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Sample records for latvian gdp vary

  1. Applications of the Time-Varying Multi-Hazard Index to Armed Conflicts and GDP Growth Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isanuk, M.; Skorik, A.; Lerner-Lam, A.

    2004-12-01

    The time-varying Multi-Hazard Index has many potential applications for comparisons against quantitative measures of sustainable development. We have compared the time-varying severity of multiple natural hazards against time-varying socio-economic data for selected countries. Our analysis compares Gross Domestic Product (GDP) growth and armed conflict occurrence against multiple hazard severity as measured by an empirical time-varying multiple hazard index. The purpose of these analyses is to establish and characterize correlations between the Multi-Hazard Index and trends in GDP and conflicts over the past 25 years. To analyze the relationship between natural hazards and armed conflicts, the Multi-Hazard Index was correlated against the number of conflicts at each intensity level for individual countries. A preliminary analysis was performed studying the apparent relationship as well as the possible existence of time lags. In a similar although more quantitative analysis, the GDP data was correlated against the Multi-Hazard Index for a particular country at different time lags. Analysis involving the conflict datasets yielded varying results from country to country. Colombia shows the strongest correlation, with all positive values of the Multi-Hazard Index followed by an escalation in conflict intensity. The results for other countries are more difficult to interpret as certain years show increases in the number of conflicts at one intensity level and a decrease for other intensity levels. Some issues that need to be addressed include the coding of the intensity for the conflict data, the dating for both conflicts and hazards, and the use of national boundaries as geographic extents. The degree of correlation between GDP growth and the Multi-Hazard Index varies from country to country as well. Our calculations for Honduras show an extremely high correlation, for example, implying a strong economic sensitivity to natural hazards, whereas for China no significant

  2. Paranormal beliefs of Latvian college students: a Latvian version of the revised paranormal belief scale.

    PubMed

    Utinans, A; Ancane, G; Tobacyk, J J; Boyraz, G; Livingston, M M; Tobacyk, J S

    2015-02-01

    A Latvian version of the Revised Paranormal Belief Scale (RPBS) was completed by 229 Latvian university students. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed six relatively independent factors labeled Magical Abilities, Psychokinesis, Traditional Religious Belief, Superstition, Spirit Travel, and Extraordinary Life Forms. Based on the motivational-control model, it was hypothesized that the societal stressors affecting Latvian society during the last 50 yr. have led to a reduced sense of personal control which, in turn, has resulted in increased endorsement of paranormal beliefs to re-establish a sense of control. The motivational-control hypothesis was not supported. Results indicated that (except for Traditional Religious Belief in women), the majority of these students were disbelievers in paranormal phenomena. As hypothesized, Latvian women reported significantly greater paranormal belief than men.

  3. Development of Latvian Information Infrastructure and Tasks for Latvian Academic Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karnitis, Edwin

    1995-01-01

    Presents an overview of information infrastructure development in Latvia and discusses the role of the Latvian Academic Library. Describes Latvia's telecommunications, information network, data transmission, and electronic information services and reviews the types of electronic information sources that have been created. (Author/JMV)

  4. Wave Energy Potential in the Latvian EEZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beriņš, J.; Beriņš, J.; Kalnačs, J.; Kalnačs, A.

    2016-06-01

    The present article deals with one of the alternative forms of energy - sea wave energy potential in the Latvian Exclusice Economic Zone (EEZ). Results have been achieved using a new method - VEVPP. Calculations have been performed using the data on wave parameters over the past five years (2010-2014). We have also considered wave energy potential in the Gulf of Riga. The conclusions have been drawn on the recommended methodology for the sea wave potential and power calculations for wave-power plant pre-design stage.

  5. Retrospective dosimetry for Latvian workers at Chernobyl.

    PubMed

    Mironova-Ulmane, N; Pavlenko, A; Zvagule, T; Kärner, T; Bruvere, R; Volrate, A

    2001-01-01

    Between 1986 and 1991 approximately 6500 Latvian inhabitants were recruited for clean-up work at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. Their absorbed doses are usually unknown, because less than half of them had their external exposure officially documented. Clinical investigations show a high morbidity rate for these clean-up workers when compared with that of the general population. In order to understand the causes of their diseases and the impact of ionising radiation, electron spin resonance (ESR) has been used to measure the absorbed doses in human tooth enamel. The doses estimated by ESR were between two and three times higher than previously documented and are in accord with the results of immunological and biological tests. The results may be explained by considering the effects of irradiation caused by long-lived incorporated radionuclides.

  6. Corrective Feedback in L2 Latvian Classrooms: Teacher Perceptions versus the Observed Actualities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilans, Gatis

    2016-01-01

    This two-part study aims to investigate teacher perceptions about providing oral corrective feedback (CF) to minority students of Latvian as a second language and compare the perceptions to the actual provision of CF in L2 Latvian classrooms. The survey sample represents sixty-six L2 Latvian teachers while the classroom observations involved 13…

  7. Corrective Feedback in L2 Latvian Classrooms: Teacher Perceptions versus the Observed Actualities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilans, Gatis

    2016-01-01

    This two-part study aims to investigate teacher perceptions about providing oral corrective feedback (CF) to minority students of Latvian as a second language and compare the perceptions to the actual provision of CF in L2 Latvian classrooms. The survey sample represents sixty-six L2 Latvian teachers while the classroom observations involved 13…

  8. Homogeneity of Latvian temperature and precipitation series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizuma, L.; Briede, A.

    2010-09-01

    During previous years and decades the homogenization of Latvian monthly temperature and precipitation data series was based on the direct homogenization methods which relayed on metadata and studies of the effects of specific changes in time of observation as well as methods of observation. However, the method is not effective for temperature and precipitation data series shifts detection caused by measurement's place relocation or environmental changes. The both climatological temperature and precipitation records are significantly affected by a number of non-climatological factors (station moves, changes in instrumentation; introduction of different observing practices like a different observing time or introduction of wetting corrections for precipitation, changes in the local urban environment). If these non-homogeneities are not accounted for properly, that makes the data unrepresentative to be used for analyses of climate state, variations and changes. Monthly and daily Latvian station series (1950-2008) of surface air temperature and precipitation are statistically tested with respect to homogeneity. Two homogeneity tests are applied to evaluate monthly series. The multiple analyses of series for homogenization MASHv3.02 has been applied to 23 Latvian mean, maximum and minimum daily and monthly data series and daily and monthly precipitation series. The standard normal homogeneity tests (SNHT) has been applied to monthly mean temperature and precipitation series. During the tested period the station network is dense enough for efficient homogeneity testing. It has been found that all the time series contain the homogeneity breaks at least during one of the month. For some stations the multiple breaks were found. For mean temperature time series the 80 % of the breaks are generally less than ±0.20C. The largest detected homogeneity breaks in the mean monthly temperatures are up to ±1.00C, in mean monthly maximum temperature are up to ±1.30C and for mean

  9. [Medical Service of the Latvian National Armed Forces].

    PubMed

    Aleinikov, S I; Golota, A S; Krassii, A B; Soldatov, E A; Shalakhin, R A

    2015-08-01

    The article is a brief description of the current state of the Latvian National Armed Forces medical service and is based on the study of the open access foreign sources. At the beginning, the general information about Latvia, its Armed Forces, and their medical service is presented. Then the medical service particular features are described with more detail, namely, the organization of inpatient and outpatient treatment, medical supply, scientific research, combat medicine, medical staff education and training, medical service personnel income.

  10. Latvian Language Competencies for Peace Corps Volunteers in the Republic of Latvia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viksnins, Helen M.

    This guide is designed for Latvian language training of Peace Corps workers in Latvia, is intended for use in a competency-based language training program, and reflects daily communication needs in that context. It consists of an introductory section on the history, alphabet, and phonology of the Latvian language and a series of 13 topical…

  11. Latvian scientists research into chemical uses of timber

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-20

    Scientists of the Institute of Wood Chemistry of the Latvian Academy of Sciences have developed two highly efficient processes for producing furfural, a feedstock for varnishes, synthetic resins and plastics. It is made of production wastes, including branches and small-dimension timber. By one process, the raw material is chipped, treated first with diluted sulphuric acid and then with steam heated to 250 degrees C. The other uses concentrated sulphuric acid as a catalyst. Besides furfural, this process also yields sugar solutions used in alcohol and nutrient yeast production.

  12. Prediction of Malaysian monthly GDP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hin, Pooi Ah; Ching, Soo Huei; Yeing, Pan Wei

    2015-12-01

    The paper attempts to use a method based on multivariate power-normal distribution to predict the Malaysian Gross Domestic Product next month. Letting r(t) be the vector consisting of the month-t values on m selected macroeconomic variables, and GDP, we model the month-(t+1) GDP to be dependent on the present and l-1 past values r(t), r(t-1),…,r(t-l+1) via a conditional distribution which is derived from a [(m+1)l+1]-dimensional power-normal distribution. The 100(α/2)% and 100(1-α/2)% points of the conditional distribution may be used to form an out-of sample prediction interval. This interval together with the mean of the conditional distribution may be used to predict the month-(t+1) GDP. The mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), estimated coverage probability and average length of the prediction interval are used as the criterions for selecting the suitable lag value l-1 and the subset from a pool of 17 macroeconomic variables. It is found that the relatively better models would be those of which 2 ≤ l ≤ 3, and involving one or two of the macroeconomic variables given by Market Indicative Yield, Oil Prices, Exchange Rate and Import Trade.

  13. Latvian and Russian textbooks: eye movements in reading text formatted in two columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paeglis, Roberts; Gorshanova, Irina; Bagucka, Kristine; Lacis, Ivars

    2008-09-01

    Research of eye movements in reading textbooks suggests that reading the Cyrillic-based Russian language differs from reading the extended Latin-based Latvian texts. Ten bilingual students were asked to start reading a book passage in Latvian and to continue reading the text in Russian. Key parameters in information processing have been analyzed. Even though the difference in duration of fixations does not reach statistical significance, saccade size and regression rate are smaller in Russian.

  14. Characterization of GDP-Fucose

    PubMed Central

    James, Douglas W.; Jones, Russell L.

    1979-01-01

    The peripheral root cap cells of corn (cv. SX-17A) secrete a fucose-rich, high molecular weight, polysaccharide slime via the dictyosome pathway. To study the synthesis of this polysaccharide, a technique for isolating and assaying GDP-fucose:polysaccharide fucosyl transferase activity was developed. Corn roots were excised from germinated seeds, incubated 12 hours at 10 C in water, and ground in 100 millimolar Tris or Pipes buffer (pH 7.0) with or without 0.5 molar sucrose. The membrane-bound enzyme was solubilized by sonication in the presence of 2 molar urea and 1.5% (v/v) Triton X-100 and assayed by monitoring the incorporation of GDP-[14C]fucose into endogenous acceptors. Optimum enzyme activity is expressed at pH 7.0 and 30 C in the presence of 0.8% (v/v) Triton X-100. The enzyme does not require divalent cations for activation and is inhibited by concentrations of MnCl2 or MgCl2 greater than 1 millimolar. Corn root cap slime will serve as an exogenous acceptor for the enzyme if it is first hydrolyzed in 5 millimolar trifluoroacetic acid for 60 minutes at 18 pounds per square inch, 121 C. This procedure prepares the acceptor by removing terminal fucose residues from the slime molecule. Kinetics of fucose release during hydrolysis of native slime and in vitro synthesized product suggests that the two polymers possess similar linkages to fucose. PMID:16661104

  15. Dynamics of telomere length in different age groups in a Latvian population.

    PubMed

    Zole, Egija; Pliss, Liana; Ranka, Renate; Krumina, Astrida; Baumanis, Viesturs

    2013-12-01

    The shortening of telomeres with ageing is a well-documented observation; however, the reported number of nucleotides in telomeres varies between different laboratories and studies. Such variability is likely caused by ethnic differences between the populations studied. Until now, there were no studies that investigated the variability of telomere length in a senescent Latvian population of the most common mitochondrial haplogroups, defined as H (45%), U (25%), Y chromosomal N1c (40%) and R1a1 (40%). Telomere length was determined in 121 individuals in different age groups, including a control group containing individuals of 20-40 years old and groups of individuals between 60-70 years old, 71-80 years old, 81-90 years old, and above 90 years old. Telomere length was determined using the Southern blot telomeric restriction fragment assay (TRF). Decreased telomere length with ageing was confirmed, but a comparison of centenarians and individuals between 60-90 years of age did not demonstrate a significant difference in telomere length. However, significant variability in telomere length was observed in the control group, indicating probable rapid telomere shortening in some individuals that could lead up to development of health status decline appearing with ageing. Telomere length measured in mononuclear blood cells (MNC) was compared with the telomere length measured in whole peripheral white blood cells (WBC) using TRF. Telomere length in MNC was longer than in WBC for the control group with individuals 20 to 40 years old; in contrast, for the group of individuals aged 65 to 85 years old, measured telomere length was shorter in MNC when compared to WBC.

  16. Epidemiology of Voice Disorders in Latvian School Teachers.

    PubMed

    Trinite, Baiba

    2017-07-01

    The prevalence of voice disorders in the teacher population in Latvia has not been studied so far and this is the first epidemiological study whose goal is to investigate the prevalence of voice disorders and their risk factors in this professional group. A wide cross-sectional study using stratified sampling methodology was implemented in the general education schools of Latvia. The self-administered voice risk factor questionnaire and the Voice Handicap Index were completed by 522 teachers. Two teachers groups were formed: the voice disorders group which included 235 teachers with actual voice problems or problems during the last 9 months; and the control group which included 174 teachers without voice disorders. Sixty-six percent of teachers gave a positive answer to the following question: Have you ever had problems with your voice? Voice problems are more often found in female than male teachers (68.2% vs 48.8%). Music teachers suffer from voice disorders more often than teachers of other subjects. Eighty-two percent of teachers first faced voice problems in their professional carrier. The odds of voice disorders increase if the following risk factors exist: extra vocal load, shouting, throat clearing, neglecting of personal health, background noise, chronic illnesses of the upper respiratory tract, allergy, job dissatisfaction, and regular stress in the working place. The study findings indicated a high risk of voice disorders among Latvian teachers. The study confirmed data concerning the multifactorial etiology of voice disorders. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Female Leaders in a Radical Right Movement: The Latvian National Front

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stasulane, Anita

    2017-01-01

    Gender is the central axis around which the transformation of radical right forces is taking place: a new type of movement is emerging which is not excessively masculine. Latvia is experiencing an increase in women's participation in the radical right, the Latvian National Front (LNF) being a vivid example. The development of the LNF was…

  18. Female Leaders in a Radical Right Movement: The Latvian National Front

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stasulane, Anita

    2017-01-01

    Gender is the central axis around which the transformation of radical right forces is taking place: a new type of movement is emerging which is not excessively masculine. Latvia is experiencing an increase in women's participation in the radical right, the Latvian National Front (LNF) being a vivid example. The development of the LNF was…

  19. Sustainability by Education: How Latvian Heritage Was Kept Alive in German Exile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franzenburg, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Sustainability is one of the core challenges for education in modern times, particularly concerning cultural heritage. The study evaluates, from a German point of view, how Latvians outside of Latvia after World War II kept their cultural heritage alive by educational concepts, which can be characterized as early roots of modern sustainable…

  20. Accommodation of GDP-Linked Sugars in the Active Site of GDP-Perosamine Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Paul D.; Carney, Amanda E.; Holden, Hazel M.

    2009-01-12

    Perosamine (4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-d-mannose), or its N-acetylated form, is one of several dideoxy sugars found in the O-antigens of such infamous Gram-negative bacteria as Vibrio cholerae O1 and Escherichia coli O157:H7. It is added to the bacterial O-antigen via a nucleotide-linked version, namely GDP-perosamine. Three enzymes are required for the biosynthesis of GDP-perosamine starting from mannose 1-phosphate. The focus of this investigation is GDP-perosamine synthase from Caulobacter crescentus, which catalyzes the final step in GDP-perosamine synthesis, the conversion of GDP-4-keto-6-deoxymannose to GDP-perosamine. The enzyme is PLP-dependent and belongs to the aspartate aminotransferase superfamily. It contains the typically conserved active site lysine residue, which forms a Schiff base with the PLP cofactor. Two crystal structures were determined for this investigation: a site-directed mutant protein (K186A) complexed with GDP-perosamine and the wild-type enzyme complexed with an unnatural ligand, GDP-3-deoxyperosamine. These structures, determined to 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively, revealed the manner in which products, and presumably substrates, are accommodated within the active site pocket of GDP-perosamine synthase. Additional kinetic analyses using both the natural and unnatural substrates revealed that the K{sub m} for the unnatural substrate was unperturbed relative to that of the natural substrate, but the k{sub cat} was lowered by a factor of approximately 200. Taken together, these studies shed light on why GDP-perosamine synthase functions as an aminotransferase whereas another very similar PLP-dependent enzyme, GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-d-mannose 3-dehydratase or ColD, catalyzes a dehydration reaction using the same substrate.

  1. Beyond GDP: Classifying Alternative Measures for Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleys, Brent

    2012-01-01

    Both the potential pitfalls of macro-economic policies focused on stimulating economic growth and the problems involved in using GDP as a measure of well-being or economic welfare have long been recognized by economists and researchers from other social sciences. Therefore, it is no surprise that alternative measures for policy-making have been…

  2. Beyond GDP: Classifying Alternative Measures for Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleys, Brent

    2012-01-01

    Both the potential pitfalls of macro-economic policies focused on stimulating economic growth and the problems involved in using GDP as a measure of well-being or economic welfare have long been recognized by economists and researchers from other social sciences. Therefore, it is no surprise that alternative measures for policy-making have been…

  3. Latvian Approach to the Environmental Issues in the Military Area and Unexploded Ordnance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-04-01

    Regional Development would be involved. Environmental Education and Training in the Military Area When being tasked to provide the Latvian National Armed...of Environmental Protection and Regional Development 15-28 Proposed Activities to enhance the environmental education and training in military area In...Ministry of Defence * National Armed Forces Staff * National Defence Academy 15-29 Proposed Activities to enhance the environmental education and

  4. Democracy, GDP, and the Impact of Natural Disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Vink, G.; Brett, A. P.; Burgess, E.; Cecil-Cockwell, D.; Chicoine, A.; Difiore, P.; Harding, J.; Millian, C.; Olivi, E.; Piaskowy, S.; Sproat, J.; van der Hoop, H.; Walsh, P.; Warren, A.; West, L.; Wright, G.

    2007-05-01

    In 1998 Amartya Sen won the Nobel Prize in economics for the observation that there has never been a famine in a nation with a democratic form of government and a free press. We find that a similar relationship can be demonstrated for all natural disasters. Data from the United Nations Food Programme and the United States Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance is used to display strong correlations between the democracy index, GDP, and the humanitarian impact of natural disasters. We find that nations in which disasters have high humanitarian impact, approximated by lives lost, are also nations which are below the median per capita GDP and the median democracy level. While the response to natural disasters varies from country to country, several additional global trends are observed. Since 1964, the number of recorded natural disasters has increased by a factor of five. During this same time period the number of deaths has decreased significantly. In particular, the humanitarian impact of the 'typical' natural disaster has decreased by a factor of five. Post-disaster foreign aid is the common response from the international community when a natural disaster strikes. Our study also compares the history of foreign aid grants distributed by the US Office of Foreign Disaster Aid (OFDA) with the number of deaths worldwide from natural disasters. We find that the amount of aid given is responsive to the degree of global humanitarian impact.

  5. Short-Term Forecasting of Loads and Wind Power for Latvian Power System: Accuracy and Capacity of the Developed Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radziukynas, V.; Klementavičius, A.

    2016-04-01

    The paper analyses the performance results of the recently developed short-term forecasting suit for the Latvian power system. The system load and wind power are forecasted using ANN and ARIMA models, respectively, and the forecasting accuracy is evaluated in terms of errors, mean absolute errors and mean absolute percentage errors. The investigation of influence of additional input variables on load forecasting errors is performed. The interplay of hourly loads and wind power forecasting errors is also evaluated for the Latvian power system with historical loads (the year 2011) and planned wind power capacities (the year 2023).

  6. Genetic variation spectrum in ATP7B gene identified in Latvian patients with Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Zarina, Agnese; Tolmane, Ieva; Kreile, Madara; Chernushenko, Aleksandrs; Cernevska, Gunta; Pukite, Ieva; Micule, Ieva; Krumina, Zita; Krumina, Astrida; Rozentale, Baiba; Piekuse, Linda

    2017-07-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism caused by allelic variants in ATP7B gene. More than 500 distinct variants have been reported, the most common WD causing allelic variant in the patients from Central, Eastern, and Northern Europe is H1069Q. All Latvian patients with clinically confirmed WD were screened for the most common mutation p.H1069Q by PCR Bi-PASA method. Direct DNA sequencing of gene ATP7B (all 21 exons) was performed for the patients with WD symptoms, being either heterozygous for H1069Q or without it on any allele. We identified 15 different allelic variants along with eight non-disease-causing allelic variants. Based on the gene molecular analysis and patients' clinical data variant p.His1069Gln was found in 66.9% of WD alleles. Wide clinical variability was observed among individuals with the same ATP7B genotype. The results of our study confirm that neurological manifestations of WD are typically present later than the liver disease but no significant association between the presence/absence of the most common genetic variant and mode of initial WD presentation or age at presentation was identified. (1) The most prevalent mutation in Latvian patients with Wilson disease was c.3207C>A (p.His1069Gln); (2) No significant phenotype-genotype correlation was found in Latvian patients with Wilson disease; (3) The estimated prevalence of Wilson disease in Latvia is 1 of 24,000 cases which is higher than frequently quoted prevalence of 1: 30,000.

  7. Life Cycle Assessment of Biogas Production from Marine Macroalgae: a Latvian Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilicka, Iluta; Blumberga, Dagnija; Romagnoli, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    There is potential environmental benefit to be gained from the use of algae because of their ability to fix CO2, no need for direct land use and utilization of bio-waste (rich in potassium, phosphate and nitrogen based compounds) as a nutrients. The aim of the research is to assess the impact of biogas production and the final use in a cogeneration unit system from a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) in comparison with a similar reference system using a non-renewable source (e.g. natural gas). The paper is intended to be a preliminary study for understanding the implementation of this novel technology in a Latvian context.

  8. Functional expression of Escherichia coli enzymes synthesizing GDP-L-fucose from inherent GDP-D-mannose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mattila, P; Räbinä, J; Hortling, S; Helin, J; Renkonen, R

    2000-10-01

    Fucosylation of glycans on glycoproteins and -lipids requires the enzymatic activity of relevant fucosyltransferases and GDP-L-fucose as the donor. Due to the biological importance of fucosylated glycans, a readily accessible source of GDP-L-fucose would be required. Here we describe the construction of a stable recombinant S.cerevisiae strain expressing the E.coli genes gmd and wcaG encoding the two enzymes, GDP-mannose-4,6-dehydratase (GMD) and GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-D-mannose-3,5-epimerase/4-reductase (GMER(FX)) respectively, needed to convert GDP-mannose to GDP-fucose via the de novo pathway. Taking advantage of the rich inherent cytosolic GDP-mannose pool in S.cerevisiae cells we could easily produce 0.2 mg/l of GDP-L-fucose with this recombinant yeast strain without addition of any external GDP-mannose. The GDP-L-fucose product could be used as the fucose donor for alpha1,3fucosyltransferase to synthesize sialyl Lewis x (sLex), a glycan crucial for the selectin-dependent leukocyte traffic.

  9. Is Decoupling GDP Growth from Environmental Impact Possible?

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Paul C.; Werner, Adrian D.; Costanza, Robert; Mohr, Steve H.; Simmons, Craig T.

    2016-01-01

    The argument that human society can decouple economic growth—defined as growth in Gross Domestic Product (GDP)—from growth in environmental impacts is appealing. If such decoupling is possible, it means that GDP growth is a sustainable societal goal. Here we show that the decoupling concept can be interpreted using an easily understood model of economic growth and environmental impact. The simple model is compared to historical data and modelled projections to demonstrate that growth in GDP ultimately cannot be decoupled from growth in material and energy use. It is therefore misleading to develop growth-oriented policy around the expectation that decoupling is possible. We also note that GDP is increasingly seen as a poor proxy for societal wellbeing. GDP growth is therefore a questionable societal goal. Society can sustainably improve wellbeing, including the wellbeing of its natural assets, but only by discarding GDP growth as the goal in favor of more comprehensive measures of societal wellbeing. PMID:27741300

  10. Is Decoupling GDP Growth from Environmental Impact Possible?

    PubMed

    Ward, James D; Sutton, Paul C; Werner, Adrian D; Costanza, Robert; Mohr, Steve H; Simmons, Craig T

    2016-01-01

    The argument that human society can decouple economic growth-defined as growth in Gross Domestic Product (GDP)-from growth in environmental impacts is appealing. If such decoupling is possible, it means that GDP growth is a sustainable societal goal. Here we show that the decoupling concept can be interpreted using an easily understood model of economic growth and environmental impact. The simple model is compared to historical data and modelled projections to demonstrate that growth in GDP ultimately cannot be decoupled from growth in material and energy use. It is therefore misleading to develop growth-oriented policy around the expectation that decoupling is possible. We also note that GDP is increasingly seen as a poor proxy for societal wellbeing. GDP growth is therefore a questionable societal goal. Society can sustainably improve wellbeing, including the wellbeing of its natural assets, but only by discarding GDP growth as the goal in favor of more comprehensive measures of societal wellbeing.

  11. Risk factors for long-term mental and psychosomatic distress in Latvian Chernobyl liquidators.

    PubMed Central

    Viel, J F; Curbakova, E; Dzerve, B; Eglite, M; Zvagule, T; Vincent, C

    1997-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies on the health effects of the Chernobyl disaster have focused largely on physical health, whereas the psychological consequences have received little attention. The authors have assessed the associations of various exposure variables with mental and psychosomatic distress in a sample of 1412 Latvian liquidators drawn from the State Latvian Chernobyl Clean-up Workers Registry. The outcome was a mixed mental-psychosomatic disorder occurring during 1986 to 1995. Comparisons among subgroups of the cohort classified according to exposure type or level were based on the proportional hazards model. Length of work (> or = 28 days) in a 10-km radius from the reactor (relative risk [RR] = 1.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14-1.70), work (> 1 time) on the damaged reactor roof (RR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.02-2.09), forest work (RR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.19-1.68), fresh fruit consumption (> or = 1 time/day) (RR = 1.72, 95% CI 1.12-2.65) are risk factors for mixed mental-psychosomatic disorder. Construction of the sarcophagus (RR = 1.82, 95% CI 0.89-3.72) is also associated with this outcome, although nonsignificantly. Distinguishing stress-related from radiation-induced effects in this data set was difficult and these findings should provide a basis for later hypothesis testing in other cohorts. PMID:9467079

  12. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita and geographical distribution of ophthalmologists in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Regina de Souza; Diniz, Alice Selles; Lacerda, Fabrício Martins; Mello, Paulo Augusto de Arruda

    2012-01-01

    To assess the number of ophthalmologists in Brazil, their regional distribution, ophthalmologist/habitant ratio, and the relation between ophthalmologist and State Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita to aid public health policies. An ecologic study was conducted. Data were obtained from the "Census 2011 Brazilian Ophthalmology Council", from "Demographic Census of Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE) 2010 and from "Brazilian Regional Accounts, 2005-2009"- Ministry of Planning, Budget and Management - IBGE. The number of ophthalmologists in Brazil is 15,719. Considering the performance in more than one municipality, the number of ophthalmologists in service is 17,992, that is, one ophthalmologist for 10,601; the ophthalmologist/site ratio vary among the States from a minimum of 1/51,437 (Amapá) to a maximum of 1/4,279 (Distrito Federal). There is a correlation among State GDP per capita and the number of ophthalmologists/habitant: the higher the GDP per capita, the larger is the number of ophthalmologists acting in the State (p<0.0001). According to this study, there is no lack of Ophthalmologists in the country, but a distribution imbalance which leads to professional shortage in particular places. A higher concentration of ophthalmologists/inhabitants was noticed in States which the economic growth is higher, expressed by the GDP per capita.

  13. GDP-tubulin incorporation into growing microtubules modulates polymer stability.

    PubMed

    Valiron, Odile; Arnal, Isabelle; Caudron, Nicolas; Job, Didier

    2010-06-04

    Microtubule growth proceeds through the endwise addition of nucleotide-bound tubulin dimers. The microtubule wall is composed of GDP-tubulin subunits, which are thought to come exclusively from the incorporation of GTP-tubulin complexes at microtubule ends followed by GTP hydrolysis within the polymer. The possibility of a direct GDP-tubulin incorporation into growing polymers is regarded as hardly compatible with recent structural data. Here, we have examined GTP-tubulin and GDP-tubulin incorporation into polymerizing microtubules using a minimal assembly system comprised of nucleotide-bound tubulin dimers, in the absence of free nucleotide. We find that GDP-tubulin complexes can efficiently co-polymerize with GTP-tubulin complexes during microtubule assembly. GDP-tubulin incorporation into microtubules occurs with similar efficiency during bulk microtubule assembly as during microtubule growth from seeds or centrosomes. Microtubules formed from GTP-tubulin/GDP-tubulin mixtures display altered microtubule dynamics, in particular a decreased shrinkage rate, apparently due to intrinsic modifications of the polymer disassembly properties. Thus, although microtubules polymerized from GTP-tubulin/GDP-tubulin mixtures or from homogeneous GTP-tubulin solutions are both composed of GDP-tubulin subunits, they have different dynamic properties, and this may reveal a novel form of microtubule "structural plasticity."

  14. GDP-Tubulin Incorporation into Growing Microtubules Modulates Polymer Stability*

    PubMed Central

    Valiron, Odile; Arnal, Isabelle; Caudron, Nicolas; Job, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Microtubule growth proceeds through the endwise addition of nucleotide-bound tubulin dimers. The microtubule wall is composed of GDP-tubulin subunits, which are thought to come exclusively from the incorporation of GTP-tubulin complexes at microtubule ends followed by GTP hydrolysis within the polymer. The possibility of a direct GDP-tubulin incorporation into growing polymers is regarded as hardly compatible with recent structural data. Here, we have examined GTP-tubulin and GDP-tubulin incorporation into polymerizing microtubules using a minimal assembly system comprised of nucleotide-bound tubulin dimers, in the absence of free nucleotide. We find that GDP-tubulin complexes can efficiently co-polymerize with GTP-tubulin complexes during microtubule assembly. GDP-tubulin incorporation into microtubules occurs with similar efficiency during bulk microtubule assembly as during microtubule growth from seeds or centrosomes. Microtubules formed from GTP-tubulin/GDP-tubulin mixtures display altered microtubule dynamics, in particular a decreased shrinkage rate, apparently due to intrinsic modifications of the polymer disassembly properties. Thus, although microtubules polymerized from GTP-tubulin/GDP-tubulin mixtures or from homogeneous GTP-tubulin solutions are both composed of GDP-tubulin subunits, they have different dynamic properties, and this may reveal a novel form of microtubule “structural plasticity.” PMID:20371874

  15. Interrelation of GDP and pension capital: Mathematical and econometrical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepp, A. N.; Dolgodvorov, A. D.

    2016-12-01

    This article is a mathematicalanalysis of the relationship between GDP and the development of funded pension systems. For this purpose, a mathematical formula was derived from the macro-economic GDP, proportional to the level of income and consumption for the dependence of GDP on the level of pension payments, the value of pension savings and the structure of compulsory contributions to the pension fund allocated to the distribution and accumulative pension system. A derivation of the equation proves the linear relationship of GDP and the share of pension contributions channeled to the funded pension system. Thus, the macroeconomic indicator with the larger negative impact on GDP was proven to be the elimination of the compulsory funded pension system. Based on the econometric analysis, the positive effect of the distributive pension system was proven on macroeconomic parameters.

  16. Associations of HLA DR and DQ molecules with Lyme borreliosis in Latvian patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many autoimmune diseases are associated with variants of HLA genes such as those encoding the MHC complex. This correlation is not absolute, but may help in understanding of the molecular mechanism of disease. The purpose of this study was to determine HLA-DR,-DQ alleles in Latvian patients with Lyme borreliosis and control (healthy) persons. Case patients and control subjects were similar in age, gender and ethnic heritage and differed only as regards the presence of Borrelia burgdorferi infection. The study included 25 patients with clinical stage – erythema migrans and 30 control (healthy) persons. HLA genotyping was performed by PCR with sequence-specific primers. Results The results show difference in HLA-DRB1 alleles distribution between patients and control subjects. The frequencies of HLA-DRB1 *04 (OR 11.24; p < 0.007) and HLA-DRB1 *17 (03) (OR 8.05; p < 0.033) were increased in the Lyme disease patients. And the frequency of allele DRB1*13 (OR 0.12; p < 0.017) was lower in Borreliosis patients and higher in control group. But, significant differences in frequencies of HLA-DQ alleles we did not detect. Conclusions HLA predisposition to Lyme borreliosis appears not to be limited to HLA molecules, but some HLA-DR alleles also have a significant influence, and, may have implications in our understanding of pathogenesis of this disease. In particular, HLA-DRB1*04 and DRB1 *17 (03) may contribute to the Lyme borreliosis development in Latvian population PMID:22892251

  17. Associations of HLA DR and DQ molecules with Lyme borreliosis in Latvian patients.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuka, Lilija; Eglite, Jelena; Lucenko, Irina; Zalite, Mara; Viksna, Ludmila; Krumiņa, Angelika

    2012-08-14

    Many autoimmune diseases are associated with variants of HLA genes such as those encoding the MHC complex. This correlation is not absolute, but may help in understanding of the molecular mechanism of disease. The purpose of this study was to determine HLA-DR,-DQ alleles in Latvian patients with Lyme borreliosis and control (healthy) persons. Case patients and control subjects were similar in age, gender and ethnic heritage and differed only as regards the presence of Borrelia burgdorferi infection. The study included 25 patients with clinical stage - erythema migrans and 30 control (healthy) persons. HLA genotyping was performed by PCR with sequence-specific primers. The results show difference in HLA-DRB1 alleles distribution between patients and control subjects. The frequencies of HLA-DRB1 *04 (OR 11.24; p < 0.007) and HLA-DRB1 *17 (03) (OR 8.05; p < 0.033) were increased in the Lyme disease patients. And the frequency of allele DRB1*13 (OR 0.12; p < 0.017) was lower in Borreliosis patients and higher in control group. But, significant differences in frequencies of HLA-DQ alleles we did not detect. HLA predisposition to Lyme borreliosis appears not to be limited to HLA molecules, but some HLA-DR alleles also have a significant influence, and, may have implications in our understanding of pathogenesis of this disease. In particular, HLA-DRB1*04 and DRB1 *17 (03) may contribute to the Lyme borreliosis development in Latvian population.

  18. Geographic origin of publications in radiological journals as a function of GDP and percentage of GDP spent on research.

    PubMed

    Halpenny, Darragh; Burke, John; McNeill, Graeme; Snow, Aisling; Torreggiani, William C

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the geographic origin of publications in the highest impacting radiology journals and to examine the link between the percentage of gross domestic product (GDP) spent on research by a country and the output of radiology publications. The five highest impacting general radiology journals (according to the ISI Web of Knowledge database) were selected over a 6-year period from January 2002 to December 2007. Publications were totaled according to the country of the corresponding author. Publications (total and corrected for population size) were assessed according to the GDP of a given country and the percentage of GDP spent on research in that country. Correlation was determined using Spearman's rank. In total, 10,925 papers were identified. The top 10 nations produced 83.9% of the total number of papers. The United States was the most prolific country, with 41.7% of the total. The second-ranked and third-ranked countries were Germany (11.6%) and Japan (6.7%). Corrected for GDP, smaller European countries outperformed larger nations. Switzerland (0.925 publications per billion of GDP), Austria (0.694 publications per billion of GDP), and Belgium (0.648 publications per billion of GDP) produced the most papers per billion of GDP. When corrected for percentage of GDP spent on research, European countries again ranked highest, with Greece, Turkey, and Belgium having the best ratios. The percentage of GDP spent on research was positively correlated with the number of publications in high-ranking radiology journals (r = 0.603, P < .001). The United States is the most productive country in absolute number of publications. The flaws of using population size to compare publication output are clear, and a comparison using GDP and the percentage of GDP spent on research may give more meaningful results. When GDP is taken into consideration, smaller European countries are more productive. The importance of investment in radiologic research is

  19. Health Care Expenditure and GDP in African Countries: Evidence from Semiparametric Estimation with Panel Data

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Zhike; Zhu, Huiming

    2014-01-01

    A large body of literature studies on the relationship between health care expenditure (HCE) and GDP have been analyzed using data intensively from developed countries, but little is known for other regions. This paper considers a semiparametric panel data analysis for the study of the relationship between per capita HCE and per capita GDP for 42 African countries over the period 1995–2009. We found that infant mortality rate per 1,000 live births has a negative effect on per capita HCE, while the proportion of the population aged 65 is statistically insignificant in African countries. Furthermore, we found that the income elasticity is not constant but varies with income level, and health care is a necessity rather than a luxury for African countries. PMID:24741366

  20. Differential dynamics of RAS isoforms in GDP- and GTP-bound states.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Abhijeet; Travesset, Alex

    2015-06-01

    RAS subfamily proteins regulates cell growth promoting signaling processes by cycling between active (GTP-bound) and inactive (GDP-bound) states. Different RAS isoforms, though structurally similar, exhibit functional specificity and are associated with different types of cancers and developmental disorders. Understanding the dynamical differences between the isoforms is crucial for the design of inhibitors that can selectively target a particular malfunctioning isoform. In this study, we provide a comprehensive comparison of the dynamics of all the three RAS isoforms (HRAS, KRAS, and NRAS) using extensive molecular dynamics simulations in both the GDP- (total of 3.06 μs) and GTP-bound (total of 2.4 μs) states. We observed significant differences in the dynamics of the isoforms, which rather interestingly, varied depending on the type of the nucleotide bound and the simulation temperature. Both SwitchI (Residues 25-40) and SwitchII (Residues 59-75) differ significantly in their flexibility in the three isoforms. Furthermore, Principal Component Analysis showed that there are differences in the conformational space sampled by the GTP-bound RAS isoforms. We also identified a previously unreported pocket, which opens transiently during MD simulations, and can be targeted to regulate nucleotide exchange reaction or possibly interfere with membrane localization. Further, we present the first simulation study showing GDP destabilization in the wild-type RAS protein. The destabilization of GDP/GTP occurred only in 1/50 simulations, emphasizing the need of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) to accelerate such an extremely unfavorable process. This observation along with the other results presented in this article further support our previously hypothesized mechanism of GEF-assisted nucleotide exchange.

  1. GDP Matters: Cost Effectiveness of Cochlear Implantation and Deaf Education in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Emmett, Susan D; Tucci, Debara L; Smith, Magteld; Macharia, Isaac M; Ndegwa, Serah N; Nakku, Doreen; Mukara, Kaitesi B; Kaitesi, Mukara B; Ibekwe, Titus S; Mulwafu, Wakisa; Gong, Wenfeng; Francis, Howard W; Saunders, James E

    2015-09-01

    Cochlear implantation and deaf education are cost effective in Sub-Saharan Africa. Cost effectiveness of pediatric cochlear implantation has been well established in developed countries but is unknown in low resource settings, where access to the technology has traditionally been limited. With incidence of severe-to-profound congenital sensorineural hearing loss 5 to 6 times higher in low/middle-income countries than the United States and Europe, developing cost-effective management strategies in these settings is critical. Costs were obtained from experts in Nigeria, South Africa, Kenya, Rwanda, Uganda, and Malawi using known costs and published data, with estimation when necessary. A disability adjusted life years (DALY) model was applied using 3% discounting and 10-year length of analysis. Sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of device cost, professional salaries, annual number of implants, and probability of device failure. Cost effectiveness was determined using the WHO standard of cost-effectiveness ratio/gross domestic product per capita (CER/GDP) less than 3. Cochlear implantation was cost effective in South Africa and Nigeria, with CER/GDP of 1.03 and 2.05, respectively. Deaf education was cost effective in all countries investigated, with CER/GDP ranging from 0.55 to 1.56. The most influential factor in the sensitivity analysis was device cost, with the cost-effective threshold reached in all countries using discounted device costs that varied directly with GDP. Cochlear implantation and deaf education are equally cost effective in lower-middle and upper-middle income economies of Nigeria and South Africa. Device cost may have greater impact in the emerging economies of Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, and Malawi.

  2. Immunogenetic Markers Definition in Latvian Patients with Lyme Borreliosis and Lyme Neuroborreliosis

    PubMed Central

    Kovalchuka, Lilija; Cvetkova, Svetlana; Trofimova, Julija; Eglite, Jelena; Gintere, Sandra; Lucenko, Irina; Oczko-Grzesik, Barbara; Viksna, Ludmila; Krumina, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1 alleles in two groups of patients in Latvia: patients with Lyme borreliosis and patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis. The study included 216 patients with Lyme borreliosis, 29 patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis and 282 control persons. All surveyed persons were residents of Latvia. The HLA-DR genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction- sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP). The predisposition to the Lyme borreliosis is associated with the HLA-DRB1*07, -DRB1*17(03), -DRB1*04, -DRB1*15(02) alleles. The allele -DRB1*11(05), -DRB1*14(06) and -DRB1*13(06) were significantly more frequent in controls. In-group with Lyme neuroborreliosis differences were found for the -DRB1*07 and -DRB1*04 alleles, but only HLA-DRB1*07 allele was statistically significant after Bonferroni correction and associated with Lyme neuroborreliosis in Latvian patients. PMID:27916969

  3. Immunogenetic Markers Definition in Latvian Patients with Lyme Borreliosis and Lyme Neuroborreliosis.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuka, Lilija; Cvetkova, Svetlana; Trofimova, Julija; Eglite, Jelena; Gintere, Sandra; Lucenko, Irina; Oczko-Grzesik, Barbara; Viksna, Ludmila; Krumina, Angelika

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1 alleles in two groups of patients in Latvia: patients with Lyme borreliosis and patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis. The study included 216 patients with Lyme borreliosis, 29 patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis and 282 control persons. All surveyed persons were residents of Latvia. The HLA-DR genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction- sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP). The predisposition to the Lyme borreliosis is associated with the HLA-DRB1*07, -DRB1*17(03), -DRB1*04, -DRB1*15(02) alleles. The allele -DRB1*11(05), -DRB1*14(06) and -DRB1*13(06) were significantly more frequent in controls. In-group with Lyme neuroborreliosis differences were found for the -DRB1*07 and -DRB1*04 alleles, but only HLA-DRB1*07 allele was statistically significant after Bonferroni correction and associated with Lyme neuroborreliosis in Latvian patients.

  4. Global evidence on the distribution of GDP growth rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Michael A.; Baek, Grace; Li, Yiyang; Park, Leslie Y.; Zhao, Wei

    2017-02-01

    We study the size distribution of changes in the gross domestic product (GDP) of 167 countries for the period 1950-2011. A consensus has developed in the literature that the distribution of GDP growth rates can be approximated by the Laplace distribution in the central part and power-law distributions in the tails. Using a richer database than prior studies and testing for more theoretical distributions, we find that the distribution of GDP growth rates can be fitted using the heavy-tailed Cauchy distribution for almost all countries. Significantly, this same finding recently has been demonstrated for (1) the distribution of firm growth rates and (2) the distribution of firm economic profit rates. Together, these three findings suggest the possibility that there exist universal mechanisms that give rise to general laws governing the growth dynamics of firms and economies.

  5. A reassessment of the relationship between GDP and life satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Proto, Eugenio; Rustichini, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    The scientific debate on the relation between Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and self reported indices of life satisfaction is still open. In a well-known finding, Easterlin reported no significant relationship between happiness and aggregate income in time-series analysis. However, life satisfaction appears to be strictly monotonically increasing with income when one studies this relation at a point in time across nations. Here, we analyze the relation between per capita GDP and life satisfaction without imposing a functional form and eliminating potentially confounding country-specific factors. We show that this relation clearly increases in country with a per capita GDP below 15,000 USD (2005 in Purchasing Power Parity), then it flattens for richer countries. The probability of reporting the highest level of life satisfaction is more than 12% lower in the poor countries with a per capita GDP below 5,600 USD than in the counties with a per capita GDP of about 15,000 USD. In countries with an income above 17,000 USD the probability of reporting the highest level of life satisfaction changes within a range of 2% maximum. Interestingly enough, life satisfaction seems to peak at around 30,000 USD and then slightly but significantly decline among the richest countries. These results suggest an explanation of the Easterlin paradox: life satisfaction increases with GDP in poor country, but this relation is approximately flat in richer countries. We explain this relation with aspiration levels. We assume that a gap between aspiration and realized income is negatively perceived; and aspirations to higher income increase with income. These facts together have a negative effect on life satisfaction, opposite to the positive direct effect of the income. The net effect is ambiguous. We predict a higher negative effect in individuals with higher sensitivity to losses (measured by their neuroticism score) and provide econometric support of this explanation.

  6. A Reassessment of the Relationship between GDP and Life Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Proto, Eugenio; Rustichini, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    The scientific debate on the relation between Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and self reported indices of life satisfaction is still open. In a well-known finding, Easterlin reported no significant relationship between happiness and aggregate income in time-series analysis. However, life satisfaction appears to be strictly monotonically increasing with income when one studies this relation at a point in time across nations. Here, we analyze the relation between per capita GDP and life satisfaction without imposing a functional form and eliminating potentially confounding country-specific factors. We show that this relation clearly increases in country with a per capita GDP below 15,000 USD (2005 in Purchasing Power Parity), then it flattens for richer countries. The probability of reporting the highest level of life satisfaction is more than 12% lower in the poor countries with a per capita GDP below 5,600 USD than in the counties with a per capita GDP of about 15,000 USD. In countries with an income above 17,000 USD the probability of reporting the highest level of life satisfaction changes within a range of 2% maximum. Interestingly enough, life satisfaction seems to peak at around 30,000 USD and then slightly but significantly decline among the richest countries. These results suggest an explanation of the Easterlin paradox: life satisfaction increases with GDP in poor country, but this relation is approximately flat in richer countries. We explain this relation with aspiration levels. We assume that a gap between aspiration and realized income is negatively perceived; and aspirations to higher income increase with income. These facts together have a negative effect on life satisfaction, opposite to the positive direct effect of the income. The net effect is ambiguous. We predict a higher negative effect in individuals with higher sensitivity to losses (measured by their neuroticism score) and provide econometric support of this explanation. PMID:24312179

  7. CDKN2A and CDK4 variants in Latvian melanoma patients: analysis of a clinic-based population.

    PubMed

    Pjanova, Dace; Engele, Ludmila; Randerson-Moor, Juliette A; Harland, Mark; Bishop, D Timothy; Newton Bishop, Julia A; Taylor, Claire; Debniak, Tadeusz; Lubinski, Jan; Kleina, Regina; Heisele, Olita

    2007-06-01

    Germline mutations of the CDKN2A and CDK4 genes explain a significant proportion of familial melanoma. To date, there have been few published estimations of the prevalence of such mutations in sporadic melanoma patients. In this study, we investigated CDKN2A and CDK4 exon 2 for germline mutations in 125 consecutive cutaneous malignant melanoma patients recruited through the Latvian Oncological Center, using amplicon melting analysis and sequencing. No disease-related CDKN2A germline mutations were identified in any of the melanoma patients analysed but the previously described CDK4 mutation, Arg24His, was found in one patient with a family history of melanoma. CDKN2A polymorphisms were studied as putative low penetrance susceptibility genes. The proportion of cases with polymorphisms in this Latvian melanoma population was Ala148Thr (c.442G>A) (6%), 500 C/G (c.*29C>G) (18%), and 540 C/T (c.*69C>T) (20%); however, only the frequency of the Ala148Thr polymorphism was higher in melanoma patients than in 203 controls (6 versus 1%, P=0.03). Ala148Thr has also been reported in association with melanoma in a Polish series but not in an English series. We therefore examined the Ala148Thr carrier's haplotype in 10 Latvian and 39 Polish samples. No significant difference was seen between these populations and the predominant haplotype observed in English samples, giving no indication that the discrepancy could be explained by population differences in linkage disequilibrium. In summary, our results show that germline mutations at the CDKN2A locus are rare in sporadic melanoma in Latvia. The study does, however, provide some additional evidence for a role for the CDKN2A polymorphism Ala148Thr as a low penetrance susceptibility gene. The detected CDK4 exon 2 mutation was found in only the seventh family identified worldwide with a germline CDK4 mutation.

  8. Structures of NodZ α1,6-fucosyltransferase in complex with GDP and GDP-fucose

    SciTech Connect

    Brzezinski, Krzysztof; Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2012-02-01

    Crystal structures of the bacterial α1,6-fucosyltransferase NodZ in complex with GDP and GDP-fucose are presented. Rhizobial NodZ α1,6-fucosyltransferase (α1,6-FucT) catalyzes the transfer of the fucose (Fuc) moiety from guanosine 5′-diphosphate-β-l-fucose to the reducing end of the chitin oligosaccharide core during Nod-factor (NF) biosynthesis. NF is a key signalling molecule required for successful symbiosis with a legume host for atmospheric nitrogen fixation. To date, only two α1,6-FucT structures have been determined, both without any donor or acceptor molecule that could highlight the structural background of the catalytic mechanism. Here, the first crystal structures of α1,6-FucT in complex with its substrate GDP-Fuc and with GDP, which is a byproduct of the enzymatic reaction, are presented. The crystal of the complex with GDP-Fuc was obtained through soaking of native NodZ crystals with the ligand and its structure has been determined at 2.35 Å resolution. The fucose residue is exposed to solvent and is disordered. The enzyme–product complex crystal was obtained by cocrystallization with GDP and an acceptor molecule, penta-N-acetyl-l-glucosamine (penta-NAG). The structure has been determined at 1.98 Å resolution, showing that only the GDP molecule is present in the complex. In both structures the ligands are located in a cleft formed between the two domains of NodZ and extend towards the C-terminal domain, but their conformations differ significantly. The structures revealed that residues in three regions of the C-terminal domain, which are conserved among α1,2-, α1,6- and protein O-fucosyltransferases, are involved in interactions with the sugar-donor molecule. There is also an interaction with the side chain of Tyr45 in the N-terminal domain, which is very unusual for a GT-B-type glycosyltransferase. Only minor conformational changes of the protein backbone are observed upon ligand binding. The only exception is a movement of the loop

  9. The crystal structure of human GDP-L-fucose synthase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huan; Sun, Lihua; Li, Jian; Xu, Chunyan; Yu, Feng; Liu, Yahui; Ji, Chaoneng; He, Jianhua

    2013-09-01

    Human GDP-l-fucose synthase, also known as FX protein, synthesizes GDP-l-fucose from its substrate GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-d-mannose. The reaction involves epimerization at both C-3 and C-5 followed by an NADPH-dependent reduction of the carbonyl at C-4. In this paper, the first crystal structure of human FX protein was determined at 2.37 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit of the crystal structure contains four molecules which form two homodimers. Each molecule consists of two domains, a Rossmann-fold NADPH-binding motif and a carboxyl terminal domain. Compared with the Escherichia coli GDP-l-fucose synthase, the overall structures of these two enzymes have four major differences. There are four loops in the structure of human FX protein corresponding to two α-helices and two β-sheets in that of the E. coli enzyme. Besides, there are seven different amino acid residues binding with NAPDH comparing human FX protein with that from E. coli. The structure of human FX reveals the key catalytic residues and could be useful for the design of drugs for the treatment of inflammation, auto-immune diseases, and possibly certain types of cancer.

  10. Point mutations associated with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy in a Latvian population

    PubMed Central

    Baumane, Kristine; Zalite, Solveiga; Ranka, Renate; Zole, Egija; Pole, Ilva; Sepetiene, Svetlana; Laganovska, Guna; Baumanis, Viesturs; Pliss, Liana

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To study mutations associated with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) in patients suspected of having this mitochondrial disorder in a Latvian population. Additional aims were to determine the heteroplasmy status of all non-synonymous polymorphisms identified in the current study and to identify the mitochondrial haplogroups of the studied participants because these factors may contribute to the manifestation of LHON. Methods Twelve patients, including patients in two families, were enrolled in the current study. LHON was suspected based on the findings of ophthalmologic examinations. In clinically affected individuals, the presence of all previously reported LHON-associated mutations was assessed with sequencing analysis. Additionally, the SURVEYOR endonuclease assay was used to detect heteroplasmy. The mitochondrial haplogroups were identified with restriction analysis and the sequencing of hypervariable segment 1. Results In one family (mother and son), there was one primary LHON-associated mutation, G11778A. In addition, one rare previously reported LHON-associated polymorphism, A13637G, was detected in two unrelated patients. A non-synonymous polymorphism at T6253C was found in one individual. This mutation was reported in the background of the 3460 mutation among LHON patients in a Chinese population. No non-synonymous point mutations in mitochondrial DNA were found in five of the study participants. Conclusions Molecular analysis of 12 patients with suspected LHON confirmed the diagnosis in four patients and allowed the use of appropriate prophylactic measures and treatment. Further investigations and additional studies of different populations are necessary to confirm the role of the non-synonymous polymorphisms A13637G and T6253C in the manifestation of LHON and the associations of these polymorphisms with mitochondrial haplogroups and heteroplasmy. PMID:24319328

  11. Brown adipose tissue mitochondria: modulation by GDP and fatty acids depends on the respiratory substrates

    PubMed Central

    De Meis, Leopoldo; Ketzer, Luisa A.; Camacho-Pereira, Juliana; Galina, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The UCP1 [first UCP (uncoupling protein)] that is found in the mitochondria of brown adipocytes [BAT (brown adipose tissue)] regulates the heat production, a process linked to non-shivering thermogenesis. The activity of UCP1 is modulated by GDP and fatty acids. In this report, we demonstrate that respiration and heat released by BAT mitochondria vary depending on the respiratory substrate utilized and the coupling state of the mitochondria. It has already been established that, in the presence of pyruvate/malate, BAT mitochondria are coupled by faf-BSA (fatty-acid-free BSA) and GDP, leading to an increase in ATP synthesis and mitochondrial membrane potential along with simultaneous decreases in both the rates of respiration and heat production. Oleate restores the uncoupled state, inhibiting ATP synthesis and increasing the rates of both respiration and heat production. We now show that in the presence of succinate: (i) the rates of uncoupled mitochondria respiration and heat production are five times slower than in the presence of pyruvate/malate; (ii) faf-BSA and GDP accelerate heat and respiration as a result and, in coupled mitochondria, these two rates are accelerated compared with pyruvate/malate; (iii) in spite of the differences in respiration and heat production noted with the two substrates, the membrane potential and the ATP synthesized were the same; and (iv) oleate promoted a decrease in heat production and respiration in coupled mitochondria, an effect different from that observed using pyruvate/malate. These effects are not related to the production of ROS (reactive oxygen species). We suggest that succinate could stimulate a new route to heat production in BAT mitochondria. PMID:21561434

  12. Brown adipose tissue mitochondria: modulation by GDP and fatty acids depends on the respiratory substrates.

    PubMed

    De Meis, Leopoldo; Ketzer, Luisa A; Camacho-Pereira, Juliana; Galina, Antonio

    2012-02-01

    The UCP1 [first UCP (uncoupling protein)] that is found in the mitochondria of brown adipocytes [BAT (brown adipose tissue)] regulates the heat production, a process linked to non-shivering thermogenesis. The activity of UCP1 is modulated by GDP and fatty acids. In this report, we demonstrate that respiration and heat released by BAT mitochondria vary depending on the respiratory substrate utilized and the coupling state of the mitochondria. It has already been established that, in the presence of pyruvate/malate, BAT mitochondria are coupled by faf-BSA (fatty-acid-free BSA) and GDP, leading to an increase in ATP synthesis and mitochondrial membrane potential along with simultaneous decreases in both the rates of respiration and heat production. Oleate restores the uncoupled state, inhibiting ATP synthesis and increasing the rates of both respiration and heat production. We now show that in the presence of succinate: (i) the rates of uncoupled mitochondria respiration and heat production are five times slower than in the presence of pyruvate/malate; (ii) faf-BSA and GDP accelerate heat and respiration as a result and, in coupled mitochondria, these two rates are accelerated compared with pyruvate/malate; (iii) in spite of the differences in respiration and heat production noted with the two substrates, the membrane potential and the ATP synthesized were the same; and (iv) oleate promoted a decrease in heat production and respiration in coupled mitochondria, an effect different from that observed using pyruvate/malate. These effects are not related to the production of ROS (reactive oxygen species). We suggest that succinate could stimulate a new route to heat production in BAT mitochondria.

  13. Activation of brown adipose tissue mitochondrial GDP binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Swick, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    The primary function of brown adipose tissue (BAT) is heat production. This ability is attributed to the existence of a unique inner mitochondrial membrane protein termed the uncoupling protein or thermogenin. This protein is permeable to H+ and thus allows respiration (and therefore thermogenesis) to proceed at a rapid rate, independent of ADP phosphorylation. Proton conductance can be inhibited by the binding of purine nucleotides to the uncoupling protein. The binding of (/sup 3/H)-GDP to BAT mitochondria is frequently used as a measure of BAT thermogenic activity. Rats fed a diet that was low but adequate in protein exhibited a decrease in feed efficiency. In addition, BAT thermogenesis was activated as indicated by an elevation in the level of GDP binding to BAT mitochondria. This phenomena occurred in older rats and persisted over time.

  14. Labelled drug-related public expenditure in relation to gross domestic product (GDP) in Europe: a luxury good?

    PubMed

    Prieto, Luis

    2010-05-17

    "Labelled drug-related public expenditure" is the direct expenditure explicitly labelled as related to illicit drugs by the general government of the state. As part of the reporting exercise corresponding to 2005, the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction's network of national focal points set up in the 27 European Union (EU) Member States, Norway, and the candidates countries to the EU, were requested to identify labelled drug-related public expenditure, at the country level. This was reported by 10 countries categorised according to the functions of government, amounting to a total of EUR 2.17 billion. Overall, the highest proportion of this total came within the government functions of Health (66%), and Public Order and Safety (POS) (20%). By country, the average share of GDP was 0.023% for Health, and 0.013% for POS. However, these shares varied considerably across countries, ranging from 0.00033% in Slovakia, up to 0.053% of GDP in Ireland in the case of Health, and from 0.003% in Portugal, to 0.02% in the UK, in the case of POS; almost a 161-fold difference between the highest and the lowest countries for Health, and a 6-fold difference for POS. Why do Ireland and the UK spend so much in Health and POS, or Slovakia and Portugal so little, in GDP terms? To respond to this question and to make a comprehensive assessment of drug-related public expenditure across countries, this study compared Health and POS spending and GDP in the 10 reporting countries. Results found suggest GDP to be a major determinant of the Health and POS drug-related public expenditures of a country. Labelled drug-related public expenditure showed a positive association with the GDP across the countries considered: r = 0.81 in the case of Health, and r = 0.91 for POS. The percentage change in Health and POS expenditures due to a one percent increase in GDP (the income elasticity of demand) was estimated to be 1.78% and 1.23% respectively. Being highly income elastic

  15. Structures of NodZ α1,6-fucosyltransferase in complex with GDP and GDP-fucose

    PubMed Central

    Brzezinski, Krzysztof; Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2012-01-01

    Rhizobial NodZ α1,6-fucosyltransferase (α1,6-FucT) catalyzes the transfer of the fucose (Fuc) moiety from guanosine 5′-­diphosphate-β-l-fucose to the reducing end of the chitin oligosaccharide core during Nod-factor (NF) biosynthesis. NF is a key signalling molecule required for successful symbiosis with a legume host for atmospheric nitrogen fixation. To date, only two α1,6-FucT structures have been determined, both without any donor or acceptor molecule that could highlight the structural background of the catalytic mechanism. Here, the first crystal structures of α1,6-FucT in complex with its substrate GDP-Fuc and with GDP, which is a byproduct of the enzymatic reaction, are presented. The crystal of the complex with GDP-Fuc was obtained through soaking of native NodZ crystals with the ligand and its structure has been determined at 2.35 Å resolution. The fucose residue is exposed to solvent and is disordered. The enzyme–product complex crystal was obtained by cocrystallization with GDP and an acceptor molecule, penta-N-acetyl-l-­glucosamine (penta-NAG). The structure has been determined at 1.98 Å resolution, showing that only the GDP molecule is present in the complex. In both structures the ligands are located in a cleft formed between the two domains of NodZ and extend towards the C-terminal domain, but their conformations differ significantly. The structures revealed that residues in three regions of the C-­terminal domain, which are conserved among α1,2-, α1,6- and protein O-fucosyltransferases, are involved in interactions with the sugar-donor molecule. There is also an interaction with the side chain of Tyr45 in the N-terminal domain, which is very unusual for a GT-B-type glycosyltransferase. Only minor conformational changes of the protein backbone are observed upon ligand binding. The only exception is a movement of the loop located between strand βC2 and helix αC3. In addition, there is a shift of the αC3 helix itself upon GDP

  16. Structures of NodZ [alpha]1,6-fucosyltransferase in complex with GDP and GDP-fucose

    SciTech Connect

    Brzezinski, Krzysztof; Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2012-03-26

    Rhizobial NodZ {alpha}1,6-fucosyltransferase ({alpha}1,6-FucT) catalyzes the transfer of the fucose (Fuc) moiety from guanosine 5'-diphosphate-{beta}-L-fucose to the reducing end of the chitin oligosaccharide core during Nod-factor (NF) biosynthesis. NF is a key signaling molecule required for successful symbiosis with a legume host for atmospheric nitrogen fixation. To date, only two {alpha}1,6-FucT structures have been determined, both without any donor or acceptor molecule that could highlight the structural background of the catalytic mechanism. Here, the first crystal structures of {alpha}1,6-FucT in complex with its substrate GDP-Fuc and with GDP, which is a byproduct of the enzymatic reaction, are presented. The crystal of the complex with GDP-Fuc was obtained through soaking of native NodZ crystals with the ligand and its structure has been determined at 2.35 {angstrom} resolution. The fucose residue is exposed to solvent and is disordered. The enzyme-product complex crystal was obtained by cocrystallization with GDP and an acceptor molecule, penta-N-acetyl-L-glucosamine (penta-NAG). The structure has been determined at 1.98 {angstrom} resolution, showing that only the GDP molecule is present in the complex. In both structures the ligands are located in a cleft formed between the two domains of NodZ and extend towards the C-terminal domain, but their conformations differ significantly. The structures revealed that residues in three regions of the C-terminal domain, which are conserved among {alpha}1,2-, {alpha}1,6- and protein O-fucosyltransferases, are involved in interactions with the sugar-donor molecule. There is also an interaction with the side chain of Tyr45 in the N-terminal domain, which is very unusual for a GT-B-type glycosyltransferase. Only minor conformational changes of the protein backbone are observed upon ligand binding. The only exception is a movement of the loop located between strand {beta}C2 and helix {alpha}C3. In addition, there is

  17. Structures of NodZ α1,6-fucosyltransferase in complex with GDP and GDP-fucose.

    PubMed

    Brzezinski, Krzysztof; Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2012-02-01

    Rhizobial NodZ α1,6-fucosyltransferase (α1,6-FucT) catalyzes the transfer of the fucose (Fuc) moiety from guanosine 5'-diphosphate-β-L-fucose to the reducing end of the chitin oligosaccharide core during Nod-factor (NF) biosynthesis. NF is a key signalling molecule required for successful symbiosis with a legume host for atmospheric nitrogen fixation. To date, only two α1,6-FucT structures have been determined, both without any donor or acceptor molecule that could highlight the structural background of the catalytic mechanism. Here, the first crystal structures of α1,6-FucT in complex with its substrate GDP-Fuc and with GDP, which is a byproduct of the enzymatic reaction, are presented. The crystal of the complex with GDP-Fuc was obtained through soaking of native NodZ crystals with the ligand and its structure has been determined at 2.35 Å resolution. The fucose residue is exposed to solvent and is disordered. The enzyme-product complex crystal was obtained by cocrystallization with GDP and an acceptor molecule, penta-N-acetyl-L-glucosamine (penta-NAG). The structure has been determined at 1.98 Å resolution, showing that only the GDP molecule is present in the complex. In both structures the ligands are located in a cleft formed between the two domains of NodZ and extend towards the C-terminal domain, but their conformations differ significantly. The structures revealed that residues in three regions of the C-terminal domain, which are conserved among α1,2-, α1,6- and protein O-fucosyltransferases, are involved in interactions with the sugar-donor molecule. There is also an interaction with the side chain of Tyr45 in the N-terminal domain, which is very unusual for a GT-B-type glycosyltransferase. Only minor conformational changes of the protein backbone are observed upon ligand binding. The only exception is a movement of the loop located between strand βC2 and helix αC3. In addition, there is a shift of the αC3 helix itself upon GDP

  18. LM-research opportunities and activities at the Latvian Academy of Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Lielausis, O.

    1996-06-01

    In this presentation selected examples will be considered characterizing the breadth of their interests in LM applications. So, InGaSn eutectic was used as a modeling liquid for investigation of MHD effects typical to some LM-blanket configurations. LM coatings proposed for the protection of divertor plates were considered too. Experiments were performed on a superconducting magnet providing a 5.6 T magnetic field in a 30 liters bore. In a large vacuum chamber (12 m{sup 3}; 6.65 10{sup {minus}4} Pa) lithium cooling system for high temperature reactors was examined. Electromagnetic pumps and flowmeters able to work at lithium temperatures up to 960{degrees}C were tested. A Na loop, where two mounted in line electromagnetic pumps are delivering a 25 atm. pressure. The main Na loop equipped with em. pumps is based on a d=10 cm tubing. LM devices were installed in the Latvian 500 MW nuclear research reactor IRT-5000 too. First, a equipped with conductive e.m. pumps loop, where InGaSn serves as a {gamma}-carrier from activity generator (placed close to the core) to two outer 20 Mrad/h irradiators. Second, a LM system for rector control, where contained in InGaSn indium is used for neutron absorption and reactivity control. A closed cylindrical LM container was installed in the core instead of a traditional control rod. The container is divided in two chambers by means of elastic membranes. The one chamber contains InGaSn, the second GaSn (without In). By means of e.m. pumps the proportion between InGaSn and GaSn in the active zone can be changed ensuring a possibility to control the amount of introduced in the core absorbing material. Long term tests of the system were performed on a zero-power assembly. But for a shorter time the system was inserted in the core of the acting main reactor too and the efficiency of the control was confirmed.

  19. Performance Analysis of Air-to-Water Heat Pump in Latvian Climate Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazjonovs, Janis; Sipkevics, Andrejs; Jakovics, Andris; Dancigs, Andris; Bajare, Diana; Dancigs, Leonards

    2014-12-01

    Strategy of the European Union in efficient energy usage demands to have a higher proportion of renewable energy in the energy market. Since heat pumps are considered to be one of the most efficient heating and cooling systems, they will play an important role in the energy consumption reduction in buildings aimed to meet the target of nearly zero energy buildings set out in the EU Directive 2010/31/EU. Unfortunately, the declared heat pump Coefficient of Performance (COP) corresponds to a certain outdoor temperature (+7 °C), therefore different climate conditions, building characteristics and settings result in different COP values during the year. The aim of this research is to investigate the Seasonal Performance factor (SPF) values of air-to-water heat pump which better characterize the effectiveness of heat pump in a longer selected period of time, especially during the winter season, in different types of residential buildings in Latvian climate conditions. Latvia has four pronounced seasons of near-equal length. Winter starts in mid-December and lasts until mid-March. Latvia is characterized by cold, maritime climate (duration of the average heating period being 203 days, the average outdoor air temperature during the heating period being 0.0 °C, the coldest five-day average temperature being -20.7 °C, the average annual air temperature being +6.2 °C, the daily average relative humidity being 79 %). The first part of this research consists of operational air-towater heat pump energy performance monitoring in different residential buildings during the winter season. The second part of the research takes place under natural conditions in an experimental construction stand which is located in an urban environment in Riga, Latvia. The inner area of this test stand, where air-to-water heat pump performance is analyzed, is 9 m2. The ceiling height is 3 m, all external wall constructions (U = 0.16 W/(m2K)) have ventilated facades. To calculate SPF, the

  20. Rescue of Notch signaling in cells incapable of GDP-L-fucose synthesis by gap junction transfer of GDP-L-fucose in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ayukawa, Tomonori; Matsumoto, Kenjiroo; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki O; Ishio, Akira; Yamakawa, Tomoko; Aoyama, Naoki; Suzuki, Takuya; Matsuno, Kenji

    2012-09-18

    Notch (N) is a transmembrane receptor that mediates cell-cell interactions to determine many cell-fate decisions. N contains EGF-like repeats, many of which have an O-fucose glycan modification that regulates N-ligand binding. This modification requires GDP-L-fucose as a donor of fucose. The GDP-L-fucose biosynthetic pathways are well understood, including the de novo pathway, which depends on GDP-mannose 4,6 dehydratase (Gmd) and GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-D-mannose 3,5-epimerase/4-reductase (Gmer). However, the potential for intercellularly supplied GDP-L-fucose and the molecular basis of such transportation have not been explored in depth. To address these points, we studied the genetic effects of mutating Gmd and Gmer on fucose modifications in Drosophila. We found that these mutants functioned cell-nonautonomously, and that GDP-L-fucose was supplied intercellularly through gap junctions composed of Innexin-2. GDP-L-fucose was not supplied through body fluids from different isolated organs, indicating that the intercellular distribution of GDP-L-fucose is restricted within a given organ. Moreover, the gap junction-mediated supply of GDP-L-fucose was sufficient to support the fucosylation of N-glycans and the O-fucosylation of the N EGF-like repeats. Our results indicate that intercellular delivery is a metabolic pathway for nucleotide sugars in live animals under certain circumstances.

  1. Relations between enabling skills and reading comprehension: a follow-up study of Latvian students from first to second grade.

    PubMed

    Sprugevica, Ieva; Høien, Torleiv

    2004-04-01

    In order to examine the relationships among various phonological skills and reading comprehension, Latvian children were followed from grade 1 to grade 2 and were tested with a battery of phonological, word reading, and reading comprehension tasks. A principal component analysis of the phonological tasks revealed three salient factors: a phonemic awareness factor, a rapid naming factor, and a short-term memory factor. In order to analyze the relationship between various phonological skills and reading comprehension, a structural modeling analysis was performed. Phonemic awareness and rapid naming explained approximately the same amount of unique variance in reading comprehension, but phonemic awareness had most predictive power indirectly via word decoding. Only rapid naming had a significant direct impact on reading comprehension.

  2. The CHEK2 del5395 is a founder mutation without direct effects for cancer risk in the latvian population

    PubMed Central

    Kalniete, D; Nakazawa-Miklasevica, M; Irmejs, A; Vjaters, E; Gardovskis, J; Miklasevics, E

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Our objective was to determine: 1) whether the checkpoint kinase 2 (CHEK2) del5395 (g.27417113-27422508 del, NC_000022.11) is a founder mutation in the Latvian population, 2) if there is an association between CHEK2 del5395 mutation and cancer risk, and 3) and whether the CHEK2 del5395 mutation impacts cancer predisposition in Chernobyl disaster liquidators (the civil and military personnel who were called upon to deal with consequences of the 1986 nuclear disaster) as well as geriatric populations. We recruited 438 breast cancer patients, 568 colorectal cancer patients, 399 ovarian cancer patients, 419 prostate cancer patients, 526 healthy blood donors, 480 Chernobyl disaster liquidators and 444 geriatric cancer-free participants. DNA samples were isolated from blood samples and subjected to multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The truncation of del5395 was estimated by fragment size of the multiplex PCR.All groups were compared to the healthy blood donors using Fisher’s exact test. All p values were two-sided and the odds ratios (OR) calculated by two-by-two table. In cancer groups, the del5395 mutation was most frequently observed in the ovarian cancer group (1.00%, OR = 1.32). In control groups, the del5395 mutation was most frequent (0.76%) in the healthy donors, which exceeded its frequency in the Chernobyl liquidators group and the geriatric group by 0.01 and 0.08%, respectively. For all groups, the OR appeared to be >1 only in ovarian cancer patients. However, OR rates showed no statistical significance in either cancer or control groups, with the p value fluctuating within the range of 0.39-1.00. The CHEK2 gene del5395 is a founder mutation in the Latvian population, which, however, does not have a direct impact on genetic predisposition toward colorectal, breast, ovarian and prostate cancer. PMID:27785394

  3. Genotype and allele frequencies of isoniazid-metabolizing enzymes NAT2 and GSTM1 in Latvian tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Igumnova, Viktorija; Capligina, Valentina; Krams, Alvils; Cirule, Andra; Elferts, Didzis; Pole, Ilva; Jansone, Inta; Bandere, Dace; Ranka, Renate

    2016-07-01

    Pharmacogenomic testing of tuberculosis drug-metabolizing enzyme genes was proposed as a strategy to identify patients at risk for suboptimal responses to medications. However, variations of the genotype frequencies among ethnic groups exist and new alleles are been identified. The aim of this study was to identify polymorphisms of genes encoding metabolic enzymes NAT2 and GSTM1 in tuberculosis patients in Latvia and to estimate the frequency of NAT2 slow acetylator and GSTM1 null genotypes. In total, 85 DNA samples were genotyped, all individuals were Caucasian. An ethnic heterogeneity reflecting the multiethnic population of the country was observed. 49 patients were Latvians, 30 were Russians and 6 of other ethnicity. In total, 7 NAT2 alleles were identified: *4, *5, *6, *7, *11, *12, * and *13. The most frequent was the slow acetylation allele NAT2*6 (frequency 0.388) followed by the slow acetylation allele NAT2*5 and the rapid acetylation allele NAT2*4 (frequencies 0.306 and 0.194, respectively). The predominance of slow (51.8%) and intermediate (43.5%) acetylators compared with rapid acetylators (4.7%) was observed. The GSTM1 null genotype was detected in 48.2% of tuberculosis patients. When subgroup analysis was performed according to ethnicity, the results showed that neither NAT2 allele frequencies nor GSTM1 null genotype frequency did not differ significantly in TB patients of Latvian or Russian ethnicity. Overall, genotyping results were similar with previous reports of a NAT2 gene variation and GSTM1 null genotype frequency in Caucasians. Our findings have a contribution for the pharmacogenetics-based tuberculosis therapy in Latvia in future. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. FX enzyme and GDP-L-Fuc transporter expression in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Villar-Portela, Susana; Muinelo-Romay, Laura; Cuevas, Elisa; Gil-Martín, Emilio; Fernández-Briera, Almudena

    2013-08-01

    Fucosylation is regulated by fucosyltransferases, the guanosine diphosphate-L-fucose (GDP-L-Fuc) synthetic pathway, and the GDP-L-fucose transporter (GDP-L-Fuc Tr). We have reported previously an increased level of α(1,6)fucosyltransferase activity and expression in colorectal cancer (CRC). The present study aimed to analyse the expression profiles of the FX enzyme and GDP-L-Fuc Tr in a cohort of operated CRC patients to elucidate their role in α(1,6)fucosylation in this neoplasm. We assessed the immunohistochemical expression of FX and GDP-L-Fuc Tr in a series of tumour samples and healthy tissues from CRC specimens. FX expression was observed in 58 of 91 (63.7%) tumours and 23 of 28 (82.1%) corresponding healthy samples. GDP-L-Fuc Tr expression was detected in 86 of 102 (84.3%) colorectal tumours, and 13 of 27 (48.1%) healthy tissue specimens. The expression of GDP-L-Fuc Tr was statistically higher in tumours than in healthy tissues (P < 0.001). A correlation was found between FX and GDP-L-Fuc Tr expression in tumour samples (P = 0.003). GDP-L-Fuc Tr overexpression in the tumour tissue of CRC patients suggests that GDP-L-Fuc transport to the Golgi apparatus may be an important factor associated with increased α(1,6)fucosylation in CRC. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The Staphylococcus epidermidis gdpS regulates biofilm formation independently of its protein-coding function.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tao; Zhao, Yanfeng; Wu, Yang; Qu, Di

    2017-04-01

    The second messenger cyclic di-guanylate (c-di-GMP) plays an important role in controlling the switch between planktonic and biofilm lifestyles. The synthesis of c-di-GMP is catalyzed by di-guanylate cyclases (DGCs) and the enzymes are characterized by the presence of a conserved GGDEF domain. In the sequenced staphylococcal genomes, gdpS is the only gene encoding a GGDEF domain-containing protein. Previous studies have shown that gdpS contributes to staphylococcal biofilm formation, but its effect remains under debate. In the present study, we deleted gdpS in Staphylococcus epidermidis strain RP62A. Disruption of gdpS in this strain impaired biofilm formation under both static and dynamic flow conditions, suggesting that gdpS act as a positive regulator of biofilm development in this high-biofilm-forming isolate. The predicted translational start site of gdpS in S. epidermidis differs between the Refseq database and the Genbank database. By using site-directed mutagenesis and Western blot analysis, we determined GdpS is translated from the start codon annotated in the Refseq database. In addition, mutation in the GGDEF domain did not affect the ability of gdpS to complement the biofilm defect of the gdpS mutant. Heterologous di-guanylate cyclases expressed in trans failed to complement the gdpS mutant. These results confirmed that gdpS modulates staphylococcal biofilm independently of c-di-GMP signaling pathway. Furthermore, mutations of the start codon did not abolish the capacity of gdpS to enhance biofilm formation. Taken together, these findings indicated that the S. epidermidis gdpS regulates biofilm formation independently of its protein-coding function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Changes in GDP binding to brown adipose tissue mitochondria and the uncoupling protein

    SciTech Connect

    Swick, A.G.; Swick, R.W. )

    1988-12-01

    Incubation in vitro of brown adipose tissue (BAT) mitochondria with divalent cations, spermine, or alkaline phosphatase led to a marked increase in the binding of ({sup 3}H)GDP. The effect of Mg{sup 2+} appeared to be the most specific and led to the largest increase in GDP binding. A simplified method was developed for measuring GDP binding to purified uncoupling protein from rat BAT mitochondria. Application of this method indicates that uncoupling protein from cold-acclimated rats binds twice as much GDP as uncoupling protein from cold-acclimated rats that were briefly returned to thermoneutrality, paralleling changes in GDP binding to the mitochondria. Incubation of BAT mitochondria with Mg{sup 2+} led to a smaller increase in GDP binding to the subsequently purified uncoupling protein, suggesting that divalent cations may somehow participate in the regulation of the activity of the uncoupling protein.

  7. Negative cooperativity in binding of muscarinic receptor agonists and GDP as a measure of agonist efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Jakubík, J; Janíčková, H; El-Fakahany, EE; Doležal, V

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Conventional determination of agonist efficacy at G-protein coupled receptors is measured by stimulation of guanosine-5′-γ−thiotriphosphate (GTPγS) binding. We analysed the role of guanosine diphosphate (GDP) in the process of activation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and provide evidence that negative cooperativity between agonist and GDP binding is an alternative measure of agonist efficacy. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Filtration and scintillation proximity assays measured equilibrium binding as well as binding kinetics of [35S]GTPγS and [3H]GDP to a mixture of G-proteins as well as individual classes of G-proteins upon binding of structurally different agonists to the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. KEY RESULTS Agonists displayed biphasic competition curves with the antagonist [3H]-N-methylscopolamine. GTPγS (1 µM) changed the competition curves to monophasic with low affinity and 50 µM GDP produced a similar effect. Depletion of membrane-bound GDP increased the proportion of agonist high-affinity sites. Carbachol accelerated the dissociation of [3H]GDP from membranes. The inverse agonist N-methylscopolamine slowed GDP dissociation and GTPγS binding without changing affinity for GDP. Carbachol affected both GDP association with and dissociation from Gi/o G-proteins but only its dissociation from Gs/olf G-proteins. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These findings suggest the existence of a low-affinity agonist-receptor conformation complexed with GDP-liganded G-protein. Also the negative cooperativity between GDP and agonist binding at the receptor/G-protein complex determines agonist efficacy. GDP binding reveals differences in action of agonists versus inverse agonists as well as differences in activation of Gi/o versus Gs/olf G-proteins that are not identified by conventional GTPγS binding. PMID:20958290

  8. Negative cooperativity in binding of muscarinic receptor agonists and GDP as a measure of agonist efficacy.

    PubMed

    Jakubík, J; Janíčková, H; El-Fakahany, E E; Doležal, V

    2011-03-01

    Conventional determination of agonist efficacy at G-protein coupled receptors is measured by stimulation of guanosine-5'-γ-thiotriphosphate (GTPγS) binding. We analysed the role of guanosine diphosphate (GDP) in the process of activation of the M₂ muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and provide evidence that negative cooperativity between agonist and GDP binding is an alternative measure of agonist efficacy. Filtration and scintillation proximity assays measured equilibrium binding as well as binding kinetics of [³⁵S]GTPγS and [³H]GDP to a mixture of G-proteins as well as individual classes of G-proteins upon binding of structurally different agonists to the M₂ muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. Agonists displayed biphasic competition curves with the antagonist [³H]-N-methylscopolamine. GTPγS (1 µM) changed the competition curves to monophasic with low affinity and 50 µM GDP produced a similar effect. Depletion of membrane-bound GDP increased the proportion of agonist high-affinity sites. Carbachol accelerated the dissociation of [³H]GDP from membranes. The inverse agonist N-methylscopolamine slowed GDP dissociation and GTPγS binding without changing affinity for GDP. Carbachol affected both GDP association with and dissociation from G(i/o) G-proteins but only its dissociation from G(s/olf) G-proteins. These findings suggest the existence of a low-affinity agonist-receptor conformation complexed with GDP-liganded G-protein. Also the negative cooperativity between GDP and agonist binding at the receptor/G-protein complex determines agonist efficacy. GDP binding reveals differences in action of agonists versus inverse agonists as well as differences in activation of G(i/o) versus G(s/olf) G-proteins that are not identified by conventional GTPγS binding. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. Characterization of the GDP-D-mannose biosynthesis pathway in Coxiella burnetii: the initial steps for GDP-β-D-virenose biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Narasaki, Craig T; Mertens, Katja; Samuel, James E

    2011-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii, the etiologic agent of human Q fever, is a gram-negative and naturally obligate intracellular bacterium. The O-specific polysaccharide chain (O-PS) of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of C. burnetii is considered a heteropolymer of the two unusual sugars β-D-virenose and dihydrohydroxystreptose and mannose. We hypothesize that GDP-D-mannose is a metabolic intermediate to GDP-β-D-virenose. GDP-D-mannose is synthesized from fructose-6-phosphate in 3 successive reactions; Isomerization to mannose-6-phosphate catalyzed by a phosphomannose isomerase (PMI), followed by conversion to mannose-1-phosphate mediated by a phosphomannomutase (PMM) and addition of GDP by a GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMP). GDP-D-mannose is then likely converted to GDP-6-deoxy-D-lyxo-hex-4-ulopyranose (GDP-Sug), a virenose intermediate, by a GDP-mannose-4,6-dehydratase (GMD). To test the validity of this pathway in C. burnetii, three open reading frames (CBU0671, CBU0294 and CBU0689) annotated as bifunctional type II PMI, as PMM or GMD were functionally characterized by complementation of corresponding E. coli mutant strains and in enzymatic assays. CBU0671, failed to complement an Escherichia coli manA (PMM) mutant strain. However, complementation of an E. coli manC (GMP) mutant strain restored capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis. CBU0294 complemented a Pseudomonas aeruginosa algC (GMP) mutant strain and showed phosphoglucomutase activity (PGM) in a pgm E. coli mutant strain. Despite the inability to complement a manA mutant, recombinant C. burnetii PMI protein showed PMM enzymatic activity in biochemical assays. CBU0689 showed dehydratase activity and determined kinetic parameters were consistent with previously reported data from other organisms. These results show the biological function of three C. burnetii LPS biosynthesis enzymes required for the formation of GDP-D-mannose and GDP-Sug. A fundamental understanding of C. burnetii genes that encode PMI, PMM and GMP is

  10. Modulation of guanosine nucleotides biosynthetic pathways enhanced GDP-L-fucose production in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Heong; Shin, So-Yeon; Kim, Myoung-Dong; Han, Nam Soo; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2012-03-01

    Guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) is the key substrate for biosynthesis of guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-L-fucose. In this study, improvement of GDP-L-fucose production was attempted by manipulating the biosynthetic pathway for guanosine nucleotides in recombinant Escherichia coli-producing GDP-L-fucose. The effects of overexpression of inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) dehydrogenase, guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP) synthetase (GuaB and GuaA), GMP reductase (GuaC) and guanosine-inosine kinase (Gsk) on GDP-L-fucose production were investigated in a series of fed-batch fermentations. Among the enzymes tested, overexpression of Gsk led to a significant improvement of GDP-L-fucose production. Maximum GDP-L-fucose concentration of 305.5 ± 5.3 mg l(-1) was obtained in the pH-stat fed-batch fermentation of recombinant E. coli-overexpressing Gsk, which corresponds to a 58% enhancement in the GDP-L-fucose production compared with the control strain overexpressing GDP-L-fucose biosynthetic enzymes. Such an enhancement of GDP-L-fucose production could be due to the increase in the intracellular level of GMP.

  11. Cloning and characterization of GDP-perosamine synthetase (Per) from Escherichia coli O157:H7 and synthesis of GDP-perosamine in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Guohui; Liu Jun; Liu Xiang; Chen Min; Zhang Houcheng Wang, Peng George

    2007-11-23

    GDP-perosamine synthetase (Per, E.C. not yet classified) is important to the synthesis of Escherichia coli O157:H7 O-antigen. The mutant in per gene can disrupt the synthesis of O157 O-antigen. In this study, GDP-perosamine synthetase was cloned from E. coli O157:H7 and over-expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant His-tagged Per fusion protein was a decamer with molecular weight of 431 kDa. The optimal pH value of this recombinant protein was 7.5. The divalent ions had no significant effect on Per-catalyzed reaction. The K{sub m} and K{sub cat}/K{sub m} for GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-D-mannose were 0.09 mM and 2.1 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} S{sup -1}, and those for L-glutamate were 2 mM and 0.52 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1}S{sup -1}, respectively. Per was used to synthesize GDP-perosamine from GDP-mannose together with recombinant GDP-mannose dehydratase (GMD, E.C. 4.2.1.47). The purified GDP-perosamine was identified by MS and NMR. In summary, this work provided a feasible approach for the synthesis of GDP-perosamine which can lead to the study of LPS biosynthesis of pathogenic E. coli O157:H7.

  12. Enhanced production of GDP-L-fucose by overexpression of NADPH regenerator in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Heong; Chin, Young-Wook; Han, Nam Soo; Kim, Myoung-Dong; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2011-08-01

    Biosynthesis of guanosine 5'-diphosphate-L-fucose (GDP-L-fucose) requires NADPH as a reducing cofactor. In this study, endogenous NADPH regenerating enzymes such as glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), isocitrate dehydrogenase (Icd), and NADP(+)-dependent malate dehydrogenase (MaeB) were overexpressed to increase GDP-L-fucose production in recombinant Escherichia coli. The effects of overexpression of each NADPH regenerating enzyme on GDP-L-fucose production were investigated in a series of batch and fed-batch fermentations. Batch fermentations showed that overexpression of G6PDH was the most effective for GDP-L-fucose production. However, GDP-L-fucose production was not enhanced by overexpression of G6PDH in the glucose-limited fed-batch fermentation. Hence, a glucose feeding strategy was optimized to enhance GDP-L-fucose production. Fed-batch fermentation with a pH-stat feeding mode for sufficient supply of glucose significantly enhanced GDP-L-fucose production compared with glucose-limited fed-batch fermentation. A maximum GDP-L-fucose concentration of 235.2 ± 3.3 mg l(-1), corresponding to a 21% enhancement in the GDP-L-fucose production compared with the control strain overexpressing GDP-L-fucose biosynthetic enzymes only, was achieved in the pH-stat fed-batch fermentation of the recombinant E. coli overexpressing G6PDH. It was concluded that sufficient glucose supply and efficient NADPH regeneration are crucial for NADPH-dependent GDP-L-fucose production in recombinant E. coli.

  13. Effects of maternal mortality on gross domestic product (GDP) in the WHO African region.

    PubMed

    Kirigia, Joses M; Oluwole, Doyin; Mwabu, Germano M; Gatwiri, Doris; Kainyu, Lenity H

    2006-01-01

    WHO African region has got the highest maternal mortality rate compared to the other five regions. Maternal mortality is hypothesized to have significantly negative effect on the gross domestic product (GDP). The objective of the current study was to estimate the loss in GDP attributable to maternal mortality in the WHO African Region. The burden of maternal mortality on GDP was estimated using a double-log econometric model. The analysis is based on cross-sectional data for 45 of the 46 Member States in the WHO African Region. Data were obtained from UNDP and the World Bank publications. All the explanatory variables included in the double-log model were found to have statistically significant effect on per capita gross domestic product (GDP) at 5 % level in a t-distribution test. The coefficients for land (D), capital (K), educational enrollment (EN) and exports (X) had a positive sign; while labor (L), imports (M) and maternal mortality rate (MMR) were found to impact negatively on GDP. Maternal mortality of a single person was found to reduce per capita GDP by US $ 0.36 per year. The study has demonstrated that maternal mortality has a statistically significant negative effect on GDP. Thus, as policy-makers strive to increase GDP through land reform programs, capital investments, export promotion and increase in educational enrollment, they should always remember that investment in maternal mortality-reducing interventions promises significant economic returns.

  14. The relationship between health and GDP in OECD countries in the very long run.

    PubMed

    Swift, Robyn

    2011-03-01

    This paper uses Johansen multivariate cointegration analysis to examine the relationship between health and GDP for 13 OECD countries over the last two centuries, for periods ranging from 1820-2001 to 1921-2001. A similar, long run, cointegrating relationship between life expectancy and both total GDP and GDP per capita was found for all the countries estimated. The relationships have a significant influence on both total GDP and GPD per capita in most of the countries estimated, with 1% increase in life expectancy resulting in an average 6% increase in total GDP in the long run, and 5% increase in GDP per capita. Total GDP and GDP per capita also have a significant influence on life expectancy for most countries. There is no evidence of changes in the relationships for any country over the periods estimated, indicating that shifts in the major causes of illness and death over time do not appear to have influenced the link between health and economic growth.

  15. Body fat in children and adolescents participating in organized sports: Descriptive epidemiological study of 6048 Latvian athletes.

    PubMed

    Kalnina, Liga; Sauka, Melita; Timpka, Toomas; Dahlström, Örjan; Nylander, Eva; Selga, Guntars; Ligere, Renate; Karklina, Helena; Priedite, Ilga S; Larins, Viesturs

    2015-08-01

    Pressure among young athletes to meet body composition goals may lead to poor nutrition and affect growth. To examine the proportion of body fat (%BF), measured by bioimpedance analysis, among Latvian children and adolescents participating in organized sports. Our study had a nationally representative sample of 6048 young athletes, aged 10-17 years. Their %BF was measured using a multifrequency, 8-pole, bioelectrical impedance leg-to-hand analyzer. About 19.2% (CI 14.4-20.0) of boys and 15.1% (CI 14.0-16.3) of girls had a %BF value below the recommended levels. The %BF in young female athletes participating in aesthetic sports was lower than among their peers participating in other sports. Young male athletes participating in aesthetic sports had lower %BF levels at 10 and 12 years of age, compared with participants in weight-class sports; and lower levels of %BF from age 10-14 years, compared with participants in non-weight-sensitive sports. Almost every fifth child and adolescent participating in organized sports displayed critically low body fat levels. Body fat needs to be assessed regularly in young athletes, to prevent negative consequences on health. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  16. Stability of sterigmatocystin during the bread making process and its occurrence in bread from the Latvian market.

    PubMed

    Veršilovskis, Aleksandrs; Bartkevičs, Vadims

    2012-05-01

    Sterigmatocystin (STC) is a carcinogenic and mutagenic mycotoxin produced by fungi of many Aspergillus species. The aim of this research was to test the stability of STC during the bread making process and to check bread samples from the Latvian market for STC contamination, using a previously developed electrospray positive ionisation (ESI(+)) liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. Wheat grain naturally contaminated with STC was used for bread baking. STC was found to be stable during the bread-making process. In the food survey 17% of the analysed breads were positive for STC, with concentration levels of 2-7 μg kg(-1). One out of six rye bread samples, one out of nine rye-wheat bread samples and three out of 14 wheat bread samples were contaminated with STC. Four out of five contaminated samples contained whole grains as the main ingredient. We conclude that whole grain bread may be a possible source of STC, although even STC-positive bread samples identified in this study contained quite low toxin levels.

  17. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF THIN GDP SHELLS USED AS CRYOGENIC DIRECT DRIVE TARGETS AT OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    NIKROO,A; CZECHOWICZ,D; CHEN,K.C; DICKEN,M; MORRIS,C; ANDREWS,R; GREENWOOD,A.L; CASTILLO,E

    2003-06-01

    OAK-B135 Thin glow discharge polymer (GDP) shells are currently used as the targets for cryogenic direct drive laser fusion experiments. These shells need to be filled with nearly 1000 atm of D{sub 2} and cooled to cryogenic temperatures without failing due to buckling and bursting pressures they experience in this process. Therefore, the mechanical and permeation properties of these shells are of utmost importance in successful and rapid filling with D{sub 2}. In this paper, they present an overview of buckle and burst pressures of several different types of GDP shells. These include those made using traditional GDP deposition parameters (standard GDP) using a high deposition pressure and using modified parameters (strong GDP) of low deposition pressure that leads to more robust shells.

  18. Biosynthesis of GDP-fucose and Other Sugar Nucleotides in the Blood Stages of Plasmodium falciparum*

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, Sílvia; Bandini, Giulia; Ospina, Diego; Bernabeu, Maria; Mariño, Karina; Fernández-Becerra, Carmen; Izquierdo, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrate structures play important roles in many biological processes, including cell adhesion, cell-cell communication, and host-pathogen interactions. Sugar nucleotides are activated forms of sugars used by the cell as donors for most glycosylation reactions. Using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based method, we identified and quantified the pools of UDP-glucose, UDP-galactose, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, GDP-mannose, and GDP-fucose in Plasmodium falciparum intraerythrocytic life stages. We assembled these data with the in silico functional reconstruction of the parasite metabolic pathways obtained from the P. falciparum annotated genome, exposing new active biosynthetic routes crucial for further glycosylation reactions. Fucose is a sugar present in glycoconjugates often associated with recognition and adhesion events. Thus, the GDP-fucose precursor is essential in a wide variety of organisms. P. falciparum presents homologues of GDP-mannose 4,6-dehydratase and GDP-l-fucose synthase enzymes that are active in vitro, indicating that most GDP-fucose is formed by a de novo pathway that involves the bioconversion of GDP-mannose. Homologues for enzymes involved in a fucose salvage pathway are apparently absent in the P. falciparum genome. This is in agreement with in vivo metabolic labeling experiments showing that fucose is not significantly incorporated by the parasite. Fluorescence microscopy of epitope-tagged versions of P. falciparum GDP-mannose 4,6-dehydratase and GDP-l-fucose synthase expressed in transgenic 3D7 parasites shows that these enzymes localize in the cytoplasm of P. falciparum during the intraerythrocytic developmental cycle. Although the function of fucose in the parasite is not known, the presence of GDP-fucose suggests that the metabolite may be used for further fucosylation reactions. PMID:23615908

  19. Biochemical characterization of GDP-L-fucose de novo synthesis pathway in fungus Mortierella alpina.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yan; Perepelov, Andrei V; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Hao; Knirel, Yuriy A; Wang, Lei; Chen, Wei

    2010-01-22

    Mortierella alpina is a filamentous fungus commonly found in soil, which is able to produce large amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids. L-fucose is an important sugar found in a diverse range of organisms, playing a variety of biological roles. In this study, we characterized the de novo biosynthetic pathway of GDP-L-fucose (the nucleotide-activated form of L-fucose) in M. alpina. Genes encoding GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) and GDP-keto-6-deoxymannose 3,5-epimerase/4-reductase (GMER) were expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzymes were produced as His-tagged fusion proteins. Conversion of GDP-mannose to GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy mannose by GMD and GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy mannose to GDP-L-fucose by GMER were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis, electro-spray ionization-mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The k(m) values of GMD for GDP-mannose and GMER for GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy mannose were determined to be 0.77 mM and 1.047 mM, respectively. Both NADH and NADPH may be used by GMER as the coenzyme. The optimum temperature and pH were determined to be 37 degrees C and pH 9.0 (GMD) or pH 7.0 (GMER). Divalent cations are not required for GMD and GMER activity, and the activities of both enzymes may be enhanced by DTT. To our knowledge this is the first report on the characterization of GDP-L-fucose biosynthetic pathway in fungi. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Biochemical characterization of GDP-L-fucose de novo synthesis pathway in fungus Mortierella alpina

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Yan; Perepelov, Andrei V.; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Hao; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Wang, Lei; Chen, Wei

    2010-01-22

    Mortierella alpina is a filamentous fungus commonly found in soil, which is able to produce large amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids. L-Fucose is an important sugar found in a diverse range of organisms, playing a variety of biological roles. In this study, we characterized the de novo biosynthetic pathway of GDP-L-fucose (the nucleotide-activated form of L-fucose) in M. alpina. Genes encoding GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) and GDP-keto-6-deoxymannose 3,5-epimerase/4-reductase (GMER) were expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzymes were produced as His-tagged fusion proteins. Conversion of GDP-mannose to GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy mannose by GMD and GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy mannose to GDP-L-fucose by GMER were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis, electro-spray ionization-mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The k{sub m} values of GMD for GDP-mannose and GMER for GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy mannose were determined to be 0.77 mM and 1.047 mM, respectively. Both NADH and NADPH may be used by GMER as the coenzyme. The optimum temperature and pH were determined to be 37 {sup o}C and pH 9.0 (GMD) or pH 7.0 (GMER). Divalent cations are not required for GMD and GMER activity, and the activities of both enzymes may be enhanced by DTT. To our knowledge this is the first report on the characterization of GDP-L-fucose biosynthetic pathway in fungi.

  1. Biosynthesis of GDP-fucose and other sugar nucleotides in the blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Sílvia; Bandini, Giulia; Ospina, Diego; Bernabeu, Maria; Mariño, Karina; Fernández-Becerra, Carmen; Izquierdo, Luis

    2013-06-07

    Carbohydrate structures play important roles in many biological processes, including cell adhesion, cell-cell communication, and host-pathogen interactions. Sugar nucleotides are activated forms of sugars used by the cell as donors for most glycosylation reactions. Using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based method, we identified and quantified the pools of UDP-glucose, UDP-galactose, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, GDP-mannose, and GDP-fucose in Plasmodium falciparum intraerythrocytic life stages. We assembled these data with the in silico functional reconstruction of the parasite metabolic pathways obtained from the P. falciparum annotated genome, exposing new active biosynthetic routes crucial for further glycosylation reactions. Fucose is a sugar present in glycoconjugates often associated with recognition and adhesion events. Thus, the GDP-fucose precursor is essential in a wide variety of organisms. P. falciparum presents homologues of GDP-mannose 4,6-dehydratase and GDP-L-fucose synthase enzymes that are active in vitro, indicating that most GDP-fucose is formed by a de novo pathway that involves the bioconversion of GDP-mannose. Homologues for enzymes involved in a fucose salvage pathway are apparently absent in the P. falciparum genome. This is in agreement with in vivo metabolic labeling experiments showing that fucose is not significantly incorporated by the parasite. Fluorescence microscopy of epitope-tagged versions of P. falciparum GDP-mannose 4,6-dehydratase and GDP-L-fucose synthase expressed in transgenic 3D7 parasites shows that these enzymes localize in the cytoplasm of P. falciparum during the intraerythrocytic developmental cycle. Although the function of fucose in the parasite is not known, the presence of GDP-fucose suggests that the metabolite may be used for further fucosylation reactions.

  2. PSMA6 (rs2277460, rs1048990), PSMC6 (rs2295826, rs2295827) and PSMA3 (rs2348071) genetic diversity in Latvians, Lithuanians and Taiwanese

    PubMed Central

    Sjakste, Tatjana; Paramonova, Natalia; Wu, Lawrence Shi-Shin; Zemeckiene, Zivile; Sitkauskiene, Brigita; Sakalauskas, Raimundas; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Sjakste, Nikolajs

    2014-01-01

    PSMA6 (rs2277460, rs1048990), PSMC6 (rs2295826, rs2295827) and PSMA3 (rs2348071) genetic diversity was investigated in 1438 unrelated subjects from Latvia, Lithuania and Taiwan. In general, polymorphism of each individual locus showed tendencies similar to determined previously in HapMap populations. Main differences concern Taiwanese and include presence of rs2277460 rare allele A not found before in Asians and absence of rs2295827 rare alleles homozygotes TT observed in all other human populations. Observed patterns of SNPs and haplotype diversity were compatible with expectation of neutral model of evolution. Linkage disequilibrium between the rs2295826 and rs2295827 was detected to be complete in Latvians and Lithuanians (D´ = 1; r2 = 1) and slightly disrupted in Taiwanese (D´ = 0.978; r2 = 0.901). Population differentiation (FST statistics) was estimated from pairwise population comparisons of loci variability, five locus haplotypes and PSMA6 and PSMC6 two locus haplotypes. Latvians were significantly different from all Asians at each of 5 SNPs and from Lithuanians at the rs1048990 and PSMC6 loci. Lithuanian and Asian populations exhibited similarities at the PSMC6 loci and were different at the PSMA6 and PSMA3 SNPs. Considering five locus haplotypes all European populations were significantly different from Asian; Lithuanian population was different from both Latvian and CEU. Allele specific patterns of transcription factor binding sites and splicing signals were predicted in silico and addressed to eventual functionality of nucleotide substitutions and their potential to be involved in human genome evolution and geographical adaptation. Current study represents a novel step toward a systematic analysis of the proteasomal gene genetic diversity in human populations. PMID:25606411

  3. Enhancing GDP-fucose production in recombinant Escherichia coli by metabolic pathway engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yafei; Han, Donglei; Pan, Ying; Wang, Shuaishuai; Fang, Junqiang; Wang, Peng; Liu, Xian-wei

    2015-02-01

    Guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-fucose is the indispensible donor substrate for fucosyltransferase-catalyzed synthesis of fucose-containing biomolecules, which have been found involving in various biological functions. In this work, the salvage pathway for GDP-fucose biosynthesis from Bacterioides fragilis was introduced into Escherichia coli. Besides, the biosynthesis of guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), an essential substrate for GDP-fucose biosynthesis, was enhanced via overexpression of enzymes involved in the salvage pathway of GTP biosynthesis. The production capacities of metabolically engineered strains bearing different combinations of recombinant enzymes were compared. The shake flask fermentation of the strain expressing Fkp, Gpt, Gmk and Ndk obtained the maximum GDP-fucose content of 4.6 ± 0.22 μmol/g (dry cell mass), which is 4.2 fold that of the strain only expressing Fkp. Through fed-batch fermentation, the GDP-fucose content further rose to 6.6 ± 0.14 μmol/g (dry cell mass). In addition to a better productivity than previous fermentation processes based on the de novo pathway for GDP-fucose biosynthesis, the established schemes in this work also have the advantage to be a potential avenue to GDP-fucose analogs encompassing chemical modification on the fucose residue.

  4. Rapid changes in number of GDP binding sites on brown adipose tissue mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Swick, A.G.; Swick, R.W.

    1986-08-01

    (TH)GDP binding to brown adipose tissue (BAT) mitochondria increased more than twofold in 20 min when rats were moved from 27 to 4C. When animals housed at 4C for 2 h were returned to 27C, GDP binding decreased sharply in 20 min and returned to control levels in 2 h. These results are consistent with a rapid unmasking and remasking of GDP bindings sites. GDP binding to mitochondria from warm and acutely cold treated rats was not modified by prior swelling, by freeze-thawing, nor by sonication of the mitochondria before assay. GDP-inhibitable proton conductance, as measured by passive swelling, was unaffected by this brief exposure to cold but more than doubled in rats kept at 4C for 10 days. The authors hypothesize that the rate of GDP-inhibitable swelling may be a reflection of uncoupling protein concentration in the BAT mitochondria, whereas physiological thermogenic activity is more appropriately indicated by GDP binding. The alterations in binding activity appear not to be due to changes in the mitochondrial membrane integrity.

  5. Modulation of GDP-fucose level for generating proteins with reduced rate of fucosylation (WO2010141855).

    PubMed

    Taupin, Philippe

    2011-09-01

    The application (WO2010141855) is in the field of glycobiology, and involves the control of the rate of fucosylation of proteins by exogenous factors. It aims at controlling the rate of protein fucosylation with inhibitors (drugs or nucleic acid antagonists) of enzymes involved in the synthesis of GDP-fucose. Mammalian cell lines were cultured in the presence of inhibitors, for example, siRNA. The rates of GDP-fucose in cells and during protein fucosylation were characterized. The level of protein fucosylation decreases rapidly in response to a decrease in GDP-fucose level. The relationship between the rate of fucosylation of proteins and the level of GDP-fucose in a cell is non-linear. Reduction in the rate of protein fucosylation can be achieved with a minimal reduction of the level of GDP-fucose in cells. The paradigm may be used to synthesize proteins and antibodies, with a reduced rate of fucosylation. The application claims that the use of drugs or nucleic acid antagonists that inhibit the enzymes involved in GDP-fucose biosynthesis optimizes the level of GDP-fucose present in cells, and reduces the rate of fucosylation of glycoproteins.

  6. Biochemical analysis of leishmanial and human GDP-Mannose Pyrophosphorylases and selection of inhibitors as new leads.

    PubMed

    Mao, Wei; Daligaux, Pierre; Lazar, Noureddine; Ha-Duong, Tâp; Cavé, Christian; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Loiseau, Philippe M; Pomel, Sébastien

    2017-04-07

    Leishmaniases are an ensemble of diseases caused by the protozoan parasite of the genus Leishmania. Current antileishmanial treatments are limited and present main issues of toxicity and drug resistance emergence. Therefore, the generation of new inhibitors specifically directed against a leishmanial target is an attractive strategy to expand the chemotherapeutic arsenal. GDP-Mannose Pyrophosphorylase (GDP-MP) is a prominent therapeutic target involved in host-parasite recognition which has been described to be essential for parasite survival. In this work, we produced and purified GDP-MPs from L. mexicana (LmGDP-MP), L. donovani (LdGDP-MP), and human (hGDP-MP), and compared their enzymatic properties. From a rationale design of 100 potential inhibitors, four compounds were identified having a promising and specific inhibitory effect on parasite GDP-MP and antileishmanial activities, one of them exhibits a competitive inhibition on LdGDP-MP and belongs to the 2-substituted quinoline series.

  7. Metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum to produce GDP-L-fucose from glucose and mannose.

    PubMed

    Chin, Young-Wook; Park, Jin-Byung; Park, Yong-Cheol; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2013-06-01

    Wild-type Corynebacterium glutamicum was metabolically engineered to convert glucose and mannose into guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-L-fucose, a precursor of fucosyl-oligosaccharides, which are involved in various biological and pathological functions. This was done by introducing the gmd and wcaG genes of Escherichia coli encoding GDP-D-mannose-4,6-dehydratase and GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-D-mannose-3,5-epimerase-4-reductase, respectively, which are known as key enzymes in the production of GDP-L-fucose from GDP-D-mannose. Coexpression of the genes allowed the recombinant C. glutamicum cells to produce GDP-L-fucose in a minimal medium containing glucose and mannose as carbon sources. The specific product formation rate was much higher during growth on mannose than on glucose. In addition, the specific product formation rate was further increased by coexpressing the endogenous phosphomanno-mutase gene (manB) and GTP-mannose-1-phosphate guanylyl-transferase gene (manC), which are involved in the conversion of mannose-6-phosphate into GDP-D-mannose. However, the overexpression of manA encoding mannose-6-phosphate isomerase, catalyzing interconversion of mannose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate showed a negative effect on formation of the target product. Overall, coexpression of gmd, wcaG, manB and manC in C. glutamicum enabled production of GDP-L-fucose at the specific rate of 0.11 mg g cell(-1) h(-1). The specific GDP-L-fucose content reached 5.5 mg g cell(-1), which is a 2.4-fold higher than that of the recombinant E. coli overexpressing gmd, wcaG, manB and manC under comparable conditions. Well-established metabolic engineering tools may permit optimization of the carbon and cofactor metabolisms of C. glutamicum to further improve their production capacity.

  8. Analysis of Latvian familial melanoma patients shows novel variants in the noncoding regions of CDKN2A and that the CDK4 mutation R24H is a founder mutation.

    PubMed

    Veinalde, Rūta; Ozola, Aija; Azarjana, Kristīne; Molven, Anders; Akslen, Lars A; Doniņa, Simona; Proboka, Guna; Cēma, Ingrīda; Baginskis, Ainārs; Pjanova, Dace

    2013-06-01

    Hereditary cutaneous melanoma is associated with mutations in the high-risk CDKN2A gene in about 40% of melanoma-prone families. Mutations in the CDK4 gene are the cause in only a few pedigrees. In this study, we analyzed 20 Latvian familial melanoma probands and carried out a comprehensive analysis of CDKN2A including sequencing of its promoter/intronic regions and deletion screening. We also analyzed the critical second exon of the CDK4 gene. One novel intronic variant (IVS2+82C>T) of the CDKN2A gene and a small deletion (c.-20677_-20682delGTACGC) in its promoter region were found. Genotyping of the novel variants in larger melanoma and control groups indicated that the deletion increases the risk of melanoma (odds ratio=6.353, 95% confidence interval: 1.34-30.22, P=0.0168). The CDK4 gene analysis showed a Latvian melanoma family with the mutation R24H carried on the same haplotype as in two previously described Latvian CDK4-positive families. Our study suggests that the main risk gene in Latvian families with a strong family history of melanoma is CDK4 and that most of the other cases analyzed could be sporadic or associated with low-penetrance risk genes.

  9. The Arabidopsis Golgi-localized GDP-L-fucose transporter is required for plant development

    SciTech Connect

    Rautengarten, Carsten; Ebert, Berit; Liu, Lifeng; Stonebloom, Solomon; Smith-Moritz, Andreia M.; Pauly, Markus; Orellana, Ariel; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Heazlewood, Joshua L.

    2016-07-06

    Nucleotide sugar transport across Golgi membranes is essential for the luminal biosynthesis of glycan structures. Here we identify GDP-fucose transporter 1 (GFT1), an Arabidopsis nucleotide sugar transporter that translocates GDP-L-fucose into the Golgi lumen. Using proteo-liposome-based transport assays, we show that GFT preferentially transports GDP-L-fucose over other nucleotide sugars in vitro, while GFT1-silenced plants are almost devoid of L-fucose in cell wall-derived xyloglucan and rhamnogalacturonan II. Furthermore, these lines display reduced L-fucose content in N-glycan structures accompanied by severe developmental growth defects. We conclude that GFT1 is the major nucleotide sugar transporter for import of GDP-L-fucose into the Golgi and is required for proper plant growth and development.

  10. The Arabidopsis Golgi-localized GDP-L-fucose transporter is required for plant development

    DOE PAGES

    Rautengarten, Carsten; Ebert, Berit; Liu, Lifeng; ...

    2016-07-06

    Nucleotide sugar transport across Golgi membranes is essential for the luminal biosynthesis of glycan structures. Here we identify GDP-fucose transporter 1 (GFT1), an Arabidopsis nucleotide sugar transporter that translocates GDP-L-fucose into the Golgi lumen. Using proteo-liposome-based transport assays, we show that GFT preferentially transports GDP-L-fucose over other nucleotide sugars in vitro, while GFT1-silenced plants are almost devoid of L-fucose in cell wall-derived xyloglucan and rhamnogalacturonan II. Furthermore, these lines display reduced L-fucose content in N-glycan structures accompanied by severe developmental growth defects. We conclude that GFT1 is the major nucleotide sugar transporter for import of GDP-L-fucose into the Golgi andmore » is required for proper plant growth and development.« less

  11. The Arabidopsis Golgi-localized GDP-L-fucose transporter is required for plant development.

    PubMed

    Rautengarten, Carsten; Ebert, Berit; Liu, Lifeng; Stonebloom, Solomon; Smith-Moritz, Andreia M; Pauly, Markus; Orellana, Ariel; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Heazlewood, Joshua L

    2016-07-06

    Nucleotide sugar transport across Golgi membranes is essential for the luminal biosynthesis of glycan structures. Here we identify GDP-fucose transporter 1 (GFT1), an Arabidopsis nucleotide sugar transporter that translocates GDP-L-fucose into the Golgi lumen. Using proteo-liposome-based transport assays, we show that GFT preferentially transports GDP-L-fucose over other nucleotide sugars in vitro, while GFT1-silenced plants are almost devoid of L-fucose in cell wall-derived xyloglucan and rhamnogalacturonan II. Furthermore, these lines display reduced L-fucose content in N-glycan structures accompanied by severe developmental growth defects. We conclude that GFT1 is the major nucleotide sugar transporter for import of GDP-L-fucose into the Golgi and is required for proper plant growth and development.

  12. The Arabidopsis Golgi-localized GDP-L-fucose transporter is required for plant development

    PubMed Central

    Rautengarten, Carsten; Ebert, Berit; Liu, Lifeng; Stonebloom, Solomon; Smith-Moritz, Andreia M.; Pauly, Markus; Orellana, Ariel; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Heazlewood, Joshua L.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide sugar transport across Golgi membranes is essential for the luminal biosynthesis of glycan structures. Here we identify GDP-fucose transporter 1 (GFT1), an Arabidopsis nucleotide sugar transporter that translocates GDP-L-fucose into the Golgi lumen. Using proteo-liposome-based transport assays, we show that GFT preferentially transports GDP-L-fucose over other nucleotide sugars in vitro, while GFT1-silenced plants are almost devoid of L-fucose in cell wall-derived xyloglucan and rhamnogalacturonan II. Furthermore, these lines display reduced L-fucose content in N-glycan structures accompanied by severe developmental growth defects. We conclude that GFT1 is the major nucleotide sugar transporter for import of GDP-L-fucose into the Golgi and is required for proper plant growth and development. PMID:27381418

  13. Toward the mechanism of NH(4) (+) sensitivity mediated by Arabidopsis GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Kempinski, Chase F; Haffar, Rawaa; Barth, Carina

    2011-05-01

    The ascorbic acid (AA)-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana mutant vtc1-1, which is defective in GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMPase), exhibits conditional hypersensitivity to ammonium (NH(4) (+) ), a phenomenon that is independent of AA deficiency. As GMPase is important for GDP-mannose biosynthesis, a nucleotide sugar necessary for protein N-glycosylation, it has been thought that GDP-mannose deficiency is responsible for the growth defect in vtc1-1 in the presence of NH(4) (+) . Therefore, the motivation for this work was to elucidate the growth and developmental processes that are affected in vtc1-1 in the presence of NH(4) (+) and to determine whether GDP-mannose deficiency generally causes NH(4) (+) sensitivity. Furthermore, as NH(4) (+) may alter cytosolic pH, we investigated the responses of vtc1-1 to pH changes in the presence and absence of NH(4) (+) . Using qRT-PCR and staining procedures, we demonstrate that defective N-glycosylation in vtc1-1 contributes to cell wall, membrane and cell cycle defects, resulting in root growth inhibition in the presence of NH(4) (+) . However, by using mutants acting upstream of vtc1-1 and contributing to GDP-mannose biosynthesis, we show that GDP-mannose deficiency does not generally lead to and is not the primary cause of NH(4) (+) sensitivity. Instead, our data suggest that GMPase responds to pH alterations in the presence of NH(4) (+) .

  14. The GDP-bound form of Arf6 is located at the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Macia, Eric; Luton, Frédéric; Partisani, Mariagrazia; Cherfils, Jacqueline; Chardin, Pierre; Franco, Michel

    2004-05-01

    The function of Arf6 has been investigated largely by using the T27N and the Q67L mutants, which are thought to be blocked in GDP- and GTP-bound states, respectively. However, these mutants have been poorly characterized biochemically. Here, we found that Arf6(T27N) is not an appropriate marker of the inactive GDP-bound form because it has a high tendency to lose its nucleotide in vitro and to denature. As a consequence, most of the protein is aggregated in vivo and localizes to detergent-insoluble structures. However, a small proportion of Arf6(T27N) is able to form a stable complex with its exchange factor EFA6 at the plasma membrane, accounting for its dominant-negative phenotype. To define the cellular localization of Arf6-GDP, we designed a new mutant, Arf6(T44N). In vitro, this mutant has a 30-fold decreased affinity for GTP. In vivo, it is mostly GDP bound and, in contrast to the wild type, does not switch to the active conformation when expressed with EFA6. This GDP-locked mutant is found at the plasma membrane, where it localizes with EFA6 and Ezrin in actin- and phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate-enriched domains. From these results, we conclude that the Arf6 GDP-GTP cycle takes place at the plasma membrane.

  15. GTP- and GDP-Dependent Rab27a Effectors in Pancreatic Beta-Cells.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Mami; Ishizaki, Toshimasa; Kimura, Toshihide

    2015-01-01

    Small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) participate in a wide variety of cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and intracellular transport. Conventionally, only the guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP)-bound small GTPase interacts with effector proteins, and the resulting downstream signals control specific cellular functions. Therefore, the GTP-bound form is regarded as active, and the focus has been on searching for proteins that bind the GTP form to look for their effectors. The Rab family small GTPase Rab27a is highly expressed in some secretory cells and is involved in the control of membrane traffic. The present study reviews recent progress in our understanding of the roles of Rab27a and its effectors in pancreatic beta-cells. In the basal state, GTP-bound Rab27a controls insulin secretion at pre-exocytic stages via its GTP-dependent effectors. We previously identified novel guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-bound Rab27-interacting proteins. Interestingly, GDP-bound Rab27a controls endocytosis of the secretory membrane via its interaction with these proteins. We also demonstrated that the insulin secretagogue glucose converts Rab27a from its GTP- to GDP-bound forms. Thus, GTP- and GDP-bound Rab27a regulate pre-exocytic and endocytic stages in membrane traffic, respectively. Since the physiological importance of GDP-bound GTPases has been largely overlooked, we consider that the investigation of GDP-dependent effectors for other GTPases is necessary for further understanding of cellular function.

  16. Functional expression of a human GDP-L-fucose transporter in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Förster-Fromme, Karin; Schneider, Sarah; Sprenger, Georg A; Albermann, Christoph

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the translocation of nucleotide-activated sugars from the cytosol across a membrane into the endoplasmatic reticulum or the Golgi apparatus which is an important step in the synthesis of glycoproteins and glycolipids in eukaryotes. The heterologous expression of the recombinant and codon-adapted human GDP-L-fucose antiporter gene SLC35C1 (encoding an N-terminal OmpA-signal sequence) led to a functional transporter protein located in the cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli. The in vitro transport was investigated using inverted membrane vesicles. SLC35C1 is an antiporter specific for GDP-L-fucose and depending on the concomitant reverse transport of GMP. The recombinant transporter FucT1 exhibited an activity for the transport of (3)H-GDP-L-fucose with a Vmax of 8 pmol/min mg with a Km of 4 µM. The functional expression of SLC35C1 in GDP-L-fucose overproducing E. coli led to the export of GDP-L-fucose to the culture supernatant. The export of GDP-L-fucose by E. coli provides the opportunity for the engineering of a periplasmatic fucosylation reaction in recombinant bacterial cells.

  17. Crystal structure of a tetrameric GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase from a bacterial GDP-D-rhamnose biosynthetic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, N.A.; Mulichak, A.M.; Lam, J.S.; Rocchetta, H.L.; Garavito, R.M.

    2010-03-08

    D-Rhamnose is a rare 6-deoxy monosaccharide primarily found in the lipopolysaccharide of pathogenic bacteria, where it is involved in host-bacterium interactions and the establishment of infection. The biosynthesis of D-rhamnose proceeds through the conversion of GDP-D-mannose by GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) to GDP-4-keto-6-deoxymannose, which is subsequently reduced to GDP-D-rhamnose by a reductase. We have determined the crystal structure of GMD from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in complex with NADPH and GDP. GMD belongs to the NDP-sugar modifying subfamily of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) enzymes, all of which exhibit bidomain structures and a conserved catalytic triad (Tyr-XXX-Lys and Ser/Thr). Although most members of this enzyme subfamily display homodimeric structures, this bacterial GMD forms a tetramer in the same fashion as the plant MUR1 from Arabidopsis thaliana. The cofactor binding sites are adjoined across the tetramer interface, which brings the adenosyl phosphate moieties of the adjacent NADPH molecules to within 7 {angstrom} of each other. A short peptide segment (Arg35-Arg43) stretches into the neighboring monomer, making not only protein-protein interactions but also hydrogen bonding interactions with the neighboring cofactor. The interface hydrogen bonds made by the Arg35-Arg43 segment are generally conserved in GMD and MUR1, and the interacting residues are highly conserved among the sequences of bacterial and eukaryotic GMDs. Outside of the Arg35-Arg43 segment, residues involved in tetrameric contacts are also quite conserved across different species. These observations suggest that a tetramer is the preferred, and perhaps functionally relevant, oligomeric state for most bacterial and eukaryotic GMDs.

  18. Posttranslational modifications of Rab proteins cause effective displacement of GDP dissociation inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Oesterlin, Lena K; Goody, Roger S; Itzen, Aymelt

    2012-04-10

    Intracellular vesicular trafficking is regulated by approximately 60 members of the Rab subfamily of small Ras-like GDP/GTP binding proteins. Rab proteins cycle between inactive and active states as well as between cytosolic and membrane bound forms. Membrane extraction/delivery and cytosolic distribution of Rabs is mediated by interaction with the protein GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) that binds to prenylated inactive (GDP-bound) Rab proteins. Because the Rab:GDP:GDI complex is of high affinity, the question arises of how GDI can be displaced efficiently from Rab protein in order to allow the necessary recruitment of the Rab to its specific target membrane. While there is strong evidence that DrrA, as a bacterially encoded GDP/GTP exchange factor, contributes to this event, we show here that posttranslational modifications of Rabs can also modulate the affinity for GDI and thus cause effective displacement of GDI from Rab:GDI complexes. These activities have been found associated with the phosphocholination and adenylylation activities of the enzymes AnkX and DrrA/SidM, respectively, from the pathogenic bacterium Legionella pneumophila. Both modifications occur after spontaneous dissociation of Rab:GDI complexes within their natural equilibrium. Therefore, the effective GDI displacement that is observed is caused by inhibition of reformation of Rab:GDI complexes. Interestingly, in contrast to adenylylation by DrrA, AnkX can covalently modify inactive Rabs with high catalytic efficiency even when GDP is bound to the GTPase and hence can inhibit binding of GDI to Rab:GDP complexes. We therefore speculate that human cells could employ similar mechanisms in the absence of infection to effectively displace Rabs from GDI.

  19. Different Effects of Guanine Nucleotides (GDP and GTP) on Protein-Mediated Mitochondrial Proton Leak

    PubMed Central

    Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej M.; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compared the influence of GDP and GTP on isolated mitochondria respiring under conditions favoring oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and under conditions excluding this process, i.e., in the presence of carboxyatractyloside, an adenine nucleotide translocase inhibitor, and/or oligomycin, an FOF1-ATP synthase inhibitor. Using mitochondria isolated from rat kidney and human endothelial cells, we found that the action of GDP and GTP can differ diametrically depending on the conditions. Namely, under conditions favoring OXPHOS, both in the absence and presence of linoleic acid, an activator of uncoupling proteins (UCPs), the addition of 1 mM GDP resulted in the state 4 (non-phosphorylating respiration)-state 3 (phosphorylating respiration) transition, which is characteristic of ADP oxidative phosphorylation. In contrast, the addition of 1 mM GTP resulted in a decrease in the respiratory rate and an increase in the membrane potential, which is characteristic of UCP inhibition. The stimulatory effect of GDP, but not GTP, was also observed in inside-out submitochondrial particles prepared from rat kidney mitochondria. However, the effects of GDP and GTP were more similar in the presence of OXPHOS inhibitors. The importance of these observations in connection with the action of UCPs, adenine nucleotide translocase (or other carboxyatractyloside-sensitive carriers), carboxyatractyloside- and purine nucleotide-insensitive carriers, as well as nucleoside-diphosphate kinase (NDPK) are considered. Because the measurements favoring oxidative phosphorylation better reflect in vivo conditions, our study strongly supports the idea that GDP cannot be considered a significant physiological inhibitor of UCP. Moreover, it appears that, under native conditions, GTP functions as a more efficient UCP inhibitor than GDP and ATP. PMID:24904988

  20. Different effects of guanine nucleotides (GDP and GTP) on protein-mediated mitochondrial proton leak.

    PubMed

    Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej M; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compared the influence of GDP and GTP on isolated mitochondria respiring under conditions favoring oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and under conditions excluding this process, i.e., in the presence of carboxyatractyloside, an adenine nucleotide translocase inhibitor, and/or oligomycin, an FOF1-ATP synthase inhibitor. Using mitochondria isolated from rat kidney and human endothelial cells, we found that the action of GDP and GTP can differ diametrically depending on the conditions. Namely, under conditions favoring OXPHOS, both in the absence and presence of linoleic acid, an activator of uncoupling proteins (UCPs), the addition of 1 mM GDP resulted in the state 4 (non-phosphorylating respiration)-state 3 (phosphorylating respiration) transition, which is characteristic of ADP oxidative phosphorylation. In contrast, the addition of 1 mM GTP resulted in a decrease in the respiratory rate and an increase in the membrane potential, which is characteristic of UCP inhibition. The stimulatory effect of GDP, but not GTP, was also observed in inside-out submitochondrial particles prepared from rat kidney mitochondria. However, the effects of GDP and GTP were more similar in the presence of OXPHOS inhibitors. The importance of these observations in connection with the action of UCPs, adenine nucleotide translocase (or other carboxyatractyloside-sensitive carriers), carboxyatractyloside- and purine nucleotide-insensitive carriers, as well as nucleoside-diphosphate kinase (NDPK) are considered. Because the measurements favoring oxidative phosphorylation better reflect in vivo conditions, our study strongly supports the idea that GDP cannot be considered a significant physiological inhibitor of UCP. Moreover, it appears that, under native conditions, GTP functions as a more efficient UCP inhibitor than GDP and ATP.

  1. Importin-beta is a GDP-to-GTP exchange factor of Ran: implications for the mechanism of nuclear import.

    PubMed

    Lonhienne, Thierry G; Forwood, Jade K; Marfori, Mary; Robin, Gautier; Kobe, Bostjan; Carroll, Bernard J

    2009-08-21

    Ran-GTP interacts strongly with importin-beta, and this interaction promotes the release of the importin-alpha-nuclear localization signal cargo from importin-beta. Ran-GDP also interacts with importin-beta, but this interaction is 4 orders of magnitude weaker than the Ran-GTP.importin-beta interaction. Here we use the yeast complement of nuclear import proteins to show that the interaction between Ran-GDP and importin-beta promotes the dissociation of GDP from Ran. The release of GDP from the Ran-GDP-importin-beta complex stabilizes the complex, which cannot be dissociated by importin-alpha. Although Ran has a higher affinity for GDP compared with GTP, Ran in complex with importin-beta has a higher affinity for GTP. This feature is responsible for the generation of Ran-GTP from Ran-GDP by importin-beta. Ran-binding protein-1 (RanBP1) activates this reaction by forming a trimeric complex with Ran-GDP and importin-beta. Importin-alpha inhibits the GDP exchange reaction by sequestering importin-beta, whereas RanBP1 restores the GDP nucleotide exchange by importin-beta by forming a tetrameric complex with importin-beta, Ran, and importin-alpha. The exchange is also inhibited by nuclear-transport factor-2 (NTF2). We suggest a mechanism for nuclear import, additional to the established RCC1 (Ran-guanine exchange factor)-dependent pathway that incorporates these results.

  2. A cross-section test of Cobb-Douglass production function between market capitalization and GDP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avakian, Adam; Podobnik, Boris; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2012-02-01

    Most classical economic theories imply that both (a) economies with lower output (GDP) per person tend to grow faster in per capita terms and (b) economies with lower capital per person tend to grow faster in per capita terms. It is well-known that the former was found to be wrong. Taking market capitalization as a proxy for physical capital, we analyze a cohort of countries over a 17-year period (1994-2010) and we find the latter statement in agreement with empirical data implying a contradictive result that while capital data worldwide tend to converge, GDP data tend to diverge. However, for the countries analyzed, for which we have both market capitalization and GDP data, we find that even economies with lower output (GDP) per person tend to grow faster in per capita terms. The result that for all countries one obtains divergence while for a group of countries having both market capitalization and GDP data we have convergence is in contrast with the refutation of (a) but our results only apply to countries that have an exchange market, and are thus participating in globalization, indicating the convergent effect of globalization.

  3. Low GDP Solution and Glucose-Sparing Strategies for Peritoneal Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Szeto, Cheuk Chun; Johnson, David W

    2017-01-01

    Long-term exposure to a high glucose concentration in conventional peritoneal dialysis (PD) solution has a number of direct and indirect (via glucose degradation products [GDP]) detrimental effects on the peritoneal membrane, as well as systemic metabolism. Glucose- or GDP-sparing strategies often are hypothesized to confer clinical benefits to PD patients. Icodextrin (glucose polymer) solution improves peritoneal ultrafiltration and reduces the risk of fluid overload, but these beneficial effects are probably the result of better fluid removal rather than being glucose sparing. Although frequently used for glucose sparing, the role of amino acid-based solution in this regard has not been tested thoroughly. When glucose-free solutions are used in a combination regimen, published studies showed that glycemic control was improved significantly in diabetic PD patients, and there probably are beneficial effects on peritoneal function. However, the long-term effects of glucose-free solutions, used either alone or as a combination regimen, require further studies. On the other hand, neutral pH-low GDP fluids have been shown convincingly to preserve residual renal function and urine volume. The cost effectiveness of these solutions supports the regular use of neutral pH-low GDP solutions. Nevertheless, further studies are required to determine whether neutral pH-low GDP solutions exert beneficial effects on patient-level outcomes, such as peritonitis, technique survival, and patient survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. GDP-D-mannose epimerase regulates male gametophyte development, plant growth and leaf senescence in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Tiancong; Liu, Zhipeng; Fan, Meng; Chen, Yan; Tian, Haixia; Wu, Dewei; Gao, Hua; Ren, Chunmei; Song, Susheng; Xie, Daoxin

    2017-09-04

    Plant GDP-D-mannose epimerase (GME) converts GDP-D-mannose to GDP-L-galactose, a precursor of both L-ascorbate (vitamin C) and cell wall polysaccharides. However, the genetic functions of GME in Arabidopsis are unclear. In this study, we found that mutations in Arabidopsis GME affect pollen germination, pollen tube elongation, and transmission and development of the male gametophyte through analysis of the heterozygous GME/gme plants and the homozygous gme plants. Arabidopsis gme mutants also exhibit severe growth defects and early leaf senescence. Surprisingly, the defects in male gametophyte in the gme plants are not restored by L-ascorbate, boric acid or GDP-L-galactose, though boric acid rescues the growth defects of the mutants, indicating that GME may regulate male gametophyte development independent of L-ascorbate and GDP-L-galactose. These results reveal key roles for Arabidopsis GME in reproductive development, vegetative growth and leaf senescence, and suggest that GME regulates plant growth and controls male gametophyte development in different manners.

  5. GDP Release Preferentially Occurs on the Phosphate Side in Heterotrimeric G-proteins

    PubMed Central

    Louet, Maxime; Martinez, Jean; Floquet, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    After extra-cellular stimulation of G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs), GDP/GTP exchange appears as the key, rate limiting step of the intracellular activation cycle of heterotrimeric G-proteins. Despite the availability of a large number of X-ray structures, the mechanism of GDP release out of heterotrimeric G-proteins still remains unknown at the molecular level. Starting from the available X-ray structure, extensive unconstrained/constrained molecular dynamics simulations were performed on the complete membrane-anchored Gi heterotrimer complexed to GDP, for a total simulation time overcoming 500 ns. By combining Targeted Molecular Dynamics (TMD) and free energy profiles reconstruction by umbrella sampling, our data suggest that the release of GDP was much more favored on its phosphate side. Interestingly, upon the forced extraction of GDP on this side, the whole protein encountered large, collective motions in perfect agreement with those we described previously including a domain to domain motion between the two ras-like and helical sub-domains of Gα. PMID:22829757

  6. Studies on the substrate specificity of a GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase from Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Lu; Zheng, Ruixiang Blake

    2012-01-01

    Summary A series of methoxy and deoxy derivatives of mannopyranose-1-phosphate (Manp-1P) were chemically synthesized, and their ability to be converted into the corresponding guanosine diphosphate mannopyranose (GDP-Manp) analogues by a pyrophosphorylase (GDP-ManPP) from Salmonella enterica was studied. Evaluation of methoxy analogues demonstrated that GDP-ManPP is intolerant of bulky substituents at the C-2, C-3, and C-4 positions, in turn suggesting that these positions are buried inside the enzyme active site. Additionally, both the 6-methoxy and 6-deoxy Manp-1P derivatives are good or moderate substrates for GDP-ManPP, thus indicating that the C-6 hydroxy group of the Manp-1P substrate is not required for binding to the enzyme. When taken into consideration with other previously published work, it appears that this enzyme has potential utility for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of GDP-Manp analogues, which are useful probes for studying enzymes that employ this sugar nucleotide as a substrate. PMID:23019451

  7. Activity of enzymes catalyzing formation of beta-L-fucosyl phosphate and GDP-beta-L-fucose in amphibian tissues and their application in chemo-enzymic synthesis of GDP-beta-L-fucose.

    PubMed

    Druzhinina, T N; Utkina, N S; Chan, K; Strecker, G; Shibaev, V N

    1999-07-01

    Amphibian oviduct and liver were shown to contain enzymes that catalyze the formation of GDP-beta-L-fucose from GDP-alpha-D-mannose or L-fucose. The conversion of L-fucose into beta-L-fucopyranosyl phosphate was achieved on a preparative scale using high-activity fucokinase in toad liver extracts. For chemo-enzymic preparation of GDP-beta-L-fucose, a convenient modification for pyrophosphate synthesis through phosphomorpholidate which does not require anhydrous conditions is suggested.

  8. Sustainable Use Of Macro-Algae For Biogas Production In Latvian Conditions: A Preliminary Study Through An Integrated Mca And Lca Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastare, Laura; Romagnoli, Francesco; Lauka, Dace; Dzene, Ilze; Kuznecova, Tatjana

    2014-12-01

    The study focuses on sustainability evaluation of an algae-based energy system in Latvia with a holistic and integrated approach of multi-criteria analysis combined with life cycle assessment (including a practical side - biogas yield experiments of locally available algae). The study shows potential for sustainable use of algae in Latvian conditions and thus that algal biomass can be utilized for the production of biogas. The most sustainable and feasible scenario of using algae for biogas energy production foresees the collection of algae biomass from natural water bodies. Important beneficial effects through the use of algae are related to avoiding global warming potential (GWP) and eutrophication impacts. Biogas batch experiments carried out with the local macrophyte C.demersum have shown a methane yield of 554 l CH4/kg VS.

  9. Assessment of the Present and Future Offshore Wind Power Potential: A Case Study in a Target Territory of the Baltic Sea Near the Latvian Coast

    PubMed Central

    Teilans, Artis

    2013-01-01

    Offshore wind energy development promises to be a significant domestic renewable energy source in Latvia. The reliable prediction of present and future wind resources at offshore sites is crucial for planning and selecting the location for wind farms. The overall goal of this paper is the assessment of offshore wind power potential in a target territory of the Baltic Sea near the Latvian coast as well as the identification of a trend in the future wind energy potential for the study territory. The regional climate model CLM and High Resolution Limited Area Model (Hirlam) simulations were used to obtain the wind climatology data for the study area. The results indicated that offshore wind energy is promising for expanding the national electricity generation and will continue to be a stable resource for electricity generation in the region over the 21st century. PMID:23983619

  10. Assessment of the present and future offshore wind power potential: a case study in a target territory of the Baltic Sea near the Latvian coast.

    PubMed

    Lizuma, Lita; Avotniece, Zanita; Rupainis, Sergejs; Teilans, Artis

    2013-01-01

    Offshore wind energy development promises to be a significant domestic renewable energy source in Latvia. The reliable prediction of present and future wind resources at offshore sites is crucial for planning and selecting the location for wind farms. The overall goal of this paper is the assessment of offshore wind power potential in a target territory of the Baltic Sea near the Latvian coast as well as the identification of a trend in the future wind energy potential for the study territory. The regional climate model CLM and High Resolution Limited Area Model (Hirlam) simulations were used to obtain the wind climatology data for the study area. The results indicated that offshore wind energy is promising for expanding the national electricity generation and will continue to be a stable resource for electricity generation in the region over the 21st century.

  11. Dynamic regulation of GDP binding to G proteins revealed by magnetic field-dependent NMR relaxation analyses

    PubMed Central

    Toyama, Yuki; Kano, Hanaho; Mase, Yoko; Yokogawa, Mariko; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2017-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) serve as molecular switches in signalling pathways, by coupling the activation of cell surface receptors to intracellular responses. Mutations in the G protein α-subunit (Gα) that accelerate guanosine diphosphate (GDP) dissociation cause hyperactivation of the downstream effector proteins, leading to oncogenesis. However, the structural mechanism of the accelerated GDP dissociation has remained unclear. Here, we use magnetic field-dependent nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analyses to investigate the structural and dynamic properties of GDP bound Gα on a microsecond timescale. We show that Gα rapidly exchanges between a ground-state conformation, which tightly binds to GDP and an excited conformation with reduced GDP affinity. The oncogenic D150N mutation accelerates GDP dissociation by shifting the equilibrium towards the excited conformation. PMID:28223697

  12. Dynamic regulation of GDP binding to G proteins revealed by magnetic field-dependent NMR relaxation analyses.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Yuki; Kano, Hanaho; Mase, Yoko; Yokogawa, Mariko; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2017-02-22

    Heterotrimeric guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) serve as molecular switches in signalling pathways, by coupling the activation of cell surface receptors to intracellular responses. Mutations in the G protein α-subunit (Gα) that accelerate guanosine diphosphate (GDP) dissociation cause hyperactivation of the downstream effector proteins, leading to oncogenesis. However, the structural mechanism of the accelerated GDP dissociation has remained unclear. Here, we use magnetic field-dependent nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analyses to investigate the structural and dynamic properties of GDP bound Gα on a microsecond timescale. We show that Gα rapidly exchanges between a ground-state conformation, which tightly binds to GDP and an excited conformation with reduced GDP affinity. The oncogenic D150N mutation accelerates GDP dissociation by shifting the equilibrium towards the excited conformation.

  13. Systems GMM estimates of the health care spending and GDP relationship: a note.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Saten

    2013-06-01

    This paper utilizes the systems generalized method of moments (GMM) [Arellano and Bover (1995) J Econometrics 68:29-51; Blundell and Bond (1998) J Econometrics 87:115-143], and panel Granger causality [Hurlin and Venet (2001) Granger Causality tests in panel data models with fixed coefficients. Mime'o, University Paris IX], to investigate the health care spending and gross domestic product (GDP) relationship for organisation for economic co-operation and development countries over the period 1960-2007. The system GMM estimates confirm that the contribution of real GDP to health spending is significant and positive. The panel Granger causality tests imply that a bi-directional causality exists between health spending and GDP. To this end, policies aimed at raising health spending will eventually improve the well-being of the population in the long run.

  14. Comparative study of structural models of Leishmania donovani and human GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylases.

    PubMed

    Daligaux, Pierre; Bernadat, Guillaume; Tran, Linh; Cavé, Christian; Loiseau, Philippe M; Pomel, Sébastien; Ha-Duong, Tâp

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania is the parasite responsible for the neglected disease leishmaniasis. Its virulence and survival require biosynthesis of glycoconjugates, whose guanosine diphospho-d-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GDP-MP) is a key player. However, experimentally resolved structures of this enzyme are still lacking. We herein propose structural models of the GDP-MP from human and Leishmania donovani. Based on a multiple sequences alignment, the models were built with MODELLER and then carefully refined with all atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent. Their quality was evaluated against several standard criteria, including their ability to bind GDP-mannose assessed by redocking calculations. Special attention was given in this study to interactions of the catalytic site residues with the enzyme substrate and competitive inhibitors, opening the perspective of medicinal chemistry developments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Functional characterization of GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase from Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni.

    PubMed

    Asención Diez, Matías D; Demonte, Ana; Giacomelli, Jorge; Garay, Sergio; Rodrígues, Daniel; Hofmann, Birgit; Hecht, Hans-Juerguen; Guerrero, Sergio A; Iglesias, Alberto A

    2010-02-01

    Leptospira interrogans synthesizes a range of mannose-containing glycoconjugates relevant for its virulence. A prerequisite in the synthesis is the availability of the GDP-mannose, produced from mannose-1-phosphate and GTP in a reaction catalyzed by GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase. The gene coding for a putative enzyme in L. interrogans was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The identity of this enzyme was confirmed by electrospray-mass spectroscopy, Edman sequencing and immunological assays. Gel filtration chromatography showed that the dimeric form of the enzyme is catalytically active and stable. The recombinant protein was characterized as a mannose-1-phosphate guanylyltransferase. S (0.5) for the substrates were determined both in GDP-mannose pyrophosphorolysis: 0.20 mM (GDP-mannose), 0.089 mM (PPi), and 0.47 mM; and in GDP-mannose synthesis: 0.24 mM (GTP), 0.063 mM (mannose-1-phosphate), and 0.45 mM (Mg(2+)). The enzyme was able to produce GDP-mannose, IDP-mannose, UDP-mannose and ADP-glucose. We obtained a structural model of the enzyme using as a template the crystal structure of mannose-1-phosphate guanylyltransferase from Thermus thermophilus HB8. Binding of substrates and cofactor in the model agree with the pyrophosphorylases reaction mechanism. Our studies provide insights into the structure of a novel molecular target, which could be useful for detection of leptospirosis and for the development of anti-leptospiral drugs.

  16. Macroenvironmental factors including GDP per capita and physical activity in Europe.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Adrian J; Van Stralen, Maartje M; Kunst, Anton E; Te Velde, Saskia J; Van Lenthe, Frank J; Salmon, Jo; Brug, Johannes

    2013-02-01

    Socioeconomic inequalities in physical activity at the individual level are well reported. Whether inequalities in economic development and other macroenvironmental variables between countries are also related to physical activity at the country level is comparatively unstudied. We examined the relationship between country-level data on macroenvironmental factors (gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, public sector expenditure on health, percentage living in urban areas, and cars per 1000 population) with country-level physical activity prevalence obtained from previous pan-European studies. Studies that assessed leisuretime physical activity (n = 3 studies including 27 countries in adults, n = 2 studies including 28 countries in children) and total physical activity (n = 3 studies in adults including 16 countries) were analyzed separately as were studies among adults and children. Strong and consistent positive correlations were observed between country prevalence of leisure-time physical activity and country GDP per capita in adults (average r = 0.70; all studies, P G 0.05). In multivariate analysis, country prevalence of leisure-time physical activity among adults remained associated with country GDP per capita (two of three studies) but not urbanization or educational attainment. Among school-age populations, no association was found between country GDP per capita and country prevalence of leisure-time physical activity. In those studies that assessed total physical activity (which also includes occupational and transport physical activity), no association with country GDP per capita was observed. Clear differences in national leisure-time physical activity levels throughout Europe may be a consequence of economic development. Lack of economic development of some countries in Europe may make increasing leisure-time physical activity more difficult. Further examination of the link between country GDP per capita and national physical activity levels (across

  17. Micronutrient deficiencies in early childhood can lower a country's GDP: The Myanmar example.

    PubMed

    Win, Aung Zaw

    2016-01-01

    Myanmar (Burma) is a developing country in South East Asia. While Myanmar is among the 20 countries where 80% of the world's malnourished children live, its military consumes the majority of the national budget. Children who are malnourished between conception and age two are at high risk for impaired physical and mental development, which adversely affects the country's productivity and growth. Myanmar is facing three major micronutrient deficiencies which are iodine, iron and vitamin A deficiencies. The three micronutrient deficiencies can cost about 2.4% of the country's GDP. Children are the future of Myanmar and persistent micronutrient deficiencies will hamper its economic growth and lower its GDP.

  18. Genetic metabolic complementation establishes a requirement for GDP-fucose in Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Novozhilova, Natalia M.; Turco, Salvatore J.

    2017-01-01

    To survive in its sand fly vector, the trypanosomatid protozoan parasite Leishmania first attaches to the midgut to avoid excretion, but eventually it must detach for transmission by the next bite. In Leishmania major strain Friedlin, this is controlled by modifications of the stage-specific adhesin lipophosphoglycan (LPG). During differentiation to infective metacyclics, d-arabinopyranose (d-Arap) caps the LPG side-chain galactose residues, blocking interaction with the midgut lectin PpGalec, thereby leading to parasite detachment and transmission. Previously, we characterized two closely related L. major genes (FKP40 and AFKP80) encoding bifunctional proteins with kinase/pyrophosphorylase activities required for salvage and conversion of l-fucose and/or d-Arap into the nucleotide-sugar substrates required by glycosyltransferases. Whereas only AFKP80 yielded GDP-d-Arap from exogenous d-Arap, both proteins were able to salvage l-fucose to GDP-fucose. We now show that Δafkp80− null mutants ablated d-Arap modifications of LPG as predicted, whereas Δfkp40− null mutants resembled wild type (WT). Fucoconjugates had not been reported previously in L. major, but unexpectedly, we were unable to generate fkp40−/afkp80− double mutants, unless one of the A/FKPs was expressed ectopically. To test whether GDP-fucose itself was essential for Leishmania viability, we employed “genetic metabolite complementation.” First, the trypanosome de novo pathway enzymes GDP-mannose dehydratase (GMD) and GDP-fucose synthetase (GMER) were expressed ectopically; from these cells, the Δfkp40−/Δafkp80− double mutant was now readily obtained. As expected, the Δfkp40−/Δafkp80−/+TbGMD-GMER line lacked the capacity to generate GDP-Arap, while synthesizing abundant GDP-fucose. These results establish a requirement for GDP-fucose for L. major viability and predict the existence of an essential fucoconjugate(s). PMID:28465349

  19. Genetic metabolic complementation establishes a requirement for GDP-fucose in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongjie; Novozhilova, Natalia M; Bandini, Giulia; Turco, Salvatore J; Ferguson, Michael A J; Beverley, Stephen M

    2017-06-23

    To survive in its sand fly vector, the trypanosomatid protozoan parasite Leishmania first attaches to the midgut to avoid excretion, but eventually it must detach for transmission by the next bite. In Leishmania major strain Friedlin, this is controlled by modifications of the stage-specific adhesin lipophosphoglycan (LPG). During differentiation to infective metacyclics, d-arabinopyranose (d-Arap) caps the LPG side-chain galactose residues, blocking interaction with the midgut lectin PpGalec, thereby leading to parasite detachment and transmission. Previously, we characterized two closely related L. major genes (FKP40 and AFKP80) encoding bifunctional proteins with kinase/pyrophosphorylase activities required for salvage and conversion of l-fucose and/or d-Arap into the nucleotide-sugar substrates required by glycosyltransferases. Whereas only AFKP80 yielded GDP-d-Arap from exogenous d-Arap, both proteins were able to salvage l-fucose to GDP-fucose. We now show that Δafkp80(-) null mutants ablated d-Arap modifications of LPG as predicted, whereas Δfkp40(-) null mutants resembled wild type (WT). Fucoconjugates had not been reported previously in L. major, but unexpectedly, we were unable to generate fkp40(-)/afkp80(-) double mutants, unless one of the A/FKPs was expressed ectopically. To test whether GDP-fucose itself was essential for Leishmania viability, we employed "genetic metabolite complementation." First, the trypanosome de novo pathway enzymes GDP-mannose dehydratase (GMD) and GDP-fucose synthetase (GMER) were expressed ectopically; from these cells, the Δfkp40(-)/Δafkp80(-) double mutant was now readily obtained. As expected, the Δfkp40(-)/Δafkp80(-)/+TbGMD-GMER line lacked the capacity to generate GDP-Arap, while synthesizing abundant GDP-fucose. These results establish a requirement for GDP-fucose for L. major viability and predict the existence of an essential fucoconjugate(s). © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular

  20. Spatial disparity dynamics of ecosystem service values and GDP in Shaanxi Province, China in the last 30 years.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianhong; Ding, Yao

    2017-01-01

    The regional policy in China is shifting from solely gross domestic product (GDP) orientation to development that is more balanced between economic growth and ecological protection, as well as achieving equality among regions. Using land use maps and the adjusted value coefficients to assess ecosystem service values (ESV) for the 1980s, 1995, 2000, and 2010, we estimated the ESV in Shaanxi Province for different years, and characterized the spatial and temporal distribution of ESV and GDP. The results demonstrated that the total value of ecosystem services in Shaanxi Province increased from 208.95 billion Yuan in the 1980s to 309.76 billion Yuan in 2010. Variation Coefficient (Cv) and Theil index (T) were used to reflect the disparities of GDP or ESV within the study area. The values of Cv in descending order are GDP, ESV per capita, ESV, and GDP per capita. The Theil indexes of GDP were much greater than the ones of ESV. Variations of Cv and T showed that disparity in GDP kept increasing from the 1980s to 2000, then decreased; while no significant change in regional disparity of ESV were detected in parallel. The cities with higher GDP usually contributed little to ESV, and vice versa. The variation in GDP and ESV, in terms of the prefectural totals and per capita values, increased from the 1980s to 2010. This study provides an accessible way for local decision makers to evaluate the regional balance between economic growth and ecosystem services.

  1. Spatial disparity dynamics of ecosystem service values and GDP in Shaanxi Province, China in the last 30 years

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianhong; Ding, Yao

    2017-01-01

    The regional policy in China is shifting from solely gross domestic product (GDP) orientation to development that is more balanced between economic growth and ecological protection, as well as achieving equality among regions. Using land use maps and the adjusted value coefficients to assess ecosystem service values (ESV) for the 1980s, 1995, 2000, and 2010, we estimated the ESV in Shaanxi Province for different years, and characterized the spatial and temporal distribution of ESV and GDP. The results demonstrated that the total value of ecosystem services in Shaanxi Province increased from 208.95 billion Yuan in the 1980s to 309.76 billion Yuan in 2010. Variation Coefficient (Cv) and Theil index (T) were used to reflect the disparities of GDP or ESV within the study area. The values of Cv in descending order are GDP, ESV per capita, ESV, and GDP per capita. The Theil indexes of GDP were much greater than the ones of ESV. Variations of Cv and T showed that disparity in GDP kept increasing from the 1980s to 2000, then decreased; while no significant change in regional disparity of ESV were detected in parallel. The cities with higher GDP usually contributed little to ESV, and vice versa. The variation in GDP and ESV, in terms of the prefectural totals and per capita values, increased from the 1980s to 2010. This study provides an accessible way for local decision makers to evaluate the regional balance between economic growth and ecosystem services. PMID:28358918

  2. Carbon emissions, logistics volume and GDP in China: empirical analysis based on panel data model.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaopeng; Ren, Dongfang; Shi, Jiaxing

    2016-12-01

    This paper studies the relationship among carbon emissions, GDP, and logistics by using a panel data model and a combination of statistics and econometrics theory. The model is based on the historical data of 10 typical provinces and cities in China during 2005-2014. The model in this paper adds the variability of logistics on the basis of previous studies, and this variable is replaced by the freight turnover of the provinces. Carbon emissions are calculated by using the annual consumption of coal, oil, and natural gas. GDP is the gross domestic product. The results showed that the amount of logistics and GDP have a contribution to carbon emissions and the long-term relationships are different between different cities in China, mainly influenced by the difference among development mode, economic structure, and level of logistic development. After the testing of panel model setting, this paper established a variable coefficient model of the panel. The influence of GDP and logistics on carbon emissions is obtained according to the influence factors among the variables. The paper concludes with main findings and provides recommendations toward rational planning of urban sustainable development and environmental protection for China.

  3. Modified GDP Through Health Cost Analysis of Air Pollution: The Case of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Zaim

    1999-02-01

    / Economic growth and performance is monitored through the gross domestic product (GDP) of a nation. It has long been recognized that the traditionally computed GDP does not account for gains and losses observed due to the consumption of natural resources and environmental services. Hence, the objective of this study is to modify the Turkish GDP by taking social cost associated with air pollution into consideration. To this end health benefits and economic costs of air-quality improvement are estimated. The computations are based on the dose-response coefficients reported in several studies. The results indicate that a decrease in PM10 and SO2 levels to the WHO guideline would have resulted in a total of 48.309 x 10(10) and 153.38 x 10(10) Turkish lira savings in 1990 and 1993, respectively. These correspond to 0.12% and 0.08% of 1990 and 1993 GDPs, respectively. KEY WORDS: Health costs; Air pollution; Modified GDP

  4. GDP-to-GTP exchange on the microtubule end can contribute to the frequency of catastrophe

    PubMed Central

    Piedra, Felipe-Andrés; Kim, Tae; Garza, Emily S.; Geyer, Elisabeth A.; Burns, Alexander; Ye, Xuecheng; Rice, Luke M.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules are dynamic polymers of αβ-tubulin that have essential roles in chromosome segregation and organization of the cytoplasm. Catastrophe—the switch from growing to shrinking—occurs when a microtubule loses its stabilizing GTP cap. Recent evidence indicates that the nucleotide on the microtubule end controls how tightly an incoming subunit will be bound (trans-acting GTP), but most current models do not incorporate this information. We implemented trans-acting GTP into a computational model for microtubule dynamics. In simulations, growing microtubules often exposed terminal GDP-bound subunits without undergoing catastrophe. Transient GDP exposure on the growing plus end slowed elongation by reducing the number of favorable binding sites on the microtubule end. Slower elongation led to erosion of the GTP cap and an increase in the frequency of catastrophe. Allowing GDP-to-GTP exchange on terminal subunits in simulations mitigated these effects. Using mutant αβ-tubulin or modified GTP, we showed experimentally that a more readily exchangeable nucleotide led to less frequent catastrophe. Current models for microtubule dynamics do not account for GDP-to-GTP exchange on the growing microtubule end, so our findings provide a new way of thinking about the molecular events that initiate catastrophe. PMID:27146111

  5. GDP-to-GTP exchange on the microtubule end can contribute to the frequency of catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Piedra, Felipe-Andrés; Kim, Tae; Garza, Emily S; Geyer, Elisabeth A; Burns, Alexander; Ye, Xuecheng; Rice, Luke M

    2016-11-07

    Microtubules are dynamic polymers of αβ-tubulin that have essential roles in chromosome segregation and organization of the cytoplasm. Catastrophe-the switch from growing to shrinking-occurs when a microtubule loses its stabilizing GTP cap. Recent evidence indicates that the nucleotide on the microtubule end controls how tightly an incoming subunit will be bound (trans-acting GTP), but most current models do not incorporate this information. We implemented trans-acting GTP into a computational model for microtubule dynamics. In simulations, growing microtubules often exposed terminal GDP-bound subunits without undergoing catastrophe. Transient GDP exposure on the growing plus end slowed elongation by reducing the number of favorable binding sites on the microtubule end. Slower elongation led to erosion of the GTP cap and an increase in the frequency of catastrophe. Allowing GDP-to-GTP exchange on terminal subunits in simulations mitigated these effects. Using mutant αβ-tubulin or modified GTP, we showed experimentally that a more readily exchangeable nucleotide led to less frequent catastrophe. Current models for microtubule dynamics do not account for GDP-to-GTP exchange on the growing microtubule end, so our findings provide a new way of thinking about the molecular events that initiate catastrophe.

  6. An Empirical Analysis of Differences in GDP per Capita and the Role of Human Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sfakianakis, George; Magoutas, Anastasios I.; Georgopoulos, Demosthenes

    2010-01-01

    Using a generalized production function approach and insights from empirical research on the determinants of growth, this paper assesses the relative importance of specific factors in explaining differences in the levels of per capita GDP. Emphasis is placed on education, physical capital accumulation, the share of the public sector in economic…

  7. Developing a comprehensive time series of GDP per capita for 210 countries from 1950 to 2015

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Income has been extensively studied and utilized as a determinant of health. There are several sources of income expressed as gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, but there are no time series that are complete for the years between 1950 and 2015 for the 210 countries for which data exist. It is in the interest of population health research to establish a global time series that is complete from 1950 to 2015. Methods We collected GDP per capita estimates expressed in either constant US dollar terms or international dollar terms (corrected for purchasing power parity) from seven sources. We applied several stages of models, including ordinary least-squares regressions and mixed effects models, to complete each of the seven source series from 1950 to 2015. The three US dollar and four international dollar series were each averaged to produce two new GDP per capita series. Results and discussion Nine complete series from 1950 to 2015 for 210 countries are available for use. These series can serve various analytical purposes and can illustrate myriad economic trends and features. The derivation of the two new series allows for researchers to avoid any series-specific biases that may exist. The modeling approach used is flexible and will allow for yearly updating as new estimates are produced by the source series. Conclusion GDP per capita is a necessary tool in population health research, and our development and implementation of a new method has allowed for the most comprehensive known time series to date. PMID:22846561

  8. An Empirical Analysis of Differences in GDP per Capita and the Role of Human Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sfakianakis, George; Magoutas, Anastasios I.; Georgopoulos, Demosthenes

    2010-01-01

    Using a generalized production function approach and insights from empirical research on the determinants of growth, this paper assesses the relative importance of specific factors in explaining differences in the levels of per capita GDP. Emphasis is placed on education, physical capital accumulation, the share of the public sector in economic…

  9. Hydrogen bonding in the mechanism of GDP-mannose mannosyl hydrolase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mildvan, A. S.; Xia, Z.; Azurmendi, H. F.; Legler, P. M.; Balfour, M. R.; Lairson, L. L.; Withers, S. G.; Gabelli, S. B.; Bianchet, M. A.; Amzel, L. M.

    2006-06-01

    GDP-mannose mannosyl hydrolase (GDPMH) from E. coli catalyzes the hydrolysis of GDP-α- D-sugars to GDP and β- D-sugars by nucleophilic substitution with inversion at the anomeric C1 of the sugar, with general base catalysis by His-124. The 1.3 Å X-ray structure of the GDPMH-Mg 2+-GDP complex was used to model the complete substrate, GDP-mannose into the active site. The substrate is linked to the enzyme by 12 hydrogen bonds, as well as by the essential Mg 2+. In addition, His-124 was found to participate in a hydrogen bonded triad: His-124-NδH⋯Tyr-127-OH⋯Pro-120(C dbnd6 O). The contributions of these hydrogen bonds to substrate binding and to catalysis were investigated by site-directed mutagenesis. The hydrogen bonded triad detected in the X-ray structure was found to contribute little to catalysis since the Y127F mutation of the central residue shows only 2-fold decreases in both kcat and Km. The GDP leaving group is activated by the essential Mg 2+ which contributes at least 10 5-fold to kcat, and by nine hydrogen bonds, including those from Tyr-103, Arg-37, Arg-52, and Arg-65 (via an intervening water), each of which contribute factors to kcat ranging from 24- to 309-fold. Both Arg-37 and Tyr-103 bind the β-phosphate of the leaving GDP and are only 5.0 Å apart. Accordingly, the R37Q/Y103F double mutant shows partially additive effects of the two single mutants on kcat, indicating cooperativity of Arg-37 and Tyr-103 in promoting catalysis. The extensive activation of the GDP leaving group suggests a mechanism with dissociative character with a cationic oxocarbenium-like transition state and a half-chair conformation of the sugar ring, as found with glycosidase enzymes. Accordingly, Asp-22 which contributes 10 2.1- to 10 2.6-fold to kcat, is positioned to both stabilize a developing cationic center at C1 and to accept a hydrogen bond from the C2-OH of the mannosyl group, and His-88, which contributes 10 2.3-fold to kcat, is positioned to accept

  10. Moving Beyond GDP: Cost Effectiveness of Cochlear Implantation and Deaf Education in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Emmett, Susan D; Tucci, Debara L; Bento, Ricardo F; Garcia, Juan M; Juman, Solaiman; Chiossone-Kerdel, Juan A; Liu, Ta J; de Muñoz, Patricia Castellanos; Ullauri, Alejandra; Letort, Jose J; Mansilla, Teresita; Urquijo, Diana P; Aparicio, Maria L; Gong, Wenfeng; Francis, Howard W; Saunders, James E

    2016-09-01

    Cochlear implantation (CI) and deaf education are cost effective management strategies of childhood profound sensorineural hearing loss in Latin America. CI has been widely established as cost effective in North America and Europe and is considered standard of care in those regions, yet cost effectiveness in other economic environments has not been explored. With 80% of the global hearing loss burden existing in low- and middle-income countries, developing cost effective management strategies in these settings is essential. This analysis represents the continuation of a global assessment of CI and deaf education cost effectiveness. Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Paraguay, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela participated in the study. A Disability Adjusted Life Years model was applied with 3% discounting and 10-year length of analysis. Experts from each country supplied cost estimates from known costs and published data. Sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of device cost, professional salaries, annual number of implants, and probability of device failure. Cost effectiveness was determined using the World Health Organization standard of cost effectiveness ratio/gross domestic product per capita (CER/GDP)<3. Deaf education was very cost effective in all countries (CER/GDP 0.07-0.93). CI was cost effective in all countries (CER/GDP 0.69-2.96), with borderline cost effectiveness in the Guatemalan sensitivity analysis (Max CER/GDP 3.21). Both cochlear implantation and deaf education are widely cost effective in Latin America. In the lower-middle income economy of Guatemala, implant cost may have a larger impact. GDP is less influential in the middle- and high-income economies included in this study.

  11. The burden of natural and technological disaster-related mortality on gross domestic product (GDP) in the WHO African region.

    PubMed

    Kirigia, Joses M; Sambo, Luis G; Aldis, W; Mwabu, Germano M

    2002-01-01

    The WHO Africa region has the highest disaster mortality rate compared to the other five regions of the organization. Those deaths are hypothesized to have significantly negative effect on per capita gross domestic product (GDP). The objective of this study was to estimate the loss in GDP attributable to natural and technological disaster-related mortality in the WHO African Region. We estimated the impact of disaster-related mortality on GDP using double-log econometric model and cross-sectional data (from the UNDP and the World Bank publications) on 45 out of 46 countries in the WHO African Region. The coefficients for capital (K), educational enrolment (EN), life expectancy (LE) and exports (X) had a positive sign; while imports (M) and disaster mortality (DS) were found to impact negatively on GDP. The abovementioned explanatory variables were found to have statistically significant effect on GDP at 5% level in a t-distribution test. Disaster mortality of a single person was found to reduce GDP by US$0.018. We have demonstrated that disaster mortality has a significant negative effect on GDP. Thus, as policy-makers strive to increase GDP through capital investment, export promotion and increase in educational enrolment, they should always recall that investments in strengthening national capacity to mitigate the effects of national disasters expeditiously and effectively shall yield significant economic returns.

  12. Dimensions of Well-Being in EU Regions: Do GDP and Unemployment Tell Us All We Need to Know?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Kitty

    2005-01-01

    Unemployment and GDP are widely used as proxies for a broader concept of well-being in the European Union, especially at regional level. This paper asks whether such an approach is reasonable. Using data from a range of sources, it examines the association between unemployment, GDP and a number of alternative well-being indicators in five…

  13. The effect of low-GDP solution on ultrafiltration and solute transport in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyu-Hyang; Do, Jun-Young; Park, Jong-Won; Yoon, Kyung-Woo; Kim, Yong-Lim

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have reported benefits for human peritoneal mesothelial cell function of a neutral-pH dialysate low in glucose degradation products (GDPs). However, the effects of low-GDP solution on ultrafiltration (UF), transport of solutes, and control of body water remain elusive. We therefore investigated the effect of low-GDP solution on UF, solute transport, and control of body water. Among 79 new continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients, 60 completed a 12-month protocol (28 in a lactate-based high-GDP solution group, 32 in a lactate-based low-GDP solution group). Clinical indices--including 24-hour UF volume (UFV), 24-hour urine volume (UV), residual renal function, and dialysis adequacy--were measured at months 1, 6, and 12. At months 1, 6, and 12, UFV, glucose absorption, 4-hour dialysate-to-plasma (D/P) creatinine, and 1-hour D/P Na(+) were assessed during a modified 4.25% peritoneal equilibration test (PET). Body composition by bioelectric impedance analysis was measured at months 1 and 12 in 26 CAPD patients. Daily UFV was lower in the low-GDP group. Despite similar solute transport and aquaporin function, the low-GDP group also showed lower UFV and higher glucose absorption during the PET. Factors associated with UFV during the PET were lactate-based high-GDP solution and 1-hour D/P Na(+). No differences in volume status and obesity at month 12 were observed, and improvements in hypervolemia were equal in both groups. Compared with the high-GDP group, the low-GDP group had a lower UFV during a PET and a lower daily UFV during the first year after peritoneal dialysis initiation. Although the low-GDP group had a lower daily UFV, no difficulties in controlling edema were encountered.

  14. Free energy simulations of a GTPase: GTP and GDP binding to archaeal initiation factor 2.

    PubMed

    Satpati, Priyadarshi; Clavaguéra, Carine; Ohanessian, Gilles; Simonson, Thomas

    2011-05-26

    Archaeal initiation factor 2 (aIF2) is a protein involved in the initiation of protein biosynthesis. In its GTP-bound, "ON" conformation, aIF2 binds an initiator tRNA and carries it to the ribosome. In its GDP-bound, "OFF" conformation, it dissociates from tRNA. To understand the specific binding of GTP and GDP and its dependence on the ON or OFF conformational state of aIF2, molecular dynamics free energy simulations (MDFE) are a tool of choice. However, the validity of the computed free energies depends on the simulation model, including the force field and the boundary conditions, and on the extent of conformational sampling in the simulations. aIF2 and other GTPases present specific difficulties; in particular, the nucleotide ligand coordinates a divalent Mg(2+) ion, which can polarize the electronic distribution of its environment. Thus, a force field with an explicit treatment of electronic polarizability could be necessary, rather than a simpler, fixed charge force field. Here, we begin by comparing a fixed charge force field to quantum chemical calculations and experiment for Mg(2+):phosphate binding in solution, with the force field giving large errors. Next, we consider GTP and GDP bound to aIF2 and we compare two fixed charge force fields to the recent, polarizable, AMOEBA force field, extended here in a simple, approximate manner to include GTP. We focus on a quantity that approximates the free energy to change GTP into GDP. Despite the errors seen for Mg(2+):phosphate binding in solution, we observe a substantial cancellation of errors when we compare the free energy change in the protein to that in solution, or when we compare the protein ON and OFF states. Finally, we have used the fixed charge force field to perform MDFE simulations and alchemically transform GTP into GDP in the protein and in solution. With a total of about 200 ns of molecular dynamics, we obtain good convergence and a reasonable statistical uncertainty, comparable to the force

  15. The effect of carbon tax on carbon emission abatement and GDP: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao; Leung, Yee; Xu, Yuan; Yung, Linda Chor Wing

    2017-10-01

    Carbon tax has been advocated as an effective economic instrument for the abatement of CO2 emission by various countries, including China, the world's biggest carbon emission country. However, carbon emission abatement cannot be done while ignoring the impact on economic growth. A delicate balance needs to be achieved between the two to find an appropriate pathway for sustainable development. This paper applies a multi-objective optimization approach to analyze the impact of levying carbon tax on the energy-intensive sectors of Guangdong province in China under the constraint of emission reduction target. This approach allows us to evaluate carbon emission minimization while maximizing GDP. For policy analysis, we construct five scenarios for evaluation and optimal choice. The results of the analysis show that a lower initial carbon tax rate is not necessarily better, and that a carbon tax is an effective means to reduce CO2 emissions while maintaining a certain level of GDP growth.

  16. A hybrid group method of data handling with discrete wavelet transform for GDP forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isa, Nadira Mohamed; Shabri, Ani

    2013-09-01

    This study is proposed the application of hybridization model using Group Method of Data Handling (GMDH) and Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) in time series forecasting. The objective of this paper is to examine the flexibility of the hybridization GMDH in time series forecasting by using Gross Domestic Product (GDP). A time series data set is used in this study to demonstrate the effectiveness of the forecasting model. This data are utilized to forecast through an application aimed to handle real life time series. This experiment compares the performances of a hybrid model and a single model of Wavelet-Linear Regression (WR), Artificial Neural Network (ANN), and conventional GMDH. It is shown that the proposed model can provide a promising alternative technique in GDP forecasting.

  17. National GDP, Science Interest and Science Achievement: A Person-by-Nation Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Drob, Elliot M. Tucker; Cheung, Amanda K.; Briley, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Maximizing science achievement is a critical target of educational policy, with important implications for national and international economic and technological competitiveness. Previous research has identified both science interest and socioeconomic status (SES) as robust predictors of science achievement, but little research has examined their joint effects. In a dataset drawn from approximately 400,000 high school students from 57 countries, we document large interest by SES and interest by per capita gross domestic product (GDP) interactions in the prediction of science achievement. Student interest in science is a substantially stronger predictor of science achievement in higher socioeconomic contexts and in higher GDP nations. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that, in higher opportunity contexts, motivational factors play larger roles in learning and achievement. They add to the growing body of evidence indicating that substantial cross national differences in psychological effect sizes are not simply a logical possibility, but in many cases, an empirical reality. PMID:25304883

  18. [Energy consumption and GDP growth in Beijing: cointegration and causality analysis].

    PubMed

    Chen, Cao-Cao; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Chun-Lan; Wang, Hai-Hua; Li, Zheng

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, the Johansen cointegration technique and the vector error correction model (VECM) were used to examine the causal relationship between energy consumption (LEC) and gross domestic product (LGDP) for Beijing during the period of 1980 to 2008. Results indicated that LEC and LGDP for Beijing were related by one cointegrating vector and there was a long-run unidirectional causal relationship from GDP to energy consumption. The long-term and short-term elasticity from economy to energy consumption were 0.44 and 0.12 separately. Statistic analysis showed that from 1980 to 2008 every 1% growth in GDP annually would drive energy consumption increasing rate by 0.4% correspondently. And the effect imposed from economy to energy consumption was lagging. It showed that energy consumption was not a strong exogenous variable as to economy. The finding has significant implications from the point of view of energy conservation, emission reduction and economic development.

  19. The effect of carbon tax on carbon emission abatement and GDP: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao; Leung, Yee; Xu, Yuan; Yung, Linda Chor Wing

    2017-07-01

    Carbon tax has been advocated as an effective economic instrument for the abatement of CO2 emission by various countries, including China, the world's biggest carbon emission country. However, carbon emission abatement cannot be done while ignoring the impact on economic growth. A delicate balance needs to be achieved between the two to find an appropriate pathway for sustainable development. This paper applies a multi-objective optimization approach to analyze the impact of levying carbon tax on the energy-intensive sectors of Guangdong province in China under the constraint of emission reduction target. This approach allows us to evaluate carbon emission minimization while maximizing GDP. For policy analysis, we construct five scenarios for evaluation and optimal choice. The results of the analysis show that a lower initial carbon tax rate is not necessarily better, and that a carbon tax is an effective means to reduce CO2 emissions while maintaining a certain level of GDP growth.

  20. The impact of the GDP and population on trade of COMESA using panel data approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzalouh, Lubna; Ismail, Mohd. Tahir; Rahman, Rosmanjawati Abd.

    2016-06-01

    The general consensus from a plethora of literature is that the estimates of variability for analyzing panel data models are precise and achieve accurate inferences. Panel data can also be used to control for heterogeneity through several models, such as the fixed effect model (FEM), the random effects model (REM), and the pooled regression model(PM). This study aims to uncover the increases in trade volume among the member countries of Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) and identify the important factors that affect COMESA trade using panel data models. In addition, this study intends to investigate the independent variables and their effect on the export and import of COMESA member countries. Results show that in FEM, an increase in GDP leads to a 65% increase in imports, and in REM, an increase in GDP leads to an 86% increase in exports. These findings suggest that FEM and REM are appropriate for explaining the imports and exports of COMESA, respectively.

  1. Identification and Characterization of GONST1, a Golgi-Localized GDP-Mannose Transporter in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Timothy C.; Handford, Michael G.; Yuseff, Maria-Isabel; Orellana, Ariel; Dupree, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Transport of nucleotide sugars across the Golgi apparatus membrane is required for the luminal synthesis of a variety of plant cell surface components. We identified an Arabidopsis gene encoding a nucleotide sugar transporter (designated GONST1) that we have shown by transient gene expression to be localized to the Golgi. GONST1 complemented a GDP-mannose transport–defective yeast mutant (vrg4-2), and Golgi-rich vesicles from the complemented strain displayed increased GDP-mannose transport activity. GONST1 promoter::β-glucuronidase studies suggested that this gene is expressed ubiquitously. The identification of a Golgi-localized nucleotide sugar transporter from plants will allow the study of the importance of this class of proteins in the synthesis of plant cell surface components such as cell wall polysaccharides. PMID:11595802

  2. Biochemical characterization of an isoform of GDP-D-mannose-4,6-dehydratase from Mortierella alpina.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongchao; Zhang, Chen; Chen, Haiqin; Yang, Qin; Zhou, Xin; Gu, Zhennan; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei; Chen, Yong Q

    2016-10-01

    To clarify the molecular mechanism of GDP-L-fucose biosynthesis in Mortierella alpina. Analysis of the M. alpina genome suggests that there were two isofunctional GDP-D-mannose-4,6-dehydratase genes (GMD1 and GMD2) that have never been found in a microorganism before. GMD2 was expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The addition of exogenous NAD(+) or NADP(+) was not essential for GMD2 activity. GMD2 may have considerable importance for GDP-L-fucose biosynthesis under nitrogen starvation. The transcriptional regulation of GMD1 may be more susceptible to GDP and GTP than that of GMD2. Significant changes were observed in the concentration of GDP-L-fucose (30 and 36 % inhibition respectively) and total fatty acids (18 and 12 % inhibition respectively) in M. alpina grown on GMD inhibitors medium, which suggests that GDP-L-fucose is functionally significant in lipid metabolism. This is the first time that an isofunctional GDP-D-mannose-4,6-dehydratase has been characterized in a microorganism.

  3. Varying constants quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Leszczyńska, Katarzyna; Balcerzak, Adam; Dabrowski, Mariusz P. E-mail: abalcerz@wmf.univ.szczecin.pl

    2015-02-01

    We discuss minisuperspace models within the framework of varying physical constants theories including Λ-term. In particular, we consider the varying speed of light (VSL) theory and varying gravitational constant theory (VG) using the specific ansätze for the variability of constants: c(a) = c{sub 0} a{sup n} and G(a)=G{sub 0} a{sup q}. We find that most of the varying c and G minisuperspace potentials are of the tunneling type which allows to use WKB approximation of quantum mechanics. Using this method we show that the probability of tunneling of the universe ''from nothing'' (a=0) to a Friedmann geometry with the scale factor a{sub t} is large for growing c models and is strongly suppressed for diminishing c models. As for G varying, the probability of tunneling is large for G diminishing, while it is small for G increasing. In general, both varying c and G change the probability of tunneling in comparison to the standard matter content (cosmological term, dust, radiation) universe models.

  4. Two genes in Arabidopsis thaliana encoding GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase are required for ascorbate biosynthesis and seedling viability.

    PubMed

    Dowdle, John; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Gatzek, Stephan; Rolinski, Susanne; Smirnoff, Nicholas

    2007-11-01

    Plants synthesize ascorbate from guanosine diphosphate (GDP)-mannose via L-galactose/L-gulose, although uronic acids have also been proposed as precursors. Genes encoding all the enzymes of the GDP-mannose pathway have previously been identified, with the exception of the step that converts GDP-L-galactose to L-galactose 1-P. We show that a GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase, encoded by the Arabidopsis thaliana VTC2 gene, catalyses this step in the ascorbate biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, a homologue of VTC2, At5g55120, encodes a second GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase with similar properties to VTC2. Two At5g55120 T-DNA insertion mutants (vtc5-1 and vtc5-2) have 80% of the wild-type ascorbate level. Double mutants were produced by crossing the loss-of-function vtc2-1 mutant with each of the two vtc5 alleles. These show growth arrest immediately upon germination and the cotyledons subsequently bleach. Normal growth was restored by supplementation with ascorbate or L-galactose, indicating that both enzymes are necessary for ascorbate generation. vtc2-1 leaves contain more mannose 6-P than wild-type. We conclude that the GDP-mannose pathway is the only significant source of ascorbate in A. thaliana seedlings, and that ascorbate is essential for seedling growth. A. thaliana leaves accumulate more ascorbate after acclimatization to high light intensity. VTC2 expression and GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase activity rapidly increase on transfer to high light, but the activity of other enzymes in the GDP-mannose pathway is little affected. VTC2 and At5g55120 (VTC5) expression also peak in at the beginning of the light cycle and are controlled by the circadian clock. The GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase step may therefore play an important role in controlling ascorbate biosynthesis.

  5. The Production and Utilization of GDP-glucose in the Biosynthesis of Trehalose 6-Phosphate by Streptomyces venezuelae.

    PubMed

    Asención Diez, Matías D; Miah, Farzana; Stevenson, Clare E M; Lawson, David M; Iglesias, Alberto A; Bornemann, Stephen

    2017-01-20

    Trehalose-6-phosphate synthase OtsA from streptomycetes is unusual in that it uses GDP-glucose as the donor substrate rather than the more commonly used UDP-glucose. We now confirm that OtsA from Streptomyces venezuelae has such a preference for GDP-glucose and can utilize ADP-glucose to some extent too. A crystal structure of the enzyme shows that it shares twin Rossmann-like domains with the UDP-glucose-specific OtsA from Escherichia coli However, it is structurally more similar to Streptomyces hygroscopicus VldE, a GDP-valienol-dependent pseudoglycosyltransferase enzyme. Comparison of the donor binding sites reveals that the amino acids associated with the binding of diphosphoribose are almost all identical in these three enzymes. By contrast, the amino acids associated with binding guanine in VldE (Asn, Thr, and Val) are similar in S. venezuelae OtsA (Asp, Ser, and Phe, respectively) but not conserved in E. coli OtsA (His, Leu, and Asp, respectively), providing a rationale for the purine base specificity of S. venezuelae OtsA. To establish which donor is used in vivo, we generated an otsA null mutant in S. venezuelae The mutant had a cell density-dependent growth phenotype and accumulated galactose 1-phosphate, glucose 1-phosphate, and GDP-glucose when grown on galactose. To determine how the GDP-glucose is generated, we characterized three candidate GDP-glucose pyrophosphorylases. SVEN_3027 is a UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, SVEN_3972 is an unusual ITP-mannose pyrophosphorylase, and SVEN_2781 is a pyrophosphorylase that is capable of generating GDP-glucose as well as GDP-mannose. We have therefore established how S. venezuelae can make and utilize GDP-glucose in the biosynthesis of trehalose 6-phosphate.

  6. The Production and Utilization of GDP-glucose in the Biosynthesis of Trehalose 6-Phosphate by Streptomyces venezuelae*

    PubMed Central

    Asención Diez, Matías D.; Miah, Farzana; Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Lawson, David M.; Iglesias, Alberto A.; Bornemann, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Trehalose-6-phosphate synthase OtsA from streptomycetes is unusual in that it uses GDP-glucose as the donor substrate rather than the more commonly used UDP-glucose. We now confirm that OtsA from Streptomyces venezuelae has such a preference for GDP-glucose and can utilize ADP-glucose to some extent too. A crystal structure of the enzyme shows that it shares twin Rossmann-like domains with the UDP-glucose-specific OtsA from Escherichia coli. However, it is structurally more similar to Streptomyces hygroscopicus VldE, a GDP-valienol-dependent pseudoglycosyltransferase enzyme. Comparison of the donor binding sites reveals that the amino acids associated with the binding of diphosphoribose are almost all identical in these three enzymes. By contrast, the amino acids associated with binding guanine in VldE (Asn, Thr, and Val) are similar in S. venezuelae OtsA (Asp, Ser, and Phe, respectively) but not conserved in E. coli OtsA (His, Leu, and Asp, respectively), providing a rationale for the purine base specificity of S. venezuelae OtsA. To establish which donor is used in vivo, we generated an otsA null mutant in S. venezuelae. The mutant had a cell density-dependent growth phenotype and accumulated galactose 1-phosphate, glucose 1-phosphate, and GDP-glucose when grown on galactose. To determine how the GDP-glucose is generated, we characterized three candidate GDP-glucose pyrophosphorylases. SVEN_3027 is a UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, SVEN_3972 is an unusual ITP-mannose pyrophosphorylase, and SVEN_2781 is a pyrophosphorylase that is capable of generating GDP-glucose as well as GDP-mannose. We have therefore established how S. venezuelae can make and utilize GDP-glucose in the biosynthesis of trehalose 6-phosphate. PMID:27903647

  7. Binding of GTPgamma[35S] is regulated by GDP and receptor activation. Studies with the nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor.

    PubMed

    McDonald, John; Lambert, David G

    2010-03-01

    We have examined the effects of ligand efficacy and receptor density on the binding of guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTPgammaS) and GDP to the nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) peptide receptor (NOP)-coupled G-proteins. In GTPgamma[(35)S] binding experiments, using stable (CHO(hNOP)) and inducible (CHO(INDhNOP)) recombinant human and rat NOP we have measured: (i) ligand-specific GDP requirements; (ii) the effects of receptor density on guanine nucleotide affinity/capacity; and (iii) the effect of ligand efficacy on GTPgammaS association kinetics. GTPgammaS competition curves were shallow and modelled by high- and low-affinity components that were relatively consistent between cell types and tissue preparations. In the presence of 1 microM N/OFQ a high-affinity GDP binding site was also present, but the fraction of total binding was reduced. In an efficacy-dependent manner, the partial agonists [F/G]N/OFQ(1-13)NH(2) ([Phe(1)psi(CH(2)-NH)Gly(2)]-nociceptin(1-13)NH(2)) and naloxone benzoylhydrazone both reduced the fraction of high-affinity sites for GDP (relative to basal). While the pIC(50) for high-affinity GDP binding site did not decrease in the presence of 1 microM N/OFQ, N/OFQ produced a significant reduction in pIC(50) for the low-affinity site. Agonist-mediated decrease in affinity for GDP binding was efficacy-dependent. GDP displayed three affinities: high, conserved in the presence and absence of ligand; intermediate, present as a low fraction under basal conditions; low (efficacy-dependent), present during receptor activation representing the majority of binding. The affinity of GTPgamma[(35)S] was regulated by GDP and receptor activation caused increased binding of GTPgamma[(35)S] through a reduction in GDP affinity.

  8. Health Care Expenditure and GDP in Oil Exporting Countries: Evidence from OPEC Data, 1995-2012

    PubMed Central

    Fazaeli, Ali Akbar; Ghaderi, Hossein; Salehi, Masoud; Fazaeli, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a large body of literature examining income in relation to health expenditures. The share of expenditures in health sector from GDP in developed countries is often larger than in non-developed countries, suggesting that as the level of economic growth increases, health spending increase, too. Objectives: This paper estimates long-run relationships between health expenditures and GDP based on panel data of a sample of 12 countries of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), using data for the period 1995-2012. Patients & Methods: We use panel data unit root tests, cointegration analysis and ECM model to find long-run and short-run relation. This study examines whether health is a luxury or a necessity for OPEC countries within a unit root and cointegration framework. Results: Panel data analysis indicates that health expenditures and GDP are co-integrated and have Engle and Granger causality. In addition, in oil countries that have oil export income, the share of government expenditures in the health sector is often greater than in private health expenditures similar developed countries. Conclusions: The findings verify that health care is not a luxury good and income has a robust relationship to health expenditures in OPEC countries. PMID:26383195

  9. Chemoenzymatic synthesis of GDP-l-fucose and the Lewis X glycan derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Hu, Tianshun; Frantom, Patrick A.; Zheng, Tianqing; Gerwe, Brian; del Amo, David Soriano; Garret, Sarah; Seidel, Ronald D.; Wu, Peng

    2009-01-01

    Lewis X (Lex)-containing glycans play important roles in numerous cellular processes. However, the absence of robust, facile, and cost-effective methods for the synthesis of Lex and its structurally related analogs has severely hampered the elucidation of the specific functions of these glycan epitopes. Here we demonstrate that chemically defined guanidine 5′-diphosphate-β-l-fucose (GDP-fucose), the universal fucosyl donor, the Lex trisaccharide, and their C-5 substituted derivatives can be synthesized on preparative scales, using a chemoenzymatic approach. This method exploits l-fucokinase/GDP-fucose pyrophosphorylase (FKP), a bifunctional enzyme isolated from Bacteroides fragilis 9343, which converts l-fucose into GDP-fucose via a fucose-1-phosphate (Fuc-1-P) intermediate. Combining the activities of FKP and a Helicobacter pylori α1,3 fucosyltransferase, we prepared a library of Lex trisaccharide glycans bearing a wide variety of functional groups at the fucose C-5 position. These neoglycoconjugates will be invaluable tools for studying Lex-mediated biological processes. PMID:19805264

  10. Impact of HIV/AIDS on Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in the WHO Africa Region.

    PubMed

    Kirigia, Joses M; Sambo, Luis G; Okorosobo, Tuoyo; Mwabu, Germano M

    2002-01-01

    HIV/AIDS is hypothesized to have substantive negative impact on health status and economic development of individuals, households, communities and nations. The objective of this study was to estimate the burden of HIV/AIDS on GDP in the WHO African Region using a production function approach. The economic burden analysis was done using a double-log econometric model and a cross-sectional data on 45 to 46 countries in the WHO African Region. The data were obtained from WHO, UNAIDS, ECA, UNDP and the World Bank publications. The coefficient for Capital (K), Education (EN), Export (X) and Imports (M) were found to be statistically significant determinants of per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP) at 5% level of significance (using a one-sided t-distribution test). Unfortunately, HIV/AIDS morbidity (V) and HIV/AIDS deaths (VD), at the same level of significance, were found to have statistically insignificant impact on GDP. However, the coefficients of these variables had negative signs as expected. In all African countries, there is need for more detailed research on the total economic cost of HIV/AIDS (probably estimated using micro-level costing and willingness-to-pay methods) and for economic evaluations of treatment, prevention and promotion programmes.

  11. Cloning, purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the Bacillus subtilis GTPase YphC–GDP complex

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ling; Muench, Stephen P.; Roujeinikova, Anna; Sedelnikova, Svetlana E.; Rice, David W.

    2006-05-01

    Crystals of a selenomethionine-incorporated YphC–GDP complex have been grown using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and polyethylene glycol as a precipitating agent. The Bacillus subtilis YphC gene encodes an essential GTPase thought to be involved in ribosome binding and whose protein product may represent a target for the development of a novel antibacterial agent. Sequence analysis reveals that YphC belongs to the EngA family of GTPases, which uniquely contain two adjacent GTP-binding domains. Crystals of a selenomethionine-incorporated YphC–GDP complex have been grown using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and polyethylene glycol as a precipitating agent. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 62.71, b = 65.05, c = 110.61 Å, and have one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Data sets at three different wavelengths were collected on a single crystal to 2.5 Å resolution at the Daresbury SRS in order to solve the structure by MAD. Ultimately, analysis of YphC in complex with GDP may allow a greater understanding of the EngA family of essential GTPases.

  12. Health insurance or subsidy has universal advantage for management of hospital malnutrition unrelated to GDP.

    PubMed

    Klek, Stanislaw; Chourdakis, Michael; Abosaleh, Dima Abdulqudos; Amestoy, Alejandra; Baik, Hyun Wook; Baptista, Gertrudis; Barazzoni, Rocco; Fukushima, Ryoji; Hartono, Josef; Jayawardena, Ranil; Garcia, Rafael Jimenez; Krznaric, Zeljko; Nyulasi, Ibolya; Parallada, Gabriela; Francisco, Eliza Mei Perez; Panisic-Sekeljic, Marina; Perman, Mario; Prins, Arina; Del Rio Requejo, Isabel Martinez; Reddy, Ravinder; Singer, Pierre; Sioson, Marianna; Ukleja, Andrew; Vartanian, Carla; Fuentes, Nicolas Velasco; Waitzberg, Dan Linetzky; Zoungrana, Steve Leonce; Galas, Aleksander

    2017-03-01

    Protein-energy and micronutrient malnutrition are global public health problems which, when not prevented and severe, require medical management by clinicians with nutrition expertise, preferably as a collectively skilled team, especially when disease-related. This study aimed to investigate barriers and facilitators of clinical nutrition services (CNS), especially the use of oral, enteral (EN) and parenteral (PN) nutrition in institutional and home settings. An international survey was performed between January and December 2014 in twenty-six countries from all continents. Electronic questionnaires were distributed to 28 representatives of clinical nutrition (PEN) societies, 27 of whom responded. The questionnaire comprised questions regarding a country's economy, reimbursement for CNS, education about and the use of EN and PN. The prevalence of malnutrition was not related to gross domestic product (GDP) at purchasing power parity (PPP) per capita (p=0.186). EN and PN were used in all countries surveyed (100%), but to different extents. Reimbursement of neither EN nor PN use depended on GDP, but was associated with increased use of EN and PN in hospitals (p=0.035), although not evident for home or chronic care facilities. The size of GDP did not affect the use of EN (p=0.256), but it mattered for PN (p=0.019). A worldwide survey by nutrition support societies did not find a link between national economic performance and the implementation of medical nutrition services. Reimbursement for CNS, available through health insurance systems, is a factor in effective nutrition management.

  13. Chemoenzymatic synthesis of GDP-L-fucose and the Lewis X glycan derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Hu, Tianshun; Frantom, Patrick A; Zheng, Tianqing; Gerwe, Brian; Del Amo, David Soriano; Garret, Sarah; Seidel, Ronald D; Wu, Peng

    2009-09-22

    Lewis X (Le(x))-containing glycans play important roles in numerous cellular processes. However, the absence of robust, facile, and cost-effective methods for the synthesis of Le(x) and its structurally related analogs has severely hampered the elucidation of the specific functions of these glycan epitopes. Here we demonstrate that chemically defined guanidine 5'-diphosphate-beta-l-fucose (GDP-fucose), the universal fucosyl donor, the Le(x) trisaccharide, and their C-5 substituted derivatives can be synthesized on preparative scales, using a chemoenzymatic approach. This method exploits l-fucokinase/GDP-fucose pyrophosphorylase (FKP), a bifunctional enzyme isolated from Bacteroides fragilis 9343, which converts l-fucose into GDP-fucose via a fucose-1-phosphate (Fuc-1-P) intermediate. Combining the activities of FKP and a Helicobacter pylori alpha1,3 fucosyltransferase, we prepared a library of Le(x) trisaccharide glycans bearing a wide variety of functional groups at the fucose C-5 position. These neoglycoconjugates will be invaluable tools for studying Le(x)-mediated biological processes.

  14. Health Care Expenditure and GDP in Oil Exporting Countries: Evidence From OPEC Data, 1995-2012.

    PubMed

    Fazaeli, Ali Akbar; Ghaderi, Hossein; Salehi, Masoud; Fazaeli, Ali Reza

    2015-06-11

    There is a large body of literature examining income in relation to health expenditures. The share of expenditures in health sector from GDP in developed countries is often larger than in non-developed countries, suggesting that as the level of economic growth increases, health spending increase, too. This paper estimates long-run relationships between health expenditures and GDP based on panel data of a sample of 12 countries of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), using data for the period 1995-2012. We use panel data unit root tests, cointegration analysis and ECM model to find long-run and short-run relation. This study examines whether health is a luxury or a necessity for OPEC countries within a unit root and cointegration framework. Panel data analysis indicates that health expenditures and GDP are co-integrated and have Engle and Granger causality. In addition, in oil countries that have oil export income, the share of government expenditures in the health sector is often greater than in private health expenditures similar developed countries. The findings verify that health care is not a luxury good and income has a robust relationship to health expenditures in OPEC countries.

  15. The Rabies Virus L Protein Catalyzes mRNA Capping with GDP Polyribonucleotidyltransferase Activity.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Minako; Ito, Naoto; Sugiyama, Makoto; Ogino, Tomoaki

    2016-05-21

    The large (L) protein of rabies virus (RABV) plays multiple enzymatic roles in viral RNA synthesis and processing. However, none of its putative enzymatic activities have been directly demonstrated in vitro. In this study, we expressed and purified a recombinant form of the RABV L protein and verified its guanosine 5'-triphosphatase and GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase (PRNTase) activities, which are essential for viral mRNA cap formation by the unconventional mechanism. The RABV L protein capped 5'-triphosphorylated but not 5'-diphosphorylated RABV mRNA-start sequences, 5'-AACA(C/U), with GDP to generate the 5'-terminal cap structure G(5')ppp(5')A. The 5'-AAC sequence in the substrate RNAs was found to be strictly essential for RNA capping with the RABV L protein. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis showed that some conserved amino acid residues (G1112, T1170, W1201, H1241, R1242, F1285, and Q1286) in the PRNTase motifs A to E of the RABV L protein are required for cap formation. These findings suggest that the putative PRNTase domain in the RABV L protein catalyzes the rhabdovirus-specific capping reaction involving covalent catalysis of the pRNA transfer to GDP, thus offering this domain as a target for developing anti-viral agents.

  16. The Rabies Virus L Protein Catalyzes mRNA Capping with GDP Polyribonucleotidyltransferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Minako; Ito, Naoto; Sugiyama, Makoto; Ogino, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    The large (L) protein of rabies virus (RABV) plays multiple enzymatic roles in viral RNA synthesis and processing. However, none of its putative enzymatic activities have been directly demonstrated in vitro. In this study, we expressed and purified a recombinant form of the RABV L protein and verified its guanosine 5′-triphosphatase and GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase (PRNTase) activities, which are essential for viral mRNA cap formation by the unconventional mechanism. The RABV L protein capped 5′-triphosphorylated but not 5′-diphosphorylated RABV mRNA-start sequences, 5′-AACA(C/U), with GDP to generate the 5′-terminal cap structure G(5′)ppp(5′)A. The 5′-AAC sequence in the substrate RNAs was found to be strictly essential for RNA capping with the RABV L protein. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis showed that some conserved amino acid residues (G1112, T1170, W1201, H1241, R1242, F1285, and Q1286) in the PRNTase motifs A to E of the RABV L protein are required for cap formation. These findings suggest that the putative PRNTase domain in the RABV L protein catalyzes the rhabdovirus-specific capping reaction involving covalent catalysis of the pRNA transfer to GDP, thus offering this domain as a target for developing anti-viral agents. PMID:27213429

  17. Characterization of a novel prokaryotic GDP dissociation inhibitor domain from the G protein coupled membrane protein FeoB.

    PubMed

    Eng, Edward T; Jalilian, Amir R; Spasov, Krasimir A; Unger, Vinzenz M

    2008-01-25

    The FeoB family of membrane embedded G proteins are involved with high affinity Fe(II) uptake in prokaryotes. Here, we report that FeoB harbors a novel GDP dissociation inhibitor-like domain that specifically stabilizes GDP-binding through an interaction with the switch I region of the G protein. We show that the stabilization of GDP binding is conserved between species despite a high degree of sequence variability in their guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI)-like domains, and demonstrate that the presence of the membrane embedded domain increases GDP-binding affinity roughly 150-fold over the level accomplished by action of the GDI-like domain alone. To our knowledge, this is the first example for a prokaryotic GDI, targeting a bacterial G protein-coupled membrane process. Our findings suggest that Fe(II) uptake in bacteria involves a G protein regulatory pathway reminiscent of signaling mechanisms found in higher-order organisms.

  18. Characterization of a novel prokaryotic GDP dissociation inhibitor domain from the G protein coupled membrane protein FeoB

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Edward T.; Jalilian, Amir R.; Spasov, Krasimir A.; Unger, Vinzenz M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The FeoB family of membrane embedded G proteins are involved with high affinity Fe(II) uptake in prokaryotes. Here, we report that FeoB harbors a novel GDP dissociation inhibitor like domain that specifically stabilizes GDP-binding through an interaction with the switch I region of the G protein. We show that the stabilization of GDP-binding is conserved between species despite a high degree of sequence variability in their GDI-like domains, and demonstrate that the presence of the membrane embedded domain increases GDP-binding affinity roughly 150-fold over the level accomplished by action of the GDI-like domain alone. To our knowledge, this is the first example for a prokaryotic GDI, targeting a bacterial G protein-coupled membrane process. Our findings suggest that Fe(II) uptake in bacteria involves a G protein regulatory pathway reminiscent of signaling mechanisms found in higher order organisms. PMID:18068722

  19. 5′-Phospho-RNA Acceptor Specificity of GDP Polyribonucleotidyltransferase of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus in mRNA Capping

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Minako

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase (PRNTase) domain of the multifunctional L protein of rhabdoviruses, such as vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and rabies virus, catalyzes the transfer of 5′-phospho-RNA (pRNA) from 5′-triphospho-RNA (pppRNA) to GDP via a covalent enzyme-pRNA intermediate to generate a 5′-cap structure (GpppA). Here, using an improved oligo-RNA capping assay with the VSV L protein, we showed that the Michaelis constants for GDP and pppAACAG (VSV mRNA-start sequence) are 0.03 and 0.4 μM, respectively. A competition assay between GDP and GDP analogues in the GpppA formation and pRNA transfer assay using GDP analogues as pRNA acceptors indicated that the PRNTase domain recognizes the C-2-amino group, but not the C-6-oxo group, N-1-hydrogen, or N-7-nitrogen, of GDP for the cap formation. 2,6-Diaminopurine-riboside (DAP), 7-deazaguanosine (7-deaza-G), and 7-methylguanosine (m7G) diphosphates efficiently accepted pRNA, resulting in the formation of DAPpppA, 7-deaza-GpppA, and m7GpppA (cap 0), respectively. Furthermore, either the 2′- or 3′-hydroxyl group of GDP was found to be required for efficient pRNA transfer. A 5′-diphosphate form of antiviral ribavirin weakly inhibited the GpppA formation but did not act as a pRNA acceptor. These results indicate that the PRNTase domain has a unique guanosine-binding mode different from that of eukaryotic mRNA capping enzyme, guanylyltransferase. IMPORTANCE mRNAs of nonsegmented negative-strand (NNS) RNA viruses, such as VSV, possess a fully methylated cap structure, which is required for mRNA stability, efficient translation, and evasion of antiviral innate immunity in host cells. GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase (PRNTase) is an unconventional mRNA capping enzyme of NNS RNA viruses that is distinct from the eukaryotic mRNA capping enzyme, guanylyltransferase. In this study, we studied the pRNA acceptor specificity of VSV PRNTase using various GDP analogues and identified chemical groups

  20. 5'-Phospho-RNA Acceptor Specificity of GDP Polyribonucleotidyltransferase of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus in mRNA Capping.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Minako; Ogino, Tomoaki

    2017-03-15

    The GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase (PRNTase) domain of the multifunctional L protein of rhabdoviruses, such as vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and rabies virus, catalyzes the transfer of 5'-phospho-RNA (pRNA) from 5'-triphospho-RNA (pppRNA) to GDP via a covalent enzyme-pRNA intermediate to generate a 5'-cap structure (GpppA). Here, using an improved oligo-RNA capping assay with the VSV L protein, we showed that the Michaelis constants for GDP and pppAACAG (VSV mRNA-start sequence) are 0.03 and 0.4 μM, respectively. A competition assay between GDP and GDP analogues in the GpppA formation and pRNA transfer assay using GDP analogues as pRNA acceptors indicated that the PRNTase domain recognizes the C-2-amino group, but not the C-6-oxo group, N-1-hydrogen, or N-7-nitrogen, of GDP for the cap formation. 2,6-Diaminopurine-riboside (DAP), 7-deazaguanosine (7-deaza-G), and 7-methylguanosine (m(7)G) diphosphates efficiently accepted pRNA, resulting in the formation of DAPpppA, 7-deaza-GpppA, and m(7)GpppA (cap 0), respectively. Furthermore, either the 2'- or 3'-hydroxyl group of GDP was found to be required for efficient pRNA transfer. A 5'-diphosphate form of antiviral ribavirin weakly inhibited the GpppA formation but did not act as a pRNA acceptor. These results indicate that the PRNTase domain has a unique guanosine-binding mode different from that of eukaryotic mRNA capping enzyme, guanylyltransferase. IMPORTANCE mRNAs of nonsegmented negative-strand (NNS) RNA viruses, such as VSV, possess a fully methylated cap structure, which is required for mRNA stability, efficient translation, and evasion of antiviral innate immunity in host cells. GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase (PRNTase) is an unconventional mRNA capping enzyme of NNS RNA viruses that is distinct from the eukaryotic mRNA capping enzyme, guanylyltransferase. In this study, we studied the pRNA acceptor specificity of VSV PRNTase using various GDP analogues and identified chemical groups of GDP as

  1. Thermodynamics of the GTP-GDP-operated conformational switch of selenocysteine-specific translation factor SelB.

    PubMed

    Paleskava, Alena; Konevega, Andrey L; Rodnina, Marina V

    2012-08-10

    SelB is a specialized translation factor that binds GTP and GDP and delivers selenocysteyl-tRNA (Sec-tRNA(Sec)) to the ribosome. By analogy to elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), SelB is expected to control the delivery and release of Sec-tRNA(Sec) to the ribosome by the structural switch between GTP- and GDP-bound conformations. However, crystal structures of SelB suggested a similar domain arrangement in the apo form and GDP- and GTP-bound forms of the factor, raising the question of how SelB can fulfill its delivery function. Here, we studied the thermodynamics of guanine nucleotide binding to SelB by isothermal titration calorimetry in the temperature range between 10 and 25 °C using GTP, GDP, and two nonhydrolyzable GTP analogs, guanosine 5'-O-(γ-thio)triphosphate (GTPγS) and guanosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)-triphosphate (GDPNP). The binding of SelB to either guanine nucleotide is characterized by a large heat capacity change (-621, -467, -235, and -275 cal × mol(-1) × K(-1), with GTP, GTPγS, GDPNP, and GDP, respectively), associated with compensatory changes in binding entropy and enthalpy. Changes in heat capacity indicate a large decrease of the solvent-accessible surface area in SelB, amounting to 43 or 32 amino acids buried upon binding of GTP or GTPγS, respectively, and 15-19 amino acids upon binding GDP or GDPNP. The similarity of the GTP and GDP forms in the crystal structures can be attributed to the use of GDPNP, which appears to induce a structure of SelB that is more similar to the GDP than to the GTP-bound form.

  2. Characterization of GDP-mannose dehydrogenase from the brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus providing the precursor for the alginate polymer.

    PubMed

    Tenhaken, Raimund; Voglas, Elena; Cock, J Mark; Neu, Volker; Huber, Christian G

    2011-05-13

    Alginate is a major cell wall polymer of brown algae. The precursor for the polymer is GDP-mannuronic acid, which is believed to be derived from a four-electron oxidation of GDP-mannose through the enzyme GDP-mannose dehydrogenase (GMD). So far no eukaryotic GMD has been biochemically characterized. We have identified a candidate gene in the Ectocarpus siliculosus genome and expressed it as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli. The GMD from Ectocarpus differs strongly from related enzymes in bacteria and is as distant to the bacterial proteins as it is to the group of UDP-glucose dehydrogenases. It lacks the C-terminal ∼120 amino acid domain present in bacterial GMDs, which is believed to be involved in catalysis. The GMD from brown algae is highly active at alkaline pH and contains a catalytic Cys residue, sensitive to heavy metals. The product GDP-mannuronic acid was analyzed by HPLC and mass spectroscopy. The K(m) for GDP-mannose was 95 μM, and 86 μM for NAD(+). No substrate other than GDP-mannose was oxidized by the enzyme. In gel filtration experiments the enzyme behaved as a dimer. The Ectocarpus GMD is stimulated by salts even at low molar concentrations as a possible adaptation to marine life. It is rapidly inactivated at temperatures above 30 °C.

  3. Time-varying BRDFs.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Sunkavalli, Kalyan; Ramamoorthi, Ravi; Belhumeur, Peter N; Nayar, Shree K

    2007-01-01

    The properties of virtually all real-world materials change with time, causing their bidirectional reflectance distribution functions (BRDFs) to be time varying. However, none of the existing BRDF models and databases take time variation into consideration; they represent the appearance of a material at a single time instance. In this paper, we address the acquisition, analysis, modeling, and rendering of a wide range of time-varying BRDFs (TVBRDFs). We have developed an acquisition system that is capable of sampling a material's BRDF at multiple time instances, with each time sample acquired within 36 sec. We have used this acquisition system to measure the BRDFs of a wide range of time-varying phenomena, which include the drying of various types of paints (watercolor, spray, and oil), the drying of wet rough surfaces (cement, plaster, and fabrics), the accumulation of dusts (household and joint compound) on surfaces, and the melting of materials (chocolate). Analytic BRDF functions are fit to these measurements and the model parameters' variations with time are analyzed. Each category exhibits interesting and sometimes nonintuitive parameter trends. These parameter trends are then used to develop analytic TVBRDF models. The analytic TVBRDF models enable us to apply effects such as paint drying and dust accumulation to arbitrary surfaces and novel materials.

  4. A GDP-driven model for the binary and weighted structure of the International Trade Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almog, Assaf; Squartini, Tiziano; Garlaschelli, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Recent events such as the global financial crisis have renewed the interest in the topic of economic networks. One of the main channels of shock propagation among countries is the International Trade Network (ITN). Two important models for the ITN structure, the classical gravity model of trade (more popular among economists) and the fitness model (more popular among networks scientists), are both limited to the characterization of only one representation of the ITN. The gravity model satisfactorily predicts the volume of trade between connected countries, but cannot reproduce the missing links (i.e. the topology). On the other hand, the fitness model can successfully replicate the topology of the ITN, but cannot predict the volumes. This paper tries to make an important step forward in the unification of those two frameworks, by proposing a new gross domestic product (GDP) driven model which can simultaneously reproduce the binary and the weighted properties of the ITN. Specifically, we adopt a maximum-entropy approach where both the degree and the strength of each node are preserved. We then identify strong nonlinear relationships between the GDP and the parameters of the model. This ultimately results in a weighted generalization of the fitness model of trade, where the GDP plays the role of a ‘macroeconomic fitness’ shaping the binary and the weighted structure of the ITN simultaneously. Our model mathematically explains an important asymmetry in the role of binary and weighted network properties, namely the fact that binary properties can be inferred without the knowledge of weighted ones, while the opposite is not true.

  5. Projections of health care expenditures as a share of the GDP: actuarial and macroeconomic approaches.

    PubMed Central

    Warshawsky, M J

    1994-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION. Can the steady increases in health care expenditures as a share of GDP projected by widely cited actuarial models be rationalized by a macroeconomic model with sensible parameters and specification? DATA SOURCES. National Income and Product Accounts, and Social Security and Health Care Financing Administration are the data sources used in parameters estimates. STUDY DESIGN. Health care expenditures as a share of gross domestic product (GDP) are projected using two methodological approaches--actuarial and macroeconomic--and under various assumptions. The general equilibrium macroeconomic approach has the advantage of allowing an investigation of the causes of growth in the health care sector and its consequences for the overall economy. DATA COLLECTION METHODS. Simulations are used. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Both models unanimously project a continued increase in the ratio of health care expenditures to GDP. Under the most conservative assumptions, that is, robust economic growth, improved demographic trends, or a significant moderation in the rate of health care price inflation, the health care sector will consume more than a quarter of national output by 2065. Under other (perhaps more realistic) assumptions, including a continuation of current trends, both approaches predict that health care expenditures will comprise between a third and a half of national output. In the macroeconomic model, the increasing use of capital goods in the health care sector explains the observed rise in relative prices. Moreover, this "capital deepening" implies that a relatively modest fraction of the labor force is employed in health care and that the rest of the economy is increasingly starved for capital, resulting in a declining standard of living. PMID:8063567

  6. The data of GDP and exchange rate used in the Balassa-Samuelson hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiguo; Xue, Jing; Du, Chonghua

    2016-12-01

    This article introduces the data of the log real GDP per capita ratio and the log real exchange rate which are used to revisit the Balassa-Samuelson Hypothesis. We acquired the data from IMF and World Bank database, and provide the name and source of the data. All data are openly accessible. Besides, we describe the value of data as well as the method to process the data which can also be found in "The Balassa-Samuelson Hypothesis in the developed and developing countries revisited" (Weiguo Wang, Jing Xue, Chonghua Du, 2016) [1].

  7. Fluorosis varied treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, I Anand

    2010-01-01

    Fluorosis has been reported way back in 1901. The treatment options for fluorosis are varied depending upon individual cases. This article comes from Madurai in India where its surrounding towns are fluorosis-prone zones. The purpose of this article is to report various treatment options available for dental fluorosis; this is the first time that complete full mouth rehabilitation for dental fluorosis is being reported. This article also dwells on the need for the dentists to be aware of their local indigenous pathologies to treat it in a better manner. PMID:20582220

  8. Backbone resonance assignments for G protein α(i3) subunit in the GDP-bound state.

    PubMed

    Mase, Yoko; Yokogawa, Mariko; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-10-01

    Guanine-nucleotide binding proteins (G proteins) serve as molecular switches in signaling pathways, by coupling the activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the cell surface to intracellular responses. In the resting state, G protein forms a heterotrimer, consisting of the G protein α subunit with GDP (Gα·GDP) and the G protein βγ subunit (Gβγ). Ligand binding to GPCRs promotes the GDP-GTP exchange on Gα, leading to the dissociation of the GTP-bound form of Gα (Gα·GTP) and Gβγ. Then, Gα·GTP and Gβγ bind to their downstream effector enzymes or ion channels and regulate their activities, leading to a variety of cellular responses. Finally, Gα hydrolyzes the bound GTP to GDP and returns to the resting state by re-associating with Gβγ. The G proteins are classified with four major families based on the amino acid sequences of Gα: i/o, s, q/11, and 12/13. Here, we established the backbone resonance assignments of human Gαi3, a member of the i/o family with a molecular weight of 41 K, in complex with GDP. The chemical shifts were compared with those of Gα(i3) in complex with a GTP-analogue, GTPγS, which we recently reported, indicating that the residues with significant chemical shift differences are mostly consistent with the regions with the structural differences between the GDP- and GTPγS-bound states, as indicated in the crystal structures. The assignments of Gα(i3)·GDP would be useful for the analyses of the dynamics of Gα(i3) and its interactions with various target molecules.

  9. Characterization of an fungal l-fucokinase involved in Mortierella alpina GDP-l-fucose salvage pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongchao; Zhang, Chen; Chen, Haiqin; Yang, Qin; Zhou, Xin; Gu, Zhennan; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei; Chen, Yong Q

    2016-08-01

    GDP-l-fucose functions as a biological donor for fucosyltransferases, which are required for the catalysis of l-fucose to various acceptor molecules including oligosaccharides, glycoproteins and glycolipids. Mortierella alpina is one of the highest lipid-producing fungi and can biosynthesis GDP-l-fucose in the de novo pathway. Analysis of the M. alpina genome suggests that there is a gene encoding l-fucokinase (FUK) for the conversion of fucose to l-fucose-1-phosphate in the GDP-l-fucose salvage pathway, which has never been found in fungi before. This gene was characterized to explore its role in GDP-l-fucose synthesis. The yield of GDP-l-fucose is relatively higher in lipid accumulation phase (0.096 mg per g cell) than that in cell multiplication phase (0.074 mg per g cell) of M. alpina Additionally, the transcript level of FUK is up regulated by nitrogen exhaustion when M. alpina starts to accumulate lipid, highlights the functional significance of FUK in the GDP-l-fucose biosynthesis in M. alpina Gene encoding FUK was expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli and the resulting protein was purified to homogeneity. The product of FUK reaction was analyzed by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Kinetic parameters and other properties of FUK were investigated. Comparative analyses between the FUK protein and other homologous proteins were performed. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report a comprehensive characterization of FUK in a fungus. Mortierella alpina could be used as an alternative source for the production of GDP-l-fucose. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Vibrational structure of GDP and GTP bound to RAS: an isotope-edited FTIR study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, H; Sukal, S; Deng, H; Leyh, T S; Callender, R

    2001-04-03

    A complete vibrational description of the bonding of a ligand to a protein requires the assignment of both symmetric and antisymmetric vibrational modes. The symmetric modes of isotopically enriched enzyme-bound ligands can be obtained by Raman difference spectroscopy, but until now, the antisymmetric modes, which require IR difference spectroscopy, have not been generally accessible. We have developed the methodology needed to perform IR difference spectroscopy, assign the antisymmetric modes, and accurately describe bonding. The method is used to assess the bonding changes that occur as Mg.GDP and Mg.GTP move from solution into the active site of RAS. Binding to RAS opens the nonbridging, O--P--O angle of the gamma-phosphate of GTP by 2.7 degrees, yet the angular freedom (dispersion of the O--P--O angle) of the gamma-phosphate is comparable to that in solution. In contrast, the motion of the beta-phosphate of GDP is highly restricted, suggesting that it positions the gamma-phosphate for nucleophilic attack. The beta,gamma-bridging O-P bond of bound GTP is slightly weakened, being lengthened by 0.005 A in the active site, corresponding to a bond order decrease of 0.012 valence unit (vu). The observed binding changes are consistent with a RAS-mediated hydrolysis mechanism that parallels that for solution hydrolysis.

  11. Per-capita GDP and nonequilibrium wealth-concentration in a model for trade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moukarzel, Cristian F.

    2013-12-01

    Data describing the per-capita Gross Domestic Product of around two hundred countries in years 1960 to 2008 are analyzed and found to decay approximately exponentially with rank. We discuss this experimental fact in the context of a wealth exchange model called Yard-Sale exchange, in which pairs of agents (i.e. nations) 'bet' for a fraction f of the wealth of the poorest of them. If the chances for this poorest agent to win the bet are not large enough, this model presents a 'wealth condensation' phase, in which one lucky agent gets to own the whole wealth in the end. In a recent study of this model [1], it was found that, in the condensed phase, the typical wealth of an agent with rank R decays exponentially with R. By establishing a parallel between wealth of a nation and its per-capita GDP, these observations suggest that international trade rules are such that strong wealth concentration is favored. Possible extensions of this work, that also consider endogenous factors affecting the evolution of GDP, are also discussed.

  12. GDP-mannose transporter paralogues play distinct roles in polarized growth of Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Jackson-Hayes, Loretta; Hill, Terry W; Loprete, Darlene M; Gordon, Barbara S; Groover, Chassidy J; Johnson, Laura R; Martin, Stuart A

    2010-01-01

    GDP-mannose transporters (GMT) carry GDP-mannose nucleotide sugars from the cytosol across the Golgi apparatus membrane for use as substrates in protein glycosylation in plants, animals and fungi. Genomes of some fungal species, such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, contain only one gene encoding a GMT, while others, including Aspergillus nidulans, contain two (gmtA and gmtB). We previously showed that cell wall integrity and normal hyphal morphogenesis in A. nidulans depend upon the function of GmtA and that GmtA localizes to a Golgi-like compartment. Cells bearing the calI11 mutation in gmtA also have reduced cell surface mannosylation. Here we show that GmtB colocalizes with GmtA, suggesting that the role of GmtB is similar to that of GmtA, although the respective transcript levels differ during spore germination and early development. Transcript levels of gmtB are high in ungerminated spores and remain so throughout the first 16 h of germination. In contrast, transcript levels of gmrtA are negligible in ungerminated spores but increase to levels comparable to those of gmtB during germination. These observations suggest that although GmtA and GmtB reside within the same subcellular compartments, they nevertheless perform distinct functions at different stages of development.

  13. Cryptococcus neoformans dual GDP-mannose transporters and their role in biology and virulence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo A; Griffith, Cara L; Skowyra, Michael L; Salinas, Nichole; Williams, Matthew; Maier, Ezekiel J; Gish, Stacey R; Liu, Hong; Brent, Michael R; Doering, Tamara L

    2014-06-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic yeast responsible for lethal meningoencephalitis in humans. This pathogen elaborates a polysaccharide capsule, which is its major virulence factor. Mannose constitutes over one-half of the capsule mass and is also extensively utilized in cell wall synthesis and in glycosylation of proteins and lipids. The activated mannose donor for most biosynthetic reactions, GDP-mannose, is made in the cytosol, although it is primarily consumed in secretory organelles. This compartmentalization necessitates specific transmembrane transporters to make the donor available for glycan synthesis. We previously identified two cryptococcal GDP-mannose transporters, Gmt1 and Gmt2. Biochemical studies of each protein expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that both are functional, with similar kinetics and substrate specificities in vitro. We have now examined these proteins in vivo and demonstrate that cells lacking Gmt1 show significant phenotypic differences from those lacking Gmt2 in terms of growth, colony morphology, protein glycosylation, and capsule phenotypes. Some of these observations may be explained by differential expression of the two genes, but others suggest that the two proteins play overlapping but nonidentical roles in cryptococcal biology. Furthermore, gmt1 gmt2 double mutant cells, which are unexpectedly viable, exhibit severe defects in capsule synthesis and protein glycosylation and are avirulent in mouse models of cryptococcosis.

  14. GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase is essential for cell wall integrity, morphogenesis and viability of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hechun; Ouyang, Haomiao; Zhou, Hui; Jin, Cheng

    2008-09-01

    GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMPP) catalyses the synthesis of GDP-mannose, which is the precursor for the mannose residues in glycoconjugates, using mannose 1-phosphate and GTP as substrates. Repression of GMPP in yeast leads to phenotypes including cell lysis, defective cell wall, and failure of polarized growth and cell separation. Although several GMPPs have been isolated and characterized in filamentous fungi, the physiological consequences of their actions are not clear. In this study, Afsrb1, which is a homologue of yeast SRB1/PSA1/VIG9, was identified in the Aspergillus fumigatus genome. The Afsrb1 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and recombinant AfSrb1 was functionally confirmed as a GMPP. By the replacement of the native Afsrb1 promoter with an inducible Aspergillus nidulans alcA promoter, the conditional inactivation mutant strain YJ-gmpp was constructed. The presence of 3 % glucose completely blocked transcription of P(alcA)-Afsrb1, and was lethal to strain YJ-gmpp. Repression of Afsrb1 expression in strain YJ-gmpp led to phenotypes including hyphal lysis, defective cell wall, impaired polarity maintenance, and branching site selection. Also, rapid germination and reduced conidiation were documented. However, in contrast to yeast, strain YJ-gmpp retained the ability to direct polarity establishment and septation. Our results showed that the Afsrb1 gene is essential for cell wall integrity, morphogenesis and viability of Aspergillus fumigatus.

  15. Antisense-mediated depletion of tomato GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase increases susceptibility to chilling stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Yan; Li, Dong; Deng, Yong-Sheng; Lv, Wei; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2013-02-15

    The GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (GGP), which converts GDP-l-galactose to l-Gal-1-phosphate, is generally considered to be a key enzyme of the major ascorbate biosynthesis pathways in higher plants, but experimental evidence for its role in tomato is lacking. In the present study, the GGP gene was isolated from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and transient expression of SlGGP-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion protein in onion cells revealed the cytoplasmic and nucleus localization of the protein. Antisense transgenic tomato lines with only 50-75% ascorbate level of the wild type (WT) were obtained. Chilling treatment induced lower increase in AsA levels and redox ratio of ascorbate in antisense transgenic plants compared with WT plants. Under chilling stress, transgenic plants accumulated more malendialdehyde (MDA) and more O(2)(·-), leaked more electrolytes and showed lower maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm), net photosynthetic rate (Pn), and oxidizable P700 compared with WT plants. Furthermore, the antisense transgenic plants exhibited significantly higher H(2)O(2) level and lower ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity. Our results suggested that GGP plays an important role in protecting plants against chilling stress by maintaining ascorbate pool and ascorbate redox state.

  16. A multifactor approach to forecasting Romanian gross domestic product (GDP) in the short run.

    PubMed

    Armeanu, Daniel; Andrei, Jean Vasile; Lache, Leonard; Panait, Mirela

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the application of a generalized dynamic factor model (GDFM) based on dynamic principal components analysis to forecasting short-term economic growth in Romania. We have used a generalized principal components approach to estimate a dynamic model based on a dataset comprising 86 economic and non-economic variables that are linked to economic output. The model exploits the dynamic correlations between these variables and uses three common components that account for roughly 72% of the information contained in the original space. We show that it is possible to generate reliable forecasts of quarterly real gross domestic product (GDP) using just the common components while also assessing the contribution of the individual variables to the dynamics of real GDP. In order to assess the relative performance of the GDFM to standard models based on principal components analysis, we have also estimated two Stock-Watson (SW) models that were used to perform the same out-of-sample forecasts as the GDFM. The results indicate significantly better performance of the GDFM compared with the competing SW models, which empirically confirms our expectations that the GDFM produces more accurate forecasts when dealing with large datasets.

  17. Expression and crystallographic studies of the Arabidopsis thaliana GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase VTC1.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shun; Liu, Lin

    2016-10-01

    GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase catalyzes the production of GDP-D-mannose, an intermediate product in the plant ascorbic acid (AsA) biosynthetic pathway. This enzyme is a key regulatory target in AsA biosynthesis and is encoded by VITAMIN C DEFECTIVE 1 (VTC1) in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Here, recombinant VTC1 was expressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were obtained from VTC1 crystals grown in the absence and presence of substrate using X-rays. The ligand-free VTC1 crystal diffracted X-rays to 3.3 Å resolution and belonged to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 183.6, c = 368.5 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°; the crystal of VTC1 in the presence of substrate diffracted X-rays to 1.75 Å resolution and belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 70.8, b = 83.9, c = 74.5 Å, α = γ = 90.0, β = 114.9°.

  18. Improving health and well-being independently of GDP: dividends of greener and prosocial economies.

    PubMed

    Pretty, Jules; Barton, Jo; Bharucha, Zareen Pervez; Bragg, Rachel; Pencheon, David; Wood, Carly; Depledge, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    Increases in gross domestic product (GDP) beyond a threshold of basic needs do not lead to further increases in well-being. An explanation is that material consumption (MC) also results in negative health externalities. We assess how these externalities influence six factors critical for well-being: (i) healthy food; (ii) active body; (iii) healthy mind; (iv) community links; (v) contact with nature; and (vi) attachment to possessions. If environmentally sustainable consumption (ESC) were increasingly substituted for MC, thus improving well-being and stocks of natural and social capital, and sustainable behaviours involving non-material consumption (SBs-NMC) became more prevalent, then well-being would increase regardless of levels of GDP. In the UK, the individualised annual health costs of negative consumption externalities (NCEs) currently amount to £62 billion for the National Health Service, and £184 billion for the economy (for mental ill-health, dementia, obesity, physical inactivity, diabetes, loneliness and cardiovascular disease). A dividend is available if substitution by ESC and SBs-NMC could limit the prevalence of these conditions.

  19. A multifactor approach to forecasting Romanian gross domestic product (GDP) in the short run

    PubMed Central

    Armeanu, Daniel; Lache, Leonard; Panait, Mirela

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the application of a generalized dynamic factor model (GDFM) based on dynamic principal components analysis to forecasting short-term economic growth in Romania. We have used a generalized principal components approach to estimate a dynamic model based on a dataset comprising 86 economic and non-economic variables that are linked to economic output. The model exploits the dynamic correlations between these variables and uses three common components that account for roughly 72% of the information contained in the original space. We show that it is possible to generate reliable forecasts of quarterly real gross domestic product (GDP) using just the common components while also assessing the contribution of the individual variables to the dynamics of real GDP. In order to assess the relative performance of the GDFM to standard models based on principal components analysis, we have also estimated two Stock-Watson (SW) models that were used to perform the same out-of-sample forecasts as the GDFM. The results indicate significantly better performance of the GDFM compared with the competing SW models, which empirically confirms our expectations that the GDFM produces more accurate forecasts when dealing with large datasets. PMID:28742100

  20. Global Sea Level Rise and its Impact Estimation Model by Beach Mechanics, GDP, and Shoreline Length using Big Data Approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    Existing research has shown consistent increase in global sea levels due to warming of the climate; since 1870, average global sea level has risen by about 20 cm. There are processes that scientists and coastal engineers can follow to estimate the erosion and flooding risk impacts for specific locations based on historical data. However, there are no methods available to assess the risk impacts for locations where little research has been conducted. In this study, we introduce a prototype to better predict sea level change and land loss using big data technology. Our approach combines cluster analysis and artificial intelligence to classify and calculate impacts for locations worldwide. Data from 235 locations (89 countries) on sea level change was gathered from NOAA data investigations and other research organizations, including beach profile data, shoreline length data, and GDP data. The rate of sea level rise varies from -18 to 21 mm/yr. We divide the data into 4 groups (Group A: +0 to 9mm, Group B: +10 to +20mm, Group C: -0 to -9mm, and Group D:-10 to -20mm). Our research focuses on types A and B only since both reflect increase on sea level rise. We find the correlation between the sea level rise and factors such as the economic parameter (α), sea level rise height (h), beach breaker wave (Hb), gravitational constant (g), period of wave (T), foreshore slope (i), and sand sizes (D). We conclude the sea level rise impact ($ lost) can be more scientifically and precisely predicted using our model.

  1. Time Varying Feature Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echterhoff, J.; Simonis, I.; Atkinson, R.

    2012-04-01

    The infrastructure to gather, store and access information about our environment is improving and growing rapidly. The increasing amount of information allows us to get a better understanding of the current state of our environment, historical processes and to simulate and predict the future state of the environment. Finer grained spatial and temporal data and more reliable communications make it easier to model dynamic states and ephemeral features. The exchange of information within and across geospatial domains is facilitated through the use of harmonized information models. The Observations & Measurements (O&M) developed through OGC and standardised by ISO is an example of such a cross-domain information model. It is used in many domains, including meteorology, hydrology as well as the emergency management. O&M enables harmonized representation of common metadata that belong to the act of determining the state of a feature property, whether by sensors, simulations or humans. In addition to the resulting feature property value, information such as the result quality but especially the time that the result applies to the feature property can be represented. Temporal metadata is critical to modelling past and future states of a feature. The features, and the semantics of each property, are defined in domain specific Application Schema using the General Feature Model (GFM) from ISO 19109 and usually encoded following ISO 19136. However, at the moment these standards provide only limited support for the representation and handling of time varying feature data. Features like rivers, wildfires or gas plumes have a defined state - for example geographic extent - at any given point in time. To keep track of changes, a more complex model for example using time-series coverages is required. Furthermore, the representation and management of feature property value changes via the service interfaces defined by OGC and ISO - namely: WFS and WCS - would be rather complex

  2. Binding of GTPγ[35S] is regulated by GDP and receptor activation. Studies with the nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, John; Lambert, David G

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: We have examined the effects of ligand efficacy and receptor density on the binding of guanosine 5′-[γ-thio]triphosphate (GTPγS) and GDP to the nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) peptide receptor (NOP)-coupled G-proteins. Experimental approach: In GTPγ[35S] binding experiments, using stable (CHOhNOP) and inducible (CHOINDhNOP) recombinant human and rat NOP we have measured: (i) ligand-specific GDP requirements; (ii) the effects of receptor density on guanine nucleotide affinity/capacity; and (iii) the effect of ligand efficacy on GTPγS association kinetics. Key results: GTPγS competition curves were shallow and modelled by high- and low-affinity components that were relatively consistent between cell types and tissue preparations. In the presence of 1 µM N/OFQ a high-affinity GDP binding site was also present, but the fraction of total binding was reduced. In an efficacy-dependent manner, the partial agonists [F/G]N/OFQ(1-13)NH2 ([Phe1ψ(CH2-NH)Gly2]-nociceptin(1-13)NH2) and naloxone benzoylhydrazone both reduced the fraction of high-affinity sites for GDP (relative to basal). While the pIC50 for high-affinity GDP binding site did not decrease in the presence of 1 µM N/OFQ, N/OFQ produced a significant reduction in pIC50 for the low-affinity site. Agonist-mediated decrease in affinity for GDP binding was efficacy-dependent. GDP displayed three affinities: high, conserved in the presence and absence of ligand; intermediate, present as a low fraction under basal conditions; low (efficacy-dependent), present during receptor activation representing the majority of binding. Conclusions and implications: The affinity of GTPγ[35S] was regulated by GDP and receptor activation caused increased binding of GTPγ[35S] through a reduction in GDP affinity. PMID:20148892

  3. Carbon dioxide emissions, GDP, energy use, and population growth: a multivariate and causality analysis for Ghana, 1971-2013.

    PubMed

    Asumadu-Sarkodie, Samuel; Owusu, Phebe Asantewaa

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the relationship between carbon dioxide emissions, GDP, energy use, and population growth in Ghana was investigated from 1971 to 2013 by comparing the vector error correction model (VECM) and the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL). Prior to testing for Granger causality based on VECM, the study tested for unit roots, Johansen's multivariate co-integration and performed a variance decomposition analysis using Cholesky's technique. Evidence from the variance decomposition shows that 21 % of future shocks in carbon dioxide emissions are due to fluctuations in energy use, 8 % of future shocks are due to fluctuations in GDP, and 6 % of future shocks are due to fluctuations in population. There was evidence of bidirectional causality running from energy use to GDP and a unidirectional causality running from carbon dioxide emissions to energy use, carbon dioxide emissions to GDP, carbon dioxide emissions to population, and population to energy use. Evidence from the long-run elasticities shows that a 1 % increase in population in Ghana will increase carbon dioxide emissions by 1.72 %. There was evidence of short-run equilibrium relationship running from energy use to carbon dioxide emissions and GDP to carbon dioxide emissions. As a policy implication, the addition of renewable energy and clean energy technologies into Ghana's energy mix can help mitigate climate change and its impact in the future.

  4. The de novo synthesis of GDP-fucose is essential for flagellar adhesion and cell growth in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Turnock, Daniel C; Izquierdo, Luis; Ferguson, Michael A J

    2007-09-28

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes human African sleeping sickness in sub-Saharan Africa. The parasite makes several essential glycoproteins, which has led to the investigation of the sugar nucleotides and glycosyltransferases required to synthesize these structures. Fucose is a common sugar in glycoconjugates from many organisms; however, the sugar nucleotide donor GDP-fucose was only recently detected in T. brucei, and the importance of fucose metabolism in this organism is not known. In this paper, we identified the genes encoding functional GDP-fucose biosynthesis enzymes in T. brucei and created conditional null mutants of TbGMD, the gene encoding the first enzyme in the pathway from GDP-mannose to GDP-fucose, in both bloodstream form and procyclic form parasites. Under nonpermissive conditions, both life cycle forms of the parasite became depleted in GDP-fucose and suffered growth arrest, demonstrating that fucose metabolism is essential to both life cycle stages. In procyclic form parasites, flagellar detachment from the cell body was also observed under nonpermissive conditions, suggesting that fucose plays a significant role in flagellar adhesion. Fluorescence microscopy of epitope-tagged TbGMD revealed that this enzyme is localized in glycosomes, despite the absence of PTS-1 or PTS-2 target sequences.

  5. A High-Throughput Assay for Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Based on the Transcreener GDP Assay.

    PubMed

    Reichman, Melvin; Schabdach, Amanda; Kumar, Meera; Zielinski, Tom; Donover, Preston S; Laury-Kleintop, Lisa D; Lowery, Robert G

    2015-12-01

    Ras homologous (Rho) family GTPases act as molecular switches controlling cell growth, movement, and gene expression by cycling between inactive guanosine diphosphate (GDP)- and active guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-bound conformations. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) positively regulate Rho GTPases by accelerating GDP dissociation to allow formation of the active, GTP-bound complex. Rho proteins are directly involved in cancer pathways, especially cell migration and invasion, and inhibiting GEFs holds potential as a therapeutic strategy to diminish Rho-dependent oncogenesis. Methods for measuring GEF activity suitable for high-throughput screening (HTS) are limited. We developed a simple, generic biochemical assay method for measuring GEF activity based on the fact that GDP dissociation is generally the rate-limiting step in the Rho GTPase catalytic cycle, and thus addition of a GEF causes an increase in steady-state GTPase activity. We used the Transcreener GDP Assay, which relies on selective immunodetection of GDP, to measure the GEF-dependent stimulation of steady-state GTP hydrolysis by small GTPases using Dbs (Dbl's big sister) as a GEF for Cdc42, RhoA, and RhoB. The assay is well suited for HTS, with a homogenous format and far red fluorescence polarization (FP) readout, and it should be broadly applicable to diverse Rho GEF/GTPase pairs.

  6. Simulating GTP:Mg and GDP:Mg with a simple force field: a structural and thermodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Thomas; Satpati, Priyadarshi

    2013-04-05

    Di- and tri-phosphate nucleotides are essential cofactors for many proteins, usually in an Mg(2+) -bound form. Proteins like GTPases often detect the difference between NDP and NTP and respond by changing conformations. To study such complexes, simple, fixed charge force fields have been used, which allow long simulations and precise free energy calculations. The preference for NTP or NDP binding depends on many factors, including ligand structure and Mg(2+) coordination and the changes they undergo upon binding. Here, we use a simple force field to examine two Mg(2+) coordination modes for the unbound GDP and GTP: direct, or "Inner Sphere" (IS) coordination by one or more phosphate oxygens and indirect, "Outer Sphere" (OS) coordination involving one or more bridging waters. We compare GTP: and GDP:Mg binding with OS and IS coordination; combining the results with experimental data then indicates that GTP prefers the latter. We also examine different kinds of IS coordination and their sensitivity to a key force field parameter: the optimal Mg:oxygen van der Waals distance Rmin . Increasing Rmin improves the Mg:oxygen distances, the GTP: and GDP:Mg binding affinities, and the fraction of GTP:Mg with β + γ phosphate coordination, but does not improve or change the GTP/GDP affinity difference, which remains much larger than experiment. It has no effect on the free energy of GDP binding to a GTPase. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Prevalence of type 2 diabetes in the Arab world: impact of GDP and energy consumption.

    PubMed

    Meo, S A; Usmani, A M; Qalbani, E

    2017-03-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a rapidly growing and most challenging health issue of the 21st century. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of type-2 DM and its association with Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and energy consumption in the Arab world countries. We identified 88 articles through systematic searches including Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science, PubMed and EMBASE databases published between 1980-2015. The related literature was searched by using the keywords including diabetes mellitus, prevalence, incidence, epidemiology of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and names of the individual Arab world countries. The articles were selected and investigated for the prevalence of T2DM. No limitations were imposed in the design of the study or publication language. Finally, 50 peer-reviewed publications were included and the rest were excluded. Arab world countries with the highest prevalence of T2DM are: Kingdom of Saudi Arabia 31.6%, Oman 29%, Kuwait 25.4%, Bahrain 25.0% and United Arab Emirates 25.0%. The lowest prevalence was found in Mauritania (4.7%) and Somalia (3.9%). The highest prevalence was observed in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries (25.45%) whilst non-GCC countries had the lowest prevalence (12.69%). The combined mean prevalence of T2DM in both GCC and Non-GCC Arab countries was 16.17%. The prevalence of T2DM was found to be significantly associated with higher Gross Domestic Product (GDP) (p=0.020) and energy consumption (p=0.017). In the Arab world, the countries with the highest prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus are: Saudi Arabia, Oman, Kuwait, Bahrain and UAE, whilst the countries with the lowest prevalence are Mauritania and Somalia. This prevalence was significantly associated with high GDP per capita and energy consumption. Arab states must incorporate diabetes preventive policies on a war-footing basis to minimize the burden of the disease.

  8. Alcohol-Attributable Fraction in Liver Disease: Does GDP Per Capita Matter?

    PubMed

    Kröner, Paul T; Mankal, Pavan Kumar; Dalapathi, Vijay; Shroff, Kavin; Abed, Jean; Kotler, Donald P

    2015-01-01

    The alcohol-attributable fraction (AAF) quantifies alcohol's disease burden. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is influenced by alcohol consumption per capita, duration, gender, ethnicity, and other comorbidities. In this study, we investigated the association between AAF/alcohol-related liver mortality and alcohol consumption per capita, while stratifying to per-capita gross domestic product (GDP). Data obtained from the World Health Organization and World Bank for both genders on AAF on liver disease, per-capita alcohol consumption (L/y), and per-capita GDP (USD/y) were used to conduct a cross-sectional study. Countries were classified as "high-income" and "very low income" if their respective per-capita GDP was greater than $30,000 or less than $1,000. Differences in total alcohol consumption per capita and AAF were calculated using a 2-sample t test. Scatterplots were generated to supplement the Pearson correlation coefficients, and F test was conducted to assess for differences in variance of ALD between high-income and very low income countries. Twenty-six and 27 countries met the criteria for high-income and very low income countries, respectively. Alcohol consumption per capita was higher in high-income countries. AAF and alcohol consumption per capita for both genders in high-income and very low income countries had a positive correlation. The F test yielded an F value of 1.44 with P = .357. No statistically significant correlation was found among alcohol types and AAF. Significantly higher mortality from ALD was found in very low income countries relative to high-income countries. Previous studies had noted a decreased AAF in low-income countries as compared to higher-income countries. However, the non-statistically significant difference between AAF variances of low-income and high-income countries was found by this study. A possible explanation is that both high-income and low-income populations will consume sufficient amount of alcohol, irrespective of its

  9. GDI1 encodes a GDP dissociation inhibitor that plays an essential role in the yeast secretory pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, M D; Zahner, J E; Cheney, C M; Novick, P J

    1994-01-01

    GTP binding proteins of the Sec4/Ypt/rab family regulate distinct vesicular traffic events in eukaryotic cells. We have cloned GDI1, an essential homolog of bovine rab GDI (GDP dissociation inhibitor) from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Analogous to the bovine protein, purified Gdi1p slows the dissociation of GDP from Sec4p and releases the GDP-bound form from yeast membranes. Depletion of Gdi1p in vivo leads to loss of the soluble pool of Sec4p and inhibition of protein transport at multiple stages of the secretory pathway. Complementation analysis indicates that GDI1 is allelic to sec19-1. These results establish that Gdi1p plays an essential function in membrane traffic and are consistent with a role for Gdi1p in the recycling of proteins of the Sec4/Ypt/rab family from their target membranes back to their vesicular pools. Images PMID:8157010

  10. Parallel modulation of brown adipose tissue GDP-binding, substrate uptake and (Na(+)-K+)-ATPase activity in the rat.

    PubMed

    Zamora, F; Alemany, M; Arola, L

    1991-10-01

    Brown adipose tissue (Na(+)-K+)-ATPase activity, in vitro glucose uptake and 2-aminoisobutyric acid uptake, as well as mitochondrial GDP-binding and succinate dehydrogenase activity were determined in order to study the relationship between these parameters in control, cold acclimated and cafeteria-fed rats. GDP-binding, (Na(+)-K+)-ATPase and glucose uptake were increased in interscapular brown adipose tissue from cold-acclimated and cafeteria-fed rats, whereas 2-aminoisobutyric acid uptake was only increased in cafeteria-fed rats. GDP-binding and (Na(+)-K+)-ATPase activity showed a high correlation coefficient suggesting a parallel modulation of both systems, which would probably share a common regulation mechanism.

  11. The environmental Kuznets curve and CO2 emissions in the USA : Is the relationship between GDP and CO2 emissions time varying? Evidence across economic sectors.

    PubMed

    Congregado, Emilio; Feria-Gallardo, Julia; Golpe, Antonio A; Iglesias, Jesús

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we analyze the existence of the environmental Kuznets curve as reported by Kuznets (Am Econ Rev 5:1-28, 1955) by using the methodology proposed by Kejriwal and Perron (J Econ 146:59-73, 2008, J Bus Econ Stat 28:503-522, 2010) and applying Jaunky's (Energy Policy 39(3):1228-1240, 2011) specification using quarterly data from 1973:1 to 2015:2. We also allow different behaviors across time and identify it by economic sectors. Our results show the existence of the environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) in the USA only when we allow for structural breaks. Interestingly, the industrial sector shows a different pattern than do other economic sectors; with the beginning of the economic crisis, it appears to have abandoned the objective of the environmental stabilization found until then.

  12. Conformational selection through electrostatics: Free energy simulations of GTP and GDP binding to archaeal initiation factor 2.

    PubMed

    Satpati, Priyadarshi; Simonson, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Archaeal Initiation Factor 2 is a GTPase involved in protein biosynthesis. In its GTP-bound, "ON" conformation, it binds an initiator tRNA and carries it to the ribosome. In its GDP-bound, "OFF" conformation, it dissociates from tRNA. To understand the specific binding of GTP and GDP and their dependence on the conformational state, molecular dynamics free energy simulations were performed. The ON state specificity was predicted to be weak, with a GTP/GDP binding free energy difference of -1 kcal/mol, favoring GTP. The OFF state specificity is larger, 4 kcal/mol, favoring GDP. The overall effects result from a competition among many interactions in several complexes. To interpret them, we use a simpler, dielectric continuum model. Several effects are robust with respect to the model details. Both nucleotides have a net negative charge, so that removing them from solvent into the binding pocket carries a desolvation penalty, which is large for the ON state, and strongly disfavors GTP binding compared to GDP. Short-range interactions between the additional GTP phosphate group and ionized sidechains in the binding pocket offset most, but not all of the desolvation penalty; more distant groups also contribute significantly, and the switch 1 loop only slightly. The desolvation penalty is lower for the more open, wetter OFF state, and the GTP/GDP difference much smaller. Short-range interactions in the binding pocket and with more distant groups again make a significant contribution. Overall, the simulations help explain how conformational selection is achieved with a single phosphate group. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Short-term and long-term effects of GDP on traffic deaths in 18 OECD countries, 1960-2011.

    PubMed

    Dadgar, Iman; Norström, Thor

    2017-02-01

    Research suggests that increases in gross domestic product (GDP) lead to increases in traffic deaths plausibly due to the increased road traffic induced by an expanding economy. However, there also seems to exist a long-term effect of economic growth that is manifested in improved traffic safety and reduced rates of traffic deaths. Previous studies focus on either the short-term, procyclical effect, or the long-term, protective effect. The aim of the present study is to estimate the short-term and long-term effects jointly in order to assess the net impact of GDP on traffic mortality. We extracted traffic death rates for the period 1960-2011 from the WHO Mortality Database for 18 OECD countries. Data on GDP/capita were obtained from the Maddison Project. We performed error correction modelling to estimate the short-term and long-term effects of GDP on the traffic death rates. The estimates from the error correction modelling for the entire study period suggested that a one-unit increase (US$1000) in GDP/capita yields an instantaneous short-term increase in the traffic death rate by 0.58 (p<0.001), and a long-term decrease equal to -1.59 (p<0.001). However, period-specific analyses revealed a structural break implying that the procyclical effect outweighs the protective effect in the period prior to 1976, whereas the reverse is true for the period 1976-2011. An increase in GDP leads to an immediate increase in traffic deaths. However, after the mid-1970s this short-term effect is more than outweighed by a markedly stronger protective long-term effect, whereas the reverse is true for the period before the mid-1970s. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. Structural basis of GDP release and gating in G protein coupled Fe[superscript 2+] transport

    SciTech Connect

    Guilfoyle, Amy; Maher, Megan J.; Rapp, Mikaela; Clarke, Ronald; Harrop, Stephen; Jormakka, Mika

    2009-09-29

    G proteins are key molecular switches in the regulation of membrane protein function and signal transduction. The prokaryotic membrane protein FeoB is involved in G protein coupled Fe{sup 2+} transport, and is unique in that the G protein is directly tethered to the membrane domain. Here, we report the structure of the soluble domain of FeoB, including the G protein domain, and its assembly into an unexpected trimer. Comparisons between nucleotide free and liganded structures reveal the closed and open state of a central cytoplasmic pore, respectively. In addition, these data provide the first observation of a conformational switch in the nucleotide-binding G5 motif, defining the structural basis for GDP release. From these results, structural parallels are drawn to eukaryotic G protein coupled membrane processes.

  15. Overexpression of Rho-GDP-dissociation inhibitor-γ inhibits migration of neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiao; Li, Xiao; Cheng, Hua; Wang, Kai; Lu, Wei; Wen, Tieqiao

    2013-11-01

    Neural stem cell (NSC) migration relies heavily on the regulation of actin and microtubule cytoskeletons by Rho GTPases, which are critical regulators of key steps during NSC migration. However, the migration mechanism remains unclear. Rho-GDP-dissociation inhibitor-γ (Rho-GDIγ) was identified as an important downregulator of the Rho family of GTPases, because of its ability to prevent nucleotide exchange and thus membrane association. This study investigates the role of Rho-GDIγ in neural stem cells migration. Our results indicate that the overexpression of Rho-GDIγ maintains NSCs in the stem cell state, meanwhile preventing NSC migration through inhibition of Rac1 expression, one of the Rho-family GTPases. This study provides the basis for further study of the molecular mechanism of NSC migration. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Structural basis of GDP release and gating in G protein coupled Fe2+ transport

    PubMed Central

    Guilfoyle, Amy; Maher, Megan J; Rapp, Mikaela; Clarke, Ronald; Harrop, Stephen; Jormakka, Mika

    2009-01-01

    G proteins are key molecular switches in the regulation of membrane protein function and signal transduction. The prokaryotic membrane protein FeoB is involved in G protein coupled Fe2+ transport, and is unique in that the G protein is directly tethered to the membrane domain. Here, we report the structure of the soluble domain of FeoB, including the G protein domain, and its assembly into an unexpected trimer. Comparisons between nucleotide free and liganded structures reveal the closed and open state of a central cytoplasmic pore, respectively. In addition, these data provide the first observation of a conformational switch in the nucleotide-binding G5 motif, defining the structural basis for GDP release. From these results, structural parallels are drawn to eukaryotic G protein coupled membrane processes. PMID:19629046

  17. Relating traffic fatalities to GDP in Europe on the long term.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Constantinos; Yannis, George; Papadimitriou, Eleonora; Lassarre, Sylvain

    2016-07-01

    Modeling road safety development can provide important insight into policies for the reduction of traffic fatalities. In order to achieve this goal, both the quantifiable impact of specific parameters, as well as the underlying trends that cannot always be measured or observed, need to be considered. One of the key relationships in road safety links fatalities with risk and exposure, where exposure reflects the amount of travel, which in turn translates to how much travelers are exposed to risk. In general two economic variables: GDP and unemployment rate are selected to analyse the statistical relationships with some indicators of road accident fatality risk. The objective of this research is to provide an overview of relevant literature on the topic and outline some recent developments in macro-panel data analysis that have resulted in ongoing research that has the potential to improve our ability to forecast traffic fatality trends, especially under turbulent financial situations. For this analysis, time series of the number of fatalities and GDP in 30 European countries for a period of 38 years (1975-2012) are used. This process relies on estimating long-term models (as captured by long term time-series models, which model each country separately). Based on these developments, utilizing state-of-the-art modelling and analysis techniques such as the Common Correlated Effects Mean Group estimator (Pesaran), the long-term elasticity mean value equals 0.63, and is significantly different from zero for 10 countries only. When we take away the countries, where the number of fatalities is stationary, the average elasticity takes a higher value of nearly 1. This shows the strong sensitivity of the estimate of the average elasticity over a panel of European countries and underlines the necessity to be aware of the underlying nature of the time series, to get a suitable regression model.

  18. Single GDP-dissociation Inhibitor Protein regulates endocytic and secretory pathways in Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Senthil kumar; Kumar, Kamal; Singh, Pawan Kishor; Rastogi, Ruchir; Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-01-01

    The role of GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) protein in regulation of Rab cycle in Leishmania is not known. Here, we have cloned and characterized the functions of GDI homologue in vivo in Leishmania. Our results have shown that LdGDI:WT along with GDP removes the Rab5 from purified endosomes and inhibits the homotypic fusion between early endosomes. Whereas, LdGDI:R239A, a dominant negative mutant of GDI, under the same condition neither removes the Rab5 from endosome nor inhibits fusion. To determine the role of Ld-GDI in vivo, transgenic parasites overexpressing GFP-LdGDI:WT or GFP-LdGDI:R239A, are co-expressed with RFP-LdRab5:WT, RFP-LdRab7:WT or RFP-LdRab1:WT. Our results have shown that overexpression of GFP-LdGDI:WT extracts the RFP-LdRab5, RFP-LdRab7 or RFP-LdRab1 from their discrete endomembrane predominantly into cytosol. No change in the distribution of indicated Rabs is detected with overexpression of GFP-LdGDI:R239A. To determine the functional significance, we have used hemoglobin as an endocytic marker and gp63 as a marker for secretory pathway. We have found that overexpression of GFP-LdGDI:WT enhances the lysosomal targeting of internalized hemoglobin and the secretion of gp63 in the parasites possibly by triggering Rab cycle. This is the first demonstration of a single GDI ubiquitously regulating both endocytic and secretory pathways in Leishmania. PMID:27841328

  19. China's Pathways to Achieving 40% ~ 45% Reduction in CO{sub 2} Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Ke, Jing

    2011-09-30

    Achieving China’s goal of reducing its carbon intensity (CO{sub 2} per unit of GDP) by 40% to 45% percent below 2005 levels by 2020 will require the strengthening and expansion of energy efficiency policies across the buildings, industries and transport sectors. This study uses a bottom-up, end-use model and two scenarios -- an enhanced energy efficiency (E3) scenario and an alternative maximum technically feasible energy efficiency improvement (Max Tech) scenario – to evaluate what policies and technical improvements are needed to achieve the 2020 carbon intensity reduction target. The findings from this study show that a determined approach by China can lead to the achievement of its 2020 goal. In particular, with full success in deepening its energy efficiency policies and programs but following the same general approach used during the 11th Five Year Plan, it is possible to achieve 49% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions per unit of GDP (CO{sub 2} emissions intensity) in 2020 from 2005 levels (E3 case). Under the more optimistic but feasible assumptions of development and penetration of advanced energy efficiency technology (Max Tech case), China could achieve a 56% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions intensity in 2020 relative to 2005 with cumulative reduction of energy use by 2700 Mtce and of CO{sub 2} emissions of 8107 Mt CO{sub 2} between 2010 and 2020. Energy savings and CO{sub 2} mitigation potential varies by sector but most of the energy savings potential is found in energy-intensive industry. At the same time, electricity savings and the associated emissions reduction are magnified by increasing renewable generation and improving coal generation efficiency, underscoring the dual importance of end-use efficiency improvements and power sector decarbonization.

  20. Transforming growth factor β signaling upregulates the expression of human GDP-fucose transporter by activating transcription factor Sp1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu-Xin; Ma, Anna; Liu, Li

    2013-01-01

    GDP-fucose transporter plays a crucial role in fucosylation of glycoproteins by providing activated fucose donor, GDP-fucose, for fucosyltransferases in the lumen of the Golgi apparatus. Fucose-containing glycans are involved in many biological processes, which are essential for growth and development. Mutations in the GDP-fucose transporter gene cause leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome II, a disease characterized by slow growth, mental retardation and immunodeficiency. However, no information is available regarding its transcriptional regulation. Here, by using human cells, we show that TGF-β1 specifically induces the GDP-fucose transporter expression, but not other transporters tested such as CMP-sialic acid transporter, suggesting a diversity of regulatory pathways for the expression of these transporters. The regulatory elements that are responsive to the TGF-β1 stimulation are present in the region between bp -330 and -268 in the GDP-fucose transporter promoter. We found that this region contains two identical octamer GC-rich motifs (GGGGCGTG) that were demonstrated to be essential for the transporter expression. We also show that the transcription factor Sp1 specifically binds to the GC-rich motifs in vitro and Sp1 coupled with phospho-Smad2 is associated with the promoter region covering the Sp1-binding motifs in vivo using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. In addition, we further confirmed that Sp1 is essential for the GDP-fucose transporter expression stimulated by TGF-β1 using a luciferase reporter system. These results highlight the role of TGF-β signaling in regulation of the GDP-fucose transporter expression via activating Sp1. This is the first transcriptional study for any nucleotide sugar transporters that have been identified so far. Notably, TGF-β1 receptor itself is known to be modified by fucosylation. Given the essential role of GDP-fucose transporter in fucosylation, the finding that TGF-β1 stimulates the expression of

  1. Transforming Growth Factor β Signaling Upregulates the Expression of Human GDP-Fucose Transporter by Activating Transcription Factor Sp1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yu-Xin; Ma, Anna; Liu, Li

    2013-01-01

    GDP-fucose transporter plays a crucial role in fucosylation of glycoproteins by providing activated fucose donor, GDP-fucose, for fucosyltransferases in the lumen of the Golgi apparatus. Fucose-containing glycans are involved in many biological processes, which are essential for growth and development. Mutations in the GDP-fucose transporter gene cause leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome II, a disease characterized by slow growth, mental retardation and immunodeficiency. However, no information is available regarding its transcriptional regulation. Here, by using human cells, we show that TGF-β1 specifically induces the GDP-fucose transporter expression, but not other transporters tested such as CMP-sialic acid transporter, suggesting a diversity of regulatory pathways for the expression of these transporters. The regulatory elements that are responsive to the TGF-β1 stimulation are present in the region between bp −330 and −268 in the GDP-fucose transporter promoter. We found that this region contains two identical octamer GC-rich motifs (GGGGCGTG) that were demonstrated to be essential for the transporter expression. We also show that the transcription factor Sp1 specifically binds to the GC-rich motifs in vitro and Sp1 coupled with phospho-Smad2 is associated with the promoter region covering the Sp1-binding motifs in vivo using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. In addition, we further confirmed that Sp1 is essential for the GDP-fucose transporter expression stimulated by TGF-β1 using a luciferase reporter system. These results highlight the role of TGF-β signaling in regulation of the GDP-fucose transporter expression via activating Sp1. This is the first transcriptional study for any nucleotide sugar transporters that have been identified so far. Notably, TGF-β1 receptor itself is known to be modified by fucosylation. Given the essential role of GDP-fucose transporter in fucosylation, the finding that TGF-β1 stimulates the expression of

  2. The disruption of GDP-fucose de novo biosynthesis suggests the presence of a novel fucose-containing glycoconjugate in Plasmodium asexual blood stages.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Sílvia; López-Gutiérrez, Borja; Bandini, Giulia; Damerow, Sebastian; Absalon, Sabrina; Dinglasan, Rhoel R; Samuelson, John; Izquierdo, Luis

    2016-11-16

    Glycosylation is an important posttranslational protein modification in all eukaryotes. Besides glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors and N-glycosylation, O-fucosylation has been recently reported in key sporozoite proteins of the malaria parasite. Previous analyses showed the presence of GDP-fucose (GDP-Fuc), the precursor for all fucosylation reactions, in the blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum. The GDP-Fuc de novo pathway, which requires the action of GDP-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) and GDP-L-fucose synthase (FS), is conserved in the parasite genome, but the importance of fucose metabolism for the parasite is unknown. To functionally characterize the pathway we generated a PfGMD mutant and analyzed its phenotype. Although the labelling by the fucose-binding Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I) was completely abrogated, GDP-Fuc was still detected in the mutant. This unexpected result suggests the presence of an alternative mechanism for maintaining GDP-Fuc in the parasite. Furthermore, PfGMD null mutant exhibited normal growth and invasion rates, revealing that the GDP-Fuc de novo metabolic pathway is not essential for the development in culture of the malaria parasite during the asexual blood stages. Nonetheless, the function of this metabolic route and the GDP-Fuc pool that is generated during this stage may be important for gametocytogenesis and sporogonic development in the mosquito.

  3. The disruption of GDP-fucose de novo biosynthesis suggests the presence of a novel fucose-containing glycoconjugate in Plasmodium asexual blood stages

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, Sílvia; López-Gutiérrez, Borja; Bandini, Giulia; Damerow, Sebastian; Absalon, Sabrina; Dinglasan, Rhoel R.; Samuelson, John; Izquierdo, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation is an important posttranslational protein modification in all eukaryotes. Besides glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors and N-glycosylation, O-fucosylation has been recently reported in key sporozoite proteins of the malaria parasite. Previous analyses showed the presence of GDP-fucose (GDP-Fuc), the precursor for all fucosylation reactions, in the blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum. The GDP-Fuc de novo pathway, which requires the action of GDP-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) and GDP-L-fucose synthase (FS), is conserved in the parasite genome, but the importance of fucose metabolism for the parasite is unknown. To functionally characterize the pathway we generated a PfGMD mutant and analyzed its phenotype. Although the labelling by the fucose-binding Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I) was completely abrogated, GDP-Fuc was still detected in the mutant. This unexpected result suggests the presence of an alternative mechanism for maintaining GDP-Fuc in the parasite. Furthermore, PfGMD null mutant exhibited normal growth and invasion rates, revealing that the GDP-Fuc de novo metabolic pathway is not essential for the development in culture of the malaria parasite during the asexual blood stages. Nonetheless, the function of this metabolic route and the GDP-Fuc pool that is generated during this stage may be important for gametocytogenesis and sporogonic development in the mosquito. PMID:27849032

  4. A Novel GDP-d-glucose Phosphorylase Involved in Quality Control of the Nucleoside Diphosphate Sugar Pool in Caenorhabditis elegans and Mammals*

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Lital N.; Gomez, Tara A.; Clarke, Steven G.; Linster, Carole L.

    2011-01-01

    The plant VTC2 gene encodes GDP-l-galactose phosphorylase, a rate-limiting enzyme in plant vitamin C biosynthesis. Genes encoding apparent orthologs of VTC2 exist in both mammals, which produce vitamin C by a distinct metabolic pathway, and in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans where vitamin C biosynthesis has not been demonstrated. We have now expressed cDNAs of the human and worm VTC2 homolog genes (C15orf58 and C10F3.4, respectively) and found that the purified proteins also display GDP-hexose phosphorylase activity. However, as opposed to the plant enzyme, the major reaction catalyzed by these enzymes is the phosphorolysis of GDP-d-glucose to GDP and d-glucose 1-phosphate. We detected activities with similar substrate specificity in worm and mouse tissue extracts. The highest expression of GDP-d-glucose phosphorylase was found in the nervous and male reproductive systems. A C. elegans C10F3.4 deletion strain was found to totally lack GDP-d-glucose phosphorylase activity; this activity was also found to be decreased in human HEK293T cells transfected with siRNAs against the human C15orf58 gene. These observations confirm the identification of the worm C10F3.4 and the human C15orf58 gene expression products as the GDP-d-glucose phosphorylases of these organisms. Significantly, we found an accumulation of GDP-d-glucose in the C10F3.4 mutant worms, suggesting that the GDP-d-glucose phosphorylase may function to remove GDP-d-glucose formed by GDP-d-mannose pyrophosphorylase, an enzyme that has previously been shown to lack specificity for its physiological d-mannose 1-phosphate substrate. We propose that such removal may prevent the misincorporation of glucosyl residues for mannosyl residues into the glycoconjugates of worms and mammals. PMID:21507950

  5. A novel GDP-D-glucose phosphorylase involved in quality control of the nucleoside diphosphate sugar pool in Caenorhabditis elegans and mammals.

    PubMed

    Adler, Lital N; Gomez, Tara A; Clarke, Steven G; Linster, Carole L

    2011-06-17

    The plant VTC2 gene encodes GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase, a rate-limiting enzyme in plant vitamin C biosynthesis. Genes encoding apparent orthologs of VTC2 exist in both mammals, which produce vitamin C by a distinct metabolic pathway, and in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans where vitamin C biosynthesis has not been demonstrated. We have now expressed cDNAs of the human and worm VTC2 homolog genes (C15orf58 and C10F3.4, respectively) and found that the purified proteins also display GDP-hexose phosphorylase activity. However, as opposed to the plant enzyme, the major reaction catalyzed by these enzymes is the phosphorolysis of GDP-D-glucose to GDP and D-glucose 1-phosphate. We detected activities with similar substrate specificity in worm and mouse tissue extracts. The highest expression of GDP-D-glucose phosphorylase was found in the nervous and male reproductive systems. A C. elegans C10F3.4 deletion strain was found to totally lack GDP-D-glucose phosphorylase activity; this activity was also found to be decreased in human HEK293T cells transfected with siRNAs against the human C15orf58 gene. These observations confirm the identification of the worm C10F3.4 and the human C15orf58 gene expression products as the GDP-D-glucose phosphorylases of these organisms. Significantly, we found an accumulation of GDP-D-glucose in the C10F3.4 mutant worms, suggesting that the GDP-D-glucose phosphorylase may function to remove GDP-D-glucose formed by GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase, an enzyme that has previously been shown to lack specificity for its physiological D-mannose 1-phosphate substrate. We propose that such removal may prevent the misincorporation of glucosyl residues for mannosyl residues into the glycoconjugates of worms and mammals.

  6. Book Review: "The Road to Sustainability, GDP and Future Generations" Pulselli et al, WIT Press, Southhampton, UK 197p 2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    “The Road to Sustainability, GDP and future generations” by Pulselli, F.M., Bastianoni, S., Marchettini, N. Tiezzi, E. was reviewed upon request by the journal’s editor. Briefly, this book presents the authors’ perspective on the complex and important topic of sustainability. Su...

  7. Hydrodynamic response from oxygen non-uniformities in glow-discharge polymer (GDP) plastic in OMEGA OHRV experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Suzanne; Celliers, Peter; Haan, Steve; Baxamusa, Salman; Johnson, Michael; Hughes, Jim; Reynolds, Hannah; Watson, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Simulations and target characterization indicated that inhomogeneity in oxygen content could be a significant seed for Rayleigh-Taylor growth in GDP-ablator NIF implosions. This has been indirectly supported by observation of larger than expected in-flight modulations during NIF GDP capsule implosions, and the realization that such inhomogeneities can result from photo-induced oxygen uptake. In order to investigate the magnitude of the effect of these oxygen heterogeneities on the hydrodynamic response of GDP ablators, oxygen modulations were photo-induced in GDP foils by illuminating the foils with blue light through a periodic mask pattern. The foils were then used as ablators driven on OMEGA by a halfraum to replicate foot conditions on NIF. The resulting optically reflective shock wave was observed using the OMEGA High Resolution Velocimeter (OHRV). Two-dimensional velocity maps were obtained for both oxygen-modulated and unmodulated samples, with the modulated samples showing clear evidence of the propagation of a rippled shock wave as a result of the photo-induced oxygen heterogeneity. This work was supported by Department of Energy Contract #DE-NA0001808. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Concentration of rat brown adipose tissue uncoupling protein may not be correlated with /sup 3/H-GDP binding

    SciTech Connect

    Henningfield, M.F.; Swick, A.G.; Swick, R.W.

    1986-03-01

    Rats fed diets low in protein or exposed to cold show an increase in brown adipose tissue (BAT) mitochondrial /sup 3/H-GDP binding. To investigate this phenomenon further, the uncoupling protein associated with BAT function was measured immunochemically on nitrocellulose blots. Quantitation of uncoupling protein was achieved by densitometer scanning with a BioRad densitometer. Peaks were integrated with Chromatochart software and an Apple IIe computer. A standard curve of purified uncoupling protein (50 to 500 ng) was used to calculate uncoupling protein concentration. There is a 1.5-fold increase in uncoupling protein per mg of protein in BAT mitochondria from rats exposed to cold for 15 days. There was no decrease in uncoupling protein from rats exposed to the cold followed by 24 h at 27/sup 0/C although /sup 3/H-GDP binding had decreased by half. Rats fed diets containing either 5 or 15% lactalbumin for 3 weeks did not show differences in uncoupling protein concentration although /sup 3/H-GDP binding was 1.5-fold greater in BAT mitochondria from the low protein group. These results indicate that GDP binding does not necessarily reflect the concentration of uncoupling protein in BAT mitochondria.

  9. Book Review: "The Road to Sustainability, GDP and Future Generations" Pulselli et al, WIT Press, Southhampton, UK 197p 2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    “The Road to Sustainability, GDP and future generations” by Pulselli, F.M., Bastianoni, S., Marchettini, N. Tiezzi, E. was reviewed upon request by the journal’s editor. Briefly, this book presents the authors’ perspective on the complex and important topic of sustainability. Su...

  10. Crystal structure of the GTPase domain and the bundle signalling element of dynamin in the GDP state

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Roopsee; Eschenburg, Susanne; Reubold, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamin is the prototype of a family of large multi-domain GTPases. The 100 kDa protein is a key player in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, where it cleaves off vesicles from membranes using the energy from GTP hydrolysis. We have solved the high resolution crystal structure of a fusion protein of the GTPase domain and the bundle signalling element (BSE) of dynamin 1 liganded with GDP. The structure provides a hitherto missing snapshot of the GDP state of the hydrolytic cycle of dynamin and reveals how the switch I region moves away from the active site after GTP hydrolysis and release of inorganic phosphate. Comparing our structure of the GDP state with the known structures of the GTP state, the transition state and the nucleotide-free state of dynamin 1 we describe the structural changes through the hydrolytic cycle. - Highlights: • High resolution crystal structure of the GDP-state of a dynamin 1 GTPase-BSE fusion. • Visualizes one of the key states of the hydrolytic cycle of dynamin. • The dynamin-specific loop forms a helix as soon as a guanine base is present.

  11. GDP-bound and Nucleotide-free Intermediates of the Guanine Nucleotide Exchange in the Rab5·Vps9 System*

    PubMed Central

    Uejima, Tamami; Ihara, Kentaro; Goh, Tatsuaki; Ito, Emi; Sunada, Mariko; Ueda, Takashi; Nakano, Akihiko; Wakatsuki, Soichi

    2010-01-01

    Many GTPases regulate intracellular transport and signaling in eukaryotes. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activate GTPases by catalyzing the exchange of their GDP for GTP. Here we present crystallographic and biochemical studies of a GEF reaction with four crystal structures of Arabidopsis thaliana ARA7, a plant homolog of Rab5 GTPase, in complex with its GEF, VPS9a, in the nucleotide-free and GDP-bound forms, as well as a complex with aminophosphonic acid-guanylate ester and ARA7·VPS9a(D185N) with GDP. Upon complex formation with ARA7, VPS9 wedges into the interswitch region of ARA7, inhibiting the coordination of Mg2+ and decreasing the stability of GDP binding. The aspartate finger of VPS9a recognizes GDP β-phosphate directly and pulls the P-loop lysine of ARA7 away from GDP β-phosphate toward switch II to further destabilize GDP for its release during the transition from the GDP-bound to nucleotide-free intermediates in the nucleotide exchange reaction. PMID:20833725

  12. GDP-bound and nucleotide-free intermediates of the guanine nucleotide exchange in the Rab5·Vps9 system.

    PubMed

    Uejima, Tamami; Ihara, Kentaro; Goh, Tatsuaki; Ito, Emi; Sunada, Mariko; Ueda, Takashi; Nakano, Akihiko; Wakatsuki, Soichi

    2010-11-19

    Many GTPases regulate intracellular transport and signaling in eukaryotes. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activate GTPases by catalyzing the exchange of their GDP for GTP. Here we present crystallographic and biochemical studies of a GEF reaction with four crystal structures of Arabidopsis thaliana ARA7, a plant homolog of Rab5 GTPase, in complex with its GEF, VPS9a, in the nucleotide-free and GDP-bound forms, as well as a complex with aminophosphonic acid-guanylate ester and ARA7·VPS9a(D185N) with GDP. Upon complex formation with ARA7, VPS9 wedges into the interswitch region of ARA7, inhibiting the coordination of Mg(2+) and decreasing the stability of GDP binding. The aspartate finger of VPS9a recognizes GDP β-phosphate directly and pulls the P-loop lysine of ARA7 away from GDP β-phosphate toward switch II to further destabilize GDP for its release during the transition from the GDP-bound to nucleotide-free intermediates in the nucleotide exchange reaction.

  13. The relationships between electricity consumption and GDP in Asian countries, using hierarchical structure methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantar, Ersin; Keskin, Mustafa

    2013-11-01

    This study uses hierarchical structure methods (minimal spanning tree (MST) and hierarchical tree (HT)) to examine the relationship between energy consumption and economic growth in a sample of 30 Asian countries covering the period 1971-2008. These countries are categorized into four panels based on the World Bank income classification, namely high, upper middle, lower middle, and low income. In particular, we use the data of electricity consumption and real gross domestic product (GDP) per capita to detect the topological properties of the countries. We show a relationship between electricity consumption and economic growth by using the MST and HT. We also use the bootstrap technique to investigate a value of the statistical reliability to the links of the MST. Finally, we use a clustering linkage procedure in order to observe the cluster structure. The results of the structural topologies of these trees are as follows: (i) we identified different clusters of countries according to their geographical location and economic growth, (ii) we found a strong relationship between energy consumption and economic growth for all income groups considered in this study and (iii) the results are in good agreement with the causal relationship between electricity consumption and economic growth.

  14. "Biocompatible" Neutral pH Low-GDP Peritoneal Dialysis Solutions: Much Ado About Nothing?

    PubMed

    Misra, Paraish S; Nessim, Sharon J; Perl, Jeffrey

    2017-03-01

    Adverse outcomes in peritoneal dialysis (PD), including PD related infections, the loss of residual kidney function (RKF), and longitudinal, deleterious changes in peritoneal membrane function continue to limit the long-term success of PD therapy. The observation that these deleterious changes occur upon exposure to conventional glucose-based PD solutions fuels the search for a more biocompatible PD solution. The development of a novel PD solution with a neutral pH, and lower in glucose degradation products (GDPs) compared to its conventional predecessors has been labeled a "biocompatible" solution. While considerable evidence in support of these novel solutions' biocompatibility has emerged from cell culture and animal studies, the clinical benefits as compared to conventional PD solutions are less clear. Neutral pH low GDP (NpHLGDP) PD solutions appear to be effective in reducing infusion pain, but their effects on other clinical endpoints including peritoneal membrane function, preservation of RKF, PD-related infections, and technique and patient survival are less clear. The literature is limited by studies characterized by relatively few patients, short follow-up time, heterogeneity with regards to the novel PD solution type under study, and the different patient populations under study. Nonetheless, the search for a more biocompatible PD solution continues with emerging data on promising non glucose-based solutions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase from Pogonatherum paniceum enhances salinity and drought tolerance of transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Ai, Taobo; Liao, Xuehong; Li, Rui; Fan, Linhong; Luo, Fengxue; Xu, Ying; Wang, Shenghua

    Pogonatherum paniceum is a highly drought- and salt-tolerant plant species that is typically used for ecological restoration and the conservation of soil and water in many countries. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying plant abiotic stress responses, especially to salinity and drought stresses, in species such as P. paniceum could be important to broader crop improvement efforts. GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMPase) is the limiting enzyme in the synthesis of L-ascorbic acid (AsA), which plays a crucial role in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We have cloned and characterized the cDNA of the PpGMP gene of P. paniceum encoding a GMPase. The full-length cDNA sequence contains 1411 nucleotides encoding a putative protein with 361 amino acid residues and an approximate molecular mass of 39.68 kDa. The GMPase transcript was up-regulated in P. paniceum plants subjected to salinity and drought stress, respectively. Transgenic tobacco expressing PpGMPase exhibited enhanced salinity and drought resistance, a higher seed germination rate, better growth performance, a higher AsA content, a more stable redox state, higher superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and lower levels of malonaldehyde (MDA) and H2O2 under drought and salinity stress. Taken together, expression of PpGMPase in tobacco conferred salinity and drought stress tolerance by increasing the content of AsA, thereby enhancing ROS-detoxifying functions. Thus, PpGMP is a potential candidate gene for crop improvement.

  16. Overexpression of Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor alpha predicts poor survival in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Wei-Fan; Ho, Hsu-Chueh; Chang, Hua-Yuan; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Chen, Yuh-Ling; Hour, Tzyh-Chyuan; Chuang, Shu-Ju; Wu, Yu-Jen; Chen, Hau-Ren; Chen, Jen-Hao; Liu, Shyun-Yeu; Lu, Chin-Li; Chen, Jeff Yi-Fu

    2011-06-01

    Oral cancer has emerged as one of the fastest growing malignancies in Taiwan. However, biomarkers that reliably predict clinical outcomes have yet to be identified. This study was aimed to identify tumor-associated proteins that could be prognostic biomarkers for oral cancer. We compared the protein expression between oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) tissues and adjacent non-cancerous matched tissues (NCMTs) by proteomics. We found that Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor alpha (RhoGDIα) was differentially expressed in frozen cancerous samples and OSCC cell lines but not in NCMTs. Furthermore, our results indicated that RhoGDIα was selectively upregulated in 78 OSCC tissue sections (p<0.001), and this high expression was significantly correlated with increased tumor size (p<0.05) and poor overall survival (p<0.01). There was a trend that RhoGDIα expression was localized in the cytoplasm of cancer cells but was localized in the plasma membrane of NCMTs. Finally, expression of RhoGDIα was validated to be an independent prognostic indicator for overall survival (p<0.01). These results have identified a novel biomarker that may be useful for prediction of poor prognosis in OSCC patients.

  17. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and productivity of schizophrenia trials: an ecological study.

    PubMed

    Moll, Carina; Gessler, Ursula; Bartsch, Stephanie; El-Sayeh, Hany George; Fenton, Mark; Adams, Clive Elliott

    2003-12-05

    The 5000 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's database affords an opportunity to research for variables related to the differences between nations of their output of schizophrenia trials. Ecological study--investigating the relationship between four economic/demographic variables and number of schizophrenia RCTs per country. The variable with closest correlation was used to predict the expected number of studies. GDP closely correlated with schizophrenia trial output, with 76% of the total variation about the Y explained by the regression line (r = 0.87, 95% CI 0.79 to 0.92, r2 = 0.76). Many countries have a strong tradition of schizophrenia trials, exceeding their predicted output. All nations with no identified trial output had GDPs that predicted zero trial activity. Several nations with relatively small GDPs are, nevertheless, highly productive of trials. Some wealthy countries seem either not to have produced the expected number of randomised trials or not to have disseminated them to the English-speaking world. This hypothesis-generating study could not investigate causal relationships, but suggests, that for those seeking all relevant studies, expending effort searching the scientific literature of Germany, Italy, France, Brazil and Japan may be a good investment.

  18. Rice GDP dissociation inhibitor 3 inhibits OsMAPK2 activity through physical interaction.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jae Bok; Yi, Young Byung; Bahk, Jeong Dong

    2011-11-04

    GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) plays an essential role in regulating the state of bound nucleotides and subcellular localizations of Rab proteins. In our previous study, we showed that OsGDI3 facilitates the recycling of OsRab11 with a help of OsGAP1. In this study, we show that OsGDI3 complement the yeast sec19-1 mutant, a temperature-sensitive allele of the yeast GDI gene, suggesting that OsGDI3 is a functional ortholog of yeast GDI. To obtain further knowledge on the function of OsGDI3, candidate OsGDI3-interacting proteins were identified by yeast two-hybrid screens. OsMAPK2 is one of OsGDI3 interacting proteins from yeast two-hybrid screens and subject to further analysis. A kinase assay showed that the autophosphorylation activity of OsMAPK2 is inhibited by OsGDI3 in vitro. In addition, ectopic expressions of OsGDI3-in Arabidopsis cause reductions at the level of phosphorylated AtMPK in phosphorylation activity. Taken together, OsGDI3 functions as a negative regulator of OsMAPK2 through modulating its kinase activity.

  19. AtGDI2, a novel Arabidopsis gene encoding a Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ueda, T; Yoshizumi, T; Anai, T; Matsui, M; Uchimiya, H; Nakano, A

    1998-01-05

    The GTPase cycle of Rab/Ypt proteins is strictly controlled by several classes of regulators to ensure their proper roles in membrane traffic. GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) is known to play essential roles in regulating nucleotide states and subcellular localizations of Rab/Ypt proteins. To obtain further knowledge on this regulator molecule in plants, we isolated and characterized two genes of Arabidopsis thaliana that encode different GDIs. AtGDI1 has been identified by a novel functional cloning in yeast [Ueda et al. (1996) Plant Cell, 8, 2079-2091] and AtGDI2 was isolated by cross-hybridization in this study. AtGDI2, as well as AtGDI1, complements the yeast sec19/gdi1 mutant, indicating that they can replace the function of yeast GDI. Evidence is shown that both AtGDI1 and AtGDI2 can interact with Ara4, an Arabidopsis Rab protein, in the yeast ypt1 mutant cells. AtGDI2 is ubiquitously expressed in Arabidopsis tissues with some difference from AtGDI1 in expression level. Genomic DNA hybridization using specific probes reveals the presence of one more GDI gene in Arabidopsis. This may imply differentiated roles of GDI in higher plants.

  20. 7-methylguanosine diphosphate (m(7)GDP) is not hydrolyzed but strongly bound by decapping scavenger (DcpS) enzymes and potently inhibits their activity.

    PubMed

    Wypijewska, Anna; Bojarska, Elzbieta; Lukaszewicz, Maciej; Stepinski, Janusz; Jemielity, Jacek; Davis, Richard E; Darzynkiewicz, Edward

    2012-10-09

    Decapping scavenger (DcpS) enzymes catalyze the cleavage of a residual cap structure following 3' → 5' mRNA decay. Some previous studies suggested that both m(7)GpppG and m(7)GDP were substrates for DcpS hydrolysis. Herein, we show that mononucleoside diphosphates, m(7)GDP (7-methylguanosine diphosphate) and m(3)(2,2,7)GDP (2,2,7-trimethylguanosine diphosphate), resulting from mRNA decapping by the Dcp1/2 complex in the 5' → 3' mRNA decay, are not degraded by recombinant DcpS proteins (human, nematode, and yeast). Furthermore, whereas mononucleoside diphosphates (m(7)GDP and m(3)(2,2,7)GDP) are not hydrolyzed by DcpS, mononucleoside triphosphates (m(7)GTP and m(3)(2,2,7)GTP) are, demonstrating the importance of a triphosphate chain for DcpS hydrolytic activity. m(7)GTP and m(3)(2,2,7)GTP are cleaved at a slower rate than their corresponding dinucleotides (m(7)GpppG and m(3)(2,2,7)GpppG, respectively), indicating an involvement of the second nucleoside for efficient DcpS-mediated digestion. Although DcpS enzymes cannot hydrolyze m(7)GDP, they have a high binding affinity for m(7)GDP and m(7)GDP potently inhibits DcpS hydrolysis of m(7)GpppG, suggesting that m(7)GDP may function as an efficient DcpS inhibitor. Our data have important implications for the regulatory role of m(7)GDP in mRNA metabolic pathways due to its possible interactions with different cap-binding proteins, such as DcpS or eIF4E.

  1. NDK Interacts with FtsZ and Converts GDP to GTP to Trigger FtsZ Polymerisation - A Novel Role for NDK

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Saurabh; Jakkala, Kishor; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Arumugam, Muthu; Ranjeri, Raghavendra; Gupta, Prabuddha; Rajeswari, Haryadi; Ajitkumar, Parthasarathi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDK), conserved across bacteria to humans, synthesises NTP from NDP and ATP. The eukaryotic homologue, the NDPK, uses ATP to phosphorylate the tubulin-bound GDP to GTP for tubulin polymerisation. The bacterial cytokinetic protein FtsZ, which is the tubulin homologue, also uses GTP for polymerisation. Therefore, we examined whether NDK can interact with FtsZ to convert FtsZ-bound GDP and/or free GDP to GTP to trigger FtsZ polymerisation. Methods Recombinant and native NDK and FtsZ proteins of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis were used as the experimental samples. FtsZ polymersation was monitored using 90° light scattering and FtsZ polymer pelleting assays. The γ32P-GTP synthesised by NDK from GDP and γ32P-ATP was detected using thin layer chromatography and quantitated using phosphorimager. The FtsZ bound 32P-GTP was quantitated using phosphorimager, after UV-crosslinking, followed by SDS-PAGE. The NDK-FtsZ interaction was determined using Ni2+-NTA-pulldown assay and co-immunoprecipitation of the recombinant and native proteins in vitro and ex vivo, respectively. Results NDK triggered instantaneous polymerisation of GDP-precharged recombinant FtsZ in the presence of ATP, similar to the polymerisation of recombinant FtsZ (not GDP-precharged) upon the direct addition of GTP. Similarly, NDK triggered polymerisation of recombinant FtsZ (not GDP-precharged) in the presence of free GDP and ATP as well. Mutant NDK, partially deficient in GTP synthesis from ATP and GDP, triggered low level of polymerisation of MsFtsZ, but not of MtFtsZ. As characteristic of NDK’s NTP substrate non-specificity, it used CTP, TTP, and UTP also to convert GDP to GTP, to trigger FtsZ polymerisation. The NDK of one mycobacterial species could trigger the polymerisation of the FtsZ of another mycobacterial species. Both the recombinant and the native NDK and FtsZ showed interaction with each other in vitro and ex vivo, alluding

  2. NDK Interacts with FtsZ and Converts GDP to GTP to Trigger FtsZ Polymerisation--A Novel Role for NDK.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Saurabh; Jakkala, Kishor; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Arumugam, Muthu; Ranjeri, Raghavendra; Gupta, Prabuddha; Rajeswari, Haryadi; Ajitkumar, Parthasarathi

    2015-01-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDK), conserved across bacteria to humans, synthesises NTP from NDP and ATP. The eukaryotic homologue, the NDPK, uses ATP to phosphorylate the tubulin-bound GDP to GTP for tubulin polymerisation. The bacterial cytokinetic protein FtsZ, which is the tubulin homologue, also uses GTP for polymerisation. Therefore, we examined whether NDK can interact with FtsZ to convert FtsZ-bound GDP and/or free GDP to GTP to trigger FtsZ polymerisation. Recombinant and native NDK and FtsZ proteins of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis were used as the experimental samples. FtsZ polymersation was monitored using 90° light scattering and FtsZ polymer pelleting assays. The γ32P-GTP synthesised by NDK from GDP and γ32P-ATP was detected using thin layer chromatography and quantitated using phosphorimager. The FtsZ bound 32P-GTP was quantitated using phosphorimager, after UV-crosslinking, followed by SDS-PAGE. The NDK-FtsZ interaction was determined using Ni2+-NTA-pulldown assay and co-immunoprecipitation of the recombinant and native proteins in vitro and ex vivo, respectively. NDK triggered instantaneous polymerisation of GDP-precharged recombinant FtsZ in the presence of ATP, similar to the polymerisation of recombinant FtsZ (not GDP-precharged) upon the direct addition of GTP. Similarly, NDK triggered polymerisation of recombinant FtsZ (not GDP-precharged) in the presence of free GDP and ATP as well. Mutant NDK, partially deficient in GTP synthesis from ATP and GDP, triggered low level of polymerisation of MsFtsZ, but not of MtFtsZ. As characteristic of NDK's NTP substrate non-specificity, it used CTP, TTP, and UTP also to convert GDP to GTP, to trigger FtsZ polymerisation. The NDK of one mycobacterial species could trigger the polymerisation of the FtsZ of another mycobacterial species. Both the recombinant and the native NDK and FtsZ showed interaction with each other in vitro and ex vivo, alluding to the possibility of direct

  3. Causal relationship between CO₂ emissions, real GDP, energy consumption, financial development, trade openness, and urbanization in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Farhani, Sahbi; Ozturk, Ilhan

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the causal relationship between CO2 emissions, real GDP, energy consumption, financial development, trade openness, and urbanization in Tunisia over the period of 1971-2012. The long-run relationship is investigated by the auto-regressive distributed lag (ARDL) bounds testing approach to cointegration and error correction method (ECM). The results of the analysis reveal a positive sign for the coefficient of financial development, suggesting that the financial development in Tunisia has taken place at the expense of environmental pollution. The Tunisian case also shows a positive monotonic relationship between real GDP and CO2 emissions. This means that the results do not support the validity of environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) hypothesis. In addition, the paper explores causal relationship between the variables by using Granger causality models and it concludes that financial development plays a vital role in the Tunisian economy.

  4. A rho GDP dissociation inhibitor produced by apoptotic T-cells inhibits growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Venkatasubramanian, Sambasivan; Dhiman, Rohan; Paidipally, Padmaja; Cheekatla, Satyanarayana S; Tripathi, Deepak; Welch, Elwyn; Tvinnereim, Amy R; Jones, Brenda; Theodorescu, Dan; Barnes, Peter F; Vankayalapati, Ramakrishna

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we found that a subpopulation of CD4(+)CD25(+) (85% Foxp3(+)) cells from persons with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) inhibits growth of M. tuberculosis (M. tb) in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). A soluble factor, Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor (D4GDI), produced by apoptotic CD4(+)CD25(+) (85% Foxp3(+)) cells is responsible for this inhibition of M. tb growth in human macrophages and in mice. M. tb-expanded CD4(+C)D25(+)Foxp3(+)D4GDI(+) cells do not produce IL-10, TGF-β and IFN-γ. D4GDI inhibited growth of M. tb in MDMs by enhancing production of IL-1β, TNF-α and ROS, and by increasing apoptosis of M. tb-infected MDMs. D4GDI was concentrated at the site of disease in tuberculosis patients, with higher levels detected in pleural fluid than in serum. However, in response to M. tb, PBMC from tuberculosis patients produced less D4GDI than PBMC from persons with LTBI. M. tb-expanded CD4+CD25+ (85% Foxp3(+)) cells and D4GDI induced intracellular M. tb to express the dormancy survival regulator DosR and DosR-dependent genes, suggesting that D4GDI induces a non-replicating state in the pathogen. Our study provides the first evidence that a subpopulation of CD4(+)CD25(+) (85% Foxp3+) cells enhances immunity to M. tb, and that production of D4GDI by this subpopulation inhibits M. tb growth.

  5. A Rho GDP Dissociation Inhibitor Produced by Apoptotic T-Cells Inhibits Growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Venkatasubramanian, Sambasivan; Dhiman, Rohan; Paidipally, Padmaja; Cheekatla, Satyanarayana S.; Tripathi, Deepak; Welch, Elwyn; Tvinnereim, Amy R.; Jones, Brenda; Theodorescu, Dan; Barnes, Peter F.; Vankayalapati, Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we found that a subpopulation of CD4+CD25+ (85% Foxp3+) cells from persons with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) inhibits growth of M. tuberculosis (M. tb) in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). A soluble factor, Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor (D4GDI), produced by apoptotic CD4+CD25+ (85% Foxp3+) cells is responsible for this inhibition of M. tb growth in human macrophages and in mice. M. tb-expanded CD4+CD25+Foxp3+D4GDI+ cells do not produce IL-10, TGF-β and IFN-γ. D4GDI inhibited growth of M. tb in MDMs by enhancing production of IL-1β, TNF-α and ROS, and by increasing apoptosis of M. tb-infected MDMs. D4GDI was concentrated at the site of disease in tuberculosis patients, with higher levels detected in pleural fluid than in serum. However, in response to M. tb, PBMC from tuberculosis patients produced less D4GDI than PBMC from persons with LTBI. M. tb-expanded CD4+CD25+ (85% Foxp3+) cells and D4GDI induced intracellular M. tb to express the dormancy survival regulator DosR and DosR-dependent genes, suggesting that D4GDI induces a non-replicating state in the pathogen. Our study provides the first evidence that a subpopulation of CD4+CD25+ (85% Foxp3+) cells enhances immunity to M. tb, and that production of D4GDI by this subpopulation inhibits M. tb growth. PMID:25659138

  6. VvGONST-A and VvGONST-B are Golgi-localised GDP-sugar transporters in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.).

    PubMed

    Utz, Daniella; Handford, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Plant nucleotide-sugar transporters (NSTs) are responsible for the import of nucleotide-sugar substrates into the Golgi lumen, for subsequent use in glycosylation reactions. NSTs are specific for either GDP- or UDP-sugars, and almost all transporters studied to date have been isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana L. In order to determine the conservation of the import mechanism in other higher plant species, here we report the identification and characterisation of VvGONST-A and VvGONST-B from grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Thompson Seedless), which are the orthologues of the GDP-sugar transporters GONST3 and GONST4 in Arabidopsis. Both grapevine NSTs possess the molecular features characteristic of GDP-sugar transporters, including a GDP-binding domain (GXL/VNK) towards the C-terminal. VvGONST-A and VvGONST-B expression is highest at berry setting and decreases throughout berry development and ripening. Moreover, we show using green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged versions and brefeldin A treatments, that both are localised in the Golgi apparatus. Additionally, in vitro transport assays after expression of both NSTs in tobacco leaves indicate that VvGONST-A and VvGONST-B are capable of transporting GDP-mannose and GDP-glucose, respectively, but not a range of other UDP- and GDP-sugars. The possible functions of these NSTs in glucomannan synthesis and/or glycosylation of sphingolipids are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Staphylococcus aureus protein-coding gene gdpS modulates sarS expression via mRNA-mRNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuan; Zhang, Xu; Shang, Fei; Sun, Haipeng; Sun, Baolin; Xue, Ting

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important Gram-positive pathogen responsible for numerous diseases ranging from localized skin infections to life-threatening systemic infections. The virulence of S. aureus is essentially determined by a wide spectrum of factors, including cell wall-associated proteins and secreted toxins that are precisely controlled in response to environmental changes. GGDEF domain protein from Staphylococcus (GdpS) is the only conserved staphylococcal GGDEF domain protein that is involved not in c-di-GMP synthesis but in the virulence regulation of S. aureus NCTC8325. Our previous study showed that the inactivation of gdpS generates an extensive change of virulence factors together with, in particular, a major Spa (protein A) surface protein. As reported, sarS is a direct positive regulator of spa. The decreased transcript levels of sarS in the gdpS mutant compared with the parental NCTC8325 strain suggest that gdpS affects spa through interaction with sarS. In this study, site mutation and complementary experiments showed that the translation product of gdpS was not involved in the regulation of transcript levels of sarS. We found that gdpS functioned through direct RNA-RNA base pairing with the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of sarS mRNA and that a putative 18-nucleotide region played a significant role in the regulatory process. Furthermore, the mRNA half-life analysis of sarS in the gdpS mutant showed that gdpS positively regulates the mRNA levels of sarS by contributing to the stabilization of sarS mRNA, suggesting that gdpS mRNA may regulate spa expression in an RNA-dependent pathway. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Identification and characterization of Arabidopsis AtNUDX9 as a GDP-d-mannose pyrophosphohydrolase: its involvement in root growth inhibition in response to ammonium.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Maruta, Takanori; Ogawa, Takahisa; Tanabe, Noriaki; Tamoi, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2015-09-01

    GDP-d-mannose (GDP-d-Man) is an important intermediate in ascorbic acid (AsA) synthesis, cell wall synthesis, protein N-glycosylation, and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchoring in plants. Thus, the modulation of intracellular levels of GDP-d-Man could be important for maintaining various cellular processes. Here an Arabidopsis GDP-d-Man pyrophosphohydrolase, AtNUDX9 (AtNUDT9; At3g46200), which hydrolysed GDP-d-Man to GMP and mannose 1-phosphate, was identified. The K m and V max values for GDP-d-Man of AtNUDX9 were 376±24 μM and 1.61±0.15 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein, respectively. Among various tissues, the expression levels of AtNUDX9 and the total activity of GDP-d-Man pyrophosphohydrolase were the highest in the roots. The GDP-d-Man pyrophosphohydrolase activity was increased in the root of plants grown in the presence of ammonium. No difference was observed in the levels of AsA in the leaf and root tissues of the wild-type and knockout-nudx9 (KO-nudx9) plants, whereas a marked increase in N-glycoprotein levels and enhanced growth were detected in the roots of KO-nudx9 plants in the presence of ammonium. These results suggest that AtNUDX9 is involved in the regulation of GDP-d-Man levels affecting ammonium sensitivity via modulation of protein N-glycosylation in the roots.

  9. Identification and characterization of Arabidopsis AtNUDX9 as a GDP-d-mannose pyrophosphohydrolase: its involvement in root growth inhibition in response to ammonium

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Maruta, Takanori; Ogawa, Takahisa; Tanabe, Noriaki; Tamoi, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    GDP-d-mannose (GDP-d-Man) is an important intermediate in ascorbic acid (AsA) synthesis, cell wall synthesis, protein N-glycosylation, and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchoring in plants. Thus, the modulation of intracellular levels of GDP-d-Man could be important for maintaining various cellular processes. Here an Arabidopsis GDP-d-Man pyrophosphohydrolase, AtNUDX9 (AtNUDT9; At3g46200), which hydrolysed GDP-d-Man to GMP and mannose 1-phosphate, was identified. The K m and V max values for GDP-d-Man of AtNUDX9 were 376±24 μM and 1.61±0.15 μmol min–1 mg–1 protein, respectively. Among various tissues, the expression levels of AtNUDX9 and the total activity of GDP-d-Man pyrophosphohydrolase were the highest in the roots. The GDP-d-Man pyrophosphohydrolase activity was increased in the root of plants grown in the presence of ammonium. No difference was observed in the levels of AsA in the leaf and root tissues of the wild-type and knockout-nudx9 (KO-nudx9) plants, whereas a marked increase in N-glycoprotein levels and enhanced growth were detected in the roots of KO-nudx9 plants in the presence of ammonium. These results suggest that AtNUDX9 is involved in the regulation of GDP-d-Man levels affecting ammonium sensitivity via modulation of protein N-glycosylation in the roots. PMID:26049160

  10. The dynamic links between carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, health spending and GDP growth: A case study for 51 countries.

    PubMed

    Chaabouni, Sami; Saidi, Kais

    2017-10-01

    This document investigated the causal relationship between carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, health spending and GDP growth for 51 countries (divided into three groups of countries: low-income countries; group of countries with lower and upper middle income; group of middle income countries) covering the annual period 1995-2013. Dynamic simultaneous-equations models and generalized method of moments (GMM) are used to investigate this relationship. The main results provide evidence of a causal relationship between the three variables. The empirical results show that there is a bidirectional causality between CO2 emissions and GDP per capita, between health spending and economic growth for the three groups of estimates. The results also indicate that there is a unidirectional causality from CO2 emissions to health spending, except low income group countries. We found that health plays an important role in GDP per capita; it limits its effect on a growing deterioration in the quality of the environment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Shock compression of glow discharge polymer (GDP): density functional theory (DFT) simulations and experiments on Sandia's Z-machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Thomas R.; Cochrane, K. R.; Ao, T.; Lemke, R. W.; Flicker, D. G.; Schoff, M. E.; Blue, B. E.; Hamel, S.; Herrmann, M. C.

    2015-11-01

    Glow discharge polymer (GDP) is used extensively as capsule/ablation material in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules. Accurate knowledge of the equation of state (EOS) under shock and release is particularly important for high-fidelity design, analysis, and optimization of ICF experiments since the capsule material is subject to several converging shocks as well as release towards the cryogenic fuel. We performed Density Functional Theory (DFT) based quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations, to gain knowledge of the behavior of GDP - including the effect of changes in chemical composition. The shock pressures calculated from DFT are compared experimental data taken on magnetically launched flyer plate impact experiments on at Sandia's Z-machine. Large GDP samples were grown in a planar geometry to improve the sample quality and maintained in a nitrogen atmosphere following manufacturing, thus allowing for a direct comparison to the DFT/QMD simulations. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. The biocompatibility of neutral pH, low-GDP peritoneal dialysis solutions: benefit at bench, bedside, or both?

    PubMed

    Perl, Jeffrey; Nessim, Sharon J; Bargman, Joanne M

    2011-04-01

    For patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD), the development of peritonitis, the decline of residual kidney function, and the loss of peritoneal membrane function are central events that affect both patient and technique survival. The use of glucose as the osmotic agent in conventional PD solutions may increase the susceptibility to each of these events. However, its use may also be associated with systemic metabolic perturbations and, in turn, an increase in cardiovascular morbidity. Both in vitro and in vivo evidence suggest that both the local peritoneal and systemic toxicity induced by the use of glucose may be in part mediated by the presence of glucose degradation products (GDPs) coupled with the hyperosmolarity, reduced pH, and use of lactate as the buffer in conventional PD solutions. Therefore, the use of neutral pH, low-GDP (NpHL(GDP)), bicarbonate-buffered PD solutions may represent a promising strategy to attenuate some of these adverse effects. However, the impact of these novel solutions on clinical outcomes remains largely unknown. In this review, we will highlight evidence regarding the biocompatibility of NpHL(GDP) PD solutions, review the utility of current biomarkers in the evaluation of biocompatibility, and discuss the clinical outcome data with these solutions.

  13. Shock compression of glow discharge polymer (GDP): density functional theory (DFT) simulations and experiments on Sandia's Z-machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, K. R.; Ao, T.; Hamel, S.; Lemke, R. W.; Schoff, M. E.; Blue, B. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Mattsson, T. R.

    2015-06-01

    Glow discharge polymer (GDP) is used extensively in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules. Accurate knowledge of the equation of state (EOS) under shock and release is particularly important for high-fidelity design and analysis of ICF experiments since the capsule material is subject to several converging shocks as well as release towards the cryogenic fuel. We performed Density Functional Theory (DFT) based molecular dynamics simulations, to gain knowledge of the behavior of GDP - for example regarding the role of chemical dissociation during shock compression, we find that the dissociation regime along the Hugoniot extends from 50 GPa to 250 GPa. The shock pressures calculated from DFT are compared to experimental data taken on magnetically launched flyer plate impact experiments at Sandia's Z-machine. Large GDP samples were grown in a planar geometry to improve the sample quality and maintained in a nitrogen atmosphere following manufacturing, thus allowing for a direct comparison to the simulations. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000

  14. Multivariate time series analysis on the dynamic relationship between Class B notifiable diseases and gross domestic product (GDP) in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Yin, Fei; Zhou, Ting; Zhang, Xing-Yu; Li, Xiao-Song

    2016-12-23

    The surveillance of infectious diseases is of great importance for disease control and prevention, and more attention should be paid to the Class B notifiable diseases in China. Meanwhile, according to the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the annual growth of Chinese gross domestic product (GDP) would decelerate below 7% after many years of soaring. Under such circumstances, this study aimed to answer what will happen to the incidence rates of infectious diseases in China if Chinese GDP growth remained below 7% in the next five years. Firstly, time plots and cross-correlation matrices were presented to illustrate the characteristics of data. Then, the multivariate time series (MTS) models were proposed to explore the dynamic relationship between incidence rates and GDP. Three kinds of MTS models, i.e., vector auto-regressive (VAR) model for original series, VAR model for differenced series and error-correction model (ECM), were considered in this study. The rank of error-correction term was taken as an indicator for model selection. Finally, our results suggested that four kinds of infectious diseases (epidemic hemorrhagic fever, pertussis, scarlet fever and syphilis) might need attention in China because their incidence rates have increased since the year 2010.

  15. Multivariate time series analysis on the dynamic relationship between Class B notifiable diseases and gross domestic product (GDP) in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Yin, Fei; Zhou, Ting; Zhang, Xing-Yu; Li, Xiao-Song

    2016-12-01

    The surveillance of infectious diseases is of great importance for disease control and prevention, and more attention should be paid to the Class B notifiable diseases in China. Meanwhile, according to the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the annual growth of Chinese gross domestic product (GDP) would decelerate below 7% after many years of soaring. Under such circumstances, this study aimed to answer what will happen to the incidence rates of infectious diseases in China if Chinese GDP growth remained below 7% in the next five years. Firstly, time plots and cross-correlation matrices were presented to illustrate the characteristics of data. Then, the multivariate time series (MTS) models were proposed to explore the dynamic relationship between incidence rates and GDP. Three kinds of MTS models, i.e., vector auto-regressive (VAR) model for original series, VAR model for differenced series and error-correction model (ECM), were considered in this study. The rank of error-correction term was taken as an indicator for model selection. Finally, our results suggested that four kinds of infectious diseases (epidemic hemorrhagic fever, pertussis, scarlet fever and syphilis) might need attention in China because their incidence rates have increased since the year 2010.

  16. Structure of the protein core of translation initiation factor 2 in apo, GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms

    SciTech Connect

    Simonetti, Angelita; Fabbretti, Attilio; Hazemann, Isabelle; Jenner, Lasse; Gualerzi, Claudio O.; Klaholz, Bruno P.

    2013-06-01

    The crystal structures of the eubacterial translation initiation factor 2 in apo form and with bound GDP and GTP reveal conformational changes upon nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, notably of the catalytically important histidine in the switch II region. Translation initiation factor 2 (IF2) is involved in the early steps of bacterial protein synthesis. It promotes the stabilization of the initiator tRNA on the 30S initiation complex (IC) and triggers GTP hydrolysis upon ribosomal subunit joining. While the structure of an archaeal homologue (a/eIF5B) is known, there are significant sequence and functional differences in eubacterial IF2, while the trimeric eukaryotic IF2 is completely unrelated. Here, the crystal structure of the apo IF2 protein core from Thermus thermophilus has been determined by MAD phasing and the structures of GTP and GDP complexes were also obtained. The IF2–GTP complex was trapped by soaking with GTP in the cryoprotectant. The structures revealed conformational changes of the protein upon nucleotide binding, in particular in the P-loop region, which extend to the functionally relevant switch II region. The latter carries a catalytically important and conserved histidine residue which is observed in different conformations in the GTP and GDP complexes. Overall, this work provides the first crystal structure of a eubacterial IF2 and suggests that activation of GTP hydrolysis may occur by a conformational repositioning of the histidine residue.

  17. Facile Modulation of Antibody Fucosylation with Small Molecule Fucostatin Inhibitors and Cocrystal Structure with GDP-Mannose 4,6-Dehydratase.

    PubMed

    Allen, John G; Mujacic, Mirna; Frohn, Michael J; Pickrell, Alex J; Kodama, Paul; Bagal, Dhanashri; San Miguel, Tisha; Sickmier, E Allen; Osgood, Steve; Swietlow, Aleksander; Li, Vivian; Jordan, John B; Kim, Ki-Won; Rousseau, Anne-Marie C; Kim, Yong-Jae; Caille, Seb; Achmatowicz, Mike; Thiel, Oliver; Fotsch, Christopher H; Reddy, Pranhitha; McCarter, John D

    2016-10-21

    The efficacy of therapeutic antibodies that induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity can be improved by reduced fucosylation. Consequently, fucosylation is a critical product attribute of monoclonal antibodies produced as protein therapeutics. Small molecule fucosylation inhibitors have also shown promise as potential therapeutics in animal models of tumors, arthritis, and sickle cell disease. Potent small molecule metabolic inhibitors of cellular protein fucosylation, 6,6,6-trifluorofucose per-O-acetate and 6,6,6-trifluorofucose (fucostatin I), were identified that reduces the fucosylation of recombinantly expressed antibodies in cell culture in a concentration-dependent fashion enabling the controlled modulation of protein fucosylation levels. 6,6,6-Trifluorofucose binds at an allosteric site of GDP-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) as revealed for the first time by the X-ray cocrystal structure of a bound allosteric GMD inhibitor. 6,6,6-Trifluorofucose was found to be incorporated in place of fucose at low levels (<1%) in the glycans of recombinantly expressed antibodies. A fucose-1-phosphonate analog, fucostatin II, was designed that inhibits fucosylation with no incorporation into antibody glycans, allowing the production of afucosylated antibodies in which the incorporation of non-native sugar is completely absent-a key advantage in the production of therapeutic antibodies, especially biosimilar antibodies. Inhibitor structure-activity relationships, identification of cellular and inhibitor metabolites in inhibitor-treated cells, fucose competition studies, and the production of recombinant antibodies with varying levels of fucosylation are described.

  18. Study on effectiveness of gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin (GDP) for relapsed or refractory AIDS-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Dong Ta; Shi, Chun Mei; Chen, Qiang; Huang, Jing Ze; Liang, Jian Gang

    2012-11-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) remains the second most common malignant complication in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Even though NHL is commonly chemosensitive to primary treatment, failure or relapse still occurs in a large number of patients. We conducted this retrospective study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin (GDP) for relapsed or refractory AIDS-related NHL (AIDS-NHL). Forty-eight patients with relapsed or refractory AIDS-NHL were treated with intravenous combination chemotherapy with GDP. The overall objective response rate was 54.1% (95% confidence interval, CI, 40.1-68.3%), with 10 complete responses and 16 partial responses. The 2-year overall survival rate (OS) was 70.8% (95% CI 58.0-83.7%), and the 5-year OS was 41.7% (95% CI 27.7-55.6%). The 2-year progression-free survival rate (PFS) was 37.5% (95% CI 23.8-51.2%), and the 5-year PFS was 25.0% (95% CI 12.8-37.3%). The median progression-free survival was 8.8 months (95% CI 0-20.3 months), and the median overall survival was 40.6 months (95% CI 22.6-58.6 months). Patients with B cell tumors who relapsed but had no B symptoms were clinical stage I/II, had infiltration fewer than two extranodal sites, had CD4⁺ counts >200 cells/μL, and had lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) less than the upper limit of normal benefited from GDP. The level of LDH had a significant impact on the response rate to chemotherapy with GDP (P = 0.015). Myelosuppression was the main side effect; the incidence of grade 3-4 anemia was 8.3%; leukopenia, 37.5%; and thrombocytopenia, 48.3%. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine variables for OS and PFS. This study confirms that GDP is an effective and safe salvage regimen in relapsed or refractory AIDS-NHL, was associated with modest declines in CD4⁺ lymphocyte counts, and did not promote HIV-1 viral replication.

  19. Prognostic value of Rho GDP dissociation inhibitors in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma following liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ming-Chun; Zhu, Qian-Qian; Owusu-Ansah, Kwabena-Gyabaah; Zhu, Yang-Bo; Yang, Zhe; Xie, Hai-Yang; Zhou, Lin; Wu, Li-Ming; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2017-01-01

    Rho GDP dissociation inhibitors (GDIs) are pivotal regulators of Rho GTPases, which are essential for tumor progression, yet their role in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains poorly understood. The purpose of the present study was to assess the role of RhoGDIs in the invasiveness and migration of liver cancer, and to determine their clinical prognostic significances in HCC following liver transplantation (LT). In the present study, the expression of RhoGDIs was assessed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and confirmed by western-blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Their prognostic values were also analyzed, and determined in patients treated with LT. In addition, the functions of RhoGDIs in liver cancer cell line were studied in vitro. As a result, the downregulation of RhoGDI1 and RhoGDI2 at mRNA and protein levels were detected in HCC when compared with that of adjacent noncancerous tissues (P<0.05). However, the level of RhoGDI3 was identified to be similar in tumor and para-carcinoma tissues. Additionally, Kaplan-Meier curves demonstrated that patients with lower expression of RhoGDI1 or RhoGDI2 exhibited significantly increased risk of tumor recurrence following LT (P=0.007 and P=0.006, respectively). Cox proportional hazards model analysis revealed that the decreased expression level of RhoGDI2 was an unfavorable independent prognostic factor (hazard ratio, 3.306; P=0.001). In vitro studies involving the silencing of RhoGDI1 or RhoGDI2 demonstrated a significant increase in the migratory and invasive ability of tumor cells upon the silencing of these genes. Results from the present study indicate that RhoGDI dysregulation is a frequent event in human HCC, and that it promotes cancer progression by stimulating cell migration and invasion. RhoGDI2 may be a prognostic biomarker for patients with HCC following LT, and act as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:28789355

  20. What makes Ras an efficient molecular switch: a computational, biophysical, and structural study of Ras-GDP interactions with mutants of Raf.

    PubMed

    Filchtinski, Daniel; Sharabi, Oz; Rüppel, Alma; Vetter, Ingrid R; Herrmann, Christian; Shifman, Julia M

    2010-06-11

    Ras is a small GTP-binding protein that is an essential molecular switch for a wide variety of signaling pathways including the control of cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis. In the GTP-bound state, Ras can interact with its effectors, triggering various signaling cascades in the cell. In the GDP-bound state, Ras looses its ability to bind to known effectors. The interaction of the GTP-bound Ras (Ras(GTP)) with its effectors has been studied intensively. However, very little is known about the much weaker interaction between the GDP-bound Ras (Ras(GDP)) and Ras effectors. We investigated the factors underlying the nucleotide-dependent differences in Ras interactions with one of its effectors, Raf kinase. Using computational protein design, we generated mutants of the Ras-binding domain of Raf kinase (Raf) that stabilize the complex with Ras(GDP). Most of our designed mutations narrow the gap between the affinity of Raf for Ras(GTP) and Ras(GDP), producing the desired shift in binding specificity towards Ras(GDP). A combination of our best designed mutation, N71R, with another mutation, A85K, yielded a Raf mutant with a 100-fold improvement in affinity towards Ras(GDP). The Raf A85K and Raf N71R/A85K mutants were used to obtain the first high-resolution structures of Ras(GDP) bound to its effector. Surprisingly, these structures reveal that the loop on Ras previously termed the switch I region in the Ras(GDP).Raf mutant complex is found in a conformation similar to that of Ras(GTP) and not Ras(GDP). Moreover, the structures indicate an increased mobility of the switch I region. This greater flexibility compared to the same loop in Ras(GTP) is likely to explain the natural low affinity of Raf and other Ras effectors to Ras(GDP). Our findings demonstrate that an accurate balance between a rigid, high-affinity conformation and conformational flexibility is required to create an efficient and stringent molecular switch. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd

  1. Two pathways for importing GDP-fucose into the endoplasmic reticulum lumen function redundantly in the O-fucosylation of Notch in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Hiroyuki O; Ayukawa, Tomonori; Nakayama, Minoru; Higashi, Shunsuke; Kamiyama, Shin; Nishihara, Shoko; Aoki, Kazuhisa; Ishida, Nobuhiro; Sanai, Yutaka; Matsuno, Kenji

    2010-02-05

    Notch is a transmembrane receptor that shares homology with proteins containing epidermal growth factor-like repeats and mediates the cell-cell interactions necessary for many cell fate decisions. In Drosophila, O-fucosyltransferase 1 catalyzes the O-fucosylation of these epidermal growth factor-like repeats. This O-fucose elongates, resulting in an O-linked tetrasaccharide that regulates the signaling activities of Notch. Fucosyltransferases utilize GDP-fucose, which is synthesized in the cytosol, but fucosylation occurs in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi. Therefore, GDP-fucose uptake into the ER and Golgi is essential for fucosylation. However, although GDP-fucose biosynthesis is well understood, the mechanisms and intracellular routes of GDP-fucose transportation remain unclear. Our previous study on the Drosophila Golgi GDP-fucose transporter (Gfr), which specifically localizes to the Golgi, suggested that another GDP-fucose transporter(s) exists in Drosophila. Here, we identified Efr (ER GDP-fucose transporter), a GDP-fucose transporter that localizes specifically to the ER. Efr is a multifunctional nucleotide sugar transporter involved in the biosynthesis of heparan sulfate-glycosaminoglycan chains and the O-fucosylation of Notch. Comparison of the fucosylation defects in the N-glycans in Gfr and Efr mutants revealed that Gfr and Efr made distinct contributions to this modification; Gfr but not Efr was crucial for the fucosylation of N-glycans. We also found that Gfr and Efr function redundantly in the O-fucosylation of Notch, although they had different localizations and nucleotide sugar transportation specificities. These results indicate that two pathways for the nucleotide sugar supply, involving two nucleotide sugar transporters with distinct characteristics and distributions, contribute to the O-fucosylation of Notch.

  2. Dissociation of GDP dissociation inhibitor and membrane translocation are required for efficient activation of Rac by the Dbl homology-pleckstrin homology region of Tiam.

    PubMed

    Robbe, Karine; Otto-Bruc, Annie; Chardin, Pierre; Antonny, Bruno

    2003-02-14

    Small G proteins of the Rho/Rac/Cdc42 family are associated with lipid membranes through their prenylated C termini. Alternatively, these proteins form soluble complexes with GDI proteins. To assess how this membrane partitioning influences the activation of Rac by guanine nucleotide exchange factors, GDP-to-GTP exchange reactions were performed in the presence of liposomes using different forms of Rac-GDP. We show that both non-prenylated Rac-GDP and the soluble complex between prenylated Rac-GDP and GDI are poorly activated by the Dbl homology-pleckstrin homology (DH-PH) domain of the exchange factor Tiam1, whereas prenylated Rac-GDP bound to liposomes is activated about 10 times more rapidly. Sedimentation experiments with liposomes reveal that the DH-PH region of Tiam1 forms, with nucleotide-free prenylated Rac, a membrane-bound complex from which GDI is excluded. Taken together, these experiments demonstrate that the dissociation of Rac-GDP from GDI and its translocation to membrane lipids favor DH-PH-catalyzed nucleotide exchange because the steric hindrance caused by GDI is relieved and because the membrane environment favors functional interaction between the DH-PH domain and the small G protein.

  3. A concerted mechanism for opening the GDP binding pocket and release of the nucleotide in hetero-trimeric G-proteins.

    PubMed

    Louet, Maxime; Perahia, David; Martinez, Jean; Floquet, Nicolas

    2011-08-05

    G-protein hetero-trimers play a fundamental role in cell function. Their dynamic behavior at the atomic level remains to be understood. We have studied the Gi hetero-trimer through a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and normal mode analyses. We showed that these big proteins could undergo large-amplitude conformational changes, without any energy penalty and with an intrinsic dynamics centered on their GDP binding pocket. Among the computed collective motions, one of the modes (mode 17) was particularly able to significantly open both the base and the phosphate sides of the GDP binding pocket. This mode describing mainly a motion between the Ras-like and the helical domains of G(α) was in close agreement with some available X-ray data and with many other biochemical/biophysical observations including the kink of helix α5. The use of a new protocol, which allows extraction of the GDP ligand along the computed normal modes, supported that the exit of GDP was largely coupled to an opening motion along mode 17. We propose for the first time a "concerted mechanism" model in which the opening of the GDP pocket and the kink of the α5 helix occur concomitantly and favor GDP release from G(αβγ) complexes. This model is discussed in the context of the G-protein-coupled receptor/G-protein interaction close to the cell membrane. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. X-ray, NMR, and Mutational Studies of the Catalytic Cycle of the GDP-Mannose Mannosyl Hydrolase Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gabelli,S.; Azurmendi, H.; Bianchet, M.; Amzel, L.; Mildva, A.

    2006-01-01

    GDP-mannose hydrolase catalyzes the hydrolysis with inversion of GDP-{alpha}-D-hexose to GDP and {beta}-D-hexose by nucleophilic substitution by water at C1 of the sugar. Two new crystal structures (free enzyme and enzyme-substrate complex), NMR, and site-directed mutagenesis data, combined with the structure of the enzyme-product complex reported earlier, suggest a four-stage catalytic cycle. An important loop (L6, residues 119-125) contains a ligand to the essential Mg{sup 2+} (Gln-123), the catalytic base (His-124), and three anionic residues. This loop is not ordered in the X-ray structure of the free enzyme due to dynamic disorder, as indicated by the two-dimensional 1H-15N HMQC spectrum, which shows selective exchange broadening of the imidazole nitrogen resonances of His-124 (k{sub ex} = 6.6 x 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}). The structure of the enzyme-Mg{sup 2+}-GDP-mannose substrate complex of the less active Y103F mutant shows loop L6 in an open conformation, while the structure of the enzyme-Mg{sup 2+}-GDP product complex showed loop L6 in a closed, 'active' conformation. 1H-15N HMQC spectra show the imidazole N of His-124 to be unprotonated, appropriate for general base catalysis. Substituting Mg{sup 2+} with the more electrophilic metal ions Mn{sup 2+} or Co{sup 2+} decreases the pK{sub a} in the pH versus k{sub cat} rate profiles, showing that deprotonation of a metal-bound water is partially rate-limiting. The H124Q mutation, which decreases k{sub cat} 103.4-fold and largely abolishes its pH dependence, is rescued by the Y103F mutation, which increases k{sub cat} 23-fold and restores its pH dependence. The structural basis of the rescue is the fact that the Y103F mutation shifts the conformational equilibrium to the open form moving loop L6 out of the active site, thus permitting direct access of the specific base hydroxide from the solvent. In the proposed dissociative transition state, which occurs in the closed, active conformation of the enzyme, the

  5. Exploring Patterns of Soil Organic Matter Decomposition with Students and the Public Through the Global Decomposition Project (GDP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, J. H.; Natali, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Global Decomposition Project (GDP) is a program designed to introduce and educate students and the general public about soil organic matter and decomposition through a standardized protocol for collecting, reporting, and sharing data. This easy-to-use hands-on activity focuses on questions such as "How do environmental conditions control decomposition of organic matter in soil?" and "Why do some areas accumulate organic matter and others do not?" Soil organic matter is important to local ecosystems because it affects soil structure, regulates soil moisture and temperature, and provides energy and nutrients to soil organisms. It is also important globally because it stores a large amount of carbon, and when microbes "eat", or decompose organic matter they release greenhouse gasses such as carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere, which affects the earth's climate. The protocol describes a commonly used method to measure decomposition using a paper made of cellulose, a component of plant cell walls. Participants can receive pre-made cellulose decomposition bags, or make decomposition bags using instructions in the protocol and easily obtained materials (e.g., window screen and lignin-free paper). Individual results will be shared with all participants and the broader public through an online database. We will present decomposition bag results from a research site in Alaskan tundra, as well as from a middle-school-student led experiment in California. The GDP demonstrates how scientific methods can be extended to educate broader audiences, while at the same time, data collected by students and the public can provide new insight into global patterns of soil decomposition. The GDP provides a pathway for scientists and educators to interact and reach meaningful education and research goals.

  6. Government Expenditures on Education as the Percentage of GDP in the EU

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galetic, Fran

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the government expenditures as the percentage of gross domestic product across countries of the European Union. There is a statistical model based on Z-score, whose aim is to calculate how much each EU country deviates from the average value. The model shows that government expenditures on education vary significantly between…

  7. Impact of GDP, Spending on R&D, Number of Universities and Scientific Journals on Research Publications among Asian Countries

    PubMed Central

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Al Masri, Abeer A.; Usmani, Adnan Mahmood; Memon, Almas Naeem; Zaidi, Syed Ziauddin

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to compare the impact of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita, spending on Research and Development (R&D), number of universities, and Indexed Scientific Journals on total number of research documents (papers), citations per document and Hirsch index (H-index) in various science and social science subjects among Asian countries. Materials and Methods In this study, 40 Asian countries were included. The information regarding Asian countries, their GDP per capita, spending on R&D, total number of universities and indexed scientific journals were collected. We recorded the bibliometric indicators, including total number of research documents, citations per document and H-index in various science and social sciences subjects during the period 1996–2011. The main sources for information were World Bank, SCI-mago/Scopus and Web of Science; Thomson Reuters. Results The mean per capita GDP for all the Asian countries is 14448.31±2854.40 US$, yearly per capita spending on R&D 0.64±0.16 US$, number of universities 72.37±18.32 and mean number of ISI indexed journal per country is 17.97±7.35. The mean of research documents published in various science and social science subjects among all the Asian countries during the period 1996–2011 is 158086.92±69204.09; citations per document 8.67±0.48; and H-index 122.8±19.21. Spending on R&D, number of universities and indexed journals have a positive correlation with number of published documents, citations per document and H-index in various science and social science subjects. However, there was no association between the per capita GDP and research outcomes. Conclusion The Asian countries who spend more on R&D have a large number of universities and scientific indexed journals produced more in research outcomes including total number of research publication, citations per documents and H-index in various science and social science subjects. PMID:23840471

  8. Mutagenesis in the switch IV of the helical domain of the human Gsalpha reduces its GDP/GTP exchange rate.

    PubMed

    Echeverría, V; Hinrichs, M V; Torrejón, M; Ropero, S; Martinez, J; Toro, M J; Olate, J

    2000-01-01

    The Galpha subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins are constituted by a conserved GTPase "Ras-like" domain (RasD) and by a unique alpha-helical domain (HD). Upon GTP binding, four regions, called switch I, II, III, and IV, have been identified as undergoing structural changes. Switch I, II, and III are located in RasD and switch IV in HD. All Galpha known functions, such as GTPase activity and receptor, effector, and Gbetagamma interaction sites have been found to be localized in RasD, but little is known about the role of HD and its switch IV region. Through the construction of chimeras between human and Xenopus Gsalpha we have previously identified a HD region, encompassing helices alphaA, alphaB, and alphaC, that was responsible for the observed functional differences in their capacity to activate adenylyl cyclase (Antonelli et al. [1994]: FEBS Lett 340:249-254). Since switch IV is located within this region and contains most of the nonconservative amino acid differences between both Gsalpha proteins, in the present work we constructed two human Gsalpha mutant proteins in which we have changed four and five switch IV residues for the ones present in the Xenopus protein. Mutants M15 (hGsalphaalphaS133N, M135P, P138K, P143S) and M17 (hGsalphaalphaS133N, M135P, V137Y, P138K, P143S) were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized by their ability to bind GTPgammaS, dissociate GDP, hydrolyze GTP, and activate adenylyl cyclase. A decreased rate of GDP release, GTPgammaS binding, and GTP hydrolysis was observed for both mutants, M17 having considerably slower kinetics than M15 for all functions tested. Reconstituted adenylyl cyclase activity with both mutants showed normal activation in the presence of AlF(4)(-), but a decreased activation with GTPgammaS, which is consistent with the lower GDP dissociating rate they displayed. These data provide new evidence on the role that HD is playing in modulating the GDP/GTP exchange of the Gsalpha subunit.

  9. Impact of GDP, spending on R&D, number of universities and scientific journals on research publications among Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Al Masri, Abeer A; Usmani, Adnan Mahmood; Memon, Almas Naeem; Zaidi, Syed Ziauddin

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the impact of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita, spending on Research and Development (R&D), number of universities, and Indexed Scientific Journals on total number of research documents (papers), citations per document and Hirsch index (H-index) in various science and social science subjects among Asian countries. In this study, 40 Asian countries were included. The information regarding Asian countries, their GDP per capita, spending on R&D, total number of universities and indexed scientific journals were collected. We recorded the bibliometric indicators, including total number of research documents, citations per document and H-index in various science and social sciences subjects during the period 1996-2011. The main sources for information were World Bank, SCI-mago/Scopus and Web of Science; Thomson Reuters. The mean per capita GDP for all the Asian countries is 14448.31±2854.40 US$, yearly per capita spending on R&D 0.64±0.16 US$, number of universities 72.37±18.32 and mean number of ISI indexed journal per country is 17.97±7.35. The mean of research documents published in various science and social science subjects among all the Asian countries during the period 1996-2011 is 158086.92±69204.09; citations per document 8.67±0.48; and H-index 122.8±19.21. Spending on R&D, number of universities and indexed journals have a positive correlation with number of published documents, citations per document and H-index in various science and social science subjects. However, there was no association between the per capita GDP and research outcomes. The Asian countries who spend more on R&D have a large number of universities and scientific indexed journals produced more in research outcomes including total number of research publication, citations per documents and H-index in various science and social science subjects.

  10. Comparison of gemcitabin, cisplatin, and dexamethasone (GDP), CHOP, and CHOPE in the first-line treatment of peripheral T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Jia, Bo; Hu, Shaoxuan; Yang, Jianliang; Zhou, Shengyu; Liu, Peng; Qin, Yan; Gui, Lin; Yang, Sheng; Lin, Hua; Zhang, Changgong; Xing, Puyuan; Wang, Lin; Dong, Mei; Zhou, Liqiang; Sun, Yan; He, Xiaohui; Shi, Yuankai

    2016-10-01

    Optimal chemotherapy regimen for peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) has not been fully defined. This study aimed to evaluate the optimal chemotherapy regimen in the first-line treatment for PTCL patients. Between 2003 and 2014, 93 consecutive patients with PTCL were enrolled in this study. Of 93 patients, 42 patients received CHOPE, 40 patients with CHOP, and 11 patients with GDP regimen. Response could be evaluated in 88 of 93 patients at the end of primary treatment. The CR rate for patients received CHOP (n = 38), CHOPE (n = 39), and GDP (n = 11) were 28.9, 51.3, and 45.5%, respectively, (P = 0.132) with an ORR of 65.8, 76.9, and 90.9%, respectively, (P = 0.210). The median follow-up time was 17.1 (1.4-108.3) months. Median progression-free survival (PFS) in CHOP (n = 40), CHOPE (n = 42), and GDP (n = 11) groups were 6.0, 15.3, and 9.7 months (P = 0.094) with 1-year PFS of 35.0, 54.8, and 45.5%, respectively, (P = 0.078). One-year OS for patients received CHOP (n = 40), CHOPE (n = 42), and GDP (n = 11) were 65.0, 83.3, and 100%, respectively, (P = 0.013) (CHOP vs CHOPE, P = 0.030; CHOP vs GDP, P = 0.024; CHOPE vs GDP, P = 0.174). CHOPE has a trend to improve CR rate, 1-year PFS and OS compared with CHOP alone. GDP shows promising efficacy which worth further exploration in large cohort studies. Clinical experience presented in this study may serve as reference for future large cohort studies.

  11. Inhibition of NIH 3T3 cell proliferation by a mutant ras protein with preferential affinity for GDP.

    PubMed Central

    Feig, L A; Cooper, G M

    1988-01-01

    Substitution of asparagine for serine at position 17 decreased the affinity of rasH p21 for GTP 20- to 40-fold without significantly affecting its affinity for GDP. Transfection of NIH 3T3 cells with a mammalian expression vector containing the Asn-17 rasH gene and a Neor gene under the control of the same promoter yielded only a small fraction of the expected number of G418-resistant colonies, indicating that expression of Asn-17 p21 inhibited cell proliferation. The inhibitory effect of Asn-17 p21 required its localization to the plasma membrane and was reversed by coexpression of an activated ras gene, indicating that the mutant p21 blocked the endogenous ras function required for NIH 3T3 cell proliferation. NIH 3T3 cells transformed by v-mos and v-raf, but not v-src, were resistant to inhibition by Asn-17 p21, indicating that the requirement for normal ras function can be bypassed by these cytoplasmic oncogenes. The Asn-17 mutant represents a novel reagent for the study of ras function by virtue of its ability to inhibit cellular ras activity in vivo. Since this phenotype is likely associated with the preferential affinity of the mutant protein for GDP, analogous mutations might also yield inhibitors of other proteins whose activities are regulated by guanine nucleotide binding. Images PMID:3145408

  12. Looking for non-linear relation evidences between Brazilian gross domestic product (GDP) and fixed capital stock (K)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, A.; Guerra, S. M. G.; Sauer, I. L.

    2004-02-01

    This paper deals with the epistemologic problem of searching for experimental evidences of a particular economic model theory. The difficulties of such tasks are well-known due to the peculiarities of the economic system, mainly related to the non-repetitiousness of experiments. Thus, indirect evidence and other related parameter correlations must be looked for. In the present case, a Brazilian macroeconomic historical data set is analysed and some particular phenomena relating correlation between gross domestic production (GDP), fixed capital stock and electricity consumption (EC) and their respectives elasticities are presented. Developed countries, in general, present different behaviour of these variables, compared to emerging economies, not only from the point of view of absolute value aspect, but also from the point of view internal dynamic interaction process. The celebrated correlation between EC and GDP, easily verified in the data of developed countries, becomes actually a myth for the emerging countries. However, this “bad” result could be an evidence of a model proposed by the authors.

  13. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli to produce 2'-fucosyllactose via salvage pathway of guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-l-fucose.

    PubMed

    Chin, Young-Wook; Seo, Nari; Kim, Jae-Han; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2016-11-01

    2'-Fucosyllactose (2-FL) is one of the key oligosaccharides in human milk. In the present study, the salvage guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-l-fucose biosynthetic pathway from fucose was employed in engineered Escherichia coli BL21star(DE3) for efficient production of 2-FL. Introduction of the fkp gene coding for fucokinase/GDP-l-fucose pyrophosphorylase (Fkp) from Bacteroides fragilis and the fucT2 gene encoding α-1,2-fucosyltransferase from Helicobacter pylori allows the engineered E. coli to produce 2-FL from fucose, lactose and glycerol. To enhance the lactose flux to 2-FL production, the attenuated, and deleted mutants of β-galactosidase were employed. Moreover, the 2-FL yield and productivity were further improved by deletion of the fucI-fucK gene cluster coding for fucose isomerase (FucI) and fuculose kinase (FucK). Finally, fed-batch fermentation of engineered E. coli BL21star(DE3) deleting lacZ and fucI-fucK, and expressing fkp and fucT2 resulted in 23.1 g/L of extracellular concentration of 2-FL and 0.39 g/L/h productivity. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2443-2452. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Isolation and nucleotide sequence of the GDP-mannose:cellobiosyl-diphosphopolyprenol alpha-mannosyltransferase gene from Acetobacter xylinum.

    PubMed Central

    Petroni, E A; Ielpi, L

    1996-01-01

    A genetic locus from Acetobacter xylinum involved in acetan polysaccharide synthesis has been characterized. The chromosomal region was identified by screening a genomic library of A. xylinum in a Xanthomonas campestris mutant defective in xanthan polysaccharide synthesis. The A. xylinum cosmid clone can functionally complement a xanthan-negative mutant. The polymer produced by the recombinant strain was found to be indistinguishable from xanthan. Insertion mutagenesis and subcloning of the cosmid clone combined with complementation studies allowed the identification of a 2.3-kb fragment of A. xylinum chromosomal DNA. The nucleotide sequence of this fragment was analyzed and found to contain an open reading frame (aceA) of 1,182 bp encoding a protein of 43.2 kDa. Results from biochemical and genetic analyses strongly suggest that the aceA gene encodes the GDP-mannose:cellobiosyl-diphosphopolyprenol alpha-mannosyltransferase enzyme, which is responsible for the transfer of an alpha-mannosyl residue from GDP-Man to cellobiosyl-diphosphopolyprenol. A search for similarities with other known mannosyltransferases revealed that all bacterial alpha-mannosyltransferases have a short COOH-terminal amino acid sequence in common. PMID:8759843

  15. Macro determinants of cause-specific injury mortality in the OECD countries: an exploration of the importance of GDP and unemployment.

    PubMed

    Muazzam, Sana; Nasrullah, Muazzam

    2011-08-01

    Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and unemployment has a strong documented impact on injury mortality. The aim of our study is to investigate the relationship of GDP per capita and unemployment with gender- and cause-specific injury mortalities in the member nations of Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Country-based data on injury mortality per 100,000 population, including males and females aged 1-74, for the 4 year period 1996-1999, were gathered from the World Health Organization's Statistical Information System. We selected fourteen cause-specific injury mortalities. Data on GDP, unemployment rate and population growth were taken from World Development Indicators. GDP and unemployment rate per 100 separately were regressed on total and cause-specific injury mortality rate per 100,000 for males and females. Overall in the OECD countries, GDP per capita increased 12.5% during 1996-1999 (P = 0.03) where as unemployment rate decreased by 12.3% (P = 0.05). Among males, most cause-specific injury mortality rates decreased with increasing GDP except motor vehicle traffic crashes (MTC) that increased with increasing GDP (coefficient = 0.75; P < 0.001). Similar trend was found in females, except suicidal injury mortalities that also increased with increasing GDP (coefficient = 0.31; P = 0.04). When we modeled cause-specific injury mortality rates with unemployment, injuries due to firearm missiles (coefficient = 0.53; P < 0.001), homicide (coefficient = 0.36; P < 0.001), and other violence (coefficient = 0.41; P < 0.001) increased with increase in unemployment rate among males. However, among females only accidental falls (coefficient = 0.36; P = 0.01) were found significantly associated with increasing unemployment rate. GDP is more related to cause-specific injury mortality than unemployment. Injury mortality does not relate similarly to each diagnosis-specific cause among males and females. Further research on

  16. Exploring Patterns of Soil Organic Matter Decomposition with Students through the Global Decomposition Project (GDP) and the Interactive Model of Leaf Decomposition (IMOLD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, S. M.; Wood, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    As decomposition rates are affected by climate change, understanding crucial soil interactions that affect plant growth and decomposition becomes a vital part of contributing to the students' knowledge base. The Global Decomposition Project (GDP) is designed to introduce and educate students about soil organic matter and decomposition through a standardized protocol for collecting, reporting, and sharing data. The Interactive Model of Leaf Decomposition (IMOLD) utilizes animations and modeling to learn about the carbon cycle, leaf anatomy, and the role of microbes in decomposition. Paired together, IMOLD teaches the background information and allows simulation of numerous scenarios, and the GDP is a data collection protocol that allows students to gather usable measurements of decomposition in the field. Our presentation will detail how the GDP protocol works, how to obtain or make the materials needed, and how results will be shared. We will also highlight learning objectives from the three animations of IMOLD, and demonstrate how students can experiment with different climates and litter types using the interactive model to explore a variety of decomposition scenarios. The GDP demonstrates how scientific methods can be extended to educate broader audiences, and data collected by students can provide new insight into global patterns of soil decomposition. Using IMOLD, students will gain a better understanding of carbon cycling in the context of litter decomposition, as well as learn to pose questions they can answer with an authentic computer model. Using the GDP protocols and IMOLD provide a pathway for scientists and educators to interact and reach meaningful education and research goals.

  17. Crystal Structures of the Scaffolding Protein LGN Reveal the General Mechanism by Which GoLoco Binding Motifs Inhibit the Release of GDP from Gαi *

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Min; Li, Jianchao; Zhu, Jinwei; Wen, Wenyu; Zhang, Mingjie; Wang, Wenning

    2012-01-01

    GoLoco (GL) motif-containing proteins regulate G protein signaling by binding to Gα subunit and acting as guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors. GLs of LGN are also known to bind the GDP form of Gαi/o during asymmetric cell division. Here, we show that the C-terminal GL domain of LGN binds four molecules of Gαi·GDP. The crystal structures of Gαi·GDP in complex with LGN GL3 and GL4, respectively, reveal distinct GL/Gαi interaction features when compared with the only high resolution structure known with GL/Gαi interaction between RGS14 and Gαi1. Only a few residues C-terminal to the conserved GL sequence are required for LGN GLs to bind to Gαi·GDP. A highly conserved “double Arg finger” sequence (RΨ(D/E)(D/E)QR) is responsible for LGN GL to bind to GDP bound to Gαi. Together with the sequence alignment, we suggest that the LGN GL/Gαi interaction represents a general binding mode between GL motifs and Gαi. We also show that LGN GLs are potent guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors. PMID:22952234

  18. Overexpression of an alfalfa GDP-mannose 3, 5-epimerase gene enhances acid, drought and salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis by increasing ascorbate accumulation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lichao; Wang, Yanrong; Liu, Wenxian; Liu, Zhipeng

    2014-11-01

    GDP-mannose 3', 5'-epimerase (GME) catalyses the conversion of GDP-D-mannose to GDP-L-galactose, an important step in the ascorbic acid (ascorbic acid) biosynthetic pathway in higher plants. In this study, a novel cDNA fragment (MsGME) encoding a GME protein was isolated and characterised from alfalfa (Medicago sativa). An expression analysis confirmed that MsGME expression was induced by salinity, PEG and acidity stresses. MsGME overexpression in Arabidopsis enhanced tolerance of the transgenic plants to salt, drought and acid. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that the transcript levels of GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMP), L-galactose-phosphate 1-P phosphatase (GP) and GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (GGP) were increased in transgenic Arabidopsis (T3 generation). Moreover, the ascorbate content was increased in transgenic Arabidopsis. Our results suggest that MsGME can effectively enhance tolerance of transgenic Arabidopsis to acid, drought and salt by increasing ascorbate accumulation.

  19. Mammalian translation elongation factor eEF1A2: X-ray structure and new features of GDP/GTP exchange mechanism in higher eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Crepin, Thibaut; Shalak, Vyacheslav F; Yaremchuk, Anna D; Vlasenko, Dmytro O; McCarthy, Andrew; Negrutskii, Boris S; Tukalo, Michail A; El'skaya, Anna V

    2014-11-10

    Eukaryotic elongation factor eEF1A transits between the GTP- and GDP-bound conformations during the ribosomal polypeptide chain elongation. eEF1A*GTP establishes a complex with the aminoacyl-tRNA in the A site of the 80S ribosome. Correct codon-anticodon recognition triggers GTP hydrolysis, with subsequent dissociation of eEF1A*GDP from the ribosome. The structures of both the 'GTP'- and 'GDP'-bound conformations of eEF1A are unknown. Thus, the eEF1A-related ribosomal mechanisms were anticipated only by analogy with the bacterial homolog EF-Tu. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the mammalian eEF1A2*GDP complex which indicates major differences in the organization of the nucleotide-binding domain and intramolecular movements of eEF1A compared to EF-Tu. Our results explain the nucleotide exchange mechanism in the mammalian eEF1A and suggest that the first step of eEF1A*GDP dissociation from the 80S ribosome is the rotation of the nucleotide-binding domain observed after GTP hydrolysis. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Time-varying cosmological term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socorro, J.; D'oleire, M.; Pimentel, Luis O.

    2015-11-01

    We present the case of time-varying cosmological term using the Lagrangian formalism characterized by a scalar field ϕ with standard kinetic energy and arbitrary potential V(ϕ). This model is applied to Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW)cosmology. Exact solutions of the field equations are obtained by a special ansats to solve the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equation and a particular potential for the scalar field and barotropic perfect fluid. We present the evolution on this cosmological term with different scenarios.

  1. Varying Constants, Gravitation and Cosmology.

    PubMed

    Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. Thus, it is of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  2. Diurnally-Varying Lunar Hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, A. R.; Hurley, D.; Retherford, K. D.; Mandt, K.; Greathouse, T. K.; Farrell, W. M.; Vilas, F.

    2016-12-01

    Dayside, non-polar lunar hydration signatures have been observed by a handful of instruments and present insights into the lunar water cycle. In this study, we utilize the unique measurements from the current Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission to study the phenomenon of diurnally-varying dayside lunar hydration. The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) onboard LRO senses a strong far-ultraviolet water absorption edge indicating hydration in small abundances in the permanently shadowed regions as well as on the lunar dayside. We report on diurnal variability in hydration in different terrain types. We investigate the importance of different sources of hydration, including solar wind bombardment and meteoroid bombardment, by observing trends during magnetotail and meteor stream crossings.

  3. Structural and functional analysis of a FeoB A143S G5 loop mutant explains the accelerated GDP release rate.

    PubMed

    Guilfoyle, Amy P; Deshpande, Chandrika N; Vincent, Kimberley; Pedroso, Marcelo M; Schenk, Gerhard; Maher, Megan J; Jormakka, Mika

    2014-05-01

    GTPases (G proteins) hydrolyze the conversion of GTP to GDP and free phosphate, comprising an integral part of prokaryotic and eukaryotic signaling, protein biosynthesis and cell division, as well as membrane transport processes. The G protein cycle is brought to a halt after GTP hydrolysis, and requires the release of GDP before a new cycle can be initiated. For eukaryotic heterotrimeric Gαβγ proteins, the interaction with a membrane-bound G protein-coupled receptor catalyzes the release of GDP from the Gα subunit. Structural and functional studies have implicated one of the nucleotide binding sequence motifs, the G5 motif, as playing an integral part in this release mechanism. Indeed, a Gαs G5 mutant (A366S) was shown to have an accelerated GDP release rate, mimicking a G protein-coupled receptor catalyzed release state. In the present study, we investigate the role of the equivalent residue in the G5 motif (residue A143) in the prokaryotic membrane protein FeoB from Streptococcus thermophilus, which includes an N-terminal soluble G protein domain. The structure of this domain has previously been determined in the apo and GDP-bound states and in the presence of a transition state analogue, revealing conformational changes in the G5 motif. The A143 residue was mutated to a serine and analyzed with respect to changes in GTPase activity, nucleotide release rate, GDP affinity and structural alterations. We conclude that the identity of the residue at this position in the G5 loop plays a key role in the nucleotide release rate by allowing the correct positioning and hydrogen bonding of the nucleotide base. © 2014 FEBS.

  4. The Structure of the MUR1 GDP-mannose 4,67-deydratase from A. thaliana: Implications for Ligand Binding Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Mulichak, A.M.; Bonin, C.P.; Reiter, W.-D.; Garavito, R.M.

    2010-03-08

    GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase catalyzes the first step in the de novo synthesis of GDP-L-fucose, the activated form of L-fucose, which is a component of glycoconjugates in plants known to be important to the development and strength of stem tissues. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of the MUR1 dehydratase isoform from Arabidopsis thaliana complexed with its NADPH cofactor as well as with the ligands GDP and GDP-D-rhamnose. MUR1 is a member of the nucleoside-diphosphosugar modifying subclass of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase enzyme family, having homologous structures and a conserved catalytic triad of Lys, Tyr, and Ser/Thr residues. MUR1 is the first member of this subfamily to be observed as a tetramer, the interface of which reveals a close and intimate overlap of neighboring NADP{sup +}-binding sites. The GDP moiety of the substrate also binds in an unusual syn conformation. The protein-ligand interactions around the hexose moiety of the substrate support the importance of the conserved triad residues and an additional Glu side chain serving as a general base for catalysis. Phe and Arg side chains close to the hexose ring may serve to confer substrate specificity at the O2 position. In the MUR1/GDP-D-rhamnose complex, a single unique monomer within the protein tetramer that has an unoccupied substrate site highlights the conformational changes that accompany substrate binding and may suggest the existence of negative cooperativity in MUR1 function.

  5. Structure of an ADP-ribosylation factor, ARF1, from Entamoeba histolytica bound to Mg(2+)-GDP.

    PubMed

    Serbzhinskiy, Dmitry A; Clifton, Matthew C; Sankaran, Banumathi; Staker, Bart L; Edwards, Thomas E; Myler, Peter J

    2015-05-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the etiological agent of amebiasis, a diarrheal disease which causes amoebic liver abscesses and amoebic colitis. Approximately 50 million people are infected worldwide with E. histolytica. With only 10% of infected people developing symptomatic amebiasis, there are still an estimated 100,000 deaths each year. Because of the emergence of resistant strains of the parasite, it is necessary to find a treatment which would be a proper response to this challenge. ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) is a member of the ARF family of GTP-binding proteins. These proteins are ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells; they generally associate with cell membranes and regulate vesicular traffic and intracellular signalling. The crystal structure of ARF1 from E. histolytica has been determined bound to magnesium and GDP at 1.8 Å resolution. Comparison with other structures of eukaryotic ARF proteins shows a highly conserved structure and supports the interswitch toggle mechanism of communicating the conformational state to partner proteins.

  6. Classifications and typology of the natural and triggered technological risks according to the GDP and probability of occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranguelov, Boyko; Frantzova, Antoanetta

    2013-04-01

    New approach to the risk management concept based on the assessment of damages (in % of GDP), probability of occurrence and necessary measures to create resilient society is presented. Several theoretical models are investigated and compared. The "acceptable risk" concept is developed based on the preventive measures and expected results. "Resilient", "Transition" and "Forbidden" areas related to the damages and probability of occurrence are graphically defined. Nonlinear expression of damages is presented following the Poisson distribution of rare events. Scenario about the threaten objects and possible damages in case of the complex natural hazardous events (earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides)is presented. A number of natural hazards acting simultaneously or in near time domain to the city urban area with a lot of different threaten objects on the Black Sea coast (Balchik) is shown as an illustration to the theoretical conclusions.

  7. Involvement of rho p21 and its inhibitory GDP/GTP exchange protein (rho GDI) in cell motility.

    PubMed Central

    Takaishi, K; Kikuchi, A; Kuroda, S; Kotani, K; Sasaki, T; Takai, Y

    1993-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that rho p21, a ras p21-related small GTP-binding protein (G protein), regulates the actomyosin system. The actomyosin system is known to be essential for cell motility. In the present study, we examined the action of rho p21, its inhibitory GDP/GTP exchange protein (named rho GDI), its stimulatory GDP/GTP exchange protein (named smg GDS), and Clostridium botulinum ADP-ribosyltransferase C3, known to selectively ADP-ribosylate rho p21 and to impair its function, in cell motility (chemokinesis) of Swiss 3T3 cells. We quantitated the capacity of cell motility by measuring cell tracks by phagokinesis. Microinjection of the GTP gamma S-bound active form of rhoA p21 or smg GDS into Swiss 3T3 cells did not affect cell motility, but microinjection of rho GDI into the cells did inhibit cell motility. This rho GDI action was prevented by comicroinjection of rho GDI with the GTP gamma S-bound form of rhoA p21 but not with the same form of rhoA p21 lacking the C-terminal three amino acids which was not posttranslationally modified with lipids. The rho GDI action was not prevented by Ki-rasVal-12 p21 or any of the GTP gamma S-bound form of other small GTP-binding proteins including rac1 p21, G25K, and smg p21B. Among these small G proteins, rhoA p21, rac1 p21, and G25K are known to be substrates for rho GDI. The rho GDI action was not prevented by comicroinjection of rho GDI with smg GDS. Microinjection of C3 into Swiss 3T3 cells also inhibited cell motility. These results indicate that the rho GDI-rho p21 system regulates cell motility, presumably through the actomyosin system. Images PMID:8417362

  8. One pot synthesis of GDP-mannose by a multi-enzyme cascade for enzymatic assembly of lipid-linked oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Rexer, Thomas F T; Schildbach, Anna; Klapproth, Jan; Schierhorn, Angelika; Mahour, Reza; Pietzsch, Markus; Rapp, Erdmann; Reichl, Udo

    2017-09-18

    Glycosylation of proteins is a key function of the biosynthetic-secretory pathway in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus. Glycosylated proteins play a crucial role in cell trafficking and signaling, cell-cell adhesion, blood-group antigenicity, and immune response. In addition, the glycosylation of proteins is an important parameter in the optimization of many glycoprotein-based drugs such as monoclonal antibodies. In vitro glycoengineering of proteins requires glycosyltransferases as well as expensive nucleotide sugars. Here, we present a designed pathway consisting of five enzymes, glucokinase (Glk), phosphomannomutase (ManB), mannose-1-phosphate-guanyltransferase (ManC), inorganic pyrophosphatase (PmPpA) and 1-domain polyphosphate kinase 2 (1D-Ppk2) expressed in E. coli for the cell-free production and regeneration of GDP-mannose from mannose and polyphosphate with catalytic amounts of GDP and ADP. It was shown that GDP-mannose is produced at various conditions, i.e. pH 7-8, temperature 25-35°C and co-factor concentrations of 5-20 mM MgCl2 . The maximum reaction rate of GDP-mannose achieved was 2.7 µM/min at 30°C and 10 mM MgCl2 producing 566 nmol GDP-mannose after a reaction time of 240 min. With respect to the initial GDP concentration (0.8 mM) this is equivalent to a yield of 71%. Additionally, the cascade was coupled to purified, transmembrane-deleted Alg1 (ALG1▵TM), the first mannosyltransferase in the ER-associated lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO) assembly. Thereby, in a one-pot reaction, phytanyl-PP-(GlcNAc)2 -Man1 was produced with efficient nucleotide sugar regeneration for the first time. Phytanyl-PP-(GlcNAc)2 -Man1 can serve as a substrate for the synthesis of LLO for the cell-free in vitro glycosylation of proteins. A high-performance anion exchange chromatography method with UV and conductivity detection (HPAEC-UV/CD) assay was optimized and validated to determine the enzyme kinetics. The established kinetic model

  9. Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles of Campylobacter spp. Isolated from Broiler Chicken Meat of Estonian, Latvian and Lithuanian Origin at Estonian Retail Level and from Patients with Severe Enteric Infections in Estonia.

    PubMed

    Mäesaar, M; Kramarenko, T; Meremäe, K; Sõgel, J; Lillenberg, M; Häkkinen, L; Ivanova, M; Kovalenko, K; Hörman, A; Hänninen, M-L; Roasto, M

    2016-03-01

    The resistance patterns of Campylobacter spp. isolated from retail broiler chicken meat originating either from Estonia, Lithuania or Latvia collected in Estonia were determined. Additionally, in collaboration with the laboratories of several Estonian hospitals, antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined for Campylobacter isolates from patients with severe Campylobacter enteric infections. The isolates were identified at the species level by the PCR method. Respectively, 88.8% of the isolates were C. jejuni, and 11.2% were C. coli. In total, 126 Campylobacter isolates of broiler chicken meat and human origin were tested for minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) with the broth microdilution VetMIC(TH) method (National Veterinary Institute; Uppsala, Sweden) for a total of six antimicrobials. Resistance to one or more antimicrobials was detected in 62 (63.3%) of Campylobacter broiler chicken meat isolates and in 20 (71.4%) of human-origin isolates. Large proportions of the broiler chicken meat isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin (60.2%). Multidrug resistance (i.e. to three or more unrelated antimicrobials) was detected in five (5.1%) C. jejuni isolates. Among the human isolates, 20 (71.4%) were resistant to fluoroquinolones, and two (7.1%) C. jejuni isolates exhibited multidrug resistance. The chicken meat isolates of Estonian origin were the most susceptible. However, a high proportion of fluoroquinolone-resistant C. jejuni isolates were found in Latvian and Lithuanian products. The results of this study indicate that the problems caused by the inappropriate use of antimicrobials extend beyond the country in which a food originates; therefore, both domestic and international interventions and agreements are required to implement common policies on antimicrobial usage and to minimize the emergence of Campylobacter drug resistance. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. KONJAC1 and 2 Are Key Factors for GDP-Mannose Generation and Affect l-Ascorbic Acid and Glucomannan Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sawake, Shota; Tajima, Noriaki; Mortimer, Jenny C; Lao, Jeemeng; Ishikawa, Toshiki; Yu, Xiaolan; Yamanashi, Yukiko; Yoshimi, Yoshihisa; Kawai-Yamada, Maki; Dupree, Paul; Tsumuraya, Yoichi; Kotake, Toshihisa

    2015-12-01

    Humans are unable to synthesize l-ascorbic acid (AsA), yet it is required as a cofactor in many critical biochemical reactions. The majority of human dietary AsA is obtained from plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMPP), VITAMIN C DEFECTIVE1 (VTC1), catalyzes a rate-limiting step in AsA synthesis: the formation of GDP-Man. In this study, we identified two nucleotide sugar pyrophosphorylase-like proteins, KONJAC1 (KJC1) and KJC2, which stimulate the activity of VTC1. The kjc1kjc2 double mutant exhibited severe dwarfism, indicating that KJC proteins are important for growth and development. The kjc1 mutation reduced GMPP activity to 10% of wild-type levels, leading to a 60% reduction in AsA levels. On the contrary, overexpression of KJC1 significantly increased GMPP activity. The kjc1 and kjc1kjc2 mutants also exhibited significantly reduced levels of glucomannan, which is also synthesized from GDP-Man. Recombinant KJC1 and KJC2 enhanced the GMPP activity of recombinant VTC1 in vitro, while KJCs did not show GMPP activity. Yeast two-hybrid assays suggested that the stimulation of GMPP activity occurs via interaction of KJCs with VTC1. These results suggest that KJCs are key factors for the generation of GDP-Man and affect AsA level and glucomannan accumulation through the stimulation of VTC1 GMPP activity.

  11. Recruitment of Arf1-GDP to Golgi by Glo3p-type ArfGAPs is crucial for golgi maintenance and plant growth.

    PubMed

    Min, Myung Ki; Jang, Mihue; Lee, Myounghui; Lee, Junho; Song, Kyungyoung; Lee, Yongjik; Choi, Kwan Yong; Robinson, David G; Hwang, Inhwan

    2013-02-01

    ADP-ribosylation factor1 (Arf1), a member of the small GTP-binding proteins, plays a pivotal role in protein trafficking to multiple organelles. In its GDP-bound form, Arf1 is recruited from the cytosol to organelle membranes, where it functions in vesicle-mediated protein trafficking. However, the mechanism of Arf1-GDP recruitment remains unknown. Here, we provide evidence that two Glo3p-type Arf GTPase-activating proteins (ArfGAPs), ArfGAP domain8 (AGD8) and AGD9, are involved in the recruitment of Arf1-GDP to the Golgi apparatus in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). RNA interference plants expressing low levels of AGD8 and AGD9 exhibited abnormal Golgi morphology, inhibition of protein trafficking, and arrest of plant growth and development. In RNA interference plants, Arf1 was poorly recruited to the Golgi apparatus. Conversely, high levels of AGD8 and AGD9 induced Arf1 accumulation at the Golgi and suppressed Golgi disruption and inhibition of vacuolar trafficking that was caused by overexpression of AGD7. Based on these results, we propose that the Glo3p-type ArfGAPs AGD8 and AGD9 recruit Arf1-GDP from the cytosol to the Golgi for Arf1-mediated protein trafficking, which is essential for plant development and growth.

  12. The de novo and salvage pathways of GDP-mannose biosynthesis are both sufficient for the growth of bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Kuettel, Sabine; Wadum, Majken C T; Güther, Maria Lucia S; Mariño, Karina; Riemer, Carolin; Ferguson, Michael A J

    2012-04-01

    The sugar nucleotide GDP-mannose is essential for Trypanosoma brucei. Phosphomannose isomerase occupies a key position on the de novo pathway to GDP-mannose from glucose, just before intersection with the salvage pathway from free mannose. We identified the parasite phosphomannose isomerase gene, confirmed that it encodes phosphomannose isomerase activity and localized the endogenous enzyme to the glycosome. We also created a bloodstream-form conditional null mutant of phosphomannose isomerase to assess the relative roles of the de novo and salvage pathways of GDP-mannose biosynthesis. Phosphomannose isomerase was found to be essential for parasite growth. However, supplementation of the medium with low concentrations of mannose, including that found in human plasma, relieved this dependence. Therefore, we do not consider phosphomannose isomerase to be a viable drug target. We further established culture conditions where we can control glucose and mannose concentrations and perform steady-state [U-(13) C]-D-glucose labelling. Analysis of the isotopic sugar composition of the parasites variant surface glycoprotein synthesized in cells incubated in 5 mM [U-(13) C]-D-glucose in the presence and absence of unlabelled mannose showed that, under physiological conditions, about 80% of GDP-mannose synthesis comes from the de novo pathway and 20% from the salvage pathway.

  13. KONJAC1 and 2 Are Key Factors for GDP-Mannose Generation and Affect l-Ascorbic Acid and Glucomannan Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sawake, Shota; Tajima, Noriaki; Lao, Jeemeng; Ishikawa, Toshiki; Yu, Xiaolan; Yamanashi, Yukiko; Yoshimi, Yoshihisa; Kawai-Yamada, Maki

    2015-01-01

    Humans are unable to synthesize l-ascorbic acid (AsA), yet it is required as a cofactor in many critical biochemical reactions. The majority of human dietary AsA is obtained from plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMPP), VITAMIN C DEFECTIVE1 (VTC1), catalyzes a rate-limiting step in AsA synthesis: the formation of GDP-Man. In this study, we identified two nucleotide sugar pyrophosphorylase-like proteins, KONJAC1 (KJC1) and KJC2, which stimulate the activity of VTC1. The kjc1kjc2 double mutant exhibited severe dwarfism, indicating that KJC proteins are important for growth and development. The kjc1 mutation reduced GMPP activity to 10% of wild-type levels, leading to a 60% reduction in AsA levels. On the contrary, overexpression of KJC1 significantly increased GMPP activity. The kjc1 and kjc1kjc2 mutants also exhibited significantly reduced levels of glucomannan, which is also synthesized from GDP-Man. Recombinant KJC1 and KJC2 enhanced the GMPP activity of recombinant VTC1 in vitro, while KJCs did not show GMPP activity. Yeast two-hybrid assays suggested that the stimulation of GMPP activity occurs via interaction of KJCs with VTC1. These results suggest that KJCs are key factors for the generation of GDP-Man and affect AsA level and glucomannan accumulation through the stimulation of VTC1 GMPP activity. PMID:26672069

  14. Novel protein and Mg[superscript 2+] configurations in the Mg[superscript 2+] GDP Complex of the SRP GTPase ffh

    SciTech Connect

    Focia, Pamela J.; Alam, Hena; Lu, Thanh; Ramirez, Ursula D.; Freymann, Douglas M.

    2010-03-05

    Ffh is the signal sequence recognition and targeting subunit of the prokaryotic signal recognition particle (SRP). Previous structural studies of the NG GTPase domain of Ffh demonstrated magnesium-dependent and magnesium-independent binding conformations for GDP and GMPPNP that are believed to reflect novel mechanisms for exchange and activation in this member of the GTPase superfamily. The current study of the NG GTPase bound to Mg{sup 2+} GDP reveals two new binding conformations - in the first the magnesium interactions are similar to those seen previously, however, the protein undergoes a conformational change that brings a conserved aspartate into its second coordination sphere. In the second, the protein conformation is similar to that seen previously, but the magnesium coordination sphere is disrupted so that only five oxygen ligands are present. The loss of the coordinating water molecule, at the position that would be occupied by the oxygen of the {gamma}-phosphate of GTP, is consistent with that position being privileged for exchange during phosphate release. The available structures of the GDP-bound protein provide a series of structural snapshots that illuminate steps along the pathway of GDP release following GTP hydrolysis.

  15. Recruitment of Arf1-GDP to Golgi by Glo3p-Type ArfGAPs Is Crucial for Golgi Maintenance and Plant Growth1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Min, Myung Ki; Jang, Mihue; Lee, Myounghui; Lee, Junho; Song, Kyungyoung; Lee, Yongjik; Choi, Kwan Yong; Robinson, David G.; Hwang, Inhwan

    2013-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation factor1 (Arf1), a member of the small GTP-binding proteins, plays a pivotal role in protein trafficking to multiple organelles. In its GDP-bound form, Arf1 is recruited from the cytosol to organelle membranes, where it functions in vesicle-mediated protein trafficking. However, the mechanism of Arf1-GDP recruitment remains unknown. Here, we provide evidence that two Glo3p-type Arf GTPase-activating proteins (ArfGAPs), ArfGAP domain8 (AGD8) and AGD9, are involved in the recruitment of Arf1-GDP to the Golgi apparatus in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). RNA interference plants expressing low levels of AGD8 and AGD9 exhibited abnormal Golgi morphology, inhibition of protein trafficking, and arrest of plant growth and development. In RNA interference plants, Arf1 was poorly recruited to the Golgi apparatus. Conversely, high levels of AGD8 and AGD9 induced Arf1 accumulation at the Golgi and suppressed Golgi disruption and inhibition of vacuolar trafficking that was caused by overexpression of AGD7. Based on these results, we propose that the Glo3p-type ArfGAPs AGD8 and AGD9 recruit Arf1-GDP from the cytosol to the Golgi for Arf1-mediated protein trafficking, which is essential for plant development and growth. PMID:23266962

  16. Mammalian translation elongation factor eEF1A2: X-ray structure and new features of GDP/GTP exchange mechanism in higher eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Crepin, Thibaut; Shalak, Vyacheslav F.; Yaremchuk, Anna D.; Vlasenko, Dmytro O.; McCarthy, Andrew; Negrutskii, Boris S.; Tukalo, Michail A.; El'skaya, Anna V.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic elongation factor eEF1A transits between the GTP- and GDP-bound conformations during the ribosomal polypeptide chain elongation. eEF1A*GTP establishes a complex with the aminoacyl-tRNA in the A site of the 80S ribosome. Correct codon–anticodon recognition triggers GTP hydrolysis, with subsequent dissociation of eEF1A*GDP from the ribosome. The structures of both the ‘GTP’- and ‘GDP’-bound conformations of eEF1A are unknown. Thus, the eEF1A-related ribosomal mechanisms were anticipated only by analogy with the bacterial homolog EF-Tu. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the mammalian eEF1A2*GDP complex which indicates major differences in the organization of the nucleotide-binding domain and intramolecular movements of eEF1A compared to EF-Tu. Our results explain the nucleotide exchange mechanism in the mammalian eEF1A and suggest that the first step of eEF1A*GDP dissociation from the 80S ribosome is the rotation of the nucleotide-binding domain observed after GTP hydrolysis. PMID:25326326

  17. Chemical synthesis of guanosine diphosphate mannuronic acid (GDP-ManA) and its C-4-O-methyl and C-4-deoxy congeners.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingju; Howell, P Lynne; Overkleeft, Herman S; Filippov, Dmitri V; van der Marel, Gijsbert A; Codée, Jeroen D C

    2017-10-10

    Described is the first synthesis of guanosine diphosphate mannuronic acid (GDP-ManA), the sugar donor used by algae and bacteria for the production of alginate, an anionic polysaccharide composed of β-d-mannuronic acid (ManA) and α-l-guluronic acid (GulA). Understanding the biosynthesis of these polyanionic polysaccharides on the molecular level, opens up avenues to use and modulate the biosynthesis machinery for biotechnological and therapeutic applications. The synthesis reported here delivers multi-milligram amounts of the GDP-ManA donor that can be used to study the polymerase (Alg8 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa) that generates the poly-ManA chain. Also reported is the assembly of two close analogues of GDP-ManA: the first bears a C-4-O-methyl group, while the second has been deoxygenated at this position. Both molecules may be used as "chain stoppers" in future enzymatic ManA polymerisation reactions. The crucial pyrophosphate linkage of the GDP-mannuronic acids has been constructed by the phosphorylation of the appropriate ManA-1-phosphates with a guanosine phosphoramidite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Study on disparity of regional economic development based on geoinformatic Tupu and GWR model: a case of growth of GDP per capita in China from 1999 to 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feixue; Li, Manchun; Liang, Jian

    2007-06-01

    Regional disparity of economic development in China is always greatly concerned by investigators domestic and abroad, and sets of models have been used in the analysis. Spatial dependence, which is hidden in the data with spatial attributes, usually is not taken into account in classical statistics methods, such as ordinary linear regression(OLR) model. Along with the development of spatial statistics, more and more attentions are paid on spatial interactions between observations in the study of regional disparity. Geographically weighted regression (GWR) is a simple but effective model to recognize spatial variation and local difference, which considers the influence of the spatially non-stationarity of the variables. In this study, GWR model and Geo-Informatic Tupu were used to analyze the disparity of regional economic development in China, taking GDP per capita in 1999 and 2003 as a case, which is usually used to measure level of economic development. GDP per capita in the 338 cities in 1999 were selected to simulate GDP per capita in 2003 and to analysis non-stationarity of the growth of GDP per capita. Using Geo-Informatic Tupu, A series of maps were processed to display patterns of local parameter estimates, such as local r-squares, the residual sum of squares, local residual and so on, to gain a better understanding of the degree of spatial non-stationarity in a relationship over space. We tested for geographic heterogeneity in the parameters and compare them to estimates obtained from global regression approaches. The results suggested there was heterogeneity in the regression coefficients across broad regions of China, and a one-size fits all approach to describe growth processes appeared simplistic. The GWR model improved over the OLR model, and it was able to better explain the variation in the data and to simulate GDP per capita with smaller errors than the OLR models.

  19. Gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin (GDP) as salvage chemotherapy for patients with relapsed or refractory peripheral T cell lymphoma-not otherwise specified.

    PubMed

    Qi, Fei; Dong, Mei; He, Xiaohui; Li, Yexiong; Wang, Weihu; Liu, Peng; Yang, Jianliang; Gui, Lin; Zhang, Changgong; Yang, Sheng; Zhou, Shengyu; Shi, Yuankai

    2017-02-01

    Standard therapeutic options for patients with relapsed or refractory peripheral T cell lymphoma-not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS) remain unclear. There are few large cohort studies specifically focused on gemcitabine-based chemotherapy for PTCL-NOS. We retrospectively reviewed patients with relapsed or refractory PTCL-NOS who received salvage GDP (gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin) chemotherapy at the Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC), Beijing, China, from May 2008 to August 2014. Twenty-five patients were enrolled and analyzed. The median number of cycles of GDP chemotherapy per patient was four (range, 2-8 cycles). Overall response rate was 64.0% (16/25) with five achieved complete remission or complete remission unconfirmed. After a median follow-up of 9 months, median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival after relapse or progression (second-PFS) were 9.3 and 5.4 months. One-year PFS rate and 1-year OS rate were 27.4% and 43.9%, respectively. Median second-PFS was significantly longer in patients sensitive to GDP than the ones resistant to the treatment (10.3 vs. 2.8 months, p < .01). In addition, the low International Prognostic Index, low Prognostic Index for T cell lymphoma, or normal level of LDH in serum was associated with favorable prognosis. Grade 3/4 adverse effect was observed in 10 of 25 patients treated with GDP including neutropenia (8/25), thrombocytopenia (5/25), and anemia (4/25). Taken together, our study suggests that GDP is an effective and optional salvage regimen for relapsed or refractory PTCL-NOS.

  20. Concurrent IMRT and weekly cisplatin followed by GDP chemotherapy in newly diagnosed, stage IE to IIE, nasal, extranodal NK/T-Cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ke, Q-H; Zhou, S-Q; Du, W; Liang, G; Lei, Y; Luo, F

    2014-12-12

    On the basis of the benefits of frontline radiation in early-stage, extranodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTL), we conducted the trial of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) followed by three cycles of gemcitabine, dexamethasone and cisplatin (GDP). Thirty-two patients with newly diagnosed, stage IE to IIE, nasal ENKTL received CCRT (that is, all patients received intensity-modulated radiotherapy 56 Gy and cisplatin 30 mg/m(2) weekly, 3-5 weeks). Three cycles of GDP (gemcitabine 1000 mg/m(2) intravenously (i.v.) on days 1 and 8, dexamethasone 40 mg orally on days 1-4 and cisplatin 75 mg/m(2) i.v. on day 1 (GDP), every 21 days as an outpatient were scheduled after CCRT. All patients completed CCRT, which resulted in 100% response that included 24 complete responses (CRs) and eight partial responses. The CR rate after CCRT was 75.0% (that is, 24 of 32 responses). Twenty-eight of the 32 patients completed the planned three cycles of GDP, whereas four patients did not because they withdrew (n = 1) or because they had an infection (n = 3). The overall response rate and the CR rate were 90.6% (that is, 29 of 32 responses) and 84.4% (that is, 27 of 32 responses), respectively. Only two patient experienced grade 3 toxicity during CCRT (nausea), whereas 13 of the 30 patients experienced grade 4 neutropenia. The estimated 3-year overall survival and progression-free rates were 87.50% and 84.38%, respectively. In conclusion, CCRT followed by GDP chemotherapy can be a feasible and effective treatment strategy for stage IE to IIE nasal ENKTL.

  1. Spatiotemporal changes in both asset value and GDP associated with seismic exposure in China in the context of rapid economic growth from 1990 to 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jidong; Wang, Cailin; He, Xin; Wang, Xu; Li, Ning

    2017-03-01

    Accurate exposure estimation is essential for seismic risk assessment. Recent rapid urbanization and economic growth in China have led to massive spatiotemporal changes in both the asset value and GDP exposed to seismic hazards. Using available GDP data, the asset value dataset produced by Wu et al (2014a) and spatial disaggregation technology, gridded maps of GDP and asset value are overlaid with the latest seismic map to investigate spatiotemporal changes in economic exposure in the most seismically hazardous areas (MSHAs) in China in 1990, 2000 and 2010. We found that 15.4% of China’s asset value and 14.1% of China’s GDP were located in MSHAs in 2010, and the asset value and GDP exposed to MSHAs reached 15.9 trillion CNY and 6.2 trillion CNY, respectively, with average annual rates of increase of 14.4% and 11.3% over the two decades. The evidence of increased exposure provides valuable information regarding whom or what risk managers should give the most attention based on the economic exposure changes in earthquake-prone areas of China. Notably, the North China seismic belt, which is associated with the largest economic exposure to earthquakes and a rapidly increasing rate of economic exposure compared to those in other seismic belts, and the Qinghai-Tibet seismic belt, which has the highest earthquake occurrence, are two seismic belts of interest. A more detailed study is required to determine the relationship between increased economic exposure and earthquake disaster losses combined with hazard level and vulnerability.

  2. Influence of GTP/GDP and magnesium ion on the solvated structure of the protein FtsZ: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Jamous, Carla; Basdevant, Nathalie; Ha-Duong, Tap

    2014-01-01

    We present here a structural analysis of ten extensive all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the monomeric protein FtsZ in various binding states. Since the polymerization and GTPase activities of FtsZ depend on the nature of a bound nucleotide as well as on the presence of a magnesium ion, we studied the structural differences between the average conformations of the following five systems: FtsZ-Apo, FtsZ-GTP, FtsZ-GDP, FtsZ-GTP-Mg, and FtsZ-GDP-Mg. The in silico solvated average structure of FtsZ-Apo significantly differs from the crystallographic structure 1W59 of FtsZ which was crystallized in a dimeric form without nucleotide and magnesium. The simulated Apo form of the protein also clearly differs from the FtsZ structures when it is bound to its ligand, the most important discrepancies being located in the loops surrounding the nucleotide binding pocket. The three average structures of FtsZ-GTP, FtsZ-GDP, and FtsZ-GTP-Mg are overall similar, except for the loop T7 located at the opposite side of the binding pocket and whose conformation in FtsZ-GDP notably differs from the one in FtsZ-GTP and FtsZ-GTP-Mg. The presence of a magnesium ion in the binding pocket has no impact on the FtsZ conformation when it is bound to GTP. In contrast, when the protein is bound to GDP, the divalent cation causes a translation of the nucleotide outwards the pocket, inducing a significant conformational change of the loop H6-H7 and the top of helix H7.

  3. Structural insights into a unique Legionella pneumophila effector LidA recognizing both GDP and GTP bound Rab1 in their active state.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Yin, Kun; Lu, Defen; Li, Bingqing; Zhu, Deyu; Chen, Yuzhen; Zhang, Hao; Xu, Sujuan; Chai, Jijie; Gu, Lichuan

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila hijacks the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived vesicles to create an organelle designated Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) required for bacterial replication. Maturation of the LCV involved acquisition of Rab1, which is mediated by the bacterial effector protein SidM/DrrA. SidM/DrrA is a bifunctional enzyme having the activity of both Rab1-specific GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) displacement factor (GDF) and guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). LidA, another Rab1-interacting bacterial effector protein, was reported to promote SidM/DrrA-mediated recruitment of Rab1 to the LCV as well. Here we report the crystal structures of LidA complexes with GDP- and GTP-bound Rab1 respectively. Structural comparison revealed that GDP-Rab1 bound by LidA exhibits an active and nearly identical conformation with that of GTP-Rab1, suggesting that LidA can disrupt the switch function of Rab1 and render it persistently active. As with GTP, LidA maintains GDP-Rab1 in the active conformation through interaction with its two conserved switch regions. Consistent with the structural observations, biochemical assays showed that LidA binds to GDP- and GTP-Rab1 equally well with an affinity approximately 7.5 nM. We propose that the tight interaction with Rab1 allows LidA to facilitate SidM/DrrA-catalyzed release of Rab1 from GDIs. Taken together, our results support a unique mechanism by which a bacterial effector protein regulates Rab1 recycling.

  4. Structural Insights into a Unique Legionella pneumophila Effector LidA Recognizing Both GDP and GTP Bound Rab1 in Their Active State

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Defen; Li, Bingqing; Zhu, Deyu; Chen, Yuzhen; Zhang, Hao; Xu, Sujuan; Chai, Jijie; Gu, Lichuan

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila hijacks the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived vesicles to create an organelle designated Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) required for bacterial replication. Maturation of the LCV involved acquisition of Rab1, which is mediated by the bacterial effector protein SidM/DrrA. SidM/DrrA is a bifunctional enzyme having the activity of both Rab1-specific GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) displacement factor (GDF) and guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). LidA, another Rab1-interacting bacterial effector protein, was reported to promote SidM/DrrA-mediated recruitment of Rab1 to the LCV as well. Here we report the crystal structures of LidA complexes with GDP- and GTP-bound Rab1 respectively. Structural comparison revealed that GDP-Rab1 bound by LidA exhibits an active and nearly identical conformation with that of GTP-Rab1, suggesting that LidA can disrupt the switch function of Rab1 and render it persistently active. As with GTP, LidA maintains GDP-Rab1 in the active conformation through interaction with its two conserved switch regions. Consistent with the structural observations, biochemical assays showed that LidA binds to GDP- and GTP-Rab1 equally well with an affinity approximately 7.5 nM. We propose that the tight interaction with Rab1 allows LidA to facilitate SidM/DrrA-catalyzed release of Rab1 from GDIs. Taken together, our results support a unique mechanism by which a bacterial effector protein regulates Rab1 recycling. PMID:22416225

  5. Structural Studies of the Nudix GDP-mannose Hydrolase from E. coli Reveals a New Motif for Mannose Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    A Boto; W Xu; J Jakoncic; A Pannuri; T Romeo; M Bessman; S Gabelli; L Amzel

    2011-12-31

    The Nudix hydrolase superfamily, characterized by the presence of the signature sequence GX5EX7REUXEEXGU (where U is I, L, or V), is a well-studied family in which relations have been established between primary sequence and substrate specificity for many members. For example, enzymes that hydrolyze the diphosphate linkage of ADP-ribose are characterized by having a proline 15 amino acids C-terminal of the Nudix signature sequence. GDPMK is a Nudix enzyme that conserves this characteristic proline but uses GDP-mannose as the preferred substrate. By investigating the structure of the GDPMK alone, bound to magnesium, and bound to substrate, the structural basis for this divergent substrate specificity and a new rule was identified by which ADP-ribose pyrophosphatases can be distinguished from purine-DP-mannose pyrophosphatases from primary sequence alone. Kinetic and mutagenesis studies showed that GDPMK hydrolysis does not rely on a single glutamate as the catalytic base. Instead, catalysis is dependent on residues that coordinate the magnesium ions and residues that position the substrate properly for catalysis. GDPMK was thought to play a role in biofilm formation because of its upregulation in response to RcsC signaling; however, GDPMK knockout strains show no defect in their capacity of forming biofilms.

  6. Leishmania donovani lacking the Golgi GDP-Man transporter LPG2 exhibit attenuated virulence in mammalian hosts.

    PubMed

    Gaur, Upasna; Showalter, Melissa; Hickerson, Suzanne; Dalvi, Rahul; Turco, Salvatore J; Wilson, Mary E; Beverley, Stephen M

    2009-07-01

    Surface phosophoglycans such as lipophosphoglycan (LPG) or proteophosphoglycan (PPG) and glycosylinositol phospholipids (GIPLs) modulate essential interactions between Leishmania and mammalian macrophages. Phosphoglycan synthesis depends on the Golgi GDP-mannose transporter encoded by LPG2. LPG2-null (lpg2(-)) Leishmania major cannot establish macrophage infections or induce acute pathology, whereas lpg2(-)Leishmania mexicana retain virulence. lpg2(-)Leishmania donovani has been reported to survive poorly in cultured macrophages but in vivo survival has not been explored. Herein we discovered that, similar to lpg2(-)L. major, lpg2(-)L. donovani promastigotes exhibited diminished virulence in mice, but persisted at consistently low levels. lpg2(-)L. donovani promastigotes could not establish infection in macrophages and could not transiently inhibit phagolysosomal fusion. Furthermore, lpg2(-) promastigotes of L. major, L. donovani and L. mexicana were highly susceptible to complement-mediated lysis. We conclude that phosphoglycan assembly and expression mediated by L. donovani LPG2 are important for promastigote and amastigote virulence, unlike L. mexicana but similar to L. major.

  7. A novel inhibitor of Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor α improves the therapeutic efficacy of paclitaxel in Lewis lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xing Chen; Chen, Xu Xia; Zhang, Y U; Wang, Hai Jun; Feng, You

    2015-07-01

    Molecular-targeted therapies are considered a promising strategy for the treatment of most types of human cancer. Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor α (RhoGDIα), which functions mainly by controlling the cellular distribution and activity of Rho GTPases and is associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis of cancer patients, has become a new promising target for anticancer treatment. Recently, a specific RhoGDIα inhibitor (no. SKLB-163) was developed via computer-aided drug design and de novo synthesis. Previous studies have shown that SKLB-163 had extremely good antitumor activities against diverse cancer cell lines. In the present study, SKLB-163 was used in combination with paclitaxel in order to determine the synergistic effect of the antitumor activity. The findings showed that the combination therapy clearly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis of LL/2 in vitro. The LL/2 mice model also showed that the combination therapy inhibited tumor growth in vivo. Proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochmeistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling showed that combination therapy inhibited cell proliferation and increased apoptosis compared to the treatment with SKLB-163 or paclitaxel alone. The data suggests that the combination therapy exerted synergistic antitumor effects, providing a novel way to augment the antitumor efficacy of cytotoxic chemotherapy.

  8. Leishmania donovani lacking the Golgi GDP-Man transporter LPG2 exhibit attenuated virulence in mammalian hosts

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Upasna; Showalter, Melissa; Hickerson, Suzanne; Dalvi, Rahul; Turco, Salvatore J.; Wilson, Mary E.; Beverley, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    Surface phosophoglycans such as lipophosphoglycan (LPG) or proteophosphoglycan (PPG) and glycosylinositol phospholipids (GIPLs) modulate essential interactions between Leishmania and mammalian macrophages. Phosphoglycan synthesis depends on the Golgi GDP-mannose transporter encoded by LPG2. LPG2-null (lpg2−) L. major cannot establish macrophage infections or induce acute pathology, whereas lpg2− L. mexicana retain virulence. lpg2− L. donovani has been reported to survive poorly in cultured macrophages but in vivo survival has not been explored. Herein we discovered that, similar to lpg2− L. major, lpg2− L. donovani promastigotes exhibited diminished virulence in mice, but persisted at consistently low levels. lpg2− L. donovani promastigotes could not establish infections macrophages and could not transiently inhibit phagolysosomal fusion. Furthermore, lpg2− promastigotes of L. major, L. donovani and L. mexicana were highly susceptible to complement mediated lysis. We conclude that phosphoglycan assembly and expression mediated by L. donovani LPG2 are important for promastigote and amastigote virulence, unlike L. mexicana but similar to L. major. PMID:19328787

  9. Structure of an ADP-ribosylation factor, ARF1, from Entamoeba histolytica bound to Mg2+–GDP

    PubMed Central

    Serbzhinskiy, Dmitry A.; Clifton, Matthew C.; Sankaran, Banumathi; Staker, Bart L.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Myler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the etiological agent of amebiasis, a diarrheal disease which causes amoebic liver abscesses and amoebic colitis. Approximately 50 million people are infected worldwide with E. histolytica. With only 10% of infected people developing symptomatic amebiasis, there are still an estimated 100 000 deaths each year. Because of the emergence of resistant strains of the parasite, it is necessary to find a treatment which would be a proper response to this challenge. ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) is a member of the ARF family of GTP-binding proteins. These proteins are ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells; they generally associate with cell membranes and regulate vesicular traffic and intracellular signalling. The crystal structure of ARF1 from E. histolytica has been determined bound to magnesium and GDP at 1.8 Å resolution. Comparison with other structures of eukaryotic ARF proteins shows a highly conserved structure and supports the interswitch toggle mechanism of communicating the conformational state to partner proteins. PMID:25945714

  10. Placenta-specific novel splice variants of Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor β are highly expressed in cancerous cells.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Keiichi; Fukuda, Yorikane; Ohshima, Keiichi; Terashima, Masanori; Yamaguchi, Ken; Mochizuki, Tohru

    2012-12-03

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA transcripts not only plays a role in normal molecular processes but is also associated with cancer development. While normal transcripts are ubiquitously expressed in normal tissues, splice variants created through abnormal alternative splicing events are often expressed in cancer cells. Although the Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor β (ARHGDIB) gene has been found to be ubiquitously expressed in normal tissues and involved in cancer development, the presence of splice variants of ARHGDIB has not yet been investigated. Validation analysis for the presence of and exon structures of splice variants of ARHGDIB, performed using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing, successfully identified novel splice variants of ARHGDIB, that is, 6a, 6b, and 6c, in colon, pancreas, stomach, and breast cancer cell lines. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that these variants were also highly expressed in normal placental tissue but not in other types of normal tissue. Expression of ARHGDIB variants 6a, 6b, and 6c appears to be restricted to cancer cells and normal placental tissue, suggesting that these variants possess cancer-specific functions and, as such, are potential cancer-related biomarkers.

  11. Salvage chemotherapy of gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin (GDP) for patients with relapsed or refractory peripheral T-cell lymphomas: a consortium for improving survival of lymphoma (CISL) trial.

    PubMed

    Park, Byeong-Bae; Kim, Won Seog; Suh, Cheolwon; Shin, Dong-Yeop; Kim, Jeong-A; Kim, Hoon-Gu; Lee, Won Sik

    2015-11-01

    There is no standard salvage chemotherapy for relapsed or refractory peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs). Gemcitabine combined with cisplatin has been known as an effective regimen for lymphoma treatment in the salvage setting. We investigated the efficacy and toxicity of gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin (GDP) for relapsed or refractory PTCLs in search of a more effective and less toxic therapy. Patients with relapsed or refractory PTCLs with more than one previous regimen were eligible. Treatment consisted of gemcitabine 1000 mg/m(2) intravenously (i.v.) on days 1 and 8, dexamethasone 40 mg orally on days 1-4, and cisplatin 70 mg/m(2) i.v. on day 1, and then every 21 days. Patients could proceed to autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) after four cycles of GDP or receive up to six treatment cycles. Twenty-five eligible patients were evaluated for toxicity and response. The diagnoses of participants included 14 cases of PTCL-not otherwise specified (NOS) (56 %) and four cases of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (16 %) among others. The median age of the patients was 59 years (range 20-75 years). After treatments with GDP, which delivered a median of four GDP cycles, there were 12 patients with complete responses (CR; 48 %) and six with partial responses (PR; 24 %). The overall response rate (RR) was 72 %. Four patients preceded to ASCT, and three patients finally achieved CR. The median progression free survival was 9.3 months (95 % confidence interval (CI); 4.1-14.6) with a median follow-up duration of 27.1 months. In a total of 86 cycles of GDP, grade 3 or 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia occurred in 16.3 and 12.8 % of cycles, respectively. Three patients (3.3 %) experienced febrile neutropenia. GDP is a highly effective and optimal salvage regimen for relapsed or refractory PTCLs and can be administered with acceptable toxicity.

  12. Role of Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor α in control of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)-mediated sodium reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Tengis S; Levchenko, Vladislav; Staruschenko, Alexander

    2014-10-10

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is expressed in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron where it performs sodium reabsorption from the lumen. We have recently shown that ENaC activity contributes to the development of salt-induced hypertension as a result of deficiency of EGF level. Previous studies revealed that Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor α (RhoGDIα) is involved in the control of salt-sensitive hypertension and renal injury via Rac1, which is one of the small GTPases activating ENaC. Here we investigated the intracellular mechanism mediating the involvement of the RhoGDIα/Rac1 axis in the control of ENaC and the effect of EGF on ENaC in this pathway. We demonstrated that RhoGDIα is highly expressed in the cortical collecting ducts of mice and rats, and its expression is down-regulated in Dahl salt-sensitive rats fed a high salt diet. Knockdown of RhoGDIα in cultured cortical collecting duct principal cells increased ENaC subunits expression and ENaC-mediated sodium reabsorption. Furthermore, RhoGDIα deficiency causes enhanced response to EGF treatment. Patch clamp analysis reveals that RhoGDIα significantly decreases ENaC current density and prevents its up-regulation by RhoA and Rac1. Inhibition of Rho kinase with Y27632 had no effects on ENaC response to EGF either in control or RhoGDIα knocked down cells. However, EGF treatment increased levels of active Rac1, which was further enhanced in RhoGDIα-deficient cells. We conclude that changes in the RhoGDIα-dependent pathway have a permissive role in the Rac1-mediated enhancement of ENaC activity observed in salt-induced hypertension.

  13. Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor beta promotes cell proliferation and invasion by modulating the AKT pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yang; Yi, Jiang; Lizhi, Lv; Qiucheng, Cai

    2014-11-01

    Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) beta, (RhoGDI2), has been identified as a proto-oncogene that is upregulated in human cancers, but the role of RhoGDI2 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the RhoGDI2 expression level in HCC tissues and the function of RhoGDI2 in HCC cell growth and metastasis. We examined the RhoGDI2 mRNA expression level in 64 sets of HCC tissue and their adjacent nontumor tissue counterparts using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. In vitro proliferation and invasion assays were conducted to determine the effect of RhoGDI2 on the ability of HCC cells to proliferate and invade, respectively. Western blot analysis was conducted to examine expression levels of RhoGDI2p-AKT, MMP-2, and MMP-9 in HCC cells. RhoGDI2 mRNA was significantly overexpressed in the HCC specimens compared with the nonneoplastic liver specimens, and the RhoGDI2 mRNA and protein levels were higher in the HCC cell lines, especially the highly metastatic cell lines 97L and 97H. To further investigate the role that RhoGDI2 plays in HCC, we overexpressed RhoGDI2 using a lentivirus-mediated overexpression technique in two HCC cell lines (Huh7 and 7721) that endogenously express a low level of RhoGDI2. Stable cells overexpressing RhoGDI2 demonstrated a significant increase in cell proliferation and invasion. Furthermore, our additional findings indicated that RhoGDI2-mediated cellular invasion requires the PI3K/Akt signaling-dependent expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Our findings suggest that RhoGDI2 plays an important role in HCC growth and invasion and should be considered a novel HCC therapeutic target candidate.

  14. Biochemical and Functional Studies on the Burkholderia cepacia Complex bceN Gene, Encoding a GDP-D-Mannose 4,6-Dehydratase

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Pedro F.; Leitão, Jorge H.

    2013-01-01

    This work reports the biochemical and functional analysis of the Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 bceN gene, encoding a protein with GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase enzyme activity (E.C.4.2.1.47). Data presented indicate that the protein is active when in the tetrameric form, catalyzing the conversion of GDP-D-mannose into GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-D-mannose. This sugar nucleotide is the intermediary necessary for the biosynthesis of GDP-D-rhamnose, one of the sugar residues of cepacian, the major exopolysaccharide produced by environmental and human, animal and plant pathogenic isolates of the Burkholderia cepacia complex species. Vmax and Km values of 1.5±0.2 µmol.min−1.mg−1 and 1024±123 µM, respectively, were obtained from the kinetic characterization of the B. cenocepacia J2315 BceN protein by NMR spectroscopy, at 25°C and in the presence of 1 mol MgCl2 per mol of protein. The enzyme activity was strongly inhibited by the substrate, with an estimated Ki of 2913±350 µM. The lack of a functional bceN gene in a mutant derived from B. cepacia IST408 slightly reduced cepacian production. However, in the B. multivorans ATCC17616 with bceN as the single gene in its genome with predicted GMD activity, a bceN mutant did not produce cepacian, indicating that this gene product is required for cepacian biosynthesis. PMID:23460819

  15. eIF2β is critical for eIF5-mediated GDP-dissociation inhibitor activity and translational control.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Martin D; Kershaw, Christopher J; White, Christopher; Hoyle, Danielle; Richardson, Jonathan P; Costello, Joseph L; Donaldson, Ian J; Zhou, Yu; Pavitt, Graham D

    2016-11-16

    In protein synthesis translation factor eIF2 binds initiator tRNA to ribosomes and facilitates start codon selection. eIF2 GDP/GTP status is regulated by eIF5 (GAP and GDI functions) and eIF2B (GEF and GDF activities), while eIF2α phosphorylation in response to diverse signals is a major point of translational control. Here we characterize a growth suppressor mutation in eIF2β that prevents eIF5 GDI and alters cellular responses to reduced eIF2B activity, including control of GCN4 translation. By monitoring the binding of fluorescent nucleotides and initiator tRNA to purified eIF2 we show that the eIF2β mutation does not affect intrinsic eIF2 affinities for these ligands, neither does it interfere with eIF2 binding to 43S pre-initiation complex components. Instead we show that the eIF2β mutation prevents eIF5 GDI stabilizing nucleotide binding to eIF2, thereby altering the off-rate of GDP from eIF2•GDP/eIF5 complexes. This enables cells to grow with reduced eIF2B GEF activity but impairs activation of GCN4 targets in response to amino acid starvation. These findings provide support for the importance of eIF5 GDI activity in vivo and demonstrate that eIF2β acts in concert with eIF5 to prevent premature release of GDP from eIF2γ and thereby ensure tight control of protein synthesis initiation.

  16. eIF2β is critical for eIF5-mediated GDP-dissociation inhibitor activity and translational control

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Martin D.; Kershaw, Christopher J.; White, Christopher; Hoyle, Danielle; Richardson, Jonathan P.; Costello, Joseph L.; Donaldson, Ian J.; Zhou, Yu; Pavitt, Graham D.

    2016-01-01

    In protein synthesis translation factor eIF2 binds initiator tRNA to ribosomes and facilitates start codon selection. eIF2 GDP/GTP status is regulated by eIF5 (GAP and GDI functions) and eIF2B (GEF and GDF activities), while eIF2α phosphorylation in response to diverse signals is a major point of translational control. Here we characterize a growth suppressor mutation in eIF2β that prevents eIF5 GDI and alters cellular responses to reduced eIF2B activity, including control of GCN4 translation. By monitoring the binding of fluorescent nucleotides and initiator tRNA to purified eIF2 we show that the eIF2β mutation does not affect intrinsic eIF2 affinities for these ligands, neither does it interfere with eIF2 binding to 43S pre-initiation complex components. Instead we show that the eIF2β mutation prevents eIF5 GDI stabilizing nucleotide binding to eIF2, thereby altering the off-rate of GDP from eIF2•GDP/eIF5 complexes. This enables cells to grow with reduced eIF2B GEF activity but impairs activation of GCN4 targets in response to amino acid starvation. These findings provide support for the importance of eIF5 GDI activity in vivo and demonstrate that eIF2β acts in concert with eIF5 to prevent premature release of GDP from eIF2γ and thereby ensure tight control of protein synthesis initiation. PMID:27458202

  17. GDP-GTP exchange processes of G{alpha}i1 protein are accelerated/decelerated depending on the type and the concentration of added detergents.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Makoto; Tanaka, Takeshi; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Wakamatsu, Kaori

    2009-12-01

    Although detergents have been widely used in G-protein studies to increase solubility and stability of the protein, we noticed that detergents modulate the nucleotide-binding properties of G-proteins. Hence, we analysed the effects of detergents on guanine nucleotide exchange reactions of Galpha(i1). Lubrol PX, a non-ionic detergent, which has been widely used in nucleotide dissociation/binding assays, was found to accelerate both GDP dissociation and GTPgammaS binding from/to Galpha in parallel at above its critical micelle concentration (cmc). Sodium cholate, an anionic detergent, which have been used to extract G-proteins from animal tissues, decelerated and accelerated GDP dissociation below and above its cmc, respectively. Surprisingly, micellar cholate decelerated GTPgammaS binding, and the binding rate constant was decreased by three orders of magnitude in the presence of 2% cholate. These results demonstrate that the guanine nucleotide exchange reactions of Galpha(i1) are drastically modulated by detergents differently depending on the type and the state (monomeric or micellar) of the detergents and that dissociation of GDP from Galpha(i1) does not necessarily lead to immediate binding of GTP to Galpha(i1) in some cases. These effects of detergents on G-proteins must be taken into account in G-protein experiments.

  18. A glutamic finger in the guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARNO displaces Mg2+ and the beta-phosphate to destabilize GDP on ARF1.

    PubMed Central

    Béraud-Dufour, S; Robineau, S; Chardin, P; Paris, S; Chabre, M; Cherfils, J; Antonny, B

    1998-01-01

    The Sec7 domain of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARNO (ARNO-Sec7) is responsible for the exchange activity on the small GTP-binding protein ARF1. ARNO-Sec7 forms a stable complex with the nucleotide-free form of [Delta17]ARF1, a soluble truncated form of ARF1. The crystal structure of ARNO-Sec7 has been solved recently, and a site-directed mutagenesis approach identified a hydrophobic groove and an adjacent hydrophilic loop as the ARF1-binding site. We show that Glu156 in the hydrophilic loop of ARNO-Sec7 is involved in the destabilization of Mg2+ and GDP from ARF1. The conservative mutation E156D and the charge reversal mutation E156K reduce the exchange activity of ARNO-Sec7 by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, [E156K]ARNO-Sec7 forms a complex with the Mg2+-free form of [Delta17]ARF1-GDP without inducing the release of GDP. Other mutations in ARNO-Sec7 and in [Delta17]ARF1 suggest that prominent hydrophobic residues of the switch I region of ARF1 insert into the groove of the Sec7 domain, and that Lys73 of the switch II region of ARF1 forms an ion pair with Asp183 of ARNO-Sec7. PMID:9649435

  19. GDP-D-mannose 3,5-epimerase (GME) plays a key role at the intersection of ascorbate and non-cellulosic cell-wall biosynthesis in tomato.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Louise; Alhagdow, Moftah; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Quemener, Bernard; Guillon, Fabienne; Bouchet, Brigitte; Faurobert, Mireille; Gouble, Barbara; Page, David; Garcia, Virginie; Petit, Johann; Stevens, Rebecca; Causse, Mathilde; Fernie, Alisdair R; Lahaye, Marc; Rothan, Christophe; Baldet, Pierre

    2009-11-01

    The GDP-D-mannose 3,5-epimerase (GME, EC 5.1.3.18), which converts GDP-d-mannose to GDP-l-galactose, is generally considered to be a central enzyme of the major ascorbate biosynthesis pathway in higher plants, but experimental evidence for its role in planta is lacking. Using transgenic tomato lines that were RNAi-silenced for GME, we confirmed that GME does indeed play a key role in the regulation of ascorbate biosynthesis in plants. In addition, the transgenic tomato lines exhibited growth defects affecting both cell division and cell expansion. A further remarkable feature of the transgenic plants was their fragility and loss of fruit firmness. Analysis of the cell-wall composition of leaves and developing fruit revealed that the cell-wall monosaccharide content was altered in the transgenic lines, especially those directly linked to GME activity, such as mannose and galactose. In agreement with this, immunocytochemical analyses showed an increase of mannan labelling in stem and fruit walls and of rhamnogalacturonan labelling in the stem alone. The results of MALDI-TOF fingerprinting of mannanase cleavage products of the cell wall suggested synthesis of specific mannan structures with modified degrees of substitution by acetate in the transgenic lines. When considered together, these findings indicate an intimate linkage between ascorbate and non-cellulosic cell-wall polysaccharide biosynthesis in plants, a fact that helps to explain the common factors in seemingly unrelated traits such as fruit firmness and ascorbate content.

  20. UK and Twenty Comparable Countries GDP-Expenditure-on-Health 1980-2013: The Historic and Continued Low Priority of UK Health-Related Expenditure.

    PubMed

    Harding, Andrew J E; Pritchard, Colin

    2016-07-10

    It is well-established that for a considerable period the United Kingdom has spent proportionally less of its gross domestic product (GDP) on health-related services than almost any other comparable country. Average European spending on health (as a % of GDP) in the period 1980 to 2013 has been 19% higher than the United Kingdom, indicating that comparable countries give far greater fiscal priority to its health services, irrespective of its actual fiscal value or configuration. While the UK National Health Service (NHS) is a comparatively lean healthcare system, it is often regarded to be at a 'crisis' point on account of low levels of funding. Indeed, many state that currently the NHS has a sizeable funding gap, in part due to its recently reduced GDP devoted to health but mainly the challenges around increases in longevity, expectation and new medical costs. The right level of health funding is a political value judgement. As the data in this paper outline, if the UK 'afforded' the same proportional level of funding as the mean average European country, total expenditure would currently increase by one-fifth. © 2016 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  1. The effects of calcium channel blocker benidipine and calmodulin antagonist W7 on GDP-binding capacity of brown adipose tissue in mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuh-Min; Lin, Pi-Yao; Chen, Ming-Der

    2009-03-01

    It has been suggested that increased dietary calcium intake can attenuate obesity. Calcium antagonists, such as benidipine, also have been shown to have an anti-obesity effect. However, the mechanism for calcium-related anti-obesity effect has not yet been established. A defective brown adipose tissue thermogenesis has been shown in obese rodents. This study was designed to examine the direct effects of calcium channel blocker benidipine and calmodulin antagonist W7 administration on the adaptive thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue taken from the genetically obese mice and their lean controls. The GDP binding to brown-fat cell mitochondria was used as a brown adipose tissue thermogenic index. The results show that benidipine treatment had no marked effect on brown-fat cell GDP-binding capacities in both obese and lean mice. However, GDP-binding capacities were significantly reduced in both obese and lean mice after the W7 administration. The results of this study support the previous finding that benidipine did not have direct thermogenic effect on brown adipose tissue and suggest that the change in intracellular calmodulin availability might contribute to the adaptive thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue.

  2. Gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin (GDP) is an effective and well-tolerated salvage therapy for relapsed/refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Moccia, Alden A; Hitz, Felicitas; Hoskins, Paul; Klasa, Richard; Power, Maryse M; Savage, Kerry J; Shenkier, Tamara; Shepherd, John D; Slack, Graham W; Song, Kevin W; Gascoyne, Randy D; Connors, Joseph M; Sehn, Laurie H

    2017-02-01

    The optimal choice of salvage therapy for patients with relapsed/refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) or Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) remains unknown. Based on promising results of phase II trials, the preferred salvage regimen in British Columbia since 2002 has been the out-patient regimen, gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin (GDP). We conducted a retrospective analysis including all patients with relapsed/refractory DLBCL or HL who received GDP as salvage therapy between September 2002 and June 2010. We identified 235 patients: 152 DLBCL, 83 HL. Overall response rates were 49% and 71% for patients with DLBCL and HL, respectively. Within the transplant-eligible population, 52% of patients with DLBCL and 96% of patients with HL proceeded to stem cell transplantation. The 2-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 21% and 28% in the DLBCL cohort, and 58% and 85% in the HL group. GDP is an effective and well-tolerated out-patient salvage regimen for relapsed/refractory DLBCL and HL.

  3. Impact of Oxidative Stress on Ascorbate Biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas via Regulation of the VTC2 Gene Encoding a GDP-l-galactose Phosphorylase*

    PubMed Central

    Urzica, Eugen I.; Adler, Lital N.; Page, M. Dudley; Linster, Carole L.; Arbing, Mark A.; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Clarke, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    The l-galactose (Smirnoff-Wheeler) pathway represents the major route to l-ascorbic acid (vitamin C) biosynthesis in higher plants. Arabidopsis thaliana VTC2 and its paralogue VTC5 function as GDP-l-galactose phosphorylases converting GDP-l-galactose to l-galactose-1-P, thus catalyzing the first committed step in the biosynthesis of l-ascorbate. Here we report that the l-galactose pathway of ascorbate biosynthesis described in higher plants is conserved in green algae. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii genome encodes all the enzymes required for vitamin C biosynthesis via the l-galactose pathway. We have characterized recombinant C. reinhardtii VTC2 as an active GDP-l-galactose phosphorylase. C. reinhardtii cells exposed to oxidative stress show increased VTC2 mRNA and l-ascorbate levels. Genes encoding enzymatic components of the ascorbate-glutathione system (e.g. ascorbate peroxidase, manganese superoxide dismutase, and dehydroascorbate reductase) are also up-regulated in response to increased oxidative stress. These results indicate that C. reinhardtii VTC2, like its plant homologs, is a highly regulated enzyme in ascorbate biosynthesis in green algae and that, together with the ascorbate recycling system, the l-galactose pathway represents the major route for providing protective levels of ascorbate in oxidatively stressed algal cells. PMID:22393048

  4. Synthesis of GDP-mannose and mannosylglycerate from labeled mannose by genetically engineered Escherichia coli without loss of specific isotopic enrichment.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Maria-Manuel; Santos, Helena; Boos, Winfried

    2003-01-01

    We report the construction of an Escherichia coli mutant that harbors two compatible plasmids and that is able to synthesize labeled 2-O-alpha-D-mannosyl-D-glycerate from externally added labeled mannose without the loss of specific isotopic enrichment. The strain carries a deletion in the manA gene, encoding phosphomannose isomerase. This deletion prevents the formation of fructose-6-phosphate from mannose-6-phosphate after the uptake of mannose from the medium by mannose-specific enzyme II of the phosphotransferase system (PtsM). The strain also has a deletion of the cps gene cluster that prevents the synthesis of colanic acid, a mannose-containing polymer. Plasmid-encoded phosphomannomutase (cpsG) and mannose-1-phosphate guanylyltransferase (cpsB) ensure the formation of GDP-mannose. A second plasmid harbors msg, a gene from Rhodothermus marinus that encodes mannosylglycerate synthase, which catalyzes the formation of 2-O-alpha-D-mannosyl-D-glycerate from GDP-mannose and endogenous glycerate. The rate-limiting step in 2-O-alpha-D-mannosyl-D-glycerate formation is the transfer of GDP-mannose to glycerate. 2-O-alpha-D-mannosyl-D-glycerate can be released from cells by treatment with cold-water shock. The final product is formed in a yield exceeding 50% the initial quantity of labeled mannose, including loss during preparation and paper chromatography.

  5. EF-Tu dynamics during pre-translocation complex formation: EF-Tu·GDP exits the ribosome via two different pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Chunlai; Kavaliauskas, Darius; Knudsen, Charlotte R; Goldman, Yale E; Cooperman, Barry S

    2015-10-30

    The G-protein EF-Tu, which undergoes a major conformational change when EF-Tu·GTP is converted to EF-Tu·GDP, forms part of an aminoacyl(aa)-tRNA·EF-Tu·GTP ternary complex (TC) that accelerates the binding of aa-tRNA to the ribosome during peptide elongation. Such binding, placing a portion of EF-Tu in contact with the GTPase Associated Center (GAC), is followed by GTP hydrolysis and Pi release, and results in formation of a pretranslocation (PRE) complex. Although tRNA movement through the ribosome during PRE complex formation has been extensively studied, comparatively little is known about the dynamics of EF-Tu interaction with either the ribosome or aa-tRNA. Here we examine these dynamics, utilizing ensemble and single molecule assays employing fluorescent labeled derivatives of EF-Tu, tRNA, and the ribosome to measure changes in either FRET efficiency or fluorescence intensity during PRE complex formation. Our results indicate that ribosome-bound EF-Tu separates from the GAC prior to its full separation from aa-tRNA, and suggest that EF-Tu·GDP dissociates from the ribosome by two different pathways. These pathways correspond to either reversible EF-Tu·GDP dissociation from the ribosome prior to the major conformational change in EF-Tu that follows GTP hydrolysis, or irreversible dissociation after or concomitant with this conformational change.

  6. Synthesis of GDP-Mannose and Mannosylglycerate from Labeled Mannose by Genetically Engineered Escherichia coli without Loss of Specific Isotopic Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio, Maria-Manuel; Santos, Helena; Boos, Winfried

    2003-01-01

    We report the construction of an Escherichia coli mutant that harbors two compatible plasmids and that is able to synthesize labeled 2-O-α-d-mannosyl-d-glycerate from externally added labeled mannose without the loss of specific isotopic enrichment. The strain carries a deletion in the manA gene, encoding phosphomannose isomerase. This deletion prevents the formation of fructose-6-phosphate from mannose-6-phosphate after the uptake of mannose from the medium by mannose-specific enzyme II of the phosphotransferase system (PtsM). The strain also has a deletion of the cps gene cluster that prevents the synthesis of colanic acid, a mannose-containing polymer. Plasmid-encoded phosphomannomutase (cpsG) and mannose-1-phosphate guanylyltransferase (cpsB) ensure the formation of GDP-mannose. A second plasmid harbors msg, a gene from Rhodothermus marinus that encodes mannosylglycerate synthase, which catalyzes the formation of 2-O-α-d-mannosyl-d-glycerate from GDP-mannose and endogenous glycerate. The rate-limiting step in 2-O-α-d-mannosyl-d-glycerate formation is the transfer of GDP-mannose to glycerate. 2-O-α-d-mannosyl-d-glycerate can be released from cells by treatment with cold-water shock. The final product is formed in a yield exceeding 50% the initial quantity of labeled mannose, including loss during preparation and paper chromatography. PMID:12514000

  7. Mutations in GDP-Mannose Pyrophosphorylase B Cause Congenital and Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophies Associated with Hypoglycosylation of α-Dystroglycan

    PubMed Central

    Carss, Keren J.; Stevens, Elizabeth; Foley, A. Reghan; Cirak, Sebahattin; Riemersma, Moniek; Torelli, Silvia; Hoischen, Alexander; Willer, Tobias; van Scherpenzeel, Monique; Moore, Steven A.; Messina, Sonia; Bertini, Enrico; Bönnemann, Carsten G.; Abdenur, Jose E.; Grosmann, Carla M.; Kesari, Akanchha; Punetha, Jaya; Quinlivan, Ros; Waddell, Leigh B.; Young, Helen K.; Wraige, Elizabeth; Yau, Shu; Brodd, Lina; Feng, Lucy; Sewry, Caroline; MacArthur, Daniel G.; North, Kathryn N.; Hoffman, Eric; Stemple, Derek L.; Hurles, Matthew E.; van Bokhoven, Hans; Campbell, Kevin P.; Lefeber, Dirk J.; Lin, Yung-Yao; Muntoni, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies with hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan (α-DG) are a heterogeneous group of disorders often associated with brain and eye defects in addition to muscular dystrophy. Causative variants in 14 genes thought to be involved in the glycosylation of α-DG have been identified thus far. Allelic mutations in these genes might also cause milder limb-girdle muscular dystrophy phenotypes. Using a combination of exome and Sanger sequencing in eight unrelated individuals, we present evidence that mutations in guanosine diphosphate mannose (GDP-mannose) pyrophosphorylase B (GMPPB) can result in muscular dystrophy variants with hypoglycosylated α-DG. GMPPB catalyzes the formation of GDP-mannose from GTP and mannose-1-phosphate. GDP-mannose is required for O-mannosylation of proteins, including α-DG, and it is the substrate of cytosolic mannosyltransferases. We found reduced α-DG glycosylation in the muscle biopsies of affected individuals and in available fibroblasts. Overexpression of wild-type GMPPB in fibroblasts from an affected individual partially restored glycosylation of α-DG. Whereas wild-type GMPPB localized to the cytoplasm, five of the identified missense mutations caused formation of aggregates in the cytoplasm or near membrane protrusions. Additionally, knockdown of the GMPPB ortholog in zebrafish caused structural muscle defects with decreased motility, eye abnormalities, and reduced glycosylation of α-DG. Together, these data indicate that GMPPB mutations are responsible for congenital and limb-girdle muscular dystrophies with hypoglycosylation of α-DG. PMID:23768512

  8. Varying electric charge in multiscale spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcagni, Gianluca; Magueijo, João; Fernández, David Rodríguez

    2014-01-01

    We derive the covariant equations of motion for Maxwell field theory and electrodynamics in multiscale spacetimes with weighted Laplacian. An effective spacetime-dependent electric charge of geometric origin naturally emerges from the theory, thus giving rise to a varying fine-structure constant. The theory is compared with other varying-coupling models, such as those with a varying electric charge or varying speed of light. The theory is also confronted with cosmological observations, which can place constraints on the characteristic scales in the multifractional measure. We note that the model considered here is fundamentally different from those previously proposed in the literature, either of the varying-e or varying-c persuasion.

  9. EFFECTS OF CONVERSION TO A BICARBONATE/LACTATE-BUFFERED, NEUTRAL-PH, LOW-GDP PD REGIMEN IN PREVALENT PD: A 2-YEAR RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Karima; Douma, Caroline; Ferrantelli, Evelina; Ter Wee, Pieter M; Beelen, Robert H; van Ittersum, Frans J

    2017-03-27

    ♦ Background: The use of pH-neutral peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluids low in glucose degradation products (GDP) may better preserve the peritoneal membrane and have fewer systemic effects. The effects of conversion from conventional to neutral-pH, low-GDP PD fluids in prevalent patients are unclear. Few studies on the role of neutral-pH, low-GDP PD have studied residual renal function, ultrafiltration, peritonitis incidence and technique failure, transport characteristics, and local and systemic markers of inflammation in prevalent PD patients. ♦ Methods: In a multi-center open-label randomized clinical trial (RCT), we randomly assigned 40 of 78 stable continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD) and automated PD (APD) patients to treatment with bicarbonate/lactate, neutral-pH, low-GDP PD fluid (Physioneal; Baxter Healthcare Corporation, Deerfield, IL, USA) and compared them with 38 patients continuing their current standard lactate-buffered PD fluid (PDF) (Dianeal; Baxter Healthcare Corporation, Deerfield, IL, USA) during 2 years. Primary outcome was residual renal function (RRF) and ultrafiltration (UF) during peritoneal equilibration test (PET); peritonitis incidence was a secondary outcome. Furthermore, clinical parameters as well as several biomarkers in effluents and serum were measured. ♦ Results: During follow-up, RRF did not differ between the groups. In the Physioneal group ultrafiltration (UF) during PET remained more or less stable (-20 mL [confidence interval (CI):-163.5 - 123.5 mL]; p = 0.7 over 24 months), whereas it declined in the Dianeal group (-243 mL [CI: -376.6 to -109.4mL]; p < 0.0001 over 24 months), resulting in a difference of 233.7mL [95% CI 41.0 - 425.5 mL]; p = 0.017 between the groups at 24months. The peritonitis rate was lower in the Physioneal group: adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.38 (0.15 - 0.97) p = 0.043. No differences were observed between the 2 groups in peritoneal adequacy or transport characteristics nor effluent markers of local

  10. Impact of GDP, spending on R&D, number of universities and scientific journals on research publications in pharmacological sciences in Middle East.

    PubMed

    Meo, S A; Usmani, A M; Vohra, M S; Bukhari, I A

    2013-10-01

    Research in pharmacological science is vital to support the health needs of human beings. Measuring the research output provides information that forms the basis of strategic decisions. This study aimed to investigate the impact of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), spending on Research and Development (R&D), number of universities and scientific journals on research documents (papers), citable documents, citations per document and H-index in pharmacological science among Middle East countries. All the 16 Middle East countries were included in the study. The information regarding GDP, spending on R&D, total number of universities and indexed scientific journals were collected. We recorded the total number of research documents, citable documents, citations per document and H-index in pharmacological science during the period 1996-2011. The main sources for information were World Bank, Web of Science, Journal Citation Reports (Thomson Reuters) and SCI-mago/Scopus. The mean per capita GDP of all the Middle East countries is 18125.49±5386.28 US$, spending on R&D 0.63±0.28% of GDP in US$, number of universities 36.56±11.33 and mean ISI indexed journal are 8.25±3.93. The number of research documents published in pharmacological science among the Middle East countries during the period 1996-2011 is 1344.44±499.34; citable documents 1286.37±476.34; citations per document 7.62± 0.84; and H-index is 30.68±6.32. There was a positive correlation between spending on R&D and citations per documents (r = 0.56, p = 0.02), H-Index (r = 0.56, p = 0.02); number of universities and research documents (r = 0.72, p = 0.002), citable documents (r = 0.72, p = 0.001); ISI indexed journals and research documents (r = 0.88, p = 0.0001), citable documents (r = 0.88, p = 0.0001), H-Index (r = 0.67, p = 0.004). However, there was no correlation between the GDP per capita and research outcome in pharmacological science. There is a positive association between spending on R&D, number of

  11. Bioinformatics analysis of Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor beta and its expression in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ming, Zongjuan; Guo, Chunli; Jiang, Meihua; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yuping; Fan, Na; Zhong, Yujie; Meng, Xia; Yang, Shuanying

    2014-11-04

    Lung cancer has been considered as one of the most important causes of cancer-related mortality worldwide. To predict lung cancer, researchers identified several molecular markers. However, many underlying markers of lung cancer remain unclear. One of these markers is Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor beta (GDIβ), which is related to tumorigenicity, development and invasion. This study was designed to analyze the biological characteristics of Rab GDIβ and to detect the mRNA and protein expressions of Rab GDIβ in lung cancer cells; this study also aimed to investigate the functions of this protein in lung cancer. Using online software from the websites of NCBI, ProtParam and so on, we analyzed the biological characteristics of Rab GDIβ. RT-PCR was performed to detect gene expressions in A549 and 16HBE cell lines and immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining was conducted to detect Rab GDIβ protein expression in 57 cases of human lung cancer tissues and 19 cases of normal lung tissues. The association of protein expression with patient clinical and pathological characteristics was assessed in each dataset. Bioinformatic analysis on Rab GDIβ: The mRNA of human Rab GDIβ contains two transcript variants; the common structural elements of the two proteins are mainly α-helix, random coil, β-turn and extended strand. Three and four transmembrane domains could be found in the entire polypeptide chain of protein variants 1 and 2, respectively; both transcript variants are hydrophilic and soluble proteins. The RT-PCR result: The mRNA expression of Rab GDIβ was down-regulation in A549 cells compared with that in 16HBE cells. The IHC result: The protein expression of Rab GDIβ in lung cancer cells was significantly lower than that in normal lung tissues (P <0.05) but was not correlated with patients' age, gender, tumor size, pathological type, differentiation, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis and TNM stage. The expression of Rab GDIβ was low in non-small cell lung

  12. Fractal analysis of time varying data

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Sadana, Ajit

    2002-01-01

    Characteristics of time varying data, such as an electrical signal, are analyzed by converting the data from a temporal domain into a spatial domain pattern. Fractal analysis is performed on the spatial domain pattern, thereby producing a fractal dimension D.sub.F. The fractal dimension indicates the regularity of the time varying data.

  13. Novel shock absorber features varying yield strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geier, D. J.

    1964-01-01

    A shock absorbent webbing of partially drawn synthetic strands is arranged in sections of varying density related to the varying mass of the human body. This is contoured to protect the body at points of contact, when subjected to large acceleration or deceleration forces.

  14. GDP-L-fucose: {beta}-D-galactoside 2-{alpha}-Lfucosyltransferases, DNA sequences encoding the same, method for producing the same and a method of genotyping a person

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, J.B.; Lennon, G.; Rouquier, S.; Giorgi, D.; Kelly, R.J.

    1998-09-15

    The gene encoding GDP-L-fucose: {beta}-D-Galactoside 2-{alpha}-Lfucosyltransferase has been cloned, and a mutation in this gene has been found to be responsible for an individual being a non-secretor. 30 figs.

  15. GDP-L-fucose: .beta.-D-galactoside 2-.alpha.-L-fucosyltransferases, DNA sequences encoding the same, method for producing the same and a method of genotyping a person

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, John B.; Lennon, Gregory; Rouquier, Sylvie; Giorgi, Dominique; Kelly, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    The gene encoding GDP-L-fucose: .beta.-D-Galactoside 2-.alpha.-L-fucosyltransferase has been cloned, and a mutation in this gene has been found to be responsible for an individual being a non-secretor.

  16. GDP-L-fucose: {beta}-D-galactoside 2-{alpha}-Lfucosyltransferases, DNA sequences encoding the same, method for producing the same and a method of genotyping a person

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, J.B.; Lennon, G.; Rouquier, S.; Giorgi, D.; Kelly, R.J.

    1998-09-15

    The gene encoding GDP-L-fucose: {beta}-D-Galactoside 2-{alpha}-Lfucosyltransferase has been cloned, and a mutation in this gene has been found to be responsible for an individual being a non-secretor. 30 figs.

  17. Exploring the correlation between the sequence composition of the nucleotide binding G5 loop of the FeoB GTPase domain (NFeoB) and intrinsic rate of GDP release.

    PubMed

    Guilfoyle, Amy P; Deshpande, Chandrika N; Schenk, Gerhard; Maher, Megan J; Jormakka, Mika

    2014-12-12

    GDP release from GTPases is usually extremely slow and is in general assisted by external factors, such as association with guanine exchange factors or membrane-embedded GPCRs (G protein-coupled receptors), which accelerate the release of GDP by several orders of magnitude. Intrinsic factors can also play a significant role; a single amino acid substitution in one of the guanine nucleotide recognition motifs, G5, results in a drastically altered GDP release rate, indicating that the sequence composition of this motif plays an important role in spontaneous GDP release. In the present study, we used the GTPase domain from EcNFeoB (Escherichia coli FeoB) as a model and applied biochemical and structural approaches to evaluate the role of all the individual residues in the G5 loop. Our study confirms that several of the residues in the G5 motif have an important role in the intrinsic affinity and release of GDP. In particular, a T151A mutant (third residue of the G5 loop) leads to a reduced nucleotide affinity and provokes a drastically accelerated dissociation of GDP.

  18. Peripheral Vision Varies from Person to Person

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164630.html Peripheral Vision Varies From Person to Person And 'bad spots' ... left side? A bad spot in your peripheral vision may be to blame. Peripheral vision is the ...

  19. National Income Inequality and Declining GDP Growth Rates Are Associated with Increases in HIV Diagnoses among People Who Inject Drugs in Europe: A Panel Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nikolopoulos, Georgios K.; Fotiou, Anastasios; Kanavou, Eleftheria; Richardson, Clive; Detsis, Marios; Pharris, Anastasia; Suk, Jonathan E.; Semenza, Jan C.; Costa-Storti, Claudia; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Sypsa, Vana; Malliori, Melpomeni-Minerva; Friedman, Samuel R.; Hatzakis, Angelos

    2015-01-01

    Background There is sparse evidence that demonstrates the association between macro-environmental processes and drug-related HIV epidemics. The present study explores the relationship between economic, socio-economic, policy and structural indicators, and increases in reported HIV infections among people who inject drugs (PWID) in the European Economic Area (EEA). Methods We used panel data (2003–2012) for 30 EEA countries. Statistical analyses included logistic regression models. The dependent variable was taking value 1 if there was an outbreak (significant increase in the national rate of HIV diagnoses in PWID) and 0 otherwise. Explanatory variables included the growth rate of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), the share of the population that is at risk for poverty, the unemployment rate, the Eurostat S80/S20 ratio, the Gini coefficient, the per capita government expenditure on health and social protection, and variables on drug control policy and drug-using population sizes. Lags of one to three years were investigated. Findings In multivariable analyses, using two-year lagged values, we found that a 1% increase of GDP was associated with approximately 30% reduction in the odds of an HIV outbreak. In GDP-adjusted analyses with three-year lagged values, the effect of the national income inequality on the likelihood of an HIV outbreak was significant [S80/S20 Odds Ratio (OR) = 3.89; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.15 to 13.13]. Generally, the multivariable analyses produced similar results across three time lags tested. Interpretation Given the limitations of ecological research, we found that declining economic growth and increasing national income inequality were associated with an elevated probability of a large increase in the number of HIV diagnoses among PWID in EEA countries during the last decade. HIV prevention may be more effective if developed within national and European-level policy contexts that promote income equality, especially among vulnerable

  20. Rabconnectin-3, a novel protein that binds both GDP/GTP exchange protein and GTPase-activating protein for Rab3 small G protein family.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Fumiko; Kawabe, Hiroshi; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Shinohara, Masahiko; Deguchi-Tawarada, Maki; Takeuchi, Masakazu; Sasaki, Takuya; Takai, Yoshimi

    2002-03-22

    Rab3A, a member of the Rab3 small G protein family, regulates Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis of neurotransmitter. The cyclical activation and inactivation of Rab3A are essential for the Rab3A action in exocytosis. GDP-Rab3A is activated to GTP-Rab3A by Rab3 GDP/GTP exchange protein (Rab3 GEP), and GTP-Rab3A is inactivated to GDP-Rab3A by Rab3 GTPase-activating protein (Rab3 GAP). It remains unknown how or in which step of the multiple exocytosis steps these regulators are activated and inactivated. We isolated here a novel protein that was co-immunoprecipitated with Rab3 GEP and GAP by their respective antibodies from the crude synaptic vesicle fraction of rat brain. The protein, named rabconnectin-3, bound both Rab3 GEP and GAP. The cDNA of rabconnectin-3 was cloned from a human cDNA library and its primary structure was determined. Human rabconnectin-3 consisted of 3,036 amino acids and showed a calculated M(r) of 339,753. It had 12 WD domains. Tissue and subcellular distribution analyses in rat indicated that rabconnectin-3 was abundantly expressed in the brain where it was enriched in the synaptic vesicle fraction. Immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy revealed that rabconnectin-3 was concentrated on synaptic vesicles at synapses. These results indicate that rabconnectin-3 serves as a scaffold molecule for both Rab3 GEP and GAP on synaptic vesicles.

  1. Myristoylation-facilitated binding of the G protein ARF1GDP to membrane phospholipids is required for its activation by a soluble nucleotide exchange factor.

    PubMed

    Franco, M; Chardin, P; Chabre, M; Paris, S

    1996-01-19

    We have investigated the role of N-myristoylation in the activation of bovine ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1). We previously showed that myristoylation allows some spontaneous GDP-to-GTP exchange to occur on ARF1 at physiological Mg2+ levels in the presence of phospholipid vesicles (Franco, M., Chardin, P., Chabre, M., and Paris, S. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 1337-1341). Here, we report that this basal nucleotide exchange can be accelerated (by up to 5-fold) by addition of a soluble fraction obtained from bovine retinas. This acceleration is totally abolished by brefeldin A (IC50 = 2 microM) and by trypsin treatment of the retinal extract, as expected for an ARF-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor. To accelerate GDP release from ARF1, this soluble exchange factor absolutely requires myristoylation of ARF1 and the presence of phospholipid vesicles. The retinal extract also stimulates guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)-triphosphate (GTP gamma S) release from ARF1 in the presence of phospholipids, but in this case myristoylation of ARF is not required. These observations, together with our previous findings that both myristoylated and non-myristoylated forms of ARF GTP-gamma S but only the myristoylated form of ARFGDP bind to membrane phospholipids, suggest that (i) the retinal exchange factor acts only on membrane-bound ARF, (ii) the myristate is not involved in the protein-protein interaction between ARF1 and the exchange factor, and (iii) N-myristoylation facilitates both spontaneous and catalyzed GDP-to-GTP exchange on ARF1 simply by facilitating the binding of ARFGDP to membrane phospholipids.

  2. Two tomato GDP-D-mannose epimerase isoforms involved in ascorbate biosynthesis play specific roles in cell wall biosynthesis and development.

    PubMed

    Mounet-Gilbert, Louise; Dumont, Marie; Ferrand, Carine; Bournonville, Céline; Monier, Antoine; Jorly, Joana; Lemaire-Chamley, Martine; Mori, Kentaro; Atienza, Isabelle; Hernould, Michel; Stevens, Rebecca; Lehner, Arnaud; Mollet, Jean Claude; Rothan, Christophe; Lerouge, Patrice; Baldet, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    GDP-D-mannose epimerase (GME, EC 5.1.3.18) converts GDP-D-mannose to GDP-L-galactose, and is considered to be a central enzyme connecting the major ascorbate biosynthesis pathway to primary cell wall metabolism in higher plants. Our previous work demonstrated that GME is crucial for both ascorbate and cell wall biosynthesis in tomato. The aim of the present study was to investigate the respective role in ascorbate and cell wall biosynthesis of the two SlGME genes present in tomato by targeting each of them through an RNAi-silencing approach. Taken individually SlGME1 and SlGME2 allowed normal ascorbate accumulation in the leaf and fruits, thus suggesting the same function regarding ascorbate. However, SlGME1 and SlGME2 were shown to play distinct roles in cell wall biosynthesis, depending on the tissue considered. The RNAi-SlGME1 plants harbored small and poorly seeded fruits resulting from alterations of pollen development and of pollination process. In contrast, the RNAi-SlGME2 plants exhibited vegetative growth delay while fruits remained unaffected. Analysis of SlGME1- and SlGME2-silenced seeds and seedlings further showed that the dimerization state of pectin rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) was altered only in the RNAi-SlGME2 lines. Taken together with the preferential expression of each SlGME gene in different tomato tissues, these results suggest sub-functionalization of SlGME1 and SlGME2 and their specialization for cell wall biosynthesis in specific tomato tissues.

  3. A conserved phenylalanine as a relay between the α5 helix and the GDP binding region of heterotrimeric Gi protein α subunit.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Ali I; Lokits, Alyssa D; Gilbert, James A; Iverson, Tina M; Meiler, Jens; Hamm, Heidi E

    2014-08-29

    G protein activation by G protein-coupled receptors is one of the critical steps for many cellular signal transduction pathways. Previously, we and other groups reported that the α5 helix in the G protein α subunit plays a major role during this activation process. However, the precise signaling pathway between the α5 helix and the guanosine diphosphate (GDP) binding pocket remains elusive. Here, using structural, biochemical, and computational techniques, we probed different residues around the α5 helix for their role in signaling. Our data showed that perturbing the Phe-336 residue disturbs hydrophobic interactions with the β2-β3 strands and α1 helix, leading to high basal nucleotide exchange. However, mutations in β strands β5 and β6 do not perturb G protein activation. We have highlighted critical residues that leverage Phe-336 as a relay. Conformational changes are transmitted starting from Phe-336 via β2-β3/α1 to Switch I and the phosphate binding loop, decreasing the stability of the GDP binding pocket and triggering nucleotide release. When the α1 and α5 helices were cross-linked, inhibiting the receptor-mediated displacement of the C-terminal α5 helix, mutation of Phe-336 still leads to high basal exchange rates. This suggests that unlike receptor-mediated activation, helix 5 rotation and translocation are not necessary for GDP release from the α subunit. Rather, destabilization of the backdoor region of the Gα subunit is sufficient for triggering the activation process. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Two tomato GDP-D-mannose epimerase isoforms involved in ascorbate biosynthesis play specific roles in cell wall biosynthesis and development

    PubMed Central

    Mounet-Gilbert, Louise; Dumont, Marie; Ferrand, Carine; Bournonville, Céline; Monier, Antoine; Jorly, Joana; Lemaire-Chamley, Martine; Mori, Kentaro; Atienza, Isabelle; Hernould, Michel; Stevens, Rebecca; Lehner, Arnaud; Mollet, Jean Claude; Rothan, Christophe; Lerouge, Patrice; Baldet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    GDP-D-mannose epimerase (GME, EC 5.1.3.18) converts GDP-D-mannose to GDP-L-galactose, and is considered to be a central enzyme connecting the major ascorbate biosynthesis pathway to primary cell wall metabolism in higher plants. Our previous work demonstrated that GME is crucial for both ascorbate and cell wall biosynthesis in tomato. The aim of the present study was to investigate the respective role in ascorbate and cell wall biosynthesis of the two SlGME genes present in tomato by targeting each of them through an RNAi-silencing approach. Taken individually SlGME1 and SlGME2 allowed normal ascorbate accumulation in the leaf and fruits, thus suggesting the same function regarding ascorbate. However, SlGME1 and SlGME2 were shown to play distinct roles in cell wall biosynthesis, depending on the tissue considered. The RNAi-SlGME1 plants harbored small and poorly seeded fruits resulting from alterations of pollen development and of pollination process. In contrast, the RNAi-SlGME2 plants exhibited vegetative growth delay while fruits remained unaffected. Analysis of SlGME1- and SlGME2-silenced seeds and seedlings further showed that the dimerization state of pectin rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) was altered only in the RNAi-SlGME2 lines. Taken together with the preferential expression of each SlGME gene in different tomato tissues, these results suggest sub-functionalization of SlGME1 and SlGME2 and their specialization for cell wall biosynthesis in specific tomato tissues. PMID:27382114

  5. Latvian Mathematics Teachers' Beliefs on Effective Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapkova, Alesja

    2011-01-01

    The article aims to present findings of a study on the profile of traditional/constructivist beliefs of mathematics teachers in Latvia connected with effective teaching. For this purpose, data acquired within the framework of the project "Nordic-Baltic comparative research in mathematics education" (NorBa) were analyzed. The sample…

  6. Teaching of laser medical topics: Latvian experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spigulis, Janis

    2002-10-01

    Pilot program for Master's studies on Biomedical Optics has been developed and launched at University of Latvia in 1995. The Curriculum contains several basic subjects like Fundamentals of Biomedical Optics, Medical Lightguides, Anatomy and Physiology, Lasers and Non-coherent Light Sources, Optical Instrumentation for Healthcare, Optical Methods for Patient Treatment, Basic Physics, etc. Special English Terminology and Laboratory-Clinical Praxis are also involved, and the Master Theses is the final step for the degree award. Recently a new extensive short course for medical laser users "Lasers and Bio-optics in Medicine" has been prepared in the PowerPoint format and successfully presented in Latvia, Lithuania and Sweden.

  7. Latvian Mathematics Teachers' Beliefs on Effective Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapkova, Alesja

    2011-01-01

    The article aims to present findings of a study on the profile of traditional/constructivist beliefs of mathematics teachers in Latvia connected with effective teaching. For this purpose, data acquired within the framework of the project "Nordic-Baltic comparative research in mathematics education" (NorBa) were analyzed. The sample…

  8. Altered lignification in mur1-1 a mutant deficient in GDP-L-fucose synthesis with reduced RG-II cross linking.

    PubMed

    Voxeur, Aline; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Legée, Frédéric; Sakai, Kaori; Antelme, Sébastien; Durand-Tardif, Mylène; Lapierre, Catherine; Sibout, Richard

    2017-01-01

    In the plant cell wall, boron links two pectic domain rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II) chains together to form a dimer and thus contributes to the reinforcement of cell adhesion. We studied the mur1-1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana which has lost the ability to form GDP-fucose in the shoots and show that the extent of RG-II cross-linking is reduced in the lignified stem of this mutant. Surprisingly, MUR1 mutation induced an enrichment of resistant interunit bonds in lignin and triggered the overexpression of many genes involved in lignified tissue formation and in jasmonic acid signaling. The defect in GDP-fucose synthesis induced a loss of cell adhesion at the interface between stele and cortex, as well as between interfascicular fibers. This led to the formation of regenerative xylem, where tissue detachment occurred, and underlined a loss of resistance to mechanical forces. Similar observations were also made on bor1-3 mutant stems which are altered in boron xylem loading, leading us to suggest that diminished RG-II dimerization is responsible for regenerative xylem formation.

  9. Regulation of ascorbate biosynthesis in green algae has evolved to enable rapid stress-induced response via the VTC2 gene encoding GDP-l-galactose phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Meireles, André; Neupert, Juliane; Zsigmond, Laura; Rosado-Souza, Laise; Kovács, László; Nagy, Valéria; Galambos, Anikó; Fernie, Alisdair R; Bock, Ralph; Tóth, Szilvia Z

    2017-04-01

    Ascorbate (vitamin C) plays essential roles in stress resistance, development, signaling, hormone biosynthesis and regulation of gene expression; however, little is known about its biosynthesis in algae. In order to provide experimental proof for the operation of the Smirnoff-Wheeler pathway described for higher plants and to gain more information on the regulation of ascorbate biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we targeted the VTC2 gene encoding GDP-l-galactose phosphorylase using artificial microRNAs. Ascorbate concentrations in VTC2 amiRNA lines were reduced to 10% showing that GDP-l-galactose phosphorylase plays a pivotal role in ascorbate biosynthesis. The VTC2 amiRNA lines also grow more slowly, have lower chlorophyll content, and are more susceptible to stress than the control strains. We also demonstrate that: expression of the VTC2 gene is rapidly induced by H2 O2 and (1) O2 resulting in a manifold increase in ascorbate content; in contrast to plants, there is no circadian regulation of ascorbate biosynthesis; photosynthesis is not required per se for ascorbate biosynthesis; and Chlamydomonas VTC2 lacks negative feedback regulation by ascorbate in the physiological concentration range. Our work demonstrates that ascorbate biosynthesis is also highly regulated in Chlamydomonas albeit via mechanisms distinct from those previously described in land plants.

  10. GDP-capture compound--a novel tool for the profiling of GTPases in pro- and eukaryotes by capture compound mass spectrometry (CCMS).

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan; Fischer, Jenny J; Baessler, Olivia Y Graebner Neé; Schrey, Anna K; Ungewiss, Jan; Glinski, Mirko; Sefkow, Michael; Dreger, Mathias; Koester, Hubert

    2010-02-10

    The functional isolation of proteome subsets based on small molecule-protein interactions is an increasingly popular and promising field in functional proteomics. Entire protein families may be profiled on the basis of their common interaction with a metabolite or small molecule inhibitor. This is enabled by novel multifunctional small molecule probes. One platform approach in this field are Capture Compounds that contain a small molecule of interest to bind target proteins, a photo-activatable reactivity function to covalently trap bound proteins, and a sorting function to isolate Capture Compound-protein conjugates from complex biological samples for direct trypsinisation and protein identification by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (CCMS). We here present the synthesis and application of a novel GDP-Capture Compound for the functional enrichment of GTPases, a pivotal protein family that exerts key functions in signal transduction. We present data from CCMS experiments on two biological lysates from Escherichia coli and from human-derived Hek293 cells. The GDP-Capture Compound robustly captures a wide range of different GTPases from both systems and will be a valuable tool for the proteomic profiling of this important protein family.

  11. X-ray structure of the T. aquaticus FtsY:GDP complex suggests functional roles for the C-terminal helix of the SRP GTPases.

    PubMed

    Gawronski-Salerno, Joseph; Coon, John S; Focia, Pamela J; Freymann, Douglas M

    2007-03-01

    FtsY and Ffh are structurally similar prokaryotic Signal Recognition Particle GTPases that play an essential role in the Signal Recognition Particle (SRP)-mediated cotranslational targeting of proteins to the membrane. The two GTPases assemble in a GTP-dependent manner to form a heterodimeric SRP targeting complex. We report here the 2.1 A X-ray structure of FtsY from T. aquaticus bound to GDP. The structure of the monomeric protein reveals, unexpectedly, canonical binding interactions for GDP. A comparison of the structures of the monomeric and complexed FtsY NG GTPase domain suggests that it undergoes a conformational change similar to that of Ffh NG during the assembly of the symmetric heterodimeric complex. However, in contrast to Ffh, in which the C-terminal helix shifts independently of the other subdomains, the C-terminal helix and N domain of T. aquaticus FtsY together behave as a rigid body during assembly, suggesting distinct mechanisms by which the interactions of the NG domain "module" are regulated in the context of the two SRP GTPases.

  12. Role of the Arf6 GDP/GTP cycle and Arf6 GTPase-activating proteins in actin remodeling and intracellular transport.

    PubMed

    Klein, Stéphanie; Franco, Michel; Chardin, Pierre; Luton, Frédéric

    2006-05-05

    We have analyzed both biochemically and functionally a series of Arf6 mutants, providing new insights into the molecular mode of action of the small G protein Arf6. First, by comparing a fast-cycling mutant (Arf6(T157N)) and a GTPase-deficient mutant (Arf6(Q67L)), we established the necessity for completion of the Arf6 GDP/GTP cycle for recycling of major histocompatibility complex molecules to the plasma membrane. Second, we found that aluminum fluoride (AlF), known for inducing membrane protrusion in cells expressing exogenous wild-type Arf6, stabilized a functional wild-type Arf6.AlF(x) . GTPase-activating protein (GAP) complex in vitro and in vivo. We also found that the tandem mutation Q37E/S38I prevented the binding of two Arf GAPs, but not the effector ARHGAP10, and blocked the formation of membrane protrusion and actin reorganization. Together, our results with AlF(x) and Arf6(Q37E/S38I) demonstrate the critical role of the Arf6 GAPs as effectors for Arf6-regulated actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Finally, competition experiments conducted in vivo suggest the existence of a membrane receptor for GDP-bound Arf6.

  13. A Structural Study of GDP-4-Keto-6-Deoxy-D-Mannose-3-Dehydratase: Caught in the Act of Geminal Diamine Formation¶

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Paul D.; Holden, Hazel M.

    2008-01-01

    Di- and tri-deoxysugars are an important class of carbohydrates synthesized by certain plants, fungi, and bacteria. Colitose, for example, is a 3,6-dideoxysugar found in the O-antigens of Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, and Vibrio cholerae, among others. These types of dideoxysugars are thought to serve as antigenic determinants and to play key roles in bacterial defense and survival. Four enzymes are required for the biochemical synthesis of colitose starting from mannose-1-phosphate. The focus of this investigation, GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-D-mannose-3-dehydratase (ColD), catalyzes the third step in the pathway, namely the PLP-dependent removal of the C3′-hydroxyl group from GDP-4-keto-6-deoxymannose. Whereas most PLP-dependent enzymes contain an active site lysine, ColD utilizes a histidine as its catalytic acid/base. The ping-pong mechanism of the enzyme first involves the conversion of PLP to PMP followed by the dehydration step. Here we present the three-dimensional structure of a site-directed mutant form of ColD whereby the active site histidine has been replaced with a lysine. The electron density reveals that the geminal diamine, a tetrahedral intermediate in the formation of PMP from PLP, has been trapped within the active site region. Functional assays further demonstrate that this mutant form of ColD cannot catalyze the dehydration reaction. PMID:17997582

  14. Interferon-induced guanylate-binding proteins lack an N(T)KXD consensus motif and bind GMP in addition to GDP and GTP.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y S; Patterson, C E; Staeheli, P

    1991-09-01

    The primary structures of interferon (IFN)-induced guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) were deduced from cloned human and murine cDNAs. These proteins contained only two of the three sequence motifs typically found in GTP/GDP-binding proteins. The N(T)KXD motif, which is believed to confer guanine specificity in other nucleotide-binding proteins, was absent. Nevertheless, the IFN-induced GBPs exhibited a high degree of selectivity for binding to agarose-immobilized guanine nucleotides. An interesting feature of IFN-induced GBPs is that they strongly bound to GMP agarose in addition to GDP and GTP agaroses but failed to bind to ATP agarose and all other nucleotide agaroses tested. Both GTP and GMP, but not ATP, competed for binding of murine GBP-1 to agarose-immobilized GMP. The IFN-induced GBPs thus define a distinct novel family of proteins with GTP-binding activity. We further demonstrate that human and murine cells contain at least two genes encoding IFN-induced GBPs. The cloned murine cDNA codes for GBP-1, an IFN-induced protein previously shown to be absent from mice of Gbp-1b genotype.

  15. Deciphering the sugar biosynthetic pathway and tailoring steps of nucleoside antibiotic A201A unveils a GDP-l-galactose mutase.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qinghua; Chen, Qi; Song, Yongxiang; Huang, Hongbo; Li, Jun; Ma, Junying; Li, Qinglian; Ju, Jianhua

    2017-05-09

    Galactose, a monosaccharide capable of assuming two possible configurational isomers (d-/l-), can exist as a six-membered ring, galactopyranose (Galp), or as a five-membered ring, galactofuranose (Galf). UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) mediates the conversion of pyranose to furanose thereby providing a precursor for d-Galf Moreover, UGM is critical to the virulence of numerous eukaryotic and prokaryotic human pathogens and thus represents an excellent antimicrobial drug target. However, the biosynthetic mechanism and relevant enzymes that drive l-Galf production have not yet been characterized. Herein we report that efforts to decipher the sugar biosynthetic pathway and tailoring steps en route to nucleoside antibiotic A201A led to the discovery of a GDP-l-galactose mutase, MtdL. Systematic inactivation of 18 of the 33 biosynthetic genes in the A201A cluster and elucidation of 10 congeners, coupled with feeding and in vitro biochemical experiments, enabled us to: (i) decipher the unique enzyme, GDP-l-galactose mutase associated with production of two unique d-mannose-derived sugars, and (ii) assign two glycosyltransferases, four methyltransferases, and one desaturase that regiospecifically tailor the A201A scaffold and display relaxed substrate specificities. Taken together, these data provide important insight into the origin of l-Galf-containing natural product biosynthetic pathways with likely ramifications in other organisms and possible antimicrobial drug targeting strategies.

  16. [Construction of three-dimensional models of Arabidopsis thaliana FtsZ-proteins on basis of crystal structure of archaebacterial FtsZ-GDP complex].

    PubMed

    Demchuk, O N; Nyporko, A Iu; Blium, Ia B

    2006-01-01

    Three-dimensional models of FtsZ-protein complexes with GDP from Arabidopsis thaliana L. localized in cytosol (Entrez database code NP190843) and in chloroplasts (Entrez database code AAA82068) were developed. Crystal structure of the FtsZ-GDP complex from archaea Methanococcus jannaschii (PDB-code 1FSZ) was used as a matrix. Secondary structures of computed models contain ten beta-strands. A chloroplast form of FtsZ-protein has ten alpha-helices and four 3(10)-helices, whereas cytosolic form of protein has nine and three structures correspondently and neither a0-helix before nucleotide-binding domain nor C-terminal 3(10)-helix in secondary domain. The T2-loop of nucleotide-binding pocket of chloroplast form of FtsZ-ptotein in position 111 contains non-charged alanin residue instead of the charged one which is typical for cytosolic and bacterial forms of proteins. At low sequence homology of FtsZ-proteins (approximately 47%) the developed models demonstrate high coincidence with matrix both in the structures of nucleotide-binding pocket and in the whole molecule. The models are completely suitable for further studies of possible sites of binding with dinitroaniline herbicides.

  17. Genetics of xanthan production in Xanthomonas campestris: the xanA and xanB genes are involved in UDP-glucose and GDP-mannose biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Köplin, R; Arnold, W; Hötte, B; Simon, R; Wang, G; Pühler, A

    1992-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 3.4-kb EcoRI-PstI DNA fragment of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris revealed two open reading frames, which were designated xanA and xanB. The genes xanA and xanB encode proteins of 448 amino acids (molecular weight of 48,919) and 466 amino acids (molecular weight of 50,873), respectively. These genes were identified by analyzing insertion mutants which were known to be involved in xanthan production. Specific tests for the activities of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of UDP-glucose and GDP-mannose indicated that the xanA gene product was involved in the biosynthesis of both glucose 1-phosphate and mannose 1-phosphate. The deduced amino acid sequence of xanB showed a significant degree of homology (59%) to the phosphomannose isomerase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of alginate. Moreover, biochemical analysis and complementation experiments with the Escherichia coli manA fragment revealed that xanB encoded a bifunctional enzyme, phosphomannose isomerase-GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase. Images PMID:1370280

  18. Varying G. [in Einstein gravitation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Hsieh, S.-H.; Owen, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of the variation of the gravitational constant with cosmological time is critically analyzed. Since Einstein's equation does not allow G to vary on any time scale, no observational data can be analyzed within the context of the standard theory. The recently proposed scale covariant theory, which allows (but does not demand) G to vary, and which has been shown to have passed several standard cosmological tests, is employed to discuss some recent nonnull observational results which indicate a time variation of G.

  19. Varying G. [in Einstein gravitation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Hsieh, S.-H.; Owen, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of the variation of the gravitational constant with cosmological time is critically analyzed. Since Einstein's equation does not allow G to vary on any time scale, no observational data can be analyzed within the context of the standard theory. The recently proposed scale covariant theory, which allows (but does not demand) G to vary, and which has been shown to have passed several standard cosmological tests, is employed to discuss some recent nonnull observational results which indicate a time variation of G.

  20. Venturi Tube with Varying Mass Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regenscheit, B.

    1948-01-01

    Measurements on three tubes with flow regulated by suction at the trainling edge of the tube are described. It was possible to vary the mass of air flowing through the tube over a large range. Such tubes could be used for shrouded propellers.

  1. Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.; Cassel, Susie L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX), a clinical program designed to assess the degree to which an individual is able to demonstrate self-control for overall general relaxation. The program is designed for use with the Cassel Biosensors biofeedback equipment. (JAC)

  2. Regularizing cosmological singularities by varying physical constants

    SciTech Connect

    Dąbrowski, Mariusz P.; Marosek, Konrad E-mail: k.marosek@wmf.univ.szczecin.pl

    2013-02-01

    Varying physical constant cosmologies were claimed to solve standard cosmological problems such as the horizon, the flatness and the Λ-problem. In this paper, we suggest yet another possible application of these theories: solving the singularity problem. By specifying some examples we show that various cosmological singularities may be regularized provided the physical constants evolve in time in an appropriate way.

  3. The Varied Uses of Readability Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Edward

    Readability formulas have varied uses. In education they are used to match children's reading ability to the difficulty level of material, select stories and books for classroom use and for individual students' particular needs, select textbooks and other reading materials, aid educational research, and check reading materials of newly literate…

  4. Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.; Cassel, Susie L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX), a clinical program designed to assess the degree to which an individual is able to demonstrate self-control for overall general relaxation. The program is designed for use with the Cassel Biosensors biofeedback equipment. (JAC)

  5. The Varied Uses of Readability Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Edward

    Readability formulas have varied uses. In education they are used to match children's reading ability to the difficulty level of material, select stories and books for classroom use and for individual students' particular needs, select textbooks and other reading materials, aid educational research, and check reading materials of newly literate…

  6. In silico analysis of the fucosylation-associated genome of the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni: cloning and characterization of the enzymes involved in GDP-L-fucose synthesis and Golgi import

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Carbohydrate structures of surface-expressed and secreted/excreted glycoconjugates of the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni are key determinants that mediate host-parasite interactions in both snail and mammalian hosts. Fucose is a major constituent of these immunologically important glycans, and recent studies have sought to characterize fucosylation-associated enzymes, including the Golgi-localized fucosyltransferases that catalyze the transfer of L-fucose from a GDP-L-fucose donor to an oligosaccharide acceptor. Importantly, GDP-L-fucose is the only nucleotide-sugar donor used by fucosyltransferases and its availability represents a bottleneck in fucosyl-glycotope expression. Methods A homology-based genome-wide bioinformatics approach was used to identify and molecularly characterize the enzymes that contribute to GDP-L-fucose synthesis and Golgi import in S. mansoni. Putative functions were further investigated through molecular phylogenetic and immunocytochemical analyses. Results We identified homologs of GDP-D-mannose-4,6-dehydratase (GMD) and GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-D-mannose-3,5-epimerase-4-reductase (GMER), which constitute a de novo pathway for GDP-L-fucose synthesis, in addition to a GDP-L-fucose transporter (GFT) that putatively imports cytosolic GDP-L-fucose into the Golgi. In silico primary sequence analyses identified characteristic Rossman loop and short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase motifs in GMD and GMER as well as 10 transmembrane domains in GFT. All genes are alternatively spliced, generating variants of unknown function. Observed quantitative differences in steady-state transcript levels between miracidia and primary sporocysts may contribute to differential glycotope expression in early larval development. Additionally, analyses of protein expression suggest the occurrence of cytosolic GMD and GMER in the ciliated epidermal plates and tegument of miracidia and primary sporocysts, respectively, which is consistent with previous

  7. In silico analysis of the fucosylation-associated genome of the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni: cloning and characterization of the enzymes involved in GDP-L-fucose synthesis and Golgi import.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Nathan A; Anderson, Tavis K; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Yoshino, Timothy P

    2013-07-09

    Carbohydrate structures of surface-expressed and secreted/excreted glycoconjugates of the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni are key determinants that mediate host-parasite interactions in both snail and mammalian hosts. Fucose is a major constituent of these immunologically important glycans, and recent studies have sought to characterize fucosylation-associated enzymes, including the Golgi-localized fucosyltransferases that catalyze the transfer of L-fucose from a GDP-L-fucose donor to an oligosaccharide acceptor. Importantly, GDP-L-fucose is the only nucleotide-sugar donor used by fucosyltransferases and its availability represents a bottleneck in fucosyl-glycotope expression. A homology-based genome-wide bioinformatics approach was used to identify and molecularly characterize the enzymes that contribute to GDP-L-fucose synthesis and Golgi import in S. mansoni. Putative functions were further investigated through molecular phylogenetic and immunocytochemical analyses. We identified homologs of GDP-D-mannose-4,6-dehydratase (GMD) and GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-D-mannose-3,5-epimerase-4-reductase (GMER), which constitute a de novo pathway for GDP-L-fucose synthesis, in addition to a GDP-L-fucose transporter (GFT) that putatively imports cytosolic GDP-L-fucose into the Golgi. In silico primary sequence analyses identified characteristic Rossman loop and short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase motifs in GMD and GMER as well as 10 transmembrane domains in GFT. All genes are alternatively spliced, generating variants of unknown function. Observed quantitative differences in steady-state transcript levels between miracidia and primary sporocysts may contribute to differential glycotope expression in early larval development. Additionally, analyses of protein expression suggest the occurrence of cytosolic GMD and GMER in the ciliated epidermal plates and tegument of miracidia and primary sporocysts, respectively, which is consistent with previous localization of highly

  8. Components in time-varying graphs.

    PubMed

    Nicosia, Vincenzo; Tang, John; Musolesi, Mirco; Russo, Giovanni; Mascolo, Cecilia; Latora, Vito

    2012-06-01

    Real complex systems are inherently time-varying. Thanks to new communication systems and novel technologies, today it is possible to produce and analyze social and biological networks with detailed information on the time of occurrence and duration of each link. However, standard graph metrics introduced so far in complex network theory are mainly suited for static graphs, i.e., graphs in which the links do not change over time, or graphs built from time-varying systems by aggregating all the links as if they were concurrent in time. In this paper, we extend the notion of connectedness, and the definitions of node and graph components, to the case of time-varying graphs, which are represented as time-ordered sequences of graphs defined over a fixed set of nodes. We show that the problem of finding strongly connected components in a time-varying graph can be mapped into the problem of discovering the maximal-cliques in an opportunely constructed static graph, which we name the affine graph. It is, therefore, an NP-complete problem. As a practical example, we have performed a temporal component analysis of time-varying graphs constructed from three data sets of human interactions. The results show that taking time into account in the definition of graph components allows to capture important features of real systems. In particular, we observe a large variability in the size of node temporal in- and out-components. This is due to intrinsic fluctuations in the activity patterns of individuals, which cannot be detected by static graph analysis.

  9. Oxidation of 5'-dGMP, 5'-dGDP, and 5'-dGTP by a platinum(IV) complex.

    PubMed

    Kipouros, Ioannis; Fica-Contreras, Sebastian Matias; Bowe, Gregory Joon Kee; Choi, Sunhee

    2015-12-01

    We previously reported that a Pt(IV) complex, [Pt(IV)(dach)Cl4] [trans-d,l-1,2-diaminocyclohexanetetrachloroplatinum(IV)] binds to the N7 of 5'-dGMP (deoxyguanosine-5'-monophosphate) at a relatively fast rate and oxidizes it to 8-oxo-5'-dGMP. Here, we further studied the kinetics of the oxidation of 5'-dGMP by the Pt(IV) complex. The electron transfer rate constants between 5'-dGMP and Pt(IV) in [H8-5'-dGMP-Pt(IV)] and [D8-5'-dGMP-Pt(IV)] were similar, giving a small value of the kinetic isotope effect (KIE: 1.2 ± 0.2). This small KIE indicates that the deprotonation of H8 in [H8-5'-dGMP-Pt(IV)] is not involved in the rate-determining step in the electron transfer between guanine (G) and Pt(IV). We also studied the reaction of 5'-dGDP (deoxyguanosine-5'-diphosphate) and 5'-dGTP (deoxyguanosine-5'-triphosphate) with the Pt(IV) complex. Our results showed that [Pt(IV)(dach)Cl4] oxidized 5'-dGDP and 5'-dGTP to 8-oxo-5'-dGDP and 8-oxo-5'-dGTP, respectively, by the same mechanism and kinetics as for 5'-dGMP. The Pt(IV) complex binds to N7 followed by a two-electron inner sphere electron transfer from G to Pt(IV). The reaction was catalyzed by Pt(II) and occurred faster at higher pH. The electron transfer was initiated by either an intramolecular nucleophilic attack by any of the phosphate groups or an intermolecular nucleophilic attack by free OH(-) in the solution. The rates of reactions for the three nucleotides followed the order: 5'-dGMP > 5'-dGDP > 5'-dGTP, indicating that the bulkier the phosphate groups are, the slower the reaction is, due to the larger steric hindrance and rotational barrier of the phosphate groups.

  10. Activation by intracellular GDP, metabolic inhibition and pinacidil of a glibenclamide-sensitive K-channel in smooth muscle cells of rat mesenteric artery.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H; Bolton, T B

    1995-01-01

    1. Single-channel recordings were made from cell-attached and isolated patches, and whole-cell currents were recorded under voltage clamp from single smooth muscle cells obtained by enzymic digestion of a small branch of the rat mesenteric artery. 2. In single voltage-clamped cells 1 mM uridine diphosphate (UDP) or guanidine diphosphate (GDP) added to the pipette solution, or pinacidil (100 microM) a K-channel opener (KCO) applied in the bathing solution, evoked an outward current of up to 100pA which was blocked by glibenclamide (10 microM). In single cells from which recordings were made by the 'perforated patch' (nystatin pipette) technique, metabolic inhibition by 1 mM NaCN and 10 mM 2-deoxy-glucose also evoked a similar glibenclamide-sensitive current. 3. Single K-channel activity was observed in cell-attached patches only infrequently unless the metabolism of the cell was inhibited, whereupon channel activity blocked by glibenclamide was seen; pinacidil applied to the cell evoked similar glibenclamide-sensitive channel activity. If the patch was pulled off the cell to form an isolated inside-out patch, similar glibenclamide-sensitive single-channel currents were observed in the presence of UDP and/or pinacidil to those seen in cell-attached mode; channel conductance was 20 pS (60:130 K-gradient) and openings showed no voltage-dependence and noisy inward currents, typical of the nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) activated K-channel (KNDP) seen previously in rabbit portal vein. 4. Formation of an isolated inside-out patch into an ATP-free solution did not increase the probability of channel opening which declined with time even when some single-channel activity had occurred in the cell-attached mode before detachment. However, application of 1 mM UDP or GDP, but not ATP, to inside-out patches evoked single-channel activity. Application of ATP-free solution to isolated patches, previously exposed to ATP and in which channel activity had been seen, did not evoke

  11. Impact of GDP, spending on R&D, the number of universities and scientific journals on research publications in environmental sciences in the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Al Masri, Abeer A; Usmani, Adnan Mahmood; Halepoto, Dost Muhammad

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to assess the impact of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP), spending on Research and Development (R&D), the number of universities and scientific journals on the published research documents, citable documents, citations per document and H-index in environmental sciences in the Middle East countries. All the 16 Middle East countries were included in the study. Information regarding the GDP, spending on R&D, the total number of universities and indexed journals was collected. Total number of research documents (papers), citable documents, citations per document and H-index in environmental sciences during the period 1996-2011 was recorded. The study used the World Bank, SCI-mago/Scopus, Web of Science, Journal Citation Reports (Thomson Reuters) as the main sources of information. The mean GDP per capita of all the Middle East countries amounted to 18 125.49±5386.28 US$, spending on R&D was 0.63±0.28 US$, the number of universities equaled 36.56±11.33 and mean ISI indexed journals amounted to 8.25±3.93. The mean number of research documents published in environmental sciences in the Middle East countries during the period 1996-2011 was 2202.12±883.98; citable documents: 2156.87±865.09; citations per document: 8.74±0.73; and the H-index: 35.37±6.17. There was a positive correlation between the money spent on R&D and citations per documents (r = 0.6, p = 0.01), H-Index (r = 0.6, p = 0.01); the number of universities and a total of research documents (r = 0.65, p = 0.006), citable documents (r = 0.65, p = 0.006), H-Index (r = 0.50, p = 0.04), as well as ISI indexed journals and total research documents (r = 0.94, p = 0.0001), citable documents (r = 0.94, p = 0.0001), H-Index (r = 0.73, p = 0.001). The Middle East countries which spend more on R&D and which have a large number of universities and ISI indexed journals are likely to produce more significant volume of research papers in the field of environmental science.

  12. Influence of Bicarbonate/Low-GDP Peritoneal Dialysis Fluid (Bicavera) on In Vitro and Ex Vivo Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition of Mesothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fernández–Perpén, Antonio; Pérez–Lozano, María Luisa; Bajo, María–Auxiliadora; Albar–Vizcaino, Patricia; Correa, Pilar Sandoval; del Peso, Gloria; Castro, María–José; Aguilera, Abelardo; Ossorio, Marta; Peter, Mirjam E.; Passlick–Deetjen, Jutta; Aroeira, Luiz S.; Selgas, Rafael; López–Cabrera, Manuel; Sánchez–Tomero, J. Antonio

    2012-01-01

    ♦ Background: Peritoneal membrane damage induced by peritoneal dialysis (PD) is largely associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of mesothelial cells (MCs), which is believed to be a result mainly of the glucose degradation products (GDPs) present in PD solutions. ♦ Objectives: This study investigated the impact of bicarbonate-buffered, low-GDP PD solution (BicaVera: Fresenius Medical Care, Bad Homburg, Germany) on EMT of MCs in vitro and ex vivo. ♦ Methods: In vitro studies: Omentum-derived MCs were incubated with lactate-buffered standard PD fluid or BicaVera fluid diluted 1:1 with culture medium. Ex vivo studies: From 31 patients randomly distributed to either standard or BicaVera solution and followed for 24 months, effluents were collected every 6 months for determination of EMT markers in effluent MCs. ♦ Results: Culturing of MCs with standard fluid in vitro resulted in morphology change to a non-epithelioid shape, with downregulation of E-cadherin (indicative of EMT) and strong induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. By contrast, in vitro exposure of MCs to bicarbonate/low-GDP solution had less impact on both EMT parameters. Ex vivo studies partially confirmed the foregoing results. The BicaVera group, with a higher prevalence of the non-epithelioid MC phenotype at baseline (for unknown reasons), showed a clear and significant trend to gain and maintain an epithelioid phenotype at medium- and longer-term and to show fewer fibrogenic characteristics. By contrast, the standard solution group demonstrated a progressive and significantly higher presence of the non-epithelioid phenotype. Compared with effluent MCs having an epithelioid phenotype, MCs with non-epithelioid morphology showed significantly lower levels of E-cadherin and greater levels of fibronectin and VEGF. In comparing the BicaVera and standard solution groups, MCs from the standard solution group showed significantly higher secretion of

  13. Continuously Varying Critical Exponents Beyond Weak Universality

    PubMed Central

    Khan, N.; Sarkar, P.; Midya, A.; Mandal, P.; Mohanty, P. K.

    2017-01-01

    Renormalization group theory does not restrict the form of continuous variation of critical exponents which occurs in presence of a marginal operator. However, the continuous variation of critical exponents, observed in different contexts, usually follows a weak universality scenario where some of the exponents (e.g., β, γ, ν) vary keeping others (e.g., δ, η) fixed. Here we report ferromagnetic phase transition in (Sm1−yNdy)0.52Sr0.48MnO3 (0.5 ≤ y ≤ 1) single crystals where all three exponents β, γ, δ vary with Nd concentration y. Such a variation clearly violates both universality and weak universality hypothesis. We propose a new scaling theory that explains the present experimental results, reduces to the weak universality as a special case, and provides a generic route leading to continuous variation of critical exponents and multi-criticality. PMID:28327622

  14. Varying potential silicon carbide gas sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Virgil B. (Inventor); Ryan, Margaret A. (Inventor); Williams, Roger M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A hydrocarbon gas detection device operates by dissociating or electro-chemically oxidizing hydrocarbons adsorbed to a silicon carbide detection layer. Dissociation or oxidation are driven by a varying potential applied to the detection layer. Different hydrocarbon species undergo reaction at different applied potentials so that the device is able to discriminate among various hydrocarbon species. The device can operate at temperatures between 100.degree. C. and at least 650.degree. C., allowing hydrocarbon detection in hot exhaust gases. The dissociation reaction is detected either as a change in a capacitor or, preferably, as a change of current flow through an FET which incorporates the silicon carbide detection layers. The silicon carbide detection layer can be augmented with a pad of catalytic material which provides a signal without an applied potential. Comparisons between the catalytically produced signal and the varying potential produced signal may further help identify the hydrocarbon present.

  15. Learning Time-Varying Coverage Functions

    PubMed Central

    Du, Nan; Liang, Yingyu; Balcan, Maria-Florina; Song, Le

    2015-01-01

    Coverage functions are an important class of discrete functions that capture the law of diminishing returns arising naturally from applications in social network analysis, machine learning, and algorithmic game theory. In this paper, we propose a new problem of learning time-varying coverage functions, and develop a novel parametrization of these functions using random features. Based on the connection between time-varying coverage functions and counting processes, we also propose an efficient parameter learning algorithm based on likelihood maximization, and provide a sample complexity analysis. We applied our algorithm to the influence function estimation problem in information diffusion in social networks, and show that with few assumptions about the diffusion processes, our algorithm is able to estimate influence significantly more accurately than existing approaches on both synthetic and real world data. PMID:25960624

  16. Continuously Varying Critical Exponents Beyond Weak Universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, N.; Sarkar, P.; Midya, A.; Mandal, P.; Mohanty, P. K.

    2017-03-01

    Renormalization group theory does not restrict the form of continuous variation of critical exponents which occurs in presence of a marginal operator. However, the continuous variation of critical exponents, observed in different contexts, usually follows a weak universality scenario where some of the exponents (e.g., β, γ, ν) vary keeping others (e.g., δ, η) fixed. Here we report ferromagnetic phase transition in (Sm1‑yNdy)0.52Sr0.48MnO3 (0.5 ≤ y ≤ 1) single crystals where all three exponents β, γ, δ vary with Nd concentration y. Such a variation clearly violates both universality and weak universality hypothesis. We propose a new scaling theory that explains the present experimental results, reduces to the weak universality as a special case, and provides a generic route leading to continuous variation of critical exponents and multi-criticality.

  17. The Thermal Collector With Varied Glass Covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luminosu, I.; Pop, N.

    2010-08-01

    The thermal collector with varied glass covers represents an innovation realized in order to build a collector able to reach the desired temperature by collecting the solar radiation from the smallest surface, with the highest efficiency. In the case of the thermal collector with variable cover glasses, the number of the glass plates covering the absorber increases together with the length of the circulation pipe for the working fluid. The thermal collector with varied glass covers compared to the conventional collector better meet user requirements because: for the same temperature increase, has the collecting area smaller; for the same collection area, realizes the highest temperature increase and has the highest efficiency. This works is addressed to researchers in the solar energy and to engineers responsible with air-conditioning systems design or industrial and agricultural products drying.

  18. Varied line-space gratings and applications

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, W.R.

    1991-07-15

    This paper presents a straightforward analytical and numerical method for the design of a specific type of varied line-space grating system. The mathematical development will assume plane or nearly-plane spherical gratings which are illuminated by convergent light, which covers many interesting cases for synchrotron radiation. The gratings discussed will have straight grooves whose spacing varies across the principal plane of the grating. Focal relationships and formulae for the optical grating-pole-to-exist-slit distance and grating radius previously presented by other authors will be derived with a symbolic algebra system. It is intended to provide the optical designer with the tools necessary to design such a system properly. Finally, some possible advantages and disadvantages for application to synchrotron to synchrotron radiation beamlines will be discussed.

  19. Synchronization in time-varying networks.

    PubMed

    Kohar, Vivek; Ji, Peng; Choudhary, Anshul; Sinha, Sudeshna; Kurths, Jüergen

    2014-08-01

    We study the stability of the synchronized state in time-varying complex networks using the concept of basin stability, which is a nonlocal and nonlinear measure of stability that can be easily applied to high-dimensional systems [P. J. Menck, J. Heitzig, N. Marwan, and J. Kurths, Nature Phys. 9, 89 (2013)]. The time-varying character is included by stochastically rewiring each link with the average frequency f. We find that the time taken to reach synchronization is lowered and the stability range of the synchronized state increases considerably in dynamic networks. Further we uncover that small-world networks are much more sensitive to link changes than random ones, with the time-varying character of the network having a significant effect at much lower rewiring frequencies. At very high rewiring frequencies, random networks perform better than small-world networks and the synchronized state is stable over a much wider window of coupling strengths. Lastly we show that the stability range of the synchronized state may be quite different for small and large perturbations, and so the linear stability analysis and the basin stability criterion provide complementary indicators of stability.

  20. Genetic Lips Extraction Method for Varying Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akashi, Takuya; Mitsukura, Yasue; Fukumi, Minoru; Akamatsu, Norio

    In this paper, a lips extraction method that can extract lips region from varying lips shape at the moment of speech by using only one template image is described. The method that is proposed in this paper, has invariance for an open and closed mouth, showing or not showing any teeth, and has high speed and high extraction accuracy in consideration for characteristics of the lips by using a genetic method. This method uses the template matching using a genetic algorithm. Furthermore, color of lips and characteristics of the lips shape variances at the moment of speech in this system are utilized. The effectiveness of this method is demonstrated with only one template for each person being tested and a search object, that is, the varying lips shape at the moment of speech of vowels by means of computer simulations. These computer simulations indicate that this method can extract the varying lips shape at the moment of speech by using only one template. Moreover, in the extraction processing of every vowel, a high speed and high extraction accuracy can be obtained.

  1. Synchronization in time-varying networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohar, Vivek; Ji, Peng; Choudhary, Anshul; Sinha, Sudeshna; Kurths, Jüergen

    2014-08-01

    We study the stability of the synchronized state in time-varying complex networks using the concept of basin stability, which is a nonlocal and nonlinear measure of stability that can be easily applied to high-dimensional systems [P. J. Menck, J. Heitzig, N. Marwan, and J. Kurths, Nature Phys. 9, 89 (2013), 10.1038/nphys2516]. The time-varying character is included by stochastically rewiring each link with the average frequency f. We find that the time taken to reach synchronization is lowered and the stability range of the synchronized state increases considerably in dynamic networks. Further we uncover that small-world networks are much more sensitive to link changes than random ones, with the time-varying character of the network having a significant effect at much lower rewiring frequencies. At very high rewiring frequencies, random networks perform better than small-world networks and the synchronized state is stable over a much wider window of coupling strengths. Lastly we show that the stability range of the synchronized state may be quite different for small and large perturbations, and so the linear stability analysis and the basin stability criterion provide complementary indicators of stability.

  2. Adaptive, template moderated, spatially varying statistical classification.

    PubMed

    Warfield, S K; Kaus, M; Jolesz, F A; Kikinis, R

    2000-03-01

    A novel image segmentation algorithm was developed to allow the automatic segmentation of both normal and abnormal anatomy from medical images. The new algorithm is a form of spatially varying statistical classification, in which an explicit anatomical template is used to moderate the segmentation obtained by statistical classification. The algorithm consists of an iterated sequence of spatially varying classification and nonlinear registration, which forms an adaptive, template moderated (ATM), spatially varying statistical classification (SVC). Classification methods and nonlinear registration methods are often complementary, both in the tasks where they succeed and in the tasks where they fail. By integrating these approaches the new algorithm avoids many of the disadvantages of each approach alone while exploiting the combination. The ATM SVC algorithm was applied to several segmentation problems, involving different image contrast mechanisms and different locations in the body. Segmentation and validation experiments were carried out for problems involving the quantification of normal anatomy (MRI of brains of neonates) and pathology of various types (MRI of patients with multiple sclerosis, MRI of patients with brain tumors, MRI of patients with damaged knee cartilage). In each case, the ATM SVC algorithm provided a better segmentation than statistical classification or elastic matching alone.

  3. Distinct roles for the two Rho GDP/GTP exchange factor domains of kalirin in regulation of neurite growth and neuronal morphology.

    PubMed

    Penzes, P; Johnson, R C; Kambampati, V; Mains, R E; Eipper, B A

    2001-11-01

    The actin cytoskeleton, essential for neuronal development, is regulated in part by small GTP binding proteins of the Rho subfamily. Kalirin-9, with two Rho subfamily-specific GDP/GTP exchange factor (GEF) domains, localizes to neurites and growth cones of primary cortical neurons. Kalirin-9 overexpression in cultured cortical neurons induces longer neurites and altered neuronal morphology. Expression of the first GEF domain alone results in drastically shortened axons and excessive growth cones, mediated by Rac1. Expression of the second GEF domain alone induces axonal over-elongation and abundant filopodial neurites, mediated by RhoA. Coordination of the actions of the individual GEF domains through their presence in Kalirin-9, with its Sec14p, spectrin, and Src homology domain 3 motifs, is essential for regulating neurite extension and neuronal morphology.

  4. The personal and national costs of CVD: impacts on income, taxes, government support payments and GDP due to lost labour force participation.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Deborah; Shrestha, Rupendra; Percival, Richard; Passey, Megan; Callander, Emily; Kelly, Simon

    2013-06-05

    CVD has the ability to interrupt an individual's ability to participate in the labour force, and this can have considerable follow-up on impacts to both the individual and the state. This study aimed to quantify the personal cost of lost income and the cost to the state from lost income taxation, increased benefit payments and lost GDP as a result of early retirement due to CVD in Australians aged 45-64 in 2009. Cross-sectional analysis of the base population of Health&WealthMOD, a microsimulation model built on data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics' Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers and STINMOD, an income and savings microsimulation model. Individuals aged 45 to 64 years who have retired early due to CVD have a median value of total weekly income of only $268 whereas those who are employed full time are likely to have almost five times this. The national aggregate impact of CVD through the loss of labour force participation amongst 45 to 64 year olds, equated to around AU$1.1 billion in lost income, $AU225 million in lost income taxation revenue, AU$85 million in additional government benefit payments, and AU$748 million in lost GDP, in 2009 alone. The costs of CVD to both individuals and the state are considerable. Whilst individuals bear the economic costs of lost income in addition to the burden of the condition itself, the state impacts are loss of productivity from reduced workforce participation, lost income taxation revenue, and increasing government support payments - in addition to direct health care costs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A mutation in GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase causes conditional hypersensitivity to ammonium, resulting in Arabidopsis root growth inhibition, altered ammonium metabolism, and hormone homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Barth, Carina; Gouzd, Zachary A; Steele, Hilary P; Imperio, Ryan M

    2010-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA) is an antioxidant fulfilling a multitude of cellular functions. Given its pivotal role in maintaining the rate of cell growth and division in the quiescent centre of the root, it was hypothesized that the AA-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana mutants vtc1-1, vtc2-1, vtc3-1, and vtc4-1 have altered root growth. To test this hypothesis, root development was studied in the wild type and vtc mutants grown on Murashige and Skoog medium. It was discovered, however, that only the vtc1-1 mutant has strongly retarded root growth, while the other vtc mutants exhibit a wild-type root phenotype. It is demonstrated that the short-root phenotype in vtc1-1 is independent of AA deficiency and oxidative stress. Instead, vtc1-1 is conditionally hypersensitive to ammonium (NH(4)(+)). To provide new insights into the mechanism of NH(4)(+) sensitivity in vtc1-1, root development, NH(4)(+) content, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, glutamate dehydrogenase activity, and glutamine content were assessed in wild-type and vtc1-1 mutant plants grown in the presence and absence of high NH(4)(+) and the GS inhibitor MSO. Since VTC1 encodes a GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase, an enzyme generating GDP-mannose for AA biosynthesis and protein N-glycosylation, it was also tested whether protein N-glycosylation is affected in vtc1-1. Furthermore, since root development requires the action of a variety of hormones, it was investigated whether hormone homeostasis is linked to NH(4)(+) sensitivity in vtc1-1. Our data suggest that NH(4)(+) hypersensitivity in vtc1-1 is caused by disturbed N-glycosylation and that it is associated with auxin and ethylene homeostasis and/or nitric oxide signalling.

  6. A mutation in GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase causes conditional hypersensitivity to ammonium, resulting in Arabidopsis root growth inhibition, altered ammonium metabolism, and hormone homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Carina; Gouzd, Zachary A.; Steele, Hilary P.; Imperio, Ryan M.

    2010-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA) is an antioxidant fulfilling a multitude of cellular functions. Given its pivotal role in maintaining the rate of cell growth and division in the quiescent centre of the root, it was hypothesized that the AA-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana mutants vtc1-1, vtc2-1, vtc3-1, and vtc4-1 have altered root growth. To test this hypothesis, root development was studied in the wild type and vtc mutants grown on Murashige and Skoog medium. It was discovered, however, that only the vtc1-1 mutant has strongly retarded root growth, while the other vtc mutants exhibit a wild-type root phenotype. It is demonstrated that the short-root phenotype in vtc1-1 is independent of AA deficiency and oxidative stress. Instead, vtc1-1 is conditionally hypersensitive to ammonium (NH4+). To provide new insights into the mechanism of NH4+ sensitivity in vtc1-1, root development, NH4+ content, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, glutamate dehydrogenase activity, and glutamine content were assessed in wild-type and vtc1-1 mutant plants grown in the presence and absence of high NH4+ and the GS inhibitor MSO. Since VTC1 encodes a GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase, an enzyme generating GDP-mannose for AA biosynthesis and protein N-glycosylation, it was also tested whether protein N-glycosylation is affected in vtc1-1. Furthermore, since root development requires the action of a variety of hormones, it was investigated whether hormone homeostasis is linked to NH4+ sensitivity in vtc1-1. Our data suggest that NH4+ hypersensitivity in vtc1-1 is caused by disturbed N-glycosylation and that it is associated with auxin and ethylene homeostasis and/or nitric oxide signalling. PMID:20007685

  7. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy followed by GDP chemotherapy for newly diagnosed stage I/II extranodal natural killer/T cell lymphoma, nasal type.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Yang, Jianliang; Liu, Peng; Zhou, Shengyu; Gui, Lin; He, Xiaohui; Qin, Yan; Zhang, Changgong; Yang, Sheng; Xing, Puyuan; Sun, Yan; Shi, Yuankai

    2017-09-01

    Extranodal natural killer (NK)/T cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL) is an aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma and the majority of ENKTL cases are diagnosed at the localized stage. Radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy has been used for localized ENKTL, but the optimal combination treatment modality and the best first-line chemotherapy regimen have not been defined. In this retrospective study, 44 patients with newly diagnosed, stages I/II ENKTL were enrolled and received intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, 50-56 Gy) followed by GDP (gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin) chemotherapy. The median number of chemotherapy cycles per patient was 4 (range, 2-6 cycles). At the end of treatment, the overall response rate was 95% (42/44), including 39 patients (89%) who attained complete response. Two patients developed systemic progression after IMRT. With a median follow-up of 37.5 months, the 3-year overall survival (OS) rate and progression-free survival (PFS) rate were 85% (95% CI, 74 to 96%) and 77% (95% CI, 64 to 91%), respectively. Locoregional and systemic failure rates for this treatment were 9% (4/44) and 14% (6/44), respectively. The most common grades 3 to 4 adverse events included leukopenia (37%), neutropenia (34%), and mucositis (25%). No treatment-related deaths were observed. This study suggested high efficacy and low toxicity of IMRT followed by GDP regimen chemotherapy for newly diagnosed stage I/II ENKTL patients. These results require further investigation in prospective trials.

  8. A sodium gadolinium phosphate with two different types of tunnel structure: Synthesis, crystal structure, and optical properties of Na 3GdP 2O 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, M.; Cheng, W.-D.; Zhang, H.; Zhao, D.; Zhang, W.-L.; Yang, S.-L.

    2008-09-01

    A sodium gadolinium phosphate crystal, Na 3GdP 2O 8, has been synthesized by a high-temperature solution reaction, and it exhibits a new structural family of the alkali-metal-rare-earth phosphate system. Although many compounds with formula M 3LnP 2O 8 have been reported, but they were shown to be orthorhombic [R. Salmon, C. Parent, M. Vlasse, G. LeFlem, Mater. Res. Bull. 13 (1978) 439] rather than monoclinic as shown in this paper. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis shows the structure to be monoclinic with space group C2/ c and the cell parameters: a=27.55 (25), b=5.312 (4), c=13.935(11) Å, β=91.30(1)°, and V=2038.80 Å 3, Z=4. Its structure features a three-dimensional GdP 2O 83- anionic framework with two different types of interesting tunnels at where Na atoms are located by different manners. The framework is constructed by Gd polyhedra and isolated PO 4 tetrahedra. It is different from the structure of K 3NdP 2O 8 [R. Salmon, C. Parent, M. Vlasse, G. LeFlem, Mater. Res. Bull. 13 (1978) 439] with space group P2 1/ m that shows only one type of tunnel. The emission spectrum and the absorption spectrum of the compound have been investigated. Additionally, the calculations of band structure, density of states, dielectric constants, and refractive indexes have been also performed with the density functional theory method. The obtained results tend to support the experimental data.

  9. Regulation of cytoplasmic division of Xenopus embryo by rho p21 and its inhibitory GDP/GTP exchange protein (rho GDI)

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that the rho family, a member of the ras p21- related small GTP-binding protein superfamily, regulates cell morphology, cell motility, and smooth muscle contraction through the actomyosin system. The actomyosin system is also known to be essential for cytoplasmic division of cells (cytokinesis). In this study, we examined the action of rho p21, its inhibitory GDP/GTP exchange protein, named rho GDI, its stimulatory GDP/GTP exchange protein, named smg GDS, and botulinum ADP-ribosyltransferase C3, known to selectively ADP-ribosylate rho p21 and to impair its function, in the cytoplasmic division using Xenopus embryos. The sperm-induced cytoplasmic division of Xenopus embryos was not affected by microinjection into the embryos of either smg GDS or the guanosine-5'-(3-O-thio)triphosphate (GTP gamma S)-bound form of rhoA p21, one member of the rho family, but completely inhibited by microinjection of rho GDI or C3. Under these conditions, nuclear division occurred normally but the furrow formation, which was induced by the contractile ring consisting of actomyosin just beneath the plasma membrane, was impaired. Comicroinjection of rho GDI with the GTP gamma S-bound form of rhoA p21 prevented the rho GDI action. Moreover, the sperm-induced cytoplasmic division of Xenopus embryos was inhibited by microinjection into the embryos of the rhoA p21 pre-ADP- ribosylated by C3 which might serve as a dominant negative inhibitor of endogenous rho p21. These results indicate that rho p21 together with its regulatory proteins regulates the cytoplasmic division through the actomyosin system. PMID:8436590

  10. New varying speed of light theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magueijo, João

    2003-11-01

    We review recent work on the possibility of a varying speed of light (VSL). We start by discussing the physical meaning of a varying-c, dispelling the myth that the constancy of c is a matter of logical consistency. We then summarize the main VSL mechanisms proposed so far: hard breaking of Lorentz invariance; bimetric theories (where the speeds of gravity and light are not the same); locally Lorentz invariant VSL theories; theories exhibiting a colour-dependent speed of light; varying-c induced by extra dimensions (e.g. in the brane-world scenario); and field theories where VSL results from vacuum polarization or CPT violation. We show how VSL scenarios may solve the cosmological problems usually tackled by inflation, and also how they may produce a scale-invariant spectrum of Gaussian fluctuations, capable of explaining the WMAP data. We then review the connection between VSL and theories of quantum gravity, showing how 'doubly special' relativity has emerged as a VSL effective model of quantum space-time, with observational implications for ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) and gamma ray bursts. Some recent work on the physics of 'black' holes and other compact objects in VSL theories is also described, highlighting phenomena associated with spatial (as opposed to temporal) variations in c. Finally, we describe the observational status of the theory. The evidence is currently slim—redshift dependence in the atomic fine structure, anomalies with UHECRs, and (to a much lesser extent) the acceleration of the universe and the WMAP data. The constraints (e.g. those arising from nucleosynthesis or geological bounds) are tight but not insurmountable. We conclude with the observational predictions of the theory and the prospects for its refutation or vindication.

  11. Control of nonlinear time-varying systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. R.; Su, R.

    1981-01-01

    Necessary and sufficient conditions are given for a time-varying nonlinear system of specific form to be transformed into a time-invariant controllable linear system. Since the present work will be in a neighborhood of the origin, it is unnecessary to name specific sets and it is assumed that all assumptions, conditions and results hold in an open set in the appropriate Euclidean space that contains the origin. This theory can be combined with the global inverse function theorems to produce global results.

  12. Linear Parameter Varying Control for Actuator Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob; Wu, N. Eva; Belcastro, Christine; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A robust linear parameter varying (LPV) control synthesis is carried out for an HiMAT vehicle subject to loss of control effectiveness. The scheduling parameter is selected to be a function of the estimates of the control effectiveness factors. The estimates are provided on-line by a two-stage Kalman estimator. The inherent conservatism of the LPV design is reducing through the use of a scaling factor on the uncertainty block that represents the estimation errors of the effectiveness factors. Simulations of the controlled system with the on-line estimator show that a superior fault-tolerance can be achieved.

  13. 3D-printing spatially varying BRDFs.

    PubMed

    Rouiller, Olivier; Bickel, Bernd; Kautz, Jan; Matusik, Wojciech; Alexa, Marc

    2013-01-01

    A new method fabricates custom surface reflectance and spatially varying bidirectional reflectance distribution functions (svBRDFs). Researchers optimize a microgeometry for a range of normal distribution functions and simulate the resulting surface's effective reflectance. Using the simulation's results, they reproduce an input svBRDF's appearance by distributing the microgeometry on the printed material's surface. This method lets people print svBRDFs on planar samples with current 3D printing technology, even with a limited set of printing materials. It extends naturally to printing svBRDFs on arbitrary shapes.

  14. A time-varying magnetic flux concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibret, B.; Premaratne, M.; Lewis, P. M.; Thomson, R.; Fitzgerald, P. B.

    2016-08-01

    It is known that diverse technological applications require the use of focused magnetic fields. This has driven the quest for controlling the magnetic field. Recently, the principles in transformation optics and metamaterials have allowed the realization of practical static magnetic flux concentrators. Extending such progress, here, we propose a time-varying magnetic flux concentrator cylindrical shell that uses electric conductors and ferromagnetic materials to guide magnetic flux to its center. Its performance is discussed based on finite-element simulation results. Our proposed design has potential applications in magnetic sensors, medical devices, wireless power transfer, and near-field wireless communications.

  15. Brown Dwarf Variability: What's Varying and Why?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark Scott

    2014-01-01

    Surveys by ground based telescopes, HST, and Spitzer have revealed that brown dwarfs of most spectral classes exhibit variability. The spectral and temporal signatures of the variability are complex and apparently defy simplistic classification which complicates efforts to model the changes. Important questions include understanding if clearings are forming in an otherwise uniform cloud deck or if thermal perturbations, perhaps associated with breaking gravity waves, are responsible. If clouds are responsible how long does it take for the atmospheric thermal profile to relax from a hot cloudy to a cooler cloudless state? If thermal perturbations are responsible then what atmospheric layers are varying? How do the observed variability timescales compare to atmospheric radiative, chemical, and dynamical timescales? I will address such questions by presenting modeling results for time-varying partly cloudy atmospheres and explore the importance of various atmospheric processes over the relevant timescales for brown dwarfs of a range of effective temperatures. Regardless of the origin of the observed variability, the complexity seen in the atmospheres of the field dwarfs hints at the variability that we may encounter in the next few years in directly imaged young Jupiters. Thus understanding the nature of variability in the field dwarfs, including sensitivity to gravity and metallicity, is of particular importance for exoplanet characterization.

  16. MULTIVARIATE VARYING COEFFICIENT MODEL FOR FUNCTIONAL RESPONSES

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongtu; Li, Runze; Kong, Linglong

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by recent work studying massive imaging data in the neuroimaging literature, we propose multivariate varying coefficient models (MVCM) for modeling the relation between multiple functional responses and a set of covariates. We develop several statistical inference procedures for MVCM and systematically study their theoretical properties. We first establish the weak convergence of the local linear estimate of coefficient functions, as well as its asymptotic bias and variance, and then we derive asymptotic bias and mean integrated squared error of smoothed individual functions and their uniform convergence rate. We establish the uniform convergence rate of the estimated covariance function of the individual functions and its associated eigenvalue and eigenfunctions. We propose a global test for linear hypotheses of varying coefficient functions, and derive its asymptotic distribution under the null hypothesis. We also propose a simultaneous confidence band for each individual effect curve. We conduct Monte Carlo simulation to examine the finite-sample performance of the proposed procedures. We apply MVCM to investigate the development of white matter diffusivities along the genu tract of the corpus callosum in a clinical study of neurodevelopment. PMID:23645942

  17. MULTIVARIATE VARYING COEFFICIENT MODEL FOR FUNCTIONAL RESPONSES

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongtu; Li, Runze; Kong, Linglong

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by recent work studying massive imaging data in the neuroimaging literature, we propose multivariate varying coefficient models (MVCM) for modeling the relation between multiple functional responses and a set of covariates. We develop several statistical inference procedures for MVCM and systematically study their theoretical properties. We first establish the weak convergence of the local linear estimate of coefficient functions, as well as its asymptotic bias and variance, and then we derive asymptotic bias and mean integrated squared error of smoothed individual functions and their uniform convergence rate. We establish the uniform convergence rate of the estimated covariance function of the individual functions and its associated eigenvalue and eigenfunctions. We propose a global test for linear hypotheses of varying coefficient functions, and derive its asymptotic distribution under the null hypothesis. We also propose a simultaneous confidence band for each individual effect curve. We conduct Monte Carlo simulation to examine the finite-sample performance of the proposed procedures. We apply MVCM to investigate the development of white matter diffusivities along the genu tract of the corpus callosum in a clinical study of neurodevelopment. PMID:12926711

  18. Local Rank Inference for Varying Coefficient Models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan; Kai, Bo; Li, Runze

    2009-12-01

    By allowing the regression coefficients to change with certain covariates, the class of varying coefficient models offers a flexible approach to modeling nonlinearity and interactions between covariates. This paper proposes a novel estimation procedure for the varying coefficient models based on local ranks. The new procedure provides a highly efficient and robust alternative to the local linear least squares method, and can be conveniently implemented using existing R software package. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations both reveal that the gain of the local rank estimator over the local linear least squares estimator, measured by the asymptotic mean squared error or the asymptotic mean integrated squared error, can be substantial. In the normal error case, the asymptotic relative efficiency for estimating both the coefficient functions and the derivative of the coefficient functions is above 96%; even in the worst case scenarios, the asymptotic relative efficiency has a lower bound 88.96% for estimating the coefficient functions, and a lower bound 89.91% for estimating their derivatives. The new estimator may achieve the nonparametric convergence rate even when the local linear least squares method fails due to infinite random error variance. We establish the large sample theory of the proposed procedure by utilizing results from generalized U-statistics, whose kernel function may depend on the sample size. We also extend a resampling approach, which perturbs the objective function repeatedly, to the generalized U-statistics setting; and demonstrate that it can accurately estimate the asymptotic covariance matrix.

  19. MULTIVARIATE VARYING COEFFICIENT MODEL FOR FUNCTIONAL RESPONSES.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongtu; Li, Runze; Kong, Linglong

    2012-10-01

    Motivated by recent work studying massive imaging data in the neuroimaging literature, we propose multivariate varying coefficient models (MVCM) for modeling the relation between multiple functional responses and a set of covariates. We develop several statistical inference procedures for MVCM and systematically study their theoretical properties. We first establish the weak convergence of the local linear estimate of coefficient functions, as well as its asymptotic bias and variance, and then we derive asymptotic bias and mean integrated squared error of smoothed individual functions and their uniform convergence rate. We establish the uniform convergence rate of the estimated covariance function of the individual functions and its associated eigenvalue and eigenfunctions. We propose a global test for linear hypotheses of varying coefficient functions, and derive its asymptotic distribution under the null hypothesis. We also propose a simultaneous confidence band for each individual effect curve. We conduct Monte Carlo simulation to examine the finite-sample performance of the proposed procedures. We apply MVCM to investigate the development of white matter diffusivities along the genu tract of the corpus callosum in a clinical study of neurodevelopment.

  20. Formant transitions in varied utterance positions

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Aim Acoustic characteristics associated with varied utterance positions were examined to understand the acoustic consequences of potential articulatory changes near utterance boundaries. Methods Second formant (F2) transition characteristics, including transition duration (ms), transition extent (Hz), and derived slope of transition (Hz/ms), of twelve healthy speakers of American English were examined for two diphthong transitions in sew and sigh and one consonant-vowel (CV) transition in bee in utterance initial, utterance final, and utterance end positions. Speakers performed a task of contrastive stress variation that served to demonstrate the changeability of acoustic characteristics as an index of articulatory change in shaping the vocal tract. Results Contrastive stress, as compared to words spoken without increased stress, was associated with longer transition duration, greater transition extent, and a decreased slope. Although some utterance position effects were present, no systematic differences consistent with boundary strengthening or declination could be concluded. Conclusion Findings suggest that varied utterance positions may be associated with stimuli-dependent variation in articulatory changes that is reflected in the acoustic output. These results indicate the need to further understand the construct of utterance-level speech materials, such as carrier phrases, in clinical practice and research. PMID:24356307

  1. Transient, spatially varied groundwater recharge modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assefa, Kibreab Amare; Woodbury, Allan D.

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this work is to integrate field data and modeling tools in producing temporally and spatially varying groundwater recharge in a pilot watershed in North Okanagan, Canada. The recharge modeling is undertaken by using the Richards equation based finite element code (HYDRUS-1D), ArcGIS™, ROSETTA, in situ observations of soil temperature and soil moisture, and a long-term gridded climate data. The public version of HYDUS-1D and another version with detailed freezing and thawing module are first used to simulate soil temperature, snow pack, and soil moisture over a one year experimental period. Statistical analysis of the results show both versions of HYDRUS-1D reproduce observed variables to the same degree. After evaluating model performance using field data and ROSETTA derived soil hydraulic parameters, the HYDRUS-1D code is coupled with ArcGIS™ to produce spatially and temporally varying recharge maps throughout the Deep Creek watershed. Temporal and spatial analysis of 25 years daily recharge results at various representative points across the study watershed reveal significant temporal and spatial variations; average recharge estimated at 77.8 ± 50.8 mm/year. Previous studies in the Okanagan Basin used Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance without any attempt of model performance evaluation, notwithstanding its inherent limitations. Thus, climate change impact results from this previous study and similar others, such as Jyrkama and Sykes (2007), need to be interpreted with caution.

  2. Experiences from a Varied Career in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frame, Katherine

    2006-04-01

    I received my doctorate in Experimental High Energy Physics from Michigan State Univeristy. My thesis was based on my work with QCD jet physics at the D0 collider experiment at Fermi National Laboratory. My first postdoctoral position was with Oxford University working on solar neutrino oscillations at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). Following this, I joined what is now the Nuclear Nonproliferation Safeguards, Science and Technology group (N-1) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Over this time, I've worked on a wide range of physics topics in a wide range of physical and social environments. I would like to share some of the experiences I've had working in such varied environment and the thoughts that have guided me on my path that eventually led me from basic research to a more applied field.

  3. Varying ghost dark energy and particle creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshudyan, M.

    2016-02-01

    One of the models of dark energy is the ghost dark energy, which has a geometrical origin. Recently, a certain type of phenomenological modification of ghost dark energy has been suggested which motivated us for this work. The goal of this paper is twofold. First, we would like to study the cosmological scenario involving interacting varying ghost dark energy. A cosmographic analysis of a non-interacting model is also performed. Then, we study the particle creation following the straight analogy between quantization in Minkowski background and canonical quantization of a scalar field in curved dynamical backgrounds. Particular attention will be paid to massless-particle production from a radiation-dominated universe (according to our toy model) which evolves to our large-scale universe. Constraints on the parameters of the models obtained during the cosmographic analysis did allow to demonstrate the possibility of a massless-particle creation in a radiation-dominated universe.

  4. Application of Hamilton's law of varying action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, C. D.

    1975-01-01

    The law of varying action enunciated by Hamilton in 1834-1835 permits the direct analytical solution of the problems of mechanics, both stationary and nonstationary, without consideration of force equilibrium and the theory of differential equations associated therewith. It has not been possible to obtain direct analytical solutions to nonstationary systems through the use of energy theory, which has been limited for 140 years to the principle of least action and to Hamilton's principle. It is shown here that Hamilton's law permits the direct analytical solution to nonstationary, initial value systems in the mechanics of solids without any knowledge or use of the theory of differential equations. Solutions are demonstrated for nonconservative, nonstationary particle motion, both linear and nonlinear.

  5. [Comparative toxicity of photosensitizers in varying destruction].

    PubMed

    Sinitsina, O O; Zholdakova, Z I; Poliakova, E E; Golovach, E N; Sycheva, L P; Beliaeva, N N; Kuznetsova, N A

    2007-01-01

    The toxicity of the photosensitizers proflavine acetate (PA) versus methylene blue (MB) was evaluated during their varying destruction. Under the influence of visible light, a partial (25%) transformation of the photosensitizers was shown to be attended by their enhanced toxicity and 100% destruction of the parent substances caused a reduction in their hazard. PA and its phototransformation products mainly affect the antiperoxide protection system and the structural and functional states of the liver, kidney, and duodenum. The maximum noneffective dose is 0.002 mg/kg. The possibility of using PA for water disinfection depends on the ratio of safe and effective concentrations. A partial (25%) MB destruction products cause mutagenic effects; the permissible dose of the mutagen is 0.00025 mg/kg. MB is not recommended for disinfection of all types of waters.

  6. Varied Clinical Manifestations of Amebic Colitis.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Chad J; Fleming, Rhonda; Boman, Darius A; Zuckerman, Marc J

    2015-11-01

    Invasive amebiasis is common worldwide, but infrequently observed in the United States. It is associated with considerable morbidity in patients residing in or traveling to endemic areas. We review the clinical and endoscopic manifestations of amebic colitis to alert physicians to the varied clinical manifestations of this potentially life-threatening disease. Copyright ©Most patients present with watery or bloody diarrhea. Less common presentations of amebic colitis include abdominal pain, overt gastrointestinal bleeding, exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease, or the incidental association with colon cancer. Amebic liver abscesses are the most frequent complication. Rectosigmoid involvement may be found on colonoscopy; however, most case series have reported that the cecum is the most commonly involved site, followed by the ascending colon. Endoscopic evaluation should be used to assist in the diagnosis, with attention to the observation of colonic inflammation, ulceration, and amebic trophozoites on histopathological examination.

  7. Tuning ferromagnetism by varying ion beam profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariwal, Rajesh V.; Malik, Hitendra K.; Asokan, K.

    2017-02-01

    Present study demonstrates a novel technique to tune the ferromagnetism at room temperature by varying the ion beam profiles from 3 to 7 mm during Carbon ion implantation in ZnO matrix and keeping other beam parameters constant. The interaction of implanted C ions with host ZnO matrix at different profiles result in variable ferromagnetism from 0.75 to 3.0  ×  10‑4 emu gm‑1 due to difference in the induced radiation pressure. Similar variation is also observed in the optical bandgap from 3.35 to 3.24 eV for different beam profiles. This study shows that the material properties can be tuned and controlled by the variation of beam profiles during the ion implantation.

  8. Time varying arctic climate change amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Chylek, Petr; Dubey, Manvendra K; Lesins, Glen; Wang, Muyin

    2009-01-01

    During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

  9. Photon Propagation in Slowly Varying Electromagnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbstein, F.

    2017-03-01

    Effective theory of soft photons in slowly varying electromagnetic background fields is studied at one-loop order in QED. This is of relevance for the study of all-optical signatures of quantum vacuum nonlinearity in realistic electromagnetic background fields as provided by high-intensity lasers. The central result derived in this article is a new analytical expression for the photon polarization tensor in two linearly polarized counterpropagating pulsed Gaussian laser beams. Treating the peak field strengths of both laser beams as free parameters, this field configuration can be considered as interpolating between the limiting cases of a purely right- or left-moving laser beam (if one of the peak field strengths is set equal to zero) and the standing-wave type scenario with two counter-propagating beams of equal strength.

  10. An ETAS model with varying productivity rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harte, D. S.

    2014-07-01

    We present an epidemic type aftershock sequenc (ETAS) model where the offspring rates vary both spatially and temporally. This is achieved by distinguishing between those space-time volumes where the interpoint space and time distances are small, and those where they are considerably larger. We also question the nature of the background component in the ETAS model. Is it simply a temporal boundary correction (t = 0) or does it represent an additional tectonic process not described by the aftershock component? The form of these stochastic models should not be considered to be fixed. As we accumulate larger and better earthquake catalogues, GPS data, strain rates, etc., we have the ability to ask more complex questions about the nature of the process. By fitting modified models consistent with such questions, we should gain a better insight into the earthquake process. Hence, we consider a sequence of incrementally modified ETAS type models rather than `the' ETAS model.

  11. Application of Hamilton's law of varying action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, C. D.

    1975-01-01

    The law of varying action enunciated by Hamilton in 1834-1835 permits the direct analytical solution of the problems of mechanics, both stationary and nonstationary, without consideration of force equilibrium and the theory of differential equations associated therewith. It has not been possible to obtain direct analytical solutions to nonstationary systems through the use of energy theory, which has been limited for 140 years to the principle of least action and to Hamilton's principle. It is shown here that Hamilton's law permits the direct analytical solution to nonstationary, initial value systems in the mechanics of solids without any knowledge or use of the theory of differential equations. Solutions are demonstrated for nonconservative, nonstationary particle motion, both linear and nonlinear.

  12. Time varying, multivariate volume data reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, James P; Fout, Nathaniel; Ma, Kwan - Liu

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale supercomputing is revolutionizing the way science is conducted. A growing challenge, however, is understanding the massive quantities of data produced by large-scale simulations. The data, typically time-varying, multivariate, and volumetric, can occupy from hundreds of gigabytes to several terabytes of storage space. Transferring and processing volume data of such sizes is prohibitively expensive and resource intensive. Although it may not be possible to entirely alleviate these problems, data compression should be considered as part of a viable solution, especially when the primary means of data analysis is volume rendering. In this paper we present our study of multivariate compression, which exploits correlations among related variables, for volume rendering. Two configurations for multidimensional compression based on vector quantization are examined. We emphasize quality reconstruction and interactive rendering, which leads us to a solution using graphics hardware to perform on-the-fly decompression during rendering. In this paper we present a solution which addresses the need for data reduction in large supercomputing environments where data resulting from simulations occupies tremendous amounts of storage. Our solution employs a lossy encoding scheme to acrueve data reduction with several options in terms of rate-distortion behavior. We focus on encoding of multiple variables together, with optional compression in space and time. The compressed volumes can be rendered directly with commodity graphics cards at interactive frame rates and rendering quality similar to that of static volume renderers. Compression results using a multivariate time-varying data set indicate that encoding multiple variables results in acceptable performance in the case of spatial and temporal encoding as compared to independent compression of variables. The relative performance of spatial vs. temporal compression is data dependent, although temporal compression has the

  13. On Varying-coefficient Independence Screening for High-dimensional Varying-coefficient Models

    PubMed Central

    Song, Rui; Yi, Feng; Zou, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Varying coefficient models have been widely used in longitudinal data analysis, nonlinear time series, survival analysis, and so on. They are natural non-parametric extensions of the classical linear models in many contexts, keeping good interpretability and allowing us to explore the dynamic nature of the model. Recently, penalized estimators have been used for fitting varying-coefficient models for high-dimensional data. In this paper, we propose a new computationally attractive algorithm called IVIS for fitting varying-coefficient models in ultra-high dimensions. The algorithm first fits a gSCAD penalized varying-coefficient model using a subset of covariates selected by a new varying-coefficient independence screening (VIS) technique. The sure screening property is established for VIS. The proposed algorithm then iterates between a greedy conditional VIS step and a gSCAD penalized fitting step. Simulation and a real data analysis demonstrate that IVIS has very competitive performance for moderate sample size and high dimension. PMID:25484548

  14. On Varying-coefficient Independence Screening for High-dimensional Varying-coefficient Models.

    PubMed

    Song, Rui; Yi, Feng; Zou, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Varying coefficient models have been widely used in longitudinal data analysis, nonlinear time series, survival analysis, and so on. They are natural non-parametric extensions of the classical linear models in many contexts, keeping good interpretability and allowing us to explore the dynamic nature of the model. Recently, penalized estimators have been used for fitting varying-coefficient models for high-dimensional data. In this paper, we propose a new computationally attractive algorithm called IVIS for fitting varying-coefficient models in ultra-high dimensions. The algorithm first fits a gSCAD penalized varying-coefficient model using a subset of covariates selected by a new varying-coefficient independence screening (VIS) technique. The sure screening property is established for VIS. The proposed algorithm then iterates between a greedy conditional VIS step and a gSCAD penalized fitting step. Simulation and a real data analysis demonstrate that IVIS has very competitive performance for moderate sample size and high dimension.

  15. Does the Newtonian Gravity "Constant" G Vary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noerdlinger, Peter D.

    2015-08-01

    A series of measurements of Newton's gravity constant, G, dating back as far as 1893, yielded widely varying values, the variation greatly exceeding the stated error estimates (Gillies, 1997; Quinn, 2000, Mohr et al 2008). The value of G is usually said to be unrelated to other physics, but we point out that the 8B Solar Neutrino Rate ought to be very sensitive. Improved pulsar timing could also help settle the issue as to whether G really varies. We claim that the variation in measured values over time (1893-2014 C.E.) is a more serious problem than the failure of the error bars to overlap; it appears that challenging or adjusting the error bars hardly masks the underlying disagreement in central values. We have assessed whether variations in the gravitational potential due to (for example) local dark matter (DM) could explain the variations. We find that the required potential fluctuations could transiently accelerate the Solar System and nearby stars to speeds in excess of the Galactic escape speed. Previous theories for the variation in G generally deal with supposed secular variation on a cosmological timescale, or very rapid oscillations whose envelope changes on that scale (Steinhardt and Will 1995). Therefore, these analyses fail to support variations on the timescale of years or spatial scales of order parsecs, which would be required by the data for G. We note that true variations in G would be associated with variations in clock rates (Derevianko and Pospelov 2014; Loeb and Maoz 2015), which could mask changes in orbital dynamics. Geringer-Sameth et al (2014) studied γ-ray emission from the nearby Reticulum dwarf galaxy, which is expected to be free of "ordinary" (stellar, black hole) γ-ray sources and found evidence for DM decay. Bernabei et al (2003) also found evidence for DM penetrating deep underground at Gran Sasso. If, indeed, variations in G can be tied to variations in gravitational potential, we have a new tool to assess the DM density.

  16. Mutant Huntingtin Impairs BDNF Release from Astrocytes by Disrupting Conversion of Rab3a-GTP into Rab3a-GDP

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yan; Zhao, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is essential for neuronal differentiation and survival. We know that BDNF levels decline in the brains of patients with Huntington's disease (HD), a neurodegenerative disease caused by the expression of mutant huntingtin protein (mHtt), and furthermore that administration of BDNF in HD mice is protective against HD neuropathology. BDNF is produced in neurons, but astrocytes are also an important source of BDNF in the brain. Nonetheless, whether mHtt affects astrocytic BDNF in the HD brain remains unknown. Here we investigated astrocytes from HD140Q knock-in mice and uncovered evidence that mHtt decreases BDNF secretion from astrocytes, which is mediated by exocytosis in astrocytes. Our results demonstrate that mHtt associates with Rab3a, a small GTPase localized on membranes of dense-core vesicles, and prevents GTP-Rab3a from binding to Rab3-GAP1, disrupting the conversion of GTP-Rab3a into GDP-Rab3a and thus impairing the docking of BDNF vesicles on plasma membranes of astrocytes. Importantly, overexpression of Rab3a rescues impaired BDNF vesicle docking and secretion from HD astrocytes. Moreover, ATP release and the number of ATP-containing dense-core vesicles docking are decreased in HD astrocytes, suggesting that the exocytosis of dense-core vesicles is impaired by mHtt in HD astrocytes. Further, Rab3a overexpression reduces reactive astrocytes in the striatum of HD140Q knock-in mice. Our results indicate that compromised exocytosis of BDNF in HD astrocytes contributes to the decreased BDNF levels in HD brains and underscores the importance of improving glial function in the treatment of HD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder that affects one in every 10,000 Americans. To date, there is no effective treatment for HD, in part because the pathogenic mechanism driving the disease is not fully understood. The dysfunction of astrocytes is known to contribute to the

  17. Rice GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase OsVTC1-1 and OsVTC1-3 play different roles in ascorbic acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hua; Deng, Zaian; Zhang, Chuanyu; Wang, Yayun; Wang, Juan; Liu, Hai; Zhang, Zhili; Huang, Rongfeng; Zhang, Zhijin

    2016-02-01

    GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMPase) catalyzes the synthesis of GDP-D-mannose, which is a precursor for ascorbic acid (AsA) synthesis in plants. The rice genome encodes three GMPase homologs OsVTC1-1, OsVTC1-3 and OsVTC1-8, but their roles in AsA synthesis are unclear. The overexpression of OsVTC1-1 or OsVTC1-3 restored the AsA synthesis of vtc1-1 in Arabidopsis, while that of OsVTC1-8 did not, indicating that only OsVTC1-1 and OsVTC1-3 are involved in AsA synthesis in rice. Similar to Arabidopsis VTC1, the expression of OsVTC1-1 was high in leaves, induced by light, and inhibited by dark. Unlike OsVTC1-1, the expression level of OsVTC1-3 was high in roots and quickly induced by the dark, while the transcription level of OsVTC1-8 did not show obvious changes under constant light or dark treatments. In OsVTC1-1 RNAi plants, the AsA content of rice leaves decreased, and the AsA production induced by light was limited. In contrast, OsVTC1-3 RNAi lines altered AsA synthesis levels in rice roots, but not in the leaves or under the light/dark treatment. The enzyme activity showed that OsVTC1-1 and OsVTC1-3 had higher GMPase activities than OsVTC1-8 in vitro. Our data showed that, unlike in Arabidopsis, the rice GPMase homologous proteins illustrated a new model in AsA synthesis: OsVTC1-1 may be involved in the AsA synthesis, which takes place in leaves, while OsVTC1-3 may be responsible for AsA synthesis in roots. The different roles of rice GMPase homologous proteins in AsA synthesis may be due to their differences in transcript levels and enzyme activities.

  18. FRET-based direct and continuous monitoring of human fucosyltransferases activity: an efficient synthesis of versatile GDP-L-fucose derivatives from abundant D-galactose.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Takahiro; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a facile and versatile protocol for the continuous monitoring of human fucosyltransferases activity by using fluorescence energy resonance transfer (FRET), and have explored the feasibility of its use in an inhibitor screening assay. A convenient sugar nucleotide with a fluorogenic probe, 6-deoxy-6-N-(2-naphalene-2-yl-acetamide)-beta-L-galactopyranos-1-yl-guanosine 5'-diphosphate disodium salt (1), was efficiently synthesized from naturally abundant D-galactopyranose via a key intermediate, 6-azide-1,2,3,4-tetra-O-benzoyl-6-deoxy-beta-L-galactopyranose (10). It was demonstrated that the combined use of the glycosyl donor 1 and a dansylated acceptor substrate, sialyl-alpha2,3-LacNAc derivative (2) allowed us to carry out highly sensitive, direct, and continuous in vitro monitoring of the generation of sialyl Lewis X (SLe x), which is catalyzed by human alpha-1,3-fucosyltransferase VI (FUT-VI). A kinetic analysis revealed that compound 1 was an excellent donor substrate (KM=0.94 microM and Vmax=0.14 microM min(-1)) for detecting human FUT-VI activity. To the best of our knowledge, this synthetic fluorogenic probe is the most sensitive and selective donor substrate for FUT-VI among all of the known GDP-Fuc analogues, including the parent GDP-Fuc. When a dansylated asparagine-linked glycopeptide 20, which is derived from egg yolk was employed as an alternate acceptor substrate, a FRET-based assay with compound 1 could be used to directly monitor the alpha1,6-fucosylation at the reducing terminal GlcNAc residue by human FUT-VIII (KM=175 microM and Vmax=0.06 microM/ min); this indicates that the present method might become a general protocol for the characterization of various mammalian fucosyltransferases in the presence of designated fluorogenic acceptor substrates. The present protocol revealed that compound 23, which was obtained by a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between the disodium salt 16 and 1-ethynyl-naphthalene exhibits highly potent inhibitory

  19. Scrotal abscess: Varied etiology, associations, and management

    PubMed Central

    Ramareddy, Raghu S.; Alladi, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To report a series of scrotal abscess, a rare problem, their etiology, and management. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of children who presented with scrotal abscess between January 2010 and March 2015, analyzed with respect to clinical features, pathophysiology of spread and management. Results: Eight infants and a 3-year-old phenotypically male child presented with scrotal abscess as a result of abdominal pathologies which included mixed gonadal dysgenesis (MGD) [1]; three anorectal malformations with ectopic ureter [1], urethral stricture [1], and neurogenic bladder [1]; meconium peritonitis with meconium periorchitis [2], ileal atresia [1], and intra-abdominal abscess [1]; posturethroplasty for Y urethral duplication with metal stenosis [1] and idiopathic pyocele [1]. Transmission of the organism had varied routes include fallopian tube [1], urethra ejaculatory reflux [4], hematogenous [2], and the patent process of vaginalis [2]. Two of the nine required extensive evaluation for further management. Treating the predisposing pathology resolved scrotal abscesses in eight of nine patients, one of whom, required vasectomy additionally. Idiopathic pyocele responded to needle aspiration and antibiotics. Conclusion: Scrotal abscess needs a high index of suspicion for predisposing pathology, especially in infants. Laparoscopy is safe and effective in the management of the MGD and ectopic ureter. PMID:27695207

  20. TIME-VARYING DYNAMICAL STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eve J.; Chang, Philip; Murray, Norman

    2015-02-10

    We present numerical evidence of dynamic star formation in which the accreted stellar mass grows superlinearly with time, roughly as t {sup 2}. We perform simulations of star formation in self-gravitating hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that is continuously driven. By turning the self-gravity of the gas in the simulations on or off, we demonstrate that self-gravity is the dominant physical effect setting the mass accretion rate at early times before feedback effects take over, contrary to theories of turbulence-regulated star formation. We find that gravitational collapse steepens the density profile around stars, generating the power-law tail on what is otherwise a lognormal density probability distribution function. Furthermore, we find turbulent velocity profiles to flatten inside collapsing regions, altering the size-line width relation. This local flattening reflects enhancements of turbulent velocity on small scales, as verified by changes to the velocity power spectra. Our results indicate that gas self-gravity dynamically alters both density and velocity structures in clouds, giving rise to a time-varying star formation rate. We find that a substantial fraction of the gas that forms stars arrives via low-density flows, as opposed to accreting through high-density filaments.

  1. Varying Inundation Regimes Differentially Affect Natural and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Climate change is altering sea-level rise rates and precipitation patterns worldwide. Coastal wetlands are vulnerable to these changes. System responses to stressors are important for resource managers and environmental stewards to understand in order to best manage them. Thin layer sand or sediment application to drowning and eroding marshes is one approach to build elevation and resilience. The above- and below-ground structure, soil carbon dioxide emissions, and pore water constituents in vegetated natural marsh sediments and sand-amended sediments were examined at varying inundation regimes between mean sea level and mean high water (0.82 m NAVD88 to 1.49 m NAVD88) in a field experiment at Laws Point, part of the Plum Island Sound Estuary (MA). Significantly lower salinities, pH, sulfides, phosphates, and ammonium were measured in the sand-amended sediments than in the natural sediments. In natural sediments there was a pattern of increasing salinity with increasing elevation while in the sand-amended sediments the trend was reversed, showing decreasing salinity with increasing elevation. Sulfide concentrations generally increased from low to high inundation with highest concentrations at the highest inundation (i.e., at the lowest elevations). High pore water phosphate concentrations were measured at low elevations in the natural sediments, but the sand-amended treatments had mostly low concentrations of phosphate and no consistent pattern with elevation. A

  2. Rumor Detection over Varying Time Windows

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Sejeong; Jung, Kyomin

    2017-01-01

    This study determines the major difference between rumors and non-rumors and explores rumor classification performance levels over varying time windows—from the first three days to nearly two months. A comprehensive set of user, structural, linguistic, and temporal features was examined and their relative strength was compared from near-complete date of Twitter. Our contribution is at providing deep insight into the cumulative spreading patterns of rumors over time as well as at tracking the precise changes in predictive powers across rumor features. Statistical analysis finds that structural and temporal features distinguish rumors from non-rumors over a long-term window, yet they are not available during the initial propagation phase. In contrast, user and linguistic features are readily available and act as a good indicator during the initial propagation phase. Based on these findings, we suggest a new rumor classification algorithm that achieves competitive accuracy over both short and long time windows. These findings provide new insights for explaining rumor mechanism theories and for identifying features of early rumor detection. PMID:28081135

  3. Topological properties of adiabatically varied Floquet systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dana, Itzhack

    2017-08-01

    Energy or quasienergy (QE) band spectra depending on two parameters may have a nontrivial topological characterization by Chern integers. Band spectra of one-dimensional (1D) systems that are spanned by just one parameter, a Bloch phase, are topologically trivial. Recently, an ensemble of 1D Floquet (time-periodic) systems, double-kicked rotors (DKRs) that are classically nonintegrable and depend on an external parameter, has been studied. It was shown that a QE band spanned by both the Bloch phase and the external parameter is characterized by a Chern integer. The latter determines the change in the mean angular momentum of a state in the band when the external parameter is adiabatically varied by a natural period. We show here, under conditions much more general than in previous works, that the ensemble of DKRs for all values of the external parameter corresponds to a 1D double-kicked particle (DKP) having translational invariance in the position-momentum phase plane. This DKP can be characterized by a second Chern integer, which is shown to be connected with the integer above for the DKR ensemble. This connection is expressed by a Diophantine equation (DE), which we derive. The DE, involving the band degeneracies of the DKR ensemble and of the DKP system, determines the allowed values of the DKR-ensemble integer. In particular, this integer is generically nonzero, showing the general topological nontriviality of the DKR ensemble.

  4. Percolation model with continuously varying exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, R. F. S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2013-10-01

    This work analyzes a percolation model on the diamond hierarchical lattice (DHL), where the percolation transition is retarded by the inclusion of a probability of erasing specific connected structures. It has been inspired by the recent interest on the existence of other universality classes of percolation models. The exact scale invariance and renormalization properties of DHL leads to recurrence maps, from which analytical expressions for the critical exponents and precise numerical results in the limit of very large lattices can be derived. The critical exponents ν and β of the investigated model vary continuously as the erasing probability changes. An adequate choice of the erasing probability leads to the result ν=∞, like in some phase transitions involving vortex formation. The percolation transition is continuous, with β>0, but β can be as small as desired. The modified percolation model turns out to be equivalent to the Q→1 limit of a Potts model with specific long range interactions on the same lattice.

  5. Proactive inhibitory control varies with task context.

    PubMed

    Wardak, Claire; Ramanoël, Stephen; Guipponi, Olivier; Boulinguez, Philippe; Ben Hamed, Suliann

    2012-12-01

    The goal of executive control is to adjust our behaviour to the environment. It involves not only the continuous planning and adaptation of actions but also the inhibition of inappropriate movements. Recently, a proactive form of inhibitory control has been shown, demonstrating that actions can be withheld, in an uncertain environment, thanks to the proactive locking of the mechanism by which motor commands are triggered (e.g. while waiting at traffic lights in a dense pedestrian zone, one will refrain in anticipation of a brisk acceleration when the green light comes on). However, little is known about this executive function and it remains unclear whether the overall amount of inhibitory control can be modulated as a function of the context. Here, we show that the level of this control varies parametrically as a function of the exogenous and endogenous factors setting the task context. We also show that the level of implemented proactive inhibitory control is dynamically readjusted to match the implicit temporal structure of the environment. These observations are discussed in relation to possible underlying functional substrates and related neurological and psychiatric pathologies.

  6. Device for varying engine valve timing

    SciTech Connect

    Hampton, K.

    1988-07-05

    A device is described for angularly displacing a camshaft relative to the crankshaft of an IC engine to vary the engine valve timing, comprising; a hub member; means to attach the hub member to the engine crankshaft; a drive member rotatably mounted on the hub member, and means connecting the drive member in driving relationship with the engine crankshaft; an advancing member; a first means interconnecting the advancing member with the hub member affecting limited axial movement of the advancing member relative to the hub member; a second means interconnecting the advancing member with the drive member which upon axial movement of the advancing member causes limited rotation of the drive member relative to the hub member; an annular means mounted on the hub member, the advancing member mounted on the annular means; coacting meshing means formed in part on the annular means for moving the advancing member axially relative to the hub upon limited rotation of the annular means relative to the hub; and a non-rotational retarder means which when actuated applies a retarding torque to the annular means causing limited rotation of the annular means relative to the hub and thus cause the advancing member to move axially of the hub whereby the drive member is moved a limited angular distance relative to the hub member.

  7. Modelling tourists arrival using time varying parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suciptawati, P.; Sukarsa, K. G.; Kencana, Eka N.

    2017-06-01

    The importance of tourism and its related sectors to support economic development and poverty reduction in many countries increase researchers’ attentions to study and model tourists’ arrival. This work is aimed to demonstrate time varying parameter (TVP) technique to model the arrival of Korean’s tourists to Bali. The number of Korean tourists whom visiting Bali for period January 2010 to December 2015 were used to model the number of Korean’s tourists to Bali (KOR) as dependent variable. The predictors are the exchange rate of Won to IDR (WON), the inflation rate in Korea (INFKR), and the inflation rate in Indonesia (INFID). Observing tourists visit to Bali tend to fluctuate by their nationality, then the model was built by applying TVP and its parameters were approximated using Kalman Filter algorithm. The results showed all of predictor variables (WON, INFKR, INFID) significantly affect KOR. For in-sample and out-of-sample forecast with ARIMA’s forecasted values for the predictors, TVP model gave mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) as much as 11.24 percent and 12.86 percent, respectively.

  8. Dermatophyte susceptibility varies towards antimicrobial textiles.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Timo R; Mucha, Helmut; Hoefer, Dirk

    2012-07-01

    Dermatophytoses are a widespread problem worldwide. Textiles in contact with infected skin can serve as a carrier for fungus propagation. Hitherto, it is unknown, whether antifungal textiles could contribute in controlling dermatophytes e.g. by disrupting the chain of infection. Testing of antimicrobial fabrics for their antifungal activities therefore is a fundamental prerequisite to assess the putative clinical relevance of textiles for dermatophyte prevention. Fabrics finished with either didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC), poly-hexamethylenbiguanide, copper and two silver chloride concentrations were tested for their antifungal activity against Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes and Candida albicans. To prove dermatophyte susceptibility towards the textiles, swatches were subjected to DIN EN 14199 (Trichophyton sp.) or DIN EN ISO 20743 (C. albicans) respectively. In addition, samples were embedded, and semi-thin sections were analysed microscopically. While all samples showed a clear inhibition of C. albicans, activity against Trichophyton sp. varied significantly: For example, DDAC completely inhibited T. rubrum growth, whereas T. mentagrophytes growth remained unaffected even in direct contact to the fibres. The results favour to add T. mentagrophytes as a test organism in textile dermatophyte efficacy tests. Microscopic analysis of swatches allowed detailed evaluation of additional parameters like mycelium thickness, density and hyphae penetration depth into the fabric.

  9. How earthquake properties vary with depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-06-01

    A new study shows systematically how seismic properties vary with depth. Lay et al. analyzed recent large and great earthquakes, including the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman (Mw 9.2), 2010 Chile (Mw 8.8), and 2011 Tohoku (Mw 9.0) earthquakes. The researchers define four domains of seismogenic behavior along megathrust faults according to depth. In domain A, the shallowest, reaching to about 15 kilometers below sea level, large tsunami- generating earthquakes can occur. In domain B, extending from about 15- to 35-kilometers depth, great earthquake events with large slip but diffuse short-period energy occur. In domain C, from 35- to 55-kilometers depth, smaller isolated megathrust patches rupture, producing bursts of coherent short-period energy in both great ruptures and in moderatesized events. In domain D, which extends from about 30- to 45-kilometers depth in subduction zones where relatively young ocean lithosphere is being underthrust with shallow plate dip, low-frequency earthquakes, seismic tremor, and slow slip events occur. Below this zone, stabile sliding or ductile doma takes place. (Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth, doi:10.1029/2011JB009133, 2012)

  10. Varied acceptance of clinical trial results.

    PubMed

    Klimt, C R

    1989-12-01

    The subject of varied acceptance of clinical trial results is discussed in the context of review of trials with which I have been involved and my subjective evaluation of their impact on the practice of clinical medicine. My experience goes back to 1949 and a World Health Organization trial of hyperimmune gamma globulin against rabies. This was followed by a large trial of secondary prevention of poliomyelitis. I participated in the planning and initiation of the first chronic disease trial, the University Group Diabetes Program (UGDP). The latter lasted for 15 years and its ramifications continue to this day. My next trial was the Coronary Drug Project (CDP), a complex trial with more than 8,000 patients. The trials of aspirin and aspirin combined with persantine (the CDPA, AMIS, PARIS I, and PARIS II) followed. My last three trials were a trial of photocoagulation in diabetic retinopathy (DRS), a six-country trial of the antiarrhythmic drug mexiletine (IMPACT), and a study involving two diagnostic procedures for pulmonary embolism (PIOPED). When one considers, in retrospect, the plethora of trials one is struck by the uniform absence of a priori considerations of the impact on medical practice, or likely lack thereof, of possible outcomes.

  11. Honeybee Odometry: Performance in Varying Natural Terrain

    PubMed Central

    Tautz, Juergen; Zhang, Shaowu; Spaethe, Johannes; Brockmann, Axel; Si, Aung

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that honeybees flying through short, narrow tunnels with visually textured walls perform waggle dances that indicate a much greater flight distance than that actually flown. These studies suggest that the bee's “odometer” is driven by the optic flow (image motion) that is experienced during flight. One might therefore expect that, when bees fly to a food source through a varying outdoor landscape, their waggle dances would depend upon the nature of the terrain experienced en route. We trained honeybees to visit feeders positioned along two routes, each 580 m long. One route was exclusively over land. The other was initially over land, then over water and, finally, again over land. Flight over water resulted in a significantly flatter slope of the waggle-duration versus distance regression, compared to flight over land. The mean visual contrast of the scenes was significantly greater over land than over water. The results reveal that, in outdoor flight, the honeybee's odometer does not run at a constant rate; rather, the rate depends upon the properties of the terrain. The bee's perception of distance flown is therefore not absolute, but scene-dependent. These findings raise important and interesting questions about how these animals navigate reliably. PMID:15252454

  12. Serotonin release varies with brain tryptophan levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    This study examines directly the effects on serotonin release of varying brain tryptophan levels within the physiologic range. It also addresses possible interactions between tryptophan availability and the frequency of membrane depolarization in controlling serotonin release. We demonstrate that reducing tryptophan levels in rat hypothalamic slices (by superfusing them with medium supplemented with 100 microM leucine) decreases tissue serotonin levels as well as both the spontaneous and the electrically-evoked serotonin release. Conversely, elevating tissue tryptophan levels (by superfusing slices with medium supplemented with 2 microM tryptophan) increases both the tissue serotonin levels and the serotonin release. Serotonin release was found to be affected independently by the tryptophan availability and the frequency of electrical field-stimulation (1-5 Hz), since increasing both variables produced nearly additive increases in release. These observations demonstrate for the first time that both precursor-dependent elevations and reductions in brain serotonin levels produce proportionate changes in serotonin release, and that the magnitude of the tryptophan effect is unrelated to neuronal firing frequency. The data support the hypothesis that serotonin release is proportionate to intracellular serotonin levels.

  13. Serotonin release varies with brain tryptophan levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    This study examines directly the effects on serotonin release of varying brain tryptophan levels within the physiologic range. It also addresses possible interactions between tryptophan availability and the frequency of membrane depolarization in controlling serotonin release. We demonstrate that reducing tryptophan levels in rat hypothalamic slices (by superfusing them with medium supplemented with 100 microM leucine) decreases tissue serotonin levels as well as both the spontaneous and the electrically-evoked serotonin release. Conversely, elevating tissue tryptophan levels (by superfusing slices with medium supplemented with 2 microM tryptophan) increases both the tissue serotonin levels and the serotonin release. Serotonin release was found to be affected independently by the tryptophan availability and the frequency of electrical field-stimulation (1-5 Hz), since increasing both variables produced nearly additive increases in release. These observations demonstrate for the first time that both precursor-dependent elevations and reductions in brain serotonin levels produce proportionate changes in serotonin release, and that the magnitude of the tryptophan effect is unrelated to neuronal firing frequency. The data support the hypothesis that serotonin release is proportionate to intracellular serotonin levels.

  14. Rumor Detection over Varying Time Windows.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sejeong; Cha, Meeyoung; Jung, Kyomin

    2017-01-01

    This study determines the major difference between rumors and non-rumors and explores rumor classification performance levels over varying time windows-from the first three days to nearly two months. A comprehensive set of user, structural, linguistic, and temporal features was examined and their relative strength was compared from near-complete date of Twitter. Our contribution is at providing deep insight into the cumulative spreading patterns of rumors over time as well as at tracking the precise changes in predictive powers across rumor features. Statistical analysis finds that structural and temporal features distinguish rumors from non-rumors over a long-term window, yet they are not available during the initial propagation phase. In contrast, user and linguistic features are readily available and act as a good indicator during the initial propagation phase. Based on these findings, we suggest a new rumor classification algorithm that achieves competitive accuracy over both short and long time windows. These findings provide new insights for explaining rumor mechanism theories and for identifying features of early rumor detection.

  15. Stratospheric Impact of Varying Sea Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Nielsen, Jon E.; Waugh, Darryn; Pawson, Steven

    2004-01-01

    The Finite-Volume General Circulation Model (FVGCM) has been run in 50 year simulations with the: 1) 1949-1999 Hadley Centre sea surface temperatures (SST), and 2) a fixed annual cycle of SSTs. In this presentation we first show that the 1949-1999 FVGCM simulation produces a very credible stratosphere in comparison to an NCEP/NCAR reanalysis climatology. In particular, the northern hemisphere has numerous major and minor stratospheric warming, while the southern hemisphere has only a few over the 50-year simulation. During the northern hemisphere winter, temperatures are both warmer in the lower stratosphere and the polar vortex is weaker than is found in the mid-winter southern hemisphere. Mean temperature differences in the lower stratosphere are shown to be small (less than 2 K), and planetary wave forcing is found to be very consistent with the climatology. We then will show the differences between our varying SST simulation and the fixed SST simulation in both the dynamics and in two parameterized trace gases (ozone and methane). In general, differences are found to be small, with subtle changes in planetary wave forcing that lead to reduced temperatures in the SH and increased temperatures in the NH.

  16. Vector curvaton with varying kinetic function

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Karciauskas, Mindaugas; Wagstaff, Jacques M.

    2010-01-15

    A new model realization of the vector curvaton paradigm is presented and analyzed. The model consists of a single massive Abelian vector field, with a Maxwell-type kinetic term. By assuming that the kinetic function and the mass of the vector field are appropriately varying during inflation, it is shown that a scale-invariant spectrum of superhorizon perturbations can be generated. These perturbations can contribute to the curvature perturbation of the Universe. If the vector field remains light at the end of inflation it is found that it can generate substantial statistical anisotropy in the spectrum and bispectrum of the curvature perturbation. In this case the non-Gaussianity in the curvature perturbation is predominantly anisotropic, which will be a testable prediction in the near future. If, on the other hand, the vector field is heavy at the end of inflation then it is demonstrated that particle production is approximately isotropic and the vector field alone can give rise to the curvature perturbation, without directly involving any fundamental scalar field. The parameter space for both possibilities is shown to be substantial. Finally, toy models are presented which show that the desired variation of the mass and kinetic function of the vector field can be realistically obtained, without unnatural tunings, in the context of supergravity or superstrings.

  17. Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence varies by cat breed.

    PubMed

    Must, Kärt; Hytönen, Marjo K; Orro, Toomas; Lohi, Hannes; Jokelainen, Pikka

    2017-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a widespread zoonotic parasite that is relevant for veterinary and public health. The domestic cat, the definitive host species with the largest worldwide population, has become evolutionarily and epidemiologically the most important host of T. gondii. The outcome of T. gondii infection is influenced by congenital and acquired host characteristics. We detected differences in T. gondii seroprevalence by cat breed in our previous studies. The aims of this study were to estimate T. gondii seroprevalence in selected domestic cat breeds, and to evaluate whether being of a certain breed is associated with T. gondii seropositivity, when the age and lifestyle of the cat are taken into account. The studied breeds were the Birman, British Shorthair, Burmese, Korat, Norwegian Forest Cat, Ocicat, Persian, and Siamese. Plasma samples were analyzed for the presence of immunoglobulin G antibodies against T. gondii with a commercial direct agglutination test at dilution 1:40. The samples were accompanied by owner-completed questionnaires that provided background data on the cats. Overall, 41.12% of the 1121 cats tested seropositive, and the seroprevalence increased with age. The Burmese had the lowest seroprevalence (18.82%) and the Persian had the highest (60.00%). According to the final multivariable logistic regression model, the odds to test seropositive were four to seven times higher in Birmans, Ocicats, Norwegian Forest Cats, and Persians when compared with the Burmese, while older age and receiving raw meat were also risk factors for T. gondii seropositivity. This study showed that T. gondii seroprevalence varies by cat breed and identified being of certain breeds, older age, and receiving raw meat as risk factors for seropositivity.

  18. How specific halide adsorption varies hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Stock, Philipp; Müller, Melanie; Utzig, Thomas; Valtiner, Markus

    2016-03-11

    Hydrophobic interactions (HI) are driven by the water structure around hydrophobes in aqueous electrolytes. How water structures at hydrophobic interfaces and how this influences the HI was subject to numerous studies. However, the effect of specific ion adsorption on HI and hydrophobic interfaces remains largely unexplored or controversial. Here, the authors utilized atomic force microscopy force spectroscopy at well-defined nanoscopic hydrophobic interfaces to experimentally address how specific ion adsorption of halide ions as well as NH4 (+), Cs(+), and Na(+) cations alters interaction forces across hydrophobic interfaces. Our data demonstrate that iodide adsorption at hydrophobic interfaces profoundly varies the hydrophobic interaction potential. A long-range and strong hydration repulsion at distances D > 3 nm, is followed by an instability which could be explained by a subsequent rapid ejection of adsorbed iodides from approaching hydrophobic interfaces. In addition, the authors find only a weakly pronounced influence of bromide, and as expected no influence of chloride. Also, all tested cations do not have any significant influence on HI. Complementary, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and quartz-crystal-microbalance with dissipation monitoring showed a clear adsorption of large halide ions (Br(-)/I(-)) onto hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Interestingly, iodide can even lead to a full disintegration of SAMs due to specific and strong interactions of iodide with gold. Our data suggest that hydrophobic surfaces are not intrinsically charged negatively by hydroxide adsorption, as it was generally believed. Hydrophobic surfaces rather interact strongly with negatively charged large halide ions, leading to a surface charging and significant variation of interaction forces.

  19. Elastic modulus varies along the bovine femur.

    PubMed

    Nobakhti, Sabah; Katsamenis, Orestis L; Zaarour, Nizar; Limbert, Georges; Thurner, Philipp J

    2017-07-01

    Bone is a heterogeneous material and its mechanical properties vary within the body. Variations in the mechanical response of different bone samples taken from the body cannot be fully explained by only looking at local compositional information at the tissue level. Due to different states of the stress within bones, one might expect that mechanical properties change over the length of a bone; this has not been a matter of systematic research in previous studies. In this study, the distribution of the tissue elastic modulus along the bovine femur is investigated using three-point bending tests. Two bovine femora were split to seven and eight blocks from proximal to distal metaphysis, respectively and twenty beam shaped bone samples were extracted and tested from each block. Based on our findings, the longitudinal elastic modulus follows a gradient pattern along the bovine femur as it increases along the bone from the proximal metaphysis to mid-diaphysis and then decreases toward the distal metaphysis again. Considering long bones to be subjected to bending loads, this mechanism alters the bone structure to support load in the regions where it is needed; similar as outlined by Wolff's law. In another part of this study, microfocus X-ray computed tomography (μCT) was found unable to predict the same trend of changes for the elastic modulus via image-based or density-based elastic moduli calculations. This is insofar important as conventional finite element models of bone are often directly shaped from μCT data. Based on our findings, it seems that current computed tomography based finite element models generated in this manner may not adequately capture the local variation of material behavior of bone tissue, but this may be improved by considering the changes of the elastic modulus along the femur. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Saccadic adaptation to a systematically varying disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Ohl, Sven; Rolfs, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Saccadic adaptation maintains the correct mapping between eye movements and their targets, yet the dynamics of saccadic gain changes in the presence of systematically varying disturbances has not been extensively studied. Here we assessed changes in the gain of saccade amplitudes induced by continuous and periodic postsaccadic visual feedback. Observers made saccades following a sequence of target steps either along the horizontal meridian (Two-way adaptation) or with unconstrained saccade directions (Global adaptation). An intrasaccadic step—following a sinusoidal variation as a function of the trial number (with 3 different frequencies tested in separate blocks)—consistently displaced the target along its vector. The oculomotor system responded to the resulting feedback error by modifying saccade amplitudes in a periodic fashion with similar frequency of variation but lagging the disturbance by a few tens of trials. This periodic response was superimposed on a drift toward stronger hypometria with similar asymptotes and decay rates across stimulus conditions. The magnitude of the periodic response decreased with increasing frequency and was smaller and more delayed for Global than Two-way adaptation. These results suggest that—in addition to the well-characterized return-to-baseline response observed in protocols using constant visual feedback—the oculomotor system attempts to minimize the feedback error by integrating its variation across trials. This process resembles a convolution with an internal response function, whose structure would be determined by coefficients of the learning model. Our protocol reveals this fast learning process in single short experimental sessions, qualifying it for the study of sensorimotor learning in health and disease. PMID:27098027

  1. Functional Piezocrystal Characterisation under Varying Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xiaochun; Qiu, Zhen; Jiang, Tingyi; Sadiq, Muhammad R.; Huang, Zhihong; Demore, Christine E. M.; Cochran, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Piezocrystals, especially the relaxor-based ferroelectric crystals, have been subject to intense investigation and development within the past three decades, motivated by the performance advantages offered by their ultrahigh piezoelectric coefficients and higher electromechanical coupling coefficients than piezoceramics. Structural anisotropy of piezocrystals also provides opportunities for devices to operate in novel vibration modes, such as the d36 face shear mode, with domain engineering and special crystal cuts. These piezocrystal characteristics contribute to their potential usage in a wide range of low- and high-power ultrasound applications. In such applications, conventional piezoelectric materials are presently subject to varying mechanical stress/pressure, temperature and electric field conditions. However, as observed previously, piezocrystal properties are significantly affected by a single such condition or a combination of conditions. Laboratory characterisation of the piezocrystal properties under these conditions is therefore essential to fully understand these materials and to allow electroacoustic transducer design in realistic scenarios. This will help to establish the extent to which these high performance piezocrystals can replace conventional piezoceramics in demanding applications. However, such characterisation requires specific experimental arrangements, examples of which are reported here, along with relevant results. The measurements include high frequency-resolution impedance spectroscopy with the piezocrystal material under mechanical stress 0–60 MPa, temperature 20–200 °C, high electric AC drive and DC bias. A laser Doppler vibrometer and infrared thermal camera are also integrated into the measurement system for vibration mode shape scanning and thermal conditioning with high AC drive. Three generations of piezocrystal have been tested: (I) binary, PMN-PT; (II) ternary, PIN-PMN-PT; and (III) doped ternary, Mn

  2. Audibility of time-varying signals in time-varying backgrounds: Model and data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Brian C. J.; Glasberg, Brian R.

    2004-05-01

    We have described a model for calculating the partial loudness of a steady signal in the presence of a steady background sound [Moore et al., J. Audio Eng. Soc. 45, 224-240 (1997)]. We have also described a model for calculating the loudness of time-varying signals [B. R. Glasberg and B. C. J. Moore, J. Audio Eng. Soc. 50, 331-342 (2002)]. These two models have been combined to allow calculation of the partial loudness of a time-varying signal in the presence of a time-varying background. To evaluate the model, psychometric functions for the detection of a variety of time-varying signals (e.g., telephone ring tones) have been measured in a variety of background sounds sampled from everyday listening situations, using a two-alternative forced-choice task. The different signals and backgrounds were interleaved, to create stimulus uncertainty, as would occur in everyday life. The data are used to relate the detectability index, d', to the calculated partial loudness. In this way, the model can be used to predict the detectability of any signal, based on its calculated partial loudness. [Work supported by MRC (UK) and by Nokia.

  3. Inositol phospholipids regulate the guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor Tiam1 by facilitating its binding to the plasma membrane and regulating GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Ian N; Batty, Ian H; Prescott, Alan R; Gray, Alex; Kular, Gursant S; Stewart, Hazel; Downes, C Peter

    2004-09-15

    Binding of the Rac1-specific guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor, Tiam1, to the plasma membrane requires the N-terminal pleckstrin homology domain. In the present study, we show that membrane-association is mediated by binding of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) to the pleckstrin homology domain. Moreover, in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, translocation of Tiam1 to the cytosol, following receptor-mediated stimulation of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) breakdown, correlates with decreased Rac1-GTP levels, indicating that membrane-association is required for GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1. In addition, we show that platelet-derived growth factor activates Rac1 in vivo by increasing PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) concentrations, rather than the closely related lipid, PtdIns(3,4)P(2). Finally, the data demonstrate that PtdIns(4,5)P(2) and PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) bind to the same pleckstrin homology domain in Tiam1 and that soluble inositol phosphates appear to compete with lipids for this binding. Together, these novel observations provide strong evidence that distinct phosphoinositides regulate different functions of this enzyme, indicating that local concentrations of signalling lipids and the levels of cytosolic inositol phosphates will play crucial roles in determining its activity in vivo.

  4. Inositol phospholipids regulate the guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor Tiam1 by facilitating its binding to the plasma membrane and regulating GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Binding of the Rac1-specific guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor, Tiam1, to the plasma membrane requires the N-terminal pleckstrin homology domain. In the present study, we show that membrane-association is mediated by binding of PtdIns(4,5)P2 to the pleckstrin homology domain. Moreover, in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, translocation of Tiam1 to the cytosol, following receptor-mediated stimulation of PtdIns(4,5)P2 breakdown, correlates with decreased Rac1-GTP levels, indicating that membrane-association is required for GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1. In addition, we show that platelet-derived growth factor activates Rac1 in vivo by increasing PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 concentrations, rather than the closely related lipid, PtdIns(3,4)P2. Finally, the data demonstrate that PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 bind to the same pleckstrin homology domain in Tiam1 and that soluble inositol phosphates appear to compete with lipids for this binding. Together, these novel observations provide strong evidence that distinct phosphoinositides regulate different functions of this enzyme, indicating that local concentrations of signalling lipids and the levels of cytosolic inositol phosphates will play crucial roles in determining its activity in vivo. PMID:15242348

  5. Mutations in FGD4 Encoding the Rho GDP/GTP Exchange Factor FRABIN Cause Autosomal Recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 4H

    PubMed Central

    Delague, Valérie ; Jacquier, Arnaud ; Hamadouche, Tarik ; Poitelon, Yannick ; Baudot, Cécile ; Boccaccio, Irène ; Chouery, Eliane ; Chaouch, Malika ; Kassouri, Nora ; Jabbour, Rosette ; Grid, Djamel ; Mégarbané, André ; Haase, Georg ; Lévy, Nicolas 

    2007-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disorders are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies characterized by muscle weakness and wasting, foot and hand deformities, and electrophysiological changes. The CMT4H subtype is an autosomal recessive demyelinating form of CMT that was recently mapped to a 15.8-Mb region at chromosome 12p11.21-q13.11, in two consanguineous families of Mediterranean origin, by homozygosity mapping. We report here the identification of mutations in FGD4, encoding FGD4 or FRABIN (FGD1-related F-actin binding protein), in both families. FRABIN is a GDP/GTP nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), specific to Cdc42, a member of the Rho family of small guanosine triphosphate (GTP)–binding proteins (Rho GTPases). Rho GTPases play a key role in regulating signal-transduction pathways in eukaryotes. In particular, they have a pivotal role in mediating actin cytoskeleton changes during cell migration, morphogenesis, polarization, and division. Consistent with these reported functions, expression of truncated FRABIN mutants in rat primary motoneurons and rat Schwann cells induced significantly fewer microspikes than expression of wild-type FRABIN. To our knowledge, this is the first report of mutations in a Rho GEF protein being involved in CMT. PMID:17564959

  6. Mutations in FGD4 encoding the Rho GDP/GTP exchange factor FRABIN cause autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 4H.

    PubMed

    Delague, Valérie; Jacquier, Arnaud; Hamadouche, Tarik; Poitelon, Yannick; Baudot, Cécile; Boccaccio, Iréne; Chouery, Eliane; Chaouch, Malika; Kassouri, Nora; Jabbour, Rosette; Grid, Djamel; Mégarbané, Andre; Haase, Georg; Lévy, Nicolas

    2007-07-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disorders are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies characterized by muscle weakness and wasting, foot and hand deformities, and electrophysiological changes. The CMT4H subtype is an autosomal recessive demyelinating form of CMT that was recently mapped to a 15.8-Mb region at chromosome 12p11.21-q13.11, in two consanguineous families of Mediterranean origin, by homozygosity mapping. We report here the identification of mutations in FGD4, encoding FGD4 or FRABIN (FGD1-related F-actin binding protein), in both families. FRABIN is a GDP/GTP nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), specific to Cdc42, a member of the Rho family of small guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding proteins (Rho GTPases). Rho GTPases play a key role in regulating signal-transduction pathways in eukaryotes. In particular, they have a pivotal role in mediating actin cytoskeleton changes during cell migration, morphogenesis, polarization, and division. Consistent with these reported functions, expression of truncated FRABIN mutants in rat primary motoneurons and rat Schwann cells induced significantly fewer microspikes than expression of wild-type FRABIN. To our knowledge, this is the first report of mutations in a Rho GEF protein being involved in CMT.

  7. Ab initio computational study of reaction mechanism of peptide bond formation on HF/6-31G(d,p) level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siahaan, P.; Lalita, M. N. T.; Cahyono, B.; Laksitorini, M. D.; Hildayani, S. Z.

    2017-02-01

    Peptide plays an important role in modulation of various cell functions. Therefore, formation reaction of the peptide is important for chemical reactions. One way to probe the reaction of peptide synthesis is a computational method. The purpose of this research is to determine the reaction mechanism for peptide bond formation on Ac-PV-NH2 and Ac-VP-NH2 synthesis from amino acid proline and valine by ab initio computational approach. The calculations were carried out by theory and basis set HF/6-31G(d,p) for four mechanisms (path 1 to 4) that proposed in this research. The results show that the highest of the rate determining step between reactant and transition state (TS) for path 1, 2, 3, and 4 are 163.06 kJ.mol-1, 1868 kJ.mol-1, 5685 kJ.mol-1, and 1837 kJ.mol-1. The calculation shows that the most preferred reaction of Ac-PV-NH2 and Ac-VP-NH2 synthesis from amino acid proline and valine are on the path 1 (initiated with the termination of H+ in proline amino acid) that produce Ac-PV-NH2.

  8. Insights into the GTP/GDP cycle of RabX3, a novel GTPase from Entamoeba histolytica with tandem G-domains.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Mintu; Mukherjee, Madhumita; Srivastava, Vijay Kumar; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Datta, Sunando

    2014-02-25

    Members of the small GTPase Ras superfamily regulate a host of systems through their ability to catalyze the GTP/GDP cycle. All family members reported thus far possess a single GTPase domain with a P-loop containing a nucleoside triphosphate hydrolase fold. Here for the first time we report a novel member from Entamoeba histolytica, EhRabX3, which harbors two GTPase domains in tandem and exhibits unique biochemical properties. A combination of biochemical and microcalorimetric studies revealed that EhRabX3 binds to a single guanine nucleotide through its N-terminal domain. Unlike most of the members of the Ras superfamily, the dissociation of the nucleotide from EhRabX3 is independent of Mg(2+), perhaps indicating a novel mechanism of nucleotide exchange by this protein. We found that EhRabX3 is extremely sluggish in hydrolyzing GTP, and that could be attributed to its atypical nucleotide binding pocket. It harbors substitutions at two positions that confer oncogenicity to Ras because of impaired GTP hydrolysis. Engineering these residues into the conserved counterparts enhanced their GTPase activity by at least 20-fold. In contrast to most of the members of the Ras superfamily, EhRabX3 lacks the prenylation motif. Using indirect immunofluorescence and biochemical fractionation, we demonstrated that the protein is distributed all over the cytosol in amoebic trophozoites. Collectively, this unique ancient GTPase exhibits a striking evolutionary divergence from the other members of the superfamily.

  9. Production of non-fucosylated antibodies by co-expression of heterologous GDP-6-deoxy-D-lyxo-4-hexulose reductase.

    PubMed

    von Horsten, Hans Henning; Ogorek, Christiane; Blanchard, Véronique; Demmler, Christian; Giese, Christoph; Winkler, Karsten; Kaup, Matthias; Berger, Markus; Jordan, Ingo; Sandig, Volker

    2010-12-01

    All IgG-type antibodies are N-glycosylated in their Fc part at Asn-297. Typically, a fucose residue is attached to the first N-acetylglucosamine of these complex-type N-glycans. Antibodies lacking core fucosylation show a significantly enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and an increased efficacy of anti-tumor activity. In cases where the clinical efficacy of an antibody is to some extent mediated by its ADCC effector function, afucosylated N-glycans could help to reduce dose requirement and save manufacturing costs. Using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells as a model, we demonstrate here that heterologous expression of the prokaryotic enzyme GDP-6-deoxy-d-lyxo-4-hexulose reductase within the cytosol can efficiently deflect the fucose de novo pathway. Antibody-producing CHO cells that were modified in this way secrete antibodies lacking core fucose as demonstrated by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and HPAEC-PAD monosaccharide analysis. Engineering of the fucose de novo pathway has led to the construction of IgGs with a strongly enhanced ADCC effector function. The method described here should have broad practical applicability for the development of next-generation therapeutic antibodies.

  10. Genome mining of the sordarin biosynthetic gene cluster from Sordaria araneosa Cain ATCC 36386: characterization of cycloaraneosene synthase and GDP-6-deoxyaltrose transferase.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Fumitaka; Matsuura, Yasunori; Hayashi, Takaaki; Fukushima, Masayuki; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2016-07-01

    Sordarin is a glycoside antibiotic with a unique tetracyclic diterpene aglycone structure called sordaricin. To understand its intriguing biosynthetic pathway that may include a Diels-Alder-type [4+2]cycloaddition, genome mining of the gene cluster from the draft genome sequence of the producer strain, Sordaria araneosa Cain ATCC 36386, was carried out. A contiguous 67 kb gene cluster consisting of 20 open reading frames encoding a putative diterpene cyclase, a glycosyltransferase, a type I polyketide synthase, and six cytochrome P450 monooxygenases were identified. In vitro enzymatic analysis of the putative diterpene cyclase SdnA showed that it catalyzes the transformation of geranylgeranyl diphosphate to cycloaraneosene, a known biosynthetic intermediate of sordarin. Furthermore, a putative glycosyltransferase SdnJ was found to catalyze the glycosylation of sordaricin in the presence of GDP-6-deoxy-d-altrose to give 4'-O-demethylsordarin. These results suggest that the identified sdn gene cluster is responsible for the biosynthesis of sordarin. Based on the isolated potential biosynthetic intermediates and bioinformatics analysis, a plausible biosynthetic pathway for sordarin is proposed.

  11. Tamarindus indica extract alters release of alpha enolase, apolipoprotein A-I, transthyretin and Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor beta from HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Chong, Ursula Rho Wan; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Abdul-Aziz, Azlina; Hashim, Onn Haji; Junit, Sarni Mat

    2012-01-01

    The plasma cholesterol and triacylglycerol lowering effects of Tamarindus indica extract have been previously described. We have also shown that the methanol extract of T. indica fruit pulp altered the expression of lipid-associated genes including ABCG5 and APOAI in HepG2 cells. In the present study, effects of the same extract on the release of proteins from the cells were investigated using the proteomics approach. When culture media of HepG2 cells grown in the absence and presence of the methanol extract of T. indica fruit pulp were subjected to 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, the expression of seven proteins was found to be significantly different (p<0.03125). Five of the spots were subsequently identified as alpha enolase (ENO1), transthyretin (TTR), apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I; two isoforms), and rab GDP dissociation inhibitor beta (GDI-2). A functional network of lipid metabolism, molecular transport and small molecule biochemistry that interconnects the three latter proteins with the interactomes was identified using the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis software. The methanol extract of T. indica fruit pulp altered the release of ENO1, ApoA-I, TTR and GDI-2 from HepG2 cells. Our results provide support on the effect of T. indica extract on cellular lipid metabolism, particularly that of cholesterol.

  12. MERTK signaling in the retinal pigment epithelium regulates the tyrosine phosphorylation of GDP Dissociation Inhibitor alpha from the GDI/CHM family of RAB GTPase effectors

    PubMed Central

    Shelby, Shameka J.; Feathers, Kecia L.; Ganios, Anna M.; Jia, Lin; Miller, Jason M.; Thompson, Debra A.

    2015-01-01

    Photoreceptor outer segments (OS) in the vertebrate retina undergo a process of continual renewal involving shedding of disc membranes that are cleared by phagocytic uptake into the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). In dystrophic Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, OS phagocytosis is blocked by a mutation in the gene encoding the receptor tyrosine kinase MERTK. To identify proteins tyrosine-phosphorylated downstream of MERTK in the RPE, MALDI-mass spectrometry with peptide-mass fingerprinting was used in comparative studies of RCS congenic and dystrophic rats. At times corresponding to peak phagocytic activity, the RAB GTPase effector GDP dissociation inhibitor alpha (GDI1) was found to undergo tyrosine phosphorylation only in congenic rats. In cryosections of native RPE/choroid, GDI1 colocalized with MERTK and the intracellular tyrosine-kinase SRC. In cultured RPE-J cells, and in transfected heterologous cells, MERTK stimulated SRC-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of GDI1. In OS-fed RPE-J cells, GDI1 colocalized with MERTK and SRC on apparent phagosomes located near the apical membrane. In addition, both GDI1 and RAB5, a regulator of vesicular transport, colocalized with ingested OS, but exhibited labeling patterns that were coincident in some areas and mutually exclusive in others. Taken together, these findings identify a novel role of MERTK signaling in membrane trafficking in the RPE that is likely to subserve mechanisms of phagosome formation. PMID:26283020

  13. Elevated expression of H type GDP-L-fucose:beta-D-galactoside alpha-2-L-fucosyltransferase is associated with human colon adenocarcinoma progression.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, J; Thurin, J; Cooper, H S; Wang, P; Mackiewicz, M; Steplewski, Z; Blaszczyk-Thurin, M

    1995-01-01

    GDP-L-fucose:beta-D-galactoside alpha-2-L-fucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.69) is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of fucosylated type 1 and 2 lactoseries structures, such as Lewis b and the H type 2 and Lewis Y, respectively, that are accumulated in colon adenocarcinoma. Analysis of the mRNA transcript level for the human H gene-encoded beta-D-galactoside alpha-2-L-fucosyltransferase revealed 40- and 340-fold increases in the mRNA levels in all adenocarcinomas and tumor cell lines, respectively, compared to normal colon mucosa where a low level of mRNA transcript was detected. A variable increase in mRNA transcript levels was observed in 50% of adenomatous polyps. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the protein coding region of the cDNAs derived from normal colon, adenoma, and colon adenocarcinoma revealed 100% homology, suggesting that there are no tumor-associated allelic variations within the H beta-D-galactoside alpha-2-L-fucosyltransferase cDNA. These results suggest that beta-D-galactoside alpha-2-L-fucosyltransferase expression highly correlates with malignant progression of colon adenocarcinoma. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7539926

  14. Low-GDP peritoneal dialysis fluid ('balance') has less impact in vitro and ex vivo on epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of mesothelial cells than a standard fluid.

    PubMed

    Bajo, María Auxiliadora; Pérez-Lozano, María Luisa; Albar-Vizcaino, Patricia; del Peso, Gloria; Castro, María-José; Gonzalez-Mateo, Guadalupe; Fernández-Perpén, Antonio; Aguilera, Abelardo; Sánchez-Villanueva, Rafael; Sánchez-Tomero, J Antonio; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Peter, Mirjam E; Passlick-Deetjen, Jutta; Selgas, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Peritoneal membrane deterioration during peritoneal dialysis (PD) is associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of mesothelial cells (MC), which is believed to be mainly due to glucose degradation products (GDPs) present in PD solutions. Here we investigate the impact of GDPs in PD solutions on the EMT of MC in vitro and ex vivo. For in vitro studies, omentum-derived MC were incubated with standard PD fluid or low-GDP solution diluted 1:1 with culture medium. For ex vivo studies, 33 patients, who were distributed at random to either the 'standard' or the 'low GDP' groups, were followed over 24 months. Effluents were collected every 6 months to determine EMT markers in effluent MC. Exposure of MC to standard fluid in vitro resulted in morphological change into a non-epitheloid shape, down-regulation of E-cadherin, indicative of EMT, and in a strong induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. In contrast, in vitro exposure of MC to low-GDP solution did not lead to these phenotype changes. This could be confirmed ex vivo, as the prevalence of non-epitheloid phenotype of MC in the standard group was significantly higher with increasing PD duration and MC isolated from this group showed significantly higher levels of EMT-associated molecules including fibronectin, collagen I, VEGF, IL-8 and TGF-β levels when compared with the low-GDP group. Over time, the expression of E-cadherin also decreased in the standard but increased in the low-GDP group. In addition, the levels of EMT-associated molecules (fibronectin, VEGF and IL-8) increased in the standard but decreased in the low-GDP group. A similar trend was also observed for collagen I and for TGF-β (for the first year), but did not reach global statistical significance. Accordingly, effluent MC with non-epitheloid morphology showed significantly lower levels of E-cadherin and greater levels of fibronectin, collagen I, VEGF and IL 8 when compared with MC with epitheloid phenotype

  15. Genetic variations in the PSMA3, PSMA6 and PSMC6 genes are associated with type 1 diabetes in Latvians and with expression level of number of UPS-related and T1DM-susceptible genes in HapMap individuals.

    PubMed

    Sjakste, Tatjana; Paramonova, Natalia; Osina, Kristine; Dokane, Kristine; Sokolovska, Jelizaveta; Sjakste, Nikolajs

    2016-04-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), a key player of proteostasis network in the body, was implicated in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) pathogenesis. Polymorphisms in genes encoding proteasome subunits may potentially affect system efficiency. However, data in this field are still limited. To fulfil this gap, single nucleotide polymorphisms in the PSMB5 (rs11543947), PSMA6 (rs2277460, rs1048990), PSMC6 (rs2295826, rs2295827) and PSMA3 (rs2348071) genes were genotyped on susceptibility to T1DM in Latvians. The rs11543947 was found to be neutral and other loci manifested disease susceptibility, with rs1048990 and rs2348071 being the most significantly associated (P < 0.001; OR 2.042 [1.376-3.032] and OR 2.096 [1.415-3.107], respectively). Risk effect was associated with female phenotype for rs2277460 and family history for rs2277460, rs2295826 and rs2295827. Five-locus genotypes being at risk simultaneously at any two or more loci showed strong (P < 0.0001) T1DM association. The T1DM protective effects (P < 0.001) were shown for five-locus genotype and haplotype homozygous on common alleles and composed of common alleles, respectively. Using SNPexp data set, correlations have been revealed between the rs1048990, rs2295826, rs2295827 and rs2348071 T1DM risk genotypes and expression levels of 14 genes related to the UPS and 42 T1DM-susceptible genes encoding proteins involved in innate and adaptive immunity, antiviral response, insulin signalling, glucose-energy metabolism and other pathways implicated in T1DM pathogenesis. Genotype-phenotype and genotype-genotype clusterings support genotyping results. Our results provide evidence on new T1DM-susceptible loci in the PSMA3, PSMA6 and PSMC6 proteasome genes and give a new insight into the T1DM pathogenesis.

  16. Allelic Variation in Paralogs of GDP-l-Galactose Phosphorylase Is a Major Determinant of Vitamin C Concentrations in Apple Fruit1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Mellidou, Ifigeneia; Chagné, David; Laing, William A.; Keulemans, Johan; Davey, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    To identify the genetic factors underlying the regulation of fruit vitamin C (l-ascorbic acid [AsA]) concentrations, quantitative trait loci (QTL) studies were carried out in an F1 progeny derived from a cross between the apple (Malus × domestica) cultivars Telamon and Braeburn over three years. QTL were identified for AsA, glutathione, total antioxidant activity in both flesh and skin tissues, and various quality traits, including flesh browning. Four regions on chromosomes 10, 11, 16, and 17 contained stable fruit AsA-QTL clusters. Mapping of AsA metabolic genes identified colocations between orthologs of GDP-l-galactose phosphorylase (GGP), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), and nucleobase-ascorbate transporter within these QTL clusters. Of particular interest are the three paralogs of MdGGP, which all colocated within AsA-QTL clusters. Allelic variants of MdGGP1 and MdGGP3 derived from the cultivar Braeburn parent were also consistently associated with higher fruit total AsA concentrations both within the mapping population (up to 10-fold) and across a range of commercial apple germplasm (up to 6-fold). Striking differences in the expression of the cv Braeburn MdGGP1 allele between fruit from high- and low-AsA genotypes clearly indicate a key role for MdGGP1 in the regulation of fruit AsA concentrations, and this MdGGP allele-specific single-nucleotide polymorphism marker represents an excellent candidate for directed breeding for enhanced fruit AsA concentrations. Interestingly, colocations were also found between MdDHAR3-3 and a stable QTL for browning in the cv Telamon parent, highlighting links between the redox status of the AsA pool and susceptibility to flesh browning. PMID:23001142

  17. An activating mutant of Rac1 that fails to interact with Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor stimulates membrane ruffling in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Payal N; Gibson, Richard M; Tong, Xiaofeng; Miyoshi, Jun; Takai, Yoshimi; Konieczkowski, Martha; Sedor, John R; Wilson-Delfosse, Amy L

    2004-01-01

    Rac1, a member of the Rho family of small GTP-binding proteins, is involved in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton via activation of lamellipodia and membrane ruffle formation. RhoGDI (Rho-family-specific GDP-dissociation inhibitor) forms a complex with Rho proteins in the cytosol of mammalian cells. It not only regulates guanine nucleotide binding to Rho proteins, but may also function as a molecular shuttle to carry Rho proteins from an inactive cytosolic pool to the membrane for activation. These studies tested if RhoGDI is necessary for the translocation of Rac1 from the cytosol to the plasma membrane for the formation of membrane ruffles. We describe a novel mutant of Rac1, R66E (Arg66-->Glu), that fails to bind RhoGDI. This RhoGDI-binding-defective mutation is combined with a Rac1-activating mutation G12V, resulting in a double-mutant [Rac1(G12V/R66E)] that fails to interact with RhoGDI in COS-7 cells, but remains constitutively activated. This double mutant stimulates membrane ruffling to a similar extent as that observed after epidermal growth factor treatment of non-transfected cells. To confirm that Rac1 can signal ruffle formation in the absence of interaction with RhoGDI, Rac1(G12V) was overexpressed in cultured mesangial cells derived from a RhoGDI knockout mouse. Rac1-mediated membrane ruffling was indistinguishable between the RhoGDI(-/-) and RhoGDI(+/+) cell lines. In both the COS-7 and cultured mesangial cells, Rac1(G12V) and Rac1(G12V/R66E) co-localize with membrane ruffles. These findings suggest that interaction with RhoGDI is not essential in the mechanism by which Rac1 translocates to the plasma membrane to stimulate ruffle formation. PMID:14629200

  18. Cloning and expression of GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase gene and ascorbic acid content of acerola (Malpighia glabra L.) fruit at ripening stages.

    PubMed

    Badejo, Adebanjo A; Jeong, Seok T; Goto-Yamamoto, Nami; Esaka, Muneharu

    2007-09-01

    Acerola (Malpighia glabra L.) is one of the richest natural sources of L-ascorbic acid (AsA; vitamin C). GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMP; EC 2.7.7.13) was found to play a major role in the proposed AsA biosynthetic pathway in plants, considering that Arabidopsis vtc1-1 mutant with point mutation in this gene has a highly reduced AsA content. GMP cDNA was isolated from acerola fruits, designated MgGMP, using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), and its expression was monitored during fruit ripening. The full-length cDNA was found to have an ORF of 1083bp encoding a polypeptide of 361 amino acids. In silico analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence showed a pI of 6.45 and molecular mass of 39.7kD. MgGMP showed over 80% amino acid sequence identity with other plant GMP homologues. The phylogenetic tree shows the close relation of MgGMP to the GMP of other plants as against those from parasite, yeasts and mammals. Southern analysis indicated that M. glabra contains not less than two copies of GMP genes. Northern blot analysis showed the transcript abundance of MgGMP in all the organs of acerola examined, with the fruit having the highest expression. The relative transcript abundance of MgGMP mRNA levels in the fruits changes as the ripening process progresses, with the unripe green fruits having the highest relative mRNA level, and the lowest was found in the fruits at advanced ripening stage. A strong correlation was also observed between the relative MgGMP mRNA levels and the AsA contents of acerola during fruit ripening.

  19. Evolutionary conservation and genomic organization of XAP-4, an Xq28 located gene coding for a human rab GDP-dissociation inhibitor (GDI).

    PubMed

    Sedlacek, Z; Konecki, D S; Korn, B; Klauck, S M; Poustka, A

    1994-10-01

    After the development of efficient methods for the construction of transcription maps of defined genomic regions, the rate-limiting step in the analysis of the coding potentials of these regions is the elucidation of function of the novel genes and the examination of their possible involvement in hereditary diseases localized to the region. This can be greatly facilitated by the detection of sequence homology to a gene of known function. XAP-4 is one of the genes identified in the G6PD region of the human Xq28 by direct cDNA selection. The rapid assembly of this gene and the determination of its function was possible because of its sequence homology with the bovine smg p25A/rab3A GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI). Sequence comparison with other GDIs in the databases has revealed that XAP-4 belongs to one of at least two distinct classes of mammalian rab GDIs. The rab GDIs, which play an important role in the regulation of cellular transport, are highly evolutionarily conserved, as are several other genes identified in the neighborhood of XAP-4. This genomic region is very gene dense, and all the cDNA clones from the approximately 2.5-kb-long transcript of XAP-4 map to a single 7.5-kb genomic EcoRI fragment. The genomic organization of XAP-4 has been examined to determine the distribution of the exonic sequences within this short segment of genomic DNA. It was found that, similar to several other genes from the region, XAP-4 is split into exons of average size, which are interrupted by very short introns.

  20. Differential proteomic analysis of HL60 cells treated with secalonic acid F reveals caspase 3-induced cleavage of Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor 2.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Yi, Zhiwei; Wang, Yuqiao; Zhang, Qin; Zhong, Tianhua; Qiu, Yinkun; Wu, Zhen; Tang, Xixiang

    2012-12-01

    Secalonic acid F (SAF) has been previously identified, however, little is known about its cytotoxic activity and related cytotoxic mechanism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic activity of SAF isolated from a deep sea originated fungus Penicillium sp. F11 in HL60 cells and to analyze the differences in protein expression of HL60 cells treated with SAF. The CCK-8 assay and Annexin V-FLUOS/PI assay indicated that SAF displayed dose- and time-dependent inhibition of HL60 cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) analysis of HL60 cells treated with SAF (4 µg/ml) revealed 10 differentially expressed protein spots (P<0.05), 5 upregulated and 5 downregulated. Three spots (1 downregulated and 2 upregulated) were identified as Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor 2 (RhoGDI 2) proteins by MALDI-TOF MS. Western blotting further demonstrated the decreased abundance of full-length RhoGDI 2 together with the increased abundance of caspase 3-cleaved product of RhoGDI 2. The caspase 3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO could suppress the cytotoxic effect of SAF and significantly block the cleavage of RhoGDI 2. RhoGDI 2 is a cytosolic regulator of Rho GTPase and the caspase 3-cleaved product of RhoGDI 2 can advance progression of the apoptotic process. Our data showed that SAF may modulate RhoGDI 2 levels in HL60 cells, thereby potentially disrupting cell signaling pathways important for HL60 cell function.

  1. Heat resistance and salt hypersensitivity in Lactococcus lactis due to spontaneous mutation of llmg_1816 (gdpP) induced by high-temperature growth.

    PubMed

    Smith, William M; Pham, Thi Huong; Lei, Lin; Dou, Junchao; Soomro, Aijaz H; Beatson, Scott A; Dykes, Gary A; Turner, Mark S

    2012-11-01

    During construction of several gene deletion mutants in Lactococcus lactis MG1363 which involved a high-temperature (37.5°C) incubation step, additional spontaneous mutations were observed which resulted in stable heat resistance and in some cases salt-hypersensitive phenotypes. Whole-genome sequencing of one strain which was both heat resistant and salt hypersensitive, followed by PCR and sequencing of four other mutants which shared these phenotypes, revealed independent mutations in llmg_1816 in all cases. This gene encodes a membrane-bound stress signaling protein of the GdpP family, members of which exhibit cyclic dimeric AMP (c-di-AMP)-specific phosphodiesterase activity. Mutations were predicted to lead to single amino acid substitutions or protein truncations. An independent llmg_1816 mutant (Δ1816), created using a suicide vector, also displayed heat resistance and salt hypersensitivity phenotypes which could be restored to wild-type levels following plasmid excision. L. lactis Δ1816 also displayed improved growth in response to sublethal concentrations of penicillin G. High-temperature incubation of a wild-type industrial L. lactis strain also resulted in spontaneous mutation of llmg_1816 and heat-resistant and salt-hypersensitive phenotypes, suggesting that this is not a strain-specific phenomenon and that it is independent of a plasmid integration event. Acidification of milk by the llmg_1816-altered strain was inhibited by lower salt concentrations than the parent strain. This study demonstrates that spontaneous mutations can occur during high-temperature growth of L. lactis and that inactivation of llmg_1816 leads to temperature resistance and salt hypersensitivity.

  2. Functional YFP-tagging of the essential GDP-mannose transporter reveals an important role for the secretion related small GTPase SrgC protein in maintenance of Golgi bodies in Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Neuza D S P; Arentshorst, Mark; Weenink, Xavier O; Punt, Peter J; van den Hondel, Cees A M J J; Ram, Arthur F J

    2011-03-01

    The addition of mannose residues to glycoproteins and glycolipids in the Golgi is carried out by mannosyltransferases. Their activity depends on the presence of GDP-mannose in the lumen of the Golgi. The transport of GDP-mannose (mannosyl donor) into the Golgi requires a specific nucleotide sugar transport present in the Golgi membrane. Here, we report the identification and functional characterization of the putative GDP-mannose transporter in Aspergillus niger, encoded by the gmtA gene (An17g02140). The single GDP-mannose transporter was identified in the A. niger genome and deletion analysis showed that gmtA is an essential gene. The lethal phenotype of the gmtA could be fully complemented by expressing an YFP-GmtA fusion protein from the endogenous gmtA promoter. Fluorescence studies revealed that, as in other fungal species, GmtA localized as punctate dots throughout the hyphal cytoplasm, representing Golgi bodies or Golgi equivalents. SrgC encodes a member of the Rab6/Ypt6 subfamily of secretion-related GTPases and is predicted to be required for the Golgi to vacuole transport. Loss of function of the srgC gene in A. niger resulted in strongly reduced growth and the inability to form conidiospores at 37°C and higher. Furthermore, the srgC disruption in the A. niger strain expressing the functional YFP-GmtA fusion protein led to an apparent 'disappearance' of the Golgi-like structures. The analysis suggests that SrgC has an important role in maintaining the integrity of Golgi-like structures in A. niger.

  3. GDP (Gemcitabine, Dexamethasone, and Cisplatin) Is Highly Effective and Well-Tolerated for Newly Diagnosed Stage IV and Relapsed/Refractory Extranodal Natural Killer/T-Cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing-jing; Dong, Mei; He, Xiao-hui; Li, Ye-xiong; Wang, Wei-hu; Liu, Peng; Yang, Jian-liang; Gui, Lin; Zhang, Chang-gong; Yang, Sheng; Zhou, Sheng-yu; Shi, Yuan-kai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and tolerance of GDP (gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin) regimen in patients with newly diagnosed stage IV and relapsed/refractory extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL). The study enrolled 41 ENKTL patients who received GDP regimen at the Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College between January 2008 and January 2015. The disease status was newly diagnosed stage IV in 15 patients and relapsed/refractory in 26 patients. The median number of cycles of chemotherapy per patient was 6 (range, 2–8 cycles). The overall response rate and complete-remission rate were 83.0% (34/41) and 41.5% (17/41), respectively. After a median follow-up of 16.2 months, 1-year progression-free survival rate and 1-year overall survival rate for the whole cohort were 54.5% and 72.7%. Grade 3 to 4 adverse events included neutropenia (34.1%), thrombocytopenia (19.5%), and anemia (14.6%). Our study has suggested high efficacy and low toxicity profile of GDP regimen in patients with newly diagnosed stage IV and relapsed/refractory ENKTL. PMID:26871836

  4. DFT (B3LYP/LanL2DZ and B3LYP/6311G+(d,p)) comparative vibrational spectroscopic analysis of organic-inorganic compound bis(4-acetylanilinium) tetrachlorocuprate(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkari, A.; Chaabane, I.; Guidara, K.

    2016-07-01

    The organic-inorganic salt, bis(4-acetylanilinium) tetrachlorocuprate(II), was synthesized and characterized by means of FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and Raman (3500-50 cm-1) in solid phase. The structure of [C8H10NO]2CuCl4 compound which was optimized by density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP method showed that the calculated values obtained by B3LYP with LanL2DZ and 6311G+(d,p) basis sets are in better agreement with the experimental data. The computed vibrational frequencies were scaled by different scale factors to yield a good agreement with the experimental vibrational frequencies. The latter have been discussed on the basis of quantum chemical DFT calculations using the B3LYP/6311G+(d,p) and B3LYP/LanL2DZ method approach in gas phase. Besides, the effects due to the substitutions and the intermolecular interactions were investigated. The comparative analysis of the Raman spectra of the title compound with that of the free ligand was also discussed. The geometries and normal modes of the vibrations obtained from B3LYP/6311G+(d,p) calculation are found to be in good agreement with the experimentally observed data. The complete vibrational assignments and analysis of the observed fundamental bands of molecule were carried out.

  5. Prostate Cancer Treatments Have Varying Side Effects, Study Shows

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164200.html Prostate Cancer Treatments Have Varying Side Effects, Study Shows Even ' ... News) -- The long-term side effects of different prostate cancer treatments vary -- and knowing that may help men ...

  6. Comparison of Linear Microinstability Calculations of Varying Input Realism

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rewoldt

    2003-09-08

    The effect of varying ''input realism'' or varying completeness of the input data for linear microinstability calculations, in particular on the critical value of the ion temperature gradient for the ion temperature gradient mode, is investigated using gyrokinetic and gyrofluid approaches. The calculations show that varying input realism can have a substantial quantitative effect on the results.

  7. Activation of the Regulator of G protein Signaling 14 (RGS14):Gαi1-GDP signaling complex is regulated by Resistance to Inhibitors of Cholinesterase-8A (Ric-8A)

    PubMed Central

    Vellano, Christopher P.; Shu, Feng-jue; Ramineni, Suneela; Yates, Cindee K.; Tall, Gregory G.; Hepler, John R.

    2011-01-01

    RGS14 is a brain scaffolding protein that integrates G protein and MAP kinase signaling pathways. Like other RGS proteins, RGS14 is a GTPase activating protein (GAP) that terminates Gαi/o signaling. Unlike other RGS proteins, RGS14 also contains a G protein regulatory (also known as GoLoco) domain that binds Gαi1/3-GDP in cells and in vitro. Here we report that Ric-8A, a non-receptor guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), functionally interacts with the RGS14:Gαi1-GDP signaling complex to regulate its activation state. RGS14 and Ric-8A are recruited from the cytosol to the plasma membrane in the presence of co-expressed Gαi1 in cells, suggesting formation of a functional protein complex with Gαi1. Consistent with this idea, Ric-8A stimulates dissociation of the RGS14:Gαi1-GDP complex in cells and in vitro using purified proteins. Purified Ric-8A stimulates dissociation of the RGS14:Gαi1-GDP complex to form a stable Ric-8A:Gαi complex in the absence of GTP. In the presence of activating nucleotide, Ric-8A interacts with the RGS14:Gαi1-GDP complex to stimulate both the steady-state GTPase activity of Gαi1 and GTP binding to Gαi1. However, sufficiently high concentrations of RGS14 competitively reverse these stimulatory effects of Ric-8A on Gαi1 nucleotide binding and GTPase activity. This observation correlates with findings that show RGS14 and Ric-8A share an overlapping binding region within the last 11 amino acids of Gαi1. As further evidence that these proteins are functionally linked, native RGS14 and Ric-8A co-exist within the same hippocampal neurons. These findings demonstrate that RGS14 is a newly appreciated integrator of unconventional Ric-8A and Gαi1 signaling. PMID:21158412

  8. Biosynthesis of the Common Polysaccharide Antigen of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1: Characterization and Role of GDP-D-Rhamnose:GlcNAc/GalNAc-Diphosphate-Lipid α1,3-D-Rhamnosyltransferase WbpZ.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Hao, Youai; Lam, Joseph S; Vlahakis, Jason Z; Szarek, Walter A; Vinnikova, Anna; Veselovsky, Vladimir V; Brockhausen, Inka

    2015-06-15

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces two major cell surface lipopolysaccharides, characterized by distinct O antigens, called common polysaccharide antigen (CPA) and O-specific antigen (OSA). CPA contains a polymer of D-rhamnose (D-Rha) in α1-2 and α1-3 linkages. Three putative glycosyltransferase genes, wbpX, wbpY, and wbpZ, are part of the CPA biosynthesis cluster. To characterize the enzymatic function of the wbpZ gene product, we chemically synthesized the donor substrate GDP-D-Rha and enzymatically synthesized GDP-D-[(3)H]Rha. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we showed that WbpZ transferred one D-Rha residue from GDP-D-Rha in α1-3 linkage to both GlcNAc- and GalNAc-diphosphate-lipid acceptor substrates. WbpZ is also capable of transferring D-mannose (D-Man) to these acceptors. Therefore, WbpZ has a relaxed specificity with respect to both acceptor and donor substrates. The diphosphate group of the acceptor, however, is required for activity. WbpZ does not require divalent metal ion for activity and exhibits an unusually high pH optimum of 9. WbpZ from PAO1 is therefore a GDP-D-Rha:GlcNAc/GalNAc-diphosphate-lipid α1,3-D-rhamnosyltransferase that has significant activity of GDP-D-Man:GlcNAc/GalNAc-diphosphate-lipid α1,3-D-mannosyltransferase. We used site-directed mutagenesis to replace the Asp residues of the two DXD motifs with Ala. Neither of the mutant constructs of wbpZ (D172A or D254A) could be used to rescue CPA biosynthesis in the ΔwbpZ knockout mutant in a complementation assay. This suggested that D172 and D254 are essential for WbpZ function. This work is the first detailed characterization study of a D-Rha-transferase and a critical step in the development of CPA synthesis inhibitors. This is the first characterization of a D-rhamnosyltransferase and shows that it is essential in Pseudomonas aeruginosa for the synthesis of the common polysaccharide antigen. Copyright © 2015, American Society for

  9. Linear Parameter Varying Identification of Dynamic Joint Stiffness during Time-Varying Voluntary Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Golkar, Mahsa A.; Sobhani Tehrani, Ehsan; Kearney, Robert E.

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic joint stiffness is a dynamic, nonlinear relationship between the position of a joint and the torque acting about it, which can be used to describe the biomechanics of the joint and associated limb(s). This paper models and quantifies changes in ankle dynamic stiffness and its individual elements, intrinsic and reflex stiffness, in healthy human subjects during isometric, time-varying (TV) contractions of the ankle plantarflexor muscles. A subspace, linear parameter varying, parallel-cascade (LPV-PC) algorithm was used to identify the model from measured input position perturbations and output torque data using voluntary torque as the LPV scheduling variable (SV). Monte-Carlo simulations demonstrated that the algorithm is accurate, precise, and robust to colored measurement noise. The algorithm was then used to examine stiffness changes associated with TV isometric contractions. The SV was estimated from the Soleus EMG using a Hammerstein model of EMG-torque dynamics identified from unperturbed trials. The LPV-PC algorithm identified (i) a non-parametric LPV impulse response function (LPV IRF) for intrinsic stiffness and (ii) a LPV-Hammerstein model for reflex stiffness consisting of a LPV static nonlinearity followed by a time-invariant state-space model of reflex dynamics. The results demonstrated that: (a) intrinsic stiffness, in particular ankle elasticity, increased significantly and monotonically with activation level; (b) the gain of the reflex pathway increased from rest to around 10–20% of subject's MVC and then declined; and (c) the reflex dynamics were second order. These findings suggest that in healthy human ankle, reflex stiffness contributes most at low muscle contraction levels, whereas, intrinsic contributions monotonically increase with activation level. PMID:28579954

  10. Holographic cinematography of time-varying reflecting and time-varying phase objects using a Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    The use of a Nd:YAG laser to record holographic motion pictures of time-varying reflecting objects and time-varying phase objects is discussed. Sample frames from both types of holographic motion pictures are presented. The holographic system discussed is intended for three-dimensional flow visualization of the time-varying flows that occur in jet-engine components.

  11. Propagation of phase modulation signals in time-varying plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Min; Li, Xiaoping; Wang, Di; Liu, Yanming; He, Pan

    2016-05-01

    The effects of time-varying plasma to the propagation of phase modulation signals are investigated in this paper. Through theoretical analysis, the mechanism of the interaction between the time-varying plasma and the phase modulation signal is given. A time-varying plasma generator which could produce arbitrary time-varying plasma is built by adjusting the discharge power. A comparison of results from experiment and simulation prove that the time-varying plasma could cause the special rotation of QPSK (Quadrature Phase Shift Keying) constellation, and the mechanism of constellation point's rotation is analyzed. Additionally, the experimental results of the QPSK signals' EVM (Error Vector Magnitude) after time-varying and time-invariant plasma with different ωp/ω are given. This research could be used to improve the TT&C (Tracking Telemeter and Command) system of re-entry vehicles.

  12. Stable Inversion for Nonlinear Nonminimum-Phase Time Varying Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devasia, S.; Paden, B.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we extend stable inversion to nonlinear time-varying systems and study computational issues; the technique is applicable to minimum-phase as well as nonminimum-phase systems. The inversion technique is new, even in the linear time-varying case, and relies on partitioning (the dichotomic split of) the linearized system dynamics into time-varying, stable, and unstable, submanifolds. This dichotomic split is used to build time-varying filters which are, in turn, the basis of a contraction used to find a bounded inverse input-state trajectory. Finding the inverse input-state trajectory allows the development or exact-output tracking controllers. The method is local to the time-varying trajectory and requires that the internal dynamics vary slowly; however, the method represents a significant advance relative to presently available tracking controllers. Present techniques are restricted to time-invariant nonlinear systems and, in the general case, track only asymptotically.

  13. Stable Inversion for Nonlinear Nonminimum-Phase Time Varying Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devasia, S.; Paden, B.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we extend stable inversion to nonlinear time-varying systems and study computational issues; the technique is applicable to minimum-phase as well as nonminimum-phase systems. The inversion technique is new, even in the linear time-varying case, and relies on partitioning (the dichotomic split of) the linearized system dynamics into time-varying, stable, and unstable, submanifolds. This dichotomic split is used to build time-varying filters which are, in turn, the basis of a contraction used to find a bounded inverse input-state trajectory. Finding the inverse input-state trajectory allows the development or exact-output tracking controllers. The method is local to the time-varying trajectory and requires that the internal dynamics vary slowly; however, the method represents a significant advance relative to presently available tracking controllers. Present techniques are restricted to time-invariant nonlinear systems and, in the general case, track only asymptotically.

  14. Estimating varying coefficients for partial differential equation models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyu; Cao, Jiguo; Carroll, Raymond J

    2017-01-11

    Partial differential equations (PDEs) are used to model complex dynamical systems in multiple dimensions, and their parameters often have important scientific interpretations. In some applications, PDE parameters are not constant but can change depending on the values of covariates, a feature that we call varying coefficients. We propose a parameter cascading method to estimate varying coefficients in PDE models from noisy data. Our estimates of the varying coefficients are shown to be consistent and asymptotically normally distributed. The performance of our method is evaluated by a simulation study and by an empirical study estimating three varying coefficients in a PDE model arising from LIDAR data.

  15. A novel rabconnectin-3-binding protein that directly binds a GDP/GTP exchange protein for Rab3A small G protein implicated in Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis of neurotransmitter.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Hiroshi; Sakisaka, Toshiaki; Yasumi, Masato; Shingai, Tatsushi; Izumi, Genkichi; Nagano, Fumiko; Deguchi-Tawarada, Maki; Takeuchi, Masakazu; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Takai, Yoshimi

    2003-06-01

    Rab3A, a member of the Rab3 small G protein family, regulates Ca2+-dependent exocytosis of neurotransmitter. The cyclical activation and inactivation of Rab3A are essential for the Rab3A action in exocytosis. GDP-Rab3A is activated to GTP-Rab3A by Rab3 GDP/GTP exchange protein (Rab3 GEP) and GTP-Rab3A is inactivated to GDP-Rab3A by Rab3 GTPase-activating protein (Rab3 GAP). We have recently found a novel protein, named rabconnectin-3, which is co-immunoprecipitated with Rab3 GEP or GAP from the extract of the crude synaptic vesicle (CSV) fraction of rat brain. Rabconnectin-3 is abundantly expressed in the brain where it is associated with synaptic vesicles. We have found that two more proteins are co-immunoprecipitated with Rab3 GEP from the CSV fraction of rat brain. We attempted here to isolate and characterize one of them. We determined its partial amino acid sequence, cloned its cDNA from a human cDNA library, and determined its primary structure. The protein consisted of 1490 amino acids (aa) and showed a calculated molecular weight of 163808. The protein had 7 WD domains. The protein was abundantly expressed in the brain where it co-localized with rabconnectin-3 on synaptic vesicles. The protein formed a stable complex with rabconnectin-3. We named this protein rabconnectin-3beta and renamed rabconnectin-3 rabconnectin-3alpha. Rabconnectin-3beta, but not rabconnectin-3alpha, directly bound Rab3 GEP. Neither rabconnectin-3alpha nor -3beta directly bound Rab3 GAP. These results indicate that rabconnectin-3 consists of the alpha and beta subunits and binds directly Rab3 GEP through the beta subunit and indirectly Rab3 GAP through an unidentified molecule(s).

  16. How Do Parenting Concepts Vary within and between the Families?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roskam, Isabelle; Meunier, Jean Christophe

    2009-01-01

    How do parenting concepts vary within and between the families? The present study regards parenting as a complex family process by considering three concepts of parenting: styles, differential treatment and coparenting consistency. A main question was addressed: whether and how these parenting concepts vary within the families towards siblings or…

  17. Dynamic Factor Analysis Models with Time-Varying Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Sy-Miin; Zu, Jiyun; Shifren, Kim; Zhang, Guangjian

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic factor analysis models with time-varying parameters offer a valuable tool for evaluating multivariate time series data with time-varying dynamics and/or measurement properties. We use the Dynamic Model of Activation proposed by Zautra and colleagues (Zautra, Potter, & Reich, 1997) as a motivating example to construct a dynamic factor…

  18. Specimen loading list for the varying temperature experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Qualls, A.L.; Sitterson, R.G.

    1998-09-01

    The varying temperature experiment HFIR-RB-13J has been assembled and inserted in the reactor. Approximately 5300 specimens were cleaned, inspected, matched, and loaded into four specimen holders. A listing of each specimen loaded into the steady temperature holder, its position in the capsule, and the identification of the corresponding specimen loaded into the varying temperature holder is presented in this report.

  19. How Do Parenting Concepts Vary within and between the Families?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roskam, Isabelle; Meunier, Jean Christophe

    2009-01-01

    How do parenting concepts vary within and between the families? The present study regards parenting as a complex family process by considering three concepts of parenting: styles, differential treatment and coparenting consistency. A main question was addressed: whether and how these parenting concepts vary within the families towards siblings or…

  20. Dynamic Factor Analysis Models with Time-Varying Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Sy-Miin; Zu, Jiyun; Shifren, Kim; Zhang, Guangjian

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic factor analysis models with time-varying parameters offer a valuable tool for evaluating multivariate time series data with time-varying dynamics and/or measurement properties. We use the Dynamic Model of Activation proposed by Zautra and colleagues (Zautra, Potter, & Reich, 1997) as a motivating example to construct a dynamic factor…

  1. Extending satisficing control strategy to slowly varying nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binazadeh, T.; Shafiei, M. H.

    2013-04-01

    Based on the satisficing control strategy, a novel approach to design a stabilizing control law for nonlinear time varying systems with slowly varying parameters (slowly varying systems) is presented. The satisficing control strategy has been originally introduced for time-invariant systems; however, this technique does not have any stability proof for time varying systems. In this paper, first, a parametric version of the satisficing control strategy is developed. Then, by considering the time as a frozen parameter, the parametric satisficing control strategy is utilized. Finally, a theorem is presented which suggested a stabilizing satisficing control law for the slowly varying control systems. Moreover, in this theorem, the maximum admissible rate of change of the system dynamics is evaluated. The efficiency of the proposed approach is demonstrated by a computer simulation.

  2. Time varying voltage combustion control and diagnostics sensor

    DOEpatents

    Chorpening, Benjamin T [Morgantown, WV; Thornton, Jimmy D [Morgantown, WV; Huckaby, E David [Morgantown, WV; Fincham, William [Fairmont, WV

    2011-04-19

    A time-varying voltage is applied to an electrode, or a pair of electrodes, of a sensor installed in a fuel nozzle disposed adjacent the combustion zone of a continuous combustion system, such as of the gas turbine engine type. The time-varying voltage induces a time-varying current in the flame which is measured and used to determine flame capacitance using AC electrical circuit analysis. Flame capacitance is used to accurately determine the position of the flame from the sensor and the fuel/air ratio. The fuel and/or air flow rate (s) is/are then adjusted to provide reduced flame instability problems such as flashback, combustion dynamics and lean blowout, as well as reduced emissions. The time-varying voltage may be an alternating voltage and the time-varying current may be an alternating current.

  3. Estimation of Time-Varying Pilot Model Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaal, Peter M. T.; Sweet, Barbara T.

    2011-01-01

    Human control behavior is rarely completely stationary over time due to fatigue or loss of attention. In addition, there are many control tasks for which human operators need to adapt their control strategy to vehicle dynamics that vary in time. In previous studies on the identification of time-varying pilot control behavior wavelets were used to estimate the time-varying frequency response functions. However, the estimation of time-varying pilot model parameters was not considered. Estimating these parameters can be a valuable tool for the quantification of different aspects of human time-varying manual control. This paper presents two methods for the estimation of time-varying pilot model parameters, a two-step method using wavelets and a windowed maximum likelihood estimation method. The methods are evaluated using simulations of a closed-loop control task with time-varying pilot equalization and vehicle dynamics. Simulations are performed with and without remnant. Both methods give accurate results when no pilot remnant is present. The wavelet transform is very sensitive to measurement noise, resulting in inaccurate parameter estimates when considerable pilot remnant is present. Maximum likelihood estimation is less sensitive to pilot remnant, but cannot detect fast changes in pilot control behavior.

  4. Control design for a class of nonlinear parameter varying systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiushan; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Stabilisation for a class of one-sided Lipschitz nonlinear parameter varying systems is dealt with in this paper. First, the nonlinear parameter varying system is represented as a subsystem of a differential inclusion. Sufficient conditions for exponential stabilisation for the differential inclusion are given by solving linear matrix inequalities. Then a continuous control law is designed to stabilise the differential inclusion. It leads to stabilising the nonlinear parameter varying system. Finally, a simulation example is presented to show the validity and advantages of the proposed method.

  5. Signature motifs of GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase, a non-segmented negative strand RNA viral mRNA capping enzyme, domain in the L protein are required for covalent enzyme–pRNA intermediate formation

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Julie; Ogino, Minako; Green, Todd J.; Ogino, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    The unconventional mRNA capping enzyme (GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase, PRNTase; block V) domain in RNA polymerase L proteins of non-segmented negative strand (NNS) RNA viruses (e.g. rabies, measles, Ebola) contains five collinear sequence elements, Rx(3)Wx(3–8)ΦxGxζx(P/A) (motif A; Φ, hydrophobic; ζ, hydrophilic), (Y/W)ΦGSxT (motif B), W (motif C), HR (motif D) and ζxxΦx(F/Y)QxxΦ (motif E). We performed site-directed mutagenesis of the L protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, a prototypic NNS RNA virus) to examine participation of these motifs in mRNA capping. Similar to the catalytic residues in motif D, G1100 in motif A, T1157 in motif B, W1188 in motif C, and F1269 and Q1270 in motif E were found to be essential or important for the PRNTase activity in the step of the covalent L-pRNA intermediate formation, but not for the GTPase activity that generates GDP (pRNA acceptor). Cap defective mutations in these residues induced termination of mRNA synthesis at position +40 followed by aberrant stop–start transcription, and abolished virus gene expression in host cells. These results suggest that the conserved motifs constitute the active site of the PRNTase domain and the L-pRNA intermediate formation followed by the cap formation is essential for successful synthesis of full-length mRNAs. PMID:26602696

  6. Protein glycosylation in pmt mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Influence of heterologously expressed cellobiohydrolase II of Trichoderma reesei and elevated levels of GDP-mannose and cis-prenyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Górka-Nieć, Wioletta; Bańkowska, Renata; Palamarczyk, Grazyna; Krotkiewski, Hubert; Kruszewska, Joanna S

    2007-05-01

    Protein O-mannosylation has been postulated to be critical for production and secretion of glycoproteins in fungi. Therefore, understanding the regulation of this process and the influence of heterologous expression of glycoproteins on the activity of enzymes engaged in O-glycosylation are of considerable interest. In this study we expressed cellobiohydrolase II (CBHII) of T. reesei, which is normally highly O-mannosylated, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae pmt mutants partially blocked in O-mannosylation. We found that the lack of Pmt1 or Pmt2 protein O-mannosyltransferase activity limited the glycosylation of CBHII, but it did not affect its secretion. The S. cerevisiae pmt1Delta and pmt2Delta mutants expressing T. reesei cbh2 gene showed a decrease of GDP-mannose level and a very high activity of cis-prenyltransferase compared to untransformed strains. On the other hand, elevation of cis-prenyltransferase activity by overexpression of the S. cerevisiae RER2 gene in these mutants led to an increase of dolichyl phosphate mannose synthase activity, but it did not influence the activity of O-mannosyltransferases. Overexpression of the MPG1 gene increased the level of GDP-mannose and stimulated the activity of mannosyltransferases elongating O-linked sugar chains, leading to partial restoration of CBHII glycosylation.

  7. Reducing AsA leads to leaf lesion and defence response in knock-down of the AsA biosynthetic enzyme GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase gene in tomato plant.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chanjuan; Ouyang, Bo; Yang, Changxian; Zhang, Xiaohui; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Yuyang; Zhang, Junhong; Li, Hanxia; Ye, Zhibiao

    2013-01-01

    As a vital antioxidant, L-ascorbic acid (AsA) affects diverse biological processes in higher plants. Lack of AsA in cell impairs plant development. In the present study, we manipulated a gene of GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase which catalyzes the conversion of D-mannose-1-P to GDP-D-mannose in AsA biosynthetic pathway and found out the phenotype alteration of tomato. In the tomato genome, there are four members of GMP gene family and they constitutively expressed in various tissues in distinct expression patterns. As expected, over-expression of SlGMP3 increased total AsA contents and enhanced the tolerance to oxidative stress in tomato. On the contrary, knock-down of SlGMP3 significantly decreased AsA contents below the threshold level and altered the phenotype of tomato plants with lesions and further senescence. Further analysis indicated the causes for this symptom could result from failing to instantly deplete the reactive oxygen species (ROS) as decline of free radical scavenging activity. More ROS accumulated in the leaves and then triggered expressions of defence-related genes and mimic symptom occurred on the leaves similar to hypersensitive responses against pathogens. Consequently, the photosynthesis of leaves was dramatically fallen. These results suggested the vital roles of AsA as an antioxidant in leaf function and defence response of tomato.

  8. Signature motifs of GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase, a non-segmented negative strand RNA viral mRNA capping enzyme, domain in the L protein are required for covalent enzyme-pRNA intermediate formation.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Julie; Ogino, Minako; Green, Todd J; Ogino, Tomoaki

    2016-01-08

    The unconventional mRNA capping enzyme (GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase, PRNTase; block V) domain in RNA polymerase L proteins of non-segmented negative strand (NNS) RNA viruses (e.g. rabies, measles, Ebola) contains five collinear sequence elements, Rx(3)Wx(3-8)ΦxGxζx(P/A) (motif A; Φ, hydrophobic; ζ, hydrophilic), (Y/W)ΦGSxT (motif B), W (motif C), HR (motif D) and ζxxΦx(F/Y)QxxΦ (motif E). We performed site-directed mutagenesis of the L protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, a prototypic NNS RNA virus) to examine participation of these motifs in mRNA capping. Similar to the catalytic residues in motif D, G1100 in motif A, T1157 in motif B, W1188 in motif C, and F1269 and Q1270 in motif E were found to be essential or important for the PRNTase activity in the step of the covalent L-pRNA intermediate formation, but not for the GTPase activity that generates GDP (pRNA acceptor). Cap defective mutations in these residues induced termination of mRNA synthesis at position +40 followed by aberrant stop-start transcription, and abolished virus gene expression in host cells. These results suggest that the conserved motifs constitute the active site of the PRNTase domain and the L-pRNA intermediate formation followed by the cap formation is essential for successful synthesis of full-length mRNAs.

  9. Spatially Varying Index of Refraction: An Open Ended Undergraduate Topic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, David A.

    1980-01-01

    Presents an experiment on the bending of light in a medium with a continuously varying index of refraction. Several theoretical approaches for the analysis of this experiment, designed for college physics students, are also presented. (HM)

  10. 253. Mabry Mill. The varying roof lines and siding gives ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    253. Mabry Mill. The varying roof lines and siding gives the mill an interesting texture, increasing its photogenic value. Looking north. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  11. Water-salt exchange during bedrest of varying duration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natochin, Y. V.

    1978-01-01

    Problems associated with the status of water-sodium metabolism under bedrest programs of varying lengths were studied. The dynamics of electrolyte concentration in blood serum, functional status of kidney osmosis regulating function, and other problems are discussed.

  12. Nonlinear Varying Coefficient Models with Applications to Studying Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kürüm, Esra; Li, Runze; Wang, Yang; ŞEntürk, Damla

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by a study on factors affecting the level of photosynthetic activity in a natural ecosystem, we propose nonlinear varying coefficient models, in which the relationship between the predictors and the response variable is allowed to be nonlinear. One-step local linear estimators are developed for the nonlinear varying coefficient models and their asymptotic normality is established leading to point-wise asymptotic confidence bands for the coefficient functions. Two-step local linear estimators are also proposed for cases where the varying coefficient functions admit different degrees of smoothness; bootstrap confidence intervals are utilized for inference based on the two-step estimators. We further propose a generalized F test to study whether the coefficient functions vary over a covariate. We illustrate the proposed methodology via an application to an ecology data set and study the finite sample performance by Monte Carlo simulation studies. PMID:24976756

  13. Nonlinear Varying Coefficient Models with Applications to Studying Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kürüm, Esra; Li, Runze; Wang, Yang; SEntürk, Damla

    2014-03-01

    Motivated by a study on factors affecting the level of photosynthetic activity in a natural ecosystem, we propose nonlinear varying coefficient models, in which the relationship between the predictors and the response variable is allowed to be nonlinear. One-step local linear estimators are developed for the nonlinear varying coefficient models and their asymptotic normality is established leading to point-wise asymptotic confidence bands for the coefficient functions. Two-step local linear estimators are also proposed for cases where the varying coefficient functions admit different degrees of smoothness; bootstrap confidence intervals are utilized for inference based on the two-step estimators. We further propose a generalized F test to study whether the coefficient functions vary over a covariate. We illustrate the proposed methodology via an application to an ecology data set and study the finite sample performance by Monte Carlo simulation studies.

  14. Spatially Varying Index of Refraction: An Open Ended Undergraduate Topic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, David A.

    1980-01-01

    Presents an experiment on the bending of light in a medium with a continuously varying index of refraction. Several theoretical approaches for the analysis of this experiment, designed for college physics students, are also presented. (HM)

  15. Analysis and Design of Time-Varying Filter Banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodagar, Iraj

    Analysis-synthesis filter banks have been studied extensively and a wide range of theoretical problems have been subsequently addressed. However, almost all the research activity has been concentrated on time-invariant filter banks whose components are fixed and do not change in time. The objective of this thesis is to develop analysis and design techniques for time-varying FIR analysis-synthesis filter banks that are perfect reconstructing (PR). In such systems, the analysis and/or synthesis filters, the down-up sampling rates, or even the number of bands can change in time. The underlying idea is that by adapting the basis functions of the filter bank transform to the signal properties, one can represent the relevant information of the signal more efficiently. For analysis purposes, we derive the time-varying impulse response of the filter bank in terms of the analysis and synthesis filter coefficients. We are able to represent this impulse response in terms of the product of the analysis and synthesis matrix transforms. Our approach to the PR time-varying filter bank design is to change the analysis -synthesis filter bank among a set of time-invariant filter banks. The analysis filter banks are switched instantaneously. To eliminate the distortion during switching, a new time-varying synthesis section is designed for each transition. Three design techniques are developed for the time-varying filter bank design. The first technique uses the least squares synthesis filters. This method improves the reconstruction quality significantly, but does not usually achieve the perfect reconstruction. Using the second technique, one can design PR time-varying systems by redesigning the analysis filters. The drawback is that this method requires numerical optimizations. The third technique introduces a new structure for exactly reconstructing time-varying filter banks. This structure consists of the conventional filter bank followed by a time-varying post filter. The post

  16. Design of 2D time-varying vector fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoning; Kwatra, Vivek; Wei, Li-Yi; Hansen, Charles D; Zhang, Eugene

    2012-10-01

    Design of time-varying vector fields, i.e., vector fields that can change over time, has a wide variety of important applications in computer graphics. Existing vector field design techniques do not address time-varying vector fields. In this paper, we present a framework for the design of time-varying vector fields, both for planar domains as well as manifold surfaces. Our system supports the creation and modification of various time-varying vector fields with desired spatial and temporal characteristics through several design metaphors, including streamlines, pathlines, singularity paths, and bifurcations. These design metaphors are integrated into an element-based design to generate the time-varying vector fields via a sequence of basis field summations or spatial constrained optimizations at the sampled times. The key-frame design and field deformation are also introduced to support other user design scenarios. Accordingly, a spatial-temporal constrained optimization and the time-varying transformation are employed to generate the desired fields for these two design scenarios, respectively. We apply the time-varying vector fields generated using our design system to a number of important computer graphics applications that require controllable dynamic effects, such as evolving surface appearance, dynamic scene design, steerable crowd movement, and painterly animation. Many of these are difficult or impossible to achieve via prior simulation-based methods. In these applications, the time-varying vector fields have been applied as either orientation fields or advection fields to control the instantaneous appearance or evolving trajectories of the dynamic effects.

  17. Acute Exposure Guideline Levels (AEGLs) for Time Varying Toxic Plumes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-12

    chemicals for a general population. Inhalation exposures in the real world, however, vary strongly in space and time and thus do not correspond to the...12-09-2014 Memorandum Report Toxic airborne contaminants Health effects prediction Space and time varying exposures Extension of EPA AEGLs 64-4464...few fixed-duration exposures to a few constant-density conditions are tabulated. The issue of how to treat real toxic plumes, whose agent density

  18. Loudness of time-varying stimuli with electric stimulation.

    PubMed

    Francart, Tom; Innes-Brown, Hamish; McDermott, Hugh J; McKay, Colette M

    2014-06-01

    McKay, Henshall, Farrell, and McDermott [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 113, 2054-2063 (2003)] developed a practical method to estimate the loudness of periodic electrical signals presented through a cochlear implant. In the present work, this method was extended to time-varying sounds based on two models of time-varying loudness for normal listeners. To fit the model parameters, loudness balancing data was collected with six cochlear implant listeners. The pulse rate of a modulated pulse train was adjusted to equalize its loudness to a reference stimulus. The stimuli were single-electrode time-limited pulse bursts, repeated at a rate of 50 Hz, with on-times varying between 2 and 20 ms. The parameters of two different models of time-varying loudness were fitted to the results. For each model, parameters defining the time windows over which the electrical pulses contribute to instantaneous loudness were optimized. In each case, a good fit was obtained with the loudness balancing results. Therefore, the practical method was successfully extended to time-varying sounds by combining it with existing models of time-varying loudness for acoustic stimulation.

  19. Sensor placement for calibration of spatially varying model parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Paromita; Hu, Zhen; Mahadevan, Sankaran

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a sensor placement optimization framework for the calibration of spatially varying model parameters. To account for the randomness of the calibration parameters over space and across specimens, the spatially varying parameter is represented as a random field. Based on this representation, Bayesian calibration of spatially varying parameter is investigated. To reduce the required computational effort during Bayesian calibration, the original computer simulation model is substituted with Kriging surrogate models based on the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the model response and the Karhunen-Loeve expansion (KLE) of the spatially varying parameters. A sensor placement optimization problem is then formulated based on the Bayesian calibration to maximize the expected information gain measured by the expected Kullback-Leibler (K-L) divergence. The optimization problem needs to evaluate the expected K-L divergence repeatedly which requires repeated calibration of the spatially varying parameter, and this significantly increases the computational effort of solving the optimization problem. To overcome this challenge, an approximation for the posterior distribution is employed within the optimization problem to facilitate the identification of the optimal sensor locations using the simulated annealing algorithm. A heat transfer problem with spatially varying thermal conductivity is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. Spatially Varying Coefficient Model for Neuroimaging Data with Jump Discontinuities.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongtu; Fan, Jianqing; Kong, Linglong

    2014-07-01

    Motivated by recent work on studying massive imaging data in various neuroimaging studies, we propose a novel spatially varying coefficient model (SVCM) to capture the varying association between imaging measures in a three-dimensional (3D) volume (or 2D surface) with a set of covariates. Two stylized features of neuorimaging data are the presence of multiple piecewise smooth regions with unknown edges and jumps and substantial spatial correlations. To specifically account for these two features, SVCM includes a measurement model with multiple varying coefficient functions, a jumping surface model for each varying coefficient function, and a functional principal component model. We develop a three-stage estimation procedure to simultaneously estimate the varying coefficient functions and the spatial correlations. The estimation procedure includes a fast multiscale adaptive estimation and testing procedure to independently estimate each varying coefficient function, while preserving its edges among different piecewise-smooth regions. We systematically investigate the asymptotic properties (e.g., consistency and asymptotic normality) of the multiscale adaptive parameter estimates. We also establish the uniform convergence rate of the estimated spatial covariance function and its associated eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. Our Monte Carlo simulation and real data analysis have confirmed the excellent performance of SVCM.