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Sample records for laurence-moon syndrome

  1. Laurence Moon Bardet Biedl Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, A B; Niloy, Ahmed Al Muntasir; Shah, Tazin Afrose; Biswas, Sunil Kumar; Imran, A Khan; Murshed, Khaled Mahbub; Ahmed, Mashrafi

    2009-01-01

    A 14 year old Bangladeshi boy presented with obesity, reduced vision, mental retardation, hypogonadism, delayed development and learning difficulty. On examination, he had polydactyly, moon face, bilateral gynaecomastia, small penis and undescended testes. Retinitis pigmentosa was found on fundoscopy. With typical features, he was diagnosed as a case of Laurence-Moon-Bardet-Biedl syndrome. It is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with mutation in 6 loci identified so far. It is commonly found in communities with high inter-family marriage. Clinical features appear early in childhood and diagnosis is usually done by puberty. Prominent features include rod-cone dystrophy leading to blindness, postaxial polydactyly, central obesity, learning disability, hypogonadism in males and renal dysfunction. Relatives with a single affected gene may have obesity, hypertension, diabetes and renal disease. There is increased risk of renal cell carcinoma. There is no definite treatment. Early diagnosis and symptomatic, supportive and rehabilitative measures can reduce the disability. These include dietary modification, oral hypoglycaemic drugs, testosterone supplement etc. Relatives of the patient should be screened for renal abnormality.

  2. Neuropathy target esterase impairments cause Oliver-McFarlane and Laurence-Moon syndromes.

    PubMed

    Hufnagel, Robert B; Arno, Gavin; Hein, Nichole D; Hersheson, Joshua; Prasad, Megana; Anderson, Yvonne; Krueger, Laura A; Gregory, Louise C; Stoetzel, Corinne; Jaworek, Thomas J; Hull, Sarah; Li, Abi; Plagnol, Vincent; Willen, Christi M; Morgan, Thomas M; Prows, Cynthia A; Hegde, Rashmi S; Riazuddin, Saima; Grabowski, Gregory A; Richardson, Rudy J; Dieterich, Klaus; Huang, Taosheng; Revesz, Tamas; Martinez-Barbera, J P; Sisk, Robert A; Jefferies, Craig; Houlden, Henry; Dattani, Mehul T; Fink, John K; Dollfus, Helene; Moore, Anthony T; Ahmed, Zubair M

    2015-02-01

    Oliver-McFarlane syndrome is characterised by trichomegaly, congenital hypopituitarism and retinal degeneration with choroidal atrophy. Laurence-Moon syndrome presents similarly, though with progressive spinocerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia and without trichomegaly. Both recessively inherited disorders have no known genetic cause. Whole-exome sequencing was performed to identify the genetic causes of these disorders. Mutations were functionally validated in zebrafish pnpla6 morphants. Embryonic expression was evaluated via in situ hybridisation in human embryonic sections. Human neurohistopathology was performed to characterise cerebellar degeneration. Enzymatic activities were measured in patient-derived fibroblast cell lines. Eight mutations in six families with Oliver-McFarlane or Laurence-Moon syndrome were identified in the PNPLA6 gene, which encodes neuropathy target esterase (NTE). PNPLA6 expression was found in the developing human eye, pituitary and brain. In zebrafish, the pnpla6 curly-tailed morphant phenotype was fully rescued by wild-type human PNPLA6 mRNA and not by mutation-harbouring mRNAs. NTE enzymatic activity was significantly reduced in fibroblast cells derived from individuals with Oliver-McFarlane syndrome. Intriguingly, adult brain histology from a patient with highly overlapping features of Oliver-McFarlane and Laurence-Moon syndromes revealed extensive cerebellar degeneration and atrophy. Previously, PNPLA6 mutations have been associated with spastic paraplegia type 39, Gordon-Holmes syndrome and Boucher-Neuhäuser syndromes. Discovery of these additional PNPLA6-opathies further elucidates a spectrum of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders associated with NTE impairment and suggests a unifying mechanism with diagnostic and prognostic importance. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Polydactyly

    MedlinePlus

    ... van Creveld syndrome (chondroectodermal dysplasia) Familial polydactyly Laurence-Moon-Biedl syndrome Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome Smith-Lemli-Opitz ... constitute endorsements of those other sites. Copyright 1997-2017, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial ...

  4. New criteria for improved diagnosis of Bardet-Biedl syndrome: results of a population survey

    PubMed Central

    Beales, P; Elcioglu, N; Woolf, A; Parker, D; Flinter, F

    1999-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is an autosomal recessive condition characterised by rod-cone dystrophy, postaxial polydactyly, central obesity, mental retardation, hypogonadism, and renal dysfunction. BBS expression varies both within and between families and diagnosis is often difficult. We sought to define the condition more clearly by studying 109 BBS patients and their families, the largest population surveyed to date. The average age at diagnosis was 9 years, which is late for such a debilitating condition, but the slow development of the clinical features of BBS probably accounts for this. Postaxial polydactyly had been present in 69% of patients at birth, but obesity had only begun to develop at around 2-3 years, and retinal degeneration had not become apparent until a mean age of 8.5 years. Our study identified some novel clinical features, including neurological, speech, and language deficits, behavioural traits, facial dysmorphism, and dental anomalies. In the light of these features we propose a revision of the diagnostic criteria, which may facilitate earlier diagnosis of this disorder. We present evidence for an overlapping phenotype with the Laurence-Moon syndrome and propose a unifying, descriptive label be adopted (polydactyly-obesity-kidney-eye syndrome).
  We report an increased prevalence of renal malformations and renal cell carcinoma in the unaffected relatives of BBS patients and suggest that these may be a consequence of heterozygosity for BBS genes. Our findings have important implications for the care of BBS patients and their unaffected relatives.


Keywords: Bardet-Biedl syndrome; diagnosis; renal malformation; heterozygotes PMID:10874630

  5. The Story of the Earth Angels: A Functional Academics Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willows, Mary

    2003-01-01

    On the last day of school in June 2002, the author received her class list for the following year: five girls ranging in age from 12 to 15 years old. Their disabilities included retinopathy of prematurity, encephalitis, Laurence-Moon-Biedl syndrome, cerebral palsy, dyslexia, hearing impairment, cortical visual impairment, and significant…

  6. The Story of the Earth Angels: A Functional Academics Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willows, Mary

    2003-01-01

    On the last day of school in June 2002, the author received her class list for the following year: five girls ranging in age from 12 to 15 years old. Their disabilities included retinopathy of prematurity, encephalitis, Laurence-Moon-Biedl syndrome, cerebral palsy, dyslexia, hearing impairment, cortical visual impairment, and significant…

  7. [Syndromes 2. Pfeiffer syndrome].

    PubMed

    Freihofer, H P

    1998-07-01

    Acrocephalosyndactylias are syndromes characterized by abnormalities of the head (craniosynostosis), the face (hypertelorism, retromaxillism), hands and feet (cutaneous or bony syndactyly). Inheritance is autosomal dominant, but spontaneous cases are described also. The group is divided into several syndromes with varying penetrance and expressivity. As an example of an acrocephalosyndactylia is the Pfeiffer syndrome presented.

  8. Williams syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Williams syndrome may show: A flattened nasal bridge with small upturned nose Long ridges in the ... Alternative Names Williams-Beuren syndrome Images Low nasal bridge References Morris CA. Williams syndrome. In: Pagon RA, ...

  9. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood ... fibrillin. A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, and ...

  10. Sjogren's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Sjogren's syndrome Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Sjogren's (SHOW-grins) syndrome is a disorder of your immune system ... disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. In Sjogren's syndrome, the mucous membranes and moisture-secreting glands of ...

  11. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... example, polycystic ovary syndrome can cause menstrual disturbances, weight gain beginning in adolescence, excess hair growth, and impaired insulin action and diabetes. Metabolic syndrome-a combination of ...

  12. Metabolic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Insulin resistance syndrome; Syndrome X ... middle and upper parts of the body (central obesity ). This body type may be described as "apple-shaped." Insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas. ...

  13. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Like for Kids With Marfan Syndrome? en español Síndrome de Marfan Evan couldn't wait for school ... for Marfan syndrome runs in families, getting passed down to children from parents who have the disease. ...

  14. Dumping Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Syndrome Related Topics Section Navigation Digestive Diseases Abdominal Adhesions Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Adults Definition & Facts ... Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome Dental Enamel Defects and Celiac Disease Dermatitis Herpetiformis Dermatitis ...

  15. Aicardi Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Girls with Aicardi syndrome have varying degrees of intellectual disability and developmental delay. Many girls also have developmental ... Girls with Aicardi syndrome have varying degrees of intellectual disability and developmental delay. Many girls also have developmental ...

  16. Malabsorption Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... the foods you eat. If you have a malabsorption syndrome, your small intestine cannot absorb nutrients from foods. Causes of malabsorption syndromes include Celiac disease Lactose intolerance Short bowel ...

  17. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  18. Horner syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000708.htm Horner syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Horner syndrome is a rare condition that affects the nerves ...

  19. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Like for Kids With Marfan Syndrome? en español Síndrome de Marfan Evan couldn't wait for school ... for Marfan syndrome runs in families, getting passed down to children from parents who have the disease. ...

  20. Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells is caused by abnormal cell division after fertilization. Translocation Down syndrome. Down syndrome can also occur ... one option available for couples undergoing in vitro fertilization who are at increased risk of passing along ...

  1. LEOPARD syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    LEOPARD syndrome is a very rare inherited disorder in which there are problems with the skin, face, ... LEOPARD syndrome is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. This means the person only needs the abnormal ...

  2. Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... help with blood clotting. If you have a myelodysplastic syndrome, the stem cells do not mature into healthy ... can lead to infection, anemia, or easy bleeding. Myelodysplastic syndromes often do not cause early symptoms and are ...

  3. Klinefelter Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... testicles, which can lead to lower production of testosterone. The syndrome may also cause reduced muscle mass, ... caused by Klinefelter syndrome are related to low testosterone (hypogonadism). Testosterone replacement therapy reduces the risk of ...

  4. Alport syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Autosomal dominant Alport syndrome (ADAS) -- This is the rarest type. Males and females have equally severe disease. Symptoms KIDNEYS With all types of Alport syndrome the kidneys are affected. The tiny blood vessels in the glomeruli of the kidneys are ...

  5. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... at increased risk of developing weak, brittle bones (osteoporosis). Pregnancy complications. Most women with Turner syndrome are infertile. ... loss, eye problems, high blood pressure, diabetes and osteoporosis. Periodic ... Pregnancy and fertility treatment Few women with Turner syndrome ...

  6. Marfan syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder of connective tissue. This is the tissue that strengthens the body's structures. Disorders ... Marfan syndrome is caused by defects in a gene called fibrillin-1. Fibrillin-1 plays an important role ...

  7. Apert Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Datta, Saikat; Saha, Sandip; Kar, Arnab; Mondal, Souvonik; Basu, Syamantak

    2014-09-01

    Apert syndrome is one of the craniosynostosis syndromes which, due to its association with other skeletal anomalies, is also known as acrocephalosyndactyly. It is a rare congenital anomaly which stands out from other craniosynostosis due to its characteristic skeletal presentations.

  8. Turcot Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of brain tumors in Turcot syndrome are: Glioblastoma . This type of brain tumor is a very ... to generation in a family. In families with glioblastoma and other features of Lynch syndrome, mutations (alterations) ...

  9. Proteus Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Donate Cash Donation Life Insurance Gift Matching Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome ... approved by the Proteus Syndrome Foundation Assessment and management of the orthopedic and other complications of Proteus ...

  10. Edwards' syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Doreen; Dearmun, Annette

    2016-12-08

    Edwards' syndrome is a serious genetic condition that affects fetal cellular functions, tissue development and organogenesis. Most infants with the syndrome are female, but there is no race predominance.

  11. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  12. Craniofacial Syndrome Descriptions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dysplasia Goldenhar/Hemifacial Moebius syndrome Pfeiffer syndrome Pierre Robin Sequence Treacher Collins syndrome Other syndromes Wonder News & ... absence of the radial limb. Pfeiffer syndrome Pierre Robin Sequence Saethre-Chotzen Saethre-Chotzen syndrome is a ...

  13. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  14. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  15. Fraser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kalpana Kumari, M K; Kamath, Sulata; Mysorekar, Vijaya V; Nandini, G

    2008-01-01

    Fraser syndrome or cryptophthalmos is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by major features such as cryptophthalmos, syndactyly and abnormal genitalia. The diagnosis of this syndrome can be made on clinical examination and perinatal autopsy. We present the autopsy findings of a rare case of Fraser syndrome in a male infant.

  16. [Autoinflammatory syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ida, Hiroaki; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2009-03-01

    The autoinflammatory syndromes include a group of inherited diseases that are characterized by 1) seemingly unprovoked episodes of systemic inflammations, 2) absence of high titer of autoantibody or auto-reactive T cell, and 3) inborn error of innate immunity. In this article, we will focus on the clinical features, the pathogenesis related the genetic defects, and the therapeutic strategies in the representative disorders including familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), hyper-IgD with periodic fever syndrome (HIDS), syndrome of pyogenic arthritis with pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA), and Blau syndrome. Recent advances in genetics and molecular biology have proceeded our understanding of the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory syndromes.

  17. [Autoinflammatory syndromes].

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, P; Gross, W L

    2009-06-01

    In its strict sense, the term "autoinflammatory syndromes" comprises the hereditary periodic fever syndromes (HPF), which are caused by mutations of pattern-recognition receptors (PRR) and perturbations of the cytokine balance. These include the crypyrinopathies, familial Mediterranean fever, TNF-receptor associated periodic fever syndrome (TRAPS), hyper-IgD and periodic syndrome (HIDS), pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome, NALP12-HPF, and the Blau syndrome. The diseases are characterized by spontaneous activation of cells of the innate immunity in the absence of ligands. Autoantibodies are usually not found. HPF clinically present with recurrent fever episodes and inflammation, especially of serosal and synovial interfaces and the skin. Intriguingly, PRR-mediated autoinflammtory mechanisms also play a role in a number of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  18. Overgrowth Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Andrew C.; Kalish, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous multiple malformation syndromes associated with pathologic overgrowth have been described and, for many, their molecular bases elucidated. This review describes the characteristic features of these overgrowth syndromes, as well as the current understanding of their molecular bases, intellectual outcomes, and cancer predispositions. We review syndromes such as Sotos, Malan, Marshall–Smith, Weaver, Simpson–Golabi–Behmel, Perlman, Bannayan–Riley–Ruvalcaba, PI3K-related, Proteus, Beckwith–Wiedemann, fibrous dysplasia, Klippel–Trenaunay–Weber, and Maffucci. PMID:27617124

  19. Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Devi, Basanti; Behera, Binodini; Patro, Sibasish; Pattnaik, Subhransu S; Puhan, Manas R

    2013-05-01

    Gorlin Syndrome, a rare genodermatosis, otherwise known as Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is a multisystem disease affecting skin, nervous system, eyes, endocrine glands, and bones. It is characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, palmoplantar pits, jaw cysts, and bony deformities like kyphoscoliosis and frontal bossing. We would like to report a case of Gorlin syndrome with classical features, as this is a rare genodermatosis.

  20. Proteus Syndrome Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome Foundation The Proteus Syndrome Foundation , a 501c3 ... 1 Trial with ARQ 092 in Proteus Syndrome Proteus Syndrome Patient Registry The Proteus Syndrome Foundation Contact ...

  1. Cardiorenal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Kidney dysfunction in patients with heart failure and cardiovascular disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease are common. A recently proposed consensus definition of cardiorenal syndrome stresses the bidirectional nature of these heart-kidney interactions. The treatment of cardiorenal syndrome is challenging, however, promising new therapeutic options are currently being investigated in recent and ongoing clinical trials. PMID:20948701

  2. Poland syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Chandra Madhur; Kumar, Shrawan; Meghwani, Manoj K; Agrawal, Ravi P

    2014-01-01

    Poland's syndrome is a rare congenital condition, characterized by the absence of the sternal or breastbone portion of the pectoralis major muscle, which may be associated with the absence of nearby musculoskeletal structures. We hereby report an 8-year-old boy with typical features of Poland syndrome, the first documented case from Uttar Pradesh, India.

  3. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Connective tissue helps support all parts of your body. It also helps control how your body grows and develops. Marfan syndrome most often affects ... A mutation, or change, in the gene that controls how the body makes fibrillin causes Marfan syndrome. Fibrillin is a ...

  4. Tourette Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Look, Kathy

    Tourette Syndrome has a history of being misdiagnosed or undiagnosed due to its unusual and complex symptoms. This paper describes: the symptoms of Tourette Syndrome; its etiology; age of onset; therapeutic methods, such as drug therapy, psychotherapy, diet control, and hypnosis; educational implications; and employment prospects. Several…

  5. [Gorlin's syndrome].

    PubMed

    do Amaral, B; Costa e Sousa, R; Moreira, C G

    1997-05-01

    The major features of the nevoid basal-cell carcinoma syndrome are epidermal multiple cell carcinomas, cysts of the jaws and skeletal abnormalities, mainly in the ribs. The authors have reviewed the literature concerning multiple anomalies which are associated to this syndrome, and report a clinical case, emphasizing the advantages of early diagnosis, mainly for dermal and maxillary lesions.

  6. Tourette Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Look, Kathy

    Tourette Syndrome has a history of being misdiagnosed or undiagnosed due to its unusual and complex symptoms. This paper describes: the symptoms of Tourette Syndrome; its etiology; age of onset; therapeutic methods, such as drug therapy, psychotherapy, diet control, and hypnosis; educational implications; and employment prospects. Several…

  7. Nephrotic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... of removing extra fluids and waste from your blood — typically with an artificial kidney machine (dialyzer). Chronic kidney disease. Nephrotic syndrome may cause your kidneys to gradually lose their function over time. If kidney ... in your urine. Blood tests. If you have nephrotic syndrome, a blood ...

  8. Linburg syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rennie, William R.J.; Muller, Hellmuth

    1998-01-01

    Objective To review the causes and demographics of Linburg syndrome. Design An illustrative case report and a demographic study. Setting Adult and pediatric orthopedic clinics at the Health Sciences Centre in Winnipeg. Patients One patient with Linburg syndrome and 200 patients and relatives presenting to adult and pediatric orthopedic clinics with conditions not involving their hands, wrists or forearms. Outcome measures The presence of the intertendinous anomaly and of carpal tunnel syndrome. Results Tendinous connection(s) between flexor pollicis longus and flexor digitorum profundus muscles were found in 20% of the study population. The anomaly was found in all age groups. No association was found between Linburg syndrome and the presence of carpal tunnel syndrome or previous injury to the hand or forearm. Conclusion Tendinous connection between flexor pollicis longus and flexor digitorum profundus muscles is a common anomaly that rarely causes clinical symptoms. PMID:9711164

  9. Syndromic craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Derderian, Christopher; Seaward, James

    2012-05-01

    Although most cases of craniosynostosis are nonsyndromic, craniosynostosis is known to occur in conjunction with other anomalies in well-defined patterns that make up clinically recognized syndromes. Patients with syndromic craniosynostoses are much more complicated to care for, requiring a multidisciplinary approach to address all of their needs effectively. This review describes the most common craniosynostosis syndromes, their characteristic features and syndrome-specific functional issues, and new modalities utilized in their management. General principles including skull development, the risk of developing increased intracranial pressure in craniosynostosis syndromes, and techniques to measure intracranial pressure are discussed. Evolving techniques of the established operative management of craniosynostosis are discussed together with more recent techniques including spring cranioplasty and posterior cranial vault distraction osteogenesis.

  10. Escobar syndrome mimicing congenital patellar syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ezirmik, Naci; Yildiz, Kadri; Can, Cahit Emre

    2012-08-01

    Multiple pterygium syndrome (MPS) is a syndrome that is characterized abnormal face, short length and skin pterygiums on some body legions (servical, antecubital, popliteal, interdigital and on neck). It is also called as Pterygium Colli syndrome, Escobar syndrome or Pterygium syndrome. Escobar (multyple pterygium) syndrome is a rare syndrome. Intrauterin growth reterdation, abnormal face, wide-spead pterygiums that resulted in joint contractures, ptosis, chryptoorchidism, patellar dysplasia and foot deformities are seen on this syndrome. Primarly autosomal resesive crossing are observed; also autosomal dominant and X-linked crossing. This case were presented as it has components of Escobar syndrome and Isolated Patellar Aplasia syndrome in same time.

  11. DRESS syndrome.

    PubMed

    Descamps, Vincent; Ranger-Rogez, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome, initially recognized as a serious form of cutaneous drug adverse reaction, is now viewed as a drug-related syndrome that can cause life-threatening organ dysfunctions. Characteristic features include a long time interval from first drug exposure to symptom onset and a prolonged course, often with flares, even after discontinuation of the causal drug. The pathophysiology of DRESS syndrome remains incompletely understood but involves reactivation of herpes viruses (HHV-6, HHV-7, EBV, and CMV), against which the body mounts a strong immune response. The culprit drugs may not only affect epigenetic control mechanisms, thereby promoting viral reactivation, but also induce an antiviral T-cell response by interacting with the major histocompatibility complex receptor in individuals with genetic susceptibility factors. Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a potentially life-threatening form of cutaneous drug adverse reaction. The severity of this syndrome is related to the systemic manifestations, which can result in multiorgan failure. DRESS syndrome is characterized by highly specific features, most notably regarding the timing of the manifestations. New insights into the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms indicate a role for immunogenetic susceptibility factors and for reactivation of human herpes viruses (HHVs), chiefly HHV-6. We report a typical case of DRESS syndrome and discuss recent data about this condition. Copyright © 2013 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. [HELLP syndrome].

    PubMed

    Vigil-De Gracia, Paulino

    2015-01-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are one of the most common complications of pregnancy, but one of the most serious expressions of this pathology is HELLP syndrome. The HELLP syndrome is characterized by the presence of hypertension disorder more a triad: microangiopathic hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count. Patient with HELLP syndrome is associated with increased maternal risk complications such as: cerebral hemorrhage, retinal detachment, hematoma/ hepatic rupture, acute renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation, placental abruption and therefore a maternal death. For all these reasons it is recommended to search for findings of HELLP syndrome in patients with hypertensive disorder of pregnancy. The main clinical confusion of HELLP syndrome is acute fatty liver of pregnancy, however there are parameters that help correct identification. The presence of HELLP syndrome involves a rapid termination of pregnancy and the administration of corticosteroids does not improve maternal morbidity and mortality but may help raise the platelet count, thus decreasing the need for transfusion and shorten hospital stay. Much of the decline in maternal morbidity and mortality associated with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy is in proper diagnosis and effective management of HELLP syndrome.

  13. Hubris syndrome.

    PubMed

    Owen, David

    2008-08-01

    Hubris syndrome is associated with power, more likely to manifest itself the longer the person exercises power and the greater the power they exercise. A syndrome not to be applied to anyone with existing mental illness or brain damage. Usually symptoms abate when the person no longer exercises power. It is less likely to develop in people who retain a personal modesty, remain open to criticism, have a degree of cynicism or well developed sense of humour. Four heads of government in the last 100 years are singled out as having developed hubris syndrome: David Lloyd George, Margaret Thatcher, George W Bush and Tony Blair.

  14. [DRESS syndrome].

    PubMed

    Adamcová, Monika; Šturdík, Igor; Koller, Tomáš; Payer, Juraj

    2016-04-01

    DRESS syndrome (Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms) is severe drug-induced allergic-type reaction which occurs few days to weeks after taking a drug in a predisposed patient. Organ damage, eosinophilia and skin rash are typical at presentation. Corticotherapy is often necessary in severe cases. In this report we describe a case of 56-year old female with fever, elevated liver tests and skin rash. DRESS syndrome was diagnosed and allopurinol was indentified as a causative drug. Due to possible fatal outcome, DRESS syndrome should be considered in a differential diagnosis of all patients presenting with similar signs and symptoms.

  15. Jerusalem syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bar-el, Y; Durst, R; Katz, G; Zislin, J; Strauss, Z; Knobler, H Y

    2000-01-01

    Jerusalem's psychiatrists expect to encounter, as the millennium approaches, an ever-increasing number of tourists who, upon arriving in Jerusalem, may suffer psychotic decompensation. To describe the Jerusalem syndrome as a unique acute psychotic state. This analysis is based on accumulated clinical experience and phenomenological data consisting of cultural and religious perspectives. Three main categories of the syndrome are identified and described, with special focus on the category pertaining to spontaneous manifestations, unconfounded by previous psychotic history or psychopathology. The discrete form of the Jerusalem syndrome is related to religious excitement induced by proximity to the holy places of Jerusalem, and is indicated by seven characteristic sequential stages.

  16. Rapunzel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Altonbary, Ahmed Youssef; Bahgat, Monir Hussein

    2015-01-01

    Bezoars are concretions of human or vegetable fibers that accumulate in the gastrointestinal tract. Trichobezoars are common in patients with underlying psychiatric disorders who chew and swallow their own hair. Rapunzel syndrome is a rare form of gastric trichobezoar with a long tail extending into the small bowel. This syndrome was first described in 1968 by Vaughan et al. and since then till date just 64 cases have been described in the literature. We present the only documented case with Rapunzel syndrome in Egypt. PMID:27847892

  17. Neuroacanthocytosis syndromes.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hans H; Danek, Adrian; Walker, Ruth H

    2011-10-25

    Neuroacanthocytosis (NA) syndromes are a group of genetically defined diseases characterized by the association of red blood cell acanthocytosis and progressive degeneration of the basal ganglia. NA syndromes are exceptionally rare with an estimated prevalence of less than 1 to 5 per 1'000'000 inhabitants for each disorder. The core NA syndromes include autosomal recessive chorea-acanthocytosis and X-linked McLeod syndrome which have a Huntington's disease-like phenotype consisting of a choreatic movement disorder, psychiatric manifestations and cognitive decline, and additional multi-system features including myopathy and axonal neuropathy. In addition, cardiomyopathy may occur in McLeod syndrome. Acanthocytes are also found in a proportion of patients with autosomal dominant Huntington's disease-like 2, autosomal recessive pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and several inherited disorders of lipoprotein metabolism, namely abetalipoproteinemia (Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome) and hypobetalipoproteinemia leading to vitamin E malabsorption. The latter disorders are characterized by a peripheral neuropathy and sensory ataxia due to dorsal column degeneration, but movement disorders and cognitive impairment are not present. NA syndromes are caused by disease-specific genetic mutations. The mechanism by which these mutations cause neurodegeneration is not known. The association of the acanthocytic membrane abnormality with selective degeneration of the basal ganglia, however, suggests a common pathogenetic pathway. Laboratory tests include blood smears to detect acanthocytosis and determination of serum creatine kinase. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging may demonstrate striatal atrophy. Kell and Kx blood group antigens are reduced or absent in McLeod syndrome. Western blot for chorein demonstrates absence of this protein in red blood cells of chorea-acanthocytosis patients. Specific genetic testing is possible in all NA syndromes. Differential diagnoses

  18. Gerstmann's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Benton, A L

    1992-05-01

    Recent case reports describe the occurrence of a more or less pure Gerstmann syndrome in association with a focal lesion in the posterior perisylvian territory of the brain's left hemisphere. In addition, an electrocortical stimulation study reported the Gerstmann symptom combination and a number of other symptom combinations on stimulation of small areas in the left posterior parietotemporal cortex. The neuropsychological implications of these and other recent findings are considered in light of the variety of "syndromes" produced by lesions in this region, the rare occurrence of Gerstmann's syndrome, and its appearance as a consequence of lesions in diverse cerebral areas.

  19. [Autoinflammatory syndromes/fever syndromes].

    PubMed

    Schedel, J; Bach, B; Kümmerle-Deschner, J B; Kötter, I

    2011-05-01

    Hereditary periodic (fever) syndromes, also called autoinflammatory syndromes, are characterized by relapsing fever and additional manifestations such as skin rashes, mucosal manifestations, or joint symptoms. Some of these disorders present with organ involvement and serological signs of inflammation without fever. There is a strong serological inflammatory response with an elevation of serum amyloid A (SAA), resulting in an increased risk of secondary amyloidosis. There are monogenic disorders (familial mediterranean fever (FMF), hyper-IgD-syndrome (HIDS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), "pyogenic arthritis, acne, pyoderma gangrenosum" (PAPA), and "pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA) where mutations in genes have been described, which in part by influencing the function of the inflammasome, in part by other means, lead to the induction of the production of IL-1β. In "early-onset of enterocolitis (IBD)", a functional IL-10 receptor is lacking. Therapeutically, above all, the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra is used. In case of TRAPS and PGA, TNF-antagonists (etanercept) may also be used; in FMF colchicine is first choice. As additional possible autoinflammatory syndromes, PFAPA syndrome (periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis), Schnitzler syndrome, Still's disease of adult and pediatric onset, Behçet disease, gout, chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and Crohn's disease also are mentioned.

  20. Joubert Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Synapses, & Circuits Health Administrator Division of Intramural Research, Scientific Director ... This research is critical for increasing our understanding of Joubert syndrome, and for developing methods of treatment and prevention. NINDS, in conjunction with ...

  1. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... for slowed growth and development, but your daily observations are very important. Any medications that your child ... your child's symptoms? Diagnosing Rett syndrome involves careful observation of your child's growth and development and answering ...

  2. Horner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... birth Tumor of the hormonal and nervous systems (neuroblastoma) Unknown causes In some cases the cause of ... a tumor of the hormonal and nervous systems (neuroblastoma). There's no specific treatment for Horner syndrome. Often, ...

  3. Behcet's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Behcet's syndrome is a disease that involves vasculitis, which is inflammation of the blood vessels. It causes problems in many parts of the body. The ... National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  4. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone your body produces to help ... into energy for your body. If you are insulin resistant, too much sugar builds up in your ...

  5. Menkes syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menkes syndrome, cells in the body can absorb copper, but they are unable to release it. It ... makes it hard for the body to distribute copper in food from the intestines into the bloodstream ...

  6. Klinefelter syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Testosterone therapy may be prescribed. This can help: Grow body hair Improve appearance of muscles Improve concentration Improve mood and self esteem Increase energy and sex drive Increase strength Most men with this syndrome are not able to get ...

  7. Gerstmann's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... It is characterized by four primary symptoms: a writing disability (agraphia or dysgraphia), a lack of understanding ... speaking, in understanding speech, or in reading and writing). There are few reports of the syndrome, sometimes ...

  8. Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Eesha; Pandey, Ramesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of the connective tissue, with skeletal, ligamentous, orooculofacial, pulmonary, abdominal, neurological and the most fatal, cardiovascular manifestations. It has no cure but early diagnosis, regular monitoring and preventive lifestyle regimen ensure a good prognosis. However, the diagnosis can be difficult as it is essentially a clinical one, relying on family history, meticulous physical examination and investigation of involved organ systems. Patients of Marfan syndrome portray very typical physical and orofacial characteristics, suggesting obvious recognition, but due to variable phenotypic expression, cases often go unnoticed unless a full range of attributing features is apparent. Dental practitioners are very likely to encounter patients of Marfan syndrome at an early age as they frequently present for dental treatment. The present case report illustrates the preliminary screening of Marfan syndrome in a dental office followed by timely diagnosis and appropriate referrals. PMID:24336584

  9. Scheie syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... to have children and who have a family history of Scheie syndrome. Counseling is also recommended for families who ... L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap ...

  10. Sanfilippo syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... to have children and who have a family history of Sanfilippo syndrome. Counseling is also recommended for ... L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap ...

  11. Beals Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... have many of the skeletal (bone) and aortic enlargement problems as people with Marfan syndrome, and treatments ... appearance to the top of the ear Aortic enlargement and/or mitral valve regurgitation (occasionally) People with ...

  12. Reye Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Browse Related Terms Pediatric Liver Disease , Reye Syndrome , Aspirin , Progression of Liver Disease , Liver Transplant Help Fight ... a mystery. However studies have shown that using aspirin to treat viral illnesses increases the risk of ...

  13. Caplan syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... people with rheumatoid arthritis who have breathed in mining dust that contains coal. This lung disease is ... Caplan syndrome is caused by breathing in coal mining dust. This causes inflammation and can lead to ...

  14. HELLP syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... It is considered to be a variant of preeclampsia. Sometimes the presence of HELLP syndrome is due ... out of 1,000 pregnancies. In women with preeclampsia or eclampsia , the condition develops in 10% to ...

  15. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause is long-term exposure to too much cortisol, a hormone that your adrenal gland makes. Sometimes, ... can cause your body to make too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome is rare. Some symptoms are Upper ...

  16. Eisenmenger syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... in some people who were born with structural problems of the heart. Causes Eisenmenger syndrome is a condition that results from abnormal blood circulation caused by a defect in the heart. Most ...

  17. Brugada Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... you suspect it may be because of a heart condition, seek emergency medical attention. If your parent, sibling or child ... especially in children. Complications of Brugada syndrome require emergency ... loss of heart function, breathing and consciousness, which often occurs while ...

  18. Morquio syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... chap 40. Read More Autosomal recessive Enzyme Heart failure - overview Sanfilippo syndrome Short stature Review Date 4/20/2015 Updated by: Chad Haldeman-Englert, MD, FACMG, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Section on Medical ...

  19. Piriformis syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... the sciatic nerve. The syndrome, which affects more women than men, is uncommon. But when it occurs, it can cause sciatica . Causes The piriformis muscle is involved in nearly every movement you make with your lower body, from walking ...

  20. Tourette syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicines are available to treat Tourette syndrome. The exact medicine that is used depends on the symptoms ... must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get ...

  1. Reifenstein syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome Images Male reproductive system References Achermann JC, Hughes IA. Pediatric disorders of sex development. In: Melmed S, ... Birmingham, Birminghum, AL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla ...

  2. Hunter Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal or near-normal height. Hernias (inguinal and umbilical) are common in Hunter syndrome. A hernia occurs ... in which the membranes that surround the spinal cord may become thick and scarred (hypertrophic cervical pachymeningitis). ...

  3. [Heptopulmonary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cuadrado, Antonio; Díaz, Ainhoa; Iruzubieta, Paula; Salcines, José Ramón; Crespo, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome is characterized by the presence of liver disease, pulmonary vascular dilatations, and arterial hypoxemia. It is usually associated with cirrhosis of any origin, but has been described in other liver diseases, both acute and chronic, and not always associated with portal hypertension. The gold standard method to detect pulmonary vascular dilations is contrast enhancement echocardiography with saline and is essential for the diagnosis of hepatopulmonary syndrome. These dilatations reflect changes in the pulmonary microvasculature (vasodilatation, intravascular monocyte accumulation, and angiogenesis) and induce a ventilation/perfusion mismatch, or even true intrapulmonary shunts, which eventually trigger hypoxemia. This syndrome worsens patients' prognosis and impairs their quality of life and may lead to the need for liver transplantation, which is the only effective and definitive treatment. In this article, we review the etiological, pathophysiological, clinical and therapeutic features of this syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  4. Gilbert's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes Gilbert's syndrome. The gene normally controls an enzyme that helps break down bilirubin in your liver. ... your bloodstream to the liver, where normally an enzyme breaks down the bilirubin and removes it from ...

  5. Brown Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Does Brown syndrome cause eye problems besides abnormal eye movements? In the more severely affected cases of Brown ... acquired and congenital cases. In congenital cases, the eye movement problem is usually constant and unlikely to resolve ...

  6. Fahr's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understanding Sleep The Life and Death of a Neuron Order Publications Support Resources Patient Organizations Professional Societies ... Myopathy Information Page Moebius Syndrome Information Page Motor Neuron Diseases Information Page Moyamoya Disease Information Page Mucolipidoses ...

  7. Dravet Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Research at NINDS Focus on Research Bioengineering Epilepsy Health Disparities Neural Interfaces Parkinson's Disease Spinal Cord ... basic and clinical research on all types of epilepsy, including Dravet syndrome. Study of the genetic defects ...

  8. Dressler's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome can cause more-serious complications, including: Cardiac tamponade. Inflammation of the pericardium can cause fluids to ... including: Draining excess fluids. If you develop cardiac tamponade, your doctor will likely recommend a procedure (pericardiocentesis) ...

  9. Hunter syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hunter syndrome is a disease in which long chains of sugar molecules (glycosaminoglycans, formerly called mucopolysaccharides ) are ... of the enzyme iduronate sulfatase. Without this enzyme, chains of sugar molecules build up in various body ...

  10. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... a person is concentrating (like working on a computer) or relaxing (like listening to music). The type ... doctor who knows a lot about the nervous system). All kids who have Tourette syndrome have tics — ...

  11. Cushing syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Cushing syndrome have: Round, red, full face ( moon face ) Slow growth rate (in children) Weight gain ... constitute endorsements of those other sites. Copyright 1997-2017, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial ...

  12. [Mobius syndrome].

    PubMed

    Vladuţiu, Cristina; Duma, Ionela

    2012-01-01

    Mobius syndrom, an anomaly in cranial nerve developement, presents with a remarkable clinical polymorphism. The rare occurence of this pathology and the questions raised by the diagnosis and treatment determined us to make this presentation.

  13. Autoinflammatory syndromes.

    PubMed

    Galeazzi, M; Gasbarrini, G; Ghirardello, A; Grandemange, S; Hoffman, H M; Manna, R; Podswiadek, M; Punzi, L; Sebastiani, G D; Touitou, I; Doria, A

    2006-01-01

    The autoinflammatory disorders are a new and expanding classification of inflammatory diseases characterized by recurrent episodes of systemic inflammation in the absence of pathogens, autoantibodies or antigen specific T cells. These disorders are caused by primary dysfunction of the innate immune system, without evidence of adaptive immune dysregulation. Innate immune abnormalities include aberrant responses to pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) like lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan, prominent neutrophilia in blood and tissues, and dysregulation of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1beta, TNF-alpha) or their receptors. The autoinflammatory diseases comprise both hereditary (Familial Mediterranean Fever, FMF; Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency, MKD; TNF Receptor Associated Periodic Syndrome, TRAPS; Cryopyrin Associated Periodic Syndrome, CAPS; Blau syndrome; Pyogenic sterile Arthritis, Pyoderma gangrenosum and Acne syndrome, PAPA; Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis, CRMO) and multifactorial (Crohn's and Behçet's diseases) disorders. Mutations responsible for FMF, TRAPS, CAPS, PAPA are in proteins involved in modulation of inflammation and apoptosis.

  14. Aase syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Aase-Smith syndrome; Hypoplastic anemia - triphalangeal thumbs, Aase-Smith type ... Jones KL, Jones MC, Del Campo M, eds. Smith's Recognizable Patterns of Human Malformation . 7th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  15. Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help improve skills. They may include speech, physical, occupational, and/or educational therapy. With support and treatment, many people with Down syndrome live happy, productive lives. NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  16. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... turnersyndrome. html • Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institutes of Child Health & Human Development (NIH): www. nichd. nih. gov/ health/ topics/ Turner_ Syndrome. cfm • Mayo Clinic: www. mayoclinic. com/ health/ turner- ...

  17. Reye syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... e1-1104.e1. Hurwitz ES. Reye's syndrome. In: Cherry JD, Demmler-Harrison G, Kaplan SL, Steinblach W, Hotez P, eds. Feigin and Cherry's Textbook of Pediatric Infectious Diseases . 7th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  18. Duane Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... due to abnormal development of the 6 th cranial nerve. It is characterized by difficulty rotating one or ... eye muscles. In Duane syndrome, the 6 th cranial nerve that controls the lateral rectus muscle (the muscle ...

  19. Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Amy E; Allanson, Judith E; Tartaglia, Marco; Gelb, Bruce D

    2013-01-26

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic multisystem disorder characterised by distinctive facial features, developmental delay, learning difficulties, short stature, congenital heart disease, renal anomalies, lymphatic malformations, and bleeding difficulties. Mutations that cause Noonan syndrome alter genes encoding proteins with roles in the RAS-MAPK pathway, leading to pathway dysregulation. Management guidelines have been developed. Several clinically relevant genotype-phenotype correlations aid risk assessment and patient management. Increased understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease could help development of pharmacogenetic treatments.

  20. Noonan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Amy E; Allanson, Judith E; Tartaglia, Marco; Gelb, Bruce D

    2014-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic multisystem disorder characterised by distinctive facial features, developmental delay, learning difficulties, short stature, congenital heart disease, renal anomalies, lymphatic malformations, and bleeding difficulties. Mutations that cause Noonan syndrome alter genes encoding proteins with roles in the RAS–MAPK pathway, leading to pathway dysregulation. Management guidelines have been developed. Several clinically relevant genotype–phenotype correlations aid risk assessment and patient management. Increased understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease could help development of pharmacogenetic treatments. PMID:23312968

  1. [HELLP syndrome].

    PubMed

    Filipowicz, Ewa; Staszków, Monika

    2015-01-01

    HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelet count) is a relatively rare complication of pregnancy. It usually develops in the IIId trimester or after delivery. HELLP syndrome is associated with increased maternal (placental abruption, disseminated intravascular coagulation, hepatic hematomas and rupture, and acute kidney injury) and neonatal (prematurity, low birth weight) risk complications. In this article the diagnosis, clinical picture and treatment of this disease have been shortly reviewed.

  2. SAPHO syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Sueli; Sampaio-Barros, Percival D

    2013-05-01

    SAPHO syndrome is a disorder characterized by Synovitis, Acne, Pustulosis, Hyperostosis, and Osteitis. As the osteoarticular and skin manifestations often do not occur simultaneously and there are no validated diagnostic criteria, the diagnosis can be difficult. Clinical and imaging investigation is necessary to establish the many differential diagnoses of SAPHO syndrome. The etiopathogenesis involves infectious (probably Propionibacterium acnes), immunologic, and genetic factors. Treatment is based on information gathered from case reports and small series, and is related to specific skin or articular symptoms.

  3. [DRESS syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rabenkogo, A; Vigue, M G; Jeziorski, E

    2015-01-01

    DRESS syndrome (drug reaction eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) is a rare and serious drug toxidermia with potentially multiple organ dysfunctions. This report relates the case of a 9-year-old girl who presented a right cervical and mediastinal adenopathy with a mediastinal lump, fever, and deterioration of the general condition. The hospital assessment concluded in an abscess due to Staphylococcus aureus secreting a Panton-Valentine toxin with nonsevere pleuritis and pericarditis. The outcome was favorable with antibiotic treatment consisting of amoxicillin-acid clavulanic, amikacin, and clindamycin followed by oxacillin, rifampicin, and colchicine. On the 25th day of treatment, she presented recurrence of fever with a generalized rash, moderate hepatic cytolysis, hypereosinophilia, with the presence of activated lymphocytes that were further suggestive of visceral DRESS syndrome. A skin biopsy was performed that confirmed the diagnosis. The outcome was favorable after stopping all ongoing treatments even though none of the administered treatments were classically responsible for the syndrome. Symptomatic treatments (antihistaminic and topical steroids) were also administered. Patch tests, performed secondarily, were positive to penicillins; amoxicillin-clavulanic acid or oxacillin were then suspected of being responsible for the DRESS syndrome. Potentially serious, the DRESS syndrome should be considered together with atoxic epidermal necrolysis or Stevens-Johnson syndromes in the case of any rash appearing after drug administration, especially in the presence of face and eyelid edema. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Learning about WAGR Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... children who have WAGR syndrome may have normal intelligence. Other symptoms of WAGR syndrome may also include: ... mild. Some individuals with WAGR syndrome have normal intelligence. Children with WAGR syndrome should be referred for ...

  5. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Metabolic Syndrome? Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of ... that may play a role in causing metabolic syndrome. Outlook Metabolic syndrome is becoming more common due to a ...

  6. Russell-Silver syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Silver-Russell syndrome; Silver syndrome; RSS; Russell-Silver syndrome ... Organization for Rare Disorders -- rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/russell-silver-syndrome NIH/NLM Genetics Home Reference -- ghr. ...

  7. Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Want to Know About Puberty Train Your Temper Irritable Bowel Syndrome KidsHealth > For Kids > Irritable Bowel Syndrome Print A ... to minimize or prevent these symptoms. What Is Irritable Bowel Syndrome? Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a fairly common ...

  8. Down Syndrome (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CPR: A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Down Syndrome KidsHealth > For Kids > Down Syndrome Print A A ... skills. continue Do a Lot of People Have Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is not contagious , so you can' ...

  9. What Is Down Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Down Syndrome » What Is Down Syndrome? What Is Down Syndrome? In every cell in the human body there ... degrees, or not at all. How Common is Down Syndrome? According to the Centers for Disease Control and ...

  10. Preexcitation Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Atul; Sra, Jasbir; Akhtar, Masood

    2016-03-01

    The classic electrocardiogram in Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is characterized by a short PR interval and prolonged QRS duration in the presence of sinus rhythm with initial slurring. The clinical syndrome associated with above electrocardiogram finding and the history of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia is referred to as Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Various eponyms describing accessory or anomalous conduction pathways in addition to the normal pathway are collectively referred to as preexcitation syndromes. The latter form and associated eponyms are frequently used in literature despite controversy and disagreements over their actual anatomical existence and electrophysiological significance. This communication highlights inherent deficiencies in the knowledge that has existed since the use of such eponyms began. With the advent of curative ablation, initially surgical, and then catheter based, the knowledge gaps have been mostly filled with better delineation of the anatomic and electrophysiological properties of anomalous atrioventricular pathways. It seems reasonable, therefore, to revisit the clinical and electrophysiologic role of preexcitation syndromes in current practice.

  11. Pfeiffer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vogels, Annick; Fryns, Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that associates craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly on hands and feet. Hydrocephaly may be found occasionally, along with severe ocular proptosis, ankylosed elbows, abnormal viscera, and slow development. Based on the severity of the phenotype, Pfeiffer syndrome is divided into three clinical subtypes. Type 1 "classic" Pfeiffer syndrome involves individuals with mild manifestations including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia and finger and toe abnormalities; it is associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Type 2 consists of cloverleaf skull, extreme proptosis, finger and toe abnormalities, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, developmental delay and neurological complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without a cloverleaf skull. Clinical overlap between the three types may occur. Pfeiffer syndrome affects about 1 in 100,000 individuals. The disorder can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR-1 or FGFR-2. Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography showing craniosynostosis, hypertelorism with proptosis, and broad thumb, or molecularly if it concerns a recurrence and the causative mutation was found. Molecular genetic testing is important to confirm the diagnosis. Management includes multiple-staged surgery of craniosynostosis. Midfacial surgery is performed to reduce the exophthalmos and the midfacial hypoplasia.

  12. Sheehan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Keleştimur, Fahrettin

    2003-01-01

    Sheehan's syndrome occurs as a result of ischemic pituitary necrosis due to severe postpartum hemorrhage. It may be rarely seen without massive bleeding or after normal delivery. Improvement in obstetric care and availability of rapid blood transfusion coincided with a remarkable reduction in the frequency of Sheehan's syndrome particularly in western society. But it has recently been reported more often from well-developed countries. It is one of the most common causes of hypopituitarism in underdeveloped or developing countries. Enlargement of pituitary gland, small sella size, disseminated intravascular coagulation and autoimmunity have been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of Sheehan's syndrome in women who suffer from severe postpartum hemorrhage. The patients may seek medical advice because of various presentations ranging from non-specific symptoms to coma and the clinical manifestation may change from one patient to another. Failure of postpartum lactation and failure to resume menses after delivery are the most common presenting symptoms. Although a small percentage of patients with Sheehan's syndrome may cause abrupt onset severe hypopituitarism immediately after delivery, most patients have a mild disease and go undiagnosed and untreated for a long time. It may result in partial or panhypopituitarism and GH is one of the hormones lost earliest. The great majority of the patients has empty sella on CT or MRI. Lymphocytic hypophysitis should be kept in mind in differential diagnosis. In this review, the old and recent data regarding Sheehan's syndrome are presented.

  13. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    NBCC syndrome; Gorlin-Goltz syndrome; Basal cell nevus syndrome; BCNS; Basal cell cancer - nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome ... Nevoid basal cell carcinoma nevus syndrome is a rare genetic condition. The gene linked to the syndrome is known as PTCH (" ...

  14. Can Myelodysplastic Syndromes Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myelodysplastic Syndromes Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Myelodysplastic Syndromes Be Prevented? Since smoking is linked to the ... Syndromes? Can Myelodysplastic Syndromes Be Prevented? More In Myelodysplastic Syndromes About Myelodysplastic Syndromes Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  15. Apert's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jyothsna, Mandapati; Ahmed, Syed Basheer; Sree Lakshmi, Ketham Reddy

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Apert's syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by craniosynostosis, midfacial malforma­tion and symmetrical syndactyly of hands and feet. Craniofacial deformities include cone-shaped calvarium, fat forehead, prop-tosis, hypertelorism and short nose with a bulbous tip. Intraoral findings include high arched palate with pseudocleft, maxillary transverse and sagittal hypoplasia with concomitant dental crowding, skeletal and dental anterior open bite and several retained primary teeth. We report one such case of 14-year-old boy having all the classical features of Apert's syndrome with particular emphasis on brief review of genetic features. How to cite this article: Kumar GR, Jyothsna M, Ahmed SB, Lakshmi KRS. Apert's Syndrome. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(1):69-72. PMID:25206244

  16. Compartment syndromes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  17. Compartment syndromes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  18. Cushing syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bista, Bibek; Beck, Nancy

    2014-02-01

    Cushing syndrome is the constellation of signs and symptoms caused by protracted exposure to glucocorticoids. The most common cause of Cushing syndrome in children and adolescents is exogenous administration of glucocorticoids. Presenting features commonly include weight gain, growth retardation, hirsutism, obesity, striae, acne and hypertension. Almost invariably, linear growth is severely diminished, a factor which may be useful in differentiating between childhood obesity and Cushing syndrome. Diagnostic approaches are based on distinguishing between adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-dependent and ACTH-independent etiologies, and consideration of the most likely diagnosis by age. Treatment modality is dependent upon etiology. After cure, important components of care include attention to linear growth, pubertal progression and body composition.

  19. [Autoinflammatory syndromes].

    PubMed

    Gomes, José Melo; Gomes, Sónia Melo; Conde, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Autoinflammatory syndromes (AIS) are a heterogeneous group of congenital diseases characterized by the presence of recurrent episodes of fever and local or generalized inflammation, in the absence of infectious agents, detectable auto-antibodies or antigen-specific autoreactive T-cells. These diseases have been much better understood during the past 15 years, mainly due to the marked advances of the Human Genoma Project and its implications in the identification and characterization of genetic mutations. In this paper we make a revision of the classification of AIS and focus our attention specially on the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), in particular the CINCA syndrome that shares many clinical characteristics with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  20. Flammer syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The new term Flammer syndrome describes a phenotype characterized by the presence of primary vascular dysregulation together with a cluster of symptoms and signs that may occur in healthy people as well as people with disease. Typically, the blood vessels of the subjects with Flammer syndrome react differently to a number of stimuli, such as cold and physical or emotional stress. Nearly all organs, particularly the eye, can be involved. Although the syndrome has some advantages, such as protection against the development of atherosclerosis, Flammer syndrome also contributes to certain diseases, such as normal tension glaucoma. The syndrome occurs more often in women than in men, in slender people than in obese subjects, in people with indoor rather than outdoor jobs, and in academics than in blue collar workers. Affected subjects tend to have cold extremities, low blood pressure, prolonged sleep onset time, shifted circadian rhythm, reduced feeling of thirst, altered drug sensitivity, and increased general sensitivity, including pain sensitivity. The plasma level of endothelin-1 is slightly increased, and the gene expression in lymphocytes is changed. In the eye, the retinal vessels are stiffer and their spatial variability larger; the autoregulation of ocular blood flow is decreased. Glaucoma patients with Flammer syndrome have an increased frequency of the following: optic disc hemorrhages, activated retinal astrocytes, elevated retinal venous pressure, optic nerve compartmentalization, fluctuating diffuse visual field defects, and elevated oxidative stress. Further research should lead to a more concise definition, a precise diagnosis, and tools for recognizing people at risk. This may ultimately lead to more efficient and more personalized treatment. PMID:25075228

  1. Morbihan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Veraldi, Stefano; Persico, Maria Chiara; Francia, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of severe Morbihan syndrome (chronic erythematous edema of the upper portion of the face) in a 60-year-old man. The syndrome was characterized clinically by erythematous edema involving the forehead, glabella, and both eyelids, because of which the patient was not able to open completely his eyes. Furthermore, erythema and telangiectasiae were visible on the nose and cheeks. Laboratory and instrumental examinations were within normal ranges or negative. Histopathological examination showed dermal edema, perivascular and periadnexal lympho-histiocytic infiltrate, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Oral isotretinoin was ineffective despite the relatively long duration of the therapy (26 weeks). PMID:23741671

  2. [PFAPA syndrome].

    PubMed

    André, Suzete Costa Anjos; Vales, Fernando; Cardoso, Eduardo; Santos, Margarida

    2009-01-01

    PFAPA syndrome is characterized by periodic fever, pharyngitis, cervical adenitis and aphthous stomatitis. The bouts of fever can last for days or even weeks. Between crises, patients remain asymptomatic for variable periods. It appears before the age of five and has limited duration (4-8 years). Its aetiopathogeny is unknown. Corticoids are the treatment of choice. Tonsillectomy has been proposed as a solution but remains controversial. We present the case of a 4-year-old girl with PFAPA syndrome who underwent tonsillectomy in January, 2008, and we review the literature.

  3. [Wilkie's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bognár, Gábor; Ledniczky, György; Palik, Eva; Zubek, László; Sugár, István; Ondrejka, Pál

    2008-10-01

    Loss of retroperitoneal fatty tissue as a result of a variety of debilitating conditions and noxa is believed to be the etiologic factor of superior mesenteric artery syndrome. A case of a 35 years old female patient with severe malnutrition and weight loss is presented, who developed superior mesenteric artery syndrome. Various theories of etiology, clinical course and treatment options of this uncommon disease are discussed. In our case, conservative management was inefficient, while surgical treatment aiming to bypass the obstruction by an anastomosis between the jejunum and the proximal duodenum (duodenojejunostomy) was successful. An interdisciplinary teamwork provides the most beneficial diagnostic and therapeutic result in this often underestimated disease.

  4. Reye's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Malcolmson, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    The author defines and discusses Reye's syndrome and the hypotheses relating to its causes and associating its incidence with that of chickenpox and influenza A and B. The recent decline in the incidence of Reye's syndrome appears to be related to the reduced use of Aspirin in children and adolescents. Although evidence so far is circumstantial, North American P(a)ediatric Associations have indicated that Aspirin should not be used to control fever in children who have viral infections but especially in children suspected of having chickenpox or influenza A or B. PMID:21264006

  5. Nephrotic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... child will have a relapse — where the nephrotic syndrome comes back after going away. In that case, treatment would begin again until the child outgrows the condition or it improves on its own./p> Reviewed by: Robert S. Mathias, MD Date reviewed: March 2014 previous 1 • ...

  6. Waardenburg's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yesudian, D P; Jayaraman, M; Janaki, V R; Yesudian, P

    1995-01-01

    Three children in a family of five presented with heterochromia iridis, lateral displacement of inner canthi and varying degrees of sensorineural deafness. All the 3 showed iris atrophy. The father of the children had only heterochromia iridis. A diagnosis of Waardenburg's syndrome Type I was made in the children with the father probably representing a forme fruste of the condition.

  7. [Waardenburg's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gimñenez, F; Carbonell, R; Pérez, F; Lozano, I

    1994-01-01

    Reporting one case of this condition type-2 with heterochromia iridis and cochlear deafness. The AA. review the syndrome's components and it nomenclature as well. They discuss about the convenience of including this deviation in the chapter of "diseases of the embryonic neural crest". The specific place of the gene responsibly in the chromosome-2 and the possibilities of genetic counselling are considered.

  8. Overtraining syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Budgett, R

    1990-01-01

    This review discusses the overtraining syndrome which is characterized by fatigue and underperformance precipitated by stress of training. Other stresses, depression and an increased susceptibility to infections may be important. Treatment requires rest and a stress management program over 3 months. PMID:2097018

  9. Overtraining syndrome.

    PubMed

    Budgett, R

    1990-12-01

    This review discusses the overtraining syndrome which is characterized by fatigue and underperformance precipitated by stress of training. Other stresses, depression and an increased susceptibility to infections may be important. Treatment requires rest and a stress management program over 3 months.

  10. Aicardi syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 591. US National Library of Medicine. Aicardi syndrome. Updated September 20, 2016. ghr.nlm. ... Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow us ... Developers U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department ...

  11. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment of Cushing's syndrome. Current Drug Targets-Immune, Endocrine & Metabolic Disorders . 2004;4:335–342. Lin D, Loughlin K. Diagnosis and management of surgical adrenal diseases. Urology . 2005;66:476–483. Newell-Price J, ... & Nutrition Blood Diseases Diagnostic Tests La ...

  12. HELLP Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sandvoß, Mareike; Potthast, Arne Björn; von Versen-Höynck, Frauke; Das, Anibh Martin

    2017-04-01

    The hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome is frequently observed in mothers whose offspring have long-chain fatty acid oxidation defects. We previously found that fatty acid oxidation is compromised not only in these inborn errors of metabolism but also in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) from all pregnancies complicated by the HELLP syndrome. Sirtuins are oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))dependent deacetylases linked to the metabolic status of the cell. SIRT 4 is known to have regulatory functions in fatty acid oxidation. The HELLP syndrome is often associated with short-term hypoxia. We studied sirtuins (SIRT 1, SIRT 3, and SIRT 4) in HUVECs from pregnancies complicated by the HELLP syndrome and uncomplicated pregnancies exposed to hypoxia (n = 7 controls, 7 HELLP; 0, 10, 60, or 120 minutes of 2% O2). Protein levels of SIRT 4 were significantly higher in HUVECs from HELLP compared to control after 60 and 120 minutes of hypoxia. The NAD(+) levels increased in a time-dependent manner.

  13. Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  14. Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  15. [SAPHO syndrome].

    PubMed

    Heldmann, F; Kiltz, U; Baraliakos, X; Braun, J

    2014-10-01

    The SAPHO syndrome, an acronym for synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis, is a rare disease which affects bones, joints and the skin. The main osteoarticular features are hyperostosis and osteitis. Osteoarticular symptoms predominantly occur on the anterior chest wall but the spine and the peripheral skeleton can also be involved. The most important skin affections are palmoplantar pustulosis and severe acne. The etiology of this syndrome remains unclear but infectious, immunological and genetic factors are involved. The diagnostic features of SAPHO syndrome are clinical and radiological. The most important diagnostic procedure is Tc-99 m bone scintigraphy but conventional x-rays as well as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can also contribute to the final diagnosis. Bone histology and positron emission tomography CT (PET-CT) may help to differentiate SAPHO syndrome from malignancies and infectious osteomyelitis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the cornerstone of treatment. The results obtained using antibiotics and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), such as sulfasalazine and methotrexate are inconsistent. Bisphosphonates and anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) drugs have shown promising results in small studies but further research is still necessary.

  16. Waardenburg syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Read, A P; Newton, V E

    1997-01-01

    Auditory-pigmentary syndromes are caused by physical absence of melanocytes from the skin, hair, eyes, or the stria vascularis of the cochlea. Dominantly inherited examples with patchy depigmentation are usually labelled Waardenburg syndrome (WS). Type I WS, characterised by dystopia canthorum, is caused by loss of function mutations in the PAX3 gene. Type III WS (Klein-Waardenburg syndrome, with abnormalities of the arms) is an extreme presentation of type I; some but not all patients are homozygotes. Type IV WS (Shah-Waardenburg syndrome with Hirschsprung disease) can be caused by mutations in the genes for endothelin-3 or one of its receptors, EDNRB. Type II WS is a heterogeneous group, about 15% of whom are heterozygous for mutations in the MITF (microphthalmia associated transcription factor) gene. All these forms show marked variability even within families, and at present it is not possible to predict the severity, even when a mutation is detected. Characterising the genes is helping to unravel important developmental pathways in the neural crest and its derivatives. Images PMID:9279758

  17. Kindler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ashton, G H S

    2004-03-01

    Kindler syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive skin fragility disorder characterized by blistering in infancy, followed by photosensitivity and progressive poikiloderma. Ultrastructural examination reveals marked basement membrane reduplication and variable levels of cleavage at the dermal-epidermal junction. The molecular pathology underlying Kindler syndrome has recently been shown to involve loss-of-function mutations in a novel gene, KIND1, encoding kindlin-1. Immunofluorescence, gene expression and cell biology studies have shown that kindlin-1 is expressed mainly in basal keratinocytes and plays a role in the attachment of the actin cytoskeleton via focal contacts to the extracellular matrix. Thus, Kindler syndrome is the first genodermatosis caused by a defect in actin-extracellular matrix linkage rather than the classic keratin-extracellular matrix linkage underlying the pathology of other inherited skin fragility disorders such as epidermolysis bullosa. This article reviews the clinical features as well as the molecular and cellular pathology of Kindler syndrome and highlights the importance of the new protein, kindlin-1, in cell-matrix adhesion and its intriguing link to photosensitivity.

  18. [Locomotive syndrome and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Jun-ichi; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2014-10-01

    The Japanese Orthopedic Association coined the term locomotive syndrome (LS) to designate a condition of elderly people in high risk groups of requiring nursing care because of problems with their musculoskeletal diseases. LS is a socioeconomic concept, and closely associated with osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and sarcopenia. Recent studies have revealed that metabolic syndrome (MS), a clustering of cardiovascular risk factors, has been related with LS. For example, individuals with MS have a greater risk of osteoarthritis and sarcopenia. Secreted factors from adipose tissue and skeletal muscles, namely, adipokines and myokines, are involved in the association of LS and MS.

  19. The Source for Syndromes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Gail J.; Hoge, Debra Reichert

    Designed for practicing speech-language pathologists, this book discusses different syndrome disabilities, pertinent speech-language characteristics, and goals and strategies to begin intervention efforts at a preschool level. Chapters address: (1) Angelman syndrome; (2) Asperger syndrome; (3) Down syndrome; (4) fetal alcohol syndrome; (5) fetal…

  20. Down Syndrome: Eye Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Read in Chinese What causes Down syndrome? Down syndrome is caused by a duplication of all ... Where can I find more information regarding Down Syndrome? National Down Syndrome Society VISIT SITE » Downs Syndrome Association VISIT ...

  1. The Source for Syndromes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Gail J.; Hoge, Debra Reichert

    Designed for practicing speech-language pathologists, this book discusses different syndrome disabilities, pertinent speech-language characteristics, and goals and strategies to begin intervention efforts at a preschool level. Chapters address: (1) Angelman syndrome; (2) Asperger syndrome; (3) Down syndrome; (4) fetal alcohol syndrome; (5) fetal…

  2. Dravet syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Incorpora, Gemma

    2009-01-01

    "Dravet syndrome" (DS) previously named severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI), or epilepsy with polymorphic seizures, is a rare disorder characterized by an early, severe, generalized, epileptic encephalopathy. DS is characterized by febrile and afebrile seizures beginning in the 1st year of life followed by different types of seizures (either focal or generalized), which are typically resistant to antiepileptic drugs. A developmental delay from the 2nd to 3rd year of life becomes evident, together with motor disturbances and personality disorders. Beside the classic syndrome, there are milder cases which have been called severe myoclonic epilepsy borderline (SMEB). DS is caused by a mutation in the neuronal sodium channel gene, SCN1A , that is also mutated in generalized epilepsy with FS+ (GEFS+). PMID:19737414

  3. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  4. Overtraining Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kreher, Jeffrey B.; Schwartz, Jennifer B.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Fatigue and underperformance are common in athletes. Understanding overtraining syndrome (OTS) is helpful in the evaluation, management, and education of athletes. Evidence Acquisition: Relevant articles in English were searched with OVID (1948-2011) and PubMed using the following keywords: overtraining syndrome, overtraining, overreaching, unexplained underperformance, staleness, pathophysiology, management, treatment, evaluation. Bibliographies were reviewed for additional resources. Results: OTS appears to be a maladapted response to excessive exercise without adequate rest, resulting in perturbations of multiple body systems (neurologic, endocrinologic, immunologic) coupled with mood changes. Many hypotheses of OTS pathogenesis are reviewed, and a clinical approach to athletes with possible OTS (including history, testing, and prevention) is presented. Conclusions: OTS remains a clinical diagnosis with arbitrary definitions per the European College of Sports Science’s position statement. History and, in most situations, limited serologies are helpful. However, much remains to be learned given that most past research has been on athletes with overreaching rather than OTS. PMID:23016079

  5. Parinaud's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moffie, D; Ongerboer de Visser, B W; Stefanko, S Z

    1983-02-01

    Five cases of a tumour in the quadrigeminal area have been described, 4 of which could be verified by autopsy. In 2 cases with a metastasis in the tegmentum of the mesencephalon, a Parinaud syndrome was present. In 2 other cases, however, with extensive destruction of the quadrigeminal plate and of the posterior commissure this syndrome was not present. In the 5th case, with a big vascular tumour of the pineal area, disturbances of eye movements and pupils were also lacking. From these observations we may conclude that (1) destruction of the quadrigeminal plate has no influence upon vertical eye movements. (2) destruction of the posterior commissure, in combination with the quadrigeminal plate, is not always followed by disturbances of vertical eye movements. In man it is still not clear which structures are responsible for the performance of vertical eye movements.

  6. [Kartagener syndrome].

    PubMed

    Naves, Kattia Cristina; Santos, João Paulo Vieira dos; Santana, José Henrique; Lopes, Gesner Pereira

    2005-01-01

    A white, 48-year-old woman, natural from Uberaba-MG, presented herself to hospital. She had a picture of rest dyspnea, fever, productive cough, greenish catarrh and ventilatory-dependent thoracic pain, for 3 days. During investigation, through radiogram and thoracic tomography, it was visualized the presence of dextrocardia and consolidation in low right lobe by bronchopneumonic process. It was opted for hospitalization and antibiotic therapy. Investigation was carried on with tomography of mastoids and paranasal cavities which showed bilateral chronic otomastoiditis and images of chronic sinusopathy allowing the diagnosis of a case of Kartagener Syndrome. Our purpose in this case report is to include new informations for who search about this syndrome.

  7. Kartagener syndrome.

    PubMed

    Skeik, Nedaa; Jabr, Fadi I

    2011-01-12

    Kartagener syndrome is a rare, ciliopathic, autosomal recessive genetic disorder that causes a defect in the action of the cilia lining the respiratory tract and fallopian tube. Patients usually present with chronic recurrent rhinosinusitis, otitis media, pneumonia, and bronchiectasis caused by pseudomonal infection. Situs inversus can be seen in about 50% of cases. Diagnosis can be made by tests to prove impaired cilia function, biopsy, and genetic studies. Treatment is supportive. In severe cases, the prognosis can be fatal if bilateral lung transplantation is delayed. We present a case of a 66-year-old woman with chronic recurrent upper respiratory infections, pseudomonal pneumonia, and chronic bronchiectasis who presented with acute respiratory failure. She was diagnosed with Kartagener syndrome based on her clinical presentation and genetic studies. She expired on ventilator with refractory respiratory and multiorgan failure.

  8. Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Elizabeth A

    2009-12-01

    To provide an overview of Marfan syndrome (MFS), including diagnostic criteria, genetic factors involved, emerging theories for treatment, a case study, and an overview of genetic counseling for individuals and families of those with MFS. Selected research, review, and clinical articles. MFS is a connective tissue disorder with distinct physical characteristics. Recent advances in the field of genetics have traced this disease process to certain gene mutations. Affecting the optical, skeletal and cardiovascular systems, MFS can cause significant morbidity and mortality if left untreated. Close surveillance and early treatment are necessary to ensure a normal life span. It is important for the advanced practice nurse (APN) to be aware of the complications in those with MFS. Attentive surveillance can decrease mortality and morbidity associated with this syndrome. A multidisciplinary approach, utilizing the expertize of the APN, is necessary for comprehensive care.

  9. [Fryns syndrome].

    PubMed

    Heljić, Suada; Terzić, Sabina; Dzinović, Amra; Mackić, Mirela

    2006-01-01

    Fryns syndrome is an extremely rare developmental disorder associated with deletion of long arm of chromosome 16. Characteristics of the Fyns syndrome are: craniofacial dysmorfism, diaphragmatic defects with lung hypoplasia, distal digital hypoplasia, brain and urogenital abnormalities and other developmental disturbances. After the first description in two stillborn sisters by Fryns (1971), new reports appeared with descriptions included disorders which have not described previously. We described a case of female live born with deletion of long arm of chromosome 16. Our patient had a typical craniofacial dysmorfism, brain abnormalities (Dandy Walker malformation), cardiac defects (artial septal defect and persistent ductus arteriosus), renal hypoplasia, gastrointestinal problems, hypotonia and feeding difficulties. Our patient had no diaphragmatic hernia and he survived neonatal period with severe neurological impairment.

  10. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Ricard

    2017-03-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is defined by the development of venous and/or arterial thromboses, often multiple, and pregnancy morbidity (mainly, recurrent fetal losses), in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Some estimates indicate that the incidence of the APS is around 5 new cases per 100,000 persons per year and the prevalence around 40-50 cases per 100,000 persons. The aPL are positive in approximately 13% of patients with stroke, 11% with myocardial infarction, 9.5% of patients with deep vein thrombosis and 6% of patients with pregnancy morbidity. Currently, there is consensus in treating APS patients with thrombosis with long-term oral anticoagulation and to prevent obstetric manifestations with the use of aspirin and heparin. This review summarizes the main knowledge on the clinical and therapeutic aspects of this syndrome. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Smith, W A

    1998-12-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a more common a condition than previously estimated. The most recent estimates are that 3 to 6 million patients have been diagnosed with FMS. The ACR criteria, established in 1990, provide the primary care provider with definitive subjective and objective findings that have shown to be 88% accurate in their ability to diagnose patients with the syndrome. There is no cure for FMS. It is a chronic condition, but patients quality of life can be improved when fatigue and pain are reduced. The institution of a plan that is developed collaboratively by the patient and the provider is the essence of successful symptom management. The hallmarks of the management plan include: improving the quality of sleep through the judicious use of medications that boost the body's level of serotonin (therefore reducing fatigue), and reducing pain through complimentary modalities such as exercise, physical therapy, relaxation techniques, massage, and biofeedback.

  12. Fluency Disorders in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Borsel, John; Tetnowski, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of various genetic syndromes have included "stuttering" as a primary symptom associated with that syndrome. Specifically, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Tourette syndrome, Neurofibromatosis type I, and Turner syndrome all list "stuttering" as a characteristic of that syndrome. An extensive review of…

  13. Fluency Disorders in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Borsel, John; Tetnowski, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of various genetic syndromes have included "stuttering" as a primary symptom associated with that syndrome. Specifically, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Tourette syndrome, Neurofibromatosis type I, and Turner syndrome all list "stuttering" as a characteristic of that syndrome. An extensive review of…

  14. [Fibromyalgia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Naranjo Hernández, A; Rodríguez Lozano, C; Ojeda Bruno, S

    1992-02-01

    The Fibromialgia Syndrome (FS) is a common clinical entity which may produce symtoms and signs related to multiple fields of Medicine. Typical clinical characteristics of FS include extensive pain, presence of sensitive points during exploration, morning stiffness, asthenia and non-refresing sleep. Frequently, associated rheumatologic diseases are observed, as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthrosis and vertebral disorders. In FS, complementary tests are usually normal. The most widely accepted hypothesis suggests that this is a disorder affecting modulation of pain sensitivity.

  15. Gerstmann's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sukumar, S; Ferguson, G C

    1996-05-01

    Although Gerstmann's syndrome has been well documented since it was characterised in the latter half of last century, there has not been much literature on it in the last few years. We present a classical case in a patient who was admitted into hospital for an unrelated problem. We conclude that clinical examination still has a valuable role in neurology, despite the availability of excellent imaging techniques.

  16. Brachycephalic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Gilles; Heidenreich, Dorothee

    2016-07-01

    Animals presenting with brachycephalic syndrome suffer from multilevel obstruction of the airways as well as secondary structural collapse. Stenotic nares, aberrant turbinates, nasopharyngeal collapse, soft palate elongation and hyperplasia, laryngeal collapse, and left bronchus collapse are being described as the most common associated anomalies. Rhinoplasty and palatoplasty as well as newer surgical techniques and postoperative care strategies have resulted in significant improvement of the prognosis even in middle-aged dogs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Crush syndrome].

    PubMed

    Scapellato, S; Maria, S; Castorina, G; Sciuto, G

    2007-08-01

    Crush injuries and crush syndrome are common after natural (e.g. earthquake, land-slide, tornadoes, tsunami) or man-made catastrophes (e.g. wars, terrorist attacks), in fact the history of this disease is well reported both in earthquake rescue reviews and in military literature. However, there are instances due to conventional causes, such as building collapses, road traffic accident, accident at work or altered level of consciousness after stroke or drug overdose. These situations of ''big or small'' catastrophes can occur at any time and anywhere, for this reason every clinician should be prepared to address issues of crush syndrome quickly and aggressively. The treatment has to manage and to predict clinical conditions before they present themselves. In particular, acute renal failure is one of the few life-threatening complications that can be reversed. This article reviews the various evidences and summarizes the treatment strategies available. Fundamental targets in crush syndrome management are early aggressive hydration, urine alkalinization and, when possible, forced diuresis. Since electrolyte imbalance may be fatal due to arrhythmias secondary to hyperkalemia (especially associated with hypocalcemia), it's necessary to correct these abnormalities using insulin-glucose solution and/or potassium binders, and if nevertheless serum potassium levels remain high this serious disease will necessitate dialysis, which is often a vital procedure.

  18. [Sanfilippo Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Osipova, L A; Kuzenkova, L M; Namazova-Baranova, L S; Gevorkyan, A K; Podkletnova, T V; Vashakmadze, N D

    2015-01-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis type III) is a lysosomal disorder caused by a defect in the catabolism of heparan sulfate. Mucopolysaccharidosis type III is the most common type of all mucopolysaccharidoses. The pathogenic basis of the disease consists of the storage of undegraded substrate in the central nervous system. Progressive cognitive decline resulting in dementia and behavioural abnormalities are the main clinical characteristics of Sanfilippo syndrome. Mucopolysaccharidosis type III may be misdiagnosed as otherforms of developmental delay, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autistic spectrum disorders because of lack of somatic symptoms, presence of mild and atypical forms of the disease. Patients with Sanfilippo syndrome may have comparatively low urinary glycosaminoglycans levels resulting in false negative urinary assay. Definitive diagnosis is made by enzyme assay on leucocytes and cultured fibroblasts. There is currently no effective treatment of mucopolysaccharidosis type III, though ongoing researches of gene, substrate reduction and intrathecal enzyme replacement therapies expect getting curative method to alter devasting damage of central nervous system in near future.

  19. Gitelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cotovio, Patricia; Silva, Cristina; Oliveira, Nuno; Costa, Fátima

    2013-04-11

    Hypokalaemia is a common clinical disorder, the cause of which can usually be determined by the patient's clinical history. Gitelman syndrome is an inherited tubulopathy that must be considered in some settings of hypokalaemia. We present the case of a 60-year-old male patient referred to our nephrology department for persistent hypokalaemia. Clinical history was positive for symptoms of orthostatic hypotension and polyuria. There was no history of drugs consumption other than potassium supplements. Complementary evaluation revealed hypokalaemia (2.15 mmol/l), hypomagnesaemia (0.29 mmol/l), metabolic alkalosis (pH 7.535, bicarbonate 34.1 mmol/l), hypereninaemia (281.7 U/ml), increased chloride (160 mmol/l) and sodium (126 mmol/l) urinary excretion and reduced urinary calcium excretion (0.73 mmol/l). Renal function, remainder serum and urinary ionogram, and renal ultrasound were normal. A diagnosis of Gitelman syndrome was established. We reinforced oral supplementation with potassium chloride and magnesium sulfate. Serum potassium stabilised around 3 mmol/l. The aim of our article is to remind Gitelman syndrome in the differential diagnosis of persistent hypokalaemia.

  20. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Various types of PNS, singly or in multiples, may be associated with either benign or malignant tumors and may involve almost every organ system, directly or indirectly. These disorders can precede the discovery of the tumor by weeks, months, or even years, and many are good diagnostic and prognostic indicators. The true incidence of PNS in animal cancer patients is unknown, although approximately 75% of all human cancer patients, at some time during the tumor-bearing part of their lives, suffer from one or more of these disorders. Recognition of PNS is valuable because the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor, because they may allow assessment of premalignant states, because they may aid in the search for metastases, because they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy, and because they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformations and oncogene expression. Recognition of these syndromes is relevant to the diagnosis and treatment of many problems in veterinary cancer medicine. 22 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. Acrodysostosis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Silve, C; Le-Stunff, C; Motte, E; Gunes, Y; Linglart, A; Clauser, E

    2012-01-01

    Acrodysostosis (ADO) refers to a heterogeneous group of rare skeletal dysplasia that share characteristic features including severe brachydactyly, facial dysostosis and nasal hypoplasia. The literature describing acrodysostosis cases has been confusing because some reported patients may have had other phenotypically related diseases presenting with Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy (AHO) such as pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a (PHP1a) or pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP). A question has been whether patients display or not abnormal mineral metabolism associated with resistance to PTH and/or resistance to other hormones that bind G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) linked to Gsα, as observed in PHP1a. The recent identification in patients affected with acrodysostosis of defects in two genes, PRKAR1A and PDE4D, both important players in the GPCR–Gsα–cAMP–PKA signaling, has helped clarify some issues regarding the heterogeneity of acrodysostosis, in particular the presence of hormonal resistance. Two different genetic and phenotypic syndromes are now identified, both with a similar bone dysplasia: ADOHR, due to PRKAR1A defects, and ADOP4 (our denomination), due to PDE4D defects. The existence of GPCR-hormone resistance is typical of the ADOHR syndrome. We review here the PRKAR1A and PDE4D gene defects and phenotypes identified in acrodysostosis syndromes, and discuss them in view of phenotypically related diseases caused by defects in the same signaling pathway. PMID:24363928

  2. Acrodysostosis syndromes.

    PubMed

    Silve, C; Le-Stunff, C; Motte, E; Gunes, Y; Linglart, A; Clauser, E

    2012-11-21

    Acrodysostosis (ADO) refers to a heterogeneous group of rare skeletal dysplasia that share characteristic features including severe brachydactyly, facial dysostosis and nasal hypoplasia. The literature describing acrodysostosis cases has been confusing because some reported patients may have had other phenotypically related diseases presenting with Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy (AHO) such as pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a (PHP1a) or pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP). A question has been whether patients display or not abnormal mineral metabolism associated with resistance to PTH and/or resistance to other hormones that bind G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) linked to Gsα, as observed in PHP1a. The recent identification in patients affected with acrodysostosis of defects in two genes, PRKAR1A and PDE4D, both important players in the GPCR-Gsα-cAMP-PKA signaling, has helped clarify some issues regarding the heterogeneity of acrodysostosis, in particular the presence of hormonal resistance. Two different genetic and phenotypic syndromes are now identified, both with a similar bone dysplasia: ADOHR, due to PRKAR1A defects, and ADOP4 (our denomination), due to PDE4D defects. The existence of GPCR-hormone resistance is typical of the ADOHR syndrome. We review here the PRKAR1A and PDE4D gene defects and phenotypes identified in acrodysostosis syndromes, and discuss them in view of phenotypically related diseases caused by defects in the same signaling pathway.

  3. Hepatorenal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lata, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is defined as a functional renal failure in patients with liver disease with portal hypertension and it constitutes the climax of systemic circulatory changes associated with portal hypertension. This term refers to a precisely specified syndrome featuring in particular morphologically intact kidneys, where regulatory mechanisms have minimised glomerular filtration and maximised tubular resorption and urine concentration, which ultimately results in uraemia. The syndrome occurs almost exclusively in patients with ascites. Type 1 HRS develops as a consequence of a severe reduction of effective circulating volume due to both an extreme splanchnic arterial vasodilatation and a reduction of cardiac output. Type 2 HRS is characterised by a stable or slowly progressive renal failure so that its main clinical consequence is not acute renal failure, but refractory ascites, and its impact on prognosis is less negative. Liver transplantation is the most appropriate therapeutic method, nevertheless, only a few patients can receive it. The most suitable “bridge treatments” or treatment for patients ineligible for a liver transplant include terlipressin plus albumin. Terlipressin is at an initial dose of 0.5-1 mg every 4 h by intravenous bolus to 3 mg every 4 h in cases when there is no response. Renal function recovery can be achieved in less than 50% of patients and a considerable decrease in renal function may reoccur even in patients who have been responding to therapy over the short term. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt plays only a marginal role in the treatment of HRS. PMID:23049205

  4. Sheehan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Züleyha; Laway, Bashir A; Dokmetas, Hatice S; Atmaca, Hulusi; Kelestimur, Fahrettin

    2016-12-22

    Sheehan syndrome or postpartum hypopituitarism is a condition characterized by hypopituitarism due to necrosis of the pituitary gland. The initial insult is caused by massive postpartum haemorrhage (PPH), leading to impaired blood supply to the pituitary gland, which has become enlarged during pregnancy. Small sella turcica size, vasospasms (caused by PPH) and/or thrombosis (associated with pregnancy or coagulation disorders) are predisposing factors; autoimmunity might be involved in the progressive worsening of pituitary functions. Symptoms are caused by a decrease or absence of one or more of the pituitary hormones, and vary, among others, from failure to lactate and nonspecific symptoms (such as fatigue) to severe adrenal crisis. In accordance with the location of hormone-secreting cells relative to the vasculature, the secretion of growth hormone and prolactin is most commonly affected, followed by follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone; severe necrosis of the pituitary gland also affects the secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone and adrenocorticotropic hormone. Symptoms usually become evident years after delivery, but can, in rare cases, develop acutely. The incidence of Sheehan syndrome depends, to a large extent, on the occurrence and management of PPH. Sheehan syndrome is an important cause of hypopituitarism in developing countries, but has become rare in developed countries. Diagnosis is based on clinical manifestations combined with a history of severe PPH; hormone levels and/or stimulation tests can confirm clinical suspicion. Hormone replacement therapy is the only available management option so far.

  5. Alport Syndrome Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Groups Hear From the Experts Follow us on Facebook! Alport Syndrome Foundation of USA 3 days ago ... by Alport Syndrome Foundation on Flickr! View on Facebook · Share View on Facebook The Alport Syndrome Foundation ...

  6. Reye syndrome - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - Reye syndrome ... The following organizations are good resources for information on Reye Syndrome : National Reye's Syndrome Foundation, Inc. -- www.reyessyndrome.org National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke -- www. ...

  7. What is Down Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Down Syndrome: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What is Down syndrome? Down syndrome describes a set of cognitive and ...

  8. What Causes Down Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What causes Down syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... Down Syndrome Registry​ . Chromosomal Changes That Can Cause Down Syndrome Research shows that three types of chromosomal changes ...

  9. How Are Myelodysplastic Syndromes Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Syndromes Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Are Myelodysplastic Syndromes Scored? Doctors often group cancers into different stages ... Ask Your Doctor About Myelodysplastic Syndromes? More In Myelodysplastic Syndromes About Myelodysplastic Syndromes Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  10. Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Friderichsen syndrome; Fulminant meningococcal sepsis - Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome; Hemorrhagic adrenalitis ... bacteria growing (multiplying) inside the body. Symptoms include: Fever and chills Joint and muscle pain Headache Vomiting ...

  11. [Metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Takata, Hiroshi; Fujimoto, Shimpei

    2013-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome (Mets) is a combination of disorders including abdominal obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia and hypertension, which increases risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes when occurring together. In Japan, diagnosis criteria of Mets consists of an increased waist circumference and 2 or more of CVD risk factors. Annual health checkups and health guidance using Mets criteria were established in 2008 for the prevention of life-style related diseases in Japan. In this issue, history and diagnostic criteria of Mets and concerns for Mets concept were described.

  12. Kartagener syndrome.

    PubMed

    Casanova, M S; Tuji, F M; Yoo, H J; Haiter-Neto, F

    2006-09-01

    Kartagener syndrome (KS), an autosomal recessively inherited disease, is characterized by the triad of situs inversus, bronchiectasis and sinusitis. This disorder affects the activity of proteins important to the movement of cilia, especially in the respiratory tract and the spermatozoa, developing a series of systemic alterations, which can be diagnosed through radiographic examination. The aim of this paper is to describe a clinical case of this unusual pathology, including a brief literature review, emphasising the radiographic aspects of this pathology and stressing the importance of early diagnosis, which could be determined by an oral radiologist.

  13. Marfan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sivasankari, T; Mathew, Philips; Austin, Ravi David; Devi, Sakthi

    2017-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is the autosomal dominant-inherited multisystem connective-tissue disorder, with a reported incidence of 1 in 10,000 individuals and equal distribution in both genders. The main clinical manifestation of this disorder consists of an exaggerated length of the upper and lower limbs, hyperlaxity, scoliosis, alterations in the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems, and atypical bone overgrowth. Orofacial manifestations such as high-arched palate, hypodontia, long narrow teeth, bifid uvula, mandibular prognathism, and temporomandibular disorders are also common. Early diagnosis of MFS is essential to prevent the cardiovascular complications and treatment of orofacial manifestations, thus to increase the quality of life of the patient. PMID:28584496

  14. Jacobsen syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mattina, Teresa; Perrotta, Concetta Simona; Grossfeld, Paul

    2009-03-07

    Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears). Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from approximately 7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia) and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be very severe

  15. Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Murray, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (Gilles de la Tourette disease) is a disorder of involuntary muscular tics, vocalizations and compulsive behavior. The tics and muscle movements vary in form and course; the complex repetitive patterns are eventually replaced by other patterns. The vocalization may be in the form of sounds, words or profanities and sometimes echolalia, echopraxia and palilalia. The onset may be from age two to 15 but is usually between ages eight and 12. Recent studies suggest that there is a hypersensitivity of dopamine receptors. Most patients respond well to haloperidol, but other drugs that may be of value include clonidine, pimozide, fluphenazine and trifluoroperazine. PMID:21286050

  16. [SAPHO syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gharsallah, I; Souissi, A; Dhahri, R; Boussetta, N; Sayeh, S; Métoui, L; Ajili, F; Louzir, B; Othmani, S

    2014-09-01

    SAPHO (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis) syndrome is a rare entity characterized by the association of heterogeneous osteoarticular and cutaneous manifestations that have for common denominator an aseptic inflammatory process. The etiopathogeny of this disease is still a matter of debate. Although it has been related to the spondylarthritis family, an infectious origin is suggested. Diagnosis is based on the presence of at least one of the three diagnostic criteria proposed by Kahn. The treatment includes NSAIDs, antibiotics, corticosteroids, methotrexate and more recently the bisphosphonates and the TNFα inhibitors.

  17. Postmenopausal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Pronob K.; Agarwal, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Menopause is one of the most significant events in a woman's life and brings in a number of physiological changes that affect the life of a woman permanently. There have been a lot of speculations about the symptoms that appear before, during and after the onset of menopause. These symptoms constitute the postmenopausal syndrome; they are impairing to a great extent to the woman and management of these symptoms has become an important field of research lately. This chapter attempts to understand these symptoms, the underlying pathophysiology and the management options available. PMID:26330639

  18. Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Odenike, Olatoyosi; Anastasi, John; Le Beau, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis The myelodysplastic syndromes are a diverse group of clonal stem cell disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, peripheral cytopenias, and an increased propensity to evolve to acute myeloid leukemia. The molecular pathogenesis of these disorders is poorly understood, but recurring chromosomal abnormalities occur in ~50% of cases, and are the focus of much investigation. The availability of newer molecular techniques has allowed the identification of additional genetic aberrations, including mutations and epigenetic changes of prognostic and potential therapeutic importance. This review will focus on the key role of cytogenetic analysis in MDS in the context of the diagnosis, prognosis, and pathogenesis of these disorders. PMID:22118747

  19. Delayed Induction of Human NTE (PNPLA6) Rescues Neurodegeneration and Mobility Defects of Drosophila swiss cheese (sws) Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Sujkowski, Alyson; Rainier, Shirley; Fink, John K.; Wessells, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Human PNPLA6 gene encodes Neuropathy Target Esterase protein (NTE). PNPLA6 gene mutations cause hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG39 HSP), Gordon-Holmes syndrome, Boucher-Neuhäuser syndromes, Laurence-Moon syndrome, and Oliver-McFarlane syndrome. Mutations in the Drosophila NTE homolog swiss cheese (sws) cause early-onset, progressive behavioral defects and neurodegeneration characterized by vacuole formation. We investigated sws5 flies and show for the first time that this allele causes progressive vacuolar formation in the brain and progressive deterioration of negative geotaxis speed and endurance. We demonstrate that inducible, neuron-specific expression of full-length human wildtype NTE reduces vacuole formation and substantially rescues mobility. Indeed, neuron-specific expression of wildtype human NTE is capable of rescuing mobility defects after 10 days of adult life at 29°C, when significant degeneration has already occurred, and significantly extends longevity of mutants at 25°C. These results raise the exciting possibility that late induction of NTE function may reduce or ameliorate neurodegeneration in humans even after symptoms begin. In addition, these results highlight the utility of negative geotaxis endurance as a new assay for longitudinal tracking of degenerative phenotypes in Drosophila. PMID:26671664

  20. Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Smyth, C M; Bremner, W J

    1998-06-22

    Klinefelter syndrome is the most common sex chromosome disorder. Affected males carry an additional X chromosome, which results in male hypogonadism, androgen deficiency, and impaired spermatogenesis. Some patients may exhibit all of the classic signs of this disorder, including gynecomastia, small testes, sparse body hair, tallness, and infertility, whereas others, because of the wide variability in clinical expression, lack many of these features. Treatment consists of testosterone replacement therapy to correct the androgen deficiency and to provide patients with appropriate virilization. This therapy also has positive effects on mood and self-esteem and has been shown to protect against osteoporosis, although it will not reverse infertility. Although the diagnosis of Klinefelter syndrome is now made definitively using chromosomal karyotyping, revealing in most instances a 47,XXY genotype, the diagnosis also can be made using a careful history and results of a physical examination, with the hallmark being small, firm testes. As it affects 1 in 500 male patients and presents with a variety of clinical features, primary care physicians should be familiar with this condition.

  1. Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sherling, Dawn Harris; Perumareddi, Parvathi; Hennekens, Charles H

    2017-07-01

    The United States is experiencing its greatest life expectancy ever. Nonetheless, the general health of the US population is far from at an all-time high. An important contributor to the pandemic of cardiovascular disease is that overweight and obesity are also the major determinants of metabolic syndrome, an all too common and all too serious clinical and public health challenge. Clinicians have traditionally evaluated each of the major risk factors contributing to metabolic syndrome on an individual basis. There is evidence, however, that the risk factors are more than additive. The overlap of these factors in each disease state, resulting in increased atherogenic risks, is worth examining as a broader entity rather than separately. While therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLCs) should be strongly recommended, clinicians should not let the perfect be the enemy of the possible. Evidence-based doses of statins, aspirin and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, or angiotensin II receptor blockers should be prescribed as adjuncts, not alternatives, to TLCs. In fact, there is cogent evidence that the benefits of these pharmacologic therapies may also be at least additive.

  2. KBG syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brancati, Francesco; Sarkozy, Anna; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2006-12-12

    KBG syndrome is a rare condition characterised by a typical facial dysmorphism, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, skeletal (mainly costovertebral) anomalies and developmental delay. To date, KBG syndrome has been reported in 45 patients. Clinical features observed in more than half of patients that may support the diagnosis are short stature, electroencephalogram (EEG) anomalies (with or without seizures) and abnormal hair implantation. Cutaneous syndactyly, webbed short neck, cryptorchidism, hearing loss, palatal defects, strabismus and congenital heart defects are less common findings. Autosomal dominant transmission has been observed in some families, and it is predominantly the mother, often showing a milder clinical picture, that transmits the disease. The diagnosis is currently based solely on clinical findings as the aetiology is unknown. The final diagnosis is generally achieved after the eruption of upper permanent central incisors at 7-8 years of age when the management of possible congenital anomalies should have been already planned. A full developmental assessment should be done at diagnosis and, if delays are noted, an infant stimulation program should be initiated. Subsequent management and follow-up should include an EEG, complete orthodontic evaluation, skeletal investigation with particular regard to spine curvatures and limb asymmetry, hearing testing and ophthalmologic assessment.

  3. KBG syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brancati, Francesco; Sarkozy, Anna; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2006-01-01

    KBG syndrome is a rare condition characterised by a typical facial dysmorphism, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, skeletal (mainly costovertebral) anomalies and developmental delay. To date, KBG syndrome has been reported in 45 patients. Clinical features observed in more than half of patients that may support the diagnosis are short stature, electroencephalogram (EEG) anomalies (with or without seizures) and abnormal hair implantation. Cutaneous syndactyly, webbed short neck, cryptorchidism, hearing loss, palatal defects, strabismus and congenital heart defects are less common findings. Autosomal dominant transmission has been observed in some families, and it is predominantly the mother, often showing a milder clinical picture, that transmits the disease. The diagnosis is currently based solely on clinical findings as the aetiology is unknown. The final diagnosis is generally achieved after the eruption of upper permanent central incisors at 7–8 years of age when the management of possible congenital anomalies should have been already planned. A full developmental assessment should be done at diagnosis and, if delays are noted, an infant stimulation program should be initiated. Subsequent management and follow-up should include an EEG, complete orthodontic evaluation, skeletal investigation with particular regard to spine curvatures and limb asymmetry, hearing testing and ophthalmologic assessment. PMID:17163996

  4. Meckel syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Salonen, R; Paavola, P

    1998-01-01

    Meckel syndrome (MKS) is a lethal syndrome with a central nervous system malformation, usually occipital meningoencephalocele, bilaterally large multicystic kidneys with fibrotic changes of the liver, and polydactyly in most cases. Additional anomalies are frequent. A common characteristic of the parenchymal changes of many organs is a proliferation of the stromal connective tissue and increase and dilatation of the associated epithelial ducts. Autosomal recessive inheritance is well confirmed and the gene locus has been mapped to chromosome 17q21-24 by genome wide linkage study. The locus was later refined to within a less than 1 cM region (17q22), in which most of the Finnish MKS patients share a common chromosomal haplotype suggesting one major and relatively old mutation. However, in most of the non-Finnish MKS families studied, this linkage could not be confirmed. The linkage studies provide evidence that more than one locus is involved in bringing about the combination of CNS malformations, cystic kidneys, and polydactyly, maybe even in typical cases of MKS. Prenatal diagnosis of MKS by vaginal ultrasound scan is possible from 11-12 weeks of pregnancy, especially in families where there is a known risk. In those families where linkage to 17q22 is established, prenatal diagnosis by DNA analysis is possible. Images PMID:9643292

  5. Sheehan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kilicli, Fatih; Dokmetas, Hatice Sebila; Acibucu, Fettah

    2013-04-01

    Sheehan's syndrome (SS) is characterized by various degrees of hypopituitarism, and develops as a result of ischemic pituitary necrosis due to severe postpartum hemorrhage. Increased pituitary volume, small sella size, disseminated intravascular coagulation and autoimmunity are the proposed factors in the pathogenesis of SS. Hormonal insufficiencies, ranging from single pituitary hormone insufficiency to total hypopituitarism, are observed in patients. The first most important issue in the diagnosis is being aware of the syndrome. Lack of lactation and failure of menstrual resumption after delivery that complicated with severe hemorrhage are the most important clues in diagnosing SS. The most frequent endocrine disorders are the deficiencies of growth hormone and prolactin. In patients with typical obstetric history, prolactin response to TRH seems to be the most sensitive screening test in diagnosing SS. Other than typical pituitary deficiency, symptoms such as anemia, pancytopenia, osteoporosis, impairment in cognitive functions and impairment in the quality of life are also present in these patients. Treatment of SS is based on the appropriate replacement of deficient hormones. Growth hormone replacement has been found to have positive effects; however, risk to benefit ratio, side effects and cost of the treatment should be taken into account.

  6. Allergic acute coronary syndrome (Kounis syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Lovely; Masrur, Shihab; Parker, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    Anaphylaxis rarely manifests as a vasospastic acute coronary syndrome with or without the presence of underlying coronary artery disease. The variability in the underlying pathogenesis produces a wide clinical spectrum of this syndrome. We present three cases of anaphylactic acute coronary syndrome that display different clinical variants of this phenomenon. The main pathophysiological mechanism of the allergic anginal syndromes is the inflammatory mediators released during a hypersensitivity reaction triggered by food, insect bites, or drugs. It is important to appropriately recognize and treat Kounis syndrome in patients with exposure to a documented allergen. PMID:26130889

  7. Raynaud's syndrome and carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Waller, D. G.; Dathan, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    We report three cases of Raynaud's syndrome with digital ischaemic ulceration, in association with carpal tunnel syndrome. In all cases, the aetiology of the Raynaud's syndrome was probably unrelated to the nerve compression. However, symptoms were worse on the side of the median nerve lesion in two patients and worse on the side with the most severe nerve dysfunction in the third; symptoms were relieved by carpal tunnel decompression in two patients. We suggest that carpal tunnel syndrome may exacerbate Raynaud's syndrome and should be considered particularly in patients with asymmetrical digital lesions. PMID:3983046

  8. Metabolic Syndrome: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mortada, Rami; Williams, Tracy

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by androgen excess, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. It is the most common endocrinopathy among women of reproductive age, affecting between 6.5% and 8% of women, and is the most common cause of infertility. Insulin resistance is almost always present in women with PCOS, regardless of weight, and they often develop diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The Rotterdam criteria are widely used for diagnosis. These criteria require that patients have at least two of the following conditions: hyperandrogenism, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. The diagnosis of PCOS also requires exclusion of other potential etiologies of hyperandrogenism and ovulatory dysfunction. The approach to PCOS management differs according to the presenting symptoms and treatment goals, particularly the patient's desire for pregnancy. Weight loss through dietary modifications and exercise is recommended for patients with PCOS who are overweight. Oral contraceptives are the first-line treatment for regulating menstrual cycles and reducing manifestations of hyperandrogenism, such as acne and hirsutism. Clomiphene is the first-line drug for management of anovulatory infertility. Metformin is recommended for metabolic abnormalities such as prediabetes, and a statin should be prescribed for cardioprotection if the patient meets standard criteria for statin therapy.

  9. Syndromes with supernumerary teeth.

    PubMed

    Lubinsky, Mark; Kantaputra, Piranit Nik

    2016-10-01

    While most supernumerary teeth are idiopathic, they can be associated with a number of Mendelian syndromes. However, this can also be a coincidental finding, since supernumerary teeth occur in 6% or more of the normal population. To better define this relationship, we analyzed the evidence for specific associations. We excluded conditions with a single affected patient reported, supernumerary teeth adjacent to clefts or other forms of alveolar disruption (as secondary rather than primary findings), and natal teeth, which can involve premature eruption of a normal tooth. Since, the cause of supernumerary teeth shows considerable heterogeneity, certain findings are less likely to be coincidental, such as five or more supernumerary teeth in a single patient, or locations outside of the premaxilla. We found only eight genetic syndromes with strong evidence for an association: cleidocranial dysplasia; familial adenomatous polyposis; trichorhinophalangeal syndrome, type I; Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome; Nance-Horan syndrome; Opitz BBB/G syndrome; oculofaciocardiodental syndrome; and autosomal dominant Robinow syndrome. There is also suggestive evidence of an association with two uncommon disorders, Kreiborg-Pakistani syndrome (craniosynostosis and dental anomalies), and insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus with acanthosisnigricans. An association of a Mendelian disorder with a low frequency manifestation of supernumerary teeth is difficult to exclude without large numbers, but several commonly cited syndromes lacked evidence for clear association, including Hallermann-Streiff syndrome, Fabry disease, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Apert and Crouzon syndromes, Zimmermann-Laband syndrome, and Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Nodding Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sejvar, James J.; Riek, Lul; Vandemaele, Katelijn A.H.; Lamunu, Margaret; Kuesel, Annette C.; Schmutzhard, Erich; Matuja, William; Bunga, Sudhir; Foltz, Jennifer; Nutman, Thomas B.; Winkler, Andrea S.; Mbonye, Anthony K.

    2013-01-01

    An epidemic illness characterized by head nodding associated with onchocerciasis has been described in eastern Africa since the early 1960s; we summarize published reports and recent studies. Onset of nodding occurs in previously healthy 5–15-year-old children and is often triggered by eating or cold temperatures and accompanied by cognitive impairment. Its incidence has increased in Uganda and South Sudan over the past 10 years. Four case–control studies identified modest and inconsistent associations. There were nonspecific lesions seen by magnetic resonance imaging, no cerebrospinal fluid inflammation, and markedly abnormal electroencephalography results. Nodding episodes are atonic seizures. Testing has failed to demonstrate associations with trypanosomiasis, cysticercosis, loiasis, lymphatic filariasis, cerebral malaria, measles, prion disease, or novel pathogens; or deficiencies of folate, cobalamin, pyridoxine, retinol, or zinc; or toxicity from mercury, copper, or homocysteine. There is a consistent enigmatic association with onchocerciasis detected by skin snip or serologic analysis. Nodding syndrome is an unexplained epidemic epilepsy. PMID:23965548

  11. Pisa Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Michel, Sáenz Farret; Arias Carrión, Oscar; Correa, Thalia Estefania Sánchez; Alejandro, Pellene Luis; Micheli, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Lateral trunk flexion is often seen in patients with Parkinson disease, sometimes coming on as a subacute phenomenon associated with medication adjustments, and in others with gradual onset that seems related to a neurodegenerative process related to the evolution of the disease.Either acute or subacute presentations seem to be pure abnormalities in the coronal plane and are usually reversible. However, a chronic form occurs often in a combined fashion with anteroposterior flexion (camptocormia), improves only partially, remains stable, or even worsens over time.The acute/subacute phenotype is the condition originally named as Pisa syndrome (PS).The pathophysiology of PS remains poorly understood, and a cholinergic-dopaminergic imbalance has been suggested as being involved in the cause of this disorder. The role of other neurotransmitters and how they become dysfunctional in PS remains to be elucidated.Specific treatments, other than discontinuing the medications responsible for the disorder, whenever possible, are undeveloped because of the unknown etiology.

  12. Kallmann syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dodé, Catherine; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The Kallmann syndrome (KS) combines hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) with anosmia. This is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease. KAL1, encoding the extracellular glycoprotein anosmin-1, is responsible for the X chromosome-linked recessive form of the disease. Mutations in FGFR1 or FGF8, encoding fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 and fibroblast growth factor-8, respectively, underlie an autosomal dominant form with incomplete penetrance. Finally, mutations in PROKR2 and PROK2, encoding prokineticin receptor-2 and prokineticin-2, have been found in heterozygous, homozygous, and compound heterozygous states. These two genes are likely to be involved both in monogenic recessive and digenic/oligogenic KS transmission modes. Notably, mutations in any of the above-mentioned KS genes have been found in less than 30% of the KS patients, which indicates that other genes involved in the disease remain to be discovered. PMID:18985070

  13. Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, E.E.J.; Pelc, K.; Dan, B.

    2012-01-01

    Rett syndrome is one of the most common causes of complex disability in girls. It is characterized by early neurological regression that severely affects motor, cognitive and communication skills, by autonomic dysfunction and often a seizure disorder. It is a monogenic X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder related to mutation in MECP2, which encodes the methyl-CpG-binding protein MeCP2. There are several mouse models either based on conditional knocking out of the Mecp2 gene or on a truncating mutation. We discuss the clinical aspects with special emphasis on the behavioral phenotype and we review current perspectives in clinical management alongside with perspectives in altering gene expression. PMID:22670134

  14. Fraser Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Adnan Aslam; Siddiqui, Sorath Noorani

    2015-10-01

    Fraser's Syndrome (FS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with a spectrum of malformations. The most consistent features are Cryptophthalmos (CO), syndactyly, genitourinary tract abnormalities, laryngeal and tracheal anomalies, craniofacial dysmorphism, malformations of the ear and nose, orofacial clefting and musculoskeletal defects. FS is genetically heterogeneous; so far mutations in FRAS1, FREM2 and GRIP1 genes have been linked to FS. FS can be diagnosed on clinical examination, pre-natal ultrasound or perinatal autopsy. We present a case of a 3 months old child born to consanguineous healthy parents with bilateral complete CO, unilateral microphthalmia, hypertelorism, syndactyly (hands and feet bilaterally), ambiguous genitalia with cryptorchidism and an umbilical hernia. We also present the criteria for diagnosing FS and the significant features on pre-natal ultrasonography. Around 200 case reports of patients with FS and CO have been published. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of FS in Pakistan.

  15. Olmsted syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ali, M E; Sikdar, A U; Akhtar, N; Islam, Z M

    2007-01-01

    Olmsted syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by symmetrical sharply marginated mutilating keratoderma of palms & soles & hyperkeratotic plaques around the body orifices, onychodystrophy, ainhum & amputation of digital phalanges, flextion deformities of the fingers, localized alopecia, leukokeratosis of the tongue, shortness of stature & laxity of large joints. Inheritance is autosomal dominant, although sporadic cases have been reported. Here we describe two cases of this rare disorder with thickened hyperkeratotic lesion over palm & soles & along with amputation of 3rd , 4th & 5th toes in one case. In one of our case (case no. 2) the immediate younger brother has got the same disease. Both of them were treated with tab. Neotegason 25 mg orally daily for 3 months & there was significant improvement after treatment.

  16. Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Turner, Anne M

    2014-10-01

    Noonan syndrome is a common autosomal dominant condition, readily recognisable in childhood. It is characterised by a pattern of typical facial dysmorphism and malformations including congenital cardiac defects, short stature, abnormal chest shape, broad or webbed neck, and a variable learning disability. Mildly affected adults may not be diagnosed until the birth of a more obviously affected child. The phenotype is highly variable. Important progress in understanding the molecular basis of this and other related conditions was made in 2001 when germline mutations in the PTPN11 gene were found to account for ∼50% of cases. Since then, mutations in additional genes in the rat sarcoma (RAS) pathway have been identified in a proportion of the remainder. Molecular confirmation of diagnosis is now possible for many families and has become increasingly important in guiding management. Increased awareness by paediatricians will lead to earlier diagnosis, and provide patients and their families with accurate genetic counselling, including options when planning pregnancy.

  17. Noonan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    van der Burgt, Ineke

    2007-01-01

    Noonan Syndrome (NS) is characterised by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The main facial features of NS are hypertelorism with down-slanting palpebral fissures, ptosis and low-set posteriorly rotated ears with a thickened helix. The cardiovascular defects most commonly associated with this condition are pulmonary stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Other associated features are webbed neck, chest deformity, mild intellectual deficit, cryptorchidism, poor feeding in infancy, bleeding tendency and lymphatic dysplasias. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In approximately 50% of cases, the disease is caused by missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene on chromosome 12, resulting in a gain of function of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 protein. Recently, mutations in the KRAS gene have been identified in a small proportion of patients with NS. A DNA test for mutation analysis can be carried out on blood, chorionic villi and amniotic fluid samples. NS should be considered in all foetuses with polyhydramnion, pleural effusions, oedema and increased nuchal fluid with a normal karyotype. With special care and counselling, the majority of children with NS will grow up and function normally in the adult world. Management should address feeding problems in early childhood, evaluation of cardiac function and assessment of growth and motor development. Physiotherapy and/or speech therapy should be offered if indicated. A complete eye examination and hearing evaluation should be performed during the first few years of schooling. Preoperative coagulation studies are indicated. Signs and symptoms lessen with age and most adults with NS do not require special medical care. PMID:17222357

  18. Prenatal Tests for Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    PRENATAL TESTS FOR DOWN SYNDROME S HARE W ITH W OMEN PRENATAL TESTS FOR DOWN SYNDROME What Is Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is a common birth defect that includes mental retardation and— often— heart ...

  19. Treatment of Kounis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cevik, Cihan; Nugent, Kenneth; Shome, Goutam P; Kounis, Nicholas G

    2010-09-03

    Kounis syndrome is potentially a life-threatening medical emergency with both a severe allergic reaction and acute coronary syndrome. Most of the information about this syndrome has come from the case reports. The management of these patients may be challenging for clinicians, and unfortunately guidelines have not been established yet. In this article, we review the current guidelines of acute coronary syndromes and anaphylaxis along with the published cases with Kounis syndrome secondary to beta-lactam antibiotics. We have summarized our recommendations for the work-up and treatment of Kounis syndrome from available data. Obviously, larger prospective studies are needed to establish definitive treatment guidelines for these patients.

  20. Cushing syndrome in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Stratakis, Constantine A

    2012-12-01

    Cushing syndrome is characterized by truncal obesity, growth deceleration, skin changes, muscle weakness, and hypertension. Cushing syndrome in childhood usually results from the exogenous administration of glucocorticoids. This article presents the causes and discusses the treatment of endogenous Cushing syndrome. It also discusses the clinical and molecular genetics of inherited forms of this syndrome. Cushing syndrome needs to be diagnosed and treated properly when first recognized; improper treatment can turn this otherwise completely curable disorder into a chronic ailment. Barriers to optimal care of a pediatric patient with Cushing syndrome are discussed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. "Fibrositis" syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rice, J R

    1986-03-01

    There appears to be as yet undefined but significant and possibly multifactorial elements of personality, stress, or depression in the manifestations and possibly the pathogenesis of FS. If these factors, perhaps amplified by the neurophysiologic effects of disturbed sleep, produce a neurochemical disturbance in CNS function, and if this perturbation includes a reduction or impairment of function involving the pain-modulation pathways, then a simple and perhaps compelling explanation for the experience of pain in FS becomes apparent. Reduced midbrain/brainstem inhibition of ascending nociceptive impulses would clearly explain the finding of tender points in normal-appearing areas of the body, as well as the lack of segmental distribution of discomfort in FS. Local anesthetics, injected peripherally into tender points, would be expected, as is the case, to block pain and tenderness in the local area for the duration of action of the agent used. Analgesics with peripheral activity, such as aspirin and NSAIDs, are relatively ineffective in treating FS, and would be predictably so in a disorder involving reduced central pain inhibition as opposed to increased peripheral nociceptive input. It would not be surprising to find that centrally acting agents, particularly those producing enhancement of serotonergic neurons such as amitriptyline, would provide substantial or total pain relief as well as improvement in mood in a significant number of patients. Most importantly, this concept would highlight the real pain experienced by these patients and the obligation of involved physicians to appropriately diagnose and treat this common pain syndrome. Avoiding excessive conjecture, it is then permissible at the present time to conclude that: FS is a characteristic, clinically common pain syndrome in which aspects of the pain itself appear to be of physiologic origin. Although stress or inherent personality traits may play a role in FS, the relative uniformity in symptomatology

  2. Burning Mouth Syndrome and "Burning Mouth Syndrome".

    PubMed

    Rifkind, Jacob Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is distressing to both the patient and practitioner unable to determine the cause of the patient's symptoms. Burning mouth syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion, which is used only after nutritional deficiencies, mucosal disease, fungal infections, hormonal disturbances and contact stomatitis have been ruled out. This article will explore the many causes and treatment of patients who present with a chief complaint of "my mouth burns," including symptomatic treatment for those with burning mouth syndrome.

  3. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is defined by venous or arterial thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity in patients with persistent presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs). Catastrophic APS is the most severe form of APS, which is associated with rapid development of microvascular thrombosis resulting in multiorgan failure in patients with aPLs. Patients with APS and catastrophic APS are recognized to have a high risk of recurrent thrombosis that can occur despite anticoagulant therapy. Although antithrombotic therapy remains the mainstay of treatment, bleeding manifestations can complicate management and contribute to increased morbidity. Patients with persistently elevated aPL levels, particularly those who exhibit positive testing for lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies, and anti-β2GPI antibodies (triple positivity), appear to be at increased risk for thrombosis and pregnancy complications, whereas isolated positivity for aPLs appears to be associated with low risk. Recognizing that patients with APS have different thrombotic risk profiles may assist clinicians in assessing the risks and benefits of anticoagulation. The optimal type, intensity, and duration of anticoagulation in the treatment of APS remain controversial, particularly for arterial thrombosis and recurrent thrombosis. Future studies that delineate thrombotic risk in APS and evaluate current and novel anticoagulants as well as nonanticoagulant therapies are required.

  4. [Pseudoexfoliation syndrome].

    PubMed

    Esmail, F

    1991-05-01

    The Frequency of the Pseudoexfoliation-Syndrom (= PES) was investigated about two months in a prospective study of 1069 patients in the university eye hospital of Zurich. 7.35% of these patients had a PES with or without glaucoma. Among the clinic patients there were 9.9% and among the policlinic patients 6.26%. All our patients were elder than 60 years old, 58.9% between 70-85 years. There were 33.37% men and 66.63% women. 33% of the PES-patients had a tension over 22 mmHg. 42.86% of the patients had the highest tension over 30 mmHg. 33.33% (= 26 patients) had a PES without glaucoma and 66.66% (= 52 patients) a PES with glaucoma. 56.42% of the patients (= 44 patients) had in one eye PES and 43.58% (34 patients) in both eyes. 9.61% (= 5 pat.) had an absolute PES-glaucoma in one eye.

  5. Angelman Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Seth S; Sell, Gabrielle L; Zbinden, Mark A; Bird, Lynne M

    2015-07-01

    In this review we summarize the clinical and genetic aspects of Angelman syndrome (AS), its molecular and cellular underpinnings, and current treatment strategies. AS is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe cognitive disability, motor dysfunction, speech impairment, hyperactivity, and frequent seizures. AS is caused by disruption of the maternally expressed and paternally imprinted UBE3A, which encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Four mechanisms that render the maternally inherited UBE3A nonfunctional are recognized, the most common of which is deletion of the maternal chromosomal region 15q11-q13. Remarkably, duplication of the same chromosomal region is one of the few characterized persistent genetic abnormalities associated with autistic spectrum disorder, occurring in >1-2% of all cases of autism spectrum disorder. While the overall morphology of the brain and connectivity of neural projections appear largely normal in AS mouse models, major functional defects are detected at the level of context-dependent learning, as well as impaired maturation of hippocampal and neocortical circuits. While these findings demonstrate a crucial role for ubiquitin protein ligase E3A in synaptic development, the mechanisms by which deficiency of ubiquitin protein ligase E3A leads to AS pathophysiology in humans remain poorly understood. However, recent efforts have shown promise in restoring functions disrupted in AS mice, renewing hope that an effective treatment strategy can be found.

  6. Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kyllerman, Mårten

    2013-01-01

    Angelman syndrome combines severe mental retardation, epilepsy, ataxia, speech impairment, and unique behavior with happy demeanor, laughing, short attention span, hyperactivity, and sleep disturbance. Occurrence has been calculated at 1:20000 to 1:12000 constituting about 6% of all children with severe mental retardation and epilepsy. The physical "prototype" includes microcephaly with flat neck, fair skin and hair, wide-spaced teeth, and open mouth with tongue protrusion. Epilepsy is characterized by atypical absences, erratic myoclonus, and occasional tonic-clonic seizures. EEG demonstrates high-amplitude 2-3Hz delta activity with spike and slow-wave discharges and sleep-activated generalized epileptiform discharges. Sodium valproate, benzodiazepines, and priacetam are frequently used and effective. Development is generally slow, the majority attaining independent walking in the first 2.5-6 years. Vocabulary is limited to a few single words with superior speech and object apprehension. The condition is due to a lack of expression of the UBE3A gene on chromosome 15q. Maternal deletions of 15q11-13 produce the most pronounced phenotype (65-70% of probands), uniparental disomy and imprinting center mutations (10%), and UBE3A point mutations (11%) produce milder phenotypes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Premenstrual syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yonkers, Kimberly Ann; O’Brien, P M Shaughn; Eriksson, Elias

    2011-01-01

    Most women of reproductive age have some physical discomfort or dysphoria in the weeks before menstruation. Symptoms are often mild, but can be severe enough to substantially affect daily activities. About 5–8% of women thus suffer from severe premenstrual syndrome (PMS); most of these women also meet criteria for premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Mood and behavioural symptoms, including irritability, tension, depressed mood, tearfulness, and mood swings, are the most distressing, but somatic complaints, such as breast tenderness and bloating, can also be problematic. We outline theories for the underlying causes of severe PMS, and describe two main methods of treating it: one targeting the hypothalamus-pituitary-ovary axis, and the other targeting brain serotonergic synapses. Fluctuations in gonadal hormone levels trigger the symptoms, and thus interventions that abolish ovarian cyclicity, including long-acting analogues of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) or oestradiol (administered as patches or implants), effectively reduce the symptoms, as can some oral contraceptives. The effectiveness of serotonin reuptake inhibitors, taken throughout the cycle or during luteal phases only, is also well established. PMID:18395582

  8. Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lisa; Lehman, Erik; Brown, Ashley D.; Ahmad, Syeda; Berlin, Cheston

    2015-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of a 35-year single-center experience with pediatric tics and Tourette syndrome was conducted. 482 charts from 1972 to 2007 were reviewed. Follow-up surveys were mailed to last known address and 83 patients responded (17%). Response rate was affected by long interval from last visit; contact information was often incorrect as it was the address of the patient as a child. Males constituted 84%. Mean tic onset was 6.6 years. At first visit, 83% had multiple motor tics and >50% had comorbidities. 44% required only 1 visit and 90% less than 12 visits. Follow-up showed positive clinical and social outcomes in 73/83 survey responses. Of those indicating a poor outcome, mean educational level was lower and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and learning disabilities were significantly higher. Access to knowledgeable caregivers was a problem for adult patients. A shortage of specialists may in part be addressed by interested general pediatricians. PMID:25200367

  9. Sjogern's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Connolly, M K

    2001-03-01

    Sjogren's syndrome (SS) is a systemic autoimmune exocrinopathy that affects the salivary and lacrimal glands. It typically presents as the "sicca complex" of dry eyes (xerophthalmia) and dry mouth (xerostomia) along with other symptoms such as arthritis. SS is classified as either primary or secondary. In the primary form, dry eyes and dry mouth occur alone. In the secondary form, the dry eyes and dry mouth occur in the context of another rheumatic disease, most commonly rheumatoid arthritis. There is an increasing list of systemic manifestations affecting the lung, kidney, and nervous system in patients with SS. The skin is affected in half of SS patients. Despite this high frequency of cutaneous involvement, patients with SS are not commonly seen in dermatology practices. SS is underrecognized and underdiagnosed because the cutaneous manifestations are nonspecific (eg, xerosis, pruritus) and less severe than the oral, ocular, or musculoskeletal symptoms. Nonetheless, because of its high prevalence, risk of cutaneous vasculitis, and the increased risk of a lymphoproliferative disorder, it is important for dermatologists to be familiar with SS.

  10. Asherman's syndrome.

    PubMed

    March, Charles M

    2011-03-01

    Asherman's syndrome is being diagnosed with increasing frequency. Although it usually occurs following curettage of the pregnant or recently pregnant uterus, any uterine surgery can lead to intrauterine adhesions (IUA). Most women with IUA have amenorrhea or hypomenorrhea, but up to a fourth have painless menses of normal flow and duration. Those who have amenorrhea may also have cyclic pelvic pain caused by outflow obstruction. The accompanying retrograde menstruation may lead to endometriosis. In addition to abnormal menses, infertility and recurrent spontaneous abortion are common complaints. Hysteroscopy is the standard method to both diagnose and treat this condition. Various techniques for adhesiolysis and for prevention of scar reformation have been advocated. The most efficacious appears to be the use of miniature scissors for adhesiolysis and the placement of a balloon stent inside the uterus immediately after surgery. Postoperative estrogen therapy is prescribed to stimulate endometrial regrowth. Follow-up studies to assure resolution of the scarring are mandatory before the patient attempts to conceive as is careful monitoring of pregnancies for cervical incompetence, placenta accreta, and intrauterine growth retardation. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  11. Kawasaki Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, Anne H.; Shulman, Stanford T.

    1998-01-01

    Kawasaki syndrome (KS) is an acute, sometimes fatal vasculitis of young children. KS has replaced acute rheumatic fever as the most common cause of acquired heart disease in children in the United States. The illness is manifested by prolonged fever, conjunctival injection, enanthem, exanthem, erythema and swelling of the hands and feet, and cervical adenopathy. These acute features of illness are self-limiting, but coronary artery abnormalities occur in 20% of untreated patients. The etiology of the illness is unknown, but its clinical and epidemiologic features are most consistent with an infectious cause. Common cardiovascular manifestations of the illness include myocarditis, pericardial effusion, and coronary artery aneurysm formation. Treatment with intravenous gamma globulin (IVGG) and aspirin within the first 10 days of illness reduces the prevalence of coronary artery abnormalities from 20% in those treated with aspirin alone to 4%. Patients who develop coronary artery aneurysms, particularly those who develop giant coronary artery aneurysms, may suffer myocardial infarction secondary to thrombosis or stenosis in the abnormal vessel. Additional research to determine the cause of KS is urgently needed to allow for improved diagnosis, more specific therapy, and prevention of the disorder. PMID:9665974

  12. Central Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... cord. This syndrome can be caused by stroke, multiple sclerosis, tumors, epilepsy, brain or spinal cord trauma, or ... cord. This syndrome can be caused by stroke, multiple sclerosis, tumors, epilepsy, brain or spinal cord trauma, or ...

  13. Anisocoria and Horner's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... In children, Horner’s syndrome may be caused by neuroblastoma, a tumor arising in another part of the body. Although rare, the risk of neuroblastoma is significantly greater with acquired Horner’s syndrome than ...

  14. [Meckel-Gruber syndrome].

    PubMed

    Szafranko, K; Chodkiewicz, B; Gajdulewicz, M

    1996-01-01

    Two cases of the Meckel-Gruber syndrome were described at two subsequent pregnancies. Suspicion of this syndrome was established by ultrasonography and confirmed by histopathological findings. Both of the pregnancies were terminated by premature induced delivery.

  15. Milk-alkali syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000332.htm Milk-alkali syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Milk-alkali syndrome is a condition in which there ...

  16. Rett Syndrome: Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Selected Staff Profiles Multimedia About NICHD Institute ... this: Page Content Rett syndrome is a neurological and developmental genetic disorder that occurs mostly in females. Infants with Rett syndrome seem to grow and ...

  17. Klinefelter Syndrome (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and learning word skills like spelling, reading, or writing. Doctors think Klinefelter syndrome is fairly common. Most ... Klinefelter syndrome may have difficulty with spelling, reading, writing, and paying attention. They may tend to be ...

  18. Myofascial Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... worsens. Treatment options for myofascial pain syndrome include physical therapy and trigger point injections. Pain medications and relaxation ... syndrome typically includes medications, trigger point injections or physical therapy. No conclusive evidence supports using one therapy over ...

  19. Prader-Willi syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001605.htm Prader-Willi syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Prader-Willi syndrome is a disease that is present from birth ( ...

  20. Facts about Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome usually have an IQ (a measure of intelligence) in the mildly-to-moderately low range and are slower to speak than other children. Some common physical features of Down syndrome include: ...

  1. Miller Fisher Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... new ways to diagnose, treat, and, ultimately, cure neuropathies such as Miller Fisher syndrome. Information from the ... new ways to diagnose, treat, and, ultimately, cure neuropathies such as Miller Fisher syndrome. Information from the ...

  2. Fragile X syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... It is the most common form of inherited intellectual disability in boys. Causes Fragile X syndrome is caused ... history of fragile X syndrome, developmental problems, or intellectual disability may not be present. Symptoms Behavior problems associated ...

  3. Fragile X Syndrome Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Fragile X Syndrome: Overview Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content The genetic disorder Fragile X syndrome, which results from mutations in a gene on ...

  4. Toxic Shock Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... toxic shock syndrome results from toxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus (staph) bacteria, but the condition may also be caused ... a skin or wound infection. Bacteria, most commonly Staphylococcus aureus (staph), causes toxic shock syndrome. It can also ...

  5. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... present at birth. The syndrome often involves port wine stains, excess growth of bones and soft tissue, ... Symptoms of Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome include: Many port wine stains or other blood vessel problems, including dark ...

  6. Fragile X Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Cruz, Felix F.

    1985-01-01

    Physical, psychological, and cytogenic characteristics of individuals with the Fragile X syndrome are reviewed. Prospects for therapy with folic acid, prenatal diagnosis, phenotype of heterozygote for the marker X, and unresolved issues about the syndrome are discussed. (CL)

  7. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) Overview Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal disorder common among women of reproductive age. Women with PCOS may have infrequent or prolonged menstrual periods ...

  8. Kleine-Levin Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cerebral Atrophy Information Page Cerebral Palsy Information Page Cerebro-Oculo-Facio-Skeletal Syndrome (COFS) Information Page Charcot- ... Cerebral Atrophy Information Page Cerebral Palsy Information Page Cerebro-Oculo-Facio-Skeletal Syndrome (COFS) Information Page Charcot- ...

  9. Scalded skin syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Ritter disease; Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSS) ... Scalded skin syndrome (SSS) is caused by infection with certain strains of Staphylococcus bacteria. The bacteria produce a toxin that causes the skin ...

  10. Marfan syndrome (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder of connective tissue which causes skeletal defects typically recognized in a tall, lanky person. A person with Marfan syndrome may exhibit long limbs and spider-like fingers, ...

  11. Treacher Collins Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... loss in Treacher Collins syndrome is due to abnormalities in the structures of the outer and middle ear which conduct sound to the nerve endings in the inner ear. Thus, the loss in Treacher Collins syndrome ...

  12. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... have a genetic risk factor. References Nirken MH, et al. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: ... com/home. Accessed Nov. 25, 2013. High WA, et al. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: ...

  13. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000085.htm Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) is a condition in some ...

  14. Dubin-Johnson syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000242.htm Dubin-Johnson syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dubin-Johnson syndrome (DJS) is a disorder passed down through ...

  15. Fragile X Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Cruz, Felix F.

    1985-01-01

    Physical, psychological, and cytogenic characteristics of individuals with the Fragile X syndrome are reviewed. Prospects for therapy with folic acid, prenatal diagnosis, phenotype of heterozygote for the marker X, and unresolved issues about the syndrome are discussed. (CL)

  16. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001311.htm Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome is a rare, inherited disease. It causes ...

  17. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal disorder common among women of reproductive age. Women with PCOS may have infrequent or prolonged menstrual periods or ...

  18. Sheehan's Syndrome (Postpartum Hypopituitarism)

    MedlinePlus

    Sheehan's syndrome Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Sheehan's syndrome is a condition that affects women who lose a life-threatening amount of blood in childbirth or who have severe low blood pressure ...

  19. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Topics > Polycystic ovary syndrome Polycystic ovary syndrome Polycystic ovary syndrome Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a health problem ... of infertility. Expand all | Collapse all What is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)? Polycystic (pah-lee-SIS-tik) ovary syndrome ( ...

  20. Do We Know What Causes Myelodysplastic Syndromes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Factors, and Prevention Do We Know What Causes Myelodysplastic Syndromes? Some cases of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are linked ... Syndromes? Can Myelodysplastic Syndromes Be Prevented? More In Myelodysplastic Syndromes About Myelodysplastic Syndromes Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  1. Elbow Synovial Fold Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Density MR with arrows The clinical differential diagnosis of plica syndrome includes lateral epicondylitis (aka tennis elbow ), loose bodies... Elbow Synovial Fold Syndrome Radiology Corner Elbow Synovial Fold Syndrome Guarantor: CPT Amit Sanghi, USA, MC FS Contributors: CPT Amit...the case of a 17 year old female with elbow synovial fold syndrome (aka plica synovialis). The etiology is thought to be related to repetitive

  2. Vibration syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Alice M.; Goda, D. F

    1970-01-01

    Stewart, Alice M., and Goda, D. F. (1970).Brit. J. industr. Med.,27, 19-27. Vibration syndrome. Raynaud's phenomenon, or the finger blanching of men who work with vibrating tools, is undoubtedly due to vasospasm. Nevertheless the abnormal element in the situation is not a series of traumatized nerve endings but a deposition of callus under the palmar surfaces of fingers and thumbs. This deposition is a late consequence of the most distinctive, but not necessarily the most painful, of the numerous effects incurred as a result of the tool speed being completely out of the control of the operator and of the tool/component rebound being only partially under his control. The replacement of soft finger pads by rigid callus is also the only consequence of hard manual work to show how necessary it is for a structure like a finger–which is largely composed of bones, joints, tendons, and skin–to have a reservoir, the equivalent of a blood-filled sponge, between every joint to accommodate any sudden reduction in blood volume, or indeed any sudden increase in the volume of blood held in the arteries and veins relative to the amount held in the capillaries. It is still a moot point whether users of vibrating tools have more arm complaints of a serious nature than other manual workers. They do, however, have a multiplicity of aches and pains, ascribable to various causes including tool speed and tool/component rebound, which are in toto very sensitive to such things as blunt impacts, hard components, heavy tools, awkward jobs, and inept handling of tools, whether the ineptness be due to inexperience or to advancing age. Users of vibrating tools have more pain in the hands and wrists than in the elbows and shoulders, but the pain tends to persist longer in the latter sites than in the former sites. PMID:5418915

  3. Meckel-Gruber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gazioğlu, N; Vural, M; Seçkin, M S; Tüysüz, B; Akpir, E; Kuday, C; Ilikkan, B; Erginel, A; Cenani, A

    1998-03-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome is a congenital disorder characterized by occipital encephalocele, polydactyly and polycystic kidneys. This rare syndrome has been reported in the literature as incompatible with life. We present the case of a newborn afflicted with the clinical triad of Meckel-Gruber syndrome. Appropriate treatment instituted in our case led to a good early outcome.

  4. [Meckel-Gruber syndrome].

    PubMed

    Flessa, A; Rempen, A; Schmausser, B; Marx, A

    1996-01-01

    The lethal Meckel-Gruber-Syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally during ultrasound screening between 16 and 20 weeks of pregnancy. Two case reports of Meckel-Gruber-Syndrome are given, which demonstrate the importance of a reliable ultrasound examination. The results supply the basis for an adequate counseling of the patient with the option of pregnancy termination in case of the lethal syndrome.

  5. Familial Crouzon syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Samatha, Y.; Vardhan, T. Harsha; Kiran, A. Ravi; Sankar, A.J. Sai; Ramakrishna, B.

    2010-01-01

    Crouzon syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition of the craniosynostotic syndromes without syndactyly and with various dentofacial anomalies. Craniosynostosis, maxillary hypoplasia, shallow orbits, ocular proptosis and hypertelorism are the characteristic features of Crouzon syndrome. This report describes the variable clinical features in affected individuals over two generations of a family with dentofacial deformities and review of literature. PMID:22114439

  6. Familial Crouzon syndrome.

    PubMed

    Samatha, Y; Vardhan, T Harsha; Kiran, A Ravi; Sankar, A J Sai; Ramakrishna, B

    2010-10-01

    Crouzon syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition of the craniosynostotic syndromes without syndactyly and with various dentofacial anomalies. Craniosynostosis, maxillary hypoplasia, shallow orbits, ocular proptosis and hypertelorism are the characteristic features of Crouzon syndrome. This report describes the variable clinical features in affected individuals over two generations of a family with dentofacial deformities and review of literature.

  7. Lethal multiple pterygium syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Tulika; Noor, Nazia Nagori; Kural, Moolraj; Tripathi, Amita

    2016-01-01

    The multiple pterygium syndrome is consist of wide range of fetal malformations which have a genetic linkage. A defect in embryonic acetylcholine receptor which can be inherited as autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, or X-linked fashion is the cause of this syndrome. We present a sporadic case of lethal multiple pterygium syndrome. PMID:27843868

  8. Cardio-renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gnanaraj, Joseph; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Cardio-renal syndrome is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The purpose of this article is to highlight the interaction between the cardiovascular system and the renal system and how their interaction results in the complex syndrome of cardio-renal dysfunction. Additionally, we outline the available therapeutic strategies to manage this complex syndrome. PMID:27635229

  9. The Axenfeld syndrome and the Rieger syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, N; Kaback, M

    1978-01-01

    A family is reported in which both the syndrome of Axenfeld and the eye malformations of the syndrome of Rieger occur, indicating that both may be expressions of the same gene. We also review the associated anomalies already reported, emphasise their high incidence, suggest that these are not accidental associations, and propose some possible explanations for the high incidence. Images PMID:416212

  10. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    PubMed

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy.

  11. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crow, Heidi C; Gonzalez, Yoly

    2013-02-01

    Pain in the tongue or oral tissues described as "burning" has been referred to by many terms including burning mouth syndrome. When a burning sensation in the mouth is caused by local or systemic factors, it is called secondary burning mouth syndrome and when these factors are treated the pain will resolve. When burning mouth syndrome occurs in the absence of identified risk indicators, the term primary burning mouth syndrome is utilized. This article focuses on descriptions, etiologic theories, and management of primary burning mouth syndrome, a condition for which underlying causative agents have been ruled out.

  12. Periodic syndromes of childhood.

    PubMed

    Arav-Boger, R; Spirer, Z

    1997-01-01

    Periodic syndromes of childhood comprise a large group of disorders that require long-term follow-up to be diagnosed. Several disorders have fixed rhythmicity and are therefore identified more easily. Other disorders are usually diagnosed after a prolonged follow-up and exclusion of other more common childhood diseases. In general, most of the periodic fever syndromes have a benign prognosis, and their symptomatology tends to improve in the long term. Periodic syndromes without fever or chronic pain syndromes constitute not only a diagnostic dilemma but also a therapeutic challenge. A general diagnostic approach to the periodic syndromes is outlined in Figure 1.

  13. Fat embolism syndrome

    PubMed Central

    George, Jacob; George, Reeba; Dixit, R.; Gupta, R. C.; Gupta, N.

    2013-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome is an often overlooked cause of breathlessness in trauma wards. Presenting in a wide range of clinical signs of varying severity, fat embolism is usually diagnosed by a physician who keeps a high degree of suspicion. The clinical background, chronology of symptoms and corroborative laboratory findings are instrumental in a diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome. There are a few diagnostic criteria which are helpful in making a diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome. Management is mainly prevention of fat embolism syndrome, and organ supportive care. Except in fulminant fat embolism syndrome, the prognosis is usually good. PMID:23661916

  14. [Postpartum endocrine syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ducarme, G; Châtel, P; Luton, D

    2008-05-01

    Postpartum endocrine syndromes occur in the year after delivery. They are due to immunologic and vascular modifications during pregnancy. The Sheehan syndrome is the first described postpartum endocrine syndrome and consists on a hypophyse necrosis in relation with a hypovolemic shock during delivery. The immunologic consequences of the pregnancy are the most frequent, sometimes discrete and transitory. The physiological evolution of the endocrine glands during pregnancy and the most frequent post-partum endocrine syndromes are discussed: postpartum lymphocytic hypophysitis, thyroiditis and Sheehan' syndrome.

  15. Behcet's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dalvi, Sam R; Yildirim, Resit; Yazici, Yusuf

    2012-12-03

    Behcet's syndrome (BS) is a vasculitis, seen more commonly around the Mediterranean and the Far East, and manifests with oral and genital ulcerations, skin lesions, uveitis, and vascular, central nervous system and gastrointestinal involvement. Its natural history of getting less severe over time, more severe disease in males and lack of specific diagnostic testing separates it from other commonly seen conditions in rheumatology. Most of the serious manifestations respond well to immunosuppression, and these are the mainstays of treatment for BS. BS is more prevalent in regions along the Silk Road, from the Mediterranean to the Far East. The genetic risk factor most strongly associated with BS is the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B51 allele. While genetic factors seem to play a role in the development of certain features of BS, there is general consensus that as yet unidentified environmental stimuli are necessary for initiation of disease. Proposed exogenous triggers include both bacterial and viral infections, which may then lead to dysregulation of the immune system, ultimately leading to the phenotypic expression of disease. The clinical manifestations of BS are protean in nature. While most patients develop mucocutaneous and genital ulcers along with eye disease, other patients may also present with arthritis, frank vasculitis, thrombophlebitis and CNS disease. Interestingly, the manifestations of this illness vary considerably based on gender and ethnicity. As the phenotypic expression among patients with BS is quite heterogeneous, pharmacological therapy is variable and dependent upon the severity of the disease as well as organ involvement. Treatment for BS overlaps considerably with therapies for other autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and the vasculitides. Pharmacological agents utilized for treatment of BS include corticosteroids, colchicine, azathioprine, and tumour necrosis factor (TNF).α inhibitors

  16. Barth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    First described in 1983, Barth syndrome (BTHS) is widely regarded as a rare X-linked genetic disease characterised by cardiomyopathy (CM), skeletal myopathy, growth delay, neutropenia and increased urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid (3-MGCA). Fewer than 200 living males are known worldwide, but evidence is accumulating that the disorder is substantially under-diagnosed. Clinical features include variable combinations of the following wide spectrum: dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), endocardial fibroelastosis (EFE), left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC), ventricular arrhythmia, sudden cardiac death, prolonged QTc interval, delayed motor milestones, proximal myopathy, lethargy and fatigue, neutropenia (absent to severe; persistent, intermittent or perfectly cyclical), compensatory monocytosis, recurrent bacterial infection, hypoglycaemia, lactic acidosis, growth and pubertal delay, feeding problems, failure to thrive, episodic diarrhoea, characteristic facies, and X-linked family history. Historically regarded as a cardiac disease, BTHS is now considered a multi-system disorder which may be first seen by many different specialists or generalists. Phenotypic breadth and variability present a major challenge to the diagnostician: some children with BTHS have never been neutropenic, whereas others lack increased 3-MGCA and a minority has occult or absent CM. Furthermore, BTHS was first described in 2010 as an unrecognised cause of fetal death. Disabling mutations or deletions of the tafazzin (TAZ) gene, located at Xq28, cause the disorder by reducing remodeling of cardiolipin, a principal phospholipid of the inner mitochondrial membrane. A definitive biochemical test, based on detecting abnormal ratios of different cardiolipin species, was first described in 2008. Key areas of differential diagnosis include metabolic and viral cardiomyopathies, mitochondrial diseases, and many causes of neutropenia and recurrent male miscarriage

  17. [Epidemiology of Asperger's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yukiko; Saito, Kazuhiko

    2007-03-01

    Only a little data is available so far on the prevalence of Asperger's syndrome. The prevalence that Fombonne (2003) estimated after considering six European research was 2/10,000. In Ishikawa's study (2006) conducted in Nagoya city, Japan, the prevalence of Asperger's syndrome was 56/10,000. Currently there are not strict diagnostic criteria of Asperger's syndrome and methods of investigation are not consistent in each study. Therefore the prevalence rate for Asperger's syndrome covered very wide range. Although we still don't have a precise prevalence data on Asperger's syndrome, the awareness of this syndrome emerged in these several decades tells us that further research and support for the children of Asperger's syndrome and their family are necessary.

  18. A Rare Variant of Wallenberg's Syndrome: Opalski syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kk, Parathan; R, Kannan; P, Chitrambalam; Aiyappan, Senthil Kumar; N, Deepthi

    2014-07-01

    Lateral Medullary Syndrome (LMS) is a well-documented vascular syndrome of the posterior circulation territory. This syndrome is easily localised because of characteristic presentation, unique territory of blood supply and very small area of involvement. We present a case of Wallenberg's syndrome which did not have all the classical components of the syndrome, like Horner's syndrome. Opalski syndrome is a rare variant of Wallenberg syndrome, where lateral medullary syndrome is associated with ipsilateral hemiparesis. This case report highlights how differential involvement of the lateral part of medulla can result in varied presentation.

  19. A Rare Variant of Wallenberg’s Syndrome: Opalski syndrome

    PubMed Central

    KK, Parathan; P, Chitrambalam; Aiyappan, Senthil Kumar; N, Deepthi

    2014-01-01

    Lateral Medullary Syndrome (LMS) is a well-documented vascular syndrome of the posterior circulation territory. This syndrome is easily localised because of characteristic presentation, unique territory of blood supply and very small area of involvement. We present a case of Wallenberg’s syndrome which did not have all the classical components of the syndrome, like Horner’s syndrome. Opalski syndrome is a rare variant of Wallenberg syndrome, where lateral medullary syndrome is associated with ipsilateral hemiparesis. This case report highlights how differential involvement of the lateral part of medulla can result in varied presentation. PMID:25177595

  20. Down Syndrome Myths and Truths

    MedlinePlus

    ... leading human rights organization for all individuals with Down syndrome. National Down Syndrome Society 8 E 41st Street, 8th Floor New ... New York 10017 800-221-4602 [email protected] Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Waardenburg syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Type I ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific Articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (10 links) WAARDENBURG SYNDROME, TYPE 1 WAARDENBURG SYNDROME, TYPE 2A WAARDENBURG SYNDROME, TYPE ... Syndrome Type I Nayak CS, Isaacson G. Worldwide distribution of Waardenburg syndrome. Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 2003 ...

  2. The Nathalie syndrome. A new hereditary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cremers, C W; Ter Haar, B G; Van Rens, T J

    1975-11-01

    Deafness, cataract, muscular atrophy, skeletal abnormalities, retardation of growth, underdeveloped secondary sexual characteristics, and electrocardiographic abnormalities are the features of a new, probably hereditary syndrome. Case reports are presented.

  3. Antiphospholipid syndrome (Hughes syndrome): 10 clinical topics.

    PubMed

    Hughes, G R V

    2010-04-01

    This year in Galveston, Texas, Silvia Pierangeli hosts the 13th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies. Twenty-six years after the first antiphospholipid syndrome meeting, the number of interested colleagues has multiplied, and the subject has become more scientifically understood. So also has the clinical picture. In this short contribution, I will highlight a number of clinical observations which may, or may not, contribute to our understanding of antiphospholipid syndrome.

  4. Do you know this syndrome? Leopard syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Cançado, Flávio Heleno da Silva Queiroz; da Silva, Luis Candido Pinto; Taitson, Paulo Franco; de Andrade, Ana Carolina Dias Viana; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is known as Leopard syndrome, which is a mnemonic rule for multiple lentigines (L), electrocardiographic conduction abnormalities (E), ocular hypertelorism (O), pulmonary stenosis (P), abnormalities of genitalia (A), retardation of growth (R), and deafness (D). We report the case of a 12-year-old patient with some of the abovementioned characteristics: hypertelorism, macroglossia, lentigines, hypospadias, cryptorchidism, subaortic stenosis, growth retardation, and hearing impairment. Due to this set of symptoms, we diagnosed Leopard syndrome. PMID:28225973

  5. Basal cell nevus syndrome or Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thalakoti, Srikanth; Geller, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) or Gorlin syndrome is a rare neurocutaneous syndrome sometimes known as the fifth phacomatosis, inherited in autosomal dominant fashion with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Gorlin syndrome is characterized by development of multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), jaw cysts, palmar or plantar pits, calcification of falx cerebri, various developmental skeletal abnormalities such as bifid rib, hemi- or bifid vertebra and predisposition to the development of various tumors. BCNS is caused by a mutation in the PTCH1 gene localized to 9q22.3. Its estimated prevalence varies between 1/55600 and 1/256000 with an equal male to female ratio. The medulloblastoma variant seen in Gorlin syndrome patients is of the desmoplastic type, characteristically presenting during the first 3 years of life. Therefore, children with desmoplastic medulloblastoma should be carefully screened for other features of BCNS. Radiation therapy for desmoplastic medulloblastoma should be avoided in BCNS patients as it may induce development of invasive BCCs and other tumors in the skin area exposed to radiation. This syndrome is a multisystem disorder so involvement of multiple specialists with a multimodal approach to detect and treat various manifestations at early stages will reduce the long-term sequelae and severity of the condition. Life expectancy is not significantly altered but morbidity from complications and cosmetic scarring can be substantial.

  6. [Menopause and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Meirelles, Ricardo M R

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease increases considerably after the menopause. One reason for the increased cardiovascular risk seems to be determined by metabolic syndrome, in which all components (visceral obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and glucose metabolism disorder) are associated with higher incidence of coronary artery disease. After menopause, metabolic syndrome is more prevalent than in premenopausal women, and may plays an important role in the occurrence of myocardial infarction and other atherosclerotic and cardiovascular morbidities. Obesity, an essential component of the metabolic syndrome, is also associated with increased incidence of breast, endometrial, bowel, esophagus, and kidney cancer. The treatment of metabolic syndrome is based on the change in lifestyle and, when necessary, the use of medication directed to its components. In the presence of symptoms of the climacteric syndrome, hormonal therapy, when indicated, will also contribute to the improvement of the metabolic syndrome.

  7. [Shy-Drager syndrome].

    PubMed

    Dusejovská, Magdaléna; Vareka, Tomás; Macásek, Jaroslav; Hrubant, Karel; Zák, Ales; Zeman, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    Shy-Drager syndrome is a rare neurological disease with a poor prognosis causing a generalised autonomy dysfunction. The disorder is also known as multiple system atrophy, the orthostatic hypotension syndrome or Shy-McGee-Drager syndrome. Patients have mainly dysautonomic symptoms. Patients suffer from orthostatic hypotension, bradycardia, anhidrosis, failure of accommodation, sialoporia, low tears secretion, gastrointestinal dysmotility and incomplete emptying of the urinary bladder. Neuropathological examination of patient's brains demonstrated neurodegenerative changes of the structures of central nervous system, mainly of brainstem. The Shy-Drager syndrome results from striatonigral and olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy and from accumulation of alpha-synuclein in these structures. The patients suffering from the Shy-Drager syndrome are very often misdiagnosed because of overlap of symptomatology with psychiatric and psychosomatic diseases. It is also very difficult to make the diagnosis because of complexity of symptoms. The prognosis of Shy-Drager syndrome is very poor; patients are markedly disabled and have shorter survival.

  8. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Hamartomas are tumour-like malformations, consisting of disorganized normal tissues, typical of the site of tumour manifestation. Familial manifestation of hamartomatous polyps can be noted in juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS), Peutz-Jeghers’ syndrome (PJS), hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome (HMPS) and PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (PHTS). All the aforementioned syndromes are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and form a rather heterogenous group both in respect to the number and localization of polyps and the risk of cancer development in the alimentary tract and other organs. Individual syndromes of hamartomatous polyposis frequently manifest similar symptoms, particularly during the early stage of the diseases when in several cases their clinical pictures do not allow for differential diagnosis. The correct diagnosis of the disease using molecular methods allows treatment to be implemented earlier and therefore more effectively since it is followed by a strict monitoring of organs that manifest a predisposition for neoplastic transformation. PMID:23724922

  9. SAPHO syndrome associated spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Takigawa, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Masato; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Misawa, Haruo; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Takahata, Tomohiro; Nakahara, Hiroyuki; Nakahara, Shinnosuke; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2008-10-01

    The concept of synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome has been well clarified, after Chamot et al. suggested this peculiar disorder in 1987. The most commonly affected site in SAPHO syndrome is the anterior chest, followed by the spine. However, the clinical course and taxonomic concept of SAPHO spinal lesions are poorly understood. This study was performed to analyze: (1) the detailed clinical course of spinal lesions in SAPHO syndrome, and (2) the relationship between SAPHO syndrome with spinal lesions and seronegative spondyloarthropathy. Thirteen patients with spondylitis in SAPHO syndrome were analyzed. The features of spinal lesions were a chronic onset with a slight inflammatory reaction, and slowly progressing non-marginal syndesmophytes at multi spinal levels, besides the coexistence of specific skin lesions. SAPHO syndrome, especially spinal lesions related to palmoplantar pustulosis, can be recognized as a subtype of seronegative spondyloarthropathy.

  10. Metabolic syndrome targets.

    PubMed

    Smith, Steven R

    2004-10-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of easy-to-measure clinical phenotypes that serve as markers for increased risk for CVD and diabetes. There is no universal agreement as to the underlying pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome. At its core, the metabolic syndrome is the result of energy excess; therefore treating obesity is a good strategy to reverse the clinical features of the metabolic syndrome. Hypertension is a special case, may not be part of the core pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome, and will not be discussed. After a brief review of recent developments in the pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome, this review will concentrate on peripheral targets in the following categories: ectopic fat and fat oxidation, intrinsic defects in substrate switching and mitochondrial biogenesis, lipolysis and lipid turnover, adipose tissue as an endocrine organ, nutrient / energy sensing systems, and inflammation. The advantages and pitfalls of these targets will be discussed with an eye towards the relevant literature.

  11. TEENAGERS AS PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Arthur

    1958-01-01

    Adolescents tend to abandon the program of preventive and therapeutic medical care established for them in infancy by pediatrician and parents. Factors in this resistance were analyzed, and a teenage clinic was established. In review of experience over a four-year period, during which the number of appointments monthly rose from 20 to 300, it was noted that the needs of adolescents are related to their stage of development. In the teenage clinic the adolescent assumes an increasingly important role in communication between himself and the physician, with concurrent diminution of the parental role. Special goals of medical counseling of adolescents include strengthening of parent-adolescent relationships and adjustment of the teenager to school and community. The adolescent requests information about normal and abnormal growth and development (obesity, acne, sexual changes). Somatic abnormalities noted on physical examination were of three classes: (1) “Normal” deviations (male gynecomastia, adolescent striae, functional heart murmurs). (2) Medical problems usual to persons of any age. (3) Comparatively rare entities (lupus erythematosus disseminatus, Laurence-Moon-Biedel syndrome). PMID:13608297

  12. Townes-Brocks syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Powell, C.; Michaelis, R.

    1999-01-01

    Townes-Brocks syndrome (TBS) is an autosomal dominant disorder with multiple malformations and variable expression. Major findings include external ear anomalies, hearing loss, preaxial polydactyly and triphalangeal thumbs, imperforate anus, and renal malformations. Most patients with Townes-Brocks syndrome have normal intelligence, although mental retardation has been noted in a few.


Keywords: Townes-Brocks syndrome; chromosome 16q12.1; SALL1 PMID:10051003

  13. [Chilaidity syndrome. Case report].

    PubMed

    Candela, Stefano; Candela, Giancarlo; Di Libero, Lorenzo; Argano, Francesco; Romano, Ornella; Iannella, Iolanda

    2012-01-01

    Chilaidity syndrome is a mal position by bowel mal rotation o malfissation. It is more common in right side expecially in obese people. If asyimptomatic, the syndrome is an occasional comparison by radiology, surgical exploration by laparoscopy or autopsy, otherwise, if symptomatic, there are obstructive symptoms,abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension, flatulence, breath, constipation and anorexia. Diagnosis is radiological. We present a rare case of this syndrome in a man with serious obstructive symptoms.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Cowden syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... percentage of affected individuals have delayed development or intellectual disability. The features of Cowden syndrome overlap with those ... features of Cowden syndrome , such as macrocephaly and intellectual disability. Other cases of Cowden syndrome and Cowden-like ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Wagner syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Wagner syndrome Wagner syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Wagner syndrome is a hereditary disorder that causes progressive ...

  16. Guide to Understanding Moebius Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Development Most persons with Moebius syndrome have normal intelligence. A small percentage of people with Moebius syndrome have mental retardation. Cleft Palate Some children with Moebius syndrome are born with a cleft ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Down syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Down syndrome Down syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Down syndrome is a chromosomal condition that is associated with ...

  18. First Trimester Down Syndrome Screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... is carrying has a chromosome disorder such as Down syndrome (trisomy 21) or Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18) . The ... the options you may be offered for prenatal Down syndrome screening. Other options include the second trimester maternal ...

  19. Toxic Shock Syndrome (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help Someone Who's Being Bullied? Volunteering Toxic Shock Syndrome KidsHealth > For Teens > Toxic Shock Syndrome Print ... it, then take some precautions. What Is Toxic Shock Syndrome? If you're a girl who's had ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Turner syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Turner syndrome Turner syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Turner syndrome is a chromosomal condition that affects development in ...

  1. Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Leypoldt, F; Wandinger, K-P

    2014-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes are immune-mediated erroneous attacks on the central or peripheral nervous systems, or both, directed originally against the tumour itself. They have been known for more than 40 years, but recently the discovery of new subgroups of paraneoplastic encephalitis syndromes with a remarkably good response to immune therapy has ignited new clinical and scientific interest. Knowledge of these subgroups and their associated autoantibodies is important in therapeutic decision-making. However, the abundance of new autoantibodies and syndromes can be confusing. This review paper summarizes current knowledge and new developments in the field of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes, their classification, pathophysiology and treatment. PMID:23937626

  2. Diabetic Hyperosmolar Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment can correct diabetic hyperosmolar syndrome within hours. Treatment typically includes: Intravenous fluids to counter dehydration Intravenous insulin to lower your blood sugar levels Intravenous potassium, ...

  3. Classic Raymond Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khan, Majid; Naveed, Sadaf; Haider, Iqbal; Humayun, Mohammad; Khan, Abidullah

    2017-03-01

    Classic Raymond syndrome presents with abducens nerve palsy on the ipsilateral side with contralateral hemiparesis and facial nerve paralysis. A 60-year gentleman presented with deviation of left angle of mouth and right sided weakness. Examination showed that he had left sided abducens nerve palsy, with contralateral central facial paralysis and paresis. MRI of brain confirmed left pontine infarct. These findings were consistent with classic Raymond syndrome. Till now, only a few cases have been reported worldwide, this being the first case reported in South Asia. This case confirms that classic Raymond syndrome is different from the common type of Raymond syndrome in terms of sparing of coritcofacial fibers in the latter type.

  4. Locked-in syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cardwell, Michael S

    2013-02-01

    Locked-in syndrome is a rare neuropsychological disorder. Its primary features are quadriplegia and paralysis of the cranial nerves except for those responsible for vertical eye movements. The differential diagnosis includes persistent vegetative state, brain death, minimally conscious states, C3 transection of the spinal cord, and conversion locked-in syndrome. Etiologies of locked-in syndrome include hemorrhagic and thrombotic events, tumors affecting the ventral pons, infectious agents, iatrogenic causes, trauma, metabolic abnormalities, and other miscellaneous causes. The clinical manifestations, differential diagnosis, neuropsychological assessment, rehabilitation, and prognosis of patients with locked-in syndrome are discussed.

  5. Chromosome instability syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 11, discusses chromosome instability syndromes. The focus is on the most extensively studied genotypic chromosomal aberrations which include Bloom syndrome, Fanconi anemia, ataxia telangiectasia, and xeroderma pigmentosum. The great interest in these syndromes is out of proportion to their rare occurrence; however, studies of genotypic chromosome breakage have been inspired by the hope of throwing light on chromosome structure and behavior. A table is given which relates chromosomal aberrations in Bloom syndrome which may cause or promote cancer. 34 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Laugier–Hunziker syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Ramakant S; Kotrashetti, Vijayalakshmi S; Hosmani, Jagadish V

    2012-01-01

    Laugier–Hunziker syndrome is a rare acquired disorder characterized by diffuse hyperpigmentation of the oral mucosa and longitudinal melanonychia in adults. They appear as macular lesions less than 5 mm in diameter. Laugier–Hunziker syndrome is considered to be a benign disease with no systemic manifestation or malignant potential. Therefore, it is important to rule out other mucocutaneous pigmentary disorders that do require medical management. Prompt clinical recognition also averts the need for excessive and invasive procedures and treatments. In India, the reported cases of this syndrome are very few. We provide a review of literature on Laugier–Hunziker syndrome with its differential diagnosis. PMID:22923898

  7. Isolated pulmonary Goodpasture syndrome.

    PubMed

    Harrity, P; Gilbert-Barness, E; Cabalka, A; Hong, R; Zimmerman, J

    1991-01-01

    The case of a 13-year-old girl with Goodpasture syndrome is reported. The presentation at this age with only pulmonary hemorrhage is unusual among Goodpasture syndrome patients. The case illustrates well the diagnostic difficulties in Goodpasture syndrome. The choices of treatment modalities available for this disease and the results and risks of such treatment options are reviewed. A discussion and classification of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage is presented. The case emphasizes that Goodpasture syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage in spite of a lack of renal abnormalities and that serum anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody testing can be of great help in confirming the diagnosis.

  8. Compartment Syndrome in Children.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Pooya; Hayes, Christopher B

    2016-07-01

    Compartment syndrome in children can present differently than adults. Increased analgesic need should be considered the first sign of evolving compartment syndrome in children. Children with supracondylar humerus fractures, floating elbow injuries, operatively treated forearm fractures, and tibia fractures are at high risk for developing compartment syndrome. Elbow flexion beyond 90° in supracondylar humerus fractures and closed treatment of forearm fractures in floating elbow injuries are associated with increased risk of compartment syndrome. Prompt diagnosis and treatment with fasciotomy in children result in excellent long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Neurobiology of Tourette Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ünal, Dilek; Akdemir, Devrim

    2016-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by chronic motor and vocal tics. Although it is a common disorder in childhood, the etiology of Tourette Syndrome has not been fully elucidated yet. Studies, -conducted so far- have revealed differences in neurobiological structures of individuals who suffer from Tourette Syndrome. The objective of this review is to assess etiological and pathophysiological studies in the Tourette Syndrome literature. An electronical search was conducted in PubMed database using the keywords tic disorders, Tourette Syndrome, neurobiology, genetics, neuroimaging and animal models. Research and review studies published between 1985 and 2015, with a selection preference towards recent publications, were reviewed. According to the studies, genetic predisposition hypothesis is considered as a priority. However, a precise genetic disorder associated with Tourette Syndrome has not been found. The evidence from postmortem and neuroimaging studies in heterogenous patient groups and animal studies supports the pathological involvement of cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) circuits in Tourette Syndrome. Consequently, the most emphasized hypothesis in the pathophysiology is the dopaminergic dysfunction in these circuits. Furthermore, these findings of the animal, postmortem and neuroimaging studies have confirmed the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of Tourette Syndrome. In conclusion, more studies are needed to understand the etiology of the disorder. The data obtained from neurobiological studies of the disorder will not only shed light on the way of Tourette Syndrome, but also guide studies on its treatment options.

  10. The Disuse Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bortz II, Walter M.

    1984-01-01

    Our cultural sedentariness, recently acquired, lies at the base of much human ill-being. Physical inactivity predictably leads to deterioration of many body functions. A number of these effects coexist so frequently in our society that they merit inclusion in a specific syndrome, the disuse syndrome. The identifying characteristics of the syndrome are cardiovascular vulnerability, obesity, musculoskeletal fragility, depression and premature aging. The syndrome is experimentally reproducible and, significantly, the clinical features are subject to both preventive and restitutive efforts that happily are cheap, safe, accessible and effective. PMID:6516349

  11. Capgras' syndrome with organic disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, M. N.; Hawthorne, M. E.; Gribbin, N.; Jacobson, R.

    1990-01-01

    Capgras' syndrome, one form of the delusional misidentification syndromes, is described. Three patients with the syndrome are reported. The first had a right cerebral infarction, the second had nephrotic syndrome secondary to severe pre-eclampsia in the puerperium, and the third had uncontrolled diabetes mellitus with dementia. Evidence is reviewed regarding an organic aetiology for Capgras' syndrome. We conclude that, when the syndrome is present, a thorough search for organic disorder should be made. PMID:2084656

  12. Polycystic ovary syndrome and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ali, Aus Tariq

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous disorder, where the main clinical features include menstrual irregularities, sub-fertility, hyperandrogenism, and hirsutism. The prevalence of PCOS depends on ethnicity, environmental and genetic factors, as well as the criteria used to define it. On the other hand, metabolic syndrome is a constellation of metabolic disorders which include mainly abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, impaired glucose metabolism, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. These associated disorders directly increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DMT2), coronary heart disease (CHD), cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and endometrial cancer. Many patients with PCOS have features of metabolic syndrome such as visceral obesity, hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance. These place patients with PCOS under high risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), Type 2 diabetes (DMT2) and gynecological cancer, in particular, endometrial cancer. Metabolic syndrome is also increased in infertile women with PCOS. The aim of this review is to provide clear and up to date information about PCOS and its relationship with metabolic syndrome, and the possible interaction between different metabolic disorders.

  13. Sirenomelia: the mermaid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meisheri, I V; Waigankar, V S; Patel, M P; Naregal, A; Ramesh, S; Muthal, P

    1996-10-01

    Sirenomelia, or mermaid syndrome, is the extreme form of caudal regression syndrome. We present another case of this fascinating anomaly with fused lower limbs, absent external genitalia, and absent genitourinary system. The patient could not be salvaged because of bilateral renal agenesis. Detailed autopsy findings and a review of the literature are presented.

  14. Down Syndrome (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... teachers and others to come up with a plan for the best way for each child to learn. Kids with Down syndrome like their playtime, too. They play sports and participate in activities, such as music lessons or dance classes. Kids with Down syndrome may ...

  15. Epidemiology of Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Stephanie L.; Allen, Emily G.; Bean, Lora H.; Freeman, Sallie B.

    2007-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most commonly identified genetic form of mental retardation and the leading cause of specific birth defects and medical conditions. Traditional epidemiological studies to determine the prevalence, cause, and clinical significance of the syndrome have been conducted over the last 100 years. DS has been estimated to occur…

  16. Macrocytosis in Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachtel, Tom J.; Pueschel, Siegfried M.

    1991-01-01

    The study, with 61 Down Syndrome (trisomy 21) adult subjects, found that macrocytosis in the absence of anemia was virtually universal and erythrocyte survival half-time was shorter than normal. Findings suggest that erythrocytes have a younger mean age in persons with Down Syndrome, possibly indicating an accelerated aging process of red blood…

  17. Learning about Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... is not possible to tell the level of intelligence a baby with Down syndrome will have. All areas of development including motor skills, language, intellectual abilities, and social and adaptive skills are followed closely in children with Down syndrome. Early referral, beginning at birth, ...

  18. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parke, A L; Liu, P T; Parke, D V

    2003-01-01

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and renal failure, is described, its clinical features outlined, its origins in tissue oxidative stress following severe infections, surgical trauma, ionizing radiation, high-dosage drugs and chemicals, severe hemorrhage, etc., are defined, and its prevention and treatment prescribed.

  19. Restless Legs Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Restless Legs Syndrome Share Print Restless Legs Syndrome Table of Contents1. Overview2. Symptoms3. Diagnosis4. Treatment5. Questions OverviewWhat ... twitch when you try and sleep (also called periodic limb movements of sleep or PLMS). DiagnosisHow does ...

  20. Redefining syndromic surveillance.

    PubMed

    Katz, Rebecca; May, Larissa; Baker, Julia; Test, Elisa

    2011-12-01

    With growing concerns about international spread of disease and expanding use of early disease detection surveillance methods, the field of syndromic surveillance has received increased attention over the last decade. The purpose of this article is to clarify the various meanings that have been assigned to the term syndromic surveillance and to propose a refined categorization of the characteristics of these systems. Existing literature and conference proceedings were examined on syndromic surveillance from 1998 to 2010, focusing on low- and middle-income settings. Based on the 36 unique definitions of syndromic surveillance found in the literature, five commonly accepted principles of syndromic surveillance systems were identified, as well as two fundamental categories: specific and non-specific disease detection. Ultimately, the proposed categorization of syndromic surveillance distinguishes between systems that focus on detecting defined syndromes or outcomes of interest and those that aim to uncover non-specific trends that suggest an outbreak may be occurring. By providing an accurate and comprehensive picture of this field's capabilities, and differentiating among system types, a unified understanding of the syndromic surveillance field can be developed, encouraging the adoption, investment in, and implementation of these systems in settings that need bolstered surveillance capacity, particularly low- and middle-income countries. Copyright © 2011 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Second-Impact Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Sarah; Battin, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Sports-related injuries are among the more common causes of injury in adolescents that can result in concussion and its sequelae, postconcussion syndrome and second-impact syndrome (SIS). Students who experience multiple brain injuries within a short period of time (hours, days, or weeks) may suffer catastrophic or fatal reactions related to SIS.…

  2. The Othello Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Famuyiwa, Oluwole O.; Ekpo, Micheal

    1983-01-01

    A case of the Othello syndrome is presented. In its classical form the syndrome is rare, but as with other allied paranoid states, its medicosocial implications are great. Rational management should include pharmacotherapy, conjoint family therapy after symptom remission, and long-term individual psychotherapy. PMID:6827614

  3. Second-Impact Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Sarah; Battin, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Sports-related injuries are among the more common causes of injury in adolescents that can result in concussion and its sequelae, postconcussion syndrome and second-impact syndrome (SIS). Students who experience multiple brain injuries within a short period of time (hours, days, or weeks) may suffer catastrophic or fatal reactions related to SIS.…

  4. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes.

    PubMed

    Zbuk, Kevin M; Eng, Charis

    2007-09-01

    The hamartomatous polyposis syndromes are a heterogeneous group of disorders that share an autosomal-dominant pattern of inheritance and are characterized by hamartomatous polyps of the gastrointestinal tract. These syndromes include juvenile polyposis syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and the PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome. The frequency and location of the polyps vary considerably among syndromes, as does the affected patient's predisposition to the development of gastrointestinal and other malignancies. Although the syndromes are uncommon, it is important for the clinician to recognize these disorders because they are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, not only from malignancy but also from nonmalignant manifestations such as bleeding, intussusception, and bowel obstruction. Each hamartomatous polyposis syndrome has its own distinctive organ-specific manifestations and each requires a different surveillance strategy, which makes accurate diagnosis crucial for appropriate patient management. The availability of clinical genetic testing for these disorders means that appropriate recognition allows for timely referral for cancer genetic counseling, and often allows for predicative testing in at-risk family members. Promisingly, an understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of these disorders offers insights into the mechanisms underlying the development of sporadic malignancy, and enables rational selection of targeted therapies that warrant further investigation.

  5. Macrocytosis in Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachtel, Tom J.; Pueschel, Siegfried M.

    1991-01-01

    The study, with 61 Down Syndrome (trisomy 21) adult subjects, found that macrocytosis in the absence of anemia was virtually universal and erythrocyte survival half-time was shorter than normal. Findings suggest that erythrocytes have a younger mean age in persons with Down Syndrome, possibly indicating an accelerated aging process of red blood…

  6. The Aarskog syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fryns, J P; Macken, J; Vinken, L; Igodt-Ameye, L; van den Berghe, H

    1978-06-09

    In this report a description is given of the Aarskog syndrome in six males belonging to three different families. Partial expression of the syndrome was confirmed in two of the three examined obligate female heterozygotes, who had short stature, small hands and feet, short neck, and a round face with widow's peak and, in one of them, ptosis of the eyelids.

  7. Epidemiology of Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Stephanie L.; Allen, Emily G.; Bean, Lora H.; Freeman, Sallie B.

    2007-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most commonly identified genetic form of mental retardation and the leading cause of specific birth defects and medical conditions. Traditional epidemiological studies to determine the prevalence, cause, and clinical significance of the syndrome have been conducted over the last 100 years. DS has been estimated to occur…

  8. Syndrome in question*

    PubMed Central

    Peruzzo, Juliano; Nazar, Fernanda Luca; Tubone, Mariana Quirino; Escobar, Gabriela Fortes; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentation changes and minor facial malformations. It has four clinical variants. We report the case of a girl who, like her mother, was affected by this syndrome. The diagnosis was made after detection and treatment of deafness. PMID:26375234

  9. The sick building syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sumedha M.

    2008-01-01

    The sick building syndrome comprises of various nonspecific symptoms that occur in the occupants of a building. This feeling of ill health increases sickness absenteeism and causes a decrease in productivity of the workers. As this syndrome is increasingly becoming a major occupational hazard, the cause, management and prevention of this condition have been discussed in this article. PMID:20040980

  10. Heterogeneity in Waardenburg syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Hageman, M J; Delleman, J W

    1977-01-01

    Heterogeneity of Waardenburg syndrome is demonstrated in a review of 1,285 patients from the literature and 34 previously unreported patients in five families in the Netherlands. The syndrome seems to consist of two genetically distinct entities that can be differentiated clinically: type I, Waardenburg syndrome with dystopia canthorum; and type II, Waardenburg syndrome without dystopia canthorum. Both types have an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. The incidence of bilateral deafness in the two types of the syndrome was found in one-fourth with type I and about half of the patients with type II. This difference has important consequences for genetic counseling. Images Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:331943

  11. [Antiphospholipid syndrome and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Gadó, Klára; Domján, Gyula

    2012-08-05

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by arterial and venous thromboembolic events and persistent laboratory evidence of antiphospholipid antibodies. Obstetric complications such as recurrent miscarriage, early delivery, oligohydramnios, prematurity, intrauterine growth restriction, fetal distress, fetal or neonatal thrombosis, pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, and HELLP syndrome are also hallmarks of antiphospholipid syndrome. This syndrome is one of the diseases associated with the most severe thrombotic risk. Changes in the hemostatic system during normal pregnancy also result in a hypercoagulable state resulting in elevated thrombotic risk. Thromboembolic events are responsible of the vast majority of maternal and fetal deaths. Administration of appropriate thromboprophylaxis helps prevent thromboembolic complications during pregnancy in women with antiphospholipid syndrome and also give birth to healthy children. It is important to centralize the medication and management of these patients. It helps in the thoughtful care of these pregnant women encountering serious problems.

  12. Anti phospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miah, M T; Hoque, M A; Sutradhar, S R; Mahmood, T; Tarafder, B K

    2009-01-01

    Anti Phospholipid Syndrome (APS) is a relatively new conception of syndrome complex first noticed in 1983. It may be primary or secondary to other diseases like SLE, RA, Systemic sclerosis, behchet's syndrome, temporal arteritis, sjogren's syndrome psoriatic arthropathy etc. Clinical manifestations are consequences of vascular thrombosis and embolism like DVT, pulmonary embolism, stroke, TIA, complication of pregnancy with pregnancy loss. We report a 34 years married female housewife who presented with sudden onset of nausea, vomiting, vertigo, dysphagia, dysarthria and ataxia. She had a chronic leg ulcer. Neurological findings were consistent with lateral medullary syndrome due to stroke though she was normotensive, nondiabetic with normal lipid profile. She had history of two abortions in last three years. Investigations were done accordingly and she fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of APS. No secondary cause was detected after thorough clinical examination and laboratory investigations. She was treated symptomatically along with oral anticoagulation. She improved slowly but steadily.

  13. Eisenmenger Syndrome in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2016-01-01

    Eisenmenger syndrome is very rare in pregnant women. Debates remain concerning the management of Eisenmenger syndrome in this patient population and the prognosis is unclear in terms of maternal and fetoneonatal outcomes. Epidural analgesia is preferred for Cesarean section as it alleviates perioperative pain and reduces the pulmonary and systemic vascular resistances. Maternal mortality in the presence of Eisenmenger syndrome is reported as 30-50% and even up to 65% in those with Cesarean section. The major causes of death could be hypovolemia, thromboembolism and preeclampsia. Pregnancy should ideally be avoided in a woman with Eisenmenger syndrome concerning the high maternal mortality rate and probable poor prognosis of the baby. A short labour and an atraumatic delivery under epidural block are preferred in the women with a strong desire of pregnancy. The purpose of this article is to discuss the debates of Eisenmenger syndrome in pregnancy and the possible resolutions. PMID:27849306

  14. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, DN; Raval, N; Patadiya, H; Tarsariya, V

    2014-01-01

    The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) (the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome caused due to mutations in the patched gene found on chromosome arm 9 q. It shows high penetrance and variable expressivity; is characterized by basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts, palmar and/or plantar pits and ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri. Until date, very few cases of GGS have been reported in India. Early diagnosis and treatment as well as genetic counseling are essential for this syndrome. A rare case report of a patient with characteristic features of GGS diagnosed at a rural dental college of Gujarat, India is presented here. This case report draws attention of the valuable role of dentist in diagnosis and early management of this syndrome. PMID:24761254

  15. Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crumrine, Patricia K

    2002-01-01

    Lennox-Gastaut syndrome is a type of childhood epilepsy that has enormous detrimental effects on the patient's physical and developmental health and can also take a dramatic toll on the well-being of the patient's family. Lennox-Gastaut syndrome is characterized by variable etiology, multiple types of intractable seizures, and cognitive impairment in most patients. It is one of the most difficult epilepsy syndromes to treat and is frequently resistant to treatment with standard antiepilepsy drugs. This article reviews the etiology of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, characteristics of predominant seizure types, methods of evaluating patients for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, and available treatments including antiepilepsy drug therapy, ketogenic diet, and surgical options.

  16. [Schizophrenia or Asperger syndrome?].

    PubMed

    Da Fonseca, David; Viellard, Marine; Fakra, Eric; Bastard-Rosset, Delphine; Deruelle, Christine; Poinso, François

    2008-09-01

    Patients with Asperger syndrome are often diagnosed late or are wrongly considered to have schizophrenia. Misdiagnosing Asperger syndrome creates serious problems by preventing effective therapy. Several clinical signs described in Asperger syndrome could also be considered as clinical signs of schizophrenia, including impaired social interactions, disabilities in communication, restricted interests, and delusions of persecution. A number of clinical features may facilitate the differential diagnosis: younger age at onset, family history of pervasive developmental disorder, recurring conversations on the same topic, pragmatic aspects of language use, oddities of intonation and pitch, lack of imagination, and incomprehension of social rules are more characteristic of Asperger syndrome. Accurate distinction between Asperger syndrome and schizophrenia would make it possible to offer more treatment appropriate to the patient's functioning.

  17. Gorlin-goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Dn; Raval, N; Patadiya, H; Tarsariya, V

    2014-03-01

    The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) (the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome caused due to mutations in the patched gene found on chromosome arm 9 q. It shows high penetrance and variable expressivity; is characterized by basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts, palmar and/or plantar pits and ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri. Until date, very few cases of GGS have been reported in India. Early diagnosis and treatment as well as genetic counseling are essential for this syndrome. A rare case report of a patient with characteristic features of GGS diagnosed at a rural dental college of Gujarat, India is presented here. This case report draws attention of the valuable role of dentist in diagnosis and early management of this syndrome.

  18. Atraumatic painless compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Scott; Griffin, Gregory D; Simon, Erin L

    2013-12-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is a time-sensitive diagnosis and surgical emergency because it poses a threat to life and the limbs. It is defined by Matsen et al (Surg Gynecol Obstet. 1978;147(6):943–949) as "a condition in which increased pressure within a limited space compromises the circulation and function of the tissues within that space." The most common cause of compartment syndrome is traumatic injury. A variety of other conditions such as vascular injuries, bleeding disorders, thrombosis, fasciitis, gas gangrene, rhabdomyolysis, prolonged limb compression, cellulitis, and nephrotic syndrome may also cause compartment syndrome. Patients who are elderly, have preexisting nerve damage, or have psychopathology may have an atypical presentation. This case highlights the first report of a 75-year-old woman who developed painless bilateral compartment syndrome in the absence of traumatic injury.

  19. The skinache syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Bassøe, C F

    1995-01-01

    Chronic pain of unknown aetiology, and characterized by cutaneous trigger points, has been coined the skinache syndrome. The treatment of the skinache syndrome was evaluated in 94 patients by two independent methods 2 years after treatment. After one subcutaneous injection of lidocaine 68% of the patients were cured. The pain recurred in 27 patients having suffered for an average of 2 years. Surgical removal of the cutaneous trigger points cured 77% of the latter patients. The odds ratio of success of surgical treatment versus all other treatments combined was 101.3. The skinache syndrome requires a precise clinical investigation. Even when the origin of the pain in tendons, muscle and adipose tissue is excluded, the skinache syndrome remains a common, debilitating disorder. In contrast to fibromyalgia, the skinache syndrome has a simple and effective cure. PMID:8537946

  20. [Asthenic syndrome in patients with burnout syndrome].

    PubMed

    Chutko, L S; Surushkina, S Iu; Rozhkova, A V; Nikishena, I S; Iakovenko, E A

    2013-01-01

    The authors present the results of a survey of 103 patients aged 25 to 45 years with burnout syndrom. The results showed that most patients with the syndrome of burnout have clinical manifestations of asthenia, varying degrees of severity. According to psychological and psychophysiological examination in this group of patients were found attention and memory dysfunction. This study evaluated the efficacy of memoplant in the treatment of this pathology. The high efficiency of memoplant (improvement in 69.7% of cases) was detected, confirmed by the data of the clinical, psychological and neuropsychological research.

  1. Syndrome in question: Gorlin-Goltz syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Pauline Lyrio; de Souza Filho, João Basílio; de Abreu, Karina Demoner; Brezinscki, Marisa Simon; Pignaton, Christine Chambo

    2016-01-01

    The Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) is an uncommon disorder caused by a mutation in Patched, tumor suppressor gene. It is mainly characterized by numerous early onset basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic cysts of jaw and skeletal abnormalities. Due to the wide clinical spectrum, treatment and management of its modalities are not standardized and should be individualized and monitored by a multidisciplinary team. We report a typical case in a 30-year-old man with multiple basal cell carcinomas, keratotic pits of palmar creases and bifid ribs, with a history of several corrective surgeries for keratocystic odontogenic tumors, among other lesions characteristic of the syndrome. PMID:27579759

  2. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Polycystic Ovary Syndrome KidsHealth > For Teens > Polycystic Ovary Syndrome A A ... condition called polycystic ovary sydrome (PCOS) . What Is Polycystic Ovary Syndrome? Polycystic (pronounced: pol-ee-SISS-tik) ovary syndrome ...

  3. Guillain-Barré Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Guillain-Barré Syndrome KidsHealth > For Kids > Guillain-Barré Syndrome Print ... Is GBS Treated? Recovering From GBS What Is Guillain-Barré Syndrome? Guillain-Barré syndrome (say: GHEE-yan bah- ...

  4. The Source for Syndromes 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Gail J.; Hoge, Debra Reichert

    Designed for practicing speech-language pathologists, this book discusses different lesser-known syndrome disabilities, pertinent speech-language characteristics, and goals and strategies to begin intervention efforts at a preschool level. Chapters address: (1) Apert syndrome; (2) Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome; (3) CHARGE syndrome; (4) Cri-du-Chat…

  5. The Source for Syndromes 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Gail J.; Hoge, Debra Reichert

    Designed for practicing speech-language pathologists, this book discusses different lesser-known syndrome disabilities, pertinent speech-language characteristics, and goals and strategies to begin intervention efforts at a preschool level. Chapters address: (1) Apert syndrome; (2) Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome; (3) CHARGE syndrome; (4) Cri-du-Chat…

  6. [Central infantile hypotonia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Lesný, I; Prosková, M; Lehovský, M

    1989-04-14

    Czechoslovak child neurologists devoted much attention to central infantile hypotonic syndrome (CIHS) in a series of investigations conducted in 1959-1986. They found that it is a developmental syndrome caused by affection of the immature brain, and later, at the age of 3-5 years, it disappears or transforms into other syndromes: most frequently cerebellar syndromes and developmental disintegrations (disintegration of the development of the CNS and medium-grade mental retardation). These groups overlap only little. From the hypotonic syndrome also the spastic syndrome or minor cerebral syndromes may develop. CIHS has, similarly as some other manifestations of CNS affections, multiple causes. One of them is most probably a defect of or lack of development of facilitating pathways of gamma fibres from the cerebellum or possibly from the reticular formation of the brain stem to the spinal cord; another probable cause is longer immaturity of the afferent system (which leads finally to developmental disintegration). It may be assumed that the facilitating systems of pathways develop later and are thus more immature and therefore more vulnerable. According to the latest information it seems that in CIHS also the muscular component participates as prenatal cerebral affections can cause myopathy with hypotonia.

  7. Revisiting HELLP syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dusse, Luci Maria; Alpoim, Patrícia Nessralla; Silva, Juliano Teixeira; Rios, Danyelle Romana Alves; Brandão, Augusto Henriques; Cabral, Antônio Carlos Vieira

    2015-12-07

    HELLP syndrome was first described in 1982 by Weinstein et al. and the term HELLP refers to an acronym used to describe the clinical condition that leads to hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets. The syndrome frequency varies from 0.5 to 0.9% pregnancies and manifests preferentially between the 27th and 37th week of gestation. Approximately 30% of cases occur after delivery. Although the etiopathogenesis of this syndrome remains unclear, histopathologic findings in the liver include intravascular fibrin deposits that presumably may lead to hepatic sinusoidal obstruction, intrahepatic vascular congestion, and increased intrahepatic pressure with ensuing hepatic necrosis, intraparenchymal and subcapsular hemorrhage, and eventually capsular rupture. Typical clinical symptoms of HELLP syndrome are pain in the right upper quadrant abdomen or epigastric pain, nausea and vomiting. However, this syndrome can present nonspecific symptoms and the diagnosis may be difficult to be established. Laboratory tests and imaging exams are essential for differential diagnosis with other clinical conditions. Treatment of HELLP syndrome with corticosteroids, targeting both lung maturation of the fetus is still an uncertain clinical value. In conclusion, three decades after the tireless efforts of Dr. Weinstein to characterize HELLP syndrome, it remains a challenge to the scientific community and several questions need to be answered for the benefit of pregnant women.

  8. Dysmobility syndrome: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Keith D; Farrier, Kaela; Russell, Melissa; Burton, Elissa

    2017-01-01

    Background A new term, dysmobility syndrome, has recently been described as a new approach to identify older people at risk of poor health outcomes. The aim was to undertake a systematic review of the existing research literature on dysmobility syndrome. Method All articles reporting dysmobility syndrome were identified in a systematic review of Medline (Proquest), CINAHL, PubMed, PsycInfo, EMBASE, and Scopus databases. Key characteristics of identified studies were extracted and summarized. Results The systematic review identified five papers (three cross-sectional, one case control, and one longitudinal study). No intervention studies were identified. Prevalence of dysmobility syndrome varied between studies (22%–34% in three of the studies). Dysmobility syndrome was shown to be associated with reduced function, increased falls and fractures, and a longitudinal study showed its significant association with mortality. Conclusion Early research on dysmobility syndrome indicates that it may be a useful classification approach to identify older people at risk of adverse health outcomes and to target for early interventions. Future research needs to standardize the optimal mix of measures and cut points, and investigate whether balance performance may be a more useful factor than history of falls for dysmobility syndrome. PMID:28144132

  9. Vascular compression syndromes.

    PubMed

    Czihal, Michael; Banafsche, Ramin; Hoffmann, Ulrich; Koeppel, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Dealing with vascular compression syndromes is one of the most challenging tasks in Vascular Medicine practice. This heterogeneous group of disorders is characterised by external compression of primarily healthy arteries and/or veins as well as accompanying nerval structures, carrying the risk of subsequent structural vessel wall and nerve damage. Vascular compression syndromes may severely impair health-related quality of life in affected individuals who are typically young and otherwise healthy. The diagnostic approach has not been standardised for any of the vascular compression syndromes. Moreover, some degree of positional external compression of blood vessels such as the subclavian and popliteal vessels or the celiac trunk can be found in a significant proportion of healthy individuals. This implies important difficulties in differentiating physiological from pathological findings of clinical examination and diagnostic imaging with provocative manoeuvres. The level of evidence on which treatment decisions regarding surgical decompression with or without revascularisation can be relied on is generally poor, mostly coming from retrospective single centre studies. Proper patient selection is critical in order to avoid overtreatment in patients without a clear association between vascular compression and clinical symptoms. With a focus on the thoracic outlet-syndrome, the median arcuate ligament syndrome and the popliteal entrapment syndrome, the present article gives a selective literature review on compression syndromes from an interdisciplinary vascular point of view.

  10. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Jonathan A.; Sawaya, Ronald Andari; Friedenberg, Frank K.

    2013-01-01

    Coinciding with the increasing rates of cannabis abuse has been the recognition of a new clinical condition known as Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is characterized by chronic cannabis use, cyclic episodes of nausea and vomiting, and frequent hot bathing. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome occurs by an unknown mechanism. Despite the well-established anti-emetic properties of marijuana, there is increasing evidence of its paradoxical effects on the gastrointestinal tract and CNS. Tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, and cannabigerol are three cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant with opposing effects on the emesis response. The clinical course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome may be divided into three phases: prodromal, hyperemetic, and recovery phase. The hyperemetic phase usually ceases within 48 hours, and treatment involves supportive therapy with fluid resuscitation and anti-emetic medications. Patients often demonstrate the learned behavior of frequent hot bathing, which produces temporary cessation of nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. The broad differential diagnosis of nausea and vomiting often leads to delay in the diagnosis of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome shares several similarities with CHS and the two conditions are often confused. Knowledge of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and natural course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is limited and requires further investigation. PMID:22150623

  11. Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Galli, Jonathan A; Sawaya, Ronald Andari; Friedenberg, Frank K

    2011-12-01

    Coinciding with the increasing rates of cannabis abuse has been the recognition of a new clinical condition known as Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is characterized by chronic cannabis use, cyclic episodes of nausea and vomiting, and frequent hot bathing. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome occurs by an unknown mechanism. Despite the well-established anti-emetic properties of marijuana, there is increasing evidence of its paradoxical effects on the gastrointestinal tract and CNS. Tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, and cannabigerol are three cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant with opposing effects on the emesis response. The clinical course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome may be divided into three phases: prodromal, hyperemetic, and recovery phase. The hyperemetic phase usually ceases within 48 hours, and treatment involves supportive therapy with fluid resuscitation and anti-emetic medications. Patients often demonstrate the learned behavior of frequent hot bathing, which produces temporary cessation of nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. The broad differential diagnosis of nausea and vomiting often leads to delay in the diagnosis of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome shares several similarities with CHS and the two conditions are often confused. Knowledge of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and natural course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is limited and requires further investigation.

  12. Loin pain hematuria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Taba Taba Vakili, Sahar; Alam, Tausif; Sollinger, Hans

    2014-09-01

    Loin pain hematuria syndrome is a rare disease with a prevalence of ∼0.012%. The most prominent clinical features include periods of severe intermittent or persistent unilateral or bilateral loin pain accompanied by either microscopic or gross hematuria. Patients with loin pain hematuria syndrome initially present with hematuria, flank pain, or most often both hematuria and flank pain. Kidney biopsies from patients with loin pain hematuria typically reveal only minor pathologic abnormalities. Further, loin pain hematuria syndrome is not associated with loss of kidney function or urinary tract infections. Loin pain hematuria syndrome-associated hematuria and pain are postulated to be linked to vascular disease of the kidney, coagulopathy, renal vasospasm with microinfarction, hypersensitivity, complement activation on arterioles, venocalyceal fistula, abnormal ureteral peristalsis, and intratubular deposition of calcium or uric acid microcrystals. Many patients with loin pain hematuria syndrome also meet criteria for a somatoform disorder, and analgesic medications, including narcotics, commonly are used to treat loin pain hematuria syndrome-associated pain. Interventional treatments include renal denervation, kidney autotransplantation, and nephrectomy; however, these methods should be used only as a last resort when less invasive measures have been tried unsuccessfully. In this review article, we discuss and critique current clinical practices related to loin pain hematuria syndrome pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.

  13. UV-sensitive syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Graciela

    2005-09-04

    UV-sensitive syndrome (UV(S)S) is a human DNA repair-deficiency disorder with mild clinical manifestations. In contrast to other disorders with photosensitivity, no neurological or developmental abnormalities and no predisposition to cancer have been reported. The cellular and biochemical responses of UV(S)S and Cockayne syndrome (CS) cells to UV light are indistinguishable, and result from defective transcription-coupled repair of photoproducts in expressed genes [G. Spivak, T. Itoh, T. Matsunaga, O. Nikaido, P. Hanawalt, M. Yamaizumi, Ultra violet-sensitive syndrome cells are defective in transcription-coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, DNA Repair, 1, 2002, 629-643]. The severe neurological and developmental deficiency characteristic of CS may arise from unresolved blockage of transcription at oxidative DNA lesions, which could result in excessive cell death and/or attenuated transcription. We have proposed that individuals with UV(S)S develop normally because they are proficient in repair of oxidative base damage or in transcriptional bypass of these lesions; consistent with this hypothesis, CS-B cells, but not UV(S)S cells, are deficient in host cell reactivation of plasmids containing oxidative base lesions [G. Spivak, P. Hanawalt, Host cell reactivation of plasmids containing oxidative DNA lesions is defective in Cockayne syndrome but normal in UV-sensitive syndrome, 2005, submitted for publication]. In this review, I will summarize the current understanding of the UV-sensitive syndrome and compare it with the Cockayne syndrome.

  14. [Dysmorphic neonatal syndrome and Ogilvie syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rendón-Medina, Marco Aurelio

    Acute colonic pseudo-obstruction, or Ogilvie syndrome, is a motility abnormality characterised by rapid and progressive dilation of the large intestine. To achieve a diagnosis it is fundamental to exclude mechanical obstruction with imaging studies such as computer axial tomography. The combined incidence of Ogilvie and dysmorphic syndrome has not been described. Female patient of 28 years old with a history of infant cerebral palsy came to emergency room with 4 days of intestinal obstruction. She had hypokalaemia that was reverted, but persisted with obstruction. Later after 72h with recovery of fluids and electrolytes and administration of prokinetics, the obstruction reversed. She was discharged with no complications. Non-invasive medical treatment solves most cases. Promising results have been achieved with neostigmine. In the event of no response to drug therapy, the next step is endoscopic treatment. Even with high recurrence this is preferred due to its lower level of complications in contrast to surgical decompression. Neonatal dysmorphic syndrome is often associated with disorders of the central nervous system. So far, there have been no reports on the incidence of this disease with Ogilvie syndrome, although 9% of cases have been described as associated with neurological events. Conservative management in this disease is the initial approach. Interventions should be reserved for when conservative treatment fails. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  15. Rare case of nephrotic syndrome: Schimke syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Anna Kelly Krislane de Vasconcelos; Torres, Luiz Fernando Oliveira; Silva, Ana Corina Brainer Amorim da; Dantas, Adrianna Barros Leal; Zuntini, Káthia Liliane da Cunha Ribeiro; Aguiar, Lia Cordeiro Bastos

    2016-01-01

    Schimke syndrome corresponds to dysplasia of bone and immunity, associated with progressive renal disease secondary to nephrotic syndrome cortico-resistant, with possible other abnormalities such as hypothyroidism and blond marrow aplasia. It is a rare genetic disorder, with few reports in the literature. The most frequent renal involvement is nephrotic syndrome with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and progressive renal failure. The objective of this study was to report a case of Schimke syndrome, diagnostic investigation and management of the case. Resumo A síndrome Schimke corresponde à displasia imuno-óssea, associada à doença renal progressiva secundária à síndrome nefrótica córtico-resistente, podendo haver outras anormalidades como hipotireoidismo e aplasia de medula óssea. Trata-se de uma patologia genética rara, com poucos relatos na literatura. O acometimento renal mais frequente é uma síndrome nefrótica por glomeruloesclerose segmentar e focal e falência renal progressiva. O objetivo deste estudo foi relatar um caso de síndrome de Schimke, investigação diagnóstica e condução do caso.

  16. Personality and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Paul T.; Uda, Manuela; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schlessinger, David; Terracciano, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome has paralleled the sharp increase in obesity. Given its tremendous physical, emotional, and financial burden, it is of critical importance to identify who is most at risk and the potential points of intervention. Psychological traits, in addition to physiological and social risk factors, may contribute to metabolic syndrome. The objective of the present research is to test whether personality traits are associated with metabolic syndrome in a large community sample. Participants (N = 5,662) from Sardinia, Italy, completed a comprehensive personality questionnaire, the NEO-PI-R, and were assessed on all components of metabolic syndrome (waist circumference, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, blood pressure, and fasting glucose). Logistic regressions were used to predict metabolic syndrome from personality traits, controlling for age, sex, education, and current smoking status. Among adults over age 45 (n = 2,419), Neuroticism and low Agreeableness were associated with metabolic syndrome, whereas high Conscientiousness was protective. Individuals who scored in the top 10% on Conscientiousness were approximately 40% less likely to have metabolic syndrome (OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.41–0.92), whereas those who scored in the lowest 10% on Agreeableness were 50% more likely to have it (OR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.09–2.16). At the facet level, traits related to impulsivity and hostility were the most strongly associated with metabolic syndrome. The present research indicates that those with fewer psychological resources are more vulnerable to metabolic syndrome and suggests a psychological component to other established risk factors. PMID:20567927

  17. Michels syndrome, Carnevale syndrome, OSA syndrome, and Malpuech syndrome: variable expression of a single disorder (3MC syndrome)?

    PubMed

    Titomanlio, Luigi; Bennaceur, Selim; Bremond-Gignac, Dominique; Baumann, Clarisse; Dupuy, Olivier; Verloes, Alain

    2005-09-01

    We report on a 3-year-old girl with Michels syndrome, a rare condition characterized by craniosynostosis, blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthus inversus, cleft lip/palate, abnormal supra-umbilical abdominal wall, and mental deficiency. The phenotypic findings are compared with the six previously reported Michels cases, and with patients referred to as Carnevale, OSA, and Malpuech syndromes. Michels syndrome is characterized by cleft lip and palate, anterior chamber anomalies, blepharophimosis, epicanthus inversus, and craniosynostosis. Carnevale syndrome shows hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, ptosis, strabismus synophrys, large and fleshy ears, and lozenge-shaped diastasis around the umbilicus. OSA syndrome resembles Carnevale, with humeroradial synostoses, and spinal anomalies as extra features. Malpuech syndrome shows IUGR, hypertelorism, cleft lip and palate, micropenis, hypospadias, renal anomalies, and caudal appendage. All are autosomal recessive. Despite the presence of apparently distinctive key features, it appears that these four entities share multiple similarities in the facial Gestalt and the pattern of MCA. Those similarities lead us to postulate that they belong to the same spectrum, which could be referred to as "3MC syndrome" (Malpuech-Michels-Mingarelli-Carnevale syndrome).

  18. Iliotibial band friction syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Published articles on iliotibial band friction syndrome have been reviewed. These articles cover the epidemiology, etiology, anatomy, pathology, prevention, and treatment of the condition. This article describes (1) the various etiological models that have been proposed to explain iliotibial band friction syndrome; (2) some of the imaging methods, research studies, and clinical experiences that support or call into question these various models; (3) commonly proposed treatment methods for iliotibial band friction syndrome; and (4) the rationale behind these methods and the clinical outcome studies that support their efficacy. PMID:21063495

  19. Cantu syndrome and lymphoedema.

    PubMed

    García-Cruz, Diana; Mampel, Alejandra; Echeverria, Maria I; Vargas, Ana L; Castañeda-Cisneros, Gema; Davalos-Rodriguez, Nory; Patiño-Garcia, Brenda; Garcia-Cruz, Maria O; Castañeda, Victor; Cardona, Ernesto G; Marin-Solis, Bertha; Cantu, Jose M; Nuñez-Reveles, Nelly; Moran-Moguel, Cristina; Thavanati, Pavarthi K R; Ramirez-Garcia, Sergio; Sanchez-Corona, Jose

    2011-01-01

    Three female patients with Cantu syndrome were studied, two of whom were adults presenting with the complication of lymphoedema, as described earlier in a male patient with this syndrome. The aim of this study is to report the clinical characteristics of these three new cases and to emphasize that lymphoedema, as observed in two of the patients described here, has been observed in 11.5% of patients with Cantu syndrome and that heterochromia iridis, observed in one patient, is probably a new feature of this condition.

  20. The Mirizzi syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Pemberton, M.; Wells, A. D.

    1997-01-01

    The Mirizzi syndrome is an unusual presentation of gallstones which occurs when a gallstone becomes impacted in either Hartmann's pouch of the gallbladder or the cystic duct, causing obstruction of the common hepatic duct by extrinsic compression. The diagnosis of this syndrome is of importance because surgery in its presence is associated with an increased incidence of bile duct injury. The pathology, clinical presentation and management of this syndrome are discussed, and several illustrative case reports presented. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9307740

  1. Dostoevsky and Stendhal's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Amâncio, Edson José

    2005-12-01

    Stendhal's syndrome occurs among travelers when they encounter a work of art of great beauty. It is characterized by an altered perception of reality, emotional disturbances, and crises of panic and anxiety with somatization. The patient profile described originally for this syndrome was of particularly sensitive individuals who were admirers of works or art: artists, poets, writers and art students, among others. The Russian writer Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky suffered from epilepsy and there is evidence that he presented the symptoms of Stendahl's syndrome while contemplating some works of art, particularly when viewing Hans Holbein's masterpiece, Dead Christ, during a visit to the museum in Basle.

  2. Ischemic bilateral opercular syndrome.

    PubMed

    Milanlioglu, Aysel; Aydın, Mehmet Nuri; Gökgül, Alper; Hamamcı, Mehmet; Erkuzu, Mehmet Atilla; Tombul, Temel

    2013-01-01

    Opercular syndrome, also known as Foix-Chavany-Marie syndrome, is a paralysis of the facial, pharyngeal, masticatory, tongue, laryngeal, and brachial muscles. It is a rare cortical form of pseudobulbar palsies caused by vascular insults to bilateral operculum. Its clinical presentations include anarthria, weakness of voluntary muscles involving face, tongue, pharynx, larynx, and masticatory muscles. However, autonomic reflexes and emotional activities of these structures are preserved. In the present case, an 81-year-old male presented with acute onset of anarthria with difficulties in chewing, speaking, and swallowing that was diagnosed with opercular syndrome.

  3. Iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lavine, Ronald

    2010-07-20

    Published articles on iliotibial band friction syndrome have been reviewed. These articles cover the epidemiology, etiology, anatomy, pathology, prevention, and treatment of the condition. This article describes (1) the various etiological models that have been proposed to explain iliotibial band friction syndrome; (2) some of the imaging methods, research studies, and clinical experiences that support or call into question these various models; (3) commonly proposed treatment methods for iliotibial band friction syndrome; and (4) the rationale behind these methods and the clinical outcome studies that support their efficacy.

  4. Hydrocephalus in pfeiffer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moore, M H; Hanieh, A

    1994-07-01

    A review of the clinical records and CT scan findings of 11 patients with Pfeiffer syndrome showed ventricular dilation in the majority. In 7 cases the ventriculomegaly was sufficiently severe as to be classified as hydrocephalus and warrant ventricular shunting. The common co-existence of hydrocephalus and multiple premature sutural fusion in Pfeiffer syndrome is a further factor in the apparently worse prognosis of this condition when compared to Crouzon and Apert syndrome. Primary cerebral anomalies as a causative factor for the development of hydrocephalus are infrequently recorded. Extensive craniosynostosis with cranial base distortion and constriction would appear to contribute to the production of hydrocephalus.

  5. Iliopsoas Syndrome in Dancers

    PubMed Central

    Laible, Catherine; Swanson, David; Garofolo, Garret; Rose, Donald J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coxa saltans refers to a constellation of diagnoses that cause snapping of the hip and is a major cause of anterior hip pain in dancers. When the internal type is accompanied by weakness or pain, it is referred to as iliopsoas syndrome. Iliopsoas syndrome is the result of repetitive active hip flexion in abduction and can be confused with other hip pathology, most commonly of labral etiology. Purpose: To report the incidence, clinical findings, treatment protocol, and results of treatment for iliopsoas syndrome in a population of dancers. Study Design: Retrospective case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A retrospective database review of 653 consecutive patients evaluated for musculoskeletal complaints over a 3-year period was completed. The diagnosis of iliopsoas syndrome was made based on anterior hip or groin pain, weakness with resisted hip flexion in abduction, or symptomatic clicking or snapping with a positive iliopsoas test. Patients identified with iliopsoas syndrome were further stratified according to age at time of onset, insidious versus acute onset, duration of symptoms, side of injury, presence of rest pain, pain with activities of daily living, and associated lower back pain. All patients diagnosed with iliopsoas syndrome underwent physical therapy, including hip flexor stretching and strengthening, pelvic mobilization, and modification of dance technique or exposure as required. Results: A total of 49 dancers were diagnosed and treated for iliopsoas syndrome. Within this injured population of 653 patients, the incidence in female dancers was 9.2%, significantly higher than that in male dancers (3.2%). The mean age at the time of injury was 24.6 years. The incidence of iliopsoas syndrome in dancers younger than 18 years was 12.8%, compared with 7% in dancers older than 18 years. Student dancers had the highest incidence (14%), followed by amateur dancers (7.5%), while professional dancers had the lowest incidence (4.6%). All

  6. Iliopsoas Syndrome in Dancers.

    PubMed

    Laible, Catherine; Swanson, David; Garofolo, Garret; Rose, Donald J

    2013-08-01

    Coxa saltans refers to a constellation of diagnoses that cause snapping of the hip and is a major cause of anterior hip pain in dancers. When the internal type is accompanied by weakness or pain, it is referred to as iliopsoas syndrome. Iliopsoas syndrome is the result of repetitive active hip flexion in abduction and can be confused with other hip pathology, most commonly of labral etiology. To report the incidence, clinical findings, treatment protocol, and results of treatment for iliopsoas syndrome in a population of dancers. Retrospective case series; Level of evidence, 4. A retrospective database review of 653 consecutive patients evaluated for musculoskeletal complaints over a 3-year period was completed. The diagnosis of iliopsoas syndrome was made based on anterior hip or groin pain, weakness with resisted hip flexion in abduction, or symptomatic clicking or snapping with a positive iliopsoas test. Patients identified with iliopsoas syndrome were further stratified according to age at time of onset, insidious versus acute onset, duration of symptoms, side of injury, presence of rest pain, pain with activities of daily living, and associated lower back pain. All patients diagnosed with iliopsoas syndrome underwent physical therapy, including hip flexor stretching and strengthening, pelvic mobilization, and modification of dance technique or exposure as required. A total of 49 dancers were diagnosed and treated for iliopsoas syndrome. Within this injured population of 653 patients, the incidence in female dancers was 9.2%, significantly higher than that in male dancers (3.2%). The mean age at the time of injury was 24.6 years. The incidence of iliopsoas syndrome in dancers younger than 18 years was 12.8%, compared with 7% in dancers older than 18 years. Student dancers had the highest incidence (14%), followed by amateur dancers (7.5%), while professional dancers had the lowest incidence (4.6%). All patients responded to conservative treatment, and no

  7. Van Gogh syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roka, Y B; Thapa, R; Puri, P R; Aryal, S

    2011-04-01

    Self injury is the intentional and direct injury to self that include bite, burn, ulceration and head banging. These injuries are rarely fatal and are usually not suicidal in nature. This behavior is common among adolescents, psychiatric patients and in females. Bipolar disorder, drug abuse and metabolic syndromes like LeschNyhan and Munchausen's syndrome are often associated with this disorder. Repetitive self mutilation is termed the Van Gogh syndrome after the famous painter who cut off his ear and gave it to a prostitute. We describe two such cases of self mutilation in schizophrenic patients.

  8. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome.

    PubMed

    Forbes, N; Walwyn, M; Rao, G; Ellis, D; Lee, M G

    2013-03-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is a rare congenital, vascular disorder affecting one or more limbs. The syndrome is characterized by capillary malformations, soft tissue or bony hypertrophy and varicose veins or venous malformations. We present a case of this disorder in a twelve-year old boy who had an enlarged right lower limb with varicosities. Investigations revealed extensive superficial and deep venous varices, with dilatation of the right common iliac and external iliac veins. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome should be suspected in a child presenting with capillary haemangioma and an enlarged limb.

  9. [Unusual pyramidal pathology syndrome].

    PubMed

    Baliasnyĭ, M M; Tatsiĭ, N P

    1989-01-01

    A syndrome is described comprising: 1, impossibility to close only one eye (right or left) at a time, or each eye alternatively with intact capability of closing both eyes; 2, unvoluntary screwing up of an eye during voluntary closing of another (palpebro-palpebral synkinesia); 3, head turning to the side of an eye closed (palpebrocervical synkinesia); 4, with the hands clenched, left thumb is over the right, as is the left arm over the right when folded. The syndrome is supposed to be related with consealed lefthandedness which is presumably indicative of lateralization of the dominant speech center. If this is correct, the syndrome may have a distinct topical diagnostic value.

  10. [Asperger's syndrome in females].

    PubMed

    Waris, Petra; Kulomäki, Tuula; Tani, Pekka

    2011-01-01

    Literature on Asperger's syndrome (AS) has mainly described symptoms that are manifested in boys. Only recently, attention has been paid on the features in AS girls that differ from the typical clinical picture and may complicate the detection of the syndrome. Because AS girls may react passively in general or compensate or hide their difficulties by other abilities, the need for support is not necessarily brought up. In that case this developmental disorder easily remains unrecognized. Recognition of the syndrome at an early stage makes early supportive actions possible.

  11. Anton's Syndrome and Eugenics

    PubMed Central

    Frahm-Falkenberg, Siska

    2011-01-01

    Anton's syndrome is arguably the most striking form of anosognosia. Patients with this syndrome behave as if they can see despite their obvious blindness. Although best known for his description of asomatognosia and visual anosognosia, Gabriel Anton (1858-1933) made other significant contributions to the clinical neurosciences, including pioneering work in neurosurgery, neuropsychology, and child psychiatry. However, it has not been recognized in the English literature that Anton was also a dedicated advocate of eugenics and racial hygiene. This paper provides a case of Anton's syndrome and puts the works of Gabriel Anton into their historic context. PMID:21779298

  12. Mobious syndrome: MR findings

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Maskal Revanna; Vaishali, Dhulappa Mudabasappagol; Vedaraju, Kadaba Shamachar; Nagaraj, Bangalore Rangaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Möbius syndrome is an extremely rare congenital disorder. We report a case of Möbius syndrome in a 2-year-old girl with bilateral convergent squint and left-sided facial weakness. The characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of Möbius syndrome, which include absent bilateral abducens nerves and absent left facial nerve, were noted. In addition, there was absence of left anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) and absence of bilateral facial colliculi. Clinical features, etiology, and imaging findings are discussed. PMID:28104946

  13. Ischemic Bilateral Opercular Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Milanlioglu, Aysel; Aydın, Mehmet Nuri; Gökgül, Alper; Hamamcı, Mehmet; Erkuzu, Mehmet Atilla; Tombul, Temel

    2013-01-01

    Opercular syndrome, also known as Foix-Chavany-Marie syndrome, is a paralysis of the facial, pharyngeal, masticatory, tongue, laryngeal, and brachial muscles. It is a rare cortical form of pseudobulbar palsies caused by vascular insults to bilateral operculum. Its clinical presentations include anarthria, weakness of voluntary muscles involving face, tongue, pharynx, larynx, and masticatory muscles. However, autonomic reflexes and emotional activities of these structures are preserved. In the present case, an 81-year-old male presented with acute onset of anarthria with difficulties in chewing, speaking, and swallowing that was diagnosed with opercular syndrome. PMID:23476665

  14. Joint hypermobility syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fikree, Asma; Aziz, Qasim; Grahame, Rodney

    2013-05-01

    Although perceived as a rare condition, joint hypermobility syndrome is common. Its prevalence in rheumatology clinics is extremely high. Early estimates suggest that it may be the most common of all rheumatologic conditions. The problem lies in the general lack of awareness of the syndrome, its means of recognition, and the resultant failure to diagnose it correctly when present. It is a worldwide problem. This article provides an overview of hypermobility and hypermobility syndrome, stressing its multisystemic nature and the negative impact that it may have on quality of life, with particular reference to gastrointestinal involvement.

  15. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... breathing during sleep Insulin resistance Metabolic syndrome, a group of risk factors for heart disease and type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes Obesity Heart disease and high blood pressure (cardiovascular disease) Mood disorders Endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial ...

  16. Dumping syndrome (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Dumping syndrome occurs when the contents of the stomach empty too quickly into the small intestine. The ... causing nausea, cramping, diarrhea, sweating, faintness, and palpitations. Dumping usually occurs after the consumption of too much ...

  17. Learning about Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Girls with Turner Syndrome are usually of normal intelligence with good verbal skills and reading skills. Some ... obtain cells from the unborn baby for chromosomal analysis. If a diagnosis is confirmed prenatally, the baby ...

  18. Shaken baby syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Shaken baby syndrome is a severe form of child abuse caused by violently shaking an infant or child. ... the baby. Still, it is a form of child abuse . Injuries are most likely to happen when the ...

  19. Munchausen by Proxy Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome (MBPS) is a relatively rare form of child abuse that involves the exaggeration or fabrication of illnesses ... by a primary caretaker. Also known as "medical child abuse," MBPS was named after Baron von Munchausen, an ...

  20. Tarsal tunnel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Tibial nerve dysfunction; Neuropathy - posterior tibial nerve; Peripheral neuropathy - tibial nerve; Tibial nerve entrapment ... tunnel syndrome is an unusual form of peripheral neuropathy . It occurs when there is damage to the ...

  1. Cri du chat syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... slow growth Low-set or abnormally shaped ears Intellectual disability Partial webbing or fusing of fingers or toes ... Groups 5P- Society -- www.fivepminus.org Outlook (Prognosis) Intellectual disability is common. Half of children with this syndrome ...

  2. Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Guillain-Barre syndrome is a rare disorder that causes your immune system to attack your peripheral nervous system ( ... over a period of weeks and then stabilize. Guillain-Barre can be hard to diagnose. Possible tests include ...

  3. Lesch-Nyhan syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... motor development followed by abnormal movements and increased reflexes. A striking feature of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome is ... a physical exam. The exam may show: Increased reflexes Spasticity (having spasms) Blood and urine tests may ...

  4. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... regional pain syndrome is an uncommon form of chronic pain that usually affects an arm or a ... I need? Is my condition likely temporary or chronic? What types of treatments are available? Which do ...

  5. Empty sella syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... sella syndrome is a condition in which the pituitary gland shrinks or becomes flattened. ... The pituitary gland is a small gland located just underneath the brain. It is attached to the bottom of the ...

  6. Short bowel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Small intestine insufficiency; Short gut syndrome; Necrotizing enterocolitis - short bowel ... The small intestine absorbs much of the nutrients found in foods we eat. When one half or more of our small ...

  7. Catastrophic Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    El-Abedin, Zein; Abdel Aziz, Rashad; Talat, Ibrahim; Saleh, Mohammed; Abdel-Samia, Hanna; Sameh, Amro; Sharha, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports one case of successfully treated patients suffering from a rare entity, the catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS). Management of this patient is discussed in detail. PMID:27375916

  8. The obesity hypoventilation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Olson, Amy L; Zwillich, Clifford

    2005-09-01

    The obesity hypoventilation syndrome, which is defined as a combination of obesity and chronic hypoventilation, utimately results in pulmonary hypertension, cor pulmonale, and probable early mortality. Since the classical description of this syndrome nearly fifty years ago, research has led to a better understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in this disease process, and to the development of effective treatment options. However, recent data indicate the obesity hypoventilation syndrome is under-recognized, and under-treated. Because obesity has become a national epidemic, it is critical that physicians are able to recognize and treat obesity-associated diseases. This article reviews current definitions of the obesity hypoventilation syndrome, clinical presentation and diagnosis, present understanding of the pathophysiology, and treatment options.

  9. The obesity hypoventilation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Powers, Mark Anthony

    2008-12-01

    We only need to look around us to see that we are in an epidemic of obesity and obesity-related medical problems. The obesity hypoventilation syndrome is a disorder in which an obese person with normal lungs chronically hypoventilates. Obesity impairs ventilatory mechanics, increases the work of breathing and carbon dioxide production, results in respiratory muscle dysfunction, and reduces ventilatory response to hypercapnia. Sleep-disordered breathing is present in most patients with the obesity hypoventilation syndrome. When noninvasive ventilation can be successfully introduced, hypoventilation can usually be corrected. Weight loss is the desirable long-term treatment for the obesity hypoventilation syndrome. This paper concisely overviews the physiologic factors that lead to the obesity hypoventilation syndrome and discusses therapies for it.

  10. Ramsay Hunt Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. After chickenpox clears, the virus lies dormant in your nerves. ... Hunt syndrome occurs in people who've had chickenpox. Once you recover from chickenpox, that virus can ...

  11. International Rett Syndrome Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... your state! State Resources Rettsyndrome.org is the world's leading Rett syndrome research funding organization We have ... toward treatments for millions of people around the world with Autism, Parkinson's, Alzheimers, Schizophrenia and Traumatic Brain ...

  12. Congenital nephrotic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be high. There may be signs of malnutrition. A urinalysis reveals fat and large amounts of ... The disorder often leads to infection, malnutrition, and kidney failure. ... die within the first year. Congenital nephrotic syndrome ...

  13. Post-splenectomy syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001290.htm Post-splenectomy syndrome To use the sharing features on ... Sabiston Textbook of Surgery: The Biological Basis of Modern Surgical Practice . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017: ...

  14. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. ... in skin temperature, color, or texture Intense burning pain Extreme skin sensitivity Swelling and stiffness in affected ...

  15. Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of bacteria often found in undercooked poultry Influenza virus Epstein-Barr virus HIV, the virus that causes AIDS Mycoplasma pneumonia Surgery Hodgkin's lymphoma Rarely, influenza vaccinations or childhood vaccinations Guillain-Barre syndrome affects ...

  16. Acute coronary syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndromes: a report of the American College of Cardiology/ American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. ... risk: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. ...

  17. Metabolic Syndrome (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of high blood pressure, heart attack, or stroke. Insulin resistance . This occurs when the body's cells don't ... Polycystic ovarian syndrome. Thought to be related to insulin resistance, this disorder involves the release of extra male ...

  18. Marfan Syndrome (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Doctors & Hospitals Q&A Recipes En Español Teachers - Looking for Health Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the ... other talents and interests. Keep in touch with teachers and explain that even though Marfan syndrome doesn' ...

  19. Computer Vision Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Susan A

    2017-07-01

    With the increased use of electronic devices with visual displays, computer vision syndrome is becoming a major public health issue. Improving the visual status of workers using computers results in greater productivity in the workplace and improved visual comfort.

  20. Toxic Shock Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... manufacturers pulled certain types of tampons off the market, the incidence of toxic shock syndrome in menstruating ... Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization and proceeds from Web advertising help support ...

  1. Shaken Baby Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Randell C.; Smith, Wilbur L.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the history, epidemiology, biomechanics, diagnosis, treatment, outcomes, long-term management, and prevention of shaken baby syndrome. It presents medical-legal issues as well as a discussion of programs aimed at prevention of physical abuse. (Author/DB)

  2. Loeys-Dietz Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome is a genetic disorder of the body’s connective tissue. It has some features in common with Marfan ... a mutation, growth and development of the body’s connective tissue and other body systems is disrupted, leading to ...

  3. Tourette Syndrome (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... help their child cope with the condition. About Tics Two types of tics are associated with Tourette syndrome: Motor tics — sudden, apparently uncontrollable movements such as exaggerated eye ...

  4. Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the use of herbs, such as ginkgo, ginger, chasteberry, evening primrose oil and St. John's wort. ... Nov. 2, 2014. Khayat S. Effect of treatment with ginger on the severity of premenstrual syndrome symptoms. ISRN ...

  5. Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... through the pain; that can lead to permanent muscle or nerve damage. Sometimes chronic exertional compartment syndrome is mistaken for shin splints, a more common cause of leg pain in young people who do a lot of vigorous weight- ...

  6. Churg-Strauss Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... nose, sneezing and itching. Sinus pain and inflammation (sinusitis). You may experience facial pain and develop nasal ... syndrome have a history of nasal allergies, chronic sinusitis or asthma, which is often severe or hard ...

  7. Identifying Aarskog Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mufeed, Abdullah; Ramachamparambathu, Ashir Kolikkal; Hasoon, Umer

    2016-01-01

    Aarskog syndrome also known as Aarskog-Scott Syndrome, Facio-digito-genital Syndrome or Faciogenital Dysplasia is a rare, X-linked disorder predominantly affecting males, characterized by facial, skeletal and genital anomalies. This is a case report of a 15-year-old male patient who visited our college complaining of poor facial aesthetics. History revealed consanguinity and his sibling to be suffering from the same. A diagnosis of Aarskog syndrome was made based upon the detailed patient history, thorough clinical evaluation and identification of characteristic findings in radiographs. Professional counselling explained him the nature of his condition and treatment options to correct dental anomalies and congenital malformations were advised. PMID:28209013

  8. Distal arthrogryposis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, K. P.; Panigrahi, I.; Ray, M.; Marwaha, R. K.

    2008-01-01

    A 5-month-old male infant presented with weak cry, decreased body movements, tightness of whole body since birth, and one episode of generalized seizure on day 4 of life. He was born at term by elective caesarian section performed for breech presentation. The child had failure to thrive, contractures at elbow and knee joints, hypertonia, microcephaly, small mouth, retrognathia, and camptodactyly. There was global developmental delay. Abdominal examination revealed umbilical and bilateral inguinal hernia. Visual evoked response and brainstem evoked response audiometry were abnormal. Nerve conduction velocity was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain revealed paucity of white matter in bilateral cerebral hemispheres with cerebellar and brain stem atrophy. The differential diagnoses considered in the index patient were distal arthrogryposis (DA) syndrome, cerebroculofacioskeletal syndrome, and Pena Shokier syndrome. The index patient most likely represents a variant of DA: Sheldon Hall syndrome. PMID:20300297

  9. Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a problem that affects the large intestine. It can cause abdominal cramping, bloating, and a change in bowel ... go back and forth between the two. Although IBS can cause a great deal of discomfort, it ...

  10. Stuttering and Tourette's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Teachers Speech-Language Pathologists Physicians Employers Tweet Stuttering and Tourette's Syndrome Parents of Preschoolers Parents of ... to 3 people in 1000. Just as in stuttering, TS is more common in males than females ( ...

  11. Post-Polio Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... first episode of polio. Currently, the most accepted theory regarding the cause of post-polio syndrome rests ... conserve your energy. Moving from one frame of mind to another can be difficult. Here are some ...

  12. Impingement syndrome (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... arch of the shoulder blade, it can cause shoulder pain called impingement syndrome. The tendons become compressed, damaged, and inflamed leading to rotator cuff tendonitis. This can occur ... use of the shoulder like baseball pitching, or from an injury.

  13. Shaken Baby Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Randell C.; Smith, Wilbur L.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the history, epidemiology, biomechanics, diagnosis, treatment, outcomes, long-term management, and prevention of shaken baby syndrome. It presents medical-legal issues as well as a discussion of programs aimed at prevention of physical abuse. (Author/DB)

  14. Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... St. Geme JW, Schor NF. Defects in the metabolism of lipids. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. ... the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Lipid Metabolism Disorders Read more Malabsorption Syndromes Read more Latest ...

  15. Empty Sella Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... who have high levels of prolactin may be given bromocriptine. In some cases, particularly when spinal fluid drainage is observed, surgery may be needed. × Treatment Unless the syndrome results in other medical problems, treatment for endocrine dysfunction ...

  16. 4H Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome appears normal. Symptoms usually start during the second year of life, but patients with normal early childhood and symptoms only from the second decade have been described. Neurological symptoms include: Late ...

  17. Crigler-Najjar syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Seek genetic counseling if you are planning to have children and have a family history of Crigler-Najjar. Call your ... Genetic counseling is recommended for people with a family history of Crigler-Najjar syndrome who want to have ...

  18. Hallermann-Streiff Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jayakar; Ragavi, B Sindhu; Raneesha, PK; Ahmed, N Ashwak; Cynthia, S; Manoharan, D; Manoharan, R

    2013-01-01

    Hallermann-Streiff syndrome (HSS) is a rare disorder characterized by dyscephalia, with facial and dental abnormalities. We report a 12-year-old female child who presented with abnormal facial features, dental abnormalities and sparse scalp hair. PMID:24082185

  19. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Priya Shirish; Deshmukh, Vijay; Golgire, Someshwar

    2012-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an uncommon autosomal dominant inherited disorder, which is characterized by multiple odontogenic Keratocysts and basal cell carcinomas, skeletal, dental, ophthalmic, and neurological abnormalities, intracranial ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri, and facial dysmorphism. Pathogenesis of the syndrome is attributed to abnormalities in the long arm of chromosome 9 (q22.3-q31) and loss or mutations of human patched gene (PTCH1 gene). Diagnosis is based upon established major and minor clinical and radiological criteria and ideally confirmed by deoxyribo nucleic acid analysis. We report a case of a 9-year-old girl presenting with three major and one minor feature of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. Radiologic findings of the syndrome are easily identifiable on Orthopantomogram, chest X-ray, and Computed tomography scans. These investigations prompt an early verification of the disease, which is very important to prevent recurrence and better survival rates from the coexistent diseases.

  20. Turner Syndrome: Other FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... can cause certain learning challenges, including problems learning mathematics and with memory. 7 Most girls and women ... Stanford School of Medicine Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research. (n.d.). Turner syndrome . Retrieved June 26, ...

  1. Melkersson-Rosenthal Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... It can be symptomatic of Crohn's disease or sarcoidosis. × Definition Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome is a rare neurological ... It can be symptomatic of Crohn's disease or sarcoidosis. View Full Definition Treatment Treatment is symptomatic and ...

  2. Ectopic Cushing syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cushing syndrome have: Round, red, and full face ( moon face ) Slow growth rate in children Weight gain ... constitute endorsements of those other sites. Copyright 1997-2017, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial ...

  3. 4H Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... cure for 4H syndrome; treatment is supportive. Is prenatal diagnosis possible? As long as the genetic defect has not been identified, prenatal diagnosis is not possible. How is scientific research on ...

  4. Marfan Syndrome (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... later. People with Marfan syndrome also often have myopia (nearsightedness) and are at greater risk for developing ... be couch potatoes. They can and should play, exercise, and generally be active — they just have to ...

  5. Exploding head syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sharpless, Brian A

    2014-12-01

    Exploding head syndrome is characterized by the perception of abrupt, loud noises when going to sleep or waking up. They are usually painless, but associated with fear and distress. In spite of the fact that its characteristic symptomatology was first described approximately 150 y ago, exploding head syndrome has received relatively little empirical and clinical attention. Therefore, a comprehensive review of the scientific literature using Medline, PsycINFO, Google Scholar, and PubMed was undertaken. After first discussing the history, prevalence, and associated features, the available polysomnography data and five main etiological theories for exploding head syndrome are summarized. None of these theories has yet reached dominance in the field. Next, the various methods used to assess and treat exploding head syndrome are discussed, as well as the limited outcome data. Finally, recommendations for future measure construction, treatment options, and differential diagnosis are provided. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Just a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ligament and bones ... from irritated tendons or other swelling narrows the tunnel and causes the nerve to be compressed. Symptoms ...

  7. Mindy Has Tourette Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connely, Connie

    1992-01-01

    A primary teacher describes what it was like for her to have a first grade student with Tourette Syndrome. After discussing diagnosis and intervention, she makes suggestions for teachers who think they have students with similar problems. (SM)

  8. Sick Sinus Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... occurs in bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome is often atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is a chaotic rhythm of the upper chambers ... to prevent fast rhythms. If you have atrial fibrillation or other abnormal heart rhythms that increase your ...

  9. Blueberries and Metabolic Syndrome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Metabolic Syndrome is a cluster of metabolic disorders that increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Type 2 diabetes, elevated blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidemia are among the metabolic alterations that predispose the individual to several adverse cardiovascular complications. The hea...

  10. Androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Ieuan A; Davies, John D; Bunch, Trevor I; Pasterski, Vickie; Mastroyannopoulou, Kiki; MacDougall, Jane

    2012-10-20

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome in its complete form is a disorder of hormone resistance characterised by a female phenotype in an individual with an XY karyotype and testes producing age-appropriate normal concentrations of androgens. Pathogenesis is the result of mutations in the X-linked androgen receptor gene, which encodes for the ligand-activated androgen receptor--a transcription factor and member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. This Seminar describes the clinical manifestations of androgen insensitivity syndrome from infancy to adulthood, reviews the mechanism of androgen action, and shows examples of how mutations of the androgen receptor gene cause the syndrome. Management of androgen insensitivity syndrome should be undertaken by a multidisciplinary team and include gonadectomy to avoid gonad tumours in later life, appropriate sex-hormone replacement at puberty and beyond, and an emphasis on openness in disclosure.

  11. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disorder that causes extreme fatigue. This fatigue is not the kind of tired feeling that ... activities. The main symptom of CFS is severe fatigue that lasts for 6 months or more. You ...

  12. DHAT SYNDROME REVISITED

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurmeet

    1985-01-01

    SUMMARY Fifty consequetive patients of male potency disorders were examined and classified as Dhat Syndrome, Impotence or Premature ejaculation depending on definition laid down for these. Dhat syndrome has been found predominantly in young adults. Thirty one patients (62%) complained of Dhat as a major symptom. Associated diagnosis was depression (48%) and anxiety neurosis (16%). No psychiatric disorder was noticed in 16 (32%) cases. The socio-demographic relationships are given and difficulty in handling such patients has been discussed. PMID:21927085

  13. Milwaukee shoulder syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pandey, A; Das, S K; Kumar, P; Kumar, M; Meena, D; Garg, V

    2011-05-01

    Milwaukee shoulder syndrome or rapid destructive arthritis of the shoulder; is a particular form of arthritis which affects mainly elderly patients, predominantly women, with limited pain and sometimes neuropathic joints, rotator cuff tear, joint instability, mildly inflammatory or noninflammatory, blood-stained effusion, calcium apatite crystals, and marked joint and bone destruction. This is very uncommon condition and very sparsely reported and so far, there is no case report from India, hence, we report a case of Milwaukee shoulder syndrome from India.

  14. Pellegrini-Stieda syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, J C; Shapiro, M S

    1995-06-01

    The Pellegrini-Stieda "sign" is commonly seen in patients who have a history of trauma to the medial collateral ligament of the knee. Although most are asymptomatic, a few patients will develop the characteristic Pellegrini-Stieda syndrome, which can be severely limiting. When conservative measures fail, surgical treatment consisting of excision of the bony fragment with careful repair of the medial collateral ligament can eradicate the symptoms. This syndrome is reviewed in detail, and an illustrative case report is included.

  15. Horner syndrome: clinical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kanagalingam, Sivashakthi; Miller, Neil R

    2015-01-01

    Horner syndrome consists of unilateral ptosis, an ipsilateral miotic but normally reactive pupil, and in some cases, ipsilateral facial anhidrosis, all resulting from damage to the ipsilateral oculosympathetic pathway. Herein, we review the clinical signs and symptoms that can aid in the diagnosis and localization of a Horner syndrome as well as the causes of the condition. We emphasize that pharmacologic testing can confirm its presence and direct further testing and management. PMID:28539793

  16. Metabolic syndrome update.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Scott M

    2016-05-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a multiplex risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. It is composed of atherogenic dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, insulin resistance and elevated glucose, a pro-thrombotic state, and a pro-inflammatory state. Excess energy intake and concomitant obesity are the major drivers of the syndrome. Lifestyle intervention can reverse metabolic risk factors, but at times, drug therapies or bariatric surgery may be required to control more overt risk factors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. [Thyroid hormone resistance syndromes].

    PubMed

    Bernal, Juan

    2011-04-01

    Thyroid hormone resistance syndromes are a group of genetic conditions characterized by decreased tissue sensitivity to thyroid hormones. Three syndromes, in which resistance to hormone action is respectively due to mutations in the gene encoding for thyroid hormone receptor TRβ, impaired T4 and T3 transport, and impaired conversion of T4 to T3 mediated by deiodinases. An updated review of each of these forms of resistance is provided, and their pathogenetic mechanisms and clinical approaches are discussed.

  18. SYNDROME IN QUESTION*

    PubMed Central

    Chiacchio, Nilton Di; Jasso-Olivares, Julio Cesar; Chiacchio, Nilton Gioia Di; Jacinto, José Antonio; Restrepo, Maria Victoria Suárez

    2015-01-01

    The Iso-Kikuchi Syndrome is a rare condition characterized by nail dysplasia involving the index fingers, including micronychia, polyonychia, anonychia, irregular lunula, malalignment and hemionychogryphosis. On the antero-posterior image, radiologic examination reveals a narrowing of the distal phalanx. The lateral image shows a Y-shaped bifurcation of the distal phalanx. We report a case of a patient with typical clinical and radiologic signs of Iso-Kikuchi Syndrome. PMID:26131880

  19. Multiple pterygium syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Penchaszadeh, V B; Salszberg, B

    1981-01-01

    The multiple pterygium syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive condition characterised by arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, pterygia of the neck, fingers, and antecubital, popliteal, and intercrural areas, growth retardation, and facial, vertebral, and genital anomalies. We present two unrelated patients of 17 and 6 years of age, respectively, affected with this condition. We describe the natural history of their disorder since birth and review the spectrum of phenotypic variation of the multiple pterygium syndrome in 25 published cases. Images PMID:7334504

  20. Supraclavicular nerve entrapment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Douchamps, Frédéric; Courtois, Anne-Catherine; Bruyère, Pierre-Julien; Crielaard, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    Supraclavicular nerve entrapment syndrome, although rare, should be considered among the causes of anterior shoulder girdle pain. This syndrome is usually related to anatomic variants (involving the bone structures, fibrous bands, or muscles and tendons). Computed tomography is the most useful investigation. Medications used to treat neuropathic pain may provide relief. Otherwise, a local glucocorticoid injection or even surgical decompression should be considered. Copyright © 2011 Société française de rhumatologie. All rights reserved.

  1. [Alice in Wonderland syndrome].

    PubMed

    Asensio-Sánchez, V M

    2014-02-01

    A case of Alice in Wonderland syndrome is described as the only sign of Epstein-Barr virus infection. Epstein-Barr virus infection may include visual symptoms as the first or only signs of disease. All patients presenting with a clinical picture consistent with the Alice in Wonderland syndrome should undergo serological testing for Epstein-Barr virus infection. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. [The Hallgren syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gajová, H; Rehůrek, J; Smrzová, M

    2000-09-01

    Hallgren syndrome is a hereditary disease with autosomal recessive inheritance. Its exact genetic background has not been elucidated so far. From the clinical aspect is comprises association of retinitis pigmentosa, atrophy of the optic nerve, nystagmus and congenital hearing damage combined with neurological and psychiatric symptoms. The authors describe two siblings with the clinical picture of this syndrome. It is a finding not published so far in the Czech literature.

  3. [Reiter's syndrome oral manifestations].

    PubMed

    Fotiou, G; Laskaris, G

    1988-01-01

    Reiter's syndrome is characterized by arthritis, non-gonococcal urethritis, conjunctivitis and mucocutaneous lesions. Oral lesions occur in 20-40% of the cases. They appear as papules and ulcerations on the buccal mucosa, gingiva and lips. Lesions on the tongue resemple "geographic tongue". One case of Reiter's syndrome is described. The significance of the clinical lesions, their microscopic appearance and the differential diagnosis are discussed.

  4. Hemiparkinsonism-hemiatrophy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ayromlou, Hormoz; Najmi, Safa; Arami, Mohammad Ali

    2011-03-01

    The syndrome of hemiparkinsonism-hemiatrophy is an uncommon form of secondary Parkinsonism that presents with unilateral body Parkinsonism plus variable atrophy on the same side. Diagnosis of this syndrome needs a complete past medical history taking, as well as assessment of the familial history, clinical examination and complete paraclinical tests.The response to medical therapy has been variable in various researches. This case showed a good response to the addition of a dopamine agonist to levodopa therapy.

  5. Syndrome in question*

    PubMed Central

    Dalapicola, Monique Coelho; Veasey, John Verrinder; Lellis, Rute Facchini

    2016-01-01

    Ross syndrome is a rare disease characterized by peripheral nervous system dysautonomia with selective degeneration of cholinergic fibers. It is composed by the triad of unilateral or bilateral segmental anhidrosis, deep hyporeflexia and Holmes-Adie's tonic pupil. The presence of compensatory sweating is frequent, usually the symptom that most afflicts patients. The aspects of the syndrome are put to discussion due to the case of a male patient, caucasian, 47 years old, with clinical onset of 25 years. PMID:26982793

  6. Locked-in syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sepcić, J; Sepić-Grahovac, D; Strenja-Grubesić, J; Antonelli, L; Andrasević, D

    1992-01-01

    A patient, young fisherman, with a locked-in syndrome is reported, in whom intact consciousness, quadriplegia of spastic type, voluntary eye blinking, (de)sursumvergence and anarthria were observed. Thrombosis of the basilar artery and slightly disturbed bioelectrogenesis of the cerebral cortex were proved by clinical examination. The patient died after 41 days. At the autopsy thrombosis a. basilaris and ventrobasal pontine infarction were confirmed. Differential diagnosis of this and similar syndromes has been discussed.

  7. Unmasking Diogenes Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Kashinath; Gopinath, Hima; Kini, Hema; Kumar, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    Diogenes syndrome is characterized by extreme self-neglect, social withdrawal, and poor personal and domestic hygiene. We report a case of Diogenes syndrome presenting with dermatitis passivata. An unusual “mask” of dirt resembling a carapace, onset of neglect after awareness of a breast lump and resumption of personal grooming and social activities after removal of the lump and counseling were seen. PMID:26120158

  8. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thoppay, Jaisri R; De Rossi, Scott S; Ciarrocca, Katharine N

    2013-07-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic condition that is characterized by burning symptoms of the oral mucosa without obvious clinical examination findings. This syndrome has complex characteristics, but its cause remains largely enigmatic, making treatment and management of patients with BMS difficult. Despite not being accompanied by evident organic changes, BMS can significantly reduce the quality of life for such patients. Therefore, it is incumbent on dental professionals to diagnose and manage patients with BMS as a part of comprehensive care.

  9. Lehman syndrome: a new syndrome for pierre robin sequence.

    PubMed

    Correia-Sá, Inês; Horta, Ricardo; Neto, Tiago; Amarante, José; Marques, Marisa

    2015-05-01

    Lehman syndrome, or lateral meningocele syndrome, is characterized by facial dysmorphism, multiple lateral meningoceles, and skeletal abnormalities. Only nine cases have been described. We present a case of a 2-year-old boy presenting with micrognathia, glossoptosis, and hypertelorism as well as associated severe obstructive sleep apnea. He was submitted to bilateral mandibular distraction with external nonresorbable devices to correct Pierre Robin sequence (PRS). Later, multiple lateral meningoceles were identified, and a diagnosis of Lehman syndrome was made. Lehman syndrome must be considered in syndromic infants with PRS. Distraction osteogenesis is a safe procedure that is effective as a first choice in the treatment of patients with Lehman syndrome presenting with micrognathia.

  10. [Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome].

    PubMed

    Wisłowska, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome is the most dangerous form of the antiphospholipid syndrome, which is characterized by rapid onset of thrombosis in small vessels of many organs and intravascular coagulation, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia. The syndrome develops over a short period of time with acute multi-organ failure, including kidney, respiratory, cardiovascular, central nervous system and adrenal glands, often associated with disseminated thrombotic microangiopathy. The catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome involves three or more systems, organs and/or tissues, the development of symptoms must occur within less than one week, it is necessary to confirm the histopathological vascular occlusion in at least one organ or tissue, and laboratory confirmation of the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies in the serum on two occasions over an interval of 12 weeks. This syndrome is characterized by a high mortality despite the use of optimal treatment. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment of patients with catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome is essential to save the life of these patients. In the last 10 years, the mortality in this disease decreased from 50% to 30% with simultaneous treatment with anticoagulants, corticosteroids, plasmapheresis and immunoglobulins.

  11. Infections in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Andréa; Fenaux, Pierre; Dreyfus, François; Cordonnier, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes are associated with a risk of severe infections. While neutropenia is likely to be the main predisposing factor, several other immune defects have been reported, including impaired neutrophil function, B-, T- and NK-cell defects and the possible consequences of iron overload due to red blood cell transfusions. The advanced age of most patients, their frequent comorbidities, and the fact that drugs such as hypomethylating agents and lenalidomide, which are effective in myelodysplastic syndromes but can transiently worsen neutropenia, may increase the risk of infection and their severity in this context. The majority of infections in myelodysplastic syndromes are bacterial, while the incidence of fungal infections is not well known and viral infections seem to be rare. No prophylactic measures against infections have demonstrated efficacy in myelodysplastic syndromes. However, pending more data, we propose here some recommendations for the management of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. In the future, an important contribution can be made by prospective trials testing the efficacy of prophylactic and therapeutic approaches to infection in these patients, especially in the context of the new drugs available for myelodysplastic syndromes. PMID:22733024

  12. Restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bayard, Max; Avonda, Thomas; Wadzinski, James

    2008-07-15

    Restless legs syndrome is a common neurologic movement disorder that affects approximately 10 percent of adults. Of those affected with this condition, approximately one third have symptoms severe enough to require medical therapy. Restless legs syndrome may be a primary condition, or it may be secondary to iron deficiency, renal failure, pregnancy, or the use of certain medications. The diagnosis is clinical, requiring an urge to move the legs usually accompanied by an uncomfortable sensation, occurrence at rest, improvement with activity, and worsening of symptoms in the evening or at night. Restless legs syndrome causes sleep disturbances, is associated with anxiety and depression, and has a negative effect on quality of life. Treatment of secondary causes of restless legs syndrome may result in improvement or resolution of symptoms. Currently, there is little information regarding the effects of lifestyle changes on the symptoms of restless legs syndrome. If medications are needed, dopamine agonists are the primary medications for moderate to severe restless legs syndrome. Other medications that may be effective include gabapentin, carbidopa/levodopa, opioids, and benzodiazepines.

  13. The HELLP syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, C A

    2010-01-01

    The HELLP syndrome is a serious complication in pregnancy characterized by haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count occurring in 0.5 to 0.9% of all pregnancies and in 10- 20% of cases with severe preeclampsia. The present review highlights occurrence, diagnosis, complications, surveillance, treatment, mode of delivery and risk of recurrence. Clinical reviews published between 2000 and 2009 were screened using PubMed and Cochrane databases. About 70% of cases develop before delivery, the majority in the third trimester of pregnancy; the remainder within 48 hours after delivery. The HELLP syndrome may be complete or incomplete. The syndrome is a progressive condition and serious complications are frequent. Conservative treatment (48 hours) is controversial. Delivery is indicated if the HELLP syndrome occurs after the 34th week or the foetal and/or maternal conditions deteriorate. Vaginal delivery is preferable. In gestational ages between 24 and 34 weeks, a single course of corticosteroid for foetal lung maturation is recommended. Standard corticosteroid treatment is, owever, of uncertain clinical value in the maternal HELLP syndrome. Close surveillance of the mother should be continued for at least 48 hours after delivery.The recognition of HELLP syndrome and an aggressive multidisciplinary approach and prompt transfer of these women to obstetric centres with expertise in this field are required for the improvement of materno-foetal prognosis.

  14. Unusual headache syndromes.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Luiz P

    2013-01-01

    Some headache syndromes have few cases reported in the literature. Their clinical characteristics, pathogenesis, and treatment may have not been completely defined. They may not actually be uncommon but rather under-recognized and/or underreported. A literature review of unusual headache syndromes, searching PubMed and ISI Web of Knowledge, was performed. After deciding which disorders to study, relevant publications in scientific journals, including original articles, reviews, meeting abstracts, and letters or correspondences to the editors were searched. This paper reviewed the clinical characteristics, the pathogenesis, the diagnosis, and the treatment of five interesting and unusual headache syndromes: exploding head syndrome, red ear syndrome, neck-tongue syndrome, nummular headache, and cardiac cephalgia. Recognizing some unusual headaches, either primary or secondary, may be a challenge for many non-headache specialist physicians. It is important to study them because the correct diagnosis may result in specific treatments that may improve the quality of life of these patients, and this can even be life saving. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  15. [A girl with Angelman syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cobben, Jan Maarten; van Hal, Arjen; van den Puttelaar-van Hal, Nora; van Dijk, Fleur S

    2014-01-01

    Angelman syndrome is a genetic syndrome with a prevalence of 1 in 20,000. The combination of behaviour and phenotype makes this syndrome one of the easiest genetic syndromes to recognise. Here we describe the case of Femke, a 3-year-old girl with Angelman syndrome. The phenotype is described from a medical perspective as well from the perspective of the parents. Any physician might encounter a child or adult with a rare syndrome. It is difficult to determine what these kinds of syndrome entail based on tables or numbers alone. Descriptions of individual cases are therefore of utmost importance. Furthermore, it is important to recognise that, despite their possible considerable mental disabilities, people with genetic syndromes are just like any other human and should not be seen as just someone with a syndrome.

  16. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes: a review.

    PubMed

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Qvist, Niels; Brusgaard, Klaus; Nielsen, Claus Buhl; Hansen, Tine Plato; Ousager, Lilian Bomme

    2014-07-15

    Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes such as Gorlin Syndrome and multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome 2B are sometimes referred to as HPS. HPS is characterized by the development of hamartomatous polyps in the gastrointestinal tract as well as several extra-intestinal findings such as dermatological and dysmorphic features or extra-intestinal cancer. The syndromes are rare and inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.The diagnosis of HPS has traditionally been based on clinical criteria, but can sometimes be difficult as the severity of symptoms range considerably from only a few symptoms to very severe cases - even within the same family. De novo cases are also frequent. However, because of the discovery of several associated germline-mutations as well as the rapid development in genetics it is now possible to use genetic testing more often in the diagnostic process. Management of the syndromes is different for each syndrome as extra-intestinal symptoms and types of cancers differs.Clinical awareness and early diagnosis of HPS is important, as affected patients and at-risk family members should be offered genetic counselling and surveillance. Surveillance in children with HPS might prevent or detect intestinal or extra-intestinal complications, whereas in adulthood surveillance is recommended due to an increased risk of cancer e.g. intestinal cancer or breast cancer.

  17. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes: A review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes such as Gorlin Syndrome and multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome 2B are sometimes referred to as HPS. HPS is characterized by the development of hamartomatous polyps in the gastrointestinal tract as well as several extra-intestinal findings such as dermatological and dysmorphic features or extra-intestinal cancer. The syndromes are rare and inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. The diagnosis of HPS has traditionally been based on clinical criteria, but can sometimes be difficult as the severity of symptoms range considerably from only a few symptoms to very severe cases - even within the same family. De novo cases are also frequent. However, because of the discovery of several associated germline-mutations as well as the rapid development in genetics it is now possible to use genetic testing more often in the diagnostic process. Management of the syndromes is different for each syndrome as extra-intestinal symptoms and types of cancers differs. Clinical awareness and early diagnosis of HPS is important, as affected patients and at-risk family members should be offered genetic counselling and surveillance. Surveillance in children with HPS might prevent or detect intestinal or extra-intestinal complications, whereas in adulthood surveillance is recommended due to an increased risk of cancer e.g. intestinal cancer or breast cancer. PMID:25022750

  18. Acute radiation syndrome and chronic radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grammaticos, Philip; Giannoula, Evanthia; Fountos, George P

    2013-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) or sickness or poisoning or toxicity is induced after a whole body exposure of men to high doses of radiation between 1-12Gy. First symptoms are from the gastrointestinal system, which together with bone marrow are the most sensitive parts of our body. Chronic radiation syndrome (CRS) may be induced by smaller than 1Gy radiation doses or after a mild form of ARS. Prophylaxis and treatment suggestions are described. In cases of ARS, a large part of the exposed population after proper medical care may survive, while without medical care this part of the population will be lost. Prophylaxis may also save another part of the population.

  19. [Caplan's syndrome: rarely presenting as syndrome].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Albina; Göhner, Katja; Cohen, Clemens D

    2014-02-26

    Ein 59-jähriger Spezialtiefbauarbeiter, ehemaliger Uranbergbauarbeiter, präsentierte sich mit Hämoptoe und asymmetrischen Arthritiden. Labortests ergaben Mikrohämaturie und anti-neutrophile zytoplasmatische Antikörper. Computertomographisch bestanden bilateral disseminierte Thorax-Rundherde. Thorakoskopische Lungenkeilresektion zeigte Granulome mit Anthrakose und Silikose-Material im nekrotischen Zentrum. Die Diagnose eines Caplan-Syndroms wurde gestellt. Die Beschwerden besserten sich unter der Steroid-Therapie. Weitere Abklärung der Mikrohämaturie erbrachte die Diagnose eines klarzelligen Nierenzellkarzinoms. Bei diesem Patienten mit «pulmorenalem Syndrom» war das Nierenzellkarzinom, das bei Minenarbeitern im Uranbergbau ebenfalls vermehrt auftritt, ursächlich für die Mikrohämaturie.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: renal coloboma syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions renal coloboma syndrome renal coloboma syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Renal coloboma syndrome (also known as papillorenal syndrome) is ...

  1. Takotsubo Syndrome: Insights from Japan.

    PubMed

    Akashi, Yoshihiro J; Ishihara, Masaharu

    2016-10-01

    We report the history and new insights of takotsubo syndrome based on the achievements that Japanese researchers have contributed and summarize the evidence originally presented from Japan. Takotsubo syndrome is a newly described heart failure characterized by transient left ventricular dysfunction. We should be aware of this entity as a syndrome, not actual cardiomyopathy. Japanese researchers focus on the experimental approaches for clinical diagnosis and treatment of takotsubo syndrome. As representatives from a country originally naming this syndrome takotsubo, a global registry for takotsubo syndrome including Japan should be established. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Abdominal vascular syndromes: characteristic imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Cardarelli-Leite, Leandro; Velloni, Fernanda Garozzo; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Lemos, Marcelo Delboni; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal vascular syndromes are rare diseases. Although such syndromes vary widely in terms of symptoms and etiologies, certain imaging findings are characteristic. Depending on their etiology, they can be categorized as congenital-including blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome)-or compressive-including "nutcracker" syndrome, median arcuate ligament syndrome, Cockett syndrome (also known as May-Thurner syndrome), and superior mesenteric artery syndrome. In this article, we aimed to illustrate imaging findings that are characteristic of these syndromes, through studies conducted at our institution, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature on this topic.

  3. Nonthyroidal illness syndrome or euthyroid sick syndrome?

    PubMed

    Chopra, I J

    1996-01-01

    To characterize the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) and to discuss various underlying potential biochemical mechanisms for this condition. The pertinent medical literature was reviewed, and studies of thyroid function in systemic non-thyroidal illnesses were summarized. Abnormalities of thyroid function in the NTIS have been classified into four major categories: (1) low triiodothyronine (T3) syndrome, (2) a combination of low T3 and low thyroxine (T4), (3) high T4 syndrome, and (4) other abnormalities. The NTIS has been noted in essentially all severe systemic illnesses and after caloric deprivation, major operations, and administration of some drugs. Some mechanisms that may contribute to low serum T3 in the NTIS are decreased type I 5 -monodeiodinase in tissues, decreased uptake of T4 by tissues, decreased serum binding, increased reverse T3, alterations in selenium status, cytokines, and a decrease in thyrotropin. Decreased thyrotropin may also contribute to low T4 levels in NTIS, as may decreased serum T4-binding proteins, abnormalities in T4-binding globulin, and circulating inhibitors of binding of T4 to serum proteins. Although T4 treatment of patients with NTIS has yielded little improvement, administration of T3 has produced some beneficial effects. Further studies should be conducted to determine appropriate patient populations, dose-response ratios, and possible adverse effects of treatment of the NTIS with T3.

  4. Marfan syndrome: An eyesight of syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Agarwal, Sarita

    2014-12-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS), a relatively common autosomal dominant hereditary disorder of connective tissue with prominent manifestations in the skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular systems, is caused by mutations in the glycoprotein gene fibrillin-1 (FBN1). Aortic root dilation and mitral valve prolapse are the main presentations among the cardiovascular malformations of MFS. The revised Ghent diagnostics nosology of Marfan syndrome is established in accordance with a combination of major and minor clinical manifestations in various organ systems and the family history. The pathogenesis of Marfan syndrome has not been fully elucidated. However, fibrillin-1 gene mutations are believed to exert a dominant negative effect. The treatment includes prophylactic β-blockers and angiotensin II-receptor blockers in order to slow down the dilation of the ascending aorta and prophylactic aortic surgery. Importantly, β-blocker therapy may reduce TGF-β activation, which has been recognized as a contributory factor in MFS. The identification of a mutation allows for early diagnosis, prognosis, genetic counseling, preventive management of carriers and reassurance for unaffected relatives. The importance of knowing in advance the location of the putative family mutation is highlighted by its straightforward application to prenatal and postnatal screening. The present article aims to provide an overview of this rare hereditary disorder.

  5. Autoimmune Basis for Postural Tachycardia Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-14

    Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome; Postural Tachycardia Syndrome; Tachycardia; Arrhythmias, Cardiac; Autonomic Nervous System Diseases; Orthostatic Intolerance; Cardiovascular Diseases; Primary Dysautonomias

  6. Plant defense syndromes.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anurag A; Fishbein, Mark

    2006-07-01

    Given that a plant's defensive strategy against herbivory is never likely to be a single trait, we develop the concept of plant defense syndromes, where association with specific ecological interactions can result in convergence on suites of covarying defensive traits. Defense syndromes can be studied within communities of diverse plant species as well as within clades of closely related species. In either case, theory predicts that plant defense traits can consistently covary across species, due to shared evolutionary ancestry or due to adaptive convergence. We examined potential defense syndromes in 24 species of milkweeds (Asclepias spp.) in a field experiment. Employing phylogenetically independent contrasts, we found few correlations between seven defensive traits, no bivariate trade-offs, and notable positive correlations between trichome density and latex production, and between C:N ratio and leaf toughness. We then used a hierarchical cluster analysis to produce a phenogram of defense trait similarity among the 24 species. This analysis revealed three distinct clusters of species. The defense syndromes of these species clusters are associated with either low nutritional quality or a balance of higher nutritional quality coupled with physical or chemical defenses. The phenogram based on defense traits was not congruent, however, with a molecular phylogeny of the group, suggesting convergence on defense syndromes. Finally, we examined the performance of monarch butterfly caterpillars on the 24 milkweed species in the field; monarch growth and survival did not differ on plants in the three syndromes, although multiple regression revealed that leaf trichomes and toughness significantly reduced caterpillar growth. The discovery of convergent plant defense syndromes can be used as a framework to ask questions about how abiotic environments, communities of herbivores, and biogeography are associated with particular defense strategies of plants.

  7. Juvenile polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brosens, Lodewijk Aa; Langeveld, Danielle; van Hattem, W Arnout; Giardiello, Francis M; Offerhaus, G Johan A

    2011-11-28

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple distinct juvenile polyps in the gastrointestinal tract and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. The cumulative life-time risk of colorectal cancer is 39% and the relative risk is 34. Juvenile polyps have a distinctive histology characterized by an abundance of edematous lamina propria with inflammatory cells and cystically dilated glands lined by cuboidal to columnar epithelium with reactive changes. Clinically, juvenile polyposis syndrome is defined by the presence of 5 or more juvenile polyps in the colorectum, juvenile polyps throughout the gastrointestinal tract or any number of juvenile polyps and a positive family history of juvenile polyposis. In about 50%-60% of patients diagnosed with juvenile polyposis syndrome a germline mutation in the SMAD4 or BMPR1A gene is found. Both genes play a role in the BMP/TGF-beta signalling pathway. It has been suggested that cancer in juvenile polyposis may develop through the so-called "landscaper mechanism" where an abnormal stromal environment leads to neoplastic transformation of the adjacent epithelium and in the end invasive carcinoma. Recognition of this rare disorder is important for patients and their families with regard to treatment, follow-up and screening of at risk individuals. Each clinician confronted with the diagnosis of a juvenile polyp should therefore consider the possibility of juvenile polyposis syndrome. In addition, juvenile polyposis syndrome provides a unique model to study colorectal cancer pathogenesis in general and gives insight in the molecular genetic basis of cancer. This review discusses clinical manifestations, genetics, pathogenesis and management of juvenile polyposis syndrome.

  8. Juvenile polyposis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brosens, Lodewijk AA; Langeveld, Danielle; van Hattem, W Arnout; Giardiello, Francis M; Offerhaus, G Johan A

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple distinct juvenile polyps in the gastrointestinal tract and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. The cumulative life-time risk of colorectal cancer is 39% and the relative risk is 34. Juvenile polyps have a distinctive histology characterized by an abundance of edematous lamina propria with inflammatory cells and cystically dilated glands lined by cuboidal to columnar epithelium with reactive changes. Clinically, juvenile polyposis syndrome is defined by the presence of 5 or more juvenile polyps in the colorectum, juvenile polyps throughout the gastrointestinal tract or any number of juvenile polyps and a positive family history of juvenile polyposis. In about 50%-60% of patients diagnosed with juvenile polyposis syndrome a germline mutation in the SMAD4 or BMPR1A gene is found. Both genes play a role in the BMP/TGF-beta signalling pathway. It has been suggested that cancer in juvenile polyposis may develop through the so-called “landscaper mechanism” where an abnormal stromal environment leads to neoplastic transformation of the adjacent epithelium and in the end invasive carcinoma. Recognition of this rare disorder is important for patients and their families with regard to treatment, follow-up and screening of at risk individuals. Each clinician confronted with the diagnosis of a juvenile polyp should therefore consider the possibility of juvenile polyposis syndrome. In addition, juvenile polyposis syndrome provides a unique model to study colorectal cancer pathogenesis in general and gives insight in the molecular genetic basis of cancer. This review discusses clinical manifestations, genetics, pathogenesis and management of juvenile polyposis syndrome. PMID:22171123

  9. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic calcifications, and facial dysmorphism (macrocephaly, cleft lip/palate and severe eye anomalies). Intellectual deficit is present in up to 5% of cases. BCCs (varying clinically from flesh-colored papules to ulcerating plaques and in diameter from 1 to 10 mm) are most commonly located on the face, back and chest. The number of BBCs varies from a few to several thousand. Recurrent jaw cysts occur in 90% of patients. Skeletal abnormalities (affecting the shape of the ribs, vertebral column bones, and the skull) are frequent. Ocular, genitourinary and cardiovascular disorders may occur. About 5–10% of NBCCS patients develop the brain malignancy medulloblastoma, which may be a potential cause of early death. NBCCS is caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Clinical diagnosis relies on specific criteria. Gene mutation analysis confirms the diagnosis. Genetic counseling is mandatory. Antenatal diagnosis is feasible by means of ultrasound scans and analysis of DNA extracted from fetal cells (obtained by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling). Main differential diagnoses include Bazex syndrome, trichoepithelioma papulosum multiplex and Torre's syndrome (Muir-Torre's syndrome). Management requires a multidisciplinary approach. Keratocysts are treated by surgical removal. Surgery for BBCs is indicated when the number of lesions is limited; other treatments include laser ablation, photodynamic

  10. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome).

    PubMed

    Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2008-11-25

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic calcifications, and facial dysmorphism (macrocephaly, cleft lip/palate and severe eye anomalies). Intellectual deficit is present in up to 5% of cases. BCCs (varying clinically from flesh-colored papules to ulcerating plaques and in diameter from 1 to 10 mm) are most commonly located on the face, back and chest. The number of BBCs varies from a few to several thousand. Recurrent jaw cysts occur in 90% of patients. Skeletal abnormalities (affecting the shape of the ribs, vertebral column bones, and the skull) are frequent. Ocular, genitourinary and cardiovascular disorders may occur. About 5-10% of NBCCS patients develop the brain malignancy medulloblastoma, which may be a potential cause of early death. NBCCS is caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Clinical diagnosis relies on specific criteria. Gene mutation analysis confirms the diagnosis. Genetic counseling is mandatory. Antenatal diagnosis is feasible by means of ultrasound scans and analysis of DNA extracted from fetal cells (obtained by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling). Main differential diagnoses include Bazex syndrome, trichoepithelioma papulosum multiplex and Torre's syndrome (Muir-Torre's syndrome). Management requires a multidisciplinary approach. Keratocysts are treated by surgical removal. Surgery for BBCs is indicated when the number of lesions is limited; other treatments include laser ablation, photodynamic

  11. One of the Rarest Syndromes in Dentistry: Gardner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Basaran, Guvenc; Erkan, Mustafa

    2008-01-01

    Gardner syndrome is a rare, autosomal dominant syndrome. It will follow a positive course with diagnosis and treatment by medical and dental specialists. Orthodontists or general dental physicians can easily diagnose the syndrome through radiological images taken in addition to dental and skeletal findings. The aim of this study was therefore to report two cases of this syndrome and to evaluate it from an orthodontic perspective in order to attract the attention of orthodontists to this rare anomaly. PMID:19212549

  12. Velocardiofacial syndrome, DiGeorge syndrome: the chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kobrynski, Lisa J; Sullivan, Kathleen E

    2007-10-20

    Velocardiofacial syndrome, DiGeorge syndrome, and some other clinical syndromes have in common a high frequency of hemizygous deletions of chromosome 22q11.2. This deletion syndrome is very common, affecting nearly one in 3000 children. Here, we focus on recent advances in cardiac assessment, speech, immunology, and pathophysiology of velocardiofacial syndrome. The complex medical care of patients needs a multidisciplinary approach, and every patient has his own unique clinical features that need a tailored approach. Patients with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome might have high level of functioning, but most often need interventions to improve the function of many organ systems.

  13. Pre-Menstrual Syndrome in Women with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Linda; Cunningham, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    Background: Prevalence of pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS) may be higher in women with Down syndrome due to syndrome specific characteristics in biochemistry, psychopathology and lifestyle. Recognition of PMS may be difficult for women with intellectual disabilities and their carers. Method: A daily diary, used to diagnose PMS with typical women, was…

  14. Pre-Menstrual Syndrome in Women with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Linda; Cunningham, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    Background: Prevalence of pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS) may be higher in women with Down syndrome due to syndrome specific characteristics in biochemistry, psychopathology and lifestyle. Recognition of PMS may be difficult for women with intellectual disabilities and their carers. Method: A daily diary, used to diagnose PMS with typical women, was…

  15. Hypothyroidism in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Krishna, Svs; Modi, Kd

    2012-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and hypothyroidism are well established forerunners of atherogenic cardiovascular disease. Considerable overlap occurs in the pathogenic mechanisms of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease by metabolic syndrome and hypothyroidism. Insulin resistance has been studied as the basic pathogenic mechanism in metabolic syndrome.[1] This cross sectional study intended to assess thyroid function in patients with metabolic syndrome and to investigate the association between hypothyroidism and metabolic syndrome. One hundred patients with metabolic syndrome who fulfilled the National Cholesterol Education Program- Adult Treatment Panel (NCEP-ATP) III criteria [ 3 out of 5 criteria positive namely blood pressure ≥ 130/85 mm hg or on antihypertensive medications, fasting plasma glucose > 100 mg/dl or on anti-diabetic medications, fasting triglycerides > 150 mg/dl, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) < 40 mg/dl in males and < 50 mg/dl in females, waist circumference > 102 cms in men and 88 cms in women] were included in the study group.[2] Fifty patients who had no features of metabolic syndrome (0 out of 5 criteria for metabolic syndrome) were included in the control group. Patients with liver disorders, renal disorders, congestive cardiac failure, pregnant women, patients on oral contraceptive pills, statins and other medications that alter thyroid functions and lipid levels and those who are under treatment for any thyroid related disorder were excluded from the study. Acutely ill patients were excluded taking into account sick euthyroid syndrome. Patients were subjected to anthropometry, evaluation of vital parameters, lipid and thyroid profile along with other routine laboratory parameters. Students t-test, Chi square test and linear regression, multiple logistic regression models were used for statistical analysis. P value < 0.05 was considered significant. Of the 100 patients in study group, 55 were females (55%) and 45 were males (45

  16. Hypothyroidism in metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Krishna, SVS; Modi, KD

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and hypothyroidism are well established forerunners of atherogenic cardiovascular disease. Considerable overlap occurs in the pathogenic mechanisms of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease by metabolic syndrome and hypothyroidism. Insulin resistance has been studied as the basic pathogenic mechanism in metabolic syndrome.[1] This cross sectional study intended to assess thyroid function in patients with metabolic syndrome and to investigate the association between hypothyroidism and metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients with metabolic syndrome who fulfilled the National Cholesterol Education Program- Adult Treatment Panel (NCEP-ATP) III criteria [ 3 out of 5 criteria positive namely blood pressure ≥ 130/85 mm hg or on antihypertensive medications, fasting plasma glucose > 100 mg/dl or on anti-diabetic medications, fasting triglycerides > 150 mg/dl, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) < 40 mg/dl in males and < 50 mg/dl in females, waist circumference > 102 cms in men and 88 cms in women] were included in the study group.[2] Fifty patients who had no features of metabolic syndrome (0 out of 5 criteria for metabolic syndrome) were included in the control group. Patients with liver disorders, renal disorders, congestive cardiac failure, pregnant women, patients on oral contraceptive pills, statins and other medications that alter thyroid functions and lipid levels and those who are under treatment for any thyroid related disorder were excluded from the study. Acutely ill patients were excluded taking into account sick euthyroid syndrome. Patients were subjected to anthropometry, evaluation of vital parameters, lipid and thyroid profile along with other routine laboratory parameters. Students t-test, Chi square test and linear regression, multiple logistic regression models were used for statistical analysis. P value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Of the 100 patients in study group, 55

  17. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Gregory R.

    1994-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a neuropathy resulting from compression of the median nerve as it passes through a narrow tunnel in the wrist on its way to the hand. The lack of precise objective and clinical tests, along with symptoms that are synonymous with other syndromes in the upper extremity, cause carpal tunnel syndrome to appear to be a rare entity in athletics. However, it should not be ruled out as a possible etiology of upper extremity paralysis in the athlete. More typically, carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common peripheral entrapment neuropathy encountered in industry. Treatment may include rest and/or splinting of the involved wrist, ice application, galvanic stimulation, or iontophoresis to reduce inflammation, and then transition to heat modalities and therapeutic exercises for developing flexibility, strength, and endurance. In addition, an ergonomic assessment should be conducted, resulting in modifications to accommodate the carpal tunnel syndrome patient. ImagesFig 3.Fig 4.Fig 5.Fig 6.Fig 7. PMID:16558255

  18. Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Comi, Anne M

    2015-01-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is the third most common neurocutaneous disorder, after neurofibromatosis and tuberous sclerosis, and impacts approximately 1 in 20000 live births. Sturge-Weber syndrome is not inherited, but rather occurs exclusively sporadically, in both males and females and in all races and ethnic backgrounds. Sturge-Weber syndrome presents at birth with a capillary malformation on the face (port-wine birthmark) with later diagnosis of abnormal vasculature in the eye and the brain which result in a range of complications. The underlying somatic mosaic mutation causing both Sturge-Weber syndrome and isolated port-wine birthmarks was recently discovered and is an activating mutation in GNAQ. When a newborn presents with a facial port-wine birthmark on the upper face, that child has a 15-50% risk of developing Sturge-Weber syndrome brain and/or eye involvement, depending on the extent of the birthmark, and close monitoring and appropriate screening is essential for early diagnosis and optimal treatment. Treatment options include laser therapy for lightening of the birthmark, eye drops and surgery for glaucoma management, and aggressive anticonvulsant treatment, low dose aspirin, and neurosurgery where necessary. Future possible treatments based upon new knowledge of the somatic mutation and downstream pathways are currently being considered and studied. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Fat embolism syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Robin R.

    1997-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome, an important contributor to the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome, has been associated with both traumatic and nontraumatic disorders. Fat embolization after long bone trauma is probably common as a subclinical event. Fat emboli can deform and pass through the lungs, resulting in systemic embolization, most commonly to the brain and kidneys. The diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome is based on the patient’s history, supported by clinical signs of pulmonary, cerebral and cutaneous dysfunction and confirmed by the demonstration of arterial hypoxemia in the absence of other disorders. Treatment of fat embolism syndrome consists of general supportive measures, including splinting, maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance and the administration of oxygen. Endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilatory assistance can be indicated. The role of corticosteroids remains controversial. Early stabilization of long bone fractures has been shown to decrease the incidence of pulmonary complications. Clinical and experimental studies suggest that the exact method of fracture fixation plays a minor role in the development of pulmonary dysfunction. As more is learned about the specifics of the various triggers for the development of fat embolism syndrome, it is hoped that the prospect of more specific therapy for the prevention and treatment of this disorder will become a reality. PMID:9336522

  20. Management of Neuroacanthocytosis Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Walker, Ruth H

    2015-01-01

    The two core neuroacanthocytosis (NA) syndromes, chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc) and McLeod syndrome, are progressive neurodegenerative disorders that primarily affect the basal ganglia. The characteristic phenotype comprises a variety of movement disorders including chorea, dystonia, and parkinsonism, as well as psychiatric and cognitive symptoms attributable to basal ganglia dysfunction. These disorders are symptomatically managed on a case-by-case basis, with very few practitioners seeing more than a single case in their careers. A literature search was performed on PubMed utilizing the terms neuroacanthocytosis, chorea-acanthocytosis, and McLeod syndrome, and articles were reviewed for mentions of therapies, successful or otherwise. There have been no blinded, controlled trials and only one retrospective case series describing ChAc. The various therapies that have been used in patients with NA syndromes are summarized. Management remains at present purely symptomatic, which is similar in principle to other more common basal ganglia neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease (HD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). However, there are some specific issues particular to NA syndromes that merit attention. An integrated multidisciplinary approach is the ideal management strategy for these complex and multifaceted neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. Meningioma in Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takahiro; Shinojima, Naoki; Todaka, Tatemi; Nishikawa, Shigeyuki; Yano, Shigetoshi; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi

    2015-09-01

    Down syndrome comprises multiple malformations and is due to trisomy of chromosome 21. There is epidemiologic evidence that individuals with Down syndrome are at decreased risk for solid tumors including brain tumors. It has been suggested that some genes expressed on the extra copy of chromosome 21 act as tumor suppressor genes and contribute to protection against tumorigenesis. We report the first case to our knowledge of a patient with Down syndrome, an 8-year-old boy, with an intracranial meningioma, in which the status of chromosome 21 was examined. The diagnosis was based on histologic examination of the surgically resected tumor. Postoperatively, the patient's neurologic status improved, and there was no tumor regrowth in the next 2 years. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for chromosome 22 confirmed high allele loss involving the neurofibromin 2 gene locus, a finding typical in meningiomas. Fluorescence in situ hybridization also revealed chromosome 21 heterogeneity in tumor cells; not only cells with trisomy 21 but also cells with disomy and monosomy 21 were present. All blood cells from the patient manifested trisomy 21. Deletion of the chromosome 21 allele may be associated with tumorigenesis of meningioma in Down syndrome. This supports the hypothesis that some genes whose expression is increased on the extra copy of chromosome 21 function as tumor suppressor genes and that they contribute to the reduced tumor incidence in individuals with Down syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Coprophenomena in Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Roger D; Zinner, Samuel H; Müller-Vahl, Kirsten R; Fast, Diane K; Burd, Larry J; Kano, Yukiko; Rothenberger, Aribert; Roessner, Veit; Kerbeshian, Jacob; Stern, Jeremy S; Jankovic, Joseph; Loughin, Thomas; Janik, Piotr; Shady, Gary; Robertson, Mary M; Lang, Anthony E; Budman, Cathy; Magor, Alida; Bruun, Ruth; Berlin, Cheston M

    2009-03-01

    The aims of this descriptive study were to examine the prevalence and associations of coprophenomena (involuntary expression of socially unacceptable words or gestures) in individuals with Tourette syndrome. Participant data were obtained from the Tourette Syndrome International Database Consortium. A specialized data collection form was completed for each of a subset of 597 consecutive new patients with Tourette syndrome from 15 sites in seven countries. Coprolalia occurred at some point in the lifetime of 19.3% of males and 14.6% of females, and copropraxia in 5.9% of males and 4.9% of females. Coprolalia was three times as frequent as copropraxia, with a mean onset of each at about 11 years, 5 years after the onset of tics. In 11% of those with coprolalia and 12% of those with copropraxia these coprophenomena were one of the initial symptoms of Tourette syndrome. The onsets of tics, coprophenomena, smelling of non-food objects, and spitting were strongly intercorrelated. Early onset of coprophenomena was not associated with its longer persistence. The most robust associations of coprophenomena were with the number of non-tic repetitive behaviors, spitting, and inappropriate sexual behavior. Although coprophenomena are a frequently feared possibility in the course of Tourette syndrome, their emergence occurs in only about one in five referred patients. Because the course and actual impact of coprophenomena are variable, additional prospective research is needed to provide better counseling and prognostic information.

  3. [Paraneoplastic rheumatic syndromes].

    PubMed

    Gracia-Ramos, Abraham Edgar; Vera-Lastra, Olga Lidia

    2012-01-01

    Paraneoplastic rheumatic syndromes are defined as those events associated with cancer that occur away from the primary tumor or its metastases and are induced by the presence of the tumor through biological products like hormones, peptides, autocrine or paracrine mediators, antibodies or cytotoxic lymphocytes. Of these, hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, carcinomatous polyarthritis, dermatomyositis/polymyositis, and paraneoplastic vasculitis are the most frequently recognized. Other less known associations are based upon a smaller number of case reports, and include palmar fasciitis, panniculitis, erythema nodosum, Raynaud¥s phenomenon, erythromelalgia and Lupus-like syndrome. Usually the clinical course of rheumatic paraneoplastic syndrome and cancer parallels the resolution of the tumor usually leads to resolution of this syndrome. It is difficult make the distinction between idiopathic rheumatic syndromes from those that result from cancer. Still, there are several clinical data that can guide us to the presence of an occult malignancy, and should be identified as the detection of cancer can lead to early treatment and better prognosis.

  4. Asperger's syndrome in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Roy, Mandy; Dillo, Wolfgang; Emrich, Hinderk M; Ohlmeier, Martin D

    2009-01-01

    Asperger's syndrome is one of the autism spectrum disorders. Affected individuals display considerably impaired capacity for social interaction, unusual special interests, and a tendency towards ritualized behavior. The etiology, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of Asperger's syndrome in adulthood are outlined on the basis of a selective literature review via Medline and information in relevant reference books. Furthermore, the authors report their personal experience at a special clinic for adults. Asperger's syndrome in adulthood can be diagnosed by thorough anamnesis, heteroanamnesis-with emphasis on childhood-and painstaking clinical examination. The considerable psychosocial impairments affect the patients' professional, social, and private lives. The precise etiology is still unknown, but a multifactorial origin with genetic, neurobiological, and psychosocial components appears probable. Although no specific, empirically tested treatment concepts have yet been established, psychotherapeutic elements (structuring and directive interventions) seem to be helpful, together with pharmacotherapy-if indicated-in the presence of comorbidity. Asperger's syndrome should be included in the differential diagnosis of adults who display the corresponding symptoms. The etiopathogenesis and treatment of Asperger's syndrome in adulthood should be further investigated.

  5. The SAHA syndrome.

    PubMed

    Orfanos, C E; Adler, Y D; Zouboulis, C C

    2000-01-01

    The presence of seborrhoea, acne, hirsutism and alopecia in women has first been summarized as SAHA syndrome in 1982 and can be associated with polycystic ovary syndrome, cystic mastitis, obesity and infertility. In 1994, the association of these androgen-dependent cutaneous signs, was classified according to their etiology into four types: (1) idiopathic, (2) ovarian, (3) adrenal, and (4) hyperprolactinemic SAHA. The HAIRAN syndrome has been currently described as a fifth variant with polyendocrinopathy. The SAHA syndrome generally occurs in young to middle-aged women and involves either the presence of elevated blood levels of androgens or increased androgen-driven peripheral response with normal circulating androgen levels. Peripheral metabolism of androgens takes place in various areas within the pilosebaceous unit, as indicated by local differences in the activities of aromatase, 5alpha-reductase as well as of the presence of the androgen receptors. In cases of SAHA syndrome, careful diagnostic and clinical evaluation has to be performed in order to identify the cause for peripheral hyperandrogenism and to exclude androgen-producing tumors. Treatment will target the etiology, whereas the management in idiopathic cases will aim to improve the clinical features of SAHA.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Knobloch syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... however, most people with Knobloch syndrome have normal intelligence. Related Information What does it mean if a ... Bueno MR. Novel pathogenic mutations and skin biopsy analysis in Knobloch syndrome. Mol Vis. 2009;15:801- ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Maffucci syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Maffucci syndrome usually have a normal lifespan, and intelligence is unaffected. The extent of their physical impairment ... Ollier disease and maffucci syndrome? An in-depth analysis of the literature. Neurosurgery. 2009 Dec;65(6): ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: FG syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... family diagnosed with the disorder. FG syndrome affects intelligence and behavior. Almost everyone with the condition has ... Pembrey M, Moraine C, Briault S. FG syndrome: linkage analysis in two families supporting a new gene localization ...

  9. Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome (KTS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Sturge-Weber syndrome. These individuals may experience seizures and mental deficiency. In some cases, features of ... is Sturge-Weber syndrome. These individuals may experience seizures and mental deficiency. In some cases, features of ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Costello syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... mutation analysis in Costello syndrome: genotype and phenotype correlation. Am J Med Genet A. 2006 Jan 1; ... Levy N, Arveiler B, Black G. Genotype-phenotype correlation in Costello syndrome: HRAS mutation analysis in 43 ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Brugada syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brugada syndrome. Methodist Debakey Cardiovasc J. 2014 Jan-Mar;10(1):25-8. Review. Citation on PubMed ... P, Brugada J, Hong K. Brugada Syndrome. 2005 Mar 31 [updated 2016 Nov 17]. In: Pagon RA, ...

  12. Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000837.htm Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome is a disorder of the blood ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Lujan syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Description Lujan syndrome is a condition characterized by intellectual disability, behavioral problems, and certain physical features. It occurs almost exclusively in males. The intellectual disability associated with Lujan syndrome is usually mild to ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Meckel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... area? Other Names for This Condition dysencephalia splanchnocystica Meckel-Gruber syndrome MKS Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes named? Additional Information & Resources ... Meckel syndrome Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Institute ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Kleefstra syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources (1 link) National Human Genome Research Institute: Chromosome Abnormalities Educational Resources (5 links) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Intellectual Disability (PDF) Disease InfoSearch: Chromosome 9q Deletion Syndrome MalaCards: kleefstra syndrome Orphanet: Kleefstra ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Alagille syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Syndrome Alliance Children's Liver Association for Support Services (CLASS) National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) GeneReviews (1 link) Alagille Syndrome ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials. ...

  17. A family with Alport's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jain, P.

    1970-01-01

    Alport's syndrome has been diagnosed in members of four successive generations of one family. Renal biopsy was performed in two of these patients. The syndrome is briefly reviewed. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:5416510

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Partington syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partington syndrome is a neurological disorder that causes intellectual disability along with a condition called focal dystonia that ... signs and symptoms are often less severe. The intellectual disability associated with Partington syndrome usually ranges from mild ...

  19. Features of Fragile X Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome (FXS) is a genetic condition that causes intellectual disability, behavioral and learning challenges and various physical characteristics. ... of males with Fragile X syndrome demonstrate significant intellectual disability. Disabilities in FXS include a range from moderate ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Mabry syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Description Mabry syndrome is a condition characterized by intellectual disability, distinctive facial features, increased levels of an enzyme ... signs and symptoms. People with Mabry syndrome have intellectual disability that is often moderate to severe. They typically ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Sotos syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Sotos syndrome Sotos syndrome Enable ...

  2. Biliary hypoplasia in Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, K; Ahmed, S F; Murday, V; McGrogan, P

    2006-05-01

    Neonatal hepatitis and biliary hypoplasia are not recognised features of Williams syndrome. A case of Williams syndrome, presenting with neonatal conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia leading to an initial misdiagnosis is reported.

  3. HALLGREN'S SYNDROME: TWO CASE REPORTS

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, S.; Gurunadh, V.S.; Singh, G.P.; Sundari, G.S.

    1994-01-01

    Two cases of Hallgren's syndrome presenting with retinitis pigmentosa, sensory-neural hearing loss along with schizophrenia in one patient and major depression in the other, are reported along with a brief description of this rare syndrome. PMID:21743702

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Barth syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... becomes increasingly weakened and is less able to pump blood. Individuals with Barth syndrome may have elastic ... of the muscle and impairs its ability to pump blood. In people with Barth syndrome , the heart ...

  5. Syndromic Disorders with Short Stature

    PubMed Central

    Şıklar, Zeynep; Berberoğlu, Merih

    2014-01-01

    Short stature is one of the major components of many dysmorphic syndromes. Growth failure may be due to a wide variety of mechanisms, either related to the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor axis or to underlying unknown pathologies. In this review, the relatively more frequently seen syndromes with short stature (Noonan syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Silver-Russell syndrome and Aarskog-Scott syndrome) were discussed. These disorders are associated with a number of endocrinopathies, as well as with developmental, systemic and behavioral issues. At present, GH therapy is used in most syndromic disorders, although long-term studies evaluating this treatment are insufficient and some controversies exist with regard to GH dose, optimal age to begin therapy and adverse effects. Before starting GH treatment, patients with syndromic disorders should be evaluated extensively. PMID:24637303

  6. Fatigue Fighters in Sjogren's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Patient Education Sheet Fatigue Fighters in Sjögren’s Syndrome The SSF thanks Frederick Vivino, MD, FACR, University of Pennsylvania, Penn Rheumatology Associates & Sjögren’s Syndrome Center, Philadelphia, for authoring this Patient Education ...

  7. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Share Compartir Symptoms On this Page ... Symptoms What's the Clinical Course of CFS? Chronic fatigue syndrome can be misdiagnosed or overlooked because its ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Gorlin syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Resources (2 links) GeneReview: Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and Rehabilitation Related ...

  9. What Are the Key Statistics about Myelodysplastic Syndromes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Syndromes About Myelodysplastic Syndromes What Are the Key Statistics About Myelodysplastic Syndromes? In the United States, myelodysplastic ... Types of Myelodysplastic Syndromes What Are the Key Statistics About Myelodysplastic Syndromes? What's New in Myelodysplastic Syndrome ...

  10. Treatment Options for Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Myelo-proliferative Neoplasms Patient Myelodysplastic Syndromes Treatment Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Health Professional Myelodysplastic ...

  11. General Information about Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Myelo-proliferative Neoplasms Patient Myelodysplastic Syndromes Treatment Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Health Professional Myelodysplastic ...

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Myelodysplastic Syndromes)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Myelo-proliferative Neoplasms Patient Myelodysplastic Syndromes Treatment Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Health Professional Myelodysplastic ...

  13. Andersen-Tawil syndrome.

    PubMed

    Weir, Robin A P; Petrie, Colin J; Murday, Victoria; Findlay, Iain N

    2011-04-01

    Advances in the understanding of genetic aspects of cardiovascular diseases, together with an increase in the availability of genetic analysis, have resulted in not only increased diagnosis of known inherited conditions, but also the identification of novel syndromes. The combination of potassium-sensitive periodic paralysis, ventricular arrhythmias and dysmorphism, initially described by Andersen and Tawil, represents such a novel condition. We report a case in which genetic analysis led to the diagnosis of Andersen-Tawil syndrome after 15 years of protracted non-invasive and invasive investigations from initial presentation to ultimate diagnosis in a young female. In conclusion, we describe the clinical and genetic features of Andersen-Tawil syndrome and demonstrate the utility of genetic testing in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease.

  14. Neonatal hepatitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Eve A

    2003-10-01

    Conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia in an infant indicates neonatal liver disease. This neonatal hepatitis syndrome has numerous possible causes, classified as infective, anatomic/structural, metabolic, genetic, neoplastic, vascular, toxic, immune and idiopathic. Any infant who is jaundiced at 2-4 weeks old needs to have the serum conjugated bilirubin measured, even if he/she looks otherwise well. If conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia is present, a methodical and comprehensive diagnostic investigation should be performed. Early diagnosis is critical for the best outcome. In particular, palliative surgery for extrahepatic biliary atresia has the best chance of success if performed before the infant is 8 weeks old. Definitive treatments available for many causes of neonatal hepatitis syndrome should be started as soon as possible. Alternatively, liver transplantation may be life saving. Supportive care, especially with attention to nutritional needs, is important for all infants with neonatal hepatitis syndrome.

  15. Posterior ankle impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2005-10-01

    Posterior ankle impingement syndrome is a clinical disorder characterized by posterior ankle pain that occurs in forced plantar flexion. The pain may be acute as a result of trauma or chronic from repetitive stress. Pathology of the os trigonum-talar process is the most common cause of this syndrome, but it also may result from flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis, ankle osteochondritis, subtalar joint disease, and fracture. Patients usually report chronic or recurrent posterior ankle pain caused or exacerbated by forced plantar flexion or push-off maneuvers, such as may occur during dancing, kicking, or downhill running. Diagnosis of posterior ankle impingement syndrome is based primarily on clinical history and physical examination. Radiography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging depict associated bone and soft-tissue abnormalities. Symptoms typically improve with nonsurgical management, but surgery may be required in refractory cases.

  16. Lemierre's syndrome (necrobacillosis)

    PubMed Central

    Golpe, R.; Marin, B.; Alonso, M.

    1999-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome or postanginal septicaemia (necrobacillosis) is caused by an acute oropharyngeal infection with secondary septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and frequent metastatic infections. Fusobacterium necrophorum is the most common pathogen isolated from the patients. The interval between the oropharyngeal infection and the onset of the septicaemia is usually short. The most common sites of septic embolisms are the lungs and joints, and other locations can be affected. A high degree of clinical suspicion is needed to diagnose the syndrome. Computed tomography of the neck with contrast is the most useful study to detect internal jugular vein thrombosis. Treatment includes intravenous antibiotic therapy and drainage of septic foci. The role of anticoagulation is controversial. Ligation or excision of the internal jugular vein may be needed in some cases.


Keywords: Lemierre's syndrome; Fusobacterium necrophorum; necrobacillosis; septicaemia; oropharynx PMID:10448489

  17. Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Valverde, E; Ferrer-Oliveras, R; Alijotas-Reig, J

    2016-04-01

    Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome is an acquired autoimmune disorder that is associated with various obstetric complications and, in the absence of prior history of thrombosis, with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies directed against other phospholipids, proteins called cofactors or PL-cofactor complexes. Although the obstetric complications have been related to the procoagulant properties of antiphospholipid antibodies, pathological studies of human placenta have shown the proinflammatory capacity of antiphospholipid antibodies via the complement system and proinflammatory cytokines. There is no general agreement on which antiphospholipid antibodies profile (laboratory) confers the greatest obstetric risk, but the best candidates are categories I and IIa. Combined treatment with low doses of aspirin and heparin achieves good obstetric and maternal outcomes. In this study, we also review the therapeutic possibilities in refractory cases, although the likelihood of progressing to other autoimmune diseases is low. We briefly comment on incomplete obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome, also known as antiphospholipid antibody-mediated pregnancy morbidity syndrome.

  18. Hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Canpolat, Nur

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a clinical syndrome characterized by the triad of thrombotic microangiopathy, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Hemolytic uremic syndrome represents a heterogeneous group of disorders with variable etiologies that result in differences in presentation, management and outcome. In recent years, better understanding of the HUS, especially those due to genetic mutations in the alternative complement pathway have provided an update on the terminology, classification, and treatment of the disease. This review will provide the updated classification of the disease and the current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches on the complement-mediated HUS in addition to STEC-HUS which is the most common cause of the HUS in childhood. PMID:26265890

  19. Atypical Cogan's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Queirós, João; Maia, Sofia; Seca, Mariana; Friande, António; Araújo, Maria; Meireles, Angelina

    2013-01-01

    Background. Cogan's syndrome is a rare clinical entity whose etiopathology is still unknown, and the treatment strategies are not clearly defined. Case. A 23-year-old male presented with symptoms of headache, peripheral facial palsy, persistent right hearing loss and bilateral papillitis. Workup excluded all infectious, granulomatous, neoplastic, and immune causes. The diagnosis of atypical Cogan's syndrome was established, and the patient was treated with systemic corticosteroids and later on with cyclophosphamide and methotrexate. There were improvement of visual symptoms and stabilisation of left hearing. Conclusion. Cogan's syndrome is a very rare disease with no specific biological tests for the diagnosis. The diagnostic exams are mostly important to exclude other etiologies. The atypical ocular and audiovestibular manifestations make the diagnosis difficult, delaying the institution of appropriate therapy which may result in profound bilateral deafness. PMID:23691387

  20. [Economy class syndrome].

    PubMed

    Morio, Hiroshi

    2003-10-01

    Economy class syndrome is venous thromboembolism following air travel. This syndrome was firstly reported in 1946, and many cases have been reported since 1990s. Low air pressure and low humidity in the aircraft cabin may contribute to the mechanism of this syndrome. Risk factors for venous thrombosis in the plane were old age, small height, obesity, hormonal therapy, malignancy, smoking, pregnancy or recent parturition, recent trauma or operation, chronic disease and history of venous thrombosis. In Japan, the feminine gender is also risk factor though reason was not well known. For prophylaxis, adequate fluid intake and leg exercise are recommended to all passengers. For passengers with high risk, prophylactic measures such as compression stockings, aspirin or low molecular weight heparin should be considered.