Science.gov

Sample records for latvian soldier injured

  1. Damage Control Resuscitation: A New Paradigm for Fluid Resuscitation of Severely Injured Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    hypotensive) resuscitation with Hextend for the treatment of injured soldiers the goal is (Dubick and Atkins, 2003; PHTLS , 2005) to raise blood...Fibrinolysis, 17, 397-402. Peng, R. Y. and Bongard, F. S., 1999: Hypothermia in trauma patients. J Am Coll Surg, 188, 685-696. 7 PHTLS Basic and Advanced

  2. Music for the injured soldier: a contribution of American women's military bands during World War II.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Jill M

    2007-01-01

    This study is an investigation of the contributions of women's military bands in the United States to the reconditioning of the injured American troops during World War II. Primary and secondary sources revealed that these bands welcomed home hospital ships, performed for convalescing soldiers in hospitals, and provided music for hospital dances. While each of the bands investigated served in similar capacities, only one, the 403rd Women's Army Corps (WAC) Band, was stationed at a hospital. While entertainment by women's bands was an important part of the Army Reconditioning Program for the injured, the study also revealed a working partnership that developed between these musicians and the medical community. Sixty years after the war, band members believe their performances in hospitals were the most important contribution of their service. Some historians have concluded that music used in military hospitals during the war was the impetus for the music therapy profession.

  3. MILITARY PAY: Processes for Retaining Injured Army National Guard and Reserve Soldiers on Active Duty Have Been Improved, but Some Challenges Remain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    average length of stay of soldiers treated by civilian providers through CBHCI with the average length of stay of soldiers treated at MTFs...these metrics may be misleading. According to the Army’s metrics, the average length of stay , before being returned to duty or medically separated...for soldiers treated by civilian providers through CBHCI is 288 days whereas the average length of stay for soldiers

  4. Indian Soldiers Need Eye Protection

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Combat-related eye injuries entail enormous financial, social and psychological cost. Military Combat Eye Protection (MCEP) decreases both the incidence and severity of eye injuries. Experts have recognised the need for MCEP for Indian soldiers. We aim to review the combat-related eye injuries and combat eye protection among the Indian soldiers. Global practices of MCEP are also reviewed. We also aim to offer our recommendations for Indian soldiers. We carried out Medline search for combat-related eye injuries and MCEP and separately searched for eye injuries among Indian soldiers during war and other operations. We present the findings as results. Recommendations are based on the opinions of the experts. Combat-related eye injuries increased from 3% of injured in the 1965 Indo-Pakistan War to 4.8% in 1971 war. During peace-keeping operations in Sri Lanka (1987-89) eye injuries increased to 10.5% of the injured. Statistics on eye injuries during counterinsurgency operations are not available. MCEP have shown reduction in eye injuries, and thus MCEP forms a part of personal equipment of the soldiers in developed countries. Indian soldiers do not have provision of MCEP. Combat-related eye injuries among Indian Army soldiers have been increasing. Data on eye injuries during counterinsurgency operations are not available. Indian soldiers do not have provision of MCEP. Provision of MCEP is therefore desirable. Awareness program among the commanders and the soldiers shall result in attitudinal changes and increased compliance. PMID:28384904

  5. [The former soldiers becoming first aid trainers].

    PubMed

    Prieur, Joël

    2015-12-01

    The Order of Malta France is organising, through an innovative partnership with the French Army, the training of first aid instructors aimed at former soldiers injured in combat. One soldier, who received multiple wounds in Lebanon in 2011, describes his training experience.

  6. Paranormal beliefs of Latvian college students: a Latvian version of the revised paranormal belief scale.

    PubMed

    Utinans, A; Ancane, G; Tobacyk, J J; Boyraz, G; Livingston, M M; Tobacyk, J S

    2015-02-01

    A Latvian version of the Revised Paranormal Belief Scale (RPBS) was completed by 229 Latvian university students. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed six relatively independent factors labeled Magical Abilities, Psychokinesis, Traditional Religious Belief, Superstition, Spirit Travel, and Extraordinary Life Forms. Based on the motivational-control model, it was hypothesized that the societal stressors affecting Latvian society during the last 50 yr. have led to a reduced sense of personal control which, in turn, has resulted in increased endorsement of paranormal beliefs to re-establish a sense of control. The motivational-control hypothesis was not supported. Results indicated that (except for Traditional Religious Belief in women), the majority of these students were disbelievers in paranormal phenomena. As hypothesized, Latvian women reported significantly greater paranormal belief than men.

  7. Development of Latvian Information Infrastructure and Tasks for Latvian Academic Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karnitis, Edwin

    1995-01-01

    Presents an overview of information infrastructure development in Latvia and discusses the role of the Latvian Academic Library. Describes Latvia's telecommunications, information network, data transmission, and electronic information services and reviews the types of electronic information sources that have been created. (Author/JMV)

  8. Wave Energy Potential in the Latvian EEZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beriņš, J.; Beriņš, J.; Kalnačs, J.; Kalnačs, A.

    2016-06-01

    The present article deals with one of the alternative forms of energy - sea wave energy potential in the Latvian Exclusice Economic Zone (EEZ). Results have been achieved using a new method - VEVPP. Calculations have been performed using the data on wave parameters over the past five years (2010-2014). We have also considered wave energy potential in the Gulf of Riga. The conclusions have been drawn on the recommended methodology for the sea wave potential and power calculations for wave-power plant pre-design stage.

  9. Self-reported load carriage injuries of military soldiers.

    PubMed

    Orr, Robin Marc; Coyle, Julia; Johnston, Venerina; Pope, Rodney

    2016-01-13

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether occupational load carriage constitutes a significant source of injury to military soldiers. An online survey was sent to soldiers serving in specific Australian Army Corps known to experience the greatest occupational exposure to load carriage. Of the 338 respondents, 34% sustained at least one load carriage injury. Fifty-two per cent of those injured during initial training reported sustaining an additional load carriage injury. The majority of injuries (61%) were to the lower limbs with bones and joints the most frequently injured body structures (39%). Endurance marching (continuous marching as part of a physical training session) was the activity accounting for most (38%) injuries. Occupational load carriage is associated with military soldier injuries and, once injured, soldiers are at a high risk of future load carriage injury. The bodily sites and nature of self-reported injuries in this study are akin to those of formally reported injuries and those of other militaries.

  10. Soldiering on

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Coeli

    2010-01-01

    As community colleges welcome an influx of veterans returning from combat in Iraq and Afghanistan, administrators must focus on helping these soldiers--many who are pursuing higher education for the first time--obtain the knowledge and skills necessary to thrive in a changing economy. The process starts the moment these men and women set foot on…

  11. Retrospective dosimetry for Latvian workers at Chernobyl.

    PubMed

    Mironova-Ulmane, N; Pavlenko, A; Zvagule, T; Kärner, T; Bruvere, R; Volrate, A

    2001-01-01

    Between 1986 and 1991 approximately 6500 Latvian inhabitants were recruited for clean-up work at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. Their absorbed doses are usually unknown, because less than half of them had their external exposure officially documented. Clinical investigations show a high morbidity rate for these clean-up workers when compared with that of the general population. In order to understand the causes of their diseases and the impact of ionising radiation, electron spin resonance (ESR) has been used to measure the absorbed doses in human tooth enamel. The doses estimated by ESR were between two and three times higher than previously documented and are in accord with the results of immunological and biological tests. The results may be explained by considering the effects of irradiation caused by long-lived incorporated radionuclides.

  12. Corrective Feedback in L2 Latvian Classrooms: Teacher Perceptions versus the Observed Actualities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilans, Gatis

    2016-01-01

    This two-part study aims to investigate teacher perceptions about providing oral corrective feedback (CF) to minority students of Latvian as a second language and compare the perceptions to the actual provision of CF in L2 Latvian classrooms. The survey sample represents sixty-six L2 Latvian teachers while the classroom observations involved 13…

  13. Examination of the Effectiveness of Predictors for Musculoskeletal Injuries in Female Soldiers

    PubMed Central

    Kodesh, Einat; Shargal, Eyal; Kislev-Cohen, Rotem; Funk, Shany; Dorfman, Lev; Samuelly, Gil; Hoffman, Jay R.; Sharvit, Nurit

    2015-01-01

    The amount of training days lost to injury during military training has highlighted the need to identify a screening tool to predict injury. One hundred and fifty-eight female soldiers from the Combat Fitness Instructor Course (CFIC) of the Israel Defense Forces volunteered to participate in this study. All soldiers were free of orthopedic and neurologic conditions for at least one month before the study. All participants performed a battery of measurements during the first week of the course. Measures included anthropometric, functional movement screen (FMS), power performances (counter movement jump [CMJ], drop jump, single leg triple hop jump [SLTH], 10-m sprint) and a 2K run. Injury data was collected throughout the 3 month course. Median tests were used to compare between injured/non-injured soldiers. Chi-square and/or logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between various predictors and injury. Percent body fat [%BF] was higher (p = 0.04), distance for SLTH was less for both left and right legs (p = 0.029, p = 0.047 respectively) and 2K run was slower (p =0.044) in injured compared to non-injured soldiers. No differences between groups were noted in total FMS score, however more zero scores in one or more movement pattern were found in the injured group (51.35 % vs. 30.5% p=0.0293). Only %BF, 2K run and SLTH distance were significant predictors of injury (p = 0.05, p = 0.02, p =0.016 respectively). The results of this study indicated that the FMS total score is not a predictor of injury in female soldiers in a CFIC. We found that %BF, SLTH, 2K run time, 10 meter sprint time and zero scores differentiated between injured and non-injured soldiers. In addition, %BF, 2K run and SLTH were each found to be separate predictors of injury. Further research is needed to determine threshold scores that predict injury. Key points A total of 145 injuries were reported during the three month Combat Fitness Instructor Course in a female soldiers

  14. [Medical Service of the Latvian National Armed Forces].

    PubMed

    Aleinikov, S I; Golota, A S; Krassii, A B; Soldatov, E A; Shalakhin, R A

    2015-08-01

    The article is a brief description of the current state of the Latvian National Armed Forces medical service and is based on the study of the open access foreign sources. At the beginning, the general information about Latvia, its Armed Forces, and their medical service is presented. Then the medical service particular features are described with more detail, namely, the organization of inpatient and outpatient treatment, medical supply, scientific research, combat medicine, medical staff education and training, medical service personnel income.

  15. Latvian Language Competencies for Peace Corps Volunteers in the Republic of Latvia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viksnins, Helen M.

    This guide is designed for Latvian language training of Peace Corps workers in Latvia, is intended for use in a competency-based language training program, and reflects daily communication needs in that context. It consists of an introductory section on the history, alphabet, and phonology of the Latvian language and a series of 13 topical…

  16. Changes in Soldier Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drucker, Eugene H.

    As part of a study for increasing motivation and preventing attitude deterioration among enlisted men, two studies were conducted: (1) to determine the attitudes of soldiers in 1970 (974 basic trainees at Fort Knox) and compare them with those of soldiers similarly questioned between 1945 and 1951; and (2) to review the literature on attitude…

  17. Latvian scientists research into chemical uses of timber

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-20

    Scientists of the Institute of Wood Chemistry of the Latvian Academy of Sciences have developed two highly efficient processes for producing furfural, a feedstock for varnishes, synthetic resins and plastics. It is made of production wastes, including branches and small-dimension timber. By one process, the raw material is chipped, treated first with diluted sulphuric acid and then with steam heated to 250 degrees C. The other uses concentrated sulphuric acid as a catalyst. Besides furfural, this process also yields sugar solutions used in alcohol and nutrient yeast production.

  18. Decontamination of Combat Wounds in the Injured Soldier

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    Command Fort Detrick, Frederick, Maryland 21701 Contract No. DADAl7-72-C-2153 Department of t’lastic Surgery University of Virginia Medical Center...curred within fou- weeks. The healed fingertip had an excellent sensory perception, normal range of motion, and an acceptable cosmetic appearance. This...Stevenson, T.R., Magee, C.M., Thacker, J.G., and Edgerton, M.T.: Treatise on the contaminated wound. in "Symposium on Basic Science in Plastic Surgery .* Ed

  19. Helping Severely Injured Soldiers Participate Fully in Society

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Veterans Research Foundation Pittsburgh, PA 15206-1206...Cooper, Ph.D. 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Veterans ... veterans with disabilities completed questionnaires and interviews during the 2008 National Disabled Veterans Winter Sports Clinic (sponsored by the

  20. Facing the Long War: Factors that Lead Soldiers to Stay in the Army during Persistent Conflict

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-19

    beyond the living conditions approach, which tends to focus on the material resources available to individuals” Quality of Life studies became popular...in the 1970s. See Jens Alber, et al., “The Quality of Life in Europe,” European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions ...Health problems also decrease soldier resiliency, as sick or injured soldiers are less capable of adapting to harsh conditions .29 Due to an increase

  1. Soldier’s Radio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-14

    individual soldier. "t’s primary use is by individuals in squads or small units, but may also be used to interconnect into local and wide area...Velopilnq the concept for the Soldier’s Radio. The operation of the SR can be partitioned into two areas. The architecture required to provide intra- squad ... SQUAD CONMECTrVITY The basic radio ccmmunications architectures suitable for :cnsideration for the SR intra- squad operations include the Net, .tar

  2. Latvian and Russian textbooks: eye movements in reading text formatted in two columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paeglis, Roberts; Gorshanova, Irina; Bagucka, Kristine; Lacis, Ivars

    2008-09-01

    Research of eye movements in reading textbooks suggests that reading the Cyrillic-based Russian language differs from reading the extended Latin-based Latvian texts. Ten bilingual students were asked to start reading a book passage in Latvian and to continue reading the text in Russian. Key parameters in information processing have been analyzed. Even though the difference in duration of fixations does not reach statistical significance, saccade size and regression rate are smaller in Russian.

  3. Six legged soldiers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Jeffrey Lockwood has written a fascinating if at times depressing exploration of the role of insects in warfare. Dr. Lockwood reviews the martial use of insects, starting with stinging bees and wasps, which were in ancient and Medieval times widely used in war to induce panic among enemy soldiers. ...

  4. The Student Soldier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halligan, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Educating America's service men and women has long been a core mission of many community colleges, especially in cities and towns that host military bases and installations. Today, a soldier, sailor, or Marine can be stationed anywhere in the world and continue his or her education with the help of distance learning initiatives. Whether a soldier…

  5. To Stay a Soldier

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    and children standing by, that he would gladly go back and do it again. He is not alone. As of July 2009, a total of 913 soldiers, sailors, airmen... resil - ience when he or she needs it most. It is difficult to completely explain the shortcomings that evolved in regard to the care of some of the

  6. Soldiers of Misfortune?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    accountability thereto. 123 Once these laws were passed, contractors could be required to adhere to them through signing consent agreements as part of...and improving legal account - ability for their wrong doing. This monograph will be of interest to Soldiers and policymakers engaged in the difficult...should PMSCs be held legally accountable for their actions? Based on these questions, the author identifies areas in which armed contractors seem to

  7. Soldier systems sensor fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brubaker, Kathryne M.

    1998-08-01

    This paper addresses sensor fusion and its applications in emerging Soldier Systems integration and the unique challenges associated with the human platform. Technology that,provides the highest operational payoff in a lightweight warrior system must not only have enhanced capabilities, but have low power components resulting in order of magnitude reductions coupled with significant cost reductions. These reductions in power and cost will be achieved through partnership with industry and leveraging of commercial state of the art advancements in microelectronics and power sources. As new generation of full solution fire control systems (to include temperature, wind and range sensors) and target acquisition systems will accompany a new generation of individual combat weapons and upgrade existing weapon systems. Advanced lightweight thermal, IR, laser and video senors will be used for surveillance, target acquisition, imaging and combat identification applications. Multifunctional sensors will provide embedded training features in combat configurations allowing the soldier to 'train as he fights' without the traditional cost and weight penalties associated with separate systems. Personal status monitors (detecting pulse, respiration rate, muscle fatigue, core temperature, etc.) will provide commanders and highest echelons instantaneous medical data. Seamless integration of GPS and dead reckoning (compass and pedometer) and/or inertial sensors will aid navigation and increase position accuracy. Improved sensors and processing capability will provide earlier detection of battlefield hazards such as mines, enemy lasers and NBC (nuclear, biological, chemical) agents. Via the digitized network the situational awareness database will automatically be updated with weapon, medical, position and battlefield hazard data. Soldier Systems Sensor Fusion will ultimately establish each individual soldier as an individual sensor on the battlefield.

  8. THE "BRAIN INJURED" ADOLESCENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GORDON, SOL

    WRITTEN FOR PARENTS, THIS BOOKLET DESCRIBES THE BRAIN INJURED ADOLESCENT AND THE PROBLEMS AND EXPERIENCES FACED BY THE ADOLESCENT AND HIS PARENTS. EIGHTEEN QUESTIONS ASKED BY PARENTS OF THESE CHILDREN ARE DISCUSSED. THE AREAS COVERED ARE-- (1) SOCIAL EXPERIENCES, (2) GUIDED INDEPENDENCE, (3) SOCIAL SKILLS, (4) SUCCESS EXPERIENCES, (5) LEISURE TIME…

  9. The Relationship of Early Pain Scores and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Burned Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    diabetic peripheral neuropathy . Pain 2005;115: 29–36. 22. Perry S, Difede J, Musngi G, Frances AJ, Jacobsberg L. Pre- dictors of posttraumatic stress...PTSD and must rely on historical controls of the prevalence of PTSD in uninjured soldiers and soldiers who were not severely injured.7–11,12 The...overall prevalence of PTSD in this study regardless of injury severity, pain score, or burn size is 27.7% (13/47). This is similar to findings from other

  10. Sustainability by Education: How Latvian Heritage Was Kept Alive in German Exile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franzenburg, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Sustainability is one of the core challenges for education in modern times, particularly concerning cultural heritage. The study evaluates, from a German point of view, how Latvians outside of Latvia after World War II kept their cultural heritage alive by educational concepts, which can be characterized as early roots of modern sustainable…

  11. Female Leaders in a Radical Right Movement: The Latvian National Front

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stasulane, Anita

    2017-01-01

    Gender is the central axis around which the transformation of radical right forces is taking place: a new type of movement is emerging which is not excessively masculine. Latvia is experiencing an increase in women's participation in the radical right, the Latvian National Front (LNF) being a vivid example. The development of the LNF was…

  12. A Comparative Case Study of Risk, Resiliency, and Coping Among Injured National Guard.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Lisa A; Huebner, Angela J; Hirschfeld, Mara K; Sankar, Sudha; Blow, Adrian J; Guty, Danielle; Kees, Michelle; Ketner, Joel S

    2016-05-01

    An injury during deployment disrupts family and life functioning. The purpose of the present study was to provide an in-depth examination of three injured National Guard soldiers showing how differential experiences of navigating multiple systems to obtain treatment for injury resulted in different adjustment trajectories for these soldiers and their families. A comparative case study examined three families where a soldier's injury was a central theme of family adjustment. Qualitative data were drawn from interviews conducted conjointly with both the soldier and spouse to provide an in-depth perspective of adjustment, meaning, and resource utilization patterns. In addition, survey data were collected at three time points in the deployment cycle (predeployment, 90 days post, and 1 year). These data were integrated into the case analysis, including mental health, marital relationship, treatment history, and characteristics of resilience. Study findings suggest that a delay in diagnosis, wait time for treatment, and the lack of comprehensive formal and financial support for a soldier following nonhostile injury lead to a pileup of stressors that are detrimental to the soldier's physical and mental health, financial stability, and family well-being. Further study is needed to understand how these system level issues impede resilience among National Guard families.

  13. Robust Soldier Crab Ball Gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunji, Yukio-Pegio; Nishiyama, Yuta; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2011-09-01

    Based on the field observation of soldier crabs, we previously proposed a model for a swarm of soldier crabs. Here, we describe the interaction of coherent swarms in the simulation model, which is implemented in a logical gate. Because a swarm is generated by inherent perturbation, a swarm can be generated and maintained under highly perturbed conditions. Thus, the model reveals a robust logical gate rather than stable one. In addition, we show that the logical gate of swarms is also implemented by real soldier crabs (Mictyris guinotae).

  14. The Dark Side of Comprehensive Soldier Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eidelson, Roy; Pilisuk, Marc; Soldz, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF), the focus of the January 2011 special issue of the "American Psychologist," is a $125 million resilience training initiative designed to reduce and prevent the adverse psychological consequences of combat for soldiers and veterans. These are worthy goals. Soldiers and veterans deserve the best care possible,…

  15. Soldier universal robot controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyams, Jeffrey; Batavia, Parag; Liao, Elizabeth; Somerville, Andrew

    2008-04-01

    The Soldier Universal Robot Controller (SURC) is a modular OCU designed for simultaneous control of heterogeneous unmanned vehicles. It has a well defined, published API., defined using XML schemas, that allows other potential users of the system to develop their own modules for rapid integration with SURC. The SURC architecture is broken down into three layers: User Interface, Core Functions, and Transport. The User Interface layer is the front end module which provides the human computer interface for user control of robots. The Core layer is further divided into the following modules: Capabilities, Tactical, Mobility, and World Model. The Capabilities module keeps track of the known robots and provides a list of specifications and services. The Mobility module provides path planning via D*, while the Tactical module provides higher level mission planning (multi-agent/multi-mission) capabilities for collaborative operations. The World Model module is a relational database which stores world model objects. Finally, a Transport module provides translation from the SURC architecture to the robot specific messaging protocols (such as JAUS). This allows fast integration of new robot protocols into an existing SURC implementation to enable a new system to rapidly leverage existing SURC capabilities. The communication between different modules within the SURC architecture is done via XML. This gives developers and users the flexibility to extend existing messages without breaking backwards compatibility. The modularity of SURC offers users and developers alike the capability to create custom modules and plug them into place, as long as they follow the pre defined messaging API for that module.

  16. The Soldier Fitness Tracker: Global Delivery of Comprehensive Soldier Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fravell, Mike; Nasser, Katherine; Cornum, Rhonda

    2011-01-01

    Carefully implemented technology strategies are vital to the success of large-scale initiatives such as the U.S. Army's Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) program. Achieving the U.S. Army's vision for CSF required a robust information technology platform that was scaled to millions of users and that leveraged the Internet to enable global reach.…

  17. The injured eye

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Eye injuries come at a high cost to society and are avoidable. Ocular blast injuries can be primary, from the blast wave itself; secondary, from fragments carried by the blast wind; tertiary; due to structural collapse or being thrown against a fixed object; or quaternary, from burns and indirect injuries. Ballistic eye protection significantly reduces the incidence of eye injuries and should be encouraged from an early stage in Military training. Management of an injured eye requires meticulous history taking, evaluation of vision that measures the acuity and if there is a relative pupillary defect as well as careful inspection of the eyes, under anaesthetic if necessary. A lateral canthotomy with cantholysis should be performed immediately if there is a sight-threatening retrobulbar haemorrhage. Systemic antibiotics should be prescribed if there is a suspected penetrating or perforating injury. A ruptured globe should be protected by an eye shield. Primary repair of ruptured globes should be performed in a timely fashion. Secondary procedures will often be required at a later date to achieve sight preservation. A poor initial visual acuity is not a guarantee of a poor final result. The final result can be predicted after approximately 3–4 weeks. Future research in eye injuries attempts to reduce scarring and neuronal damage as well as to promote photoreceptor rescue, using post-transcriptional inhibition of cell death pathways and vaccination to promote neural recovery. Where the sight has been lost sensory substitution of a picture from a spectacle mounted video camera to the touch receptors of the tongue can be used to achieve appreciation of the outside world. PMID:21149360

  18. Left Behind: Children of Soldiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerles, Joe F.

    2011-01-01

    Recent international conflicts have increased the dangers of American military personnel. These soldiers are part of the growing contingent of military families with children. Because these children are more aware of the dangers, the stress and worry affects them in a variety of ways, especially in school-age children. This article investigates…

  19. Soldier Quality of Life Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    Soldier QoL and can support system developers and Army leaders in assessing tradeoffs between QoL and resource demands such as fuel, water , and... WATER LIVING STANDARDS OPERATIONAL READINESS MORALE SUSTAINABILITY WASTE REDUCTION...SUSTAINMENT WATER DEMAND REDUCTION USER NEEDS DATA COLLECTION CONTINGENCY BASES ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT BASE CAMPS

  20. Short-Term Forecasting of Loads and Wind Power for Latvian Power System: Accuracy and Capacity of the Developed Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radziukynas, V.; Klementavičius, A.

    2016-04-01

    The paper analyses the performance results of the recently developed short-term forecasting suit for the Latvian power system. The system load and wind power are forecasted using ANN and ARIMA models, respectively, and the forecasting accuracy is evaluated in terms of errors, mean absolute errors and mean absolute percentage errors. The investigation of influence of additional input variables on load forecasting errors is performed. The interplay of hourly loads and wind power forecasting errors is also evaluated for the Latvian power system with historical loads (the year 2011) and planned wind power capacities (the year 2023).

  1. "Once a Soldier, a Soldier Forever": Exiled Zimbabwean Soldiers in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Maringira, Godfrey; Carrasco, Lorena Núñez

    2015-01-01

    Through military training, soldiers' bodies are shaped and prepared for war and military-related duties. In the context these former Zimbabwean soldiers find themselves--that of desertion and 'underground life' in exile in South Africa--their military-trained bodies and military skills are their only resource. In this article, we explore the ways in which former soldiers maintain and 'reuse' their military-trained bodies in South Africa for survival, in a context of high unemployment and a violent, inner-city environment. We look at their social world and practices of soldiering--a term that refers to the specific forms of their social interaction in exile, through which they keep their memories of their military past alive. By attending to their subjectivities and the endurance of their masculine military identities and bodies, we aim to contribute to the discussion on demilitarization, which has largely focused on the failure of models of intervention to assist ex-combatants in postconflict contexts.

  2. Life Cycle Assessment of Biogas Production from Marine Macroalgae: a Latvian Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilicka, Iluta; Blumberga, Dagnija; Romagnoli, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    There is potential environmental benefit to be gained from the use of algae because of their ability to fix CO2, no need for direct land use and utilization of bio-waste (rich in potassium, phosphate and nitrogen based compounds) as a nutrients. The aim of the research is to assess the impact of biogas production and the final use in a cogeneration unit system from a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) in comparison with a similar reference system using a non-renewable source (e.g. natural gas). The paper is intended to be a preliminary study for understanding the implementation of this novel technology in a Latvian context.

  3. Eyekon: Distributed Augmented Reality for Soldier Teams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    Eyekon: Distributed Augmented Reality for Soldier Teams TOPIC: Information Superiority/Information Operations and Information Age... Augmented Reality for Soldier Teams 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER...by ANSI Std Z39-18 Eyekon: Distributed Augmented Reality for Soldier Teams Abstract The battlefield is a place of violence ruled by

  4. Civil Liberties of a Soldier.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The degree to which soldiers can exercise their First Amendment rights, defined as civil liberties, within the confines of the military establishment is the subject under discussion. Historical precedents for the exercise of such rights in Post World War I Austria and West Germany are cited and placed in juxtaposition to similiar liberties in the U.S. Army. The four liberties contained in the First Amendment are then discussed.

  5. Army Families and Soldier Readiness.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    self-sufficiency while they are away on deployments. According to the measures in this study, Army personnel have a high level of individual...could improve soldiers’ levels of emotional well-being and yield potentially high payoffs by reducing needs for other ser- vices. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We...military member • Commitment to the Army • Army career intention • Adequacy of child care during deployment These seven dimensions of individual

  6. Soldier Alienation: A Measureable Concept

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    to the general question, "Who is today’s soldier and hoW should she/he be treated in order to maximize performance?" The technology exists to perform...modify expectations (Meglino, Youngblood, Randolph, Mobly , and DeNise, 1979). The approach suggested, then, would involve longitudinal research aired...In W. H. Truitt & G. Lolomons (Eds.), Science, Technology and Freedom. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1974. Lee, A. M. An obituary for alienation, Social

  7. Soldier Dimensions in Combat Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-07

    basic questions in this area of research. We urge our reviewers to provide constructive suggestions regarding ways to improve this plan. Moreover, we...experiment would last 3 full days and nights--a total of 72 hours. Randomly generated numbers from a simple BASIC program using the R•4D command could be...1%). Field hospital care: Excellent . The soldier you will be rating is operating a 25 mm cannon on a Bradley Fi’hting Vehicle. Read each item

  8. Title Sheet, National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Title Sheet, National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch, 5000 West National Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, WI

  9. Remains of War: Walt Whitman, Civil War Soldiers, and the Legacy of Medical Collections

    PubMed Central

    Barbian, Lenore; Sledzik, Paul S.; Reznick, Jeffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    The National Museum of Health and Medicine holds a collection of anatomical specimens from nearly 2,000 soldiers injured during the American Civil War. Originally collected as part of a study of trauma and disease during war, these specimens have been museum artifacts for over 140 years. During this time, they have been displayed and utilized in an array of interpretative strategies. They have functioned as medical specimens documenting the effects of gunshot wounds and infection to the human body, as mementos mori symbolizing the refuse of a nation divided by war, and as objects of osteological and forensic interest. The museum’s curators recently discovered four of these specimens from soldiers who the poet and essayist Walt Whitman nursed in the wartime hospitals of Washington, DC. Uniting these remains with Whitman’s words yields a new interpretation that bears witness to individual histories during a time of unprecedented conflict in American history. PMID:22741042

  10. Soldier Representation in Modeling and Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-18

    33  Appendix A - TRAC-MTRY Recommended FY07 Soldier FACT CRAs ...A-1  Appendix B - TRAC-MTRY Recommended FY08 Soldier FACT CRAs ................................. B-1  Appendix C - Original Collaborative...1  iii iv List of Tables Table A-1. Recommended CRAs for FY07

  11. The Life of a Civil War Soldier.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Barbara J.

    2002-01-01

    Provides a lesson plan that is based on the Gettysburg National Military Park's "Life of a Civil War Soldier" traveling trunk program. Explains that this lesson offers a recipe for using a trunk to present the life of a Civil War soldier in the classroom. Includes activities and learning stations. (CMK)

  12. Ethics surrounding the medical evacuation of catastrophically injured individuals from an operational theatre of war.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Rebecca A

    2016-10-01

    Although prolonging life is usually in the best interests of patients, the British Medical Association states that it is not appropriate to prolong life with no regard to its quality. Medical advances both on the battlefield and within the field hospitals have resulted in the unexpected survival of a number of British personnel, and in some cases, soldiers are being repatriated with injuries categorised as 'catastrophic'. This paper considers medical ethics based on the Beauchamp and Childress Four Principles framework with regard to whether catastrophically injured individuals should be repatriated without any prior advanced directive and without evaluation of future quality of life.

  13. Soldiers' experiences with military health care.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Bonnie M; Loan, Lori A; Heiner, Stacy L; Hemman, Eileen A; Swanson, Kristen M

    2005-12-01

    Patient satisfaction can be enhanced by narrowing gaps between what health care consumers experience and what they expect. A study was therefore conducted to better understand health care experiences and expectations among Army beneficiaries. Data collected using focus groups were analyzed by using qualitative research methods. A concept was identified and labeled "Soldier Care." It involves first-line care delivered at the unit level as well as the interface between first-line care and military treatment facilities. There are four features of Soldier Care, i.e., provider competence, the sick call cycle, getting appointments, and unit leadership. Together, these features affect soldiers' time from injury to recovery. Insights about Soldier Care can provide decision-makers with direction for initiating changes that may contribute to improved soldier satisfaction with health care.

  14. The Soldier Fitness Tracker: global delivery of Comprehensive Soldier Fitness.

    PubMed

    Fravell, Mike; Nasser, Katherine; Cornum, Rhonda

    2011-01-01

    Carefully implemented technology strategies are vital to the success of large-scale initiatives such as the U.S. Army's Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) program. Achieving the U.S. Army's vision for CSF required a robust information technology platform that was scaled to millions of users and that leveraged the Internet to enable global reach. The platform needed to be agile, provide powerful real-time reporting, and have the capacity to quickly transform to meet emerging requirements. Existing organizational applications, such as "Single Sign-On," and authoritative data sources were exploited to the maximum extent possible. Development of the "Soldier Fitness Tracker" is the most recent, and possibly the best, demonstration of the potential benefits possible when existing organizational capabilities are married to new, innovative applications. Combining the capabilities of the extant applications with the newly developed applications expedited development, eliminated redundant data collection, resulted in the exceeding of program objectives, and produced a comfortable experience for the end user, all in less than six months. This is a model for future technology integration.

  15. Associations of HLA DR and DQ molecules with Lyme borreliosis in Latvian patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many autoimmune diseases are associated with variants of HLA genes such as those encoding the MHC complex. This correlation is not absolute, but may help in understanding of the molecular mechanism of disease. The purpose of this study was to determine HLA-DR,-DQ alleles in Latvian patients with Lyme borreliosis and control (healthy) persons. Case patients and control subjects were similar in age, gender and ethnic heritage and differed only as regards the presence of Borrelia burgdorferi infection. The study included 25 patients with clinical stage – erythema migrans and 30 control (healthy) persons. HLA genotyping was performed by PCR with sequence-specific primers. Results The results show difference in HLA-DRB1 alleles distribution between patients and control subjects. The frequencies of HLA-DRB1 *04 (OR 11.24; p < 0.007) and HLA-DRB1 *17 (03) (OR 8.05; p < 0.033) were increased in the Lyme disease patients. And the frequency of allele DRB1*13 (OR 0.12; p < 0.017) was lower in Borreliosis patients and higher in control group. But, significant differences in frequencies of HLA-DQ alleles we did not detect. Conclusions HLA predisposition to Lyme borreliosis appears not to be limited to HLA molecules, but some HLA-DR alleles also have a significant influence, and, may have implications in our understanding of pathogenesis of this disease. In particular, HLA-DRB1*04 and DRB1 *17 (03) may contribute to the Lyme borreliosis development in Latvian population PMID:22892251

  16. Facilitating Soldier Receipt of Needed Mental Health Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    psychological problems. As of 28 October 2011, 25 Soldiers who had sought behavioral health treatment had been interviewed. All of these Soldiers...military leaders to identify soldiers to participate in 12 focus groups regarding why soldiers do and do not receive treatment for psychological problems...3 each of soldiers in the following rank categories: E1-E4, E5-7, O1-O3, O4-O5, on issues involved in seeking treatment for psychological problems

  17. Infrared Thermographic Measurement of Long Term Circulatory Compromise in Trenchfoot Injured Argentine Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-17

    surface pain, cold sensitivity or hyperhidrosis . Equipment The subject’s temperatures were monitored by utilizing an AGEMA TIC-8000 Infrared System...injury; the patient’s reports of cold intolerance, weight bearing surface pain and hyperhidrosis six years post injury support this conclusion. It

  18. Feasibility of Mind-Body Intervention to Promote Wellness in Injured Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-06

    health treatment. It is a self-care practice that is more accessible than most yoga practices and can be adapted to those with injuries. Qigong has been...New York: HarperCollins. Hoge, C. W., Auchterlonie, J. L., & Milliken, C. S. (2006). Mental health problems, use of mental health services, and...Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Patient Health Questionnaire -15 (PHQ-15), and a Client Satisfaction

  19. Evaluation of Stroma-Free Hemoglobin Solutions as Resuscitative Fluids for the Injured Soldier

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    sri -~ S. i~ -~I *1*~-. - -~ ti- H -~ S - - +1-i-i ~ .--.- -~ ~ .4 ~’ ~ - -Cl -- - :4 - I; I :4 - :4 .44- :4 I :4 . - ~f1 :4 ti- H - H ...hemoglobin solutions have FWo .𔄁~i if !t 1V& lt-j: di aised the question of non-stroma related n:z i i, L𔃼 !, A i h ,7,, ! \\,ycr 4dm’, toxicity in the...animal, wecre anesthetized andsl_ that peratia all\\ prepared as prex.iou’ dcscrillci by- 1_71(2(_bi solta iW P x th px’ I U, \\kit h the modification th

  20. Damage Control Resuscitation: Optimizing Blood Component use to Save Lives of Severely Injured Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    amounts of fibrinogen contained in each blood component (FFP, platelets , WB, RBCs and cryoprecipitate) as described by Stinger et al (2008). 2.2...patients who received the usual higher ratio of RBCs to plasma. O ussed in this current paper involve the use of fresh whole blood and apheresis ... platelets in theater. Data suggest that the availability of platelets will reduce the need for fresh whole blood, but the availability of platelets is

  1. Rehabilitation of injured U.S. servicemember with traumatic brain injury, stroke, spinal cord injury, and bilateral amputations: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pai, Ajit B; Jasper, Nicholas R; Cifu, David X

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of injuries that can arise from combat situations, specifically as a result of the Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom conflicts, is challenging. As injured troops leave the war zone early for medical care, they are treated by an interwoven system of care that includes both the Department of Defense and Veterans Health Administration. Physicians across these settings are increasingly faced with patients who have multiple rehabilitation diagnoses as a result of the severity of blast injuries; therefore, the importance of active communication across the system must be highlighted. This case describes the seamless transition of an injured soldier across the continuum of care.

  2. Embedded Training in a Ground Soldier System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    what a Soldier/leader sees via night vision goggles as well as enhanced goggles that fuse image intensification and thermal imagery. However, the...10 Can the conditions under which this task is performed (body position, combat situation, day/ night ) be quite varied, and practice /experience...What features must the virtual world incorporate specifically for ground Soldier systems? Night scenarios, not day, should be the default

  3. Weight Measurements and Standards for Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    available for all population Soldiers during periods designated by the research study design. nutrition , physical fitness, Soldiers, health , weight, body...Leveraging Technology: Creating and Sustaining changes for Health ”, to present a talk on nutrition intake tracking and the H.E.A.L.T.H. program...Army National Guard (LANG) called Healthy Eating , Activity, and Lifestyle Training Headquarters (H.E.A.L.T.H.) (1). This program was designed to

  4. Shooting disabled soldiers: medicine and photography in World War I America.

    PubMed

    Linker, Beth

    2011-07-01

    This article challenges conventional theories about the role of medical photography in the early twentieth century. Some scholars argue that the camera intensified the Foucauldian medical gaze, reducing patients to mere pathologies. Others maintain that with the rise of the new modern hospital and its state-of-the-art technologies, the patient fell from view entirely, with apertures pointing toward streamlined operating rooms rather than the human subjects who would go under the knife. The Army Surgeon General's World War I rehabilitation journal, Carry On: A Magazine on the Reconstruction of Disabled Soldiers and Sailors, problematizes these assumptions. Hoping to persuade a skeptical public that the Army's new programs in medical rehabilitation for disabled soldiers provided the best means of veteran welfare, the editorial officials at Carry On photographed patients fully clothed, wounds hidden, engaged in everyday activities in order to give the impression that the medical sciences of the day could cure permanent disabilities. In the end, Carry On shows us that medical doctors could, and did, use photography to conceal as well as reveal the reality faced by injured soldiers. In doing so, they (like other Progressive reformers at the time) hoped to persuade the public that rehabilitation had the power to make the wounds of war disappear.

  5. A Comparative Study of Visual Depth Perception of Brain-Injured and Nonbrain-Injured Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship, Elise

    1972-01-01

    The brain-injured group performed with greater error scores and required more time to complete the tasks; although the brain-injured group took more time on the binocular tasks, their performance scores were similar to the nonbrain-injured group scores. (Author)

  6. Wounded, Ill, and Injured Challenges.

    PubMed

    Jones, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    The Washington Post articles of February 2007 led to a close examination of the care provided Wounded Warriors at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Subsequent reports by the President's Commission, Independent Review Group, and Defense Health Board all recommended ways to improve care. Joint Task Force National Capital Region Medical was established to implement the recommended improvements in Warrior care, and the recommendations of the Base Realignment and Closure Commission to close Walter Reed and realign the staff into a new Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and Fort Belvoir Community Hospital. It accomplished these tasks, maintained existing wounded, ill, and injured care, and safely transferred patients during the height of the fighting season in Afghanistan. It successfully accomplished its mission through engaged leadership, establishing an appropriate environment for Warrior care, careful management of casualty flow, and robust communication with all parties affected by the changes. The lessons learned in Warrior care should be considered when planning future military medical operations.

  7. Physical training risk factors for musculoskeletal injury in female soldiers.

    PubMed

    Roy, Tanja C; Songer, Thomas; Ye, Feifei; LaPorte, Ronald; Grier, Tyson; Anderson, Morgan; Chervak, Michelle

    2014-12-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries (MSIs) result in the most medical encounters, lost duty days, and permanent disability. Women are at greater risk of injury than men and physical training is the leading cause of injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate the demographic, body composition, fitness, and physical training risk factors for injuries in female Soldiers serving in garrison Army units over the past 12 months. Self-report survey was collected from 625 women. The ankle was the most frequently injured body region, 13%. Running was the activity most often associated with injury, 34%. In univariate analysis lower rank, older age, history of deployment, no unit runs, weekly frequency of personal resistance training, and history of injury were all associated with injury. In multivariate analysis rank, history of injury, weekly frequency of unit runs, and weekly frequency of personal resistance training were the best combination of predictors of injury. Running once or twice a week with the unit protected against MSIs, whereas participating in personal resistance training sessions once or twice a week increased the risk of MSIs. With more emphasis on running and resistance training, the U.S. Army could reduce injuries and save billions of dollars in training and health care costs.

  8. 3. OVERVIEW OF NORTH PART, SOLDIER FIELD, LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. OVERVIEW OF NORTH PART, SOLDIER FIELD, LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM THE WALL ALONG THE WEST SIDE, OPPOSITE THE CHAPEL. NOTE STONE WALL AND PILASTERS IN THE FAR CENTRAL DISTANCE. - Presidio of Monterey, Soldier Field, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  9. Immunogenetic Markers Definition in Latvian Patients with Lyme Borreliosis and Lyme Neuroborreliosis.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuka, Lilija; Cvetkova, Svetlana; Trofimova, Julija; Eglite, Jelena; Gintere, Sandra; Lucenko, Irina; Oczko-Grzesik, Barbara; Viksna, Ludmila; Krumina, Angelika

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1 alleles in two groups of patients in Latvia: patients with Lyme borreliosis and patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis. The study included 216 patients with Lyme borreliosis, 29 patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis and 282 control persons. All surveyed persons were residents of Latvia. The HLA-DR genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction- sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP). The predisposition to the Lyme borreliosis is associated with the HLA-DRB1*07, -DRB1*17(03), -DRB1*04, -DRB1*15(02) alleles. The allele -DRB1*11(05), -DRB1*14(06) and -DRB1*13(06) were significantly more frequent in controls. In-group with Lyme neuroborreliosis differences were found for the -DRB1*07 and -DRB1*04 alleles, but only HLA-DRB1*07 allele was statistically significant after Bonferroni correction and associated with Lyme neuroborreliosis in Latvian patients.

  10. Immunogenetic Markers Definition in Latvian Patients with Lyme Borreliosis and Lyme Neuroborreliosis

    PubMed Central

    Kovalchuka, Lilija; Cvetkova, Svetlana; Trofimova, Julija; Eglite, Jelena; Gintere, Sandra; Lucenko, Irina; Oczko-Grzesik, Barbara; Viksna, Ludmila; Krumina, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1 alleles in two groups of patients in Latvia: patients with Lyme borreliosis and patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis. The study included 216 patients with Lyme borreliosis, 29 patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis and 282 control persons. All surveyed persons were residents of Latvia. The HLA-DR genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction- sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP). The predisposition to the Lyme borreliosis is associated with the HLA-DRB1*07, -DRB1*17(03), -DRB1*04, -DRB1*15(02) alleles. The allele -DRB1*11(05), -DRB1*14(06) and -DRB1*13(06) were significantly more frequent in controls. In-group with Lyme neuroborreliosis differences were found for the -DRB1*07 and -DRB1*04 alleles, but only HLA-DRB1*07 allele was statistically significant after Bonferroni correction and associated with Lyme neuroborreliosis in Latvian patients. PMID:27916969

  11. Occupational Stress, Health, and General Well Being among Soldiers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartone, Paul T.; Hoover, Elizabeth

    A soldier's occupation is a very stressful one, especially for junior enlisted soldiers who have little control over their highly-regimented work lives. This prospective study examined the relationship between soldier occupational stress and health and well-being 8 to 10 months later. Through an ongoing, longitudinal study of attitudes, health,…

  12. CDKN2A and CDK4 variants in Latvian melanoma patients: analysis of a clinic-based population.

    PubMed

    Pjanova, Dace; Engele, Ludmila; Randerson-Moor, Juliette A; Harland, Mark; Bishop, D Timothy; Newton Bishop, Julia A; Taylor, Claire; Debniak, Tadeusz; Lubinski, Jan; Kleina, Regina; Heisele, Olita

    2007-06-01

    Germline mutations of the CDKN2A and CDK4 genes explain a significant proportion of familial melanoma. To date, there have been few published estimations of the prevalence of such mutations in sporadic melanoma patients. In this study, we investigated CDKN2A and CDK4 exon 2 for germline mutations in 125 consecutive cutaneous malignant melanoma patients recruited through the Latvian Oncological Center, using amplicon melting analysis and sequencing. No disease-related CDKN2A germline mutations were identified in any of the melanoma patients analysed but the previously described CDK4 mutation, Arg24His, was found in one patient with a family history of melanoma. CDKN2A polymorphisms were studied as putative low penetrance susceptibility genes. The proportion of cases with polymorphisms in this Latvian melanoma population was Ala148Thr (c.442G>A) (6%), 500 C/G (c.*29C>G) (18%), and 540 C/T (c.*69C>T) (20%); however, only the frequency of the Ala148Thr polymorphism was higher in melanoma patients than in 203 controls (6 versus 1%, P=0.03). Ala148Thr has also been reported in association with melanoma in a Polish series but not in an English series. We therefore examined the Ala148Thr carrier's haplotype in 10 Latvian and 39 Polish samples. No significant difference was seen between these populations and the predominant haplotype observed in English samples, giving no indication that the discrepancy could be explained by population differences in linkage disequilibrium. In summary, our results show that germline mutations at the CDKN2A locus are rare in sporadic melanoma in Latvia. The study does, however, provide some additional evidence for a role for the CDKN2A polymorphism Ala148Thr as a low penetrance susceptibility gene. The detected CDK4 exon 2 mutation was found in only the seventh family identified worldwide with a germline CDK4 mutation.

  13. Soldier/robot team acoustic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stuart H.; Scanlon, Michael V.

    2003-09-01

    The future battlefield will require an unprecedented level of automation in which soldier-operated, autonomous, and semi-autonomous ground, air, and sea platforms along with mounted and dismounted soldiers will function as a tightly coupled team. Sophisticated robotic platforms with diverse sensor suites will be an integral part of the Objective Force, and must be able to collaborate not only amongst themselves but also with their manned partners. The Army Research Laboratory has developed a robot-based acoustic detection system that will detect and localize on an impulsive noise event, such as a sniper's weapon firing. Additionally, acoustic sensor arrays worn on a soldier's helmet or equipment can enhance his situational awareness and RSTA capabilities. The Land Warrior or Objective Force Warrior body-worn computer can detect tactically significant impulsive signatures from bullets, mortars, artillery, and missiles or spectral signatures from tanks, helicopters, UAVs, and mobile robots. Time-difference-of-arrival techniques can determine a sound's direction of arrival, while head attitude sensors can instantly determine the helmet orientation at time of capture. With precision GPS location of the soldier, along with the locations of other soldiers, robots, or unattended ground sensors that heard the same event, triangulation techniques can produce an accurate location of the target. Data from C-4 explosions and 0.50-Caliber shots shows that both helmet and robot systems can localize on the same event. This provides an awesome capability - mobile robots and soldiers working together on an ever-changing battlespace to detect the enemy and improve the survivability, mobility, and lethality of our future warriors.

  14. Soldier Data Tag Study Effort. Appendices,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-10

    84-C-0146 on ,.a. SOLDIER DATA TAG " -:.,r .* STUDY EFFORT I T IT t APPENDICES to U.S. Army Soldier Support Center ATZI /ODS (Mr. Occhialini) Fort...SUPPORT CENTER * P2 DEN HARRISON, IN 46216 11 -:NG QVFZF N UAE AND ADORESS i REPORT DATE ATZI --DDS (MR. OCCHIALINI) JN 13 WAMSEROF PAGES 7-4 .’,kT N...Memorandum ATZI -DDS (14 Sep. 83) Subject: Input Requirements for SDT Cost/Benefits Analysis (CBA) , To Ch, Ofc of Analysis Spt From C, SDT, Date 5 Oct. 83

  15. Factors influencing injury severity score regarding Thai military personnel injured in mass casualty incident April 10, 2010: lessons learned from armed conflict casualties: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Political conflicts in Bangkok, Thailand have caused mass casualties, especially the latest event April 10, 2010, in which many military personnel were injured. Most of them were transferred to Phramongkutklao Hospital, the largest military hospital in Thailand. The current study aimed to assess factors influencing Injury Severity Score (ISS) regarding Thai military personnel injured in the mass casualty incident (MCI) April 10, 2010. Methods A total of 728 injured soldiers transferred to Phramongkutklao Hospital were reviewed. Descriptive statistics was used to display characteristics of the injuries, relationship between mechanism of injury and injured body regions. Multiple logistic regressions were used to calculate the adjusted odds ratio (adjusted OR) of ISS comparing injured body region categories. Results In all, 153 subjects defined as major data category were enrolled in this study. Blast injury was the most common mechanism of injury (90.2%). These victims displayed 276 injured body regions. The most common injured body region was the extremities (48.5%). A total of 18 patients (11.7%) had an ISS revealing more than 16 points. Three victims who died were expected to die due to high Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS). However, one with high TRISS survived. Factors influencing ISS were age (p = 0.04), abdomen injury (adjusted OR = 29.9; 95% CI, 5.8-153.5; P < 0.01), head & neck injury (adjusted OR = 13.8; 95% CI, 2.4-80.4; P < 0.01) and chest injury (adjusted OR = 9.9; 95% CI, 2.1-47.3; P < 0.01). Conclusions Blast injury was the most common mechanism of injury among Thai military personnel injured in the MCI April 10, 2010. Age and injured body region such as head & neck, chest and abdomen significantly influenced ISS. These factors should be investigated for effective medical treatment and preparing protective equipment to prevent such injuries in the future. PMID:22214518

  16. Dynamics of telomere length in different age groups in a Latvian population.

    PubMed

    Zole, Egija; Pliss, Liana; Ranka, Renate; Krumina, Astrida; Baumanis, Viesturs

    2013-12-01

    The shortening of telomeres with ageing is a well-documented observation; however, the reported number of nucleotides in telomeres varies between different laboratories and studies. Such variability is likely caused by ethnic differences between the populations studied. Until now, there were no studies that investigated the variability of telomere length in a senescent Latvian population of the most common mitochondrial haplogroups, defined as H (45%), U (25%), Y chromosomal N1c (40%) and R1a1 (40%). Telomere length was determined in 121 individuals in different age groups, including a control group containing individuals of 20-40 years old and groups of individuals between 60-70 years old, 71-80 years old, 81-90 years old, and above 90 years old. Telomere length was determined using the Southern blot telomeric restriction fragment assay (TRF). Decreased telomere length with ageing was confirmed, but a comparison of centenarians and individuals between 60-90 years of age did not demonstrate a significant difference in telomere length. However, significant variability in telomere length was observed in the control group, indicating probable rapid telomere shortening in some individuals that could lead up to development of health status decline appearing with ageing. Telomere length measured in mononuclear blood cells (MNC) was compared with the telomere length measured in whole peripheral white blood cells (WBC) using TRF. Telomere length in MNC was longer than in WBC for the control group with individuals 20 to 40 years old; in contrast, for the group of individuals aged 65 to 85 years old, measured telomere length was shorter in MNC when compared to WBC.

  17. Point mutations associated with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy in a Latvian population

    PubMed Central

    Baumane, Kristine; Zalite, Solveiga; Ranka, Renate; Zole, Egija; Pole, Ilva; Sepetiene, Svetlana; Laganovska, Guna; Baumanis, Viesturs; Pliss, Liana

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To study mutations associated with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) in patients suspected of having this mitochondrial disorder in a Latvian population. Additional aims were to determine the heteroplasmy status of all non-synonymous polymorphisms identified in the current study and to identify the mitochondrial haplogroups of the studied participants because these factors may contribute to the manifestation of LHON. Methods Twelve patients, including patients in two families, were enrolled in the current study. LHON was suspected based on the findings of ophthalmologic examinations. In clinically affected individuals, the presence of all previously reported LHON-associated mutations was assessed with sequencing analysis. Additionally, the SURVEYOR endonuclease assay was used to detect heteroplasmy. The mitochondrial haplogroups were identified with restriction analysis and the sequencing of hypervariable segment 1. Results In one family (mother and son), there was one primary LHON-associated mutation, G11778A. In addition, one rare previously reported LHON-associated polymorphism, A13637G, was detected in two unrelated patients. A non-synonymous polymorphism at T6253C was found in one individual. This mutation was reported in the background of the 3460 mutation among LHON patients in a Chinese population. No non-synonymous point mutations in mitochondrial DNA were found in five of the study participants. Conclusions Molecular analysis of 12 patients with suspected LHON confirmed the diagnosis in four patients and allowed the use of appropriate prophylactic measures and treatment. Further investigations and additional studies of different populations are necessary to confirm the role of the non-synonymous polymorphisms A13637G and T6253C in the manifestation of LHON and the associations of these polymorphisms with mitochondrial haplogroups and heteroplasmy. PMID:24319328

  18. Letters of a Slave Turned Union Soldier.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humanities, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the influx of Black soldiers into the Union army following the Emancipation Proclamation. Concentrates on the case of Private Spotswood Rice. Provides a short history of Rice, including copies of Rice's letters to his enslaved daughters, the daughter's slaveholders, and an angry retort from the slaveowner to the federal commander in…

  19. Soldier Integrated Headwear System: System Design Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    Nationale Canada Abstract The aim of the Soldier Integrated Headwear System –Technology Demonstration Project (SIHS-TDP) is to empirically...determine the most promising headwear integration concept that significantly enhances the survivability and effectiveness of the future Canadian

  20. The Factors of Soldier’s Load

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-03

    from a lack of adequate strategic and theater lift, helicopters, and trucks to provide logistica and mobility as units and training procedures were...end improvements to the soldier’s equipment, across the technology and industrial base, and monitoring the impact that each small change has on the land

  1. Diogenes, Dogfaced Soldiers, and Deployment Music Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Geoffrey; Williamson, Bill

    2010-01-01

    This webtext explores the cynical/kynical humor of soldier videos, suggesting that amateur videos paradoxically both undercut authority and honor effective leaders, both make light of and also publicly reveal deployment hardships, both distance the performers from military groupthink and celebrate unit camaraderie.

  2. Posttraumatic Resilience in Former Ugandan Child Soldiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klasen, Fionna; Oettingen, Gabriele; Daniels, Judith; Post, Manuela; Hoyer, Catrin; Adam, Hubertus

    2010-01-01

    The present research examines posttraumatic resilience in extremely exposed children and adolescents based on interviews with 330 former Ugandan child soldiers (age = 11-17, female = 48.5%). Despite severe trauma exposure, 27.6% showed posttraumatic resilience as indicated by the absence of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and clinically…

  3. The Soviet Soldier - Premilitary and Political Training.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    FORCES, TAE AN OATH AND SOLEMNLY SWEAR M0 BE AN UPRIGHT, BRADE , DISCIPLINED, VIGILANT SOLDIER, M0 STRICTLY PRESERVE MILITARY AND GOVERNMET SECETS...Scituate, Mass.: 1973 Ivanov, Yu., Col., "Servicemen’s Code of Life", Soviet Military Review, February, 1982 Jones, David R., Soviet Arned Forces Review

  4. Deployments, Stress, and Soldiers' Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perot, Mindy

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on identifying whether certain factors affected the academic performance of Soldiers attending an Army educational institution. Academic performance was measured by the grade percentile average of the participant upon the completion of their course of enrollment. Factors that were considered within the study through…

  5. Ventilator Technologies Sustain Critically Injured Patients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    Consider this scenario: A soldier has been critically wounded in a sudden firefight in a remote region of Afghanistan. The soldier s comrades attend to him and radio for help, but the soldier needs immediate medical expertise and treatment that is currently miles away. The connection between medical support for soldiers on the battlefield and astronauts in space may not be immediately obvious. But when it comes to providing adequate critical care, NASA and the military have very similar operational challenges, says Shannon Melton of NASA contractor Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering. Melton works within Johnson Space Center s Space Medicine Division, which supports astronaut crew health before, during, and after flight. In space, we have a limited number of care providers, and those providers are not always clinicians with extensive medical training. We have limited room to provide care, limited consumables, and our environment is not like that of a hospital, she says. The Space Medicine Division s Advanced Projects Group works on combining the expertise of both clinicians and engineers to develop new capabilities that address the challenges of medical support in space, including providing care to distant patients. This field, called telemedicine, blends advanced communications practices and technologies with innovative medical devices and techniques to allow caregivers with limited or no medical experience to support a patient s needs. NASA, just by its nature, has been doing remote medicine since the beginning of the Space Program, says Melton, an engineer in the Advanced Projects Group. Since part of NASA s mandate is to transfer the results of its technological innovation for the benefit of the public, the Agency has worked with doctors and private industry to find ways to apply the benefits of space medicine on Earth. In one such case, a NASA partnership has resulted in new technologies that may improve the quality of emergency medicine for wounded

  6. No Significant Acute and Subacute Differences between Blast and Blunt Concussions across Multiple Neurocognitive Measures and Symptoms in Deployed Soldiers.

    PubMed

    Dretsch, Michael N; Kelly, Mark P; Coldren, Rodney L; Parish, Robert V; Russell, Michael L

    2015-08-15

    Seventy-one deployed U.S. Army soldiers who presented for concussion care due to either blast or blunt mechanisms within 72 h of injury were assessed using the Military Acute Concussion Evaluation, the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM), traditional neuropsychological tests, and health status questionnaires. Follow-up ANAM testing was performed 10 d after initial testing (±5 d). Twenty-one soldiers were excluded: two for poor effort and 19 who had combined blast/blunt injuries. Of the remaining 50 male participants, 34 had blast injuries and 16 had blunt injuries. There were no statistically significant differences between blast injury and blunt injury participants in demographic, physical, or psychological health factors, concussive symptoms, or automated and traditional neurocognitive testing scores within 72 h post-injury. In addition, follow-up ANAM scores up to 15 d post-injury were not significantly different (available on 21 blast-injured and 13 blunt-injured subjects). Pre-injury baseline ANAM scores were compared where available, and revealed no statistically significant differences between 22 blast injury and eight blunt injury participants. These findings suggest there are no significant differences between mechanisms of injury during both the acute and subacute periods in neurobehavioral concussion sequelae while deployed in a combat environment. The current study supports the use of sports/mechanical concussion models for early concussion management in the deployed setting and exploration of variability in potential long-term outcomes.

  7. LM-research opportunities and activities at the Latvian Academy of Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Lielausis, O.

    1996-06-01

    In this presentation selected examples will be considered characterizing the breadth of their interests in LM applications. So, InGaSn eutectic was used as a modeling liquid for investigation of MHD effects typical to some LM-blanket configurations. LM coatings proposed for the protection of divertor plates were considered too. Experiments were performed on a superconducting magnet providing a 5.6 T magnetic field in a 30 liters bore. In a large vacuum chamber (12 m{sup 3}; 6.65 10{sup {minus}4} Pa) lithium cooling system for high temperature reactors was examined. Electromagnetic pumps and flowmeters able to work at lithium temperatures up to 960{degrees}C were tested. A Na loop, where two mounted in line electromagnetic pumps are delivering a 25 atm. pressure. The main Na loop equipped with em. pumps is based on a d=10 cm tubing. LM devices were installed in the Latvian 500 MW nuclear research reactor IRT-5000 too. First, a equipped with conductive e.m. pumps loop, where InGaSn serves as a {gamma}-carrier from activity generator (placed close to the core) to two outer 20 Mrad/h irradiators. Second, a LM system for rector control, where contained in InGaSn indium is used for neutron absorption and reactivity control. A closed cylindrical LM container was installed in the core instead of a traditional control rod. The container is divided in two chambers by means of elastic membranes. The one chamber contains InGaSn, the second GaSn (without In). By means of e.m. pumps the proportion between InGaSn and GaSn in the active zone can be changed ensuring a possibility to control the amount of introduced in the core absorbing material. Long term tests of the system were performed on a zero-power assembly. But for a shorter time the system was inserted in the core of the acting main reactor too and the efficiency of the control was confirmed.

  8. Performance Analysis of Air-to-Water Heat Pump in Latvian Climate Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazjonovs, Janis; Sipkevics, Andrejs; Jakovics, Andris; Dancigs, Andris; Bajare, Diana; Dancigs, Leonards

    2014-12-01

    Strategy of the European Union in efficient energy usage demands to have a higher proportion of renewable energy in the energy market. Since heat pumps are considered to be one of the most efficient heating and cooling systems, they will play an important role in the energy consumption reduction in buildings aimed to meet the target of nearly zero energy buildings set out in the EU Directive 2010/31/EU. Unfortunately, the declared heat pump Coefficient of Performance (COP) corresponds to a certain outdoor temperature (+7 °C), therefore different climate conditions, building characteristics and settings result in different COP values during the year. The aim of this research is to investigate the Seasonal Performance factor (SPF) values of air-to-water heat pump which better characterize the effectiveness of heat pump in a longer selected period of time, especially during the winter season, in different types of residential buildings in Latvian climate conditions. Latvia has four pronounced seasons of near-equal length. Winter starts in mid-December and lasts until mid-March. Latvia is characterized by cold, maritime climate (duration of the average heating period being 203 days, the average outdoor air temperature during the heating period being 0.0 °C, the coldest five-day average temperature being -20.7 °C, the average annual air temperature being +6.2 °C, the daily average relative humidity being 79 %). The first part of this research consists of operational air-towater heat pump energy performance monitoring in different residential buildings during the winter season. The second part of the research takes place under natural conditions in an experimental construction stand which is located in an urban environment in Riga, Latvia. The inner area of this test stand, where air-to-water heat pump performance is analyzed, is 9 m2. The ceiling height is 3 m, all external wall constructions (U = 0.16 W/(m2K)) have ventilated facades. To calculate SPF, the

  9. Narrating the self-injured body

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Illness narratives have traditionally been used as a conceptual tool for exploring experiences of chronic illness or disease. In this paper, I suggest that Frank's typology of illness narratives (chaos, restitution and quest) also offers an illuminating approach to analysing accounts of self-injury, demonstrating the diverse ways in which self-injury is practiced, experienced and narrated. Drawing on 24 narrative interviews with 12 people who had self-injured, I focus on participants’ accounts of their self-injured bodies. The approach is phenomenological, and concerned with talk about the experience of living with and in a body that has been marked by self-injury. Thus, the act of self-injury is not the sole focus, and particular attention is paid to accounts of the bodily aftermath: scars, marks and wounds. Scars left by self-injury can be seen as communicative, and the analysis developed here demonstrates some of the various ways that these marks may be read. Attending to these diverse narratives can contribute to the provision of compassionate, non-judgemental care for patients who have self-injured. Further, highlighting the existence of different ways of narrating the self-injured body may offer an optimistic resource for people who have self-injured. PMID:24812335

  10. Strengthening care of injured children globally

    PubMed Central

    Abantanga, Francis; Goosen, Jacques; Joshipura, Manjul; Juillard, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Part of the solution to the growing problem of child injury is to strengthen the care that injured children receive. This paper will point out the potential health gains to be made by doing this and will then review recent advances in the care of injured children in individual institutions and countries. It will discuss how these individual efforts have been aided by increased international attention to trauma care. Although there are no major, well-funded global programmes to improve trauma care, recent guidance documents developed by WHO and a broad network of collaborators have stimulated increased global attention to improving planning and resources for trauma care. This has in turn led to increased attention to strengthening trauma care capabilities in countries, including needs assessments and implementation of WHO recommendations in national policy. Most of these global efforts, however, have not yet specifically addressed children. Given the special needs of the injured child and the high burden of injury-related death and disability among children, clearly greater emphasis on childhood trauma care is needed. Trauma care needs assessments being conducted in a growing number of countries need to focus more on capabilities for care of injured children. Trauma care policy development needs to better encompass childhood trauma care. More broadly, the growing network of individuals and groups collaborating to strengthen trauma care globally needs to engage a broader range of stakeholders who will focus on and champion the improvement of care for injured children. PMID:19551257

  11. Training Capability Data for Dismounted Soldier Training System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Example Dismounted Soldier Training System Layout. Body position and movement. Soldiers are matched to pre-determined generic avatars prior to...initial calibration. The sensor harness combined with calibration enables the Soldier to enter and control his avatar within the VE. The HMD sensor...movement in the real world. Soldiers’ physical movements from standing to kneeling to prone are captured by leg sensors and mirrored by their avatar in the

  12. Development of Accommodation Models for Soldiers in Vehicles: Squad

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    in a squad mockup (Figure 1). Figure 1. Squad mockup . The current study used data from 144 men and women tested in the squad mockup . Table...measurements in the mockup . At the Advanced Combat Uniform (ACU) level, Soldiers wore their own advanced combat uniform consisting of a jacket, trousers...ensemble levels. Note that a Rifleman kit was included in the Seated Soldier Study but only worn by Soldiers tested in the driver mockup . All squad

  13. Weight Measurements and Standards for Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Medical Brigade with an environmental/internet-based intervention to increase health risk communication and promote healthy body weight/ fatness and...Soldiers, health, weight, body fat 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...the 94th RRC with an environmental/internet-based intervention to increase health risk communication and promote healthy body weight/ fatness and

  14. Cultural Adaptation of Second Language Soldiers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-05

    Although we interviewed second language soldiers from Korea, the Philippeans, Micronesia, Samoa, Guam, Italy, Turkey, Bolivia, Colombia and Vietnam, by far...we are citizens of the US." Interview #26 LTC Littlefield, Director, Transportation Career Development Division and MAJ Saylor, Coordinator... Transportation Officer Basic Course, Transporta- tion School, Ft Eustis, VA, 14 Jun 81. NARRATIVE 4. This interview dealt with the performance of Puerto Rican

  15. Genetic Screen for PTSD-Prone Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    for determining genotypes at 8 loci in the calcyon gene which is strongly associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and...associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) could be useful as an unbiased screen for PTSD-prone soldiers. Subjects participating... deficit / hyperactivity disorder . Mol. Psychiatry 10, 1117-1125. Li,J.Z., Absher,D.M., Tang,H., Southwick,A.M., Casto,A.M., Ramachandran,S., Cann,H.M

  16. Tailoring Multimedia Instruction to Soldier Needs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Psychology , Division 19 of the American Psychological Association . Paul (Norm) Blankenbeckler is a Training Manager with Northrop Grumman in Columbus...Fort Monroe, VA: Department of the Army, Training and Doctrine Command. U.S. Army. (2008). Soldier Training Publication No. 21-24-SMCT, Soldier’s Manual ...instructional design techniques could be applied to design IMI for learners’ specific needs, and (c) what outcomes are associated with different types of needs

  17. Iron supplementation and the female soldier.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Anthony E

    2006-04-01

    Twenty-two percent of women in the United States are iron deficient. Iron deficiency adversely affects immune function as well as physical and cognitive performance. Although the risk of developing iron deficiency is high for female soldiers, this risk can be minimized with proper nutritional guidance. Recommended dietary modifications include (1) heme iron consumption, (2) ingestion of vitamin C and protein with meals, and (3) discontinued tea and coffee consumption with meals.

  18. Early Management of the Critically Injured

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Donald J.

    1966-01-01

    A plan for the early management of the critically injured patient is described with emphasis on the priorities of management of injuries to certain organ-systems. The most important priorities are the establishment and maintenance of adequate ventilation and adequate circulation. The general surgeon is best qualified to assume full responsibility for the proper care of the critically injured, of patients with multiple injuries, and of patients in traumatic shock. He must assume the risk of transfusing unmatched whole blood and of deferring non-essential radiographs. The emergency and radiology departments may have to be by-passed to save the life of the critically injured patient. The measures required to establish a clear airway, to treat complications which can impair ventilation, to manage shock and hemorrhage and the possible complications of massive transfusions of blood are reviewed. PMID:5922504

  19. VIEW OF CONFEDERATE SOLDIERS AND SAILORS MONUMENT, WITH MARYLAND MONUMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF CONFEDERATE SOLDIERS AND SAILORS MONUMENT, WITH MARYLAND MONUMENT AND FLAGPOLE IN BACKGROUND. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Point Lookout Confederate Cemetery, Point Lookout, Ridge, St. Mary's County, MD

  20. Genotype and allele frequencies of isoniazid-metabolizing enzymes NAT2 and GSTM1 in Latvian tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Igumnova, Viktorija; Capligina, Valentina; Krams, Alvils; Cirule, Andra; Elferts, Didzis; Pole, Ilva; Jansone, Inta; Bandere, Dace; Ranka, Renate

    2016-07-01

    Pharmacogenomic testing of tuberculosis drug-metabolizing enzyme genes was proposed as a strategy to identify patients at risk for suboptimal responses to medications. However, variations of the genotype frequencies among ethnic groups exist and new alleles are been identified. The aim of this study was to identify polymorphisms of genes encoding metabolic enzymes NAT2 and GSTM1 in tuberculosis patients in Latvia and to estimate the frequency of NAT2 slow acetylator and GSTM1 null genotypes. In total, 85 DNA samples were genotyped, all individuals were Caucasian. An ethnic heterogeneity reflecting the multiethnic population of the country was observed. 49 patients were Latvians, 30 were Russians and 6 of other ethnicity. In total, 7 NAT2 alleles were identified: *4, *5, *6, *7, *11, *12, * and *13. The most frequent was the slow acetylation allele NAT2*6 (frequency 0.388) followed by the slow acetylation allele NAT2*5 and the rapid acetylation allele NAT2*4 (frequencies 0.306 and 0.194, respectively). The predominance of slow (51.8%) and intermediate (43.5%) acetylators compared with rapid acetylators (4.7%) was observed. The GSTM1 null genotype was detected in 48.2% of tuberculosis patients. When subgroup analysis was performed according to ethnicity, the results showed that neither NAT2 allele frequencies nor GSTM1 null genotype frequency did not differ significantly in TB patients of Latvian or Russian ethnicity. Overall, genotyping results were similar with previous reports of a NAT2 gene variation and GSTM1 null genotype frequency in Caucasians. Our findings have a contribution for the pharmacogenetics-based tuberculosis therapy in Latvia in future.

  1. The CHEK2 del5395 is a founder mutation without direct effects for cancer risk in the latvian population

    PubMed Central

    Kalniete, D; Nakazawa-Miklasevica, M; Irmejs, A; Vjaters, E; Gardovskis, J; Miklasevics, E

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Our objective was to determine: 1) whether the checkpoint kinase 2 (CHEK2) del5395 (g.27417113-27422508 del, NC_000022.11) is a founder mutation in the Latvian population, 2) if there is an association between CHEK2 del5395 mutation and cancer risk, and 3) and whether the CHEK2 del5395 mutation impacts cancer predisposition in Chernobyl disaster liquidators (the civil and military personnel who were called upon to deal with consequences of the 1986 nuclear disaster) as well as geriatric populations. We recruited 438 breast cancer patients, 568 colorectal cancer patients, 399 ovarian cancer patients, 419 prostate cancer patients, 526 healthy blood donors, 480 Chernobyl disaster liquidators and 444 geriatric cancer-free participants. DNA samples were isolated from blood samples and subjected to multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The truncation of del5395 was estimated by fragment size of the multiplex PCR.All groups were compared to the healthy blood donors using Fisher’s exact test. All p values were two-sided and the odds ratios (OR) calculated by two-by-two table. In cancer groups, the del5395 mutation was most frequently observed in the ovarian cancer group (1.00%, OR = 1.32). In control groups, the del5395 mutation was most frequent (0.76%) in the healthy donors, which exceeded its frequency in the Chernobyl liquidators group and the geriatric group by 0.01 and 0.08%, respectively. For all groups, the OR appeared to be >1 only in ovarian cancer patients. However, OR rates showed no statistical significance in either cancer or control groups, with the p value fluctuating within the range of 0.39-1.00. The CHEK2 gene del5395 is a founder mutation in the Latvian population, which, however, does not have a direct impact on genetic predisposition toward colorectal, breast, ovarian and prostate cancer. PMID:27785394

  2. Nutritional support in the critically injured.

    PubMed

    Fox, Vicki J; Miller, Julie; McClung, Meredith

    2004-12-01

    Nutritional support must be an integral part of the management of trauma victims. This article compares the stress response, a maladaptive response, and starvation, an adaptive process, examines the clinical research regarding total parenteral nutrition and total enteral nutrition, provides an evidence-based approach to initiating nutritional support in critically injured patients, and discusses considerations in selecting nutritional formulas.

  3. Thromboembolic Complications in Thermally Injured Patients,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    utilisation systdmatique chez le brOld sauf chez les patients A bolism: A clinico -pathological study in injured and burned patients. thromoemblie.Br. J...fueron identificados como casos de tromboembolismo, complications in the surgical patient. Ann. Surg. 186:669, 1977 pulmonar significativo. En s6lo tres

  4. Nursing care of the thermally injured patient.

    PubMed

    Elfving, U

    1980-01-01

    Team work is required in the treatment of the thermally injured patient--nursing staff being part of the team. The nurses are with the patient for 24 hours a day and they have to understand the objectives of all other members of the team involved in the treatment as well as thoroughly mastering their own work. For the nursing staff the care of the thermally injured patient is a challenge. The work demands strong motivation and interest--it includes at times painful treatment, isolation and also constant alertness. It is important that the nursing staff is given continuous training so that they are able to give the required care efficiently and to keep up active interest. Practical work is the best way of getting aquainted with the complex forms of treatment of the thermally injured patient. It also lessens the fear of a badly burned patient. Nursing care of the thermally injured patient consists of good basic care, local attention and active observation. The basic care consists of basic hygiene, diet, observation of the patient's psychological condition, giving emotional support, encouraging initiative physiotherapy and postural treatment.

  5. Medical field management of the injured diver.

    PubMed

    Van Meter, K

    1999-03-01

    This article discusses the history of medical field management of the injured diver, and presents a comprehensive medical equipment list for field treatment as well as treatment protocols. Case reports are used to illustrate the principles and outcome of medical field management.

  6. The Head-Injured College Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Cooper B.

    Intended for use by professionals as well as head-injured college students and their families, the text provides basic information about head injuries, brain anatomy, the effects of injury to the various areas of the brain, and the major factors in recovery and rehabilitation. It examines the viability of college attendance for the head-injured…

  7. Reconstructive Surgery in the Thermally Injured Patient

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    lateral thoracic, lower abdom- inal, or groin areas are chosen. Since harvesting includes removal of all regenerative dermal layers down to adipose tissue...Understanding and managing burn pain : part 1. Am J Nursing 2009;109:4. 113Reconstructive Surgery in the Thermally Injured Patient

  8. eArmyU Improves Educational Access for Soldiers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brotherton, Phaedra

    2002-01-01

    Describes how the Army's venture into distance learning, eArmyU, is proving to be a big success, with more than 12,000 soldiers enrolled since it began a year ago. Soldiers are lining up for the program that offers free tuition, a laptop, and Internet access. But historically black colleges and universities may be missing out due to distance…

  9. 13. Photocopy of engraving (from A. Witteman's Ohio Soldiers' and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of engraving (from A. Witteman's Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' Home Near Sandusky, (New York: The Albertype Co.), 1894) VIEW EAST, COTTAGE 'L', (UPPER LEFT COTTAGE 'F', COTTAGE 'G'; UPPER RIGHT COTTAGE UNKNOWN) - Ohio Soldiers' & Sailors' Home, Cottage L, U.S. Route 250 at DeWitt Avenue, Sandusky, Erie County, OH

  10. 11. Photocopy of engraving (from A. Witteman's Ohio Soldiers' and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of engraving (from A. Witteman's Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' Home Near Sandusky, (New York: The Albertype Co.), 1894) VIEW SOUTH, FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, COTTAGE 'H', COTTAGE 'I', COTTAGE 'K', ASSEMBLY HALL, COTTAGE 'L', COTTAGE 'M', COTTAGE 'N' - Ohio Soldiers' & Sailors' Home, U.S. Route 250 at DeWitt Avenue, Sandusky, Erie County, OH

  11. Mild Head Trauma and Chronic Headaches in Returning US Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    multiple headache diagnoses. Two of the soldiers with migraine were also diagnosed with occipital neuralgia . One of these soldiers was diag- nosed with...13 (27) Occipital neuralgia 5 (15) 3 (6) Medication overuse headache 4 (12) 0 (0) Headache NOS 7 (21) 7 (14) Multiple headache types 10 (30) 16 (33

  12. 15. NORTHEAST CORNER, SOLDIER FIELD, LOOKING SOUTHEAST TOWARD THE GYMNASIUM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. NORTHEAST CORNER, SOLDIER FIELD, LOOKING SOUTHEAST TOWARD THE GYMNASIUM, SHOWING EAST DITCH AND A SECTION OF LOW WALL. No date, probably ca. 1935. Photographer unknown. Original silver gelatin print measures 13.1 cm by 7.3 cm, flush mounted on mat board. - Presidio of Monterey, Soldier Field, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  13. Soldier Education in the British Army, 1920-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Jim

    2008-01-01

    This article surveys the history of compulsory education for soldiers' career advancement in the British army. It begins with an examination of the organizational context before analyzing the rationale, syllabus, teaching and assessment of soldier education. It concludes that for members of the army education organization their self-perception as…

  14. Tyraminergic and Octopaminergic Modulation of Defensive Behavior in Termite Soldier

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Yuki; Aonuma, Hitoshi; Sasaki, Ken; Miura, Toru

    2016-01-01

    In termites, i.e. a major group of eusocial insects, the soldier caste exhibits specific morphological characteristics and extremely high aggression against predators. Although the genomic background is identical to the other non-aggressive castes, they acquire the soldier-specific behavioral character during the course of caste differentiation. The high aggressiveness and defensive behavior is essential for colony survival, but the neurophysiological bases are completely unknown. In the present study, using the damp-wood termite Hodotermopsis sjostedti, we focused on two biogenic amines, octopamine (OA) and tyramine (TA), as candidate neuromodulators for the defensive behavior in soldiers. High-performance liquid chromatographic analysis revealed that TA levels in the brain and suboesophageal ganglion (SOG) and the OA level in brain were increased in soldiers than in pseudergates (worker caste). Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that TA/OA neurons that innervate specific areas, including the mandibular muscles, antennal nerve, central complex, suboesophageal ganglion, and thoracic and/or abdominal ganglia, were enlarged in a soldier-specific manner. Together with the results that pharmacological application of TA promoted the defensive behavior in pseudergates, these findings suggest that the increased TA/OA levels induce the higher aggressiveness and defensive behavior in termite soldiers. The projection targets of these soldier-specific enlarged TA/OA neurons may have important roles in the higher aggressiveness and defensive behavior of the termite soldiers, inducing the neuronal transition that accompanies external morphological changes. PMID:27196303

  15. Finding "Another Great World": Australian Soldiers and Wartime Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laugesen, Amanda

    2006-01-01

    This article is an exploration of the relationship between Australian soldiers and wartime libraries in the First and Second World Wars. It examines the way soldiers, as readers, used a variety of libraries, including those of charitable organizations, the education libraries organized by military authorities, and the libraries formed in Prisoner…

  16. Zinc: an essential trace element with potential benefits to soldiers.

    PubMed

    McClung, James P; Scrimgeour, Angus G

    2005-12-01

    Zinc is a trace element known to be an essential nutrient for life. It functions as a cofactor for numerous enzymes, including those involved in DNA and RNA replication and protein synthesis. Soldiers represent a unique population faced with intense metabolic and mental demands, as well as exposure to various immune challenges. Some of these factors may affect their dietary zinc requirements. Although severe zinc deficiency is unlikely to occur, some soldiers may experience less than optimal zinc status because of diminished intake coupled with increased requirements. For those soldiers, supplemental dietary zinc may serve a protective function in numerous disease states affecting modern warfighters. This review highlights the importance of adequate zinc nutriture to soldiers and discusses the potential benefits of supplemental zinc in a number of diseases currently affecting soldiers, including diarrhea, respiratory diseases, malaria, and leishmaniasis.

  17. Integrated soldier power and data system (ISPDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, Roman; Forrester, Thomas; Lee, Kang; Stephens, Robert; Lai, Anthony; Zahzah, Mohamad

    2014-06-01

    Physical Optics Corporation (POC) developed the body-worn Integrated Soldier Power and Data System (ISPDS), a configurable node for plug-in wired or wireless server/client or peer-to-peer computing with accommodations for power, sensor I/O interfaces, and energy harvesting. The enabling technology increases the efficacy of uniformed personnel and first responders and provides an option for reducing force structure associated with the need for hardware network infrastructure to enable a mobile digital communications architecture for dismounted troops. The ISPDS system addresses the DoD's need for an "intelligent" power control system in an effort to increase mission duration and maximize the first responders and warfighter's effectiveness without concern for the available energy resources (i.e., batteries). ISPDS maximizes durability and survivability, assesses influences that affect performance, and provides the network backbone and mobile node hardware. POC is producing two vest-integrated variants, one each for the U.S. Army PEO Ground Soldier and the Air Soldier, with each including state-of-the-art low-profile and robust wearable connectors, cabling, and harnesses, and an integrated low-profile power manager and conformal battery for data and power distribution. The innovative intelligent power controller (IPC), in the form of the ISPDS firmware and power sensing and control electronics, will enable ISPDS to optimize power levels both automatically and in accordance with manually set preferences. The IPC module is power dense and efficient, and adaptively provides lossless transfer of available harvested photovoltaic energy to the battery. The integrated systems were tested for suitable electrical, electromagnetic interference (EMI), and environmental performance as outlined in military standards such as MIL-STD- 810G and MIL STD-461F.

  18. Soldier evaluation of the virtual reality Iraq.

    PubMed

    Reger, Greg M; Gahm, Gregory A; Rizzo, Albert A; Swanson, Robert; Duma, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Repeated combat deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan are resulting in increased rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among military personnel. Although exposure therapy is an effective treatment for this disorder, some personnel do not significantly respond to treatment, possibly due to poor activation of the trauma memory or a lack of emotional engagement during therapy. In addition, some service members do not seek mental healthcare due to treatment stigma. Researchers recently developed a virtual reality (VR) Iraq to attempt to improve activation of the traumatic memory during exposure therapy and to provide a treatment approach that may be more appealing to some service members, relative to traditional face-to-face talk therapy. Initial validation of the application requires an assessment of how well it represents the experiences of previously deployed service members. This study evaluated the realism of the VR Iraq application according to the subjective evaluation of 93 U.S. Army soldiers who returned from Iraq in the last year. Those screening negative for PTSD used and evaluated a VR tactical convoy and a VR dismounted patrol in a simulated Middle Eastern city. Results indicated that 86% of soldiers rated the overall realism of the VR convoy as ranging from adequate to excellent. Eighty-two percent of soldiers reported adequate-to-excellent overall realism of the city environment. Results provide evidence that the VR Iraq presents a realistic context in which VR exposure therapy can be conducted. However, clinical trials are needed to assess the efficacy of VR exposure therapy for Iraq veterans with PTSD.

  19. Women Soldiers in Korea: Troop Viewpoints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-01

    27. Recreation/Education Services6-Satisfaction Score Analisis 121 29. Women-in Co--mba Attitude Sore Anaysis 123 28. then i Comy Atitude ,Scii Anaysis... data with respect to some known aspects of soldiering in Korea ard women in the Army;.,and (2) to explore for some newunderstanding of the problem areas...dbsents and suggetiohs: The write-in data is not the focus of this report. That information was reviewed, summarized and presented, to the comma nd-for

  20. Breastfeeding during military deployment: a soldier's story.

    PubMed

    Sleutel, Martha Rider

    2012-01-01

    Thousands of women of childbearing age are serving and being deployed in the United States military. U.S. Department of Defense policies related to breastfeeding and deployment are inconsistent among the different branches of the military and sometimes conflict with evidence-based guidelines about optimal breastfeeding practices. This is the story of an active duty soldier who was deployed while breastfeeding and the obstacles she encountered trying to send breast milk home to her son. The article explores policy, health and professional practice implications.

  1. Child Soldiers: Children Associated with Fighting Forces.

    PubMed

    Song, Suzan J; de Jong, Joop

    2015-10-01

    Around the world, there are an estimated 300,000 to 500,000 children involved in armed conflict. Children can be abducted into a fighting force to fight or serve as sex slaves. Child soldiers have depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress symptoms; however, evidence is mixed because of methodologic limitations. Various mental health interventions have been tried, with promising results. Child and adolescent psychiatrists are uniquely trained in understanding and assisting youth to heal from such extraordinary experiences. A public health paradigm could include interventions that are based on a comprehensive assessment of interweaving developmental, biological, psychological, and sociocultural factors.

  2. 32 CFR 553.16 - Persons eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home National Cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Persons eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home... eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home National Cemetery. The Board of Commissioners of the US Soldiers' and Airmen's Home will prescribe rules governing burial in the Soldiers' Home National Cemetery....

  3. 32 CFR 553.16 - Persons eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home National Cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Persons eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home... eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home National Cemetery. The Board of Commissioners of the US Soldiers' and Airmen's Home will prescribe rules governing burial in the Soldiers' Home National Cemetery....

  4. 32 CFR 553.16 - Persons eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home National Cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Persons eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home... eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home National Cemetery. The Board of Commissioners of the US Soldiers' and Airmen's Home will prescribe rules governing burial in the Soldiers' Home National Cemetery....

  5. 32 CFR 553.16 - Persons eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home National Cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Persons eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home... eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home National Cemetery. The Board of Commissioners of the US Soldiers' and Airmen's Home will prescribe rules governing burial in the Soldiers' Home National Cemetery....

  6. 32 CFR 553.16 - Persons eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home National Cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Persons eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home... eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home National Cemetery. The Board of Commissioners of the US Soldiers' and Airmen's Home will prescribe rules governing burial in the Soldiers' Home National Cemetery....

  7. Acute Management for the Injured Hand

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Geoffrey J.

    1985-01-01

    If not optimally treated, a hand injury can lead to disability which often has considerable economic and social implications. The role of the primary care physician is to diagnose the injury correctly and initiate management which will keep this disability to a minimum. This is best achieved by making a composite diagnosis to include all the injured components of the hand. The emphasis must be on early mobilization of the injured area and the maintenance of mobility in all joints of the upper limb. Early referral to physiotherapy and occupational therapy departments is highly desirable. The major pitfall in managing hand injuries is over zealous treatment of the fracture at the expense of the soft tissue injury, resulting in iatrogenic stiffness. PMID:21274226

  8. Accident characteristics of injured motorcyclists in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Pang, T Y; Umar, R S; Azhar, A A; Ahmad, M M; Nasir, M T; Harwant, S

    2000-03-01

    This study examines the accident characteristics of injured motorcyclists in Malaysia. The aim of this study is to identify the characteristics of motorcyclists who are at higher fatality risk and subsequently be the targeted group for the fatality-reduction countermeasures. A total of 412 motorcycle crash victims with serious or fatal injuries were analysed. The results showed that the injured motorcyclists were predominant young, novice riders of less than 3 years licensure and male. A fatal outcome was more likely to be associated with a larger engine capacity motorcycle, collision with a heavy vehicle, head on collision, and collision at a non-junction road. In contrast, a non-fatal outcome was more likely to be associated with a small engine capacity motorcycle, collision with another motorcycle or passenger car, junction accidents, and side or rear collisions.

  9. The Objective Force Soldier/Soldier Team. Volume II - The Science and Technology Challenges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    SCIENCE BOARD FINAL REPORT November 2001 DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF THE ARMY (ACQUISITION, LOGISTICS AND TECHNOLOGY ) WASHINGTON...D.C. 20310-0103 VOLUME II THE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CHALLENGES REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burder...Soldier Team - Volume II - The Science and Technology Challenges Unclassified 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  10. [Child Soldiers as Refugees in Germany].

    PubMed

    Zito, Dima

    2016-12-01

    Child Soldiers as Refugees in Germany How do former child soldiers cope with their potentially traumatic experiences, and how do the living conditions as refugees influence these coping processes? A dissertation at the faculty of human and social sciences at the University of Wuppertal, based on biographical-narrative interviews with 15 young refugees from six African countries, describes the characteristics of the traumatic sequences in the countries of origin and in exile, and elaborates typical coping processes. In order to survive a situation of absolute subjection within armed groups, children develop forms of adequate adaptation to the context like regulation and detachment of emotions e.g. with the use of drugs, assimilation to an idea of "hard masculinity" etc. They become victims, witnesses and often perpetrators of extreme violence (man-made-disaster), respectively traumatic processes can be seen in all sequences. After leaving the armed groups there is no way back into the families and communities destroyed by armed conflict, so they become refugees. In Germany, they are subjected to a bureaucratic and excluding asylum system, in which decisions on all relevant areas of life (age determination, place and right of residence, form of accommodation, access to education, etc.) are imposed on them. Especially the insecure right of residence and the living conditions in refugee camps are severe risk factors, impeding stabilization. Social support, e. g. by competent professionals, access to trauma- and culture-sensitive psychotherapy, societal inclusion, but also personal resilience are essential for coping with trauma and developing new future perspectives.

  11. Stability of sterigmatocystin during the bread making process and its occurrence in bread from the Latvian market.

    PubMed

    Veršilovskis, Aleksandrs; Bartkevičs, Vadims

    2012-05-01

    Sterigmatocystin (STC) is a carcinogenic and mutagenic mycotoxin produced by fungi of many Aspergillus species. The aim of this research was to test the stability of STC during the bread making process and to check bread samples from the Latvian market for STC contamination, using a previously developed electrospray positive ionisation (ESI(+)) liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. Wheat grain naturally contaminated with STC was used for bread baking. STC was found to be stable during the bread-making process. In the food survey 17% of the analysed breads were positive for STC, with concentration levels of 2-7 μg kg(-1). One out of six rye bread samples, one out of nine rye-wheat bread samples and three out of 14 wheat bread samples were contaminated with STC. Four out of five contaminated samples contained whole grains as the main ingredient. We conclude that whole grain bread may be a possible source of STC, although even STC-positive bread samples identified in this study contained quite low toxin levels.

  12. Altered glycosaminoglycan metabolism in injured arterial wall

    SciTech Connect

    Salisbury, B.G.; Hajjar, D.P.; Minick, C.R.

    1985-06-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAG) are believed to be important in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We have previously demonstrated that areas of injured aorta that have been re-endothelialized accumulate increased amounts of lipid and GAG when compared to areas remaining de-endothelialized. We have now examined the net incorporation of labeled precursors into the individual GAG present in both re-endothelialized and de-endothelialized areas of rabbit aorta. Aortic tissue was examined at 2-3 and 10-14 weeks after a denuding injury by incubating tissue minces with (/sup 3/H)glucosamine and sodium (/sup 35/S)sulfate for 24 hr. Following incubation, the aortic GAG were isolated and assayed for uronic acid concentration and radioactivity. Results indicate that the total GAG concentration was significantly greater in the re-endothelialized as compared to de-endothelialized areas. The concentration in uninjured aorta was 9.01. The difference between the injured tissues was attributable to increased concentrations of sulfated GAG. Hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate were the most metabolically active of the GAG in either uninjured or injured aorta, together accounting for over 75% of the /sup 3/H label. The /sup 3/H specific radioactivities of the four GAG in the short-term, re-endothelialized subgroup were all increased nearly twice that found in uninjured and de-endothelialized tissues. With the exception of heparan sulfate, no significant differences were noted in the /sup 3/H specific radioactivities between the re-endothelialized and de-endothelialized areas in the long-term subgroup. These results indicate that, relative to adjacent areas of de-endothelialization, GAG preferentially accumulate in re-endothelialized areas even as early as 2-3 weeks following a denuding injury.

  13. Closeup of headstones in Section 4 of soldiers from Brazil, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up of headstones in Section 4 of soldiers from Brazil, Italy, Argentina, and Britain, view to southwest - Cypress Hills National Cemetery, Jamaica Avenue Unit, 625 Jamaica Avenue, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  14. SECTION C, WITH SOLDIERS AND SAILORS MONUMENT AT LEFT AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SECTION C, WITH SOLDIERS AND SAILORS MONUMENT AT LEFT AND COMMITTAL SHELTER AT EXTREME RIGHT. VIEW TO WEST. - Bath National Cemetery, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Juan Avenue, Bath, Steuben County, NY

  15. Soldier occupational load carriage: a narrative review of associated injuries.

    PubMed

    Orr, Robin Marc; Pope, Rodney; Johnston, Venerina; Coyle, Julia

    2014-01-01

    This narrative review examines injuries sustained by soldiers undertaking occupational load carriage tasks. Military soldiers are required to carry increasingly heavier occupational loads. These loads have been found to increase the physiological cost to the soldier and alter their gait mechanics. Aggregated research findings suggest that the lower limbs are the most frequent anatomical site of injury associated with load carriage. While foot blisters are common, other prevalent lower limb injuries include stress fractures, knee and foot pain, and neuropathies, like digitalgia and meralgia. Shoulder neuropathies (brachial plexus palsy) and lower back injuries are not uncommon. Soldier occupational load carriage has the potential to cause injuries that impact on force generation and force sustainment. Through understanding the nature of these injuries targeted interventions, like improved physical conditioning and support to specialised organisations, can be employed.

  16. VIEW OF SITE WITH CONFEDERATE SOLDIERS AND SAILORS MONUMENT, MARYLAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF SITE WITH CONFEDERATE SOLDIERS AND SAILORS MONUMENT, MARYLAND MONUMENT, FENCING, GATE, AND FLAGPOLE. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Point Lookout Confederate Cemetery, Point Lookout, Ridge, St. Mary's County, MD

  17. Soldier Performance Research Project: Armor Field and SIMNET Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    Event 5. The crew will react to an ATGM ambush. The TC must issue the contact report and fire command (both timed). The tank should take evasive ...Cammand’s (TEXO34) Armor and Engineer Board who conducted the Soldier Performance Research Project (SPRP) Armor tests: MC Royce Simson, Test Director CPI...the Soldier Performance Research Project (SPP), the Armor portion was conducted in two phases to provide a rigorous assessment of the cognitive skill

  18. Soldiers in Cold Environments (Soldats en environnements froids)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    Apr 2009 Soldiers in Cold Environments ( Soldats en environnements froids) Research and Technology Organisation (NATO) BP 25, F-92201 Neuilly-sur...TP/294 www.rto.nato.int RTO MEETING PROCEEDINGS MP-HFM-168 Soldiers in Cold Environments ( Soldats en environnements froids) Papers prepared for... Soldats en environnements froids (RTO-MP-HFM-168) Synthèse Durant ce symposium, 43 exposés furent présentés par 10 nations. Les sujets allaient de

  19. Facilitating Soldier Receipt of Needed Mental Health Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-11-2-0010 TITLE: Facilitating Soldier Receipt of Needed Mental Health Treatment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Thomas W. Britt...SUBTITLE Facilitating Soldier Receipt of Needed Mental Health Treatment Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Sb. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0010 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT...the final version of the ’’Facilitating Mental Health Treatment (FMHT)" unit and leader training, gaining Institutional Review Board (and MRMC

  20. The United States Army Comprehensive Soldier Fitness: A Critical Look

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    deployments and a high operational tempo, the Army developed the Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) program. Designed to improve Soldiers’ resiliency...Army developed the Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) program. Designed to improve Soldiers’ resiliency and psychological fitness, the CSF is built...program based on positive psychology. It was developed and implemented in 2009 to respond to the increased stress on the force resulting from multiple

  1. Family Reintegration Experiences of Soldiers with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-26

    DATES COVERED 26 FEB 2014 Final 1 SEP 2011 - 31 DEC 2013 - 4. TITLE AND S UBTITLE I’· CONTRACT NUMBER I Family Reintegration Experiences of Soldiers...unlimited [ 13. SUPPLEMENTARY OTES I N/A 14. ABSTRACT I Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore family reintegration processes ofpost-mTBI...nurses who provide much of that care and who educate soldiers and their family members about mTBI. 15. SUBJECT TERMS family reintegration , deployment

  2. Armor and anesthesia: exposure, feeling, and the soldier's body.

    PubMed

    MacLeish, Kenneth T

    2012-03-01

    For many civilians, the high-tech weapons, armor, and military medicine with which U.S. soldiers are equipped present an image of lethal capacity and physical invulnerability. But, as this article explores, soldiers themselves just as often associate the life-sustaining technology of modern warfare with feelings that range from a pragmatic ambivalence about exposure to harm all the way to profoundly unsettling vulnerability. This article, based on fieldwork among soldiers and military families at the U.S. Army's Ft. Hood, examines sensory and affective dimensions of soldiers' intimate bodily relationships with the technologies that alternately or even simultaneously keep them alive and expose them to harm. I argue that modern military discipline and technology conspire to cultivate soldiers as highly durable, capable, unfeeling, interchangeable bodies, or what might be called, after Susan Buck-Morss (1992), anesthetic subjects. But for soldiers themselves, their training, combat environment, protective gear, and weapons are a rich font of both emotional and bodily feeling that exists in complex tension with the also deeply felt military imperative to carry on in the face of extreme discomfort and danger.

  3. Blood pressure in head‐injured patients

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Patrick; Gregson, Barbara A; Piper, Ian; Citerio, Giuseppe; Mendelow, A David; Chambers, Iain R

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the statistical characteristics of blood pressure (BP) readings from a large number of head‐injured patients. Methods The BrainIT group has collected high time‐resolution physiological and clinical data from head‐injured patients who require intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring. The statistical features of this dataset of BP measurements with time resolution of 1 min from 200 patients is examined. The distributions of BP measurements and their relationship with simultaneous ICP measurements are described. Results The distributions of mean, systolic and diastolic readings are close to normal with modest skewing towards higher values. There is a trend towards an increase in blood pressure with advancing age, but this is not significant. Simultaneous blood pressure and ICP values suggest a triphasic relationship with a BP rising at 0.28 mm Hg/mm Hg of ICP, for ICP up to 32 mm Hg, and 0.9 mm Hg/mm Hg of ICP for ICP from 33 to 55 mm Hg, and falling sharply with rising ICP for ICP >55 mm Hg. Conclusions Patients with head injury appear to have a near normal distribution of blood pressure readings that are skewed towards higher values. The relationship between BP and ICP may be triphasic. PMID:17138594

  4. PSMA6 (rs2277460, rs1048990), PSMC6 (rs2295826, rs2295827) and PSMA3 (rs2348071) genetic diversity in Latvians, Lithuanians and Taiwanese

    PubMed Central

    Sjakste, Tatjana; Paramonova, Natalia; Wu, Lawrence Shi-Shin; Zemeckiene, Zivile; Sitkauskiene, Brigita; Sakalauskas, Raimundas; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Sjakste, Nikolajs

    2014-01-01

    PSMA6 (rs2277460, rs1048990), PSMC6 (rs2295826, rs2295827) and PSMA3 (rs2348071) genetic diversity was investigated in 1438 unrelated subjects from Latvia, Lithuania and Taiwan. In general, polymorphism of each individual locus showed tendencies similar to determined previously in HapMap populations. Main differences concern Taiwanese and include presence of rs2277460 rare allele A not found before in Asians and absence of rs2295827 rare alleles homozygotes TT observed in all other human populations. Observed patterns of SNPs and haplotype diversity were compatible with expectation of neutral model of evolution. Linkage disequilibrium between the rs2295826 and rs2295827 was detected to be complete in Latvians and Lithuanians (D´ = 1; r2 = 1) and slightly disrupted in Taiwanese (D´ = 0.978; r2 = 0.901). Population differentiation (FST statistics) was estimated from pairwise population comparisons of loci variability, five locus haplotypes and PSMA6 and PSMC6 two locus haplotypes. Latvians were significantly different from all Asians at each of 5 SNPs and from Lithuanians at the rs1048990 and PSMC6 loci. Lithuanian and Asian populations exhibited similarities at the PSMC6 loci and were different at the PSMA6 and PSMA3 SNPs. Considering five locus haplotypes all European populations were significantly different from Asian; Lithuanian population was different from both Latvian and CEU. Allele specific patterns of transcription factor binding sites and splicing signals were predicted in silico and addressed to eventual functionality of nucleotide substitutions and their potential to be involved in human genome evolution and geographical adaptation. Current study represents a novel step toward a systematic analysis of the proteasomal gene genetic diversity in human populations. PMID:25606411

  5. Caffeine use among active duty US Army soldiers.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Harris R; Stavinoha, Trisha; McGraw, Susan; White, Alan; Hadden, Louise; Marriott, Bernadette P

    2012-06-01

    Eighty-percent of the US adult population regularly consumes caffeine, but limited information is available on the extent and patterns of use. Caffeine use is a public health issue and its risks and benefits are regularly considered in scientific literature and the lay media. Recently, new caffeine-containing products have been introduced and are widely available on Army bases and are added to rations to maintain cognitive performance. This study surveyed caffeine consumption and demographic characteristics in 990 US Army soldiers. Data were weighted by age, sex, rank, and Special Forces status. Total caffeine intake and intake from specific products were estimated. Logistic regression was used to examine relationships between caffeine use and soldier demographic and lifestyle characteristics. Eighty-two percent of soldiers consumed caffeine at least once a week. Mean daily caffeine consumption was 285 mg/day (347 mg/day among regular caffeine consumers). Male soldiers consumed, on average, 303 mg/day and females 163 mg/day (regular consumers: 365 mg/day for male soldiers, 216 mg/day for female soldiers). Coffee was the main source of caffeine intake. Among young males, energy drinks were the largest source of caffeine intake, but their intake was not greater than older males. Regression analysis indicated an association of higher caffeine intake with male sex, white race, and tobacco use (P<0.01). Most soldiers consume caffeine in levels accepted as safe, but some consume greater quantities than recommended, although definitive information on safe upper limits of caffeine intake is not available. Labels of caffeine-containing products should provide caffeine content so individuals can make informed decisions.

  6. Keeping injured employees working. Overcoming common problems.

    PubMed

    Howe, M L

    1996-10-01

    1. In the past, employers did not routinely provide work for injured/disabled employees. While today many companies wish to reduce workers' compensation costs and understand the savings available through modified work programs, remnants of the old philosophy remain. 2. Often employers initiate a new program, only to have it detailed or complicated by misunderstandings and lack of common assumptions. The occupational health nurse can be a key team member in recognizing and countering fears and concerns that prevent implementation of a successful program. 3. Common obstacles that arise are both philosophical (the employee must be 100% fit) and practical (all our jobs are repetitive, so how can we provide work?). The occupational health nurse must continue to educate, motivate, assist, and communicate the goals and vision of the new philosophy.

  7. [The lung of the thermally injured patient].

    PubMed

    Bargues, Laurent

    2002-12-15

    Severely burned patients are at high risk for developing respiratory failure at any time during their treatment. The lung of a thermally injured patient may sustain many injuries such as smoke inhalation, physical forces, inflammation and infection. The knowledge of the mechanisms of burn injury, physical exam findings, laboratory studies, relevant radiologic examinations, and fiberoptic bronchoscopy allow an early and accurate diagnosis of pulmonary damage. The treatment consists of oxygenation, mechanical ventilation, surgical treatment of burn wounds and trauma, and possible therapy for poisoning. The respiratory injuries are one of the main factors responsible for high mortality in burned patients. Better understanding of the pathophysiology and inflammatory response will lead to future therapeutic advances.

  8. THE BRAIN-INJURED CHILD IN HOME, SCHOOL, AND COMMUNITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CRUICKSHANK, WILLIAM M.

    WRITTEN FOR PARENTS, TEACHERS, AND OTHERS WHO WORK DAILY WITH BRAIN INJURED CHILDREN, THE BOOK INCLUDES CONSIDERATION OF THE SYMPTOMS OF BRAIN DAMAGE, RECOMMENDATIONS FOR DIAGNOSTIC PROCEDURES AND PERSONNEL, AND DESCRIPTIONS OF TREATMENT TECHNIQUES THAT HAVE PROVED EFFECTIVE AT HOME AND IN THE CLASSROOM. AN INTRODUCTION TO THE BRAIN INJURED CHILD…

  9. Analysis of Latvian familial melanoma patients shows novel variants in the noncoding regions of CDKN2A and that the CDK4 mutation R24H is a founder mutation.

    PubMed

    Veinalde, Rūta; Ozola, Aija; Azarjana, Kristīne; Molven, Anders; Akslen, Lars A; Doniņa, Simona; Proboka, Guna; Cēma, Ingrīda; Baginskis, Ainārs; Pjanova, Dace

    2013-06-01

    Hereditary cutaneous melanoma is associated with mutations in the high-risk CDKN2A gene in about 40% of melanoma-prone families. Mutations in the CDK4 gene are the cause in only a few pedigrees. In this study, we analyzed 20 Latvian familial melanoma probands and carried out a comprehensive analysis of CDKN2A including sequencing of its promoter/intronic regions and deletion screening. We also analyzed the critical second exon of the CDK4 gene. One novel intronic variant (IVS2+82C>T) of the CDKN2A gene and a small deletion (c.-20677_-20682delGTACGC) in its promoter region were found. Genotyping of the novel variants in larger melanoma and control groups indicated that the deletion increases the risk of melanoma (odds ratio=6.353, 95% confidence interval: 1.34-30.22, P=0.0168). The CDK4 gene analysis showed a Latvian melanoma family with the mutation R24H carried on the same haplotype as in two previously described Latvian CDK4-positive families. Our study suggests that the main risk gene in Latvian families with a strong family history of melanoma is CDK4 and that most of the other cases analyzed could be sporadic or associated with low-penetrance risk genes.

  10. Intragenomic Conflict over Soldier Allocation in Polyembryonic Parasitoid Wasps.

    PubMed

    Rautiala, Petri; Gardner, Andy

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the selection pressures that have driven the evolution of sterile insect castes has been the focus of decades of intense scientific debate. An amenable empirical test bed for theory on this topic is provided by the sterile-soldier caste of polyembryonic parasitoid wasps. The function of these soldiers has been a source of controversy, with two basic hypotheses emerging: the "brood-benefit" hypothesis that they provide an overall benefit for their siblings and the "sex-ratio-conflict" hypothesis that the soldiers mediate a conflict between brothers and sisters by killing their opposite-sex siblings. Here, we investigate the divergent sex-ratio optima of a female embryo's maternal-origin and paternal-origin genes, to determine the potential for, and direction of, intragenomic conflict over soldiering. We then derive contrasting empirically testable predictions concerning the patterns of genomic imprinting that are expected to arise out of this intragenomic conflict, for the brood-benefit versus the sex-ratio-conflict hypothesis of soldier function.

  11. The Soldiers in Societies: Defense, Regulation, and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Li; Zhou, Xuguo

    2014-01-01

    The presence of reproductively altruistic castes is one of the primary traits of the eusocial societies. Adaptation and regulation of the sterile caste, to a certain extent, drives the evolution of eusociality. Depending on adaptive functions of the first evolved sterile caste, eusocial societies can be categorized into the worker-first and soldier-first lineages, respectively. The former is marked by a worker caste as the first evolved altruistic caste, whose primary function is housekeeping, and the latter is highlighted by a sterile soldier caste as the first evolved altruistic caste, whose task is predominantly colony defense. The apparent functional differences between these two fundamentally important castes suggest worker-first and soldier-first eusociality are potentially driven by a suite of distinctively different factors. Current studies of eusocial evolution have been focused largely on the worker-first Hymenoptera, whereas understanding of soldier-first lineages including termites, eusocial aphids, gall-dwelling thrips, and snapping shrimp, is greatly lacking. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge on biology, morphology, adaptive functions, and caste regulation of the soldier caste. In addition, we discuss the biological, ecological and genetic factors that might contribute to the evolution of distinct caste systems within eusocial lineages. PMID:24644427

  12. Head-mounted display systems and the special operations soldier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyd, Rodney B.

    1998-08-01

    In 1997, the Boeing Company, working with DARPA under the Smart Modules program and the US Army Soldier Systems Command, embarked on an advanced research and development program to develop a wearable computer system tailored for use with soldiers of the US Special Operations Command. The 'special operations combat management system' is a rugged advanced wearable tactical computer, designed to provide the special operations soldier with enhanced situation awareness and battlefield information capabilities. Many issues must be considered during the design of wearable computers for a combat soldier, including the system weight, placement on the body with respect to other equipment, user interfaces and display system characteristics. During the initial feasibility study for the system, the operational environment was examined and potential users were interviewed to establish the proper display solution for the system. Many display system requirements resulted, such as head or helmet mounting, Night Vision Goggle compatibility, minimal visible light emissions, environmental performance and even the need for handheld or other 'off the head' type display systems. This paper will address these issues and other end user requirements for display systems for applications in the harsh and demanding environment of the Special Operations soldier.

  13. The Single Soldier Quality of Life Initiative: Great Expectations of Privacy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-04-01

    no-notice "hey, you" details. Soldiers went drinking off post and then drove back to the barracks because policies forbade consumption and storage of...respected under military law."𔃿 3 Recognizing the traditional soldier pastime of drinking to excess, commanders have historically controlled or limited this...REV. 97, 121 (1964) * 24 barracks assigned to enlisted personnel.,, 54 Commanders saw no need to allow soldiers to drink in the barracks. Soldiers

  14. Development of a Model of Soldier Effectiveness: Retranslation Materials and Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    sion training exercise with seven aggres- sors against one soldier, this soldier quickly found the best escape route and accomplished his mission...PERFORMANCE EFFECTIVENESS CATEGORY LEVEL 191. When apprehended for possession of mari- juana , this soldier agreed to work close- ly with his NCO to

  15. High Hopes, Grim Reality: Reintegration and the Education of Former Child Soldiers in Sierra Leone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betancourt, Theresa S.; Simmons, Stephanie; Borisova, Ivelina; Brewer, Stephanie E.; Iweala, Uzo; de la Soudiere, Marie

    2008-01-01

    A number of studies have explored aspects of education relating to the reintegration of former child soldiers into their communities. In particular, researchers have shown the negative effects of child soldiering on the educational and economic outcomes of former child soldiers. A few studies have discussed the relative benefits of education for…

  16. Scratching the Surface: A Comparison of Girl Soldiers from Three Geographic Regions of the World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spellings, Carolyn R.

    2008-01-01

    Over 300,000 children are estimated to be conscripted participants in conflicts throughout the world. Depending on the particular armed group that employs child soldiers, girls represent 6 to 50% of child soldiers. Despite this prevalence of involvement, the experience of girls as soldiers in war and political conflict has rarely been…

  17. Reintegration of child soldiers in Burundi: a tracer study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Substantial attention and resources are aimed at the reintegration of child soldiers, yet rigorous evaluations are rare. Methods This tracer study was conducted among former child soldiers (N=452) and never-recruited peers (N=191) who participated in an economic support program in Burundi. Socio-economic outcome indicators were measured retrospectively for the period before receiving support (T1; 2005–06); immediately afterwards (T2; 2006–07); and at present (T3; 2010). Participants also rated present functional impairment and mental health indicators. Results Participants reported improvement on all indicators, especially economic opportunity and social integration. At present no difference existed between both groups on any of the outcome indicators. Socio-economic functioning was negatively related with depression- and, health complaints and positively with intervention satisfaction. Conclusion The present study demonstrates promising reintegration trajectories of former child soldiers after participating in a support program. PMID:23095403

  18. Exoskeleton for Soldier Enhancement Systems Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, J.F.

    2000-09-28

    The development of a successful exoskeleton for human performance augmentation (EHPA) will require a multi-disciplinary systems approach based upon sound biomechanics, power generation and actuation systems, controls technology, and operator interfaces. The ability to integrate key components into a system that enhances performance without impeding operator mobility is essential. The purpose of this study and report are to address the issue of feasibility of building a fieldable EHPA. Previous efforts, while demonstrating progress and enhancing knowledge, have not approached the level required for a fully functional, fieldable system. It is doubtless that the technologies required for a successful exoskeleton have advanced, and some of them significantly. The question to be addressed in this report is have they advanced to the point of making a system feasible in the next three to five years? In this study, the key technologies required to successfully build an exoskeleton have been examined. The primary focus has been on the key technologies of power sources, actuators, and controls. Power sources, including internal combustion engines, fuel cells, batteries, super capacitors, and hybrid sources have been investigated and compared with respect to the exoskeleton application. Both conventional and non-conventional actuator technologies that could impact EHPA have been assessed. In addition to the current state of the art of actuators, the potential for near-term improvements using non-conventional actuators has also been addressed. Controls strategies, and their implication to the design approach, and the exoskeleton to soldier interface have also been investigated. In addition to these key subsystems and technologies, this report addresses technical concepts and issues relating to an integrated design. A recommended approach, based on the results of the study is also presented.

  19. Predictors of Change in Substance Abuse Status in Soldiers

    PubMed Central

    Mehrazmay, Alireza; Karambakhsh, Alireza; Salesi, Mahmood; Heydari, Mostafa; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Military service is a stressful task that influences the life style of army personnel. Several factors can make soldiers less capable of coping with stressful events; so they may try to start drug abuse or increase in the amount or diversity of substance abuse. Understanding factors responsible for this misbehavior among soldiers is crucial for their commanders to modify these factors. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the predictors of change in substance abuse status in soldiers. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional research was conducted to evaluate the substance abuse status among Iranian soldiers in 2010. The target population was the soldiers who had spent at least 3 months of their military service. Cluster sampling was done from army service garrisons in 12 provinces in Iran. A total of 3960 soldiers were selected with different levels of education and age. Data gathering was done with demographic questionnaires, Texas Christian university (TCU) drug screen II and ASI questionnaire (fifth edition). Four types of dependent variables were defined: “improvement”, “without change”, “deterioration”, and “severe deterioration”. Backward ordinal regression analysis was done and P values, OR, and SE were calculated by SPSS19 software. Results: Totally, 6.7% of soldiers improved, 82% remained without change, 6.1% deteriorated, and 5.2% severely deteriorated with regard to their substance abuse. Modifiable predictors were distance from home lower than 200 km (OR =1.54), bad relationship with commanders (OR = 1.88), service place dissatisfaction (OR = 1.39), and always feeling lonely (OR = 1.83). Non-modifiable factors were alcohol use within family and friends (P = 0.000); psychiatric drug use history (OR = 1.72); suicidal attempt history (OR = 1.31); divorce, separation, and extramarital contact (P = 0.001); unemployment (P = 0.019); leisure time dissatisfaction (P = 0.004); living alone (OR = 2.43); and substance abuse

  20. [Psychological impact on French soldiers in the Central African Republic].

    PubMed

    Le Pape, Erwan; de Montleau, Franck

    2015-01-01

    The many constraints and psychologically demanding situations to which French soldiers are subjected (living conditions, operational pace, scenes of exaction, hostile crowds, combat situations) have justified a psychiatrist being posted to the theatre of operation Sangaris, in the Central African Republic, soon after the military intervention began. While the psychiatrist's activity is typical of psychiatry in operational situations,.the configuration of the conflict- a civil war - and its impact on the psyche of the soldiers making up the task force have resulted in these practices being adapted and acknowledgement of the need to update skills.

  1. Haemorrhage control in severely injured patients.

    PubMed

    Gruen, Russell L; Brohi, Karim; Schreiber, Martin; Balogh, Zsolt J; Pitt, Veronica; Narayan, Mayur; Maier, Ronald V

    2012-09-22

    Most surgeons have adopted damage control surgery for severely injured patients, in which the initial operation is abbreviated after control of bleeding and contamination to allow ongoing resuscitation in the intensive-care unit. Developments in early resuscitation that emphasise rapid control of bleeding, restrictive volume replacement, and prevention or early management of coagulopathy are making definitive surgery during the first operation possible for many patients. Improved topical haemostatic agents and interventional radiology are becoming increasingly useful adjuncts to surgical control of bleeding. Better understanding of trauma-induced coagulopathy is paving the way for the replacement of blind, unguided protocols for blood component therapy with systemic treatments targeting specific deficiencies in coagulation. Similarly, treatments targeting dysregulated inflammatory responses to severe injury are under investigation. As point-of-care diagnostics become more suited to emergency environments, timely targeted intervention for haemorrhage control will result in better patient outcomes and reduced demand for blood products. Our Series paper describes how our understanding of the roles of the microcirculation, inflammation, and coagulation has shaped new and emerging treatment strategies.

  2. DANCE in developing and injured lung.

    PubMed

    Jean, Jyh-Chang; Eruchalu, Ifeanyi; Cao, Yu Xia; Joyce-Brady, Martin

    2002-01-01

    We identified rat developing arteries and neural crest derivatives with multiple epidermal growth factor-like domains (DANCE) as a developmentally regulated gene using suppression-subtractive hybridization. Northern analysis confirmed a fivefold induction of this mRNA transcript between fetal day 18 and 20 that persisted through postnatal day 17. The level was declining at postnatal day 21 and was similar in adult lung to that at fetal day 18. In adults DANCE mRNA abundance was highest in lung, kidney, and spleen, lower in heart, skeletal muscle, and brain, but absent from liver and thymus. It was abundant in pulmonary artery endothelium and a lung epithelial type 2 cell line, barely detectable in vascular smooth muscle, and absent in fibroblasts. In situ hybridization revealed a regulated pattern of expression in endothelial cells of fetal, postnatal, and adult lung. Because DANCE mRNA was inducible in systemic arteries during recovery from injury, we searched for induction in lung injured by hyperoxia. Mouse DANCE mRNA abundance was unchanged during an acute 3-day exposure period, induced threefold 5 days into the recovery phase, and returned to baseline at days 8, 11, and 14. In situ hybridization at day 5 suggested a diffuse pattern of induction. DANCE may play a role in lung endothelial cell biology during development repair after injury.

  3. Soldier morphogenesis in a nasute termite: discovery of a disc-like structure forming a soldier nasus.

    PubMed Central

    Miura, T; Matsumoto, T

    2000-01-01

    Nasute termites belonging to the subfamily Nasutitermitinae, have a soldier caste that possesses a frontal projection (nasus) on the head, from which defensive substances are secreted. In the course of caste differentiation of the processional nasute termite Hospitalitermes medioflavus, the most dynamic morphogenesis occurs in the stage of moulting from male minor worker to presoldier (the stage preceding the soldier stage). We examined the presumptive nasus epithelium in minor workers and determined that the nasus develops rapidly just prior to the moulting to presoldiers. The rapid growth is associated with two folding layers of cuticle and epithelium, which we termed the soldier-nasus disc, and resembles the imaginal discs found in holometabolous insects. PMID:10902684

  4. Altered thyroid function in severely injured patients

    PubMed Central

    Grill, Elena; Strong, Michelle; Sonnad, Seema S.; Sarani, Babak; Pascual, Jose; Collins, Heather; Sims, Carrie A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Hemorrhagic shock profoundly affects the neuroendocrine profile of trauma patients, and we hypothesized that massive resuscitation would negatively impact thyroid function. Methods A prospective, observational study investigating thyroid function in hypotensive trauma patients (systolic blood pressure <90 mm Hg × 2) who survived >48 h was conducted at a Level I center over a 6-mo period. Blood samples for thyroid function were collected at time of presentation to the trauma bay and serially for 48 h. Collected data included demographics, injury data, vital signs, transfusion needs, crystalloid use, and vasopressor requirements. Patients receiving >5 units packed red blood cells (PRBC) within 12 h were compared with those receiving ≥ 5 units. Results Patients who required >5 units of PRBC/12 h had significantly lower total and free T4 levels on initial presentation, and levels remained significantly depressed over the next 48 h when compared with patients who required a less aggressive resuscitative effort. T3 values were markedly suppressed during the initial 48 h post trauma in all patients, but were significantly lower in patients requiring >5 units PRBC. TSH levels remained within the normal range for all time points. Lower trauma admission T4 levels were associated with the need for greater crystalloid resuscitation within the first 24 h. Conclusion Measurements of thyroid function are significantly altered in severely injured patients on initial presentation, and low T4 levels predict the need for large resuscitation. Further research investigating the profile and impact of thyroid function in trauma patients during resuscitation and recovery is warranted. PMID:23043865

  5. Missing: Critical and Skeptical Perspectives on Comprehensive Soldier Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quick, James Campbell

    2011-01-01

    The author read with interest, and concern, the January 2011 issue of the "American Psychologist". The "Special Issue on Comprehensive Soldier Fitness" addressed a hugely consequential national issue and offered a vision for psychological resilience along with an elaborate set of supporting articles, concluding with some comments on "Objections"…

  6. The Comprehensive Soldier Fitness Program: Family Skills Component

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottman, John M.; Gottman, Julie S.; Atkins, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Field combat stress clinics and research have identified the signature event that precedes thoughts of suicide and homicide in combat soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan: a distressing personal relationship event with a stateside partner. In response to this alarming information, we have identified critical factors and precipitating incidents as well…

  7. Paul Mills Ireland III Portrait of a Soldier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, John P.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation explores the life and identity of Paul Mills Ireland, III. The qualitative study was conducted using the portraiture approach and was further developed by incorporating the holistic content approach of analysis in narrative research. This fifth generation soldier was the product of a strong military lineage, most of whom were…

  8. Cowards, Comrades, and Killer Angels: The Soldier in Literature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    Gole, Henry O. "Literature and History for Soldiers," MilitalY Review, 68 (May 1988), 2~15. Hemingway , Ernest . Across the River and Into the Trees. New...them. - Hemingway A Farewell to Arms Given similar combat settings, what separates the coward from the brave is neither the presence, nor even the

  9. Marital Status & Risk Behaviors Among U.S. Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    who were not married. These findings are consistent with the extensive civilian research literature documenting the physical and mental health...had a greater likelihood of driving without a seatbelt compared to married soldiers. The findings indicate that marital status is an...married. These findings are consistent with the extensive civilian research literature documenting the physical and mental health advantage of being

  10. An Ex-Soldier Finds a New Mission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Libby

    2012-01-01

    Matthew Reilly's roundabout journey to college took a painful, decisive turn after a nighttime crash in Iraq. In 2008, six months into his first combat tour with the Army, Mr. Reilly and nine soldiers from his platoon were pursuing an insurgent when their armored fighting vehicle slammed into a roadblock. It was 2 o'clock in the morning, and fresh…

  11. TRICKY AND GRAY, TWO HORSES HELD BY UNIDENTIFIED AFRICANAMERICAN SOLDIERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRICKY AND GRAY, TWO HORSES HELD BY UNIDENTIFIED AFRICAN-AMERICAN SOLDIERS, POST IN 1939 (FORT HUACHUCA HISTORICAL MUSEUM, PHOTOGRAPH 1939.00.00.06, PHOTOGRAPHER UNIDENTIFIED, CREATED BY AND PROPERTY OF THE UNITED STATES ARMY) - Fort Huachuca, Cavalry Stables, Clarkson Road, Sierra Vista, Cochise County, AZ

  12. AFRICANAMERICAN CAVALRY SOLDIERS AND THEIR MOUNTS ENTER A CORRAL BETWEEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AFRICAN-AMERICAN CAVALRY SOLDIERS AND THEIR MOUNTS ENTER A CORRAL BETWEEN TWO OF THE 1916 STABLES. PHOTOGRAPH IS LOOKING TO THE WEST AND WAS TAKEN IN 1928 (FORT HUACHUCA HISTORICAL MUSEUM, PHOTOGRAPH 1928.00.00.13, PHOTOGRAPHER UNIDENTIFIED, CREATED BY AND PROPERTY OF THE UNITED STATES ARMY) - Fort Huachuca, Cavalry Stables, Clarkson Road, Sierra Vista, Cochise County, AZ

  13. Child Soldiers and Iconography: Portrayals and (Mis)Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denov, Myriam

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, child soldiers have inundated the popular media. Images of boys armed with AK47s appear ubiquitous, providing a cautionary tale of innocent childhood gone awry. While these representations turn commonly held assumptions of a protected and innocuous childhood on its head, what they conceal is as provocative as what they…

  14. Ideological Eclecticism and Coherence among Black Soldiers: A Research Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weigert, Kathleen Maas

    1980-01-01

    Data from a sample of Black soldiers are utilized to examine extent to which "eclecticism" (low interrelatedness between goal and means) rather than "coherence" (high interrelatedness between goal and means) characterizes the ideological profiles of members of this minority group. (GC)

  15. Comprehensive Soldier Fitness: Building Resilience in a Challenging Institutional Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornum, Rhonda; Matthews, Michael D.; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2011-01-01

    The Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) program is designed to increase psychological strength and positive performance and to reduce the incidence of maladaptive responses of the entire U.S. Army. Based on the principles of positive psychology, CSF is a historically unique approach to behavioral health in a large (1.1 million members)…

  16. PEO Soldier Simulation Road Map V - The MATREX Federation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    Integrated Casualty Estimation Model ( ICEM ). This includes conceptual modeling, KA/KE, model implementation, integration, and test Command and Control...prevent real-time linkage ^ith ICEM Rulesof Engagement IWARS Develop representations and soldier behaviorsthat capture the effects of IFF systems

  17. Learning about the Civil War through Soldiers' Letters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    This article describes how students in an American history class learned about the Civil War through soldiers' letters. Letters from the Civil War era come in a variety of styles and syntax. Some are easy to read while others are extremely difficult to transcribe. But every one of them speaks to the reader, revealing an unknown entity from another…

  18. Lives beyond Suffering: The Child Soldiers of African Wars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasgow, Jacqueline N.; Baer, Allison L.

    2011-01-01

    Sierra Leone is only one of the more than 50 armed conflicts currently going on around the world. It is estimated that 20 million children were either refugees or displaced internally, and some 300,000 children under the age of 18 were used in hostilities at any given time as government or rebel soldiers, with about one-third reportedly fighting…

  19. Child Soldiers, Peace Education, and Postconflict Reconstruction for Peace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessells, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Worldwide, children are drawn into lives as soldiers and terrorism as the result of forced recruitment and also by extremist ideologies and their inability to obtain security, food, power, prestige, education, and positive life options through civilian means. Using an example from Sierra Leone, this article shows that peace education is an…

  20. Active Army and Army Reserve Soldiers: A Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corkan, JoJo T.; And Others

    A study determined whether chemical operations specialists at skill level 1 differ in terms of aptitude, job knowledge, job confidence, and perceptions of task difficulty, task importance, task frequency, and task training, depending on whether the specialists are active U.S. Army soldiers or are in the Army Reserve. The subjects for whom complete…

  1. Soldier-worn augmented reality system for tactical icon visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, David; Menozzi, Alberico; Clipp, Brian; Russler, Patrick; Cook, James; Karl, Robert; Wenger, Eric; Church, William; Mauger, Jennifer; Volpe, Chris; Argenta, Chris; Wille, Mark; Snarski, Stephen; Sherrill, Todd; Lupo, Jasper; Hobson, Ross; Frahm, Jan-Michael; Heinly, Jared

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes the development and demonstration of a soldier-worn augmented reality system testbed that provides intuitive 'heads-up' visualization of tactically-relevant geo-registered icons. Our system combines a robust soldier pose estimation capability with a helmet mounted see-through display to accurately overlay geo-registered iconography (i.e., navigation waypoints, blue forces, aircraft) on the soldier's view of reality. Applied Research Associates (ARA), in partnership with BAE Systems and the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill (UNC-CH), has developed this testbed system in Phase 2 of the DARPA ULTRA-Vis (Urban Leader Tactical, Response, Awareness, and Visualization) program. The ULTRA-Vis testbed system functions in unprepared outdoor environments and is robust to numerous magnetic disturbances. We achieve accurate and robust pose estimation through fusion of inertial, magnetic, GPS, and computer vision data acquired from helmet kit sensors. Icons are rendered on a high-brightness, 40°×30° field of view see-through display. The system incorporates an information management engine to convert CoT (Cursor-on-Target) external data feeds into mil-standard icons for visualization. The user interface provides intuitive information display to support soldier navigation and situational awareness of mission-critical tactical information.

  2. Telemedicine in US Army soldiers with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y Sammy; Cucura, Jon; Jain, Ram; Berry-Caban, Cristobal

    2015-10-01

    A retrospective study of a telemedicine clinic for active duty US Army soldiers with type 1 diabetes was conducted. Fifty-one consecutive patients (mean age 33.9 years) were enrolled into the clinic. All soldiers with known or newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes received three weekly office visits for intensive diabetes education. After this, all communication occurred via a messaging system consisting of texting, web-based download, and/or email to a diabetes management team. For urgent matters, 24/7 direct paging or telephone access was provided. Routine adjustments in insulin dosing were accomplished via email. Soldiers were followed for a mean of 17.1 months. Baseline, three-month, and end of study glycated hemoglobin (A1C) values were 9.8, 7.3, and 6.9, respectively. There were no significant differences in end of study A1C levels between patients with known vs. newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes, nor were there any differences between those patients who received insulin via pump therapy vs. multiple daily injections. Telemedicine was safe and effective in lowering A1C levels in US Army soldiers with type 1 diabetes.

  3. Morbidity of Early Spine Surgery in the Multiply Injured Patient

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-31

    Rivera JD, Gre- nier ES, Lehman RA, et al. (2012) Spinal column injuries among Americans in the global war on terrorism. J Bone Joint Surg Am 94:e135...surgery for multiply injured patients with operative spinal injuries remains unknown. The purported benefits of early intervention must be weighed...morbidity of early surgery on military casualties. The objective is to compare surgical morbidity of early spinal surgery in multiply injured patients

  4. Health significance and occurrence of injured bacteria in drinking water.

    PubMed

    McFeters, G A; LeChevallier, M W; Singh, A; Kippin, J S

    1986-01-01

    Enteropathogenic and indicator bacteria become injured in drinking water with exposure to sublethal levels of various biological, chemical and physical factors. One manifestation of this injury is the inability to grow and form colonies on selective media containing surfactants. The resulting underestimation of indicator bacteria can lead to a false estimation of water potability. m-T7 medium was developed specifically for the recovery of injured coliforms (both "total" and fecal) in drinking water. The m-T7 method was used to survey operating drinking water treatment and distribution systems for the presence of injured coliforms that were undetected with currently used media. The mean recovery with m-Endo LES medium was less than 1/100 ml while it ranged between 6 and 68/100ml with m-T7 agar. The majority of samples giving positive results with m-T7 medium yielded no detectable coliforms with m-Endo LES agar. Over 95% of the coliform bacteria in these samples were injured. Laboratory experiments were also done to ascribe the virulence of injured waterborne pathogens. Enteropathogens including Salmonella typhimurium, Yersinia enterocolitica and Shigella spp. required up to 20 times the chlorine levels to produce the same injury in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and nonpathogenic coliforms. Similar results were seen with Y. enterocolitica exposed to copper. The recovery of ETEC was followed by delayed enterotoxin production, both in vitro and in the gut of experimental animals. This indicates that injured waterborne enteropathogenic bacteria can be virulent.

  5. Health significance and occurrence of injured bacteria in drinking water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFeters, G. A.; LeChevallier, M. W.; Singh, A.; Kippin, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    Enteropathogenic and indicator bacteria become injured in drinking water with exposure to sublethal levels of various biological, chemical and physical factors. One manifestation of this injury is the inability to grow and form colonies on selective media containing surfactants. The resulting underestimation of indicator bacteria can lead to a false estimation of water potability. m-T7 medium was developed specifically for the recovery of injured coliforms (both "total" and fecal) in drinking water. The m-T7 method was used to survey operating drinking water treatment and distribution systems for the presence of injured coliforms that were undetected with currently used media. The mean recovery with m-Endo LES medium was less than 1/100 ml while it ranged between 6 and 68/100ml with m-T7 agar. The majority of samples giving positive results with m-T7 medium yielded no detectable coliforms with m-Endo LES agar. Over 95% of the coliform bacteria in these samples were injured. Laboratory experiments were also done to ascribe the virulence of injured waterborne pathogens. Enteropathogens including Salmonella typhimurium, Yersinia enterocolitica and Shigella spp. required up to 20 times the chlorine levels to produce the same injury in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and nonpathogenic coliforms. Similar results were seen with Y. enterocolitica exposed to copper. The recovery of ETEC was followed by delayed enterotoxin production, both in vitro and in the gut of experimental animals. This indicates that injured waterborne enteropathogenic bacteria can be virulent.

  6. Assessment of the Present and Future Offshore Wind Power Potential: A Case Study in a Target Territory of the Baltic Sea Near the Latvian Coast

    PubMed Central

    Teilans, Artis

    2013-01-01

    Offshore wind energy development promises to be a significant domestic renewable energy source in Latvia. The reliable prediction of present and future wind resources at offshore sites is crucial for planning and selecting the location for wind farms. The overall goal of this paper is the assessment of offshore wind power potential in a target territory of the Baltic Sea near the Latvian coast as well as the identification of a trend in the future wind energy potential for the study territory. The regional climate model CLM and High Resolution Limited Area Model (Hirlam) simulations were used to obtain the wind climatology data for the study area. The results indicated that offshore wind energy is promising for expanding the national electricity generation and will continue to be a stable resource for electricity generation in the region over the 21st century. PMID:23983619

  7. Sustainable Use Of Macro-Algae For Biogas Production In Latvian Conditions: A Preliminary Study Through An Integrated Mca And Lca Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastare, Laura; Romagnoli, Francesco; Lauka, Dace; Dzene, Ilze; Kuznecova, Tatjana

    2014-12-01

    The study focuses on sustainability evaluation of an algae-based energy system in Latvia with a holistic and integrated approach of multi-criteria analysis combined with life cycle assessment (including a practical side - biogas yield experiments of locally available algae). The study shows potential for sustainable use of algae in Latvian conditions and thus that algal biomass can be utilized for the production of biogas. The most sustainable and feasible scenario of using algae for biogas energy production foresees the collection of algae biomass from natural water bodies. Important beneficial effects through the use of algae are related to avoiding global warming potential (GWP) and eutrophication impacts. Biogas batch experiments carried out with the local macrophyte C.demersum have shown a methane yield of 554 l CH4/kg VS.

  8. Assessment of the present and future offshore wind power potential: a case study in a target territory of the Baltic Sea near the Latvian coast.

    PubMed

    Lizuma, Lita; Avotniece, Zanita; Rupainis, Sergejs; Teilans, Artis

    2013-01-01

    Offshore wind energy development promises to be a significant domestic renewable energy source in Latvia. The reliable prediction of present and future wind resources at offshore sites is crucial for planning and selecting the location for wind farms. The overall goal of this paper is the assessment of offshore wind power potential in a target territory of the Baltic Sea near the Latvian coast as well as the identification of a trend in the future wind energy potential for the study territory. The regional climate model CLM and High Resolution Limited Area Model (Hirlam) simulations were used to obtain the wind climatology data for the study area. The results indicated that offshore wind energy is promising for expanding the national electricity generation and will continue to be a stable resource for electricity generation in the region over the 21st century.

  9. Helping American Soldiers in Time of War: Reply to Comments on the Comprehensive Soldier Fitness Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2011-01-01

    Seligman responds to the comments made about the January 2011 "American Psychologist" "Special Issue on Comprehensive Soldier Fitness" (CSF). Seligman proposed an entire issue of on the topic of CSF to encourage psychologists to come to the aid of our government, and he urges psychologists not to be discouraged by this tactic.…

  10. Third International Congress on Soldiers' Physical Performance: Translating State-of-the-Science Soldier Research for Operational Utility.

    PubMed

    Nindl, Bradley C; Sharp, Marilyn A

    2015-11-01

    The Third International Congress on Soldiers' Physical Performance (ICSPP) was held on August 18-21, 2014 in Boston, MA, where it had a record attendance of 374 registrants from 27 countries. The Congress included 8 invited keynote lectures, 12 symposia, 1 featured science session, more than 200 oral and poster free communication sessions, 8 thematic poster sessions, and a Warfighter Readiness Roundtable. Collectively, the presentations focused on a fundamental premise that soldiers are the center of warfighting capability, and the human service member is the prime resource and key enabler of all warfighting systems. The intent of the ICSPP series is to focus on the soldier-the individual service member. As we move forward with focus placed on the human dimension of soldiering, the key to our scientific success and what will prove to be transformative will be the extent to which we can operationalize and disseminate our scientific knowledge for the benefit of our soldiers on the ground. The Congress fostered important scientific exchange, and dialog centered on improving military physical performance and readiness. As countries around the globe respond to current and emerging threats to their national security, it is increasingly clear that we must ensure optimal human performance of our military personnel. By taking advantage of the science and applications of physical fitness and injury prevention research, we can leverage our increased understanding for the optimal application of physical readiness processes while minimizing the injury risk potential. We believe that the continued scientific and evidence-based dialog across international partners will prove to be transformative in identifying the most effective strategies for human performance optimization in the 21st century. Innovation, leveraging current state-of-the-science, and international partnerships were all key themes throughout the Congress. From the ICSPP scientific program, it was clear that there

  11. Evaluation of the ability of primary selective enrichment to resuscitate heat-injured and freeze-injured Listeria monocytogenes cells.

    PubMed Central

    Budu-Amoako, E; Toora, S; Ablett, R F; Smith, J

    1992-01-01

    Resuscitation rates of injured Listeria monocytogenes on conventional selective Listeria enrichment broth and nonselective Trypticase soy broth containing 0.6% yeast extract were compared. Cells were heated to 60 degrees C for 5 min or frozen at -20 degrees C for 7 days. Inoculation of Trypticase soy broth-yeast extract with the stressed cells resulted in growth that was superior to that in Listeria enrichment broth. Injured cells were fully recovered at 6 to 8 h. PMID:1444432

  12. Fungistatic Activity of Freshly Killed Termite, Nasutitermes acajutlae, Soldiers in the Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Claire A.

    2007-01-01

    Termites may have high exposure to both pathogenic and competitive fungal species. Previous studies have shown anti-fungal properties of the primary components (α-pinene and limonene) of Nasutitermes frontal glands that are present on soldiers. In this study, the termite Nasutitermes acajutlae (Isoptera: Termitidae) was used to examine if the growth of naturally occurring fungi was inhibited by soldiers, as compared to workers that do not have frontal glands. Soldiers and workers were killed, surface sterilized, and placed on nutrient agar either singly or in combinations with other termites. Time until appearance of fungus and growth of visible fungal colonies was determined. Fungus appeared significantly earlier in cultures with single workers than with single soldiers (P < 0.001). Once fungus appeared, there were no significant differences in growth rate. When worker and/or soldier fluids were combined in one culture, fungal growth appeared later in cultures containing soldiers; growth was significantly slower in colonies with 5 workers and 5 soldiers than in cultures with 5 workers alone; P < 0.001. Finally, growth appeared later in cultures with 5 soldiers than in cultures with one soldier, suggesting a dose-response. Fungi that grew from termites were mostly non-pathogenic, suggesting the anti-fungal properties of soldiers may inhibit both pathogens and competitors. PMID:20307241

  13. Fungistatic activity of freshly killed termite, Nasutitermes acajutlae, soldiers in the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Claire A

    2007-01-01

    Termites may have high exposure to both pathogenic and competitive fungal species. Previous studies have shown anti-fungal properties of the primary components (alpha-pinene and limonene) of Nasutitermes frontal glands that are present on soldiers. In this study, the termite Nasutitermes acajutlae (Isoptera: Termitidae) was used to examine if the growth of naturally occurring fungi was inhibited by soldiers, as compared to workers that do not have frontal glands. Soldiers and workers were killed, surface sterilized, and placed on nutrient agar either singly or in combinations with other termites. Time until appearance of fungus and growth of visible fungal colonies was determined. Fungus appeared significantly earlier in cultures with single workers than with single soldiers (P < 0.001). Once fungus appeared, there were no significant differences in growth rate. When worker and/or soldier fluids were combined in one culture, fungal growth appeared later in cultures containing soldiers; growth was significantly slower in colonies with 5 workers and 5 soldiers than in cultures with 5 workers alone; P < 0.001. Finally, growth appeared later in cultures with 5 soldiers than in cultures with one soldier, suggesting a dose-response. Fungi that grew from termites were mostly non-pathogenic, suggesting the anti-fungal properties of soldiers may inhibit both pathogens and competitors.

  14. Psychiatric symptoms of Turkish combat-injured non-professional veterans

    PubMed Central

    Güloğlu, Berna

    2016-01-01

    Background It is well-known that exposure to combat puts individuals at risk for developing adverse psychological problems, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety, and health-related behaviour problems and that the presence of combat-related injury increases the risk for psychopathology. Little is known, however, about the consequences of combat among conscripted soldiers fighting against terrorism in their homeland. Objective The main aim of the current study was to examine the prevalence of probable PTSD, severity of PTSD symptoms, depression, anxiety, and PTSD-related functional impairment among Turkish combat-injured, non-professional veterans. In addition, investigated were also the possible differences among the symptoms of PTSD, depression, and anxiety of the veterans by the frequency of current cigarette and alcohol use. Methods A total of 366 male veterans were assessed by using a demographic information form, which obtained information about injury status and health behaviours, the Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale (PDS), and the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI). Symptom frequency and multivariate analysis of variances (MANOVA) were used to analyse the data. Results The prevalence of probable PTSD was 46.7% (171) among Turkish veterans while 16.4% experienced severe depression and 18% experienced severe anxiety. “Upset at reminders (65.8%)” was the most common PTSD symptom. “Responsibilities related to home (48.4%)” was the most frequently reported PTSD-related functional impairment. Results indicated that veterans who smoke more than half a pack per day scored significantly higher in severity of PTSD symptoms, depression, and anxiety. Contrary to expectations, there was no significant difference in symptoms of PTSD, depression, and anxiety related to the frequency of current alcohol use. Conclusion Turkish non-professional veterans with physical injuries have serious psychiatric problems an average of 13 years after

  15. Types of injuries among Polish soldiers and civilian staff in the 7th, 8th, 9th and 10th rotation of the Afghan stabilization mission

    PubMed Central

    Ziemba, Radosław

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The Afghan military theatre is specifically marked by guerilla operations and massive use of IEDs (improvised explosive devices) that pose new types of threats for their victims. At the same time, the relevant literature contains only a single, fragmentary analysis on injuries suffered by soldiers serving in the Afghan mission. Material/Methods This is a review of medical reports of the Polish Military Contingent deployed within Operation Enduring Freedom, from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2011; the analysis includes all cases of combat and non-combat injuries in terms of their causes. Results In the period under analysis, 380 Polish soldiers were reported injured; 87.1% of cases were combat and 12.9% non-combat injuries. The structure of injuries caused as a result of IED explosions was dominated by multiple limb injuries, associated most frequently with severe body cavities/spine injuries. In the case of other incidents, both combat and non-combat, the predominant consequences were single and, most commonly, less severe injuries. The average number of injuries suffered from IED attacks (3.37) was significantly higher than the number of injuries from other attacks (1.16), and higher than the number of non-combat injuries (1.43). Conclusions IED attacks pose a serious medical problem, considering their high number and the severity of injuries they cause. PMID:22367143

  16. Missing: critical and skeptical perspectives on comprehensive soldier fitness.

    PubMed

    Quick, James Campbell

    2011-10-01

    The author read with interest, and concern, the January 2011 issue of the American Psychologist. The Special Issue on Comprehensive Soldier Fitness addressed a hugely consequential national issue and offered a vision for psychological resilience along with an elaborate set of supporting articles, concluding with some comments on "Objections" to psychologists working with the military. While a bold vision was offered and a game plan presented, no data or evidence are yet available (it is far too early in the process), and that should concern us all. The author hopes the American Psychological Association (APA) and the American Psychologist offer skeptical and critical views in future issues on the issue of the psychological health of our military and as evidence emerges regarding the Comprehensive Soldier Fitness program.

  17. Nanocontamination of the Soldiers in a Battle Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, A. M.; Montanari, S.

    The paper deals with the unusual pathologies some soldiers contracted after exposure in battle theatres in Iraq and in the Balkans, and considers the hypotheses the Authors developed to explain the origin of those diseases, that proved to be lethal in a few cases. The scenario of particulate nanopollution generated by high-temperature combustions characteristic of some weapons is described. The electron-microscopy observations carried out in 37 soldiers' pathological tissues verified the internal dissemination of toxic metallic micro and nano-particles. The article considers the way of entrance of those nanopollutants: the lung for inhalation and the digestive system for the ingestion of polluted food. Battle theatre pollution is also discussed.

  18. The German-Jewish soldier: from participant to victim.

    PubMed

    Penslar, Derek

    2011-01-01

    The story of German-Jewish soldiers and veterans of World War I illustrates how, under circumstances of inclusion (even if incomplete) rather than vicious persecution, Jewish suffering in wartime, and with it the forms of collective memory and strategies for commemoration of the dead, could closely parallel, even intersect with, the suffering of Germans as a whole. To be sure, the points of intersection were accompanied by points of deflection. Even when Jews served, fought, suffered and died as German soldiers, their interpretations of the war experience, and their communities’ postwar memory and commemorative practices, differed from those of other Germans. In many ways, however, German-Jewish veterans suffered the aftermath of the war as did other Germans; they shared the prevailing fury over war guilt and reparations, and they retained a strong pride in their military service, a pride through which they interpreted the events of 1933–1945.

  19. Virtual reality exposure therapy for active duty soldiers.

    PubMed

    Reger, Greg M; Gahm, Gregory A

    2008-08-01

    Virtual reality exposure (VRE) therapy is a promising treatment for a variety of anxiety disorders and has recently been extended to the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this article, the authors briefly review the rationale for VRE and its key processes. They illustrate the treatment with an active-duty Army soldier diagnosed with combat-related PTSD. Six sessions of VRE were provided using an immersive simulation of a military convoy in Iraq. Self-reported PTSD symptoms and psychological distress were reduced at posttreatment relative to pretreatment reports, as assessed by the PTSD Checklist-Military Version and the Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale-24. The case outcomes parallel those reported in the research with other disorders and suggest the applicability of VRE in treating active duty soldiers with combat-related PTSD.

  20. Road March Performance of Special Operations Soldiers Carrying Various Loads and Load Distributions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    34 foam around Its entire circumference . Buckles and adjustment straps were located on both sides of the belt, During the study, the load was distributed in ...or pain In the neck, waist and hips following road marches with the double-pack, The comments made by the subjects Indicate that soldiers ascribed...double-pack. In the after action review soldiers generally preferred the ALICE pack over the double-pack. Soldiers commented that the ALICE pack was

  1. Identification of Soldier Behaviors Associated with Search and Target Acquisition (STA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    3 UNCLASSIFIED different gaps. Each of these FACTs focused on several critical research areas ( CRAs ). The Fiscal Year (FY) 08 Soldier FACT Call...for Proposals identified the following CRA : Soldier Search and Target Acquisition (STA): Determine validity of current Soldier STA processes for...place him in a position where he can engage any threats (i.e., can see where to aim and shoot ). The order of behaviors for “audio cues” and

  2. Investigating the Usefulness of Soldier Aids for Autonomous Unmanned Ground Vehicles, Part 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    Investigating the Usefulness of Soldier Aids for Autonomous Unmanned Ground Vehicles, Part 2 by A William Evans III, Susan G Hill, Brian Wood...Ground, MD 21005-5425 ARL-TR-7240 March 2015 Investigating the Usefulness of Soldier Aids for Autonomous Unmanned Ground Vehicles, Part...AND SUBTITLE Investigating the Usefulness of Soldier Aids for Autonomous Unmanned Ground Vehicles, Part 2 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  3. GENDER ISSUES: Medical Support for Female Soldiers Deployed to Bosnia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-03-01

    as yeast infections and urinary tract infections . They could also test for pregnancy and dispense birth control. The clinics, however, were not...settings, including advice about avoiding urinary tract infections and yeast infections; (3) female-specific health care services available in- theater...Soldiers Deployed to Bosnia had provided information on preventing urinary tract infections and vaginal infections (see fig 1.2). Figure 1.2: Which

  4. Full Spectrum Training and Development: Soldier Skills and Attributes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    ACKNOWLEDGMENT We thank the Soldiers at Fort Knox who provided valuable feedback in developing the Instructor’s Peer -to- Peer Learning Guide for the...social interaction on learning . Teachers or knowledgeable peers guide the student with questions and structured activities. This social interaction...the cadre sharpen their instructional practices 1 2 3 4 5 d. The guide can help improve the student learning process 1 2 3 4 5 e. The guide can

  5. Cognitive Rehabilitation: ACTION Training for Soldiers with Executive Dysfunction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0198 TITLE: Cognitive Rehabilitation: ACTION Training for Soldiers with Executive Dysfunction PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE October 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Cognitive ...For this proof of concept study, we have developed a cognitive intervention called ACTION (AutomatiC iniTiation of IntentiONs) sequence training in

  6. Cold Regions - Environmental Testing of Individual Soldier Clothing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-17

    This Test Operations Procedure (TOP) provides testing guidelines for individual Soldier cold weather clothing and footwear in a cold regions...Cold weather clothing test Cold weather footwear test Environmental clothing test Environmental footwear test 16...1983; TOP 10-3-512 Cold Regions Environmental Test of Boot and Similar Footwear , dated 9 May 1980; and TOP 10-4-005 Arctic Environmental Test of

  7. After Action Review Tools for Dismounted Soldier Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    trainer to elicit feedback from unit personnel concerning what transpired during an event with a focus on determining how future events could benefit...team building. It is the involvement of participants , the discussions and exchanges during the course of the AAR that permit Soldiers and leaders to ...up replay of events and allow the participants to view the action from varied views and perspectives. * Still images that can be viewed from the varied

  8. Soldier Performance and Mood States Following a Strenuous Road March

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    min after the march). Soldiers jumped as high as possible and marked a board at the highest point of the jump . The highest of 3 trials was recorded...improve shooting accuracy (15, 16). The grenade throw and vertical jump tests were used to evaluate explosive strength or power (6, 17). Under the...appear to affect leg power. Patton et al. (18) found no decline in peak or mean power on the Wingate test when subjects performed a loaded road march task

  9. Civilian Spouses of Female Soldiers: A Forgotten Breed?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-30

    the children during his absence. This too could have an impact on readiness and retention. In the child care arena, there remain societal expectations...this belief. If they are more traditional in their orientation, they expect the mother to take off from work when a child becomes ill. They do not...be absent because of family considerations. This could become especially acute if his soldier-wife is deployed and cannot share equally in child care

  10. Five Things You Should Know About Soldier - Robot Teaming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    experts at Ft. Knox indicated severe multitasking requirements for mounted Soldiers even without a robotic role (Mitchell & Henthorn , 2006). Chen and her...Display Type M ea n W or kl oa d R at in g Figure 3: Mean workload rating as a function of display type Haas, Stachowiak, White, Pillalamarri...REFERENCES Barnes, M ., R. Parasuraman, and K. Cosenzo. (2006). Adaptive automation for military robotic systems. In NATO Technical Report, Uninhabited

  11. FOCU:S--future operator control unit: soldier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Barry J.; Karan, Cem; Young, Stuart H.

    2009-05-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory's (ARL) Computational and Information Sciences Directorate (CISD) has long been involved in autonomous asset control, specifically as it relates to small robots. Over the past year, CISD has been making strides in the implementation of three areas of small robot autonomy, namely platform autonomy, Soldier-robot interface, and tactical behaviors. It is CISD's belief that these three areas must be considered as a whole in order to provide Soldiers with useful capabilities. In addressing the Soldier-robot interface aspect, CISD has begun development on a unique dismounted controller called the Future Operator Control Unit: Soldier (FOCU:S) that is based on an Apple iPod Touch. The iPod Touch's small form factor, unique touch-screen input device, and the presence of general purpose computing applications such as a web browser combine to give this device the potential to be a disruptive technology. Setting CISD's implementation apart from other similar iPod or iPhone-based devices is the ARL software that allows multiple robotic platforms to be controlled from a single OCU. The FOCU:S uses the same Agile Computing Infrastructure (ACI) that all other assets in the ARL robotic control system use, enabling automated asset discovery on any type of network. Further, a custom ad hoc routing implementation allows the FOCU:S to communicate with the ARL ad hoc communications system and enables it to extend the range of the network. This paper will briefly describe the current robotic control architecture employed by ARL and provide short descriptions of existing capabilities. Further, the paper will discuss FOCU:S specific software developed for the iPod Touch, including unique capabilities enabled by the device's unique hardware.

  12. PEO Soldier Simulation Roadmap: Initial Steps in Implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    Data Manger (EDM), AW Block 2 Helicopter Oxygen System (HOS) Laser Eye Protection (AW-LEP) Retinal Scanning Display (AW-RSD) SRU-37/P One Man Life Raft...AN/PVS-10 & Long Range SNS) Soldier Night Vision Devices (AN/PVS-7 NVG & AN/PVS-14 MNVD) STORM Micro-Laser Ranger Finder (MLRF) Target Acquisition...choice of weapon, engagement choice of optic, choice decisions of posture Engagement decision, actual target location, range, weather and terrain

  13. Training Analyses Supporting the Land Warrior and Ground Soldier Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    reactions reflected these weaknesses in that Soldier usage and proficiency ratings of many LW tasks and skills were low. Training on LW system...company in a single classroom), the trainers were unable to adapt to the diversity in learning rates and military experience in the target population...impacts within the target population. Training in NET was not sufficient to instill confidence in leaders. Leaders’ ratings of their confidence in the

  14. Satisfaction with Military Dental Care by Active Duty Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    problem and may contribute to reducing the morale similar score in Table II would indicate a satisfaction level be- of soldiers as well . As Marine Corps...ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) In fall 1992, a random, worldwide sample of 5,474 enlisted personnel and 4,036 officers was surveyed on satisfaction with twenty...composite overall satisfaction score using factor analysis. Composite scores were regressed on demographics, dental utilization, and access .barriers

  15. Loads Carried by Soldiers: Historical, Physiological, Biomechanical and Medical Aspects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    most affected. " Winged scapula " was common in many cases. Symptoms were probably due to compression of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus. In...Environmental .,;edicine Protocol No. PH-l-88, Natick, MA, 1988. 49. Hauser, CU and Martin WF. Two additional cases of traumatic winged scapula occurring in...Holder, HG. Winged scapula : case occwrring in soldiers from knapsacks. JAMA 120:448-449, 1942. 55. Jones, BH et al. Exercise induced stress fractures

  16. The Effect of Physical Load and Environment on Soldier Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    that scores on perceptual tasks were higher after mild physical activity than during periods of no exercise and sleep deprivation . Gliner et al...Akerstedt, T.; Charles, A.; Bioulac, B. Fatigue, Sleepiness, and Performance in Simulated Versus Real Driving Conditions. Sleep 2005, 28 (12), 1511–1516...The Effect of Physical Load and Environment on Soldier Performance by Ellen C. Haas, Harrison Philip Crowell, and Kathy L. Kehring ARL-TR

  17. Biologically Fit: Using Biotechnology to Create a Better Soldier

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    2013, http://www.nap.edu/catalog/10142.html, 1–4, 6. 5 D. Robert Worley, Orchestrating the Instruments of Power: A Critical Examination of the U.S...General Robert H. Scales. In his article, Scales draws his reader’s imagination into combat as member of a tactical squad. As a soldier within this team...enhancement poses. Ethicist Robert Veatch states that the theory of bioethics is a: …comprehensive, systematic account of a general approach to

  18. Affirming the Soldier’s Spirit Through Intentional Dialogue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Shay’s observation through the application of contemplative prayer. Such prayer “is a time of quietness with the anticipation of one’s relationship with...0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing...psychological traumas. At the present time the Army lacks an intentional spiritual intervention or spirit- centric assessment for Soldiers. An optimal

  19. Development of Accomodation Models for Soldiers in Vehicles: Driver

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Ebert 2013). Posture and position data were recorded for male and female enlisted personnel at three Army posts as they sat in a driver mockup ...Figure 1). Figure 1. Driver and squad mockups . The current study used data from 145 men and women tested in the driver mockup . Table 1 lists...UNCLASSIFIED 10 Figure 2 shows the garb levels used for measurements in the mockup . At the Advanced Combat Uniform (ACU) level, Soldiers wore their own

  20. Development of Accommodation Models for Soldiers in Vehicles: Squad

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    male and female enlisted personnel at three Army posts as they sat in a squad mockup (Figure 1). Figure 1. Squad mockup . The current study...used data from 144 men and women tested in the squad mockup . Table 1 lists summary statistics for standard anthropometric variables for the combined...unlimited 10 Figure 2 shows the ensemble levels used for measurements in the mockup . At the Advanced Combat Uniform (ACU) level, Soldiers wore

  1. Limitations imposed by wearing armour on Medieval soldiers' locomotor performance.

    PubMed

    Askew, Graham N; Formenti, Federico; Minetti, Alberto E

    2012-02-22

    In Medieval Europe, soldiers wore steel plate armour for protection during warfare. Armour design reflected a trade-off between protection and mobility it offered the wearer. By the fifteenth century, a typical suit of field armour weighed between 30 and 50 kg and was distributed over the entire body. How much wearing armour affected Medieval soldiers' locomotor energetics and biomechanics is unknown. We investigated the mechanics and the energetic cost of locomotion in armour, and determined the effects on physical performance. We found that the net cost of locomotion (C(met)) during armoured walking and running is much more energetically expensive than unloaded locomotion. C(met) for locomotion in armour was 2.1-2.3 times higher for walking, and 1.9 times higher for running when compared with C(met) for unloaded locomotion at the same speed. An important component of the increased energy use results from the extra force that must be generated to support the additional mass. However, the energetic cost of locomotion in armour was also much higher than equivalent trunk loading. This additional cost is mostly explained by the increased energy required to swing the limbs and impaired breathing. Our findings can predict age-associated decline in Medieval soldiers' physical performance, and have potential implications in understanding the outcomes of past European military battles.

  2. On the skin of a soldier: The story of flogging.

    PubMed

    Garrisi, Diana

    2015-01-01

    After Farrier-Major Critton struck the 150th lash on the back of Private Frederick John White, at the end of a common disciplinary session at Hounslow Barracks, West London, in 1846, the soldier, whistling, walked himself to the infirmary to have his wounds dressed. His skin healed promptly, but 4 weeks later, he was found dead in his dormitory. The army medical officers, after performing an autopsy, reached the conclusion that the soldier had died from inflammation of internal organs but excluded any connection with flogging. This version of facts did not convince the coroner for Middlesex, who decided to open an inquest. After 3 more weeks of inquiry and 2 more postmortem examinations, the famous dermatologist Erasmus Wilson contradicted the army officers by affirming that the soldier had indeed died from the effects of flogging as the analysis of the cutaneous lesions and underneath would demonstrate. This contribution will detail how the inquest into the death of Private John White sparked a medical debate on the effects of military flogging to the skin. The discussion raised by the publication of the details of the autopsies demonstrated that different and opposing points of view coexisted in the Victorian period concerning the relation between external lacerations and internal organs in cases of flogging.

  3. Development of seating accommodation models for soldiers in vehicles.

    PubMed

    Zerehsaz, Yaser; Jin, Jionghua Judy; Ebert, Sheila M; Reed, Matthew P

    2017-04-01

    Data from a previous study of soldier driving postures and seating positions were analysed to develop statistical models for defining accommodation of driver seating positions in military vehicles. Regression models were created for seating accommodation applicable to driver positions with a fixed heel point and a range of steering wheel locations in typical tactical vehicles. The models predict the driver-selected seat position as a function of population anthropometry and vehicle layout. These models are the first driver accommodation models considering the effects of body armor and body-borne gear. The obtained results can benefit the design of military vehicles, and the methods can also be extended to be utilised in the development of seating accommodation models for other driving environments where protective equipment affects driver seating posture, such as vehicles used by law-enforcement officers and firefighters. Practitioner Summary: A large-scale laboratory study of soldier driving posture and seating position was designed to focus on tactical vehicle (truck) designs. Regression techniques are utilised to develop accommodation models suitable for tactical vehicles. These are the first seating accommodation models based on soldier data to consider the effects of personal protective equipment and body-borne gear.

  4. The Felin soldier system: a tailored solution for networked operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Sueur, Philippe

    2007-04-01

    Sagem Defense Securite has been awarded a 800M euro contract for the French infantrymen modernisation programme. This programme covers the development, the qualification and the production of about 32 000 soldier systems to equip all the French infantry starting fielding in 2008. The FELIN soldier system provides the infantryman with an integrated system increasing dramatically the soldier capability in any dismounted close combat domains. Man remains at the centre of the system, which can interface equipments or systems already fielded and future equipments to match any customer's needs. Urban operations are carefully addressed thanks to a versatile and modular solution and a dedicated C4I system, Sagem Defense Securite is a European leader in defence electronics and takes part of this major French Army transformation programme, which will play a key role in the Info Centric Network initiatives promoted in France and other countries. This paper summarises the system solutions selected by the French Army with a focus on the networked capabilities and the optronic devices.

  5. Electrical stimulation promotes regeneration of injured oculomotor nerves in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lei; Yang, Min; Wan, Liang; Wang, Xu-hui; Li, Shi-ting

    2016-01-01

    Functional recovery after oculomotor nerve injury is very poor. Electrical stimulation has been shown to promote regeneration of injured nerves. We hypothesized that electrical stimulation would improve the functional recovery of injured oculomotor nerves. Oculomotor nerve injury models were created by crushing the right oculomotor nerves of adult dogs. Stimulating electrodes were positioned in both proximal and distal locations of the lesion, and non-continuous rectangular, biphasic current pulses (0.7 V, 5 Hz) were administered 1 hour daily for 2 consecutive weeks. Analysis of the results showed that electrophysiological and morphological recovery of the injured oculomotor nerve was enhanced, indicating that electrical stimulation improved neural regeneration. Thus, this therapy has the potential to promote the recovery of oculomotor nerve dysfunction. PMID:27904500

  6. Supplemental genistein, quercetin, and resveratrol intake in active duty army soldiers.

    PubMed

    Sepowitz, John J; Fauser, Kristina R; Meyer, Stephanie A; Jackson, Steven J

    2015-05-01

    Previous reports indicate that the majority of U.S. Army soldiers consume dietary supplements (DSs) > 1 time/wk. However, these studies did not evaluate phytonutrient supplementation. A growing literature suggests inclusion of phytonutrients in DSs may pose a risk for toxicity, which could impact the performance of soldier duties, as well as long-term health and wellness. This study was conducted to assess and understand soldiers' motivations to consume phytonutrient-containing DSs, specifically genistein, quercetin, and resveratrol. The study was a cross-sectional, descriptive mixed-methods design using a survey and semistructured interviews. There were 436 soldiers stationed at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington who completed the survey, from which 36 soldiers completed an interview. Overall, 34% of soldiers reported taking a single or multicomponent phytonutrient DS > 1 time/wk, from which 41 soldiers took >1 supplement/wk. Soldiers' reasons for use included unsure (54%), weight loss (12%), and other, unspecified (24%). The majority of interviewees did not consume DSs based on inclusion of genistein, quercetin, or resveratrol. The majority of soldiers, in our study, appear unable to rationalize their phytonutrient DS choices. Findings from this study illuminate the need for future research to further explore DS practices within military populations and encourage informed use of DSs.

  7. Combined foraging strategies and soldier behaviour in Nasutitermes aff. coxipoensis (Blattodea: Termitoidea: Termitidae).

    PubMed

    Almeida, Camilla S; Cristaldo, Paulo F; Florencio, Daniela F; Cruz, Nayara G; Santos, Abraão A; Oliveira, Alexandre P; Santana, Alisson S; Ribeiro, Efrem J M; Lima, Ana P S; Bacci, Leandro; Araújo, Ana P A

    2016-05-01

    A range of behavioural strategies and sensory abilities allows animals to minimize costs involved in food search. By building a network of tunnels and presenting a large number of soldiers (i.e., trophically dependent individuals), Nasutitermes spp. termites feature behaviours that imply additional costs during this process. Here we evaluated N. aff. coxipoensis foraging strategies focusing on the role of soldiers during foraging. Field experiments were carried out via nests transplantation to dune areas, and laboratory experiments evaluated termite responses to sternal gland chemical signals from workers and soldiers. N. aff. coxipoensis presented primarily nocturnal foraging. Soldiers typically initiated foraging; however, in established trails, the number of workers was always higher than that of soldiers. The number of trails remained constant over time, while the number of tunnels increased linearly over time. A higher proportion of tunnels originated in surrounding areas than directly from the nests. At observation points with tunnels, there were more stationary than walking soldiers; the opposite was true at observation points without tunnels. In mixed groups, the workers chose to follow soldier chemical signals, and in these groups, soldiers were the first to follow trails. Our results allowed us to identify a not common foraging strategy in termite species; which included the establishment of trails followed by construction of tunnels. Such foraging strategies occur predominantly at night and soldiers play a key role in the foraging process. This foraging strategy reported here seems to be employed to optimize energetic gain.

  8. Risks associated with pregnancy in spinal cord-injured women.

    PubMed

    Baker, E R; Cardenas, D D; Benedetti, T J

    1992-09-01

    We reviewed the experience with pregnancy in spinal cord-injured women at the University of Washington over the past 10 years. During that time, 11 women with spinal cord injury had 13 pregnancies. Infant outcome was uniformly good. No major obstetric complication occurred. The mothers experienced medical problems including urinary tract infection in ten and pyelonephritis in three. Autonomic hyperreflexia occurred in three of five subjects with lesions at or above the sixth thoracic vertebra. Pregnancy in the spinal cord-injured patient involves medical risk for the mother, but with careful management, an excellent outcome for both mother and infant may be anticipated.

  9. Soldiers Under Threat: An Exploration of the Effect of Real Threat on Soldier’s Perceptions, Attitudes and Morale

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    interpreted (Florian, Mikulincer & Taubmam, 1995; Bartone, Johnsen, Eid, Brun & Laberg , 2002; Bartone, 2006). As we focus on aspects of soldiers...Organizational responses to death in the military. Death Studies, 18, 23-39. Bartone, P.T., Johnsen, B.H., Eid, J. Brun, W. & Laberg , J.C. (2002...1997). General and personal mortality salience and nationalistic bias. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 23, 884- 892. Neuberg, Steven L

  10. The prevalence of symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among soldiers with amputation of a limb or spinal injury: a report from a rehabilitation centre in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Abeyasinghe, N L; de Zoysa, P; Bandara, K M K C; Bartholameuz, N A; Bandara, J M U J

    2012-01-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder has been identified as one of the most commonly occurring mental illnesses in combatants. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among soldiers who had undergone amputation of a lower or an upper limb or sustained a spinal cord injury in the battlefield, and to compare the prevalence among these categories. The research presented seeks to increase the awareness of this condition among those treating war casualties so that appropriate treatment choices could be made to address them. The study was carried out in 2009 at a rehabilitation centre for combatants of war. Data were collected from 96 male army veterans between the ages of 18-49 years using a pre-tested self-administered questionnaire based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, the Impact of Event Scale and the PTSD symptom scale. Soldiers with injuries sustained at least four weeks prior to the study were selected by a convenience sampling technique. Soldiers with multiple injuries, head injuries or those diagnosed with psychiatric disorders were excluded. The results revealed that 41.7% of the study population was compatible with the diagnosis of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Within the three groups, 42.5% of the lower limb amputees, 33.3% of the upper limb amputees and 45.7% of the participants with spinal cord injury had symptoms compatible with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. There was no difference between the prevalence among the different injury categories considered. This study highlights the need to pay more attention in providing psychological care as a part of the overall health management of injured combatants. Early preparation of soldiers for stressors of war and screening for and proper management of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder will improve the overall outcome of rehabilitation.

  11. Interleukin 6 in intact and injured mouse peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Reichert, F; Levitzky, R; Rotshenker, S

    1996-03-01

    The multifunctional cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6) has direct growth, survival and differentiation effects on peripheral and central neurons. Furthermore, it can modulate the production by non-neuronal cells of other cytokines and growth factors, and thereby affect nerve cells indirectly. We have studied IL-6 expression and production in intact and injured peripheral nerves of C57/BL/6NHSD mice, which display the normal rapid progression of Wallerian degeneration. The IL-6 mRNA was detected in nerves degenerating in vitro or in vivo, but not in intact nerves. In vitro- and in vivo-degenerating nerve segments and neuroma nerve segments synthesized and secreted IL-6. The onset of IL-6 production was rapid and prolonged. It was detected as early as 2 h after injury and persisted for the entire period of 21 days tested after the injury. Of the non-neuronal cells that reside in intact and injured nerves, macrophages and fibroblasts were the major contributors to IL-6 production. We also studied IL-6 production in intact and injured nerves of mutant C57BL/6-WLD/OLA/NHSD mice, which display very slow progression of Wallerian degeneration. Injured nerves of C57BL/6-WLD/OLA/NHSD mice produced significantly lower amounts of IL-6 than did rapidly degenerating nerves of C57/BL/6NHSD mice.

  12. The Use of Computer Assisted Career Guidance with Injured Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Julia; Wigtil, James V.

    Injured workers are individuals whose injuries have resulted in residual impairment, making it impossible for them to return to their former jobs or to seek work in an allied field. This study investigated the differential effects of computer assisted career guidance (CACG) systems combined with a cognitive information processing strategy on…

  13. Addressing the Needs of Children and Families of Combat Injured

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    active duty non-injured combat veterans (matched with CI participants for combat experience and relevant demographic factors ) and their spouses with at...who otherwise would qualify for enrollment are parents of very young children (younger than the current inclusion criteria). These demographics have...5 INTRODUCTION: This investigation focuses on measuring the impact of parental combat injury on military children

  14. RECREATION AND SOCIALIZATION FOR THE BRAIN INJURED CHILD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GOLUB, RISA S.; GORDON, SOL

    DESIGNED FOR PARENTS AND SPECIALISTS PLANNING THERAPEUTICALLY ORIENTED RECREATIONAL AND SOCIALIZATION PROGRAMS FOR BRAIN INJURED CHILDREN, THIS DOCUMENT CONTAINS 13 CHAPTERS BY DIFFERENT AUTHORS. ACTIVITIES DISCUSSED ARE GENERALLY NONCOMPETITIVE, EMPHASIZING STRUCTURE AND LIMIT. DISCUSSED ARE (1) THE ROLE OF THE OPTOMETRIST WITH THE INADEQUATE…

  15. Facilitating Classroom Success for the Closed Head Injured Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePompei, Roberta; Blosser, Jean L.

    Intended for special educators and administrators, the paper addresses the educational implications of closed head injury in children. Characteristics of head injured students are noted, including previous successful experiences in social and academic settings, inconsistent performance patterns, and cognitive deficits which are present as in other…

  16. Personal Adjustment Training for the Spinal Cord Injured

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessler, Richard; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This article describes experiences with Personal Achievement Skills (PAS), a group counseling process in a spinal cord injury project, emphasizing training in communication and goal setting in the context of group process. Issues in conducting such training and providing comprehensive service to the spinal cord injured are discussed in detail.…

  17. MMPI--2 Code-Type Congruence of Injured Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Ronald B.; Jennings, Earl; Colotla, Victor A.; Reynolds, Cecil R.; Shercliffe, Regan J.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the stability of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory--2 (J. N. Butcher, W. G. Dahlstrom, J. R. Graham, A. Tellegen, & B. Kaemmer, 1989) code types in a sample of 94 injured workers with a mean test-retest interval of 21.3 months (SD = 14.1). Congruence rates for undefined code types were 34% for…

  18. Sierra Leone's Former Child Soldiers: A Longitudinal Study of Risk, Protective Factors, and Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betancourt, Theresa S.; Brennan, Robert T.; Rubin-Smith, Julia; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Gilman, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the longitudinal course of internalizing and externalizing problems and adaptive/prosocial behaviors among Sierra Leonean former child soldiers and whether postconflict factors contribute to adverse or resilient mental health outcomes. Method: Male and female former child soldiers (N = 260, aged 10 to 17 years at…

  19. Forced Conscription of Children during Armed Conflict: Experiences of Former Child Soldiers in Northern Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vindevogel, Sofie; Coppens, Kathleen; Derluyn, Ilse; De Schryver, Maarten; Loots, Gerrit; Broekaert, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Child soldiering can be considered as one of the worst practices of institutionalized child abuse. However, little is known about the scope and nature of this abuse and the consequent experiences of children enrolled in an armed faction. This research aims at enriching the knowledge on the experiences of child soldiers in the Lord's…

  20. Phenotypically plastic traits regulate caste formation and soldier function in polyembryonic wasps

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Margaret S.; Milton, Ian; Strand, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Polyembryonic encyrtid wasps are parasitoids that have evolved a clonal form of embryogenesis and a caste system where some progeny become reproducing wasps while others develop into a sterile soldier caste. Theory based on the biology of Copidosoma floridanum predicts the primary role of soldier larvae is to mediate conflict over sex ratio, which also favours female-biased soldier production. Other data, however, suggest female-biased soldier production reflects a developmental constraint. Here we assessed whether female-biased soldier function by polyembryonic wasps reflects sex specific adaptation or constraint by conducting comparative studies with Copidosma bakeri; a species that produces clutch sizes similar to C. floridanum yet rarely produces broods associated with sex ratio conflict. Our results indicate the oviposition behaviour of adults, development of progeny, and function of soldier larvae differs greatly between C. bakeri and C. floridanum. These findings indicate that caste formation and soldier function in polyembryonic encyrtid wasps are regulated by phenotypically plastic traits. Our results further suggest the primary function of the soldier caste in some species is defence of host resources from competitors while in others it is resolution of sex ratio conflict. PMID:21040070

  1. The Impact of Soldiers with Permanent Medical Profiles on Army Operational Readiness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    legislation to automatically separate HIV positive soldiers. In Soraya S. Nelson’s, AIDS Likely to Cost the Military $3 Billion," he estimated HIV ... treatment cost for DOD is $3 billion between 1990 and 2000.59 That is $300 million a year to treat a handful of HIV positive soldiers left on active duty

  2. Phenotypically plastic traits regulate caste formation and soldier function in polyembryonic wasps.

    PubMed

    Smith, M S; Milton, I; Strand, M R

    2010-12-01

    Polyembryonic encyrtid wasps are parasitoids that have evolved a clonal form of embryogenesis and a caste system where some progeny become reproducing wasps whereas others develop into a sterile soldier caste. Theory based on the biology of Copidosoma floridanum predicts that the primary role of soldier larvae is to mediate conflict over sex ratio, which also favours female-biased soldier production. Other data, however, suggest that female-biased soldier production reflects a developmental constraint. Here, we assessed whether female-biased soldier function by polyembryonic wasps reflects sex-specific adaptation or constraint by conducting comparative studies with Copidosoma bakeri, a species that produces clutch sizes similar to C. floridanum yet rarely produces broods associated with sex ratio conflict. Our results indicate that the oviposition behaviour of adults, development of progeny and function of soldier larvae differ greatly between C. bakeri and C. floridanum. These findings indicate that caste formation and soldier function in polyembryonic encyrtid wasps are regulated by phenotypically plastic traits. Our results further suggest that the primary function of the soldier caste in some species is defence of host resources from competitors whereas in others it is the resolution of sex ratio conflict.

  3. PEO EIS Delivers Information Dominance to Soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    PEO EIS Delivers Information Dominance to Soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan Jill Finnie In the business world, it is common knowledge that superior...COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE PEO EIS Delivers Information Dominance to Soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan 5a. CONTRACT

  4. Revolting Soldiers: The Origins of Education in the Armies of the Empire in World War I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boshier, Roger

    1985-01-01

    Explores the circumstances surrounding the creation of education schemes in the armies of the British Empire. Discusses attitudes toward war and toward the soldier's role in the early 1900s, attitudes of the soldiers toward war, the University of Vimy Ridge, the Canadian Khaki University, the Oatlands program, and education for the New Zealand…

  5. The Problems of Authority and the Want of Apprenticeship in Soldiers' Character Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berghaus, Paul T.

    2016-01-01

    Militaries that take a character development approach in their moral education programs but rely heavily on authority figures as subject matter experts to teach soldiers face two serious problems. First, soldiers improperly defer to their instructors and, as a result, do not understand the moral virtues taught in class. Second, instructors are in…

  6. Reintegration of National Guard Soldiers with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    It recommends procedures and policy that will provide better support for returning Guard veterans . REINTEGRATION OF NATIONAL GUARD SOLDIERS...OIF deployments started, the military had little recent experience with reintegrating Guard combat veterans back into their communities. 42 It was...and DOD led to the YRRP, a national combat veteran reintegration program that provides Guard soldiers and their families with information, services

  7. CU @ The FOB: How the Forward Operating Base is Changing the Life of Combat Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    times a day.”17 Today’s soldiers would be hard pressed to claim they could not get enough to eat. An embedded journalist marveled over the culinary ...Times, March 27, 2005, p. A1. 5. While the researchers did not specify gender as a criterion for selecting soldiers to be interviewed, only male

  8. Undiagnosed nephrogenic diabetes insipidus as a cause of acute urinary retention in a young soldier.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Jin; Shin, Y S; Choi, H; Kim, M K; Jeong, Y B; Park, J K

    2016-10-01

    We present a case of undiagnosed nephrogenic diabetes insipidus as a cause of acute urinary retention in a 21-year-old male soldier. Soldiers live in close quarters, and have a regimented lifestyle that may not allow for frequent voiding; therefore, undiagnosed nephrogenic diabetes insipidus may result in acute urinary retention.

  9. Prior Health Care Utilization Patterns and Suicide among U.S. Army Soldiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Nicole S.; Harford, Thomas C.; Amoroso, Paul J.; Hollander, Ilyssa E.; Kay, Ashley B.

    2010-01-01

    Suicides among U.S. Army soldiers are increasing and, in January 2009, outpaced deaths due to combat. For this study, 1,873 army suicides identified through death, inpatient, and emergency room records were matched with 5,619 controls. In multivariate models, older, male, White, single, and enlisted soldiers with a prior injury (OR = 2.04, 95% CI…

  10. Soldier Quality of Life (Operational) and Readiness at Contingency Base Camps: Insights From Qualitative Interviews

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-13

    SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY MORALE INTERVIEWS GROUP DYNAMICS QOL(QUALITY OF LIFE) SURVEYS...camps and Soldier/small unit readiness to guide the development of a quantitative readiness survey. • During structured interviews, 31 Soldiers...Ensuring optimal conditions for rest, nutrition, and spiritual and psychological support. Executive Summary 4UNCLASSIFIED Background 5UNCLASSIFIED What is

  11. Head Injured Learners: Facilitating the Education/Social Adjustment of Traumatically Brain Injured Learners in Academic Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buethe, Diane; Buethe, Chris

    Based upon 15 interviews, the paper discusses specific educational and social problems as perceived by nine brain injured learners (14-24 years old), their teachers, families, and peers. Interview excerpts illustrate executive functions of self-awareness, self-evaluation, and self-monitoring; the effects on families; and student difficulties in…

  12. Modelling of soldier fly halteres for gyroscopic oscillations.

    PubMed

    Parween, Rizuwana; Pratap, Rudra

    2015-01-08

    Nature has evolved a beautiful design for small-scale vibratory rate-gyro in the form of dipteran halteres that detect body rotations via Coriolis acceleration. In most Diptera, including soldier fly, Hermetia illucens, halteres are a pair of special organs, located in the space between the thorax and the abdomen. The halteres along with their connecting joint with the fly's body constitute a mechanism that is used for muscle-actuated oscillations of the halteres along the actuation direction. These oscillations lead to bending vibrations in the sensing direction (out of the haltere's actuation plane) upon any impressed rotation due to the resulting Coriolis force. This induced vibration is sensed by the sensory organs at the base of the haltere in order to determine the rate of rotation. In this study, we evaluate the boundary conditions and the stiffness of the anesthetized halteres along the actuation and the sensing direction. We take several cross-sectional SEM (scanning electron microscope) images of the soldier fly haltere and construct its three dimensional model to get the mass properties. Based on these measurements, we estimate the natural frequency along both actuation and sensing directions, propose a finite element model of the haltere's joint mechanism, and discuss the significance of the haltere's asymmetric cross-section. The estimated natural frequency along the actuation direction is within the range of the haltere's flapping frequency. However, the natural frequency along the sensing direction is roughly double the haltere's flapping frequency that provides a large bandwidth for sensing the rate of rotation to the soldier flies.

  13. Modelling of soldier fly halteres for gyroscopic oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Parween, Rizuwana; Pratap, Rudra

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nature has evolved a beautiful design for small-scale vibratory rate-gyro in the form of dipteran halteres that detect body rotations via Coriolis acceleration. In most Diptera, including soldier fly, Hermetia illucens, halteres are a pair of special organs, located in the space between the thorax and the abdomen. The halteres along with their connecting joint with the fly's body constitute a mechanism that is used for muscle-actuated oscillations of the halteres along the actuation direction. These oscillations lead to bending vibrations in the sensing direction (out of the haltere's actuation plane) upon any impressed rotation due to the resulting Coriolis force. This induced vibration is sensed by the sensory organs at the base of the haltere in order to determine the rate of rotation. In this study, we evaluate the boundary conditions and the stiffness of the anesthetized halteres along the actuation and the sensing direction. We take several cross-sectional SEM (scanning electron microscope) images of the soldier fly haltere and construct its three dimensional model to get the mass properties. Based on these measurements, we estimate the natural frequency along both actuation and sensing directions, propose a finite element model of the haltere's joint mechanism, and discuss the significance of the haltere's asymmetric cross-section. The estimated natural frequency along the actuation direction is within the range of the haltere's flapping frequency. However, the natural frequency along the sensing direction is roughly double the haltere's flapping frequency that provides a large bandwidth for sensing the rate of rotation to the soldier flies. PMID:25572422

  14. Sleep disturbances among Swedish soldiers after military service abroad.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Karolina; Saers, Johannes; Lindberg, Eva; Janson, Christer

    2016-01-01

    Aims Since 1956, more than 100,000 Swedish soldiers have served abroad on various international missions. The aim of this paper was to determine whether there was a connection between military service abroad and sleep disorders among Swedish soldiers. Methods The prevalence of sleep disturbances among 1,080 veterans from Kosovo and Afghanistan was compared with almost 27,000 Swedes from a general population sample, using propensity score matching and logistic regression. The sleep disturbances studied were habitual snoring, difficulty inducing sleep (DIS), difficulty maintaining sleep (DMS), early morning awakenings (EMA), and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Insomnia was defined as having at least one of DIS, DMS, or EMA. The covariates used in the matching and adjustments were age, gender, smoking habits, BMI, education, ever having had asthma, moist snuff, and exercise habits. Results The veterans had a significantly lower prevalence of insomnia (26.2% versus 30.4%) and EDS (22.7% versus 29.4%) compared with a matched group from the reference population, using propensity score matching. Analyses with logistic regression showed that belonging to the military population was related to a lower risk of having DMS (adjusted OR (95% CI) 0.77 (0.64-0.91)), insomnia (OR 0.82 (0.71-0.95)), and EDS (OR 0.74 (0.63-0.86)), whereas no significant difference was found for snoring, DIS, and EMA. Conclusion Swedish veterans have fewer problems with insomnia and daytime sleepiness than the general Swedish population. The explanation of our findings may be the selection processes involved in becoming a soldier and when sampling personnel for military assignments abroad.

  15. Evaluation of the thin agar layer method for the recovery of pressure-injured and heat-injured Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Lavieri, Nicolas A; Sebranek, Joseph G; Cordray, Joseph C; Dickson, James S; Jung, Stephanie; Manu, David K; Mendonça, Aubrey F; Brehm-Stecher, Byron F; Stock, Joseph; Stalder, Kenneth J

    2014-05-01

    A sublethally injured bacterial cell has been defined as a cell that survives a stress such as heating, freezing, acid treatment, or other antimicrobial intervention but can repair the cellular damage exerted by the stressor and later regain its original ability to grow. Consequently, sublethally injured cells are not likely to be included in conventional enumeration procedures, which could result in unrealistically low counts unless efforts are made to encourage recovery of the injured cells before enumeration. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of the thin agar layer (TAL) method for the recovery of pressure-injured and heat-injured Listeria monocytogenes in a tryptic soy broth with 0.6% yeast extract system. Pressure injury consisted of treatment of a culture of mixed L. monocytogenes strains with high hydrostatic pressure at 400 or 600 MPa for 1 s, 2 min, 4 min, or 6 min at a process temperature of 12±2 °C. Heat injury consisted of treatment of a culture of mixed L. monocytogenes strains at 60±1 °C for 3, 6, or 9 min. Growth media were tryptic soy agar (TSA) with 0.6% yeast extract, modified Oxford medium (MOX), and TAL, which consisted of a 7-ml layer of TSA overlaid onto solidified MOX. Counts of viable L. monocytogenes on TAL were higher than those on MOX in the heat-injury experiment but not in the pressure-injury experiment. Therefore, the effectiveness of the TAL method may be specific to the type of injury applied to the microorganism and should be investigated in a variety of cellular injury scenarios.

  16. The major infectious epidemic diseases of Civil War soldiers.

    PubMed

    Bollet, Alfred Jay

    2004-06-01

    Two thirds of the 600,000 deaths of Civil War soldiers were caused by disease. Physicians during the war kept detailed records and reports, which were tabulated, discussed in detail, and published after the war. These records include case histories, autopsy descriptions, photographs, and photomicrographs; they are the best records of the medical experiences of any of America's wars, even those in the twentieth century. Because the Civil War occurred just before the discoveries of bacteriology, these records are of particular historical interest.

  17. Weight Measurements and Standards for Soldiers, Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    internet/population-based weight management program for the U.S. Army. Journal of Diabetes , Science and Technology 2(1), 116-126. 2. U.S. Army. The...Internet/Population-based Behavioral Weight Management Program for the U.S. Army. Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology 5, 178-187. 5. Newton, R...Reserve Soldiers: H.E.A.L.T.H. Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, 5(5), 1255-1262. 6. Stewart, T. (2014). Preliminary Evidence on an

  18. Caring for the injured child in settings of limited resource.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Jacob

    2016-02-01

    Children represent the most vulnerable members of our global society, a truth that is magnified when they are physically wounded. In much of the developed world, society has responded by offering protection in the form of law, injury prevention guidelines, and effective trauma systems to provide care for the injured child. Much of our world, though, remains afflicted by poverty and a lack of protective measures. As the globe becomes smaller by way of ease of travel and technology, surgeons are increasingly able to meet these children where they live and in doing so offer their hands and voices to care and protect these young ones. This article is intended as an overview of current issues in pediatric trauma care in the developing world as well as to offer some tips for the volunteer surgeon who may be involved in the care of the injured child in a setting of limited resource availability.

  19. Acute and Perioperative Care of the Burn-Injured Patient

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Edward A.; Shank, Erik; Woodson, Lee; Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra

    2016-01-01

    Care of burn-injured patients requires knowledge of the pathophysiologic changes affecting virtually all organs from the onset of injury until wounds are healed. Massive airway and/or lung edema can occur rapidly and unpredictably after burn and/or inhalation injury. Hemodynamics in the early phase of severe burn injury are characterized by a reduction in cardiac output, increased systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance. Approximately 2–5 days after major burn injury, a hyperdynamic and hypermetabolic state develops. Electrical burns result in morbidity much higher than expected based on burn size alone. Formulae for fluid resuscitation should serve only as guideline; fluids should be titrated to physiologic end points. Burn injury is associated basal and procedural pain requiring higher than normal opioid and sedative doses. Operating room concerns for the burn-injured patient include airway abnormalities, impaired lung function, vascular access, deceptively large and rapid blood loss, hypothermia and altered pharmacology. PMID:25485468

  20. Development of a CPM Machine for Injured Fingers.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yili; Zhang, Fuxiang; Ma, Xin; Meng, Qinggang

    2005-01-01

    Human fingers are easy to be injured. A CPM machine is a mechanism based on the rehabilitation theory of continuous passive motion (CPM). To develop a CPM machine for the clinic application in the rehabilitation of injured fingers is a significant task. Therefore, based on the theories of evidence based medicine (EBM) and CPM, we've developed a set of biomimetic mechanism after modeling the motions of fingers and analyzing its kinematics and dynamics analysis. We also design an embedded operating system based on ARM (a kind of 32-bit RISC microprocessor). The equipment can achieve the precise control of moving scope of fingers, finger's force and speed. It can serves as a rational checking method and a way of assessment for functional rehabilitation of human hands. Now, the first prototype has been finished and will start the clinical testing in Harbin Medical University shortly.

  1. Dopamine regulates termite soldier differentiation through trophallactic behaviours

    PubMed Central

    Yaguchi, Hajime; Inoue, Takaya; Sasaki, Ken; Maekawa, Kiyoto

    2016-01-01

    Caste polyphenism in social insects is regulated by social interactions among colony members. Trophallaxis is one of the most frequently observed interactions, but no studies have been conducted identifying the intrinsic factors involved in this behaviour and caste differentiation. Dopamine (DA) has multiple roles in the modulation of behaviours and physiology, and it produces species-specific behaviours in animals. Here, to verify the role of DA in termite soldier differentiation, we focused on the first soldier in an incipient colony of Zootermopsis nevadensis, which always differentiates from the oldest 3rd instar (No. 1 larva) via a presoldier. First, brain DA levels of the No. 1 larva at day 3 after its appearance were significantly higher than day 0. Second, DA synthesis gene expression levels were extraordinarily high in the No. 1 larva at day 0–1 after appearance. Finally, injection of a DA receptor antagonist into the No. 1 larva resulted in the inhibition of presoldier differentiation. Behavioural observations of the antagonist or control-injected larvae suggested that brain DA and signalling activity regulate the frequencies of trophallaxis from reproductives and presoldier differentiation. Because trophallaxis is a social behaviour frequently observed in natural conditions, the role of DA should be investigated in other social insects with frequent trophallactic and allogrooming behaviour. PMID:26998327

  2. Using black soldier fly larvae for processing organic leachates.

    PubMed

    Popa, Radu; Green, Terrence R

    2012-04-01

    A large number of biodegradable byproducts including alcohols, soluble saccharides, volatile organic acids, and amines accumulate in the liquid fraction (leachate) produced as vegetal and food scrap waste decomposes. Untreated leachate, because it is rich in nutrients and organic byproducts, has a high chemical oxygen demand and is normally cleared of soluble organic byproducts by mineralization before its discharge into waterways. Mineralizing leachates using chemical and microbial biotechnologies is, however, a lengthy and costly process. We report here that the larvae of the black soldier fly Hermetia illucens (L.) (Diptera: Stratiomyidae), an insect rich in protein and lipids, and having significant commercial value, while feeding and growing off of compost leachate, lowers its chemical oxygen demand relative to that of leachate unexposed to larvae, neutralizes its acidity, and clears it of volatile organic acids, amines, and alcohols. These observations demonstrate that black soldier fly larvae could be used to help offset the cost and clean up of organic solutes in leachate waste streams while recycling carbon, nitrogen, and phosphate into usable and commercially valuable biomass.

  3. Rearing methods for the black soldier fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae).

    PubMed

    Sheppard, D Craig; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Joyce, John A; Kiser, Barbara C; Sumner, Sonya M

    2002-07-01

    The black soldier fly, Heretia illucens (L.), is a nonpest tropical and warm-temperate region insect that is useful for managing large concentrations of animal manure and other biosolids. Manure management relying on wild fly oviposition has been successful in several studies. However, confidence in this robust natural system was low and biological studies were hampered by the lack of a dependable source of eggs and larvae. Larvae had been reared easily by earlier investigators, but achieving mating had been problematic. We achieved mating reliably in a 2 by 2 by 4-m screen cage in a 7 by 9 by 5-m greenhouse where sunlight and adequate space for aerial mating were available. Mating occurred during the shortest days of winter if the sun was not obscured by clouds. Adults were provided with water, but no food was required. Techniques for egg collection and larval rearing are given. Larvae were fed a moist mixture of wheat bran, corn meal, and alfalfa meal. This culture has been maintained for 3 yr. Maintainance of a black soldier fly laboratory colony will allow for development of manure management systems in fully enclosed animal housing and in colder regions.

  4. Soldier detection using unattended acoustic and seismic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naz, P.; Hengy, S.; Hamery, P.

    2012-06-01

    During recent military conflicts, as well as for security interventions, the urban zone has taken a preponderant place. Studies have been initiated in national and in international programs to stimulate the technical innovations for these specific scenarios. For example joint field experiments have been organized by the NATO group SET-142 to evaluate the capability for the detection and localization of snipers, mortars or artillery guns using acoustic devices. Another important operational need corresponds to the protection of military sites or buildings. In this context, unattended acoustic and seismic sensors are envisaged to contribute to the survey of specific points by the detection of approaching enemy soldiers. This paper describes some measurements done in an anechoic chamber and in free field to characterize typical sounds generated by the soldier activities (walking, crawling, weapon handling, radio communication, clothing noises...). Footstep, speech and some specific impulsive sounds are detectable at various distances from the source. Such detection algorithms may be easily merged with the existing weapon firing detection algorithms to provide a more generic "battlefield acoustic" early warning system. Results obtained in various conditions (grassy terrain, gravel path, road, forest) will be presented. A method to extrapolate the distances of detection has been developed, based on an acoustic propagation model and applied to the laboratory measurements.

  5. The Impact of Unit Membership on Smoking Among Soldiers.

    PubMed

    Toblin, Robin L; Anderson, James A; Riviere, Lyndon A; McGurk, Dennis; Sipos, Maurice L

    2016-01-01

    Cultural, organizational, and dyadic influences have been found to be associated with smoking in the military while group-level influences have been identified in the general population. However, there are few studies examining group-level influences in the military and none using group-level analyses. Such studies are essential for understanding how to optimally forestall or cease smoking. This study, using mixed effects modelling, examined whether unit membership influenced smoking behavior in soldiers from brigade combat teams. Unit membership was assessed in 2008 to 2009 at the company level (n = 2204) and in 2012 at the platoon level (n = 452). Smoking was assessed by the number of daily cigarettes smoked (range: 0-99) with smoking status (nonsmoker vs. smoker) and smoking level (none, smoker, and heavy [20 + cigarettes/day]) as the outcomes. For both samples, unit membership was not significantly associated with a soldier's propensity to smoke when comparing either all smokers to nonsmokers or heavy smokers to smokers. These results suggest typical military unit-level training programs are unlikely to be the most effective mode of intervention for smoking prevention or cessation. Smoking rates in the military may be influenced instead by small group or individual relationships or by overall military culture.

  6. Fusion solution for soldier wearable gunfire detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakiades, George; Desai, Sachi; Deligeorges, Socrates; Buckland, Bruce E.; George, Jemin

    2012-06-01

    Currently existing acoustic based Gunfire Detection Systems (GDS) such as soldier wearable, vehicle mounted, and fixed site devices provide enemy detection and localization capabilities to the user. However, the solution to the problem of portability versus performance tradeoff remains elusive. The Data Fusion Module (DFM), described herein, is a sensor/platform agnostic software supplemental tool that addresses this tradeoff problem by leveraging existing soldier networks to enhance GDS performance across a Tactical Combat Unit (TCU). The DFM software enhances performance by leveraging all available acoustic GDS information across the TCU synergistically to calculate highly accurate solutions more consistently than any individual GDS in the TCU. The networked sensor architecture provides additional capabilities addressing the multiple shooter/fire-fight problems in addition to sniper detection/localization. The addition of the fusion solution to the overall Size, Weight and Power & Cost (SWaP&C) is zero to negligible. At the end of the first-year effort, the DFM integrated sensor network's performance was impressive showing improvements upwards of 50% in comparison to a single sensor solution. Further improvements are expected when the networked sensor architecture created in this effort is fully exploited.

  7. Human performance modeling for system of systems analytics :soldier fatigue.

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Craig R.; Campbell, James E.; Miller, Dwight Peter

    2005-10-01

    The military has identified Human Performance Modeling (HPM) as a significant requirement and challenge of future systems modeling and analysis initiatives as can be seen in the Department of Defense's (DoD) Defense Modeling and Simulation Office's (DMSO) Master Plan (DoD 5000.59-P 1995). To this goal, the military is currently spending millions of dollars on programs devoted to HPM in various military contexts. Examples include the Human Performance Modeling Integration (HPMI) program within the Air Force Research Laboratory, which focuses on integrating HPMs with constructive models of systems (e.g. cockpit simulations) and the Navy's Human Performance Center (HPC) established in September 2003. Nearly all of these initiatives focus on the interface between humans and a single system. This is insufficient in the era of highly complex network centric SoS. This report presents research and development in the area of HPM in a system-of-systems (SoS). Specifically, this report addresses modeling soldier fatigue and the potential impacts soldier fatigue can have on SoS performance.

  8. Thermally Injured Patients are at Significant Risk for Thromboembolic Complications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    separate DVT and PE risk, but considered DVT and PE part of the same pathologic process. Collected data were exam- ined by Student’s t test or x2 analysis...increased blood flow to burned areas theoret- ically reduces venous stasis.7 Treatments directed at prevent- ing DVT / PE , therefore, would have little... DVT ) and pulmo- nary embolism ( PE ) in thermally injured patients is considered sufficiently uncom- mon that routine prophylactic measures are not

  9. Solute transport across the articular surface of injured cartilage.

    PubMed

    Chin, Hooi Chuan; Moeini, Mohammad; Quinn, Thomas M

    2013-07-15

    Solute transport through extracellular matrix (ECM) is important to physiology and contrast agent-based clinical imaging of articular cartilage. Mechanical injury is likely to have important effects on solute transport since it involves alteration of ECM structure. Therefore it is of interest to characterize effects of mechanical injury on solute transport in cartilage. Using cartilage explants injured by an established mechanical compression protocol, effective partition coefficients and diffusivities of solutes for transport across the articular surface were measured. A range of fluorescent solutes (fluorescein isothiocyanate, 4 and 40kDa dextrans, insulin, and chondroitin sulfate) and an X-ray contrast agent (sodium iodide) were used. Mechanical injury was associated with a significant increase in effective diffusivity versus uninjured explants for all solutes studied. On the other hand, mechanical injury had no effects on effective partition coefficients for most solutes tested, except for 40kDa dextran and chondroitin sulfate where small but significant changes in effective partition coefficient were observed in injured explants. Findings highlight enhanced diffusive transport across the articular surface of injured cartilage, which may have important implications for injury and repair situations. Results also support development of non-equilibrium methods for identification of focal cartilage lesions by contrast agent-based clinical imaging.

  10. Repair of injured proximal tubule does not involve specialized progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, Benjamin D.; Czerniak, Suzanne; DiRocco, Derek P.; Hasnain, Wirasat; Cheema, Rabia; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2011-01-01

    Recently we have established that the kidney tubular epithelium is repaired by surviving epithelial cells. It is not known, however, whether a population of intratubular adult progenitor cells are responsible for this epithelial repair after acute kidney injury. In this study, we used an unbiased DNA analog-based approach that does not rely on candidate markers to track multiple rounds of cell division in vivo. In the proximal tubule, robust thymidine analog incorporation was observed postinjury. Cell division was stochastic and enriched among cells that were injured and dedifferentiated. There was no evidence for the presence of a population of specialized progenitors that repeatedly divide in response to injury. Instead, these results indicate that after injury, new epithelial cells arise from self-duplication of surviving cells, most of which are injured. Because the renal papilla contains DNA label-retaining cells and has been proposed as a stem cell niche, we examined the proliferative behavior of these putative progenitors after ischemia-reperfusion injury. Although label-retaining cells in the renal papilla diminished with time after ischemia-reperfusion injury, they neither proliferated nor migrated to the outer medulla or cortex. Thus, nonlethally injured cells repopulate the kidney epithelium after injury in the absence of any specialized progenitor cell population. PMID:21576461

  11. Proinflammatory cytokines in injured rat brain following perinatal asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Maślińska, Danuta; Laure-Kamionowska, Milena; Kaliszek, Agnieszka; Makarewicz, Dorota

    2002-01-01

    In contrast to astrogliosis, which is common to injuries of the adult CNS, in the developing brain this process is minimal. Reasons postulated for this include the relative immaturity of the immune system and the consequent insufficient production of cytokines to evoke astrogliosis. To explore this hypothesis, the study was undertaken to detect the presence of some proinflammatory cytokines in the injured rat brain following perinatal asphyxia (ischaemia/hypoxia). The localisation of TNF-alpha, IL-15, IL-17 and IL-17 receptors was visualised by means of immunohistochemistry. In numerous neurones of the rat brain, the IL-17 appeared to be constitutively expressed. In the early period of inflammation the IL-15 was produced mainly by the blood cells penetrating the injured brain but later it was synthesised also by reactive astrocytes surrounding brain cysts and forming dense astrogliosis around necrotic brain regions. The direct effect on astrogliosis of other estimated cytokines seems to be negligible. All the results lead to the conclusion that from all cytokines identified in the injured immature rat brain the IL-15 plays the most important role during inflammatory response and participates in the gliosis of reactive astrocytes.

  12. A Review of metabolic staging in severely injured patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    An interpretation of the metabolic response to injury in patients with severe accidental or surgical trauma is made. In the last century, various authors attributed a meaning to the post-traumatic inflammatory response by using teleological arguments. Their interpretations of this response, not only facilitates integrating the knowledge, but also the flow from the bench to the bedside, which is the main objective of modern translational research. The goal of the current review is to correlate the metabolic changes with the three phenotypes -ischemia-reperfusion, leukocytic and angiogenic- that the patients express during the evolution of the systemic inflammatory response. The sequence in the expression of multiple metabolic systems that becomes progressively more elaborate and complex in severe injured patients urges for more detailed knowledge in order to establish the most adequate metabolic support according to the evolutive phase. Thus, clinicians must employ different treatment strategies based on the different metabolic phases when caring for this challenging patient population. Perhaps, the best therapeutic option would be to favor early hypometabolism during the ischemia-reperfusion phase, to boost the antienzymatic metabolism and to reduce hypermetabolism during the leukocytic phase through the early administration of enteral nutrition and the modulation of the acute phase response. Lastly, the early epithelial regeneration of the injured organs and tissues by means of an oxidative metabolism would reduce the fibrotic sequelae in these severely injured patients. PMID:20478066

  13. Identifying contextual influences of community reintegration among injured servicemembers.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Brent L; McGuire, Francis A; Britt, Thomas W; Linder, Sandra M

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests that community reintegration (CR) after injury and rehabilitation is difficult for many injured servicemembers. However, little is known about the influence of the contextual factors, both personal and environmental, that influence CR. Framed within the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and Social Cognitive Theory, the quantitative portion of a larger mixed-methods study of 51 injured, community-dwelling servicemembers compared the relative contribution of contextual factors between groups of servicemembers with different levels of CR. Cluster analysis indicated three groups of servicemembers showing low, moderate, and high levels of CR. Statistical analyses identified contextual factors (e.g., personal and environmental factors) that significantly discriminated between CR clusters. Multivariate analysis of variance and discriminant analysis indicated significant contributions of general self-efficacy, services and assistance barriers, physical and structural barriers, attitudes and support barriers, perceived level of disability and/or handicap, work and school barriers, and policy barriers on CR scores. Overall, analyses indicated that injured servicemembers with lower CR scores had lower general self-efficacy scores, reported more difficulty with environmental barriers, and reported their injuries as more disabling.

  14. Understanding contextual influences of community reintegration among injured servicemembers.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Brent L; McGuire, Francis A; Linder, Sandra M; Britt, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    As part of a larger mixed-methods research project investigating the influence of contextual factors on community reintegration (CR), this qualitative study sought to understand the subjective experiences of injured servicemembers and their perception of how contextual factors influenced their CR. More specifically, this article addresses how the influences of contextual factors differ between injured servicemembers with different levels of CR. Using a phenomenological framework, semistructured interviews were conducted with nine injured, community-dwelling servicemembers with low, moderate, and high levels of CR (three per category). Participants provided in-depth descriptions of the contextual barriers and facilitators of CR. Thematic analysis indicated the importance of social support and personal factors (e.g., self-efficacy, personal motivation) as the primary means for being reintegrated into their homes and communities. Other themes indicated factors that had an indirect but important influence on CR, including adapted sports, recreation, and other social programs; rehabilitation programs and therapists; school, work, and volunteering; and organizations and policies in developing social supports and personal factors. Comparisons between servicemembers indicated participants with low CR described many more contextual barriers and far fewer contextual facilitators to reintegration than those with high CR. Those with moderate CR were unique in that they described many facilitators and barriers to reintegration.

  15. Black soldier fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) colonization of pig carrion in south Georgia.

    PubMed

    Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Sheppard, D Craig; Joyce, John A

    2005-01-01

    The black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens (L.), is thought to colonize corpses 20-30 days postmortem. However, recent observations indicate this might not be true for all cases. Therefore, we conducted a study examining colonization by the black soldier fly and other Diptera on pig carrion in a plowed field in southern Georgia from 20 September through 21 February. Our data indicate black soldier flies could colonize a corpse within the first week after death. Knowing this information could prevent a serious mistake in estimating the time at which a corpse is colonized by this species. This study also represents the first record of Chrysomya rufifacies in Georgia.

  16. Interpersonal-Psychological Theory, Alexithymia, and Personality Predict Suicide Ideation among Maladjusted Soldiers in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai-Cheng; Tzeng, Dong-Sheng; Lin, Chi-Hung; Chung, Wei-Ching

    2016-11-24

    This case-control study enrolled 226 maladjusted soldiers and 229 controls to investigate the impact of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide, alexithymia, personality, and childhood trauma on suicide risk among Taiwanese soldiers. Assessments included the Toronto Alexithymia Scale, Eysenck Personality Inventory, Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, and Brief Symptom Rating Scale. In addition to thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness, other risks included less extraversion with higher neuroticism, higher alexithymia, poor academic performance, domestic violence, and life-threatening events. Our study demonstrates the interaction of the interpersonal-psychological theory and other suicide risk factors in Taiwanese soldiers.

  17. Development of a complicated pain syndrome following cyanide poisoning in a U.S. soldier.

    PubMed

    Lenart, Mark; Buckenmaier, Chester C; Kim, Moon J; Plunkett, Anthony R

    2010-04-01

    A majority of modern war wounds are caused by blasts and high-energy ballistics. Extremity injuries predominate since modern body armor does not protect these areas due to mobility limitations. A less known and more insidious mechanism of enemy attack among our soldiers involves treachery by the local populace posing as noncombatants. One such recent event involved the contamination of tobacco with cyanide (CN). We describe a case of a soldier with CN intoxication due to ingestion of tobacco purchased from a local merchant. The soldier developed a complex neuropathic pain syndrome and was successfully treated with an inpatient high-dose intravenous ketamine infusion in combination with continuous peripheral nerve blockade.

  18. Do Atomic Veterans have excess cancer? New results correcting for the healthy soldier bias.

    PubMed

    Bross, I D; Bross, N S

    1987-12-01

    Reanalysis of the National Research Council report on Mortality of Nuclear Weapons Test Participants, released June 4, 1985, shows 62% excess cancer among soldiers involved in nuclear weapons testing in 1957 codenamed PLUMBBOB, who had exposures to fallout of 300 mrem or more. Although the "healthy soldier bias" was discussed in the original report and a method of correcting for it was described, false negative results were reported because no correction was actually made. Correcting for the healthy soldier bias reveals excess digestive, respiratory, leukemia, and other cancers in PLUMBBOB participants whose reported doses were over 300 mrem.

  19. Does political ideology moderate stress: the special case of soldiers conducting forced evacuation.

    PubMed

    Shechner, Tomer; Slone, Michelle; Bialik, Gadi

    2007-04-01

    This study examined the moderating role of political ideology on psychological outcomes for Israeli soldiers participating in the forced evacuation of Jewish settlements from Gaza. Change in psychopathology and well-being was assessed for 3 concurrent mission groups differing in their political ideological contentiousness--forced evacuation, Gaza security, and Northern border security. After soldiers in each mission group were classified on the basis of relatively left- or right-wing political ideological tendencies, the authors examined differential impact of each mission on soldiers of differing political ideology. Results confirmed strong moderation effects of political ideology on psychological outcomes in these extreme contexts. Implications for research, prevention, and treatment are discussed.

  20. Near-infrared Spectroscopy to Reduce the Prophylactic Fasciotomies for and Missed Cases of Acute Compartment Syndrome in Soldiers Injured in OEF/OIF

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    Lower Extremity Trauma By Michael S. Shuler, MD, William M. Reisman, MD, Thomas E . Whitesides Jr., MD, Tracy L. Kinsey, MSPH, E . Mark Hammerberg, MD...Pressures in Acute Compartment Syndrome of the Leg By Michael S. Shuler, MD, William M. Reisman, MD, Tracy L. Kinsey, MSPH, Thomas E . Whitesides Jr...recently reached full enrollment. Details of study progress are described below. All study investigators (Brett Freedman, Michael Shuler, Debra

  1. Near-infrared Spectroscopy to Reduce Prophylactic Fasciotomies for and Missed Cases of Acute Compartment Syndrome in Soldiers Injured in OEF/OIF

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    3 Cohort 2 subjects are patients with tibia/fibula shaft or tibial plateau fractures that are caused by high energy impacts and are therefore...likely to develop ACS. All patients admitted to participating hospitals with tibia fractures are screened for inclusion. Coordinators are notified by...in August. By the end of the current Period 3, 95 patients with tibia fractures had been screened (Figure 2) and 31 subjects had been enrolled

  2. Near Infra-Red Spectroscopy to Reduce Prophylactic Fasciotomies for and Missed Cases of Acute Compartment Syndrome in Soldiers Injured in OEF/OIF

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    subjects are patients with tibia/fibula shaft or tibial plateau fractures that are caused by high- energy impacts and are therefore likely to develop ACS...of change in NIRS values for the trauma group 192 contrasts a finding of Shuler et al (20) in which in a series of tibial fracture cases showed 193...increased NIRS values peripheral to the fracture site. The difference between these results may 194 be due to the mode and severity of limb trauma

  3. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy to Reduce Prophylactic Fasciotomies for and Missed Cases of Acute Compartment Syndrome in Soldiers Injured in OEF/OIF

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    and cleaned by the CRO , which was completed in the second quarter of this period. The major accomplishment of this period has been the...although increasing the number of ports per machine would be make it more functional. 4d: Respond to provider feedback re: functionality and... ports to a machine, so that a patient can be monitored by a single machine, and 2. “horse-tailing” of leads, such that four (or more) sensors connect

  4. Effects of Visual and Auditory Background on Reading Achievement Test Performance of Brain-Injured and Non Brain-Injured Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, John L.

    Forty-two brain injured boys and 42 non brain injured boys (aged 11-6 to 12-6) were tested to determine the effects of increasing amounts of visual and auditory distraction on reading performance. The Stanford Achievement Reading Comprehension Test was administered with three degrees of distraction. The visual distraction consisted of either very…

  5. Ideological commitment and posttraumatic stress in former Tamil child soldiers.

    PubMed

    Kanagaratnam, Pushpa; Raundalen, Magne; Asbjørnsen, Arve E

    2005-12-01

    This study focuses on the impact of present ideological commitment on posttraumatic stress symptoms in former child soldiers living in exile. Eighteen men and two women (aged 25-37), who had joined different Tamil armed groups in Sri Lanka between the ages of 13 and 17 years, participated. The Impact of Event Scale was used to measure posttraumatic symptoms. Qualitative methods were used to investigate the participants' ideological commitment. Participants reported being exposed to many potentially traumatizing events, and had high scores on the Impact of Event Scale. Twenty-five percent of the sample showed strong ideological commitment to the "cause". Ideological commitment at the present seemed to predict better mental health when exposure was less intense and overwhelming. Time had a negative impact on ideological commitment.

  6. Robots Save Soldiers' Lives Overseas (MarcBot)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center mobile communications platform designs for future lunar missions led to improvements to fleets of tactical robots now being deployed by U.S. Army. The Multi-function Agile Remote Control Robot (MARCbot) helps soldiers search out and identify improvised explosive devices. NASA used the MARCbots to test its mobile communications platform, and in working with it, made the robot faster while adding capabilities -- upgrading to a digital camera, encrypting the controllers and video transmission, as well as increasing the range and adding communications abilities. They also simplified the design, providing more plug-and-play sensors and replacing some of the complex electronics with more trouble-free, low-cost components. Applied Geo Technology, a tribally-owned corporation in Choctaw, Mississippi, was given the task of manufacturing the modified robots. The company is now producing 40 units per month, 300 of which have already been deployed overseas.

  7. Pretraumatic Stress Reactions in Soldiers Deployed to Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Berntsen, Dorthe; Rubin, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Posttraumatic Stress Disorder is a diagnosis related to the past. Pre-traumatic stress reactions, as measured by intrusive involuntary images of possible future stressful events and their associated avoidance and increased arousal, have been overlooked in the PTSD literature. Here we introduce a scale that measures pre-traumatic stress reactions providing a clear future-oriented parallel to the posttraumatic stress reactions described in the diagnostic criteria for PTSD. We apply this pre-traumatic stress reactions checklist (PreCL) to Danish soldiers before, during, and after deployment to Afghanistan. The PreCL has good internal consistency and is highly correlated with a standard measure of PTSD symptoms. The PreCL as answered before the soldiers’ deployment significantly predicted level of PTSD symptoms during and after their deployment, while controlling for baseline PTSD symptoms and combat exposure measured during and after deployment. The findings have implications for the conceptualization of PTSD, screening, and treatment. PMID:26366328

  8. For soldier and state: dual loyalty and World War One.

    PubMed

    van Bergen, Leo

    2012-01-01

    Military medicine has always been characterized by some form of dual loyalty: physicians have to consider the interests of the individual soldier--patient as well as the interests of the state and the military in general. The way in which each individual doctor responds to this dual loyalty has mostly been viewed as a product of war circumstances on the one hand, and the personal character and/or religious and ideological beliefs of the physician on the other. Taking World War One as an example, this article argues that the nature of the illness or wound also had a part to play in this. The article shows that the disfigured were looked upon mainly in relation to the patient's own interests; the invalided-out through a combination of the patient's as well as the state's interests; and the neurotic mainly out of concern for the interests of the state.

  9. The first Civil War photographs of soldiers with facial wounds.

    PubMed

    Rogers, B O; Rhode, M G

    1995-01-01

    During the Civil War, for the first time in medical history, a large number of excellent photographs were taken of many wounded Union and (to a lesser degree) Confederate soldiers by photographers assigned by their doctors or surgeons, or by photographers employed by the Army Medical Museum. The majority of these photographs demonstrating facial, head, and neck wounds have not been published since the Civil War, except for a few minor exceptions [3, 9]. The actual art of printing photographs in medical journals, daily newspapers, and magazines did not even begin until the early 1880s--almost two decades after the Civil War [24]. Any photographs that could be found in certain rare medical and surgical books during and immediately after the War were actually pasted into those books by their printers.

  10. Occupational Lung Diseases among Soldiers Deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Szema, Anthony M

    2013-01-01

    Military personnel deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan, from 2004 to the present, has served in a setting of unique environmental conditions. Among these are exposures to burning trash in open air "burn pits" lit on fire with jet fuel JP-8. Depending on trash burned--water bottles, styrofoam trays, medical waste, unexploded munitions, and computers--toxins may be released such as dioxins and n-hexane and benzene. Particulate matter air pollution culminates from these fires and fumes. Additional environmental exposures entail sandstorms (Haboob, Shamal, and Sharqi) which differ in direction and relationship to rain. These wars saw the first use of improvised explosive devices (roadside phosphate bombs),as well as vehicle improvised explosive devices (car bombs), which not only potentially aerosolize metals, but also create shock waves to induce lung injury via blast overpressure. Conventional mortar rounds are also used by Al Qaeda in both Iraq and Afghanistan. Outdoor aeroallergens from date palm trees are prevalent in southern Iraq by the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, while indoor aeroallergen aspergillus predominates during the rainy season. High altitude lung disease may also compound the problem, particularly in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Clinically, soldiers may present with new-onset asthma or fixed airway obstruction. Some have constrictive bronchiolitis and vascular remodeling on open lung biopsy - despite having normal spirometry and chest xrays and CT scans of the chest. Others have been found to have titanium and other metals in the lung (rare in nature). Still others have fulminant biopsy-proven sarcoidiosis. We found DNA probe-positive Mycobacterium Avium Complex in lung from a soldier who had pneumonia, while serving near stagnant water and camels and goats outside Abu Gharib. This review highlights potential exposures, clinical syndromes, and the Denver Working Group recommendations on post-deployment health.

  11. Occupational Lung Diseases among Soldiers Deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Szema, Anthony M

    2013-01-01

    Military personnel deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan, from 2004 to the present, has served in a setting of unique environmental conditions. Among these are exposures to burning trash in open air “burn pits” lit on fire with jet fuel JP-8. Depending on trash burned--water bottles, styrofoam trays, medical waste, unexploded munitions, and computers--toxins may be released such as dioxins and n-hexane and benzene. Particulate matter air pollution culminates from these fires and fumes. Additional environmental exposures entail sandstorms (Haboob, Shamal, and Sharqi) which differ in direction and relationship to rain. These wars saw the first use of improvised explosive devices (roadside phosphate bombs),as well as vehicle improvised explosive devices (car bombs), which not only potentially aerosolize metals, but also create shock waves to induce lung injury via blast overpressure. Conventional mortar rounds are also used by Al Qaeda in both Iraq and Afghanistan. Outdoor aeroallergens from date palm trees are prevalent in southern Iraq by the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, while indoor aeroallergen aspergillus predominates during the rainy season. High altitude lung disease may also compound the problem, particularly in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Clinically, soldiers may present with new-onset asthma or fixed airway obstruction. Some have constrictive bronchiolitis and vascular remodeling on open lung biopsy - despite having normal spirometry and chest xrays and CT scans of the chest. Others have been found to have titanium and other metals in the lung (rare in nature). Still others have fulminant biopsy-proven sarcoidiosis. We found DNA probe–positive Mycobacterium Avium Complex in lung from a soldier who had pneumonia, while serving near stagnant water and camels and goats outside Abu Gharib. This review highlights potential exposures, clinical syndromes, and the Denver Working Group recommendations on post-deployment health. PMID:24443711

  12. Alexithymia, impulsiveness, and psychopathology in nonsuicidal self-injured adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Gatta, Michela; Dal Santo, Francesco; Rago, Alessio; Spoto, Andrea; Battistella, Pier Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a multifaceted phenomenon and a major health issue among adolescents. A better understanding of self-injury comorbidities is crucial to improve our ability to assess, treat, and prevent NSSI. Purpose This study aimed at analyzing some of the psychobehavioral correlates of NSSI: psychological problems, alexithymia, impulsiveness, and sociorelational aspects. Patients and methods This was a case–control study. The clinical sample (n=33) included adolescents attending our unit for NSSI and other issues; the controls (n=79) were high-school students. Data were collected using six questionnaires: Youth Self-Report, Barratt’s Impulsiveness Scale, Toronto Alexithymia Scale, Children’s Depression Inventory, Symptom Checklist-90-R, and Child Behavior Checklist. Results Cases scored significantly higher in all questionnaires. Habitual self-injurers scored higher on impulsiveness and alexithymia. The gesture’s repetition seems relevant to the global clinical picture: habitual self-injurers appear more likely to seek help from the sociosanitary services. We found a difference between the self-injurers’ and their parents’ awareness of the disorder. Conclusion Habitual self-injurers show signs of having difficulty with assessing the consequences of their actions (nonplanning impulsiveness) and the inability to manage their feelings. Given the significantly higher scores found for cases than for controls on all the psychopathological scales, NSSI can be seen as a cross-category psychiatric disorder, supporting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders decision to include it as a pathological entity in its own right. PMID:27672324

  13. 78 FR 18777 - Establishment of the Charles Young Buffalo Soldiers National Monument

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... reverse the decision. The War Department's action in this matter was controversial, especially within the... cavalry troops ``buffalo soldiers'' because of their dark, curly hair, which resembled a buffalo's...

  14. Use of body armor protection with fighting load impacts soldier performance and kinematics.

    PubMed

    Loverro, Kari L; Brown, Tyler N; Coyne, Megan E; Schiffman, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this evaluation was to examine how increasing body armor protection with and without a fighting load impacted soldiers' performance and mobility. Thirteen male soldiers performed one performance (repeated 30-m rushing) and three mobility tasks (walk, walk over and walk under) with three different body armor configurations and an anterior fighting load. Increasing body armor protection, decreased soldier performance, as individual and total 30-m rush times were significantly longer with greater protection. While increasing body armor protection had no impact on mobility, i.e. significant effect on trunk and lower limb biomechanics, during the walk and walk over tasks, greater protection did significantly decrease maximum trunk flexion during the walk under task. Adding fighting load may negatively impact soldier mobility, as greater maximum trunk extension was evident during the walk and walk over tasks, and decreased maximum trunk flexion exhibited during the walk under task with the fighting load.

  15. Reproductive division of labour coevolves with gall size in Australian thrips with soldiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, T. E.; Chapman, T. W.; Kranz, B. D.; Schwarz, M. P.

    2001-12-01

    An analysis of multiple species of Australian gall-inducing thrips with soldiers reveals a significant negative correlation between the size of gall produced and the reproductive division of labour. This correlation suggests that the evolution of smaller galls limited the available space and feeding sites for the offspring of female soldiers, and was a major factor that led to the evolution of an altruistic caste in the gall-inducers. We argue that high levels of inbreeding by singly mated foundresses and incestuous mating by her soldier offspring are key to this evolutionary relationship because they make the relatedness of a female soldier to her daughters and sisters approximately equal. Evidence that relatedness plays an important role is strengthened by the observation of outbred multiply mated foundresses and unbiased sex ratio of dispersers in Oncothrips waterhousei, and the inference that both gall volume and skew decreased along this lineage.

  16. Danish soldiers in Iraq: perceived exposures, psychological distress, and reporting of physical symptoms.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Lars Ravnborg; Marott, Jacob Louis; Gyntelberg, Finn; Guldager, Bernadette

    2011-10-01

    Using data from an occupational medical health surveillance program, we studied the associations between mental stressors and social support and the two outcome measures postdeployment psychological distress and multiple physical symptoms among Danish soldiers deployed to Iraq. The study was cross-sectional and questionnaire-based with soldiers returning from the mission as the target group. Witnessing atrocities, fear of being physically harmed, feeling of insecurity, feeling of meaninglessness, and having been in touch with prisoners were associated with both outcome measures. In conclusion, our findings support the assumption that other factors than combat exposure-psychosocial and cultural-are of importance in increasing psychological distress among soldiers deployed to Iraq. Additionally, we have shown that the reporting of multiple physical symptoms among the deployed soldiers is closely related to increased psychological discomfort and certain mental stressors.

  17. Improving Soldier Health and Performance by Moving Army Medicine Toward a System for Health.

    PubMed

    Caravalho, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    With growing limitations on military resources, including a reduction in the overall size of our military force, the Army must make the most of every soldier in its ranks. The only way to achieve the necessary improvements in human performance with upcoming constraints will be through exploring innovative ways of thinking while implementing the best policies and doctrine that will maintain each soldier's resilience throughout their military career. Moving the Army from a traditional health care system to a system for health is expected to substantially improve and maintain soldier health and performance by focusing on 3 key areas: the Performance Triad (sleep health, physical activity, and nutrition behaviors), Delivery of Health, and Healthy Environments. The implementation of this system for health will not only improve individual soldier's resiliency/capability both throughout and beyond their military careers and benefit Army Medicine as a whole, but could also serve as a successful model for the nation if changes are adopted.

  18. A Cup of Salt for an O. D.: "Dog Soldiers" as Anti-Apocalypse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knox, Stephen H.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Robert Stone's "Dog Soldiers," a novel written out of the author's experiences in Vietnam in 1973, and its refusal to present an ultimate apocalyptic vision of history. Contrasts it with other modern works pervaded by apocalyptic anxiety. (DMM)

  19. Effect of Timing of Surgery in Partially Injured ACLs.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Bai, Lunhao; Fu, Yonghui; Wang, Guangbin; He, Ming; Wang, Jiashi

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the optimal timing for surgical intervention of partially injured anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL). Thirty-eight patients were divided into early (n=17) or delayed (n=21) surgery groups based on the interval between injury and surgery. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. The outcome measures used were the International Knee Documentation Committee score, Lysholm knee score, Tegner activity rating, range of motion, and arthrometer measurements. The findings of this study indicate that early surgical reconstruction of partially ruptured ACLs did not result in arthrofibrosis but may prevent secondary loosening of the intact bundles and further meniscal and chondral injury.

  20. Transcranial Photoacoustic Measurements of Cold-Injured Brains in Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Yoshinori; Sato, Shunichi; Hasegawa, Makoto; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Shima, Katsuji; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2005-09-01

    We performed transcranial photoacoustic measurements of cold-injured brains in rats. Before inducing injury, a signal peak was observed at two locations corresponding to the surfaces of the skull and brain, while after injury, a third peak appeared at a location corresponding to the back surface of the skull; the third peak was found to be caused by subdural hematoma. The signal peak for the brain surface shifted to a deeper region with elapse of time after injury, indicating deformation of the brain. These findings suggest that small hemorrhage and morphological change of the brain can be transcranially detected by photoacoustic measurement.

  1. What pre-deployment and early post-deployment factors predict health function after combat deployment?: a prospective longitudinal study of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF)/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) soldiers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical and mental function are strong indicators of disability and mortality. OEF/OIF Veterans returning from deployment have been found to have poorer function than soldiers who have not deployed; however the reasons for this are unknown. Methods A prospective cohort of 790 soldiers was assessed both pre- and immediately after deployment to determine predictors of physical and mental function after war. Results On average, OEF/OIF Veterans showed significant declines in both physical (t=6.65, p<.0001) and mental function (t=7.11, p<.0001). After controlling for pre-deployment function, poorer physical function after deployment was associated with older age, more physical symptoms, blunted systolic blood pressure reactivity and being injured. After controlling for pre-deployment function, poorer mental function after deployment was associated with younger age, lower social desirability, lower social support, greater physical symptoms and greater PTSD symptoms. Conclusions Combat deployment was associated with an immediate decline in both mental and physical function. The relationship of combat deployment to function is complex and influenced by demographic, psychosocial, physiological and experiential factors. Social support and physical symptoms emerged as potentially modifiable factors. PMID:23631419

  2. Assessing Army Values in New Soldiers: Development of a Behaviorally Anchored Peer Evaluation Form

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-03

    military- style briefings. Colorful and dynamic Army Values posters paper the walls in the barracks where IET Soldiers sleep, and in the classrooms and...it is impossible for those in the process of becoming Soldiers to avoid Values imagery, discussions, vignettes, videos, classroom lectures, and...5 10.1 hours of total training time for formal classroom -based values instruction (BCT POI, 2010). The significance of

  3. Buffalo Soldiers: the Formation of the Ninth Cavalry Regiment: July 1866-March 1867

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-07

    supervise or train the enlisted soldiers properly. Literacy was not the unit’s biggest problem. Despite the lack of officers, the Ninth Cavalry Regiment was...concludes there were not enough officers available to supervise or train the enlisted soldiers properly. Literacy was not the unit’s biggest problem... Bernard C. Nalty’s Strength for the Fight. The Post-Civil War Army Books written about life in the Post-civil War Army also contributed information on

  4. Army Reserve Components: Improvements Needed to Data Quality and Management Procedures to Better Report Soldier Availability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    its number of soldiers over the next several years. The House Report accompanying the Fiscal Year 2015 National Defense Authorization Act... House of Representatives As an integral part of the Army, its reserve components (the Army Reserve and the Army National Guard) are called upon to...from a smaller population of the remaining available soldiers. 5 The House Report 113-446 accompanying a proposed bill for the National Defense

  5. Age of first reported sexual experience among U.S. soldiers.

    PubMed

    Berry-Cabán, Cristóbal S; Jenkins, Jamie N; Goorley, Elizabeth; Gray, Serena

    2014-01-01

    Studies show that the age of first sexual intercourse is directly correlated with risky sexual behavior among civilian populations. However, few studies have looked at the age of first intercourse and its consequence among soldiers. A study was conducted to examine the age of first sexual experience and sexual practices among soldiers surveyed at a large military post. The survey consisted of 31 fixed-choice items that focused on the soldiers' sexual knowledge, beliefs and behaviors. A total of 450 soldiers were included in the sample. Respondents were divided into three main categories by age groupings of first sexual experience as follows: under 14 years of age, between the ages of 14 to 17 years, and over 18 years. All values were analyzed using frequency distributions with calculations of means, standard deviations, and range. Results showed that soldiers who had their first sexual experience under the age of 14 were more likely to participate in risky sexual behaviors than those whose first sexual experience occurred when soldiers were over the age of 18.

  6. Trends in Mental Health Services Utilization and Stigma in US Soldiers From 2002 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, Joshua E.; Thomas, Jeffrey L.; Bray, Robert M.; Rae Olmsted, Kristine L.; Brown, Janice M.; Williams, Jason; Kim, Paul Y.; Clarke-Walper, Kristina; Hoge, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We characterized trends in mental health services utilization and stigma over the course of the Afghanistan and Iraq wars among active-component US soldiers. Methods. We evaluated trends in mental health services utilization and stigma using US Army data from the Health-Related Behavior (HRB) surveys from 2002, 2005, and 2008 (n = 12 835) and the Land Combat Study (LCS) surveys administered to soldiers annually from 2003 to 2009 and again in 2011 (n = 22 627). Results. HRB and LCS data suggested increased mental health services utilization and decreased stigma in US soldiers between 2002 and 2011. These trends were evident in soldiers with and without posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), or PTSD and MDD. Despite the improving trends, more than half of soldiers with mental health problems did not report seeking care. Conclusions. Mental health services utilization increased and stigma decreased over the course of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Although promising, these findings indicate that a significant proportion of US soldiers meeting criteria for PTSD or MDD do not utilize mental health services, and stigma remains a pervasive problem requiring further attention. PMID:25033143

  7. A scalable soldier-machine interface for human-robotic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samples, Brian A.

    2007-04-01

    As part of the Crew-Automated and integration Testbed (CAT) Advanced Technology Objective (ATO), the US Army Tank-automotive and Armaments Research, Development, and Engineering Center (TARDEC) developed crew stations that provided soldiers the ability to control both manned and unmanned vehicles. The crew stations were designed to optimize soldier workload and provide the ability to conduct mission planning, route planning, reconnaissance, surveillance, and target acquisition (RSTA), and fire control capabilities. The crew station software is fully configurable, portable (between crew stations), and interoperable with one another. However, the software architecture was optimized for the specific computing platform utilized by each crew station and user interfaces were hard coded. Current CAT crew station capabilities are required to execute on other crew station configurations as well as handheld devices to meet the needs of expanded soldier roles, including dismounted infantry. TARDEC is currently exploring ways to develop a scalable software architecture that is able to adapt to the physical characteristics of differing computing platforms and devices. In addition, based upon a soldier's role, the software must be able to adapt and optimize the displays based upon individual soldier needs. And finally, the software must be capable of applying a unique style to the presentation of information to the soldier. Future programs require more robust software architectures that take these requirements into account. This paper will describe how scalable software architectures can be designed to address each of these unique requirements.

  8. An examination of successful soldier postdeployment transition from combat to garrison life.

    PubMed

    Fink, David S; Gallaway, M Shayne; Millikan, Amy M

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that combat exposures and deployment-related stressors have negative implications on soldiers' postdeployment health and well-being. The current study aimed to examine the individual and combined effects of organizational and social support on the success of soldiers' postdeployment reintegration. In this study, 2,922 U.S. soldiers were surveyed from a brigade combat team at 90-120 days postdeployment, measuring soldiers' perceptions of postdeployment transition home, occupational and social support, stigma and barriers associated with accessing behavioral health care, and previous behavioral health care. Logistic regression analysis indicated that soldiers reporting a positive postdeployment transition home (n = 1,776; 61%) was significantly associated with leadership perceptions, adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.02, 1.39], unit cohesion, AOR = 1.29, 95% CI [1.09, 1.53], personal support, AOR = 1.37, 95% CI [1.23, 1.52], perceived levels of stigma, AOR = 0.73, 95% CI [0.65, 0.82] barriers to accessing care, AOR = 0.86, 95% CI [0.76, 0.97], and previously accessing behavioral health care, AOR = 0.34, 95% CI [0.28, 0.43]. These findings suggest redeploying soldiers may benefit from programs aimed at improving self-efficacy and coping through fostering occupational and social support, with special concern taken to reduce stigma and barriers to care across the Army.

  9. Emotional ambivalence and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in soldiers during military operations

    PubMed Central

    Jerg-Bretzke, Lucia; Walter, Steffen; Limbrecht-Ecklundt, Kerstin; Traue, Harald C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study examined the extent to which a specific mechanism of emotion regulation – namely, ambivalence concerning the expressiveness of German soldiers’ emotions – affects the severity of PTSD symptoms after a military operation. Methodology: A survey was conducted at three points in time among 66 soldiers deployed on military crisis operations. The Harvard Trauma Questionaire (HTQ), the Ambivalence over Emotional Expressiveness Questionnaire (AEQ-G18), and a questionnaire on the particular stress of German soldiers during military operations were used. Results: The study showed a significant correlation between emotional ambivalence and traumatization. Furthermore, it was shown that the subjective stress of soldiers leading up to deployment is more pronounced when emotional ambivalence is stronger in the context of military operations. This particular stress is greater before and during the military operation than after. Compared to a male control sample, the average AEQ-G18 scores of the soldier sample examined here are considerably lower. Conclusion: This pilot study clearly indicates that the AEQ-G18 could be a suitable predictor of the psychological burden on soldiers. The correlations between emotional ambivalence on the one hand and the particular and post-traumatic stressors on the other hand are not only statistically significant in the present pilot study, but may also be relevant as risk factors. It is, therefore, necessary to conduct more extensive studies on soldiers participating in military operations to verify the results of this pilot study. PMID:23798980

  10. Ability of Black Soldier Fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) Larvae to Recycle Food Waste.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trinh T X; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Vanlaerhoven, Sherah

    2015-04-01

    Accumulation of organic wastes, especially in livestock facilities, can be a potential pollution issue. The black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens L. (Diptera: Stratiomyidae), can consume a wide range of organic material and has the potential to be used in waste management. In addition, the prepupae stage of this insect can be harvested and used as a valuable nutritious feed for animal livestock. Five waste types with a wide range of organic source matter were specifically chosen to evaluate the consumption and reduction ability of black soldier fly larvae. H. illucens was able to reduce all waste types examined: 1) control poultry feed, 2) pig liver, 3) pig manure, 4) kitchen waste, 5) fruits and vegetables, and 6) rendered fish. Kitchen waste had the greatest mean rate of reduction (consumption by black soldier fly) per day and produced the longest and heaviest black soldier flies. Larvae reared on liver, manure, fruits and vegetables, and fish were approximately the same length and weight as larvae fed the control feed, although some diets produced larvae with a higher nutritional content. The black soldier fly has the ability to consume and reduce organic waste and be utilized as valuable animal feed. Exploration of the potential use of black soldier flies as an agent for waste management on a large-scale system should continue.

  11. Development of black soldier fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) larvae fed dairy manure.

    PubMed

    Myers, Heidi M; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Lambert, Barry D; Kattes, David

    2008-02-01

    Black soldier flies, Hermetia illucens L., are a common colonizer of animal wastes. However, all published development data for this species are from studies using artificial diets. This study represents the first examining black soldier fly development on animal wastes. Additionally, this study examined the ability of black soldier fly larvae to reduce dry matter and associated nutrients in manure. Black soldier fly larvae were fed four rates of dairy manure to determine their effects on larval and adult life history traits. Feed rate affected larval and adult development. Those fed less ration daily weighed less than those fed a greater ration. Additionally, larvae provided the least amount of dairy manure took longer to develop to the prepupal stage; however, they needed less time to reach the adult stage. Adults resulting from larvae provided 27 g dairy manure/d lived 3-4 d less than those fed 70 g dairy manure. Percentage survivorship to the prepupal or adult stages did not differ across treatments. Larvae fed 27 g dairy manure daily reduced manure dry matter mass by 58%, whereas those fed 70 g daily reduced dry matter 33%. Black soldier fly larvae were able to reduce available P by 61-70% and N by 30-50% across treatments. Based on results from this study, the black soldier fly could be used to reduce wastes and associated nutrients in confined bovine facilities.

  12. Black soldier fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) larvae reduce Escherichia coli in dairy manure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiaolin; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Brady, Jeff A; Sanford, Michelle R; Yu, Ziniu

    2008-12-01

    Escherichia coli labeled with a green fluorescent protein was inoculated into sterile dairy manure at 7.0 log cfu/g. Approximately 125 black soldier fly larvae were placed in manure inoculated and homogenized with E. coli. Manure inoculated with E. coli but without black soldier fly larvae served as the control. For the first experiment, larvae were introduced into 50, 75, 100, or 125 g sterilized dairy manure inoculated and homogenized with E. coli and stored 72 h at 27 degrees C. Black soldier fly larvae significantly reduced E. coli counts in all treatments. However, varying the amount of manure provided the black soldier fly larvae significantly affected their weight gain and their ability to reduce E. coli populations present. For the second experiment, larvae were introduced into 50 g manure inoculated with E. coli and stored for 72 h at 23, 27, 31, or 35 degrees C. Minimal bacterial growth was recorded in the control held at 35 degrees C and was excluded from the analysis. Black soldier fly larvae significantly reduced E. coli counts in manure held at remaining temperatures. Accordingly, temperature significantly influenced the ability of black soldier fly larvae to develop and reduce E. coli counts with greatest suppression occurring at 27 degrees C.

  13. Responses of the Acutely Injured Spinal Cord to Vibration that Simulates Transport in Helicopters or Mine-Resistant Ambush-Protected Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Streijger, Femke; Lee, Jae H T; Manouchehri, Neda; Melnyk, Angela D; Chak, Jason; Tigchelaar, Seth; So, Kitty; Okon, Elena B; Jiang, Shudong; Kinsler, Rachel; Barazanji, Khalid; Cripton, Peter A; Kwon, Brian K

    2016-12-15

    In the military environment, injured soldiers undergoing medical evacuation via helicopter or mine-resistant ambush-protected vehicle (MRAP) are subjected to vibration and shock inherent to the transport vehicle. We conducted the present study to assess the consequences of such vibration on the acutely injured spinal cord. We used a porcine model of spinal cord injury (SCI). After a T10 contusion-compression injury, animals were subjected to 1) no vibration (n = 7-8), 2) whole body vibration at frequencies and amplitudes simulating helicopter transport (n = 8), or 3) whole body vibration simulating ground transportation in an MRAP ambulance (n = 7). Hindlimb locomotor function (using Porcine Thoracic Injury Behavior Scale [PTIBS]), Eriochrome Cyanine histochemistry and biochemical analysis of inflammatory and neural damage markers were analyzed. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) expression levels for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were similar between the helicopter or MRAP group and the unvibrated controls. Spared white/gray matter tended to be lower in the MRAP-vibrated animals than in the unvibrated controls, especially rostral to the epicenter. However, spared white/gray matter in the helicopter-vibrated group appeared normal. Although there was a relationship between the extent of sparing and the extent of locomotor recovery, no significant differences were found in PTIBS scores between the groups. In summary, exposures to vibration in the context of ground (MRAP) or aeromedical (helicopter) transportation did not significantly impair functional outcome in our large animal model of SCI. However, MRAP vibration was associated with increased tissue damage around the injury site, warranting caution around exposure to vehicle vibration acutely after SCI.

  14. ATP Released by Injured Neurons Activates Schwann Cells

    PubMed Central

    Negro, Samuele; Bergamin, Elisanna; Rodella, Umberto; Duregotti, Elisa; Scorzeto, Michele; Jalink, Kees; Montecucco, Cesare; Rigoni, Michela

    2016-01-01

    Injured nerve terminals of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) can regenerate. This remarkable and complex response is governed by molecular signals that are exchanged among the cellular components of this synapse: motor axon nerve terminal (MAT), perisynaptic Schwann cells (PSCs), and muscle fiber. The nature of signals that govern MAT regeneration is ill-known. In the present study the spider toxin α-latrotoxin has been used as tool to investigate the mechanisms underlying peripheral neuroregeneration. Indeed this neurotoxin induces an acute, specific, localized and fully reversible damage of the presynaptic nerve terminal, and its action mimics the cascade of events that leads to nerve terminal degeneration in injured patients and in many neurodegenerative conditions. Here we provide evidence of an early release by degenerating neurons of adenosine triphosphate as alarm messenger, that contributes to the activation of a series of intracellular pathways within Schwann cells that are crucial for nerve regeneration: Ca2+, cAMP, ERK1/2, and CREB. These results contribute to define the cross-talk taking place among degenerating nerve terminals and PSCs, involved in the functional recovery of the NMJ. PMID:27242443

  15. Progressive induction of hepatocyte progenitor cells in chronically injured liver

    PubMed Central

    Tanimizu, Naoki; Ichinohe, Norihisa; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Nishikawa, Yuji; Mitaka, Toshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Differentiated epithelial cells show substantial lineage plasticity upon severe tissue injuries. In chronically injured mouse livers, part of hepatocytes become Sry-HMG box containing 9 (Sox9) (+) epithelial cell adhesion molecule (−) hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 α (+) biphenotypic hepatocytes. However, it is not clear whether all Sox9+ hepatocytes uniformly possess cellular properties as hepatocyte progenitors. Here, we examined the microarray data comparing Sox9+ hepatocytes with mature hepatocytes and identified CD24 as a novel marker for biphenotypic hepatocytes. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that part of Sox9+ hepatocytes near expanded ductular structures expressed CD24 in the liver injured by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydro-collidine (DDC) diet and by bile duct ligation. Indeed, Sox9+ hepatocytes could be separated into CD24− and CD24+ cells by fluorescence activated cell sorting. The ratio of CD24+ cells against CD24− ones in Sox9+ hepatocytes gradually increased while DDC-injury progressed and colony-forming capability mostly attributed to CD24+ cells. Although hepatocyte markers were remarkably downregulated in of Sox9+ CD24+ hepatocytes, they re-differentiated into mature hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo. Our current results demonstrate that the emergence of biphenotypic hepatocytes is a sequential event including the transition from CD24− and CD24+ status, which may be a crucial step for hepatocytes to acquire progenitor properties. PMID:28051157

  16. Characteristics of burn patients injured in methamphetamine laboratory explosions.

    PubMed

    Spann, Matthew D; McGwin, Gerald; Kerby, Jeffrey D; George, Richard L; Dunn, Shane; Rue, Loring W; Cross, James M

    2006-01-01

    The use of methamphetamine (MA) as a recreational drug has increased exponentially in recent years, resulting in an emergence of clandestine laboratories. Consequently, the frequency with which burn centers across the country are admitting patients injured as a consequence of the volatile manufacturing process of MA is increasing. This study focused on comparing outcomes between burn patients injured secondary to MA laboratory explosions and patients sustaining burns from other mechanisms. All patients identified to have suffered burns secondary to MA laboratory explosions between 1998 and 2004 were included in this study. These patients were compared with those who did not experience such burns during this same time period. In total, 19 patients were identified as having been burned in MA laboratory explosions. These patients had a larger component of third-degree burns (24.8% vs 13.5%; P < .05) as well as TBSA burned (28.4% vs 20.7%; P < .05). In addition, patients using MA had an increased incidence of inhalation injury (31.2% vs 6.1%; P < .05). They also exhibited a significantly increased frequency of complications, such as nosocomial pneumonia, respiratory failure, and sepsis. Overall, the rate of mortality was significantly increased in patients using MA (26.3% vs 8.5%; P < .05); however, no significant difference was observed after adjustment for age, burn size, and inhalation injury. MA burn patients have larger burn size, incidence of inhalation injury, and increased morbidity when compared with non-MA burn patients.

  17. Gene expression profile analyses of mice livers injured by Leigongteng

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Han, Feng-Mei; Du, Peng; Xia, Qi-Song

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the gene expression profiles of mice livers injured by Leigongteng and explore the relationship between the differentially expressed genes and liver damage. METHODS: The experimental mice were randomly divided into a control group and a liver-injured group in which the mice were administrated 33 μγ of triptolide/kg per day for 30 d. Liver mRNAs were extracted from animals in both groups and were reverse-transcribed to cDNA with dUTP labeled by different fluorescence (Cy3, Cy5) as hybridization probes. The mixed probes were hybridized with oligonucleotide microarray chips. The fluorescent signal results were acquired by scanner and analyzed with software. RESULTS: Among the 35852 target genes, 29 genes were found to be significantly differentially expressed, with 20 genes up-regulated and 9 genes down-regulated. The reliability of the differentially expressed genes was validated by RT-PCR experiments of 5 randomly selected differentially expressed genes. CONCLUSION: Based on the biological functions of the differentially expressed genes, it is obvious that the occurrence and development of liver damage induced by Leigongteng in mice are highly associated with immune response, metabolism, apoptosis and the cell skeleton of liver cells. This might be important for elucidating the regulatory network of gene expression associated with liver damage and it may also be important for discovering the pathogenic mechanisms of liver damage induced by Leigongteng. PMID:17659714

  18. Risk Propensity, Risk Perception, and Sensation Seeking in US Army Soldiers: A Preliminary Study of a Risk Assessment Task Battery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    Brain Injury (TBI). According to this report, an estimated 300,000 Soldiers are currently suffering from either PTSD or MD and 320,000 Soldiers have a...probable TBI. These injuries continue to receive a lot of attention from the public, media, and research community. Another area of public health...as injury to self or others for the post-deployed Soldier. In an effort to understand and potentially develop intervention programs to prevent risky

  19. Demographic, Physical, and Mental Health Factors Associated With Deployment of U.S. Army Soldiers to the Persian Gulf

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    MILITARY MEDICINE, 175,4:227, 2010 Demographic, Physical , and Mental Health Factors Associated With Deployment of U.S. Army Soldiers to the Persian...describe the prewar demo- graphic, occupational, and physical and mental health status of active duty Army soldiers who deployed to the Persian Gulf and...behaviors, risk- taking behaviors, and mental or physical health could influence a soldier’s postwar health status. Such factors could affect the chance

  20. Demographic, Physical, and Mental Health Factors Associated with Deployment of U.S. Army Soldiers to the Persian Gulf

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    MILITARY MEDICINE, 175,4:227, 2010 Demographic, Physical , and Mental Health Factors Associated With Deployment of U.S. Army Soldiers to the Persian...describe the prewar demo- graphic, occupational, and physical and mental health status of active duty Army soldiers who deployed to the Persian Gulf and...behaviors, risk- taking behaviors, and mental or physical health could influence a soldier’s postwar health status. Such factors could affect the chance

  1. The Soldier-Cyborg Transformation: A Framework for Analysis of Social and Ethical Issues of Future Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-05-26

    government agency. STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT THE SOLDIER- CYBORG TRANSFORMATION: A FRAMEWORK FOR ANALYSIS OF SOCIAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES OF FUTURE...UNCLASSIFIED USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT THE SOLDIER- CYBORG TRANSFORMATION: A FRAMEWORK FOR ANALYSIS OF SOCIAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES OF FUTURE...P) Donald A. Gagliano, M.D. TITLE: THE SOLDIER CYBORG TRANSFORMATION: A FRAMEWORK FOR ANALYSIS OF SOCIAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES OF FUTURE WARFARE

  2. Irradiation effect of polarization direction and intensity of semiconductor laser on injured peripheral nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo-Xin, Xiong; Lei-lei, Xiong

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the irradiation effect of polarization direction and the intensity of a semiconductor laser on the injured peripheral nerve in rabbits, the model of the injured common peroneal nerve was established, the L5,6 spinal segments of the rabbits were irradiated, a uniform rotating polarizer was placed at the laser output which made the polarization direction and intensity of the output laser change according to the 80 Hz cosine law. The experimental results show that irradiating the spinal segment of injured nerves in rabbits with this changeable semiconductor laser can significantly promote the regeneration of injured peripheral nerves and the function recovery.

  3. Relationship Between Job Burnout and Neuroendocrine Indicators in Soldiers in the Xinjiang Arid Desert: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ning; Zhang, Jianjiang; Song, Zhixin; Tang, Jinhua; Liu, Jiwen

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between job burnout and neuroendocrine indicators in soldiers living in a harsh environment. Three hundred soldiers stationed in the arid desert and 600 in an urban area were recruited. They filled in the Chinese Maslach Burnout Inventory questionnaire. One hundred soldiers were randomly selected from each group to measure their levels of noradrenaline, serotonin, heat shock protein (HSP)-70, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and serum cortisol. Job burnout was more common in soldiers from urban areas than those from rural areas. Job burnout was significantly higher among soldiers stationed in the arid desert than those in urban areas. For soldiers in the arid desert, the levels of HSP-70, serum cortisol, and adrenocorticotropic hormone were significantly higher than in soldiers in urban areas. Correlation analyses showed that the degree of job burnout was weakly negatively correlated with the level of HSP-70. Being an only child, HSP-70 levels, cortisol levels, and ACTH levels were independently associated with job burnout in soldiers stationed in the arid desert. A higher level of job burnout in soldiers stationed in arid desert and a corresponding change in neuroendocrine indicators indicated a correlation between occupational stress and neurotransmitters.

  4. Psychological effects of sexual harassment, appraisal of harassment, and organizational climate among U.S. Army soldiers.

    PubMed

    Rosen, L N; Martin, L

    1998-02-01

    This study examines the effects of three types of unwanted sexual experiences in the workplace on the psychological well-being of male and female U.S. Army soldiers, and the mediating or moderating roles of appraisal of sexual harassment, organizational climate, and the sociodemographic profile of victims. A survey was administered to 1,060 male soldiers and 305 female soldiers between May and July, 1995, at three Army posts in the United States. Unwanted sexual experiences were found to be significant predictors of psychological symptoms for male and female soldiers. Certain aspects of organizational climate and appraisal of sexual harassment were also significant predictors of psychological symptoms.

  5. Susceptibility of black soldier fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) larvae and adults to four insecticides.

    PubMed

    Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Sheppard, D Craig; Joyce, John A

    2002-06-01

    Dosage-mortality regressions were determined for black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens (L.), larvae fed cyromazine or pyriproxifen treated media. Cyromazine LC50 for larvae dying before becoming prepupae ranged from 0.25 to 0.28 ppm with dosage-mortality regression slopes between 5.79 and 12.04. Cyromazine LC50s for larvae dying before emergence ranged from 0.13 to 0.19 ppm with dosage-mortality regression slopes between 3.94 and 7.69. Pyriproxifen dosage-mortality regressions were not generated for larvae failing to become prepupae since <32% mortality was recorded at the highest concentration of 1,857 ppm. LC50s for larvae failing to become adults ranged from 0.10 to 0.12 ppm with dosage mortality-regression slopes between 1.67 and 2.32. Lambda-cyhalothrin and permethrin dosage-mortality regressions were determined for wild adult black soldier flies and house flies, Musca domestica L., and for susceptible house flies. Our results indicate that the wild house fly, unlike the black soldier fly, population was highly resistant to each of these pyrethroids. Regression slopes for black soldier flies exposed to lambda-cyhalothrin were twice as steep as those determined for the wild house fly strain. Accordingly, LC50s for the black soldier fly and susceptible house fly were 10- to 30-fold lower than those determined for wild house flies. The differential sensitivity between wild black soldier flies and house flies might be due to behavioral differences. Adult house flies usually remain in animal facilities with the possibility of every adult receiving pesticide exposure, while black soldier fly adults are typically present only during emergence and oviposition thereby limiting their exposure.

  6. Soldier morphogenesis in the damp-wood termite is regulated by the insulin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Akiko; Sugime, Yasuhiro; Sasa, Chifune; Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Yuki; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Okada, Yasukazu; Cornette, Richard; Lavine, Laura Corley; Emlen, Douglas J; Koshikawa, Shigeyuki; Miura, Toru

    2013-07-01

    Eusocial insects exhibit various morphological castes associated with the division of labor within a colony. Termite soldiers possess defensive traits including mandibles that are greatly exaggerated and enlarged, as compared to termite reproductives and workers. The enlarged mandibles of soldiers are known to result from dynamic morphogenesis during soldier differentiation that can be induced by juvenile hormone and its analogs. However, the detailed developmental mechanisms still remain unresolved. Because the insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) pathway has been shown to regulate the relative sizes of organs (i.e., allometry) in other insects, we examined the expression profiles of major IIS factors in the damp-wood termite Hodotermopsis sjostedti, during soldier differentiation. The relative expression patterns of orthologs for termite InR (HsjInR), PKB/Akt (HsjPKB/Akt), and FOXO (HsjFOXO) suggest that HsjInR and HsjPKB/Akt were up-regulated in the period of elongation of mandibles during soldier development. In situ hybridization showed that HsjInR was strongly expressed in the mandibular epithelial tissues, and RNA interference (RNAi) for HsjInR disrupted soldier-specific morphogenesis including mandibular elongation. These results suggest that signaling through the IIS pathway is required for soldier-specific morphogenesis. In addition, up-regulation of the IIS pathway in other body tissues occurred at earlier stages of development, indicating that there is tissue-specific IIS regulation. Because the IIS pathway is generally thought to act upstream of JH in insects, our results suggest the damp-wood termite may have evolved a novel feedback loop between JH and IIS that enables social interactions, rather than nutrition, to regulate caste determination.

  7. Resuscitation and coagulation in the severely injured trauma patient

    PubMed Central

    Midwinter, Mark J.; Woolley, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Developments in the resuscitation of the severely injured trauma patient in the last decade have been through the increased understanding of the early pathophysiological consequences of injury together with some observations and experiences of recent casualties of conflict. In particular, the recognition of early derangements of haemostasis with hypocoagulopathy being associated with increased mortality and morbidity and the prime importance of tissue hypoperfusion as a central driver to this process in this population of patients has led to new resuscitation strategies. These strategies have focused on haemostatic resuscitation and the development of the ideas of damage control resuscitation and damage control surgery continuum. This in turn has led to a requirement to be able to more closely monitor the physiological status, of major trauma patients, including their coagulation status, and react in an anticipatory fashion. PMID:21149355

  8. Factors Influencing Cerebral Plasticity in the Normal and Injured Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Bryan; Teskey, G. Campbell; Gibb, Robbin

    2010-01-01

    An important development in behavioral neuroscience in the past 20 years has been the demonstration that it is possible to stimulate functional recovery after cerebral injury in laboratory animals. Rodent models of cerebral injury provide an important tool for developing such rehabilitation programs. The models include analysis at different levels including detailed behavioral paradigms, electrophysiology, neuronal morphology, protein chemistry, and epigenetics. A significant challenge for the next 20 years will be the translation of this work to improve the outcome from brain injury and disease in humans. Our goal in the article will be to synthesize the multidisciplinary laboratory work on brain plasticity and behavior in the injured brain to inform the development of rehabilitation programs. PMID:21120136

  9. Schwann cell autophagy, myelinophagy, initiates myelin clearance from injured nerves

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Sanchez, Jose A.; Carty, Lucy; Iruarrizaga-Lejarreta, Marta; Palomo-Irigoyen, Marta; Varela-Rey, Marta; Griffith, Megan; Hantke, Janina; Macias-Camara, Nuria; Azkargorta, Mikel; Aurrekoetxea, Igor; De Juan, Virginia Gutiérrez; Jefferies, Harold B.J.; Aspichueta, Patricia; Elortza, Félix; Aransay, Ana M.; Martínez-Chantar, María L.; Baas, Frank; Mato, José M.; Mirsky, Rhona

    2015-01-01

    Although Schwann cell myelin breakdown is the universal outcome of a remarkably wide range of conditions that cause disease or injury to peripheral nerves, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that make Schwann cell–mediated myelin digestion possible have not been established. We report that Schwann cells degrade myelin after injury by a novel form of selective autophagy, myelinophagy. Autophagy was up-regulated by myelinating Schwann cells after nerve injury, myelin debris was present in autophagosomes, and pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy impaired myelin clearance. Myelinophagy was positively regulated by the Schwann cell JNK/c-Jun pathway, a central regulator of the Schwann cell reprogramming induced by nerve injury. We also present evidence that myelinophagy is defective in the injured central nervous system. These results reveal an important role for inductive autophagy during Wallerian degeneration, and point to potential mechanistic targets for accelerating myelin clearance and improving demyelinating disease. PMID:26150392

  10. Mode of action of air pollutants in injuring horticultural plants

    SciTech Connect

    Tibbitts, T.W.; Kobriger, J.M.

    1983-10-01

    An attempt has been made to condense the great volume of literature for many different air pollutants and from many different plant systems. Only those responses that have been reported for several species are emphasized and the discussion is limited to responses obtained with intact plants. The general outline provides a focus; uptake becomes the crucial aspect of whether or not plants are injured by air pollutants. Pollutants must get into the plant to cause injury and the primary portal of entry is through the open stomata. Once into the plant, pollutants alter biochemical reactions, resulting in cell injury and causing economic losses for horticulturists. The authors have developed this outline for the pollutants sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/), hydrogen fluoride (HF), ozone (O/sub 3/), nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/), and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), which are the most common and and most damaging gaseous pollutants in the ambient environment.

  11. [Tracheotomy in brain injured patients: which patients? Why? When? How?].

    PubMed

    Richard, I; Hamon, M-A; Ferrapie, A-L; Rome, J; Brunel, P; Mathé, J-F

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study is to determine, from the data available in the literature, the indications of tracheostomy in brain injured patients, the incidence and risk factors for complications and the follow-up required until decannulation. The incidence of tracheostomy is 10% in TBI and 50 to 70% in subpopulations with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) below 9. Early complications are not specific. The most frequent late complication is laryngotracheal stenosis, which occurs in 15% and is more frequently observed in the most severe patients with major hypertonia. It is likely that tracheostomy, if needed, should be performed early and the prognosis as to whether it will be required, can be made at the end of the first week. The follow-up of these patients includes surveillance of multiresistant colonisations and systematic performance of fibroscopy before decannulation. Cuffless, small diameters, soft tracheostomy tubes, are preferred on the long-term unless the risk of aspiration remains high.

  12. Differentiation of different mixed Listeria strains and also acid-injured, heat-injured, and repaired cells of Listeria monocytogenes using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nyarko, Esmond; Donnelly, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used to differentiate mixed strains of Listeria monocytogenes and mixed strains of L. monocytogenes and Listeria innocua. FT-IR spectroscopy was also applied to investigate the hypothesis that heat-injured and acid-injured cells would return to their original physiological integrity following repair. Thin smears of cells on infrared slides were prepared from cultures for mixed strains of L. monocytogenes, mixed strains of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua, and each individual strain. Heat-injured and acid-injured cells were prepared by exposing harvested cells of L. monocytogenes strain R2-764 to a temperature of 56 ± 0.2°C for 10 min or lactic acid at pH 3 for 60 min, respectively. Cellular repair involved incubating aliquots of acid-injured and heat-injured cells separately in Trypticase soy broth supplemented with 0.6% yeast extract for 22 to 24 h; bacterial thin smears on infrared slides were prepared for each treatment. Spectral collection was done using 250 scans at a resolution of 4 cm(-1) in the mid-infrared wavelength region. Application of multivariate discriminant analysis to the wavelength region from 1,800 to 900 cm(-1) separated the individual L. monocytogenes strains. Mixed strains of L. monocytogenes and L. monocytogenes cocultured with L. innocua were successfully differentiated from the individual strains when the discriminant analysis was applied. Different mixed strains of L. monocytogenes were also successfully separated when the discriminant analysis was applied. A data set for injury and repair analysis resulted in the separation of acid-injured, heat-injured, and intact cells; repaired cells clustered closer to intact cells when the discriminant analysis (1,800 to 600 cm(-1)) was applied. FT-IR spectroscopy can be used for the rapid source tracking of L. monocytogenes strains because it can differentiate between different mixed strains and individual strains of the pathogen.

  13. Collaborative Strengths-Based Brief Therapy with Self-Injuring Adolescents and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selekman, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a family competency-based treatment approach that capitalizes on the strengths and resources of self-injuring adolescents and their families. Throughout the article, the author provides therapeutic tools and strategies that he has found effective in his clinical practice of working with self-injuring youth and their families…

  14. Quantitative Study of Vibrational Symmetry of Injured Vocal Folds via Digital Kymography in Excised Canine Larynges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krausert, Christopher R.; Ying, Di; Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Jack J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Digital kymography and vocal fold curve fitting are blended with detailed symmetry analysis of kymograms to provide a comprehensive characterization of the vibratory properties of injured vocal folds. Method: Vocal fold vibration of 12 excised canine larynges was recorded under uninjured, unilaterally injured, and bilaterally injured…

  15. Cohesion in the Discourse of Normal and Head-Injured Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mentis, Michelle; Prutting, Carol A.

    1987-01-01

    Cohesion strategies used by three normal and three head-injured adults were examined in both conversational and narrative conditions. Head-injured subjects used different cohesion patterns than normal adults in both conditions; and both groups used different cohesion patterns in the conversational and narrative conditions. (Author/DB)

  16. Delays in transfer of elderly less-injured trauma patients can have deadly consequences.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Peter E; Colavita, Paul D; Fleming, Gregory P; Huynh, Toan T; Christmas, A Britton; Sing, Ronald F

    2014-11-01

    Transfer of severely injured patients to regional trauma centers is often expedited; however, transfer of less-injured, older patients may not evoke the same urgency. We examined referring hospitals' length of stay (LOS) and compared the subsequent outcomes in less-injured transfer patients (TP) with patients presenting directly (DP) to the trauma center. We reviewed the medical records of less-injured (Injury Severity Score [ISS] 9 or less), older (age older than 60 years) patients transferred to a regional Level 1 trauma center to determine the referring facility LOS, demographics, and injury information. Outcomes of the TP were then compared with similarly injured DP using local trauma registry data. In 2011, there were 1657 transfers; the referring facility LOS averaged greater than 3 hours. In the less-injured patients (ISS 9 or less), the average referring facility LOS was 3 hours 20 minutes compared with 2 hours 24 minutes in more severely injured patients (ISS 25 or greater, P < 0.05). The mortality was significantly lower in the DP patients (5.8% TP vs 2.6% DP, P = 0.035). Delays in transfer of less-injured, older trauma patients can result in poor outcomes including increased mortality. Geographic challenges do not allow for every patient to be transported directly to a trauma center. As a result, we propose further outreach efforts to identify potential causes for delay and to promote compliance with regional referral guidelines.

  17. Identifying Clinically Distinct Subgroups of Self-Injurers among Young Adults: A Latent Class Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klonsky, E. David; Olino, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    High rates of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI; 14%-17%) in adolescents and young adults suggest that some self-injurers may exhibit more or different psychiatric problems than others. In the present study, the authors utilized a latent class analysis to identify clinically distinct subgroups of self-injurers. Participants were 205 young adults with…

  18. Employment among Spinal Cord Injured Patients Living in Turkey: A Cross-Sectional Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunduz, Berrin; Erhan, Belgin; Bardak, Ayse Nur

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the rate of employment and to establish the factors affecting vocational status in spinal cord injured patients living in Turkey. One hundred and fifty-two traumatic spinal cord injured patients older than 18 years with injury duration of at least 1 year and living in the community were included in the study;…

  19. Sexual complementarity between host humoral toxicity and soldier caste in a polyembryonic wasp

    PubMed Central

    Uka, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Takuma; Yoshimura, Jin; Iwabuchi, Kikuo

    2016-01-01

    Defense against enemies is a type of natural selection considered fundamentally equivalent between the sexes. In reality, however, whether males and females differ in defense strategy is unknown. Multiparasitism necessarily leads to the problem of defense for a parasite (parasitoid). The polyembryonic parasitic wasp Copidosoma floridanum is famous for its larval soldiers’ ability to kill other parasites. This wasp also exhibits sexual differences not only with regard to the competitive ability of the soldier caste but also with regard to host immune enhancement. Female soldiers are more aggressive than male soldiers, and their numbers increase upon invasion of the host by other parasites. In this report, in vivo and in vitro competition assays were used to test whether females have a toxic humoral factor; if so, then its strength was compared with that of males. We found that females have a toxic factor that is much weaker than that of males. Our results imply sexual complementarity between host humoral toxicity and larval soldiers. We discuss how this sexual complementarity guarantees adaptive advantages for both males and females despite the one-sided killing of male reproductives by larval female soldiers in a mixed-sex brood. PMID:27385149

  20. Prevalence and risk of cysticercosis and taeniasis in an urban population of soldiers and their relatives.

    PubMed

    García-García, M L; Torres, M; Correa, D; Flisser, A; Sosa-Lechuga, A; Velasco, O; Meza-Lucas, A; Plancarte, A; Avila, G; Tapia, R; Aguilar, L; Mandujano, A; Alcántara, I; Morales, Z; Salcedo, A; Mañon, M D; Valdespino-Gomez, J L

    1999-09-01

    To determine markers of Taenia solium transmission and risk factors in an urban community, we studied 1,000 soldiers from a military camp in Mexico City and their relatives. Serum samples were used to detect antigens and antibodies and fecal specimens were examined for Taenia coproantigens and helminth eggs. Prevalences of 12.2% and 5.8% for cysticercosis were found among soldiers and their relatives, respectively. Taeniasis was found in 0.5% and none of the groups, respectively. Relatives of soldiers positive for cysticercosis and taeniasis markers ate more pork from street stores than restaurants or markets compared with relatives of soldiers without these indicators of infection. Also, 12.0% of the relatives of positive soldiers had a history of expelling tapeworm proglottids in the feces in contrast to 3.7% of the family members of the control group. Prevalence values and risk factors in this urban population are similar to those of previous studies performed in rural populations.

  1. Suboptimal Nutritional Characteristics in Male and Female Soldiers Compared to Sports Nutrition Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Beals, Kim; Darnell, Matthew E; Lovalekar, Mita; Baker, Rachel A; Nagai, Takashi; San-Adams, Thida; Wirt, Michael D

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the nutrient intake of male and female Soldiers in the 101 st Airborne Division (Air Assault) compared to sports nutrition standards for athletes, and to identify suboptimal eating characteristics that may impair physical performance and jeopardize military readiness. Male and female Soldiers from the 101 st Airborne Division (Air Assault) completed a 24-hour dietary recall and nutrition history questionnaire before anthropometric and body composition measurements were taken. Compared to sports nutrition guidelines, Soldiers of the 101 st under consume carbohydrates (males: 3.9 ± 2.0 vs. 5.0 g/kg, p < 0.001; females: 4.0 ± 2.1 vs. 5.0 g/kg, p = 0.001), male Soldiers eat too much fat (32.4% of kcal vs. <30% of kcal, p = 0.000) and saturated fat (males: 10.5 ± 3.9% of kcal vs. 10.0% of kcal, p = 0.044), and both males and females follow a meal pattern that may not optimize energy availability throughout the day. Eating too much fat and under fueling carbohydrate may negatively impact the adaptations to physical training and compromise overall health. Although Soldiers continue to participate in arduous training programs, future research should be aimed at determining the energy and macronutrient needs to fuel and recover from specific types of military training.

  2. Relationship of PTSD Symptoms With Combat Exposure, Stress, and Inflammation in American Soldiers.

    PubMed

    Groer, Maureen W; Kane, Bradley; Williams, S Nicole; Duffy, Allyson

    2015-05-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is of great concern in veterans. PTSD usually occurs after a person is exposed to death, threatened death, actual or threatened serious injury, or actual or threatened sexual violence. Active duty soldiers deployed to war zones are at risk for PTSD. Psychoneuroimmunological theory predicts that PTSD, depression, and stress can lead to low-grade, chronic inflammation. We asked whether there were relationships between PTSD symptoms and chronic stress, depression and inflammation in active duty U.S. soldiers. We enrolled 52 active duty enlisted and reservist soldiers in a cross-sectional study while they participated in a week of military training in fall 2011. They completed a demographic questionnaire, the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, the Combat Exposure Scale, and the PTSD symptom Checklist-Military version (PCL-M). Blood samples were taken for analysis of cytokines and C-reactive protein (CRP). Hair samples shaved from the forearm were measured for cortisol. Of the soldiers, 11 had PCL-M scores in the moderate to severe range. Regression analysis demonstrated that depression and war zone deployment were strong predictors of PTSD symptoms. CRP and hair cortisol were correlated with each other and with depression and PTSD symptoms. These results suggest relationships among war zone deployment, depression, and PTSD. Chronic stress associated with depression, PTSD, and war zone experiences may be related to inflammation in active duty soldiers.

  3. Cigarette smoking and subsequent risk of suicidal ideation among National Guard Soldiers

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Renee D; Prescott, Marta; Tamburrino, Marijo; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Liberzon, Israel; Galea, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Suicide rates are alarmingly high among military personnel, and particularly Army National Guard soldiers. Smoking is also disproportionately common in the military. In this study, we intend to investigate the relationship between cigarette smoking and suicidal ideation among a representative sample of national guard soldiers. METHODS A representative sample of Ohio Army National Guard soldiers were followed prospectively and information was gathered on smoking, suicidal ideation and depression at baseline and one year later. RESULTS Smoking at baseline was associated with significantly increased likelihood of suicidal ideation at follow-up (OR=2.0 (1.3, 3.2)). This association persisted after adjusting for demographics and history of depression at baseline, but was no longer statistically significant after adjusting for depression at follow-up. LIMITATIONS Measurement of smoking was somewhat limited. CONCLUSIONS Army National Guard soldiers who smoke have a greater risk of subsequent suicidal ideation. Depression concurrent with suicidal ideation appears to explain this relationship. If these results are replicated, screening of soldiers who smoke may be recommended as a proactive step towards mitigating the high risk of suicide in military personnel. PMID:23141668

  4. Interaction of Combat Exposure and Unit Cohesion in Predicting Suicide-Related Ideation among Post-Deployment Soldiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Mary M.; Gallaway, Michael Shayne; Millikan, Amy M.; Bell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is one of the leading causes of death among U.S. Army soldiers. Suicide-related ideation, which is associated with suicide attempts and suicide, can cause considerable distress. In a sample of 1,663 recently redeployed soldiers, we used factor analysis and structural equation modeling to test the associations between combat exposure, unit…

  5. 77 FR 6865 - Pricing for 2012 Infantry Soldier Silver Dollar and 2012 Star-Spangled Banner Commemorative Coin...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... United States Mint Pricing for 2012 Infantry Soldier Silver Dollar and 2012 Star- Spangled Banner... Star-Spangled Banner Commemorative Coin products: Introductory Product price Regular price Infantry... Infantry Soldier Silver Dollar Special N/A 51.95 Set Star-Spangled Banner Proof Silver Dollar 49.95...

  6. When the Army Post is the Campus: Understanding the Social and Academic Integration of Soldiers Attending College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson Kristin B.; Smith, Natesha L.; Lee, Allisha L.; Stevenson, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the Tinto model of student integration is applied qualitatively to soldiers attending college. The authors found that soldiers commit to the military primarily and to college secondarily; therefore, military policies and relationships related to college offered a better understanding of college commitments than did college policies…

  7. Case study illustrating risks of garrison unit watch for soldiers at risk of suicide.

    PubMed

    Brown, Christopher S; Sheridan, Richard J

    2015-06-01

    Unit watch over suicidal patients by nonmedical soldiers is often necessary in a deployed environment, but this strategy's risks may outweigh its benefits in a garrison environment. This case study illustrates risks of unit watches that are difficult for medical personnel to effectively mitigate. The suicidal soldier in question was placed on a unit watch in lieu of psychiatric hospitalization, utilizing a plan agreed upon by all parties. However, within 2 days, the plan had degenerated to an unacceptable degree. A commander is always legally responsible for subordinate soldiers' conduct, but from a patient safety perspective, medical professionals must account for the inevitable periods of decreased oversight within a unit. Medical professionals who recommend a unit watch must consider the risks associated with this course of action, including instances such as the error chain detailed in this case.

  8. Air assault soldiers demonstrate more dangerous landing biomechanics when visual input is removed.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yungchien; Sell, Timothy C; Abt, John P; Nagai, Takashi; Deluzio, Jennifer; McGrail, Mark; Rowe, Rusty; Smalley, Brian; Lephart, Scott M

    2012-01-01

    Soldiers are subjected to increased risk of musculoskeletal injuries in night operations because of limited visual input. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of vision removal on lower extremity kinematics and vertical ground reaction forces during two-legged drop landings. The researchers tested 139 Air Assault Soldiers performing a landing task with and without vision. Removing visual input resulted in increased hip abduction at initial contact, decreased maximum knee flexion, and increased maximum vertical ground reaction force. Without vision, the timing of maximum ankle dorsiflexion for the left leg was earlier than the right leg. The observed biomechanical changes may be related to the increased risk of injury in night operations. Proper night landing techniques and supplemental training should be integrated into Soldiers' training to induce musculoskeletal and biomechanical adaptations to compensate for limited vision.

  9. Potential biodiesel and biogas production from corncob by anaerobic fermentation and black soldier fly.

    PubMed

    Li, Wu; Li, Qing; Zheng, Longyu; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jibin; Yu, Ziniu; Zhang, Yanlin

    2015-10-01

    Bioenergy has become attractive as alternatives of gradually exhausted fossil fuel. Obtaining high grade bioenergy from lignocellulose is attractive that can gradually meet the demand. This study reported biogas and biodiesel were produced from corncob by a two-step bioprocess, biogas was produced from corncob by anaerobic fermentation, then biogas residue was converted by black soldier fly larvae, and then biodiesel was produced from larvae grease. 86.70 L biogas was obtained from 400 g corncob with the accumulation of biogas yield of 220.71 mL/g VS(added) by anaerobic digestion. Besides, 3.17 g of biodiesel was produced from grease after inoculating black soldier fly larvae into 400 g biogas residue. Meanwhile, the results showed that the addition of black soldier fly larvae could be effective for the degradation of lignocellulose and the accumulation of grease.

  10. Expansion of presoldier cuticle contributes to head elongation during soldier differentiation in termites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugime, Yasuhiro; Ogawa, Kota; Watanabe, Dai; Shimoji, Hiroyuki; Koshikawa, Shigeyuki; Miura, Toru

    2015-12-01

    In termites, the soldier caste possesses morphological features suitable for colony defence, despite some exceptions. Soldiers are differentiated via two moultings through a presoldier stage with dramatic morphogenesis. While a number of morphological modifications are known to occur during the presoldier moult, growth and morphogenesis seem to continue even after the moult. The present study, using the damp-wood termite Hodotermopsis sjostedti, carried out morphological and histological investigations on the developmental processes during the presoldier stage that is artificially induced by the application of a juvenile hormone analogue. Measurements of five body parameters indicated that head length significantly increased during the 14-day period after the presoldier moult, while it did not increase subsequently to the stationary moult (pseudergate moult as control). Histological observations also showed that the cuticular development played a role in the presoldier head elongation, suggesting that the soft and flexible presoldier cuticle contributed to the soldier morphogenesis in termites.

  11. Science wars—How much risk should soldiers be exposed to in military experimentation?

    PubMed Central

    Savulescu, Julian

    2015-01-01

    With the threat of biological war becoming a more and more distinct possibility, there is a growing need for vaccines and cures for diseases. As warfare moves from the battlefield to the laboratory, the military must adapt its tactics in order to preserve national security. At the moment, soldiers consent to the risk associated with combat, but with the changing nature of war, the need may arise for soldiers to put themselves at risk not only through combat, but also through scientific experimentation, in order to produce vaccines or cures and ultimately maintain national security. By allowing soldiers to trade risk on the battlefield with risk in the laboratory, deeper research can be made into diseases and biological agents, and this would therefore lessen the threat of biological war or terrorism. PMID:27774185

  12. Prazosin treatment of trauma nightmares and sleep disturbance in soldiers deployed in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Calohan, Jess; Peterson, Kris; Peskind, Elaine R; Raskind, Murray A

    2010-10-01

    Trauma nightmares and sleep disturbance impair combat soldiers' functioning. The alpha-1 adrenoreceptor antagonist prazosin has been demonstrated effective for these symptoms in Vietnam veterans. Thirteen soldiers seeking relief from distressing trauma nightmares impairing military function in northern Iraq in 2006 received prazosin alone or in combination with other psychotropics. Mean prazosin dose was 4.1 (SD = 2.2) mg before bed. Six soldiers improved markedly and 3 moderately on the Clinical Global Impression of Change Ratings of distressing dreams decreased from an average of 7.0 (SD = 0.7) to 2.9 (SD = 3.0, p < .001) and those of disturbed sleep from 6.7 (SD = 0.9) to 3.7 (SD = 2.4, p < .001). Prazosin appears effective and well tolerated in the desert warfare environment.

  13. Military morality transformed: weapons and soldiers on the nineteenth-century battlefield.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Gervase

    2011-01-01

    The increased lethality of nineteenth-century “arms of precision” caused military formations to disperse in combat, transforming the ordinary soldier from a near automaton, drilled to deliver random fire under close supervision, into a moral agent who exercised a degree of choice about where, when, and how to fire his weapon. The emerging autonomy of the soldier became a central theme in contemporary tactical debates, which struggled to reconcile the desire for discipline with the individual initiative necessary on the battlefield. This tactical conundrum offers revealing insights about human aggression and mass violence. Its dark legacy was the propagation of military values into civilian society, thus paving the way for the political soldiers of the twentieth century.

  14. Camouflage simulation and effectiveness assessment for the individual soldier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepfinger, Lisa B.

    1990-09-01

    The mission of the Individual Protection Directorate of the U. S. Army Natick Research, Development and Engineering Center is to develop clothing and equipment to protect the individual combat soldier against battlefield chemical, ballistic, surveillance, environmental and nuclear hazards. In an effort to meet our countersurveillance mission, the Terrain Analysis Systn was developed by Natick in conjunction with Decilog, Inc., Melville, New York. The Terrain Analysis System was developed to satisfy the need for a scientific method of designing camouflage patterns based on natural terrain reflectance data. It functions as a portable, abridged spectrophotometer to obtain spectral refltance data in the visible and near-infrared on any scene of interest. Data is collected on videotape in the field, digitized into the computer back in the laboratory, and spectral reflectance factors determined for each pixel in the scene. The 1976 CIE L*a*b* color coordinates are calculated and the image is clustered to a user-specific number of color domains. Camouflage patterns can be designed based on these domains, and visual camouflage evaluations can be made by overlaying the designed patterns on any desired background scene. Additional capabilities include calculation of values analogous to the CIE values, which use infrared film or an image intensifier as the observer. The Terrain Analysis System is also capable of analyzing video data taken through an image intensifier or thermal imager and calculating the probability of detection of a user-defined target against the background. "What if" cases can be run to determine the detection probability under other sets of conditions, such as a detector with a different spectral response or under different atmospheric conditions.

  15. Seeds of a Soldier: The True Story of Edgar Allan Poe - The Sergeant Major

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    2003 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2003 to 00-00-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Seeds of a Soldier. The true story of Edgar Allan Poe - the...Std Z39-18 Army Space Journal Fall 200360 By Michael L. Howard Seeds of a Soldier The true story of Edgar Allan Poe — the Sergeant Major...the Managing Editor via email to richard.burks@arspace.army.mil dgar Allan Poe wore U.S. Army sergeant major stripes. Using the name Edgar A. Perry

  16. House fly oviposition inhibition by larvae ofHermetia illucens, the black soldier fly.

    PubMed

    Bradley, S W; Sheppard, D C

    1984-06-01

    Wild populations of house flies were inhibited from ovipositing into poultry manure containing larvae of the black soldier fly,Hermetia illucens (L.). A laboratory strain of house fly responded differently, readily ovipositing into manure with lower densities of soldier fly larvae, but avoiding the higher densities tested. The amount of timeH. illucens larvae occupy the manure prior to an oviposition test influences ovipositional responses of house flies. Manure conditioned byH. illucens larvae for 4-5 days did not significantly inhibit house fly oviposition. We suggest that some type of interspecific chemical communication (allomone) is present.

  17. Post-traumatic stress disorder: review of the Comprehensive Soldier Fitness program.

    PubMed

    Steenkamp, Maria M; Nash, William P; Litz, Brett T

    2013-05-01

    Since the start of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the U.S. military has implemented several population-based initiatives to enhance psychological resilience and prevent psychological morbidity in troops. The largest of these initiatives is the Army's Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) program, which has been disseminated to more than 1 million soldiers. However, to date, CSF has not been independently and objectively reviewed, and the degree to which it successfully promotes adaptive outcomes and prevents the development of deployment-related mental health disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is uncertain. This paper critically evaluates the theoretic foundation for and evidence supporting the use of CSF.

  18. The Relationship of Family Satisfaction to Satisfaction with the Military Way of Life Among Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    expanded rcogjnition by military le-dership of the interdependence among quality of life is-ues, family well -being and satisfaction , job productivity...rw L FKI, COPY Technical Report 864 The Relationship of Family Satisfaction to Satisfaction with the Military Way of Life Among Soldiers Gary L...to Satisfaction with the Military Way of Life Among Soldiers 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S, DU-teu, GayL Sý~Iof2~ a o nivo=rsitv of North Carolina at Chiapel

  19. The Nett Warrior System: A Case Study for the Acquisition of Soldier Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-15

    rpfkbpp=C=mr_if`=mlif`v - 10 - k^s^i=mlpqdo^ar^qb=p`elli The evolution of wearable computers continued as an open system– bus wearable design was...established. The success of NW will depend on the program?s ability to incorporate soldier-driven design requirements, commercial technology, and...on the program’s ability to incorporate soldier-driven design requirements, commercial technology, and thorough system testing.   = = ^Åèìáëáíáçå

  20. Sensorimotor Intervention Recovers Noradrenaline Content in the Dentate Gyrus of Cortical Injured Rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Languren, Laura E; García-Díaz, Gabriela; González-Maciel, Angélica; Rosas-López, Laura E; Bueno-Nava, Antonio; Avila-Luna, Alberto; Ramírez-Anguiano, Hayde; González-Piña, Rigoberto

    2016-12-01

    Nowadays, a consensus has been reached that designates the functional and structural reorganization of synapses as the primary mechanisms underlying the process of recovery from brain injury. We have reported that pontine noradrenaline (NA) is increased in animals after cortical ablation (CA). The aim of the present study was to explore the noradrenergic and morphological response after sensorimotor intervention (SMI) in rats injured in the motor cortex. We used male Wistar adult rats allocated in four conditions: sham-operated, injured by cortical ablation, sham-operated with SMI and injured by cortical ablation with SMI. Motor and somatosensory performance was evaluated prior to and 20 days after surgery. During the intervening period, a 15-session, SMI program was implemented. Subsequently, total NA analysis in the pons and dentate gyrus (DG) was performed. All groups underwent histological analysis. Our results showed that NA content in the DG was reduced in the injured group versus control, and this reduction was reverted in the injured group that underwent SMI. Moreover, injured rats showed reduction in the number of granule cells in the DG and decreased dentate granule cell layer thickness. Notably, after SMI, the loss of granule cells was reverted. Locus coeruleus showed turgid cells in the injured rats. These results suggest that SMI elicits biochemical and structural modifications in the hippocampus that could reorganize the system and lead the recovery process, modulating structural and functional plasticity.

  1. Use of Quantitative Membrane Proteomics Identifies a Novel Role of Mitochondria in Healing Injured Muscles*

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Nimisha; Medikayala, Sushma; Defour, Aurelia; Rayavarapu, Sree; Brown, Kristy J.; Hathout, Yetrib; Jaiswal, Jyoti K.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscles are proficient at healing from a variety of injuries. Healing occurs in two phases, early and late phase. Early phase involves healing the injured sarcolemma and restricting the spread of damage to the injured myofiber. Late phase of healing occurs a few days postinjury and involves interaction of injured myofibers with regenerative and inflammatory cells. Of the two phases, cellular and molecular processes involved in the early phase of healing are poorly understood. We have implemented an improved sarcolemmal proteomics approach together with in vivo labeling of proteins with modified amino acids in mice to study acute changes in the sarcolemmal proteome in early phase of myofiber injury. We find that a notable early phase response to muscle injury is an increased association of mitochondria with the injured sarcolemma. Real-time imaging of live myofibers during injury demonstrated that the increased association of mitochondria with the injured sarcolemma involves translocation of mitochondria to the site of injury, a response that is lacking in cultured myoblasts. Inhibiting mitochondrial function at the time of injury inhibited healing of the injured myofibers. This identifies a novel role of mitochondria in the early phase of healing injured myofibers. PMID:22778268

  2. Sorting Nexin 9 facilitates podocin endocytosis in the injured podocyte

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Yu; Hidaka, Teruo; Ueno, Takashi; Akiba-Takagi, Miyuki; Trejo, Juan Alejandro Oliva; Seki, Takuto; Nagai-Hosoe, Yoshiko; Tanaka, Eriko; Horikoshi, Satoshi; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Suzuki, Yusuke; Asanuma, Katsuhiko

    2017-01-01

    The irreversibility of glomerulosclerotic changes depends on the degree of podocyte injury. We have previously demonstrated the endocytic translocation of podocin to the subcellular area in severely injured podocytes and found that this process is the primary disease trigger. Here we identified the protein sorting nexin 9 (SNX9) as a novel facilitator of podocin endocytosis in a yeast two-hybrid analysis. SNX9 is involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, actin rearrangement and vesicle transport regulation. Our results revealed and confirmed that SNX9 interacts with podocin exclusively through the Bin–Amphiphysin–Rvs (BAR) domain of SNX9. Immunofluorescence staining revealed the expression of SNX9 in response to podocyte adriamycin-induced injury both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, an analysis of human glomerular disease biopsy samples demonstrated strong SNX9 expression and co-localization with podocin in samples representative of severe podocyte injury, such as IgA nephropathy with poor prognosis, membranous nephropathy and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. In conclusion, we identified SNX9 as a facilitator of podocin endocytosis in severe podocyte injury and demonstrated the expression of SNX9 in the podocytes of both nephropathy model mice and human patients with irreversible glomerular disease. PMID:28266622

  3. Corps de ballet: the case of the injured ballet dancer.

    PubMed

    Turner, Bryan S; Wainwright, Steven P

    2003-05-01

    This paper contributes to debate on social constructionism in the sociology of health and illness through a study of injury among ballet dancers. In this empirical study of classical ballet dancers, we outline a phenomenology of the injured and ageing body in terms of a critical commentary on constructionism. We explore dancers' experiences of embodiment to illustrate our critique of recent interpretations of dance as a textual practice. Those forms of social constructionism that define the body as a text provide a forceful attack on discourses of authority and legitimation, but we argue that they are problematic as epistemologies and ontologies of embodiment. Through a phenomenological understanding of the experiences of embodiment, we observe how injury and ageing disrupt the practical accomplishments that underpin the ballet habitus and the dancer's identity. Although ballet injuries can terminate a dancing career, they are accepted as an inevitable part of the vocation of ballet. Our aim is to understand the interaction between injuries, dancers' experiences of discomfort and the social support that emerges from the ballet dancers as a social group. We draw on the concepts of social solidarity and collective consciousness in Emile Durkheim to show that injury is mediated through the social bonding of dancers into a professional ballet company, where injury is accepted as a sign of vocational commitment, and suggest that this 'collective effervescence' gives a novel meaning to the idea of a corps de ballet.

  4. Interplay between thyroxin, BDNF and GABA in injured neurons.

    PubMed

    Shulga, A; Rivera, C

    2013-06-03

    Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that groups of neurons in the CNS might react to pathological insults by activating developmental-like programs for survival, regeneration and re-establishment of lost connections. For instance, in cell and animal models it was shown that after trauma mature central neurons become dependent on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) trophic support for survival. This event is preceded by a shift of postsynaptic GABAA receptor-mediated responses from hyperpolarization to developmental-like depolarization. These profound functional changes in GABAA receptor-mediated transmission and the requirement of injured neurons for BDNF trophic support are interdependent. Thyroid hormones (THs) play a crucial role in the development of the nervous system, having significant effects on dendritic branching, synaptogenesis and axonal growth to name a few. In the adult nervous system TH thyroxin has been shown to have a neuroprotective effect and to promote regeneration in experimental trauma models. Interestingly, after trauma there is a qualitative change in the regulatory effect of thyroxin on BDNF expression as well as on GABAergic transmission. In this review we provide an overview of the post-traumatic changes in these signaling systems and discuss the potential significance of their interactions for the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  5. Sorting Nexin 9 facilitates podocin endocytosis in the injured podocyte.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yu; Hidaka, Teruo; Ueno, Takashi; Akiba-Takagi, Miyuki; Trejo, Juan Alejandro Oliva; Seki, Takuto; Nagai-Hosoe, Yoshiko; Tanaka, Eriko; Horikoshi, Satoshi; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Suzuki, Yusuke; Asanuma, Katsuhiko

    2017-03-07

    The irreversibility of glomerulosclerotic changes depends on the degree of podocyte injury. We have previously demonstrated the endocytic translocation of podocin to the subcellular area in severely injured podocytes and found that this process is the primary disease trigger. Here we identified the protein sorting nexin 9 (SNX9) as a novel facilitator of podocin endocytosis in a yeast two-hybrid analysis. SNX9 is involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, actin rearrangement and vesicle transport regulation. Our results revealed and confirmed that SNX9 interacts with podocin exclusively through the Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain of SNX9. Immunofluorescence staining revealed the expression of SNX9 in response to podocyte adriamycin-induced injury both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, an analysis of human glomerular disease biopsy samples demonstrated strong SNX9 expression and co-localization with podocin in samples representative of severe podocyte injury, such as IgA nephropathy with poor prognosis, membranous nephropathy and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. In conclusion, we identified SNX9 as a facilitator of podocin endocytosis in severe podocyte injury and demonstrated the expression of SNX9 in the podocytes of both nephropathy model mice and human patients with irreversible glomerular disease.

  6. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for injured growth plate.

    PubMed

    Shukrimi, Awang B; Afizah, Mohd H; Schmitt, Jacqueline F; Hui, James H P

    2013-01-01

    The growth plate has a limited self-healing capacity. Fractures sustained to the growth plate of young children could cause growth disturbances like angular deformity or growth arrest. Established therapies for injured physis only address related complications. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells which are capable of differentiating into various cells of the musculoskeletal system. Various MSC types have been tested for physeal regeneration, through in vivo lapine, porcine and ovine models, for the duration of 4-16 weeks. The created defect sizes ranged from 7-50% of the growth plate area, to simulate clinically-encountered cases. In vitro models have also been investigated, as a means to screen potential treatments. The effects of MSCs gathered from these models have revealed its function in the prevention of bone bridge formation, with the subsequent development of organized physeal repair tissue. Possible influential factors like the number of implanted MSCs, preconditioned state, growth factors, chondrocyte-MSC interaction and scaffolds are discussed. Possible further studies to optimize physeal repair based on MSC therapy in articular cartilage are also included.

  7. Social Reintegration of Traumatic Brain-Injured: The French Experience

    PubMed Central

    Truelle, J.-L.; Wild, K. Von; Onillon, M.; Montreuil, M.

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) may lead to specific handicap, often hidden, mainly due to cognitive and behavioural sequelae. Social re-entry is a long-term, fluctuant and precarious process. The French experience will be illustrated by 6 initiatives answering to 6 challenges to do with TBI specificities: 1. bridging the gap, between initial rehabilitation and community re-entry, via transitional units dealing with assessment, retraining, social/vocational orientation and follow-up. Today, there are 30 such units based on multidisciplinary teams. 2. assessing recovery by TBI-specific and validated evaluation tools: EBIS holistic document, BNI Screening of higher cerebral functions, Glasgow outcome extended, and QOLIBRI, a TBI-specific quality of life tool. 3. promoting specific re-entry programmes founded on limited medication, ecological neuro-psychological rehabilitation, exchange groups and workshops, violence prevention, continuity of care, environmental structuration, and “resocialisation”. 4. taking into account the “head injured family” 5. facilitating recovery after sports-related concussion 6. facing medico-legal consequences and compensation: In that perspective, we developed guidelines for TBI-specific expert appraisal, including mandatory neuro-psychological assessment, family interview and an annual forum gathering lawyers and health professionals. PMID:22028740

  8. Wound healing process of injured pulp tissues with emdogain gel.

    PubMed

    Kaida, Hikaru; Hamachi, Takafumi; Anan, Hisashi; Maeda, Katsumasa

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the wound healing process of injured pulp tissues with Emdogain gel (EMD). Pulpotomy was performed for the first molars of the mandibles in rats. EMD or Vitapex (VIT)-containing calcium hydroxide was applied to the exposed pulp tissues. The treated teeth were extracted after 7, 14, and 28 days and prepared for histologic examination. In the VIT-treated group, the number of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta)-expressing macrophages initially increased, followed by that of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1)-expressing macrophages. The number of cells expressing bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) gradually increased with reparative dentin formation. Meanwhile, in the EMD-treated group, cells expressing IL-1 beta or TGF-beta1 were few. However, the number of BMP-expressing cells, partly macrophages, increased in the early phase, and large amounts of reparative dentin were observed. This study demonstrated that different healing processes existed for EMD and VIT. BMP-expressing macrophages might play important roles in reparative dentin formation.

  9. Effect of safety education on classmates of injured children: a prospective clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Cook, Becky S; Ricketts, Crystal D; Brown, Rebeccah L; Garcia, Victor F; Falcone, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    We hypothesized that using the teachable moment associated with an injured classmate, school-aged children would demonstrate improved retention of injury prevention education. The injured child's class and one control with presentation class received an injury prevention presentation. Prospective evaluation was performed using pre, immediate post, and 1-month posttesting. Immediately following the presentation, 83% of classes in both groups demonstrated significant improvement in test scores. At 1 month, 100% of the injured child's and only 66% of control with presentation classrooms maintained significant improvements. This unique program results not only in immediate but also in long-term retention of injury prevention information.

  10. U.S. reserve soldiers' combat exposure and intimate partner violence: Not more common but it is more violent.

    PubMed

    Heavey, Sarah Cercone; Homish, D Lynn; Goodell, Erin Anderson; Homish, Gregory G

    2017-02-15

    Combat exposure's influence on intimate partner violence (IPV) in reserve soldiers is not well understood. This work examines combat exposure's influence on IPV in U.S. Army Reserve/National Guard soldiers and partners. Data are from Operation: SAFETY, a longitudinal study of U.S. Army Reserve/National Guard soldiers and partners. Logistic regression models examined odds of sexual aggression, physical aggression, and physical injury with combat exposure, controlling for posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, marital satisfaction, and age. Combat exposure was associated with greater physical injury, despite no association between combat exposure and physical aggression. This was significant for male soldier to female partner, as well as female partner to male soldier injury. In addition, female partners were more likely to be sexually aggressive against their male soldiers. Female soldiers' combat exposure was not associated with IPV or injury. Although men's combat exposure did not increase the likelihood of physical aggression, it increased the likelihood of IPV resulting in injury for both husband to wife and wife to husband aggression. Results indicate postdeployment programming should focus on conflict resolution and communication for both partners.

  11. Army Science Conference 2006 TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT OF SOLDIER & MAN PORTABLE FUEL CELL POWER

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-27

    Research Development Engineering Center (CERDEC) Fuel Cell Technology Team initiated several development contracts to address multiple areas where fuel cell technologies... fuel cell technology focuses specifically on Soldier worn power equipment, mainly from the sub to 100 Watt range. Man Portable Power fuel cell technology

  12. Evolution of low-profile and lightweight electrical connectors for soldier-worn applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gans, Eric; Lee, Kang; Jannson, Tomasz; Walter, Kevin

    2011-06-01

    In addition to military radios, modern warfighters carry cell phones, GPS devices, computers, and night-vision aids, all of which require electrical cables and connectors for data and power transmission. Currently each electrical device operates via independent cables using conventional cable and connector technology. Conventional cables are stiff and difficult to integrate into a soldier-worn garment. Conventional connectors are tall and heavy, as they were designed to ensure secure connections to bulkhead-type panels, and being tall, represent significant snag-hazards in soldier-worn applications. Physical Optics Corporation has designed a new, lightweight and low-profile electrical connector that is more suitable for body-worn applications and operates much like a standard garment snap. When these connectors are mated, the combined height is <0.3 in. - a significant reduction from the 2.5 in. average height of conventional connectors. Electrical connections can be made with one hand (gloved or bare) and blindly (without looking). Furthermore, POC's connectors are integrated into systems that distribute data or power from a central location on the soldier's vest, reducing the length and weight of the cables necessary to interconnect various mission-critical electronic systems. The result is a lightweight power/data distribution system offering significant advantages over conventional electrical connectors in soldier-worn applications.

  13. Using Artifacts to Understand the Life of a Soldier in World War II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anson, Staci

    2009-01-01

    For years, when the author taught about World War II, she used primary and secondary source readings, she presented Power Points, and had her students watch newsreels and other video clips. Today, her students interact with actual artifacts from history so that they can draw conclusions and gain understanding about what the soldiers' lives were…

  14. Training and Soldier-Machine Interface for the Combat Vehicle Command and Control System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-31

    FORWORD The Fort Knox Field Unit of the U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences (ARI) conducts soldier-in- the-loop...results generally indicated that voice communication was fast and flexible, whereas automated communication was brief and precise. Third, inherent

  15. Comprehensive Soldier Fitness: Building Resilience in the U.S. Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-24

    Sharing Knowledge: Achieving Breakthrough Performance 2010 Military Health System Conference Comprehensive Soldier Fitness: Building...Military Health System,5111 Leesburg Pike, Skyline 5,Falls Church,VA,22041 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING...Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES presented at the 2011 Military Health System Conference, January 24-27

  16. Analysis of Soldier Effectiveness in a Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Ground Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-17

    5% 15% 25% 50% 75% 85% 95% Figure 9: Overall thermal comfort CONCLUSION The effectiveness of Soldiers with varying physiological builds was...Curran, A., Pryor, J., Hepokoski, M. 2010 “Assessment of Various Environmental Thermal Loads on Passenger Thermal Comfort .” SAE Paper 2010-01-1205.

  17. Impact of Military Deployment and Distance Learning on Soldier-Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, August T.

    2013-01-01

    Soldiers face complex challenges, issues, and decisions when pursuing distance learning while deployed. These challenges are encountered frequently while completing undergraduate and graduate degree programs on active duty overseas. Many learning programs and benefits are available and utilized by military online learners in a war zone. Education…

  18. Sierra Leone's Former Child Soldiers: A Follow-Up Study of Psychosocial Adjustment and Community Reintegration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betancourt, Theresa Stichick; Borisova, Ivelina Ivanova; Williams, Timothy Philip; Brennan, Robert T.; Whitfield, Theodore H.; de la Soudiere, Marie; Williamson, John; Gilman, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    This is the first prospective study to investigate psychosocial adjustment in male and female former child soldiers (ages 10-18; n = 156, 12% female). The study began in Sierra Leone in 2002 and was designed to examine both risk and protective factors in psychosocial adjustment. Over the 2-year period of follow-up, youth who had wounded or killed…

  19. The Dangers of the Single Story: Child-Soldiers in Literary Fiction and Film

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Catarina

    2011-01-01

    Focusing on the paradox between innocence and responsibility generated by the term child-soldiers, which is treated differently in literary and cinematographic works from the North and the South, this article uses postcolonial theory in order to deconstruct "the single story" that may be erasing these children's many stories.…

  20. Psychotrauma and effective treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder in soldiers and peacekeepers

    PubMed Central

    Vitzthum, Karin; Mache, Stefanie; Joachim, Ricarda; Quarcoo, David; Groneberg, David A

    2009-01-01

    Psychotrauma occurs as a result to a traumatic event, which may involve witnessing someone's actual death or personally experiencing serious physical injury, assault, rape and sexual abuse, being held as a hostage, or a threat to physical or psychological integrity. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder and was defined in the past as railway spine, traumatic war neurosis, stress syndrome, shell shock, battle fatigue, combat fatigue, or post-traumatic stress syndrome (PTSS). If untreated, post-traumatic stress disorder can impair relationships of those affected and strain their families and society. Deployed soldiers are especially at a high risk to be affected by PTSD but often receive inadequate treatment. Reviews to date have focused only on a single type of treatment or groups of soldiers from only one country. The aim of the current review was to evaluate characteristics of therapeutic methods used internationally to treat male soldiers' PTSD after peacekeeping operations in South Eastern Europe and the Gulf wars. This systematic literature review returned results pertaining to the symptoms, diagnosis, timing and effectiveness of treatment. Sample groups and controls were relatively small and, therefore, the results lack generalizability. Further research is needed to understand the influence and unique psychological requirements of each specific military operation on the internationally deployed soldiers. PMID:19643016

  1. Technological evaluation of gesture and speech interfaces for enabling dismounted soldier-robot dialogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattoju, Ravi Kiran; Barber, Daniel J.; Abich, Julian; Harris, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    With increasing necessity for intuitive Soldier-robot communication in military operations and advancements in interactive technologies, autonomous robots have transitioned from assistance tools to functional and operational teammates able to service an array of military operations. Despite improvements in gesture and speech recognition technologies, their effectiveness in supporting Soldier-robot communication is still uncertain. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the performance of gesture and speech interface technologies to facilitate Soldier-robot communication during a spatial-navigation task with an autonomous robot. Gesture and speech semantically based spatial-navigation commands leveraged existing lexicons for visual and verbal communication from the U.S Army field manual for visual signaling and a previously established Squad Level Vocabulary (SLV). Speech commands were recorded by a Lapel microphone and Microsoft Kinect, and classified by commercial off-the-shelf automatic speech recognition (ASR) software. Visual signals were captured and classified using a custom wireless gesture glove and software. Participants in the experiment commanded a robot to complete a simulated ISR mission in a scaled down urban scenario by delivering a sequence of gesture and speech commands, both individually and simultaneously, to the robot. Performance and reliability of gesture and speech hardware interfaces and recognition tools were analyzed and reported. Analysis of experimental results demonstrated the employed gesture technology has significant potential for enabling bidirectional Soldier-robot team dialogue based on the high classification accuracy and minimal training required to perform gesture commands.

  2. The assessment of genetic variability among spined soldier bug (Pentatomidae: Hemiptera) populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spined soldier bug Podisus maculiventris (Say) is a predatory hemipteran found in North America. It is an important biological control agent for agricultural and forest pests. This polyphagous predator mainly preys upon the eggs and larvae of the lepidopteran and coleopteran species. To assess th...

  3. "Every City Has Soldiers": The Role of Intergenerational Relationships in Participatory Literacy Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Maisha

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the role of intergenerational relationships in the lives of experienced poets and writers ("soldiers") and emerging poets and writers in what the author terms Participatory Literacy Communities (PLCs). Drawing from Wenger's (1998) concept of communities of practice, the author uses data from two examples of PLCs--Black…

  4. Pandemic influenza outbreak on a troop ship--diary of a soldier in 1918.

    PubMed

    Summers, Jennifer A

    2012-11-01

    A newly identified diary from a soldier in 1918 describes aspects of a troop ship outbreak of pandemic influenza. This diary is the only known document that describes this outbreak and provides information not officially documented concerning possible risk factors such as overcrowding and the suboptimal outbreak response by military leaders. It also presents an independent personal perspective of this overwhelming experience.

  5. Reading at the Front: Books and Soldiers in the First World War

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutcliffe, Marcella P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the reading and educational practices of common soldiers during the First World War. It argues that the question of how war libraries were imagined and constructed by civilians needs to be framed in the larger context of pre-war Edwardian debates surrounding the "value of books" in society. Indeed, it was within…

  6. Abraham Baldwin: Soldier-Statesmen of the Constitution. A Bicentennial Series, No. 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Center of Military History, Washington, DC.

    Although his father was an illiterate blacksmith, Abraham Baldwin demonstrated how academic achievement opened opportunities in colonial society, and he later became a fervent missionary of public education. This booklet on Baldwin is one in a series on Revolutionary War soldiers who signed the U.S. Constitution. The booklet reviews his education,…

  7. Prevalence of childhood trauma among U.S. Army soldiers with suicidal behavior.

    PubMed

    Perales, Rossybelle; Gallaway, M Shayne; Forys-Donahue, Kelly L; Spiess, Anita; Millikan, Amy M

    2012-09-01

    In 2009, suicide was reported to be the third leading cause of death among U.S. Army personnel. The increase of suicides in the Army indicates the need for additional research to better understand the problem. Research in civilian populations found that experiencing childhood trauma increases the risk for various negative health outcomes, including suicide and suicide attempts, during adulthood. To date, there has been very little focus on pre-existing mental health before joining the service because of a lack of existing data. Participants were active duty Army Soldiers who attempted or completed suicide as identified by the Department of Defense Suicide Event Report. Among Soldiers exhibiting suicidal behavior, analyses were completed to identify significant associations with specific types of childhood trauma experienced before joining the Army. The prevalence of childhood trauma in this population was 43.3% among the suicide cases and 64.7% among the attempt cases. The most common types of childhood trauma among Soldiers were family problems and abuse. The need for further research among military populations is clear given the high prevalence of childhood trauma found among these Soldiers with suicidal behavior and the lack of complete data for this population.

  8. Warrior Heroes and Little Green Men: Soldiers, Military Training, and the Construction of Rural Masculinities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Rachel

    2000-01-01

    Examines military training in the United Kingdom; the construction of military masculinities, particularly the ideal type of the warrior hero; and the role of the countryside (as the training location) and rurality (as a social construction) in that process. Argues that becoming an infantry soldier means being molded to this hegemonic model of…

  9. Psychological resilience and the gene regulatory impact of posttraumatic stress in Nepali child soldiers

    PubMed Central

    Worthman, Carol M.; Adhikari, Ramesh P.; Luitel, Nagendra P.; Arevalo, Jesusa M. G.; Ma, Jeffrey; McCreath, Heather; Seeman, Teresa E.; Crimmins, Eileen M.; Cole, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    Adverse social conditions in early life have been linked to increased expression of proinflammatory genes and reduced expression of antiviral genes in circulating immune cells—the conserved transcriptional response to adversity (CTRA). However, it remains unclear whether such effects are specific to the Western, educated, industrialized, rich, and democratic (WEIRD) cultural environments in which previous research has been conducted. To assess the roles of early adversity and individual psychological resilience in immune system gene regulation within a non-WEIRD population, we evaluated CTRA gene-expression profiles in 254 former child soldiers and matched noncombatant civilians 5 y after the People’s War in Nepal. CTRA gene expression was up-regulated in former child soldiers. These effects were linked to the degree of experienced trauma and associated distress—that is, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) severity—more than to child soldier status per se. Self-perceived psychological resilience was associated with marked buffering of CTRA activation such that PTSD-affected former child soldiers with high levels of personal resilience showed molecular profiles comparable to those of PTSD-free civilians. These results suggest that CTRA responses to early life adversity are not restricted to WEIRD cultural contexts and they underscore the key role of resilience in determining the molecular impact of adverse environments. PMID:27402736

  10. Effects of Concentration Disruption on Simulated Basic Rifle Marksmanship Scores among Stryker Brigade Soldiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohlson, Carl; Hammermeister, Jon

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the hypothesis that the presence of anxiety symptoms is less related to simulated basic rifle marksmanship (S-BRM) performance than is cognitive disruption. The sample was comprised of 82 Stryker Brigade Soldiers at a large military post in the Pacific Northwest. Simulated rifle marksmanship was assessed using the Engagement…

  11. From Soldiers to Children: Developmental Sciences Transform the Construct of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franks, Bridget A.

    2014-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was first included in the American Psychiatric Association's "Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders" in 1980. Long used to describe the reactions of soldiers affected by stress in combat situations, PTSD is now recognised as a disorder affecting abused and neglected infants and…

  12. Identifying and Assessing Interaction Knowledge, Skills, and Attributes for Future Force Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    7 Figure 5 Sample SBISE animation showing a team leader talking to a group. .............................. 8 Figure 6...understand, and control a social situation (Witt & Ferris, 2003). The SBISE adopts that goal but substitutes animated characters for the role players that...would be typical in an action exam. The SBISE utilizes computer animation (see Figure 5) to present Soldiers with common interpersonal scenarios

  13. Gender differences in suicide and suicide attempts among US Army soldiers.

    PubMed

    Maguen, Shira; Skopp, Nancy A; Zhang, Ying; Smolenski, Derek J

    2015-02-28

    In order to best tailor suicide prevention initiatives and programs, it is critical to gain an understanding of how service members׳ suicide risk factors may differ by gender. We aimed to better understand gender differences in suicide and suicide attempts among soldiers, including demographic, military, mental health, and other risk factors. We also examined risk factors uniquely associated with suicide and suicide attempts. We conducted a retrospective study of 1857 US Army soldiers who died by suicide or attempted suicide between 2008 and 2010 and had a Department of Defense Suicide Event Report. Female and male soldiers had more similarities than differences when examining risk factors associated with suicide. The only gender difference approaching significance was workplace difficulties, which was more strongly associated with suicide for female soldiers, compared to their male counterparts. Among suicide decedents, the most common risk factor was having a failed intimate relationship in the 90 days prior to suicide. Among those who attempted suicide, the most common risk factor was a major psychiatric diagnosis. Better understanding both gender differences and risk factors uniquely associated with suicide has critical prevention and public health implications as we work to better understand preventable mortality in our youngest generation of service members.

  14. Physiological and Medical Aspects That Put Women Soldiers at Increased Risk for Overuse Injuries.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Yoram; Fleischmann, Chen; Yanovich, Ran; Heled, Yuval

    2015-11-01

    Anthropometric and physiological factors place female soldiers at a disadvantage relative to male soldiers in most aspects of physical performance. Average aerobic and anaerobic fitness levels are lower in women than in men. Thus, women have a lower overall work capacity and must exert themselves more than men to achieve the same output. The lower weight and fat-free mass and the higher body fat of women are associated with lower muscle strength and endurance, placing them at a disadvantage compared with men in performing military tasks such as lifting and carrying weights, or marching with a load. Working at a higher percentage of their maximal capacity to achieve the same performance levels as men, women tire earlier. Their smaller size, skeletal anatomy, and different bone geometry also predispose women to a higher incidence of exercise-related injuries. Consequently, the attrition rate of female soldiers in combat units is higher than that of their male counterparts. This review summarizes the literature on gender-related physiological and anatomical differences that put female soldiers at an increased risk of exercise-related injuries.

  15. Examinations regarding the prevalence of intestinal parasitic diseases in Polish soldiers contingents assigned to missions abroad.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the program of diagnostic examinations regarding the detection and following treatment of intestinal parasitic diseases in the population of Polish soldiers serving in different climatic and sanitary conditions. Intestinal parasitoses remain one of the health problems of soldiers participating in contemporary military operations. This fact mainly results from unsatisfactory sanitary and hygienic standards in the regions where troops are deployed, contamination of water and soil, inappropriate processes of purifying drinking water, and the terrible condition of sewage systems, water purification plants, or sewage treatment facilities. The occurrence of such diseases is further facilitated by disregard of some basic principles of food and feeding hygiene. Mass examinations of Polish troops to find the prevalence of intestinal parasitoses will cause a decrease in the morbidity rate of parasitic diseases among Polish soldiers deployed in military operations. They can also lead to a decrease in expenditure on medical treatment of disease-related complications and on damages awarded to soldiers who have developed a serious disease while being engaged in a mission abroad.

  16. Sensory analysis of rainbow trout, oncorhynchus mykiss, fed enriched black soldier fly prepupae, hermetia illucens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A growth trial and fillet sensory analysis were conducted to examine the effects of replacing dietary fish meal with black soldier fly (BSF) prepupae, Hermetia illucens, in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. A practical-type trout diet was formulated to contain 45% protein; four test diets were dev...

  17. Soldier-Scholars. Higher Education in the AEF, 1917-1919.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornebise, Alfred E.

    At the end of World War I, a system of education was created for the soldiers of the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) who remained in Europe. This book documents the history of the ventures, organized by the Young Mens Christian Association and the army, that provided educational opportunities for two million men awaiting return to home.…

  18. Authoritarianism among border police officers, career soldiers, and airport security guards at the Israeli border.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Gidi

    2006-12-01

    Several personality theories focusing on specific personality variables involved in career choice and job satisfaction are based on the assumption that individuals choose certain career choices because they believe that they may be able to meet their emotional needs (J. L. Holland, 1977). The author of this study investigated the personality traits of border police officers, career soldiers, and airport security guards in Israel. The participants were 160 men--40 border policemen, 40 career soldiers, 40 airport security guards, and 40 control participants--who filled out a demographic questionnaire and a Hebrew version of the right-wing authoritarianism (RWA) shortened scale (B. Altemeyer, personal communication, February 2000). The present hypothesis predicted that the RWA scores of border police officers would be the highest, followed by those of career soldiers, airport security guards, and control participants, in that order. Statistically significant differences in RWA scores occurred between these groups in the predicted order, with the exception of the career soldiers' RWA scores, which did not significantly differ from those of the airport security guards.

  19. From "Rebel" to "Returnee:" Daily Life and Reintegration for Young Soldiers in Northern Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annan, Jeannie; Brier, Moriah; Aryemo, Filder

    2009-01-01

    In war's aftermath, many young soldiers attempt to reintegrate and reestablish their lives. Disarmament, Demobilization, and Reintegration (DDR) programs are a priority intervention for youth in postconflict countries; yet there is little evidence to suggest what aids reintegration. This research uses qualitative methodology to describe the issues…

  20. Cyclic Gun--Human Evolution: Soldiers, Guns, Machine Logic, and the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmore, Tim

    2006-01-01

    Guns, slug-throwing weapons, have evolved as humans have increased their grasp of the mechanical arts. In the near future, however, it seems likely that soldiers' rifles operating at punishing cyclic rates of fire face the limits of physics and materials science--heat and speed will cost accuracy and distance. This article considers not only the…

  1. How to Develop Task Summaries for Soldier’s Manuals. Volume 1. Technical Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    Soldier’s Manuals (SM) are the basic written instructions for performance of critical tasks in most Army jobs. SM are intended as a sufficient ( one ... stop ) learning guide for those tasks, and are a key element of the Enlisted Personnel Management System (EPMS). Since they first appeared in 1976, SM

  2. Delivering Training Assessments in a Soldier-Centered Learning Environment: Year Two

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    training prototypes that were developed to test training concepts outlined in the Army Learning Model (ALM). The prototypes integrated training and...non-adaptive training strategies. v DELIVERING TRAINING ASSESSMENTS IN A SOLDIER-CENTERED LEARNING ENVIRONMENT: YEAR TWO CONTENTS ...general concept was to sequence and integrate the training across the different training platforms and to integrate assessments to track learning

  3. Video visor for the German army soldier-of-the-future programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritze, J.; Kiefner, M.; Lenz, H.-J.

    2007-04-01

    The German Soldier-of-the-Future ("Infanterist der Zukunft" - IdZ) programme provides three different optronic reconnaissance systems and weapon sights respectively for each infantry squad of ten soldiers. Besides the reconnaissance and targeting device (WBBG) of the squad leader and the weapon sight (WBZG) for the sniper, the so-called "Video Visier" (video visor) will be used as a new type of weapon sight for aiming and combating with the German assault rifles G36 and AG36, with the machine gun MG4 as well as with the bazooka PzF3. The video visor includes an uncooled thermal imager, a daylight camera, an eye-safe laser range finder and a digital magnetic compass with inclination sensor. Communication with the soldier-mounted central processing unit and real-time transmission of the video data (e.g. display mounted into the helmet of the soldier) is enabled by a wireless data link. In the presentation of the requirements, the philosophy and concept as well as the functionality of the video visor will be described in detail.

  4. The spined soldier bug Podisus: an important commercial and natural predator

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spined soldier bug, Podisus maculiventris is an important generalist predator of many species of insect pests in different horticultural crops. We studied the effects of temperature, prey preference, reproduction in laboratory and field studies, and population dynamics. We found the following ge...

  5. Soldier Decision-Making for Allocation of Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Assets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    decisions by assigning ISR platform sensors to simplified target detection and identification tasks. The objective, or algorithmic accuracy of the decisions...allocation tasks. Soldiers made decisions by assigning ISR platform sensors to simplified target detection and identification tasks. The objective...ISR allocation, which is the assignment of assets to target detection and identification tasks, for physical sensors on aerial platforms. Military

  6. Charles Cotesworth Pinckney: Soldier-Statesmen of the Constitution. A Bicentennial Series, No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Center of Military History, Washington, DC.

    Charles Cotesworth Pinckney was a wealthy South Carolinian whose profound sense of public duty obliged him to risk everything to assume a mantle of political and military leadership during the period of rebellion. This booklet on Pinckney is one in a series on Revolutionary War soldiers who later signed the U.S. Constitution. The booklet reviews…

  7. Post-traumatic stress symptoms among former child soldiers in Sierra Leone: follow-up study†

    PubMed Central

    Betancourt, Theresa S.; Newnham, Elizabeth A.; McBain, Ryan; Brennan, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Former child soldiers are at risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); however, the trajectory of symptoms has yet to be examined. Aims The risk and protective factors associated with PTSD symptom change among former child soldiers in Sierra Leone were investigated. Method Data from 243 former child soldiers (mean age 16.6 years, 30% female) were analysed. Results Self-reported rates of possible PTSD using standard cut-off points declined from 32% to 16% 4 years later (P<0.05). Symptoms of PTSD at baseline were significantly associated with war experiences (P<0.01) and post-conflict family abuse (P<0.001). Reliable improvement in symptoms was reported by 30%. In growth models examining symptom change, worsening of symptoms was associated with death of a parent (P<0.05) and post-conflict stigma (P<0.001). Protective effects were observed for increases in family acceptance (P<0.001). Conclusions The findings indicated improvement in PTSD symptoms among former child soldiers despite limited access to care. Family and community support played a vital part in promoting psychological adjustment. PMID:23887999

  8. Expectations of life and health among spinal cord injured adults.

    PubMed

    McColl, M A; Walker, J; Stirling, P; Wilkins, R; Corey, P

    1997-12-01

    While our understanding of aging and mortality in spinal cord injury is evolving, precise estimates are still not available for expectations of life and health following a spinal cord injury. In order to derive these estimates, information about mortality and health must be combined into a single estimate. Health expectancy estimates have been widely used in the literature of the last decade to try to understand the relationship between population health and survival, both in the general population and in special populations. This study brought the benefit of this methodology to the question of long-term survival following spinal cord injury. Specifically, the study aimed to calculate life and health expectancy in a population of spinal cord injured individuals; and to estimate the effect of factors associated with survival and health. The study involved a retrospective cohort, all of whom sustained a spinal cord injury between the ages of 25 and 34 years, and between 1945 and 1990. The study predicted a median survival time of 38 years post-injury, with 43% surviving at least 40 years. These findings suggest an increase in life expectancy of about 5 years over previous research on the same cohort. Factors affecting survival were age at injury, level and completeness of lesion. Expectations of health found in the present study are similar to those found in studies of the general population. This study showed seven remaining years of poor health expected at injury, and five remaining years expected at 40 years post injury, presumably occurring at the end of life.

  9. Midkine in repair of the injured nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yoshihiro; Sakakima, Harutoshi; Matsuda, Fumiyo; Ikutomo, Masako

    2014-01-01

    Midkine (MK) is a growth factor with neurotrophic and neurite outgrowth activities. It was expressed in the peri-ischaemic area in the acute phase of cerebral infarction in rat brains. Astrocytes were the origin of MK in this occasion. MK has been assessed in terms of its effects on neural injury. The administration of MK into the lateral ventricle immediately prior to ischaemia prevented cell death in the hippocampal CA1 neurons degenerated by transient forebrain ischaemia in gerbils. MK administration was also beneficial in rats with neural injury, especially after kainic acid-induced seizures. Gene therapy with mouse MK cDNA using an adenovirus was effective in reducing the cerebral infarction volume and in increasing the number of neuronal precursor cells in the subventricular zone of the rat brain. MK mRNA and MK protein were found in spinal cord motor neurons of the anterior horn in both the acute phase of sciatic nerve injury and 3 weeks later. MK immunoreactivity was also found in the proximal side of a sciatic nerve-injured site in sciatic nerve axons. MK receptors were expressed in Schwann cells after injury, suggesting crosstalk between axons and Schwann cells. MK was also present in nerve terminals and influenced ACh receptor clustering during neuromuscular development in Xenopus. Thus, MK may also be involved in reinforcing and maintaining the synapse. All these findings indicate the therapeutic potential of MK for promoting repair of the nervous system after injury. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Midkine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-4 PMID:24460674

  10. Exposure to traffic among urban children injured as pedestrians

    PubMed Central

    Posner, J; Liao, E; Winston, F; Cnaan, A; Shaw, K; Durbin, D

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the immediate pre-crash activities and the routine traffic exposure (street crossing and play) in a sample of urban children struck by automobiles. In particular, the traffic exposure of children who were struck while playing was compared with that of those struck while crossing streets. Design: Cross sectional survey. Setting: Urban pediatric emergency department. Patients: A total of 139 children ages 4–15 years evaluated for acute injuries resulting from pedestrian-motor vehicle collisions during a 14 month period. Main outcome measures: Sites of outdoor play, daily time in outdoor play, weekly number of street crossings, pre-crash circumstance (play v walking). Results: Altogether 39% of the children routinely used the street and 64% routinely used the sidewalks as play areas. The median number of street crossings per week per child was 27. There were no differences in exposures for the 29% who were hit while playing compared with the 71% who were hit while walking. Although 84% of the children walked to or from school at least one day per week, only 15% of the children were struck while on the school walking trip. The remainder were injured either while playing outdoors or while walking to other places. Conclusions: Urban children who are victims of pedestrian crashes have a high level of traffic exposure from a variety of circumstances related to their routine outdoor playing and street crossing activities. The distributions of traffic exposures were similar across the sample, indicating that the sample as a whole had high traffic exposure, regardless of the children's activity preceding the crash. Future pedestrian injury programs should address the pervasive nature of children's exposure to traffic during their routine outdoor activities. PMID:12226122

  11. Increased leukotriene B4 synthesis in immune injured rat glomeruli.

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M A; Nakazawa, M; Emancipator, S N; Dunn, M J

    1988-01-01

    We examined glomerular synthesis of the 5-lipoxygenase metabolite, LTB4, in normal and immune-injured rat glomeruli. Glomeruli isolated from normal rats and from rats with nephrotoxic serum nephritis (NSN), passive Heymann nephritis (PHN) and cationic bovine gamma globulin (CBGG)-induced glomerulonephritis were incubated with the calcium ionophore A23187 (3 microM). Lipids in the glomeruli and media were extracted with ethyl acetate, and were purified and fractionated by HPLC. Immunoreactive-LTB4 (i-LTB4) was determined by radioimmunoassay on HPLC fractions with a detection limit of 50 pg of i-LTB4. A large peak of i-LTB4 that comigrated with authentic LTB4 was found exclusively in glomeruli isolated from the CBGG-injected rats. Addition of the lipoxygenase inhibitor BW755C (50 micrograms/ml) to glomerular incubation resulted in greater than 90% inhibition of i-LTB4. Synthesis of i-LTB4 by glomeruli from normal, NSN and PHN rats was undetectable. Glomerular LTB4 synthesis by CBGG-injected rats was confirmed by radiometric HPLC and by gas chromatography mass-spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis. In order to rule out synthesis of LTB4 by neutrophils entrapped in the glomeruli, a group of rats received 1,000 rad total body x irradiation, with shielding of the kidneys before induction of CBGG glomerulonephritis. Despite greater than 95% reduction in total leukocyte count, glomerular synthesis of LTB4 remained enhanced. Augmented glomerular synthesis of the proinflammatory lipid, LTB4, in the CBGG model of glomerular disease could have an important role in the development of glomerular injury and proteinuria. Images PMID:2838526

  12. Autonomic arousal feedback and emotional experience: evidence from the spinal cord injured.

    PubMed

    Chwalisz, K; Diener, E; Gallagher, D

    1988-05-01

    We interviewed spinal-cord-injured, other handicapped, and nonhandicapped subjects to investigate the relation between the perception of autonomic arousal and experienced emotion. The three groups differed significantly on only one measure of affect intensity, with the spinal-cord-injured subjects more often reporting stronger fear in their lives now compared with the past. In addition, spinal-cord-injured subjects often described intense emotional experiences. Spinal-cord-injured subjects who differed in their level of autonomic feedback differed in intensity on several measures. Subjects with greater autonomic feedback tended to report more intense levels of negative emotions. The findings indicate that the perception of autonomic arousal may not be necessary for emotional experience. There were weak trends in our data, however, suggesting that the perception of arousal may enhance the experience of emotional intensity. The subjective well-being reports of the handicapped groups were comparable to those of nonhandicapped subjects, indicating successful coping with their disability.

  13. Remote monitoring of soldier safety through body posture identification using wearable sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Subir; Quwaider, Muhannad

    2008-04-01

    The physical safety and well being of the soldiers in a battlefield is the highest priority of Incident Commanders. Currently, the ability to track and monitor soldiers rely on visual and verbal communication which can be somewhat limited in scenarios where the soldiers are deployed inside buildings and enclosed areas that are out of visual range of the commanders. Also, the need for being stealth can often prevent a battling soldier to send verbal clues to a commander about his or her physical well being. Sensor technologies can remotely provide various data about the soldiers including physiological monitoring and personal alert safety system functionality. This paper presents a networked sensing solution in which a body area wireless network of multi-modal sensors can monitor the body movement and other physiological parameters for statistical identification of a soldier's body posture, which can then be indicative of the physical conditions and safety alerts of the soldier in question. The specific concept is to leverage on-body proximity sensing and a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) based mechanism that can be applied for stochastic identification of human body postures using a wearable sensor network. The key idea is to collect relative proximity information between wireless sensors that are strategically placed over a subject's body to monitor the relative movements of the body segments, and then to process that using HMM in order to identify the subject's body postures. The key novelty of this approach is a departure from the traditional accelerometry based approaches in which the individual body segment movements, rather than their relative proximity, is used for activity monitoring and posture detection. Through experiments with body mounted sensors we demonstrate that while the accelerometry based approaches can be used for differentiating activity intensive postures such as walking and running, they are not very effective for identification and

  14. Spray method for recovery of heat-injured Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Back, Kyeong-Hwan; Kim, Sang-Oh; Park, Ki-Hwan; Chung, Myung-Sub; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    Selective agar is inadequate for supporting recovery of injured cells. During risk assessment of certain foods, both injured and noninjured cells must be enumerated. In this study, a new method (agar spray method) for recovering sublethally heat-injured microorganisms was developed and used for recovery of heat-injured Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes. Molten selective agar was applied as an overlay to presolidified nonselective tryptic soy agar (TSA) by spray application. Heat-injured cells (55°C for 10 min in 0.1% peptone water or 55°C for 15 min in sterilized skim milk) were inoculated directly onto solidified TSA. After a 2-h incubation period for cell repair, selective agar was applied to the TSA surface with a sprayer, and the plates were incubated. The recovery rate for heat-injured Salmonella Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes with the spray method was compared with the corresponding rates associated with TSA alone, selective media alone, and the conventional overlay method (selective agar poured on top of resuscitated cells grown on TSA and incubated for 2 h). No significant differences (P > 0.05) were found in pathogen recovery obtained with TSA, the overlay method, and the spray method. However, a lower recovery rate (P < 0.05) was obtained for isolation of injured cells on selective media. Overall, these results indicate that the agar spray method is an acceptable alternative to the conventional overlay method and is a simpler and more convenient approach to recovery and detection of injured cells.

  15. Public-academic partnerships: working together to meet the needs of Army National Guard soldiers: an academic-military partnership.

    PubMed

    Dalack, Gregory W; Blow, Adrian J; Valenstein, Marcia; Gorman, Lisa; Spinner, Jane; Marcus, Sheila; Kees, Michelle; McDonough, Susan; Greden, John F; Ames, Barbara; Francisco, Burton; Anderson, James R; Bartolacci, James; Lagrou, Robert

    2010-11-01

    The conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq have greatly increased the number of veterans returning home with combat exposure, reintegration issues, and psychiatric symptoms. National Guard soldiers face additional challenges. Unlike active duty soldiers, they do not return to military installations with access to military health services or peers. The authors describe the formation and activities of a partnership among two large state universities in Michigan and the Michigan Army National Guard, established to assess and develop programming to meet the needs of returning soldiers. The process of forming the partnership and the challenges, opportunities, and benefits arising from it are described.

  16. Human factors considerations of IR sensors for the Canadian Integrated Soldier System Project (ISSP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frim, John; Bossi, Linda; Tack, Dave

    2009-05-01

    The Integrated Soldier System Project (ISSP) is the cornerstone of Canada's future soldier modernization effort, which seeks to "significantly enhance tactical level individual and team Lethality, Mobility and C4I performance in the complex, network-enabled, command-centric, effects-based digitized battlespace." This capital acquisition project is supported by a number of R&D Technology Demonstration Projects within Defence R&D Canada. Several of these projects focus on the human factors aspects of future technologies, such as IR sensors. The Soldier Information Requirements Technology Demonstration (SIREQ TD) project examined the performance impact of NVGs, LWIR imaging systems, and fused systems (both optical and digital fusion) on target detection, recognition and identification. NVGs were shown to provide good identification performance while LWIR systems excelled in detection tasks. Fused systems show promise of augmenting the respective stand alone capabilities of each sensor type, but more work is required to optimize fusion algorithms. The Soldier Integrated Headwear Technology Demonstration (SIHS TD) project is looking at the human factors aspects of mounting a range of vision enhancement sensors on a helmet, including optimal placement of both sensors and displays with respect to center of mass, total head borne weight, and visual offset and parallax issues. Overall headwear system weight should be less than 2.5 kg, and if an offset from the eye is required then a horizontal offset (vice vertical or oblique) of the sensor appears most acceptable. These findings have implications on the design of future IR and fused sensor systems for dismounted soldiers.

  17. Social organization in a flatworm: trematode parasites form soldier and reproductive castes.

    PubMed

    Hechinger, Ryan F; Wood, Alan C; Kuris, Armand M

    2011-03-07

    In some of the most complex animal societies, individuals exhibit a cooperative division of labour to form castes. The most pronounced types of caste formation involve reproductive and non-reproductive forms that are morphologically distinct. In colonies comprising separate or mobile individuals, this type of caste formation has been recognized only among the arthropods, sea anemones and mole-rats. Here, we document physical and behavioural caste formation in a flatworm. Trematode flatworm parasites undergo repeated clonal reproduction of 'parthenitae' within their molluscan hosts forming colonies. We present experimental and observational data demonstrating specialization among trematode parthenitae to form distinct soldier and reproductive castes. Soldiers do not reproduce, have relatively large mouthparts, and are much smaller and thinner than reproductives. Soldiers are also more active, and are disproportionally common in areas of the host where invasions occur. Further, only soldiers readily and consistently attack heterospecifics and conspecifics from other colonies. The division of labour described here for trematodes is strongly analogous to that characterizing other social systems with a soldier caste. The parallel caste formation in these systems, despite varying reproductive mode and taxonomic affiliation, indicates the general importance of ecological factors in influencing the evolution of social behaviour. Further, the 'recognition of self' and the defence of the infected host body from invading parasites are comparable to aspects of immune defence. A division of labour is probably widespread among trematodes and trematode species encompass considerable taxonomic, life history and environmental diversity. Trematodes should therefore provide new, fruitful systems to investigate the ecology and evolution of sociality.

  18. Safety knowledge and risk behaviour of injured and uninjured young skiers and snowboarders

    PubMed Central

    Macnab, Andrew J; Cadman, Robert E; Greenlaw, Julia V

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Earlier studies of ski injury indicated that youths were at increased risk of injury, that males were most likely to injure the head or face, and that females were most likely to injure the knee. OBJECTIVE: To obtain information about safety knowledge and risk behaviour that might contribute to injury among young skiers and snow-boarders. DESIGN: Survey of knowledge and behaviour in injured and noninjured cohorts. SETTING: Blackcomb Mountain, Whistler, British Columbia. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 863 noninjured and 118 injured skiers and snowboarders aged five to 17 years using Blackcomb during 1993/94. INTERVENTION: Skier Knowledge Inventory Questionnaire. RESULTS: The injured cohort had less knowledge of the Skiers Responsibility Code. In both groups, almost half had had no lessons, 31% had had bindings adjusted by nonprofessionals and chair lift safety bars were used one ride in four by children age 13 to 17 years. The injuried cohort wore helmets slightly less often. Both groups regularly skied through the trees (60% to 70%), and one-thirds had skied on closed runs. Excessive speed was identified as the major cause of injury. Skiers did not recognize jumping as contributing to injury. CONCLUSIONS: Lack of knowledge of safety rules was more prevalent among the injured cohort. Skiing without due care – including skiing through tress, skiing on closed runs, skiing with excessive speed and jumping, particularly by snowboarders – were identified as potential causes of injury. PMID:20401273

  19. World War II soldier salutes the US Flag during a Veteran's Day ceremony to dedicate a memorial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    World War II soldier salutes the US Flag during a Veteran's Day ceremony to dedicate a memorial to 'Smoky, Yorkie Doodle Dandy and Dogs of All Wars' in the Rocky River Reservation, Lakewood, Ohio. November 11, 2005

  20. Military unit support, postdeployment social support, and PTSD symptoms among active duty and National Guard soldiers deployed to Iraq.

    PubMed

    Han, Sohyun C; Castro, Frank; Lee, Lewina O; Charney, Meredith E; Marx, Brian P; Brailey, Kevin; Proctor, Susan P; Vasterling, Jennifer J

    2014-06-01

    Research suggests that military unit support and community postdeployment social support are associated with fewer PTSD symptoms following military deployment. This study extended prior research by examining the associations among predeployment unit support and PTSD symptoms before Iraq deployment as well as unit support, PTSD symptoms, and postdeployment social support after deployment among 835 U.S. Army and 173 National Guard soldiers. Multiple regression analyses indicated that predeployment unit support was not significantly associated with postdeployment PTSD severity in either group of soldiers, whereas higher unit support during deployment was significantly associated with lower postdeployment PTSD severity among active duty soldiers only. Among both groups, higher levels of postdeployment social support were associated with lower levels of postdeployment PTSD symptom severity. These findings suggest that postdeployment social support is a particularly strong buffer against postdeployment PTSD symptoms among both groups of soldiers whereas the effects of unit support may be limited.

  1. Sexual difference in juvenile-hormone titer in workers leads to sex-biased soldier differentiation in termites.

    PubMed

    Toga, Kouhei; Hanmoto, Shutaro; Suzuki, Ryutaro; Watanabe, Dai; Miura, Toru; Maekawa, Kiyoto

    2016-04-01

    In termites, the soldier caste, with its specialized defensive morphology, is one of the most important characteristics for sociality. Most of the basal termite species have both male and female soldiers, and the soldier sex ratio is almost equal or only slightly biased. However, in the apical lineages (especially family Termitidae), there are many species that have soldiers with strongly biased sex ratio. Generally in termites, since high juvenile hormone (JH) titer is required for soldier differentiation from a worker via a presoldier stage, it was hypothesized that the biased soldier-sex ratio was caused by differences in JH sensitivity and/or JH titer between male and female workers. Therefore, we focused on the presoldier differentiation and the worker JH titer in species with only male soldiers (Nasutitermes takasagoensis) and with both male and female soldiers (Reticulitermes speratus) in natural conditions. In the former species, there are four types of workers; male minor, male medium, female medium and female major workers, and presoldiers differentiate from male minor workers. First, we tried to artificially induce presoldiers from male and female workers. In N. takasagoensis, the presoldier differentiation rate and mortality was significantly higher in male minor workers. Morphological analyses showed that both male and female induced presoldiers possessed normal soldier-specific morphologies. It was suggested that female workers, from which soldiers do not differentiate under natural conditions, also maintained the physiological and developmental potential for soldier differentiation. In R. speratus, however, no differences were observed in solder differentiation rate and mortality between male and female workers. Second, the JH titers of each sex/type of workers were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in two different seasons (April and December). The results showed that, in N. takasagoensis, JH titer in male minor

  2. Estimating the human recovery costs of seriously injured road crash casualties.

    PubMed

    Bambach, M R; Mitchell, R J

    2015-12-01

    Road crashes result in substantial trauma and costs to societies around the world. Robust costing methods are an important tool to estimate costs associated with road trauma, and are key inputs into policy development and cost-benefit analysis for road safety programmes and infrastructure projects. With an expanding focus on seriously injured road crash casualties, in addition to the long standing focus on fatalities, methods for costing seriously injured casualties are becoming increasingly important. Some road safety agencies are defining a seriously injured casualty as an individual that was admitted to hospital following a road crash, and as a result, hospital separation data provide substantial potential for estimating the costs associated with seriously injured road crash casualties. The aim of this study is to establish techniques for estimating the human recovery costs of (non-fatal) seriously injured road crash casualties directly from hospital separation data. An individuals' road crash-related hospitalisation record and their personal injury insurance claim were linked for road crashes that occurred in New South Wales, Australia. These records provided the means for estimating all of the costs to the casualty directly related to their recovery from their injuries. A total of 10,897 seriously injured road crash casualties were identified and four methods for estimating their recovery costs were examined, using either unit record or aggregated hospital separation data. The methods are shown to provide robust techniques for estimating the human recovery costs of seriously injured road crash casualties, that may prove useful for identifying, implementing and evaluating safety programmes intended to reduce the incidence of road crash-related serious injuries.

  3. The Effects of Prior Combat Experience on the Expression of Somatic and Affective Symptoms in Deploying Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Journal of Psychosomatic ResThe effects of prior combat experience on the expression of somatic and affective symptoms in deploying soldiers William...theories of stress reaction, repression , and somatic amplification, combat- experienced soldiers reported limited affective complaints but greater...coping or repressive processes may be associated with selective amplification of somatic symptoms [11–13]. A number of studies suggest that exposure to

  4. A Randomized Clinical Trial of the Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality vs. Enhanced Care as Usual for Suicidal Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    Soldiers who are experiencing suicidal ideation and/or behaviors . Research clinicians for both treatment conditions were recruited from the Army...staff. Participants were recruited from a number of sources at the ARS including the outpatient behavioral health clinic and the inpatient unit...Usual (E-CAU) in a sample of n = 148 active-duty US Army Soldiers who are experiencing suicidal ideation and/or behaviors . Research clinicians for

  5. Comorbid alcohol addiction increases aggression level in soldiers with combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Zoricić, Zoran; Karlović, Dalibor; Buljan, Danijel; Marusić, Srdan

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare aggressive behavior in soldiers with combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), PTSD comorbid with alcohol addiction and alcohol addiction only. Three groups of male combat experienced soldiers with PTSD (n=43), PTSD comorbid with alcohol addiction (n=41) and alcohol addiction (n=39) were compared by Aggression rating scale A-87. PTSD was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria and Watson's PTSD rating scale. Alcohol addiction was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria and CAGE Questionnaire. Combat-experienced soldiers with alcohol addiction as well as soldiers with combat-related PTSD comorbid with alcohol addiction have a high level of verbal latent aggression (VLA), (F=26.65; P<0.001), physically latent aggression (PLA), (F=37.86; P<0.001), indirect aggression (INA), (F=56.94; P<0.001), verbal manifest aggression (VMA), (F=18.35; P<0.001), and physically manifest aggression (PMA), (F=43.22; P<0.001), vs. soldiers with combat-related PTSD without comorbid conditions. Alcohol addiction is a severe factor in increasing aggression levels in soldiers with PTSD.

  6. Microcurrent Electrical Neuromuscular Stimulation Facilitates Regeneration of Injured Skeletal Muscle in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fujiya, Hiroto; Ogura, Yuji; Ohno, Yoshitaka; Goto, Ayumi; Nakamura, Ayane; Ohashi, Kazuya; Uematsu, Daiki; Aoki, Haruhito; Musha, Haruki; Goto, Katsumasa

    2015-01-01

    Conservative therapies, mainly resting care for the damaged muscle, are generally used as a treatment for skeletal muscle injuries (such as muscle fragmentation). Several past studies reported that microcurrent electrical neuromuscular stimulation (MENS) facilitates a repair of injured soft tissues and shortens the recovery period. However, the effects of MENS on the regeneration in injured skeletal muscle are still unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of MENS on the regenerative process of injured skeletal muscle and to elucidate whether satellite cells in injured skeletal muscle are activated by MENS by using animal models. Male C57BL/6J mice, aged 7 weeks old, were used (n = 30). Mice were randomly divided into two groups: (1) cardiotoxin (CTX)-injected (CX, n = 15) and (2) CTX-injected with MENS treatment (MX, n=15) groups. CTX was injected into tibialis anterior muscle (TA) of mice in CX and MX groups to initiate the necrosis-regeneration cycle of the muscle. TA was dissected 1, 2, and 3 weeks after the injection. Muscle weight, muscle protein content, the mean cross-sectional areas of muscle fibers, the relative percentage of fibers having central nuclei, and the number of muscle satellite cells were evaluated. MENS facilitated the recovery of the muscle dry weight and protein content relative to body weight, and the mean cross-sectional areas of muscle fibers in CTX-induced injured TA muscle. The number of Pax7-positive muscle satellite cells was increased by MENS during the regenerating period. Decrease in the percentages of fibers with central nuclei after CTX-injection was facilitated by MENS. MENS may facilitate the regeneration of injured skeletal muscles by activating the regenerative potential of skeletal muscles. Key points Microcurrent electrical neuromuscular stimulation (MENS) facilitated the recovery of the relative muscle dry weight, the relative muscle protein content, and the mean cross-sectional areas of muscle

  7. Microcurrent electrical neuromuscular stimulation facilitates regeneration of injured skeletal muscle in mice.

    PubMed

    Fujiya, Hiroto; Ogura, Yuji; Ohno, Yoshitaka; Goto, Ayumi; Nakamura, Ayane; Ohashi, Kazuya; Uematsu, Daiki; Aoki, Haruhito; Musha, Haruki; Goto, Katsumasa

    2015-06-01

    Conservative therapies, mainly resting care for the damaged muscle, are generally used as a treatment for skeletal muscle injuries (such as muscle fragmentation). Several past studies reported that microcurrent electrical neuromuscular stimulation (MENS) facilitates a repair of injured soft tissues and shortens the recovery period. However, the effects of MENS on the regeneration in injured skeletal muscle are still unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of MENS on the regenerative process of injured skeletal muscle and to elucidate whether satellite cells in injured skeletal muscle are activated by MENS by using animal models. Male C57BL/6J mice, aged 7 weeks old, were used (n = 30). Mice were randomly divided into two groups: (1) cardiotoxin (CTX)-injected (CX, n = 15) and (2) CTX-injected with MENS treatment (MX, n=15) groups. CTX was injected into tibialis anterior muscle (TA) of mice in CX and MX groups to initiate the necrosis-regeneration cycle of the muscle. TA was dissected 1, 2, and 3 weeks after the injection. Muscle weight, muscle protein content, the mean cross-sectional areas of muscle fibers, the relative percentage of fibers having central nuclei, and the number of muscle satellite cells were evaluated. MENS facilitated the recovery of the muscle dry weight and protein content relative to body weight, and the mean cross-sectional areas of muscle fibers in CTX-induced injured TA muscle. The number of Pax7-positive muscle satellite cells was increased by MENS during the regenerating period. Decrease in the percentages of fibers with central nuclei after CTX-injection was facilitated by MENS. MENS may facilitate the regeneration of injured skeletal muscles by activating the regenerative potential of skeletal muscles. Key pointsMicrocurrent electrical neuromuscular stimulation (MENS) facilitated the recovery of the relative muscle dry weight, the relative muscle protein content, and the mean cross-sectional areas of muscle

  8. Molecular Hydrogen Effectively Heals Alkali-Injured Cornea via Suppression of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cejka, Cestmir; Kossl, Jan; Hermankova, Barbora; Holan, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of molecular hydrogen (H2) on the healing of alkali-injured cornea. The effects of the solution of H2 in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or PBS alone topically applied on the alkali-injured rabbit cornea with 0.25 M NaOH were investigated using immunohistochemical and biochemical methods. Central corneal thickness taken as an index of corneal hydration was measured with an ultrasonic pachymeter. Results show that irrigation of the damaged eyes with H2 solution immediately after the injury and then within next five days renewed corneal transparency lost after the injury and reduced corneal hydration increased after the injury to physiological levels within ten days after the injury. In contrast, in injured corneas treated with PBS, the transparency of damaged corneas remained lost and corneal hydration elevated. Later results—on day 20 after the injury—showed that in alkali-injured corneas treated with H2 solution the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, peroxynitrite, detected by nitrotyrosine residues (NT), and malondialdehyde (MDA) expressions were very low or absent compared to PBS treated injured corneas, where NT and MDA expressions were present. In conclusion, H2 solution favorably influenced corneal healing after alkali injury via suppression of oxidative stress.

  9. In need of remedy: US policy for compensating injured research participants.

    PubMed

    Pike, Elizabeth R

    2014-03-01

    There is an emerging ethical consensus that injured research participants should receive medical care and compensation for their research-related injuries. This consensus is premised on notions of beneficence, distributive justice, compensatory justice and reciprocity. In response, countries around the world have implemented no-fault compensation systems to ensure that research participants are adequately protected in the event of injury. The United States, the world's leading sponsor of research, has chosen instead to rely on its legal system to provide injured research participants with medical care and compensation. This article argues that US reliance on its legal system leaves injured research participants unprotected in the event of injury. Nearly every injured research participant will have difficulty receiving compensation in court, and certain classes of research participants will be barred from receiving compensation altogether. The United States' outlier status also threatens to impede US-sponsored multinational research, potentially delaying important biomedical advances. To rectify this injustice, researchers, Institutional Review Boards, sponsors and research institutions should advocate systematic no-fault compensation in the United States to bring US law into accord with global ethical norms and ensure that injured research participants are adequately protected.

  10. Mechanical characterization of the injured spinal cord after lateral spinal hemisection injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Tarun; Gilbert, Jeremy; Stelzner, Dennis; Hasenwinkel, Julie

    2012-06-10

    The glial scar formed at the site of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) has been classically hypothesized to be a potent physical and biochemical barrier to nerve regeneration. One longstanding hypothesis is that the scar acts as a physical barrier due to its increased stiffness in comparison to uninjured spinal cord tissue. However, the information regarding the mechanical properties of the glial scar in the current literature is mostly anecdotal and not well quantified. We monitored the mechanical relaxation behavior of injured rat spinal cord tissue at the site of mid-thoracic spinal hemisection 2 weeks and 8 weeks post-injury using a microindentation test method. Elastic moduli were calculated and a modified standard linear model (mSLM) was fit to the data to estimate the relaxation time constant and viscosity. The SLM was modified to account for a spectrum of relaxation times, a phenomenon common to biological tissues, by incorporating a stretched exponential term. Injured tissue exhibited significantly lower stiffness and elastic modulus in comparison to uninjured control tissue, and the results from the model parameters indicated that the relaxation time constant and viscosity of injured tissue were significantly higher than controls. This study presents direct micromechanical measurements of injured spinal cord tissue post-injury. The results of this study show that the injured spinal tissue displays complex viscoelastic behavior, likely indicating changes in tissue permeability and diffusivity.

  11. A Prospective Study on Time to Recovery in 254 Injured Novice Runners

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Rasmus Oestergaard; Rønnow, Lotte; Rasmussen, Sten; Lind, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Describe the diagnoses and the time to recovery of running-related injuries in novice runners. Design Prospective cohort study on injured runners. Method This paper is a secondary data analysis of a 933-person cohort study (DANO-RUN) aimed at characterizing risk factors for injury in novice runners. Among those sustaining running-related injuries, the types of injuries and time to recovery is described in the present paper. All injured runners were diagnosed after a thorough clinical examination and then followed prospectively during their recovery. If they recovered completely from injury, time to recovery of each injury was registered. Results A total of 254 runners were injured. The proportion of runners diagnosed with medial tibial stress syndrome was 15%, 10% for patellofemoral pain, 9% for medial meniscal injury, 7% for Achilles tendinopathy and 5% for plantar fasciitis. Among the 220 runners (87%) recovering from their injury, the median time to recovery was 71 days (minimum  = 9 days, maximum  = 617 days). Conclusions Medial tibial stress syndrome was the most common injury followed by patellofemoral pain, medial meniscal injury and Achilles tendinopathy. Half of the injured runners were unable to run 2×500 meters without pain after 10 weeks. Almost 5% of the injured runners received surgical treatment. PMID:24923269

  12. All-or-nothing thinking: The processing of emotional expressions in traumatized post-deployment soldiers.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, Claudia; Alliger-Horn, Christina; Mitte, Kristin; Glaesmer, Heide

    2016-12-21

    The exposure to trauma is a dramatic life event with complex consequences among those like changes in information processing. Dysfunctional cognitions like a negative interpretation of information are a risk factor for the development of trauma-related disorders. The aim of the present study was to test whether post-deployment soldiers with trauma differ in their interpretation of emotional expressions from member of a control group. Interpretation of emotional expressions was assessed in a sample of 106 males (n=53 soldiers, n=53 controls) with the Similarity Rating Task (simtask) and analyzed with a multidimensional scaling (MDS) approach. The findings suggest that individuals with war-related trauma tend to show a negative interpretation bias. Furthermore, traumatized individuals did not discriminate between different intensities of emotional expressions the way controls did. The findings are discussed in terms of the role of dysfunctional cognitions in the development and treatment of mental disorders.

  13. No evidence of 1918 influenza pandemic origin in Chinese laborers/soldiers in France.

    PubMed

    Shanks, G Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Laborers and soldiers from China and Southeast Asia recruited during the First World War by Britain and France have been suggested as the origin of the 1918 influenza pandemic in Western Europe. This study aimed to review the available data to better understand the sources and origins of the 1918 influenza pandemic, and clarify whether, in fact, there was an Asian connection to its onset. We reviewed official mortality lists from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission and the French Ministry of Defence for all-cause (Britain) and pneumonia/influenza (France) mortality, respectively. The results indicated that influenza mortality (estimated 1/1000) in Chinese and Southeast Asian laborers and soldiers lagged other co-located military units by several weeks. This finding does not support a Southeast Asian importation of lethal influenza to Europe in 1918.

  14. The Surveillance And Reconnaissance Ground Equipment (SARGE), real robots for real soldiers

    SciTech Connect

    Pletta, J.B.

    1994-04-01

    The Joint Program Office for Unmanned Ground Vehicles and Sandia National Laboratories are developing the Surveillance And Reconnaissance Ground Equipment (SARGE) robot. The SARGE system is a second generation refinement of Sandia`s Dixie robot. A comparison of Dixie`s actual performance and the expected SARGE performance characteristics will be given. The SARGE design philosophy embraces proven technology, low power consumption, and modular sensor packages designed to meet specific mission needs. A major aspect of the SARGE program is obtaining user acceptance through ownership of the prototype hardware. A total of ten systems are being fabricated with at least eight being given to infantry battalions for their use in day to day operations. The SARGE robot is a prototype system that is not intended to meet all the needs of the infantry soldier but will provide a reliable platform which will enable the soldier to determine first hand the required capabilities for future unmanned ground vehicles on the battlefield.

  15. Defining soldier equipment trade space: load effects on combat marksmanship and perception-action coupling.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Christopher J; Bigelow, Carol; Van Emmerik, Richard E A

    2013-01-01

    Soldier equipment compromises task performance as temporal constraints during critical situations and load increase inertial and interactive forces during movement. Methods are necessary to optimise equipment that relate task performance to underlying coordination and perception-action coupling. Employing ecological task analysis and methods from dynamical systems theory, equipment load and coordination was examined during two sub-tasks embedded in combat performance, threat discrimination and dynamic marksmanship. Perception-action coupling was degraded with load during threat discrimination, leading to delays in functional reaction time. Reduced speed and accuracy during dynamic marksmanship under load was related to disrupted segmental coordination and adaptability during postural transitions between targets. These results show how reduced performance under load relates to coordination changes and perception-action coupling. These changes in functional capability are directly related to soldier survivability in combat. The methods employed may aid equipment design towards more optimised performance by modifying equipment or its distribution on humans.

  16. A Jungian approach to dreams reported by soldiers in a modern combat zone.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Rob; Goodwyn, Erik; Ignatowski, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Treating combat deployed soldiers is becoming more prevalent and needed in psychiatry. Modern combat produces unique psychological challenges, including those without criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This article will attempt to share the primary author's experience with psychotherapy in a combat zone, along with understanding the general themes of dreams the author encountered while being deployed. Toward that end, the primary author [RW] discusses his personal experiences in Iraq working with soldiers whom he saw and treated while in theatre, with a particular focus on the dreams they reported. The co-authors [EG and MI] afterward collaborated with the primary author to formulate and provide insight into the dreams from a Jungian perspective.

  17. Perceived Levels of Information Uncertainty, Job Insecurity and Supervisor Credibility: Effects of the Drawdown Among Soldiers in the United States Army.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    defense budget will hurt their military career , they fear for their job security. This high -level of job insecurity is caused by work force reductions...screening process. It is this "involuntary separation" which has many soldiers so concerned for their careers . The high levels of job insecurity...soldiers. Insecurity levels showed a very high percentage of soldiers fear for their jobs as a result of the projected cuts during the force drawdown

  18. Army Research Needs for Automated Neuropsychological Tests: Monitoring Soldier Health and Performance Status

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology 22S (2007) S7–S14 Army research needs for automated neuropsychological tests: Monitoring soldier health and...ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 S8 K.E. Friedl et al. / Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology 22S...central role in post-deployment health research. K.E. Friedl et al. / Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology 22S (2007)

  19. Scaling Robotic Displays: Visual and Multimodal Options for Navigation by Dismounted Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 iii Contents List of Figures v List of Tables v Acknowledgments vi 1. Introduction 1 1.1 Background...need to manage the tasks in such a way as to maximize the composite score. After training, the Soldiers completed the SynWin trial and scores for each...in Complex Environment Performance, D. de Waard , G. Hockey, P. Nickel, K. Brookhuis, Eds.; Europe chapter of the Human Factors and Ergonomics

  20. Squad-Level Soldier-Robot Dynamics: Exploring Future Concepts Involving Intelligent Autonomous Robots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    acknowledgment. One Soldier recommended an earpiece be used when noise and light discipline protocols are being followed. 3.1.3.8 ASM Preprogrammed...light, etc.) 3 text message 4 panel display 0 Other: no signal, just execute tasks 2 85 COMMENTS NUMBER Need earpiece when noise discipline is...noise and light disciplines. 1 Should be communicated by voice. 2 Via an earpiece . 2 Puts you in the right area without second guessing. 1 Use

  1. Beware the BATUS Cactus--cactus dermatitis in exercising soldiers on the Albertan prairie.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, J K H; Bailey, K G

    2012-09-01

    Species of the Opuntia or prickly pear genus of cacti are endemic to the British Army Training Unit Suffield (BATUS) training area in Alberta, Canada. They are known to provoke a dermatitis reaction in harvesters of the cacti fruit. It's spines are frequently an uncomfortable nuisance to unwary soldiers exercising in BATUS. We report two cases of particularly debilitating adverse skin reactions to the cacti spines that occurred during the 2010 Exercise Prairie Thunder season.

  2. Treatment of granulomatous amoebic encephalitis with voriconazole and miltefosine in an immunocompetent soldier.

    PubMed

    Webster, Duncan; Umar, Imran; Umar, Imram; Kolyvas, George; Bilbao, Juan; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Duplisea, Kevin; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Visvesvara, Govinda S

    2012-10-01

    A 38-year-old male immunocompetent soldier developed generalized seizures. He underwent surgical debulking and a progressive demyelinating pseudotumor was identified. Serology and molecular testing confirmed a diagnosis of granulomatous amoebic encephalitis caused by Acanthamoeba sp. in this immunocompetent male. The patient was treated with oral voriconazole and miltefosine with Acanthamoeba titers returning to control levels and serial imaging demonstrating resolution of the residual lesion.

  3. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Soldier’s Manuals: A Field Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    design and execution of the project were made by the following personnel: American Institutes for Research: Daniel B. Felker Ingrid Heinsohn Tania ...content of the SM and the soldiers’ actual jobs. These questions were: * Does your SM tell you everything you need to know about how to perform the tasks in... your MOS and Skill Level? (PERFORM) " How many of the tasks in the SM are critical or important for your MOS? (CRIT) " Are any important tasks for

  4. A new secotrinervitane diterpene isolated from soldiers of the Madagascan termite species, Nasutitermes canaliculatus.

    PubMed

    Rabemanantsoa, A; Ranarivelo, Y; Andriantsiferana, M; Tillequin, F; Silverton, J V; Garraffo, H M; Spande, T F; Yeh, H J; Daly, J W

    1996-09-01

    Reported herein is the X-ray crystallographic structure of a novel 10-oxygenated secotrinervitane diterpene, 3 alpha, 10 alpha-diacetoxy-7,16-secotrinervita-7,11,15(17)-triene (4), from soldiers of the endemic Madagascan termite Nasutitermes canaliculatus, which was compared with an energy-minimized structure obtained by computer molecular modeling. We also report 1H- and 13C-NMR and MS data for this new diterpene.

  5. Return to Duty Rate of Amputee Soldiers in the Current Conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    6 If an amputee soldier wishes to remain on active duty, he or she must demonstrate a higher level of function with a prosthesis and have the...at American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Annual Meeting, Vancouver, BC, Canada, July 15–18, 2009. The opinions or assertions contained herein are...and knee disarticulation), transtibial, and Syme (includes foot proximal to the metatarsals). Rank/pay grades were grouped into three categories

  6. Reintegrating America’s Citizen-Soldiers and Airmen: "A Community Effort"

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-10

    aliens and drugs into the US. As the role of the National Guard changed so did its resourcing. The Guard received additional equipment and the...PTSD. MTBI results from an external event that causes the brain to impact the inside wall of the skull . This type of injury is highly prevalent in Iraq...reintegrate with family without being interrupted by their military obligation. This break, although well-intended, alienated Soldiers from one another

  7. Comparison of a Visual and Head Tactile Display for Soldier Navigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Abbreviations, and Acronyms ACH Advanced Combat Helmet ARL U.S. Army Research Laboratory COTS commercial-off-the-shelf HMTD head - mounted tactile display ...purpose of the study was to determine the advantages of a head - mounted tactile display (HMTD), compared with a map for Soldier navigation in an urban...their overall workload. 15. SUBJECT TERMS tactile modality, head - mounted tactile display , urban environment, threat detection, overall workload

  8. Within-year Exertional Heat Illness Incidence in U.S. Army Soldiers, 2008-2012

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    distribution of EHI within the heat season, overall and by installation was determined. In order to assess the relation between ambient weather ...conditions and EHI incidence, weather data were downloaded from the National Centers for Environmental Information website and overlaid with weekly EHI...incidence in U.S. Army Soldiers, 2008-2012 1 Summary 1.1 Overview Strenuous activity performed over long durations in hot weather increases the

  9. Innovative Methods to Acquire and Adapt Soldier Skills (INMASS) in the Operational Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    developing skills needed to perform complex, cognitively-loaded tasks . The method addresses problem solving skills when critical thinking might be... developed as a result of experience, trial and error, or creative thinking . We will take a Knowledge Audit approach in order to elicit a collection of...need for innovative training approaches to develop the required Soldier knowledge , skills , abilities, and attitudes (KSAAs). The primary goal of this

  10. Finding What Works in a Complicated Transition: Considerations for Soldiers with PTSD and mTBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-13

    with life changes and stress . Major trends within the veteran population correlate PTSD to homelessness, suicide , and unemployment; these issues may be...life changes and stress . Major trends within the veteran population correlate PTSD to homelessness, suicide , and unemployment; these issues may be...often stressful and overwhelming. Soldiers clinically diagnosed with PTSD or mild TBI, face an uphill battle in managing, processing, and coping

  11. Mortuary Affairs Soldiers: Early Intervention and Altering Barriers to Care for Traumatic Stress and PTSD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    to Care for Traumatic Stress and PTSD PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Carol S. Fullerton, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The Henry M...Intervention and Altering Barriers to Care for Traumatic Stress and PTSD 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-2-0180 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...care for MA Soldiers and 2) assessing the effectiveness of TEAM on disorder (e.g., PTSD , depression), distress, health risk behaviors (e.g., alcohol or

  12. Enhancing Soldier-Centered Learning with Emerging Training Technologies and Integrated Assessments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    classroom and game-based training platform. The mobile training focuses on declarative knowledge and covers basic terminology and principles for...operating the radio; the virtual classroom covers more advanced procedures topics; and the collaborative scenario serves as a capstone exercise where...Soldiers apply the knowledge they gained from the mobile and virtual classroom in a team-based problem-solving task. Assessments are integrated within

  13. PTSD Trajectory, Co-morbidity, and Utilization of Mental Health Services among National Guard Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    and Utilization of Mental Health Services among National Guard Soldiers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Robert J. Ursano RECIPIENT: Henry M...UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Henry M. Jackson Foundation Bethesda, MD 20852 8...Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2006;256:299–306. 7. Kaminer D, Grimsund A, Myer L, Stein DJ, Williams DR. Risk for posttraumatic stress disorder associated with

  14. Development of the Occupational Physical Assessment Test (OPAT) for Combat Arms Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    valid, safe, and legally defensible physical performance battery to predict a Soldier’s ability to serve in each MOS. Data from 877 complete datasets...were used in the development of three courses of action for gender neutral Occupational Physical Aptitude Tests (OPATs): Test Battery 1: medicine ball...put, squat lift, beep test, standing long jump, arm ergometer; Test Battery 2: medicine ball put, squat lift, beep test, standing long jump; Test

  15. Effects of Moral Conduct Waivers on First-Term Attrition of U.S. Army Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited EFFECTS OF MORAL...DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Effects of Moral Conduct Waivers on First- Term Attrition of U.S. Army Soldiers 6. AUTHOR(S... effects of moral conduct waivers on the quality of service. The analysis investigates the wartime levels of recruits who were approved for different

  16. First Kansas Colored Volunteers: Contributions of Black Union Soldiers in the Trans-Mississippi West

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-17

    Waverly House, a boarding establishment on Main Street between Shawnee and Seneca Streets that soon became a station on the Underground Railroad.”4...worked tirelessly on behalf of freedmen and ex-slaves. He was well known for his work on the Underground Railroad, and his support for the city’s...supplies from a farm belonging to Mrs. Rader , wife of a known guerrilla operating with Livingston’s gang. While many of the enlisted soldiers were

  17. Sleep Disturbances in U.S. Soldiers after Deployment to Afghanistan or Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    PD 1. Refreshments were provided to all soldiers during this time. In PD 2, a web-based (WebQ Catalyst ) or mailed questionnaire was sent 1 1/2...units after returning from leave and the stabilization period prior to change in duty stations. WebQ Catalyst , a free online questionnaire or survey...2007). In addition, advantages of WebQ Catalyst included: reminder messages to the participants, immediate checks for incomplete or missing answers

  18. Guilt, Shame and Compassionate Imagery in War: Traumatized German Soldiers with PTSD, a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Alliger-Horn, Christina; Zimmermann, Peter Lutz; Schmucker, Mervyn

    2016-01-01

    Background: The consideration of specific trauma-associated emotions poses a challenge for the differential treatment planning in trauma therapy. Soldiers experiencing deployment-related posttraumatic stress disorder often struggle with emotions of guilt and shame as a central component of their PTSD. Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which soldiers’ PTSD symptoms and their trauma-related guilt and shame may be affected as a function of their ability to develop compassionate imagery between their CURRENT SELF (today) and their TRAUMATIZED SELF (back then). Method: The sample comprised 24 male German soldiers diagnosed with PTSD who were examined on the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PDS) and two additional measures: the Emotional Distress Inventory (EIBE) and the Quality of Interaction between the CURRENT SELF and the TRAUMATIZED SELF (QUI-HD: Qualität der Interaktion zwischen HEUTIGEN ICH und DAMALIGEN ICH) at pre- and post-treatment and again at follow-up. The treatment used was imagery rescripting and reprocessing therapy (IRRT). Results: Eighteen of the 24 soldiers showed significant improvement in their PTSD symptoms at post-treatment and at follow-up (on their reliable change index). A significant change in trauma-associated guilt and shame emerged when compassionate imagery was developed towards one’s TRAUMATIZED SELF. The degree and intensity of the guilt and shame felt at the beginning of treatment and the degree of compassionate imagery developed toward the TRAUMATIZED SELF were predictors for change on the PDS scores. Conclusions: For soldiers suffering from specific war-related trauma involving PTSD, the use of self-nurturing, compassionate imagery that fosters reconciling with the traumatized part of the self can effectively diminish trauma-related symptoms, especially when guilt and shame are central emotions. PMID:27775587

  19. Development of the Occupational Physical Assessment Test (OPAT) for Combat Arms Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    were used in the development of three courses of action for gender neutral Occupational Physical Aptitude Tests (OPATs): Test Battery 1: medicine ball...valid, safe, and legally defensible physical performance battery to predict a Soldier’s ability to serve in each MOS. Data from 877 complete datasets...put, squat lift, beep test, standing long jump, arm ergometer; Test Battery 2: medicine ball put, squat lift, beep test, standing long jump; Test

  20. Soldier-relevant body borne load impacts minimum foot clearance during obstacle negotiation.

    PubMed

    Brown, T N; Loverro, K L; Schiffman, J M

    2016-07-01

    Soldiers often trip and fall on duty, resulting in injury. This study examined ten male soldiers' ability to negotiate an obstacle. Participants had lead and trail foot minimum foot clearance (MFC) parameters quantified while crossing a low (305 mm) and high (457 mm) obstacle with (19.4 kg) and without (6 kg) body borne load. To minimize tripping risk, participants increased lead foot MFC (p = 0.028) and reduced lead (p = 0.044) and trail (p = 0.035) foot variability when negotiating an obstacle with body borne load. While obstacle height had no effect on MFC (p = 0.273 and p = 0.126), placing the trail foot closer to the high obstacle when crossing with body borne load, resulted in greater lead (R = 0.640, b = 0.241, p = 0.046) and trail (R = 0.636, b = 0.287, p = 0.048) MFC. Soldiers, when carrying typical military loads, may be able to minimize their risk of tripping over an obstacle by creating a safety margin via greater foot clearance with reduced variability.

  1. Mental health training with soldiers four months after returning from Iraq: randomization by platoon.

    PubMed

    Castro, Carl Andrew; Adler, Amy B; McGurk, Dennis; Bliese, Paul D

    2012-08-01

    Military personnel report significant and increasing mental health problems in the months following return from combat. Nevertheless, studies have not assessed the impact of mental health training with this at-risk population. The present study evaluated the efficacy of a prototype mental health training module designed for U.S. soldiers 3-6 months after returning from combat; the module was a component of the Battlemind Training system. Soldiers (N = 1,645) were randomly assigned by platoon to 1 hour of training or a survey-only control group. Baseline surveys were conducted immediately before training; a training satisfaction survey was administered immediately after training, and a follow-up survey was administered 6 months later. Immediate postsession surveys were conducted with 681 subjects, and follow-up surveys were conducted with 542 soldiers. The Battlemind Training module received positive ratings from participants, and those who received it reported significantly better adjustment in terms of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, depression, and life satisfaction at follow-up compared to those in the survey-only control group. Changes in attitudes about the stigma of seeking mental health care were found immediately posttraining, but not at follow-up. The findings demonstrate that brief mental health training can be effective in reducing mental health systems with at-risk occupational groups.

  2. Repeated evolution of soldier sub-castes suggests parasitism drives social complexity in stingless bees.

    PubMed

    Grüter, Christoph; Segers, Francisca H I D; Menezes, Cristiano; Vollet-Neto, Ayrton; Falcón, Tiago; von Zuben, Lucas; Bitondi, Márcia M G; Nascimento, Fabio S; Almeida, Eduardo A B

    2017-12-01

    The differentiation of workers into morphological castes represents an important evolutionary innovation that is thought to improve division of labor in insect societies. Given the potential benefits of task-related worker differentiation, it is puzzling that physical worker castes, such as soldiers, are extremely rare in social bees and absent in wasps. Following the recent discovery of soldiers in a stingless bee, we studied the occurrence of worker differentiation in 28 stingless bee species from Brazil and found that several species have specialized soldiers for colony defence. Our results reveal that worker differentiation evolved repeatedly during the last ~ 25 million years and coincided with the emergence of parasitic robber bees, a major threat to many stingless bee species. Furthermore, our data suggest that these robbers are a driving force behind the evolution of worker differentiation as targets of robber bees are four times more likely to have nest guards of increased size than non-targets. These findings reveal unexpected diversity in the social organization of stingless bees.Although common in ants and termites, worker differentiation into physical castes is rare in social bees and unknown in wasps. Here, Grüter and colleagues find a guard caste in ten species of stingless bees and show that the evolution of the guard caste is associated with parasitization by robber bees.

  3. Clinical presentations for influenza and influenza-like illness in young, immunized soldiers.

    PubMed

    McNeill, K Mills; Vaughn, Beverly L; Brundage, Mary B; Li, Yuanzhang; Poropatich, Ron K; Gaydos, Joel C

    2005-01-01

    Concern about respiratory diseases in soldiers increased in the late 1990s as production of the successful adenovirus vaccines stopped and the possibilities of an emergent pandemic influenza strain and use of bioweapons by terrorists were seriously considered. Current information on the causes and severity of influenza-like illness (ILI) was lacking. Viral agents and clinical presentations were described in a population of soldiers highly immunized for influenza. Using standard virus isolation techniques, 10 agents were identified in 164 (48.2%) of 340 soldiers hospitalized for ILI. Influenza isolates (29) and adenoviruses (98) occurred most frequently. Most influenza cases were caused by influenza A and probably resulted from a mismatch between circulating and vaccine viruses. Most (58.5%) patients with an adenovirus had a chest radiograph; 31.3% of these had an infiltrate. Clinical findings did not differentiate ILI caused by the various agents. Only 29 cases of influenza occurred in approximately 7,200 person-years of observation, supporting the use of influenza vaccine.

  4. Assessment of subthreshold and developing behavioral health concerns among U.S. army soldiers.

    PubMed

    Fink, David S; Gallaway, M Shayne; Millikan, Amy M

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to merge existing methodologies of identifying high-risk soldiers to create a comprehensive testable model to assist leaders in the identification, mitigation, and prevention of negative behavioral health (BH) issues. In 2011, a total of 2,664 active duty U.S. Army soldiers completed a survey of demographic and military characteristics, combat exposures, and BH diagnoses and symptoms. Multivariable linear and logistic regression models were fit to examine the relationship between demographic and military characteristics, subthreshold behavioral and social health issues, and positive screening for BH symptoms. The "recent loss of someone close" and self-reporting a history of BH issues were the strongest and most consistent predictors of subthreshold behavioral and social health issues. This study found that individual and occupational factors were associated with subthreshold behavioral and social health issues, which were in turn, associated with screening positive for BH symptoms. The recent loss of someone close (an indicator of grief and loss) was not the study's primary research question, but warrants further investigation to determine its impact on the mental well-being of soldiers.

  5. Improvement in altitude performance test after further acclimatization in pre-acclimatized soldiers.

    PubMed

    Tannheimer, Markus; Buzzelli, Mark D; Albertini, Nadine; Lechner, Raimund; Ulmer, Hans-V; Engelhardt, Michael

    2013-05-01

    The Altitude Performance Test is a measure designed to assess an individual's degree of acclimatization to reduce the risk of acute mountain sickness during high-altitude activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that test results will improve in pre-acclimatized soldiers after several days of further acclimatization. The Altitude Performance Test consists of an uphill run at high altitude. The event is timed and performed with continuous oxygen saturation (SpO2) monitoring. The individual's time and lowest SpO2 measurement are recorded. This test was performed on the first day of arriving at 11,060 ft, and after 9 days at the same location. The 37 male soldiers were all pre-acclimatized before arrival. The sleeping altitude remained constant at 11,060 ft, and the daytime altitudes increased up to a maximum of 15,775 ft. Test results improved significantly after a further 9 days of acclimatization (time, -11 s; SpO2, +5%-points; p ≤ 0.001). This is remarkable because all soldiers were pre-acclimatized and showed only minor acute mountain sickness symptoms during the entire stay. This indicates that the acclimatization process is not finished after amelioration of altitude symptoms. The demonstrated improvement in physical performance could prove very important, particularly during military missions performed at high altitude.

  6. The addition of body armor diminishes dynamic postural stability in military soldiers.

    PubMed

    Sell, Timothy C; Pederson, Jonathan J; Abt, John P; Nagai, Takashi; Deluzio, Jennifer; Wirt, Michael D; McCord, Larry J; Lephart, Scott M

    2013-01-01

    Poor postural stability has been identified as a risk factor for lower extremity musculoskeletal injury. The additional weight of body armor carried by Soldiers alters static postural stability and may predispose Soldiers to lower extremity musculoskeletal injuries. However, static postural stability tasks poorly replicate the dynamic military environment, which places considerable stress on the postural control system during tactical training and combat. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of body armor on dynamic postural stability during single-leg jump landings. Thirty-six 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) Soldiers performed single-leg jump landings in the anterior direction with and without wearing body armor. The dynamic postural stability index and the individual stability indices (medial-lateral stability index, anterior-posterior stability index, and vertical stability index) were calculated for each condition. Paired sample t-tests were performed to determine differences between conditions. Significant differences existed for the medial-lateral stability index, anterior-posterior stability index, vertical stability index, and dynamic postural stability index (p < 0.05). The addition of body armor resulted in diminished dynamic postural stability, which may result in increased lower extremity injuries. Training programs should address the altered dynamic postural stability while wearing body armor in attempts to promote adaptations that will result in safer performance during dynamic tasks.

  7. Acute vs. chronic stressors, multiple suicide attempts, and persistent suicide ideation in US soldiers.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Craig J; Clemans, Tracy A; Leeson, Bruce; Rudd, Michael David

    2015-01-01

    This study examined recent-onset (i.e., acute) and persistent (i.e., chronic) life stressors among 54 acutely suicidal US Army Soldiers and examined their relationship to persistence of suicidal crises over time. Soldiers with a history of multiple suicide attempts reported the most severe suicide ideation (F(2,51) = 4.18, p = 0.021) and the greatest number of chronic stressors (F(2,51) = 5.11, p = 0.009). Chronic but not acute stressors were correlated with severity of suicide ideation (r = 0.24, p = 0.026). Participants reporting low-to-average levels of chronic stress resolved suicide ideation during the 6-month follow-up, but participants reporting high levels of chronic stress did not (Wald χ(1) = 4.57, p = 0.032). Soldiers who are multiple attempters report a greater number of chronic stressors. Chronic, but not acute-onset, stressors are associated with more severe and longer-lasting suicidal crises.

  8. Active music therapy in the rehabilitation of severe brain injured patients during coma recovery.

    PubMed

    Formisano, R; Vinicola, V; Penta, F; Matteis, M; Brunelli, S; Weckel, J W

    2001-01-01

    Active improvised music therapy may offer an adjuvant from of treatment in the early rehabilitation of severe brain-injured patients. Active music therapy consists of musical improvisation between patient and therapist by singing or by playing different musical instruments, according to the vital functions, the neurological conditions and the motor abilities of the patients. We studied 34 severe brain-injured patients with a mean coma duration of 52 days +/- 37.21 and a mean interval from coma onset to the beginning of rehabilitation of 154 days on average. Our preliminary results show a significant improvement of the collaboration of the severe brain-injured patients and a reduction of undesired behaviours such as inertia (reduced psychomotor initiative) or psychomotor agitation.

  9. Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to tracheal cells injured by influenza infection or by endotracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Ramphal, R; Small, P M; Shands, J W; Fischlschweiger, W; Small, P A

    1980-02-01

    Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to normal, injured, and regenerating tracheal mucosa was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Uninfected and influenza-infected murine tracheas were exposed to six strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from human sources and one strain of platn origin. All of the strains tested adhered to desquamating cells of the infected tracheas, but not to normal mucosa, the basal cell layer, or the regenerating epithelium. Adherence increased when the incubation time of the bacteria with the trachea was prolonged. Strains isolated from human tracheas appeared to adhere better than strains derived from the urinary tract. After endotracheal intubation of ferrets, P. aeruginosa adhered only to the injured cells and to areas of exposed basement membrane. We call this phenomenon "opportunistic adherence" and propose that alteration of the cell surfaces or cell injury facilitates the adherence of this bacterium and that adherence to injured cells may be a key to the pathogenesis of opportunistic Pseudomonas infections.

  10. Sympathetic nonadrenergic transmission contributes to autonomic dysreflexia in spinal cord-injured individuals.

    PubMed

    Groothuis, Jan T; Rongen, Gerard A; Deinum, Jaap; Pickkers, Peter; Danser, A H Jan; Geurts, Alexander C H; Smits, Paul; Hopman, Maria T E

    2010-03-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia is a hypertensive episode in spinal cord-injured individuals induced by exaggerated sympathetic activity and thought to be alpha-adrenergic mediated. alpha-Adrenoceptor antagonists have been a rational first choice; nevertheless, calcium channel blockers are primarily used in autonomic dysreflexia management. However, alpha-adrenoceptor blockade may leave a residual vasoconstrictor response to sympathetic nonadrenergic transmission unaffected. The aim was to assess the alpha-adrenergic contribution and, in addition, the role of supraspinal control to leg vasoconstriction during exaggerated sympathetic activity provoked by autonomic dysreflexia in spinal cord-injured individuals and by a cold pressure test in control individuals. Upper leg blood flow was measured using venous occlusion plethysmography during supine rest and during exaggerated sympathetic activity in 6 spinal cord-injured individuals and 7 able-bodied control individuals, without and with phentolamine (alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist) and nicardipine (calcium channel blocker) infusion into the right femoral artery. Leg vascular resistance was calculated. In spinal cord-injured individuals, phentolamine significantly reduced the leg vascular resistance increase during autonomic dysreflexia (8+/-5 versus 24+/-13 arbitrary units; P=0.04) in contrast to nicardipine (15+/-10 versus 24+/-13 arbitrary units; P=0.12). In controls, phentolamine completely abolished the leg vascular resistance increase during a cold pressure test (1+/-2 versus 18+/-14 arbitrary units; P=0.02). The norepinephrine increase during phentolamine infusion was larger (P=0.04) in control than in spinal cord-injured individuals. These results indicate that the leg vascular resistance increase during autonomic dysreflexia in spinal cord-injured individuals is not entirely alpha-adrenergic mediated and is partly explained by nonadrenergic transmission, which may, in healthy subjects, be suppressed by supraspinal

  11. The Association Between Age, Injury, and Survival to Hospital Among a Cohort of Injured Motorcyclists

    PubMed Central

    Dischinger, Patricia C.; Ryb, Gabriel E.; Ho, Shiu M.; Burch, Cynthia A.

    2007-01-01

    Despite the significant increase in mortality among older motorcyclists during the past decade, few studies have addressed specific injuries or mortality rates among all those injured. The purpose of this study is to describe the crash and injury characteristics among a cohort of motorcyclists injured in Maryland, and to determine the influence of age and crash type on mortality, injury patterns, and place of death (scene vs. hospital). Possible biases introduced by studying only those hospitalized are described. Based on the findings, specific injury prevention strategies for older vs. younger riders are proposed. PMID:18184487

  12. The effect of shower/bath frequency on the health and operational effectiveness of soldiers in a field setting

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.C.; Daniels, J.I.

    1990-11-01

    Dermal disease is significant cause of morbidity among soldiers in a combat setting. For example, among American combat troops in Vietnam, disability from skin disease was one of the single most important medical causes of man-days lost from combat. Currently, the US Army makes shower or bath facilities available to soldiers in the field on a weekly basis. US Army after-action reports and anecdotal descriptions from the field indicate that this may not be an optimal regimen for the maintenance of personal hygiene, especially with respect to diseases of the skin. Determination of the optimal frequency of showering of bathing for soldiers in a combat setting is complicated by the fact of showering or bathing for soldiers in a combat setting is complicated by the fact that soldiers in the US Army may be involved in field exercise or combat in many different areas of the world with a variety of climatic conditions. Although certain aspects of the role of environmental factors in the incidence and severity of dermal disease have been documented, the role of hygiene in the potential mitigation of these effects has not been evaluated. The present project entails a comprehensive review and analysis of available literature in order to determine the health impact of shower/bath frequency for soldiers in a combat setting. An integral component of this work is an evaluation of the impact of climate, and microclimate produced by clothing, on the type, frequency, and severity of skin disease. There is relatively large body of information concerning the effectiveness of antimicrobial soaps in minimizing the incidence and severity of dermal disease. This data will be evaluated to determine whether use of these soaps, or an increase in the use of cleansing agents in general, will result in a decrease in the severity and incidence of diseases of the skin for soldiers in the field. 32 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Knockdown of the juvenile hormone receptor gene inhibits soldier-specific morphogenesis in the damp-wood termite Zootermopsis nevadensis (Isoptera: Archotermopsidae).

    PubMed

    Masuoka, Yudai; Yaguchi, Hajime; Suzuki, Ryutaro; Maekawa, Kiyoto

    2015-09-01

    The Methoprene-tolerant (Met) protein has been established as a juvenile hormone (JH) receptor. Knockdown of the Met gene caused precocious metamorphosis and suppression of ovarian development. However, the function of Met in caste development of social insects is unclear. In termites, JH acts as a central factor for caste development, especially for soldier differentiation, which involves two molts from workers via a presoldier stage. Increased JH titer in workers is needed for the presoldier molt, and the high JH titer is maintained throughout the presoldier period. Although presoldiers have the fundamental morphological features of soldiers, the nature of the cuticle is completely different from that of soldiers. We expected that JH signals via Met are involved in soldier-specific morphogenesis of the head and mandibles during soldier differentiation, especially in the presoldier period, in natural conditions. To test this hypothesis, we focused on soldier differentiation in an incipient colony of the damp-wood termite Zootermopsis nevadensis. Met homolog (ZnMet) expression in heads increased just after the presoldier molt. This high expression was reduced by ZnMet double stranded (dsRNA) injection before the presoldier molt. Although this treatment did not cause any morphological changes in presoldiers, it caused strong effects on soldiers, their mandibles being significantly shorter and head capsules smaller than those of control soldiers. Injection of ZnMet dsRNA throughout the presoldier stage did not affect the formation of soldier morphology, including cuticle formation. These results suggested that the rapid increase in ZnMet expression and subsequent activation of JH signaling just after the presoldier molt are needed for the formation of soldier-specific weapons. Therefore, besides its established role in insect metamorphosis, the JH receptor signaling also underlies soldier development in termites.

  14. 20 CFR 10.730 - What are the conditions of coverage for Peace Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders injured...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders injured while serving outside the United States? 10.730 Section... Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders injured while serving outside the United States? (a) Any injury sustained by a volunteer or volunteer leader while he or she is located abroad shall be presumed to...

  15. Development and Validation of a Predictive Model of Return-to-Work Outcomes of Injured Employees in Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hankins, Adrian Bentley

    2013-01-01

    In Minnesota's workers' compensation system, injured employees at risk for sustaining permanent disability may be eligible for receipt of vocational rehabilitation (VR) services if they are determined to be capable of benefitting from such services. VR services can be a valuable resource to injured employees who need assistance minimizing their…

  16. The knowledge, attitudes and practices of soldiers in a gendarmerie command headquarters about family planning and venereal diseases.

    PubMed

    Oguzoncul, A Ferdane; Deveci, S Erhan; Acik, Yasemin

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices of young male soldiers about family planning. This was a cross-sectional study conducted at the Gendarmerie Command Headquarters, Elazig City, eastern Turkey, carried out on 14 April 2004. One hundred ninety-one of 209 soldiers who were present at the Gendarmerie Command Headquarters were included in the study. A questionnaire, developed by the researchers evaluating the goals of the study, was filled out by the subjects prior to the Family Planning Seminar given to the soldiers. Data were assessed using SPSS and the chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. Defining family planning correctly, being familiar with planning methods and a knowledge of sexually transmitted diseases (STD) and their prevention was found to be at low levels among soldiers. A knowledge of family planning, birth control methods, identification and prevention of STD was higher with higher levels of education. The most familiar family planning methods were condom and oral contraceptive use. Soldiers constitute one of the most significant target groups for education programs.

  17. The Effectiveness of Early Group Intervention for Military Reserves Soldiers: The Role of the Repressive Coping Style.

    PubMed

    Shoval-Zuckerman, Yael; Dekel, Rachel; Solomon, Zahava; Levi, Ofir

    2015-01-01

    This study had two aims: 1. To examine whether soldiers who participated in Early Group Intervention (EGI) would show less distress and better functioning and physical health than soldiers who did not participate in EGI, and 2. To examine the contribution of the intervention to participants with repressive coping style. The sample comprised 166 male reserve soldiers who fought in the Second Lebanon War. The intervention was conducted three months after the traumatic event, was based on military protocol, and took place over the course of one day. Data were collected at two points in time (four months apart). The findings indicated that after EGI, the intervention group experienced less post-traumatic distress than did the control group. In addition, four months after the intervention, the functioning and physical health of the intervention group was significantly better than that of the control group. Notably, the intensity of post-traumatic distress before the intervention was lower among repressors and low-anxious soldiers than among soldiers in the other two groups (high-anxious and defensive). No significant differences were found after the intervention with regard to the various styles of coping with post-traumatic distress. Future clinical implications of the findings are discussed.

  18. Mood symptoms contribute to working memory decrement in active-duty soldiers being treated for posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Dretsch, Michael N; Thiel, Kenneth J; Athy, Jeremy R; Irvin, Clinton R; Sirmon-Fjordbak, Bess; Salvatore, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    A significant proportion of military veterans of operations in Afghanistan and Iraq have been diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Growing evidence suggests that neuropsychological deficits are a symptom of PTSD. The current study investigated neurocognitive functioning among soldiers diagnosed with PTSD. Specifically, active-duty soldiers with and without a diagnosis of PTSD were assessed for performance on tests of attention and working memory. In addition, factors such as combat experience, depression, anxiety, PTSD symptom severity, and alcohol consumption were explored as possible mediators of group differences in neurocognitive functioning. Twenty-three active-duty soldiers diagnosed with PTSD were matched with 23 healthy Soldier controls; all were administered the Attention Network Task (ANT), Backward Digit Span (BDS) task, Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, PTSD Checklist—Military Version, Combat Exposure Scale, and Modified Drinking Behavior Questionnaire. Soldiers diagnosed with PTSD performed significantly worse on the working memory task (BDS) than healthy controls, and reported greater levels of PTSD symptoms, combat exposure, depression, and anxiety. However, after controlling for depression and anxiety symptoms, the relationship between PTSD and working memory was no longer present. The results indicate that PTSD is accompanied by deficits in working memory, which appear to be partially attributed to anxiety and depression symptoms. PMID:22950039

  19. Not Only Soldiers Have Weapons: Evolution of the Frontal Gland in Imagoes of the Termite Families Rhinotermitidae and Serritermitidae

    PubMed Central

    Hanus, Robert; Sillam-Dussès, David; Pflegerová, Jitka; Weyda, František; Kutalová, Kateřina; Vytisková, Blahoslava; Roisin, Yves

    2010-01-01

    Background The frontal gland is a unique adaptation of advanced termite families. It has been intensively studied in soldiers with respect to its anatomy and chemistry, with numerous novel compounds being discovered within the tremendous richness of identified products. At the same time, the presence of the frontal gland in non-soldier castes received only negligible attention in the past. Principal Findings Here, we report on the development of the frontal gland in alate imagoes of 10 genera and 13 species of Rhinotermitidae and Serritermitidae, in order to shed light on the evolution and function of this gland in imagoes. All investigated species possess a frontal gland. In most cases, it is well-developed and equipped with a sac-like reservoir, located in the postero-dorsal part of cranium, but reaching as far as the seventh abdominal segment in some Rhinotermitinae. The only exception is the genus Psammotermes, in which the gland is very small and devoid of the reservoir. Conclusions Our direct observations and comparisons with soldiers suggest a defensive role of the gland in imagoes of all studied species. This functional analogy, along with the anatomic homology between the frontal gland in soldiers and imagoes, make it likely that the gland appeared once during the early evolution of rhinotermitid ancestors, and remained as a defensive organ of prime importance in both, soldiers and imagoes. PMID:21209882

  20. Evaluation of TA10 Broth for Recovery of Heat- and Freeze-Injured Salmonella from Beef

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) Salmonella pre-enrichment broth (lactose [LAC] broth), buffered peptone water (BPW), and universal preenrichment (UP) broth were compared with TA10 broth, developed in our laboratory, for recovery of heat- and freeze-injured Salmonella (55ºC for 2-20 min a...

  1. Expanding the Role of Nurse Practitioners: Effects on Rural Access to Care for Injured Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sears, Jeanne M.; Wickizer, Thomas M.; Franklin, Gary M.; Cheadle, Allen D.; Berkowitz, Bobbie

    2008-01-01

    Context: A 3-year pilot program to expand the role of nurse practitioners (NPs) in the Washington State workers' compensation system was implemented in 2004 (SHB 1691), amid concern about disparities in access to health care for injured workers in rural areas. SHB 1691 authorized NPs to independently perform most functions of an attending…

  2. Do workers' compensation laws protect industrial hygienists from lawsuits by injured workers?

    PubMed

    Stout, N C

    1993-11-01

    Workers' compensation laws provide injured employees with a swifter, more certain, and less litigious system of compensation than existed under the common law. Although workers' compensation is almost always an injured employee's exclusive remedy against the employer, the employee may bring a common-law tort action against a "third party" who may be liable in whole or in part for the employee's injury. This article investigates whether industrial hygienists are "third parties" and therefore subject to suit by injured employees who claim that industrial hygienists negligently caused their injuries. The author concludes that in most states, where the industrial hygienist and the injured worker are fellow employees, the industrial hygienist shares the employer's immunity from suit. As to the consultant who performs industrial hygiene services as an independent contractor, the author concludes that the employer's nondelegable duty to provide a safe workplace offers industrial hygiene consultants an argument that they share the employer's immunity from suit. Countervailing arguments, however, leave the industrial hygiene consultant vulnerable to negligence claims in many jurisdictions. There is a trend among the states to extend the employer's immunity to those who provide safety and health services to the employer.

  3. Developmentally regulated impediments to skin reinnervation by injured peripheral sensory axon terminals.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Georgeann S; Martin, Seanna M; Söllner, Christian; Wright, Gavin J; Becker, Catherina G; Portera-Cailliau, Carlos; Sagasti, Alvaro

    2009-12-29

    The structural plasticity of neurites in the central nervous system (CNS) diminishes dramatically after initial development, but the peripheral nervous system (PNS) retains substantial plasticity into adulthood. Nevertheless, functional reinnervation by injured peripheral sensory neurons is often incomplete [1-6]. To investigate the developmental control of skin reinnervation, we imaged the regeneration of trigeminal sensory axon terminals in live zebrafish larvae following laser axotomy. When axons were injured during early stages of outgrowth, regenerating and uninjured axons grew into denervated skin and competed with one another for territory. At later stages, after the establishment of peripheral arbor territories, the ability of uninjured neighbors to sprout diminished severely, and although injured axons reinitiated growth, they were repelled by denervated skin. Regenerating axons were repelled specifically by their former territories, suggesting that local inhibitory factors persist in these regions. Antagonizing the function of several members of the Nogo receptor (NgR)/RhoA pathway improved the capacity of injured axons to grow into denervated skin. Thus, as in the CNS, impediments to reinnervation in the PNS arise after initial establishment of axon arbor structure.

  4. E-Message Boards for Those Who Self-Injure: Implications for E-Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Genevieve Marie; Zastawny, Sylvia; Kulpa, Anastasia

    2010-01-01

    Virtual communities for those who self-injure (SI) are increasingly popular and involve Internet communication technologies including e-message boards. The social and emotional support of an accepting virtual community may facilitate individual recovery from SI. Via self-report data, this study describes individuals who participate in virtual…

  5. Alcohol and drugs in fatally and non-fatally injured motor vehicle drivers in northern Sweden.

    PubMed

    Ahlm, Kristin; Björnstig, Ulf; Oström, Mats

    2009-01-01

    Alcohol and drugs are important risk factors for traffic injuries, a major health problem worldwide. This prospective study investigated the epidemiology and the presence of alcohol and drugs in fatally and hospitalized non-fatally injured drivers of motor vehicles in northern Sweden. During a 2-year study period, blood from fatally and hospitalized non-fatally injured drivers was tested for alcohol and drugs. The study subjects were recruited from well-defined geographical areas with known demographics. Autopsy reports, medical journals, police reports, and toxicological analyses were evaluated. Of the fatally injured, 38% tested positive for alcohol and of the non-fatally 21% tested positive; 7% and 13%, respectively, tested positive for pharmaceuticals with a warning for impaired driving; 9% and 4%, respectively, tested positive for illicit drugs. The most frequently detected pharmaceuticals were benzodiazepines, opiates, and antidepressants. Tetrahydrocannabinol was the most frequently detected illicit substance. No fatally injured women had illegal blood alcohol concentration. The relative proportion of positively tested drivers has increased and was higher than in a similar study 14 years earlier. This finding indicates that alcohol and drugs merit more attention in future traffic safety work.

  6. Helping Parents Cope with Adolescents Who Self-Injure: Strategies for School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chibbaro, Julia S.

    2007-01-01

    Professional school counselors experience unique challenges as they struggle to provide information to parents about self-injurious behaviors and methods to cope with adolescents who self-injure. This paper explores self-injurious behaviors, discusses some of the reasons why adolescents practice self-injury and recommends six strategies that…

  7. Integrating and Analyzing Psychosocial and Stage Theories To Challenge the Development of the Injured Collegiate Athlete.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Laura L.

    2003-01-01

    Integrated a psychosocial developmental theory (the Kubler-Ross Stage Theory) and a psychological stage theory (the Ross Stage Theory) and a psychological stage theory (the Chickering and Reisser psychosocial and developmental theory) for challenging injured collegiate student-athletes' personal development. A search of online databases from…

  8. MHCII-independent CD4+ T cells protect injured CNS neurons via IL-4.

    PubMed

    Walsh, James T; Hendrix, Sven; Boato, Francesco; Smirnov, Igor; Zheng, Jingjing; Lukens, John R; Gadani, Sachin; Hechler, Daniel; Gölz, Greta; Rosenberger, Karen; Kammertöns, Thomas; Vogt, Johannes; Vogelaar, Christina; Siffrin, Volker; Radjavi, Ali; Fernandez-Castaneda, Anthony; Gaultier, Alban; Gold, Ralf; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Nitsch, Robert; Zipp, Frauke; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-02-01

    A body of experimental evidence suggests that T cells mediate neuroprotection following CNS injury; however, the antigen specificity of these T cells and how they mediate neuroprotection are unknown. Here, we have provided evidence that T cell-mediated neuroprotection after CNS injury can occur independently of major histocompatibility class II (MHCII) signaling to T cell receptors (TCRs). Using two murine models of CNS injury, we determined that damage-associated molecular mediators that originate from injured CNS tissue induce a population of neuroprotective, IL-4-producing T cells in an antigen-independent fashion. Compared with wild-type mice, IL-4-deficient animals had decreased functional recovery following CNS injury; however, transfer of CD4+ T cells from wild-type mice, but not from IL-4-deficient mice, enhanced neuronal survival. Using a culture-based system, we determined that T cell-derived IL-4 protects and induces recovery of injured neurons by activation of neuronal IL-4 receptors, which potentiated neurotrophin signaling via the AKT and MAPK pathways. Together, these findings demonstrate that damage-associated molecules from the injured CNS induce a neuroprotective T cell response that is independent of MHCII/TCR interactions and is MyD88 dependent. Moreover, our results indicate that IL-4 mediates neuroprotection and recovery of the injured CNS and suggest that strategies to enhance IL-4-producing CD4+ T cells have potential to attenuate axonal damage in the course of CNS injury in trauma, inflammation, or neurodegeneration.

  9. After the Injury: Initial Evaluation of a Web-Based Intervention for Parents of Injured Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsac, M. L.; Kassam-Adams, N.; Hildenbrand, A. K.; Kohser, K. L.; Winston, F. K.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey parent knowledge of child injury reactions (including post-traumatic stress symptoms) and to evaluate parent satisfaction and learning outcomes following a video- or web-based intervention. Fifty parents of children ages 6-17 years who were injured within the past 2 months were recruited from emergency and…

  10. Key Considerations for Using No-Harm Contracts with Clients Who Self-Injure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyldahl, Rebecca S.; Richardson, Brent

    2011-01-01

    One of the more controversial issues in working with people who self-injure is whether counselors should use no-harm contracts. Important therapeutic considerations include the efficacy of such contracts or agreements in preventing self-injury, the emotional and behavioral responses of clients, and the perceived protection these contracts or…

  11. Low-level light in combination with metabolic modulators for effective therapy of injured brain

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Tingting; Zhang, Qi; Hamblin, Michael R; Wu, Mei X

    2015-01-01

    Vascular damage occurs frequently at the injured brain causing hypoxia and is associated with poor outcomes in the clinics. We found high levels of glycolysis, reduced adenosine triphosphate generation, and increased formation of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis in neurons under hypoxia. Strikingly, these adverse events were reversed significantly by noninvasive exposure of injured brain to low-level light (LLL). Low-level light illumination sustained the mitochondrial membrane potential, constrained cytochrome c leakage in hypoxic cells, and protected them from apoptosis, underscoring a unique property of LLL. The effect of LLL was further bolstered by combination with metabolic substrates such as pyruvate or lactate both in vivo and in vitro. The combinational treatment retained memory and learning activities of injured mice to a normal level, whereas other treatment displayed partial or severe deficiency in these cognitive functions. In accordance with well-protected learning and memory function, the hippocampal region primarily responsible for learning and memory was completely protected by combination treatment, in marked contrast to the severe loss of hippocampal tissue because of secondary damage in control mice. These data clearly suggest that energy metabolic modulators can additively or synergistically enhance the therapeutic effect of LLL in energy-producing insufficient tissue–like injured brain. PMID:25966949

  12. 50 CFR 27.51 - Disturbing, injuring, and damaging plants and animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Disturbing, injuring, and damaging plants and animals. 27.51 Section 27.51 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE..., poison, destroy or collect any plant or animal on any national wildlife refuge is prohibited except...

  13. 50 CFR 27.51 - Disturbing, injuring, and damaging plants and animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Disturbing, injuring, and damaging plants and animals. 27.51 Section 27.51 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE..., poison, destroy or collect any plant or animal on any national wildlife refuge is prohibited except...

  14. 50 CFR 27.51 - Disturbing, injuring, and damaging plants and animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disturbing, injuring, and damaging plants and animals. 27.51 Section 27.51 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE..., poison, destroy or collect any plant or animal on any national wildlife refuge is prohibited except...

  15. 50 CFR 27.51 - Disturbing, injuring, and damaging plants and animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Disturbing, injuring, and damaging plants and animals. 27.51 Section 27.51 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE..., poison, destroy or collect any plant or animal on any national wildlife refuge is prohibited except...

  16. 50 CFR 27.51 - Disturbing, injuring, and damaging plants and animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Disturbing, injuring, and damaging plants and animals. 27.51 Section 27.51 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE..., poison, destroy or collect any plant or animal on any national wildlife refuge is prohibited except...

  17. Predicting Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms Longitudinally in a Representative Sample of Hospitalized Injured Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zatzick, Douglas F.; Grossman, David C.; Russo, Joan; Pynoos, Robert; Berliner, Lucy; Jurkovich, Gregory; Sabin, Janice A.; Katon, Wayne; Ghesquiere, Angela; McCauley, Elizabeth; Rivara, Frederick P.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Adolescents constitute a high-risk population for traumatic physical injury, yet few longitudinal investigations have assessed the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms over time in representative samples. Method: Between July 2002 and August 2003,108 randomly selected injured adolescent patients ages 12 to 18 and…

  18. THE PROGRAM FOR BRAIN INJURED CHILDREN IN THE NEW YORK CITY PUBLIC SCHOOLS, AN APPRAISAL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSKOWITZ, SUE

    IN 1959, THE TWO EXISTING SPECIAL CLASSES FOR BRAIN INJURED CHILDREN IN NEW YORK CITY WERE EVALUATED BY OBSERVATIONS, EXAMINATION OF THE STUDENTS' MEDICAL AND EDUCATIONAL RECORDS, AND INTERVIEWS WITH TEACHERS, PSYCHOLOGISTS, PSYCHIATRISTS, AND SPEECH AND OTHER SPECIALISTS. RECOMMENDATIONS WERE MADE IN AN INTERIM REPORT. A LONGITUDINAL STUDY WAS…

  19. Efficient delivery of small interfering RNA into injured spinal cords in rats by photomechanical waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Toyooka, Terushige; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2011-03-01

    In the central nervous system, lack of axonal regeneration leads to permanent functional disabilities. In spinal cord injury (SCI), the over-expressions of intermediate filament (IF) proteins, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin, are mainly involved in glial scar formation; these proteins work as both physical and biochemical barriers to axonal regeneration. Thus, silencing of these IF proteins would be an attractive strategy to treat SCI. In this study, we first attempted to deliver fluorescent probe-labeled siRNAs into injured spinal cords in rats by applying photomechanical waves (PMWs) to examine the capability of PMWs as a tool for siRNA delivery. Intense fluorescence from siRNAs was observed in much broader regions in the spinal cords with PMW application when compared with those with siRNA injection alone. Based on this result, we delivered siRNAs for GFAP and vimentin into injured spinal tissues in rats by applying PMWs. The treatment resulted in efficient silencing of the proteins at five days after SCI and a decrease of the cavity area in the injured tissue at three weeks after SCI when compared with those with siRNA injection alone. These results demonstrate the capability of PMWs for efficient delivery of siRNAs into injured spinal cords and treatment of SCIs.

  20. Demographic Profile and Athletic Identity of Traumatic Spinal Cord Injured Wheelchair Basketball Athletes in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasiliadis, Angelo; Evaggelinou, Christina; Avourdiadou, Sevastia; Grekinis, Petros

    2010-01-01

    An epidemiological study conducted across the country of Greece was conducted in order to determine the profile and the athletic identity of spinal cord injured (SCI) wheelchair basketball athletes who participated to the 13th Greek Wheelchair Basketball Championship and Cup. The Disability Sport Participation questionnaire was used for data…