/AlSb heterostructures. Bilayer artificial graphene could be also realized by lithography of a double quantum-well heterostructure. These new materials should be interesting for the experimental exploration of Dirac-based quantum systems, for both fundamental and applied physics.

  15. Optical techniques for Rydberg physics in lattice geometries. A technical guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naber, Julian B.; Vos, Jannie; Rengelink, Robert J.; Nusselder, Rosanne J.; Davtyan, David

    2016-12-01

    We address the technical challenges when performing quantum information experiments with ultracold Rydberg atoms in lattice geometries. We discuss the following key aspects: (i) the coherent manipulation of atomic ground states, (ii) the coherent excitation of Rydberg states, and (iii) spatial addressing of individual lattice sites. We briefly review methods and solutions which have been successfully implemented, and give examples based on our experimental apparatus. This includes an optical phase-locked loop, an intensity and frequency stabilization setup for lasers, and a nematic liquid-crystal spatial light modulator.

  16. Topological magnon bands in ferromagnetic star lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owerre, S. A.

    2017-05-01

    The experimental observation of topological magnon bands and thermal Hall effect in a kagomé lattice ferromagnet Cu(1-3, bdc) has inspired the search for topological magnon effects in various insulating ferromagnets that lack an inversion center allowing a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) spin-orbit interaction. The star lattice (also known as the decorated honeycomb lattice) ferromagnet is an ideal candidate for this purpose because it is a variant of the kagomé lattice with additional links that connect the up-pointing and down-pointing triangles. This gives rise to twice the unit cell of the kagomé lattice, and hence more interesting topological magnon effects. In particular, the triangular bridges on the star lattice can be coupled either ferromagnetically or antiferromagnetically which is not possible on the kagomé lattice ferromagnets. Here, we study DM-induced topological magnon bands, chiral edge modes, and thermal magnon Hall effect on the star lattice ferromagnet in different parameter regimes. The star lattice can also be visualized as the parent material from which topological magnon bands can be realized for the kagomé and honeycomb lattices in some limiting cases.

  17. Unbiased sampling of lattice Hamilton path ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Marc L.

    2006-10-01

    Hamilton paths, or Hamiltonian paths, are walks on a lattice which visit each site exactly once. They have been proposed as models of globular proteins and of compact polymers. A previously published algorithm [Mansfield, Macromolecules 27, 5924 (1994)] for sampling Hamilton paths on simple square and simple cubic lattices is tested for bias and for efficiency. Because the algorithm is a Metropolis Monte Carlo technique obviously satisfying detailed balance, we need only demonstrate ergodicity to ensure unbiased sampling. Two different tests for ergodicity (exact enumeration on small lattices, nonexhaustive enumeration on larger lattices) demonstrate ergodicity unequivocally for small lattices and provide strong support for ergodicity on larger lattices. Two other sampling algorithms [Ramakrishnan et al., J. Chem. Phys. 103, 7592 (1995); Lua et al., Polymer 45, 717 (2004)] are both known to produce biases on both 2×2×2 and 3×3×3 lattices, but it is shown here that the current algorithm gives unbiased sampling on these same lattices. Successive Hamilton paths are strongly correlated, so that many iterations are required between statistically independent samples. Rules for estimating the number of iterations needed to dissipate these correlations are given. However, the iteration time is so fast that the efficiency is still very good except on extremely large lattices. For example, even on lattices of total size 10×10×10 we are able to generate tens of thousands of uncorrelated Hamilton paths per hour of CPU time.

  18. Topological magnon bands in ferromagnetic star lattice.

    PubMed

    Owerre, S A

    2017-05-10

    The experimental observation of topological magnon bands and thermal Hall effect in a kagomé lattice ferromagnet Cu(1-3, bdc) has inspired the search for topological magnon effects in various insulating ferromagnets that lack an inversion center allowing a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) spin-orbit interaction. The star lattice (also known as the decorated honeycomb lattice) ferromagnet is an ideal candidate for this purpose because it is a variant of the kagomé lattice with additional links that connect the up-pointing and down-pointing triangles. This gives rise to twice the unit cell of the kagomé lattice, and hence more interesting topological magnon effects. In particular, the triangular bridges on the star lattice can be coupled either ferromagnetically or antiferromagnetically which is not possible on the kagomé lattice ferromagnets. Here, we study DM-induced topological magnon bands, chiral edge modes, and thermal magnon Hall effect on the star lattice ferromagnet in different parameter regimes. The star lattice can also be visualized as the parent material from which topological magnon bands can be realized for the kagomé and honeycomb lattices in some limiting cases.

  19. Methods for forming group III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for forming Group III--arsenide-nitride semiconductor materials. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V crystals varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V crystals can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  20. Random-field Ising model on isometric lattices: Ground states and non-Porod scattering.

    PubMed

    Bupathy, Arunkumar; Banerjee, Varsha; Puri, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    We use a computationally efficient graph cut method to obtain ground state morphologies of the random-field Ising model (RFIM) on (i) simple cubic (SC), (ii) body-centered cubic (BCC), and (iii) face-centered cubic (FCC) lattices. We determine the critical disorder strength Δ_{c} at zero temperature with high accuracy. For the SC lattice, our estimate (Δ_{c}=2.278±0.002) is consistent with earlier reports. For the BCC and FCC lattices, Δ_{c}=3.316±0.002 and 5.160±0.002, respectively, which are the most accurate estimates in the literature to date. The small-r behavior of the correlation function exhibits a cusp regime characterized by a cusp exponent α signifying fractal interfaces. In the paramagnetic phase, α=0.5±0.01 for all three lattices. In the ferromagnetic phase, the cusp exponent shows small variations due to the lattice structure. Consequently, the interfacial energy E_{i}(L) for an interface of size L is significantly different for the three lattices. This has important implications for nonequilibrium properties.

  1. Random-field Ising model on isometric lattices: Ground states and non-Porod scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bupathy, Arunkumar; Banerjee, Varsha; Puri, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    We use a computationally efficient graph cut method to obtain ground state morphologies of the random-field Ising model (RFIM) on (i) simple cubic (SC), (ii) body-centered cubic (BCC), and (iii) face-centered cubic (FCC) lattices. We determine the critical disorder strength Δc at zero temperature with high accuracy. For the SC lattice, our estimate (Δc=2.278 ±0.002 ) is consistent with earlier reports. For the BCC and FCC lattices, Δc=3.316 ±0.002 and 5.160 ±0.002 , respectively, which are the most accurate estimates in the literature to date. The small-r behavior of the correlation function exhibits a cusp regime characterized by a cusp exponent α signifying fractal interfaces. In the paramagnetic phase, α =0.5 ±0.01 for all three lattices. In the ferromagnetic phase, the cusp exponent shows small variations due to the lattice structure. Consequently, the interfacial energy Ei(L ) for an interface of size L is significantly different for the three lattices. This has important implications for nonequilibrium properties.

  2. Fractional random walk lattice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelitsch, T. M.; Collet, B. A.; Riascos, A. P.; Nowakowski, A. F.; Nicolleau, F. C. G. A.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze time-discrete and time-continuous ‘fractional’ random walks on undirected regular networks with special focus on cubic periodic lattices in n  =  1, 2, 3,.. dimensions. The fractional random walk dynamics is governed by a master equation involving fractional powers of Laplacian matrices {{L}\\fracα{2}}} where α =2 recovers the normal walk. First we demonstrate that the interval 0<α ≤slant 2 is admissible for the fractional random walk. We derive analytical expressions for the transition matrix of the fractional random walk and closely related the average return probabilities. We further obtain the fundamental matrix {{Z}(α )} , and the mean relaxation time (Kemeny constant) for the fractional random walk. The representation for the fundamental matrix {{Z}(α )} relates fractional random walks with normal random walks. We show that the matrix elements of the transition matrix of the fractional random walk exihibit for large cubic n-dimensional lattices a power law decay of an n-dimensional infinite space Riesz fractional derivative type indicating emergence of Lévy flights. As a further footprint of Lévy flights in the n-dimensional space, the transition matrix and return probabilities of the fractional random walk are dominated for large times t by slowly relaxing long-wave modes leading to a characteristic {{t}-\\frac{n{α}} -decay. It can be concluded that, due to long range moves of fractional random walk, a small world property is emerging increasing the efficiency to explore the lattice when instead of a normal random walk a fractional random walk is chosen.

  3. One-dimensional lattices topologically equivalent to three-dimensional lattices within the context of the lattice gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanza, E. F.; Costanza, G.

    2017-09-01

    Continuum partial differential equations are obtained from a set of discrete stochastic evolution equations of both non-Markovian and Markovian processes and applied to the diffusion on a cubic lattice within the context of the lattice gas model. A procedure allowing to construct one-dimensional lattices that are topologically equivalent to a cubic three-dimensional lattice is described in detail using a successive ;unfolding; process. This example shows some new features that possess the procedure and extensions are also suggested in order to provide some another uses of the present approach.

  4. Ghost condensation on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Cucchieri, Attilio; Mendes, Tereza; Mihara, Antonio

    2005-11-01

    We perform a numerical study of ghost condensation--in the so-called Overhauser channel--for SU(2) lattice gauge theory in minimal Landau gauge. The off-diagonal components of the momentum-space ghost propagator G{sup cd}(p) are evaluated for lattice volumes V=8{sup 4}, 12{sup 4}, 16{sup 4}, 20{sup 4}, 24{sup 4} and for three values of the lattice coupling: {beta}=2.2, 2.3, 2.4. Our data show that the quantity {phi}{sup b}(p)={epsilon}{sup bcd}G{sup cd}(p)/2 is zero within error bars, being characterized by very large statistical fluctuations. On the contrary, vertical bar {phi}{sup b}(p) vertical bar has relatively small error bars and behaves at small momenta as L{sup -2}p{sup -z}, where L is the lattice side in physical units and z{approx_equal}4. We argue that the large fluctuations for {phi}{sup b}(p) come from spontaneous breaking of a global symmetry and are associated with ghost condensation. It may thus be necessary (in numerical simulations at finite volume) to consider vertical bar {phi}{sup b}(p) vertical bar instead of {phi}{sup b}(p), to avoid a null average due to tunneling between different broken vacua. Also, we show that {phi}{sup b}(p) is proportional to the Fourier-transformed gluon field components A-tilde{sub {mu}}{sup b}(q). This explains the L{sup -2} dependence of vertical bar {phi}{sup b}(p) vertical bar, as induced by the behavior of vertical bar A-tilde{sub {mu}}{sup b}(q) vertical bar. We fit our data for vertical bar {phi}{sup b}(p) vertical bar to the theoretical prediction (r/L{sup 2}+v)/(p{sup 4}+v{sup 2}), obtaining for the ghost condensate v an upper bound of about 0.058 GeV{sup 2}. In order to check if v is nonzero in the continuum limit, one probably needs numerical simulations at much larger physical volumes than the ones we consider. As a by-product of our analysis, we perform a careful study of the color structure of the inverse Faddeev-Popov matrix in momentum space.

  5. Casimir effect for Dirac lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordag, M.; Pirozhenko, I. G.

    2017-03-01

    We consider polarizable sheets, which recently received some attention, especially in the context of the dispersion interaction of thin sheets like graphene. These sheets are modeled by a collection of delta function potentials and resemble zero-range potentials, which are known in quantum mechanics. We develop a theoretical description and apply the so-called TGTG formula to calculate the interaction of two such lattices. Thereby, we make use of the formulation of the scattering of waves off such sheets provided earlier. We consider all limiting cases, providing a link to earlier results. Also, we discuss the relation to the pairwise summation method.

  6. Fractal lattice of gelatin nanoglobules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, D. V.; Krasovskii, A. N.

    2012-11-01

    The globular structure of polymer coatings on a glass, which were obtained from micellar solutions of gelatin in the isooctane-water-sodium (bis-2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate system, has been studied using electron microscopy. It has been shown that an increase in the average globule size is accompanied by the formation of a fractal lattice of nanoglobules and a periodic physical network of macromolecules in the coating. The stability of such system of the "liquid-in-a-solid" type is limited by the destruction of globules and the formation of a homogeneous network structure of the coating.

  7. Hadron structure from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Jeremy

    2016-01-22

    Recent progress in lattice QCD calculations of nucleon structure will be presented. Calculations of nucleon matrix elements and form factors have long been difficult to reconcile with experiment, but with advances in both methodology and computing resources, this situation is improving. Some calculations have produced agreement with experiment for key observables such as the axial charge and electromagnetic form factors, and the improved understanding of systematic errors will help to increase confidence in predictions of unmeasured quantities. The long-omitted disconnected contributions are now seeing considerable attention and some recent calculations of them will be discussed.

  8. GLAD: A Generic LAttice Debugger

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.J.

    1991-11-01

    Today, numerous simulation and analysis codes exist for the design, commission, and operation of accelerator beam lines. There is a need to develop a common user interface and database link to run these codes interactively. This paper will describe a proposed system, GLAD (Generic LAttice Debugger), to fulfill this need. Specifically, GLAD can be used to find errors in beam lines during commissioning, control beam parameters during operation, and design beam line optics and error correction systems for the next generation of linear accelerators and storage rings.

  9. Colliding-beam-accelerator lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, J.; Cornacchia, M.; Courant, E.D.; Parzen, G.

    1983-01-01

    We describe the lattice of the Colliding Beam Accelerator, a 400 x 400 GeV pp facility proposed for construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The structure adopted is very versatile, in part in consequence of its desirable behavior as function of momentum deviation and as function of the betatron tunes. Each of the six insertions can be arranged to meet specific requirements at the crossing points as illustrated by a discussion of the tuneable low-beta insertions. The luminosity in these low-beta insertions (2 x 10/sup 33/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/) would be an order of magnitude larger than the standard insertions.

  10. Percolation in finite matching lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Stephan; Ziff, Robert M.

    2016-12-01

    We derive an exact, simple relation between the average number of clusters and the wrapping probabilities for two-dimensional percolation. The relation holds for periodic lattices of any size. It generalizes a classical result of Sykes and Essam, and it can be used to find exact or very accurate approximations of the critical density. The criterion that follows is related to the criterion used by Scullard and Jacobsen to find precise approximate thresholds, and our work provides a different perspective on their approach.

  11. Lattice models of biological growth

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D.A.; Corey, E.M. )

    1990-06-15

    We show that very simple iterative rules for the growth of cells on a two-dimensional lattice can simulate biological-growth phenomena realistically. We discuss random cellular automata models for the growth of fern gametophytes, branching fungi, and leaves, and for shape transformations useful in the study of biological variation and evolution. Although there are interesting analogies between biological and physical growth processes, we stress the uniqueness of biological automata behavior. The computer growth algorithms that successfully mimic observed growth behavior may be helpful in determining the underlying biochemical mechanisms of growth regulation.

  12. Working Group Report: Lattice Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, T.; et al.,

    2013-10-22

    This is the report of the Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory prepared for the proceedings of the 2013 Community Summer Study ("Snowmass"). We present the future computing needs and plans of the U.S. lattice gauge theory community and argue that continued support of the U.S. (and worldwide) lattice-QCD effort is essential to fully capitalize on the enormous investment in the high-energy physics experimental program. We first summarize the dramatic progress of numerical lattice-QCD simulations in the past decade, with some emphasis on calculations carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Lattice-QCD Collaboration, and describe a broad program of lattice-QCD calculations that will be relevant for future experiments at the intensity and energy frontiers. We then present details of the computational hardware and software resources needed to undertake these calculations.

  13. Localization of Waves in Merged Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Alagappan, G.; Png, C. E.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a new two–dimensional physical topology–merged lattice, that allows dense number of wave localization states. Merged lattices are obtained as a result of merging two lattices of scatters of the same space group, but with slightly different spatial resonances. Such merging creates two–dimensional scattering “beats” which are perfectly periodic on the longer spatial scale. On the shorter spatial scale, the systematic breakage of the translational symmetry leads to strong wave scattering, and this causes the occurrences of wave localization states. Merged Lattices promises variety of localization states including tightly confined, and ring type annular modes. The longer scale perfect periodicity of the merged lattice, enables complete prediction and full control over the density of the localization states and its’ quality factors. In addition, the longer scale periodicity, also allows design of integrated slow wave components. Merged lattices, thus, can be engineered easily to create technologically beneficial applications. PMID:27535096

  14. Localization of Waves in Merged Lattices.

    PubMed

    Alagappan, G; Png, C E

    2016-08-18

    This article describes a new two-dimensional physical topology-merged lattice, that allows dense number of wave localization states. Merged lattices are obtained as a result of merging two lattices of scatters of the same space group, but with slightly different spatial resonances. Such merging creates two-dimensional scattering "beats" which are perfectly periodic on the longer spatial scale. On the shorter spatial scale, the systematic breakage of the translational symmetry leads to strong wave scattering, and this causes the occurrences of wave localization states. Merged Lattices promises variety of localization states including tightly confined, and ring type annular modes. The longer scale perfect periodicity of the merged lattice, enables complete prediction and full control over the density of the localization states and its' quality factors. In addition, the longer scale periodicity, also allows design of integrated slow wave components. Merged lattices, thus, can be engineered easily to create technologically beneficial applications.

  15. Localization of Waves in Merged Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagappan, G.; Png, C. E.

    2016-08-01

    This article describes a new two-dimensional physical topology-merged lattice, that allows dense number of wave localization states. Merged lattices are obtained as a result of merging two lattices of scatters of the same space group, but with slightly different spatial resonances. Such merging creates two-dimensional scattering “beats” which are perfectly periodic on the longer spatial scale. On the shorter spatial scale, the systematic breakage of the translational symmetry leads to strong wave scattering, and this causes the occurrences of wave localization states. Merged Lattices promises variety of localization states including tightly confined, and ring type annular modes. The longer scale perfect periodicity of the merged lattice, enables complete prediction and full control over the density of the localization states and its’ quality factors. In addition, the longer scale periodicity, also allows design of integrated slow wave components. Merged lattices, thus, can be engineered easily to create technologically beneficial applications.

  16. Experimental generation of optical coherence lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yahong; Cai, Yangjian E-mail: yangjiancai@suda.edu.cn; Ponomarenko, Sergey A. E-mail: yangjiancai@suda.edu.cn

    2016-08-08

    We report experimental generation and measurement of recently introduced optical coherence lattices. The presented optical coherence lattice realization technique hinges on a superposition of mutually uncorrelated partially coherent Schell-model beams with tailored coherence properties. We show theoretically that information can be encoded into and, in principle, recovered from the lattice degree of coherence. Our results can find applications to image transmission and optical encryption.

  17. Observing dynamical SUSY breaking with lattice simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamori, Issaku

    2008-11-23

    On the basis of the recently developed lattice formulation of supersymmetric theories which keeps a part of the supersymmetry, we propose a method of observing dynamical SUSY breaking with lattice simulation. We use Hamiltonian as an order parameter and measure the ground state energy as a zero temperature limit of the finite temperature simulation. Our method provides a way of obtaining a physical result from the lattice simulation for supersymmetric theories.

  18. Bose-Einstein condensates in rotating lattices.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Rajiv; Holland, M J; Carr, L D

    2006-02-17

    Strongly interacting bosons in a two-dimensional rotating square lattice are investigated via a modified Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian. Such a system corresponds to a rotating lattice potential imprinted on a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate. Second-order quantum phase transitions between states of different symmetries are observed at discrete rotation rates. For the square lattice we study, there are four possible ground-state symmetries.

  19. Trapping Rydberg Atoms in an Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Sarah E.

    2012-06-01

    Optical lattice traps for Rydberg atoms are of interest in advanced science and in practical applications. After a brief discussion of these areas of interest, I will review some basics of optical Rydberg-atom trapping. The trapping potential experienced by a Rydberg atom in an optical lattice is given by the spatial average of the free-electron ponderomotive energy weighted by the Rydberg electron's probability distribution. I will then present experimental results on the trapping of ^85Rb Rydberg atoms in a one-dimensional ponderomotive optical lattice (wavelength 1064 nm). The principal methods employed to study the lattice performance are microwave spectroscopy, which is used to measure the lattice's trapping efficiency, and photo-ionization, which is used to measure the dwell time of the atoms in the lattice. I have achieved a 90% trapping efficiency for ^85Rb 50S atoms by inverting the lattice immediately after laser excitation of ground-state atoms into Rydberg states. I have characterized the dwell time of the atoms in the lattice using photo-ionization of 50D5/2 atoms. In continued work, I have explored the dependence of the Rydberg-atom trapping potential on the angular portion of the atomic wavefunction. Distinct angular states exhibit different trapping behavior in the optical lattice, depending on how their wavefunctions are oriented relative to the lattice planes. Specifically, I have measured the lattice potential depth of sublevels of ^85Rb nD atoms (50<=n<=65) in a one-dimensional optical lattice with a transverse DC electric field. The trapping behavior varies substantially for the various angular sublevels, in agreement with theory. The talk will conclude with an outlook into planned experiments.

  20. Computational study of lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zujev, Aleksander

    This dissertation is composed of the descriptions of a few projects undertook to complete my doctorate at the University of California, Davis. Different as they are, the common feature of them is that they all deal with simulations of lattice models, and physics which results from interparticle interactions. As an example, both the Feynman-Kikuchi model (Chapter 3) and Bose-Fermi mixture (Chapter 4) deal with the conditions under which superfluid transitions occur. The dissertation is divided into two parts. Part I (Chapters 1-2) is theoretical. It describes the systems we study - superfluidity and particularly superfluid helium, and optical lattices. The numerical methods of working with them are described. The use of Monte Carlo methods is another unifying theme of the different projects in this thesis. Part II (Chapters 3-6) deals with applications. It consists of 4 chapters describing different projects. Two of them, Feynman-Kikuchi model, and Bose-Fermi mixture are finished and published. The work done on t - J model, described in Chapter 5, is more preliminary, and the project is far from complete. A preliminary report on it was given on 2009 APS March meeting. The Isentropic project, described in the last chapter, is finished. A report on it was given on 2010 APS March meeting, and a paper is in preparation. The quantum simulation program used for Bose-Fermi mixture project was written by our collaborators Valery Rousseau and Peter Denteneer. I had written my own code for the other projects.

  1. The Fermilab lattice supercomputer project

    SciTech Connect

    Fischler, M.; Atac, R.; Cook, A.; Deppe, J.; Gaines, I.; Husby, D.; Nash, T.; Pham, T.; Zmuda, T.; Hockney, G.

    1989-02-01

    The ACPMAPS system is a highly cost effective, local memory MIMD computer targeted at algorithm development and production running for gauge theory on the lattice. The machine consists of a compound hypercube of crates, each of which is a full crossbar switch containing several processors. The processing nodes are single board array processors based on the Weitek XL chip set, each with a peak power of 20 MFLOPS and supported by 8 MBytes of data memory. The system currently being assembled has a peak power of 5 GFLOPS, delivering performance at approximately $250/MFLOP. The system is programmable in C and Fortran. An underpinning of software routines (CANOPY) provides an easy and natural way of coding lattice problems, such that the details of parallelism, and communication and system architecture are transparent to the user. CANOPY can easily be ported to any single CPU or MIMD system which supports C, and allows the coding of typical applications with very little effort. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  2. QCD thermodynamics on a lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levkova, Ludmila A.

    Numerical simulations of full QCD on anisotropic lattices provide a convenient way to study QCD thermodynamics with fixed physics scales and reduced lattice spacing errors. We report results from calculations with two flavors of dynamical staggered fermions, where all bare parameters and the renormalized anisotropy are kept constant and the temperature is changed in small steps by varying only the number of time slices. Including results from zero-temperature scale setting simulations, which determine the Karsch coefficients, allows for the calculation of the Equation of State at finite temperatures. We also report on studies of the chiral properties of dynamical domain-wall fermions combined with the DBW2 gauge action for different gauge couplings and fermion masses. For quenched theories, the DBW2 action gives a residual chiral symmetry breaking much smaller than what was found with more traditional choices for the gauge action. Our goal is to investigate the possibilities which this and further improvements provide for the study of QCD thermodynamics and other simulations at stronger couplings.

  3. Collapsing lattice animals and lattice trees in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping; Grassberger, Peter

    2005-06-01

    We present high statistics simulations of weighted lattice bond animals and lattice trees on the square lattice, with fugacities for each non-bonded contact and for each bond between two neighbouring monomers. The simulations are performed using a newly developed sequential sampling method with resampling, very similar to the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method (PERM) used for linear chain polymers. We determine with high precision the line of second-order transitions from an extended to a collapsed phase in the resulting two-dimensional phase diagram. This line includes critical bond percolation as a multicritical point, and we verify that this point divides the line into different universality classes. One of them corresponds to the collapse driven by contacts and includes the collapse of (weakly embeddable) trees. There is some evidence that the other is subdivided again into two parts with different universality classes. One of these (at the far side from collapsing trees) is bond driven and is represented by the Derrida-Herrmann model of animals having bonds only (no contacts). Between the critical percolation point and this bond-driven collapse seems to be an intermediate regime, whose other end point is a multicritical point P* where a transition line between two collapsed phases (one bond driven and the other contact driven) sparks off. This point P* seems to be attractive (in the renormalization group sense) from the side of the intermediate regime, so there are four universality classes on the transition line (collapsing trees, critical percolation, intermediate regime, and Derrida-Herrmann). We obtain very precise estimates for all critical exponents for collapsing trees. It is already harder to estimate the critical exponents for the intermediate regime. Finally, it is very difficult to obtain with our method good estimates of the critical parameters of the Derrida-Herrmann universality class. As regards the bond-driven to contact-driven transition in the

  4. Commissioning Simulations for the APS Upgrade Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Sajaev, V.; Borland, M.

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid seven-bend-achromat lattice that features very strong focusing elements and a relatively small vacuum chamber has been proposed for the APS upgrade. Achieving design lattice parameters during commissioning will need to be accomplished quickly in order to minimize dark time for APS users. The paper will describe start-to-end simulation of the machine commissioning beginning from first-turn trajectory correction, progressing to orbit and lattice correction, and culminating in evaluation of the nonlinear performance of the corrected lattice

  5. Dark periodic lattices in nonlinear liquid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado-Méndez, Edgar; Trejo-Durán, Mónica; Cano-Lara, Miroslava; Huerta-Mascotte, Eduardo; Castaňo, Víctor M.

    2007-11-01

    Experimental evidence of the formation of one- and two-dimensional dark periodic lattices in a negative Kerr-type nonlinear liquid media is presented. Bright periodic lattices propagate throughout two nonlinear liquids [alcohol with rhodamine (R6G), and acetone with R6G] as the negative nonlinear refractive index forms a dark periodic lattice. Our experiments demonstrate that the nonlinearity increases with the optical power and that a proper selection of the period leads to self-phase modulation of the lattice.

  6. Elastic lattice in an incommensurate background

    SciTech Connect

    Dickman, R.; Chudnovsky, E.M. )

    1995-01-01

    We study a harmonic triangular lattice, which relaxes in the presence of an incommensurate short-wavelength potential. Monte Carlo simulations reveal that the elastic lattice exhibits only short-ranged translational correlations, despite the absence of defects in either lattice. Extended orientational order, however, persists in the presence of the background. Translational correlation lengths exhibit approximate power-law dependence upon cooling rate and background strength. Our results may be relevant to Wigner crystals, atomic monolayers on crystals surfaces, and flux-line and magnetic bubble lattices.

  7. Transmission Electron Microscope Measures Lattice Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, William T.

    1996-01-01

    Convergent-beam microdiffraction (CBM) in thermionic-emission transmission electron microscope (TEM) is technique for measuring lattice parameters of nanometer-sized specimens of crystalline materials. Lattice parameters determined by use of CBM accurate to within few parts in thousand. Technique developed especially for use in quantifying lattice parameters, and thus strains, in epitaxial mismatched-crystal-lattice multilayer structures in multiple-quantum-well and other advanced semiconductor electronic devices. Ability to determine strains in indivdual layers contributes to understanding of novel electronic behaviors of devices.

  8. Transmission Electron Microscope Measures Lattice Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, William T.

    1996-01-01

    Convergent-beam microdiffraction (CBM) in thermionic-emission transmission electron microscope (TEM) is technique for measuring lattice parameters of nanometer-sized specimens of crystalline materials. Lattice parameters determined by use of CBM accurate to within few parts in thousand. Technique developed especially for use in quantifying lattice parameters, and thus strains, in epitaxial mismatched-crystal-lattice multilayer structures in multiple-quantum-well and other advanced semiconductor electronic devices. Ability to determine strains in indivdual layers contributes to understanding of novel electronic behaviors of devices.

  9. Lattices of processes in graphs with inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Shakhbazyan, K.V.

    1995-09-01

    This article is a continuation of others work, presenting a detailed analysis of finite lattices of processes in graphs with input nodes. Lattices of processes in such graphs are studied by representing the lattices in the form of an algebra of pairs. We define the algebra of pairs somewhat generalizing the definition. Let K and D be bounded distributive lattices. A sublattice {delta} {contained_in} K x D is called an algebra of pairs if for all K {element_of} K we have (K, 1{sub D}) {element_of} {delta} and for all d {element_of} D we have (O{sub K}).

  10. One-dimensional lattices topologically equivalent to two-dimensional lattices within the context of the lattice gas model. II The triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanza, E. F.; Costanza, G.

    2016-12-01

    Continuum partial differential equations are obtained from a set of discrete stochastic evolution equations of both non-Markovian and Markovian processes and applied to the diffusion within the context of the lattice gas model. A procedure allowing to construct one-dimensional lattices that are topologically equivalent to two-dimensional lattices is described in detail in the case of a triangular lattice. This example shows the general features that possess the procedure and extensions are also suggested in order to provide a wider insight in the present approach.

  11. Buckling of imperfect periodic lattice structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, M. S.

    1983-01-01

    A simplified buckling analysis is presented for a family of periodic lattice structures such as those proposed for large space structures. A transcendental 6 x 6 matrix of eigenvalues is shown to be sufficient for modeling buckling behavior because member stiffnesses are based on an exact solution of the beam-column equation. Exact stiffnesses are derived for a curved member, thus allowing modeling of imperfect lattice structures. Comparisons of predictions of the lattice model with those available from shell and beam theory underscore the inaccuracies introduced by treating the lattice structure as a continuum. Sample calculations are provided for an isogrid cylinder and a three element double-laced truss.

  12. Polarization response of RHIC electron lens lattices

    DOE PAGES

    Ranjbar, V. H.; Méot, F.; Bai, M.; ...

    2016-10-10

    Depolarization response for a system of two orthogonal snakes at irrational tunes is studied in depth using lattice independent spin integration. Particularly, we consider the effect of overlapping spin resonances in this system, to understand the impact of phase, tune, relative location and threshold strengths of the spin resonances. Furthermore, these results are benchmarked and compared to two dimensional direct tracking results for the RHIC e-lens lattice and the standard lattice. We then consider the effect of longitudinal motion via chromatic scans using direct six dimensional lattice tracking.

  13. Subwavelength Lattice Optics by Evolutionary Design

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new class of structured optical materials—lattice opto-materials—that can manipulate the flow of visible light into a wide range of three-dimensional profiles using evolutionary design principles. Lattice opto-materials are based on the discretization of a surface into a two-dimensional (2D) subwavelength lattice whose individual lattice sites can be controlled to achieve a programmed optical response. To access a desired optical property, we designed a lattice evolutionary algorithm that includes and optimizes contributions from every element in the lattice. Lattice opto-materials can exhibit simple properties, such as on- and off-axis focusing, and can also concentrate light into multiple, discrete spots. We expanded the unit cell shapes of the lattice to achieve distinct, polarization-dependent optical responses from the same 2D patterned substrate. Finally, these lattice opto-materials can also be combined into architectures that resemble a new type of compound flat lens. PMID:25380062

  14. Potts and percolation models on bowtie lattices.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chengxiang; Wang, Yancheng; Li, Yang

    2012-08-01

    We give the exact critical frontier of the Potts model on bowtie lattices. For the case of q = 1, the critical frontier yields the thresholds of bond percolation on these lattices, which are exactly consistent with the results given by Ziff et al. [J. Phys. A 39, 15083 (2006)]. For the q = 2 Potts model on a bowtie A lattice, the critical point is in agreement with that of the Ising model on this lattice, which has been exactly solved. Furthermore, we do extensive Monte Carlo simulations of the Potts model on a bowtie A lattice with noninteger q. Our numerical results, which are accurate up to seven significant digits, are consistent with the theoretical predictions. We also simulate the site percolation on a bowtie A lattice, and the threshold is s(c) = 0.5479148(7). In the simulations of bond percolation and site percolation, we find that the shape-dependent properties of the percolation model on a bowtie A lattice are somewhat different from those of an isotropic lattice, which may be caused by the anisotropy of the lattice.

  15. Polarization response of RHIC electron lens lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, V. H.; Méot, F.; Bai, M.; Abell, D. T.; Meiser, D.

    2016-10-01

    Depolarization response for a system of two orthogonal snakes at irrational tunes is studied in depth using lattice independent spin integration. In particular we consider the effect of overlapping spin resonances in this system, to understand the impact of phase, tune, relative location and threshold strengths of the spin resonances. These results are benchmarked and compared to two dimensional direct tracking results for the RHIC e-lens lattice and the standard lattice. Finally we consider the effect of longitudinal motion via chromatic scans using direct six dimensional lattice tracking.

  16. Effect of impurities on the vortex lattice in Bose-Einstein condensates on optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mithun, T.; Porsezian, K.; Dey, Bishwajyoti

    2015-06-01

    We numerically solve the Gross-Pitaeveskii equation to study the Bose-Einstein condensate in the rotating harmonical tarp and co-rotating optical lattice. The effect of a pinning site or impurity shows that it is able to move the vortex lattice center to either left or right depending on the position of the impurity. Also, it is observed that the impurity at the random positions can destroy the vortex lattice and the resulting disordered lattice has more energy.

  17. III-V aresenide-nitride semiconductor materials and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor crystals, methods for producing such crystals and devices employing such crystals. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V crystals varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V crystals can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  18. Coincident site lattice-matched growth of semiconductors on substrates using compliant buffer layers

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew

    2016-08-23

    A method of producing semiconductor materials and devices that incorporate the semiconductor materials are provided. In particular, a method is provided of producing a semiconductor material, such as a III-V semiconductor, on a silicon substrate using a compliant buffer layer, and devices such as photovoltaic cells that incorporate the semiconductor materials. The compliant buffer material and semiconductor materials may be deposited using coincident site lattice-matching epitaxy, resulting in a close degree of lattice matching between the substrate material and deposited material for a wide variety of material compositions. The coincident site lattice matching epitaxial process, as well as the use of a ductile buffer material, reduce the internal stresses and associated crystal defects within the deposited semiconductor materials fabricated using the disclosed method. As a result, the semiconductor devices provided herein possess enhanced performance characteristics due to a relatively low density of crystal defects.

  19. 2+1 flavor lattice QCD with Luscher's Domain-Decomposed HMC algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramashi, Yoshinobu

    2006-12-01

    We report on a study of 2+1 flavor lattice QCD with the O(a)-improved Wilson quarks on a 163 × 32 lattice at the lattice spacing 1/a ≈ 2GeV employing Lüscher's domain-decomposed HMC(LDDHMC) algorithm. This is dedicated to a preliminary study for the PACS-CS project which plans to complete the Wilson-clover N f = 2 + 1 program lowering the up-down quark masses close to the physical values as much as possible. We focus on three issues: (i) how light quark masses we can reach with LDDHMC, (ii) efficiency of the algorithm compared with the conventional HMC, (iii) parameter choice for the production runs on PACS-CS.

  20. Bimaterial lattices as thermal adapters and actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toropova, Marina M.; Steeves, Craig A.

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this paper is to demonstrate how anisotropic biomaterial lattices can be used in thermal actuation. Compared to other lattices with tailored thermal expansion, the anisotropy of these bimaterial lattices makes them uniquely suitable for use as thermal actuators. Each individual cell, and hence lattices consisting of such cells, can be designed with widely different predetermined coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) in different directions, enabling complex shape changes appropriate for actuation with either passive or active control. The lattices are composed of planar non-identical cells that each consist of a skewed hexagon surrounding an irregular triangle. The cells and all members of any cell are connected to each other by pins so that they have no rotational constraints and are able to expand or contract freely. In this case, the skew angles of the hexagon and the ratio of the CTEs of the two component materials determine the overall performance of the lattice. At its boundaries, the lattice is connected to substrates by pins and configured such that the CTE between two neighboring lattice vertices coincides with the CTE of the adjacent substrate. Provided the boundary behavior of the lattice is matched to the thermal properties of the substrates, temperature changes in the structure produce thermal strains without producing any corresponding stresses. Such lattices can be used in three different ways: as adaptive elements for stress-free connection of components with different CTEs; for fine tuning of structures; and as thermally driven actuators. In this paper, we demonstrate some concepts for lattice configurations that produce thermally-driven displacements that enable several actuators: a switch, a valve and tweezers.

  1. Cold atoms in a rotating optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foot, Christopher J.

    2009-05-01

    We have demonstrated a novel experimental arrangement which can rotate a two-dimensional optical lattice at frequencies up to several kilohertz. Our arrangement also allows the periodicity of the optical lattice to be varied dynamically, producing a 2D ``accordion lattice'' [1]. The angles of the laser beams are controlled by acousto-optic deflectors and this allows smooth changes with little heating of the trapped cold (rubidium) atoms. We have loaded a BEC into lattices with periodicities ranging from 1.8μm to 18μm, observing the collapse and revival of the diffraction orders of the condensate over a large range of lattice parameters as recently reported by a group in NIST [2]. We have also imaged atoms in situ in a 2D lattice over a range of lattice periodicities. Ultracold atoms in a rotating lattice can be used for the direct quantum simulation of strongly correlated systems under large effective magnetic fields, i.e. the Hamiltonian of the atoms in the rotating frame resembles that of a charged particle in a strong magnetic field. In the future, we plan to use this to investigate a range of phenomena such as the analogue of the fractional quantum Hall effect. [4pt] [1] R. A. Williams, J. D. Pillet, S. Al-Assam, B. Fletcher, M. Shotter, and C. J. Foot, ``Dynamic optical lattices: two-dimensional rotating and accordion lattices for ultracold atoms,'' Opt. Express 16, 16977-16983 (2008) [0pt] [2] J. H. Huckans, I. B. Spielman, B. Laburthe Tolra, W. D. Phillips, and J. V. Porto, Quantum and Classical Dynamics of a BEC in a Large-Period Optical Lattice, arXiv:0901.1386v1

  2. Monolithic III-V and hybrid polysilicon-III-V microelectromechanical tunable vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, Edward M.; Lott, James A.; Nelson, Thomas R., Jr.; Harvey, M. C.; Raley, J. A.; Stintz, Andreas; Malloy, Kevin J.

    2003-04-01

    We report our progress on the design and fabrication of electrostatically-actuated microelectromechanical (MEM) tunable wavelength filters and vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). We investigate both an all-semiconductor monolithic approach and a hybrid approach based on the combination of conventional polysilicon microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and III-V semiconductor thin-film distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) and VCSEL structures. In the tunable hybrid structures the III-V semiconductor layers are flip-bonded onto specially designed polysilicon foundry MEMS structures and separated from their lattice-matched parent substrates by a novel post-bonding lift-off process.

  3. X-ray diffraction of III-nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moram, M A; Vickers, M E

    2009-03-01

    The III-nitrides include the semiconductors AlN, GaN and InN, which have band gaps spanning the entire UV and visible ranges. Thin films of III-nitrides are used to make UV, violet, blue and green light-emitting diodes and lasers, as well as solar cells, high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) and other devices. However, the film growth process gives rise to unusually high strain and high defect densities, which can affect the device performance. X-ray diffraction is a popular, non-destructive technique used to characterize films and device structures, allowing improvements in device efficiencies to be made. It provides information on crystalline lattice parameters (from which strain and composition are determined), misorientation (from which defect types and densities may be deduced), crystallite size and microstrain, wafer bowing, residual stress, alloy ordering, phase separation (if present) along with film thicknesses and superlattice (quantum well) thicknesses, compositions and non-uniformities. These topics are reviewed, along with the basic principles of x-ray diffraction of thin films and areas of special current interest, such as analysis of non-polar, semipolar and cubic III-nitrides. A summary of useful values needed in calculations, including elastic constants and lattice parameters, is also given. Such topics are also likely to be relevant to other highly lattice-mismatched wurtzite-structure materials such as heteroepitaxial ZnO and ZnSe.

  4. Tunable luminescence and enhanced photocatalytic activity for Eu(III) doped Bi2WO6 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Haidong; Yu, Lei; Wang, Juan; Ni, Min; Liu, Tingting; Chen, Feng

    2017-04-01

    A series of Eu(III) doped Bi2WO6 nanoparticles were synthesized by a hydrothermal process. The obtained Bi2WO6:Eu(III) nanoparticles were characterized by XRD, SEM, luminescence spectrophotometer and DRS. The XRD and TEM results indicate that the Eu(III) doping concentration has no influence on the phase and morphology. However, the Eu(III) doping can tune the luminescence and enhance the photocatalytic activity of Bi2WO6. With the increases of Eu3 + doping concentrations, the emission intensity of WO66 - group decreases nut the photocatalytic activity increases. The tunable luminescence of Bi2WO6:Eu(III) nanoparticles results from the energy transfer from WO66 - group to Eu(III) ion. The enhanced performance can be ascribed to efficient separation of electron and hole pairs after doping Eu(III) into the Bi2WO6 lattice.

  5. Tunable luminescence and enhanced photocatalytic activity for Eu(III) doped Bi2WO6 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gu, Haidong; Yu, Lei; Wang, Juan; Ni, Min; Liu, Tingting; Chen, Feng

    2017-04-15

    A series of Eu(III) doped Bi2WO6 nanoparticles were synthesized by a hydrothermal process. The obtained Bi2WO6:Eu(III) nanoparticles were characterized by XRD, SEM, luminescence spectrophotometer and DRS. The XRD and TEM results indicate that the Eu(III) doping concentration has no influence on the phase and morphology. However, the Eu(III) doping can tune the luminescence and enhance the photocatalytic activity of Bi2WO6. With the increases of Eu(3+) doping concentrations, the emission intensity of WO6(6-) group decreases nut the photocatalytic activity increases. The tunable luminescence of Bi2WO6:Eu(III) nanoparticles results from the energy transfer from WO6(6-) group to Eu(III) ion. The enhanced performance can be ascribed to efficient separation of electron and hole pairs after doping Eu(III) into the Bi2WO6 lattice.

  6. Entropy of Open Lattice Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, B.; Lebowitz, J. L.; Speer, E. R.

    2007-03-01

    We investigate the behavior of the Gibbs-Shannon entropy of the stationary nonequilibrium measure describing a one-dimensional lattice gas, of L sites, with symmetric exclusion dynamics and in contact with particle reservoirs at different densities. In the hydrodynamic scaling limit, L → ∞, the leading order ( O( L)) behavior of this entropy has been shown by Bahadoran to be that of a product measure corresponding to strict local equilibrium; we compute the first correction, which is O(1). The computation uses a formal expansion of the entropy in terms of truncated correlation functions; for this system the k th such correlation is shown to be O( L - k+1). This entropy correction depends only on the scaled truncated pair correlation, which describes the covariance of the density field. It coincides, in the large L limit, with the corresponding correction obtained from a Gaussian measure with the same covariance.

  7. On lattice chiral gauge theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiani, L.; Rossi, G. C.; Testa, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Smit-Swift-Aoki formulation of a lattice chiral gauge theory is presented. In this formulation the Wilson and other non invariant terms in the action are made gauge invariant by the coupling with a nonlinear auxilary scalar field, omega. It is shown that omega decouples from the physical states only if appropriate parameters are tuned so as to satisfy a set of BRST identities. In addition, explicit ghost fields are necessary to ensure decoupling. These theories can give rise to the correct continuum limit. Similar considerations apply to schemes with mirror fermions. Simpler cases with a global chiral symmetry are discussed and it is shown that the theory becomes free at decoupling. Recent numerical simulations agree with those considerations.

  8. Lattice mechanics of origami tessellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur A.; Silverberg, Jesse L.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2015-07-01

    Origami-based design holds promise for developing materials whose mechanical properties are tuned by crease patterns introduced to thin sheets. Although there have been heuristic developments in constructing patterns with desirable qualities, the bridge between origami and physics has yet to be fully developed. To truly consider origami structures as a class of materials, methods akin to solid mechanics need to be developed to understand their long-wavelength behavior. We introduce here a lattice theory for examining the mechanics of origami tessellations in terms of the topology of their crease pattern and the relationship between the folds at each vertex. This formulation provides a general method for associating mechanical properties with periodic folded structures and allows for a concrete connection between more conventional materials and the mechanical metamaterials constructed using origami-based design.

  9. Nuclear forces from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Noriyoshi

    2011-05-06

    Lattice QCD construction of nuclear forces is reviewed. In this method, the nuclear potentials are constructed by solving the Schroedinger equation, where equal-time Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter (NBS) wave functions are regarded as quantum mechanical wave functions. Since the long distance behavior of equal-time NBS wave functions is controlled by the scattering phase, which is in exactly the same way as scattering wave functions in quantum mechanics, the resulting potentials are faithful to the NN scattering data. The derivative expansion of this potential leads to the central and the tensor potentials at the leading order. Some of numerical results of these two potentials are shown based on the quenched QCD.

  10. Tracking the SSC test lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, B.T.; Douglas, D.R.; Forest, E.

    1985-10-01

    The dynamic aperture and its determination emerged from the SSC reference design study as the single most important accelerator physics issue pertinent to the SSC. Beside the fundamental need of a finite dynamic aperture for any accelerator, it was considered to be a useful criterion for the magnet selection. An aperture workshop organized in November 1984 at LBL served the purpose to identify the various aspects of the aperture question and to organize the aperture task force accordingly. It was recognized that numerical models had to play an important role and the qualifications of several tracking codes were investigated. None of the existing codes could meet all of the criteria for an ideal tracking code and substantial program development became unavoidable. It was therefore decided to begin tracking SSC test lattices.

  11. Majorana fermions in vortex lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Rudro

    2013-03-01

    We consider Majorana fermions tunneling between vortices, within an array of such vortices in a 2D chiral p-wave superconductor. We calculate that the tunneling amplitude for Majorana fermions in a pair of vortices is proportional to the sine of half the difference between the global order parameter phases at the two vortices. Using this result we study tight-binding models of Majorana fermions in vortices arranged in a triangular or square lattice. In both cases we find that this phase-tunneling relationship leads to the creation of superlattices where the Majorana fermions form macroscopically degenerate `flat' bands at zero energy, in addition to other dispersive bands. This finding suggests that in vortex arrays tunneling processes do not change the energies of a finite fraction of Majorana fermions and hence brighten the prospects of topological quantum computing with a large number of Majorana states.

  12. Lattice mechanics of origami tessellations.

    PubMed

    Evans, Arthur A; Silverberg, Jesse L; Santangelo, Christian D

    2015-07-01

    Origami-based design holds promise for developing materials whose mechanical properties are tuned by crease patterns introduced to thin sheets. Although there have been heuristic developments in constructing patterns with desirable qualities, the bridge between origami and physics has yet to be fully developed. To truly consider origami structures as a class of materials, methods akin to solid mechanics need to be developed to understand their long-wavelength behavior. We introduce here a lattice theory for examining the mechanics of origami tessellations in terms of the topology of their crease pattern and the relationship between the folds at each vertex. This formulation provides a general method for associating mechanical properties with periodic folded structures and allows for a concrete connection between more conventional materials and the mechanical metamaterials constructed using origami-based design.

  13. Reflooding of tight lattice bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Veteau, J.M.; Digonnet, A.; Deruaz, R. . Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble)

    1994-07-01

    Results regarding analytical bottom reflooding experiments in a 37- and a 127-heater rod bundle are presented for two different tight lattices. A comparison between these two geometries and with the standard pressurized water reactor (PWR) array shows a degradation of cooling efficiency when the cross section of the subchannels is decreased. The core heat sinks (guide thimbles and water tubes'') are seen to have a noticeable influence on the overall cooling of the bundle, and it is confirmed that a combined top/bottom injection does not significantly improve cooling efficiency. Calculations with CATHARE 1.3 code adjusted for the standard PWR array are presented (zero heat sinks), but results have to be confirmed over a wider range of parameters.

  14. Realizing Parafermions in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fangli; Gorshkov, Alexey

    2016-05-01

    Parafermions, which are the fractional versions of Majorana fermions, possess more exotic braiding statistics than Majorana fermions and are therefore more powerful from the point of view of topological quantum computing. We propose a scheme to realize parafermionic zero modes in optical lattices, without the use of superconductive paring. With the help of laser assisted tunneling and on-site interactions, two layers of ultracold atoms in distinct hyperfine states can be engineered to host +/- 1 / m fractional quantum Hall states. We then introduce a finite-extent potential barrier that pierces both layers - this gives rise to two counter-propagating edge states that sit on top of each other. Finally, laser induced coupling is used to introduce backscattering between the two edge states and to gap them out. We show that the resulting defects give rise to the topological degeneracy associated with parafermions. We also discuss methods for preparation and detection.

  15. FFAG lattice without opposite bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trbojevic, Dejan; Courant, Ernest D.; Garren, Al

    2000-08-01

    A future "neutrino factory" or Muon Collider requires fast muon acceleration before the storage ring. Several alternatives for fast muon acceleration have previously been considered. One of them is the FFAG (Fixed Field Alternating Gradient) synchrotron. The FFAG concept was developed in 1952 by K. R. Symon (ref. 1). The advantages of this design are the fixed magnetic field, large range of particle energy, simple RF; power supplies are simple, and there is no transition energy. But a drawback is that reverse bending magnets are included in the configuration; this increases the size and cost of the ring. Recently some modified FFAG lattice designs have been described where the amount of opposite bending was significantly reduced (ref. 2, ref. 3).

  16. SUPERSTARS III: K-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    SUPERSTARS III is a K-8 program designed as an enrichment opportunity for self-directed learners in mathematics. The basic purpose of SUPERSTARS III is to provide the extra challenge that self-motivated students need in mathematics and to do so in a structured, long-term program that does not impinge on the normal classroom routine or the…

  17. Results and Frontiers in Lattice Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bulava, John; Morningstar, Colin; Edwards, Robert; Richards, David; Fleming, George; Juge, K. Jimmy; Lichtl, Adam C.; Mathur, Nilmani; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2007-10-26

    The Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration (LHPC) baryon spectroscopy effort is reviewed. To date the LHPC has performed exploratory Lattice QCD calculations of the low-lying spectrum of Nucleon and Delta baryons. These calculations demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by obtaining the masses of an unprecedented number of excited states with definite quantum numbers. Future work of the project is outlined.

  18. The Chroma Software System for Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Edwards; Balint Joo

    2004-06-01

    We describe aspects of the Chroma software system for lattice QCD calculations. Chroma is an open source C++ based software system developed using the software infrastructure of the US SciDAC initiative. Chroma interfaces with output from the BAGEL assembly generator for optimized lattice fermion kernels on some architectures. It can be run on workstations, clusters and the QCDOC supercomputer.

  19. Lattice studies of hadrons with heavy flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Aubin

    2009-07-01

    I will discuss recent developments in lattice studies of hadrons composed of heavy quarks. I will mostly cover topics which are at a state of direct comparison with experiment, but will also discuss new ideas and promising techniques to aid future studies of lattice heavy quark physics.

  20. The mystery of the fifteenth Bravais lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaum, Allen

    2000-10-01

    An understanding of the principles of crystal structure is necessary for the study of solids. There are contradictions in the literature dealing with the nature of crystal lattices, and there is also a miscounting of the number of possible lattices. This paper clarifies the situation in a systematic and simple way.

  1. Unorthodox lattice fermion derivatives and their shortcomings

    SciTech Connect

    Bodwin, G.T.; Kovacs, E.V.

    1987-03-10

    We discuss the DWY (Lagrangian), Quinn-Weinstein, and Rebbi proposals for incorporating fermions into lattice gauge theory and analyze them in the context of weak coupling perturbation theory. We find that none of these proposals leads to a completely satisfactory lattice transcription of fully-interacting gauge theory.

  2. Recent advances in lattice Boltzmann methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Doolen, G.D.; He, X.; Nie, X.; Zhang, R.

    1998-12-31

    In this paper, the authors briefly present the basic principles of lattice Boltzmann method and summarize recent advances of the method, including the application of the lattice Boltzmann method for fluid flows in MEMS and simulation of the multiphase mixing and turbulence.

  3. On Some Properties of PBZ*-Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuntini, Roberto; Ledda, Antonio; Paoli, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    We continue the algebraic investigation of PBZ*-lattices, a notion introduced in Giuntini et al. (Stud. Logica 104, 1145-1177, 2016) in order to obtain insights into the structure of certain algebras of effects of a Hilbert space, lattice-ordered under the spectral ordering.

  4. Disorder solutions of lattice spin models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, M. T.; van Leeuwen, J. M. J.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that disorder solutions, which have been obtained by different methods, follow from a simple decimation method. The method is put in general form and new disorder solutions are constructed for the Blume-Emery-Griffiths model on a triangular lattice and for Potts and Ising models on square and fcc lattices.

  5. Selective nanoscale growth of lattice mismatched materials

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Seung-Chang; Brueck, Steven R. J.

    2017-06-20

    Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods of forming high-quality semiconductor devices using lattice-mismatched materials. In one embodiment, a composite film including one or more substantially-single-particle-thick nanoparticle layers can be deposited over a substrate as a nanoscale selective growth mask for epitaxially growing lattice-mismatched materials over the substrate.

  6. PROGRESS IN LATTICE QCD AT FINITE TEMPERATURE.

    SciTech Connect

    PETRECZKY,P.

    2007-02-11

    I review recent developments in lattice QCD at finite temperature, including the determination of the transition temperature T{sub c}, equation of state and different static screening lengths. The lattice data suggest that at temperatures above 1.5T{sub c} the quark gluon plasma can be considered as gas consisting of quarks and gluons.

  7. Numerical study of localization in antidot lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uryu, Seiji; Ando, Tsuneya

    1998-10-01

    Localization effects in antidot lattices in weak magnetic fields are numerically studied with the use of a Thouless-number method. In hexagonal antidot lattices, both conductance and inverse localization length oscillate as a function of a magnetic flux with the same period as an Al'tshuler-Aronov-Spivak oscillation, in qualitative agreement with recent experiments.

  8. Gap solitons in Rabi lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhaopin; Malomed, Boris A.

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a two-component one-dimensional system, which is based on two nonlinear Schrödinger or Gross-Pitaevskii equations (GPEs) with spatially periodic modulation of linear coupling ("Rabi lattice") and self-repulsive nonlinearity. The system may be realized in a binary Bose-Einstein condensate, whose components are resonantly coupled by a standing optical wave, as well as in terms of the bimodal light propagation in periodically twisted waveguides. The system supports various types of gap solitons (GSs), which are constructed, and their stability is investigated, in the first two finite bandgaps of the underlying spectrum. These include on- and off-site-centered solitons (the GSs of the off-site type are additionally categorized as spatially even and odd ones), which may be symmetric or antisymmetric, with respect to the coupled components. The GSs are chiefly stable in the first finite bandgap and unstable in the second one. In addition to that, there are narrow regions near the right edge of the first bandgap, and in the second one, which feature intricate alternation of stability and instability. Unstable solitons evolve into robust breathers or spatially confined turbulent modes. On-site-centered GSs are also considered in a version of the system that is made asymmetric by the Zeeman effect, or by birefringence of the optical waveguide. A region of alternate stability is found in the latter case too. In the limit of strong asymmetry, GSs are obtained in a semianalytical approximation, which reduces two coupled GPEs to a single one with an effective lattice potential.

  9. InN Thin Film Lattice Dynamics by Grazing Incidence Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, J.; Bosak, A.; Krisch, M.; Manjón, F. J.; Romero, A. H.; Garro, N.; Wang, X.; Yoshikawa, A.; Kuball, M.

    2011-05-01

    Achieving comprehensive information on thin film lattice dynamics so far has eluded well established spectroscopic techniques. We demonstrate here the novel application of grazing incidence inelastic x-ray scattering combined with ab initio calculations to determine the complete elastic stiffness tensor, the acoustic and low-energy optic phonon dispersion relations of thin wurtzite indium nitride films. Indium nitride is an especially relevant example, due to the technological interest for optoelectronic and solar cell applications in combination with other group III nitrides.

  10. A lattice approach to spinorial quantum gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renteln, Paul; Smolin, Lee

    1989-01-01

    A new lattice regularization of quantum general relativity based on Ashtekar's reformulation of Hamiltonian general relativity is presented. In this form, quantum states of the gravitational field are represented within the physical Hilbert space of a Kogut-Susskind lattice gauge theory. The gauge field of the theory is a complexified SU(2) connection which is the gravitational connection for left-handed spinor fields. The physical states of the gravitational field are those which are annihilated by additional constraints which correspond to the four constraints of general relativity. Lattice versions of these constraints are constructed. Those corresponding to the three-dimensional diffeomorphism generators move states associated with Wilson loops around on the lattice. The lattice Hamiltonian constraint has a simple form, and a correspondingly simple interpretation: it is an operator which cuts and joins Wilson loops at points of intersection.

  11. Spin Chains with Dynamical Lattice Supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagendorf, Christian

    2013-02-01

    Spin chains with exact supersymmetry on finite one-dimensional lattices are considered. The supercharges are nilpotent operators on the lattice of dynamical nature: they change the number of sites. A local criterion for the nilpotency on periodic lattices is formulated. Any of its solutions leads to a supersymmetric spin chain. It is shown that a class of special solutions at arbitrary spin gives the lattice equivalents of the {N}=(2,2) superconformal minimal models. The case of spin one is investigated in detail: in particular, it is shown that the Fateev-Zamolodchikov chain and its off-critical extension possess a lattice supersymmetry for all its coupling constants. Its supersymmetry singlets are thoroughly analysed, and a relation between their components and the weighted enumeration of alternating sign matrices is conjectured.

  12. Quantum transport in d-dimensional lattices

    DOE PAGES

    Manzano, Daniel; Chuang, Chern; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-04-28

    We show that both fermionic and bosonic uniform d-dimensional lattices can be reduced to a set of independent one-dimensional chains. This reduction leads to the expression for ballistic energy fluxes in uniform fermionic and bosonic lattices. By the use of the Jordan–Wigner transformation we can extend our analysis to spin lattices, proving the coexistence of both ballistic and non-ballistic subspaces in any dimension and for any system size. Lastly, we then relate the nature of transport to the number of excitations in the homogeneous spin lattice, indicating that a single excitation always propagates ballistically and that the non-ballistic behaviour ofmore » uniform spin lattices is a consequence of the interaction between different excitations.« less

  13. Ising antiferromagnet on the Archimedean lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Unjong

    2015-06-01

    Geometric frustration effects were studied systematically with the Ising antiferromagnet on the 11 Archimedean lattices using the Monte Carlo methods. The Wang-Landau algorithm for static properties (specific heat and residual entropy) and the Metropolis algorithm for a freezing order parameter were adopted. The exact residual entropy was also found. Based on the degree of frustration and dynamic properties, ground states of them were determined. The Shastry-Sutherland lattice and the trellis lattice are weakly frustrated and have two- and one-dimensional long-range-ordered ground states, respectively. The bounce, maple-leaf, and star lattices have the spin ice phase. The spin liquid phase appears in the triangular and kagome lattices.

  14. Extended applications of the vortex lattice method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, L. R.

    1976-01-01

    The application of the vortex lattice method to problems not usually dealt with by this technique is considered. It is shown that if the discrete vortex lattice is considered as an approximation to surface-distributed vorticity, then the concept of the generalized principal part of an integral yields a residual term to the vortex-induced velocity that renders the vortex lattice method valid for supersonic flow. Special schemes for simulating non-zero thickness lifting surfaces and fusiform bodies with vortex lattice elements are presented. Thickness effects of wing-like components are simulated by a double vortex lattice layer, and fusiform bodies are represented by a vortex grid arranged on a series of concentric cylindrical surfaces. Numerical considerations peculiar to the application of these techniques are briefly discussed.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of phonon transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yangyu; Wang, Moran

    2016-06-01

    A novel lattice Boltzmann scheme is proposed for phonon transport based on the phonon Boltzmann equation. Through the Chapman-Enskog expansion, the phonon lattice Boltzmann equation under the gray relaxation time approximation recovers the classical Fourier's law in the diffusive limit. The numerical parameters in the lattice Boltzmann model are therefore rigorously correlated to the bulk material properties. The new scheme does not only eliminate the fictitious phonon speed in the diagonal direction of a square lattice system in the previous lattice Boltzmann models, but also displays very robust performances in predicting both temperature and heat flux distributions consistent with analytical solutions for diverse numerical cases, including steady-state and transient, macroscale and microscale, one-dimensional and multi-dimensional phonon heat transport. This method may provide a powerful numerical tool for deep studies of nonlinear and nonlocal heat transports in nanosystems.

  16. Counting lattice animals in high dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, Sebastian; Mertens, Stephan

    2011-09-01

    We present an implementation of Redelemeier's algorithm for the enumeration of lattice animals in high-dimensional lattices. The implementation is lean and fast enough to allow us to extend the existing tables of animal counts, perimeter polynomials and series expansion coefficients in d-dimensional hypercubic lattices for 3 <= d <= 10. From the data we compute formulae for perimeter polynomials for lattice animals of size n <= 11 in arbitrary dimension d. When amended by combinatorial arguments, the new data suffice to yield explicit formulae for the number of lattice animals of size n <= 14 and arbitrary d. We also use the enumeration data to compute numerical estimates for growth rates and exponents in high dimensions that agree very well with Monte Carlo simulations and recent predictions from field theory.

  17. Synthetic magnetic fluxes on the honeycomb lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Gorecka, Agnieszka; Gremaud, Benoit; Miniatura, Christian

    2011-08-15

    We devise experimental schemes that are able to mimic uniform and staggered magnetic fluxes acting on ultracold two-electron atoms, such as ytterbium atoms, propagating in a honeycomb lattice. The atoms are first trapped into two independent state-selective triangular lattices and then further exposed to a suitable configuration of resonant Raman laser beams. These beams induce hops between the two triangular lattices and make atoms move in a honeycomb lattice. Atoms traveling around each unit cell of this honeycomb lattice pick up a nonzero phase. In the uniform case, the artificial magnetic flux sustained by each cell can reach about two flux quanta, thereby realizing a cold-atom analog of the Harper model with its notorious Hofstadter's butterfly structure. Different condensed-matter phenomena such as the relativistic integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, as observed in graphene samples, could be targeted with this scheme.

  18. Status of the ATF2 Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, E.; Tomas, R.; Bambade, P.; Okugi, T.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Seryi, A.; White, G.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2011-12-09

    The current status for the ATF2 Nominal and Ultra-low {beta}* lattices are presented in this paper. New lattice designs have been obtained in order to minimise the impact of the last interpretation of multipole measurements that have been included into the model. However, the new ATF2 Ultra-low design is not able to recover the expected vertical beam size at the IP with the current magnet distribution. Therefore, different quadrupole sorting have been studied. A significant gain is evident for the ATF2 Ultra-low lattice when sorting the magnets according to the skew-sextupolar components. The ATF2 Nominal lattice is also expected to benefit from the new sorting. Tuning results of the new ATF2 Ultra-low lattice under realistic imperfections are also reported.

  19. Synthetic magnetic fluxes on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górecka, Agnieszka; Grémaud, Benoît; Miniatura, Christian

    2011-08-01

    We devise experimental schemes that are able to mimic uniform and staggered magnetic fluxes acting on ultracold two-electron atoms, such as ytterbium atoms, propagating in a honeycomb lattice. The atoms are first trapped into two independent state-selective triangular lattices and then further exposed to a suitable configuration of resonant Raman laser beams. These beams induce hops between the two triangular lattices and make atoms move in a honeycomb lattice. Atoms traveling around each unit cell of this honeycomb lattice pick up a nonzero phase. In the uniform case, the artificial magnetic flux sustained by each cell can reach about two flux quanta, thereby realizing a cold-atom analog of the Harper model with its notorious Hofstadter’s butterfly structure. Different condensed-matter phenomena such as the relativistic integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, as observed in graphene samples, could be targeted with this scheme.

  20. A lattice approach to spinorial quantum gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renteln, Paul; Smolin, Lee

    1989-01-01

    A new lattice regularization of quantum general relativity based on Ashtekar's reformulation of Hamiltonian general relativity is presented. In this form, quantum states of the gravitational field are represented within the physical Hilbert space of a Kogut-Susskind lattice gauge theory. The gauge field of the theory is a complexified SU(2) connection which is the gravitational connection for left-handed spinor fields. The physical states of the gravitational field are those which are annihilated by additional constraints which correspond to the four constraints of general relativity. Lattice versions of these constraints are constructed. Those corresponding to the three-dimensional diffeomorphism generators move states associated with Wilson loops around on the lattice. The lattice Hamiltonian constraint has a simple form, and a correspondingly simple interpretation: it is an operator which cuts and joins Wilson loops at points of intersection.

  1. Toward a realistic low-field SSC lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Heifets, S.

    1985-10-01

    Three six-fold lattices for 3 T superferric SSC have been generated at TAC. The program based on the first order canonical transformation was used to compare lattices. On this basis the realistic race-track lattices were generated.

  2. Strain control of real- and lattice-spin currents in a silicene junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phonapha, Sarayut; Suwanvarangkoon, Assanai; Soodchomshom, Bumned

    2017-09-01

    We investigate real- and lattice-spin currents controlled by strain in a silicene-based junction, where chemical potential, perpendicular electric field and circularly polarized light are applied into the strained barrier. We find that the junction yields strain filtering effect with perfect strain control of real- (or lattice-)spin currents. (i) By applying electric field without circularly polarized light we show that total current is carried by pure lattice-spin up (or down) electrons tunable by strain. (ii) When circularly polarized light is irradiated onto silicene sheet without applying electric field, total current is carried by pure real-spin up (or down) electrons tunable by strain. High conductance peaks associated with pure real- (or lattice-)spin currents in case ii (or i) occur at specific magnitude of strain, yielding strain filtering effect. Magnitudes of filtered strain due to pure real- (or lattice-) spin currents may be tunable by varying chemical potential. Sensitivity may be enhanced by increasing thickness of strained barrier. Significantly, (iii) when both perpendicular electric field and circularly polarized light are applied, the total current is carried by three species of electron groups tunable by strain. This may lead to controllable numbers of electron species to transport. This result shows that strain filtering effect in a silicene-based junction is quite different from that in graphene junction. Our work reveals potential of silicene as a nano-electro-mechanical device and spin-valleytronic applications.

  3. Lattice strain accompanying the colossal magnetoresistance effect in EuB6.

    PubMed

    Manna, Rudra Sekhar; Das, Pintu; de Souza, Mariano; Schnelle, Frank; Lang, Michael; Müller, Jens; von Molnár, Stephan; Fisk, Zachary

    2014-08-08

    The coupling of magnetic and electronic degrees of freedom to the crystal lattice in the ferromagnetic semimetal EuB(6), which exhibits a complex ferromagnetic order and a colossal magnetoresistance effect, is studied by high-resolution thermal expansion and magnetostriction experiments. EuB(6) may be viewed as a model system, where pure magnetism-tuned transport and the response of the crystal lattice can be studied in a comparatively simple environment, i.e., not influenced by strong crystal-electric field effects and Jahn-Teller distortions. We find a very large lattice response, quantified by (i) the magnetic Grüneisen parameter, (ii) the spontaneous strain when entering the ferromagnetic region, and (iii) the magnetostriction in the paramagnetic temperature regime. Our analysis reveals that a significant part of the lattice effects originates in the magnetically driven delocalization of charge carriers, consistent with the scenario of percolating magnetic polarons. A strong effect of the formation and dynamics of local magnetic clusters on the lattice parameters is suggested to be a general feature of colossal magnetoresistance materials.

  4. Lattice Symmetry and Identification-The Fundamental Role of Reduced Cells in Materials Characterization.

    PubMed

    Mighell, A D

    2001-01-01

    In theory, physical crystals can be represented by idealized mathematical lattices. Under appropriate conditions, these representations can be used for a variety of purposes such as identifying, classifying, and understanding the physical properties of materials. Critical to these applications is the ability to construct a unique representation of the lattice. The vital link that enabled this theory to be realized in practice was provided by the 1970 paper on the determination of reduced cells. This seminal paper led to a mathematical approach to lattice analysis initially based on systematic reduction procedures and the use of standard cells. Subsequently, the process evolved to a matrix approach based on group theory and linear algebra that offered a more abstract and powerful way to look at lattices and their properties. Application of the reduced cell to both database work and laboratory research at NIST was immediately successful. Currently, this cell and/or procedures based on reduction are widely and routinely used by the general scientific community: (i) for calculating standard cells for the reporting of crystalline materials, (ii) for classifying materials, (iii) in crystallographic database work (iv) in routine x-ray and neutron diffractometry, and (v) in general crystallographic research. Especially important is its use in symmetry determination and in identification. The focus herein is on the role of the reduced cell in lattice symmetry determination.

  5. A Review of Nucleon Spin Calculations in Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin

    2009-08-01

    We review recent progress on lattice calculations of nucleon spin structure, including the parton distribution functions, form factors, generalization parton distributions, and recent developments in lattice techniques.

  6. Duality analysis on random planar lattices.

    PubMed

    Ohzeki, Masayuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2012-11-01

    The conventional duality analysis is employed to identify a location of a critical point on a uniform lattice without any disorder in its structure. In the present study, we deal with the random planar lattice, which consists of the randomized structure based on the square lattice. We introduce the uniformly random modification by the bond dilution and contraction on a part of the unit square. The random planar lattice includes the triangular and hexagonal lattices in extreme cases of a parameter to control the structure. A modern duality analysis fashion with real-space renormalization is found to be available for estimating the location of the critical points with a wide range of the randomness parameter. As a simple test bed, we demonstrate that our method indeed gives several critical points for the cases of the Ising and Potts models and the bond-percolation thresholds on the random planar lattice. Our method leads to not only such an extension of the duality analyses on the classical statistical mechanics but also a fascinating result associated with optimal error thresholds for a class of quantum error correction code, the surface code on the random planar lattice, which is known as a skillful technique to protect the quantum state.

  7. Dynamic Behavior of Engineered Lattice Materials

    PubMed Central

    Hawreliak, J. A.; Lind, J.; Maddox, B.; Barham, M.; Messner, M.; Barton, N.; Jensen, B. J.; Kumar, M.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is enabling the fabrication of materials with engineered lattice structures at the micron scale. These mesoscopic structures fall between the length scale associated with the organization of atoms and the scale at which macroscopic structures are constructed. Dynamic compression experiments were performed to study the emergence of behavior owing to the lattice periodicity in AM materials on length scales that approach a single unit cell. For the lattice structures, both bend and stretch dominated, elastic deflection of the structure was observed ahead of the compaction of the lattice, while no elastic deformation was observed to precede the compaction in a stochastic, random structure. The material showed lattice characteristics in the elastic response of the material, while the compaction was consistent with a model for compression of porous media. The experimental observations made on arrays of 4 × 4 × 6 lattice unit cells show excellent agreement with elastic wave velocity calculations for an infinite periodic lattice, as determined by Bloch wave analysis, and finite element simulations. PMID:27321697

  8. Antithrombin III blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... AT III) is a protein that helps control blood clotting. A blood test can determine the amount of ... may mean you have an increased risk of blood clotting. This can occur when there is not enough ...

  9. Continuum methods in lattice perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, Thomas G

    2002-11-15

    We show how methods of continuum perturbation theory can be used to simplify perturbative lattice calculations. We use the technique of asymptotic expansions to expand lattice loop integrals around the continuum limit. After the expansion, all nontrivial dependence on momenta and masses is encoded in continuum loop integrals and the only genuine lattice integrals left are tadpole integrals. Using integration-by-parts relations all of these can be expressed in terms of a small number of master integrals. Four master integrals are needed for bosonic one loop integrals, sixteen in QCD with Wilson or staggered fermions.

  10. Making the cut: lattice kirigami rules.

    PubMed

    Castle, Toen; Cho, Yigil; Gong, Xingting; Jung, Euiyeon; Sussman, Daniel M; Yang, Shu; Kamien, Randall D

    2014-12-12

    In this Letter we explore and develop a simple set of rules that apply to cutting, pasting, and folding honeycomb lattices. We consider origami-like structures that are extrinsically flat away from zero-dimensional sources of Gaussian curvature and one-dimensional sources of mean curvature, and our cutting and pasting rules maintain the intrinsic bond lengths on both the lattice and its dual lattice. We find that a small set of rules is allowed providing a framework for exploring and building kirigami—folding, cutting, and pasting the edges of paper.

  11. Making the Cut: Lattice Kirigami Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castle, Toen; Cho, Yigil; Gong, Xingting; Jung, Euiyeon; Sussman, Daniel M.; Yang, Shu; Kamien, Randall D.

    2014-12-01

    In this Letter we explore and develop a simple set of rules that apply to cutting, pasting, and folding honeycomb lattices. We consider origami-like structures that are extrinsically flat away from zero-dimensional sources of Gaussian curvature and one-dimensional sources of mean curvature, and our cutting and pasting rules maintain the intrinsic bond lengths on both the lattice and its dual lattice. We find that a small set of rules is allowed providing a framework for exploring and building kirigami—folding, cutting, and pasting the edges of paper.

  12. Charmonium excited state spectrum in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; Nilmani Mathur; David Richards

    2008-02-01

    Working with a large basis of covariant derivative-based meson interpolating fields we demonstrate the feasibility of reliably extracting multiple excited states using a variational method. The study is performed on quenched anisotropic lattices with clover quarks at the charm mass. We demonstrate how a knowledge of the continuum limit of a lattice interpolating field can give additional spin-assignment information, even at a single lattice spacing, via the overlap factors of interpolating field and state. Excited state masses are systematically high with respect to quark potential model predictions and, where they exist, experimental states. We conclude that this is most likely a result of the quenched approximation.

  13. Chiral magnetic effect in a lattice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bo; Hou, De-fu; Liu, Hui; Ren, Hai-cang; Wu, Ping-ping; Wu, Yan

    2017-06-01

    We study analytically the one-loop contribution to the chiral magnetic effect (CME) using lattice regularization with a Wilson fermion field. In the continuum limit, we find that the chiral magnetic current vanishes at nonzero temperature but emerges at zero temperature consistent with that found by Pauli-Villas regularization. For finite lattice size, however, the chiral magnetic current is nonvanishing at nonzero temperature. But the numerical value of the coefficient of CME current is very small compared with that extracted from the full QCD simulation for the same lattice parameters. The possibility of higher-order corrections from QCD dynamics is also assessed.

  14. Photonic spectrum of bichromatic optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Rist, Stefan; Morigi, Giovanna; Vignolo, Patrizia

    2009-05-15

    We study the photonic spectrum of a one-dimensional optical lattice possessing a double primitive cell, when the atoms are well localized at the lattice minima. While a one-dimensional lattice with a simple Wigner-Seitz cell always possesses a photonic band gap at the atomic resonance, in this configuration the photonic transmission spectrum may exhibit no, double, or multiple photonic band gaps depending on the ratio between the interparticle distance {rho} inside the cell and the cell size a. The transmission spectra of a weak incident probe are evaluated when the atoms are trapped in free space and inside an optical resonator for realistic experimental parameters.

  15. Updated lattice results for parton distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrou, Constantia; Cichy, Krzysztof; Constantinou, Martha; Hadjiyiannakou, Kyriakos; Jansen, Karl; Steffens, Fernanda; Wiese, Christian

    2017-07-01

    We provide an analysis of the x dependence of the bare unpolarized, helicity, and transversity isovector parton distribution functions (PDFs) from lattice calculations employing (maximally) twisted mass fermions. The x dependence of the calculated PDFs resembles the one of the phenomenological parameterizations, a feature that makes this approach very promising. Furthermore, we apply momentum smearing for the relevant matrix elements to compute the lattice PDFs and find a large improvement factor when compared to conventional Gaussian smearing. This allows us to extend the lattice computation of the distributions to higher values of the nucleon momentum, which is essential for the prospects of a reliable extraction of the PDFs in the future.

  16. Roughness in lattice ordered effect algebras.

    PubMed

    Xin, Xiao Long; Hua, Xiu Juan; Zhu, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Many authors have studied roughness on various algebraic systems. In this paper, we consider a lattice ordered effect algebra and discuss its roughness in this context. Moreover, we introduce the notions of the interior and the closure of a subset and give some of their properties in effect algebras. Finally, we use a Riesz ideal induced congruence and define a function e(a, b) in a lattice ordered effect algebra E and build a relationship between it and congruence classes. Then we study some properties about approximation of lattice ordered effect algebras.

  17. Roughness in Lattice Ordered Effect Algebras

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Xiao Long; Hua, Xiu Juan; Zhu, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Many authors have studied roughness on various algebraic systems. In this paper, we consider a lattice ordered effect algebra and discuss its roughness in this context. Moreover, we introduce the notions of the interior and the closure of a subset and give some of their properties in effect algebras. Finally, we use a Riesz ideal induced congruence and define a function e(a, b) in a lattice ordered effect algebra E and build a relationship between it and congruence classes. Then we study some properties about approximation of lattice ordered effect algebras. PMID:25170523

  18. Optical lattice on an atom chip.

    PubMed

    Gallego, D; Hofferberth, S; Schumm, T; Krüger, P; Schmiedmayer, J

    2009-11-15

    Optical dipole traps and atom chips are two very powerful tools for the quantum manipulation of neutral atoms. We demonstrate that both methods can be combined by creating an optical lattice potential on an atom chip. A red-detuned laser beam is retroreflected using the atom chip surface as a high-quality mirror, generating a vertical array of purely optical oblate traps. We transfer thermal atoms from the chip into the lattice and observe cooling into the two-dimensional regime. Using a chip-generated Bose-Einstein condensate, we demonstrate coherent Bloch oscillations in the lattice.

  19. Reactive Orthotropic Lattice Diffuser for Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An orthotropic lattice structure interconnects porous surfaces of the flap with internal lattice-structured perforations to equalize the steady pressure field on the flap surfaces adjacent to the end and to reduce the amplitude of the fluctuations in the flow field near the flap end. The global communication that exists within all of the perforations provides the mechanism to lessen the pressure gradients experienced by the end portion of the flap. In addition to having diffusive effects (diffusing the incoming flow), the three-dimensional orthogonal lattice structure is also reactive (acoustic wave phase distortion) due to the interconnection of the perforations.

  20. A lattice model for data display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, William L.; Dyer, Charles R.; Paul, Brian E.

    1994-01-01

    In order to develop a foundation for visualization, we develop lattice models for data objects and displays that focus on the fact that data objects are approximations to mathematical objects and real displays are approximations to ideal displays. These lattice models give us a way to quantize the information content of data and displays and to define conditions on the visualization mappings from data to displays. Mappings satisfy these conditions if and only if they are lattice isomorphisms. We show how to apply this result to scientific data and display models, and discuss how it might be applied to recursively defined data types appropriate for complex information processing.

  1. Lattice surgery translation for quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herr, Daniel; Nori, Franco; Devitt, Simon J.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we outline a method for a compiler to translate any non fault tolerant quantum circuit to the geometric representation of the lattice surgery error-correcting code using inherent merge and split operations. Since the efficiency of state distillation procedures has not yet been investigated in the lattice surgery model, their translation is given as an example using the proposed method. The resource requirements seem comparable or better to the defect-based state distillation process, but modularity and eventual implementability allow the lattice surgery model to be an interesting alternative to braiding.

  2. Reflectionless and invisible potentials in photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Longhi, S

    2017-08-15

    An arbitrarily shaped optical potential on a discrete photonic lattice, which transversely drifts at a speed greater than the maximum speed allowed by the light cone of the lattice band, becomes reflectionless. Such an intriguing result, which arises from the discrete translational symmetry of the lattice, is peculiar to discretized light and does not have any counterpart for light scattering in continuous optical media. A drifting non-Hermitian optical potential of the Kramers-Kronig type also is an invisible potential, i.e., a discrete optical beam crosses the drifting potential without being distorted, delayed, nor advanced.

  3. Coincidence lattices in the hyperbolic plane.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Andrade, M A; Aragón-González, G; Aragón, J L; Gómez-Rodríguez, A

    2011-01-01

    The problem of coincidences of lattices in the space R(p,q), with p + q = 2, is analyzed using Clifford algebra. We show that, as in R(n), any coincidence isometry can be decomposed as a product of at most two reflections by vectors of the lattice. Bases and coincidence indices are constructed explicitly for several interesting lattices. Our procedure is metric-independent and, in particular, the hyperbolic plane is obtained when p = q = 1. Additionally, we provide a proof of the Cartan-Dieudonné theorem for R(p,q), with p + q = 2, that includes an algorithm to decompose an orthogonal transformation into a product of reflections.

  4. The AGS-Booster lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Barton, D.S.; Claus, J.; Cottingham, J.G.; Courant, E.D.; Danby, G.T.; Dell, G.F.; Forsyth, E.B.; Gupta, R.C.; Kats, J.

    1987-01-01

    The AGS Booster has three objectives. They are to increase the space charge limit of the AGS, to increase the intensity of the polarized proton beam by accumulating many linac pulses (since the intensity is limited by the polarized ion source), and to reaccelerate heavy ions from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff before injection into the AGS. The machine is capable of accelerating protons at 7.5 Hertz from 200 MeV to 1.5 GeV or to lower final energies at faster repetition rates. The machine will also be able to accelerate heavy ions from as low as 1 MeV/nucleon to a magnetic rigidity as high as 17.6 Tesla-meters with a one second repetition rate. As an accumulator for polarized protons, the Booster should be able to store the protons at 200 MeV for several seconds. We expect that the Booster will increase the AGS proton intensity by a factor of four, polarized proton intensity by a factor of twenty to thirty, and will also enable the AGS to accelerate all species of heavy ions (at present the AGS heavy ion program is limited to the elements lighter than sulfur because it can only accelerate fully stripped ions). The construction project started in FY 1985 and is expected to be completed in 1989. The purpose of this paper is to provide a future reference for the AGS Booster lattice.

  5. Lattice Universe: examples and problems.

    PubMed

    Brilenkov, Maxim; Eingorn, Maxim; Zhuk, Alexander

    We consider lattice Universes with spatial topologies [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text]. In the Newtonian limit of General Relativity, we solve the Poisson equation for the gravitational potential in the enumerated models. In the case of point-like massive sources in the [Formula: see text] model, we demonstrate that the gravitational potential has no definite values on the straight lines joining identical masses in neighboring cells, i.e. at points where masses are absent. Clearly, this is a nonphysical result, since the dynamics of cosmic bodies is not determined in such a case. The only way to avoid this problem and get a regular solution at any point of the cell is the smearing of these masses over some region. Therefore, the smearing of gravitating bodies in [Formula: see text]-body simulations is not only a technical method but also a physically substantiated procedure. In the cases of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] topologies, there is no way to get any physically reasonable and nontrivial solution. The only solutions we can get here are the ones which reduce these topologies to the [Formula: see text] one.

  6. Metastability on the hierarchical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Hollander, Frank; Jovanovski, Oliver

    2017-07-01

    We study metastability for Glauber spin-flip dynamics on the N-dimensional hierarchical lattice with n hierarchical levels. Each vertex carries an Ising spin that can take the values -1 or +1 . Spins interact with an external magnetic field h>0 . Pairs of spins interact with each other according to a ferromagnetic pair potential J=\\{J_i\\}i=1n , where J_i>0 is the strength of the interaction between spins at hierarchical distance i. Spins flip according to a Metropolis dynamics at inverse temperature β. In the limit as β\\to∞ , we analyse the crossover time from the metastable state \\boxminus (all spins -1 ) to the stable state \\boxplus (all spins +1 ). Under the assumption that J is non-increasing, we identify the mean transition time up to a multiplicative factor 1+o_β(1) . On the scale of its mean, the transition time is exponentially distributed. We also identify the set of configurations representing the gate for the transition. For the special case where Ji = \\tilde{J}/Ni , 1 ≤slant i ≤slant n , with \\tilde{J}>0 the relevant formulas simplify considerably. Also the hierarchical mean-field limit N\\to∞ can be analysed in detail.

  7. Majorana Fermions in Vortex Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Rudro R.

    2013-09-01

    We consider Majorana fermions tunneling among an array of vortices in a 2D chiral p-wave superconductor or equivalent material. The amplitude for Majorana fermions to tunnel between a pair of vortices is found to necessarily depend on the background superconducting phase profile; it is found to be proportional to the sine of half the difference between the phases at the two vortices. Using this result we study tight-binding models of Majorana fermions in vortices arranged in triangular or square lattices. In both cases we find that the aforementioned phase-tunneling relationship leads to the creation of superlattices where the Majorana fermions form macroscopically degenerate localizable flat bands at zero energy, in addition to other dispersive bands. This finding suggests that tunneling processes in these vortex arrays do not change the energies of a finite fraction of Majorana fermions, contrary to previous expectation. The presence of flat Majorana bands, and hence less-than-expected decoherence in these vortex arrays, bodes well for the prospects of topological quantum computation with large numbers of Majorana states.

  8. Majorana fermions in vortex lattices.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Rudro R

    2013-09-27

    We consider Majorana fermions tunneling among an array of vortices in a 2D chiral p-wave superconductor or equivalent material. The amplitude for Majorana fermions to tunnel between a pair of vortices is found to necessarily depend on the background superconducting phase profile; it is found to be proportional to the sine of half the difference between the phases at the two vortices. Using this result we study tight-binding models of Majorana fermions in vortices arranged in triangular or square lattices. In both cases we find that the aforementioned phase-tunneling relationship leads to the creation of superlattices where the Majorana fermions form macroscopically degenerate localizable flat bands at zero energy, in addition to other dispersive bands. This finding suggests that tunneling processes in these vortex arrays do not change the energies of a finite fraction of Majorana fermions, contrary to previous expectation. The presence of flat Majorana bands, and hence less-than-expected decoherence in these vortex arrays, bodes well for the prospects of topological quantum computation with large numbers of Majorana states.

  9. Anyonic braiding in optical lattices

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chuanwei; Scarola, V. W.; Tewari, Sumanta; Das Sarma, S.

    2007-01-01

    Topological quantum states of matter, both Abelian and non-Abelian, are characterized by excitations whose wavefunctions undergo nontrivial statistical transformations as one excitation is moved (braided) around another. Topological quantum computation proposes to use the topological protection and the braiding statistics of a non-Abelian topological state to perform quantum computation. The enormous technological prospect of topological quantum computation provides new motivation for experimentally observing a topological state. Here, we explicitly work out a realistic experimental scheme to create and braid the Abelian topological excitations in the Kitaev model built on a tunable robust system, a cold atom optical lattice. We also demonstrate how to detect the key feature of these excitations: their braiding statistics. Observation of this statistics would directly establish the existence of anyons, quantum particles that are neither fermions nor bosons. In addition to establishing topological matter, the experimental scheme we develop here can also be adapted to a non-Abelian topological state, supported by the same Kitaev model but in a different parameter regime, to eventually build topologically protected quantum gates. PMID:18000038

  10. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-02-01

    One of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, quantum chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three-nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice quantum chromodynamics (LQCD) provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between LQCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from LQCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.

  11. Analysis of quantum spin models on hyperbolic lattices and Bethe lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniška, Michal; Gendiar, Andrej

    2016-04-01

    The quantum XY, Heisenberg, and transverse field Ising models on hyperbolic lattices are studied by means of the tensor product variational formulation algorithm. The lattices are constructed by tessellation of congruent polygons with coordination number equal to four. The calculated ground-state energies of the XY and Heisenberg models and the phase transition magnetic field of the Ising model on the series of lattices are used to estimate the corresponding quantities of the respective models on the Bethe lattice. The hyperbolic lattice geometry induces mean-field-like behavior of the models. The ambition to obtain results on the non-Euclidean lattice geometries has been motivated by theoretical studies of the anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory correspondence.

  12. Coupled-cluster method: A lattice-path-based subsystem approximation scheme for quantum lattice models

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, R. F.; Li, P. H. Y.

    2011-04-15

    An approximation hierarchy, called the lattice-path-based subsystem (LPSUBm) approximation scheme, is described for the coupled-cluster method (CCM). It is applicable to systems defined on a regular spatial lattice. We then apply it to two well-studied prototypical (spin-(1/2) Heisenberg antiferromagnetic) spin-lattice models, namely, the XXZ and the XY models on the square lattice in two dimensions. Results are obtained in each case for the ground-state energy, the ground-state sublattice magnetization, and the quantum critical point. They are all in good agreement with those from such alternative methods as spin-wave theory, series expansions, quantum Monte Carlo methods, and the CCM using the alternative lattice-animal-based subsystem (LSUBm) and the distance-based subsystem (DSUBm) schemes. Each of the three CCM schemes (LSUBm, DSUBm, and LPSUBm) for use with systems defined on a regular spatial lattice is shown to have its own advantages in particular applications.

  13. Strange Baryon Physics in Full Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin

    2007-11-01

    Strange baryon spectra and form factors are key probes to study excited nuclear matter. The use of lattice QCD allows us to test the strength of the Standard Model by calculating strange baryon quantities from first principles.

  14. Lattice Waves, Spin Waves, and Neutron Scattering

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Brockhouse, Bertram N.

    1962-03-01

    Use of neutron inelastic scattering to study the forces between atoms in solids is treated. One-phonon processes and lattice vibrations are discussed, and experiments that verified the existence of the quantum of lattice vibrations, the phonon, are reviewed. Dispersion curves, phonon frequencies and absorption, and models for dispersion calculations are discussed. Experiments on the crystal dynamics of metals are examined. Dispersion curves are presented and analyzed; theory of lattice dynamics is considered; effects of Fermi surfaces on dispersion curves; electron-phonon interactions, electronic structure influence on lattice vibrations, and phonon lifetimes are explored. The dispersion relation of spin waves in crystals and experiments in which dispersion curves for spin waves in Co-Fe alloy and magnons in magnetite were obtained and the reality of the magnon was demonstrated are discussed. (D.C.W)

  15. Ballistic Transport in Graphene Antidot Lattices.

    PubMed

    Sandner, Andreas; Preis, Tobias; Schell, Christian; Giudici, Paula; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Weiss, Dieter; Eroms, Jonathan

    2015-12-09

    The bulk carrier mobility in graphene was shown to be enhanced in graphene-boron nitride heterostructures. However, nanopatterning graphene can add extra damage and drastically degrade the intrinsic properties by edge disorder. Here we show that graphene embedded into a heterostructure with hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) on both sides is protected during a nanopatterning step. In this way, we can prepare graphene-based antidot lattices where the high mobility is preserved. We report magnetotransport experiments in those antidot lattices with lattice periods down to 50 nm. We observe pronounced commensurability features stemming from ballistic orbits around one or several antidots. Due to the short lattice period in our samples, we can also explore the boundary between the classical and the quantum transport regime, as the Fermi wavelength of the electrons approaches the smallest length scale of the artificial potential.

  16. Two-dimensional generalized Toda lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, A. V.; Olshanetsky, M. A.; Perelomov, A. M.

    1981-12-01

    The zero curvature representation is obtained for the two-dimensional generalized Toda lattices connected with semisimple Lie algebras. The reduction group and conservation laws are found and the mass spectrum is calculated.

  17. Colloquium: Physics of optical lattice clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derevianko, Andrei; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2011-04-01

    Recently invented and demonstrated optical lattice clocks hold great promise for improving the precision of modern time keeping. These clocks aim at the 10-18 fractional accuracy, which translates into a clock that would neither lose nor gain a fraction of a second over an estimated age of the Universe. In these clocks, millions of atoms are trapped and interrogated simultaneously, dramatically improving clock stability. Here the principles of operation of these clocks are discussed and, in particular, a novel concept of magic trapping of atoms in optical lattices. Recently proposed microwave lattice clocks are also highlights and several applications that employ the optical lattice clocks as a platform for precision measurements and quantum information processing.

  18. Enumerations of Lattice Animals and Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Iwan

    2001-02-01

    We have developed an improved algorithm that allows us to enumerate the number of site animals on the square lattice up to size 46. We also calculate the number of lattice trees up to size 44 and the radius of gyration of both lattice animals and trees up to size 42. Analysis of the resulting series yields an improved estimate, λ=4.062570(8), for the growth constant of lattice animals, and, λ0=3.795254(8), for the growth constant of trees, and confirms to a very high degree of certainty that both the animal and tree generating functions have a logarithmic divergence. Analysis of the radius of gyration series yields the estimate, ν=0.64115(5), for the size exponent.

  19. Lattice engineering through nanoparticle–DNA frameworks

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Ye; Zhang, Yugang; Wang, Tong; ...

    2016-02-22

    Advances in self-assembly over the past decade have demonstrated that nano- and microscale particles can be organized into a large diversity of ordered three-dimensional (3D) lattices. However, the ability to generate different desired lattice types from the same set of particles remains challenging. Here, we show that nanoparticles can be assembled into crystalline and open 3D frameworks by connecting them through designed DNA-based polyhedral frames. The geometrical shapes of the frames, combined with the DNA-assisted binding properties of their vertices, facilitate the well-defined topological connections between particles in accordance with frame geometry. With this strategy, different crystallographic lattices using themore » same particles can be assembled by introduction of the corresponding DNA polyhedral frames. As a result, this approach should facilitate the rational assembly of nanoscale lattices through the design of the unit cell.« less

  20. Lattice engineering through nanoparticle–DNA frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Ye; Zhang, Yugang; Wang, Tong; Xin, Huolin L.; Li, Huilin; Gang, Oleg

    2016-02-22

    Advances in self-assembly over the past decade have demonstrated that nano- and microscale particles can be organized into a large diversity of ordered three-dimensional (3D) lattices. However, the ability to generate different desired lattice types from the same set of particles remains challenging. Here, we show that nanoparticles can be assembled into crystalline and open 3D frameworks by connecting them through designed DNA-based polyhedral frames. The geometrical shapes of the frames, combined with the DNA-assisted binding properties of their vertices, facilitate the well-defined topological connections between particles in accordance with frame geometry. With this strategy, different crystallographic lattices using the same particles can be assembled by introduction of the corresponding DNA polyhedral frames. As a result, this approach should facilitate the rational assembly of nanoscale lattices through the design of the unit cell.

  1. Two-dimensional lattice liquid models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Murashima, Takahiro; Taniguchi, Takashi; Yamamoto, Ryoichi

    2012-09-01

    A family of models of liquid on a two-dimensional lattice (2D lattice liquid models) have been proposed as primitive models of soft-material membrane. As a first step, we have formulated them as single-component, single-layered, classical particle systems on a two-dimensional surface with no explicit viscosity. Among the family of the models, we have shown and constructed two stochastic models, a vicious walk model and a flow model, on an isotropic regular lattice and on some honeycomb lattices of various sizes. In both cases, the dynamics is governed by the nature of the frustration of the particle movements. By simulations, we have found the approximate functional form of the frustration probability and peculiar anomalous diffusions in their time-averaged mean-square displacements in the flow model. The relations to other existing statistical models and possible extensions of the models are also discussed.

  2. Lattice Engineering via Nanoparticle-DNA Frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ye; Zhang, Yugang; Wang, Tong; Xin, Huolin L.; Li, Huilin; Gang, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    Advances in self-assembly over the last decade have demonstrated that nano- and microscale particles can be organized into a large diversity of ordered three-dimensional (3D) lattices. However, the ability to generate the desired lattice type from the same set of particles remains challenging. Here, we show that nanoparticles can be assembled into crystalline and open 3D frameworks by connecting them through designed DNA-based polyhedral frames. The well-defined geometrical shapes of the frames, combined with the DNA-assisted binding properties of their vertices, facilitate the well-defined topological connections between particles in accordance with frame geometry. With this strategy, different crystallographic lattices using the same particles can be assembled by introduction of the corresponding DNA polyhedral frames. This approach should facilitate the rational assembly of nanoscale lattices through the design of the unit cell. PMID:26901516

  3. Recent lattice QCD results on nucleon structure

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinos Orginos

    2006-07-01

    I review recent developments in lattice calculations of nucleon structure. In particular, I cover the calculations of nucleon matrix elements related to generalized parton distribution functions, structure functions and form factors.

  4. Nonequivalent periodic subsets of the lattice.

    PubMed

    Cocke, W

    2013-07-01

    The use of Pólya's theorem in crystallography and other applications has greatly simplified many counting and coloring problems. Given a group of equivalences acting on a set, Pólya's theorem equates the number of unique subsets with the orbits of the group action. For a lattice and a given group of periodic equivalences, the number of nonequivalent subsets of the lattice can be solved using Pólya's counting on the group of relevant symmetries acting on the lattice. When equivalence is defined via a sublattice, the use of Pólya's theorem is equivalent to knowing the cycle index of the action of the group elements on a related finite group structure. A simple algebraic method is presented to determine the cycle index for a group element acting on a lattice subject to certain periodicity arguments.

  5. Lattice thermal conductivity evaluated using elastic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Tiantian; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Yongsheng

    2017-04-01

    Lattice thermal conductivity is one of the most important thermoelectric parameters in determining the energy conversion efficiency of thermoelectric materials. However, the lattice thermal conductivity evaluation requires time-consuming first-principles (quasi)phonon calculations, which limits seeking high-performance thermoelectric materials through high-throughput computations. Here, we establish a methodology to determine the Debye temperature Θ , Grüneisen parameter γ , and lattice thermal conductivity κ using computationally feasible elastic properties (the bulk and shear moduli). For 39 compounds with three different prototypes (the cubic isotropic rocksalt and zinc blende, and the noncubic anisotropic wurtzite), the theoretically calculated Θ ,γ , and κ are in reasonable agreement with those determined using (quasi)harmonic phonon calculations or experimental measurements. Our results show that the methodology is an efficient tool to predict the anharmonicity and the lattice thermal conductivity.

  6. Random sequential adsorption on imprecise lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privman, Vladimir; Yan, Han

    2016-06-01

    We report a surprising result, established by numerical simulations and analytical arguments for a one-dimensional lattice model of random sequential adsorption, that even an arbitrarily small imprecision in the lattice-site localization changes the convergence to jamming from fast, exponential, to slow, power-law, with, for some parameter values, a discontinuous jump in the jamming coverage value. This finding has implications for irreversible deposition on patterned substrates with pre-made landing sites for particle attachment. We also consider a general problem of the particle (depositing object) size not an exact multiple of the lattice spacing, and the lattice sites themselves imprecise, broadened into allowed-deposition intervals. Regions of exponential vs. power-law convergence to jamming are identified, and certain conclusions regarding the jamming coverage are argued for analytically and confirmed numerically.

  7. Chromatic Correction for the RHIC Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.

    1986-03-31

    We study the chromatic correction for the RHIC lattice. The scheme requires three families of sextupoles in the inner arc and outer arc respectively. It works very well to correct the tune and betatron amplitude modulations.

  8. Regge calculus models of closed lattice universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rex G.; Williams, Ruth M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the behavior of closed "lattice universes" wherein masses are distributed in a regular lattice on the Cauchy surfaces of closed vacuum universes. Such universes are approximated using a form of Regge calculus originally developed by Collins and Williams to model closed Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universes. We consider two types of lattice universes, one where all masses are identical to each other and another where one mass gets perturbed in magnitude. In the unperturbed universe, we consider the possible arrangements of the masses in the Regge Cauchy surfaces and demonstrate that the model will only be stable if each mass lies within some spherical region of convergence. We also briefly discuss the existence of Regge models that are dual to the ones we have considered. We then model a perturbed lattice universe and demonstrate that the model's evolution is well behaved, with the expansion increasing in magnitude as the perturbation is increased.

  9. THE MYOFILAMENT LATTICE: STUDIES ON ISOLATED FIBERS

    PubMed Central

    April, Ernest W.; Brandt, Philip W.; Elliott, Gerald F.

    1971-01-01

    The spacing between the thick myofilaments of muscle fibers from the walking legs of crayfish (Orconectes) was determined by optical transform analysis of electron micrograph plates of fixed single fibers and by X-ray diffraction of living single fibers. Sarcomere lengths were determined by light diffraction prior to fixation and prior to the in vivo experiments. From these combined measurements, it is demonstrated that the unit-cell volume of the myofilament lattice is constant during muscle shortening, indicating that the myofilament lattice works in a constant-volume manner. It is further demonstrated with X-ray diffraction measurements of living single fibers that the myofilament lattice continues to work at constant volume after the sarcolemma is removed from the fiber. This indicates that the constant-volume behavior of muscle is inherent to the myofilament lattice. PMID:5111882

  10. Three electroweak results from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Kronfeld, A.S., FERMI

    1998-08-01

    Quantum chromodynamics is needed to understand quarks and, hence, to determine the quarks` Yukawa couplings from experimental measurements. As a short illustration, the results of three lattice calculations are given.

  11. Colloquium: Physics of optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Derevianko, Andrei; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2011-04-01

    Recently invented and demonstrated optical lattice clocks hold great promise for improving the precision of modern time keeping. These clocks aim at the 10{sup -18} fractional accuracy, which translates into a clock that would neither lose nor gain a fraction of a second over an estimated age of the Universe. In these clocks, millions of atoms are trapped and interrogated simultaneously, dramatically improving clock stability. Here the principles of operation of these clocks are discussed and, in particular, a novel concept of magic trapping of atoms in optical lattices. Recently proposed microwave lattice clocks are also highlights and several applications that employ the optical lattice clocks as a platform for precision measurements and quantum information processing.

  12. Optical physics: Magnetic appeal in strained lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepetit, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Using strain to induce a pseudomagnetic field in a photonic lattice at optical frequencies might bring improvements to fields such as photonic crystal fibres, supercontinuum generation and frequency combs.

  13. Renormalization transformation of periodic and aperiodic lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Macia, Enrique; Rodriguez-Oliveros, Rogelio

    2006-10-01

    In this work we introduce a similarity transformation acting on transfer matrices describing the propagation of elementary excitations through either periodic or Fibonacci lattices. The proposed transformation can act at two different scale lengths. At the atomic scale the transformation allows one to express the systems' global transfer matrix in terms of an equivalent on-site model one. Correlation effects among different hopping terms are described by a series of local phase factors in that case. When acting on larger scale lengths, corresponding to short segments of the original lattice, the similarity transformation can be properly regarded as describing an effective renormalization of the chain. The nature of the resulting renormalized lattice significantly depends on the kind of order (i.e., periodic or quasiperiodic) of the original lattice, expressing a delicate balance between chemical complexity and topological order as a consequence of the renormalization process.

  14. Enhancement of optical Faraday effect of nonanuclear Tb(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Takayuki; Suzuki, Yuki; Doi, Yoshihiro; Seki, Tomohiro; Koizumi, Hitoshi; Fushimi, Koji; Fujita, Koji; Hinatsu, Yukio; Ito, Hajime; Tanaka, Katsuhisa; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2014-07-21

    The effective magneto-optical properties of novel nonanuclear Tb(III) complexes with Tb-O lattice (specifically, [Tb9(sal-R)16(μ-OH)10](+)NO3(-), where sal-R = alkyl salicylate (R = -CH3 (Me), -C2H5 (Et), -C3H7 (Pr), or -C4H9 (Bu)) are reported. The geometrical structures of these nonanuclear Tb(III) complexes were characterized using X-ray single-crystal analysis and shape-measure calculation. Optical Faraday rotation was observed in nonanuclear Tb(III) complexes in the visible region. The Verdet constant per Tb(III) ion of the Tb9(sal-Me) complex is 150 times larger than that of general Tb(III) oxide glass. To understand their large Faraday rotation, electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of Gd(III) complexes were carried out. In this Report, the magneto-optical relation to the coordination geometry of Tb ions is discussed.

  15. Theory of Lattice Strain for Materials Undergoing Plastic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karato, S.

    2008-12-01

    Radial x-ray diffraction is used to probe physical properties of materials including elastic and plastic properties. The theory used behind such an practice is the one developed by Singh (1993) in which the relation between lattice strain and elastic constants and macroscopic stress is derived. In this theory, the variation of inferred stress with the crystallographic planes, (hkl), is due to the elastic anisotropy. However, recent experimental studies showed that in many cases, the variation of stress with (hkl) far exceeds the value expected from this theory. I have developed a modified theory to rectify this problem with Singh's theory. In Singh's theory, the stress distribution in a polycrystalline material is treated only either unrelaxed or relaxed state. The role of plastic deformation is included only to the extent that plastic flow influences this stress state. Such an assumption corresponds to a Voigt model behavior, which is not an appropriate model at high temperatures where continuing plastic flow occurs with concurrent microscopic equilibrium, elastic deformation. This is a Maxwell model type behavior, and my model provides a stress analysis in a Maxwell material with anisotropic and non-linear power-law rheology. In this theory, the lattice strain corresponding to an imposed macroscopic strain-rate is calculated by three steps: (i) conversion of macroscopic strain-rate to macroscopic stress, (ii) conversion of macroscopic stress to microscopic stress at individual grains, and (iii) calculation of microscopic strain due to microscopic stress. The first step involves anisotropy in macroscopic viscosity that depends on anisotropy in crystal plasticity and lattice-preferred orientation. The second step involves anisotropic crystal plasticity and finally the third step involves elastic crystal anisotropy. In most cases, the influence of LPO is weak and in such a case, the lattice strain depends on (hkl) due to the anisotropy in both elastic and plastic

  16. The optical potential on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agadjanov, Dimitri; Döring, Michael; Mai, Maxim; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Rusetsky, Akaki

    2016-06-01

    The extraction of hadron-hadron scattering parameters from lattice data by using the Lüscher approach becomes increasingly complicated in the presence of inelastic channels. We propose a method for the direct extraction of the complex hadron-hadron optical potential on the lattice, which does not require the use of the multi-channel Lüscher formalism. Moreover, this method is applicable without modifications if some inelastic channels contain three or more particles.

  17. The optical potential on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Agadjanov, Dimitri; Doring, Michael; Mai, Maxim; MeiBner, Ulf -G.; Rusetsky, Akaki

    2016-06-08

    The extraction of hadron-hadron scattering parameters from lattice data by using the Luscher approach becomes increasingly complicated in the presence of inelastic channels. We propose a method for the direct extraction of the complex hadron-hadron optical potential on the lattice, which does not require the use of the multi-channel Luscher formalism. Furthermore, this method is applicable without modifications if some inelastic channels contain three or more particles.

  18. Lattice and Phase Diagram in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, Maria Paola

    2008-10-13

    Model calculations have produced a number of very interesting expectations for the QCD Phase Diagram, and the task of a lattice calculations is to put these studies on a quantitative grounds. I will give an overview of the current status of the lattice analysis of the QCD phase diagram, from the quantitative results of mature calculations at zero and small baryochemical potential, to the exploratory studies of the colder, denser phase.

  19. Lattice Boltzmann approach for complex nonequilibrium flows.

    PubMed

    Montessori, A; Prestininzi, P; La Rocca, M; Succi, S

    2015-10-01

    We present a lattice Boltzmann realization of Grad's extended hydrodynamic approach to nonequilibrium flows. This is achieved by using higher-order isotropic lattices coupled with a higher-order regularization procedure. The method is assessed for flow across parallel plates and three-dimensional flows in porous media, showing excellent agreement of the mass flow with analytical and numerical solutions of the Boltzmann equation across the full range of Knudsen numbers, from the hydrodynamic regime to ballistic motion.

  20. Current and lattice matched tandem solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.

    1987-01-01

    A multijunction (cascade) tandem photovoltaic solar cell device is fabricated of a Ga.sub.x In.sub.1-x P (0.505.ltoreq.X.ltoreq.0.515) top cell semiconductor lattice matched to a GaAs bottom cell semiconductor at a low-resistance heterojunction, preferably a p+/n+ heterojunction between the cells. The top and bottom cells are both lattice matched and current matched for high efficiency solar radiation conversion to electrical energy.

  1. Lattice QCD as a video game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egri, Győző I.; Fodor, Zoltán; Hoelbling, Christian; Katz, Sándor D.; Nógrádi, Dániel; Szabó, Kálmán K.

    2007-10-01

    The speed, bandwidth and cost characteristics of today's PC graphics cards make them an attractive target as general purpose computational platforms. High performance can be achieved also for lattice simulations but the actual implementation can be cumbersome. This paper outlines the architecture and programming model of modern graphics cards for the lattice practitioner with the goal of exploiting these chips for Monte Carlo simulations. Sample code is also given.

  2. Solitons in PT-symmetric nonlinear lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullaev, Fatkhulla Kh.; Konotop, Vladimir V.; Zezyulin, Dmitry A.; Kartashov, Yaroslav V.

    2011-04-15

    The existence of localized modes supported by the PT-symmetric nonlinear lattices is reported. The system considered reveals unusual properties: unlike other typical dissipative systems, it possesses families (branches) of solutions, which can be parametrized by the propagation constant; relatively narrow localized modes appear to be stable, even when the conservative nonlinear lattice potential is absent; and finally, the system supports stable multipole solutions.

  3. Optical Lattice Gases of Interacting Fermions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-02

    Communications, including a review paper on the orbital physics of cold atoms in optical lattices [1] and a book chapter on topological insulators of cold...from the early years of particle physics and quantum field theory. 4. New edge modes in periodically driven cold atoms on optical lattice. The...New Trends in Atomic and Molecular Physics , edited by M. Mohan, Springer Series on Atomic , Optical, and Plasma Physics Vol. 76, 201 (2013). 15

  4. Lattice QCD and the Jefferson Laboratory Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek, Robert Edwards, David Richards, Konstantinos Orginos

    2011-06-01

    Lattice gauge theory provides our only means of performing \\textit{ab initio} calculations in the non-perturbative regime. It has thus become an increasing important component of the Jefferson Laboratory physics program. In this paper, we describe the contributions of lattice QCD to our understanding of hadronic and nuclear physics, focusing on the structure of hadrons, the calculation of the spectrum and properties of resonances, and finally on deriving an understanding of the QCD origin of nuclear forces.

  5. Building the RHIC tracking lattice model

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Tepikian, S.

    2010-01-27

    In this note we outline the procedure to build a realistic lattice model for the RHIC beam-beam tracking simulation. We will install multipole field errors in the arc main dipoles, arc main quadrupols and interaction region magnets (DX, D0, and triplets) and introduce a residual closed orbit, tune ripples, and physical apertures in the tracking lattice model. Nonlinearities such as local IR multipoles, second order chromaticies and third order resonance driving terms are also corrected before tracking.

  6. Plasmonic lattice solitons in metallic nanowire materials

    SciTech Connect

    Swami, O. P. Kumar, Vijendra Nagar, A. K.

    2016-05-06

    In this paper, we demonstrate theoretically that the plasmonic lattice solitons (PLSs) are formed in array of metallic nanowires embedded in Kerr-type material. The strong nonlinearity at metal surface, combined with the tight confinement of the guiding modes of the metallic nanowires, provide the main physical mechanism for balancing the creation of plasmonic lattice solitons and wave diffraction. We show that the PLSs are satisfied in a verity of plasmonic systems, which have important applications in nanophotonics and subwavelength optics.

  7. The optical potential on the lattice

    DOE PAGES

    Agadjanov, Dimitri; Doring, Michael; Mai, Maxim; ...

    2016-06-08

    The extraction of hadron-hadron scattering parameters from lattice data by using the Luscher approach becomes increasingly complicated in the presence of inelastic channels. We propose a method for the direct extraction of the complex hadron-hadron optical potential on the lattice, which does not require the use of the multi-channel Luscher formalism. Furthermore, this method is applicable without modifications if some inelastic channels contain three or more particles.

  8. Vague Congruences and Quotient Lattice Implication Algebras

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xiaoyan; Xu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to further develop the congruence theory on lattice implication algebras. Firstly, we introduce the notions of vague similarity relations based on vague relations and vague congruence relations. Secondly, the equivalent characterizations of vague congruence relations are investigated. Thirdly, the relation between the set of vague filters and the set of vague congruences is studied. Finally, we construct a new lattice implication algebra induced by a vague congruence, and the homomorphism theorem is given. PMID:25133207

  9. Spin-Lattice-Coupled Order in Heisenberg Antiferromagnets on the Pyrochlore Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Kazushi; Kawamura, Hikaru

    2016-06-01

    Effects of local lattice distortions on the spin ordering are investigated for the antiferromagnetic classical Heisenberg model on the pyrochlore lattice. It is found by Monte Carlo simulations that the spin-lattice coupling (SLC) originating from site phonons induces a first-order transition into two different types of collinear magnetic ordered states. The state realized at the stronger SLC is cubic symmetric characterized by the magnetic (1/2 ,1/2 ,1/2 ) Bragg peaks, while that at the weaker SLC is tetragonal symmetric characterized by the (1,1,0) ones, each accompanied by the commensurate local lattice distortions. Experimental implications to chromium spinels are discussed.

  10. Some Poisson structures and Lax equations associated with the Toeplitz lattice and the Schur lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemarie, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The Toeplitz lattice is a Hamiltonian system whose Poisson structure is known. In this paper, we unveil the origins of this Poisson structure and derive from it the associated Lax equations for this lattice. We first construct a Poisson subvariety H n of GL n (C), which we view as a real or complex Poisson-Lie group whose Poisson structure comes from a quadratic R-bracket on gl n (C) for a fixed R-matrix. The existence of Hamiltonians, associated to the Toeplitz lattice for the Poisson structure on H n , combined with the properties of the quadratic R-bracket allow us to give explicit formulas for the Lax equation. Then we derive from it the integrability in the sense of Liouville of the Toeplitz lattice. When we view the lattice as being defined over R, we can construct a Poisson subvariety H n τ of U n which is itself a Poisson-Dirac subvariety of GL n R (C). We then construct a Hamiltonian for the Poisson structure induced on H n τ , corresponding to another system which derives from the Toeplitz lattice the modified Schur lattice. Thanks to the properties of Poisson-Dirac subvarieties, we give an explicit Lax equation for the new system and derive from it a Lax equation for the Schur lattice. We also deduce the integrability in the sense of Liouville of the modified Schur lattice.

  11. Spin-Lattice-Coupled Order in Heisenberg Antiferromagnets on the Pyrochlore Lattice.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Kazushi; Kawamura, Hikaru

    2016-06-24

    Effects of local lattice distortions on the spin ordering are investigated for the antiferromagnetic classical Heisenberg model on the pyrochlore lattice. It is found by Monte Carlo simulations that the spin-lattice coupling (SLC) originating from site phonons induces a first-order transition into two different types of collinear magnetic ordered states. The state realized at the stronger SLC is cubic symmetric characterized by the magnetic (1/2,1/2,1/2) Bragg peaks, while that at the weaker SLC is tetragonal symmetric characterized by the (1,1,0) ones, each accompanied by the commensurate local lattice distortions. Experimental implications to chromium spinels are discussed.

  12. Topological phases: An expedition off lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Michael H.; Gamper, Lukas; Gils, Charlotte; Isakov, Sergei V.; Trebst, Simon; Troyer, Matthias

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Models of topological phases where the lattice topology is a dynamical variable. > We discuss off-lattice hazards that destroy topological protection. > The Cheeger constant yields upper bound to the energy of excited states. > Baby universes meet condensed matter physics. > We study the graph Laplacian of loop gases and string nets on fluctuating lattices. - Abstract: Motivated by the goal to give the simplest possible microscopic foundation for a broad class of topological phases, we study quantum mechanical lattice models where the topology of the lattice is one of the dynamical variables. However, a fluctuating geometry can remove the separation between the system size and the range of local interactions, which is important for topological protection and ultimately the stability of a topological phase. In particular, it can open the door to a pathology, which has been studied in the context of quantum gravity and goes by the name of 'baby universe', here we discuss three distinct approaches to suppressing these pathological fluctuations. We complement this discussion by applying Cheeger's theory relating the geometry of manifolds to their vibrational modes to study the spectra of Hamiltonians. In particular, we present a detailed study of the statistical properties of loop gas and string net models on fluctuating lattices, both analytically and numerically.

  13. Links with small lattice stick numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Kyungpyo; No, Sungjong; Oh, Seungsang

    2014-04-01

    Knots and links have been considered to be useful models for structural analysis of molecular chains such as DNA and proteins. One quantity that we are interested in for molecular links is the minimum number of monomers necessary for realizing them. In this paper we consider every link in the cubic lattice. The lattice stick number sL(L) of a link L is defined to be the minimum number of sticks required to construct a polygonal representation of the link in the cubic lattice. Huh and Oh found all knots whose lattice stick numbers are at most 14. They proved that only the trefoil knot 31 and the figure-eight knot 41 have lattice stick numbers of 12 and 14, respectively. In this paper we find all links with more than one component whose lattice stick numbers are at most 14. Indeed we prove combinatorically that s_L(2^2_1)=8, s_L(2^2_1 \\sharp 2^2_1)=s_L(6^3_2)=s_L(6^3_3)=12, s_L(4^2_1)=13, s_L(5^2_1)=14 and any other non-split links have stick numbers of at least 15.

  14. Lattice calculation of nonleptonic charm decays

    SciTech Connect

    Simone, J.N.

    1991-11-01

    The decays of charmed mesons into two body nonleptonic final states are investigated. Weak interaction amplitudes of interest in these decays are extracted from lattice four-point correlation functions using a effective weak Hamiltonian including effects to order G{sub f} in the weak interactions yet containing effects to all orders in the strong interactions. The lattice calculation allows a quantitative examination of non-spectator processes in charm decays helping to elucidate the role of effects such as color coherence, final state interactions and the importance of the so called weak annihilation process. For D {yields} K{pi}, we find that the non-spectator weak annihilation diagram is not small, and we interpret this as evidence for large final state interactions. Moreover, there is indications of a resonance in the isospin {1/2} channel to which the weak annihilation process contributes exclusively. Findings from the lattice calculation are compared to results from the continuum vacuum saturation approximation and amplitudes are examined within the framework of the 1/N expansion. Factorization and the vacuum saturation approximation are tested for lattice amplitudes by comparing amplitudes extracted from lattice four-point functions with the same amplitude extracted from products of two-point and three-point lattice correlation functions arising out of factorization and vacuum saturation.

  15. Holographic superconductor on Q-lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Yi; Liu, Peng; Niu, Chao; Wu, Jian-Pin; Xian, Zhuo-Yu

    2015-02-01

    We construct the simplest gravitational dual model of a superconductor on Q-lattices. We analyze the condition for the existence of a critical temperature at which the charged scalar field will condense. In contrast to the holographic superconductor on ionic lattices, the presence of Q-lattices will suppress the condensate of the scalar field and lower the critical temperature. In particular, when the Q-lattice background is dual to a deep insulating phase, the condensation would never occur for some small charges. Furthermore, we numerically compute the optical conductivity in the superconducting regime. It turns out that the presence of Q-lattice does not remove the pole in the imaginary part of the conductivity, ensuring the appearance of a delta function in the real part. We also evaluate the gap which in general depends on the charge of the scalar field as well as the Q-lattice parameters. Nevertheless, when the charge of the scalar field is relatively large and approaches the probe limit, the gap becomes universal with ω g ≃ 9 T c which is consistent with the result for conventional holographic superconductors.

  16. Type III burst pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zongjun; Fu, Qijun; Lu, Quankang

    2000-05-01

    We present a special solar radio burst detected on 5 January 1994 using the multi-channel (50) spectrometer (1.0-2.0 GHz) of the Beijing Astronomical Observatory (BAO). Sadly, the whole event could not be recorded since it had a broader bandwidth than the limit range of the instrument. The important part was obtained, however. The event is composed of a normal drift type III burst on the lower frequency side and a reverse drift type III burst appearing almost simultaneously on the high side. We call the burst type III a burst pair. It is a typical characteristic of two type III bursts that they are morphologically symmetric about some frequency from 1.64 GHz to 1.78 GHz on the dynamic spectra records, which indicates that there are two different electron beams from the same acceleration region travelling simultaneously in opposite directions (upward and downward). A magnetic reconnection mode is a nice interpretation of type III burst pair since the plasma beta β~=0.01 is much less than 1 and the beams have velocity of about 1.07×10^8 cm s^-1 after leaving the reconnection region if we assume that the ambient magnetic field strength is about 100 G.

  17. Type III burst pair.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zongjun, Ning; Fu, Qijun; Quankang, Lu

    2000-05-01

    Presents a special solar radio burst detected on 5 January 1994 using the multi-channel (50) spectrometer (1.0 - 2.0 GHz) of the Beijing Astronomical Observatory. Sadly, the whole event could not be recorded since it had a broader bandwidth than the limit range of the instrument. The important part was obtained, however. The event is composed of a normal drift type III burst on the lower frequency side and a reverse drift type III burst appearing almost simultaneously on the high side. The authors call the burst type III a burst pair. It is a typical characteristic of two type III bursts that they are morphologically symmetric about some frequency from 1.64 GHz to 1.78 GHz on the dynamic spectra records, which indicates that there are two different electron beams from the same acceleration region travelling simultaneously in opposite directions (upward and downward). A magnetic reconnection mode is an interpretation of type III burst pair.

  18. Spanning trees of lattices embedded on the Klein bottle.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fuliang

    2014-01-01

    The problem of enumerating spanning trees in lattices with Klein bottle boundary condition is considered here. The exact closed-form expressions of the numbers of spanning trees for 4.8.8 lattice, hexagonal lattice, and 3(3) · 4(2) lattice on the Klein bottle are presented.

  19. Two-dimensional electrostatic lattices for indirect excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remeika, M.; Fogler, M. M.; Butov, L. V.; Hanson, M.; Gossard, A. C.

    2012-02-01

    We report on a method for the realization of two-dimensional electrostatic lattices for excitons using patterned interdigitated electrodes. Lattice structure is set by the electrode pattern and depth of the lattice potential is controlled by applied voltages. We demonstrate square, hexagonal, and honeycomb lattices created by this method.

  20. The Spectrum and Laplacian Spectrum of the Dice Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuli; Yan, Weigen; Tian, Tao

    2016-07-01

    The dice lattice is the dual lattice of kagomé lattice. Many physical properties on the dice lattice have been studied by physicists, such as Ising model, Glassy dynamics of Josephson arrays, and Lattice Green's function. In this paper, we derive the spectrum and Laplacian spectrum of the dice lattice with toroidal boundary condition. In addition, we apply our results to obtain the formulae of the number of spanning trees, the Kirchhoff index, and the energy of the dice lattice with toroidal boundary condition.

  1. Titanium-silicon carbide composite lattice structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moongkhamklang, Pimsiree

    Sandwich panel structures with stiff, strong face sheets and lightweight cellular cores are widely used for weight sensitive, bending dominated loading applications. The flexural stiffness and strength of a sandwich panel is determined by the stiffness, strength, thickness, and separation of the face sheets, and by the compressive and shear stiffness and strength of the cellular core. Panel performance can be therefore optimized using cores with high specific stiffness and strength. The specific stiffness and strength of all cellular materials depends upon the specific elastic modulus and strength of the material used to make the structure. The stiffest and strongest cores for ambient temperature applications utilize carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) honeycombs and lattice structures. Few options exist for lightweight sandwich panels intended for high temperature uses. High temperature alloys such as Ti-6A1-4V can be applied to SiC monofilaments to create very high specific modulus and strength fibers. These are interesting candidates for the cores of elevated temperature sandwich structures such as the skins of hypersonic vehicles. This dissertation explores the potential of sandwich panel concepts that utilize millimeter scale titanium matrix composite (TMC) lattice structures. A method has been developed for fabricating millimeter cell size cellular lattice structures with the square or diamond collinear truss topologies from 240 mum diameter Ti-6A1-4V coated SiC monofilaments (TMC monofilaments). Lattices with relative densities in the range 10% to 20% were manufactured and tested in compression and shear. Given the very high compressive strength of the TMC monofilaments, the compressive strengths of both the square and diamond lattices were dominated by elastic buckling of the constituent struts. However, under shear loading, some of the constituent struts of the lattices are subjected to tensile stresses and failure is then set by tensile failure of the

  2. HERMES III source characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Radasky, W.A. ); Halbleib, J. ); Nunan, S. )

    1991-01-01

    The Distant Light Program sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency (RAEE) is directed toward understanding the response of electronic systems to Source Region EMP (SREMP) and will result in the development of proven system hardening and validation techniques for SREMP. This program relies very strongly on testing in above ground test (AGT) simulators such as the HERMES III gamma ray simulator at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This paper describes theoretical and experimental efforts aimed at understanding the gamma ray flux produced by HERMES III in terms of its time dependence, spatial variation and spectrum. As part of this characterization, the calibration of various measuring devices must be considered. This paper describes the progress made in characterizing the HERMES III radiation output through December of 1990.

  3. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  4. Phase transitions in cooperative coinfections: Simulation results for networks and lattices.

    PubMed

    Grassberger, Peter; Chen, Li; Ghanbarnejad, Fakhteh; Cai, Weiran

    2016-04-01

    We study the spreading of two mutually cooperative diseases on different network topologies, and with two microscopic realizations, both of which are stochastic versions of a susceptible-infected-removed type model studied by us recently in mean field approximation. There it had been found that cooperativity can lead to first order transitions from spreading to extinction. However, due to the rapid mixing implied by the mean field assumption, first order transitions required nonzero initial densities of sick individuals. For the stochastic model studied here the results depend strongly on the underlying network. First order transitions are found when there are few short but many long loops: (i) No first order transitions exist on trees and on 2-d lattices with local contacts. (ii) They do exist on Erdős-Rényi (ER) networks, on d-dimensional lattices with d≥4, and on 2-d lattices with sufficiently long-ranged contacts. (iii) On 3-d lattices with local contacts the results depend on the microscopic details of the implementation. (iv) While single infected seeds can always lead to infinite epidemics on regular lattices, on ER networks one sometimes needs finite initial densities of infected nodes. (v) In all cases the first order transitions are actually "hybrid"; i.e., they display also power law scaling usually associated with second order transitions. On regular lattices, our model can also be interpreted as the growth of an interface due to cooperative attachment of two species of particles. Critically pinned interfaces in this model seem to be in different universality classes than standard critically pinned interfaces in models with forbidden overhangs. Finally, the detailed results mentioned above hold only when both diseases propagate along the same network of links. If they use different links, results can be rather different in detail, but are similar overall.

  5. Phase transitions in cooperative coinfections: Simulation results for networks and lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassberger, Peter; Chen, Li; Ghanbarnejad, Fakhteh; Cai, Weiran

    2016-04-01

    We study the spreading of two mutually cooperative diseases on different network topologies, and with two microscopic realizations, both of which are stochastic versions of a susceptible-infected-removed type model studied by us recently in mean field approximation. There it had been found that cooperativity can lead to first order transitions from spreading to extinction. However, due to the rapid mixing implied by the mean field assumption, first order transitions required nonzero initial densities of sick individuals. For the stochastic model studied here the results depend strongly on the underlying network. First order transitions are found when there are few short but many long loops: (i) No first order transitions exist on trees and on 2-d lattices with local contacts. (ii) They do exist on Erdős-Rényi (ER) networks, on d -dimensional lattices with d ≥4 , and on 2-d lattices with sufficiently long-ranged contacts. (iii) On 3-d lattices with local contacts the results depend on the microscopic details of the implementation. (iv) While single infected seeds can always lead to infinite epidemics on regular lattices, on ER networks one sometimes needs finite initial densities of infected nodes. (v) In all cases the first order transitions are actually "hybrid"; i.e., they display also power law scaling usually associated with second order transitions. On regular lattices, our model can also be interpreted as the growth of an interface due to cooperative attachment of two species of particles. Critically pinned interfaces in this model seem to be in different universality classes than standard critically pinned interfaces in models with forbidden overhangs. Finally, the detailed results mentioned above hold only when both diseases propagate along the same network of links. If they use different links, results can be rather different in detail, but are similar overall.

  6. Common Misconceptions about the Dynamical Theory of Crystal Lattices: Cauchy Relations, Lattice Potentials and Infinite Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elcoro, Luis; Etxebarria, Jesus

    2011-01-01

    The requirement of rotational invariance for lattice potential energies is investigated. Starting from this condition, it is shown that the Cauchy relations for the elastic constants are fulfilled if the lattice potential is built from pair interactions or when the first-neighbour approximation is adopted. This is seldom recognized in widely used…

  7. Common Misconceptions about the Dynamical Theory of Crystal Lattices: Cauchy Relations, Lattice Potentials and Infinite Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elcoro, Luis; Etxebarria, Jesus

    2011-01-01

    The requirement of rotational invariance for lattice potential energies is investigated. Starting from this condition, it is shown that the Cauchy relations for the elastic constants are fulfilled if the lattice potential is built from pair interactions or when the first-neighbour approximation is adopted. This is seldom recognized in widely used…

  8. Summary of Session III

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    2002-06-19

    This is a summary of the talks presented in Session III ''Simulations of Electron-Cloud Build Up'' of the Mini-Workshop on Electron-Cloud Simulations for Proton and Positron Beams ECLOUD-02, held at CERN, 15-18 April 2002.

  9. CITY III Director's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Envirometrics, Inc., Washington, DC.

    CITY III is a computer-assisted simulation game which allows the participants to make decisions affecting various aspects of the economic, governmental, and social sectors of a simulated urban area. The game director selects one of five possible starting city configurations, may set a number of conditions in the city before the start of play, and…

  10. The Apple III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditlea, Steve

    1982-01-01

    Describes and evaluates the features, performance, peripheral devices, available software, and capabilities of the Apple III microcomputer. The computer's operating system, its hardware, and the commercially produced software it accepts are discussed. Specific applications programs for financial planning, accounting, and word processing are…

  11. Ultracold Quantum Gases in Hexagonal Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengstock, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    Hexagonal structures occur in a vast variety of systems, ranging from honeycombs of bees in life sciences to carbon nanotubes in material sciences. The latter, in particular its unfolded two-dimensional layer -- Graphene -- has rapidly grown to one of the most discussed topics in condensed-matter physics. Not only does it show proximity to various carbon-based materials but also exceptional properties owing to its unusual energy spectrum. In quantum optics, ultracold quantum gases confined in periodic light fields have shown to be very general and versatile instruments to mimic solid state systems. However, so far nearly all experiments were performed in cubic lattice geometries only. Here we report on the first experimental realization of ultracold quantum gases in a state-dependent, two-dimensional, Graphene-like optical lattice with hexagonal symmetry. The lattice is realized via a spin-dependent optical lattice structure with alternating σ^+ and σ^- -sites and thus constitutes a so called `magnetic'-lattice with `antiferromagnetic'-structure. Atoms with different spin orientation can be loaded to specific lattice sites or -- depending on the parameters -- to the whole lattice. As a consequence e.g. superpositions of a superfluid spin component with a different spin component in the Mott-insulating phase can be realized as well as spin-dependent transport properties, disorder etc. After preparing an antiferromagnetically ordered state we e.g. measure sustainable changes of the transport properties of the atoms. This manifests in a significant reduction of the tunneling as compared to a single-component system. We attribute this observation to a partial tunneling blockade for one spin component induced by population in another spin component localized at alternating lattice sites. Within a Gutzwiller-Ansatz we calculate the phase diagrams for the mixed spin-states and find very good agreement with our experimental results. Moreover, by state-resolved recording

  12. Lattice-Induced Frequency Shifts in Sr Optical Lattice Clocks at the 10{sup -17} Level

    SciTech Connect

    Westergaard, P. G.; Lodewyck, J.; Lecallier, A.; Millo, J.; Lemonde, P.; Lorini, L.; Burt, E. A.; Zawada, M.

    2011-05-27

    We present a comprehensive study of the frequency shifts associated with the lattice potential in a Sr lattice clock by comparing two such clocks with a frequency stability reaching 5x10{sup -17} after a 1 h integration time. We put the first experimental upper bound on the multipolar M1 and E2 interactions, significantly smaller than the recently predicted theoretical upper limit, and give a 30-fold improved upper limit on the effect of hyperpolarizability. Finally, we report on the first observation of the vector and tensor shifts in a Sr lattice clock. Combining these measurements, we show that all known lattice related perturbations will not affect the clock accuracy down to the 10{sup -17} level, even for lattices as deep as 150 recoil energies.

  13. Full CKM matrix with lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Masataka; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    The authors show that it is now possible to fully determine the CKM matrix, for the first time, using lattice QCD. |V{sub cd}|, |V{sub cs}|, |V{sub ub}|, |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub us}| are, respectively, directly determined with the lattice results for form factors of semileptonic D {yields} {pi}lv, D {yields} Klv, B {yields} {pi}lv, B {yields} Dlv and K {yields} {pi}lv decays. The error from the quenched approximation is removed by using the MILC unquenced lattice gauge configurations, where the effect of u, d and s quarks is included. The error from the ''chiral'' extrapolation (m{sub l} {yields} m{sub ud}) is greatly reduced by using improved staggered quarks. The accuracy is comparable to that of the Particle Data Group averages. In addition, |V{sub ud}|, |V{sub ts}|, |V{sub ts}| and |V{sub td}| are determined by using unitarity of the CKM matrix and the experimental result for sin (2{beta}). In this way, they obtain all 9 CKM matrix elements, where the only theoretical input is lattice QCD. They also obtain all the Wolfenstein parameters, for the first time, using lattice QCD.

  14. Lattice-induced transparency in planar metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjappa, Manukumara; Srivastava, Yogesh Kumar; Singh, Ranjan

    2016-10-01

    Lattice modes are intrinsic to periodic structures and they can be easily tuned and controlled by changing the lattice constant of the structural array. Previous studies have revealed the excitation of sharp absorption resonances due to lattice mode coupling with the plasmonic resonances. Here, we report an experimental observation of a lattice-induced transparency (LIT) by coupling the first-order lattice mode (FOLM) to the structural resonance of a terahertz asymmetric split ring resonator. The observed sharp transparency is a result of the destructive interference between the bright mode and the FOLM assisted dark mode. As the FOLM is swept across the metamaterial resonance, the transparency band undergoes a large change in its bandwidth and resonance position. We propose a three-oscillator model to explain the underlying coupling mechanism in LIT system that shows good agreement with the observed results. Besides controlling the transparency behavior, LIT also shows a huge enhancement in its Q factor and exhibits a high group delay of 28 ps with an enhanced group index of 4.5 ×104 , which could be pivotal in ultrasensitive sensing and slow-light device applications.

  15. Topological phases of shaken quantum Ising lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Lorenzo, Samuel; José García-Ripoll, Juan; Porras, Diego

    2016-02-01

    The quantum compass model consists of a two-dimensional square spin lattice where the orientation of the spin-spin interactions depends on the spatial direction of the bonds. It has remarkable symmetry properties and the ground state shows topological degeneracy. The implementation of the quantum compass model in quantum simulation setups like ultracold atoms and trapped ions is far from trivial, since spin interactions in those systems typically are independent of the spatial direction. Ising spin interactions, on the contrary, can be induced and controlled in atomic setups with state-of-the art experimental techniques. In this work, we show how the quantum compass model on a rectangular lattice can be simulated by the use of the photon-assisted tunneling induced by periodic drivings on a quantum Ising spin model. We describe a procedure to adiabatically prepare one of the doubly degenerate ground states of this model by adiabatically ramping down a transverse magnetic field, with surprising differences depending on the parity of the lattice size. Exact diagonalizations confirm the validity of this approach for small lattices. Specific implementations of this scheme are presented with ultracold atoms in optical lattices in the Mott insulator regime, as well as with Rydberg atoms.

  16. Techniques for transparent lattice measurement and correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Weixing; Li, Yongjun; Ha, Kiman

    2017-07-01

    A novel method has been successfully demonstrated at NSLS-II to characterize the lattice parameters with gated BPM turn-by-turn (TbT) capability. This method can be used at high current operation. Conventional lattice characterization and tuning are carried out at low current in dedicated machine studies which include beam-based measurement/correction of orbit, tune, dispersion, beta-beat, phase advance, coupling etc. At the NSLS-II storage ring, we observed lattice drifting during beam accumulation in user operation. Coupling and lifetime change while insertion device (ID) gaps are moved. With the new method, dynamical lattice correction is possible to achieve reliable and productive operations. A bunch-by-bunch feedback system excites a small fraction (∼1%) of bunches and gated BPMs are aligned to see those bunch motions. The gated TbT position data are used to characterize the lattice hence correction can be applied. As there are ∼1% of total charges disturbed for a short period of time (several ms), this method is transparent to general user operation. We demonstrated the effectiveness of these tools during high current user operation.

  17. Controlling polar molecules in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Kotochigova, S.; Tiesinga, E.

    2006-04-15

    We theoretically investigate the interaction of polar molecules with optical lattices and microwave fields. We demonstrate the existence of frequency windows in the optical domain where the complex internal structure of the molecule does not influence the trapping potential of the lattice. In such frequency windows the Franck-Condon factors are so small that near-resonant interaction of vibrational levels of the molecule with the lattice fields have a negligible contribution to the polarizability, and light-induced decoherences are kept to a minimum. In addition, we show that microwave fields can induce a tunable dipole-dipole interaction between ground-state rotationally symmetric (J=0) molecules. A combination of a carefully chosen lattice frequency and microwave-controlled interaction between molecules will enable trapping of polar molecules in a lattice and possibly realize molecular quantum logic gates. Our results are based on ab initio relativistic electronic structure calculations of the polar KRb and RbCs molecules combined with calculations of their rovibrational motion.

  18. Lattice Landau Gauge via Stereographic Projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Smekal, L.; Mehta, D.; Sternbeck, A.

    alexander.jorkowski@student.adelaide.edu.au, dhagash.mehta@adelaide.edu.au, andre.sternbeck@adelaide.edu.au The complete cancellation of Gribov copies and the Neuberger 0/0 problem of lattice BRST can be avoided in modified lattice Landau gauge. In compact U(1), where the problem is a lattice artifact, there remain to be Gribov copies but their number is exponentially reduced. Moreover, there is no cancellation of copies there as the sign of the Faddeev-Popov determinant is posi- tive. Applied to the maximal Abelian subgroup this avoids the perfect cancellation amongst the remaining Gribov copies for SU(N) also. In addition, based on a definition of gauge fields on the lattice as stereographically-projected link variables, it provides a framework for gauge fixed Monte-Carlo simulations. This will include all Gribov copies in the spirit of BRST. Their average is not zero, as demonstrated explicitly in simple models. This might resolve present discrepancies between gauge-fixed lattice and continuum studies of QCD Green’s functions.

  19. Hybrid lattice Boltzmann method on overlapping grids.

    PubMed

    Di Ilio, G; Chiappini, D; Ubertini, S; Bella, G; Succi, S

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a hybrid lattice Boltzmann method (HLBM) is proposed, where the standard lattice Boltzmann implementation based on the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (LBGK) approximation is combined together with an unstructured finite-volume lattice Boltzmann model. The method is constructed on an overlapping grid system, which allows the coexistence of a uniform lattice nodes spacing and a coordinate-free lattice structure. The natural adaptivity of the hybrid grid system makes the method particularly suitable to handle problems involving complex geometries. Moreover, the provided scheme ensures a high-accuracy solution near walls, given the capability of the unstructured submodel of achieving the desired level of refinement in a very flexible way. For these reasons, the HLBM represents a prospective tool for solving multiscale problems. The proposed method is here applied to the benchmark problem of a two-dimensional flow past a circular cylinder for a wide range of Reynolds numbers and its numerical performances are measured and compared with the standard LBGK ones.

  20. The galectin lattice at a glance.

    PubMed

    Nabi, Ivan R; Shankar, Jay; Dennis, James W

    2015-07-01

    Galectins are a family of widely expressed β-galactoside-binding lectins in metazoans. The 15 mammalian galectins have either one or two conserved carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs), with galectin-3 being able to pentamerize; they form complexes that crosslink glycosylated ligands to form a dynamic lattice. The galectin lattice regulates the diffusion, compartmentalization and endocytosis of plasma membrane glycoproteins and glycolipids. The galectin lattice also regulates the selection, activation and arrest of T cells, receptor kinase signaling and the functionality of membrane receptors, including the glucagon receptor, glucose and amino acid transporters, cadherins and integrins. The affinity of transmembrane glycoproteins to the galectin lattice is proportional to the number and branching of their N-glycans; with branching being mediated by Golgi N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-branching enzymes and the supply of UDP-GlcNAc through metabolite flux through the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway. The relative affinities of glycoproteins for the galectin lattice depend on the activities of the Golgi enzymes that generate the epitopes of their ligands and, thus, provide a means to analyze biological function of lectins and of the 'glycome' more broadly. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Hybrid lattice Boltzmann method on overlapping grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Ilio, G.; Chiappini, D.; Ubertini, S.; Bella, G.; Succi, S.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a hybrid lattice Boltzmann method (HLBM) is proposed, where the standard lattice Boltzmann implementation based on the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (LBGK) approximation is combined together with an unstructured finite-volume lattice Boltzmann model. The method is constructed on an overlapping grid system, which allows the coexistence of a uniform lattice nodes spacing and a coordinate-free lattice structure. The natural adaptivity of the hybrid grid system makes the method particularly suitable to handle problems involving complex geometries. Moreover, the provided scheme ensures a high-accuracy solution near walls, given the capability of the unstructured submodel of achieving the desired level of refinement in a very flexible way. For these reasons, the HLBM represents a prospective tool for solving multiscale problems. The proposed method is here applied to the benchmark problem of a two-dimensional flow past a circular cylinder for a wide range of Reynolds numbers and its numerical performances are measured and compared with the standard LBGK ones.

  2. Incommensurate lattice modulations in Potassium Vanadate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakoumakos, Bryan; Banerjee, Arnab; Mark, Lumsden; Cao, Huibo; Kim, Jong-Woo; Hoffman, Christina; Wang, Xiaoping

    Potassium Vanadate (K2V3O8) is an S = 1/2 2D square lattice antiferromagnet that shows spin reorientation indicating a strong coupling between the magnetism and its dielectric properties with a promise of rich physics that promises multiferroicity. These tangible physical properties are strongly tied through a spin-lattice coupling to the underlying lattice and superlattice behavior. It has a superlattice (SL) onsetting below Tc = 115 K with an approximate [3 x 3 x 2] modulation. Here we present our recent experiments at TOPAZ beamline at SNS which for the first time proves conclusively that the lattice modulations are incommensurate, with an in-plane Q of 0.315. We will also show our attempts to refine the data using JANA which requires a redefinition of the lattice, as well as the temperature and Q dependence of the superlattice modulation measured using neutrons at HFIR and synchrotron x-rays at APS. Our results are not only relevant for the ongoing search of multifunctional behavior in K2V3O8 but also generally for the superlattice modulations observed in a large family of fresnoites. Work performed at ORNL and ANL is supported by U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences and Office of User Facilities Division.

  3. Elasticity of a filamentous kagome lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xiaoming; Stenull, Olaf; Lubensky, T. C.

    2013-04-01

    The diluted kagome lattice, in which bonds are randomly removed with probability 1-p, consists of straight lines that intersect at points with a maximum coordination number of 4. If lines are treated as semiflexible polymers and crossing points are treated as cross-links, this lattice provides a simple model for two-dimensional filamentous networks. Lattice-based effective-medium theories and numerical simulations for filaments modeled as elastic rods, with stretching modulus μ and bending modulus κ, are used to study the elasticity of this lattice as functions of p and κ. At p=1, elastic response is purely affine, and the macroscopic elastic modulus G is independent of κ. When κ=0, the lattice undergoes a first-order rigidity-percolation transition at p=1. When κ>0, G decreases continuously as p decreases below one, reaching zero at a continuous rigidity-percolation transition at p=pb≈0.605 that is the same for all nonzero values of κ. The effective-medium theories predict scaling forms for G, which exhibit crossover from bending-dominated response at small κ/μ to stretching-dominated response at large κ/μ near both p=1 and pb, that match simulations with no adjustable parameters near p=1. The affine response as p→1 is identified with the approach to a state with sample-crossing straight filaments treated as elastic rods.

  4. Pacific Barrier Radar III (PACBAR III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. D.; Sigler, J. D.

    1983-11-01

    The Pacific Barrier (PACBAR III) C-band radar is being installed at the Western Space and Missile Center to furnish Revolution 0 detection of foreign launches. Previously installed on a tracking ship, the upgraded system will also identify and target space objects, maintain a catalog, and cover maneuvers and decay of space objects. Nominal operation will comprise a search of a predesignated 15 deg azimuth with the capability of detecting a 6 sq m target in a 400 km orbit, track spacecraft in orbits up to 800 km altitude, have a range resolution of about 80 yd, provide realtime payload and rocket body discrimination, and transmit two-way digital message traffic between the Center and NORAD in Cheyenne Mt. Interlaced vertical and horizontal pulses will augment the search and acquisition capabilities, and the antenna will have a 140 deg plunge range. The transmitter will function at 5.4-5.65 GHz, 320 p/sec, with a peak power of 0.8 MW, and the system will have a nonambiguous range of 32,768 nmi.

  5. Nucleon Structure from Dynamical Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin

    2007-06-01

    We present lattice QCD numerical calculations of hadronic structure functions and form factors from full-QCD lattices, with a chirally symmetric fermion action, domain-wall fermions, for the sea and valence quarks. The lattice spacing is about 0.12 fm with physical volume approximately (2 fm)3 for RBC 2-flavor ensembles and (3 fm)3 for RBC/UKQCD 2+1-flavor dynamical ones. The lightest sea quark mass is about 1/2 the strange quark mass for the former ensembles and 1/4 for the latter ones. Our calculations include: isovector vector- and axial-charge form factors and the first few moments of the polarized and unpolarized structure functions of the nucleon. Nonperturbative renormalization in RI/MOM scheme is applied.

  6. Nucleon Structure from Dynamical Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H.-W.

    2007-06-13

    We present lattice QCD numerical calculations of hadronic structure functions and form factors from full-QCD lattices, with a chirally symmetric fermion action, domain-wall fermions, for the sea and valence quarks. The lattice spacing is about 0.12 fm with physical volume approximately (2 fm)3 for RBC 2-flavor ensembles and (3 fm)3 for RBC/UKQCD 2+1-flavor dynamical ones. The lightest sea quark mass is about 1/2 the strange quark mass for the former ensembles and 1/4 for the latter ones. Our calculations include: isovector vector- and axial-charge form factors and the first few moments of the polarized and unpolarized structure functions of the nucleon. Nonperturbative renormalization in RI/MOM scheme is applied.

  7. Lattice radial quantization: 3D Ising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brower, R. C.; Fleming, G. T.; Neuberger, H.

    2013-04-01

    Lattice radial quantization is introduced as a nonperturbative method intended to numerically solve Euclidean conformal field theories that can be realized as fixed points of known Lagrangians. As an example, we employ a lattice shaped as a cylinder with a 2D Icosahedral cross-section to discretize dilatations in the 3D Ising model. Using the integer spacing of the anomalous dimensions of the first two descendants (l = 1, 2), we obtain an estimate for η = 0.034 (10). We also observed small deviations from integer spacing for the 3rd descendant, which suggests that a further improvement of our radial lattice action will be required to guarantee conformal symmetry at the Wilson-Fisher fixed point in the continuum limit.

  8. Entropic Lattice Boltzmann Algorithms for Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahala, George; Yepez, Jeffrey; Soe, Min; Vahala, Linda; Keating, Brian; Carter, Jonathan

    2007-11-01

    For turbulent flows in non-trivial geometry, the scaling of CFD codes (now necessarily non-pseudo spectral) quickly saturate with the number of PEs. By projecting into a lattice kinetic phase space, the turbulent dynamics are simpler and much easier to solve since the underlying kinetic equation has only local algebraic nonlinearities in the macroscopic variables with simple linear kinetic advection. To achieve arbitrary high Reynolds number, a discrete H-theorem constraint is imposed on the collision operator resulting in an entropic lattice Boltzmann (ELB) algorithm that is unconditionally stable and scales almost perfectly with PE's on any supercomputer architecture. At this mesoscopic level, there are various kinetic lattices (ELB-27, ELB-19, ELB-15) which will recover the Navier-Stokes equation to leading order in the Chapman-Enskog asymptotics. We comment on the morphology of turbulence and its correlation to the rate of change of enstrophy as well as simulations on 1600^3 grids.

  9. Making the Cut: Lattice Kirigami Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castle, Toen; Cho, Yigil; Gong, Xingting; Jung, Euiyeon; Sussman, Daniel; Yang, Shu; Kamien, Randall

    2015-03-01

    Complex 3D structures can be built by bending and folding a flat sheet, as is done in origami. This paradigm can be extended by cutting and gluing the sheet as well as folding. The principles manifest in manipulating a piece of paper can translate across many length scales, limited only by fabrication methods. We explore and develop a simple set of rules that apply to cutting, pasting, and folding honeycomb lattices. We consider origami-like structures that are extrinsically flat away from zero-dimensional sources of Gaussian curvature and one-dimensional sources of mean curvature, and our cutting and pasting rules maintain the intrinsic bond lengths on both the lattice and its dual lattice. We find that a small set of rules is allowed, providing a framework for exploring and building kirigami - folding, cutting, and pasting the edges of paper. Support from NSF DMR12-62047.

  10. Proton spin structure from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Fukugita, M.; Kuramashi, Y.; Okawa, M.; Ukawa, A. ||

    1995-09-11

    A lattice QCD calculation of the proton matrix element of the flavor singlet axial-vector current is reported. Both the connected and disconnected contributions are calculated, for the latter employing the variant method of wall source without gauge fixing. From simulations in quenched QCD with the Wilson quark action on a 16{sup 3}{times}20 lattice at {beta}=5.7 (the lattice spacing {ital a}{approx}0.14 fm), we find {Delta}{Sigma}={Delta}{ital u}+{Delta}{ital d}+{Delta}{ital s}=+0.638(54){minus}0.347(46){minus}0.109(30)=+0.18(10) with the disconnected contribution to {Delta}{ital u} and {Delta}{ital d} equal to {minus}0.119(44), which is reasonably consistent with the experiment.

  11. Topological edge states in acoustic Kagome lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Xiang; Gorlach, Maxim A.; Alu, Andrea; Khanikaev, Alexander B.

    2017-05-01

    We demonstrate that an acoustic Kagome lattice formed by an array of interconnected resonant cavities exhibits a new class of topological states protected by C3 symmetry, and it is characterised by a topological invariant in the form of a winding number in Pauli vector space. This acoustic topological metamaterial can be considered as the two-dimensional analogue of the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model, exhibiting a topological transition when a detuning is introduced between the inter-cell and intra-cell hopping amplitudes. The topological transition caused by such detuning is accompanied by the opening of a complete topological band gap, which may host edge states. The edge states emerge on either truncated ends of the lattice terminated by a cladding layer or at the domain walls between topologically nontrivial and trivial domains. First-principles simulations based on full-wave finite element method are used to design the lattice and confirm our analytical predictions.

  12. Lattice QCD simulations of the Zc+ channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prelovsek, Sasa; Lang, C. B.; Leskovec, Luka; Mohler, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the lattice QCD simulations that search for the Zc+ with the unconventional quark content c ¯c d ¯u in the channel IG(JPC) = 1+(1+-). The major challenge is due to the two-meson states J /Ψ π , Ψ2 Sπ , Ψ1 Dπ , D D¯*, D *D¯*, ηcρ that are also inevitably present in this channel. The available lattice simulations find expected two-meson eigenstates, but no additional eigenstate as a candidate for Zc+ . This is in a striking contrast to the lattice results in the flavour non-exotic channels, where additional states are found in relation to most of the known resonances and bound states.

  13. Modeling quasi-lattice with octagonal symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Girzhon, V. V.; Smolyakov, O. V.; Zakharenko, M. I.

    2014-11-15

    We prove the possibility to use the method of modeling of a quasi-lattice with octagonal symmetry similar to that proposed earlier for the decagonal quasicrystal. The method is based on the multiplication of the groups of basis sites according to specified rules. This model is shown to be equivalent to the method of the periodic lattice projection, but is simpler because it considers merely two-dimensional site groups. The application of the proposed modeling procedure to the reciprocal lattice of octagonal quasicrystals shows a fairly good matching with the electron diffraction pattern. Similarly to the decagonal quasicrystals, the possibility of three-index labeling of the diffraction reflections is exhibited in this case. Moreover, the ascertained ratio of indices provides information on the intensity of diffraction reflections.

  14. Nucleation pathways in partially disordered lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigley, David; Lifanov, Yuri; Vorselaars, Bart

    2014-03-01

    Simple lattice models are attractive for the study of non-classical nucleation and growth from solution, a phenomenon still largely inaccessible to atomistic simulation. We have extended the Potts Lattice Gas (PLG) model of Duff and Peters to include a metastable partially ordered precursor phase, mimicking the common mineral calcium carbonate. Using a combination of multicanonical Monte Carlo and equilibrium path sampling, we demonstrate that thermodynamically favourable pathways between a metastable solution state and the fully ordered lattice proceed via formation of partially ordered nuclei. By comparing the activation energy associated with the ordering of these nuclei to that needed to nucleate the ordered phase directly, we demonstrate dissolution and re-precipitation as an emergent growth phenomenon of our model.

  15. Multisite Interactions in Lattice-Gas Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einstein, T. L.; Sathiyanarayanan, R.

    For detailed applications of lattice-gas models to surface systems, multisite interactions often play at least as significant a role as interactions between pairs of adatoms that are separated by a few lattice spacings. We recall that trio (3-adatom, non-pairwise) interactions do not inevitably create phase boundary asymmetries about half coverage. We discuss a sophisticated application to an experimental system and describe refinements in extracting lattice-gas energies from calculations of total energies of several different ordered overlayers. We describe how lateral relaxations complicate matters when there is direct interaction between the adatoms, an issue that is important when examining the angular dependence of step line tensions. We discuss the connector model as an alternative viewpoint and close with a brief account of recent work on organic molecule overlayers.

  16. Josephson vortex lattice in layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, A. E.; Dodgson, M. J. W.

    2013-09-15

    Many superconducting materials are composed of weakly coupled conducting layers. Such a layered structure has a very strong influence on the properties of vortex matter in a magnetic field. This review focuses on the properties of the Josephson vortex lattice generated by the magnetic field applied in the direction of the layers. The theoretical description is based on the Lawrence-Doniach model in the London limit, which takes only the phase degree of freedom of the superconducting order parameter into account. In spite of its simplicity, this model leads to an amazingly rich set of phenomena. We review in detail the structure of an isolated vortex line and various properties of the vortex lattice, in both dilute and dense limits. In particular, we extensively discuss the influence of the layered structure and thermal fluctuations on the selection of lattice configurations at different magnetic fields.

  17. Quantum search algorithms on a regular lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Hein, Birgit; Tanner, Gregor

    2010-07-15

    Quantum algorithms for searching for one or more marked items on a d-dimensional lattice provide an extension of Grover's search algorithm including a spatial component. We demonstrate that these lattice search algorithms can be viewed in terms of the level dynamics near an avoided crossing of a one-parameter family of quantum random walks. We give approximations for both the level splitting at the avoided crossing and the effectively two-dimensional subspace of the full Hilbert space spanning the level crossing. This makes it possible to give the leading order behavior for the search time and the localization probability in the limit of large lattice size including the leading order coefficients. For d=2 and d=3, these coefficients are calculated explicitly. Closed form expressions are given for higher dimensions.

  18. Arbitrary lattice symmetries via block copolymer nanomeshes

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Pawel W.; Rahman, Atikur; Black, Charles T.; Yager, Kevin G.

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of block copolymers is a powerful motif for spontaneously forming well-defined nanostructures over macroscopic areas. Yet, the inherent energy minimization criteria of self-assembly give rise to a limited library of structures; diblock copolymers naturally form spheres on a cubic lattice, hexagonally packed cylinders and alternating lamellae. Here, we demonstrate multicomponent nanomeshes with any desired lattice symmetry. We exploit photothermal annealing to rapidly order and align block copolymer phases over macroscopic areas, combined with conversion of the self-assembled organic phase into inorganic replicas. Repeated photothermal processing independently aligns successive layers, providing full control of the size, symmetry and composition of the nanoscale unit cell. We construct a variety of symmetries, most of which are not natively formed by block copolymers, including squares, rhombuses, rectangles and triangles. In fact, we demonstrate all possible two-dimensional Bravais lattices. Finally, we elucidate the influence of nanostructure on the electrical and optical properties of nanomeshes. PMID:26100566

  19. Excited state baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Robert G. Edwards; Dudek, Jozef J.; Richards, David G.; ...

    2011-10-31

    Here, we present a calculation of the Nucleon and Delta excited state spectrum on dynamical anisotropic clover lattices. A method for operator construction is introduced that allows for the reliable identification of the continuum spins of baryon states, overcoming the reduced symmetry of the cubic lattice. Using this method, we are able to determine a spectrum of single-particle states for spins up to and including $J = 7/2$, of both parities, the first time this has been achieved in a lattice calculation. We find a spectrum of states identifiable as admixtures of $SU(6) Ⓧ O(3)$ representations and a counting ofmore » levels that is consistent with the non-relativistic $qqq$ constituent quark model. This dense spectrum is incompatible with quark-diquark model solutions to the "missing resonance problem" and shows no signs of parity doubling of states.« less

  20. Lattice Strain Defects in a Ceria Nanolayer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An ultrathin two-dimensional CeO2 (ceria) phase on a Cu(110) surface has been fabricated and fully characterized by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, and density functional theory. The atomic lattice structure of the ceria/Cu(110) system is revealed as a hexagonal CeO2(111)-type monolayer separated from the Cu(110) surface by a partly disordered Cu–O intercalated buffer layer. The epitaxial coupling of the two-dimensional ceria overlayer to the Cu(110)-O surface leads to a nanoscopic stripe pattern, which creates defect regions of quasi-periodic lattice distortions. The symmetry and lattice mismatch at the interface is clarified to be responsible for the topographic stripe geometry and the related anisotropic strain defect regions at the ceria surface. This ceria monolayer is in a fully oxidized and thermodynamically stable state. PMID:26988695

  1. Lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity.

    PubMed

    Ilseven, E; Mendoza, M

    2016-02-01

    In the Z4 formulation, Einstein equations are written as a set of flux conservative first-order hyperbolic equations that resemble fluid dynamics equations. Based on this formulation, we construct a lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity and validate it with well-established tests, also known as "apples with apples." Furthermore, we find that by increasing the relaxation time, we gain stability at the cost of losing accuracy, and by decreasing the lattice spacings while keeping a constant numerical diffusivity, the accuracy and stability of our simulations improve. Finally, in order to show the potential of our approach, a linear scaling law for parallelization with respect to number of CPU cores is demonstrated. Our model represents the first step in using lattice kinetic theory to solve gravitational problems.

  2. Lattice gas dynamics under continuous measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Cheung, Hil F. H.; Madjarov, Ivaylo S.; Chen, Huiyao Y.; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2016-05-01

    The act of measurement has a profound consequences quantum systems. While this backaction has so far been discussed as being a limitation on the precision of measurements, it is increasingly being appreciated that measurement backaction is a powerful and versatile means of quantum control. We have previously demonstrated that backaction from position measurement can modify the coherent tunneling rate of a lattice gas through the Quantum Zeno effect. Here, we show how spatially designed measurement landscapes can be used to realize entropy segregation in lattice gases. This presents an alternate path to the longstanding challenge of realizing lattice gases with sufficiently low entropy to access regimes of correlated quantum behavior such as Néel ordered states. This work is supported by the ARO MURI on non-equilibrium dynamics.

  3. Lattice animals: dc=8 for trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruskin, H. J.; Duarte, J. A. M. S.

    1982-09-01

    The asymptotic behavior of the total number of treelike clusters (lattice trees) on the hypercubic system is investigated for d>=4 by the method of series expansions. Interest centers on ascertaining the critical dimension, dc, at which the prefactor exponent θ attains its mean-field value. We present results for θ and for the cluster growth parameter λ for d=4 to 9. The λ values are close to within a few percent of those found for the general animal case. Results for θ have large uncertainties in the dimensions of interest, and the mean-field value is approached very gradually with d, so that the possibility of a lower value for dc cannot be completely discarded. Nevertheless, the available evidence suggests that dc=8 for lattice trees. This supports the findings of Lubensky and Isaacson in their recent work on lattice animals and dilute branched polymers.

  4. Excited state baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Robert G. Edwards; Dudek, Jozef J.; Richards, David G.; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2011-10-31

    Here, we present a calculation of the Nucleon and Delta excited state spectrum on dynamical anisotropic clover lattices. A method for operator construction is introduced that allows for the reliable identification of the continuum spins of baryon states, overcoming the reduced symmetry of the cubic lattice. Using this method, we are able to determine a spectrum of single-particle states for spins up to and including $J = 7/2$, of both parities, the first time this has been achieved in a lattice calculation. We find a spectrum of states identifiable as admixtures of $SU(6) Ⓧ O(3)$ representations and a counting of levels that is consistent with the non-relativistic $qqq$ constituent quark model. This dense spectrum is incompatible with quark-diquark model solutions to the "missing resonance problem" and shows no signs of parity doubling of states.

  5. How good is the Lattice Boltzmann method?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocheemoolayil, Joseph; Barad, Michael; Kiris, Cetin

    2016-11-01

    Conflicting opinions exist in literature regarding how efficient the lattice Boltzmann method is relative to high-order finite difference approximations of the Navier-Stokes equations on Cartesian meshes, especially at high Mach numbers. We address the question from the pragmatic viewpoint of a practitioner. Dispersion, dissipation and aliasing errors of various lattice Boltzmann models are systematically quantified. The number of floating point operations and memory required for a desired accuracy level are carefully compared for the two numerical methods. Turbulent kinetic energy budgets for several standard test cases such as the decaying Taylor-Green vortex problem are used to evaluate how effective the stabilization mechanisms necessary for lattice Boltzmann method at high Reynolds numbers are. Detailed comments regarding the cyclomatic complexity of the underlying software, scalability of the underlying algorithm on state-of-the-art high-performance computing platforms and wall clock times and relative accuracy for selected simulations conducted using the two approaches are also made.

  6. Spectroscopy of charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present the ground and excited state spectra of singly, doubly and triply charmed baryons by using dynamical lattice QCD. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice and are obtained after subduction from their continuum analogues are utilized. Using novel computational techniques correlation functions of these operators are generated and the variational method is exploited to extract excited states. The lattice spectra that we obtain have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the low lying states remarkably resemble the expectations of quantum numbers from SU(6) x O(3) symmetry. Various energy splittings between the extracted states, including splittings due to hyperfine as well as spin-orbit coupling, are considered and those are also compared against similar energy splittings at other quark masses.

  7. Exploring hyperons and hypernuclei with lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S.R.; Bedaque, P.F.; Parreno, A.; Savage, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    In this work we outline a program for lattice QCD that wouldprovide a first step toward understanding the strong and weakinteractions of strange baryons. The study of hypernuclear physics hasprovided a significant amount of information regarding the structure andweak decays of light nuclei containing one or two Lambda's, and Sigma's.From a theoretical standpoint, little is known about the hyperon-nucleoninteraction, which is required input for systematic calculations ofhypernuclear structure. Furthermore, the long-standing discrepancies inthe P-wave amplitudes for nonleptonic hyperon decays remain to beunderstood, and their resolution is central to a better understanding ofthe weak decays of hypernuclei. We present a framework that utilizesLuscher's finite-volume techniques in lattice QCD to extract thescattering length and effective range for Lambda-N scattering in both QCDand partially-quenched QCD. The effective theory describing thenonleptonic decays of hyperons using isospin symmetry alone, appropriatefor lattice calculations, is constructed.

  8. Lattice gas methods for computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, Victor W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the lattice gas solution to the category 1 problems of the ICASE/LaRC Workshop on Benchmark Problems in Computational Aeroacoustics. The first and second problems were solved for Delta t = Delta x = 1, and additionally the second problem was solved for Delta t = 1/4 and Delta x = 1/2. The results are striking: even for these large time and space grids the lattice gas numerical solutions are almost indistinguishable from the analytical solutions. A simple bug in the Mathematica code was found in the solutions submitted for comparison, and the comparison plots shown at the end of this volume show the bug. An Appendix to the present paper shows an example lattice gas solution with and without the bug.

  9. Maximum independent set on diluted triangular lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fay, C. W., IV; Liu, J. W.; Duxbury, P. M.

    2006-05-01

    Core percolation and maximum independent set on random graphs have recently been characterized using the methods of statistical physics. Here we present a statistical physics study of these problems on bond diluted triangular lattices. Core percolation critical behavior is found to be consistent with the standard percolation values, though there are strong finite size effects. A transfer matrix method is developed and applied to find accurate values of the density and degeneracy of the maximum independent set on lattices of limited width but large length. An extrapolation of these results to the infinite lattice limit yields high precision results, which are tabulated. These results are compared to results found using both vertex based and edge based local probability recursion algorithms, which have proven useful in the analysis of hard computational problems, such as the satisfiability problem.

  10. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices

    PubMed Central

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-01-01

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose—Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid. PMID:26345721

  11. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-09-08

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose-Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid.

  12. Discrete breathers in hexagonal dusty plasma lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Koukouloyannis, V.; Kourakis, I.

    2009-08-15

    The occurrence of single-site or multisite localized vibrational modes, also called discrete breathers, in two-dimensional hexagonal dusty plasma lattices is investigated. The system is described by a Klein-Gordon hexagonal lattice characterized by a negative coupling parameter epsilon in account of its inverse dispersive behavior. A theoretical analysis is performed in order to establish the possibility of existence of single as well as three-site discrete breathers in such systems. The study is complemented by a numerical investigation based on experimentally provided potential forms. This investigation shows that a dusty plasma lattice can support single-site discrete breathers, while three-site in phase breathers could exist if specific conditions, about the intergrain interaction strength, would hold. On the other hand, out of phase and vortex three-site breathers cannot be supported since they are highly unstable.

  13. Modeling shocks in periodic lattice materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messner, Mark C.; Barham, Mathew I.; Kumar, Mukul; Barton, Nathan R.

    2017-01-01

    Periodic lattice materials are extremely light relative to their stiffness and strength. Developments in additive manufacturing technologies open the possibility of using periodic lattices as energy absorbers for impact loading. This work extends an equivalent continuum material model for periodic, stretch dominated lattices to shock compression by augmenting the model with an equation for the evolution of relative density under volumetric plastic deformation. When compared to detailed finite element simulations, this simple modification to the equivalent continuum model accurately captures some parts of the shock response, especially the behavior of elastic precursors. However, the model is less accurate for the properties of the compaction shock, reflecting inaccuracies in the final state of the material.

  14. Condensate oscillations in a Penrose tiling lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akdeniz, Z.; Vignolo, P.

    2017-07-01

    We study the dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate subject to a particular Penrose tiling lattice. In such a lattice, the potential energy at each site depends on the neighbour sites, accordingly to the model introduced by Sutherland [16]. The Bose-Einstein wavepacket, initially at rest at the lattice symmetry center, is released. We observe a very complex time-evolution that strongly depends on the symmetry center (two choices are possible), on the potential energy landscape dispersion, and on the interaction strength. The condensate-width oscillates at different frequencies and we can identify large-frequency reshaping oscillations and low-frequency rescaling oscillations. We discuss in which conditions these oscillations are spatially bounded, denoting a self-trapping dynamics.

  15. Excited light meson spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Thomas, Hadron Spectrum Collaboration

    2012-04-01

    I report on recent progress in calculating excited meson spectra using lattice QCD, emphasizing results and phenomenology. With novel techniques we can now extract extensive spectra of excited mesons with high statistical precision, including spin-four states and those with exotic quantum numbers. As well as isovector meson spectra, I will present new calculations of the spectrum of excited light isoscalar mesons, something that has up to now been a challenge for lattice QCD. I show determinations of the flavor content of these mesons, including the eta-eta' mixing angle, providing a window on annihilation dynamics in QCD. I will also discuss recent work on using lattice QCD to map out the energy-dependent phase shift in pi-pi scattering and future applications of the methodology to the study of resonances and decays.

  16. Exploring Three Nucleon Forces in Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Takumi

    2011-10-21

    We study the three nucleon force in N{sub f} = 2 dynamical clover fermion lattice QCD, utilizing the Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter wave function of the three nucleon system. Since parity-odd two nucleon potentials are not available in lattice QCD at this moment, we develop a new formulation to extract the genuine three nucleon force which requires only the information of parity-even two nucleon potentials. In order to handle the extremely expensive calculation cost, we consider a specific three-dimensional coordinate configuration for the three nucleons. We find that the linear setup is advantageous, where nucleons are aligned linearly with equal spacings. The lattice calculation is performed with 16{sup 3}x32 configurations at {beta} = 1.95, m{sub {pi}} = 1.13 GeV generated by CP-PACS Collaboration, and the result of the three nucleon force in triton channel is presented.

  17. Pattern Recognition of Adsorbing HP Lattice Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Matthew S.; Shi, Guangjie; Wüst, Thomas; Landau, David P.; Schmid, Friederike

    2015-03-01

    Protein adsorption is relevant in fields ranging from medicine to industry, and the qualitative behavior exhibited by course-grained models could shed insight for further research in such fields. Our study on the selective adsorption of lattice proteins utilizes the Wang-Landau algorithm to simulate the Hydrophobic-Polar (H-P) model with an efficient set of Monte Carlo moves. Each substrate is modeled as a square pattern of 9 lattice sites which attract either H or P monomers, and are located on an otherwise neutral surface. The fully enumerated set of 102 unique surfaces is simulated with each protein sequence. A collection of 27-monomer sequences is used- each of which is non-degenerate and protein-like. Thermodynamic quantities such as the specific heat and free energy are calculated from the density of states, and are used to investigate the adsorption of lattice proteins on patterned substrates. Research supported by NSF.

  18. Ising antiferromagnet on the 2-uniform lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Unjong

    2016-08-01

    The antiferromagnetic Ising model is investigated on the twenty 2-uniform lattices using the Monte Carlo method based on the Wang-Landau algorithm and the Metropolis algorithm to study the geometric frustration effect systematically. Based on the specific heat, the residual entropy, and the Edwards-Anderson freezing order parameter, the ground states of them were determined. In addition to the long-range-ordered phase and the spin ice phase found in the Archimedean lattices, two more phases were found. The partial long-range order is long-range order with exceptional disordered sites, which give extensive residual entropy. In the partial spin ice phase, the partial freezing phenomenon appears: A majority of sites are frozen without long-range order, but the other sites are fluctuating even at zero temperature. The spin liquid ground state was not found in the 2-uniform lattices.

  19. Lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilseven, E.; Mendoza, M.

    2016-02-01

    In the Z4 formulation, Einstein equations are written as a set of flux conservative first-order hyperbolic equations that resemble fluid dynamics equations. Based on this formulation, we construct a lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity and validate it with well-established tests, also known as "apples with apples." Furthermore, we find that by increasing the relaxation time, we gain stability at the cost of losing accuracy, and by decreasing the lattice spacings while keeping a constant numerical diffusivity, the accuracy and stability of our simulations improve. Finally, in order to show the potential of our approach, a linear scaling law for parallelization with respect to number of CPU cores is demonstrated. Our model represents the first step in using lattice kinetic theory to solve gravitational problems.

  20. Cold bosons in noisy optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schachenmayer, Johannes; Pichler, Hannes; Zoller, Peter; Daley, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    Cold atoms in optical lattices open the possibility to experimentally study strongly interacting many-body quantum systems with controllable parameters. A key challenge to prepare interesting quantum states in these systems is to achieve sufficiently low temperatures. At these temperatures a deep theoretical understanding of possible heating processes and how they affect the characteristics of the quantum state becomes essential. In every realistic experiment there exist many sources of noise that cause phase and amplitude fluctuations in the standing laser waves that form the optical lattice potential. This classical noise can lead to heating and a significant change of the quantum state. We study the stochastic many-body non-equilibrium dynamics of bosons in an optical lattice and determine how the state changes depending on the characteristics of the noise. We do this by solving time-dependent stochastic many-body Schr"odinger equations, both analytically and numerically.

  1. Physical Nucleon Form Factors from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Hrayr Matevosyan; Anthony W. Thomas; Gerald A. Miller

    2005-10-25

    We explore the possibility of extrapolating state of the art lattice QCD calculations of nucleon form factors to the physical regime. We find that the lattice results can be reproduced using the Light Front Cloudy Bag Model and the Extended Gari-Krmpelmann Model by letting their parameters be analytic functions of the quark mass. We then use the models to extend the lattice calculations to large values of Q{sup 2} of interest to current and planned experiments. These functions for the first model are also used to define extrapolations to the physical value of the pion mass, thereby allowing us to study how the predicted zero in G{sub E}(Q{sup 2})/G{sub M}(Q{sup 2}) varies as a function of quark mass.

  2. Experimental Realization of a Quantum Pentagonal Lattice

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Hironori; Okubo, Tsuyoshi; Kittaka, Shunichiro; Sakakibara, Toshiro; Araki, Koji; Iwase, Kenji; Amaya, Naoki; Ono, Toshio; Hosokoshi, Yuko

    2015-01-01

    Geometric frustration, in which competing interactions give rise to degenerate ground states, potentially induces various exotic quantum phenomena in magnetic materials. Minimal models comprising triangular units, such as triangular and Kagome lattices, have been investigated for decades to realize novel quantum phases, such as quantum spin liquid. A pentagon is the second-minimal elementary unit for geometric frustration. The realization of such systems is expected to provide a distinct platform for studying frustrated magnetism. Here, we present a spin-1/2 quantum pentagonal lattice in the new organic radical crystal α-2,6-Cl2-V [=α-3-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-1,5-diphenylverdazyl]. Its unique molecular arrangement allows the formation of a partially corner-shared pentagonal lattice (PCPL). We find a clear 1/3 magnetization plateau and an anomalous change in magnetization in the vicinity of the saturation field, which originate from frustrated interactions in the PCPL. PMID:26468930

  3. Lattice Strain Defects in a Ceria Nanolayer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liying; Doudin, Nassar; Surnev, Svetlozar; Barcaro, Giovanni; Sementa, Luca; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Netzer, Falko P

    2016-04-07

    An ultrathin two-dimensional CeO2 (ceria) phase on a Cu(110) surface has been fabricated and fully characterized by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, and density functional theory. The atomic lattice structure of the ceria/Cu(110) system is revealed as a hexagonal CeO2(111)-type monolayer separated from the Cu(110) surface by a partly disordered Cu-O intercalated buffer layer. The epitaxial coupling of the two-dimensional ceria overlayer to the Cu(110)-O surface leads to a nanoscopic stripe pattern, which creates defect regions of quasi-periodic lattice distortions. The symmetry and lattice mismatch at the interface is clarified to be responsible for the topographic stripe geometry and the related anisotropic strain defect regions at the ceria surface. This ceria monolayer is in a fully oxidized and thermodynamically stable state.

  4. Full-deautonomisation of a lattice equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willox, R.; Mase, T.; Ramani, A.; Grammaticos, B.

    2016-07-01

    In this letter we report on the unexpected possibility of applying the full-deautonomisation approach we recently proposed for predicting the algebraic entropy of second-order birational mappings, to discrete lattice equations. Moreover, we show, on two examples, that the full-deautonomisation technique can in fact also be successfully applied to reductions of these lattice equations to mappings with orders higher than 2. In particular, we apply this technique to a recently discovered lattice equation that has confined singularities while being nonintegrable, and we show that our approach accurately predicts this nonintegrable character. Finally, we demonstrate how our method can even be used to predict the algebraic entropy for some nonconfining higher order mappings.

  5. Organic topological insulators in organometallic lattices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z F; Liu, Zheng; Liu, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Topological insulators are a recently discovered class of materials having insulating bulk electronic states but conducting boundary states distinguished by nontrivial topology. So far, several generations of topological insulators have been theoretically predicted and experimentally confirmed, all based on inorganic materials. Here, based on first-principles calculations, we predict a family of two-dimensional organic topological insulators made of organometallic lattices. Designed by assembling molecular building blocks of triphenyl-metal compounds with strong spin-orbit coupling into a hexagonal lattice, this new classes of organic topological insulators are shown to exhibit nontrivial topological edge states that are robust against significant lattice strain. We envision that organic topological insulators will greatly broaden the scientific and technological impact of topological insulators.

  6. Hyper III on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Hyper III was a full-scale lifting-body remotely piloted research vehicle (RPRV) built at what was then the NASA Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base in Southern California. The Flight Research Center (FRC--as Dryden was named from 1959 until 1976) already had experience with testing small-scale aircraft using model-airplane techniques, but the first true remotely piloted research vehicle was the Hyper III, which flew only once in December 1969. At that time, the Center was engaged in flight research with a variety of reentry shapes called lifting bodies, and there was a desire both to expand the flight research experience with maneuverable reentry vehicles, including a high-performance, variable-geometry craft, and to investigate a remotely piloted flight research technique that made maximum use of a research pilot's skill and experience by placing him 'in the loop' as if he were in the cockpit. (There have been, as yet, no female research pilots assigned to Dryden.) The Hyper III as originally conceived was a stiletto-shaped lifting body that had resulted from a study at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. It was one of a number of hypersonic, cross-range reentry vehicles studied at Langley. (Hypersonic means Mach 5--five times the speed of sound--or faster; cross-range means able to fly a considerable distance to the left or right of the initial reentry path.) The FRC added a small, deployable, skewed wing to compensate for the shape's extremely low glide ratio. Shop personnel built the 32-foot-long Hyper III and covered its tubular frame with dacron, aluminum, and fiberglass, for about $6,500. Hyper III employed the same '8-ball' attitude indicator developed for control-room use when flying the X-15, two model-airplane receivers to command the vehicle's hydraulic controls, and a telemetry system (surplus from the X-15 program) to transmit 12 channels of data to the ground not only for display and control but for data

  7. Hyper III on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Hyper III was a full-scale lifting-body remotely piloted research vehicle (RPRV) built at what was then the NASA Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base in Southern California. The Flight Research Center (FRC--as Dryden was named from 1959 until 1976) already had experience with testing small-scale aircraft using model-airplane techniques, but the first true remotely piloted research vehicle was the Hyper III, which flew only once in December 1969. At that time, the Center was engaged in flight research with a variety of reentry shapes called lifting bodies, and there was a desire both to expand the flight research experience with maneuverable reentry vehicles, including a high-performance, variable-geometry craft, and to investigate a remotely piloted flight research technique that made maximum use of a research pilot's skill and experience by placing him 'in the loop' as if he were in the cockpit. (There have been, as yet, no female research pilots assigned to Dryden.) The Hyper III as originally conceived was a stiletto-shaped lifting body that had resulted from a study at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. It was one of a number of hypersonic, cross-range reentry vehicles studied at Langley. (Hypersonic means Mach 5--five times the speed of sound--or faster; cross-range means able to fly a considerable distance to the left or right of the initial reentry path.) The FRC added a small, deployable, skewed wing to compensate for the shape's extremely low glide ratio. Shop personnel built the 32-foot-long Hyper III and covered its tubular frame with dacron, aluminum, and fiberglass, for about $6,500. Hyper III employed the same '8-ball' attitude indicator developed for control-room use when flying the X-15, two model-airplane receivers to command the vehicle's hydraulic controls, and a telemetry system (surplus from the X-15 program) to transmit 12 channels of data to the ground not only for display and control but for data

  8. kmos: A lattice kinetic Monte Carlo framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Max J.; Matera, Sebastian; Reuter, Karsten

    2014-07-01

    Kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) simulations have emerged as a key tool for microkinetic modeling in heterogeneous catalysis and other materials applications. Systems, where site-specificity of all elementary reactions allows a mapping onto a lattice of discrete active sites, can be addressed within the particularly efficient lattice kMC approach. To this end we describe the versatile kmos software package, which offers a most user-friendly implementation, execution, and evaluation of lattice kMC models of arbitrary complexity in one- to three-dimensional lattice systems, involving multiple active sites in periodic or aperiodic arrangements, as well as site-resolved pairwise and higher-order lateral interactions. Conceptually, kmos achieves a maximum runtime performance which is essentially independent of lattice size by generating code for the efficiency-determining local update of available events that is optimized for a defined kMC model. For this model definition and the control of all runtime and evaluation aspects kmos offers a high-level application programming interface. Usage proceeds interactively, via scripts, or a graphical user interface, which visualizes the model geometry, the lattice occupations and rates of selected elementary reactions, while allowing on-the-fly changes of simulation parameters. We demonstrate the performance and scaling of kmos with the application to kMC models for surface catalytic processes, where for given operation conditions (temperature and partial pressures of all reactants) central simulation outcomes are catalytic activity and selectivities, surface composition, and mechanistic insight into the occurrence of individual elementary processes in the reaction network.

  9. Atoms in non-dissipative optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamini, Silvia

    Optical lattices induced by light detuned far from the frequency of any atomic resonance transition are ideal systems in which to develop techniques for the coherent control of atomic motional and internal states. Decoherence arising from spontaneous emission can be eliminated to an arbitrary degree by varying the detuning of the optical field. The atoms trapped in these lattices are to a large extent isolated from environmental disturbances and from each other. The first step towards the coherent control of atoms in a far-detuned lattice is their preparation in a single motional state. In this thesis the preparation of atoms in the ground vibrational state of a two-dimensional far-detuned optical lattice via resolved-sideband Raman cooling is presented. This sideband-cooling scheme involves stimulated Raman transitions between bound vibrational states of a pair of magnetic ground state sublevels, followed by an irreversible step due to optical pumping, resulting in a net loss of one quantum of vibrational energy per cooling cycle. This process provides efficient cooling in two-dimensions and leads to the accumulation of a large fraction of atoms in the 2-D ground vibrational state of a potential well associated with a single Zeeman substate. Experiments aimed at improving and monitoring the characteristics of the lar-detuned lattice and the sideband-Raman cooling efficiency are also described. Parametric excitation experiments and modelling are employed to investigate the degree of anharmonicity of the optical potential and the importance of heating induced by laser intensity noise, whilst Zeeman-state analysis of the sample is performed for monitoring the distribution of atoms over different magnetic sub- states. Finally, spin-polarization experiments are carried out in order to study the paramagnetic properties of the lattice and lead to an evaluation of a spin-temperature for the sample.

  10. Spin waves in the fcc lattice antiferromagnet: competing interactions, frustration, and instabilities in the Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Avinash; Mohapatra, Shubhajyoti; Ziman, Timothy; Chatterji, Tapan

    2017-02-01

    Spin waves in the type-III ordered antiferromagnetic state of the frustrated t- t ' Hubbard model on the face-centred-cubic (fcc) lattice are calculated to investigate finite-U-induced competing interaction and frustration effects on magnetic excitations and instabilities. Particularly strong competing interactions generated due to the interplay of fcc lattice geometry and magnetic order result in significant spin wave softening. The calculated spin wave dispersion is found to be in qualitative agreement with the measured spin wave dispersion in the pyrite mineral MnS2 obtained from inelastic neutron scattering experiments. Instabilities to other magnetic orders (type I, type II, spiral, non-collinear), as signalled by spin wave energies turning negative, are also discussed.

  11. Lattice Calculations of Nucleon Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Syritsyn, S. N.

    2011-10-24

    We present recent results of calculation of the isovector electromagnetic and axial form factors of the nucleon using lattice QCD with three different lattice actions and pion masses down to m{sub {pi}} > or approx. 300 MeV. Because of the precision of our high-statistics calculations, we can test predictions of baryon chiral perturbation theory for the charge and axial radii of the nucleon. We find that currently available baryon ChPT calculations disagree with our data, indicating that the corresponding effective theory approximations are not valid above m{sub {pi}{approx_equal}3}00 MeV.

  12. Helical Floquet Channels in 1D Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budich, Jan Carl; Hu, Ying; Zoller, Peter

    2017-03-01

    We show how dispersionless channels exhibiting perfect spin-momentum locking can arise in a 1D lattice model. While such spectra are forbidden by fermion doubling in static 1D systems, here we demonstrate their appearance in the stroboscopic dynamics of a periodically driven system. Remarkably, this phenomenon does not rely on any adiabatic assumptions, in contrast to the well known Thouless pump and related models of adiabatic spin pumps. The proposed setup is shown to be experimentally feasible with state-of-the-art techniques used to control ultracold alkaline earth atoms in optical lattices.

  13. YANG-MILLS FIELDS AND THE LATTICE.

    SciTech Connect

    CREUTZ,M.

    2004-05-18

    The Yang-Mills theory lies at the heart of our understanding of elementary particle interactions. For the strong nuclear forces, we must understand this theory in the strong coupling regime. The primary technique for this is the lattice. While basically an ultraviolet regulator, the lattice avoids the use of a perturbative expansion. I discuss some of the historical circumstances that drove us to this approach, which has had immense success, convincingly demonstrating quark confinement and obtaining crucial properties of the strong interactions from first principles.

  14. Experience with split transition lattices at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.; Tepikian, S.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.

    2010-05-23

    During the acceleration process, heavy ion beams in RHIC cross the transition energy. When RHIC was colliding deuterons and gold ions during Run-8, lattices with different integer tunes were used for the two rings. This resulted in the two rings crossing transition at different times, which proved beneficial for the 'Yellow' ring, the RF system of which is slaved to the 'Blue' ring. For the symmetric gold-gold run in FY2010, lattices with different transition energies but equal tunes were implemented. We report the optics design concept as well as operational experience with this configuration.

  15. DESIGN OF THE RCMS LATTICE OPTICS.

    SciTech Connect

    CARDONA,J.; KEWISCH,J.; PEGGS,S.

    2002-06-02

    THE RAPID CYCLING MEDICAL SYNCHROTRON (RCMS) IS DESIGNED TO BE A VERY LIGHT AND INEXPENSIVE ACCELERATOR. THIS IS POSSIBLE DUE TO THE SMALL BEAM SIZE THAT HAS BEEN CHOSEN EARLY DURING THE DESIGN STAGE. THIS CHOICE HAS IMPLICATIONS IN THE DESIGN OF THE LATTICE OPTICS. IN THIS PAPER, WE PRESENT AN OVERVIEW OF THE RCMS OPTICS LATTICE, THE KIND OF MAGNETS TO BE USED AND ALSO A DESCRIPTION OF A SPECIAL OPTIC MODULE THAT MATCHES THE ROTATING GANTRY WITH THE REST OF THE FIXED ACCELERATOR. TECHNIQUESDEVELOPED TO WIN ADDITIONAL SPACE BETWEEN QUADRUPOLES WITHOUT DISTRUBING BETA FUNCTIONS ARE ALSO PRESENTED.

  16. Propagating edge states in strained honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, Grazia; Ozawa, Tomoki; Price, Hannah M.; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the helically propagating edge states associated with pseudo-Landau levels in strained honeycomb lattices. We exploit chiral symmetry to derive a general criterion for the existence of these propagating edge states in the presence of only nearest-neighbor hoppings and we verify our criterion using numerical simulations of both uniaxially and trigonally strained honeycomb lattices. We show that the propagation of the helical edge state can be controlled by engineering the shape of the edges. Sensitivity to chiral-symmetry-breaking next-nearest-neighbor hoppings is assessed. Our result opens up an avenue toward the precise control of edge modes through manipulation of the edge shape.

  17. Fast Lattice Boltzmann Solver for Relativistic Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, M.; Herrmann, H. J.; Boghosian, B. M.; Succi, S.

    2010-07-02

    A lattice Boltzmann formulation for relativistic fluids is presented and numerically validated through quantitative comparison with recent hydrodynamic simulations of relativistic fluids. In order to illustrate its capability to handle complex geometries, the scheme is also applied to the case of a three-dimensional relativistic shock wave, generated by a supernova explosion, impacting on a massive interstellar cloud. This formulation opens up the possibility of exporting the proven advantages of lattice Boltzmann methods, namely, computational efficiency and easy handling of complex geometries, to the context of (mildly) relativistic fluid dynamics at large, from quark-gluon plasmas up to supernovae with relativistic outflows.

  18. Extra-dimensional models on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Knechtli, Francesco; Rinaldi, Enrico

    2016-08-05

    In this paper we summarize the ongoing effort to study extra-dimensional gauge theories with lattice simulations. In these models the Higgs field is identified with extra-dimensional components of the gauge field. The Higgs potential is generated by quantum corrections and is protected from divergences by the higher dimensional gauge symmetry. Dimensional reduction to four dimensions can occur through compactification or localization. Gauge-Higgs unification models are often studied using perturbation theory. Numerical lattice simulations are used to go beyond these perturbative expectations and to include nonperturbative effects. We describe the known perturbative predictions and their fate in the strongly-coupled regime for various extra-dimensional models.

  19. String breaking in four dimensional lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A.; Eichten, E.; Thacker, H.

    2001-06-01

    Virtual quark pair screening leads to breaking of the string between fundamental representation quarks in QCD. For unquenched four dimensional lattice QCD, this (so far elusive) phenomenon is studied using the recently developed truncated determinant algorithm (TDA). The dynamical configurations were generated on a 650 MHz PC. Quark eigenmodes up to 420 MeV are included exactly in these TDA studies performed at low quark mass on large coarse [but O(a{sup 2}) improved] lattices. A study of Wilson line correlators in Coulomb gauge extracted from an ensemble of 1000 two-flavor dynamical configurations reveals evidence for flattening of the string tension at distances R{approx}>1 fm.

  20. New lattice action for heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Oktay, Mehmet B.; Kronfeld, Andreas S.

    2008-03-01

    We extend the Fermilab method for heavy quarks to include interactions of dimension six and seven in the action. There are, in general, many new interactions, but we carry out the calculations needed to match the lattice action to continuum QCD at the tree level, finding six non-zero couplings. Using the heavy-quark theory of cutoff effects, we estimate how large the remaining discretization errors are. We find that our tree-level matching, augmented with one-loop matching of the dimension-five interactions, can bring these errors below 1%, at currently available lattice spacings.

  1. Lattice dynamics of a protein crystal.

    PubMed

    Meinhold, Lars; Merzel, Franci; Smith, Jeremy C

    2007-09-28

    All-atom lattice-dynamical calculations are reported for a crystalline protein, ribonuclease A. The sound velocities, density of states, heat capacity (C(V)) and thermal diffuse scattering are all consistent with available experimental data. C(V) proportional, variant T(1.68) for T < 35 K, significantly deviating from a Debye solid. In Bragg peak vicinity, inelastic scattering of x rays by phonons is found to originate from acoustic mode scattering. The results suggest an approach to protein crystal physics combining all-atom lattice-dynamical calculations with experiments on next-generation neutron sources.

  2. Transversely stable soliton trains in photonic lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Jianke

    2011-09-15

    We report the existence of transversely stable soliton trains in optics. These stable soliton trains are found in two-dimensional square photonic lattices when they bifurcate from X-symmetry points with saddle-shaped diffraction inside the first Bloch band and their amplitudes are above a certain threshold. We also show that soliton trains with low amplitudes or bifurcated from edges of the first Bloch band ({Gamma} and M points) still suffer transverse instability. These results are obtained in the continuous lattice model and are further corroborated by the discrete model.

  3. Extra-dimensional models on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Knechtli, Francesco; Rinaldi, Enrico

    2016-08-05

    In this paper we summarize the ongoing effort to study extra-dimensional gauge theories with lattice simulations. In these models the Higgs field is identified with extra-dimensional components of the gauge field. The Higgs potential is generated by quantum corrections and is protected from divergences by the higher dimensional gauge symmetry. Dimensional reduction to four dimensions can occur through compactification or localization. Gauge-Higgs unification models are often studied using perturbation theory. Numerical lattice simulations are used to go beyond these perturbative expectations and to include nonperturbative effects. We describe the known perturbative predictions and their fate in the strongly-coupled regime for various extra-dimensional models.

  4. Staggered Fermion Thermodynamics using Anisotropic Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levkova, L.

    2003-05-01

    Numerical simulations of full QCD on anisotropic lattices provide a convenient way to study QCD thermodynamics with fixed physics scales and reduced lattice spacing errors. We report results from calculations with 2-flavors of dynamical fermions where all bare parameters and hence the physics scales are kept constant while the temperature is changed in small steps by varying only the number of the time slices. The results from a series of zero-temperature scale setting simulations are used to determine the Karsch coefficients and the equation of state at finite temperatures.

  5. Excited light isoscalar mesons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Thomas

    2011-07-01

    I report a recent lattice QCD calculation of an excited spectrum of light isoscalar mesons, something that has up to now proved challenging for lattice QCD. With novel techniques we extract an extensive spectrum with high statistical precision, including spin-four states and, for the first time, light isoscalars with exotic quantum numbers. In addition, the hidden flavour content of these mesons is determined, providing a window on annihilation dynamics in QCD. I comment on future prospects including applications to the study of resonances.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann model for compressible fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, F. J.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Doolen, G. D.

    1992-01-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model is derived which simulates compressible fluids. By choosing the parameters of the equilibrium distribution appropriately, the sound speed (which may be set arbitrarily low), bulk viscosity, and kinematic viscosity can be selected. This model simulates compressible flows and can include shocks. With a proper rescaling and zero-sound speed, this model simulates Burgers's equation. The viscosity determined by a Chapman-Enskog expansion compares well with that measured form simulations. The exact solutions of Burgers's equation on the unit circle are compared to solutions of lattice Boltzmann model finding reasonable agreement.

  7. Grid refinement for entropic lattice Boltzmann models.

    PubMed

    Dorschner, B; Frapolli, N; Chikatamarla, S S; Karlin, I V

    2016-11-01

    We propose a multidomain grid refinement technique with extensions to entropic incompressible, thermal, and compressible lattice Boltzmann models. Its validity and accuracy are assessed by comparison to available direct numerical simulation and experiment for the simulation of isothermal, thermal, and viscous supersonic flow. In particular, we investigate the advantages of grid refinement for the setups of turbulent channel flow, flow past a sphere, Rayleigh-Bénard convection, as well as the supersonic flow around an airfoil. Special attention is paid to analyzing the adaptive features of entropic lattice Boltzmann models for multigrid simulations.

  8. Lattice expansions and contractions in metallic superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huberman, M. L.; Grimsditch, M.

    1989-03-01

    An electronically driven lattice deformation which explains qualitatively the supermodulus effect in metallic superlattices is derived. It is shown in the Thomas-Fermi approximation that the total energy of a metallic superlattice is lowered by uniform deformations of the constituent materials. The theory gives the correct order of magnitude for changes in lattice constants, explains why the supermodulus effect is not observed in systems in which at least one constituent is nonmetallic, and predicts the absence of an effect when the bulk Fermi energies of the constituent metals are equal.

  9. Gluon and Ghost Dynamics from Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, O.; Duarte, A. G.; Dudal, D.; Silva, P. J.

    2017-03-01

    The two point gluon and ghost correlation functions and the three gluon vertex are investigated, in the Landau gauge, using lattice simulations. For the two point functions, we discuss the approach to the continuum limit looking at the dependence on the lattice spacing and volume. The analytical structure of the propagators is also investigated by computing the corresponding spectral functions using an implementation of the Tikhonov regularisation to solve the integral equation. For the three point function we report results when the momentum of one of the gluon lines is set to zero and discuss its implications.

  10. Statistical Transmutation in Floquet Driven Optical Lattices.

    PubMed

    Sedrakyan, Tigran A; Galitski, Victor M; Kamenev, Alex

    2015-11-06

    We show that interacting bosons in a periodically driven two dimensional (2D) optical lattice may effectively exhibit fermionic statistics. The phenomenon is similar to the celebrated Tonks-Girardeau regime in 1D. The Floquet band of a driven lattice develops the moat shape, i.e., a minimum along a closed contour in the Brillouin zone. Such degeneracy of the kinetic energy favors fermionic quasiparticles. The statistical transmutation is achieved by the Chern-Simons flux attachment similar to the fractional quantum Hall case. We show that the velocity distribution of the released bosons is a sensitive probe of the fermionic nature of their stationary Floquet state.

  11. Lattice Strain Due to an Atomic Vacancy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shidong; Sellers, Michael S.; Basaran, Cemal; Schultz, Andrew J.; Kofke, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Volumetric strain can be divided into two parts: strain due to bond distance change and strain due to vacancy sources and sinks. In this paper, efforts are focused on studying the atomic lattice strain due to a vacancy in an FCC metal lattice with molecular dynamics simulation (MDS). The result has been compared with that from a continuum mechanics method. It is shown that using a continuum mechanics approach yields constitutive results similar to the ones obtained based purely on molecular dynamics considerations. PMID:19582230

  12. Towards an interoperable International Lattice Datagrid

    SciTech Connect

    G. Beckett; P. Coddington; N. Ishii; B. Joo; D. Melkumyan; R. Ostrowski; D. Pleiter; M. Sato; J. Simone; C. Watson; S. Zhang

    2007-11-01

    The International Lattice Datagrid (ILDG) is a federation of several regional grids. Since most of these grids have reached production level, an increasing number of lattice scientists start to benefit from this new research infrastructure. The ILDG Middleware Working Group has the task of specifying the ILDG middleware such that interoperability among the different grids is achieved. In this paper we will present the architecture of the ILDG middleware and describe what has actually been achieved in recent years. Particular focus is given to interoperability and security issues. We will conclude with a short overview on issues which we plan to address in the near future.

  13. The canonical forms of a lattice rule

    SciTech Connect

    Lyness, J.N.

    1992-12-31

    Much of the elementary theory of lattice rules may, be presented as an elegant application of classical results. These include Kronecker group representation theorem and the Hermite and Smith normal forms of integer matrices. The theory of the canonical form is a case in point. In this paper, some of this theory is treated in a constructive rather than abstract manner. A step-by-step approach that parallels the group theory is described, leading to an algorithm to obtain a canonical form of a rule of prime power order. The number of possible distinct canonical forms is derived, and this is used to determine the number of integration lattices having specified invariants.

  14. The canonical forms of a lattice rule

    SciTech Connect

    Lyness, J.N.

    1992-01-01

    Much of the elementary theory of lattice rules may, be presented as an elegant application of classical results. These include Kronecker group representation theorem and the Hermite and Smith normal forms of integer matrices. The theory of the canonical form is a case in point. In this paper, some of this theory is treated in a constructive rather than abstract manner. A step-by-step approach that parallels the group theory is described, leading to an algorithm to obtain a canonical form of a rule of prime power order. The number of possible distinct canonical forms is derived, and this is used to determine the number of integration lattices having specified invariants.

  15. Jacobi photonic lattices and their SUSY partners.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga-Segundo, A; Rodríguez-Lara, B M; Fernández C, David J; Moya-Cessa, H M

    2014-01-13

    We present a classical analog of quantum optical deformed oscillators in arrays of waveguides. The normal modes of these one-dimensional photonic crystals are given in terms of Jacobi polynomials. We show that it is possible to attack the problem via factorization by exploiting the corresponding quantum optical model. This allows us to provide an unbroken supersymmetric partner of the proposed Jacobi lattices. Thanks to the underlying SU(1, 1) group symmetry of the lattices, we present the analytic propagators and impulse functions for these one-dimensional photonic crystals.

  16. Spectral tunneling of lattice nonlocal solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V.; Torner, Lluis; Vysloukh, Victor A.

    2010-07-15

    We address spectral tunneling of walking spatial solitons in photorefractive media with nonlocal diffusion component of the nonlinear response and an imprinted shallow optical lattice. In contrast to materials with local nonlinearities, where solitons traveling across the lattice close to the Bragg angle suffer large radiative losses, in photorefractive media with diffusion nonlinearity resulting in self-bending, solitons survive when their propagation angle approaches and even exceeds the Bragg angle. In the spatial frequency domain this effect can be considered as tunneling through the band of spatial frequencies centered around the Bragg frequency where the spatial group velocity dispersion is positive.

  17. Fibonacci optical lattices for tunable quantum quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K.; Saha, K.; Parameswaran, S. A.; Weld, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    We describe a quasiperiodic optical lattice, created by a physical realization of the abstract cut-and-project construction underlying all quasicrystals. The resulting potential is a generalization of the Fibonacci tiling. Calculation of the energies and wave functions of ultracold atoms loaded into such a lattice demonstrate a multifractal energy spectrum, a singular continuous momentum-space structure, and the existence of controllable edge states. These results open the door to cold atom quantum simulation experiments in tunable or dynamic quasicrystalline potentials, including topological pumping of edge states and phasonic spectroscopy.

  18. Building the International Lattice Data Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Mark G. Beckett, Paul Coddington, Bálint Joó, Chris M. Maynard, Dirk Pleiter, Osamu Tatebe, Tomoteru Yoshie

    2011-06-01

    We present the International Lattice Data Grid (ILDG), a loosely federated grid-of-grids for sharing data from Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (LQCD) simulations. The ILDG comprises of metadata, file-format and web-service standards, which can be used to wrap regional data-grid interfaces, allowing seamless access to catalogues and data in a diverse set of collaborating regional grids. We discuss the technological underpinnings of the ILDG, primarily the metadata and the middleware, and offer a critique of its various aspects with the hindsight of the design work and the two years of production.

  19. MBE growth technology for high quality strained III-V layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, Frank J. (Inventor); Liu, John K. (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The III-V films are grown on large automatically perfect terraces of III-V substrates which have a different lattice constant, with temperature and Group III and V arrival rates chosen to give a Group III element stable surface. The growth is pulsed to inhibit Group III metal accumulation of low temperature, and to permit the film to relax to equilibrium. The method of the invention: (1) minimizes starting step density on sample surface; (2) deposits InAs and GaAs using an interrupted growth mode (0.25 to 2 monolayers at a time); (3) maintains the instantaneous surface stoichiometry during growth (As-stable for GaAs, In-stable for InAs); and (4) uses time-resolved RHEED to achieve aspects (1) through (3).

  20. The analyzation of 2D complicated regular polygon photonic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jing; Gao, Yuanmei

    2017-06-01

    We have numerically simulated the light intensity distribution, phase distribution, far-field diffraction of the two dimensional (2D) regular octagon and regular dodecagon lattices in detail. In addition, using the plane wave expansion (PWE) method, we numerically calculate the energy band of the two lattices. Both of the photonic lattices have the band gap. And the regular octagon lattice possesses the wide complete band gap while the regular dodecagon lattice has the incomplete gap. Moreover, we simulated the preliminary transmission image of photonic lattices. It may inspire the academic research both in light control and soliton.