Science.gov

Sample records for lattices iii baryon-baryon

  1. High Statistics Analysis using Anisotropic Clover Lattices: (III) Baryon-Baryon Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Silas Beane; Detmold, William; Lin, Huey-Wen; Luu, Thomas C.; Orginos, Kostas; Savage, Martin; Torok, Aaron M.; Walker-Loud, Andre

    2010-03-01

    Low-energy baryon-baryon interactions are calculated in a high-statistics lattice QCD study on a single ensemble of anisotropic clover gauge-field configurations at a pion mass of m_pi ~ 390 MeV, a spatial volume of L^3 ~ (2.5 fm)^3, and a spatial lattice spacing of b ~ 0.123 fm. Luscher’s method is used to extract nucleon-nucleon, hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-hyperon scattering phase shifts at one momentum from the one- and two-baryon ground-state energies in the lattice volume. The N-Sigma interactions are found to be highly spin-dependent, and the interaction in the ^3 S _1 channel is found to be strong. In contrast, the N-Lambda interactions are found to be spin-independent, within the uncertainties of the calculation, consistent with the absence of one-pion-exchange. The only channel for which a negative energy-shift is found is Lambda-Lambda, indicating that the Lambda-Lambda interaction is attractive, as anticipated from model-dependent discussions regarding the H-dibaryon. The NN scattering lengths are found to be small, clearly indicating the absence of any fine-tuning in the NN-sector at this pion mass. This is consistent with our previous Lattice QCD calculation of the NN interactions. The behavior of the signal-to-noise ratio in the baryon-baryon correlation functions, and in the ratio of correlation functions that yields the ground-state energy splitting

  2. High statistics analysis using anisotropic clover lattices: III. Baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, Silas R.; Detmold, William; Orginos, Kostas; Lin, Huey-Wen; Savage, Martin J.; Luu, Thomas C.; Torok, Aaron; Walker-Loud, Andre

    2010-03-01

    Low-energy baryon-baryon interactions are calculated in a high-statistics lattice QCD study on a single ensemble of anisotropic-clover gauge-field configurations at a pion mass of m{sub {pi}{approx}3}90 MeV, a spatial volume of L{sup 3{approx}}(2.5 fm){sup 3}, and a spatial lattice spacing of b{approx}0.123 fm. Luescher's method is used to extract nucleon-nucleon, hyperon-nucleon, and hyperon-hyperon scattering phase shifts at one momentum from the one- and two-baryon ground-state energies in the lattice volume. The isospin-3/2 N{Sigma} interactions are found to be highly spin dependent, and the interaction in the {sup 3}S{sub 1} channel is found to be strong. In contrast, the N{Lambda} interactions are found to be spin independent, within the uncertainties of the calculation, consistent with the absence of one-pion exchange. The only channel for which a negative energy shift is found is {Lambda}{Lambda}, indicating that the {Lambda}{Lambda} interaction is attractive, as anticipated from model-dependent discussions regarding the H dibaryon. The nucleon-nucleon (NN) scattering lengths are found to be small, clearly indicating the absence of any fine-tuning in the NN sector at this pion mass. This is consistent with our previous lattice QCD calculation of NN interactions. The behavior of the signal-to-noise ratio in the baryon-baryon correlation functions, and in the ratio of correlation functions that yields the ground-state energy splitting is explored. In particular, focus is placed on the window of time slices for which the signal-to-noise ratio does not degrade exponentially, as this provides the opportunity to extract quantitative information about multibaryon systems.

  3. High statistics analysis using anisotropic clover lattices: (III) Baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S; Detmold, W; Lin, H; Luu, T; Orginos, K; Savage, M; Torok, A; Walker-Loud, A

    2010-01-19

    Low-energy baryon-baryon interactions are calculated in a high-statistics lattice QCD study on a single ensemble of anisotropic clover gauge-field configurations at a pion mass of m{sub {pi}} {approx} 390 MeV, a spatial volume of L{sup 3} {approx} (2.5 fm){sup 3}, and a spatial lattice spacing of b {approx} 0.123 fm. Luescher's method is used to extract nucleon-nucleon, hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-hyperon scattering phase shifts at one momentum from the one- and two-baryon ground-state energies in the lattice volume. The isospin-3/2 N{Sigma} interactions are found to be highly spin-dependent, and the interaction in the {sup 3}S{sub 1} channel is found to be strong. In contrast, the N{Lambda} interactions are found to be spin-independent, within the uncertainties of the calculation, consistent with the absence of one-pion-exchange. The only channel for which a negative energy-shift is found is {Lambda}{Lambda}, indicating that the {Lambda}{Lambda} interaction is attractive, as anticipated from model-dependent discussions regarding the H-dibaryon. The NN scattering lengths are found to be small, clearly indicating the absence of any fine-tuning in the NN-sector at this pion mass. This is consistent with our previous Lattice QCD calculation of NN interactions. The behavior of the signal-to-noise ratio in the baryon-baryon correlation functions, and in the ratio of correlation functions that yields the ground-state energy splitting is explored. In particular, focus is placed on the window of time slices for which the signal-to-noise ratio does not degrade exponentially, as this provides the opportunity to extract quantitative information about multi-baryon systems.

  4. Nijmegen Baryon-Baryon Interactions for S = -1, -2 Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, Th. A.; Nagels, M. M.; Yamamoto, Y.

    We present and discuss the most recent version of the extended-soft-core (ESC) interactions. The ESC-model describes the nucleon-nucleon (NN), hyperon-nucleon (YN), and hyperon-hyperon (YY), in terms of meson-exchanges using (broken) SUF(3)-symmetry. In this approach to baryon-baryon (BB) the dynamics is derived from (i) one-boson-exchanges (OBE), (ii) two-meson-exchanges (TME), and (iii) meson-pair-exchanges (MPE), (iv) gluon-exchanges, and (v) quark-core effects. In the OBE-sector, a special feature is the importance of the axial-vector meson potentials, and the inclusion of a zero in the scalar- and axial- meson form-factors. Novelties are the inclusion of (a) odderon-exchange, and (b) special pronounced effects of the appearance of forbidden six-quark configurations. With these ingredients, a rather flexible dynamical framework is constructed. Namely, it appeared feasible to keep the parameters of the model in reasonable accordance with the predictions of the 3P0 quark-pair-creation model (QPC). This is the case for the meson- and meson-pair-baryon coupling constants and the F/(F + D)-ratio's as well. The NN, YN, and YY results for this model are rather promising. In particular, we improved the ΛN spin-orbit interaction greatly by the inclusion of (a) the Brown, Downs, and Iddings anti-symmetric spin-orbit potentials, and (b) new corrections to the MPE-potentials. Also, the special quark-core effects provide ample repulsion in the Σ+p(3S1,T = 3/2)- and ΣN(1S0,T = 1/2)-channels. The new version of the ESC-model reported here will be referred to as ESC07 henceforth.

  5. Nijmegen Baryon-Baryon Interactions for S = -1, -2 Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, Th. A.; Nagels, M. M.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2010-10-01

    We present and discuss the most recent version of the extended-soft-core (ESC) interactions. The ESC-model describes the nucleon-nucleon (NN), hyperon-nucleon (YN), and hyperon-hyperon (YY), in terms of meson-exchanges using (broken) SUF(3)-symmetry. In this approach to baryon-baryon (BB) the dynamics is derived from (i) one-boson-exchanges (OBE), (ii) two-meson-exchanges (TME), and (iii) meson-pair-exchanges (MPE), (iv) gluon-exchanges, and (v) quark-core effects. In the OBE-sector, a special feature is the importance of the axial-vector meson potentials, and the inclusion of a zero in the scalar- and axial- meson form-factors. Novelties are the inclusion of (a) odderon-exchange, and (b) special pronounced effects of the appearance of forbidden six-quark configurations. With these ingredients, a rather flexible dynamical framework is constructed. Namely, it appeared feasible to keep the parameters of the model in reasonable accordance with the predictions of the 3P0 quark-pair-creation model (QPC). This is the case for the meson- and meson-pair-baryon coupling constants and the F/(F + D)-ratio's as well. The NN, YN, and YY results for this model are rather promising. In particular, we improved the ΛN spin-orbit interaction greatly by the inclusion of (a) the Brown, Downs, and Iddings anti-symmetric spin-orbit potentials, and (b) new corrections to the MPE-potentials. Also, the special quark-core effects provide ample repulsion in the Σ+p(3S1, T = 3/2)- and ΣN(1S0,T = l/2)-channels. The new version of the ESC-model reported here will be referred to as ESC07 henceforth.

  6. Hyperon-hyperon interaction based on quark-model baryon-baryon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukukawa, Kenji

    2014-04-01

    Energy-independent nonlocal Gaussian potential based on the quark-model baryon-baryon interaction is derived by using the Gauss-Legendre quadrature and the Bargmann algebra. The reliability of this potential is examined with respect to the NN, YN and YY phase shifts. This potential reproduces the phase shifts predicted by quark-model baryon-baryon interaction fss2.

  7. Baryon-Baryon Interactions ---Nijmegen Extended-Soft-Core Models---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, T. A.; Nagels, M. M.; Yamamoto, Y.

    We review the Nijmegen extended-soft-core (ESC) models for the baryon-baryon (BB) interactions of the SU(3) flavor-octet of baryons (N, Lambda, Sigma, and Xi). The interactions are basically studied from the meson-exchange point of view, in the spirit of the Yukawa-approach to the nuclear force problem [H. Yukawa, ``On the interaction of Elementary Particles I'', Proceedings of the Physico-Mathematical Society of Japan 17 (1935), 48], using generalized soft-core Yukawa-functions. These interactions are supplemented with (i) multiple-gluon-exchange, and (ii) structural effects due to the quark-core of the baryons. We present in some detail the most recent extended-soft-core model, henceforth referred to as ESC08, which is the most complete, sophisticated, and successful interaction-model. Furthermore, we discuss briefly its predecessor the ESC04-model [Th. A. Rijken and Y. Yamamoto, Phys. Rev. C 73 (2006), 044007; Th. A. Rijken and Y. Yamamoto, Ph ys. Rev. C 73 (2006), 044008; Th. A. Rijken and Y. Yamamoto, nucl-th/0608074]. For the soft-core one-boson-exchange (OBE) models we refer to the literature [Th. A. Rijken, in Proceedings of the International Conference on Few-Body Problems in Nuclear and Particle Physics, Quebec, 1974, ed. R. J. Slobodrian, B. Cuec and R. Ramavataram (Presses Universitè Laval, Quebec, 1975), p. 136; Th. A. Rijken, Ph. D. thesis, University of Nijmegen, 1975; M. M. Nagels, Th. A. Rijken and J. J. de Swart, Phys. Rev. D 17 (1978), 768; P. M. M. Maessen, Th. A. Rijken and J. J. de Swart, Phys. Rev. C 40 (1989), 2226; Th. A. Rijken, V. G. J. Stoks and Y. Yamamoto, Phys. Rev. C 59 (1999), 21; V. G. J. Stoks and Th. A. Rijken, Phys. Rev. C 59 (1999), 3009]. All ingredients of these latter models are also part of ESC08, and so a description of ESC08 comprises all models so far in principle. The extended-soft-core (ESC) interactions consist of local- and non-local-potentials due to (i) one-boson-exchanges (OBE), which are the members of nonets of

  8. Instructive discussion of an effective block algorithm for baryon-baryon correlators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemura, Hidekatsu

    2016-10-01

    We describe an approach for the efficient calculation of a large number of four-point correlation functions for various baryon-baryon (BB) channels, which are the primary quantities for studying the nuclear and hyperonic nuclear forces from lattice quantum chromodynamics. Using the four-point correlation function of a proton- Λ system as a specific example, we discuss how an effective block algorithm significantly reduces the number of iterations. The effective block algorithm is applied to calculate 52 channels of the four-point correlation functions from nucleon-nucleon to Ξ- Ξ, in order to study the complete set of isospin symmetric BB interactions. The elapsed times measured for hybrid parallel computation on BlueGene/Q demonstrate that the performance of the present algorithm is reasonable for various combinations of the number of OpenMP threads and the number of MPI nodes. The numerical results are compared with the results obtained using the unified contraction algorithm for all computed sites of the 52 four-point correlators.

  9. nd Scattering Observables Derived from the Quark-Model Baryon-Baryon Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y.; Fukukawa, K.

    2010-05-12

    We solve the nd scattering in the Faddeev formalism, employing the NN sector of the quark-model baryon-baryon interaction fss2. The energy-dependence of the NN interaction, inherent to the (3q)-(3q) resonating-group formulation, is eliminated by the standard off-shell transformation utilizing the 1/sq root(N) factor, where N is the normalization kernel for the (3q)-(3q) system. This procedure yields an extra nonlocality, whose effect is very important to reproduce all the scattering observables below E{sub n}<=65 MeV. The different off-shell properties from the standard meson-exchange potentials, related to the non-locality of the quark-exchange kernel, yields appreciable effects to the differential cross sections and polarization observables of the nd elastic scattering, which are usually attributed to the specific properties of three-body forces.

  10. Strangeness S = -2 baryon-baryon interaction at next-to-leading order in chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidenbauer, J.; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Petschauer, S.

    2016-10-01

    The strangeness S = - 2 baryon-baryon interaction is studied in chiral effective field theory up to next-to-leading order. The potential at this order consists of contributions from one- and two-pseudoscalar-meson exchange diagrams and from four-baryon contact terms without and with two derivatives. SU(3) flavor symmetry is imposed for constructing the interaction in the S = - 2 sector. Specifically, the couplings of the pseudoscalar mesons to the baryons are fixed by SU(3) symmetry and, in general, also the contact terms are related via SU(3) symmetry to those determined in a previous study of the S = - 1 hyperon-nucleon interaction. The explicit SU(3) symmetry breaking due to the physical masses of the pseudoscalar mesons (π, K, η) is taken into account. It is argued that the ΞN interaction has to be relatively weak to be in accordance with available experimental constraints. In particular, the published values and upper bounds for the Ξ- p elastic and inelastic cross sections apparently rule out a somewhat stronger attractive ΞN force and, specifically, disfavor any near-threshold deuteron-like bound states in that system.

  11. Spin-orbit splitting of {sub {lambda}}{sup 9}Be excited states studied with the SU{sub 6} quark-model baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y.; Kohno, M.; Miyagawa, K.; Suzuki, Y.

    2004-10-01

    The previous Faddeev calculation of the two-alpha plus {lambda} system for {sub {lambda}}{sup 9}Be is extended to incorporate the spin-orbit components of the SU{sub 6} quark-model (QM) baryon-baryon interactions. We employ the Born kernel of the QM {lambda}N LS interaction and generate the spin-orbit component of the {lambda}{alpha} potential by {alpha}-cluster folding. The Faddeev calculation in the jj-coupling scheme implies that the direct use of the QM Born kernel for the {lambda}N LS component is not good enough to reproduce the small experimental value {delta}E{sub ls}{sup expt}=43{+-}5 keV for the 5/2{sup +}-3/2{sup +} splitting. This procedure predicts 3-5 times larger values in the models FSS and fss2. The spin-orbit contribution from the effective meson-exchange potentials in fss2 is argued to be unfavorable to the small ls splitting, through the analysis of the Scheerbaum factors for the single-particle spin-orbit potentials calculated in the G-matrix formalism.

  12. Extracting scattering phase shifts in higher partial waves from lattice QCD calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Luu, Thomas; Savage, Martin J.

    2011-06-01

    Lüscher’s method is routinely used to determine meson-meson, meson-baryon, and baryon-baryon s-wave scattering amplitudes below inelastic thresholds from lattice QCD calculations—presently at unphysical light-quark masses. In this work we review the formalism and develop the requisite expressions to extract phase shifts describing meson-meson scattering in partial waves with angular momentum l≤6 and l=9. The implications of the underlying cubic symmetry, and strategies for extracting the phase shifts from lattice QCD calculations, are presented, along with a discussion of the signal-to-noise problem that afflicts the higher partial waves.

  13. Lattice-Mismatched III-V Epilayers for High-Efficiency Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrenkiel, Scott Phillip

    2013-06-30

    The project focused on development of new approaches and materials combinations to expand and improve the quality and versatility of lattice-mismatched (LMM) III-V semiconductor epilayers for use in high-efficiency multijunction photovoltaic (PV) devices. To address these goals, new capabilities for materials synthesis and characterization were established at SDSM&T that have applications in modern opto- and nano-electronics, including epitaxial crystal growth and transmission electron microscopy. Advances were made in analyzing and controlling the strain profiles and quality of compositional grades used for these technologies. In particular, quaternary compositional grades were demonstrated, and a quantitative method for characteristic X-ray analysis was developed. The project allowed enhanced collaboration between scientists at NREL and SDSM&T to address closely related research goals, including materials exchange and characterization.

  14. Case for exotic baryon-baryon states

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.H.

    1980-01-01

    Three main points are presented. (1) Current theoretical prejudices are presented for why dibaryon states are interesting, and why they should be expected. (2) A review is given of some of the unsettled experimental issues which have emerged during this conference concerning dibaryons. (3) Phenomenological issues are raised which are critical to understanding whether dibaryon states are observable in the medium energy NN system.

  15. Determination of lattice parameters, strain state and composition in semipolar III-nitrides using high resolution X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Frentrup, Martin Wernicke, Tim; Stellmach, Joachim; Kneissl, Michael; Hatui, Nirupam; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2013-12-07

    In group-III-nitride heterostructures with semipolar or nonpolar crystal orientation, anisotropic lattice and thermal mismatch with the buffer or substrate lead to a complex distortion of the unit cells, e.g., by shearing of the lattice. This makes an accurate determination of lattice parameters, composition, and strain state under assumption of the hexagonal symmetry impossible. In this work, we present a procedure to accurately determine the lattice constants, strain state, and composition of semipolar heterostructures using high resolution X-ray diffraction. An analysis of the unit cell distortion shows that four independent lattice parameters are sufficient to describe this distortion. Assuming only small deviations from an ideal hexagonal structure, a linear expression for the interplanar distances d{sub hkl} is derived. It is used to determine the lattice parameters from high resolution X-ray diffraction 2ϑ-ω-scans of multiple on- and off-axis reflections via a weighted least-square fit. The strain and composition of ternary alloys are then evaluated by transforming the elastic parameters (using Hooke's law) from the natural crystal-fixed coordinate system to a layer-based system, given by the in-plane directions and the growth direction. We illustrate our procedure taking an example of (112{sup ¯}2) Al{sub κ}Ga{sub 1−κ}N epilayers with Al-contents over the entire composition range. We separately identify the in-plane and out-of-plane strains and discuss origins for the observed anisotropy.

  16. Nucleation, Growth, and Strain Relaxation of Lattice-Mismatched III-V Semiconductor Epitaxial Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welser, R. E.; Guido, L. J.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the early stages of evolution of highly strained 2-D InAs layers and 3-D InAs islands grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on (100) and (111) B GaAs substrates. The InAs epilayer / GaAs substrate combination has been chosen because the lattice-mismatch is severe (approx. 7.20%), yet these materials are otherwise very similar. By examining InAs-on-GaAs composites Instead of the more common In(x)Ga(1-x)As alloy, we remove an additional degree of freedom (x) and thereby simplify data interpretation. A matrix of experiments is described in which the MOCVD growth parameters -- susceptor temperature, TMIn flux, and AsH3 flux -- have been varied over a wide range. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis have been employed to observe the thin film surface morphology. In the case of 3-D growth, we have extracted activation energies and power-dependent exponents that characterize the nucleation process. As a consequence, optimized growth conditions have been identified for depositing approx. 250 A thick (100) and (111)B oriented InAs layers with relatively smooth surfaces. Together with preliminary data on the strain relaxation of these layers, the above results on the evolution of thin InAs films indicate that the (111)B orientation is particularly promising for yielding lattice-mismatched films that are fully relaxed with only misfit dislocations at the epilayer / substrate interface.

  17. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization of 1H, 13C, and 59Co in a Tris(ethylenediamine)cobalt(III) Crystalline Lattice Doped with Cr(III)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The study of inorganic crystalline materials by solid-state NMR spectroscopy is often complicated by the low sensitivity of heavy nuclei. However, these materials often contain or can be prepared with paramagnetic dopants without significantly affecting the structure of the crystalline host. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is generally capable of enhancing NMR signals by transferring the magnetization of unpaired electrons to the nuclei. Therefore, the NMR sensitivity in these paramagnetically doped crystals might be increased by DNP. In this paper we demonstrate the possibility of efficient DNP transfer in polycrystalline samples of [Co(en)3Cl3]2·NaCl·6H2O (en = ethylenediamine, C2H8N2) doped with Cr(III) in varying concentrations between 0.1 and 3 mol %. We demonstrate that 1H, 13C, and 59Co can be polarized by irradiation of Cr(III) with 140 GHz microwaves at a magnetic field of 5 T. We further explain our findings on the basis of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of the Cr(III) site and analysis of its temperature-dependent zero-field splitting, as well as the dependence of the DNP enhancement factor on the external magnetic field and microwave power. This first demonstration of DNP transfer from one paramagnetic metal ion to its diamagnetic host metal ion will pave the way for future applications of DNP in paramagnetically doped materials or metalloproteins. PMID:25069794

  18. Lattice Matched Iii-V IV Semiconductor Heterostructures: Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition and Remote Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sungwoo

    1992-01-01

    This thesis describes the growth and characterization of wide gap III-V compound semiconductors such as aluminum gallium arsenide (Al_{rm x} Ga_{rm 1-x}As), gallium nitride (GaN), and gallium phosphide (GaP), deposited by the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (Remote PECVD). In the first part of the thesis, the optimization of GaAs and Al_{rm x}Ga _{rm 1-x}As hetero -epitaxial layers on Ge substrates is described in the context of the application in the construction of cascade solar cells. The emphasis on this study is on the trade-offs in the choice of the temperature related to increasing interdiffusion/autodoping and increasing perfection of the epilayer with increasing temperature. The structural, chemical, optical, and electrical properties of the heterostructures are characterized by x-ray rocking curve measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron beam induced current (EBIC), cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (X-TEM), Raman spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL). Based on the results of this work the optimum growth temperature is 720^circC. The second part of the thesis describes the growth of GaN and GaP layers on silicon and sapphire substrates and the homoepitaxy of GaP by remote PECVD. I have designed and built an ultra high vacuum (UHV) deposition system which includes: the gas supply system, the pumping system, the deposition chamber, the load-lock chamber, and the waste disposal system. The work on the deposition of GaN on Si and sapphire focuses onto the understanding of the growth kinetics. In addition, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) for surface analysis, x-ray diffraction methods and microscopic analyses using SEM and TEM for structural characterization, infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) absorption measurements for optical characterization, and electrical characterization results

  19. Electron spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation study of a trinuclear iron(III) complex and its relevance in quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Mitrikas, George; Sanakis, Yiannis; Raptopoulou, Catherine P; Kordas, George; Papavassiliou, Georgios

    2008-02-01

    Electron spins of molecular magnets are promising candidates for large scale quantum information processing because they exhibit a large number of low-lying excited states. In this paper X-band pulse electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to determine the intrinsic relaxation times T1 and T2 of a molecular magnet with an S = 1/2 ground state, namely the neutral trinuclear oxo-centered iron (III) complex, [Fe3(micro3-O)(O2CPh)5(salox)(EtOH)(EtOH)(H2O)]. The temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation time T1 between 4.5 and 11 K shows that the Orbach relaxation process is dominant with the first excited state lying 57 cm(-1) above the ground state, whereas the phase memory time T(M) is of the order of 2.6 micros and exhibits a modest temperature dependence. These results together with previous magnetic measurements give further insight into the magnetic properties of the complex. The coherent manipulation of the electron spins is also examined by means of transient nutation experiments.

  20. Electronic bandstructure and optical gain of lattice matched III-V dilute nitride bismide quantum wells for 1.55 μm optical communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, W. J.; Bose, Sumanta; Zhang, D. H.

    2016-09-01

    Dilute nitride bismide GaNBiAs is a potential semiconductor alloy for near- and mid-infrared applications, particularly in 1.55 μm optical communication systems. Incorporating dilute amounts of bismuth (Bi) into GaAs reduces the effective bandgap rapidly, while significantly increasing the spin-orbit-splitting energy. Additional incorporation of dilute amounts of nitrogen (N) helps to attain lattice matching with GaAs, while providing a route for flexible bandgap tuning. Here we present a study of the electronic bandstructure and optical gain of the lattice matched GaNxBiy As1 -x -y /GaAs quaternary alloy quantum well (QW) based on the 16-band k .p model. We have taken into consideration the interactions between the N and Bi impurity states with the host material based on the band anticrossing and valence band anticrossing model. The optical gain calculation is based on the density matrix theory. We have considered different lattice matched GaNBiAs QW cases and studied their energy dispersion curves, optical gain spectrum, maximum optical gain, and differential gain and compared their performances based on these factors. The thickness and composition of these QWs were varied in order to keep the emission peak fixed at 1.55 μm. The well thickness has an effect on the spectral width of the gain curves. On the other hand, a variation in the injection carrier density has different effects on the maximum gain and differential gain of QWs of varying thicknesses. Among the cases studied, we found that the 6.3 nm thick GaN3 Bi5.17 As91.83 lattice matched QW was most suited for 1.55 μm (0.8 eV) GaAs-based photonic applications.

  1. EXAMINATION OF DISLOCATIONS IN LATTICE-MISMATCHED GaInAs/BUFFER LAYER/GaAs FOR III-V PHOTOVOLTAICS

    SciTech Connect

    Levander, A.; Geisz, J.

    2007-01-01

    Dislocations act as sites for nonradiative electron/hole pair recombination, which reduces the effi ciency of photovoltaics. Lattice-matched materials can be grown on top of one another without forming a high density of dislocations. However, when the growth of lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials is attempted, many dislocations result from the relaxation of strain in the crystal structure. In an attempt to reduce the number of dislocations that propagate into a solar device when using LMM materials, a compositionally step-graded buffer is placed between the two LMM materials. In order to confi ne the dislocations to the buffer layer and therefore increase material quality and device effi ciency, the growth temperature and thickness of the buffer layer were varied. A GaInP compositionally graded buffer and GaInAs p-n junction were grown on a GaAs substrate in a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system. A multibeam optical stress sensor (MOSS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the strain in the epilayers. Electrical and optoelectronic properties were measured using a probe station and multimeter setup, solar simulator, and a quantum effi ciency instrument. It was determined that device functionality was highly dependent on the growth temperature of the graded buffer. As growth temperature increased, so did the dislocation density in the device despite an increase in the dislocation velocity, which should have increased the dislocation annihilation rate and the diffusion of dislocations to the edge of the crystal. The thickness of the graded buffer also affected device effi ciency with thinner samples performing poorly. The thinner graded buffer layers had high internal resistances from reduced carrier concentrations. In terms of effi ciency, the empirically derived recipe developed by the scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) produced the highest quality cells.

  2. Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bornyakov, V.G.

    2005-06-01

    Possibilities that are provided by a lattice regularization of QCD for studying nonperturbative properties of QCD are discussed. A review of some recent results obtained from computer calculations in lattice QCD is given. In particular, the results for the QCD vacuum structure, the hadron mass spectrum, and the strong coupling constant are considered.

  3. Superradiance Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Da-Wei; Liu, Ren-Bao; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Scully, Marlan O.

    2015-01-01

    We show that the timed Dicke states of a collection of three-level atoms can form a tight-binding lattice in momentum space. This lattice, coined the superradiance lattice (SL), can be constructed based on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). For a one-dimensional SL, we need the coupling field of the EIT system to be a standing wave. The detuning between the two components of the standing wave introduces an effective uniform force in momentum space. The quantum lattice dynamics, such as Bloch oscillations, Wannier-Stark ladders, Bloch band collapsing, and dynamic localization can be observed in the SL. The two-dimensional SL provides a flexible platform for Dirac physics in graphene. The SL can be extended to three and higher dimensions where no analogous real space lattices exist with new physics waiting to be explored.

  4. Lattice cluster theory of associating telechelic polymers. III. Order parameter and average degree of self-assembly, transition temperature, and specific heat.

    PubMed

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Freed, Karl F; Douglas, Jack F

    2012-05-21

    The lattice cluster theory of strongly interacting, structured polymer fluids is applied to determine the thermodynamic properties of solutions of telechelic polymers that may associate through bifunctional end groups. Hence, this model represents a significant albeit natural extension of a diverse array of prior popular equilibrium polymerization models in which structureless "bead" monomers associate into chain-like clusters under equilibrium conditions. In particular, the thermodynamic description of the self-assembly of linear telechelic chains in small molecule solvents (initiated in Paper II) is systematically extended through calculations of the order parameter Φ and average degree of self-assembly, the self-assembly transition temperature T(p), and the specific heat C(V) of solutions of telechelic molecules. Special focus is placed on examining how molecular and thermodynamic parameters, such as the solution composition φ, temperature T, microscopic interaction energies (ε(s) and ε), and length M of individual telechelic chains, influence the computed thermodynamic quantities that are commonly used to characterize self-assembling systems.

  5. Optical properties of InAsBi and optimal designs of lattice-matched and strain-balanced III-V semiconductor superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, P. T.; Shalindar, A. J.; Riordan, N. A.; Gogineni, C.; Liang, H.; Sharma, A. R.; Johnson, S. R.

    2016-06-01

    The optical properties of bulk InAs0.936Bi0.064 grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a (100)-oriented GaSb substrate are measured using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The index of refraction and absorption coefficient are measured over photon energies ranging from 44 meV to 4.4 eV and are used to identify the room temperature bandgap energy of bulk InAs0.936Bi0.064 as 60.6 meV. The bandgap of InAsBi is expressed as a function of Bi mole fraction using the band anticrossing model and a characteristic coupling strength of 1.529 eV between the Bi impurity state and the InAs valence band. These results are programmed into a software tool that calculates the miniband structure of semiconductor superlattices and identifies optimal designs in terms of maximizing the electron-hole wavefunction overlap as a function of transition energy. These functionalities are demonstrated by mapping the design spaces of lattice-matched GaSb/InAs0.911Sb0.089 and GaSb/InAs0.932Bi0.068 and strain-balanced InAs/InAsSb, InAs/GaInSb, and InAs/InAsBi superlattices on GaSb. The absorption properties of each of these material systems are directly compared by relating the wavefunction overlap square to the absorption coefficient of each optimized design. Optimal design criteria are provided for key detector wavelengths for each superlattice system. The optimal design mid-wave infrared InAs/InAsSb superlattice is grown using molecular beam epitaxy, and its optical properties are evaluated using spectroscopic ellipsometry and photoluminescence spectroscopy.

  6. Perspectives in Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramashi, Yoshinobu

    2007-12-01

    Preface -- Fixed point actions, symmetries and symmetry transformations on the lattice / P. Hasenfratz -- Algorithms for dynamical fennions / A. D. Kennedy -- Applications of chiral perturbation theory to lattice QCD / Stephen R. Sharpe -- Lattice QCD with a chiral twist / S. Sint -- Non-perturbative QCD: renormalization, O(A) - Improvement and matching to Heavy Quark effective theory / Rainer Sommer.

  7. Addendum to triton and hypertriton binding energies calculated from SU{sub 6} quark-model baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Kohno, M.; Miyagawa, K.

    2008-02-15

    Previously we calculated the binding energies of the triton and hypertriton, using an SU{sub 6} quark-model interaction obtained by a resonating-group method of two baryon clusters. In contrast to the previous calculations employing the energy-dependent interaction kernel, we present new results using a renormalized interaction that is energy-independent and still preserves all the two-baryon data. The new binding energies are slightly smaller than the previous values. In particular the triton binding energy turns out to be 8.14 MeV with a charge-dependence correction of the two-nucleon force, 190 keV, being included. This indicates that the energy to be accounted for by three-body forces is about 350 keV.

  8. Triton and hypertriton binding energies with SU{sub 6} quark-model baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Kohno, M.; Miyagawa, K.

    2008-04-29

    Previously we calculated the binding energies of the triton and hypertriton, using an SU{sub 6} quark-model interaction which is obtained by a resonating-group method for two baryon clusters. In contrast to the previous calculations employing the energy-dependent interaction kernel, we present new results using a renormalized interaction which is energy-independent and still preserves all the two-baryon data. The new binding energies are slightly smaller than the previous values. In particular the triton binding energy turns out to be 8.14 MeV with a charge-dependence correction of the two-nucleon force, 190 keV, being included. This indicates that the energy to be accounted for by three-body forces is about 350 keV.

  9. Lattice matched crystalline substrates for cubic nitride semiconductor growth

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew G; Ptak, Aaron J; McMahon, William E

    2015-02-24

    Disclosed embodiments include methods of fabricating a semiconductor layer or device and devices fabricated thereby. The methods include, but are not limited to, providing a substrate having a cubic crystalline surface with a known lattice parameter and growing a cubic crystalline group III-nitride alloy layer on the cubic crystalline substrate by coincident site lattice matched epitaxy. The cubic crystalline group III-nitride alloy may be prepared to have a lattice parameter (a') that is related to the lattice parameter of the substrate (a). The group III-nitride alloy may be a cubic crystalline In.sub.xGa.sub.yAl.sub.1-x-yN alloy. The lattice parameter of the In.sub.xGa.sub.yAl.sub.1-x-yN or other group III-nitride alloy may be related to the substrate lattice parameter by (a')= 2(a) or (a')=(a)/ 2. The semiconductor alloy may be prepared to have a selected band gap.

  10. On Traveling Waves in Lattices: The Case of Riccati Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, Zlatinka

    2012-09-01

    The method of simplest equation is applied for analysis of a class of lattices described by differential-difference equations that admit traveling-wave solutions constructed on the basis of the solution of the Riccati equation. We denote such lattices as Riccati lattices. We search for Riccati lattices within two classes of lattices: generalized Lotka-Volterra lattices and generalized Holling lattices. We show that from the class of generalized Lotka-Volterra lattices only the Wadati lattice belongs to the class of Riccati lattices. Opposite to this many lattices from the Holling class are Riccati lattices. We construct exact traveling wave solutions on the basis of the solution of Riccati equation for three members of the class of generalized Holling lattices.

  11. Engineering novel optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Windpassinger, Patrick; Sengstock, Klaus

    2013-08-01

    Optical lattices have developed into a widely used and highly recognized tool to study many-body quantum physics with special relevance for solid state type systems. One of the most prominent reasons for this success is the high degree of tunability in the experimental setups. While at the beginning quasi-static, cubic geometries were mainly explored, the focus of the field has now shifted toward new lattice topologies and the dynamical control of lattice structures. In this review we intend to give an overview of the progress recently achieved in this field on the experimental side. In addition, we discuss theoretical proposals exploiting specifically these novel lattice geometries. PMID:23828639

  12. III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor are disclosed. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V materials varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V material can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  13. Supersymmetry on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergner, Georg; Catterall, Simon

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the motivations, difficulties and progress in the study of supersymmetric lattice gauge theories focusing in particular on 𝒩 = 1 and 𝒩 = 4 super-Yang-Mills in four dimensions. Brief reviews of the corresponding lattice formalisms are given and current results are presented and discussed. We conclude with a summary of the main aspects of current work and prospects for the future.

  14. Laterally closed lattice homomorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toumi, Mohamed Ali; Toumi, Nedra

    2006-12-01

    Let A and B be two Archimedean vector lattices and let be a lattice homomorphism. We call that T is laterally closed if T(D) is a maximal orthogonal system in the band generated by T(A) in B, for each maximal orthogonal system D of A. In this paper we prove that any laterally closed lattice homomorphism T of an Archimedean vector lattice A with universal completion Au into a universally complete vector lattice B can be extended to a lattice homomorphism of Au into B, which is an improvement of a result of M. Duhoux and M. Meyer [M. Duhoux and M. Meyer, Extended orthomorphisms and lateral completion of Archimedean Riesz spaces, Ann. Soc. Sci. Bruxelles 98 (1984) 3-18], who established it for the order continuous lattice homomorphism case. Moreover, if in addition Au and B are with point separating order duals (Au)' and B' respectively, then the laterally closedness property becomes a necessary and sufficient condition for any lattice homomorphism to have a similar extension to the whole Au. As an application, we give a new representation theorem for laterally closed d-algebras from which we infer the existence of d-algebra multiplications on the universal completions of d-algebras.

  15. THE EMMA LATTICE DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    BERG,J.S.; RUGGIERO, A.; MACHIDA, S.; KOSCIELNIAK, S.

    2007-06-25

    EMMA is a 10 to 20 MeV electron ring designed to test our understanding of beam dynamics in a relativistic linear non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator (FFAG). This paper describes the design of the EMMA lattice. We begin with a summary of the experimental goals that impact the lattice design, and then outline what motivated the choice for the basic lattice parameters, such as the type of cells, the number of cells, and the RF frequency. We next list the different configurations that we wish to operate the machine in so as to accomplish our experimental goals. Finally, we enumerate the detailed lattice parameters, showing how these parameters result from the various lattice configurations.

  16. SAGE III

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-15

    SAGE III Data and Information The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas ... on the spacecraft. SAGE III produced L1 and L2 scientific data from 5/07/2002 until 12/31/2005. The flight of the second instrument is as ... Guide Documents:  Project Guide Data Products User's Guide  (PDF) Relevant Documents:  ...

  17. Symmetry of semi-reduced lattices.

    PubMed

    Stróż, Kazimierz

    2015-05-01

    The main result of this work is extension of the famous characterization of Bravais lattices according to their metrical, algebraic and geometric properties onto a wide class of primitive lattices (including Buerger-reduced, nearly Buerger-reduced and a substantial part of Delaunay-reduced) related to low-restricted semi-reduced descriptions (s.r.d.'s). While the `geometric' operations in Bravais lattices map the basis vectors into themselves, the `arithmetic' operators in s.r.d. transform the basis vectors into cell vectors (basis vectors, face or space diagonals) and are represented by matrices from the set {\\bb V} of all 960 matrices with the determinant ±1 and elements {0, ±1} of the matrix powers. A lattice is in s.r.d. if the moduli of off-diagonal elements in both the metric tensors M and M(-1) are smaller than corresponding diagonal elements sharing the same column or row. Such lattices are split into 379 s.r.d. types relative to the arithmetic holohedries. Metrical criteria for each type do not need to be explicitly given but may be modelled as linear derivatives {\\bb M}(p,q,r), where {\\bb M} denotes the set of 39 highest-symmetry metric tensors, and p,q,r describe changes of appropriate interplanar distances. A sole filtering of {\\bb V} according to an experimental s.r.d. metric and subsequent geometric interpretation of the filtered matrices lead to mathematically stable and rich information on the Bravais-lattice symmetry and deviations from the exact symmetry. The emphasis on the crystallographic features of lattices was obtained by shifting the focus (i) from analysis of a lattice metric to analysis of symmetry matrices [Himes & Mighell (1987). Acta Cryst. A43, 375-384], (ii) from the isometric approach and invariant subspaces to the orthogonality concept {some ideas in Le Page [J. Appl. Cryst. (1982), 15, 255-259]} and splitting indices [Stróż (2011). Acta Cryst. A67, 421-429] and (iii) from fixed cell transformations to transformations

  18. A realistic lattice example

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Garren, A.A.

    1985-10-01

    A realistic, distributed interaction region (IR) lattice has been designed that includes new components discussed in the June 1985 lattice workshop. Unlike the test lattices, the lattice presented here includes utility straights and the mechanism for crossing the beams in the experimental straights. Moreover, both the phase trombones and the dispersion suppressors contain the same bending as the normal cells. Vertically separated beams and 6 Tesla, 1-in-1 magnets are assumed. Since the cells are 200 meters long, and have 60 degree phase advance, this lattice has been named RLD1, in analogy with the corresponding test lattice, TLD1. The quadrupole gradient is 136 tesla/meter in the cells, and has similar values in other quadrupoles except in those in the IR`s, where the maximum gradient is 245 tesla/meter. RLD1 has distributed IR`s; however, clustered realistic lattices can easily be assembled from the same components, as was recently done in a version that utilizes the same type of experimental and utility straights as those of RLD1.

  19. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Nathal, M. V.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kraus, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    In their simplest form, lattice block panels are produced by direct casting and result in lightweight, fully triangulated truss-like configurations which provide strength and stiffness [2]. The earliest realizations of lattice block were made from A1 and steels, primarily under funding from the US Navy [3]. This work also showed that the mechanical efficiency (eg., specific stiffness) of lattice block structures approached that of honeycomb structures [2]. The lattice architectures are also less anisotropic, and the investment casting route should provide a large advantage in cost and temperature capability over honeycombs which are limited to alloys that can be processed into foils. Based on this early work, a program was initiated to determine the feasibility of extending the high temperature superalloy lattice block [3]. The objective of this effort was to provide an alternative to intermetallics and composites in achieving a lightweight high temperature structure without sacrificing the damage tolerance and moderate cost inherent in superalloys. To establish the feasibility of the superalloy lattice block concept, work was performed in conjunction with JAMCORP, Inc. Billerica, MA, to produce a number of lattice block panels from both IN71 8 and Mar-M247.

  20. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kantzos, P. T.; Krause, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Initial investigations of investment cast superalloy lattice block suggest that this technology will yield a low cost approach to utilize the high temperature strength and environmental resistance of superalloys in lightweight, damage tolerant structural configurations. Work to date has demonstrated that relatively large superalloy lattice block panels can be successfully investment cast from both IN-718 and Mar-M247. These castings exhibited mechanical properties consistent with the strength of the same superalloys measured from more conventional castings. The lattice block structure also accommodates significant deformation without failure, and is defect tolerant in fatigue. The potential of lattice block structures opens new opportunities for the use of superalloys in future generations of aircraft applications that demand strength and environmental resistance at elevated temperatures along with low weight.

  1. Shaken lattice interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, Carrie; Yu, Hoon; Anderson, Dana

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we report on progress towards performing interferometry using atoms trapped in an optical lattice. That is, we start with atoms in the ground state of an optical lattice potential V(x) =V0cos [ 2 kx + ϕ(t) ] , and by a prescribed phase function ϕ(t) , transform from one atomic wavefunction to another. In this way, we implement the standard interferometric sequence of beam splitting, propagation, reflection, reverse propagation, and recombination. Through the use of optimal control techniques, we have computationally demonstrated a scalable accelerometer that provides information on the sign of the applied acceleration. Extension of this idea to a two-dimensional shaken-lattice-based gyroscope is discussed. In addition, we report on the experimental implementation of the shaken lattice system.

  2. SPIN ON THE LATTICE.

    SciTech Connect

    ORGINOS,K.

    2003-01-07

    I review the current status of hadronic structure computations on the lattice. I describe the basic lattice techniques and difficulties and present some of the latest lattice results; in particular recent results of the RBC group using domain wall fermions are also discussed. In conclusion, lattice computations can play an important role in understanding the hadronic structure and the fundamental properties of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). Although some difficulties still exist, several significant steps have been made. Advances in computer technology are expected to play a significant role in pushing these computations closer to the chiral limit and in including dynamical fermions. RBC has already begun preliminary dynamical domain wall fermion computations [49] which we expect to be pushed forward with the arrival of QCD0C. In the near future, we also expect to complete the non-perturbative renormalization of the relevant derivative operators in quenched QCD.

  3. Asymptotic energy of lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Weigen; Zhang, Zuhe

    2009-04-01

    The energy of a simple graph G arising in chemical physics, denoted by E(G), is defined as the sum of the absolute values of eigenvalues of G. As the dimer problem and spanning trees problem in statistical physics, in this paper we propose the energy per vertex problem for lattice systems. In general for a type of lattice in statistical physics, to compute the entropy constant with toroidal, cylindrical, Mobius-band, Klein-bottle, and free boundary conditions are different tasks with different hardness and may have different solutions. We show that the energy per vertex of plane lattices is independent of the toroidal, cylindrical, Mobius-band, Klein-bottle, and free boundary conditions. In particular, the asymptotic formulae of energies of the triangular, 33.42, and hexagonal lattices with toroidal, cylindrical, Mobius-band, Klein-bottle, and free boundary conditions are obtained explicitly.

  4. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  5. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes. PMID:27679822

  6. Legless locomotion in lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Perrin; Dai, Jin; Gong, Chaohui; Serrano, Miguel M.; Mendelson, Joseph R., III; Choset, Howie; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2015-03-01

    By propagating waves from head to tail, limbless organisms like snakes can traverse terrain composed of rocks, foliage, soil and sand. Previous research elucidated how rigid obstacles influence snake locomotion by studying a model terrain-symmetric lattices of pegs placed in hard ground. We want to understand how different substrate-body interaction modes affect performance in desert-adapted snakes during transit of substrates composed of both rigid obstacles and granular media (GM). We tested Chionactis occipitalis, the Mojave shovel-nosed snake, in two laboratory treatments: lattices of 0 . 64 cm diameter obstacles arrayed on both a hard, slick substrate and in a GM of ~ 0 . 3 mm diameter glass particles. For all lattice spacings, d, speed through the hard ground lattices was less than that in GM lattices. However, maximal undulation efficiencies ηu (number of body lengths advanced per undulation cycle) in both treatments were comparable when d was intermediate. For other d, ηu was lower than this maximum in hard ground lattices, while on GM, ηu was insensitive to d. To systematically explore such locomotion, we tested a physical robot model of the snake; performance depended sensitively on base substrate, d and body wave parameters.

  7. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes.

  8. Lattice studies of baryons

    SciTech Connect

    David Richards

    2004-10-01

    This talk describes progress at understanding the properties of the nucleon and its excitations from lattice QCD. I begin with a review of recent lattice results for the lowest-lying states of the excited baryon spectrum. The need to approach physical values of the light quark masses is emphasized, enabling the effects of the pion cloud to be revealed. I then outline the development of techniques that will enable the extraction of the masses of the higher resonances, and describe how such calculations provide insight into the structure of the hadrons. Finally, I discuss direct probes of the quark and gluon structure of baryons through the lattice measurement of the moments of quark distributions and of Generalized Parton Distributions.

  9. Latticed pentamode acoustic cloak.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Liu, Xiaoning; Hu, Gengkai

    2015-01-01

    We report in this work a practical design of pentamode acoustic cloak with microstructure. The proposed cloak is assembled by pentamode lattice made of a single-phase solid material. The function of rerouting acoustic wave round an obstacle has been demonstrated numerically. It is also revealed that shear related resonance due to weak shear resistance in practical pentamode lattices punctures broadband feature predicted based on ideal pentamode cloak. As a consequence, the latticed pentamode cloak can only conceal the obstacle in segmented frequency ranges. We have also shown that the shear resonance can be largely reduced by introducing material damping, and an improved broadband performance can be achieved. These works pave the way for experimental demonstration of pentamode acoustic cloak. PMID:26503821

  10. Latticed pentamode acoustic cloak

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Liu, Xiaoning; Hu, Gengkai

    2015-01-01

    We report in this work a practical design of pentamode acoustic cloak with microstructure. The proposed cloak is assembled by pentamode lattice made of a single-phase solid material. The function of rerouting acoustic wave round an obstacle has been demonstrated numerically. It is also revealed that shear related resonance due to weak shear resistance in practical pentamode lattices punctures broadband feature predicted based on ideal pentamode cloak. As a consequence, the latticed pentamode cloak can only conceal the obstacle in segmented frequency ranges. We have also shown that the shear resonance can be largely reduced by introducing material damping, and an improved broadband performance can be achieved. These works pave the way for experimental demonstration of pentamode acoustic cloak. PMID:26503821

  11. Exact Lattice Supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Catterall, Simon; Kaplan, David B.; Unsal, Mithat

    2009-03-31

    We provide an introduction to recent lattice formulations of supersymmetric theories which are invariant under one or more real supersymmetries at nonzero lattice spacing. These include the especially interesting case of N = 4 SYM in four dimensions. We discuss approaches based both on twisted supersymmetry and orbifold-deconstruction techniques and show their equivalence in the case of gauge theories. The presence of an exact supersymmetry reduces and in some cases eliminates the need for fine tuning to achieve a continuum limit invariant under the full supersymmetry of the target theory. We discuss open problems.

  12. Lattice of the CSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, J. W.; Yuan, Y. J.; Song, M. T.; Zhang, W. Z.; Yang, X. D.; He, Y.; Mao, L. Z.; Xia, G. X.; Yang, J. C.; Wu, J. X.; Liu, W.

    2001-12-01

    CSR, a new Cooler-Storage-Ring project, is the post-acceleration system of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). It consists of a main ring (CSRm) and an experimental ring (CSRe). From the HIRFL cyclotron system the heavy ions will be accumulated, cooled and accelerated in the CSRm, then extracted fast and injected into the CSRe for many internal-target experiments with electron cooling. The experimental ring (CSRe) will be operated with three lattice modes for different experiments. The details of the lattice for the two rings will be described in this paper.

  13. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  14. Steady-state cracks in viscoelastic lattice models

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, D.A.; Levine, H.

    1999-05-01

    We study the steady-state motion of mode III cracks propagating on a lattice exhibiting viscoelastic dynamics. The introduction of a Kelvin viscosity {eta} allows for a direct comparison between lattice results and continuum treatments. Utilizing both numerical and analytical (Wiener-Hopf) techniques, we explore this comparison as a function of the driving displacement {Delta} and the number of transverse rows {ital N}. At any {ital N}, the continuum theory misses the lattice-trapping phenomenon; this is well known, but the introduction of {eta} introduces some new twists. More importantly, for large {ital N} even at large {Delta}, the standard two-dimensional elastodynamics approach completely misses the {eta}-dependent velocity selection, as this selection disappears completely in the leading order naive continuum limit of the lattice problem. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Rigidity of lattice domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savelyev, V. A.

    1979-01-01

    The means of ensuring total rigidity of lattice domes, using comparison with solid shells of 1-3 layers are discussed. Irregularities of manufacture, processing, and other factors are considered, as they relate to diminution of rigidity. The discussion uses the concepts of upper and lower critical loads on the structure in question.

  16. Supersymmetry on the Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaich, David

    2016-03-01

    Lattice field theory provides a non-perturbative regularization of strongly interacting systems, which has proven crucial to the study of quantum chromodynamics among many other theories. Supersymmetry plays prominent roles in the study of physics beyond the standard model, both as an ingredient in model building and as a tool to improve our understanding of quantum field theory. Attempts to apply lattice techniques to supersymmetric field theories have a long history, but until recently these efforts have generally encountered insurmountable difficulties related to the interplay of supersymmetry with the lattice discretization of spacetime. In recent years these difficulties have been overcome for a class of theories that includes the particularly interesting case of maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills (N = 4 SYM) in four dimensions, which is a cornerstone of AdS/CFT duality. In combination with computational advances this progress enables practical numerical investigations of N = 4 SYM on the lattice, which can address questions that are difficult or impossible to handle through perturbation theory, AdS/CFT duality, or the conformal bootstrap program. I will briefly review some of the new ideas underlying this recent progress, and present some results from ongoing large-scale numerical calculations, including comparisons with analytic predictions.

  17. Progress in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2002-09-30

    After reviewing some of the mathematical foundations and numerical difficulties facing lattice QCD, I review the status of several calculations relevant to experimental high-energy physics. The topics considered are moments of structure functions, which may prove relevant to search for new phenomena at the LHC, and several aspects of flavor physics, which are relevant to understanding CP and flavor violation.

  18. The JKJ Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigaki, Kenta; Noda, Fumiaki; Yamamoto, Kazami; Machida, Shinji; Molodojentsev, Alexander; Ishi, Yoshihiro

    2002-12-01

    The JKJ high-intensity proton accelerator facility consists of a 400-MeV linac, a 3-GeV 1-MW rapid-cycling synchrotron and a 50-GeV 0.75-MW synchrotron. The lattice and beam dynamics design of the two synchrotrons are reported.

  19. Fibonacci Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kevin; Geiger, Zachary; Senaratne, Ruwan; Rajagopal, Shankari; Fujiwara, Kurt; Weld, David; Weld Group Team

    2015-05-01

    Quasiperiodicity is intimately involved in quantum phenomena from localization to the quantum Hall effect. Recent experimental investigation of quasiperiodic quantum effects in photonic and electronic systems have revealed intriguing connections to topological phenomena. However, such experiments have been limited by the absence of techniques for creating tunable quasiperiodic structures. We propose a new type of quasiperiodic optical lattice, constructed by intersecting a Gaussian beam with a 2D square lattice at an angle with an irrational tangent. The resulting potential, a generalization of the Fibonacci lattice, is a physical realization of the mathematical ``cut-and-project'' construction which underlies all quasiperiodic structures. Calculation of the energies and wavefunctions of atoms loaded into the proposed quasiperiodic lattice demonstrate a fractal energy spectrum and the existence of edge states. We acknowledge support from the ONR (award N00014-14-1-0805), the ARO and the PECASE program (award W911NF-14-1-0154), the AFOSR (award FA9550-12-1-0305), and the Alfred P. Sloan foundation (grant BR2013-110).

  20. Shaken Lattice Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, Carrie; Yu, Hoon; Anderson, Dana

    2015-05-01

    This work introduces a method to perform interferometry using atoms trapped in an optical lattice. Starting at t = 0 with atoms in the ground state of a lattice potential V(x) =V0cos [ 2 kx + ϕ(t) ] , we show that it is possible to transform from one atomic wavefunction to another by a prescribed shaking of the lattice, i.e., by an appropriately tailored time-dependent phase shift ϕ(t) . In particular, the standard interferometer sequence of beam splitting, propagation, reflection, reverse propagation, and recombination can be achieved via a set of phase modulation operations {ϕj(t) } . Each ϕj(t) is determined using a learning algorithm, and the split-step method calculates the wavefunction dynamics. We have numerically demonstrated an interferometer in which the shaken wavefunctions match the target states to better than 1 % . We carried out learning using a genetic algorithm and optimal control techniques. The atoms remain trapped in the lattice throughout the full interferometer sequence. Thus, the approach may be suitable for use in an dynamic environment. In addition to the general principles, we discuss aspects of the experimental implementation. Supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and Northrop Grumman.

  1. Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachrajda, C. T.

    2016-10-01

    I review the the application of the lattice formulation of QCD and large-scale numerical simulations to the evaluation of non-perturbative hadronic effects in Standard Model Phenomenology. I present an introduction to the elements of the calculations and discuss the limitations both in the range of quantities which can be studied and in the precision of the results. I focus particularly on the extraction of the QCD parameters, i.e. the quark masses and the strong coupling constant, and on important quantities in flavour physics. Lattice QCD is playing a central role in quantifying the hadronic effects necessary for the development of precision flavour physics and its use in exploring the limits of the Standard Model and in searches for inconsistencies which would signal the presence of new physics.

  2. Introduction to lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.

    1998-12-31

    The goal of the lectures on lattice QCD (LQCD) is to provide an overview of both the technical issues and the progress made so far in obtaining phenomenologically useful numbers. The lectures consist of three parts. The author`s charter is to provide an introduction to LQCD and outline the scope of LQCD calculations. In the second set of lectures, Guido Martinelli will discuss the progress they have made so far in obtaining results, and their impact on Standard Model phenomenology. Finally, Martin Luescher will discuss the topical subjects of chiral symmetry, improved formulation of lattice QCD, and the impact these improvements will have on the quality of results expected from the next generation of simulations.

  3. Revisiting the microtrabecular lattice.

    PubMed

    Clegg, James S

    2010-11-01

    The 'microtrabecular lattice' (MTL) that Keith Porter described in the 1970s and 1980s is reconsidered as a proposed fundamental cytoplasmic structure of eukaryotic cells. Although considered to be an artefact by most cell biologists of his time (and probably ours), the case is made that something like the MTL may well exist, but in a much more dynamic form than images from electron microscopy imply and convey.

  4. Crystallographic Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namburi, Manjusha; Krithivasan, Siddharth; Ansumali, Santosh

    2016-06-01

    Current approaches to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) are computationally quite expensive for most realistic scientific and engineering applications of Fluid Dynamics such as automobiles or atmospheric flows. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), with its simplified kinetic descriptions, has emerged as an important tool for simulating hydrodynamics. In a heterogeneous computing environment, it is often preferred due to its flexibility and better parallel scaling. However, direct simulation of realistic applications, without the use of turbulence models, remains a distant dream even with highly efficient methods such as LBM. In LBM, a fictitious lattice with suitable isotropy in the velocity space is considered to recover Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics in macroscopic limit. The same lattice is mapped onto a cartesian grid for spatial discretization of the kinetic equation. In this paper, we present an inverted argument of the LBM, by making spatial discretization as the central theme. We argue that the optimal spatial discretization for LBM is a Body Centered Cubic (BCC) arrangement of grid points. We illustrate an order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency for LBM and thus a significant progress towards feasibility of DNS for realistic flows.

  5. Crystallographic Lattice Boltzmann Method.

    PubMed

    Namburi, Manjusha; Krithivasan, Siddharth; Ansumali, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Current approaches to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) are computationally quite expensive for most realistic scientific and engineering applications of Fluid Dynamics such as automobiles or atmospheric flows. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), with its simplified kinetic descriptions, has emerged as an important tool for simulating hydrodynamics. In a heterogeneous computing environment, it is often preferred due to its flexibility and better parallel scaling. However, direct simulation of realistic applications, without the use of turbulence models, remains a distant dream even with highly efficient methods such as LBM. In LBM, a fictitious lattice with suitable isotropy in the velocity space is considered to recover Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics in macroscopic limit. The same lattice is mapped onto a cartesian grid for spatial discretization of the kinetic equation. In this paper, we present an inverted argument of the LBM, by making spatial discretization as the central theme. We argue that the optimal spatial discretization for LBM is a Body Centered Cubic (BCC) arrangement of grid points. We illustrate an order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency for LBM and thus a significant progress towards feasibility of DNS for realistic flows. PMID:27251098

  6. Crystallographic Lattice Boltzmann Method

    PubMed Central

    Namburi, Manjusha; Krithivasan, Siddharth; Ansumali, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Current approaches to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) are computationally quite expensive for most realistic scientific and engineering applications of Fluid Dynamics such as automobiles or atmospheric flows. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), with its simplified kinetic descriptions, has emerged as an important tool for simulating hydrodynamics. In a heterogeneous computing environment, it is often preferred due to its flexibility and better parallel scaling. However, direct simulation of realistic applications, without the use of turbulence models, remains a distant dream even with highly efficient methods such as LBM. In LBM, a fictitious lattice with suitable isotropy in the velocity space is considered to recover Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics in macroscopic limit. The same lattice is mapped onto a cartesian grid for spatial discretization of the kinetic equation. In this paper, we present an inverted argument of the LBM, by making spatial discretization as the central theme. We argue that the optimal spatial discretization for LBM is a Body Centered Cubic (BCC) arrangement of grid points. We illustrate an order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency for LBM and thus a significant progress towards feasibility of DNS for realistic flows. PMID:27251098

  7. A Mechanical Lattice Aid for Crystallography Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amezcua-Lopez, J.; Cordero-Borboa, A. E.

    1988-01-01

    Introduces a 3-dimensional mechanical lattice with adjustable telescoping mechanisms. Discusses the crystalline state, the 14 Bravais lattices, operational principles of the mechanical lattice, construction methods, and demonstrations in classroom. Provides lattice diagrams, schemes of the lattice, and various pictures of the lattice. (YP)

  8. A lattice-free concept lattice update algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Outrata, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Upon a change of input data, one usually wants an update of output computed from the data rather than recomputing the whole output over again. In Formal Concept Analysis, update of concept lattice of input data when introducing new objects to the data can be done by any of the so-called incremental algorithms for computing concept lattice. The algorithms use and update the lattice while introducing new objects to input data one by one. The present concept lattice of input data without the new objects is thus required by the computation. However, the lattice can be large and may not fit into memory. In this paper, we propose an efficient algorithm for updating the lattice from the present and new objects only, not requiring the possibly large concept lattice of present objects. The algorithm results as a modification of the Close-by-One algorithm for computing the set of all formal concepts, or its modifications like Fast Close-by-One, Parallel Close-by-One or Parallel Fast Close-by-One, to compute new and modified formal concepts and the changes of the lattice order relation only. The algorithm can be used not only for updating the lattice when new objects are introduced but also when some existing objects are removed from the input data or attributes of the objects are changed. We describe the algorithm, discuss efficiency issues and present an experimental evaluation of its performance and a comparison with the AddIntent incremental algorithm for computing concept lattice.

  9. Methods for forming group III-arsenide-nitride semiconductor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for forming Group III-arsenide-nitride semiconductor materials. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V crystals varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V crystals can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  10. Lattice-induced nonadiabatic frequency shifts in optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Beloy, K.

    2010-09-15

    We consider the frequency shift in optical lattice clocks which arises from the coupling of the electronic motion to the atomic motion within the lattice. For the simplest of three-dimensional lattice geometries this coupling is shown to affect only clocks based on blue-detuned lattices. We have estimated the size of this shift for the prospective strontium lattice clock operating at the 390-nm blue-detuned magic wavelength. The resulting fractional frequency shift is found to be on the order of 10{sup -18} and is largely overshadowed by the electric quadrupole shift. For lattice clocks based on more complex geometries or other atomic systems, this shift could potentially be a limiting factor in clock accuracy.

  11. Single identities for lattice theory and for weakly associative lattices

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, W.; Padmanabhan, R.

    1995-03-13

    We present a single identity for the variety of all lattices that is much simpler than those previously known to us. We also show that the variety of weakly associative lattices is one-based, and we present a generalized one-based theorem for subvarieties of weakly associative lattices that can be defined with absorption laws. The automated theorem-proving program OTTER was used in substantial way to obtain the results.

  12. Engineered nonlinear lattices.

    PubMed

    Clausen, C B; Christiansen, P L; Torner, L; Gaididei, Y B

    1999-11-01

    We show that with the quasi-phase-matching technique it is possible to fabricate stripes of nonlinearity that trap and guide light like waveguides. We investigate an array of such stripes and find that when the stripes are sufficiently narrow, the beam dynamics is governed by a quadratic nonlinear discrete equation. The proposed structure therefore provides an experimental setting for exploring discrete effects in a controlled manner. In particular, we show propagation of breathers that are eventually trapped by discreteness. When the stripes are wide the beams evolve in a structure we term a quasilattice, which interpolates between a lattice system and a continuous system. PMID:11970457

  13. Two Nucleons on a Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    S.R. Beane; P.F.Bedaque; A. Parreno; M.J. Savage

    2004-04-01

    The two-nucleon sector is near an infrared fixed point of QCD and as a result the S-wave scattering lengths are unnaturally large compared to the effective ranges and shape parameters. It is usually assumed that a lattice QCD simulation of the two-nucleon sector will require a lattice that is much larger than the scattering lengths in order to extract quantitative information. In this paper we point out that this does not have to be the case: lattice QCD simulations on much smaller lattices will produce rigorous results for nuclear physics.

  14. Nuclear Physics and Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, Silas

    2003-11-01

    Impressive progress is currently being made in computing properties and interac- tions of the low-lying hadrons using lattice QCD. However, cost limitations will, for the foreseeable future, necessitate the use of quark masses, Mq, that are signif- icantly larger than those of nature, lattice spacings, a, that are not significantly smaller than the physical scale of interest, and lattice sizes, L, that are not sig- nificantly larger than the physical scale of interest. Extrapolations in the quark masses, lattice spacing and lattice volume are therefore required. The hierarchy of mass scales is: L 1 j Mq j â ºC j a 1 . The appropriate EFT for incorporating the light quark masses, the finite lattice spacing and the lattice size into hadronic observables is C-PT, which provides systematic expansions in the small parame- ters e m L, 1/ Lâ ºC, p/â ºC, Mq/â ºC and aâ ºC . The lattice introduces other unphysical scales as well. Lattice QCD quarks will increasingly be artificially separated

  15. The lattice thermal conductivity of a semiconductor nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mei-Jiau; Chong, Wen-Yen; Chang, Tai-Ming

    2006-06-01

    It has been found experimentally as well as theoretically that the lattice thermal conductivity can be largely reduced by the size confinement effect. The significant boundary scattering effect is one of the dominant factors. In most existing lattice thermal conductivity models, an empirical relation is used for this scattering rate. An unconfined or confined phonon distribution obtained based on the phonon Boltzmann equation and the relaxation time approximation is then employed to calculate the lattice thermal conductivity. In this work, we first attempt to derive an analytical form of the boundary scattering rate for phonon conduction in a semiconductor nanowire and then claim two reasonable ways to take it into account correctly. Consistent mathematical models in the sense that the effects of the size confinement on (i) the phonon dispersion relation, (ii) the phonon distribution, (iii) the phonon group and phase velocities, and (iv) the Debye temperature are finally proposed.

  16. Elimination of spurious lattice fermion solutions and noncompact lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.D.

    1997-09-22

    It is well known that the Dirac equation on a discrete hyper-cubic lattice in D dimension has 2{sup D} degenerate solutions. The usual method of removing these spurious solutions encounters difficulties with chiral symmetry when the lattice spacing l {ne} 0, as exemplified by the persistent problem of the pion mass. On the other hand, we recall that in any crystal in nature, all the electrons do move in a lattice and satisfy the Dirac equation; yet there is not a single physical result that has ever been entangled with a spurious fermion solution. Therefore it should not be difficult to eliminate these unphysical elements. On a discrete lattice, particle hop from point to point, whereas in a real crystal the lattice structure in embedded in a continuum and electrons move continuously from lattice cell to lattice cell. In a discrete system, the lattice functions are defined only on individual points (or links as in the case of gauge fields). However, in a crystal the electron state vector is represented by the Bloch wave functions which are continuous functions in {rvec {gamma}}, and herein lies one of the essential differences.

  17. Optical Abelian lattice gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Tagliacozzo, L.; Celi, A.; Zamora, A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2013-03-15

    We discuss a general framework for the realization of a family of Abelian lattice gauge theories, i.e., link models or gauge magnets, in optical lattices. We analyze the properties of these models that make them suitable for quantum simulations. Within this class, we study in detail the phases of a U(1)-invariant lattice gauge theory in 2+1 dimensions, originally proposed by P. Orland. By using exact diagonalization, we extract the low-energy states for small lattices, up to 4 Multiplication-Sign 4. We confirm that the model has two phases, with the confined entangled one characterized by strings wrapping around the whole lattice. We explain how to study larger lattices by using either tensor network techniques or digital quantum simulations with Rydberg atoms loaded in optical lattices, where we discuss in detail a protocol for the preparation of the ground-state. We propose two key experimental tests that can be used as smoking gun of the proper implementation of a gauge theory in optical lattices. These tests consist in verifying the absence of spontaneous (gauge) symmetry breaking of the ground-state and the presence of charge confinement. We also comment on the relation between standard compact U(1) lattice gauge theory and the model considered in this paper. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the quantum simulation of dynamical gauge theories in optical lattices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We focus on digital simulation of abelian lattice gauge theory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We rediscover and discuss the puzzling phase diagram of gauge magnets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We detail the protocol for time evolution and ground-state preparation in any phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide two experimental tests to validate gauge theory quantum simulators.

  18. Excitonic surface lattice resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphrey, A. D.; Gentile, M. J.; Barnes, W. L.

    2016-08-01

    Electromagnetic resonances are important in controlling light at the nanoscale. The most studied such resonance is the surface plasmon resonance that is associated with metallic nanostructures. Here we explore an alternative resonance, the surface exciton-polariton resonance, one based on excitonic molecular materials. Our study is based on analytical and numerical modelling. We show that periodic arrays of suitable molecular nanoparticles may support surface lattice resonances that arise as a result of coherent interactions between the particles. Our results demonstrate that excitonic molecular materials are an interesting alternative to metals for nanophotonics; they offer the prospect of both fabrication based on supramolecular chemistry and optical functionality arising from the way the properties of such materials may be controlled with light.

  19. Buckling modes in pantographic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgio, Ivan; Della Corte, Alessandro; dell'Isola, Francesco; Steigmann, David J.

    2016-07-01

    We study buckling patterns in pantographic sheets, regarded as two-dimensional continua consisting of lattices of continuously distributed fibers. The fibers are modeled as beams endowed with elastic resistance to stretching, shearing, bending and twist. Included in the theory is a non-standard elasticity due to geodesic bending of the fibers relative to the lattice surface. xml:lang="fr"

  20. Nonlinear dust-lattice waves: a modified Toda lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, N. F.

    2008-09-07

    Charged dust grains in a plasma interact with a Coulomb potential, but also with an exponential component to the potential, due to Debye shielding in the background plasma. Here we investigate large-amplitude oscillations and waves in dust-lattices, employing techniques used in Toda lattice analysis. The lattice consists of a linear chain of particles, or a periodic ring as occurs in experimentally observed dust particle clusters. The particle motion has a triangular waveform, and chaotic motion for large amplitude motion of a grain.

  1. Silver(II) Oxide or Silver(I,III) Oxide?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tudela, David

    2008-01-01

    The often called silver peroxide and silver(II) oxide, AgO or Ag[subscript 2]O[subscript 2], is actually a mixed oxidation state silver(I,III) oxide. A thermochemical cycle, with lattice energies calculated within the "volume-based" thermodynamic approach, explain why the silver(I,III) oxide is more stable than the hypothetical silver(II) oxide.…

  2. Bidirectional negative differential thermal resistance phenomenon and its physical mechanism in the Frenkel-Kontorova lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianqiang, Zhang; Linru, Nie; Chongyang, Chen; Xinyu, Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Thermal conduction of the Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) lattices with interfacial coupling is investigated numerically. The results indicate that: (i) For appropriate lattice periods, as the system is symmetric, a bidirectional negative differential thermal resistance (NDTR) phenomenon will appear. If the system is asymmetric, the bidirectional NDTR is gradually converted into an unidirectional NDTR. (ii) The bidirectional NDTR phenomenon effect also depends on the period of the FK lattice as the other parameters remains unchanged. With the increment of the lattice period, the bidirectional NDTR will gradually disappear. (iii) From a stochastic dynamics point of view, thermal transport properties of the system are determined by the competition between the two types of thermal conduction: one comes from the collusion between atoms, the other is due to the elastic coupling between atoms. For the smaller lattice periods, the former type of thermal conduction occupies the dominating position and the NDTR effect will appear.

  3. Kenneth Wilson and Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukawa, Akira

    2015-09-01

    We discuss the physics and computation of lattice QCD, a space-time lattice formulation of quantum chromodynamics, and Kenneth Wilson's seminal role in its development. We start with the fundamental issue of confinement of quarks in the theory of the strong interactions, and discuss how lattice QCD provides a framework for understanding this phenomenon. A conceptual issue with lattice QCD is a conflict of space-time lattice with chiral symmetry of quarks. We discuss how this problem is resolved. Since lattice QCD is a non-linear quantum dynamical system with infinite degrees of freedom, quantities which are analytically calculable are limited. On the other hand, it provides an ideal case of massively parallel numerical computations. We review the long and distinguished history of parallel-architecture supercomputers designed and built for lattice QCD. We discuss algorithmic developments, in particular the difficulties posed by the fermionic nature of quarks, and their resolution. The triad of efforts toward better understanding of physics, better algorithms, and more powerful supercomputers have produced major breakthroughs in our understanding of the strong interactions. We review the salient results of this effort in understanding the hadron spectrum, the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements and CP violation, and quark-gluon plasma at high temperatures. We conclude with a brief summary and a future perspective.

  4. Introduction to lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.

    1987-01-01

    The lattice formulation of Quantum Field Theory (QFT) can be exploited in many ways. We can derive the lattice Feynman rules and carry out weak coupling perturbation expansions. The lattice then serves as a manifestly gauge invariant regularization scheme, albeit one that is more complicated than standard continuum schemes. Strong coupling expansions: these give us useful qualitative information, but unfortunately no hard numbers. The lattice theory is amenable to numerical simulations by which one calculates the long distance properties of a strongly interacting theory from first principles. The observables are measured as a function of the bare coupling g and a gauge invariant cut-off approx. = 1/..cap alpha.., where ..cap alpha.. is the lattice spacing. The continuum (physical) behavior is recovered in the limit ..cap alpha.. ..-->.. 0, at which point the lattice artifacts go to zero. This is the more powerful use of lattice formulation, so in these lectures the author focuses on setting up the theory for the purpose of numerical simulations to get hard numbers. The numerical techniques used in Lattice Gauge Theories have their roots in statistical mechanics, so it is important to develop an intuition for the interconnection between quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics. This will be the emphasis of the first lecture. In the second lecture, the author reviews the essential ingredients of formulating QCD on the lattice and discusses scaling and the continuum limit. In the last lecture the author summarizes the status of some of the main results. He also mentions the bottlenecks and possible directions for research. 88 refs.

  5. Legless locomotion in lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Perrin; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2014-11-01

    Little is known about interactions between an animal body and complex terrestrial terrain like sand and boulders during legless, undulatory travel (e.g. snake locomotion). We study the locomotor performance of Mojave shovel-nosed snakes (Chionactisoccipitalis , ~ 35 cm long) using a simplified model of heterogeneous terrain: symmetric lattices of obstacles. To quantify performance we measure mean forward speed and slip angle, βs, defined as the angle between the instantaneous velocity and tangent vectors at each point on the body. We find that below a critical peg density the presence of granular media results in high speed (~ 60 cm/s), low average slip (βs ~6°) snake performance as compared to movement in the same peg densities on hard ground (~ 25 cm/s and βs ~15°). Above this peg density, performance on granular and hard substrates converges. Speed on granular media decreases with increasing peg density to that of the speed on hard ground, while speed on hard ground remains constant. Conversely, βs on hard ground trends toward that on granular media as obstacle density increases.

  6. Reliability analysis of interdependent lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limiao, Zhang; Daqing, Li; Pengju, Qin; Bowen, Fu; Yinan, Jiang; Zio, Enrico; Rui, Kang

    2016-06-01

    Network reliability analysis has drawn much attention recently due to the risks of catastrophic damage in networked infrastructures. These infrastructures are dependent on each other as a result of various interactions. However, most of the reliability analyses of these interdependent networks do not consider spatial constraints, which are found important for robustness of infrastructures including power grid and transport systems. Here we study the reliability properties of interdependent lattices with different ranges of spatial constraints. Our study shows that interdependent lattices with strong spatial constraints are more resilient than interdependent Erdös-Rényi networks. There exists an intermediate range of spatial constraints, at which the interdependent lattices have minimal resilience.

  7. Localized structures in Kagome lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Avadh B; Bishop, Alan R; Law, K J H; Kevrekidis, P G

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the existence and stability of gap vortices and multi-pole gap solitons in a Kagome lattice with a defocusing nonlinearity both in a discrete case and in a continuum one with periodic external modulation. In particular, predictions are made based on expansion around a simple and analytically tractable anti-continuum (zero coupling) limit. These predictions are then confirmed for a continuum model of an optically-induced Kagome lattice in a photorefractive crystal obtained by a continuous transformation of a honeycomb lattice.

  8. GMUGLE: A goal lattice constructor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintz, Kenneth J.

    2001-08-01

    Goal lattices are a method for ordering the goals of a system and associating with each goal the value of performing that goal in terms of how much it contributes to the accomplishment of the topmost goal of a system. This paper presents a progress report on the development of a web-based implementation of the George Mason University Goal Lattice Engine (GMUGLE). GMUGLE allows a user to interactively create goal lattices, add/delete goals, and specify their ordering relations through a web-based interface. The database portion automatically computes the GLB and LUB of pairs of goals which have been entered to form them into a lattice. Yet to be implemented is the code to input goal values, automatically apportion the values among included goals, and accrue value among the included goals.

  9. Heavy quarks and lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2003-11-05

    This paper is a review of heavy quarks in lattice gauge theory, focusing on methodology. It includes a status report on some of the calculations that are relevant to heavy-quark spectroscopy and to flavor physics.

  10. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtl, Adam C.; Bulava, John; Morningstar, Colin; Edwards, Robert; Mathur, Nilmani; Richards, David; Fleming, George; Juge, K. Jimmy; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2007-10-26

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  11. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    John Bulava; Robert Edwards; George Fleming; K. Jimmy Juge; Adam C. Lichtl; Nilmani Mathur; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Stephen J. Wallace

    2007-06-16

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  12. Emergent three-brane lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Mashile, Grant; Park, Nicholas

    2010-05-15

    In this article the anomalous dimension of a class of operators with a bare dimension of O(N) is studied. The operators considered are dual to excited states of a two giant graviton system. In the Yang-Mills theory they are described by restricted Schur polynomials, labeled with Young diagrams that have at most two columns. In a certain limit the dilatation operator looks like a lattice version of a second derivative, with the lattice emerging from the Young diagram itself.

  13. Berry Phase in Lattice QCD.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata

    2016-07-29

    We propose the lattice QCD calculation of the Berry phase, which is defined by the ground state of a single fermion. We perform the ground-state projection of a single-fermion propagator, construct the Berry link variable on a momentum-space lattice, and calculate the Berry phase. As the first application, the first Chern number of the (2+1)-dimensional Wilson fermion is calculated by the Monte Carlo simulation. PMID:27517766

  14. Lattice gauge theory for QCD

    SciTech Connect

    DeGrand, T.

    1997-06-01

    These lectures provide an introduction to lattice methods for nonperturbative studies of Quantum Chromodynamics. Lecture 1: Basic techniques for QCD and results for hadron spectroscopy using the simplest discretizations; lecture 2: Improved actions--what they are and how well they work; lecture 3: SLAC physics from the lattice-structure functions, the mass of the glueball, heavy quarks and {alpha}{sub s} (M{sub z}), and B-{anti B} mixing. 67 refs., 36 figs.

  15. What can we learn about baryon-baryon interaction from hypernuclei {sub {lambda}}{sup 6}H and {sub {lambda}}{sup 8}H?

    SciTech Connect

    Majling, L. Gmuca, S.

    2007-09-15

    At the LHE JINR, an original approach to hypernuclear experiments was elaborated to produce relativistic hypernuclei. The production cross sections and lifetimes, {tau}, of {sub {lambda}}{sup 3}H and {sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H were measured successfully. The results of recent experiments on {sup 5}H and {sup 7}H nuclei suggest that the hypernucleus {sub {lambda}}{sup 6}H might be stable and that this may be the case even for {sub {lambda}}{sup 8}H. The unique quality of the spectrometer SPHERE may be used to identify unambiguously the isotopes of hyperhydrogen-through their pionic decay {sub {lambda}}{sup A}H {sup {yields}} {pi}{sup -} + {sup A}He-including the new hypernuclei {sub {lambda}}{sup 6}H and {sub {lambda}}{sup 8}H with extreme values of N/Z of 4 and 6, respectively. The confirmation of the very existence of these neutron-rich hypernuclei would be a strong motivation to search for their spectra in strangeness and double-charge-exchange reactions (K{sub stop}{sup -}, {pi}{sup +}) at FINUDA or ({pi}{sup -}, K{sup +}) at J-PARC. It is very probable that, similarly as in {sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H, there is a low-lying state 1{sup +} also in {sub {lambda}}{sup 6}H and {sub {lambda}}{sup 8}H. If their electromagnetic width (M1) is small enough, we could see two different values of {tau} for {sub {lambda}}{sup 6}H and/or {sub {lambda}}{sup 8}H. We investigate the spacings of the 1{sup +} and 0{sup +} states of {sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H, {sub {lambda}}{sup 6}H, and {sub {lambda}}{sup 8}H. The understanding of the structure of isospin asymmetric systems plays a key role in the description of systems as diverse as neutron-rich nuclei and neutron matter.

  16. Optimal lattice-structured materials

    DOE PAGES

    Messner, Mark C.

    2016-07-09

    This paper describes a method for optimizing the mesostructure of lattice-structured materials. These materials are periodic arrays of slender members resembling efficient, lightweight macroscale structures like bridges and frame buildings. Current additive manufacturing technologies can assemble lattice structures with length scales ranging from nanometers to millimeters. Previous work demonstrates that lattice materials have excellent stiffness- and strength-to-weight scaling, outperforming natural materials. However, there are currently no methods for producing optimal mesostructures that consider the full space of possible 3D lattice topologies. The inverse homogenization approach for optimizing the periodic structure of lattice materials requires a parameterized, homogenized material model describingmore » the response of an arbitrary structure. This work develops such a model, starting with a method for describing the long-wavelength, macroscale deformation of an arbitrary lattice. The work combines the homogenized model with a parameterized description of the total design space to generate a parameterized model. Finally, the work describes an optimization method capable of producing optimal mesostructures. Several examples demonstrate the optimization method. One of these examples produces an elastically isotropic, maximally stiff structure, here called the isotruss, that arguably outperforms the anisotropic octet truss topology.« less

  17. An Improved Lattice Kinetic Scheme for Incompressible Viscous Fluid Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kosuke; Inamuro, Takaji

    2014-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is an explicit numerical scheme for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations (INSE) without integrating the Poisson equation for the pressure. In spite of its merit, the LBM has some drawbacks in accuracy. First, we review drawbacks for three numerical methods based on the LBM. The three methods are the LBM with the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model (LBGK), the lattice kinetic scheme (LKS) and the link-wise artificial compressibility method (LWACM). Second, in order to remedy the drawbacks, we propose an improved LKS. The present method incorporates (i) the scheme used in the LWACM for determining the kinematic viscosity, (ii) an iterative calculation of the pressure and (iii) a semi-implicit algorithm, while preserving the simplicity of the algorithm of the original LKS. Finally, in simulations of test problems, we find that the improved LKS eliminates the drawbacks and gives more accurate and stable results than LBGK, LKS and LWACM.

  18. Algebraic Lattices in QFT Renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borinsky, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The structure of overlapping subdivergences, which appear in the perturbative expansions of quantum field theory, is analyzed using algebraic lattice theory. It is shown that for specific QFTs the sets of subdivergences of Feynman diagrams form algebraic lattices. This class of QFTs includes the standard model. In kinematic renormalization schemes, in which tadpole diagrams vanish, these lattices are semimodular. This implies that the Hopf algebra of Feynman diagrams is graded by the coradical degree or equivalently that every maximal forest has the same length in the scope of BPHZ renormalization. As an application of this framework, a formula for the counter terms in zero-dimensional QFT is given together with some examples of the enumeration of primitive or skeleton diagrams.

  19. Lattice Structures For Aerospace Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Olmo, E.; Grande, E.; Samartin, C. R.; Bezdenejnykh, M.; Torres, J.; Blanco, N.; Frovel, M.; Canas, J.

    2012-07-01

    The way of mass reduction improving performances in the aerospace structures is a constant and relevant challenge in the space business. The designs, materials and manufacturing processes are permanently in evolution to explore and get mass optimization solutions at low cost. In the framework of ICARO project, EADS CASA ESPACIO (ECE) has designed, manufactured and tested a technology demonstrator which shows that lattice type of grid structures is a promising weight saving solution for replacing some traditional metallic and composite structures for space applications. A virtual testing methodology was used in order to support the design of a high modulus CFRP cylindrical lattice technology demonstrator. The manufacturing process, based on composite Automatic Fiber Placement (AFP) technology developed by ECE, allows obtaining high quality low weight lattice structures potentially applicable to a wide range of aerospace structures. Launcher payload adaptors, satellite platforms, antenna towers or instrument supports are some promising candidates.

  20. Hadron Structure on the Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Can, K. U.; Kusno, A.; Mastropas, E. V.; Zanotti, J. M.

    The aim of these lectures will be to provide an introduction to some of the concepts needed to study the structure of hadrons on the lattice. Topics covered include the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon and pion, the nucleon's axial charge and moments of parton and generalised parton distribution functions. These are placed in a phenomenological context by describing how they can lead to insights into the distribution of charge, spin and momentum amongst a hadron's partonic constituents. We discuss the techniques required for extracting the relevant matrix elements from lattice simulations and draw attention to potential sources of systematic error. Examples of recent lattice results are presented and are compared with results from both experiment and theoretical models.

  1. Successive refinement lattice vector quantization.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Debargha; Mitra, Sanjit K

    2002-01-01

    Lattice Vector quantization (LVQ) solves the complexity problem of LBG based vector quantizers, yielding very general codebooks. However, a single stage LVQ, when applied to high resolution quantization of a vector, may result in very large and unwieldy indices, making it unsuitable for applications requiring successive refinement. The goal of this work is to develop a unified framework for progressive uniform quantization of vectors without having to sacrifice the mean- squared-error advantage of lattice quantization. A successive refinement uniform vector quantization methodology is developed, where the codebooks in successive stages are all lattice codebooks, each in the shape of the Voronoi regions of the lattice at the previous stage. Such Voronoi shaped geometric lattice codebooks are named Voronoi lattice VQs (VLVQ). Measures of efficiency of successive refinement are developed based on the entropy of the indices transmitted by the VLVQs. Additionally, a constructive method for asymptotically optimal uniform quantization is developed using tree-structured subset VLVQs in conjunction with entropy coding. The methodology developed here essentially yields the optimal vector counterpart of scalar "bitplane-wise" refinement. Unfortunately it is not as trivial to implement as in the scalar case. Furthermore, the benefits of asymptotic optimality in tree-structured subset VLVQs remain elusive in practical nonasymptotic situations. Nevertheless, because scalar bitplane- wise refinement is extensively used in modern wavelet image coders, we have applied the VLVQ techniques to successively refine vectors of wavelet coefficients in the vector set-partitioning (VSPIHT) framework. The results are compared against SPIHT and the previous successive approximation wavelet vector quantization (SA-W-VQ) results of Sampson, da Silva and Ghanbari.

  2. Machines for lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, P.B.

    1989-05-01

    The most promising approach to the solution of the theory of strong interactions is large scale numerical simulation using the techniques of lattice gauge theory. At the present time, computing requirements for convincing calculations of the properties of hadrons exceed the capabilities of even the most powerful commercial supercomputers. This has led to the development of massively parallel computers dedicated to lattice gauge theory. This talk will discuss the computing requirements behind these machines, and general features of the components and architectures of the half dozen major projects now in existence. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Chiral symmetry on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1994-11-01

    The author reviews some of the difficulties associated with chiral symmetry in the context of a lattice regulator. The author discusses the structure of Wilson Fermions when the hopping parameter is in the vicinity of its critical value. Here one flavor contrasts sharply with the case of more, where a residual chiral symmetry survives anomalies. The author briefly discusses the surface mode approach, the use of mirror Fermions to cancel anomalies, and finally speculates on the problems with lattice versions of the standard model.

  4. Nuclear Physics from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Silas Beane, Konstantinos Orginos, Martin Savage

    2011-01-01

    We review recent progress toward establishing lattice Quantum Chromodynamics as a predictive calculational framework for nuclear physics. A survey of the current techniques that are used to extract low-energy hadronic scattering amplitudes and interactions is followed by a review of recent two-body and few-body calculations by the NPLQCD collaboration and others. An outline of the nuclear physics that is expected to be accomplished with Lattice QCD in the next decade, along with estimates of the required computational resources, is presented.

  5. Hadron interactions

    SciTech Connect

    K. Orginos

    2011-12-01

    In this talk I am reviewing recent calculations of properties of multi-hadron systems in lattice QCD. In particular, I am reviewing results of elastic scattering phase shifts in meson-meson, meson-baryon and baryon-baryon systems, as well as discussing results indicating possible existence of bound states in two baryon systems. Finally, calculations of properties of systems with more than two hadrons are presented.

  6. Lattice fields and strong interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1989-06-01

    I review the lattice formulation of gauge theories and the use of numerical methods to investigate nonperturbative phenomena. These methods are directly applicable to studying hadronic matter at high temperatures. Considerable recent progress has been made in numerical algorithms for including dynamical fermions in such calculations. Dealing with a nonvanishing baryon density adds new unsolved challenges. 33 refs.

  7. Lattice QCD in Background Fields

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Brian Tiburzi, Andre Walker-Loud

    2009-06-01

    Electromagnetic properties of hadrons can be computed by lattice simulations of QCD in background fields. We demonstrate new techniques for the investigation of charged hadron properties in electric fields. Our current calculations employ large electric fields, motivating us to analyze chiral dynamics in strong QED backgrounds, and subsequently uncover surprising non-perturbative effects present at finite volume.

  8. Experimenting with Langevin lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gavai, R.V.; Potvin, J.; Sanielevici, S.

    1987-05-01

    We report on the status of our investigations of the effects of systematic errors upon the practical merits of Langevin updating in full lattice QCD. We formulate some rules for the safe use of this updating procedure and some observations on problems which may be common to all approximate fermion algorithms.

  9. On Some Periodic Toda Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Kac, M.; Van Moerbeke, Pierre

    1975-01-01

    A discrete version of Floquet's theory is developed and applied to a system of non-linear differential equations related to the periodic Toda lattice. A special solution previously found by Toda is thus seen to fit into the formalism of inverse scattering problems. PMID:16592244

  10. Hadronic Interactions from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinos Orginos

    2006-03-19

    In this talk I discuss a few recent results on lattice calculations of scattering lengths in hadronic processes. In particular, I present the scattering length of the pion-pion scattering in the I=2 channel and the nucleon-nucleon {sup 1}S{sub 0} channel and {sup 3}S{sub 1}-{sup 3}D{sub 1} coupled channels.

  11. Lattice continuum and diffusional creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesarovic, Sinisa Dj.

    2016-04-01

    Diffusional creep is characterized by growth/disappearance of lattice planes at the crystal boundaries that serve as sources/sinks of vacancies, and by diffusion of vacancies. The lattice continuum theory developed here represents a natural and intuitive framework for the analysis of diffusion in crystals and lattice growth/loss at the boundaries. The formulation includes the definition of the Lagrangian reference configuration for the newly created lattice, the transport theorem and the definition of the creep rate tensor for a polycrystal as a piecewise uniform, discontinuous field. The values associated with each crystalline grain are related to the normal diffusional flux at grain boundaries. The governing equations for Nabarro-Herring creep are derived with coupled diffusion and elasticity with compositional eigenstrain. Both, bulk diffusional dissipation and boundary dissipation accompanying vacancy nucleation and absorption, are considered, but the latter is found to be negligible. For periodic arrangements of grains, diffusion formally decouples from elasticity but at the cost of a complicated boundary condition. The equilibrium of deviatorically stressed polycrystals is impossible without inclusion of interface energies. The secondary creep rate estimates correspond to the standard Nabarro-Herring model, and the volumetric creep is small. The initial (primary) creep rate is estimated to be much larger than the secondary creep rate.

  12. Triangles in a Lattice Parabola.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sastry, K. R. S.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed are properties possessed by polygons inscribed in the lattice parabola y=x, including the area of a triangle, triangles of minimum area, conditions for right triangles, triangles whose area is the cube of an integer, and implications of Pick's Theorem. Further directions to pursue are suggested. (MDH)

  13. Orbital optical lattices with bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kock, T.; Hippler, C.; Ewerbeck, A.; Hemmerich, A.

    2016-02-01

    This article provides a synopsis of our recent experimental work exploring Bose-Einstein condensation in metastable higher Bloch bands of optical lattices. Bipartite lattice geometries have allowed us to implement appropriate band structures, which meet three basic requirements: the existence of metastable excited states sufficiently protected from collisional band relaxation, a mechanism to excite the atoms initially prepared in the lowest band with moderate entropy increase, and the possibility of cross-dimensional tunneling dynamics, necessary to establish coherence along all lattice axes. A variety of bands can be selectively populated and a subsequent thermalization process leads to the formation of a condensate in the lowest energy state of the chosen band. As examples the 2nd, 4th and 7th bands in a bipartite square lattice are discussed. The geometry of the 2nd and 7th bands can be tuned such that two inequivalent energetically degenerate energy minima arise at the X ±-points at the edge of the 1st Brillouin zone. In this case even a small interaction energy is sufficient to lock the phase between the two condensation points such that a complex-valued chiral superfluid order parameter can emerge, which breaks time reversal symmetry. In the 4th band a condensate can be formed at the Γ-point in the center of the 1st Brillouin zone, which can be used to explore topologically protected band touching points. The new techniques to access orbital degrees of freedom in higher bands greatly extend the class of many-body scenarios that can be explored with bosons in optical lattices.

  14. Lattice dynamics and lattice thermal conductivity of thorium dicarbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zongmeng; Huai, Ping; Qiu, Wujie; Ke, Xuezhi; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhu, Zhiyuan

    2014-11-01

    The elastic and thermodynamic properties of ThC2 with a monoclinic symmetry have been studied by means of density functional theory and direct force-constant method. The calculated properties including the thermal expansion, the heat capacity and the elastic constants are in a good agreement with experiment. Our results show that the vibrational property of the C2 dimer in ThC2 is similar to that of a free standing C2 dimer. This indicates that the C2 dimer in ThC2 is not strongly bonded to Th atoms. The lattice thermal conductivity for ThC2 was calculated by means of the Debye-Callaway model. As a comparison, the conductivity of ThC was also calculated. Our results show that the ThC and ThC2 contributions of the lattice thermal conductivity to the total conductivity are 29% and 17%, respectively.

  15. The CKM Matrix from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, Paul B.; /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    Lattice QCD plays an essential role in testing and determining the parameters of the CKM theory of flavor mixing and CP violation. Very high precisions are required for lattice calculations analyzing CKM data; I discuss the prospects for achieving them. Lattice calculations will also play a role in investigating flavor mixing and CP violation beyond the Standard Model.

  16. Modal analysis of kagome-lattice structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, H.; Blakley, S.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2015-05-01

    The first few lowest order circularly symmetric electromagnetic eigenmodes of a full kagome lattice are compared to those of a kagome lattice with a hexagonal defect. This analysis offers important insights into the physics behind the waveguiding properties of hollow-core fibers with a kagome-lattice cladding.

  17. Methods for forming group III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for forming Group III--arsenide-nitride semiconductor materials. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V crystals varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V crystals can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  18. Partial lattice participation in the spin-lattice relaxation of potassium chromium alum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overweg, J. A.; Flokstra, J.; ter Brake, H. J. M.; Gerritsma, G. J.

    1981-08-01

    We developed a SQUID-based frequency sweeping system for a.c. susceptibility measurements. Using this instrument we found that in Potassium Chromium Alum only a part of the lattice system is involved in the spin-lattice relaxation process. This partial lattice participation amounts 60-75% of the total lattice specific heat.

  19. LATTICE QCD AT FINITE DENSITY.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHMIDT, C.

    2006-07-23

    I discuss different approaches to finite density lattice QCD. In particular, I focus on the structure of the phase diagram and discuss attempts to determine the location of the critical end-point. Recent results on the transition line as function of the chemical potential (T{sub c}({mu}{sub q})) are reviewed. Along the transition line, hadronic fluctuations have been calculated; which can be used to characterize properties of the Quark Gluon plasma and eventually can also help to identify the location of the critical end-point in the QCD phase diagram on the lattice and in heavy ion experiments. Furthermore, I comment on the structure of the phase diagram at large {mu}{sub q}.

  20. Heterogeneous, weakly coupled map lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotelo Herrera, M.a. Dolores; San Martín, Jesús; Porter, Mason A.

    2016-07-01

    Coupled map lattices (CMLs) are often used to study emergent phenomena in nature. It is typically assumed (unrealistically) that each component is described by the same map, and it is important to relax this assumption. In this paper, we characterize periodic orbits and the laminar regime of type-I intermittency in heterogeneous weakly coupled map lattices (HWCMLs). We show that the period of a cycle in an HWCML is preserved for arbitrarily small coupling strengths even when an associated uncoupled oscillator would experience a period-doubling cascade. Our results characterize periodic orbits both near and far from saddle-node bifurcations, and we thereby provide a key step for examining the bifurcation structure of heterogeneous CMLs.

  1. Form factors from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dru Renner

    2012-04-01

    Precision computation of hadronic physics with lattice QCD is becoming feasible. The last decade has seen precent-level calculations of many simple properties of mesons, and the last few years have seen calculations of baryon masses, including the nucleon mass, accurate to a few percent. As computational power increases and algorithms advance, the precise calculation of a variety of more demanding hadronic properties will become realistic. With this in mind, I discuss the current lattice QCD calculations of generalized parton distributions with an emphasis on the prospects for well-controlled calculations for these observables as well. I will do this by way of several examples: the pion and nucleon form factors and moments of the nucleon parton and generalized-parton distributions.

  2. Fluctuating multicomponent lattice Boltzmann model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belardinelli, D.; Sbragaglia, M.; Biferale, L.; Gross, M.; Varnik, F.

    2015-02-01

    Current implementations of fluctuating lattice Boltzmann equations (FLBEs) describe single component fluids. In this paper, a model based on the continuum kinetic Boltzmann equation for describing multicomponent fluids is extended to incorporate the effects of thermal fluctuations. The thus obtained fluctuating Boltzmann equation is first linearized to apply the theory of linear fluctuations, and expressions for the noise covariances are determined by invoking the fluctuation-dissipation theorem directly at the kinetic level. Crucial for our analysis is the projection of the Boltzmann equation onto the orthonormal Hermite basis. By integrating in space and time the fluctuating Boltzmann equation with a discrete number of velocities, the FLBE is obtained for both ideal and nonideal multicomponent fluids. Numerical simulations are specialized to the case where mean-field interactions are introduced on the lattice, indicating a proper thermalization of the system.

  3. A transportable optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Stefan; Häfner, Sebastian; Grotti, Jacopo; Koller, Silvio; Al-Masoudi, Ali; Sterr, Uwe; Lisdat, Christian

    2016-06-01

    We present the experimental setup and first results of PTB's transportable 87Sr clock. It consists of a physics package, several compact laser breadboards, and a transportable high finesse cavity for the clock laser. A comparison of the transportable system with our stationary optical lattice clock yields an instability of 2.2 x 10-15 √s/τ for the transportable clock. The current fractional uncertainty of 1 × 10-15 is still limited by the not yet fully evaluated light shift from the free running optical lattice laser operated near the magic wavelength. We are currently improving our transportable system to reach an uncertainty at or below the 10-17 level, which will finaly be limited by the uncertainty in blackbody radiation shift correction.

  4. Breathers in strongly anharmonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Rosenau, Philip; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2014-02-01

    We present and study a family of finite amplitude breathers on a genuinely anharmonic Klein-Gordon lattice embedded in a nonlinear site potential. The direct numerical simulations are supported by a quasilinear Schrodinger equation (QLS) derived by averaging out the fast oscillations assuming small, albeit finite, amplitude vibrations. The genuinely anharmonic interlattice forces induce breathers which are strongly localized with tails evanescing at a doubly exponential rate and are either close to a continuum, with discrete effects being suppressed, or close to an anticontinuum state, with discrete effects being enhanced. Whereas the D-QLS breathers appear to be always stable, in general there is a stability threshold which improves with spareness of the lattice.

  5. Lattice Simulations and Infrared Conformality

    DOE PAGES

    Appelquist, Thomas; Fleming, George T.; Lin, Meifeng; Neil, Ethan T.; Schaich, David A

    2011-09-01

    We examine several recent lattice-simulation data sets, asking whether they are consistent with infrared conformality. We observe, in particular, that for an SU(3) gauge theory with 12 Dirac fermions in the fundamental representation, recent simulation data can be described assuming infrared conformality. Lattice simulations include a fermion mass m which is then extrapolated to zero, and we note that this data can be fit by a small-m expansion, allowing a controlled extrapolation. We also note that the conformal hypothesis does not work well for two theories that are known or expected to be confining and chirally broken, and that itmore » does work well for another theory expected to be infrared conformal.« less

  6. The Fermilab lattice supercomputer project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischler, Mark; Atac, R.; Cook, A.; Deppe, J.; Gaines, I.; Husby, D.; Nash, T.; Pham, T.; Zmuda, T.; Hockney, George; Eichten, E.; Mackenzie, P.; Thacker, H. B.; Toussaint, D.

    1989-06-01

    The ACPMAPS system is a highly cost effective, local memory MIMD computer targeted at algorithm development and production running for gauge theory on the lattice. The machine consists of a compound hypercube of crates, each of which is a full crossbar switch containing several processors. The processing nodes are single board array processors based on the Weitek XL chip set, each with a peak power of 20 MFLOPS and supported by 8MBytes of data memory. The system currently being assembled has a peak power of 5 GFLOPS, delivering performance at approximately $250/MFLOP. The system is programmable in C and Fortran. An underpinning of software routines (CANOPY) provides an easy and natural way of coding lattice problems, such that the details of parallelism, and communication and system architecture are transparent to the user. CANOPY can easily be ported to any single CPU or MIMD system which supports C, and allows the coding of typical applications with very little effort.

  7. Entropy favours open colloidal lattices.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaoming; Chen, Qian; Granick, Steve

    2013-03-01

    Burgeoning experimental and simulation activity seeks to understand the existence of self-assembled colloidal structures that are not close-packed. Here we describe an analytical theory based on lattice dynamics and supported by experiments that reveals the fundamental role entropy can play in stabilizing open lattices. The entropy we consider is associated with the rotational and vibrational modes unique to colloids interacting through extended attractive patches. The theory makes predictions of the implied temperature, pressure and patch-size dependence of the phase diagram of open and close-packed structures. More generally, it provides guidance for the conditions at which targeted patchy colloidal assemblies in two and three dimensions are stable, thus overcoming the difficulty in exploring by experiment or simulation the full range of conceivable parameters.

  8. Scattering in Quantum Lattice Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, Andrew; Love, Peter

    2009-03-01

    Quantum Lattice Gas Automata (QLGA) are of interest for their use in simulating quantum mechanics on both classical and quantum computers. QLGAs are an extension of classical Lattice Gas Automata where the constraint of unitary evolution is added. In the late 1990s, David A. Meyer as well as Bruce Boghosian and Washington Taylor produced similar models of QLGAs. We start by presenting a unified version of these models and study them from the point of view of the physics of wave-packet scattering. We show that the Meyer and Boghosian-Taylor models are actually the same basic model with slightly different parameterizations and limits. We then implement these models computationally using the Python programming language and show that QLGAs are able to replicate the analytic results of quantum mechanics (for example reflected and transmitted amplitudes for step potentials and the Klein paradox).

  9. Stable kagome lattices from group IV elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenaerts, O.; Schoeters, B.; Partoens, B.

    2015-03-01

    A thorough investigation of three-dimensional kagome lattices of group IV elements is performed with first-principles calculations. The investigated kagome lattices of silicon and germanium are found to be of similar stability as the recently proposed carbon kagome lattice. Carbon and silicon kagome lattices are both direct-gap semiconductors but they have qualitatively different electronic band structures. While direct optical transitions between the valence and conduction bands are allowed in the carbon case, no such transitions can be observed for silicon. The kagome lattice of germanium exhibits semimetallic behavior but can be transformed into a semiconductor after compression.

  10. From lattice Hamiltonians to tunable band structures by lithographic design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadjine, Athmane; Allan, Guy; Delerue, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    Recently, new materials exhibiting exotic band structures characterized by Dirac cones, nontrivial flat bands, and band crossing points have been proposed on the basis of effective two-dimensional lattice Hamiltonians. Here, we show using atomistic tight-binding calculations that these theoretical predictions could be experimentally realized in the conduction band of superlattices nanolithographed in III-V and II-VI semiconductor ultrathin films. The lithographed patterns consist of periodic lattices of etched cylindrical holes that form potential barriers for the electrons in the quantum well. In the case of honeycomb lattices, the conduction minibands of the resulting artificial graphene host several Dirac cones and nontrivial flat bands. Similar features, but organized in different ways, in energy or in k -space are found in kagome, distorted honeycomb, and Lieb superlattices. Dirac cones extending over tens of meV could be obtained in superlattices with reasonable sizes of the lithographic patterns, for instance in InAs/AlSb heterostructures. Bilayer artificial graphene could be also realized by lithography of a double quantum-well heterostructure. These new materials should be interesting for the experimental exploration of Dirac-based quantum systems, for both fundamental and applied physics.

  11. Apiary B Factory lattice design

    SciTech Connect

    Donald, M.H.R. ); Garren, A.A. )

    1991-04-01

    The Apiary B Factory is a proposed high-intensity electron-positron collider. This paper will present the lattice design for this facility, which envisions two rings with unequal energies in the PEP tunnel. The design has many interesting optical and geometrical features due to the needs to conform to the existing tunnel, and to achieve the necessary emittances, damping times and vacuum. Existing hardware is used to a maximum extent. 8 figs. 1 tab.

  12. Apiary B Factory Lattice Design

    SciTech Connect

    Donald, M.H.R.; Garren, A.A.

    1991-05-03

    The Apiary B Factory is a proposed high-intensity electron-positron collider. This paper presents the lattice design for this facility, which envisions two rings with unequal energies in the PEP tunnel. The design has many interesting optical and geometrical features due to the needs to conform to the existing tunnel, and to achieve the necessary emittances, damping times and vacuum. Existing hardware is used to a maximum extent.

  13. Threshold Resonances - a Lattice Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    David Richards

    2002-10-01

    The calculation of the masses of the lightest nucleon resonances using lattice QCD is surveyed. Recent results for the mass of the First radial excitation of the nucleon, the Roper resonance, are reviewed and the interpretation in terms of models of hadronic structure, such as the quark model and multi-quark states, discussed. The talk concludes with an outline of prospects for future calculations.

  14. Scanning phononic lattices with ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Vines, R.E.; Wolfe, J.P.; Every, A.V.

    1999-11-01

    A method for probing the elastic properties of newly developed periodic structures using acoustic waves is introduced. Highly anisotropic transmission of surface acoustic waves is observed by continuously scanning the wave vector angle. Preliminary models of wave propagation through multilayers and two-dimensional lattices explain some of the experimental features, while other features can be attributed to the resonant excitation of interface waves. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Baryon Interactions from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Sinya

    2010-05-12

    We report on new attempt to investigate baryon interactions in lattice QCD. From the Bethe-Salpeter (BS) wave function, we have successfully extracted the nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials in quenched QCD simulations, which reproduce qualitative features of modern NN potentials. The method has been extended to obtain the tensor potential as well as the central potential and also applied to the hyperon-nucleon (YN) interactions, in both quenched and full QCD.

  16. Lattice thermal expansion for normal tetrahedral compound semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, M.S. . E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.com

    2007-02-15

    The cubic root of the deviation of the lattice thermal expansion from that of the expected value of diamond for group IV semiconductors, binary compounds of III-V and II-VI, as well as several ternary compounds from groups I-III-VI{sub 2}, II-IV-V{sub 2} and I-IV{sub 2}V{sub 3} semiconductors versus their bonding length are given straight lines. Their slopes were found to be 0.0256, 0.0210, 0.0170, 0.0259, 0.0196, and 0.02840 for the groups above, respectively. Depending on the valence electrons of the elements forming these groups, a formula was found to correlate all the values of the slopes mentioned above to that of group IV. This new formula which depends on the melting point and the bonding length as well as the number of valence electrons for the elements forming the compounds, will gives best calculated values for lattice thermal expansion for all compounds forming the groups mentioned above. An empirical relation is also found between the mean ionicity of the compounds forming the groups and their slopes mentioned above and that gave the mean ionicity for the compound CuGe{sub 2}P{sub 3} in the range of 0.442.

  17. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-01-13

    In this study, one of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculationsmore » of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.« less

  18. Species-specific optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, L. J.; Thywissen, J. H.

    2007-05-15

    We examine single-frequency optical schemes for species-selective trapping of ultracold alkali-metal atoms. Independently addressing the elements of a binary mixture enables the creation of an optical lattice for one atomic species with little or no effect on the other. We analyze a 'tune-in' scheme, using near-resonant detuning to create a strong potential for one specific element. A 'tune-out' scheme is also developed, in which the trapping wavelength is chosen to lie between two strong transitions of an alkali-metal atom such that the induced dipole moment is zero for that species but is nonzero for any other. We compare these schemes by examining the trap depths and heating rates associated with both. We find that the tune-in scheme is preferable for Li-Na, Li-K, and K-Na mixtures, while the tune-out scheme is preferable for Li-Cs, K-Rb, Rb-Cs, K-Cs, and {sup 39}K-{sup 40}K mixtures. Several applications of species-selective optical lattices are explored, including the creation of a lattice for a single species in the presence of a phononlike background, the tuning of relative effective mass, and the isothermal increase of phase-space density.

  19. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-01-13

    In this study, one of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.

  20. Lattice Green's functions in all dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttmann, Anthony J.

    2010-07-01

    We give a systematic treatment of lattice Green's functions (LGF) on the d-dimensional diamond, simple cubic, body-centred cubic and face-centred cubic lattices for arbitrary dimensionality d >= 2 for the first three lattices, and for 2 <= d <= 5 for the hyper-fcc lattice. We show that there is a close connection between the LGF of the d-dimensional hyper-cubic lattice and that of the (d - 1)-dimensional diamond lattice. We give constant-term formulations of LGFs for each of these lattices in all dimensions. Through a still under-developed connection with Mahler measures, we point out an unexpected connection between the coefficients of the sc, bcc and diamond LGFs and some Ramanujan-type formulae for 1/π.

  1. Manipulation and control of a bichromatic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Claire; Barter, Thomas; Daiss, Severin; Leung, Zephy; Stamper-Kurn, Dan

    2015-05-01

    Recent experiments with ultracold atoms in optical lattices have had great success emulating the simple models of condensed matter systems. These experiments are typically performed with a single site per unit cell. We realize a lattice with up to four sites per unit cell by overlaying an attractive triangular lattice with a repulsive one at twice the wavelength. The relative displacement of the two lattices determines the particular structure. One available configuration is the kagome lattice, which has a flat energy band. In the flat band all kinetic energy states are degenerate, so we have the opportunity to explore a regime where interactions dominate. This bichromatic lattice requires careful stabilization, but offers an opportunity to manipulate the unit cell and band structure by perturbing the lattices relative to one another. I will discuss recent progress.

  2. Lattice Truss Structural Response Using Energy Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenner, Winfred Scottson

    1996-01-01

    A deterministic methodology is presented for developing closed-form deflection equations for two-dimensional and three-dimensional lattice structures. Four types of lattice structures are studied: beams, plates, shells and soft lattices. Castigliano's second theorem, which entails the total strain energy of a structure, is utilized to generate highly accurate results. Derived deflection equations provide new insight into the bending and shear behavior of the four types of lattices, in contrast to classic solutions of similar structures. Lattice derivations utilizing kinetic energy are also presented, and used to examine the free vibration response of simple lattice structures. Derivations utilizing finite element theory for unique lattice behavior are also presented and validated using the finite element analysis code EAL.

  3. III-V aresenide-nitride semiconductor materials and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor crystals, methods for producing such crystals and devices employing such crystals. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V crystals varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V crystals can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  4. CITY III Operator's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Envirometrics, Inc., Washington, DC.

    CITY III is a computer-assisted simulation game of an urban system involving player operation of and interaction with economic, social, and government components. The role of operator in the game is to take the handwritten inputs (decisions) from the CITY III participants, process them, and return output which initiates the next round of…

  5. SUPERSTARS III: K-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    SUPERSTARS III is a K-8 program designed as an enrichment opportunity for self-directed learners in mathematics. The basic purpose of SUPERSTARS III is to provide the extra challenge that self-motivated students need in mathematics and to do so in a structured, long-term program that does not impinge on the normal classroom routine or the…

  6. Interaction of ribonucleotides with metal hexacyanocobaltate(III): a possible role in chemical evolution.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shah Raj; Kamaluddin

    2007-06-01

    It has been proposed that metal cyanide complexes would have acted as effective prebiotic catalysts. Insoluble metal cyanide complexes could have concentrated biomonomers from the dilute prebiotic soup, facilitating certain prebiotic reactions. In the light of the above hypothesis, interaction of four ribonucleotides, namely 5'-AMP, 5'-GMP, 5'-CMP, and 5'-UMP with copper(II)- and cadmium(II) hexacyanocobaltate(III) has been studied. The interaction was found to be maximum at neutral pH. 5'-GMP showed greater interaction with both the metal hexacyanocobaltate(III) while copper(II) hexacyanocobaltate(III) showed greater uptake than cadmium(II) hexacyanocobaltate(III) for all the four ribonucleotides studied. Infrared spectral studies of ribonucleotides, metal hexacyanocobaltate(III) and ribonucleotide - metal hexacyanocobaltate(III) adducts indicated that the nitrogen base and phosphate moiety of ribonucleotides interact with outer divalent metal ion present in the lattice of metal hexacyanocobaltate(III).

  7. One-dimensional lattices topologically equivalent to two-dimensional lattices within the context of the lattice gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanza, E. F.; Costanza, G.

    2016-10-01

    Continuum partial differential equations are obtained from a set of discrete stochastic evolution equations of both non-Markovian and Markovian processes and applied to the diffusion within the context of the lattice gas model. A procedure allowing to construct one-dimensional lattices that are topologically equivalent to two-dimensional lattices is described in detail in the case of a rectangular lattice. This example shows the general features that possess the procedure and extensions are also suggested in order to provide a wider insight in the present approach.

  8. Colliding-beam-accelerator lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, J.; Cornacchia, M.; Courant, E.D.; Parzen, G.

    1983-01-01

    We describe the lattice of the Colliding Beam Accelerator, a 400 x 400 GeV pp facility proposed for construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The structure adopted is very versatile, in part in consequence of its desirable behavior as function of momentum deviation and as function of the betatron tunes. Each of the six insertions can be arranged to meet specific requirements at the crossing points as illustrated by a discussion of the tuneable low-beta insertions. The luminosity in these low-beta insertions (2 x 10/sup 33/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/) would be an order of magnitude larger than the standard insertions.

  9. Lattice models of biological growth

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D.A.; Corey, E.M. )

    1990-06-15

    We show that very simple iterative rules for the growth of cells on a two-dimensional lattice can simulate biological-growth phenomena realistically. We discuss random cellular automata models for the growth of fern gametophytes, branching fungi, and leaves, and for shape transformations useful in the study of biological variation and evolution. Although there are interesting analogies between biological and physical growth processes, we stress the uniqueness of biological automata behavior. The computer growth algorithms that successfully mimic observed growth behavior may be helpful in determining the underlying biochemical mechanisms of growth regulation.

  10. Multi-stable cylindrical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirrera, Alberto; Lachenal, Xavier; Daynes, Stephen; Weaver, Paul M.; Chenchiah, Isaac V.

    2013-11-01

    We present a cylindrical lattice structure that mimics the behaviour of the virus bacteriophage T4 in having two (or more) stable states which differ in their radii and length. While the virus achieves bistability through molecular mechanisms we use composite materials to exploit the interplay between pre-stress, material properties and structural geometry. We demonstrate (computationally) that multi-stability is a robust phenomenon. We also show (analytically) that it is possible to choose the design variables so that the energy is independent of the radius, thus resulting in every state of the structure being stable.

  11. GLAD: A Generic LAttice Debugger

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.J.

    1991-11-01

    Today, numerous simulation and analysis codes exist for the design, commission, and operation of accelerator beam lines. There is a need to develop a common user interface and database link to run these codes interactively. This paper will describe a proposed system, GLAD (Generic LAttice Debugger), to fulfill this need. Specifically, GLAD can be used to find errors in beam lines during commissioning, control beam parameters during operation, and design beam line optics and error correction systems for the next generation of linear accelerators and storage rings.

  12. Solitary waves on tensegrity lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraternali, F.; Senatore, L.; Daraio, C.

    2012-06-01

    We study the dynamics of lattices formed by masses connected through tensegrity prisms. By employing analytic and numerical arguments, we show that such structures support two limit dynamic regimes controlled by the prisms' properties: (i) in the low-energy (sonic) regime the system supports the formation and propagation of solitary waves which exhibit sech2 shape and (ii) in the high-energy (ultrasonic) regime the system supports atomic-scale localization. Such peculiar features found in periodic arrays of tensegrity structures suggest their use for the creation of new composite materials (here called "tensegrity materials") of potential interest for applications in impact absorption, energy localization and in new acoustic devices.

  13. Kaon Condensation with Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Detmold, Will; Detmold, William; Detmold, Will; Detmold, William; Savage, Martin; Walker-Loud, Andre; Orginos, Konstantinos; Torok, Aaron

    2008-09-01

    doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.78.054514
    Kaon condensation may play an important role in the structure of hadronic matter at densities greater than that of nuclear matter, as exist in the interior of neutron stars. We present the results of the first lattice QCD calculation of kaon condensation obtained by studying systems containing up to twelve charged kaons. Surprisingly, the equation of state of the condensate is remarkably well reproduced by leading order chiral perturbation theory. We determine the three-kaon interaction from the multi-kaon systems and update our results for pion condensates.

  14. Localization of Waves in Merged Lattices.

    PubMed

    Alagappan, G; Png, C E

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a new two-dimensional physical topology-merged lattice, that allows dense number of wave localization states. Merged lattices are obtained as a result of merging two lattices of scatters of the same space group, but with slightly different spatial resonances. Such merging creates two-dimensional scattering "beats" which are perfectly periodic on the longer spatial scale. On the shorter spatial scale, the systematic breakage of the translational symmetry leads to strong wave scattering, and this causes the occurrences of wave localization states. Merged Lattices promises variety of localization states including tightly confined, and ring type annular modes. The longer scale perfect periodicity of the merged lattice, enables complete prediction and full control over the density of the localization states and its' quality factors. In addition, the longer scale periodicity, also allows design of integrated slow wave components. Merged lattices, thus, can be engineered easily to create technologically beneficial applications. PMID:27535096

  15. Localization of Waves in Merged Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Alagappan, G.; Png, C. E.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a new two–dimensional physical topology–merged lattice, that allows dense number of wave localization states. Merged lattices are obtained as a result of merging two lattices of scatters of the same space group, but with slightly different spatial resonances. Such merging creates two–dimensional scattering “beats” which are perfectly periodic on the longer spatial scale. On the shorter spatial scale, the systematic breakage of the translational symmetry leads to strong wave scattering, and this causes the occurrences of wave localization states. Merged Lattices promises variety of localization states including tightly confined, and ring type annular modes. The longer scale perfect periodicity of the merged lattice, enables complete prediction and full control over the density of the localization states and its’ quality factors. In addition, the longer scale periodicity, also allows design of integrated slow wave components. Merged lattices, thus, can be engineered easily to create technologically beneficial applications. PMID:27535096

  16. Localization of Waves in Merged Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagappan, G.; Png, C. E.

    2016-08-01

    This article describes a new two-dimensional physical topology-merged lattice, that allows dense number of wave localization states. Merged lattices are obtained as a result of merging two lattices of scatters of the same space group, but with slightly different spatial resonances. Such merging creates two-dimensional scattering “beats” which are perfectly periodic on the longer spatial scale. On the shorter spatial scale, the systematic breakage of the translational symmetry leads to strong wave scattering, and this causes the occurrences of wave localization states. Merged Lattices promises variety of localization states including tightly confined, and ring type annular modes. The longer scale perfect periodicity of the merged lattice, enables complete prediction and full control over the density of the localization states and its’ quality factors. In addition, the longer scale periodicity, also allows design of integrated slow wave components. Merged lattices, thus, can be engineered easily to create technologically beneficial applications.

  17. Working Group Report: Lattice Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, T.; et al.,

    2013-10-22

    This is the report of the Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory prepared for the proceedings of the 2013 Community Summer Study ("Snowmass"). We present the future computing needs and plans of the U.S. lattice gauge theory community and argue that continued support of the U.S. (and worldwide) lattice-QCD effort is essential to fully capitalize on the enormous investment in the high-energy physics experimental program. We first summarize the dramatic progress of numerical lattice-QCD simulations in the past decade, with some emphasis on calculations carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Lattice-QCD Collaboration, and describe a broad program of lattice-QCD calculations that will be relevant for future experiments at the intensity and energy frontiers. We then present details of the computational hardware and software resources needed to undertake these calculations.

  18. Localization of Waves in Merged Lattices.

    PubMed

    Alagappan, G; Png, C E

    2016-08-18

    This article describes a new two-dimensional physical topology-merged lattice, that allows dense number of wave localization states. Merged lattices are obtained as a result of merging two lattices of scatters of the same space group, but with slightly different spatial resonances. Such merging creates two-dimensional scattering "beats" which are perfectly periodic on the longer spatial scale. On the shorter spatial scale, the systematic breakage of the translational symmetry leads to strong wave scattering, and this causes the occurrences of wave localization states. Merged Lattices promises variety of localization states including tightly confined, and ring type annular modes. The longer scale perfect periodicity of the merged lattice, enables complete prediction and full control over the density of the localization states and its' quality factors. In addition, the longer scale periodicity, also allows design of integrated slow wave components. Merged lattices, thus, can be engineered easily to create technologically beneficial applications.

  19. Experimental generation of optical coherence lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yahong; Ponomarenko, Sergey A.; Cai, Yangjian

    2016-08-01

    We report experimental generation and measurement of recently introduced optical coherence lattices. The presented optical coherence lattice realization technique hinges on a superposition of mutually uncorrelated partially coherent Schell-model beams with tailored coherence properties. We show theoretically that information can be encoded into and, in principle, recovered from the lattice degree of coherence. Our results can find applications to image transmission and optical encryption.

  20. Trapping Rydberg Atoms in an Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Sarah E.

    2012-06-01

    Optical lattice traps for Rydberg atoms are of interest in advanced science and in practical applications. After a brief discussion of these areas of interest, I will review some basics of optical Rydberg-atom trapping. The trapping potential experienced by a Rydberg atom in an optical lattice is given by the spatial average of the free-electron ponderomotive energy weighted by the Rydberg electron's probability distribution. I will then present experimental results on the trapping of ^85Rb Rydberg atoms in a one-dimensional ponderomotive optical lattice (wavelength 1064 nm). The principal methods employed to study the lattice performance are microwave spectroscopy, which is used to measure the lattice's trapping efficiency, and photo-ionization, which is used to measure the dwell time of the atoms in the lattice. I have achieved a 90% trapping efficiency for ^85Rb 50S atoms by inverting the lattice immediately after laser excitation of ground-state atoms into Rydberg states. I have characterized the dwell time of the atoms in the lattice using photo-ionization of 50D5/2 atoms. In continued work, I have explored the dependence of the Rydberg-atom trapping potential on the angular portion of the atomic wavefunction. Distinct angular states exhibit different trapping behavior in the optical lattice, depending on how their wavefunctions are oriented relative to the lattice planes. Specifically, I have measured the lattice potential depth of sublevels of ^85Rb nD atoms (50<=n<=65) in a one-dimensional optical lattice with a transverse DC electric field. The trapping behavior varies substantially for the various angular sublevels, in agreement with theory. The talk will conclude with an outlook into planned experiments.

  1. Observing dynamical SUSY breaking with lattice simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamori, Issaku

    2008-11-23

    On the basis of the recently developed lattice formulation of supersymmetric theories which keeps a part of the supersymmetry, we propose a method of observing dynamical SUSY breaking with lattice simulation. We use Hamiltonian as an order parameter and measure the ground state energy as a zero temperature limit of the finite temperature simulation. Our method provides a way of obtaining a physical result from the lattice simulation for supersymmetric theories.

  2. SUPER-B LATTICE STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, M.E.; Raimondi, P.; Piminov, P.; Sinyatkin, S.; Nosochkov, Y.; Wittmer, W.; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    The SuperB asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider is designed for 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} luminosity and beam energies of 6.7 and 4.18 GeV for e{sup +} and e{sup -} respectively. The High and Low Energy Rings (HER and LER) have one Interaction Point (IP) with 66 mrad crossing angle. The 1258 m rings fit to the INFN-LNF site at Frascati. The ring emittance is minimized for the high luminosity. The Final Focus (FF) chromaticity correction is optimized for maximum transverse acceptance and energy bandwidth. Included Crab Waist sextupoles suppress betatron resonances induced in the collisions with a large Piwinski angle. The LER Spin Rotator sections provide longitudinally polarized electron beam at the IP. The lattice is flexible for tuning the machine parameters and compatible with reusing the PEP-II magnets, RF cavities and other components. Details of the lattice design are presented.

  3. Computational study of lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zujev, Aleksander

    This dissertation is composed of the descriptions of a few projects undertook to complete my doctorate at the University of California, Davis. Different as they are, the common feature of them is that they all deal with simulations of lattice models, and physics which results from interparticle interactions. As an example, both the Feynman-Kikuchi model (Chapter 3) and Bose-Fermi mixture (Chapter 4) deal with the conditions under which superfluid transitions occur. The dissertation is divided into two parts. Part I (Chapters 1-2) is theoretical. It describes the systems we study - superfluidity and particularly superfluid helium, and optical lattices. The numerical methods of working with them are described. The use of Monte Carlo methods is another unifying theme of the different projects in this thesis. Part II (Chapters 3-6) deals with applications. It consists of 4 chapters describing different projects. Two of them, Feynman-Kikuchi model, and Bose-Fermi mixture are finished and published. The work done on t - J model, described in Chapter 5, is more preliminary, and the project is far from complete. A preliminary report on it was given on 2009 APS March meeting. The Isentropic project, described in the last chapter, is finished. A report on it was given on 2010 APS March meeting, and a paper is in preparation. The quantum simulation program used for Bose-Fermi mixture project was written by our collaborators Valery Rousseau and Peter Denteneer. I had written my own code for the other projects.

  4. Cascade Baryon Spectrum from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Nilmani; Bulava, John; Edwards, Robert; Engelson, Eric; Joo, Balint; Lichtl, Adam; Lin, Huey-Wen; Morningstar, Colin; Richards, David; Wallace, Stephen

    2008-12-01

    A comprehensive study of the cascade baryon spectrum using lattice QCD affords the prospect of predicting the masses of states not yet discovered experimentally, and determining the spin and parity of those states for which the quantum numbers are not yet known. The study of the cascades, containing two strange quarks, is particularly attractive for lattice QCD in that the chiral effects are reduced compared to states composed only of u/d quarks, and the states are typically narrow. We report preliminary results for the cascade spectrum obtained by using anisotropic Nf = 2 Wilson lattices with temporal lattice spacing 5.56 GeV?1.

  5. Fractionalized topological defects in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xing-Hai; Fan, Wen-Jun; Shi, Jin-Wei; Kou, Su-Peng

    2015-10-01

    Topological objects are interesting topics in various fields of physics ranging from condensed matter physics to the grand unified and superstring theories. Among those, ultracold atoms provide a playground to study the complex topological objects. In this paper we present a proposal to realize an optical lattice with stable fractionalized topological objects. In particular, we generate the fractionalized topological fluxes and fractionalized skyrmions on two-dimensional optical lattices and fractionalized monopoles on three-dimensional optical lattices. These results offer a new approach to study the quantum many-body systems on optical lattices of ultracold quantum gases with controllable topological defects, including dislocations, topological fluxes and monopoles.

  6. Subwavelength Lattice Optics by Evolutionary Design

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new class of structured optical materials—lattice opto-materials—that can manipulate the flow of visible light into a wide range of three-dimensional profiles using evolutionary design principles. Lattice opto-materials are based on the discretization of a surface into a two-dimensional (2D) subwavelength lattice whose individual lattice sites can be controlled to achieve a programmed optical response. To access a desired optical property, we designed a lattice evolutionary algorithm that includes and optimizes contributions from every element in the lattice. Lattice opto-materials can exhibit simple properties, such as on- and off-axis focusing, and can also concentrate light into multiple, discrete spots. We expanded the unit cell shapes of the lattice to achieve distinct, polarization-dependent optical responses from the same 2D patterned substrate. Finally, these lattice opto-materials can also be combined into architectures that resemble a new type of compound flat lens. PMID:25380062

  7. Polarization response of RHIC electron lens lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, V. H.; Méot, F.; Bai, M.; Abell, D. T.; Meiser, D.

    2016-10-01

    Depolarization response for a system of two orthogonal snakes at irrational tunes is studied in depth using lattice independent spin integration. In particular we consider the effect of overlapping spin resonances in this system, to understand the impact of phase, tune, relative location and threshold strengths of the spin resonances. These results are benchmarked and compared to two dimensional direct tracking results for the RHIC e-lens lattice and the standard lattice. Finally we consider the effect of longitudinal motion via chromatic scans using direct six dimensional lattice tracking.

  8. Klein tunneling in deformed honeycomb lattices.

    PubMed

    Bahat-Treidel, Omri; Peleg, Or; Grobman, Mark; Shapira, Nadav; Segev, Mordechai; Pereg-Barnea, T

    2010-02-12

    We study the scattering of waves off a potential step in deformed honeycomb lattices. For deformations below a critical value, perfect Klein tunneling is obtained; i.e., a potential step transmits waves at normal incidence with nonresonant unit-transmission probability. Beyond the critical deformation a gap forms in the spectrum, and a potential step perpendicular to the deformation direction reflects all normally incident waves, exhibiting a dramatic transition form unit transmission to total reflection. These phenomena are generic to honeycomb lattices and apply to electromagnetic waves in photonic lattices, quasiparticles in graphene, and cold atoms in optical lattices. PMID:20366822

  9. Lattices of processes in graphs with inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Shakhbazyan, K.V.

    1995-09-01

    This article is a continuation of others work, presenting a detailed analysis of finite lattices of processes in graphs with input nodes. Lattices of processes in such graphs are studied by representing the lattices in the form of an algebra of pairs. We define the algebra of pairs somewhat generalizing the definition. Let K and D be bounded distributive lattices. A sublattice {delta} {contained_in} K x D is called an algebra of pairs if for all K {element_of} K we have (K, 1{sub D}) {element_of} {delta} and for all d {element_of} D we have (O{sub K}).

  10. Modified Aladdin lattice L2V2

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.; Cho, Y.

    1985-04-05

    The N30 lattice discussed in a previous note showed that a nearly matched lattice could be produced by separating four of the present quadrupole from their present power supplies and powering them separately. Although having significantly higher dynamic aperture, less closed orbit distortion and improved natural emittance compared to the present Aladdin lattice, the proximity of the {nu}{sub x} = 5.24 tune was felt to be too close to the 3{nu}{sub x} = 16 (a structure resonance) and the tune should be raised. In order to demonstrate the tunability of this modified lattice, Yang Cho found a new tune ({nu}{sub x} = 6.27, {nu}{sub y} = 6.23), hereafter called L2V2 lattice. This lattice, although not as nicely matched as the N30 lattice, has a 10% lower natural emittance and considerably more dynamic aperture. The L2V2 lattice has not been fully optimized, but is sufficient to demonstrate the advantages of this modified Aladdin lattice.

  11. Coincident site lattice-matched growth of semiconductors on substrates using compliant buffer layers

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew

    2016-08-23

    A method of producing semiconductor materials and devices that incorporate the semiconductor materials are provided. In particular, a method is provided of producing a semiconductor material, such as a III-V semiconductor, on a silicon substrate using a compliant buffer layer, and devices such as photovoltaic cells that incorporate the semiconductor materials. The compliant buffer material and semiconductor materials may be deposited using coincident site lattice-matching epitaxy, resulting in a close degree of lattice matching between the substrate material and deposited material for a wide variety of material compositions. The coincident site lattice matching epitaxial process, as well as the use of a ductile buffer material, reduce the internal stresses and associated crystal defects within the deposited semiconductor materials fabricated using the disclosed method. As a result, the semiconductor devices provided herein possess enhanced performance characteristics due to a relatively low density of crystal defects.

  12. Antithrombin III blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be due to: Bone marrow transplant Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) AT III deficiency, an inherited condition Liver ... Schmaier AH, Miller JL. Coagulation and fibrinolysis. In: McPherson ... Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  13. Equilibrium Phase Diagrams for Stranski-Krastanov Structure Mode of III V Ternary Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kazuo

    1999-04-01

    The strain, surface and interfacial energies of III V ternary systems were calculated for three kinds of structure modes: the Frank-van der Merwe (FM) mode, the Stranski-Krastanov (SK) mode and the Volmer-Weber (VW) mode. The free energy for each mode was estimated as functions of the thickness and composition or lattice misfit. Through comparison of the free energy of each mode, it was found that the thickness-composition phase diagrams of III V ternary systems can be determined only by considering the balance of the free energy and three kinds of structure modes appear in the phase diagrams. The SK mode appears only when the lattice misfit is large and/or the lattice layer is thick. The VW mode appears when the lattice misfit is large and the lattice layer is thin and only in the InPSb/InP and GaPSb/GaP systems which have the largest lattice misfit of III V ternary systems. The stable region of the SK mode in the GaPSb/GaP and InPSb/InP phase diagrams is largest of all because the composition dependence of the strain energy of these systems is stronger than that of the other systems. The critical number of lattice layers below which two-dimensional (2D) layers precede the three-dimensional (3D) nucleation in the SK mode at x=1.0 depends on the lattice misfit. In the InPSb/InP system, the smallest number of 2D layers precede the 3D nucleation in the SK mode.

  14. Dynamic optical lattices: two-dimensional rotating and accordion lattices for ultracold atoms.

    PubMed

    Williams, R A; Pillet, J D; Al-Assam, S; Fletcher, B; Shotter, M; Foot, C J

    2008-10-13

    We demonstrate a novel experimental arrangement which can rotate a 2D optical lattice at frequencies up to several kilohertz. Ultracold atoms in such a rotating lattice can be used for the direct quantum simulation of strongly correlated systems under large effective magnetic fields, allowing investigation of phenomena such as the fractional quantum Hall effect. Our arrangement also allows the periodicity of a 2D optical lattice to be varied dynamically, producing a 2D accordion lattice.

  15. Relationships among Ionic Lattice Energies, Molecular (Formula Unit) Volumes, and Thermochemical Radii.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, H. Donald B.; Roobottom, Helen K.; Passmore, Jack; Glasser, Leslie

    1999-08-01

    The linear generalized equation described in this paper provides a further dimension to the prediction of lattice potential energies/enthalpies of ionic solids. First, it offers an alternative (and often more direct) approach to the well-established Kapustinskii equation (whose capabilities have also recently been extended by our recent provision of an extended set of thermochemical radii). Second, it makes possible the acquisition of lattice energy estimates for salts which, up until now, except for simple 1:1 salts, could not be considered because of lack of crystal structure data. We have generalized Bartlett's correlation for MX (1:1) salts, between the lattice enthalpy and the inverse cube root of the molecular (formula unit) volume, such as to render it applicable across an extended range of ionic salts for the estimation of lattice potential energies. When new salts are synthesized, acquisition of full crystal structure data is not always possible and powder data provides only minimal structural information-unit cell parameters and the number of molecules per cell. In such cases, lack of information about cation-anion distances prevents use of the Kapustinskii equation to predict the lattice energy of the salt. However, our new equation can be employed even when the latter information is not available. As is demonstrated, the approach can be utilized to predict and rationalize the thermochemistry in topical areas of synthetic inorganic chemistry as well as in emerging areas. This is illustrated by accounting for the failure to prepare diiodinetetrachloroaluminum(III), [I(2)(+)][AlCl(4)(-)] and the instability of triiodinetetrafluoroarsenic(III), [I(3)(+)][AsF(6)(-)]. A series of effective close-packing volumes for a range of ions, which will be of interest to chemists, as measures of relative ionic size and which are of use in making our estimates of lattice energies, is generated from our approach.

  16. Cold atoms in a rotating optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foot, Christopher J.

    2009-05-01

    We have demonstrated a novel experimental arrangement which can rotate a two-dimensional optical lattice at frequencies up to several kilohertz. Our arrangement also allows the periodicity of the optical lattice to be varied dynamically, producing a 2D ``accordion lattice'' [1]. The angles of the laser beams are controlled by acousto-optic deflectors and this allows smooth changes with little heating of the trapped cold (rubidium) atoms. We have loaded a BEC into lattices with periodicities ranging from 1.8μm to 18μm, observing the collapse and revival of the diffraction orders of the condensate over a large range of lattice parameters as recently reported by a group in NIST [2]. We have also imaged atoms in situ in a 2D lattice over a range of lattice periodicities. Ultracold atoms in a rotating lattice can be used for the direct quantum simulation of strongly correlated systems under large effective magnetic fields, i.e. the Hamiltonian of the atoms in the rotating frame resembles that of a charged particle in a strong magnetic field. In the future, we plan to use this to investigate a range of phenomena such as the analogue of the fractional quantum Hall effect. [4pt] [1] R. A. Williams, J. D. Pillet, S. Al-Assam, B. Fletcher, M. Shotter, and C. J. Foot, ``Dynamic optical lattices: two-dimensional rotating and accordion lattices for ultracold atoms,'' Opt. Express 16, 16977-16983 (2008) [0pt] [2] J. H. Huckans, I. B. Spielman, B. Laburthe Tolra, W. D. Phillips, and J. V. Porto, Quantum and Classical Dynamics of a BEC in a Large-Period Optical Lattice, arXiv:0901.1386v1

  17. Realizing Parafermions in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fangli; Gorshkov, Alexey

    2016-05-01

    Parafermions, which are the fractional versions of Majorana fermions, possess more exotic braiding statistics than Majorana fermions and are therefore more powerful from the point of view of topological quantum computing. We propose a scheme to realize parafermionic zero modes in optical lattices, without the use of superconductive paring. With the help of laser assisted tunneling and on-site interactions, two layers of ultracold atoms in distinct hyperfine states can be engineered to host +/- 1 / m fractional quantum Hall states. We then introduce a finite-extent potential barrier that pierces both layers - this gives rise to two counter-propagating edge states that sit on top of each other. Finally, laser induced coupling is used to introduce backscattering between the two edge states and to gap them out. We show that the resulting defects give rise to the topological degeneracy associated with parafermions. We also discuss methods for preparation and detection.

  18. Nuclear forces from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Noriyoshi

    2011-05-06

    Lattice QCD construction of nuclear forces is reviewed. In this method, the nuclear potentials are constructed by solving the Schroedinger equation, where equal-time Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter (NBS) wave functions are regarded as quantum mechanical wave functions. Since the long distance behavior of equal-time NBS wave functions is controlled by the scattering phase, which is in exactly the same way as scattering wave functions in quantum mechanics, the resulting potentials are faithful to the NN scattering data. The derivative expansion of this potential leads to the central and the tensor potentials at the leading order. Some of numerical results of these two potentials are shown based on the quenched QCD.

  19. Optical lattices with micromechanical mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerer, K.; Stannigel, K.; Genes, C.; Zoller, P.; Treutlein, P.; Camerer, S.; Hunger, D.; Haensch, T. W.

    2010-08-15

    We investigate a setup where a cloud of atoms is trapped in an optical lattice potential of a standing-wave laser field which is created by retroreflection on a micromembrane. The membrane vibrations itself realize a quantum mechanical degree of freedom. We show that the center-of-mass mode of atoms can be coupled to the vibrational mode of the membrane in free space. Via laser cooling of atoms a significant sympathetic cooling effect on the membrane vibrations can be achieved. Switching off laser cooling brings the system close to a regime of strong coherent coupling. This setup provides a controllable segregation between the cooling and coherent dynamics regimes, and allows one to keep the membrane in a cryogenic environment and atoms at a distance in a vacuum chamber.

  20. Defect solitons in photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianke; Chen, Zhigang

    2006-02-01

    Nonlinear defect modes (defect solitons) and their stability in one-dimensional photonic lattices with focusing saturable nonlinearity are investigated. It is shown that defect solitons bifurcate out from every infinitesimal linear defect mode. Low-power defect solitons are linearly stable in lower bandgaps but unstable in higher bandgaps. At higher powers, defect solitons become unstable in attractive defects, but can remain stable in repulsive defects. Furthermore, for high-power solitons in attractive defects, we found a type of Vakhitov-Kolokolov (VK) instability which is different from the usual VK instability based on the sign of the slope in the power curve. Lastly, we demonstrate that in each bandgap, in addition to defect solitons which bifurcate from linear defect modes, there is also an infinite family of other defect solitons which can be stable in certain parameter regimes. PMID:16605473

  1. On lattice chiral gauge theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiani, L.; Rossi, G. C.; Testa, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Smit-Swift-Aoki formulation of a lattice chiral gauge theory is presented. In this formulation the Wilson and other non invariant terms in the action are made gauge invariant by the coupling with a nonlinear auxilary scalar field, omega. It is shown that omega decouples from the physical states only if appropriate parameters are tuned so as to satisfy a set of BRST identities. In addition, explicit ghost fields are necessary to ensure decoupling. These theories can give rise to the correct continuum limit. Similar considerations apply to schemes with mirror fermions. Simpler cases with a global chiral symmetry are discussed and it is shown that the theory becomes free at decoupling. Recent numerical simulations agree with those considerations.

  2. Entropy of unimodular lattice triangulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauf, Johannes F.; Krüger, Benedikt; Mecke, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Triangulations are important objects of study in combinatorics, finite element simulations and quantum gravity, where their entropy is crucial for many physical properties. Due to their inherent complex topological structure even the number of possible triangulations is unknown for large systems. We present a novel algorithm for an approximate enumeration which is based on calculations of the density of states using the Wang-Landau flat histogram sampling. For triangulations on two-dimensional integer lattices we achieve excellent agreement with known exact numbers of small triangulations as well as an improvement of analytical calculated asymptotics. The entropy density is C=2.196(3) consistent with rigorous upper and lower bounds. The presented numerical scheme can easily be applied to other counting and optimization problems.

  3. Multigroup Reactor Lattice Cell Calculation

    1990-03-01

    The Winfrith Improved Multigroup Scheme (WIMS), is a general code for reactor lattice cell calculations on a wide range of reactor systems. In particular, the code will accept rod or plate fuel geometries in either regular arrays or in clusters, and the energy group structure has been chosen primarily for thermal calculations. The basic library has been compiled with 14 fast groups, 13 resonance groups and 42 thermal groups, but the user is offered themore » choice of accurate solutions in many groups or rapid calculations in few groups. Temperature dependent thermal scattering matrices for a variety of scattering laws are available in the library for the principal moderators which include hydrogen, deuterium, graphite, beryllium and oxygen. WIMSD5 is a succesor version of WIMS-D/4.« less

  4. Gluonic transversity from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detmold, W.; Shanahan, P. E.

    2016-07-01

    We present an exploratory study of the gluonic structure of the ϕ meson using lattice QCD (LQCD). This includes the first investigation of gluonic transversity via the leading moment of the twist-2 double-helicity-flip gluonic structure function Δ (x ,Q2). This structure function only exists for targets of spin J ≥1 and does not mix with quark distributions at leading twist, thereby providing a particularly clean probe of gluonic degrees of freedom. We also explore the gluonic analogue of the Soffer bound which relates the helicity flip and nonflip gluonic distributions, finding it to be saturated at the level of 80%. This work sets the stage for more complex LQCD studies of gluonic structure in the nucleon and in light nuclei where Δ (x ,Q2) is an "exotic glue" observable probing gluons in a nucleus not associated with individual nucleons.

  5. Simple lattice model of macroevolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Wojciech

    2009-04-01

    In future astrobiology, like in modern astrophysics, the numerical simulations can be a very important tool for proving theories. In this paper, I propose a simple lattice model of a multi-species ecosystem suitable for the study of emergent properties of macroevolution. Unlike the majority of ecological models, the number of species is not fixed - they emerge by "mutation" of existing species, then survive or go extinct depending on the balance between local ecological interactions. The Monte-Carlo numerical simulations show that this model is able to qualitatively reproduce phenomena that have been empirically observed, like the dependence between size of the isolated area and the number of species inhabiting there, primary production and species-diversity. The model allows also studying the causes of mass extinctions and more generally, repeatability, and the role of pure chance in macroevolution.

  6. The Chroma Software System for Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Edwards; Balint Joo

    2004-06-01

    We describe aspects of the Chroma software system for lattice QCD calculations. Chroma is an open source C++ based software system developed using the software infrastructure of the US SciDAC initiative. Chroma interfaces with output from the BAGEL assembly generator for optimized lattice fermion kernels on some architectures. It can be run on workstations, clusters and the QCDOC supercomputer.

  7. Wave propagation on a random lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Sahlmann, Hanno

    2010-09-15

    Motivated by phenomenological questions in quantum gravity, we consider the propagation of a scalar field on a random lattice. We describe a procedure to calculate the dispersion relation for the field by taking a limit of a periodic lattice. We use this to calculate the lowest order coefficients of the dispersion relation for a specific one-dimensional model.

  8. Results and Frontiers in Lattice Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    John Bulava; Robert Edwards; George Fleming; K.Jimmy Juge; Adam C. Lichtl; Nilmani Mathur; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Stephen J. Wallace

    2007-06-16

    The Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration (LHPC) baryon spectroscopy effort is reviewed. To date the LHPC has performed exploratory Lattice QCD calculations of the low-lying spectrum of Nucleon and Delta baryons. These calculations demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by obtaining the masses of an unprecedented number of excited states with definite quantum numbers. Future work of the project is outlined.

  9. Results and Frontiers in Lattice Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bulava, John; Morningstar, Colin; Edwards, Robert; Richards, David; Fleming, George; Juge, K. Jimmy; Lichtl, Adam C.; Mathur, Nilmani; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2007-10-26

    The Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration (LHPC) baryon spectroscopy effort is reviewed. To date the LHPC has performed exploratory Lattice QCD calculations of the low-lying spectrum of Nucleon and Delta baryons. These calculations demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by obtaining the masses of an unprecedented number of excited states with definite quantum numbers. Future work of the project is outlined.

  10. Moments of GPDs from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    David Richards

    2006-09-18

    I review the lattice computation of the moments of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), and their chiral extrapolation to the physical quark masses. I illustrate how lattice computations of generalized form factors can provide constraints on phenomenological parameterizations of GPDs, and provide insight into the three-dimensional picture of the nucleon.

  11. Different lattice geometries with a synthetic dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suszalski, Dominik; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2016-09-01

    The possibility of creating different geometries with the help of an extra synthetic dimension in optical lattices is studied. The additional linear potential together with Raman-assisted tunnelings are used to engineer well-controlled tunnelings between available states. The great flexibility of the system allows us to obtain different geometries of synthetic lattices with the possibility for adding synthetic gauge fields.

  12. Recent advances in lattice Boltzmann methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Doolen, G.D.; He, X.; Nie, X.; Zhang, R.

    1998-12-31

    In this paper, the authors briefly present the basic principles of lattice Boltzmann method and summarize recent advances of the method, including the application of the lattice Boltzmann method for fluid flows in MEMS and simulation of the multiphase mixing and turbulence.

  13. LHC Phenomenology and Lattice Strong Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, G. T.

    2013-03-01

    While the LHC experimentalists work to find evidence of physics beyond the standard model, lattice gauge theorists are working as well to characterize the range of possible phenomena in strongly-coupled models of electroweak symmetry breaking. I will summarize the current progress of the Lattice Strong Dynamics (LSD) collaboration on the flavor dependence of SU(3) gauge theories.

  14. Dimers on the 33 .42 lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuli; Yan, Weigen

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we obtain explicit expression of the number of close-packed dimers (perfect matchings) of the 33 .42 lattice with cylindrical boundary condition. Particularly, we show that the entropy of 33 .42 lattice is the same for cylindrical and toroidal boundary conditions.

  15. A lattice formulation of chiral gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Bodwin, G.T.

    1996-08-01

    We present a method for implementing gauge theories of chiral fermions on the lattice. Discussed topics include: the lattice as a UV regulator, a chiral QED model, modification of the fermion determinant, large gauge-field momenta, and a non-perturbative problem.

  16. Lattice studies of hadrons with heavy flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Aubin

    2009-07-01

    I will discuss recent developments in lattice studies of hadrons composed of heavy quarks. I will mostly cover topics which are at a state of direct comparison with experiment, but will also discuss new ideas and promising techniques to aid future studies of lattice heavy quark physics.

  17. Ising antiferromagnet on the Archimedean lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Unjong

    2015-06-01

    Geometric frustration effects were studied systematically with the Ising antiferromagnet on the 11 Archimedean lattices using the Monte Carlo methods. The Wang-Landau algorithm for static properties (specific heat and residual entropy) and the Metropolis algorithm for a freezing order parameter were adopted. The exact residual entropy was also found. Based on the degree of frustration and dynamic properties, ground states of them were determined. The Shastry-Sutherland lattice and the trellis lattice are weakly frustrated and have two- and one-dimensional long-range-ordered ground states, respectively. The bounce, maple-leaf, and star lattices have the spin ice phase. The spin liquid phase appears in the triangular and kagome lattices.

  18. Quantum transport in d-dimensional lattices

    DOE PAGES

    Manzano, Daniel; Chuang, Chern; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-04-28

    We show that both fermionic and bosonic uniform d-dimensional lattices can be reduced to a set of independent one-dimensional chains. This reduction leads to the expression for ballistic energy fluxes in uniform fermionic and bosonic lattices. By the use of the Jordan–Wigner transformation we can extend our analysis to spin lattices, proving the coexistence of both ballistic and non-ballistic subspaces in any dimension and for any system size. Lastly, we then relate the nature of transport to the number of excitations in the homogeneous spin lattice, indicating that a single excitation always propagates ballistically and that the non-ballistic behaviour ofmore » uniform spin lattices is a consequence of the interaction between different excitations.« less

  19. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of phonon transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yangyu; Wang, Moran

    2016-06-01

    A novel lattice Boltzmann scheme is proposed for phonon transport based on the phonon Boltzmann equation. Through the Chapman-Enskog expansion, the phonon lattice Boltzmann equation under the gray relaxation time approximation recovers the classical Fourier's law in the diffusive limit. The numerical parameters in the lattice Boltzmann model are therefore rigorously correlated to the bulk material properties. The new scheme does not only eliminate the fictitious phonon speed in the diagonal direction of a square lattice system in the previous lattice Boltzmann models, but also displays very robust performances in predicting both temperature and heat flux distributions consistent with analytical solutions for diverse numerical cases, including steady-state and transient, macroscale and microscale, one-dimensional and multi-dimensional phonon heat transport. This method may provide a powerful numerical tool for deep studies of nonlinear and nonlocal heat transports in nanosystems.

  20. Quantum transport in d-dimensional lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzano, Daniel; Chuang, Chern; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-04-01

    We show that both fermionic and bosonic uniform d-dimensional lattices can be reduced to a set of independent one-dimensional chains. This reduction leads to the expression for ballistic energy fluxes in uniform fermionic and bosonic lattices. By the use of the Jordan–Wigner transformation we can extend our analysis to spin lattices, proving the coexistence of both ballistic and non-ballistic subspaces in any dimension and for any system size. We then relate the nature of transport to the number of excitations in the homogeneous spin lattice, indicating that a single excitation always propagates ballistically and that the non-ballistic behaviour of uniform spin lattices is a consequence of the interaction between different excitations.

  1. Trapping Rydberg Atoms in an Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S. E.; Younge, K. C.; Raithel, G.

    2011-12-23

    Rubidium Rydberg atoms are laser excited and subsequently trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice (wavelength 1064 nm). Efficient trapping is achieved by a lattice inversion immediately after laser excitation using an electro-optic technique. The trapping efficiency is probed via analysis of the trap-induced shift of the two-photon microwave transition 50S{yields}51S. The inversion technique allows us to reach a trapping efficiency of 90%. The dependence of the efficiency on the timing of the lattice inversion and on the trap laser power is studied. The dwell time of 50D{sub 5/2} Rydberg atoms in the lattice is analyzed using lattice-induced photoionization.

  2. Synthetic magnetic fluxes on the honeycomb lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Gorecka, Agnieszka; Gremaud, Benoit; Miniatura, Christian

    2011-08-15

    We devise experimental schemes that are able to mimic uniform and staggered magnetic fluxes acting on ultracold two-electron atoms, such as ytterbium atoms, propagating in a honeycomb lattice. The atoms are first trapped into two independent state-selective triangular lattices and then further exposed to a suitable configuration of resonant Raman laser beams. These beams induce hops between the two triangular lattices and make atoms move in a honeycomb lattice. Atoms traveling around each unit cell of this honeycomb lattice pick up a nonzero phase. In the uniform case, the artificial magnetic flux sustained by each cell can reach about two flux quanta, thereby realizing a cold-atom analog of the Harper model with its notorious Hofstadter's butterfly structure. Different condensed-matter phenomena such as the relativistic integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, as observed in graphene samples, could be targeted with this scheme.

  3. Status of the ATF2 Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, E.; Tomas, R.; Bambade, P.; Okugi, T.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Seryi, A.; White, G.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2011-12-09

    The current status for the ATF2 Nominal and Ultra-low {beta}* lattices are presented in this paper. New lattice designs have been obtained in order to minimise the impact of the last interpretation of multipole measurements that have been included into the model. However, the new ATF2 Ultra-low design is not able to recover the expected vertical beam size at the IP with the current magnet distribution. Therefore, different quadrupole sorting have been studied. A significant gain is evident for the ATF2 Ultra-low lattice when sorting the magnets according to the skew-sextupolar components. The ATF2 Nominal lattice is also expected to benefit from the new sorting. Tuning results of the new ATF2 Ultra-low lattice under realistic imperfections are also reported.

  4. A lattice approach to spinorial quantum gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renteln, Paul; Smolin, Lee

    1989-01-01

    A new lattice regularization of quantum general relativity based on Ashtekar's reformulation of Hamiltonian general relativity is presented. In this form, quantum states of the gravitational field are represented within the physical Hilbert space of a Kogut-Susskind lattice gauge theory. The gauge field of the theory is a complexified SU(2) connection which is the gravitational connection for left-handed spinor fields. The physical states of the gravitational field are those which are annihilated by additional constraints which correspond to the four constraints of general relativity. Lattice versions of these constraints are constructed. Those corresponding to the three-dimensional diffeomorphism generators move states associated with Wilson loops around on the lattice. The lattice Hamiltonian constraint has a simple form, and a correspondingly simple interpretation: it is an operator which cuts and joins Wilson loops at points of intersection.

  5. Cooperative and noncooperative binding of protein ligands to nucleic acid lattices: experimental approaches to the determination of thermodynamic parameters.

    PubMed

    Kowalczykowski, S C; Paul, L S; Lonberg, N; Newport, J W; McSwiggen, J A; von Hippel, P H

    1986-03-25

    Many biologically important proteins bind nonspecifically, and often cooperatively, to single-or double-stranded nucleic acid lattices in discharging their physiological functions. This binding can generally be described in thermodynamic terms by three parameters: n, the binding site size; K, the intrinsic binding constant; omega, the binding cooperativity parameter. The experimental determination of these parameters often appears to be straightforward but can be fraught with conceptual and methodological difficulties that may not be readily apparent. In this paper we describe and analyze a number of approaches that can be used to measure these protein-nucleic acid interaction parameters and illustrate these methods with experiments on the binding of T4-coded gene 32 (single-stranded DNA binding) protein to various nucleic acid lattices. We consider the following procedures: (i) the titration of a fixed amount of lattice (nucleic acid) with added ligand (protein); (ii) the titration of a fixed amount of ligand with added lattice; (iii) the determination of ligand binding affinities at very low levels of lattice saturation; (iv) the analysis of ligand cluster size distribution on the lattice; (v) the analysis of ligand binding to lattices of finite length. The applicability and limitations of each approach are considered and discussed, and potential pitfalls are explicitly pointed out.

  6. Finite-difference lattice-Boltzmann methods for binary fluids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Aiguo

    2005-06-01

    We investigate two-fluid Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) kinetic methods for binary fluids. The developed theory works for asymmetric as well as symmetric systems. For symmetric systems it recovers Sirovich's theory and is summarized in models A and B. For asymmetric systems it contributes models C, D, and E which are especially useful when the total masses and/or local temperatures of the two components are greatly different. The kinetic models are discretized based on an octagonal discrete velocity model. The discrete-velocity kinetic models and the continuous ones are required to describe the same hydrodynamic equations. The combination of a discrete-velocity kinetic model and an appropriate finite-difference scheme composes a finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method. The validity of the formulated methods is verified by investigating (i) uniform relaxation processes, (ii) isothermal Couette flow, and (iii) diffusion behavior. PMID:16089910

  7. Toward a realistic low-field SSC lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Heifets, S.

    1985-10-01

    Three six-fold lattices for 3 T superferric SSC have been generated at TAC. The program based on the first order canonical transformation was used to compare lattices. On this basis the realistic race-track lattices were generated.

  8. Some physical and chemical indices of the Union Jack lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuli; Yan, Weigen; Tian, Tao

    2015-02-01

    The Union Jack lattice is the dual lattice of the 4.8.8 lattice. The quantum spin model with frustration and the Ising model on the Union Jack lattice have been studied extensively by physicists. In this paper, we derive the spectrum and Laplacian spectrum of the Union Jack lattice with toroidal boundary condition. As applications, we obtain the formulae of the number of spanning trees, the energy, and the Kirchhoff index of the Union Jack lattice with toroidal boundary condition.

  9. Dynamic Behavior of Engineered Lattice Materials

    PubMed Central

    Hawreliak, J. A.; Lind, J.; Maddox, B.; Barham, M.; Messner, M.; Barton, N.; Jensen, B. J.; Kumar, M.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is enabling the fabrication of materials with engineered lattice structures at the micron scale. These mesoscopic structures fall between the length scale associated with the organization of atoms and the scale at which macroscopic structures are constructed. Dynamic compression experiments were performed to study the emergence of behavior owing to the lattice periodicity in AM materials on length scales that approach a single unit cell. For the lattice structures, both bend and stretch dominated, elastic deflection of the structure was observed ahead of the compaction of the lattice, while no elastic deformation was observed to precede the compaction in a stochastic, random structure. The material showed lattice characteristics in the elastic response of the material, while the compaction was consistent with a model for compression of porous media. The experimental observations made on arrays of 4 × 4 × 6 lattice unit cells show excellent agreement with elastic wave velocity calculations for an infinite periodic lattice, as determined by Bloch wave analysis, and finite element simulations. PMID:27321697

  10. Duality analysis on random planar lattices.

    PubMed

    Ohzeki, Masayuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2012-11-01

    The conventional duality analysis is employed to identify a location of a critical point on a uniform lattice without any disorder in its structure. In the present study, we deal with the random planar lattice, which consists of the randomized structure based on the square lattice. We introduce the uniformly random modification by the bond dilution and contraction on a part of the unit square. The random planar lattice includes the triangular and hexagonal lattices in extreme cases of a parameter to control the structure. A modern duality analysis fashion with real-space renormalization is found to be available for estimating the location of the critical points with a wide range of the randomness parameter. As a simple test bed, we demonstrate that our method indeed gives several critical points for the cases of the Ising and Potts models and the bond-percolation thresholds on the random planar lattice. Our method leads to not only such an extension of the duality analyses on the classical statistical mechanics but also a fascinating result associated with optimal error thresholds for a class of quantum error correction code, the surface code on the random planar lattice, which is known as a skillful technique to protect the quantum state.

  11. Duality analysis on random planar lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohzeki, Masayuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2012-11-01

    The conventional duality analysis is employed to identify a location of a critical point on a uniform lattice without any disorder in its structure. In the present study, we deal with the random planar lattice, which consists of the randomized structure based on the square lattice. We introduce the uniformly random modification by the bond dilution and contraction on a part of the unit square. The random planar lattice includes the triangular and hexagonal lattices in extreme cases of a parameter to control the structure. A modern duality analysis fashion with real-space renormalization is found to be available for estimating the location of the critical points with a wide range of the randomness parameter. As a simple test bed, we demonstrate that our method indeed gives several critical points for the cases of the Ising and Potts models and the bond-percolation thresholds on the random planar lattice. Our method leads to not only such an extension of the duality analyses on the classical statistical mechanics but also a fascinating result associated with optimal error thresholds for a class of quantum error correction code, the surface code on the random planar lattice, which is known as a skillful technique to protect the quantum state.

  12. Dynamic Behavior of Engineered Lattice Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawreliak, J. A.; Lind, J.; Maddox, B.; Barham, M.; Messner, M.; Barton, N.; Jensen, B. J.; Kumar, M.

    2016-06-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is enabling the fabrication of materials with engineered lattice structures at the micron scale. These mesoscopic structures fall between the length scale associated with the organization of atoms and the scale at which macroscopic structures are constructed. Dynamic compression experiments were performed to study the emergence of behavior owing to the lattice periodicity in AM materials on length scales that approach a single unit cell. For the lattice structures, both bend and stretch dominated, elastic deflection of the structure was observed ahead of the compaction of the lattice, while no elastic deformation was observed to precede the compaction in a stochastic, random structure. The material showed lattice characteristics in the elastic response of the material, while the compaction was consistent with a model for compression of porous media. The experimental observations made on arrays of 4 × 4 × 6 lattice unit cells show excellent agreement with elastic wave velocity calculations for an infinite periodic lattice, as determined by Bloch wave analysis, and finite element simulations.

  13. Dynamic Behavior of Engineered Lattice Materials.

    PubMed

    Hawreliak, J A; Lind, J; Maddox, B; Barham, M; Messner, M; Barton, N; Jensen, B J; Kumar, M

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is enabling the fabrication of materials with engineered lattice structures at the micron scale. These mesoscopic structures fall between the length scale associated with the organization of atoms and the scale at which macroscopic structures are constructed. Dynamic compression experiments were performed to study the emergence of behavior owing to the lattice periodicity in AM materials on length scales that approach a single unit cell. For the lattice structures, both bend and stretch dominated, elastic deflection of the structure was observed ahead of the compaction of the lattice, while no elastic deformation was observed to precede the compaction in a stochastic, random structure. The material showed lattice characteristics in the elastic response of the material, while the compaction was consistent with a model for compression of porous media. The experimental observations made on arrays of 4 × 4 × 6 lattice unit cells show excellent agreement with elastic wave velocity calculations for an infinite periodic lattice, as determined by Bloch wave analysis, and finite element simulations. PMID:27321697

  14. The AGS-Booster lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Barton, D.S.; Claus, J.; Cottingham, J.G.; Courant, E.D.; Danby, G.T.; Dell, G.F.; Forsyth, E.B.; Gupta, R.C.; Kats, J.

    1987-01-01

    The AGS Booster has three objectives. They are to increase the space charge limit of the AGS, to increase the intensity of the polarized proton beam by accumulating many linac pulses (since the intensity is limited by the polarized ion source), and to reaccelerate heavy ions from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff before injection into the AGS. The machine is capable of accelerating protons at 7.5 Hertz from 200 MeV to 1.5 GeV or to lower final energies at faster repetition rates. The machine will also be able to accelerate heavy ions from as low as 1 MeV/nucleon to a magnetic rigidity as high as 17.6 Tesla-meters with a one second repetition rate. As an accumulator for polarized protons, the Booster should be able to store the protons at 200 MeV for several seconds. We expect that the Booster will increase the AGS proton intensity by a factor of four, polarized proton intensity by a factor of twenty to thirty, and will also enable the AGS to accelerate all species of heavy ions (at present the AGS heavy ion program is limited to the elements lighter than sulfur because it can only accelerate fully stripped ions). The construction project started in FY 1985 and is expected to be completed in 1989. The purpose of this paper is to provide a future reference for the AGS Booster lattice.

  15. Reactive Orthotropic Lattice Diffuser for Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An orthotropic lattice structure interconnects porous surfaces of the flap with internal lattice-structured perforations to equalize the steady pressure field on the flap surfaces adjacent to the end and to reduce the amplitude of the fluctuations in the flow field near the flap end. The global communication that exists within all of the perforations provides the mechanism to lessen the pressure gradients experienced by the end portion of the flap. In addition to having diffusive effects (diffusing the incoming flow), the three-dimensional orthogonal lattice structure is also reactive (acoustic wave phase distortion) due to the interconnection of the perforations.

  16. Charmonium excited state spectrum in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; Nilmani Mathur; David Richards

    2008-02-01

    Working with a large basis of covariant derivative-based meson interpolating fields we demonstrate the feasibility of reliably extracting multiple excited states using a variational method. The study is performed on quenched anisotropic lattices with clover quarks at the charm mass. We demonstrate how a knowledge of the continuum limit of a lattice interpolating field can give additional spin-assignment information, even at a single lattice spacing, via the overlap factors of interpolating field and state. Excited state masses are systematically high with respect to quark potential model predictions and, where they exist, experimental states. We conclude that this is most likely a result of the quenched approximation.

  17. Heavy flavour phenomenology from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gamiz, Elvira; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Heavy quark quantities are useful for testing lattice techniques against well known experimental results, as well as for testing the StandardModel (SM), and searching for physics beyond the SM. I review the results of recent lattice calculations relevant for this program including those of B and D decay constants and semileptonic decay form factors, and neutral B mixing. The impact of future improvements of lattice results on the clarification of the origin of several disagreements between theory and experiment which are starting to show up are briefly discussed.

  18. Vibration of prestressed periodic lattice structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, M. S.

    1981-01-01

    Equations are developed for vibration of general lattice structures that have repetitive geometry. The method of solution is an extension of a previous paper for buckling of similar structures. The theory is based on representing each member of the structure with the exact dynamic stiffness matrix and taking advantage of the repetitive geometry to obtain an eigenvalue problem involving the degrees-of-freedom at a single node in the lattice. Results are given for shell-and beam-like lattice structures and for rings stiffened with tension cables and a central mast. The variation of frequency with external loading and the effect of local member vibration on overall modes is shown.

  19. Entropic lattice Boltzmann model for compressible flows.

    PubMed

    Frapolli, N; Chikatamarla, S S; Karlin, I V

    2015-12-01

    We present a lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) that covers the entire range of fluid flows, from low Mach weakly compressible to transonic and supersonic flows. One of the most restrictive limitations of the lattice Boltzmann method, the low Mach number limit, is overcome here by three fundamental changes to the LBM scheme: use of an appropriately chosen multispeed lattice, accurate evaluation of the equilibrium, and the entropic relaxation for the collision. The range of applications is demonstrated through the simulation of a bow shock in front of an airfoil and the simulation of decaying compressible turbulence with shocklets.

  20. A lattice model for data display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, William L.; Dyer, Charles R.; Paul, Brian E.

    1994-01-01

    In order to develop a foundation for visualization, we develop lattice models for data objects and displays that focus on the fact that data objects are approximations to mathematical objects and real displays are approximations to ideal displays. These lattice models give us a way to quantize the information content of data and displays and to define conditions on the visualization mappings from data to displays. Mappings satisfy these conditions if and only if they are lattice isomorphisms. We show how to apply this result to scientific data and display models, and discuss how it might be applied to recursively defined data types appropriate for complex information processing.

  1. A lattice controller for telerobotic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliwa, Nancy Orlando; Soloway, Donald

    1987-01-01

    A model for a lattice control structure for telerobotic systems (Critter) has been developed and prototyped. The Critter hierarchical lattice structure, node potentiation, and weighted feedback are described, and the implementation of the Critter model on a VAX architecture is addressed with regard to node processes, lattice structure, node potentiation, and network activation. The implementation environment is considered and the Critter model attributes which are desirable in a telerobotic system are discussed. Future research directions on the use of this concept for telerobotic control are examined.

  2. Atomic Fermi gases in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Modugno, G.; De Mirandes, E.; Ferlando, F.; Ott, H.; Roati, G.; Inguscio, M.

    2005-05-05

    We report on the first experiments with atomic Fermi gases in optical lattices. We have studied the properties of non interacting fermions and of an interacting boson-fermion mixture in a 1D lattice in presence of additional linear or harmonic potentials. These systems have allowed to study for the first time the fundamental quantum transport properties of a perfect crystal and to confirm the role of interactions in real crystals. We have found that the combination of Fermi gases and optical lattices can also have important applications, such as high-resolution force sensing.

  3. Continuum methods in lattice perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, Thomas G

    2002-11-15

    We show how methods of continuum perturbation theory can be used to simplify perturbative lattice calculations. We use the technique of asymptotic expansions to expand lattice loop integrals around the continuum limit. After the expansion, all nontrivial dependence on momenta and masses is encoded in continuum loop integrals and the only genuine lattice integrals left are tadpole integrals. Using integration-by-parts relations all of these can be expressed in terms of a small number of master integrals. Four master integrals are needed for bosonic one loop integrals, sixteen in QCD with Wilson or staggered fermions.

  4. Dynamical Regge calculus as lattice gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagura, Hiroyuki

    2001-03-01

    We propose a hybrid approach to lattice quantum gravity by combining simultaneously the dynamical triangulation with the Regge calculus, called the dynamical Regge calculus (DRC). In this approach lattice diffeomorphism is realized as an exact symmetry by some hybrid ( k, l) moves on the simplicial lattice. Numerical study of 3D pure gravity shows that an entropy of the DRC is not exponetially bounded if we adopt the uniform measure Π idli. On the other hand, using the scale-invariant measure Π idli/ li, we can calculate observables and observe a large hysteresis between two phases that indicates the first-order nature of the phase transition.

  5. Tracking results using a standard cell lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, N.M.

    1987-10-01

    This is a summary of results obtained by tracking a single particle through a lattice composed of a r.f. cavity and standard FODO cells. The lattice also includes two families of sextupoles for controlling the chromaticity. The parameters of the cells, i.e. their length and phase advance, closely resemble those of the Fermilab Main Ring or the Tevatron. We therefore have a model lattice which is similar to that of those accelerators but without the straight sections present in the actual machines. It is hoped that the simplified model used will exhibit the salient features of the actual accelerator but will be simpler to understand. 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Making the Cut: Lattice Kirigami Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castle, Toen; Cho, Yigil; Gong, Xingting; Jung, Euiyeon; Sussman, Daniel M.; Yang, Shu; Kamien, Randall D.

    2014-12-01

    In this Letter we explore and develop a simple set of rules that apply to cutting, pasting, and folding honeycomb lattices. We consider origami-like structures that are extrinsically flat away from zero-dimensional sources of Gaussian curvature and one-dimensional sources of mean curvature, and our cutting and pasting rules maintain the intrinsic bond lengths on both the lattice and its dual lattice. We find that a small set of rules is allowed providing a framework for exploring and building kirigami—folding, cutting, and pasting the edges of paper.

  7. Analysis of quantum spin models on hyperbolic lattices and Bethe lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniška, Michal; Gendiar, Andrej

    2016-04-01

    The quantum XY, Heisenberg, and transverse field Ising models on hyperbolic lattices are studied by means of the tensor product variational formulation algorithm. The lattices are constructed by tessellation of congruent polygons with coordination number equal to four. The calculated ground-state energies of the XY and Heisenberg models and the phase transition magnetic field of the Ising model on the series of lattices are used to estimate the corresponding quantities of the respective models on the Bethe lattice. The hyperbolic lattice geometry induces mean-field-like behavior of the models. The ambition to obtain results on the non-Euclidean lattice geometries has been motivated by theoretical studies of the anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory correspondence.

  8. Fractional Bloch oscillations in photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Corrielli, Giacomo; Crespi, Andrea; Della Valle, Giuseppe; Longhi, Stefano; Osellame, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Bloch oscillations, the oscillatory motion of a quantum particle in a periodic potential, are one of the most fascinating effects of coherent quantum transport. Originally studied in the context of electrons in crystals, Bloch oscillations manifest the wave nature of matter and are found in a wide variety of different physical systems. Here we report on the first experimental observation of fractional Bloch oscillations, using a photonic lattice as a model system of a two-particle extended Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian. In our photonic simulator, the dynamics of two correlated particles hopping on a one-dimensional lattice is mapped into the motion of a single particle in a two-dimensional lattice with engineered defects and mimicked by light transport in a square waveguide lattice with a bent axis.

  9. Recent lattice QCD results on nucleon structure

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinos Orginos

    2006-06-25

    I review recent developments in lattice calculations of nucleon structure. In particular, I cover the calculations of nucleon matrix elements related to generalized parton distribution functions, structure functions and form factors.

  10. Optical vortex array in spatially varying lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, Amit; Kumar, Manish; Senthilkumaran, P.; Joseph, Joby

    2016-04-01

    We present an experimental method based on a modified multiple beam interference approach to generate an optical vortex array arranged in a spatially varying lattice. This method involves two steps which are: numerical synthesis of a consistent phase mask by using two-dimensional integrated phase gradient calculations and experimental implementation of produced phase mask by utilizing a phase only spatial light modulator in an optical 4f Fourier filtering setup. This method enables an independent variation of the orientation and period of the vortex lattice. As working examples, we provide the experimental demonstration of various spatially variant optical vortex lattices. We further confirm the existence of optical vortices by formation of fork fringes. Such lattices may find applications in size dependent trapping, sorting, manipulation and photonic crystals.

  11. Ballistic Transport in Graphene Antidot Lattices.

    PubMed

    Sandner, Andreas; Preis, Tobias; Schell, Christian; Giudici, Paula; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Weiss, Dieter; Eroms, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    The bulk carrier mobility in graphene was shown to be enhanced in graphene-boron nitride heterostructures. However, nanopatterning graphene can add extra damage and drastically degrade the intrinsic properties by edge disorder. Here we show that graphene embedded into a heterostructure with hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) on both sides is protected during a nanopatterning step. In this way, we can prepare graphene-based antidot lattices where the high mobility is preserved. We report magnetotransport experiments in those antidot lattices with lattice periods down to 50 nm. We observe pronounced commensurability features stemming from ballistic orbits around one or several antidots. Due to the short lattice period in our samples, we can also explore the boundary between the classical and the quantum transport regime, as the Fermi wavelength of the electrons approaches the smallest length scale of the artificial potential. PMID:26598218

  12. Lattice engineering through nanoparticle-DNA frameworks.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Zhang, Yugang; Wang, Tong; Xin, Huolin L; Li, Huilin; Gang, Oleg

    2016-06-01

    Advances in self-assembly over the past decade have demonstrated that nano- and microscale particles can be organized into a large diversity of ordered three-dimensional (3D) lattices. However, the ability to generate different desired lattice types from the same set of particles remains challenging. Here, we show that nanoparticles can be assembled into crystalline and open 3D frameworks by connecting them through designed DNA-based polyhedral frames. The geometrical shapes of the frames, combined with the DNA-assisted binding properties of their vertices, facilitate the well-defined topological connections between particles in accordance with frame geometry. With this strategy, different crystallographic lattices using the same particles can be assembled by introduction of the corresponding DNA polyhedral frames. This approach should facilitate the rational assembly of nanoscale lattices through the design of the unit cell. PMID:26901516

  13. Persistent superconductor currents in holographic lattices.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Norihiro; Ishibashi, Akihiro; Maeda, Kengo

    2014-07-01

    We consider a persistent superconductor current along the direction with no translational symmetry in a holographic gravity model. Incorporating a lattice structure into the model, we numerically construct novel solutions of hairy charged stationary black branes with momentum or rotation along the latticed direction. The lattice structure prevents the horizon from rotating, and the total momentum is only carried by matter fields outside the black brane horizon. This is consistent with the black hole rigidity theorem, and it suggests that in dual field theory with lattices, superconductor currents are made up of "composite" fields, rather than "fractionalized" degrees of freedom. We also show that our solutions are consistent with the superfluid hydrodynamics. PMID:25032917

  14. Lattice engineering through nanoparticle-DNA frameworks.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Zhang, Yugang; Wang, Tong; Xin, Huolin L; Li, Huilin; Gang, Oleg

    2016-06-01

    Advances in self-assembly over the past decade have demonstrated that nano- and microscale particles can be organized into a large diversity of ordered three-dimensional (3D) lattices. However, the ability to generate different desired lattice types from the same set of particles remains challenging. Here, we show that nanoparticles can be assembled into crystalline and open 3D frameworks by connecting them through designed DNA-based polyhedral frames. The geometrical shapes of the frames, combined with the DNA-assisted binding properties of their vertices, facilitate the well-defined topological connections between particles in accordance with frame geometry. With this strategy, different crystallographic lattices using the same particles can be assembled by introduction of the corresponding DNA polyhedral frames. This approach should facilitate the rational assembly of nanoscale lattices through the design of the unit cell.

  15. Lattice Waves, Spin Waves, and Neutron Scattering

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Brockhouse, Bertram N.

    1962-03-01

    Use of neutron inelastic scattering to study the forces between atoms in solids is treated. One-phonon processes and lattice vibrations are discussed, and experiments that verified the existence of the quantum of lattice vibrations, the phonon, are reviewed. Dispersion curves, phonon frequencies and absorption, and models for dispersion calculations are discussed. Experiments on the crystal dynamics of metals are examined. Dispersion curves are presented and analyzed; theory of lattice dynamics is considered; effects of Fermi surfaces on dispersion curves; electron-phonon interactions, electronic structure influence on lattice vibrations, and phonon lifetimes are explored. The dispersion relation of spin waves in crystals and experiments in which dispersion curves for spin waves in Co-Fe alloy and magnons in magnetite were obtained and the reality of the magnon was demonstrated are discussed. (D.C.W)

  16. Colloquium: Physics of optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Derevianko, Andrei; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2011-04-01

    Recently invented and demonstrated optical lattice clocks hold great promise for improving the precision of modern time keeping. These clocks aim at the 10{sup -18} fractional accuracy, which translates into a clock that would neither lose nor gain a fraction of a second over an estimated age of the Universe. In these clocks, millions of atoms are trapped and interrogated simultaneously, dramatically improving clock stability. Here the principles of operation of these clocks are discussed and, in particular, a novel concept of magic trapping of atoms in optical lattices. Recently proposed microwave lattice clocks are also highlights and several applications that employ the optical lattice clocks as a platform for precision measurements and quantum information processing.

  17. Regge calculus models of closed lattice universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rex G.; Williams, Ruth M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the behavior of closed "lattice universes" wherein masses are distributed in a regular lattice on the Cauchy surfaces of closed vacuum universes. Such universes are approximated using a form of Regge calculus originally developed by Collins and Williams to model closed Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universes. We consider two types of lattice universes, one where all masses are identical to each other and another where one mass gets perturbed in magnitude. In the unperturbed universe, we consider the possible arrangements of the masses in the Regge Cauchy surfaces and demonstrate that the model will only be stable if each mass lies within some spherical region of convergence. We also briefly discuss the existence of Regge models that are dual to the ones we have considered. We then model a perturbed lattice universe and demonstrate that the model's evolution is well behaved, with the expansion increasing in magnitude as the perturbation is increased.

  18. Lattice engineering through nanoparticle–DNA frameworks

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Ye; Zhang, Yugang; Wang, Tong; Xin, Huolin L.; Li, Huilin; Gang, Oleg

    2016-02-22

    Advances in self-assembly over the past decade have demonstrated that nano- and microscale particles can be organized into a large diversity of ordered three-dimensional (3D) lattices. However, the ability to generate different desired lattice types from the same set of particles remains challenging. Here, we show that nanoparticles can be assembled into crystalline and open 3D frameworks by connecting them through designed DNA-based polyhedral frames. The geometrical shapes of the frames, combined with the DNA-assisted binding properties of their vertices, facilitate the well-defined topological connections between particles in accordance with frame geometry. With this strategy, different crystallographic lattices using themore » same particles can be assembled by introduction of the corresponding DNA polyhedral frames. As a result, this approach should facilitate the rational assembly of nanoscale lattices through the design of the unit cell.« less

  19. Camera placement in integer lattices (extended abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocchiola, Michel; Kranakis, Evangelos

    1990-09-01

    Techniques for studying an art gallery problem (the camera placement problem) in the infinite lattice (L sup d) of d tuples of integers are considered. A lattice point A is visible from a camera C positioned at a vertex of (L sup d) if A does not equal C and if the line segment joining A and C crosses no other lattice vertex. By using a combination of probabilistic, combinatorial optimization and algorithmic techniques the position they must occupy in the lattice (L sup d) in the order to maximize their visibility can be determined in polynomial time, for any given number s less than or equal to (5 sup d) of cameras. This improves previous results for s less than or equal to (3 sup d).

  20. Recent lattice QCD results on nucleon structure

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinos Orginos

    2006-07-01

    I review recent developments in lattice calculations of nucleon structure. In particular, I cover the calculations of nucleon matrix elements related to generalized parton distribution functions, structure functions and form factors.

  1. Lattice engineering through nanoparticle-DNA frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Zhang, Yugang; Wang, Tong; Xin, Huolin L.; Li, Huilin; Gang, Oleg

    2016-06-01

    Advances in self-assembly over the past decade have demonstrated that nano- and microscale particles can be organized into a large diversity of ordered three-dimensional (3D) lattices. However, the ability to generate different desired lattice types from the same set of particles remains challenging. Here, we show that nanoparticles can be assembled into crystalline and open 3D frameworks by connecting them through designed DNA-based polyhedral frames. The geometrical shapes of the frames, combined with the DNA-assisted binding properties of their vertices, facilitate the well-defined topological connections between particles in accordance with frame geometry. With this strategy, different crystallographic lattices using the same particles can be assembled by introduction of the corresponding DNA polyhedral frames. This approach should facilitate the rational assembly of nanoscale lattices through the design of the unit cell.

  2. Minimizing nonadiabaticities in optical-lattice loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolfi, Michele; Kantian, Adrian; Bauer, Bela; Troyer, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    In the quest to reach lower temperatures of ultracold gases in optical-lattice experiments, nonadiabaticities during lattice loading represent one of the limiting factors that prevent the same low temperatures being reached as in experiments without lattices. Simulating the loading of a bosonic quantum gas into a one-dimensional optical lattice with and without a trap, we find that the redistribution of atomic density inside a global confining potential is by far the dominant source of heating. Based on these results we propose adjusting the trapping potential during loading to minimize changes to the density distribution. Our simulations confirm that a very simple linear interpolation of the trapping potential during loading already significantly decreases the heating of a quantum gas, and we discuss how loading protocols minimizing density redistributions can be designed.

  3. A multivariate CAR model for mismatched lattices.

    PubMed

    Porter, Aaron T; Oleson, Jacob J

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we develop a multivariate Gaussian conditional autoregressive model for use on mismatched lattices. Most current multivariate CAR models are designed for each multivariate outcome to utilize the same lattice structure. In many applications, a change of basis will allow different lattices to be utilized, but this is not always the case, because a change of basis is not always desirable or even possible. Our multivariate CAR model allows each outcome to have a different neighborhood structure which can utilize different lattices for each structure. The model is applied in two real data analysis. The first is a Bayesian learning example in mapping the 2006 Iowa Mumps epidemic, which demonstrates the importance of utilizing multiple channels of infection flow in mapping infectious diseases. The second is a multivariate analysis of poverty levels and educational attainment in the American Community Survey. PMID:25457598

  4. Random sequential adsorption on imprecise lattice.

    PubMed

    Privman, Vladimir; Yan, Han

    2016-06-28

    We report a surprising result, established by numerical simulations and analytical arguments for a one-dimensional lattice model of random sequential adsorption, that even an arbitrarily small imprecision in the lattice-site localization changes the convergence to jamming from fast, exponential, to slow, power-law, with, for some parameter values, a discontinuous jump in the jamming coverage value. This finding has implications for irreversible deposition on patterned substrates with pre-made landing sites for particle attachment. We also consider a general problem of the particle (depositing object) size not an exact multiple of the lattice spacing, and the lattice sites themselves imprecise, broadened into allowed-deposition intervals. Regions of exponential vs. power-law convergence to jamming are identified, and certain conclusions regarding the jamming coverage are argued for analytically and confirmed numerically. PMID:27369530

  5. Random sequential adsorption on imprecise lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privman, Vladimir; Yan, Han

    2016-06-01

    We report a surprising result, established by numerical simulations and analytical arguments for a one-dimensional lattice model of random sequential adsorption, that even an arbitrarily small imprecision in the lattice-site localization changes the convergence to jamming from fast, exponential, to slow, power-law, with, for some parameter values, a discontinuous jump in the jamming coverage value. This finding has implications for irreversible deposition on patterned substrates with pre-made landing sites for particle attachment. We also consider a general problem of the particle (depositing object) size not an exact multiple of the lattice spacing, and the lattice sites themselves imprecise, broadened into allowed-deposition intervals. Regions of exponential vs. power-law convergence to jamming are identified, and certain conclusions regarding the jamming coverage are argued for analytically and confirmed numerically.

  6. Bloch oscillations in optical dissipative lattices.

    PubMed

    Efremidis, Nikolaos K; Christodoulides, Demetrios N

    2004-11-01

    We show that Bloch oscillations are possible in dissipative optical waveguide lattices with a linearly varying propagation constant. These oscillations occur in spite of the fact that the Bloch wave packet experiences coupling gain and (or) loss. Experimentally, this process can be observed in different settings, such as in laser arrays and lattices of semiconductor optical amplifiers. In addition, we demonstrate that these systems can suppress instabilities arising from preferential mode noise growth.

  7. Baryon operators and spectroscopy in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Subhasish Basak; Robert Edwards; Rudolf Fiebig; George Fleming; Urs Heller; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Ikuro Sato; Stephen Wallace

    2001-10-01

    The construction of the operators and correlators required to determine the excited baryon spectrum is presented, with the aim of exploring the spatial and spin structure of the states while minimizing the number of propagator inversions. The method used to construct operators that transform irreducibly under the symmetries of the lattice is detailed, and the properties of example operators is studied using domain-wall fermion valence propagators computed on MILC asqtad dynamical lattices.

  8. Lattice QCD and the Jefferson Laboratory Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek, Robert Edwards, David Richards, Konstantinos Orginos

    2011-06-01

    Lattice gauge theory provides our only means of performing \\textit{ab initio} calculations in the non-perturbative regime. It has thus become an increasing important component of the Jefferson Laboratory physics program. In this paper, we describe the contributions of lattice QCD to our understanding of hadronic and nuclear physics, focusing on the structure of hadrons, the calculation of the spectrum and properties of resonances, and finally on deriving an understanding of the QCD origin of nuclear forces.

  9. Vague Congruences and Quotient Lattice Implication Algebras

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xiaoyan; Xu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to further develop the congruence theory on lattice implication algebras. Firstly, we introduce the notions of vague similarity relations based on vague relations and vague congruence relations. Secondly, the equivalent characterizations of vague congruence relations are investigated. Thirdly, the relation between the set of vague filters and the set of vague congruences is studied. Finally, we construct a new lattice implication algebra induced by a vague congruence, and the homomorphism theorem is given. PMID:25133207

  10. Current and lattice matched tandem solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.

    1987-01-01

    A multijunction (cascade) tandem photovoltaic solar cell device is fabricated of a Ga.sub.x In.sub.1-x P (0.505.ltoreq.X.ltoreq.0.515) top cell semiconductor lattice matched to a GaAs bottom cell semiconductor at a low-resistance heterojunction, preferably a p+/n+ heterojunction between the cells. The top and bottom cells are both lattice matched and current matched for high efficiency solar radiation conversion to electrical energy.

  11. The optical potential on the lattice

    DOE PAGES

    Agadjanov, Dimitri; Doring, Michael; Mai, Maxim; MeiBner, Ulf -G.; Rusetsky, Akaki

    2016-06-08

    The extraction of hadron-hadron scattering parameters from lattice data by using the Luscher approach becomes increasingly complicated in the presence of inelastic channels. We propose a method for the direct extraction of the complex hadron-hadron optical potential on the lattice, which does not require the use of the multi-channel Luscher formalism. Furthermore, this method is applicable without modifications if some inelastic channels contain three or more particles.

  12. Solitons in PT-symmetric nonlinear lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullaev, Fatkhulla Kh.; Konotop, Vladimir V.; Zezyulin, Dmitry A.; Kartashov, Yaroslav V.

    2011-04-15

    The existence of localized modes supported by the PT-symmetric nonlinear lattices is reported. The system considered reveals unusual properties: unlike other typical dissipative systems, it possesses families (branches) of solutions, which can be parametrized by the propagation constant; relatively narrow localized modes appear to be stable, even when the conservative nonlinear lattice potential is absent; and finally, the system supports stable multipole solutions.

  13. Lattice and Phase Diagram in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, Maria Paola

    2008-10-13

    Model calculations have produced a number of very interesting expectations for the QCD Phase Diagram, and the task of a lattice calculations is to put these studies on a quantitative grounds. I will give an overview of the current status of the lattice analysis of the QCD phase diagram, from the quantitative results of mature calculations at zero and small baryochemical potential, to the exploratory studies of the colder, denser phase.

  14. Building the RHIC tracking lattice model

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Tepikian, S.

    2010-01-27

    In this note we outline the procedure to build a realistic lattice model for the RHIC beam-beam tracking simulation. We will install multipole field errors in the arc main dipoles, arc main quadrupols and interaction region magnets (DX, D0, and triplets) and introduce a residual closed orbit, tune ripples, and physical apertures in the tracking lattice model. Nonlinearities such as local IR multipoles, second order chromaticies and third order resonance driving terms are also corrected before tracking.

  15. Moebius inversion formula and inverting lattice sums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millane, Rick P.

    2000-11-01

    The Mobius inversion formula is an interesting theorem from number theory that has application to a number inverse problems, particularly lattice problems. Specific inverse problems, however, often require related Mobius inversion formulae that can be derived from the fundamental formula. Derivation of such formulae is not easy for the non- specialist, however. Examples of the kinds of inversion formulae that can be derived and their application to inverse lattice problems are described.

  16. Some Poisson structures and Lax equations associated with the Toeplitz lattice and the Schur lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemarie, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The Toeplitz lattice is a Hamiltonian system whose Poisson structure is known. In this paper, we unveil the origins of this Poisson structure and derive from it the associated Lax equations for this lattice. We first construct a Poisson subvariety H n of GL n (C), which we view as a real or complex Poisson-Lie group whose Poisson structure comes from a quadratic R-bracket on gl n (C) for a fixed R-matrix. The existence of Hamiltonians, associated to the Toeplitz lattice for the Poisson structure on H n , combined with the properties of the quadratic R-bracket allow us to give explicit formulas for the Lax equation. Then we derive from it the integrability in the sense of Liouville of the Toeplitz lattice. When we view the lattice as being defined over R, we can construct a Poisson subvariety H n τ of U n which is itself a Poisson-Dirac subvariety of GL n R (C). We then construct a Hamiltonian for the Poisson structure induced on H n τ , corresponding to another system which derives from the Toeplitz lattice the modified Schur lattice. Thanks to the properties of Poisson-Dirac subvarieties, we give an explicit Lax equation for the new system and derive from it a Lax equation for the Schur lattice. We also deduce the integrability in the sense of Liouville of the modified Schur lattice.

  17. Spin-Lattice-Coupled Order in Heisenberg Antiferromagnets on the Pyrochlore Lattice.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Kazushi; Kawamura, Hikaru

    2016-06-24

    Effects of local lattice distortions on the spin ordering are investigated for the antiferromagnetic classical Heisenberg model on the pyrochlore lattice. It is found by Monte Carlo simulations that the spin-lattice coupling (SLC) originating from site phonons induces a first-order transition into two different types of collinear magnetic ordered states. The state realized at the stronger SLC is cubic symmetric characterized by the magnetic (1/2,1/2,1/2) Bragg peaks, while that at the weaker SLC is tetragonal symmetric characterized by the (1,1,0) ones, each accompanied by the commensurate local lattice distortions. Experimental implications to chromium spinels are discussed. PMID:27391746

  18. The Beauty of Lattice Perturbation Theory: the Role of Lattice Perturbation Theory in B Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monahan, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    As new experimental data arrive from the LHC the prospect of indirectly detecting new physics through precision tests of the Standard Model grows more exciting. Precise experimental and theoretical inputs are required to test the unitarity of the CKM matrix and to search for new physics effects in rare decays. Lattice QCD calculations of non-perturbative inputs have reached a precision at the level of a few percent; in many cases aided by the use of lattice perturbation theory. This review examines the role of lattice perturbation theory in B physics calculations on the lattice in the context of two questions: how is lattice perturbation theory used in the different heavy quark formalisms implemented by the major lattice collaborations? And what role does lattice perturbation theory play in determinations of non-perturbative contributions to the physical processes at the heart of the search for new physics? Framing and addressing these questions reveals that lattice perturbation theory is a tool with a spectrum of applications in lattice B physics.

  19. Spin-Lattice-Coupled Order in Heisenberg Antiferromagnets on the Pyrochlore Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Kazushi; Kawamura, Hikaru

    2016-06-01

    Effects of local lattice distortions on the spin ordering are investigated for the antiferromagnetic classical Heisenberg model on the pyrochlore lattice. It is found by Monte Carlo simulations that the spin-lattice coupling (SLC) originating from site phonons induces a first-order transition into two different types of collinear magnetic ordered states. The state realized at the stronger SLC is cubic symmetric characterized by the magnetic (1/2 ,1/2 ,1/2 ) Bragg peaks, while that at the weaker SLC is tetragonal symmetric characterized by the (1,1,0) ones, each accompanied by the commensurate local lattice distortions. Experimental implications to chromium spinels are discussed.

  20. Topological phases: An expedition off lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Michael H.; Gamper, Lukas; Gils, Charlotte; Isakov, Sergei V.; Trebst, Simon; Troyer, Matthias

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Models of topological phases where the lattice topology is a dynamical variable. > We discuss off-lattice hazards that destroy topological protection. > The Cheeger constant yields upper bound to the energy of excited states. > Baby universes meet condensed matter physics. > We study the graph Laplacian of loop gases and string nets on fluctuating lattices. - Abstract: Motivated by the goal to give the simplest possible microscopic foundation for a broad class of topological phases, we study quantum mechanical lattice models where the topology of the lattice is one of the dynamical variables. However, a fluctuating geometry can remove the separation between the system size and the range of local interactions, which is important for topological protection and ultimately the stability of a topological phase. In particular, it can open the door to a pathology, which has been studied in the context of quantum gravity and goes by the name of 'baby universe', here we discuss three distinct approaches to suppressing these pathological fluctuations. We complement this discussion by applying Cheeger's theory relating the geometry of manifolds to their vibrational modes to study the spectra of Hamiltonians. In particular, we present a detailed study of the statistical properties of loop gas and string net models on fluctuating lattices, both analytically and numerically.

  1. Lattice calculation of nonleptonic charm decays

    SciTech Connect

    Simone, J.N.

    1991-11-01

    The decays of charmed mesons into two body nonleptonic final states are investigated. Weak interaction amplitudes of interest in these decays are extracted from lattice four-point correlation functions using a effective weak Hamiltonian including effects to order G{sub f} in the weak interactions yet containing effects to all orders in the strong interactions. The lattice calculation allows a quantitative examination of non-spectator processes in charm decays helping to elucidate the role of effects such as color coherence, final state interactions and the importance of the so called weak annihilation process. For D {yields} K{pi}, we find that the non-spectator weak annihilation diagram is not small, and we interpret this as evidence for large final state interactions. Moreover, there is indications of a resonance in the isospin {1/2} channel to which the weak annihilation process contributes exclusively. Findings from the lattice calculation are compared to results from the continuum vacuum saturation approximation and amplitudes are examined within the framework of the 1/N expansion. Factorization and the vacuum saturation approximation are tested for lattice amplitudes by comparing amplitudes extracted from lattice four-point functions with the same amplitude extracted from products of two-point and three-point lattice correlation functions arising out of factorization and vacuum saturation.

  2. MBE growth technology for high quality strained III-V layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, Frank J. (Inventor); Liu, John K. (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The III-V films are grown on large automatically perfect terraces of III-V substrates which have a different lattice constant, with temperature and Group III and V arrival rates chosen to give a Group III element stable surface. The growth is pulsed to inhibit Group III metal accumulation of low temperature, and to permit the film to relax to equilibrium. The method of the invention: (1) minimizes starting step density on sample surface; (2) deposits InAs and GaAs using an interrupted growth mode (0.25 to 2 monolayers at a time); (3) maintains the instantaneous surface stoichiometry during growth (As-stable for GaAs, In-stable for InAs); and (4) uses time-resolved RHEED to achieve aspects (1) through (3).

  3. Plutonium (III) and uranium (III) nitrile complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Enriquez, A. E.; Matonic, J. H.; Scott, B. L.; Neu, M. P.

    2002-01-01

    Iodine oxidation of uranium and plutonium metals in tetrahydrofuran and pyridine form AnI{sub 3}(THF){sub 4} and AnI{sub 3}(py){sub 4} (An = Pu, U). These compounds represent convenient entries Into solution An(III) chemistry in organic solvents. Extensions of the actinide metal oxidation methodology in nitrile solvents by I{sub 2}, AgPF{sub 6}, and TIPF{sub 6} are presented here. Treatment of Pu{sup 0} in acetonitrile with iodine yields a putative PuI{sub 3}(NCMe){sub x} intermediate which can be trapped with the tripodal nitrogen donor ligand tpza (tpza = (tris[(2-pyrazinyl)methyl]amine)) and forms the eight-coordinate complex (tpza)PuI{sub 3}(NCMe). Treatment of excess U{sup 0} metal by iodine in acetonitrile afforded a brown crystalline mixed valence complex, [U(NCMe){sub 9}][UI{sub 6}][I], instead of UI{sub 3}(NCMe){sub 4}. The analogous reaction in bezonitrile forms red crystalline UI{sub 4}(NCPh){sub 4}. In contrast, treatment of UI{sub 3}(THF){sub 4} with excess acetonitrile cleanly generates [U(NCMe){sub 9}][I]{sub 3}. Oxidation of Pu{sup 0} by either TI(I) or Ag(I) hexafluorophosphate salts generates a nine-coordinate homoleptic acetonitrile adduct [Pu(NCMe){sub 9}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 3}. Attempts to oxidize U{sub 0} with these salts were unsuccessful.

  4. Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/000692.htm Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cranial mononeuropathy III -- diabetic type -- is usually a complication of diabetes that causes ...

  5. Phase transitions in cooperative coinfections: Simulation results for networks and lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassberger, Peter; Chen, Li; Ghanbarnejad, Fakhteh; Cai, Weiran

    2016-04-01

    We study the spreading of two mutually cooperative diseases on different network topologies, and with two microscopic realizations, both of which are stochastic versions of a susceptible-infected-removed type model studied by us recently in mean field approximation. There it had been found that cooperativity can lead to first order transitions from spreading to extinction. However, due to the rapid mixing implied by the mean field assumption, first order transitions required nonzero initial densities of sick individuals. For the stochastic model studied here the results depend strongly on the underlying network. First order transitions are found when there are few short but many long loops: (i) No first order transitions exist on trees and on 2-d lattices with local contacts. (ii) They do exist on Erdős-Rényi (ER) networks, on d -dimensional lattices with d ≥4 , and on 2-d lattices with sufficiently long-ranged contacts. (iii) On 3-d lattices with local contacts the results depend on the microscopic details of the implementation. (iv) While single infected seeds can always lead to infinite epidemics on regular lattices, on ER networks one sometimes needs finite initial densities of infected nodes. (v) In all cases the first order transitions are actually "hybrid"; i.e., they display also power law scaling usually associated with second order transitions. On regular lattices, our model can also be interpreted as the growth of an interface due to cooperative attachment of two species of particles. Critically pinned interfaces in this model seem to be in different universality classes than standard critically pinned interfaces in models with forbidden overhangs. Finally, the detailed results mentioned above hold only when both diseases propagate along the same network of links. If they use different links, results can be rather different in detail, but are similar overall.

  6. The Spectrum and Laplacian Spectrum of the Dice Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuli; Yan, Weigen; Tian, Tao

    2016-07-01

    The dice lattice is the dual lattice of kagomé lattice. Many physical properties on the dice lattice have been studied by physicists, such as Ising model, Glassy dynamics of Josephson arrays, and Lattice Green's function. In this paper, we derive the spectrum and Laplacian spectrum of the dice lattice with toroidal boundary condition. In addition, we apply our results to obtain the formulae of the number of spanning trees, the Kirchhoff index, and the energy of the dice lattice with toroidal boundary condition.

  7. Quantum magnetism on kagome lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Zhihao

    The spin 1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on kagome (a planar lattice of corner sharing triangles) is one of the most celebrated models of a strongly correlated system. Despite intensive studies, the physics of its ground state and excitations remains unsettled. Recently, researchers successfully synthesized and characterized several new materials described by this model. It is hoped that the longstanding problem can be finally resolved through combined efforts of experimentalists, material scientists and theorists. In this thesis, we present a physical picture of the low energy physics of kagome. We demonstrate that there are N/3 fermionic particles on a kagome of N sites. The motion of these particles is strongly constrained. They are bound into small bosonic states by strong pair-wise attractions. The "antiparticle" also exists and a particle-antiparticle pair can be created at energy cost 0.218J. Low energy spin 1 excitations correspond to breaking a bound state into two free particles at energy cost 0.06J. This is the physical mechanism of the kagome spin gap. Our physical picture finds several applications. The dynamical structure factor of pair-breaking processes on kagome is computed. We assume the bound states are independent thanks to their small sizes. The result agrees well with the recent inelastic neutron scattering measurement conducted on herbertsmithite, a kagome antiferromagnet. In the second application, we study the effect of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction. DM interaction is important for low energy physics on kagome since the ground state of the dominate exchange interaction is highly degenerated. Through analytical and numerical arguments, it is determined that the vacuum become unstable to creation of particle-antiparticle pairs at critical strength D of DM interaction on the sawtooth chain, a chain of corner sharing triangles. We speculate that the mechanism is behind the numerically observed quantum phase transition at finite D on

  8. Common Misconceptions about the Dynamical Theory of Crystal Lattices: Cauchy Relations, Lattice Potentials and Infinite Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elcoro, Luis; Etxebarria, Jesus

    2011-01-01

    The requirement of rotational invariance for lattice potential energies is investigated. Starting from this condition, it is shown that the Cauchy relations for the elastic constants are fulfilled if the lattice potential is built from pair interactions or when the first-neighbour approximation is adopted. This is seldom recognized in widely used…

  9. Ultracold Quantum Gases in Hexagonal Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengstock, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    Hexagonal structures occur in a vast variety of systems, ranging from honeycombs of bees in life sciences to carbon nanotubes in material sciences. The latter, in particular its unfolded two-dimensional layer -- Graphene -- has rapidly grown to one of the most discussed topics in condensed-matter physics. Not only does it show proximity to various carbon-based materials but also exceptional properties owing to its unusual energy spectrum. In quantum optics, ultracold quantum gases confined in periodic light fields have shown to be very general and versatile instruments to mimic solid state systems. However, so far nearly all experiments were performed in cubic lattice geometries only. Here we report on the first experimental realization of ultracold quantum gases in a state-dependent, two-dimensional, Graphene-like optical lattice with hexagonal symmetry. The lattice is realized via a spin-dependent optical lattice structure with alternating σ^+ and σ^- -sites and thus constitutes a so called `magnetic'-lattice with `antiferromagnetic'-structure. Atoms with different spin orientation can be loaded to specific lattice sites or -- depending on the parameters -- to the whole lattice. As a consequence e.g. superpositions of a superfluid spin component with a different spin component in the Mott-insulating phase can be realized as well as spin-dependent transport properties, disorder etc. After preparing an antiferromagnetically ordered state we e.g. measure sustainable changes of the transport properties of the atoms. This manifests in a significant reduction of the tunneling as compared to a single-component system. We attribute this observation to a partial tunneling blockade for one spin component induced by population in another spin component localized at alternating lattice sites. Within a Gutzwiller-Ansatz we calculate the phase diagrams for the mixed spin-states and find very good agreement with our experimental results. Moreover, by state-resolved recording

  10. Lattice-Induced Frequency Shifts in Sr Optical Lattice Clocks at the 10{sup -17} Level

    SciTech Connect

    Westergaard, P. G.; Lodewyck, J.; Lecallier, A.; Millo, J.; Lemonde, P.; Lorini, L.; Burt, E. A.; Zawada, M.

    2011-05-27

    We present a comprehensive study of the frequency shifts associated with the lattice potential in a Sr lattice clock by comparing two such clocks with a frequency stability reaching 5x10{sup -17} after a 1 h integration time. We put the first experimental upper bound on the multipolar M1 and E2 interactions, significantly smaller than the recently predicted theoretical upper limit, and give a 30-fold improved upper limit on the effect of hyperpolarizability. Finally, we report on the first observation of the vector and tensor shifts in a Sr lattice clock. Combining these measurements, we show that all known lattice related perturbations will not affect the clock accuracy down to the 10{sup -17} level, even for lattices as deep as 150 recoil energies.

  11. Vacancy-Assisted Diffusion in a Honeycomb Lattice and in a Diamond Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yohichi; Kitahara, Kazuo; Fujitani, Youhei; Kinouchi, Sumie

    2002-12-01

    Vacancy-assisted diffusion in a crystalline solid can be modeled by means of many particles jumping stochastically to their respective nearest-neighbor lattice-sites with double occupancy forbidden. The diffusion coefficient of a tagged particle, defined in terms of its mean square displacement, depends not only on the transition rate but also on the particle concentration. Nakazato and Kitahara [Prog. Theor. Phys. 64 (1980) 2261] devised a projection operator method to calculate its approximate expression interpolating between the low- and high-concentration limits for a square lattice in any dimension. In this paper, we apply their method to a honeycomb lattice and a diamond lattice, in each of which a set of the nearest-neighbor vectors depends on a site from which they originate. Compared with simulation results, our explicit expression is found to give a good interpolation in each lattice unless the host particles migrate more slowly than the tagged particle.

  12. Topological phases of shaken quantum Ising lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Lorenzo, Samuel; José García-Ripoll, Juan; Porras, Diego

    2016-02-01

    The quantum compass model consists of a two-dimensional square spin lattice where the orientation of the spin-spin interactions depends on the spatial direction of the bonds. It has remarkable symmetry properties and the ground state shows topological degeneracy. The implementation of the quantum compass model in quantum simulation setups like ultracold atoms and trapped ions is far from trivial, since spin interactions in those systems typically are independent of the spatial direction. Ising spin interactions, on the contrary, can be induced and controlled in atomic setups with state-of-the art experimental techniques. In this work, we show how the quantum compass model on a rectangular lattice can be simulated by the use of the photon-assisted tunneling induced by periodic drivings on a quantum Ising spin model. We describe a procedure to adiabatically prepare one of the doubly degenerate ground states of this model by adiabatically ramping down a transverse magnetic field, with surprising differences depending on the parity of the lattice size. Exact diagonalizations confirm the validity of this approach for small lattices. Specific implementations of this scheme are presented with ultracold atoms in optical lattices in the Mott insulator regime, as well as with Rydberg atoms.

  13. Incommensurate lattice modulations in Potassium Vanadate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakoumakos, Bryan; Banerjee, Arnab; Mark, Lumsden; Cao, Huibo; Kim, Jong-Woo; Hoffman, Christina; Wang, Xiaoping

    Potassium Vanadate (K2V3O8) is an S = 1/2 2D square lattice antiferromagnet that shows spin reorientation indicating a strong coupling between the magnetism and its dielectric properties with a promise of rich physics that promises multiferroicity. These tangible physical properties are strongly tied through a spin-lattice coupling to the underlying lattice and superlattice behavior. It has a superlattice (SL) onsetting below Tc = 115 K with an approximate [3 x 3 x 2] modulation. Here we present our recent experiments at TOPAZ beamline at SNS which for the first time proves conclusively that the lattice modulations are incommensurate, with an in-plane Q of 0.315. We will also show our attempts to refine the data using JANA which requires a redefinition of the lattice, as well as the temperature and Q dependence of the superlattice modulation measured using neutrons at HFIR and synchrotron x-rays at APS. Our results are not only relevant for the ongoing search of multifunctional behavior in K2V3O8 but also generally for the superlattice modulations observed in a large family of fresnoites. Work performed at ORNL and ANL is supported by U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences and Office of User Facilities Division.

  14. Full CKM matrix with lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Masataka; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    The authors show that it is now possible to fully determine the CKM matrix, for the first time, using lattice QCD. |V{sub cd}|, |V{sub cs}|, |V{sub ub}|, |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub us}| are, respectively, directly determined with the lattice results for form factors of semileptonic D {yields} {pi}lv, D {yields} Klv, B {yields} {pi}lv, B {yields} Dlv and K {yields} {pi}lv decays. The error from the quenched approximation is removed by using the MILC unquenced lattice gauge configurations, where the effect of u, d and s quarks is included. The error from the ''chiral'' extrapolation (m{sub l} {yields} m{sub ud}) is greatly reduced by using improved staggered quarks. The accuracy is comparable to that of the Particle Data Group averages. In addition, |V{sub ud}|, |V{sub ts}|, |V{sub ts}| and |V{sub td}| are determined by using unitarity of the CKM matrix and the experimental result for sin (2{beta}). In this way, they obtain all 9 CKM matrix elements, where the only theoretical input is lattice QCD. They also obtain all the Wolfenstein parameters, for the first time, using lattice QCD.

  15. Vortex lattices in theory and practice

    SciTech Connect

    Capmbell, Laurence J.

    1988-01-01

    The formal simplicity of ideal point vortex systems in two dimensions has long attracted interest in both their exact solutions and in their capacity to simulate physical processes. Attention here is focused on infinite, two-fold periodic vortex arrays, including an expression for the energy density of an arbitrary vortex lattice (i.e., an arbitrary number of vortices with arbitrary strengths in a unit cell parallelogram of arbitrary shape). For the case of two vortices per unit cell, the morphology of stable lattices can be described completely. A non-trivial physical realization of such lattices is a rotating mixture of /sup 3/He and /sup 4/He at temperatures so low that both isotopic components are superfluid. The structure of the expected lattices is quite different from the usual triangular structure. Magnetic flux lines in high-temperature superconductors show a one-parameter family of degenerate ground state of the lattice due to the anisotropy of the vortex--vortex interaction. A final topic, closely related to Josephson-junction arrays, is the case of vortices confined to a grid. That is, the vortices interact pair-wise in the usual manner but are constrained to occupy only locations on an independent periodic grid. By using vortex relaxation methods in the continuum and then imposing the grid it is possible to find low-lying states extremely rapidly compared to previous Monte Carlo calculations. 11 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Lattice-induced transparency in planar metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjappa, Manukumara; Srivastava, Yogesh Kumar; Singh, Ranjan

    2016-10-01

    Lattice modes are intrinsic to periodic structures and they can be easily tuned and controlled by changing the lattice constant of the structural array. Previous studies have revealed the excitation of sharp absorption resonances due to lattice mode coupling with the plasmonic resonances. Here, we report an experimental observation of a lattice-induced transparency (LIT) by coupling the first-order lattice mode (FOLM) to the structural resonance of a terahertz asymmetric split ring resonator. The observed sharp transparency is a result of the destructive interference between the bright mode and the FOLM assisted dark mode. As the FOLM is swept across the metamaterial resonance, the transparency band undergoes a large change in its bandwidth and resonance position. We propose a three-oscillator model to explain the underlying coupling mechanism in LIT system that shows good agreement with the observed results. Besides controlling the transparency behavior, LIT also shows a huge enhancement in its Q factor and exhibits a high group delay of 28 ps with an enhanced group index of 4.5 ×104 , which could be pivotal in ultrasensitive sensing and slow-light device applications.

  17. Lattice Landau Gauge via Stereographic Projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Smekal, L.; Mehta, D.; Sternbeck, A.

    alexander.jorkowski@student.adelaide.edu.au, dhagash.mehta@adelaide.edu.au, andre.sternbeck@adelaide.edu.au The complete cancellation of Gribov copies and the Neuberger 0/0 problem of lattice BRST can be avoided in modified lattice Landau gauge. In compact U(1), where the problem is a lattice artifact, there remain to be Gribov copies but their number is exponentially reduced. Moreover, there is no cancellation of copies there as the sign of the Faddeev-Popov determinant is posi- tive. Applied to the maximal Abelian subgroup this avoids the perfect cancellation amongst the remaining Gribov copies for SU(N) also. In addition, based on a definition of gauge fields on the lattice as stereographically-projected link variables, it provides a framework for gauge fixed Monte-Carlo simulations. This will include all Gribov copies in the spirit of BRST. Their average is not zero, as demonstrated explicitly in simple models. This might resolve present discrepancies between gauge-fixed lattice and continuum studies of QCD Green’s functions.

  18. Type III Hyperlipoproteinaemia

    PubMed Central

    Borrie, Peter

    1969-01-01

    Eighteen patients with type III hyperlipoproteinaemia, diagnosed on the basis of skin lesions, serum lipids, and lipoprotein electrophoresis, have been fully investigated over a period of 15 years. The incidence of coronary artery disease was only slightly increased, and was not increased at all among first-degree relatives. Peripheral occlusive arterial disease was probably more common. An increased incidence of carbohydrate intolerance was found in neither the patients nor their relatives. The effects of treatment on the skin were uniformly good. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:5783124

  19. Excited state baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Robert G. Edwards; Dudek, Jozef J.; Richards, David G.; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2011-10-31

    Here, we present a calculation of the Nucleon and Delta excited state spectrum on dynamical anisotropic clover lattices. A method for operator construction is introduced that allows for the reliable identification of the continuum spins of baryon states, overcoming the reduced symmetry of the cubic lattice. Using this method, we are able to determine a spectrum of single-particle states for spins up to and including $J = 7/2$, of both parities, the first time this has been achieved in a lattice calculation. We find a spectrum of states identifiable as admixtures of $SU(6) Ⓧ O(3)$ representations and a counting ofmore » levels that is consistent with the non-relativistic $qqq$ constituent quark model. This dense spectrum is incompatible with quark-diquark model solutions to the "missing resonance problem" and shows no signs of parity doubling of states.« less

  20. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-09-08

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose-Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid.

  1. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices

    PubMed Central

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-01-01

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose—Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid. PMID:26345721

  2. Organic topological insulators in organometallic lattices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z F; Liu, Zheng; Liu, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Topological insulators are a recently discovered class of materials having insulating bulk electronic states but conducting boundary states distinguished by nontrivial topology. So far, several generations of topological insulators have been theoretically predicted and experimentally confirmed, all based on inorganic materials. Here, based on first-principles calculations, we predict a family of two-dimensional organic topological insulators made of organometallic lattices. Designed by assembling molecular building blocks of triphenyl-metal compounds with strong spin-orbit coupling into a hexagonal lattice, this new classes of organic topological insulators are shown to exhibit nontrivial topological edge states that are robust against significant lattice strain. We envision that organic topological insulators will greatly broaden the scientific and technological impact of topological insulators.

  3. Arbitrary lattice symmetries via block copolymer nanomeshes

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Pawel W.; Rahman, Atikur; Black, Charles T.; Yager, Kevin G.

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of block copolymers is a powerful motif for spontaneously forming well-defined nanostructures over macroscopic areas. Yet, the inherent energy minimization criteria of self-assembly give rise to a limited library of structures; diblock copolymers naturally form spheres on a cubic lattice, hexagonally packed cylinders and alternating lamellae. Here, we demonstrate multicomponent nanomeshes with any desired lattice symmetry. We exploit photothermal annealing to rapidly order and align block copolymer phases over macroscopic areas, combined with conversion of the self-assembled organic phase into inorganic replicas. Repeated photothermal processing independently aligns successive layers, providing full control of the size, symmetry and composition of the nanoscale unit cell. We construct a variety of symmetries, most of which are not natively formed by block copolymers, including squares, rhombuses, rectangles and triangles. In fact, we demonstrate all possible two-dimensional Bravais lattices. Finally, we elucidate the influence of nanostructure on the electrical and optical properties of nanomeshes. PMID:26100566

  4. Exploring Three Nucleon Forces in Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Takumi

    2011-10-21

    We study the three nucleon force in N{sub f} = 2 dynamical clover fermion lattice QCD, utilizing the Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter wave function of the three nucleon system. Since parity-odd two nucleon potentials are not available in lattice QCD at this moment, we develop a new formulation to extract the genuine three nucleon force which requires only the information of parity-even two nucleon potentials. In order to handle the extremely expensive calculation cost, we consider a specific three-dimensional coordinate configuration for the three nucleons. We find that the linear setup is advantageous, where nucleons are aligned linearly with equal spacings. The lattice calculation is performed with 16{sup 3}x32 configurations at {beta} = 1.95, m{sub {pi}} = 1.13 GeV generated by CP-PACS Collaboration, and the result of the three nucleon force in triton channel is presented.

  5. Honeycomb optical lattices with harmonic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Block, J. Kusk; Nygaard, N.

    2010-05-15

    We consider the fate of the Dirac points in the spectrum of a honeycomb optical lattice in the presence of a harmonic confining potential. By numerically solving the tight binding model, we calculate the density of states and find that the energy dependence can be understood from analytical arguments. In addition, we show that the density of states of the harmonically trapped lattice system can be understood by application of a local density approximation based on the density of states in the homogeneous lattice. The Dirac points are found to survive locally in the trap as evidenced by the local density of states. Furthermore, they give rise to a distinct spatial profile of a noninteracting Fermi gas.

  6. Excited state baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Robert G.; Richards, David G.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2011-10-01

    We present a calculation of the Nucleon and Delta excited state spectra on dynamical anisotropic clover lattices. A method for operator construction is introduced that allows for the reliable identification of the continuum spins of baryon states, overcoming the reduced symmetry of the cubic lattice. Using this method, we are able to determine a spectrum of single-particle states for spins up to and including J=(7/2), of both parities, the first time this has been achieved in a lattice calculation. We find a spectrum of states identifiable as admixtures of SU(6) x O(3) representations and a counting of levels that is consistent with the nonrelativistic qqq constituent quark model. This dense spectrum is incompatible with quark-diquark model solutions to the 'missing resonance problem' and shows no signs of parity doubling of states.

  7. Excited state baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Robert G. Edwards; Dudek, Jozef J.; Richards, David G.; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2011-10-31

    Here, we present a calculation of the Nucleon and Delta excited state spectrum on dynamical anisotropic clover lattices. A method for operator construction is introduced that allows for the reliable identification of the continuum spins of baryon states, overcoming the reduced symmetry of the cubic lattice. Using this method, we are able to determine a spectrum of single-particle states for spins up to and including $J = 7/2$, of both parities, the first time this has been achieved in a lattice calculation. We find a spectrum of states identifiable as admixtures of $SU(6) Ⓧ O(3)$ representations and a counting of levels that is consistent with the non-relativistic $qqq$ constituent quark model. This dense spectrum is incompatible with quark-diquark model solutions to the "missing resonance problem" and shows no signs of parity doubling of states.

  8. CHARMONIUM EXCITED STATES FROM LATTICE QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; Nilmani Mathur; David Richards

    2007-11-20

    We apply the variational method with a large basis of interpolating operators to demonstrate the feasibility of extracting multiple excited states in charmonium from lattice QCD. The calculation is performed in the quenched approximation to QCD, using the clover fermion action on an anisotropic lattice. A crucial element of our approach is a knowledge of the continuum limit of the interpolating operators, providing important additional information on the spin assignment of the states, even at a single value of the lattice spacing. Though we find excited-state masses that are systematically high with respect to the quark potential model, and the experimental masses where known, we attribute this as most likely an artifact of the quenched approximation.

  9. Maximum independent set on diluted triangular lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fay, C. W., IV; Liu, J. W.; Duxbury, P. M.

    2006-05-01

    Core percolation and maximum independent set on random graphs have recently been characterized using the methods of statistical physics. Here we present a statistical physics study of these problems on bond diluted triangular lattices. Core percolation critical behavior is found to be consistent with the standard percolation values, though there are strong finite size effects. A transfer matrix method is developed and applied to find accurate values of the density and degeneracy of the maximum independent set on lattices of limited width but large length. An extrapolation of these results to the infinite lattice limit yields high precision results, which are tabulated. These results are compared to results found using both vertex based and edge based local probability recursion algorithms, which have proven useful in the analysis of hard computational problems, such as the satisfiability problem.

  10. Modeling quasi-lattice with octagonal symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Girzhon, V. V.; Smolyakov, O. V.; Zakharenko, M. I.

    2014-11-15

    We prove the possibility to use the method of modeling of a quasi-lattice with octagonal symmetry similar to that proposed earlier for the decagonal quasicrystal. The method is based on the multiplication of the groups of basis sites according to specified rules. This model is shown to be equivalent to the method of the periodic lattice projection, but is simpler because it considers merely two-dimensional site groups. The application of the proposed modeling procedure to the reciprocal lattice of octagonal quasicrystals shows a fairly good matching with the electron diffraction pattern. Similarly to the decagonal quasicrystals, the possibility of three-index labeling of the diffraction reflections is exhibited in this case. Moreover, the ascertained ratio of indices provides information on the intensity of diffraction reflections.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity.

    PubMed

    Ilseven, E; Mendoza, M

    2016-02-01

    In the Z4 formulation, Einstein equations are written as a set of flux conservative first-order hyperbolic equations that resemble fluid dynamics equations. Based on this formulation, we construct a lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity and validate it with well-established tests, also known as "apples with apples." Furthermore, we find that by increasing the relaxation time, we gain stability at the cost of losing accuracy, and by decreasing the lattice spacings while keeping a constant numerical diffusivity, the accuracy and stability of our simulations improve. Finally, in order to show the potential of our approach, a linear scaling law for parallelization with respect to number of CPU cores is demonstrated. Our model represents the first step in using lattice kinetic theory to solve gravitational problems. PMID:26986435

  12. Lattice dynamics in Bosonic 7 Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huiyao Y.; Jung, Minwoo; Rabinowitz, Jacob; Madjarov, Ivaylo S.; Cheung, Hil F. H.; Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2016-05-01

    The light mass and strong spin-dependent interactions in 7 Li make it an attractive candidate to study Bosonic quantum magnetism and lattice dynamics in regimes where rapid dynamics is favored, e.g. percolative transport and entropy segregation. Such studies require large ensembles of quantum degenerate 7 Li atoms which has proved to be a technical challenge. We describe our ongoing efforts to overcome this challenge using Raman sideband cooling (RSC). In addition to enabling the rapid production of large degenerate gases, RSC is also a very powerful means of local control of lattice gas dynamics. Extending this to a spinful 7 Li Bose gas will also enable studies of transport and defect dynamics in F=1 lattice gases. This work is supported by the ARO MURI on non-equilibrium dynamics.

  13. Mechanical Weyl Modes in Topological Maxwell Lattices.

    PubMed

    Rocklin, D Zeb; Chen, Bryan Gin-Ge; Falk, Martin; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Lubensky, T C

    2016-04-01

    We show that two-dimensional mechanical lattices can generically display topologically protected bulk zero-energy phonon modes at isolated points in the Brillouin zone, analogs of massless fermion modes of Weyl semimetals. We focus on deformed square lattices as the simplest Maxwell lattices, characterized by equal numbers of constraints and degrees of freedom, with this property. The Weyl points appear at the origin of the Brillouin zone along directions with vanishing sound speed and move away to the zone edge (or return to the origin) where they annihilate. Our results suggest a design strategy for topological metamaterials with bulk low-frequency acoustic modes and elastic instabilities at a particular, tunable finite wave vector. PMID:27081989

  14. Nucleon Structure from Dynamical Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin

    2007-06-01

    We present lattice QCD numerical calculations of hadronic structure functions and form factors from full-QCD lattices, with a chirally symmetric fermion action, domain-wall fermions, for the sea and valence quarks. The lattice spacing is about 0.12 fm with physical volume approximately (2 fm)3 for RBC 2-flavor ensembles and (3 fm)3 for RBC/UKQCD 2+1-flavor dynamical ones. The lightest sea quark mass is about 1/2 the strange quark mass for the former ensembles and 1/4 for the latter ones. Our calculations include: isovector vector- and axial-charge form factors and the first few moments of the polarized and unpolarized structure functions of the nucleon. Nonperturbative renormalization in RI/MOM scheme is applied.

  15. Nucleon Structure from Dynamical Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H.-W.

    2007-06-13

    We present lattice QCD numerical calculations of hadronic structure functions and form factors from full-QCD lattices, with a chirally symmetric fermion action, domain-wall fermions, for the sea and valence quarks. The lattice spacing is about 0.12 fm with physical volume approximately (2 fm)3 for RBC 2-flavor ensembles and (3 fm)3 for RBC/UKQCD 2+1-flavor dynamical ones. The lightest sea quark mass is about 1/2 the strange quark mass for the former ensembles and 1/4 for the latter ones. Our calculations include: isovector vector- and axial-charge form factors and the first few moments of the polarized and unpolarized structure functions of the nucleon. Nonperturbative renormalization in RI/MOM scheme is applied.

  16. Spectroscopy of charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present the ground and excited state spectra of singly, doubly and triply charmed baryons by using dynamical lattice QCD. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice and are obtained after subduction from their continuum analogues are utilized. Using novel computational techniques correlation functions of these operators are generated and the variational method is exploited to extract excited states. The lattice spectra that we obtain have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the low lying states remarkably resemble the expectations of quantum numbers from SU(6) x O(3) symmetry. Various energy splittings between the extracted states, including splittings due to hyperfine as well as spin-orbit coupling, are considered and those are also compared against similar energy splittings at other quark masses.

  17. Lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity.

    PubMed

    Ilseven, E; Mendoza, M

    2016-02-01

    In the Z4 formulation, Einstein equations are written as a set of flux conservative first-order hyperbolic equations that resemble fluid dynamics equations. Based on this formulation, we construct a lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity and validate it with well-established tests, also known as "apples with apples." Furthermore, we find that by increasing the relaxation time, we gain stability at the cost of losing accuracy, and by decreasing the lattice spacings while keeping a constant numerical diffusivity, the accuracy and stability of our simulations improve. Finally, in order to show the potential of our approach, a linear scaling law for parallelization with respect to number of CPU cores is demonstrated. Our model represents the first step in using lattice kinetic theory to solve gravitational problems.

  18. Pattern Recognition of Adsorbing HP Lattice Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Matthew S.; Shi, Guangjie; Wüst, Thomas; Landau, David P.; Schmid, Friederike

    2015-03-01

    Protein adsorption is relevant in fields ranging from medicine to industry, and the qualitative behavior exhibited by course-grained models could shed insight for further research in such fields. Our study on the selective adsorption of lattice proteins utilizes the Wang-Landau algorithm to simulate the Hydrophobic-Polar (H-P) model with an efficient set of Monte Carlo moves. Each substrate is modeled as a square pattern of 9 lattice sites which attract either H or P monomers, and are located on an otherwise neutral surface. The fully enumerated set of 102 unique surfaces is simulated with each protein sequence. A collection of 27-monomer sequences is used- each of which is non-degenerate and protein-like. Thermodynamic quantities such as the specific heat and free energy are calculated from the density of states, and are used to investigate the adsorption of lattice proteins on patterned substrates. Research supported by NSF.

  19. Lattice gas dynamics under continuous measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Cheung, Hil F. H.; Madjarov, Ivaylo S.; Chen, Huiyao Y.; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2016-05-01

    The act of measurement has a profound consequences quantum systems. While this backaction has so far been discussed as being a limitation on the precision of measurements, it is increasingly being appreciated that measurement backaction is a powerful and versatile means of quantum control. We have previously demonstrated that backaction from position measurement can modify the coherent tunneling rate of a lattice gas through the Quantum Zeno effect. Here, we show how spatially designed measurement landscapes can be used to realize entropy segregation in lattice gases. This presents an alternate path to the longstanding challenge of realizing lattice gases with sufficiently low entropy to access regimes of correlated quantum behavior such as Néel ordered states. This work is supported by the ARO MURI on non-equilibrium dynamics.

  20. Josephson vortex lattice in layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, A. E.; Dodgson, M. J. W.

    2013-09-15

    Many superconducting materials are composed of weakly coupled conducting layers. Such a layered structure has a very strong influence on the properties of vortex matter in a magnetic field. This review focuses on the properties of the Josephson vortex lattice generated by the magnetic field applied in the direction of the layers. The theoretical description is based on the Lawrence-Doniach model in the London limit, which takes only the phase degree of freedom of the superconducting order parameter into account. In spite of its simplicity, this model leads to an amazingly rich set of phenomena. We review in detail the structure of an isolated vortex line and various properties of the vortex lattice, in both dilute and dense limits. In particular, we extensively discuss the influence of the layered structure and thermal fluctuations on the selection of lattice configurations at different magnetic fields.

  1. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-01-01

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose-Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid. PMID:26345721

  2. Ising antiferromagnet on the 2-uniform lattices.

    PubMed

    Yu, Unjong

    2016-08-01

    The antiferromagnetic Ising model is investigated on the twenty 2-uniform lattices using the Monte Carlo method based on the Wang-Landau algorithm and the Metropolis algorithm to study the geometric frustration effect systematically. Based on the specific heat, the residual entropy, and the Edwards-Anderson freezing order parameter, the ground states of them were determined. In addition to the long-range-ordered phase and the spin ice phase found in the Archimedean lattices, two more phases were found. The partial long-range order is long-range order with exceptional disordered sites, which give extensive residual entropy. In the partial spin ice phase, the partial freezing phenomenon appears: A majority of sites are frozen without long-range order, but the other sites are fluctuating even at zero temperature. The spin liquid ground state was not found in the 2-uniform lattices. PMID:27627251

  3. The Abelian Higgs model on Optical Lattice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurice, Yannick; Tsai, Shan-Wen; Bazavov, Alexei; Zhang, Jin

    2015-03-01

    We study the Lattice Gauge Theory of the U(1)-Higgs model in 1+1 dimensions in the strongly coupled regime. We discuss the plaquette corrections to the effective theory where link variables are integrated out. We discuss matching with the second-order perturbation theory effective Hamiltonian for various Bose-Hubbard models. This correspondence can be exploited for building a lattice gauge theory simulator on optical lattices. We propose to implement the quantum rotors which appear in the Hamiltonian formulation using Bose mixtures or p-orbitals. Recent progress on magnetic effects in 2+1 dimensions will be discussed. Supported by the Army Research Office of the Department of Defense under Award Number W911NF-13-1-0119.

  4. Lattice Strain Defects in a Ceria Nanolayer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An ultrathin two-dimensional CeO2 (ceria) phase on a Cu(110) surface has been fabricated and fully characterized by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, and density functional theory. The atomic lattice structure of the ceria/Cu(110) system is revealed as a hexagonal CeO2(111)-type monolayer separated from the Cu(110) surface by a partly disordered Cu–O intercalated buffer layer. The epitaxial coupling of the two-dimensional ceria overlayer to the Cu(110)-O surface leads to a nanoscopic stripe pattern, which creates defect regions of quasi-periodic lattice distortions. The symmetry and lattice mismatch at the interface is clarified to be responsible for the topographic stripe geometry and the related anisotropic strain defect regions at the ceria surface. This ceria monolayer is in a fully oxidized and thermodynamically stable state. PMID:26988695

  5. Lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilseven, E.; Mendoza, M.

    2016-02-01

    In the Z4 formulation, Einstein equations are written as a set of flux conservative first-order hyperbolic equations that resemble fluid dynamics equations. Based on this formulation, we construct a lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity and validate it with well-established tests, also known as "apples with apples." Furthermore, we find that by increasing the relaxation time, we gain stability at the cost of losing accuracy, and by decreasing the lattice spacings while keeping a constant numerical diffusivity, the accuracy and stability of our simulations improve. Finally, in order to show the potential of our approach, a linear scaling law for parallelization with respect to number of CPU cores is demonstrated. Our model represents the first step in using lattice kinetic theory to solve gravitational problems.

  6. Ising antiferromagnet on the 2-uniform lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Unjong

    2016-08-01

    The antiferromagnetic Ising model is investigated on the twenty 2-uniform lattices using the Monte Carlo method based on the Wang-Landau algorithm and the Metropolis algorithm to study the geometric frustration effect systematically. Based on the specific heat, the residual entropy, and the Edwards-Anderson freezing order parameter, the ground states of them were determined. In addition to the long-range-ordered phase and the spin ice phase found in the Archimedean lattices, two more phases were found. The partial long-range order is long-range order with exceptional disordered sites, which give extensive residual entropy. In the partial spin ice phase, the partial freezing phenomenon appears: A majority of sites are frozen without long-range order, but the other sites are fluctuating even at zero temperature. The spin liquid ground state was not found in the 2-uniform lattices.

  7. Multisite Interactions in Lattice-Gas Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einstein, T. L.; Sathiyanarayanan, R.

    For detailed applications of lattice-gas models to surface systems, multisite interactions often play at least as significant a role as interactions between pairs of adatoms that are separated by a few lattice spacings. We recall that trio (3-adatom, non-pairwise) interactions do not inevitably create phase boundary asymmetries about half coverage. We discuss a sophisticated application to an experimental system and describe refinements in extracting lattice-gas energies from calculations of total energies of several different ordered overlayers. We describe how lateral relaxations complicate matters when there is direct interaction between the adatoms, an issue that is important when examining the angular dependence of step line tensions. We discuss the connector model as an alternative viewpoint and close with a brief account of recent work on organic molecule overlayers.

  8. Experimental Realization of a Quantum Pentagonal Lattice

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Hironori; Okubo, Tsuyoshi; Kittaka, Shunichiro; Sakakibara, Toshiro; Araki, Koji; Iwase, Kenji; Amaya, Naoki; Ono, Toshio; Hosokoshi, Yuko

    2015-01-01

    Geometric frustration, in which competing interactions give rise to degenerate ground states, potentially induces various exotic quantum phenomena in magnetic materials. Minimal models comprising triangular units, such as triangular and Kagome lattices, have been investigated for decades to realize novel quantum phases, such as quantum spin liquid. A pentagon is the second-minimal elementary unit for geometric frustration. The realization of such systems is expected to provide a distinct platform for studying frustrated magnetism. Here, we present a spin-1/2 quantum pentagonal lattice in the new organic radical crystal α-2,6-Cl2-V [=α-3-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-1,5-diphenylverdazyl]. Its unique molecular arrangement allows the formation of a partially corner-shared pentagonal lattice (PCPL). We find a clear 1/3 magnetization plateau and an anomalous change in magnetization in the vicinity of the saturation field, which originate from frustrated interactions in the PCPL. PMID:26468930

  9. Discrete breathers in hexagonal dusty plasma lattices.

    PubMed

    Koukouloyannis, V; Kourakis, I

    2009-08-01

    The occurrence of single-site or multisite localized vibrational modes, also called discrete breathers, in two-dimensional hexagonal dusty plasma lattices is investigated. The system is described by a Klein-Gordon hexagonal lattice characterized by a negative coupling parameter epsilon in account of its inverse dispersive behavior. A theoretical analysis is performed in order to establish the possibility of existence of single as well as three-site discrete breathers in such systems. The study is complemented by a numerical investigation based on experimentally provided potential forms. This investigation shows that a dusty plasma lattice can support single-site discrete breathers, while three-site in phase breathers could exist if specific conditions, about the intergrain interaction strength, would hold. On the other hand, out of phase and vortex three-site breathers cannot be supported since they are highly unstable.

  10. Featureless quantum insulator on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Panjin; Lee, Hyunyong; Jiang, Shenghan; Ware, Brayden; Jian, Chao-Ming; Zaletel, Michael; Han, Jung Hoon; Ran, Ying

    2016-08-01

    We show how to construct fully symmetric states without topological order on a honeycomb lattice for S =1/2 spins using the language of projected entangled pair states. An explicit example is given for the virtual bond dimension D =4 . Four distinct classes differing by lattice quantum numbers are found by applying the systematic classification scheme introduced by two of the authors [S. Jiang and Y. Ran, Phys. Rev. B 92, 104414 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.104414]. Lack of topological degeneracy or other conventional forms of symmetry breaking in the proposed wave functions are checked by numerical calculations of the entanglement entropy and various correlation functions. Exponential decay of all correlation functions measured are strongly indicative of the energy gap for the putative parent Hamiltonian of the state. Our work provides the first explicit realization of a featureless quantum state for spin-1/2 particles on a honeycomb lattice.

  11. Mechanical Weyl Modes in Topological Maxwell Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocklin, D. Zeb; Chen, Bryan Gin-ge; Falk, Martin; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Lubensky, T. C.

    2016-04-01

    We show that two-dimensional mechanical lattices can generically display topologically protected bulk zero-energy phonon modes at isolated points in the Brillouin zone, analogs of massless fermion modes of Weyl semimetals. We focus on deformed square lattices as the simplest Maxwell lattices, characterized by equal numbers of constraints and degrees of freedom, with this property. The Weyl points appear at the origin of the Brillouin zone along directions with vanishing sound speed and move away to the zone edge (or return to the origin) where they annihilate. Our results suggest a design strategy for topological metamaterials with bulk low-frequency acoustic modes and elastic instabilities at a particular, tunable finite wave vector.

  12. Parafermionic conformal field theory on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mong, Roger S. K.; Clarke, David J.; Alicea, Jason; Lindner, Netanel H.; Fendley, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Finding the precise correspondence between lattice operators and the continuum fields that describe their long-distance properties is a largely open problem for strongly interacting critical points. Here, we solve this problem essentially completely in the case of the three-state Potts model, which exhibits a phase transition described by a strongly interacting ‘parafermion’ conformal field theory. Using symmetry arguments, insights from integrability, and extensive simulations, we construct lattice analogues of nearly all the relevant and marginal physical fields governing this transition. This construction includes chiral fields such as the parafermion. Along the way we also clarify the structure of operator product expansions between order and disorder fields, which we confirm numerically. Our results both suggest a systematic methodology for attacking non-free field theories on the lattice and find broader applications in the pursuit of exotic topologically ordered phases of matter.

  13. Lattice gas methods for computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, Victor W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the lattice gas solution to the category 1 problems of the ICASE/LaRC Workshop on Benchmark Problems in Computational Aeroacoustics. The first and second problems were solved for Delta t = Delta x = 1, and additionally the second problem was solved for Delta t = 1/4 and Delta x = 1/2. The results are striking: even for these large time and space grids the lattice gas numerical solutions are almost indistinguishable from the analytical solutions. A simple bug in the Mathematica code was found in the solutions submitted for comparison, and the comparison plots shown at the end of this volume show the bug. An Appendix to the present paper shows an example lattice gas solution with and without the bug.

  14. Experimental Realization of a Quantum Pentagonal Lattice.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hironori; Okubo, Tsuyoshi; Kittaka, Shunichiro; Sakakibara, Toshiro; Araki, Koji; Iwase, Kenji; Amaya, Naoki; Ono, Toshio; Hosokoshi, Yuko

    2015-01-01

    Geometric frustration, in which competing interactions give rise to degenerate ground states, potentially induces various exotic quantum phenomena in magnetic materials. Minimal models comprising triangular units, such as triangular and Kagome lattices, have been investigated for decades to realize novel quantum phases, such as quantum spin liquid. A pentagon is the second-minimal elementary unit for geometric frustration. The realization of such systems is expected to provide a distinct platform for studying frustrated magnetism. Here, we present a spin-1/2 quantum pentagonal lattice in the new organic radical crystal α-2,6-Cl2-V [=α-3-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-1,5-diphenylverdazyl]. Its unique molecular arrangement allows the formation of a partially corner-shared pentagonal lattice (PCPL). We find a clear 1/3 magnetization plateau and an anomalous change in magnetization in the vicinity of the saturation field, which originate from frustrated interactions in the PCPL. PMID:26468930

  15. Experimental Realization of a Quantum Pentagonal Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hironori; Okubo, Tsuyoshi; Kittaka, Shunichiro; Sakakibara, Toshiro; Araki, Koji; Iwase, Kenji; Amaya, Naoki; Ono, Toshio; Hosokoshi, Yuko

    2015-10-01

    Geometric frustration, in which competing interactions give rise to degenerate ground states, potentially induces various exotic quantum phenomena in magnetic materials. Minimal models comprising triangular units, such as triangular and Kagome lattices, have been investigated for decades to realize novel quantum phases, such as quantum spin liquid. A pentagon is the second-minimal elementary unit for geometric frustration. The realization of such systems is expected to provide a distinct platform for studying frustrated magnetism. Here, we present a spin-1/2 quantum pentagonal lattice in the new organic radical crystal α-2,6-Cl2-V [=α-3-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-1,5-diphenylverdazyl]. Its unique molecular arrangement allows the formation of a partially corner-shared pentagonal lattice (PCPL). We find a clear 1/3 magnetization plateau and an anomalous change in magnetization in the vicinity of the saturation field, which originate from frustrated interactions in the PCPL.

  16. Exploring hyperons and hypernuclei with lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S.R.; Bedaque, P.F.; Parreno, A.; Savage, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    In this work we outline a program for lattice QCD that wouldprovide a first step toward understanding the strong and weakinteractions of strange baryons. The study of hypernuclear physics hasprovided a significant amount of information regarding the structure andweak decays of light nuclei containing one or two Lambda's, and Sigma's.From a theoretical standpoint, little is known about the hyperon-nucleoninteraction, which is required input for systematic calculations ofhypernuclear structure. Furthermore, the long-standing discrepancies inthe P-wave amplitudes for nonleptonic hyperon decays remain to beunderstood, and their resolution is central to a better understanding ofthe weak decays of hypernuclei. We present a framework that utilizesLuscher's finite-volume techniques in lattice QCD to extract thescattering length and effective range for Lambda-N scattering in both QCDand partially-quenched QCD. The effective theory describing thenonleptonic decays of hyperons using isospin symmetry alone, appropriatefor lattice calculations, is constructed.

  17. Excited light meson spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Thomas, Hadron Spectrum Collaboration

    2012-04-01

    I report on recent progress in calculating excited meson spectra using lattice QCD, emphasizing results and phenomenology. With novel techniques we can now extract extensive spectra of excited mesons with high statistical precision, including spin-four states and those with exotic quantum numbers. As well as isovector meson spectra, I will present new calculations of the spectrum of excited light isoscalar mesons, something that has up to now been a challenge for lattice QCD. I show determinations of the flavor content of these mesons, including the eta-eta' mixing angle, providing a window on annihilation dynamics in QCD. I will also discuss recent work on using lattice QCD to map out the energy-dependent phase shift in pi-pi scattering and future applications of the methodology to the study of resonances and decays.

  18. QED vacuum polarization on a momentum lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeger, H.; Lafrance, R.; Marleau, L. )

    1992-12-15

    We study the effect of a momentum ([ital k]) lattice as a regulator of quantum field theory. An an example, we compute the vacuum polarization in noncompact (linearized) QED from [ital k]-lattice perturbation theory to one-loop order and study the continuum limit. The amplitude has a finite part plus logarithmically, linearly, and quadratically divergent terms. The amplitude violates gauge invariance (Ward identity) and Lorentz (Euclidean) invariance and is nonlocal. For example, the linear term [similar to][Lambda][vert bar][ital k][vert bar] is nonlocal. Renormalization requires nonlocal counterterms, which is not inconsistent because the original action on the [ital k] lattice already has a nonlocality. We explicitly give the counterterms, which render the amplitude Lorentz and gauge invariant to recover the standard result.

  19. Discrete breathers in hexagonal dusty plasma lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Koukouloyannis, V.; Kourakis, I.

    2009-08-15

    The occurrence of single-site or multisite localized vibrational modes, also called discrete breathers, in two-dimensional hexagonal dusty plasma lattices is investigated. The system is described by a Klein-Gordon hexagonal lattice characterized by a negative coupling parameter epsilon in account of its inverse dispersive behavior. A theoretical analysis is performed in order to establish the possibility of existence of single as well as three-site discrete breathers in such systems. The study is complemented by a numerical investigation based on experimentally provided potential forms. This investigation shows that a dusty plasma lattice can support single-site discrete breathers, while three-site in phase breathers could exist if specific conditions, about the intergrain interaction strength, would hold. On the other hand, out of phase and vortex three-site breathers cannot be supported since they are highly unstable.

  20. POPULATION III HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Smidt, Joseph; Whalen, Daniel J.; Wiggins, Brandon K.; Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L.; Johnson, Jarrett L.

    2014-12-20

    Population III supernovae have been of growing interest of late for their potential to directly probe the properties of the first stars, particularly the most energetic events that are visible near the edge of the observable universe. Until now, hypernovae, the unusually energetic Type Ib/c supernovae that are sometimes associated with gamma-ray bursts, have been overlooked as cosmic beacons at the highest redshifts. In this, the latest of a series of studies on Population III supernovae, we present numerical simulations of 25-50 M {sub ☉} hypernovae and their light curves done with the Los Alamos RAGE and SPECTRUM codes. We find that they will be visible at z = 10-15 to the James Webb Space Telescope and z = 4-5 to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, tracing star formation rates in the first galaxies and at the end of cosmological reionization. If, however, the hypernova crashes into a dense shell ejected by its progenitor, it is expected that a superluminous event will occur that may be seen at z ∼ 20 in the first generation of stars.

  1. Lattice Strain Due to an Atomic Vacancy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shidong; Sellers, Michael S.; Basaran, Cemal; Schultz, Andrew J.; Kofke, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Volumetric strain can be divided into two parts: strain due to bond distance change and strain due to vacancy sources and sinks. In this paper, efforts are focused on studying the atomic lattice strain due to a vacancy in an FCC metal lattice with molecular dynamics simulation (MDS). The result has been compared with that from a continuum mechanics method. It is shown that using a continuum mechanics approach yields constitutive results similar to the ones obtained based purely on molecular dynamics considerations. PMID:19582230

  2. Lattices of quantized vortices in polariton superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulier, Thomas; Cancellieri, Emiliano; Sangouard, Nicolas D.; Hivet, Romain; Glorieux, Quentin; Giacobino, Élisabeth; Bramati, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    In this review, we will focus on the description of the recent studies conducted in the quest for the observation of lattices of quantized vortices in resonantly injected polariton superfluids. In particular, we will show how the implementation of optical traps for polaritons allows for the realization of vortex-antivortex lattices in confined geometries and how the development of a flexible method to inject a controlled orbital angular momentum (OAM) in such systems results in the observation of patterns of same-sign vortices.

  3. String breaking in four dimensional lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A.; Eichten, E.; Thacker, H.

    2001-06-01

    Virtual quark pair screening leads to breaking of the string between fundamental representation quarks in QCD. For unquenched four dimensional lattice QCD, this (so far elusive) phenomenon is studied using the recently developed truncated determinant algorithm (TDA). The dynamical configurations were generated on a 650 MHz PC. Quark eigenmodes up to 420 MeV are included exactly in these TDA studies performed at low quark mass on large coarse [but O(a{sup 2}) improved] lattices. A study of Wilson line correlators in Coulomb gauge extracted from an ensemble of 1000 two-flavor dynamical configurations reveals evidence for flattening of the string tension at distances R{approx}>1 fm.

  4. Fast lattice Boltzmann solver for relativistic hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, M; Boghosian, B M; Herrmann, H J; Succi, S

    2010-07-01

    A lattice Boltzmann formulation for relativistic fluids is presented and numerically validated through quantitative comparison with recent hydrodynamic simulations of relativistic fluids. In order to illustrate its capability to handle complex geometries, the scheme is also applied to the case of a three-dimensional relativistic shock wave, generated by a supernova explosion, impacting on a massive interstellar cloud. This formulation opens up the possibility of exporting the proven advantages of lattice Boltzmann methods, namely, computational efficiency and easy handling of complex geometries, to the context of (mildly) relativistic fluid dynamics at large, from quark-gluon plasmas up to supernovae with relativistic outflows.

  5. Bottomonium above Deconfinement in Lattice Nonrelativistic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Aarts, G.; Kim, S.; Lombardo, M. P.; Oktay, M. B.; Ryan, S. M.; Sinclair, D. K.; Skullerud, J.-I.

    2011-02-11

    We study the temperature dependence of bottomonium for temperatures in the range 0.4T{sub c}lattice QCD simulations for N{sub f}=2 light flavors on a highly anisotropic lattice. We find that the {Upsilon} is insensitive to the temperature in this range, while the {chi}{sub b} propagators show a crossover from the exponential decay characterizing the hadronic phase to a power-law behavior consistent with nearly free dynamics at T{approx_equal}2T{sub c}.

  6. Nonlinear wave dynamics in honeycomb lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Bahat-Treidel, Omri; Segev, Mordechai

    2011-08-15

    We study the nonlinear dynamics of wave packets in honeycomb lattices and show that, in quasi-one-dimensional configurations, the waves propagating in the lattice can be separated into left-moving and right-moving waves, and any wave packet composed of only left (or only right) movers does not change its intensity structure in spite of the nonlinear evolution of its phase. We show that the propagation of a general wave packet can be described, within a good approximation, as a superposition of left- and right-moving self-similar (nonlinear) wave packets. Finally, we find that Klein tunneling is not suppressed by nonlinearity.

  7. Quantum memory in an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Nunn, J.; Michelberger, P.; Reim, K. F.; Lee, K. C.; Langford, N. K.; Walmsley, I. A.; Dorner, U.; Jaksch, D.

    2010-08-15

    Arrays of atoms trapped in optical lattices are appealing as storage media for photons, since motional dephasing of the atoms is eliminated. The regular lattice is also associated with band structure in the dispersion experienced by incident photons. Here we study the influence of this band structure on the efficiency of quantum memories based on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and on Raman absorption. We observe a number of interesting effects, such as both reduced and superluminal group velocities, enhanced atom-photon coupling, and anomalous transmission. These effects are ultimately deleterious to the memory efficiency, but they are easily avoided by tuning the optical fields away from the band edges.

  8. Fast lattice Boltzmann solver for relativistic hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, M; Boghosian, B M; Herrmann, H J; Succi, S

    2010-07-01

    A lattice Boltzmann formulation for relativistic fluids is presented and numerically validated through quantitative comparison with recent hydrodynamic simulations of relativistic fluids. In order to illustrate its capability to handle complex geometries, the scheme is also applied to the case of a three-dimensional relativistic shock wave, generated by a supernova explosion, impacting on a massive interstellar cloud. This formulation opens up the possibility of exporting the proven advantages of lattice Boltzmann methods, namely, computational efficiency and easy handling of complex geometries, to the context of (mildly) relativistic fluid dynamics at large, from quark-gluon plasmas up to supernovae with relativistic outflows. PMID:20867451

  9. Lattice Dynamics of a Protein Crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Meinhold, Lars; Merzel, Franci; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2007-09-28

    All-atom lattice-dynamical calculations are reported for a crystalline protein, ribonuclease A. The sound velocities, density of states, heat capacity (C{sub V}) and thermal diffuse scattering are all consistent with available experimental data. C{sub V}{proportional_to}T{sup 1.68} for T<35 K, significantly deviating from a Debye solid. In Bragg peak vicinity, inelastic scattering of x rays by phonons is found to originate from acoustic mode scattering. The results suggest an approach to protein crystal physics combining all-atom lattice-dynamical calculations with experiments on next-generation neutron sources.

  10. Commensurability effects in holographic homogeneous lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Tomas; Krikun, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    An interesting application of the gauge/gravity duality to condensed matter physics is the description of a lattice via breaking translational invariance on the gravity side. By making use of global symmetries, it is possible to do so without scarifying homogeneity of the pertinent bulk solutions, which we thus term as "homogeneous holographic lattices." Due to their technical simplicity, these configurations have received a great deal of attention in the last few years and have been shown to correctly describe momentum relaxation and hence (finite) DC conductivities.

  11. Lattice Calculations of Nucleon Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Syritsyn, S. N.

    2011-10-24

    We present recent results of calculation of the isovector electromagnetic and axial form factors of the nucleon using lattice QCD with three different lattice actions and pion masses down to m{sub {pi}} > or approx. 300 MeV. Because of the precision of our high-statistics calculations, we can test predictions of baryon chiral perturbation theory for the charge and axial radii of the nucleon. We find that currently available baryon ChPT calculations disagree with our data, indicating that the corresponding effective theory approximations are not valid above m{sub {pi}{approx_equal}3}00 MeV.

  12. Fibonacci optical lattices for tunable quantum quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K.; Saha, K.; Parameswaran, S. A.; Weld, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    We describe a quasiperiodic optical lattice, created by a physical realization of the abstract cut-and-project construction underlying all quasicrystals. The resulting potential is a generalization of the Fibonacci tiling. Calculation of the energies and wave functions of ultracold atoms loaded into such a lattice demonstrate a multifractal energy spectrum, a singular continuous momentum-space structure, and the existence of controllable edge states. These results open the door to cold atom quantum simulation experiments in tunable or dynamic quasicrystalline potentials, including topological pumping of edge states and phasonic spectroscopy.

  13. Towards an interoperable International Lattice Datagrid

    SciTech Connect

    G. Beckett; P. Coddington; N. Ishii; B. Joo; D. Melkumyan; R. Ostrowski; D. Pleiter; M. Sato; J. Simone; C. Watson; S. Zhang

    2007-11-01

    The International Lattice Datagrid (ILDG) is a federation of several regional grids. Since most of these grids have reached production level, an increasing number of lattice scientists start to benefit from this new research infrastructure. The ILDG Middleware Working Group has the task of specifying the ILDG middleware such that interoperability among the different grids is achieved. In this paper we will present the architecture of the ILDG middleware and describe what has actually been achieved in recent years. Particular focus is given to interoperability and security issues. We will conclude with a short overview on issues which we plan to address in the near future.

  14. New lattice action for heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Oktay, Mehmet B.; Kronfeld, Andreas S.

    2008-03-01

    We extend the Fermilab method for heavy quarks to include interactions of dimension six and seven in the action. There are, in general, many new interactions, but we carry out the calculations needed to match the lattice action to continuum QCD at the tree level, finding six non-zero couplings. Using the heavy-quark theory of cutoff effects, we estimate how large the remaining discretization errors are. We find that our tree-level matching, augmented with one-loop matching of the dimension-five interactions, can bring these errors below 1%, at currently available lattice spacings.

  15. Stern-Gerlach splitters for lattice quasispin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosado, A. S.; Franco-Villafañe, J. A.; Pineda, C.; Sadurní, E.

    2016-07-01

    We design a Stern-Gerlach apparatus that separates quasispin components on the lattice, without the use of external fields. The effect is engineered using intrinsic parameters, such as hopping amplitudes and on-site potentials. A theoretical description of the apparatus relying on a generalized Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation beyond Dirac points is given. Our results are verified numerically by means of wave-packet evolution, including an analysis of Zitterbewegung on the lattice. The necessary tools for microwave realizations, such as complex hopping amplitudes and chiral effects, are simulated.

  16. DESIGN OF THE RCMS LATTICE OPTICS.

    SciTech Connect

    CARDONA,J.; KEWISCH,J.; PEGGS,S.

    2002-06-02

    THE RAPID CYCLING MEDICAL SYNCHROTRON (RCMS) IS DESIGNED TO BE A VERY LIGHT AND INEXPENSIVE ACCELERATOR. THIS IS POSSIBLE DUE TO THE SMALL BEAM SIZE THAT HAS BEEN CHOSEN EARLY DURING THE DESIGN STAGE. THIS CHOICE HAS IMPLICATIONS IN THE DESIGN OF THE LATTICE OPTICS. IN THIS PAPER, WE PRESENT AN OVERVIEW OF THE RCMS OPTICS LATTICE, THE KIND OF MAGNETS TO BE USED AND ALSO A DESCRIPTION OF A SPECIAL OPTIC MODULE THAT MATCHES THE ROTATING GANTRY WITH THE REST OF THE FIXED ACCELERATOR. TECHNIQUESDEVELOPED TO WIN ADDITIONAL SPACE BETWEEN QUADRUPOLES WITHOUT DISTRUBING BETA FUNCTIONS ARE ALSO PRESENTED.

  17. Excited light isoscalar mesons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Thomas

    2011-07-01

    I report a recent lattice QCD calculation of an excited spectrum of light isoscalar mesons, something that has up to now proved challenging for lattice QCD. With novel techniques we extract an extensive spectrum with high statistical precision, including spin-four states and, for the first time, light isoscalars with exotic quantum numbers. In addition, the hidden flavour content of these mesons is determined, providing a window on annihilation dynamics in QCD. I comment on future prospects including applications to the study of resonances.

  18. YANG-MILLS FIELDS AND THE LATTICE.

    SciTech Connect

    CREUTZ,M.

    2004-05-18

    The Yang-Mills theory lies at the heart of our understanding of elementary particle interactions. For the strong nuclear forces, we must understand this theory in the strong coupling regime. The primary technique for this is the lattice. While basically an ultraviolet regulator, the lattice avoids the use of a perturbative expansion. I discuss some of the historical circumstances that drove us to this approach, which has had immense success, convincingly demonstrating quark confinement and obtaining crucial properties of the strong interactions from first principles.

  19. Statistical mechanics and combinatorics of some discrete lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayyer, Arvind

    Many problems in statistical physics involve enumeration of certain objects. In this thesis, we apply ideas from combinatorics and statistical physics to understand three different lattice models. (I) We investigate the structure of the nonequilibrium stationary state (NESS) of a system of first and second class particles on L sites of a one-dimensional lattice in contact with first class particle reservoirs at the boundary sites and second class particles constrained to lie the system. The internal dynamics are described by the usual totally asymmetric exclusion process (TASEP) with second class particles. We show in a conceptually simple way how pinned and unpinned (fat) shocks determine the general structure of the phase diagram. We also point out some unexpected features in the microscopic structure of the NESS both for finite L and in the limit L → infinity. In the latter case the local distribution of second class particles is given by an equilibrium pressure ensemble with a pair potential between neighboring particles which grows logarithmically with distance. (II) We model a long linear polymer constrained between two plates as a walk on a two-dimensional lattice constrained to lie between two lines, x = y and x = y+w, which interacts with these lines via contact parameters s and t. The atomic steps of the walk can be taken to be from an arbitrary but fixed set S with the only condition being that the first coordinate of every element in S is strictly positive. For any such S and any w, we prescribe general algorithms (fully implemented in Maple) for the automated calculation of several mathematical and physical quantities of interest. (III) Ferrers (or Young) diagrams are very classical objects in representation theory, whose half-perimeter generating function of Ferrers diagrams is a straightforward rational function. We construct two new classes of Ferrers diagrams, which we call wicketed and gated Ferrers diagrams, which have internal voids in the

  20. Lattice Green functions: the seven-dimensional face-centred cubic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenine, N.; Hassani, S.; Maillard, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    We present a recursive method to generate the expansion of the lattice Green function of the d-dimensional face-centred cubic (fcc) lattice. We produce a long series for d = 7. Then we show (and recall) that, in order to obtain the linear differential equation annihilating such a long power series, the most economic way amounts to producing the non-minimal order differential equations. We use the method to obtain the minimal order linear differential equation of the lattice Green function of the seven-dimensional fcc lattice. We give some properties of this irreducible order-eleven differential equation. We show that the differential Galois group of the corresponding operator is included in SO(11, {C}). This order-eleven operator is non-trivially homomorphic to its adjoint, and we give a ‘decomposition’ of this order-eleven operator in terms of four order-one self-adjoint operators and one order-seven self-adjoint operator. Furthermore, using the Landau conditions on the integral, we forward the regular singularities of the differential equation of the d-dimensional lattice and show that they are all rational numbers. We evaluate the return probability in random walks in the seven-dimensional fcc lattice. We show that the return probability in the d-dimensional fcc lattice decreases as d-2 as the dimension d goes to infinity.

  1. Propagation of optical coherence lattices in the turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianlong; Yu, Jiayi; Cai, Yangjian; Ponomarenko, Sergey A

    2016-09-15

    We explore the propagation of recently introduced optical coherence lattices (OCLs) in the turbulent atmosphere. We show that the lattice intensity profile and the spatial degree of coherence will display periodicity reciprocity over long propagation distances even though the lattices are affected by the turbulence. The lattice periodicity reciprocity has been previously conjectured to be advantageous for free-space information transfer and optical communications. We then show how one can increase the distance over which the lattice periodicity reciprocity is preserved in the turbulent atmosphere by engineering input lattice beam parameters. We also show that the OCLs have scintillation indices lower than those of Gaussian beams. PMID:27628352

  2. Electrical properties of dislocations in III-Nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalcoli, D.; Minj, A.; Pandey, S.; Cavallini, A.

    2014-02-21

    Research on GaN, AlN, InN (III-N) and their alloys is achieving new heights due their high potential applications in photonics and electronics. III-N semiconductors are mostly grown epitaxially on sapphire, and due to the large lattice mismatch and the differences in the thermal expansion coefficients, the structures usually contain many threading dislocations (TDs). While their structural properties have been widely investigated, their electrical characteristics and their role in the transport properties of the devices are still debated. In the present contribution we will show conductive AFM studies of TDs in GaN and Al/In GaN ternary alloys to evidence the role of strain, different surface polarity and composition on their electrical properties. Local I-V curves measured at TDs allowed us to clarify their role in the macroscopic electrical properties (leakage current, mobilities) of III-N based devices. Samples obtained by different growers (AIXTRON, III-V Lab) were studied. The comparison between the results obtained in the different alloys allowed us to understand the role of In and Al on the TDs electrical properties.

  3. Diffusion of lattice gases without double occupancy on three-dimensional percolation lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetzold, O.

    1990-10-01

    We examined the diffusion of lattice gases, where double occupancy of sites is excluded, on three-dimensional percolation lattices at the percolation threshold p c . The critical exponent for the root-mean-square displacement was determined to be k=0.183±0.010, which is similiar to the result of Roman for the problem of the "ant in the labyrinth." Furthermore, we found a plateau value for k at intermediate times for systems with higher concentrations of lattice gas particles.

  4. Mössbauer investigations to characterize Fe lattice sites in sheet silicates and Peru Basin deep-sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lougear, André; König, Iris; Trautwein, Alfred X.; Suess, Erwin

    A procedure to classify different Fe lattice sites, i.e., OH-group geometries, in the clay mineral content of deep-sea sediments was developed using Mössbauer spectroscopy at low temperature (77 K). This speciation is of interest with regard to the redox behavior, reactivity and color of marine sediments, since substantial iron redox transitions (associated with sediment color change) have been documented for the structural sheet silicate iron. Lattice site classification was achieved for the Fe(II) fraction, all of which is structural clay Fe(II) in the sediments under investigation. Whereas the major part of the Fe(III) is structural clay iron as well, there is a small Fe(III) fraction in oxide minerals. Therefore, further elaboration of the procedure would be required to also achieve lattice site classification for the Fe(III) fraction. Analysis of the Mössbauer spectra is based on computer fits, the input parameters of which were derived from a separate study of Fe(II)-rich pure chlorites. The procedure of classification is qualified to investigate, e.g., in laboratory experiments, the site-specific reaction rates and the effects on sediment color of iron redox transitions in the sheet silicate content of sediments. The new skills were successfully applied in environmental impact studies on the mining of polymetallic nodules from the Peru Basin deep-sea floor.

  5. Pseudo Class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hummayani, Fadia M.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance “modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow,” some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces) to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month. PMID:27052290

  6. Electronic modification of Cu-based chalcopyrite semiconductors induced by lattice deformation and composition alchemy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, F. D.; Feng, J. Y.

    2008-02-01

    Using first principles calculation, we systematically investigate the electronic modification of Cu-based chalcopyrite semiconductors induced by lattice deformation and composition alchemy. It is shown that the optical band gap Eg is remarkably sensitive to the anion displacement μ, resulting from the opposite shifts of conduction band minimum and valence band maximum. Meanwhile, the dependence of structural parameters of alloyed compounds on alloy composition x is demonstrated for both cation and anion alloying. The d orbitals of group-III cations are found to be of great importance in the calculation. Abnormal changes in the optical band gap Eg induced by anion alloying are addressed.

  7. Twisted 3D N=4 supersymmetric YM on deformed A{sub 3}{sup *} lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Saidi, El Hassan

    2014-01-15

    We study a class of twisted 3D N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) theory on particular 3-dimensional lattice L{sub 3D} formally denoted as L{sub 3D}{sup su{sub 3}×u{sub 1}} and given by non-trivial fibration L{sub 1D}{sup u{sub 1}}×L{sub 2D}{sup su{sub 3}} with base L{sub 2D}{sup su{sub 3}}=A{sub 2}{sup *}, the weight lattice of SU(3). We first, develop the twisted 3D N=4 SYM in continuum by using superspace method where the scalar supercharge Q is manifestly exhibited. Then, we show how to engineer the 3D lattice L{sub 3D}{sup su{sub 3}×u{sub 1}} that host this theory. After that we build the lattice action S{sub latt} invariant under the following three points: (i) U(N) gauge invariance, (ii) BRST symmetry, (iii) the S{sub 3} point group symmetry of L{sub 3D}{sup su{sub 3}×u{sub 1}}. Other features such as reduction to twisted 2D supersymmetry with 8 supercharges living on L{sub 2D}≡L{sub 2D}{sup su{sub 2}×u{sub 1}}, the extension to twisted maximal 5D SYM with 16 supercharges on lattice L{sub 5D}≡L{sub 5D}{sup su{sub 4}×u{sub 1}} as well as the relation with known results are also given.

  8. Heavy quark masses from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytle, Andrew T.

    2016-07-01

    Progress in quark mass determinations from lattice QCD is reviewed, focusing on results for charm and bottom mass. These are of particular interest for precision Higgs studies. Recent determinations have achieved percent-level uncertainties with controlled systematics. Future prospects for these calculations are also discussed.

  9. A Lattice Boltzmann Method for Turbomachinery Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, A. T.; Lopez, I.

    2003-01-01

    Lattice Boltzmann (LB) Method is a relatively new method for flow simulations. The start point of LB method is statistic mechanics and Boltzmann equation. The LB method tries to set up its model at molecular scale and simulate the flow at macroscopic scale. LBM has been applied to mostly incompressible flows and simple geometry.

  10. Radiative Transitions in Charmonium from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; David Richards

    2006-01-17

    Radiative transitions between charmonium states offer an insight into the internal structure of heavy-quark bound states within QCD. We compute, for the first time within lattice QCD, the transition form-factors of various multipolarities between the lightest few charmonium states. In addition, we compute the experimentally unobservable, but physically interesting vector form-factors of the {eta}{sub c}, J/{psi} and {chi}{sub c0}. To this end we apply an ambitious combination of lattice techniques, computing three-point functions with heavy domain wall fermions on an anisotropic lattice within the quenched approximation. With an anisotropy {xi} = 3 at a{sub s} {approx} 0.1 fm we find a reasonable gross spectrum and a hyperfine splitting {approx}90 MeV, which compares favorably with other improved actions. In general, after extrapolation of lattice data at non-zero Q{sup 2} to the photopoint, our results agree within errors with all well measured experimental values. Furthermore, results are compared with the expectations of simple quark models where we find that many features are in agreement; beyond this we propose the possibility of constraining such models using our extracted values of physically unobservable quantities such as the J/{psi} quadrupole moment. We conclude that our methods are successful and propose to apply them to the problem of radiative transitions involving hybrid mesons, with the eventual goal of predicting hybrid meson photoproduction rates at the GlueX experiment.

  11. Numerical techniques for lattice gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1981-02-06

    The motivation for formulating gauge theories on a lattice is reviewed. Monte Carlo simulation techniques are then discussed for these systems. Finally, the Monte Carlo methods are combined with renormalization group analysis to give strong numerical evidence for confinement of quarks by non-Abelian gauge fields.

  12. Ultra-Cold Atoms on Optical Lattices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Parag

    2009-01-01

    The field of ultra-cold atoms, since the achievement of Bose-Einstein Condensation (Anderson et al., 1995; Davis et al., 1995; Bradley et al., 1995), have seen an immensely growing interest over the past decade. With the creation of optical lattices, new possibilities of studying some of the widely used models in condensed matter have opened up.…

  13. Winding angles of long lattice walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Yosi; Kantor, Yacov

    2016-07-01

    We study the winding angles of random and self-avoiding walks (SAWs) on square and cubic lattices with number of steps N ranging up to 107. We show that the mean square winding angle <θ2> of random walks converges to the theoretical form when N → ∞. For self-avoiding walks on the square lattice, we show that the ratio <θ4>/<θ2>2 converges slowly to the Gaussian value 3. For self-avoiding walks on the cubic lattice, we find that the ratio <θ4>/<θ2>2 exhibits non-monotonic dependence on N and reaches a maximum of 3.73(1) for N ≈ 104. We show that to a good approximation, the square winding angle of a self-avoiding walk on the cubic lattice can be obtained from the summation of the square change in the winding angles of lnN independent segments of the walk, where the ith segment contains 2i steps. We find that the square winding angle of the ith segment increases approximately as i0.5, which leads to an increase of the total square winding angle proportional to (lnN)1.5.

  14. A study of microtubule dipole lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Shubhendu

    Microtubules are cytoskeletal protein polymers orchestrating a host of important cellular functions including, but not limited to, cell support, cell division, cell motility and cell transport. In this thesis, we construct a toy-model of the microtubule lattice composed of vector Ising spins representing tubulin molecules, the building block of microtubules. Nearest-neighbor and next-to-nearest neighbor interactions are considered within an anisotropic dielectric medium. As a consequence of the helical topology, we observe that certain spin orientations render the lattice frustrated with nearest neighbor ferroelectric and next-to-nearest neighbor antiferroelectric bonds. Under these conditions, the lattice displays the remarkable property of stabilizing certain spin patterns that are robust to thermal fluctuations. We model this behavior in the framework of a generalized Ising model known as the J1 - J2 model and theoretically determine the set of stable patterns. Employing Monte-Carlo methods, we demonstrate the stability of such patterns in the microtubule lattice at human physiological temperatures. This suggests a novel biological mechanism for storing information in living organisms, whereby the tubulin spin (dipole moment) states become information bits and information gets stored in microtubules in a way that is robust to thermal fluctuations.

  15. THE EARLY DAYS OF LATTICE GAUGE THEORY.

    SciTech Connect

    CREUTZ,M.

    2003-06-09

    I discuss some of the historical circumstances that drove us to use the lattice as a non-perturbative regulator. This approach has had immense success, convincingly demonstrating quark confinement and obtaining crucial properties of the strong interactions from first principles. I wrap up with some challenges for the future.

  16. Dark Matter, the MCSSM and lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Giedt, Anthony Thomas, Ross Young

    2009-11-01

    Recent lattice measurements have given accurate estimates of the quark condensates in the proton. We use these results to significantly improve the dark matter predictions in benchmark models within the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model. The predicted spin-independent cross sections are at least an order of magnitude smaller than previously suggested and our results have significant consequences for dark matter searches.

  17. Recent results on lattice QCD thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratti, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    I review recent results on QCD thermodynamics from lattice simulations. In particular, I will focus on the QCD equation of state at zero and finite chemical potential, the curvature of the phase diagram and fluctuations of conserved charges. The latter are compared to experimental data, to the purpose of extracting the chemical freeze-out temperature and chemical potential from first principles.

  18. A lattice gas model for thermohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shiyi; Chen, Hudong; Doolen, G.D.; Gutman, S.; Lee, M.

    1990-05-03

    The FHP lattice gas model is extended to include a temperature variable in order to study thermohydrodynamics. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are derived using a Chapman-Enskog expansion. Heat conduction and convention problems are investigated, including Benard convention. It is shown that the usual FHP rescaling procedure can be avoided by controlling the temperature. 20 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Extension theorems for homogenization on lattice structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    When applying homogenization techniques to problems involving lattice structures, it is necessary to extend certain functions defined on a perforated domain to a simply connected domain. This paper provides general extension operators which preserve bounds on derivatives of order l. Only the special case of honeycomb structures is considered.

  20. Mechanical cloak design by direct lattice transformation.

    PubMed

    Bückmann, Tiemo; Kadic, Muamer; Schittny, Robert; Wegener, Martin

    2015-04-21

    Spatial coordinate transformations have helped simplifying mathematical issues and solving complex boundary-value problems in physics for decades already. More recently, material-parameter transformations have also become an intuitive and powerful engineering tool for designing inhomogeneous and anisotropic material distributions that perform wanted functions, e.g., invisibility cloaking. A necessary mathematical prerequisite for this approach to work is that the underlying equations are form invariant with respect to general coordinate transformations. Unfortunately, this condition is not fulfilled in elastic-solid mechanics for materials that can be described by ordinary elasticity tensors. Here, we introduce a different and simpler approach. We directly transform the lattice points of a 2D discrete lattice composed of a single constituent material, while keeping the properties of the elements connecting the lattice points the same. After showing that the approach works in various areas, we focus on elastic-solid mechanics. As a demanding example, we cloak a void in an effective elastic material with respect to static uniaxial compression. Corresponding numerical calculations and experiments on polymer structures made by 3D printing are presented. The cloaking quality is quantified by comparing the average relative SD of the strain vectors outside of the cloaked void with respect to the homogeneous reference lattice. Theory and experiment agree and exhibit very good cloaking performance. PMID:25848021

  1. Visualization Tools for Lattice QCD - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Massimo Di Pierro

    2012-03-15

    Our research project is about the development of visualization tools for Lattice QCD. We developed various tools by extending existing libraries, adding new algorithms, exposing new APIs, and creating web interfaces (including the new NERSC gauge connection web site). Our tools cover the full stack of operations from automating download of data, to generating VTK files (topological charge, plaquette, Polyakov lines, quark and meson propagators, currents), to turning the VTK files into images, movies, and web pages. Some of the tools have their own web interfaces. Some Lattice QCD visualization have been created in the past but, to our knowledge, our tools are the only ones of their kind since they are general purpose, customizable, and relatively easy to use. We believe they will be valuable to physicists working in the field. They can be used to better teach Lattice QCD concepts to new graduate students; they can be used to observe the changes in topological charge density and detect possible sources of bias in computations; they can be used to observe the convergence of the algorithms at a local level and determine possible problems; they can be used to probe heavy-light mesons with currents and determine their spatial distribution; they can be used to detect corrupted gauge configurations. There are some indirect results of this grant that will benefit a broader audience than Lattice QCD physicists.

  2. Spin squeezing in a Rydberg lattice clock.

    PubMed

    Gil, L I R; Mukherjee, R; Bridge, E M; Jones, M P A; Pohl, T

    2014-03-14

    We theoretically demonstrate a viable approach to spin squeezing in optical lattice clocks via optical dressing of one clock state to a highly excited Rydberg state, generating switchable atomic interactions. For realistic experimental parameters, these interactions are shown to generate over 10 dB of squeezing in large ensembles within a few microseconds and without degrading the subsequent clock interrogation. PMID:24679291

  3. Recycler lattice for Project X at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Meiqin; Johnson, David E.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    Project X is an intense proton source that provides beam for various physics programs. The source consists of an 8 GeV H- superconducting linac that injects into the Fermilab Recycler where H- are converted to protons. Protons are provided to the Main Injector and accelerated to desired energy (in the range 60-120 GeV) or extracted from the Recycler for the 8 GeV program. A long drift space is needed to accommodate the injection chicane with stripping foils. The Recycler is a fixed 8 GeV kinetic energy storage ring using permanent gradient magnets. A phase trombone straight section is used to control the tunes. In this paper, the existing FODO lattice in RR10 straight section being converted into doublet will be described. Due to this change, the phase trombone straight section has to be modified to bring the tunes to the nominal working point. A toy lattice of recycler ring is designed to simulate the end-shim effects of each permanent gradient magnet to add the flexibility to handle the tune shift to the lattice during the operation of 1.6E14 with KV distribution of the proton beam to give {approx}0.05 of space charge tune shift. The comparison or the combinations of the two modification ways for the Recycler ring lattice will be presented also in this paper.

  4. Scalar meson spectroscopy with lattice staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; DeTar, Carleton; Fu Ziwen; Prelovsek, Sasa

    2007-11-01

    With sufficiently light up and down quarks the isovector (a{sub 0}) and isosinglet (f{sub 0}) scalar meson propagators are dominated at large distance by two-meson states. In the staggered-fermion formulation of lattice quantum chromodynamics, taste-symmetry breaking causes a proliferation of two-meson states that further complicates the analysis of these channels. Many of them are unphysical artifacts of the lattice approximation. They are expected to disappear in the continuum limit. The staggered-fermion fourth-root procedure has its purported counterpart in rooted staggered chiral perturbation theory (rS{chi}PT). Fortunately, the rooted theory provides a strict framework that permits the analysis of scalar meson correlators in terms of only a small number of low-energy couplings. Thus the analysis of the point-to-point scalar meson correlators in this context gives a useful consistency check of the fourth-root procedure and its proposed chiral realization. Through numerical simulation we have measured correlators for both the a{sub 0} and f{sub 0} channels in the 'Asqtad' improved staggered-fermion formulation in a lattice ensemble with lattice spacing a=0.12 fm. We analyze those correlators in the context of rS{chi}PT and obtain values of the low-energy chiral couplings that are reasonably consistent with previous determinations.

  5. Phonons and elasticity in critically coordinated lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubensky, T. C.; Kane, C. L.; Mao, Xiaoming; Souslov, A.; Sun, Kai

    2015-07-01

    Much of our understanding of vibrational excitations and elasticity is based upon analysis of frames consisting of sites connected by bonds occupied by central-force springs, the stability of which depends on the average number of neighbors per site z. When z  <  zc  ≈  2d, where d is the spatial dimension, frames are unstable with respect to internal deformations. This pedagogical review focuses on the properties of frames with z at or near zc, which model systems like randomly packed spheres near jamming and network glasses. Using an index theorem, N0  -NS  =  dN  -NB relating the number of sites, N, and number of bonds, NB, to the number, N0, of modes of zero energy and the number, NS, of states of self stress, in which springs can be under positive or negative tension while forces on sites remain zero, it explores the properties of periodic square, kagome, and related lattices for which z  =  zc and the relation between states of self stress and zero modes in periodic lattices to the surface zero modes of finite free lattices (with free boundary conditions). It shows how modifications to the periodic kagome lattice can eliminate all but trivial translational zero modes and create topologically distinct classes, analogous to those of topological insulators, with protected zero modes at free boundaries and at interfaces between different topological classes.

  6. Lattice QCD on a Beowulf Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kima, Seyong

    Using commodity component personal computers based on Alpha processor and commodity network devices and a switch, we built an 8-node parallel computer. GNU/Linux is chosen as an operating system and message passing libraries such as PVM, LAM, and MPICH have been tested as a parallel programming environment. We discuss our lattice QCD project for a heavy quark system on this computer.

  7. Experimental study of photonic crystal triangular lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Ruhu; Qin, Bo; Jin, Chongjun

    1999-06-01

    Triangular lattice photonic crystal behaving in the electromagnetic zones constructed from fused silica cylinders in styrofoam is fabricated. The transmission spectra of the photonic crystal with and without defects are measured. On this basis, the defect modes of photonic crystal were studied, and the potential applications of the photonic crystal are discussed.

  8. Mechanical cloak design by direct lattice transformation

    PubMed Central

    Bückmann, Tiemo; Kadic, Muamer; Schittny, Robert; Wegener, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Spatial coordinate transformations have helped simplifying mathematical issues and solving complex boundary-value problems in physics for decades already. More recently, material-parameter transformations have also become an intuitive and powerful engineering tool for designing inhomogeneous and anisotropic material distributions that perform wanted functions, e.g., invisibility cloaking. A necessary mathematical prerequisite for this approach to work is that the underlying equations are form invariant with respect to general coordinate transformations. Unfortunately, this condition is not fulfilled in elastic–solid mechanics for materials that can be described by ordinary elasticity tensors. Here, we introduce a different and simpler approach. We directly transform the lattice points of a 2D discrete lattice composed of a single constituent material, while keeping the properties of the elements connecting the lattice points the same. After showing that the approach works in various areas, we focus on elastic–solid mechanics. As a demanding example, we cloak a void in an effective elastic material with respect to static uniaxial compression. Corresponding numerical calculations and experiments on polymer structures made by 3D printing are presented. The cloaking quality is quantified by comparing the average relative SD of the strain vectors outside of the cloaked void with respect to the homogeneous reference lattice. Theory and experiment agree and exhibit very good cloaking performance. PMID:25848021

  9. Variational method for lattice spectroscopy with ghosts

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, Tommy; Hagen, Christian; Gattringer, Christof; Glozman, Leonid Ya.; Lang, C.B.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the variational method used in lattice spectroscopy calculations. In particular we address the role of ghost contributions which appear in quenched or partially quenched simulations and have a nonstandard euclidean time dependence. We show that the ghosts can be separated from the physical states. Our result is illustrated with numerical data for the scalar meson.

  10. Sustainable sex ratio in lattice populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tainaka, K.; Hayashi, T.; Yoshimura, J.

    2006-05-01

    We present a lattice model of mating populations. Simulation is performed by two different methods: local and global interactions. Simulation results account for the reason why the observed sex ratio is nearly one half in many animals. The male-biased sex ratio, such as in human populations, is also explained.

  11. Lattice Multiplication in a Preservice Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nugent, Patricia M.

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the algorithm for multiplication that is referred to as lattice multiplication. Evidence of how the author's preservice students' conceptual understanding of the algorithm grew through the semester is given. In addition, the author extends the conceptualization of the algorithm from the multiplication of whole numbers to the…

  12. Clusters in irregular areas and lattices

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorek, William F.; Delmerico, Alan M.; Rogerson, Peter A.; Wong, David W.S.

    2013-01-01

    Geographic areas of different sizes and shapes of polygons that represent counts or rate data are often encountered in social, economic, health, and other information. Often political or census boundaries are used to define these areas because the information is available only for those geographies. Therefore, these types of boundaries are frequently used to define neighborhoods in spatial analyses using geographic information systems and related approaches such as multilevel models. When point data can be geocoded, it is possible to examine the impact of polygon shape on spatial statistical properties, such as clustering. We utilized point data (alcohol outlets) to examine the issue of polygon shape and size on visualization and statistical properties. The point data were allocated to regular lattices (hexagons and squares) and census areas for zip-code tabulation areas and tracts. The number of units in the lattices was set to be similar to the number of tract and zip-code areas. A spatial clustering statistic and visualization were used to assess the impact of polygon shape for zip- and tract-sized units. Results showed substantial similarities and notable differences across shape and size. The specific circumstances of a spatial analysis that aggregates points to polygons will determine the size and shape of the areal units to be used. The irregular polygons of census units may reflect underlying characteristics that could be missed by large regular lattices. Future research to examine the potential for using a combination of irregular polygons and regular lattices would be useful. PMID:24282627

  13. Marking up lattice QCD configurations and ensembles

    SciTech Connect

    P.Coddington; B.Joo; C.M.Maynard; D.Pleiter; T.Yoshie

    2007-10-01

    QCDml is an XML-based markup language designed for sharing QCD configurations and ensembles world-wide via the International Lattice Data Grid (ILDG). Based on the latest release, we present key ingredients of the QCDml in order to provide some starting points for colleagues in this community to markup valuable configurations and submit them to the ILDG.

  14. The hadron spectrum from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Peardon, Mike

    2010-08-05

    Lattice spectroscopy is becoming increasingly sophisticated. This review will introduce the methodology and describe progress made recently probing the spectrum of excitations of QCD. The focus will be on describing new developments that enable excited states, exotic quantum numbers and resonances to be explored.

  15. Lattice QCD and the unitarity triangle

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S Kronfeld

    2001-12-03

    Theoretical and computational advances in lattice calculations are reviewed, with focus on examples relevant to the unitarity triangle of the CKM matrix. Recent progress in semi-leptonic form factors for B {yields} {pi}/v and B {yields} D*lv, as well as the parameter {zeta} in B{sup 0}-{bar B}{sup 0} mixing, are highlighted.

  16. Winding angles of long lattice walks.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Yosi; Kantor, Yacov

    2016-07-01

    We study the winding angles of random and self-avoiding walks (SAWs) on square and cubic lattices with number of steps N ranging up to 10(7). We show that the mean square winding angle 〈θ(2)〉 of random walks converges to the theoretical form when N → ∞. For self-avoiding walks on the square lattice, we show that the ratio 〈θ(4)〉/〈θ(2)〉(2) converges slowly to the Gaussian value 3. For self-avoiding walks on the cubic lattice, we find that the ratio 〈θ(4)〉/〈θ(2)〉(2) exhibits non-monotonic dependence on N and reaches a maximum of 3.73(1) for N ≈ 10(4). We show that to a good approximation, the square winding angle of a self-avoiding walk on the cubic lattice can be obtained from the summation of the square change in the winding angles of lnN independent segments of the walk, where the ith segment contains 2(i) steps. We find that the square winding angle of the ith segment increases approximately as i(0.5), which leads to an increase of the total square winding angle proportional to (lnN)(1.5). PMID:27394124

  17. Method of descent for integrable lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoyavlensky, Oleg

    2009-05-01

    A method of descent for constructing integrable Hamiltonian systems is introduced. The derived periodic and nonperiodic lattices possess Lax representations with spectral parameter and have plenty of first integrals. Examples of Liouville-integrable four-dimensional Hamiltonian Lotka-Volterra systems are presented.

  18. MBE growth technology for high quality strained III-V layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, Frank J. (Inventor); Liu, John K. (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    III-V films are grown on large automatically perfect terraces of III-V substrates which have a different lattice constant, with temperature and Group II and V arrival rates chosen to give a Group III element stable surface. The growth is pulsed to inhibit Group III metal accumulation to low temperature, and to permit the film to relax to equilibrium. The method of the invention 1) minimizes starting step density on sample surface; 2) deposits InAs and GaAs using an interrupted growth mode (0.25 to 2 mono-layers at a time); 3) maintains the instantaneous surface stoichiometry during growth (As-stable for GaAs, In-stable for InAs); and 4) uses time-resolved RHEED to achieve aspects (1)-14 (3).

  19. Invariant patterns in crystal lattices: Implications for protein folding algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    HART,WILLIAM E.; ISTRAIL,SORIN

    2000-06-01

    Crystal lattices are infinite periodic graphs that occur naturally in a variety of geometries and which are of fundamental importance in polymer science. Discrete models of protein folding use crystal lattices to define the space of protein conformations. Because various crystal lattices provide discretizations of the same physical phenomenon, it is reasonable to expect that there will exist invariants across lattices related to fundamental properties of the protein folding process. This paper considers whether performance-guaranteed approximability is such an invariant for HP lattice models. The authors define a master approximation algorithm that has provable performance guarantees provided that a specific sublattice exists within a given lattice. They describe a broad class of crystal lattices that are approximable, which further suggests that approximability is a general property of HP lattice models.

  20. 5. VIEW FROM THE SOUTHEAST, SHOWING REPLACEMENT OF LATTICE PANELS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW FROM THE SOUTHEAST, SHOWING REPLACEMENT OF LATTICE PANELS WITH CONCRETE PIERS AND ARCHED LATTICE PANELS, PRIOR TO 1908 ALTERATIONS - Ralph M. Munroe House, 3485 Main Highway, Coconut Grove, Miami, Miami-Dade County, FL

  1. Detail of west end of movable span. Shows lattice beams. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of west end of movable span. Shows lattice beams. Latticed portal. Adjustable tension members connecting top chords, and metal floor beams looking south from navy land. - Naval Supply Annex Stockton, Rough & Ready Island, Stockton, San Joaquin County, CA

  2. Three-Phonon Phase Space as an Indicator of the Lattice Thermal Conductivity in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, L.; Broido, D. A.

    2007-03-01

    The room temperature lattice thermal conductivity of many semiconductors is limited primarily by three-phonon scattering processes arising from the anharmonicity of the interatomic potential. We employ an adiabatic bond charge model [1,2] for the phonon dispersions to calculate the phase space for three-phonon scattering events of several group IV and III-V semiconductors. We find that the amount of phase space available for this scattering in materials varies inversely with their measured thermal conductivities. Anomalous behavior occurs in III-V materials having large mass differences between cation and anion, which we explain in terms of the severely restricted three-phonon phase space arising from the large gap between acoustic and optic phonon branches. [1] W. Weber, Physical Review B 15, 4789 (1977). [2] K. C. Rustagi and W. Weber, Solid State Communications 18, 673 (1976).

  3. Connection Between the Lattice Boltzmann Equation and the Beam Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Kun; Luo, Li-Shi

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we analyze and compare the lattice Boltzmann equation with the beam scheme in details. We notice the similarity and differences between the lattice Boltzmann equation and the beam scheme. We show that the accuracy of the lattice Boltzmann equation is indeed second order in space. We discuss the advantages and limitations of lattice Boltzmann equation and the beam scheme. Based on our analysis, we propose an improved multi-dimensional beam scheme.

  4. Experimental evidence for lattice effects in high temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Billinge, S.J.L.; Kwei, G.H.; Thompson, J.D.

    1994-01-18

    We present an overview of the experimental evidence for a role of the lattice in the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity. It appears unlikely that a solely conventional electron-phonon interaction produces the pairing. However, there is ample evidence of strong electron and spin to lattice coupling and observations of a response of the lattice to the electronic state. We draw attention to the importance of the local structure in discussions of lattice effects in high-{Tc} superconductivity.

  5. Hadronic Vacuum Polarization Contribution to g-2 from the Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Dru Renner, Xu Feng, Marcus Petschlies, Karl Jansen

    2012-05-01

    We give a short description of the present situation of lattice QCD simulations. We then focus on the computation of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon using lattice techniques. We demonstrate that by employing improved observables for the muon anomalous magnetic moment, a significant reduction of the lattice error can be obtained. This provides a promising scenario that the accuracy of lattice calculations can match the experimental errors.

  6. Even parity excitations of the nucleon in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    B. G. Lasscock; J. N. Hedditch; W. Kamleh; D. B. Leinweber; W. Melnitchouk; A. G. Williams; J. M. Zanotti

    2007-09-01

    We study the spectrum of the even parity excitations of the nucleon in quenched lattice QCD. We extend our earlier analysis by including an expanded basis of nucleon interpolating fields, increasing the physical size of the lattice, including more configurations to enhance statistics and probing closer to the chiral limit. With a review of world lattice data, we conclude that there is little evidence of the Roper resonance in quenched lattice QCD.

  7. Heightened Sensitivity of a Lattice of Membrane Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, T. A. J.; Bray, D.

    1999-08-01

    Receptor proteins in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells have been found to form two-dimensional clusters in the plasma membrane. In this study, we examine the proposition that such clusters might show coordinated responses because of the spread of conformational states from one receptor to its neighbors. A Monte Carlo simulation was developed in which receptors flipped in probabilistic fashion between an active and an inactive state. Conformational energies depended on (i) ligand binding, (ii) a chemical modification of the receptor conferring adaptation, and (iii) the activity of neighboring receptors. Rate constants were based on data from known biological receptors, especially the bacterial Tar receptor, and on theoretical constraints derived from an analogous Ising model. The simulated system showed a greatly enhanced sensitivity to external signals compared with a corresponding set of uncoupled receptors and was operational over a much wider range of ambient concentrations. These and other properties should make a lattice of conformationally coupled receptors ideally suited to act as a "nose" by which a cell can detect and respond to extracellular stimuli.

  8. Force Evaluation in the Lattice Boltzmann Method Involving Curved Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Renwei; Yu, Dazhi; Shyy, Wei; Luo, Li-Shi; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The present work investigates two approaches for force evaluation in the lattice Boltzmann equation: the momentum- exchange method and the stress-integration method on the surface of a body. The boundary condition for the particle distribution functions on curved geometries is handled with second order accuracy based on our recent works. The stress-integration method is computationally laborious for two-dimensional flows and in general difficult to implement for three-dimensional flows, while the momentum-exchange method is reliable, accurate, and easy to implement for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows. Several test cases are selected to evaluate the present methods, including: (i) two-dimensional pressure-driven channel flow; (ii) two-dimensional uniform flow past a column of cylinders; (iii) two-dimensional flow past a cylinder asymmetrically placed in a channel (with vortex shedding); (iv) three-dimensional pressure-driven flow in a circular pipe; and (v) three-dimensional flow past a sphere. The drag evaluated by using the momentum-exchange method agrees well with the exact or other published results.

  9. Dynamics of a lattice gas system of three species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanshi; Wu, Hong; Liang, Junhao

    2016-10-01

    This paper considers a mutualism system of three species in which each species provides resource for the next one in a one-directional loop, while there exists spatial competition among them. The system is characterized by a lattice gas model and the cases of obligate mutualisms, obligate-facultative mutualisms and facultative mutualisms are considered. Using dynamical systems theory, it is shown that (i) the mutualisms can lead to coexistence of species; (ii) A weak mutualism or an extremely strong mutualism will result in extinction of species, while even the superior facultative species will be driven into extinction by its over-strong mutualism on the next one; (iii) Initial population density plays a role in the coexistence of species. It is also shown that when there exists weak mutualism, an obligate species can survive by providing more benefit to the next one, and the inferior facultative species will not be driven into extinction if it can strengthen its mutualism on the next species. Moreover, Hopf bifurcation, saddle-node bifurcation and bifurcation of heteroclinic cycles are shown in the system. Projection method is extended to exhibit bistability in the three-dimensional model: when saddle-node bifurcation occurs, stable manifold of the saddle-node point divides intR+3 into two basins of attraction of two equilibria. Furthermore, Lyapunov method is applied to exhibit unstability of heteroclinic cycles. Numerical simulations confirm and extend our results.

  10. Force evaluation in the lattice Boltzmann method involving curved geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Renwei; Yu, Dazhi; Shyy, Wei; Luo, Li-Shi

    2002-04-01

    The present work investigates two approaches for force evaluation in the lattice Boltzmann equation: the momentum-exchange method and the stress-integration method on the surface of a body. The boundary condition for the particle distribution functions on curved geometries is handled with second-order accuracy based on our recent works [Mei et al., J. Comput. Phys. 155, 307 (1999); ibid. 161, 680 (2000)]. The stress-integration method is computationally laborious for two-dimensional flows and in general difficult to implement for three-dimensional flows, while the momentum-exchange method is reliable, accurate, and easy to implement for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows. Several test cases are selected to evaluate the present methods, including: (i) two-dimensional pressure-driven channel flow; (ii) two-dimensional uniform flow past a column of cylinders; (iii) two-dimensional flow past a cylinder asymmetrically placed in a channel (with vortex shedding); (iv) three-dimensional pressure-driven flow in a circular pipe; and (v) three-dimensional flow past a sphere. The drag evaluated by using the momentum-exchange method agrees well with the exact or other published results.

  11. Perturbative treatment of lattice dynamics in finite electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinjie; Souza, Ivo; Vanderbilt, David

    2004-03-01

    The methods of density-functional perturbation theory have been shown to be very powerful for realistic calculations of lattice-vibrational, dielectric, elastic, and other response properties of crystals.(S. Baroni et al.), Rev. Mod. Phys. 73, 515 (2001). Recently, a total-energy method for insulators in nonzero electric fields has been proposed.(I. Souza, J. Íñiguez, and D. Vanderbilt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89), 117602 (2002). However, the perturbative computation of response properties under a dc bias field has not previously been addressed. Here, perturbation theory is applied to a variational total-energy functional in the presence of a static, homogeneous electric field. An analytic expression is derived for the second derivative with respect to the phonon perturbation using the 2n+1 theorem. The expression is variational with respect to the first-order Bloch-like states, and can be minimized using standard conjugate-gradients methods. We implement the method in the ABINIT code and perform illustrative calculations of the interatomic force constant matrix of III-V semiconductors.

  12. SUPERSTARS III: 3-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    SUPERSTARS III is a K-8 program designed as an enrichment opportunity for self-directed learners in mathematics. The basic purpose of SUPERSTARS III is to provide the extra challenge that self-motivated students need in mathematics and to do so in a structured, long-term program that does not impinge on the normal classroom routine or the…

  13. SUPERSTARS III: 6-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    SUPERSTARS III is a K-8 program designed as an enrichment opportunity for self-directed learners in mathematics. The basic purpose of SUPERSTARS III is to provide the extra challenge that self-motivated students need in mathematics and to do so in a structured, long-term program that does not impinge on the normal classroom routine or the…

  14. Using dBase III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Janet; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Four articles on dBASE III include three on library applications: a photocopy invoicing system for interlibrary loan, a vertical file subject headings list program, and a subject index to statistical resources. Another article explains the differences between interpreters and compilers and the advantages of the Clipper compiler for dBASE III. (EM)

  15. Potential models and lattice correlators for quarkonia at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Alberico, W. M.; De Pace, A.; Molinari, A.; Beraudo, A.

    2008-01-01

    We update our recent calculation of quarkonium Euclidean correlators at finite temperatures in a potential model by including the effect of zero modes in the lattice spectral functions. These contributions cure most of the previously observed discrepancies with lattice calculations, supporting the use of potential models at finite temperature as an important tool to complement lattice studies.

  16. Spanning trees on graphs and lattices in d dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrock, Robert; Wu, F. Y.

    2000-06-01

    The problem of enumerating spanning trees on graphs and lattices is considered. We obtain bounds on the number of spanning trees NST and establish inequalities relating the numbers of spanning trees of different graphs or lattices. A general formulation is presented for the enumeration of spanning trees on lattices in d≥2 dimensions, and is applied to the hypercubic, body-centred cubic, face-centred cubic and specific planar lattices including the kagomé, diced, 4-8-8 (bathroom-tile), Union Jack and 3-12-12 lattices. This leads to closed-form expressions for NST for these lattices of finite sizes. We prove a theorem concerning the classes of graphs and lattices →∞, where zL is a finite non-zero constant. This includes the bulk limit of lattices in any spatial dimension, and also sections of lattices whose lengths in some dimensions go to infinity while others are finite. We evaluate zL exactly for the lattices we consider, and discuss the dependence of zL on d and the lattice coordination number. We also establish a relation connecting zL to the free energy of the critical Ising model for planar lattices.

  17. Multiscale structural characterizations of mixed U(iv)-An(iii) oxalates (An(iii) = Pu or Am) combining XAS and XRD measurements.

    PubMed

    Arab-Chapelet, B; Martin, P M; Costenoble, S; Delahaye, T; Scheinost, A C; Grandjean, S; Abraham, F

    2016-04-28

    Mixed actinide(III,IV) oxalates of the general formula M2.2UAn(C2O4)5·nH2O (An = Pu or Am and M = H3O(+) and N2H5(+)) have been quantitatively precipitated by oxalic precipitation in nitric acid medium (yield >99%). Thorough multiscale structural characterization using XRD and XAS measurements confirmed the existence of mixed actinide oxalate solid solutions. The XANES analysis confirmed that the oxidation states of the metallic cations, tetravalent for uranium and trivalent for plutonium and americium, are maintained during the precipitation step. EXAFS measurements show that the local environments around U(+IV), Pu(+III) and Am(+III) are comparable, and the actinides are surrounded by ten oxygen atoms from five bidentate oxalate anions. The mean metal-oxygen distances obtained by XAS measurements are in agreement with those calculated from XRD lattice parameters. PMID:26979820

  18. PREFACE: Quantum Optics III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orszag, M.; Retamal, J. C.; Saavedra, C.; Wallentowitz, S.

    2007-06-01

    All the 50 years of conscious pondering did not bring me nearer to an answer to the question `what is light quanta?'. Nowadays, every rascal believes, he knows it, however, he is mistaken. (A Einstein, 1951 in a letter to M Besso) Quantum optics has played a key role in physics in the last several decades. On the other hand, in these early decades of the information age, the flow of information is becoming more and more central to our daily life. Thus, the related fields of quantum information theory as well as Bose-Einstein condensation have acquired tremendous importance in the last couple of decades. In Quantum Optics III, a fusion of these fields appears in a natural way. Quantum Optics III was held in Pucón, Chile, in 27-30 of November, 2006. This beautiful location in the south of Chile is near the lake Villarrica and below the snow covered volcano of the same name. This fantastic environment contributed to a relaxed atmosphere, suitable for informal discussion and for the students to have a chance to meet the key figures in the field. The previous Quantum Optics conferences took place in Santiago, Chile (Quantum Optics I, 2000) and Cozumel, Mexico (Quantum Optics II, 2004). About 115 participants from 19 countries attended and participated in the meeting to discuss a wide variety of topics such as quantum-information processing, experiments related to non-linear optics and squeezing, various aspects of entanglement including its sudden death, correlated twin-photon experiments, light storage, decoherence-free subspaces, Bose-Einstein condensation, discrete Wigner functions and many more. There was a strong Latin-American participation from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela and Mexico, as well as from Europe, USA, China, and Australia. New experimental and theoretical results were presented at the conference. In Latin-America a quiet revolution has taken place in the last twenty years. Several groups working in quantum optics and

  19. Strongly correlated quantum walks in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiss, Philipp M.; Ma, Ruichao; Tai, M. Eric; Lukin, Alexander; Rispoli, Matthew; Zupancic, Philip; Lahini, Yoav; Islam, Rajibul; Greiner, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Full control over the dynamics of interacting, indistinguishable quantum particles is an important prerequisite for the experimental study of strongly correlated quantum matter and the implementation of high-fidelity quantum information processing. We demonstrate such control over the quantum walk—the quantum mechanical analog of the classical random walk—in the regime where dynamics are dominated by interparticle interactions. Using interacting bosonic atoms in an optical lattice, we directly observed fundamental effects such as the emergence of correlations in two-particle quantum walks, as well as strongly correlated Bloch oscillations in tilted optical lattices. Our approach can be scaled to larger systems, greatly extending the class of problems accessible via quantum walks.

  20. Interacting growth walk on a honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, S. L.; Sridhar, V.; Murthy, K. P. N.

    2003-03-01

    The interacting growth walk (IGW) is a kinetic algorithm proposed recently for generating long, lattice polymer configurations. The growth process in IGW is tuned by a parameter called the growth temperature TG=1/( kBβG). In this paper we consider IGW on a honeycomb lattice. We take the non-bonded nearest neighbour contact energy as ε=-1. We show that at βG=0, IGW algorithm generates a canonical ensemble of interacting self-avoiding walks at β= β̂(β G=0)= ln(2) . However for βG>0, IGW generates an ensemble of polymer configurations most of which are in equilibrium at β= β̂(β G) . The remaining ones are frozen in ‘non-equilibrium’ configurations.

  1. Lattice Boltzmann model for wave propagation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianying; Yan, Guangwu; Shi, Xiubo

    2009-08-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model for two-dimensional wave equation is proposed by using the higher-order moment method. The higher-order moment method is based on the solution of a series of partial differential equations obtained by using multiscale technique and Chapman-Enskog expansion. In order to obtain the lattice Boltzmann model for the wave equation with higher-order accuracy of truncation errors, we removed the second-order dissipation term and the third-order dispersion term by employing the moments up to fourth order. The reversibility in time appears owing to the absence of the second-order dissipation term and the third-order dispersion term. As numerical examples, some classical examples, such as interference, diffraction, and wave passing through a convex lens, are simulated. The numerical results show that this model can be used to simulate wave propagation.

  2. The NIM Sr Optical Lattice Clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Wang, Q.; Li, Y.; Meng, F.; Lin, B.; Zang, E.; Sun, Z.; Fang, F.; Li, T.; Fang, Z.

    2016-06-01

    A 87Sr optical lattice clock is built at the National Institute of Metrology (NIM) of China. The atoms undergo two stages of laser cooling before being loaded into a horizontal optical lattice at the magic wavelength of 813 nm. After being interrogated by a narrow linewidth 698 nm clock laser pulse, the normalized excitation rate is measured to get the frequency error, which is then used to lock the clock laser to the ultra-narrow 1S0-3P0 clock transition. The total systematic uncertainty of the clock is evaluated to be 2.3 × 10-16, and the absolute frequency of the clock is measured to be 429 228 004 229 873.7(1.4) Hz with reference to the NIM5 cesium fountain.

  3. HPC CLOUD APPLIED TO LATTICE OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Changchun; Nishimura, Hiroshi; James, Susan; Song, Kai; Muriki, Krishna; Qin, Yong

    2011-03-18

    As Cloud services gain in popularity for enterprise use, vendors are now turning their focus towards providing cloud services suitable for scientific computing. Recently, Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) introduced the new Cluster Compute Instances (CCI), a new instance type specifically designed for High Performance Computing (HPC) applications. At Berkeley Lab, the physicists at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) have been running Lattice Optimization on a local cluster, but the queue wait time and the flexibility to request compute resources when needed are not ideal for rapid development work. To explore alternatives, for the first time we investigate running the Lattice Optimization application on Amazon's new CCI to demonstrate the feasibility and trade-offs of using public cloud services for science.

  4. Lattice gauge theory and Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1988-11-01

    Lattice gauge theory is now the primary non-perturbative technique for quantum field theory. The lattice represents an ultraviolet cutoff, and renormalization group arguments show how the bare coupling must be varied to obtain the continuum limit. Expansions in the inverse of the coupling constant demonstrate quark confinement in the strong coupling limit. Numerical simulation has become the approach to calculating hadronic properties. The basic algorithms for obtaining appropriately weighted gauge field configurations are discussed. Algorithms for treating fermionic fields, which still require considerably more computer time than needed for purely bosonic simulations, are also discussed. Some particularly promising recent approaches are based on global accept-reject steps and should display a rather favorable dependence of computer time on the system volume. 39 refs.

  5. Connecting physical resonant amplitudes and lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, Daniel R.; Briceño, Raúl A.; Wilson, David J.

    2016-06-01

    We present a determination of the isovector, P-wave ππ scattering phase shift obtained by extrapolating recent lattice QCD results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration using mπ = 236 MeV. The finite volume spectra are described using extensions of Lüscher's method to determine the infinite volume Unitarized Chiral Perturbation Theory scattering amplitude. We exploit the pion mass dependence of this effective theory to obtain the scattering amplitude at mπ = 140 MeV. The scattering phase shift is found to agree with experiment up to center of mass energies of 1.2 GeV. The analytic continuation of the scattering amplitude to the complex plane yields a ρ-resonance pole at Eρ = [ 755 (2) (1) (02) -i/2 129 (3) (1) (7 1) ] MeV. The techniques presented illustrate a possible pathway towards connecting lattice QCD observables of few-body, strongly interacting systems to experimentally accessible quantities.

  6. A stochastic lattice model for locust outbreak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizaki, Shinya; Katori, Makoto

    The locust is a kind of grasshoppers. Gregarious locusts form swarms and can migrate over large distances and they spread and damage a large area (locust outbreak). When the density is low, each of locusts behaves as an individual insect (solitary phase). As locusts become crowded, they become to act as a part of a group (gregarious phase) as a result of interactions among them. Modeling of this phenomenon is a challenging problem of statistical physics. We introduce a stochastic cellular automaton model of locust population-dynamics on lattices. Change of environmental conditions by seasonal migration is a key factor in gregarisation of locusts and we take it into account by changing the lattice size periodically. We study this model by computer simulations and discuss the locust outbreak as a cooperative phenomena.

  7. Skyrmions in square-lattice antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keesman, Rick; Raaijmakers, Mark; Baerends, A. E.; Barkema, G. T.; Duine, R. A.

    2016-08-01

    The ground states of square-lattice two-dimensional antiferromagnets with anisotropy in an external magnetic field are determined using Monte Carlo simulations and compared to theoretical analysis. We find a phase in between the spin-flop and spiral phase that shows strong similarity to skyrmions in ferromagnetic thin films. We show that this phase arises as a result of the competition between Zeeman and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction energies of the magnetic system. Moreover, we find that isolated (anti-)skyrmions are stabilized in finite-sized systems, even at higher temperatures. The existence of thermodynamically stable skyrmions in square-lattice antiferromagnets provides an appealing alternative over skyrmions in ferromagnets as data carriers.

  8. Quantum Operator Design for Lattice Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtl, Adam

    2006-09-07

    A previously-proposed method of constructing spatially-extended gauge-invariant three-quark operators for use in Monte Carlo lattice QCD calculations is tested, and a methodology for using these operators to extract the energies of a large number of baryon states is developed. This work is part of a long-term project undertaken by the Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration to carry out a first-principles calculation of the low-lying spectrum of QCD. The operators are assemblages of smeared and gauge-covariantly-displaced quark fields having a definite flavor structure. The importance of using smeared fields is dramatically demonstrated. It is found that quark field smearing greatly reduces the couplings to the unwanted high-lying short-wavelength modes, while gauge field smearing drastically reduces the statistical noise in the extended operators.

  9. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations of droplet evaporation.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo; Vella, Dominic; Yeomans, Julia M

    2014-11-01

    We study the utility and validity of lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulations to explore droplet evaporation driven by a concentration gradient. Using a binary-fluid lattice-Boltzmann algorithm based on Cahn-Hilliard dynamics, we study the evaporation of planar films and 3D sessile droplets from smooth solid surfaces. Our results show that LB simulations accurately reproduce the classical regime of quasi-static dynamics. Beyond this limit, we show that the algorithm can be used to explore regimes where the evaporative and diffusive timescales are not widely separated, and to include the effect of boundaries of prescribed driving concentration. We illustrate the method by considering the evaporation of a droplet from a solid surface that is chemically patterned with hydrophilic and hydrophobic stripes. PMID:25186667

  10. Equation of State from Lattice QCD Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Rajan

    2011-01-01

    We provide a status report on the calculation of the Equation of State (EoS) of QCD at finite temperature using lattice QCD. Most of the discussion will focus on comparison of recent results obtained by the HotQCD and Wuppertal-Budapest collaborations. We will show that very significant progress has been made towards obtaining high precision results over the temperature range of T = 150-700 MeV. The various sources of systematic uncertainties will be discussed and the differences between the two calculations highlighted. Our final conclusion is that these lattice results of EoS are precise enough to be used in the phenomenological analysis of heavy ion experiments at RHIC and LHC.

  11. Magnetic switching of nanoscale antidot lattices

    PubMed Central

    Gräfe, Joachim; Lebecki, Kristof M; Skripnik, Maxim; Haering, Felix; Schütz, Gisela; Ziemann, Paul; Goering, Eberhard; Nowak, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Summary We investigate the rich magnetic switching properties of nanoscale antidot lattices in the 200 nm regime. In-plane magnetized Fe, Co, and Permalloy (Py) as well as out-of-plane magnetized GdFe antidot films are prepared by a modified nanosphere lithography allowing for non-close packed voids in a magnetic film. We present a magnetometry protocol based on magneto-optical Kerr microscopy elucidating the switching modes using first-order reversal curves. The combination of various magnetometry and magnetic microscopy techniques as well as micromagnetic simulations delivers a thorough understanding of the switching modes. While part of the investigations has been published before, we summarize these results and add significant new insights in the magnetism of exchange-coupled antidot lattices. PMID:27335762

  12. Low lattice thermal conductivity of stanene.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Zhang, Hao; Shao, Hezhu; Xu, Yuchen; Zhang, Xiangchao; Zhu, Heyuan

    2016-02-03

    A fundamental understanding of phonon transport in stanene is crucial to predict the thermal performance in potential stanene-based devices. By combining first-principle calculation and phonon Boltzmann transport equation, we obtain the lattice thermal conductivity of stanene. A much lower thermal conductivity (11.6 W/mK) is observed in stanene, which indicates higher thermoelectric efficiency over other 2D materials. The contributions of acoustic and optical phonons to the lattice thermal conductivity are evaluated. Detailed analysis of phase space for three-phonon processes shows that phonon scattering channels LA + LA/TA/ZA ↔ TA/ZA are restricted, leading to the dominant contributions of high-group-velocity LA phonons to the thermal conductivity. The size dependence of thermal conductivity is investigated as well for the purpose of the design of thermoelectric nanostructures.

  13. Anomalies, gauge field topology, and the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, Michael

    2011-04-15

    Motivated by the connection between gauge field topology and the axial anomaly in fermion currents, I suggest that the fourth power of the naive Dirac operator can provide a natural method to define a local lattice measure of topological charge. For smooth gauge fields this reduces to the usual topological density. For typical gauge field configurations in a numerical simulation, however, quantum fluctuations dominate, and the sum of this density over the system does not generally give an integer winding. On cooling with respect to the Wilson gauge action, instanton like structures do emerge. As cooling proceeds, these objects tend shrink and finally 'fall through the lattice.' Modifying the action can block the shrinking at the expense of a loss of reflection positivity. The cooling procedure is highly sensitive to the details of the initial steps, suggesting that quantum fluctuations induce a small but fundamental ambiguity in the definition of topological susceptibility.

  14. Wilson Dslash Kernel From Lattice QCD Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Balint; Smelyanskiy, Mikhail; Kalamkar, Dhiraj D.; Vaidyanathan, Karthikeyan

    2015-07-01

    Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (LQCD) is a numerical technique used for calculations in Theoretical Nuclear and High Energy Physics. LQCD is traditionally one of the first applications ported to many new high performance computing architectures and indeed LQCD practitioners have been known to design and build custom LQCD computers. Lattice QCD kernels are frequently used as benchmarks (e.g. 168.wupwise in the SPEC suite) and are generally well understood, and as such are ideal to illustrate several optimization techniques. In this chapter we will detail our work in optimizing the Wilson-Dslash kernels for Intel Xeon Phi, however, as we will show the technique gives excellent performance on regular Xeon Architecture as well.

  15. Geometric stability of topological lattice phases

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, T. S.; Möller, Gunnar; Roy, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    The fractional quantum Hall (FQH) effect illustrates the range of novel phenomena which can arise in a topologically ordered state in the presence of strong interactions. The possibility of realizing FQH-like phases in models with strong lattice effects has attracted intense interest as a more experimentally accessible venue for FQH phenomena which calls for more theoretical attention. Here we investigate the physical relevance of previously derived geometric conditions which quantify deviations from the Landau level physics of the FQHE. We conduct extensive numerical many-body simulations on several lattice models, obtaining new theoretical results in the process, and find remarkable correlation between these conditions and the many-body gap. These results indicate which physical factors are most relevant for the stability of FQH-like phases, a paradigm we refer to as the geometric stability hypothesis, and provide easily implementable guidelines for obtaining robust FQH-like phases in numerical or real-world experiments. PMID:26530311

  16. Low lattice thermal conductivity of stanene

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Bo; Zhang, Hao; Shao, Hezhu; Xu, Yuchen; Zhang, Xiangchao; Zhu, Heyuan

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental understanding of phonon transport in stanene is crucial to predict the thermal performance in potential stanene-based devices. By combining first-principle calculation and phonon Boltzmann transport equation, we obtain the lattice thermal conductivity of stanene. A much lower thermal conductivity (11.6 W/mK) is observed in stanene, which indicates higher thermoelectric efficiency over other 2D materials. The contributions of acoustic and optical phonons to the lattice thermal conductivity are evaluated. Detailed analysis of phase space for three-phonon processes shows that phonon scattering channels LA + LA/TA/ZA ↔ TA/ZA are restricted, leading to the dominant contributions of high-group-velocity LA phonons to the thermal conductivity. The size dependence of thermal conductivity is investigated as well for the purpose of the design of thermoelectric nanostructures. PMID:26838731

  17. Topological hardcore bosons on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owerre, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a connection between the topological properties of hardcore bosons and that of magnons in quantum spin magnets. We utilize the Haldane-like hardcore bosons on the honeycomb lattice as an example. We show that this system maps to a spin-$1/2$ quantum XY model with a next-nearest-neighbour Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction. We obtain the magnon excitations of the quantum spin model and compute the edge states, Berry curvature, thermal and spin Nernst conductivities. Due to the mapping from spin variables to bosons, the hardcore bosons possess the same nontrivial topological properties as those in quantum spin system. These results are important in the study of magnetic excitations in quantum magnets and they are also useful for understanding the control of ultracold bosonic quantum gases in honeycomb optical lattices, which is experimentally accessible.

  18. Hadron Wave Functions from Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, V. M.

    2016-08-01

    I give a brief account of the status and perspectives of lattice calculations of the light-front wave functions at small transverse separations, usually referred to as hadron distribution amplitudes (DAs). The existing calculations indicate that the corrections to the asymptotic form of such distributions at large scales are rather small as compared to earlier model estimates. Lattice calculations also suggest an alternating pattern of such corrections for the nucleon resonances with increasing mass. Several recent results are discussed, including precise determination of the second moment of the pion DA, leading-twist DAs of the nucleon and N^*(1535) , and the first calculation of the flavor-symmetry breaking corrections in the DAs of the baryon octet.

  19. Extra-dimensional models on the lattice

    DOE PAGES

    Knechtli, Francesco; Rinaldi, Enrico

    2016-08-05

    In this paper we summarize the ongoing effort to study extra-dimensional gauge theories with lattice simulations. In these models the Higgs field is identified with extra-dimensional components of the gauge field. The Higgs potential is generated by quantum corrections and is protected from divergences by the higher dimensional gauge symmetry. Dimensional reduction to four dimensions can occur through compactification or localization. Gauge-Higgs unification models are often studied using perturbation theory. Numerical lattice simulations are used to go beyond these perturbative expectations and to include nonperturbative effects. We describe the known perturbative predictions and their fate in the strongly-coupled regime formore » various extra-dimensional models.« less

  20. Multi-hadron systems in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Will Detmold

    2009-07-01

    Lattice QCD is currently entering the stage when it can usefully be applied to systems of multiple hadrons. I briefly review the status of recent calculations of scattering parameters in the two hadron sector and discuss recent calculations of systems composed of many mesons or baryons. In the mesonic case, the NPLQCD collaboration has continued its study of systems of up to twelve pions or kaons and have computed the effect of such a hadronic medium on the static quark potential. High statistics calculations on anisotropic lattices have allowed for precision extraction of the energies and scattering phase shifts of various two baryon systems and, for the first time, the energies of certain three baryon systems have been computed.

  1. NMR-based diffusion lattice imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laun, Frederik Bernd; Müller, Lars; Kuder, Tristan Anselm

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion experiments are widely employed as they yield information about structures hindering the diffusion process, e.g., about cell membranes. While it has been shown in recent articles that these experiments can be used to determine the shape of closed pores averaged over a volume of interest, it is still an open question how much information can be gained in open well-connected systems. In this theoretical work, it is shown that the full structure information of connected periodic systems is accessible. To this end, the so-called "SEquential Rephasing by Pulsed field-gradient Encoding N Time intervals" (SERPENT) sequence is used, which employs several diffusion encoding gradient pulses with different amplitudes. Two two-dimensional solid matrices that are surrounded by an NMR-visible medium are considered: a hexagonal lattice of cylinders and a rectangular lattice of isosceles triangles.

  2. Connecting physical resonant amplitudes and lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, Daniel R.; Briceño, Raúl A.; Wilson, David J.

    2016-06-01

    We present a determination of the isovector, P-wave ππ scattering phase shift obtained by extrapolating recent lattice QCD results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration using mπ = 236 MeV. The finite volume spectra are described using extensions of Lüscher's method to determine the infinite volume Unitarized Chiral Perturbation Theory scattering amplitude. We exploit the pion mass dependence of this effective theory to obtain the scattering amplitude at mπ = 140 MeV. The scattering phase shift is found to agree with experiment up to center of mass energies of 1.2 GeV. The analytic continuation of the scattering amplitude to the complex plane yields a ρ-resonance pole at Eρ = [ 755 (2) (1) (20 02) -i/2 129 (3) (1) (7 1) ] MeV. The techniques presented illustrate a possible pathway towards connecting lattice QCD observables of few-body, strongly interacting systems to experimentally accessible quantities.

  3. Lattice Boltzmann method for adiabatic acoustics.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanbing; Shan, Xiaowen

    2011-06-13

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has been proved to be a useful tool in many areas of computational fluid dynamics, including computational aero-acoustics (CAA). However, for historical reasons, its applications in CAA have been largely restricted to simulations of isothermal (Newtonian) sound waves. As the recent kinetic theory-based reformulation establishes a theoretical framework in which LBM can be extended to recover the full Navier-Stokes-Fourier (NS) equations and beyond, in this paper, we show that, at least at the low-frequency limit (sound frequency much less than molecular collision frequency), adiabatic sound waves can be accurately simulated by the LBM provided that the lattice and the distribution function ensure adequate recovery of the full NS equations.

  4. Supersymmetry in Rydberg-dressed lattice fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weimer, Hendrik; Huijse, Liza; Gorshkov, Alexey; Pupillo, Guido; Zoller, Peter; Lukin, Mikhail; Demler, Eugene

    2012-06-01

    Supersymmetry is a powerful tool that allows the characterization of strongly correlated many-body systems, in particular in the case of supersymmetric extensions of the fermionic Hubbard model [1]. At the same time, these models can exhibit rich and exotic physics on their own, such as flat bands with a vanishing dispersion relation. We show that such lattice models can be realized with Rydberg-dressed fermions in optical lattices. Strong interactions within the ground state manifold of the atoms can be realized by admixing a weak contribution of a highly excited Rydberg state [2]. We discuss the unique possbilities of ultracold atoms for the detection of supersymmetry and the effects of tuning the system away from the supersymmetric point.[4pt] [1] P. Fendley, K. Schoutens, J. de Boer, PRL 90, 120402 (2003).[0pt] [2] J. Honer, H. Weimer, T. Pfau, H. P. B"uchler, PRL 105, 160404 (2010).

  5. Scaling of Greenwood Peierls conductance on a diluted square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalm, William; Schmitz, Albert

    The modified rectangle lattice of Dhar is a bond-diluted square lattice. The structure is self-similar and finitely ramified, like a fractal. Nevertheless certain discrete Schrödinger equation Green functions for the modified rectangle are known in closed form in the infinite lattice limit and the spectrum is continuous. By standard transfer matrix renormalization methods we present a study scaling properties of the Greenwood Peierls conductance distribution across the lattice with one dimensional lead wires attached as a function of lattice size and of additional disorder of several types.

  6. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides: promising near-lattice-matched substrates for GaN growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Priti; Rahman, A. A.; Subramanian, Shruti; Gupta, Shalini; Thamizhavel, Arumugam; Orlova, Tatyana; Rouvimov, Sergei; Vishwanath, Suresh; Protasenko, Vladimir; Laskar, Masihhur R.; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2016-03-01

    Most III-nitride semiconductors are grown on non-lattice-matched substrates like sapphire or silicon due to the extreme difficulty of obtaining a native GaN substrate. We show that several layered transition-metal dichalcogenides are closely lattice-matched to GaN and report the growth of GaN on a range of such layered materials. We report detailed studies of the growth of GaN on mechanically-exfoliated flakes WS2 and MoS2 by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy. Structural and optical characterization show that strain-free, single-crystal islands of GaN are obtained on the underlying chalcogenide flakes. We obtain strong near-band-edge emission from these layers, and analyse their temperature-dependent photoluminescence properties. We also report a proof-of-concept demonstration of large-area growth of GaN on CVD MoS2. Our results show that the transition-metal dichalcogenides can serve as novel near-lattice-matched substrates for nitride growth.

  7. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides: promising near-lattice-matched substrates for GaN growth.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Priti; Rahman, A A; Subramanian, Shruti; Gupta, Shalini; Thamizhavel, Arumugam; Orlova, Tatyana; Rouvimov, Sergei; Vishwanath, Suresh; Protasenko, Vladimir; Laskar, Masihhur R; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2016-03-30

    Most III-nitride semiconductors are grown on non-lattice-matched substrates like sapphire or silicon due to the extreme difficulty of obtaining a native GaN substrate. We show that several layered transition-metal dichalcogenides are closely lattice-matched to GaN and report the growth of GaN on a range of such layered materials. We report detailed studies of the growth of GaN on mechanically-exfoliated flakes WS2 and MoS2 by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy. Structural and optical characterization show that strain-free, single-crystal islands of GaN are obtained on the underlying chalcogenide flakes. We obtain strong near-band-edge emission from these layers, and analyse their temperature-dependent photoluminescence properties. We also report a proof-of-concept demonstration of large-area growth of GaN on CVD MoS2. Our results show that the transition-metal dichalcogenides can serve as novel near-lattice-matched substrates for nitride growth.

  8. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides: promising near-lattice-matched substrates for GaN growth

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Priti; Rahman, A. A.; Subramanian, Shruti; Gupta, Shalini; Thamizhavel, Arumugam; Orlova, Tatyana; Rouvimov, Sergei; Vishwanath, Suresh; Protasenko, Vladimir; Laskar, Masihhur R.; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    Most III-nitride semiconductors are grown on non-lattice-matched substrates like sapphire or silicon due to the extreme difficulty of obtaining a native GaN substrate. We show that several layered transition-metal dichalcogenides are closely lattice-matched to GaN and report the growth of GaN on a range of such layered materials. We report detailed studies of the growth of GaN on mechanically-exfoliated flakes WS2 and MoS2 by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy. Structural and optical characterization show that strain-free, single-crystal islands of GaN are obtained on the underlying chalcogenide flakes. We obtain strong near-band-edge emission from these layers, and analyse their temperature-dependent photoluminescence properties. We also report a proof-of-concept demonstration of large-area growth of GaN on CVD MoS2. Our results show that the transition-metal dichalcogenides can serve as novel near-lattice-matched substrates for nitride growth. PMID:27025461

  9. Geometric entanglement and quantum phase transitions in two-dimensional quantum lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Qian-Qian; Wang, Hong-Lei; Li, Sheng-Hao; Cho, Sam Young; Batchelor, Murray T.; Zhou, Huan-Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Geometric entanglement (GE), as a measure of multipartite entanglement, has been investigated as a universal tool to detect phase transitions in quantum many-body lattice models. In this paper we outline a systematic method to compute GE for two-dimensional (2D) quantum many-body lattice models based on the translational invariant structure of infinite projected entangled pair state (iPEPS) representations. By employing this method, the q -state quantum Potts model on the square lattice with q ∈{2 ,3 ,4 ,5 } is investigated as a prototypical example. Further, we have explored three 2D Heisenberg models: the antiferromagnetic spin-1/2 X X X and anisotropic X Y X models in an external magnetic field, and the antiferromagnetic spin-1 X X Z model. We find that continuous GE does not guarantee a continuous phase transition across a phase transition point. We observe and thus classify three different types of continuous GE across a phase transition point: (i) GE is continuous with maximum value at the transition point and the phase transition is continuous, (ii) GE is continuous with maximum value at the transition point but the phase transition is discontinuous, and (iii) GE is continuous with nonmaximum value at the transition point and the phase transition is continuous. For the models under consideration, we find that the second and the third types are related to a point of dual symmetry and a fully polarized phase, respectively.

  10. Vortex lattice theory: A linear algebra approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamoun, George C.

    Vortex lattices are prevalent in a large class of physical settings that are characterized by different mathematical models. We present a coherent and generalized Hamiltonian fluid mechanics-based formulation that reduces all vortex lattices into a classic problem in linear algebra for a non-normal matrix A. Via Singular Value Decomposition (SVD), the solution lies in the null space of the matrix (i.e., we require nullity( A) > 0) as well as the distribution of its singular values. We demonstrate that this approach provides a good model for various types of vortex lattices, and makes it possible to extract a rich amount of information on them. The contributions of this thesis can be classified into four main points. The first is asymmetric equilibria. A 'Brownian ratchet' construct was used which converged to asymmetric equilibria via a random walk scheme that utilized the smallest singular value of A. Distances between configurations and equilibria were measured using the Frobenius norm ||·||F and 2-norm ||·||2, and conclusions were made on the density of equilibria within the general configuration space. The second contribution used Shannon Entropy, which we interpret as a scalar measure of the robustness, or likelihood of lattices to occur in a physical setting. Third, an analytic model was produced for vortex street patterns on the sphere by using SVD in conjunction with expressions for the center of vorticity vector and angular velocity. Equilibrium curves within the configuration space were presented as a function of the geometry, and pole vortices were shown to have a critical role in the formation and destruction of vortex streets. The fourth contribution entailed a more complete perspective of the streamline topology of vortex streets, linking the bifurcations to critical points on the equilibrium curves.

  11. Lattice results on nucleon/roper properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Huey-Wen

    2009-12-01

    In this proceeding, I review the attempts to calculate the Nucleon resonance (including Roper as first radially excited state of nucleon and other excited states) using lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The latest preliminary results from Hadron Spectrum Collaboration (HSC) with mπ thickapprox 380 MeV are reported. The Sachs electric form factor of the proton and neutron and their transition with the Roper at large Q2 are also updated in this work.

  12. Excited charmonium physics from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek

    2009-12-01

    Properties of excited mesons are studied using a lattice QCD simulation of a system comparable to charmonium. We extract a spectrum of states, including those with manifestly exotic quantum numbers. Radiative transition form-factors are also computed, in particular the transition from exotic ·c1 to J /È ³ which is found to be large on the usual scale of magnetic dipole transitions.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance in Kondo lattice systems.

    PubMed

    Curro, Nicholas J

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance has emerged as a vital tool to explore the fundamental physics of Kondo lattice systems. Because nuclear spins experience two different hyperfine couplings to the itinerant conduction electrons and to the local f moments, the Knight shift can probe multiple types of spin correlations that are not accessible via other techniques. The Knight shift provides direct information about the onset of heavy electron coherence and the emergence of the heavy electron fluid.

  14. Faithful communication Hamiltonian in photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Bellec, Matthieu; Nikolopoulos, Georgios M; Tzortzakis, Stelios

    2012-11-01

    Faithful communication is a necessary precondition for large scale all-optical networking and quantum information processing. Related theoretical investigations in different areas of physics have led to various proposals in which finite discrete lattices are used as channels for short-distance communication tasks. Here, in the framework of femtosecond-laser-written waveguide arrays, we present the first experimental realization of such a channel with judiciously engineered couplings.

  15. Ab initio Hadron structure from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Bratt; R.G. Edwards; M. Engelhardt; G.T. Fleming; Ph. Hägler; B. Musch; J.W. Negele; K. Orginos; A.V. Pochinsky; D.B. Renner; D.G. Richards; W. Schroers

    2007-06-01

    Early scattering experiments revealed that the proton was not a point particle but a bound state of many quarks and gluons. Deep inelastic scattering (DIS) experiments have accurately determined the probability of struck quarks carrying a fraction of the proton's momentum. The current generation of experiments and Lattice QCD calculations will provide detailed multi-dimensional pictures of the distributions of quarks and gluons inside the proton.

  16. Current fluctuations in stochastic lattice gases.

    PubMed

    Bertini, L; De Sole, A; Gabrielli, D; Jona-Lasinio, G; Landim, C

    2005-01-28

    We study current fluctuations in lattice gases in the macroscopic limit extending the dynamic approach for density fluctuations developed in previous articles. More precisely, we establish a large deviation theory for the space-time fluctuations of the empirical current which include the previous results. We then estimate the probability of a fluctuation of the average current over a large time interval. It turns out that recent results by Bodineau and Derrida [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 180601 (2004)

  17. Proton decay matrix elements from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Yasumichi; Shintani, Eigo; Collaboration: RBC Collaboration; UKQCD Collaboration

    2012-07-27

    We report on the calculation of the matrix elements of nucleon to pseudoscalar decay through a three quark operator, a part of the low-energy, four-fermion, baryon-number-violating operator originating from grand unified theories. The direct calculation of the form factors using domain-wall fermions on the lattice, incorporating the u, d and s sea-quarks effects yields the results with all the relevant systematic uncertainties controlled for the first time.

  18. Calculating Buckling And Vibrations Of Lattice Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, M. S.; Durling, B. J.; Herstrom, C. L.; Williams, F. W.; Banerjee, J. R.; Kennedy, D.; Warnaar, D. B.

    1989-01-01

    BUNVIS-RG computer program designed to calculate vibration frequencies or buckling loads of prestressed lattice structures used in outer space. For buckling and vibration problems, BUNVIS-RG calculates deadload axial forces caused in members by any combination of externally-applied static point forces and moments at nodes, axial preload or prestrain in members, and such acceleration loads as those due to gravity. BUNVIS-RG is FORTRAN 77 computer program implemented on CDC CYBER and VAX computer.

  19. Lattice Boltzmann model for simulation of magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shiyi; Chen, Hudong; Martinez, Daniel; Matthaeus, William

    1991-01-01

    A numerical method, based on a discrete Boltzmann equation, is presented for solving the equations of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The algorithm provides advantages similar to the cellular automaton method in that it is local and easily adapted to parallel computing environments. Because of much lower noise levels and less stringent requirements on lattice size, the method appears to be more competitive with traditional solution methods. Examples show that the model accurately reproduces both linear and nonlinear MHD phenomena.

  20. Historical evolution of vortex-lattice methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, J.

    1976-01-01

    A review of the beginning and some orientation of the vortex-lattice method were given. The historical course of this method was followed in conjunction with its field of computational fluid dynamics, spanning the period from L.F. Richardson's paper in 1910 to 1975. The following landmarks were pointed out: numerical analysis of partial differential equations, lifting-line theory, finite-difference method, 1/4-3/4 rule, block relaxation technique, application of electronic computers, and advanced panel methods.

  1. Dynamics for QCD on an Infinite Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundling, Hendrik; Rudolph, Gerd

    2016-08-01

    We prove the existence of the dynamics automorphism group for Hamiltonian QCD on an infinite lattice in R^3, and this is done in a C*-algebraic context. The existence of ground states is also obtained. Starting with the finite lattice model for Hamiltonian QCD developed by Kijowski, Rudolph (cf. J Math Phys 43:1796-1808 [15], J Math Phys 46:032303 [16]), we state its field algebra and a natural representation. We then generalize this representation to the infinite lattice, and construct a Hilbert space which has represented on it all the local algebras (i.e., kinematics algebras associated with finite connected sublattices) equipped with the correct graded commutation relations. On a suitably large C*-algebra acting on this Hilbert space, and containing all the local algebras, we prove that there is a one parameter automorphism group, which is the pointwise norm limit of the local time evolutions along a sequence of finite sublattices, increasing to the full lattice. This is our global time evolution. We then take as our field algebra the C*-algebra generated by all the orbits of the local algebras w.r.t. the global time evolution. Thus the time evolution creates the field algebra. The time evolution is strongly continuous on this choice of field algebra, though not on the original larger C*-algebra. We define the gauge transformations, explain how to enforce the Gauss law constraint, show that the dynamics automorphism group descends to the algebra of physical observables and prove that gauge invariant ground states exist.

  2. Meson and baryon spectroscopy on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    David Richards

    2010-12-01

    Recent progress at understanding the excited state spectrum of mesons and baryons is described. I begin by outlining the application of the variational method to compute the spectrum, and the program of anisotropic clover lattice generation designed for hadron spectroscopy. I present results for the excited meson spectrum, with continuum quantum numbers of the states clearly delineated. I conclude with recent results for the low lying baryon spectrum, and the prospects for future calculations.

  3. QCD equation of state from the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Borsanyi, Sz.; Jakovac, A.; Ratti, C.; Szabo, K. K.; Endro''di, G.; Katz, S. D.; Fodor, Z.; Krieg, S.

    2011-05-23

    We calculate the QCD equation of state with 2+1 staggered lattice flavors and a physical pion mass. We present precision data on the trace anomaly and pressure based on simulations at N{sub t} = 6,8 and 10. These results are confirmed by N{sub t} = 12 simulations at three temperatures. Detailed results can be found in [arXiv:1007.2580v2].

  4. BB Potentials in Quenched Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold; Kostas Orginos; Martin J. Savage

    2007-12-01

    The potentials between two B-mesons are computed in the heavy-quark limit using quenched lattice QCD at $m_\\pi\\sim 400~{\\rm MeV}$. Non-zero central potentials are clearly evident in all four spin-isospin channels, (I,s_l) = (0,0) , (0,1) , (1,0) , (1,1), where s_l is the total spin of the light degrees of freedom. At short distance, we find repulsion in the $I\

  5. On boundary conditions in lattice Boltzmann methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Martinez, D. |; Mei, R.

    1996-09-01

    A lattice Boltzmann boundary condition for simulation of fluid flow using simple extrapolation is proposed. Numerical simulations, including two-dimensional Poiseuille flow, unsteady Couette flow, lid-driven square cavity flow, and flow over a column of cylinders for a range of Reynolds numbers, are carried out, showing that this scheme is of second order accuracy in space discretization. Applications of the method to other boundary conditions, including pressure condition and flux condition are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Magnetic translation group on Abrikosov lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Akira

    1996-02-01

    We investigate the magnetic translational symmetry of the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation describing quasiparticles in the vortex lattice state. Magnetic translation group is formulated for the quasiparticles and the generalized Bloch theorem is established. Projection operators are obtained and used to construct the symmetry adopted basis functions. Careful treatment of the phase of the pair potential and its quasiperiodicity enable us to get the magnetic Wannier functions, which are utilized to justify a part of Canel's assertion about the effective Hamiltonian theory.

  7. Shear viscosity in SU(2) lattice gluodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braguta, V. V.; Kotov, A. Yu

    2015-05-01

    The calculation of the gluon plasma viscosity has been performed by lattice simulations in the SU(2) gluodynamics at T/Tc = 1.2 on the supercomputers. The evaluation is based on the Kubo formula that relates viscosity to the spectral function of the correlation functions of the energy-momentum tensor. For the extraction of the spectral function from the Euclidean correlator the linear method is applied.

  8. Proof of Ira Gessel's lattice path conjecture

    PubMed Central

    Kauers, Manuel; Koutschan, Christoph; Zeilberger, Doron

    2009-01-01

    We present a computer-aided, yet fully rigorous, proof of Ira Gessel's tantalizingly simply stated conjecture that the number of ways of walking 2n steps in the region x + y ≥ 0,y ≥ 0 of the square lattice with unit steps in the east, west, north, and south directions, that start and end at the origin, equals 16n(5/6)n(1/2)n(5/3)n(2)n.

  9. Lattice effect in solid state internal conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Kalman, Peter; Keszthelyi, Tamas

    2009-03-15

    The effect of the crystal lattice on nuclear fusion reactions p+d{yields}{sup 3}He taking place in internal conversion channels is studied. Fusionable particles solved in the investigated crystalline material form a sublattice. Fusion reaction is generated by a flux of incoming fusionable particles. The calculated cross sections are compared with those of an ordinary fusion reaction. The internal conversion coefficients are also calculated.

  10. Velocity selection in coupled-map lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, Nita; Puri, Sanjay

    1993-02-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of velocity selection for traveling wave fronts in a class of coupled-map lattices, derived by discretizations of the Fisher equation [Ann. Eugenics 7, 355 (1937)]. We find that the velocity selection can be understood in terms of a discrete analog of the marginal-stability hypothesis. A perturbative approach also enables us to estimate the selected velocity accurately for small values of the discretization mesh sizes.

  11. Neutrino-Nucleon Interactions and Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Richard; Kronfeld, Andreas; Meyer, Aaron

    2016-03-01

    We address techniques to make the theoretical underpinning of neutrino-nucleon scattering more robust. We see this foundation as a necessary step to disentangle fundamental physics (such as neutrino oscillation parameters) from nuclear effects. We address a reanalysis of old experiments with elementary targets, model-independent parametrizations of nucleon form factors based on analyticity, and lattice QCD calculations of the form factors. speaker.

  12. B and D mesons in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2000-10-17

    Computational and theoretical developments in lattice QCD calculations of B and D mesons are surveyed. Several topical examples are given: new ideas for calculating the HQET parameters {bar {Lambda}} and {lambda}{sub 1}; form factors needed to determine {vert_bar}V{sub cb}{vert_bar} and {vert_bar}V{sub ub}{vert_bar}; bag parameters for the mass differences of the B mesons; and decay constants. Prospects for removing the quenched approximation are discussed.

  13. Topologically Reconfigurable Atomic Lattice Quantum Metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Pankaj; Mrejen, Michael; Kim, Jeongmin; Wu, Chihhui; Wang, Yuan; Rostovtsev, Yuri; Zhang, Xiang

    Metamaterials have attracted unprecedented attention owing to their exceptional light-matter interaction properties. However, harnessing metamaterial at single photon or few photon excitations is still a long way to go due to several critical challenges such as optical loss, defects to name a few. Here we introduce and theoretically demonstrate a novel platform toward quantum metamaterial, immune to aforementioned challenges, with ultra-cold neutral atoms trapped in an artificial crystal of light. Such periodic atomic density grating -an atomic lattice- exhibits extreme anisotropic optical response where it behaves like a metal in one direction but dielectric along orthogonal directions. We harness the interacting dark resonance physics to eliminate the absorption loss and demonstrate an all-optical and ultra-fast control over the photonic topological transition from a close to an open topology at the same frequency. Such atomic lattice quantum metamaterial enables dynamic manipulation of the decay rate of a quantum emitter by more than an order of magnitude. Our proposal brings together two important contemporary realm of science - cold atom physics and metamaterial for applications in both fundamental and applied science. Atomic lattice quantum metamaterial may provide new opportunities, at single or few photon level, for quantum sensing, quantum information processing with metamaterials.

  14. Graphene, Lattice Field Theory and Symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Drissi, L. B.; Bousmina, M.; Saidi, E. H.

    2011-02-15

    Borrowing ideas from tight binding model, we propose a board class of lattice field models that are classified by non simply laced Lie algebras. In the case of A{sub N-1{approx_equal}}su(N) series, we show that the couplings between the quantum states living at the first nearest neighbor sites of the lattice L{sub suN} are governed by the complex fundamental representations N-bar and N of su(N) and the second nearest neighbor interactions are described by its adjoint N-bar x N. The lattice models associated with the leading su(2), su(3), and su(4) cases are explicitly studied and their fermionic field realizations are given. It is also shown that the su(2) and su(3) models describe the electronic properties of the acetylene chain and the graphene, respectively. It is established as well that the energy dispersion of the first nearest neighbor couplings is completely determined by the A{sub N} roots {alpha} through the typical dependence N/2+{Sigma}{sub roots} cos(k.{alpha} with k the wave vector.Other features such as the SO(2N) extension and other applications are also discussed.

  15. Processing of IN-718 Lattice Block Castings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan G.

    2002-01-01

    Recently a low cost casting method known as lattice block casting has been developed by JAM Corporation, Wilmington, Massachusetts for engineering materials such as aluminum and stainless steels that has shown to provide very high stiffness and strength with only a fraction of density of the alloy. NASA Glenn Research Center has initiated research to investigate lattice block castings of high temperature Ni-base superalloys such as the model system Inconel-718 (IN-718) for lightweight nozzle applications. Although difficulties were encountered throughout the manufacturing process , a successful investment casting procedure was eventually developed. Wax formulation and pattern assembly, shell mold processing, and counter gravity casting techniques were developed. Ten IN-718 lattice block castings (each measuring 15-cm wide by 30-cm long by 1.2-cm thick) have been successfully produced by Hitchiner Gas Turbine Division, Milford, New Hampshire, using their patented counter gravity casting techniques. Details of the processing and resulting microstructures are discussed in this paper. Post casting processing and evaluation of system specific mechanical properties of these specimens are in progress.

  16. Multireflection boundary conditions for lattice Boltzmann models.

    PubMed

    Ginzburg, Irina; d'Humières, Dominique

    2003-12-01

    We present a general framework for several previously introduced boundary conditions for lattice Boltzmann models, such as the bounce-back rule and the linear and quadratic interpolations. The objectives are twofold: first to give theoretical tools to study the existing link-type boundary conditions and their corresponding accuracy; second to design boundary conditions for general flows which are third-order kinetic accurate. Using these new boundary conditions, Couette and Poiseuille flows are exact solutions of the lattice Boltzmann models for a Reynolds number Re=0 (Stokes limit) for arbitrary inclination with the lattice directions. Numerical comparisons are given for Stokes flows in periodic arrays of spheres and cylinders, linear periodic array of cylinders between moving plates, and for Navier-Stokes flows in periodic arrays of cylinders for Re<200. These results show a significant improvement of the overall accuracy when using the linear interpolations instead of the bounce-back reflection (up to an order of magnitude on the hydrodynamics fields). Further improvement is achieved with the new multireflection boundary conditions, reaching a level of accuracy close to the quasianalytical reference solutions, even for rather modest grid resolutions and few points in the narrowest channels. More important, the pressure and velocity fields in the vicinity of the obstacles are much smoother with multireflection than with the other boundary conditions. Finally the good stability of these schemes is highlighted by some simulations of moving obstacles: a cylinder between flat walls and a sphere in a cylinder.

  17. Exploring Hyperons and Hypernuclei with Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    S.R. Beane; P.F. Bedaque; A. Parreno; M.J. Savage

    2005-01-01

    In this work we outline a program for lattice QCD that would provide a first step toward understanding the strong and weak interactions of strange baryons. The study of hypernuclear physics has provided a significant amount of information regarding the structure and weak decays of light nuclei containing one or two Lambda's, and Sigma's. From a theoretical standpoint, little is known about the hyperon-nucleon interaction, which is required input for systematic calculations of hypernuclear structure. Furthermore, the long-standing discrepancies in the P-wave amplitudes for nonleptonic hyperon decays remain to be understood, and their resolution is central to a better understanding of the weak decays of hypernuclei. We present a framework that utilizes Luscher's finite-volume techniques in lattice QCD to extract the scattering length and effective range for Lambda-N scattering in both QCD and partially-quenched QCD. The effective theory describing the nonleptonic decays of hyperons using isospin symmetry alone, appropriate for lattice calculations, is constructed.

  18. Lattice gauge theories and Monte Carlo algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1988-10-01

    Lattice gauge theory has become the primary tool for non-perturbative calculations in quantum field theory. These lectures review some of the foundations of this subject. The first lecture reviews the basic definition of the theory in terms of invariant integrals over group elements on lattice bonds. The lattice represents an ultraviolet cutoff, and renormalization group arguments show how the bare coupling must be varied to obtain the continuum limit. Expansions in the inverse of the coupling constant demonstrate quark confinement in the strong coupling limit. The second lecture turns to numerical simulation, which has become an important approach to calculating hadronic properties. Here I discuss the basic algorithms for obtaining appropriately weighted gauge field configurations. The third lecture turns to algorithms for treating fermionic fields, which still require considerably more computer time than needed for purely bosonic simulations. Some particularly promising recent approaches are based on global accept-reject steps and should display a rather favorable dependence of computer time on the system volume. 34 refs.

  19. Hyperon-nucleon force from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemura, Hidekatsu; Ishii, Noriyoshi; Aoki, Sinya; Hatsuda, Tetsuo

    2009-03-01

    We calculate potentials between a proton and a Ξ0 (hyperon with strangeness -2) through the equal-time Bethe-Salpeter wave function, employing quenched lattice QCD simulations with the plaquette gauge action and the Wilson quark action on (4.5 fm)4 lattice at the lattice spacing a ≃ 0.14 fm. The ud quark mass in our study corresponds to mπ ≃ 0.37 and 0.51 GeV, while the s quark mass corresponds to the physical value of mK. The central pΞ0 potential has a strong (weak) repulsive core in the S10 (S31) channel for r ≲ 0.6 fm, while the potential has attractive well at medium and long distances (0.6 fm ≲ r ≲ 1.2 fm) in both channels. The sign of the pΞ0 scattering length and its quark mass dependence indicate a net attraction in both channels at low energies.

  20. Lattice Boltzmann method and channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stensholt, Sigvat; Mongstad Hope, Sigmund

    2016-07-01

    Lattice Boltzmann methods are presented at an introductory level with a focus on fairly simple simulations that can be used to test and illustrate the model’s capabilities. Two scenarios are presented. The first is a simple laminar flow in a straight channel driven by a pressure gradient (Poiseuille flow). The second is a more complex, including a wedge where Moffatt vortices may be induced if the wedge is deep enough. Simulations of the Poiseuille flow scenario accurately capture the theoretical velocity profile. The experiment shows the location of the fluid-wall boundary and the effects viscosity has on the velocity and convergence time. The numerical capabilities of the lattice Boltzmann model are tested further by simulating the more complex Moffatt vortex scenario. The method reproduces with high accuracy the theoretical predction that Moffat vortices will not form in a wedge if the vertex angle exceeds 146°. Practical issues limitations of the lattice Boltzmann method are discussed. In particular the accuracy of the bounce-back boundary condition is first order dependent on the grid resolution.

  1. Lattice QCD studies of pentaquarks and exotics

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Lasscock; John Hedditch; Waseem Kamleh; Derek Leinweber; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Anthony Thomas; Anthony Williams; Ross Young; James Zanotti

    2005-09-14

    The possible discovery of the {Theta}{sup +} pentaquark has motivated a number of studies into its nature using lattice QCD. Initial studies focused on spin-1/2 states and more recently also spin-3/2 states. Here we report the results of the first exploratory study in quenched lattice QCD of pentaquarks with both spin-1/2 and spin-3/2 using the FLIC fermion action. We do not find any evidence for the standard lattice resonance signature of attraction (i.e. binding at quark masses near the physical regime) in the spin-1/2 channels or in the J{sup P} = 3/2{sup -} channel. Some evidence of binding is inferred in the isoscalar 3/2{sup +} channel. We also present the results of our study into exotic meson states using hybrid meson interpolators with explicit gluonic degrees of freedom. We find a candidate for the J{sup PC} = 1{sup {-+}} exotic meson which has a mass consistent with the {pi}{sub 1}(1600) experimental candidate.

  2. Diquark mass differences from unquenched lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Yujiang; Cai, Hao; Chen, Ying; Gong, Ming; Liu, Zhaofeng; Qiao, Hao-Xue; Yang, Yi-Bo

    2016-07-01

    We calculate diquark correlation functions in the Landau gauge on the lattice using overlap valence quarks and 2+1-flavor domain wall fermion configurations. Quark masses are extracted from the scalar part of quark propagators in the Landau gauge. The scalar diquark quark mass difference and axial vector scalar diquark mass difference are obtained for diquarks composed of two light quarks and of a strange and a light quark. The light sea quark mass dependence of the results is examined. Two lattice spacings are used to check the discretization effects. The coarse and fine lattices are of sizes 243 × 64 and 323 × 64 with inverse spacings 1/a = 1.75(4) GeV and 2.33(5) GeV, respectively. Supported by National Science Foundation of China (11575197, 10835002, 11405178, 11335001), joint funds of NSFC (U1232109), MG and ZL are partially supported by the Youth Innovation Promotion Association of CAS (2015013, 2011013), YC and ZL acknowledge support of NSFC and DFG (CRC110)

  3. National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, Richard C.

    2014-04-15

    SciDAC-2 Project The Secret Life of Quarks: National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory, from March 15, 2011 through March 14, 2012. The objective of this project is to construct the software needed to study quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the theory of the strong interactions of sub-atomic physics, and other strongly coupled gauge field theories anticipated to be of importance in the energy regime made accessible by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It builds upon the successful efforts of the SciDAC-1 project National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory, in which a QCD Applications Programming Interface (QCD API) was developed that enables lattice gauge theorists to make effective use of a wide variety of massively parallel computers. This project serves the entire USQCD Collaboration, which consists of nearly all the high energy and nuclear physicists in the United States engaged in the numerical study of QCD and related strongly interacting quantum field theories. All software developed in it is publicly available, and can be downloaded from a link on the USQCD Collaboration web site, or directly from the github repositories with entrance linke http://usqcd-software.github.io

  4. Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Zachary S.; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-19

    In this study, we calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physicalmore » pion mass using SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.« less

  5. Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Zachary S.; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-19

    In this study, we calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physical pion mass using SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.

  6. Geometry and symmetries in lattice spinor gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Wetterich, C.

    2012-09-15

    Lattice spinor gravity is a proposal for regularized quantum gravity based on fermionic degrees of freedom. In our lattice model the local Lorentz symmetry is generalized to complex transformation parameters. The difference between space and time is not put in a priori, and the euclidean and the Minkowski quantum field theory are unified in one functional integral. The metric and its signature arise as a result of the dynamics, corresponding to a given ground state or cosmological solution. Geometrical objects as the vierbein, spin connection or the metric are expectation values of collective fields built from an even number of fermions. The quantum effective action for the metric is invariant under general coordinate transformations in the continuum limit. The action of our model is found to be also invariant under gauge transformations. We observe a 'geometrical entanglement' of gauge- and Lorentz-transformations due to geometrical objects transforming non-trivially under both types of symmetry transformations. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We formulate the geometrical aspects of a proposal for a lattice regularized model of quantum gravity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The vierbein shows an entanglement between Lorentz symmetry and gauge symmetry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Euclidean and Minkowski signatures of the collective metric and the vierbein are described within the same functional integral.

  7. Lattice gas hydrodynamics: Theory and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hasslacher, B.

    1993-01-01

    The first successful application of a microscopic analogy to create a skeleton cellular automaton and analyze it with statistical mechanical tools, was the work of Frisch, Hasslacher and Pomeau on the Navier-Stokes equation in two and three dimensions. This has become a very large research area with lattice gas models and methods being used for both fundamental investigations into the foundations of statistical mechanics and a large number of diverse applications. This present research was devoted to enlarging the fundamental scope of lattice gas models and proved successful. Since the beginning of this proposal, cellular automata have been constructed for statistical mechanical models, fluids, diffusion and shock systems in fundamental investigations. In applied areas, there are now excellent lattice gas models for complex flows through porous media, chemical reaction and combustion dynamics, multiphase flow systems, and fluid mixtures with natural boundaries. With extended cellular fluid models, one can do problems with arbitrary pairwise potentials. Recently, these have been applied to such problems as non-newtonian or polymeric liquids and a mixture of immiscible fluids passing through fractal or spongelike media in two and three dimensions. This proposal has contributed to and enlarged the scope of this work.

  8. Finite-temperature mechanical instability in disordered lattices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Leyou; Mao, Xiaoming

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical instability takes different forms in various ordered and disordered systems and little is known about how thermal fluctuations affect different classes of mechanical instabilities. We develop an analytic theory involving renormalization of rigidity and coherent potential approximation that can be used to understand finite-temperature mechanical stabilities in various disordered systems. We use this theory to study two disordered lattices: a randomly diluted triangular lattice and a randomly braced square lattice. These two lattices belong to two different universality classes as they approach mechanical instability at T=0. We show that thermal fluctuations stabilize both lattices. In particular, the triangular lattice displays a critical regime in which the shear modulus scales as G∼T(1/2), whereas the square lattice shows G∼T(2/3). We discuss generic scaling laws for finite-T mechanical instabilities and relate them to experimental systems. PMID:26986291

  9. Tunable Lattice-Induced Opacity for Matter Wave Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Greene, Chris H.

    2014-03-01

    We describe the novel phenomena of lattice-induced opacity in the process of matter wave scattering from a two dimensional atomic lattice. As an analogue to the confinement-induced resonance, the two dimensional atomic lattice can be tuned to complete opacity to a normally incident low energy matter wave, by changing the s-wave scattering length between the matter wave and the atoms in the lattice. A scheme for a matter wave transistor is proposed based on the transmission-reflection properties of the matter wave through the atomic lattice. We also propose a matter wave cavity, constructed by two parallel 2D atomic lattices that are both opaque to the matter wave. In higher kinetic energy regimes of the matter wave, the two dimensional atomic lattice is shown to be a matter wave beam splitter and wave plate, with tunable peak intensity into different directions.

  10. Optimum lattice arrangement developed from a rigorous analytical basis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, J.

    1976-01-01

    The spanwise vortex-lattice arrangement is mathematically established by lattice solutions of the slender wing which are shown to be analogous to the chordwise vortex-lattice thin wing solution. Solutions for any number N of panels wing theory lift and induced drag and thin wing theory lift and moment are predicted exactly. As N approaches infinity, the slender wing elliptic spanwise loading and thin wing cotangent chordwise loading are predicted, which proves there is mathematical convergence of the vortex-lattice method to the exact answer. Based on this planform spanwise lattice arrangement, an A-vortex-lattice spanwise system is developed for an arbitrary aspect ratio A. This A-lattice has the optimum characteristic of predicting lift accurately for any value of N.

  11. Outcome of tyrosinaemia type III.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, C J; Holme, E; Standing, S; Preece, M A; Green, A; Ploechl, E; Ugarte, M; Trefz, F K; Leonard, J V

    2001-12-01

    Tyrosinaemia type III is a rare disorder caused by a deficiency of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase, the second enzyme in the catabolic pathway of tyrosine. The majority of the nine previously reported patients have presented with neurological symptoms after the neonatal period, while others detected by neonatal screening have been asymptomatic. All have had normal liver and renal function and none has skin or eye abnormalities. A further four patients with tyrosinaemia type III are described. It is not clear whether a strict low tyrosine diet alters the natural history of tyrosinaemia type III, although there remains a suspicion that treatment may be important, at least in infancy.

  12. Solution of an associating lattice-gas model with density anomaly on a Husimi lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Tiago J.; Stilck, Jürgen F.; Barbosa, Marco Aurélio A.

    2010-11-01

    We study a model of a lattice gas with orientational degrees of freedom which resemble the formation of hydrogen bonds between the molecules. In this model, which is the simplified version of the Henriques-Barbosa model, no distinction is made between donors and acceptors in the bonding arms. We solve the model in the grand-canonical ensemble on a Husimi lattice built with hexagonal plaquettes with a central site. The ground state of the model, which was originally defined on the triangular lattice, is exactly reproduced by the solution on this Husimi lattice. In the phase diagram, one gas and two liquid [high density liquid (HDL) and low density liquid (LDL)] phases are present. All phase transitions (GAS-LDL, GAS-HDL, and LDL-HDL) are discontinuous, and the three phases coexist at a triple point. A line of temperatures of maximum density in the isobars is found in the metastable GAS phase, as well as another line of temperatures of minimum density appears in the LDL phase, part of it in the stable region and another in the metastable region of this phase. These findings are at variance with simulational results for the same model on the triangular lattice, which suggested a phase diagram with two critical points. However, our results show very good quantitative agreement with the simulations, both for the coexistence loci and the densities of particles and of hydrogen bonds. We discuss the comparison of the simulations with our results.

  13. Solution of an associating lattice-gas model with density anomaly on a Husimi lattice.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Tiago J; Stilck, Jürgen F; Barbosa, Marco Aurélio A

    2010-11-01

    We study a model of a lattice gas with orientational degrees of freedom which resemble the formation of hydrogen bonds between the molecules. In this model, which is the simplified version of the Henriques-Barbosa model, no distinction is made between donors and acceptors in the bonding arms. We solve the model in the grand-canonical ensemble on a Husimi lattice built with hexagonal plaquettes with a central site. The ground state of the model, which was originally defined on the triangular lattice, is exactly reproduced by the solution on this Husimi lattice. In the phase diagram, one gas and two liquid [high density liquid (HDL) and low density liquid (LDL)] phases are present. All phase transitions (GAS-LDL, GAS-HDL, and LDL-HDL) are discontinuous, and the three phases coexist at a triple point. A line of temperatures of maximum density in the isobars is found in the metastable GAS phase, as well as another line of temperatures of minimum density appears in the LDL phase, part of it in the stable region and another in the metastable region of this phase. These findings are at variance with simulational results for the same model on the triangular lattice, which suggested a phase diagram with two critical points. However, our results show very good quantitative agreement with the simulations, both for the coexistence loci and the densities of particles and of hydrogen bonds. We discuss the comparison of the simulations with our results.

  14. Dimorphic cerium(III) oxoarsenate(III) Ce[AsO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledderboge, Florian; Metzger, Sebastian J.; Heymann, Gunter; Huppertz, Hubert; Schleid, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Colourless, water- and air-stable single crystals of cerium(III) oxoarsenate(III) Ce[AsO3] were prepared by the reaction of cerium metal (Ce) and arsenic sesquioxide (As2O3) in the presence of cesium chloride (CsCl) as fluxing agent at 750 °C in an evacuated silica ampoule. Ce[AsO3] crystallizes monoclinically (a = 902.89(8), b = 782.54(7), c = 829.68(7) pm, β = 103.393(3)°, Z = 8) in the space group P21/c and is isotypic with α-Pb[SeO3]. There are two crystallographically different Ce3+ positions. (Ce1)3+ is coordinated by nine oxygen atoms (d(Ce-O) = 244-286 pm) and (Ce2)3+ by only eight (d(Ce-O) = 239-273 pm). Both crystallographically different As3+ cations form discrete ψ1 tetrahedra [AsO3]3- (d(As-O) = 174-179 pm), which are attached to the Ce3+ cations via edges and corners. The second monoclinic modification of Ce[AsO3] with the lattice parameters a = 439.32(4), b = 529.21(5), c = 617.34(6) pm and β = 105.369(3)° with Z = 2 was obtained by high-pressure synthesis (11 GPa, 1200 °C) and has both a higher density (6.31 vs. 6.13 g · cm-3) and a higher calculated Madelung part of the lattice energy (15,155 vs. 15,132 kJ · mol-1). It adopts the space group P21/m, crystallizing isotypically with La[AsO3], β-Pb[SeO3], Pb[SO3] (scotlandite) or K[ClO3] and exhibits nine-fold coordinated Ce3+ cations exclusively (d(Ce-O) = 254-287 pm) along with tripodal [AsO3]3- anions (d(As-O) = 175-176 pm). Raman spectroscopy on both phases of Ce[AsO3] shows stretching vibrations between 769 and 731 cm-1 as well as asymmetric vibrations in the range of 659-617 cm-1. The symmetric bending mode vibrations emerge in an interval from 340 to 410 cm-1 and the asymmetric bending modes range between 230 and 290 cm-1.

  15. LATTICE QCD AT FINITE TEMPERATURE AND DENSITY.

    SciTech Connect

    BLUM,T.; CREUTZ,M.; PETRECZKY,P.

    2004-02-24

    With the operation of the RHIC heavy ion program, the theoretical understanding of QCD at finite temperature and density has become increasingly important. Though QCD at finite temperature has been extensively studied using lattice Monte-Carlo simulations over the past twenty years, most physical questions relevant for RHIC (and future) heavy ion experiments remain open. In lattice QCD at finite temperature and density there have been at least two major advances in recent years. First, for the first time calculations of real time quantities, like meson spectral functions have become available. Second, the lattice study of the QCD phase diagram and equation of state have been extended to finite baryon density by several groups. Both issues were extensively discussed in the course of the workshop. A real highlight was the study of the QCD phase diagram in (T, {mu})-plane by Z. Fodor and S. Katz and the determination of the critical end-point for the physical value of the pion mass. This was the first time such lattice calculations at, the physical pion mass have been performed. Results by Z Fodor and S. Katz were obtained using a multi-parameter re-weighting method. Other determinations of the critical end point were also presented, in particular using a Taylor expansion around {mu} = 0 (Bielefeld group, Ejiri et al.) and using analytic continuation from imaginary chemical potential (Ph. de Forcrand and O. Philipsen). The result based on Taylor expansion agrees within errors with the new prediction of Z. Fodor and S. Katz, while methods based on analytic continuation still predict a higher value for the critical baryon density. Most of the thermodynamics studies in full QCD (including those presented at this workshop) have been performed using quite coarse lattices, a = 0.2-0.3 fm. Therefore one may worry about cutoff effects in different thermodynamic quantities, like the transition temperature T{sub tr}. At the workshop U. Heller presented a study of the transition

  16. Insertion devices for Doris III

    SciTech Connect

    Pfluger, J.; Heintze, G. ); Baran, W.; Fernow, D.; Kuntze, K. )

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the mechanical and magnetic layout of the first three insertion devices for DORIS III, an upgraded reconstruction of DORIS II, is described and results of the magnetic characterization are given as well.

  17. Continuum behavior of lattice QED, discretized with one-sided lattice differences, in one-loop order

    SciTech Connect

    Sadooghi, N.; Rothe, H.J.

    1997-06-01

    A lattice action for QED is considered, where the derivatives in the Dirac operator are replaced by one-sided lattice differences. A systematic expansion in the lattice spacing of the one-loop contribution to the fermion self-energy, vacuum polarization tensor, and vertex function is carried out for an arbitrary choice of one-sided lattice differences. It is shown that only the vacuum polarization tensor possesses the correct continuum limit, while the fermion self-energy and vertex function receive noncovariant contributions. A lattice action, discretized with a fixed choice of one-sided lattice differences, therefore, does not define a renormalizable field theory. The noncovariant contributions can, however, be eliminated by averaging the expression over all possible choices of one-sided lattice differences. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Conjugate heat and mass transfer in the lattice Boltzmann equation method.

    PubMed

    Li, Like; Chen, Chen; Mei, Renwei; Klausner, James F

    2014-04-01

    An interface treatment for conjugate heat and mass transfer in the lattice Boltzmann equation method is proposed based on our previously proposed second-order accurate Dirichlet and Neumann boundary schemes. The continuity of temperature (concentration) and its flux at the interface for heat (mass) transfer is intrinsically satisfied without iterative computations, and the interfacial temperature (concentration) and their fluxes are conveniently obtained from the microscopic distribution functions without finite-difference calculations. The present treatment takes into account the local geometry of the interface so that it can be directly applied to curved interface problems such as conjugate heat and mass transfer in porous media. For straight interfaces or curved interfaces with no tangential gradient, the coupling between the interfacial fluxes along the discrete lattice velocity directions is eliminated and thus the proposed interface schemes can be greatly simplified. Several numerical tests are conducted to verify the applicability and accuracy of the proposed conjugate interface treatment, including (i) steady convection-diffusion in a channel containing two different fluids, (ii) unsteady convection-diffusion in the channel, (iii) steady heat conduction inside a circular domain with two different solid materials, and (iv) unsteady mass transfer from a spherical droplet in an extensional creeping flow. The accuracy and order of convergence of the simulated interior temperature (concentration) field, the interfacial temperature (concentration), and heat (mass) flux are examined in detail and compared with those obtained from the "half-lattice division" treatment in the literature. The present analysis and numerical results show that the half-lattice division scheme is second-order accurate only when the interface is fixed at the center of the lattice links, while the present treatment preserves second-order accuracy for arbitrary link fractions. For curved

  19. Conjugate heat and mass transfer in the lattice Boltzmann equation method

    SciTech Connect

    Li, LK; Chen, C; Mei, RW; Klausner, JF

    2014-04-22

    An interface treatment for conjugate heat and mass transfer in the lattice Boltzmann equation method is proposed based on our previously proposed second-order accurate Dirichlet and Neumann boundary schemes. The continuity of temperature (concentration) and its flux at the interface for heat (mass) transfer is intrinsically satisfied without iterative computations, and the interfacial temperature (concentration) and their fluxes are conveniently obtained from the microscopic distribution functions without finite-difference calculations. The present treatment takes into account the local geometry of the interface so that it can be directly applied to curved interface problems such as conjugate heat and mass transfer in porous media. For straight interfaces or curved interfaces with no tangential gradient, the coupling between the interfacial fluxes along the discrete lattice velocity directions is eliminated and thus the proposed interface schemes can be greatly simplified. Several numerical tests are conducted to verify the applicability and accuracy of the proposed conjugate interface treatment, including (i) steady convection-diffusion in a channel containing two different fluids, (ii) unsteady convection-diffusion in the channel, (iii) steady heat conduction inside a circular domain with two different solid materials, and (iv) unsteady mass transfer from a spherical droplet in an extensional creeping flow. The accuracy and order of convergence of the simulated interior temperature (concentration) field, the interfacial temperature (concentration), and heat (mass) flux are examined in detail and compared with those obtained from the "half-lattice division" treatment in the literature. The present analysis and numerical results show that the half-lattice division scheme is second-order accurate only when the interface is fixed at the center of the lattice links, while the present treatment preserves second-order accuracy for arbitrary link fractions. For curved

  20. Lattice Boltzmann method for simulation of compressible flows on standard lattices.

    PubMed

    Prasianakis, Nikolaos I; Karlin, Iliya V

    2008-07-01

    The recently introduced lattice Boltzmann model for thermal flow simulation on a standard lattice [Prasianakis and Karlin, Phys. Rev. E 76, 016702 (2007)] is studied numerically in the case where compressibility effects are essential. It is demonstrated that the speed of sound and shock propagation are described correctly in a wide temperature range, and that it is possible to take into account additional physics such as heat sources and sinks. A remarkable simplicity of the model makes it viable for engineering applications in subsonic flows with large temperature and density variations. PMID:18764078

  1. Evolution of the Hofstadter butterfly in a tunable optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, F.; Ünal, F. Nur; Oktel, M. Ã.-.

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in realizing artificial gauge fields on optical lattices promise experimental detection of topologically nontrivial energy spectra. Self-similar fractal energy structures generally known as Hofstadter butterflies depend sensitively on the geometry of the underlying lattice, as well as the applied magnetic field. The recent demonstration of an adjustable lattice geometry [L. Tarruell, D. Greif, T. Uehlinger, G. Jotzu, and T. Esslinger, Nature (London) 483, 302 (2012), 10.1038/nature10871] presents a unique opportunity to study this dependence. In this paper, we calculate the Hofstadter butterflies that can be obtained in such an adjustable lattice and find three qualitatively different regimes. We show that the existence of Dirac points at zero magnetic field does not imply the topological equivalence of spectra at finite field. As the real-space structure evolves from the checkerboard lattice to the honeycomb lattice, two square-lattice Hofstadter butterflies merge to form a honeycomb lattice butterfly. This merging is topologically nontrivial, as it is accomplished by sequential closings of gaps. Ensuing Chern number transfer between the bands can be probed with the adjustable lattice experiments. We also calculate the Chern numbers of the gaps for qualitatively different spectra and discuss the evolution of topological properties with underlying lattice geometry.

  2. Iron Isotope Fractionations Reveal a Finite Bioavailable Fe Pool for Structural Fe(III) Reduction in Nontronite.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bingjie; Liu, Kai; Wu, Lingling; Li, Weiqiang; Smeaton, Christina M; Beard, Brian L; Johnson, Clark M; Roden, Eric E; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2016-08-16

    We report on stable Fe isotope fractionation during microbial and chemical reduction of structural Fe(III) in nontronite NAu-1. (56)Fe/(54)Fe fractionation factors between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) ranged from -1.2 to +0.8‰. Microbial (Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens) and chemical (dithionite) reduction experiments revealed a two-stage process. Stage 1 was characterized by rapid reduction of a finite Fe(III) pool along the edges of the clay particles, accompanied by a limited release to solution of Fe(II), which partially adsorbed onto basal planes. Stable Fe isotope compositions revealed that electron transfer and atom exchange (ETAE) occurred between edge-bound Fe(II) and octahedral (structural) Fe(III) within the clay lattice, as well as between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) via a transient sorbed phase. The isotopic fractionation factors decreased with increasing extent of reduction as a result of the depletion of the finite bioavailable Fe(III) pool. During stage 2, microbial reduction was inhibited while chemical reduction continued. However, further ETAE between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) was not observed. Our results imply that the pool of bioavailable Fe(III) is restricted to structural Fe sites located near the edges of the clay particles. Blockage of ETAE distinguishes Fe(III) reduction of layered clay minerals from that of Fe oxyhydroxides, where accumulation of structural Fe(II) is much more limited. PMID:27291525

  3. Iron Isotope Fractionations Reveal a Finite Bioavailable Fe Pool for Structural Fe(III) Reduction in Nontronite.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bingjie; Liu, Kai; Wu, Lingling; Li, Weiqiang; Smeaton, Christina M; Beard, Brian L; Johnson, Clark M; Roden, Eric E; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2016-08-16

    We report on stable Fe isotope fractionation during microbial and chemical reduction of structural Fe(III) in nontronite NAu-1. (56)Fe/(54)Fe fractionation factors between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) ranged from -1.2 to +0.8‰. Microbial (Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens) and chemical (dithionite) reduction experiments revealed a two-stage process. Stage 1 was characterized by rapid reduction of a finite Fe(III) pool along the edges of the clay particles, accompanied by a limited release to solution of Fe(II), which partially adsorbed onto basal planes. Stable Fe isotope compositions revealed that electron transfer and atom exchange (ETAE) occurred between edge-bound Fe(II) and octahedral (structural) Fe(III) within the clay lattice, as well as between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) via a transient sorbed phase. The isotopic fractionation factors decreased with increasing extent of reduction as a result of the depletion of the finite bioavailable Fe(III) pool. During stage 2, microbial reduction was inhibited while chemical reduction continued. However, further ETAE between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) was not observed. Our results imply that the pool of bioavailable Fe(III) is restricted to structural Fe sites located near the edges of the clay particles. Blockage of ETAE distinguishes Fe(III) reduction of layered clay minerals from that of Fe oxyhydroxides, where accumulation of structural Fe(II) is much more limited.

  4. Group-III Nitride Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Berishev, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Field-emission devices (cold cathodes) having low electron affinities can be fabricated through lattice-mismatched epitaxial growth of nitrides of elements from group III of the periodic table. Field emission of electrons from solid surfaces is typically utilized in vacuum microelectronic devices, including some display devices. The present field-emission devices and the method of fabricating them were developed to satisfy needs to reduce the cost of fabricating field emitters, make them compatible with established techniques for deposition of and on silicon, and enable monolithic integration of field emitters with silicon-based driving circuitry. In fabricating a device of this type, one deposits a nitride of one or more group-III elements on a substrate of (111) silicon or other suitable material. One example of a suitable deposition process is chemical vapor deposition in a reactor that contains plasma generated by use of electron cyclotron resonance. Under properly chosen growth conditions, the large mismatch between the crystal lattices of the substrate and the nitride causes strains to accumulate in the growing nitride film, such that the associated stresses cause the film to crack. The cracks lie in planes parallel to the direction of growth, so that the growing nitride film becomes divided into microscopic growing single-crystal columns. The outer ends of the fully-grown columns can serve as field-emission tips. By virtue of their chemical compositions and crystalline structures, the columns have low work functions and high electrical conductivities, both of which are desirable for field emission of electrons. From examination of transmission electron micrographs of a prototype device, the average column width was determined to be about 100 nm and the sharpness of the tips was determined to be characterized by a dimension somewhat less than 100 nm. The areal density of the columns was found to about 5 x 10(exp 9)/sq cm . about 4 to 5 orders of magnitude

  5. Measurements on Compressor-Blade Lattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinig, F.

    1948-01-01

    At the end & 1940 an investigation of a guide-vane lattice for the compressor of a TL unit [NACA comment: Turbojet] was requested. The greatest possible Mach number had to be attained. The investigation was conducted with an annular lattice subjected to axial flow. A direct-current shunt motor with a useful output of 235 horsepower at en engine speed of 1800 qm was available for driving the necessary blower. In designing the blower the speed was set at 10,000 rpm. A gear box fran an armored car was used as gearing in which supplementary fresh oil lubrication was installed. The gear box was used to step up from low to high speeds. The blower that was designed is two stage. The hub-tip ratios are 0.79 to 0.82; the design pressure coefficient for each stage is 0.6 and the design flow coefficient is 0.4. The rotor dosimeter D sub a is 0.39 meters and the resulting peripheral speed is u sub a = 204 meters per second [NACA comment: Value corrected from the German]. The blower was entirely satisfactory. The construction of the test stand is shown in figure 1. The air flows in through an annular Inlet, which is used in the measurement of the quantity of air, and is deflected into an inward-pointing radial slot. A spiral motion is imparted to the air by a guide-vane installation manually adjustable as desired, which enables injection of the air, after it has been deflected from the radial direction to the axial direction, into the lattice being investigated at any desired angle.

  6. Achromatic lattice comparison for light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Crosbie, E.A.; Cho, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The next generation of synchrotron light sources are being designed to support a large number of undulators and require long dispersion-free insertion regions. With less demand for radiation from the dipole magnets, the storage ring cost per undulator beam can be reduced by decreasing the number of dipole magnets and increasing the number of dispersion free straight sections. The two simplest achromatic lattices are the Chasman-Green or double-bend achromatic (DBA) and the three-bend achromat (TBA). The DBA in its simplest form consists of a single horizontally-focussing quadrupole between the two dipole magnets. Since this quadrupole strength is fixed by the achromatic condition, the natural emittance (/var epsilon//sub n/) may vary as the beta functions in the insertion region (IR) are varied. The expanded Chasman-Green (also DBA) uses multiple quadrupoles in the dispersive section to provide emittance control independent of the beta functions in the IR. Although this provides flexibility in the ID beta functions, the horizontal phase advance is constrained to /phi/ /approx equal/ 180/degree/ between approximately the centers of the dipole magnets. If small /var epsilon//sub n/ is required, the horizontal phase advance between the dipoles will be near one and the lattice properties will be dominated by this systematic resonance. The TBA lattice places a third dipole between the DBA dipoles, eliminating the 180/degree/ horizontal phase advance constraint. However, the requirement of small /var epsilon//sub n/ limits the range of tune, since /mu//sub x/ /approx equal/ 1.29 in the dipoles alone for /var epsilon//sub n/ near its minimum value. The minimum emittance is five times smaller for the TBA than for the DBA with the same number of periods and, therefore, its phase advance can be relaxed more than the DBA for the same natural emittance. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Lattice model for water-solute mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, A. P.; Almarza, N. G.; Barbosa, M. C.

    2016-10-01

    A lattice model for the study of mixtures of associating liquids is proposed. Solvent and solute are modeled by adapting the associating lattice gas (ALG) model. The nature of interaction of solute/solvent is controlled by tuning the energy interactions between the patches of ALG model. We have studied three set of parameters, resulting in, hydrophilic, inert, and hydrophobic interactions. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations were carried out, and the behavior of pure components and the excess properties of the mixtures have been studied. The pure components, water (solvent) and solute, have quite similar phase diagrams, presenting gas, low density liquid, and high density liquid phases. In the case of solute, the regions of coexistence are substantially reduced when compared with both the water and the standard ALG models. A numerical procedure has been developed in order to attain series of results at constant pressure from simulations of the lattice gas model in the grand canonical ensemble. The excess properties of the mixtures, volume and enthalpy as the function of the solute fraction, have been studied for different interaction parameters of the model. Our model is able to reproduce qualitatively well the excess volume and enthalpy for different aqueous solutions. For the hydrophilic case, we show that the model is able to reproduce the excess volume and enthalpy of mixtures of small alcohols and amines. The inert case reproduces the behavior of large alcohols such as propanol, butanol, and pentanol. For the last case (hydrophobic), the excess properties reproduce the behavior of ionic liquids in aqueous solution.

  8. Minimum emittance in TBA and MBA lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Peng, Yue-Mei

    2015-03-01

    For reaching a small emittance in a modern light source, triple bend achromats (TBA), theoretical minimum emittance (TME) and even multiple bend achromats (MBA) have been considered. This paper derived the necessary condition for achieving minimum emittance in TBA and MBA theoretically, where the bending angle of inner dipoles has a factor of 31/3 bigger than that of the outer dipoles. Here, we also calculated the conditions attaining the minimum emittance of TBA related to phase advance in some special cases with a pure mathematics method. These results may give some directions on lattice design.

  9. Lattice Design for the LHEC Recirculating Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; Eide, Anders; Zimmermann, Frank; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2011-05-20

    In this paper, we present a lattice design for the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC) recirculating linac. The recirculating linac consists of one roughly 3-km long linac hosting superconducting RF (SRF) accelerating cavities, two arcs and one transfer line for the recirculation. In two passes through a pulsed SRF linac the electron beam can get a maximum energy of 140 GeV. Alternatively, in the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) option the beam passes through a CW linac four times (two passes for acceleration and two for deceleration) for a maximum energy of 60 GeV.

  10. Latest Lattice Results for Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, David

    2010-09-01

    Theoretical and computational advances have enabled not only the masses of the ground states, but also some of the low-lying excited states to be calculated using Lattice Gauge Theory. In this talk, I look at recent progress aimed at understanding the spectrum of baryon excited states, including both baryons composed of the light $u$ and $d$ quarks, and of the heavier quarks. I then describe recent work aimed at understanding the radiative transitions between baryons, and in particular the $N-{\\rm Roper}$ transition. I conclude with the prospects for future calculations.

  11. Kemp Echo Lattices Incorporating Hair Cell Nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellami, Louiza

    In this thesis we develop a two-part model of the inner ear that can be used to simulate Kemp echoes, in their impulse response, and from which a characterization of the cochlea can be made. To accomplish this task, in the first part, we propose a linear digital scattering model of the cochlea, based on the well known unidimensional transmission line model into which we incorporate nonuniform and loss properties. The lattice structure of the digital scattering model is obtained by rephrasing the model equations in terms of incident and reflected waves. A spectral estimation method, which treats the system as an ARMA filter with a minimum phase transfer function of unknown degree, is used to estimate the transfer function of the cochlea. This method utilizes the theory of positive real and bounded real functions and Richard's theorem on the concept of degree reduction to determine both the degree and the predictor coefficients of the filter. The scattering model is then realized, using a new synthesis technique, from the overall transfer function and the zeros of transmission, as a cascade of real lossless lattice filters of degree two, closed on a load section. To change the nature of the sections from lossless to lossy, a new method, based on the properties of the proposed lattice structure and the damping parameter of the cochlea, was developed to distribute the load factor among the sections. Each lattice filter is described by a transfer scattering matrix whose entries are functions of the mechanical and geometrical parameters of the cochlea. The proposed synthesis method leads to a systematic estimation of the parameters of the cochlea. In the second part, we introduce a nonlinear bidirectional mechano-electrical model of a hair cell, estimate its components from experimental data, analyze its behavior, simulate it, and compare the results with experimental findings. We than propose a schematic procedure to realize a nonlinear model of the cochlea by

  12. Unidirectional Transition Waves in Bistable Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadkarni, Neel; Arrieta, Andres F.; Chong, Christopher; Kochmann, Dennis M.; Daraio, Chiara

    2016-06-01

    We present a model system for strongly nonlinear transition waves generated in a periodic lattice of bistable members connected by magnetic links. The asymmetry of the on-site energy wells created by the bistable members produces a mechanical diode that supports only unidirectional transition wave propagation with constant wave velocity. We theoretically justify the cause of the unidirectionality of the transition wave and confirm these predictions by experiments and simulations. We further identify how the wave velocity and profile are uniquely linked to the double-well energy landscape, which serves as a blueprint for transition wave control.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann approach to thermal transpiration

    SciTech Connect

    Sofonea, Victor

    2006-11-15

    Diffuse reflection boundary conditions are introduced in a thermal lattice Boltzmann model to allow for variable fluid density and temperature along the walls. The capability of this model to capture the main characteristics of the thermal transpiration phenomenon in a box at nonvanishing Knudsen numbers is demonstrated. The thermal creep velocity is found to be proportional to the temperature gradient imposed at the wall, whereas the accuracy of the simulation results are found to be of first or second order, depending on the numerical scheme.

  14. Study of hadron deformation in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrou, Constantia; Koutsou, Giannis

    2008-11-01

    We develop the formalism for the evaluation of density-density correlators in lattice QCD that includes techniques for the computation of the all-to-all propagators involved. A novel technique in this context is the implementation of the one-end trick in the meson sector. Density-density correlators provide a gauge invariant definition for the hadron wave function and yield information on hadron deformation. We evaluate density-density correlators using two degenerate flavors of dynamical Wilson fermions for the pion, the rho meson, the nucleon, and the {delta}. Using the one-end trick we obtain results that clearly show deformation of the rho meson.

  15. Lattice QCD calculation using VPP500

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seyong; Ohta, Shigemi

    1995-02-01

    A new vector parallel supercomputer, Fujitsu VPP500, was installed at RIKEN earlier this year. It consists of 30 vector computers, each with 1.6 GFLOPS peak speed and 256 MB memory, connected by a crossbar switch with 400 MB/s peak data transfer rate each way between any pair of nodes. The authors developed a Fortran lattice QCD simulation code for it. It runs at about 1.1 GFLOPS sustained per node for Metropolis pure-gauge update, and about 0.8 GFLOPS sustained per node for conjugate gradient inversion of staggered fermion matrix.

  16. SKEW QUADRUPOLE FOCUSING LATTICES AND APPLICATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    PARKER,B.

    2001-06-18

    In this paper we revisit using skew quadrupole fields in place of traditional normal upright quadrupole fields to make beam focusing structures. We illustrate by example skew lattice decoupling, dispersion suppression and chromatic correction using the neutrino factory Study-II muon storage ring design. Ongoing BNL investigation of flat coil magnet structures that allow building a very compact muon storage ring arc and other flat coil configurations that might bring significant magnet cost reduction to a VLHC motivate our study of skew focusing.

  17. Extended Scaling Relations for Planar Lattice Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benfatto, G.; Falco, P.; Mastropietro, V.

    2009-12-01

    It is widely believed that the critical properties of several planar lattice systems, like the Eight Vertex or the Ashkin-Teller models, are well described by an effective continuum fermionic theory obtained as a formal scaling limit. On the basis of this assumption several extended scaling relations among their indices were conjectured. We prove the validity of some of them, among which the ones predicted by Kadanoff (Phys Rev Lett 39:903-905, 1977) and by Luther and Peschel (Phys Rev B 12:3908-3917, 1975).

  18. Lattice QCD Thermodynamics First 5000 Trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Soltz, R; Gupta, R

    2007-03-15

    These results represent the first LQCD analysis for approximately 5000 trajectories with each of the p4rhmc and milc codes, with some of the lower temperature runs having fewer. Both runs were for lattice dimensions of 32{sup 3}x8. Some 32{sup 4} T=0 jobs were also run for p4rhmc. The p4 calculation was performed with v2.0 QMP{_}MPI.X (semi-optimized p4 code using qmp over mpi) and milc version of the su3 rhmc susc eos executable dated Mar 1, 2007 on ubgl in the /usr/gapps/hip/qcd/milc/bin subdirectory (svn revision 28). As with previous runs, calculations were performed along lines of constant physics, with the light quark masses 2-3 times their physics values and the strange quark mass set by m{sub ud} = 0.1m{sub s}. Job submissions were performed using a new subSet.pl job submission script that locates current jobs and submits additional jobs with the same beta value as pending. Note that after reaching a limit of about 35 jobs subsequent submissions are delayed and will not be submitted directly from that state. The job submission script was used to submit revised versions of the milc and p4rhmc csh scripts. Initial thermalized lattices for each code were also for milc (taken from the firstPhys runs), but the p4rhmc runs include thermalization. The only modifications for running on BG/L were to the directory names and the mT parameter which determines job durations (24 hrs on BG/L vs. 4 hrs on ubgl). All finite temperature jobs were submitted to the 512 node partitions, and all T=0 runs were submitted to 2048 node partitions. The set of runs was plagued by filesystem errors on lscratch1 and lscratcH{sub 2}. Many jobs had to be reset (deleting the most recent output file for milc and/or lattice for p4) and resubmitted. The analysis was performed with a new set of scripts that produced a more condensed output for scanning. All scans were verified with checksums, which have been retained in the output along with the line numbers. All lattices, log files, and job

  19. Vortex lattice inhomogeneity in spatially inhomogeneous superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehy, Daniel E.; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2004-11-01

    A trapped degenerate Bose gas exhibits superfluidity with spatially nonuniform superfluid density. We show that the vortex distribution in such a highly inhomogeneous rotating superfluid is nevertheless nearly uniform. The inhomogeneity in vortex density, which diminishes in the rapid-rotation limit, is driven by the discrete way vortices impart angular momentum to the superfluid. This effect favors the highest vortex density in regions where the superfluid density is most uniform (e.g., the center of a harmonically trapped gas). A striking consequence of this is that the boson velocity deviates from a rigid-body form exhibiting a radial-shear flow past the vortex lattice.

  20. Carousel deployment mechanism for coilable lattice truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warden, Robert M.; Jones, P. Alan

    1989-01-01

    The development of a mechanism for instrumentation and solar-array deployment is discussed. One part of the technology consists of a smart motor which can operate in either an analog mode to provide high speed and torque, or in the stepper mode to provide accurate positioning. The second technology consists of a coilable lattice mast which is deployed and rotated about its axis with a common drive system. A review of the design and function of the system is presented. Structural and thermal test data are included.