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Sample records for laurus delawarensis residing

  1. Probable epizootic chlamydiosis in wild California (Larus californicus) and ring-billed (Larus delawarensis) gulls in North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Pearson, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    During the summer of 1986, more than 400 California gulls (Larus californicus) and ring-billed gulls (Larvus delawarensis), primarily fledglings, died on an island in Lake Sakakawea near New Town, North Dakota (USA). Mortality was attributed largely to chlamydiosis. Necropsy findings in nine carcasses included splenomegaly (n = 9), hepatomegaly (n = 4), and pericarditis (n = 1). Livers from three California gulls and two ring-billed gulls, and spleens from the same five birds plus a third ring-billed gull were positive for Chlamydia psittaci by the direct immunofluorescence test. Chlamydia psittaci was isolated from separate pools of liver and spleen from one California gull and one ring-billed gull. This is believed to be the first record of epizootic chlamydiosis in gulls and the second report of epizootic chlamydial mortality in wild birds in North America.

  2. Fidelity and persistence of Ring-billed (Larus delawarensis) and Herring (Larus argentatus) gulls to wintering sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Daniel E.; Koenen, Kiana K. G.; Whitney, Jillian J.; MacKenzie, Kenneth G.; DeStefano, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    While the breeding ecology of gulls (Laridae) has been well studied, their movements and spatial organization during the non-breeding season is poorly understood. The seasonal movements, winter-site fidelity, and site persistence of Ring-billed (Larus delawarensis) and Herring (L. argentatus) gulls to wintering areas were studied from 2008–2012. Satellite transmitters were deployed on Ring-billed Gulls (n = 21) and Herring Gulls (n = 14). Ten Ring-billed and six Herring gulls were tracked over multiple winters and > 300 wing-tagged Ring-billed Gulls were followed to determine winter-site fidelity and persistence. Home range overlap for individuals between years ranged between 0–1.0 (95% minimum convex polygon) and 0.31–0.79 (kernel utilization distributions). Ringbilled and Herring gulls remained at local wintering sites during the non-breeding season from 20–167 days and 74–161 days, respectively. The probability of a tagged Ring-billed Gull returning to the same site in subsequent winters was high; conversely, there was a low probability of a Ring-billed Gull returning to a different site. Ring-billed and Herring gulls exhibited high winter-site fidelity, but exhibited variable site persistence during the winter season, leading to a high probability of encountering the same individuals in subsequent winters.

  3. Air pollution effects on the leaf structure of laurus nobilis, an injury resistant species

    SciTech Connect

    Christodoulakis, N.S.; Fasseas, C.

    1990-02-01

    Although the problems caused by the long-term exposure to air pollution are serious for the existence of plants, the support of plant life in heavily polluted areas is essential for the improvement of man's life in a hard-to-breath atmosphere. In Athens the problem of photochemical smog is so serious that life in the metropolitan area becomes dangerous. That is why the Laurus nobilis (laurel) plants growing on the partition isle of a continuously traffic-loaded and heavily polluted main street in Athens became the subject of investigation of the effects of long-term exposure to air pollution.

  4. Comparative investigation of Umbellularia californica and Laurus nobilis Leaf essential oils and identification of constituents active against Aedes aegypti

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Umbellularia californica (California Bay Laurel) is a native species from California and its leaves are commonly used as spice and insect repellent. The leaves of U. californica may be mistaken or used as a substitute for Mediterranean bay laurel (Laurus nobilis) on the market. The essential oils fr...

  5. Air pollution effects on the guard cells of the injury resistant leaf of Laurus nobilis L

    SciTech Connect

    Christodoulakis, N.S.

    1993-09-01

    The need for cleaner air has led to detailed investigations not only on the sources and types of air pollutants but also on the effect that these compounds have on various life forms. The plants are the first [open quotes]victims[close quotes] of the air pollutants. Extensive literature exists on the structural damages and functional problems that plants suffer after being exposed to air pollutants. Many investigators prefer to deal with damages, caused to various organs, in plants growing in non polluted environments, after being fumigated with certain air pollutants. Others investigate the problems in plants growing in polluted areas thusmore » being subject to long-term exposure to air pollutants. Generally it seems that primary producers suffer injuries, most of the time serious, that finally lead to the suppression of photosynthesis with all the undesirable consequences that this situation has for the ecosystem. Unfortunately Athens is not only the most polluted city in Greece but also an example to be avoided among the most polluted cities in the world. Serious problems occur in plants living in this environment. One exception is Laurus nobilis, introduced as an injury resistant species. These researchers studied the plant cells and the structure of their organelles, focusing on the guard cells of the leaves. They occur on the underside of leaves and they are directly affected by polluted air. Studies show that the air pollution injury resistance of Laurus is genetic. 25 refs., 21 figs« less

  6. Field Metabolic Rate Is Dependent on Time-Activity Budget in Ring-Billed Gulls (Larus delawarensis) Breeding in an Anthropogenic Environment.

    PubMed

    Marteinson, Sarah C; Giroux, Jean-François; Hélie, Jean-François; Gentes, Marie-Line; Verreault, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Environmental and behavioral factors have long been assumed to affect variation in avian field metabolic rate (FMR). However, due to the difficulties in measuring continuous behavior of birds over prolonged periods of time, complete time-activity budgets have rarely been examined in relation to FMR. Our objective was to determine the effect of activity (measured by detailed time-activity budgets) and a series of extrinsic and intrinsic factors on FMR of the omnivorous ring-billed gull (Larus delawarensis). The experiment was conducted during the incubation period when both members of the pair alternate between attending the nest-site and leaving the colony to forage in aquatic and anthropogenic environments (city, agricultural). FMR was determined using the doubly labeled water method. Time-activity budgets were extrapolated from spatio-temporal data (2-5 days) obtained from bird-borne GPS data loggers. Gulls had low FMRs compared to those predicted by allometric equations based on recorded FMRs from several seabird species. Gulls proportioned their time mainly to nest-site attendance (71% of total tracking time), which reduced FMR/g body mass, and was the best variable explaining energy expenditure. The next best variable was the duration of foraging trips, which increased FMR/g; FMR/g was also elevated by the proportion of time spent foraging or flying (17% and 8% of tracking time respectively). Most environmental variables measured did not impact FMR/g, however, the percent of time birds were subjected to temperatures below their lower critical temperature increased FMR. Time-activity budgets varied between the sexes, and with temperature and capture date suggesting that these variables indirectly affected FMR/g. The gulls foraged preferentially in anthropogenic-related habitats, which may have contributed to their low FMR/g due to the high availability of protein- and lipid-rich foods. This study demonstrates that activities were the best predictors of FMR/g in

  7. ESR and TL studies of irradiated Anatolian laurel leaf (Laurus nobilis L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepe Çam, Semra; Aydaş, Canan; Engin, Birol; Rabia Yüce, Ülkü; Aydın, Talat; Polat, Mustafa

    2012-06-01

    Laurel leaf (Laurus nobilis L.) samples that originated from Turkey were analyzed by electron spin resonance (ESR) and thermoluminescence (TL) techniques before and after γ-irradiation. Unirradiated (control) laurel leaf samples exhibit a weak ESR singlet centered at g=2.0020. Besides this central signal were two weak satellite signals situated about 3 mT left and right to it in radiation-induced spectra. The dose-response curve of the radiation-induced ESR signal at g=2.0187 (the left satellite signal) was found to be described well by a power function. Variation of the left satellite ESR signal intensity of irradiated samples at room temperature with time in a long term showed that cellulosic free radicals responsible for the ESR spectrum of laurel leaves were not stable but detectable even after 100 days. Annealing studies at four different temperatures were used to determine the kinetic behavior and activation energy of the radiation-induced cellulosic free radicals responsible from the left satellite signal (g=2.0187) in laurel leaves. TL measurements of the polymineral dust isolated from the laurel leaf samples allowed distinguishing between irradiated and unirradiated samples.

  8. Differences in the fragrances of pollen and different floral parts of male and female flowers of Laurus nobilis.

    PubMed

    Flamini, Guido; Cioni, Pier Luigi; Morelli, Ivano

    2002-07-31

    The headspace analyses of pollen, whole living female and male flowers, and staminoids have been performed on Laurus nobilis L. (Lauraceae) from Italy to determine whether there are differences in the volatiles emitted in order to give a contribution to the roles of the different flower parts in the pollination ecology of dioecious plants. Also, the essential oils obtained from male and female plants have been studied to evaluate a possible correlation between the spontaneously emitted volatiles and the constituents stored in the glandular tissues. Furthermore, the headspace sampling technique has been improved, with respect to previously employed methods, by means of solid-phase microextraction (SPME).

  9. Laurus nobilis leaf extract mediated green synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles: Characterization and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Sekar; Vaseeharan, Baskaralingam; Malaikozhundan, Balasubramanian; Shobiya, Malaikkarasu

    2016-12-01

    The present study reports the green synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles using the aqueous leaf extract of Laurus nobilis (Ln-ZnO NPs) by co-precipitation method. The synthesized Ln-ZnO NPs were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, FTIR, XRD, TEM, SEM and EDX. Ln-ZnO NPs were crystalline in nature, flower like and have hexagonal wurtzite structure with a mean particle size of 47.27nm. The antibacterial activity of Ln-ZnO NPs was greater against Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria than Gram negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria. The zone of inhibition against S. aureus was 11.4, 12.6 and 14.2mm at 25, 50 and 75μgmL -1 . The zone of inhibition against P. aeruginosa was 9.8, 10.2 and 11.3mm at 25, 50 and 75μgmL -1 . The light and confocal laser scanning microscopic images evidenced that Ln-ZnO NPs effectively inhibited the biofilm growth of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa at 75μgmL -1 . The cytotoxicity studies revealed that Ln-ZnO NPs showed no effect on normal murine RAW264.7 macrophage cells. On the other hand, Ln-ZnO NPs were effective in inhibiting the viability of human A549 lung cancer cells at higher concentrations of 80μgmL -1 . The morphological changes in the Ln-ZnO NPs treated A549 lung cancer cells were observed under phase contrast microscope. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Diversity hotspots of the laurel forest on Tenerife, Canary Islands: a phylogeographic study of Laurus and Ixanthus.

    PubMed

    Betzin, Anja; Thiv, Mike; Koch, Marcus A

    2016-09-01

    Macaronesian laurel forest is among the worldwide hotspots of threatened biodiversity. With increasing evidence that woodland composition on the Canary Islands changed dramatically during the last few thousand years, the aim of this study was to find evidence for substantial recent population dynamics of two representative species from laurel forest. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was used to evaluate fine-scaled genetic variation of the paradigmatic tree Laurus novocanariensis (Lauraceae) and a long-lived herbaceous gentian from core laurel forest, Ixanthus viscosus (Gentianaceae), on Tenerife. Bioclimatic variables were analysed to study the respective climate niches. A chloroplast DNA screening was performed to evaluate additional genetic variation. Genetic diversity of the laurel tree showed severe geographic partitioning. On Tenerife, fine-scaled Bayesian clustering of genetic variation revealed a western and an eastern gene pool, separated by a zone of high admixture and with a third major gene pool. Compared with genetic clusters found on the other Canary Islands, the East-West differentiation on Tenerife seems to be more recent than differentiation between islands. This is substantiated by the finding of extremly low levels of chloroplast DNA-based polymorphisms. Ixanthus showed no geographic structuring of genetic variation. Genetic data from Tenerife indicate contemporary gene flow and dispersal on a micro/local scale rather than reflecting an old and relic woodland history. In particular for Laurus, it is shown that this species occupies a broad bioclimatic niche. This is not correlated with its respective distribution of genetic variation, therefore indicating its large potential for contemporary rapid and effective colonization. Ixanthus is more specialized to humid conditions and is mostly found in the natural Monteverde húmedo vegetation types, but even for this species indications for long-term persistence in the respective

  11. Comparative investigation of Umbellularia californica and Laurus nobilis leaf essential oils and identification of constituents active against Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Tabanca, Nurhayat; Avonto, Cristina; Wang, Mei; Parcher, Jon F; Ali, Abbas; Demirci, Betul; Raman, Vijayasankar; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2013-12-18

    Umbellularia californica (California bay laurel) and Laurus nobilis (Mediterranean bay laurel) leaves may be mistaken or used as a substitute on the market due to their morphological similarity. In this study, a comparison of anatomical and chemical features and biological activity of both plants is presented. L. nobilis essential oil biting deterrent and larvicidal activity were negligible. On the other hand, U. californica leaf oil showed biting deterrent activity against Aedes aegypti . The identified active repellents was thymol, along with (-)-umbellulone, 1,8-cineole, and (-)-α-terpineol. U. californica essential oil also demonstrated good larvicidal activity against 1-day-old Ae. aegypti larvae with a LD50 value of 52.6 ppm. Thymol (LD50 = 17.6 ppm), p-cymene, (-)-umbellulone, and methyleugenol were the primary larvicidal in this oil. Umbellulone was found as the principal compound (37%) of U. californica essential oil, but was not present in L. nobilis essential oil. Umbellulone mosquito activity is here reported for the first time.

  12. In Vitro Study of the Antifungal Activity of Essential Oils Obtained from Mentha spicata, Thymus vulgaris, and Laurus nobilis.

    PubMed

    Houicher, Abderrahmane; Hechachna, Hind; Teldji, Hanifa; Ozogul, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the antifungal activity of the essential oils isolated from three aromatic plants against 13 filamentous fungal strains. The major constituents of Mentha spicata, Thymus vulgaris, and Laurus nobilis essential oils were carvone (52.2%), linalool (78.1%), and 1,8-cineole (45.6%), respectively. There are also some patents suggesting the use of essential oils as natural and safe alternatives to fungicides for plant protection. In the present work, M. spicata essential oil exhibited the strongest activity against all tested fungi in which Fusarium graminearum, F.moniliforme, and Penicillium expansum were the most sensitive to mint oil with lower minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) values of 2.5 μL mL-1 (v/v). Thymus vulgaris essential oil was less active compared to the oil of M. spicata. Aspergillus ochraceus was the most sensitive strain to thyme oil with MIC and MFC values of 2.5 and 5 μL mL-1, respectively. Thymus vulgaris essential oil also exhibited a moderate fungicidal effect against the tested fungi, except for A. niger (MFC >20 μL-1). L. nobilis essential oil showed a similar antifungal activity with thyme oil in which A. parasiticus was the most resistant strain to this oil (MFC >20 μL mL-1). Our findings suggested the use of these essential oils as alternatives to synthetic fungicides in order to prevent pre-and post-harvest infections and ensure product safety. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Antifungal activity, mode of action and anti-biofilm effects of Laurus nobilis Linnaeus essential oil against Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, Larissa Rangel; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; Ferreira, Gabriela Lacet Silva; Freires, Irlan Almeida; de Carvalho, Fabíola Galbiatti; Castellano, Lúcio Roberto; de Castro, Ricardo Dias

    2017-01-01

    The present study demonstrated the antifungal potential of the chemically characterized essential oil (EO) of Laurus nobilis L. (bay laurel) against Candida spp. biofilm adhesion and formation, and further established its mode of action on C. albicans. L. nobilis EO was obtained and tested for its minimum inhibitory and fungicidal concentrations (MIC/MFC) against Candida spp., as well as for interaction with cell wall biosynthesis and membrane ionic permeability. Then we evaluated its effects on the adhesion, formation, and reduction of 48hC. albicans biofilms. The EO phytochemical profile was determined by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The MIC and MFC values of the EO ranged from (250 to 500) μg/mL. The MIC values increased in the presence of sorbitol (osmotic protector) and ergosterol, which indicates that the EO may affect cell wall biosynthesis and membrane ionic permeability, respectively. At 2 MIC the EO disrupted initial adhesion of C. albicans biofilms (p<0.05) and affected biofilm formation with no difference compared to nystatin (p>0.05). When applied for 1min, every 8h, for 24h and 48h, the EO reduced the amount of C. albicans mature biofilm with no difference in relation to nystatin (p>0.05). The phytochemical analysis identified isoeugenol as the major compound (53.49%) in the sample. L. nobilis EO has antifungal activity probably due to monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes in its composition. This EO may affect cell wall biosynthesis and membrane permeability, and showed deleterious effects against C. albicans biofilms. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. In vitro and in vivo assessment of the effect of Laurus novocanariensis oil and essential oil in human skin.

    PubMed

    Viciolle, E; Castilho, P; Rosado, C

    2012-12-01

    Laurus novocanariensis is an endemic plant from the Madeira Island forest that derives a fatty oil, with a strong spicy odour, from its berries that has been used for centuries in traditional medicine to treat skin ailments. This work aimed to investigate the effect of the application of both the oil and its essential oil on normal skin, to assess their safety and potential benefits. Diffusion studies with Franz cells using human epidermal membranes were conducted. The steady-state fluxes of two model molecules through untreated skin were compared with those obtained after a 2-h pre-treatment with either the oil or the essential oil. Additionally, eleven volunteers participated in the in vivo study that was conducted on the forearm and involved daily application of the oil for 5 days. Measurements were performed every day in the treated site with bioengineering methods that measure erythema, irritation and loss of barrier function. Slightly higher steady-state fluxes were observed for both the lipophilic and the hydrophilic molecule when the epidermal membranes were pre-treated. Nevertheless, such differences had no statistical significance, which seems to confirm that neither the oil nor the essential oil impaired the epidermal barrier. Results collected with the Chromameter, the Laser Doppler Flowmeter and the visual scoring are in agreement with those established in the in vitro study. They indicate that the repeated application of the oil did not cause erythema, because the results observed in the first day of the study were maintained throughout the week. Application of the oil did not affect the skin barrier function, because the transepidermal water loss remained constant throughout the study. The stratum corneum hydration was slightly reduced on days 4 and 5. This work shows that both the oil and the essential oil were well tolerated by the skin and did not cause significant barrier impairment or irritation. © 2012 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the

  15. Laurus nobilis, Zingiber officinale and Anethum graveolens Essential Oils: Composition, Antioxidant and Antibacterial Activities against Bacteria Isolated from Fish and Shellfish.

    PubMed

    Snuossi, Mejdi; Trabelsi, Najla; Ben Taleb, Sabrine; Dehmeni, Ameni; Flamini, Guido; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2016-10-22

    Several bacterial strains were isolated from wild and reared fish and shellfish. The identification of these strains showed the dominance of the Aeromonas hydrophila species in all seafood samples, followed by Staphylococcus spp., Vibrio alginolyticus , Enterobacter cloacae , Klebsiella ornithinolytica , Klebsiella oxytoca and Serratia odorifera . The isolates were studied for their ability to produce exoenzymes and biofilms. The chemical composition of the essential oils from Laurus nobilis leaves, Zingiber officinale rhizomes and Anethum graveolens aerial parts was studied by GC and GC/MS. The essential oils' antioxidant and antibacterial activities against the isolated microorganisms were studied. Low concentrations of the three essential oils were needed to inhibit the growth of the selected bacteria and the lowest MBCs values were obtained for the laurel essential oil. The selected essential oils can be used as a good natural preservative in fish food due to their antioxidant and antibacterial activities.

  16. Studies on the sesquiterpene lactones from Laurus novocanariensis lead to the clarification of the structures of 1-epi-tatridin B and its epimer tatridin B.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Braulio M; Terrero, David; Cabrera, Inmaculada; Reina, Matías

    2018-06-01

    The germacranolide 1-epi-tatridin B has been isolated from the aerial parts of Laurus novocanariensis. We have observed that the identification of this lactone and its epimer tetradin B in the scientific literature is confusing and contradictory. We have therefore studied this issue clarifying errors and contributing to the structural elucidation of other related products. Moreover, we have isolated from this plant a lactone with an 1,5-ether bridge, previously obtained from Austrolabium candidum. We have now named it austroliolide, reassigned its 13 C NMR spectrum and compared its structure with that of badgerin. In addition, we have also isolated from L. novocanariensis the known germacranolides artemorin, costunolide, tatridin A, tulirinol and verlotorin, the eudesmanolides β-cyclopyrethrosin, 1β-hydroxy-arbusculin A, magnoliaolide and reynosin, and the guaianolide dehydrocostus lactone. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Volatile oil composition and antiproliferative activity of Laurus nobilis, Origanum syriacum, Origanum vulgare, and Salvia triloba against human breast adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Kalaldeh, Jelnar Z; Abu-Dahab, Rana; Afifi, Fatma U

    2010-04-01

    Medicinal plants and culinary herbs have gained importance in the last decade as cytotoxic and antitumor agents. We hypothesized that some of the commonly used spices with reported antimicrobial activity might have antiproliferative activity. In the present study, selected spices used in Jordan were chemically analyzed and investigated for their antiproliferative activity to the adenocarcinoma of breast cell line (MCF7). The composition of the essential oils of Laurus nobilis L, Origanum syriacum L, Origanum vulgare L, and Salvia triloba L was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The antiproliferative activities of the hydrodistilled volatile oils and the crude ethanol and water extracts were evaluated using the sulphorhodamine B assay. 1,8-Cineol was the major constituent in the hydrodistilled oils of both plants, L nobilis and S triloba, with concentrations of 40.91% and 45.16%, respectively. The major constituent of O syriacum was the carvacrol (47.10%), whereas that of O vulgare was trans-sabinene hydrate (27.19%). The ethanol crude extracts of O syriacum, L nobilis, and S triloba showed antiproliferative activity to MCF7 with IC(50) values 6.40, 24.49, and 25.25 microg/mL, respectively. However, none of the hydrodistilled essential oils of the tested plant species or their aqueous extracts demonstrated cytotoxic activity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Chemical composition and antioxidant properties of Laurus nobilis L. and Myrtus communis L. essential oils from Morocco and evaluation of their antimicrobial activity acting alone or in combined processes for food preservation.

    PubMed

    Cherrat, Lamia; Espina, Laura; Bakkali, Mohammed; García-Gonzalo, Diego; Pagán, Rafael; Laglaoui, Amin

    2014-04-01

    This study describes the antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of Laurus nobilis L. and Myrtus communis L. essential oils (EOs). This is the first report of the synergistic antimicrobial effect of these EOs in combination with physical food preservation treatments. EOs obtained by steam distillation from aerial parts of Laurus nobilis and Myrtus communis were analysed by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The main compounds were 1,8-cineole and 2-carene (L. nobilis EO); and myrtenyl acetate, 1,8-cineole and α-pinene (M. communis EO). L. nobilis EO showed higher antioxidant activity than M. communis EO in three complementary antioxidant tests. Although antimicrobial activity tests demonstrated the effectiveness of L. nobilis EO and the lack of bactericidal effect of M. communis EO, synergistic lethal effects were observed when combining each EO (0.2 µL mL(-1)) with mild heat (54°C for 10 min) or high hydrostatic pressure (175-400 MPa for 20 min). In contrast, combination of EOs with pulsed electric fields (30 kV cm(-1) for 25 pulses) showed no additional effects. This study shows the great potential of these EOs in combined treatments with mild heat and high hydrostatic pressure to obtain a higher inactivation of foodborne pathogens, which might help in the design of safe processes applied at low intensity. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Short- and long-term modulation of the lutein epoxide and violaxanthin cycles in two species of the Lauraceae: sweet bay laurel (Laurus nobilis L.) and avocado (Persea americana Mill.).

    PubMed

    Esteban, R; Jiménez, M S; Morales, D; Jiménez, E T; Hormaetxe, K; Becerril, J M; Osmond, B; García-Plazaola, J I

    2008-05-01

    Short- and long-term responses of the violaxanthin (V) and lutein epoxide (Lx) cycles were studied in two species of Lauraceae: sweet bay laurel (Laurus nobilis L.) and avocado (Persea americana L.). The Lx content exceeded the V content in shade leaves of both species. Both Lx and V were de-epoxidised on illumination, but only V was fully restored by epoxidation in low light. Violaxanthin was preferentially de-epoxidised in low light in L. nobilis. This suggests that Lx accumulates with leaf ageing, partly because its conversion to lutein is limited in shade. After exposure to strong light, shade leaves of avocado readjusted the total pools of alpha- and beta-xanthophyll cycles by de novo synthesis of antheraxanthin, zeaxanthin and lutein. This occurred in parallel with a sustained depression of F(v)/F(m). In Persea indica, a closely related but low Lx species, F(v)/F(m) recovered faster after a similar light treatment, suggesting the involvement of the Lx cycle in sustained energy dissipation. Furthermore, the seasonal correlation between non-reversible Lx and V photoconversions and pre-dawn F(v)/F(m) in sun leaves of sweet bay supported the conclusion that the Lx cycle is involved in a slowly reversible downregulation of photosynthesis analogous to the V cycle.

  20. [Burnout in nursing residents].

    PubMed

    Franco, Gianfábio Pimentel; de Barros, Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antônio; Zeitoun, Sandra Salloum

    2011-03-01

    Nursing residents may experience physical and emotional exhaustion from the daily life of attending the Program. The aim of this study was to determine the Burnout incidence among Nursing Residents. An investigative, descriptive, analytical, longitudinal-prospective study was conducted with 16 Residents over two years. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used, translated and validated for Brazil, as well as a sociodemographic/occupational data tool. Of all residents, 17.2% showed high rates in Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization; 18.8% showed impaired commitment in Personal Accomplishment, 75% of which belonged to specialty areas, such as Emergency Nursing, Adult and Pediatric Intensive Care. Age and specialty area were positively correlated with Personal Accomplishment. One of the Residents was identified with changes in three subscales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, thus characterized as a Burnout Syndrome patient. Nursing Residents have profiles of disease. Knowing these factors can minimize health risks of these workers.

  1. A Resident Engineer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Gary T.

    This paper examines the work of resident engineers in a university setting. The need for engineers with industrial experience is established, and the benefits of using resident engineers in training programs are cited. Attributes and problems associated with the practice are studied from the viewpoints of industry, government, universities, and…

  2. Facility Focus: Residence Halls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes residence halls seeking to meet needs beyond traditional mass housing for the 18- to 22-year-old students: Whittemore Hall at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College (for older students); Small Group Housing at Washington University (grouping students with common interests); and the renovation of the residence hall at Boston's…

  3. Rewarding the Resident Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Jennifer M.; Drake, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Residents routinely make significant contributions to the education of medical students. However, little attention has been paid to rewarding these individuals for their involvement in these academic activities. This report describes a program that rewards resident teachers with an academic appointment as a Clinical Instructor. The residents…

  4. Technology in Residence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Jordan

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the necessity for incorporating current technology in today's college residence halls to meet the more diverse and continued activities of its students. Technology addressed covers data networking and telecommunications, heating and cooling systems, and fire-safety systems. (GR)

  5. Facilty Focus: Residence Halls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunnewell, James F., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Western Ridge Residence at Colorado College and Beard Hall at Wheaton College. The buildings feature multiple levels that take advantage of views and also help create a "homey" feeling. (EV)

  6. Burnout Syndrome During Residency.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Namigar; Karacalar, Serap; Polat, Cengiz; Kıran, Özlem; Gültop, Fethi; Kalyon, Seray Türkmen; Sinoğlu, Betül; Zincirci, Mehmet; Kaya, Ender

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is identified the degree of Burnout Syndrome (BOS) and find out its correlation with years of recidency and sociodemograpfic chareacteristics, training, sleeping habits, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. After approval from the Hospital Ethics Committee and obtaining informed consent, First, second, third, fourth and fifth year of recidency staff (n=127) working in our hospital were involved in this study. The standardized Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used in this study. Fifty six male (44.1%) and seventy one female (55.9%) residents were enroled in this study (Coranbach Alfa(α)=0.873). 57% of the first year residents smokes cigaret and 54% of them use alcohol. 2% of them gets one day off after hospital night shift, 61% of them suffers from disturbed sleep. 60% of them had been stated that they willingly selected their profession. 61% of them prefers talking to friends and 32% of them prefers shopping to overcome stress. There were statistical difference acording to years of recidency in MBI, Emotional Burnout (EB) and desensitisation scale (DS) points. EB scale points of the second year of residency group was statisticaly higher than fourth year of residency group. DS points of second year of residency group was also statisticaly higher than the third and fourth year of residency group. There was no statistical difference between any groups in Personal Success. BOS is a frequent problem during residency in anaesthesia. Appropriate definition and awareness are the first important steps to prevent this syndrome. Further administrative approaches should be evaluated with regard to their effects.

  7. Professionalism in Residency Training

    PubMed Central

    Gronowski, Ann M.; McGill, Mitchell R.

    2016-01-01

    Professionalism is one of the most important competencies for physicians but is also the most difficult to teach, assess, and manage. To better understand professionalism in pathology, we surveyed practicing pathologists and pathology residents and fellows in training. We identified 12 key desirable attributes of professionalism. In addition, 8 case scenarios highlighting unprofessional behavior were presented, and results between pathologists in practice and in training were compared. No significant differences between attending pathologists and residents were identified in how these cases should be managed. Our study demonstrated remarkable concordance between practicing pathologists and residents as to what constitutes professionalism and how to manage unprofessional behavior. Our case-based approach can be a useful technique to teach professionalism to both pathologists in practice and in training. PMID:28725778

  8. Resident training in microbiology.

    PubMed

    Haller, Barbara L

    2007-06-01

    To meet the challenges of diagnosis and management of infectious diseases, clinical pathology residents must receive comprehensive training in microbiology, learn to think critically, develop problem-solving skills, and take active roles as laboratory consultants. Residents well trained in clinical microbiology become capable laboratory professionals, developing cost-effective testing strategies, decreasing risk for medical errors, and improving patient care. Newer methods for diagnosing infectious disease, such as real-time polymerase chain reaction, microarrays for pathogen detection, and rapid assays for antigen or antibody detection, have become standard. Knowledge of infectious disease principles, drug therapeutic options, and drug resistance is also important. Suggestions for training and for assessing resident competency in clinical microbiology are presented.

  9. Financing Residency Training Redesign.

    PubMed

    Carney, Patricia A; Waller, Elaine; Green, Larry A; Crane, Steven; Garvin, Roger D; Pugno, Perry A; Kozakowski, Stanley M; Douglass, Alan B; Jones, Samuel; Eiff, M Patrice

    2014-12-01

    Redesign in the health care delivery system creates a need to reorganize resident education. How residency programs fund these redesign efforts is not known. Family medicine residency program directors participating in the Preparing Personal Physicians for Practice (P(4)) project were surveyed between 2006 and 2011 on revenues and expenses associated with training redesign. A total of 6 university-based programs in the study collectively received $5,240,516 over the entire study period, compared with $4,718,943 received by 8 community-based programs. Most of the funding for both settings came from grants, which accounted for 57.8% and 86.9% of funding for each setting, respectively. Department revenue represented 3.4% of university-based support and 13.1% of community-based support. The total average revenue (all years combined) per program for university-based programs was just under $875,000, and the average was nearly $590,000 for community programs. The vast majority of funds were dedicated to salary support (64.8% in university settings versus 79.3% in community-based settings). Based on the estimated ratio of new funding relative to the annual costs of training using national data for a 3-year program with 7 residents per year, training redesign added 3% to budgets for university-based programs and about 2% to budgets for community-based programs. Residencies undergoing training redesign used a variety of approaches to fund these changes. The costs of innovations marginally increased the estimated costs of training. Federal and local funding sources were most common, and costs were primarily salary related. More research is needed on the costs of transforming residency training.

  10. Residence Hall Fires.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Dorothy

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how one college's experience with a tragic fire in one of its residence halls prompted a reevaluation of its fire-prevention-and-response strategies. Staff training, sprinkler installation, new alarm systems, and exit hardware to help make building exiting more efficient are discussed. (GR)

  11. Resident Assistant Workplace Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boone, Katherine B.

    2018-01-01

    The sources of work motivation for resident assistants have received little attention in the literature over the last decade. As the role grows more complex and more expectations are added to the RA position, determining what current factors motivate students to apply for the RA position is essential. This study presents quantitative research to…

  12. Observing Community Residences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Steven J.; Bogdan, Robert

    The document offers guidelines effectively monitoring the quality of care provided in community residences serving people with disabilities. An initial section offers suggestions on observation and evaluation procedures. The remainder of the document lists possible questions to be asked in 19 areas: location, building and yard, relations with the…

  13. Resident, State of Alaska

    Science.gov Websites

    Skip to content State of Alaska myAlaska My Government Resident Business in Alaska Visiting Alaska State Employees State of Alaska Search Home Quick Links Departments Commissioners Employee Whitepages State Government Jobs Federal Jobs Starting a Small Business Living Get a Driver License Get a Hunting

  14. Leadership Training in Otolaryngology Residency.

    PubMed

    Bent, John P; Fried, Marvin P; Smith, Richard V; Hsueh, Wayne; Choi, Karen

    2017-06-01

    Although residency training offers numerous leadership opportunities, most residents are not exposed to scripted leadership instruction. To explore one program's attitudes about leadership training, a group of otolaryngology faculty (n = 14) and residents (n = 17) was polled about their attitudes. In terms of self-perception, more faculty (10 of 14, 71.4%) than residents (9 of 17, 52.9%; P = .461) considered themselves good leaders. The majority of faculty and residents (27 of 31) thought that adults could be taught leadership ability. Given attitudes about leadership ability and the potential for improvement through instruction, consideration should be given to including such training in otolaryngology residency.

  15. Resident-to-resident violence triggers in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Snellgrove, Susan; Beck, Cornelia; Green, Angela; McSweeney, Jean C

    2013-11-01

    Certified nurses' assistants (CNAs) employed by a rural nursing home in Northeast Arkansas described their perceptions of resident-to-resident violence in order to provide insight on factors, including unmet needs, that may trigger the phenomenon. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 11 CNAs. Data were analyzed using content analysis and constant comparison. Two categories of triggers emerged from the data-active and passive. Active triggers involved the actions of other residents that were intrusive in nature, such as wandering into a residents' personal space, taking a resident's belongings, and so forth. Passive triggers did not involve the actions of residents but related to the internal and external environment of the residents. Examples were factors such as boredom, competition for attention and communication difficulties. Results indicate that there are factors, including unmet needs within the nursing home environment that may be identified and altered to prevent violence between residents.

  16. The Fundamentals of Resident Dismissal.

    PubMed

    Schenarts, Paul J; Langenfeld, Sean

    2017-02-01

    Residents have the rights and responsibilities of both students and employees. Dismissal of a resident from a training program is traumatic and has lasting repercussions for the program director, the faculty, the dismissed resident, and the residency. A review of English language literature was performed using PUBMED and OVID databases, using the search terms, resident dismissal, resident termination, student dismissal, student and resident evaluation, legal aspects of education, and remediation. The references of each publication were also reviewed to identify additional appropriate citations. If the Just Cause threshold has been met, educators have the absolute discretion to evaluate academic and clinical performance. Legal opinion has stated that it is not necessary to wait until a patient is harmed to dismiss a resident. Evaluations should be standard and robust. Negative evaluations are not defamatory as the resident gave consent to be evaluated. Provided departmental and institutional polices have been followed, a resident can be dismissed without a formal hearing. Residencies are entitled to modify academic requirements and dismissal is not considered a breach of contract. Although there is anxiety regarding resident dismissal, the courts have uniformly supported faculty having this role. When indicated, failure to dismiss a resident also places the program director and the faculty at risk for educational malpractice.

  17. The pregnant female surgical resident

    PubMed Central

    Shifflette, Vanessa; Hambright, Susannah; Amos, Joseph Darryl; Dunn, Ernest; Allo, Maria

    2018-01-01

    Background Surgery continues to be an intense, time-consuming residency. Many medical students decide against surgery as a profession due to the long work hours and family strain. The pregnant female surgical resident has an added stress factor compared to her male counterpart. Methods We distributed an electronic, online 26-question survey to 32 general surgery programs in the southwestern region of the United States. Each program distributed our survey to the female surgical residents who had been pregnant during residency in the last 5 years. Each program was re-contacted 6 weeks after the initial contact. Most questions were in a 5-point Likert scale format. The responses were collected and analyzed using the Survey Monkey website. Results An unvalidated survey was sent to 32 general surgery programs and 26 programs responded (81%). Each program was asked for the total number of possible responses from female residents that met our criteria (60 female residents). Seven of the programs (27%) stated that they have had zero residents pregnant. We had 22 residents respond (37%). Over half of the residents (55%) were pregnant during their 2nd or 3rd year of residency, with only 18% pregnant during a research year. Thirty-one percent had a lower American Board of Surgery In-Training Exam (ABSITE) score. Ninety percent of the residents were able to take 4 weeks or more for maternity leave. Most of the residents (95%) stated that they would do this again during residency given the opportunity, but many of the residents felt that returning back to work with a child at home was the most difficult part. Conclusion Our preliminary study shows that the programs surveyed were accommodating to the female surgical resident. Nevertheless, despite adequate support from their program and an overall positive experience, many residents indicated that they had a decline in their education and performance. PMID:29785149

  18. Impact of Residency Training Redesign on Residents' Clinical Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Waller, Elaine; Eiff, M Patrice; Dexter, Eve; Rinaldo, Jason C B; Marino, Miguel; Garvin, Roger; Douglass, Alan B; Phillips, Robert; Green, Larry A; Carney, Patricia A

    2017-10-01

    The In-training Examination (ITE) is a frequently used method to evaluate family medicine residents' clinical knowledge. We compared family medicine ITE scores among residents who trained in the 14 programs that participated in the Preparing the Personal Physician for Practice (P4) Project to national averages over time, and according to educational innovations. The ITE scores of 802 consenting P4 residents who trained in 2007 through 2011 were obtained from the American Board of Family Medicine. The primary analysis involved comparing scores within each academic year (2007 through 2011), according to program year (PGY) for P4 residents to all residents nationally. A secondary analysis compared ITE scores among residents in programs that experimented with length of training and compared scores among residents in programs that offered individualized education options with those that did not. Release of ITE scores was consented to by 95.5% of residents for this study. Scores of P4 residents were higher compared to national scores in each year. For example, in 2011, the mean P4 score for PGY1 was 401.2, compared to the national average of 386. For PGY2, the mean P4 score was 443.1, compared to the national average of 427, and for PGY3, the mean P4 score was 477.0, compared to the national PGY3 score of 456. Scores of residents in programs that experimented with length of training were similar to those in programs that did not. Scores were also similar between residents in programs with and without individualized education options. Family medicine residency programs undergoing substantial educational changes, including experiments in length of training and individualized education, did not appear to experience a negative effect on resident's clinical knowledge, as measured by ITE scores. Further research is needed to study the effect of a wide range of residency training innovations on ITE scores over time.

  19. Nursing home resident smoking policies.

    PubMed

    Stefanacci, Richard G; Lester, Paula E; Kohen, Izchak

    2008-01-01

    To identify nursing home standards related to resident smoking through a nation wide survey of directors of nursing. A national survey was distributed online and was completed by 248 directors of nursing. The directors of nurses answered questions concerning resident smoking including the criteria utilized to determine an unsafe resident smoker. For those residents identified as unsafe, the questions asked were specifically related to monitoring, staff involvement, safety precautions and policy. The results of the survey demonstrated a consistent policy practiced among facilities across the United States. The monitoring of nursing home residents is based on a resident's mental acuity, physical restrictions and equipment requirements. Once a resident was identified as a smoker at risk of harm to self or others, staff involvement ranged from distributing cigarettes to direct supervision. In addition, the majority of facilities required residents to wear fire resistant aprons and provided a fire extinguisher in smoking areas. Monitoring policies of nursing home residents who smoke starts with identifying those residents at risk based on an assessment of mental acuity, physical restrictions and equipment requirements. Those that are identified as being at risk smokers have their cigarettes controlled and distributed by nursing staff and are supervised by facility staff when smoking. This policy is implemented through written policy as well as staff education. Despite some discrepancies in the actual implementation of policies to supervise residents who smoke, the policies for assessment for at-risk smokers requiring monitoring is consistent on a national basis.

  20. Do Residency Selection Factors Predict Radiology Resident Performance?

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Vikas; Bump, Gregory M; Heller, Matthew T; Chen, Ling-Wan; Branstetter, Barton F; Amesur, Nikhil B; Hughes, Marion A

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of our study is to determine what information in medical student residency applications predicts radiology residency success as defined by objective clinical performance data. We performed a retrospective cohort study of residents who entered our institution's residency program through the National Resident Matching Program as postgraduate year 2 residents and completed the program over the past 2 years. Medical school grades, selection to Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) Honor Society, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) scores, publication in peer-reviewed journals, and whether the applicant was from a peer institution were the variables examined. Clinical performance was determined by calculating each resident's cumulative major discordance rate for on-call cases the resident read and gave a preliminary interpretation. A major discordance was defined as a difference between the preliminary resident and the final attending interpretations that could immediately impact the care of the patient. A multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine significant variables. Twenty-seven residents provided preliminary reports on call for 67,145 studies. The mean major discordance rate was 1.08% (range 0.34%-2.54%). Higher USMLE Step 1 scores, publication before residency, and election to AOA Honor Society were all statistically significant predictors of lower major discordance rates (P values 0.01, 0.01,  and <0.001, respectively). Overall resident performance was excellent. There are predictors that help select the better performing residents, namely higher USMLE Step 1 scores, one to two publications during medical school, and election to AOA in the junior year of medical school. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Resident Peritoneal NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonzaga, Rosemary; Matzinger, Polly; Perez-Diez, Ainhoa

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe a new population of NK cells that reside in the normal, un-inflamed peritoneal cavity. Phenotypically, they share some similarities with the small population of CD49b negative, CD27 positive immature splenic NK cells, and liver NK cells but differ in their expression of CD62L, TRAIL and EOMES. Functionally, the peritoneal NK cells resemble the immature splenic NK cells in their production of IFN-γ, GM-CSF and TNF-α and in the killing of YAC-1 target cells. We also found that the peritoneum induces different behavior in mature and immature splenic NK cells. When transferred intravenously into RAGγcKO mice, both populations undergo homeostatic proliferation in the spleen, but only the immature splenic NK cells, are able to reach the peritoneum. When transferred directly into the peritoneum, the mature NK cells survive but do not divide, while the immature NK cells proliferate profusely. These data suggest that the peritoneum is not only home to a new subset of tissue resident NK cells but that it differentially regulates the migration and homeostatic proliferation of immature versus mature NK cells. PMID:22079985

  2. Resident Exposure to Peripheral Nerve Surgical Procedures During Residency Training

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Joseph A.; Daniels, Alan H.; Akelman, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Background Variability in case exposures has been identified for orthopaedic surgery residents. It is not known if this variability exists for peripheral nerve procedures. Objective The objective of this study was to assess ACGME case log data for graduating orthopaedic surgery, plastic surgery, general surgery, and neurological surgery residents for peripheral nerve surgical procedures and to evaluate intraspecialty and interspecialty variability in case volume. Methods Surgical case logs from 2009 to 2014 for the 4 specialties were compared for peripheral nerve surgery experience. Peripheral nerve case volume between specialties was performed utilizing a paired t test, 95% confidence intervals were calculated, and linear regression was calculated to assess the trends. Results The average number of peripheral nerve procedures performed per graduating resident was 54.2 for orthopaedic surgery residents, 62.8 for independent plastic surgery residents, 84.6 for integrated plastic surgery residents, 22.4 for neurological surgery residents, and 0.4 for surgery residents. Intraspecialty comparison of the 10th and 90th percentile peripheral nerve case volume in 2012 revealed remarkable variability in training. There was a 3.9-fold difference within orthopaedic surgery, a 5.0-fold difference within independent plastic surgery residents, an 8.8-fold difference for residents from integrated plastic surgery programs, and a 7.0-fold difference within the neurological surgery group. Conclusions There is interspecialty and intraspecialty variability in peripheral nerve surgery volume for orthopaedic, plastic, neurological, and general surgery residents. Caseload is not the sole determinant of training quality as mentorship, didactics, case breadth, and complexity play an important role in training. PMID:27168883

  3. Machiavelli and the chief resident.

    PubMed

    Raviglione, M C

    1990-06-01

    A good chief resident is under pressure from residents and the department director and must work for the welfare of both the housestaff and the institution. Using precepts from Niccoló Machiavelli's The Prince, the author gives advice for chief residents on how to balance their responsibilities. The author, using Machiavelli's precepts, discusses the difficulties of introducing change, supervising former colleagues and peers, the opprobrium that inevitably attaches to tough decisions, the need to set good examples, and other aspects of being a chief resident.

  4. Education Research: Neurology resident education

    PubMed Central

    Mayans, David; Schneider, Logan; Adams, Nellie; Khawaja, Ayaz M.; Engstrom, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To survey US-trained graduating neurology residents who are American Academy of Neurology members, in an effort to trend perceived quality and completeness of graduate neurology education. Methods: An electronic survey was sent to all American Academy of Neurology members graduating from US neurology residency programs in the Spring of 2014. Results: Of 805 eligible respondents, 24% completed the survey. Ninety-three percent of adult neurology residents and 56% of child neurology residents reported plans to pursue fellowship training after residency. Respondents reported a desire for additional training in neurocritical care, neuro-oncology, neuromuscular diseases, botulinum toxin injection, and nerve blocks. There remains a clear deficit in business training of neurology residents, although there was notable improvement in knowledge of coding and office management compared to previous surveys. Discussion: Although there are still areas of perceived weakness in neurology training, graduating neurology residents feel generally well prepared for their chosen careers. However, most still pursue fellowship training for reasons that are little understood. In addition to certain subspecialties and procedures, practice management remains deficient in neurology training and is a point of future insecurity for most residents. Future curriculum changes should consider resident-reported gaps in knowledge, with careful consideration of improving business training. PMID:26976522

  5. Factors Influencing Resident Choice of Prosthodontic Residency Program.

    PubMed

    Wojnarwsky, Pandora Keala Lee; Wang, Yan; Shah, Kumar; Koka, Sreenivas

    2017-06-01

    The decision by prosthodontic residency program directors to employ the Match process highlights the need to understand applicant priorities that influence their choice of which programs to rank highly. The purpose of this study is to determine the factors that were most important to residents when choosing from among nonmilitary based prosthodontics dental residency programs in the United States. Following completion of a pilot study, all currently enrolled prosthodontic residents at nonmilitary residency programs were invited to participate via the internet. The study consisted of a survey instrument asking residents to rank 26 possible factors that might impact an applicant's choice of residency program. In addition, the instrument collected other possible influencing variables including gender and debt load. Mean rank scores were compared to determine the most and least important factors. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare specific factors between the possible influencing variables. Two hundred and thirty residents completed the survey instrument, representing a 54.1% response rate of possible participants. With regard to factors influencing program choice, reputation of the residency program was the factor ranked the highest by participants, followed in descending order by the program director's personality, curriculum content, access to use of the latest digital technology, and opportunities for dental implant placement. Quality of schools for children, community outreach opportunities, and the ability to moonlight were ranked as the least important factors. Male and female residents ranked factors such as tuition/stipend, curriculum content, and community outreach opportunities significantly differently. Depending on debt load, residents ranked the factors tuition/stipend, ability to moonlight, curriculum content, and safety of the area where the program is differently. Current prosthodontic residents valued the reputation of the program as the most

  6. Incorporating resident research into the dermatology residency program

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Richard F; Raimer, Sharon S; Kelly, Brent C

    2013-01-01

    Programmatic changes for the dermatology residency program at The University of Texas Medical Branch were first introduced in 2005, with the faculty goal incorporating formal dermatology research projects into the 3-year postgraduate training period. This curriculum initially developed as a recommendation for voluntary scholarly project activity by residents, but it evolved into a program requirement for all residents in 2009. Departmental support for this activity includes assignment of a faculty mentor with similar interest about the research topic, financial support from the department for needed supplies, materials, and statistical consultation with the Office of Biostatistics for study design and data analysis, a 2-week elective that provides protected time from clinical activities for the purpose of preparing research for publication and submission to a peer-reviewed medical journal, and a departmental award in recognition for the best resident scholarly project each year. Since the inception of this program, five classes have graduated a total of 16 residents. Ten residents submitted their research studies for peer review and published their scholarly projects in seven dermatology journals through the current academic year. These articles included three prospective investigations, three surveys, one article related to dermatology education, one retrospective chart review, one case series, and one article about dermatopathology. An additional article from a 2012 graduate about dermatology education has also been submitted to a journal. This new program for residents was adapted from our historically successful Dermatology Honors Research Program for medical students at The University of Texas Medical Branch. Our experience with this academic initiative to promote dermatology research by residents is outlined. It is recommended that additional residency programs should consider adopting similar research programs to enrich resident education. PMID:23901305

  7. Incorporating resident research into the dermatology residency program.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Richard F; Raimer, Sharon S; Kelly, Brent C

    2013-01-01

    Programmatic changes for the dermatology residency program at The University of Texas Medical Branch were first introduced in 2005, with the faculty goal incorporating formal dermatology research projects into the 3-year postgraduate training period. This curriculum initially developed as a recommendation for voluntary scholarly project activity by residents, but it evolved into a program requirement for all residents in 2009. Departmental support for this activity includes assignment of a faculty mentor with similar interest about the research topic, financial support from the department for needed supplies, materials, and statistical consultation with the Office of Biostatistics for study design and data analysis, a 2-week elective that provides protected time from clinical activities for the purpose of preparing research for publication and submission to a peer-reviewed medical journal, and a departmental award in recognition for the best resident scholarly project each year. Since the inception of this program, five classes have graduated a total of 16 residents. Ten residents submitted their research studies for peer review and published their scholarly projects in seven dermatology journals through the current academic year. These articles included three prospective investigations, three surveys, one article related to dermatology education, one retrospective chart review, one case series, and one article about dermatopathology. An additional article from a 2012 graduate about dermatology education has also been submitted to a journal. This new program for residents was adapted from our historically successful Dermatology Honors Research Program for medical students at The University of Texas Medical Branch. Our experience with this academic initiative to promote dermatology research by residents is outlined. It is recommended that additional residency programs should consider adopting similar research programs to enrich resident education.

  8. The Challenge of Problem Residents

    PubMed Central

    Yao, David C; Wright, Scott M

    2001-01-01

    Internal medicine residency training is demanding and residents can experience a wide variety of professional and personal difficulties. Residency programs everywhere have had and will continue to have problem residents. Training programs should be equipped to effectively identify and manage residents who experience problems. Previous articles that have been published on the topic of problem residents primarily addressed concerns such as impairment due to depression and substance abuse. The content of this article is derived from a comprehensive review of the literature as well as other data sources such as interviews with program directors and workshops at national professional meetings. This article focuses primarily on four issues related to problem residents: their identification, underlying causes, management, and prevention. The study attempts to be evidence-based, wherever possible, highlighting what is known. Recommendations based on the synthesis of the data are also made. Future ongoing studies of problem residents will improve our understanding of the matters involved, and may ultimately lead to improved outcomes for these trainees. PMID:11520388

  9. Sexual Education for Psychiatric Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Stephen B.; Scott, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors seek to promote sexuality curriculum development in departments of psychiatry. Methods: The authors first focus on educational philosophy about what residents can be taught about sexual topics and then provide numerical and narrative resident evaluation data following a 6-month, half day per week rotation in a sexuality…

  10. Residence Hall Seating That Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiens, Janet

    2003-01-01

    Describes the seating chosen for residence halls at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of New England. The seating required depends on ergonomics, aesthetics, durability, cost, and code requirements. In addition, residence halls must have a range of seating types to accommodate various uses. (SLD)

  11. Lessons from a Teacher Residency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, A. Lin; Roegman, Rachel; Reagan, Emilie Mitescu

    2018-01-01

    Teacher residencies, based on the medical school training model, are emerging as an innovative model of educator preparation. The authors describe one such program in New York City, the Teaching Residents at Teachers College (TR@TC). They say the program has been successful in recruiting nontraditional candidates (including minorities) into…

  12. Early resident-to-resident physics education in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Kansagra, Akash P

    2014-01-01

    The revised ABR board certification process has updated the method by which diagnostic radiology residents are evaluated for competency in clinical radiologic physics. In this work, the author reports the successful design and implementation of a resident-taught physics course consisting of 5 weekly, hour-long lectures intended for incoming first-year radiology residents in their first month of training. To the author's knowledge, this is the first description of a course designed to provide a very early framework for ongoing physics education throughout residency without increasing the didactic burden on faculty members. Twenty-six first-year residents spanning 2 academic years took the course and reported subjective improvement in their knowledge (90%) and interest (75%) in imaging physics and a high level of satisfaction with the use of senior residents as physics educators. Based on the success of this course and the minimal resources required for implementation, this work may serve as a blueprint for other radiology residency programs seeking to develop revised physics curricula. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Needs Assessment for Incoming PGY-1 Residents in Neurosurgical Residency.

    PubMed

    Brandman, David M; Haji, Faizal A; Matte, Marie C; Clarke, David B

    2015-01-01

    Residents must develop a diverse range of skills in order to practice neurosurgery safely and effectively. The purpose of this study was to identify the foundational skills required for neurosurgical trainees as they transition from medical school to residency. Based on the CanMEDS competency framework, a web-based survey was distributed to all Canadian academic neurosurgical centers, targeting incoming and current PGY-1 neurosurgical residents as well as program directors. Using Likert scale and free-text responses, respondents rated the importance of various cognitive (e.g. management of raised intracranial pressure), technical (e.g. performing a lumbar puncture) and behavioral skills (e.g. obtaining informed consent) required for a PGY-1 neurosurgical resident. Of 52 individuals contacted, 38 responses were received. Of these, 10 were from program directors (71%), 11 from current PGY-1 residents (58%) and 17 from incoming PGY-1 residents (89%). Respondents emphasized operative skills such as proper sterile technique and patient positioning; clinical skills such as lesion localization and interpreting neuro-imaging; management skills for common scenarios such as raised intracranial pressure and status epilepticus; and technical skills such as lumbar puncture and external ventricular drain placement. Free text answers were concordant with the Likert scale results. We surveyed Canadian neurosurgical program directors and PGY-1 residents to identify areas perceived as foundational to neurosurgical residency education and training. This information is valuable for evaluating the appropriateness of a training program's goals and objectives, as well as for generating a national educational curriculum for incoming PGY-1 residents.

  14. Psychiatry residents in a milieu participatory democracy: a resident's view.

    PubMed

    Gersten, D

    1978-11-01

    Psychiatry residents respond with a variety of coping mechanisms to the lack of traditional structure in a milieu participatory democracy. To incorporate themselves into the system they must accept such democratic ideals as equality among staff and patients, group decision making, and free self-expression and give up some of their traditional ideas about staff and patient roles, treatment modalities, and the therapeutic environment. The author was a first-year resident in psychiatry on a university hospital inpatient therapeutic community; he discusses the conflicts between residents, who often adopt a "we-they" attitude, and the permanent staff, whose protectiveness of the ward community reflects their personal commitment to its ideals.

  15. Applying Expectancy Theory to residency training: proposing opportunities to understand resident motivation and enhance residency training

    PubMed Central

    Shweiki, Ehyal; Martin, Niels D; Beekley, Alec C; Jenoff, Jay S; Koenig, George J; Kaulback, Kris R; Lindenbaum, Gary A; Patel, Pankaj H; Rosen, Matthew M; Weinstein, Michael S; Zubair, Muhammad H; Cohen, Murray J

    2015-01-01

    Medical resident education in the United States has been a matter of national priority for decades, exemplified initially through the Liaison Committee for Graduate Medical Education and then superseded by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. A recent Special Report in the New England Journal of Medicine, however, has described resident educational programs to date as prescriptive, noting an absence of innovation in education. Current aims of contemporary medical resident education are thus being directed at ensuring quality in learning as well as in patient care. Achievement and work-motivation theories attempt to explain people’s choice, performance, and persistence in tasks. Expectancy Theory as one such theory was reviewed in detail, appearing particularly applicable to surgical residency training. Correlations between Expectancy Theory as a work-motivation theory and residency education were explored. Understanding achievement and work-motivation theories affords an opportunity to gain insight into resident motivation in training. The application of Expectancy Theory in particular provides an innovative perspective into residency education. Afforded are opportunities to promote the development of programmatic methods facilitating surgical resident motivation in education. PMID:25995656

  16. Applying Expectancy Theory to residency training: proposing opportunities to understand resident motivation and enhance residency training.

    PubMed

    Shweiki, Ehyal; Martin, Niels D; Beekley, Alec C; Jenoff, Jay S; Koenig, George J; Kaulback, Kris R; Lindenbaum, Gary A; Patel, Pankaj H; Rosen, Matthew M; Weinstein, Michael S; Zubair, Muhammad H; Cohen, Murray J

    2015-01-01

    Medical resident education in the United States has been a matter of national priority for decades, exemplified initially through the Liaison Committee for Graduate Medical Education and then superseded by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. A recent Special Report in the New England Journal of Medicine, however, has described resident educational programs to date as prescriptive, noting an absence of innovation in education. Current aims of contemporary medical resident education are thus being directed at ensuring quality in learning as well as in patient care. Achievement and work-motivation theories attempt to explain people's choice, performance, and persistence in tasks. Expectancy Theory as one such theory was reviewed in detail, appearing particularly applicable to surgical residency training. Correlations between Expectancy Theory as a work-motivation theory and residency education were explored. Understanding achievement and work-motivation theories affords an opportunity to gain insight into resident motivation in training. The application of Expectancy Theory in particular provides an innovative perspective into residency education. Afforded are opportunities to promote the development of programmatic methods facilitating surgical resident motivation in education.

  17. Personal finances of urology residents in Canada.

    PubMed

    Teichman, J M; Tongco, W; MacNeily, A E; Smart, M

    2000-12-01

    We examined how Urology residents in Canada manage their personal finances. A survey instrument was designed to elicit information on demographics, expenses, savings and incomes. The questionnaire was completed by 40 Urology residents attending the 2000 Queen's Urology Exam Skills Training (QUEST) program. Twenty-eight residents (70%) had educational debt (median debt $50 000). Seventeen residents (45%) paid credit card interest charges within the last year. Four residents (10%) maintained an unpaid credit card balance > $7500 at 17% annual interest rate. Twenty-six residents (67%) contributed to Registered Retirement Savings Program (RRSP) accounts. Seventeen residents (44%) contributed to non-RRSP retirement accounts. Nineteen residents (50%) budgeted expenses. Median resident income was $45 000. Thirteen residents (34%) had cash reserves < $250. Many residents save little, and incur substantial debt over and above educational loans. Many residents would benefit from instruction concerning prudent financial management. Residents should be informed of the consequences of low saving and high debt.

  18. The psychiatry resident research experience.

    PubMed

    MacMaster, Frank P; Cohen, Jordan; Waheed, Waqar; Magaud, Emilie; Sembo, Mariko; Langevin, Lisa Marie; Rittenbach, Katherine

    2016-11-14

    Research activity is especially critical in the field of psychiatry as it is evolving rapidly thanks to advances in neuroscience. We administered a 34-item survey regarding research experiences targeted at psychiatry residents and postgraduate residency program directors in Canada. One hundred and nineteen participants answered the survey (16 program directors, 103 residents) allowing for a margin of error of 8.4% at a 95% confidence interval. Research was rated as important in informing clinical practice (87.0% yes, 13.0% no), but only 28.7% of respondents reported that it was taught well at their home institution (33.0% no, 38.3% neutral). Only a small proportion was enthusiastic or very enthusiastic about participating in research (21.7%). While the importance of research is recognized, there is little consensus with respect to whether a standardized research practicum component is included in the resident curriculum.

  19. Helping Residents Protect Water Sources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Building on the successful early engagement of the Plain Sect agricultural community, the Eastern Lancaster County Source Water Protection Collaborative is expanding its efforts to involve local residents in the work of protecting drinking water sources.

  20. The Optometric Residency: Its Bloom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleything, Willard B.

    1979-01-01

    Guidelines for proposed residencies in optometry are presented for pediatric, rehabilitative, and hospital optometry. Their significance in terms of costs, patient population, faculty expertise, and critical mass are discussed. (JMF)

  1. The Residency as a Developmental Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brent, David A.

    1981-01-01

    The residency is examined from the standpoint of adult developmental theory, and significant developmental tasks facing residents are described. Recommendations for management of common developmental conflicts occurring in residency are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  2. Selection criteria of residents for residency programs in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Kuwait, 21 residency training programs were offered in the year 2011; however, no data is available regarding the criteria of selecting residents for these programs. This study aims to provide information about the importance of these criteria. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from members (e.g. chairmen, directors, assistants …etc.) of residency programs in Kuwait. A total of 108 members were invited to participate. They were asked to rate the importance level (scale from 1 to 5) of criteria that may affect the acceptance of an applicant to their residency programs. Average scores were calculated for each criterion. Results Of the 108 members invited to participate, only 12 (11.1%) declined to participate. Interview performance was ranked as the most important criteria for selecting residents (average score: 4.63/5.00), followed by grade point average (average score: 3.78/5.00) and honors during medical school (average score: 3.67/5.00). On the other hand, receiving disciplinary action during medical school and failure in a required clerkship were considered as the most concerning among other criteria used to reject applicants (average scores: 3.83/5.00 and 3.54/5.00 respectively). Minor differences regarding the importance level of each criterion were noted across different programs. Conclusions This study provided general information about the criteria that are used to accept/reject applicants to residency programs in Kuwait. Future studies should be conducted to investigate each criterion individually, and to assess if these criteria are related to residents' success during their training. PMID:23331670

  3. 24 CFR 964.140 - Resident training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...: (1) Community organization and leadership training; (2) Organizational development training for Resident Management Corporations and duly elected Resident Councils; (3) Public housing policies, programs...

  4. Residency training in aesthetic surgery: maximizing the residents' experience.

    PubMed

    Stadelmann, W K; Rapaport, D P; Payne, W; Shons, A R; Krizek, T J

    1998-06-01

    Plastic surgery residency programs often rely on a residents' aesthetic clinic to help train residents in aesthetic surgery. The television media may be used to help boost interest in such clinics. We report our experience with a local television station in helping to produce a "health segment" broadcast that chronicled the experience of an aesthetic patient in the residents' aesthetic clinic. As a result of this broadcast, approximately 150 people responded by telephone and subsequently attended a series of seminars designed to screen patients and educate the audience about the aesthetic clinic. A total of 121 patients (112 women and 9 men) signed up for personal consultations. The age distribution and requested procedures are presented. From the data, we conclude that there is a healthy demand for reduced-fee plastic surgery procedures performed by residents in plastic surgery. The number and variety of cases generated are sufficiently diverse to provide a well-rounded operative experience. The pursuit of media coverage of a not-for-profit clinic has the potential for generating large patient volume. Such efforts, although very attractive, are not without their own risks, which must be taken into consideration before engaging the media in the public interest arena.

  5. Assessment of medical residents' satisfaction.

    PubMed

    González-Martínez, José Francisco; García-García, José Antonio; Del Rosario Arnaud-Viñas, María; Arámbula-Morales, Enna Gabriela; Uriega-González Plata, Silvia; Mendoza-Guerrero, José Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Modern medical education is focused on students, and it is necessary to assess its level of satisfaction. A questionnaire was validated and we then conducted a study about the educational satisfaction level of medical residents of the Hospital General of Mexico. An observational, descriptive, cross-sectional and prospective study was conducted. A questionnaire of 21 items was validated and then applied to a representative sample of medical residents. Each item was evaluated with a scale from 0 to 10 and then gathered in groups: 0-5 = poor, 6-7 = average, 8 = good, 9 = very good, and 10 = excellent. Descriptive and inferential statistics were carried out using SPSS v.17.0. The questionnaire had internal validity with Cronbach's alpha >0.91 by item. Included in the study were 355 medical residents representing 37 different specialties. The performance perception of the ìheadî professors showed a wide heterogeneity: excellent (23.7%), very good (20.6%), good (16.9%), average (23.1%), poor (15.8%). Fourth-year residents and upward valued the educational performance higher (p = 0.001) as well as medical/surgical residents (p = 0.02). Intermediate-level residents valued the professor higher (p = 0.001), similar to students who were married or living with a partner (p <0.001). Upon contrasting the evaluation of the teacher's performance with the overall course performance, a linear, direct and significant correlation was obtained with Spearman's correlation coefficient = 0.78 and regression coefficient (p <0.001). We found a wide range of heterogeneity of results. Performance of the professors was the basic component to judge the quality of the residents' courses.

  6. Does Residency Selection Criteria Predict Performance in Orthopaedic Surgery Residency?

    PubMed

    Raman, Tina; Alrabaa, Rami George; Sood, Amit; Maloof, Paul; Benevenia, Joseph; Berberian, Wayne

    2016-04-01

    More than 1000 candidates applied for orthopaedic residency positions in 2014, and the competition is intense; approximately one-third of the candidates failed to secure a position in the match. However, the criteria used in the selection process often are subjective and studies have differed in terms of which criteria predict either objective measures or subjective ratings of resident performance by faculty. Do preresidency selection factors serve as predictors of success in residency? Specifically, we asked which preresidency selection factors are associated or correlated with (1) objective measures of resident knowledge and performance; and (2) subjective ratings by faculty. Charts of 60 orthopaedic residents from our institution were reviewed. Preresidency selection criteria examined included United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 and Step 2 scores, Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) scores, number of clinical clerkship honors, number of letters of recommendation, number of away rotations, Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) honor medical society membership, fourth-year subinternship at our institution, and number of publications. Resident performance was assessed using objective measures including American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (ABOS) Part I scores and Orthopaedics In-Training Exam (OITE) scores and subjective ratings by faculty including global evaluation scores and faculty rankings of residents. We tested associations between preresidency criteria and the subsequent objective and subjective metrics using linear correlation analysis and Mann-Whitney tests when appropriate. Objective measures of resident performance namely, ABOS Part I scores, had a moderate linear correlation with the USMLE Step 2 scores (r = 0.55, p < 0.001) and number of clinical honors received in medical school (r = 0.45, p < 0.001). OITE scores had a weak linear correlation with the number of clinical honors (r = 0.35, p = 0.009) and USMLE Step 2 scores (r = 0.29, p = 0

  7. An Analysis of Publication Productivity During Residency for 1506 Neurosurgical Residents and 117 Residency Departments in North America.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nickalus R; Saad, Hassan; Oravec, Chesney S; Norrdahl, Sebastian P; Fraser, Brittany; Wallace, David; Lillard, Jock C; Motiwala, Mustafa; Nguyen, Vincent N; Lee, Siang Liao; Jones, Anna V; Ajmera, Sonia; Kalakoti, Piyush; Dave, Pooja; Moore, Kenneth A; Akinduro, Olutomi; Nyenwe, Emmanuel; Vaughn, Brandy; Michael, L Madison; Klimo, Paul

    2018-05-30

    Bibliometrics is defined as the study of statistical and mathematical methods used to quantitatively analyze scientific literature. The application of bibliometrics in neurosurgery continues to evolve. To calculate a number of publication productivity measures for almost all neurosurgical residents and departments within North America. These measures were correlated with survey results on the educational environment within residency programs. During May to June 2017, data were collected from departmental websites and Scopus to compose a bibliometric database of neurosurgical residents and residency programs. Data related to authorship value and study content were collected on all articles published by residents. A survey of residency program research and educational environment was administered to program directors and coordinators; results were compared with resident academic productivity. The median number of publications in residency was 3; median h-index and Resident index were 1 and 0.17 during residency, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in academic productivity among male neurosurgical residents compared with females. The majority of articles published were tier 1 clinical articles. Residency program research support was significantly associated with increased resident productivity (P < .001). Scholarly activity requirements were not associated with increased resident academic productivity. This study represents the most comprehensive bibliometric assessment of neurosurgical resident academic productivity during training to date. New benchmarks for individual and department academic productivity are provided. A supportive research environment for neurosurgical residents is associated with increased academic productivity, but a scholarly activity requirement was, surprisingly, not shown to have a positive effect.

  8. Evaluating Dermatology Residency Program Websites.

    PubMed

    Ashack, Kurt A; Burton, Kyle A; Soh, Jonathan M; Lanoue, Julien; Boyd, Anne H; Milford, Emily E; Dunnick, Cory; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-03-16

    Internet resources play an important role in how medical students access information related to residency programs.Evaluating program websites is necessary in order to provide accurate information for applicants and provide information regarding areas of website improvement for programs. To date, dermatology residency websites (D  WS) have not been evaluated.This paper evaluates dermatology residency websites based on availability of predefined measures. Using the FREIDA (Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database) Online database, authors searched forall accredited dermatology program websites. Eligible programs were identified through the FREIDA Online database and had a functioning website. Two authors independently extracted data with consensus or third researcher resolution of differences. This data was accessed and archived from July 15th to July 17th, 2015.Primary outcomes measured were presence of content on education, resident and faculty information, program environment, applicant recruitment, schedule, salary, and website quality evaluated using an online tool (WooRank.com). Out of 117 accredited dermatology residencies, 115 had functioning webpages. Of these, 76.5% (75) had direct links found on the FRIEDA Online database. Most programs contained information on education, faculty, program environment, and applicant recruitment. However, website quality and marketing effectiveness were highly variable; most programs were deemed to need improvements in the functioning of their webpages. Also, additional information on current residents and about potential away rotations were lacking from most websites with only 52.2% (60) and 41.7% (48) of programs providing this content, respectively. A majority of dermatology residency websites contained adequate information on many of the factors we evaluated. However, many were lacking in areas that matter to applicants. We hope this report will encourage dermatology residencyprograms

  9. General surgery residency training issues.

    PubMed

    Klingensmith, Mary E; Lewis, Frank R

    2013-01-01

    The practice of general surgery has undergone a marked evolution in the past 20 years, which has been inadequately recognized and minimally addressed. The changes that have occurred have been disruptive to residency training, and to date there has been inadequate compensation for these. Evidence is now emerging of significant issues in the overall performance of recent graduates from at least 3 sources: the evaluation of external agents who incorporate these graduates into their practice or group, the opinions of the residents themselves, and the performance of graduates on the oral examination of the American Board of Surgery during the past 8 years. The environmental and technological causes of the present situation represent improvements in care for patients, and are clearly irreversible. Hence, solutions to the problems must be sought in other areas. To address the issues effectively, greater recognition and engagement are needed by the surgical community so that effective solutions can be crafted. These will need to include improvements in the efficiency of teaching, with the assumption of greater individual resident responsibility for their knowledge, the establishment of more defined standards for knowledge and skills acquisition by level of residency training, with flexible self-assessment available online, greater focus of the curriculum on current rather than historical practice, increased use of structured assessments (including those in a simulated environment), and modifications to the overall structure of the traditional 5-year residency.

  10. Plagiarism in residency application essays.

    PubMed

    Segal, Scott; Gelfand, Brian J; Hurwitz, Shelley; Berkowitz, Lori; Ashley, Stanley W; Nadel, Eric S; Katz, Joel T

    2010-07-20

    Anecdotal reports suggest that some residency application essays contain plagiarized content. To determine the prevalence of plagiarism in a large cohort of residency application essays. Retrospective cohort study. 4975 application essays submitted to residency programs at a single large academic medical center between 1 September 2005 and 22 March 2007. Specialized software was used to compare residency application essays with a database of Internet pages, published works, and previously submitted essays and the percentage of the submission matching another source was calculated. A match of more than 10% to an existing work was defined as evidence of plagiarism. Evidence of plagiarism was found in 5.2% (95% CI, 4.6% to 5.9%) of essays. The essays of non-U.S. citizens were more likely to demonstrate evidence of plagiarism. Other characteristics associated with the prevalence of plagiarism included medical school location outside the United States and Canada; previous residency or fellowship; lack of research experience, volunteer experience, or publications; a low United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 score; and non-membership in the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. The software database is probably incomplete, the 10%-match threshold for defining plagiarism has not been statistically validated, and the study was confined to applicants to 1 institution. Evidence of matching content in an essay cannot be used to infer the applicant's intent and is not sensitive to variations in the cultural context of copying in some societies. Evidence of plagiarism in residency application essays is more common in international applicants but was found in those by applicants to all specialty programs, from all medical school types, and even among applicants with significant academic honors. No external funding.

  11. Simulation Activity in Otolaryngology Residencies.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Ellen S; Wiet, Gregory J; Seidman, Michael; Hussey, Heather M; Malekzadeh, Sonya; Fried, Marvin P

    2015-08-01

    Simulation has become a valuable tool in medical education, and several specialties accept or require simulation as a resource for resident training or assessment as well as for board certification or maintenance of certification. This study investigates current simulation resources and activities in US otolaryngology residency programs and examines interest in advancing simulation training and assessment within the specialty. Web-based survey. US otolaryngology residency training programs. An electronic web-based survey was disseminated to all US otolaryngology program directors to determine their respective institutional and departmental simulation resources, existing simulation activities, and interest in further simulation initiatives. Descriptive results are reported. Responses were received from 43 of 104 (43%) residency programs. Simulation capabilities and resources are available in most respondents' institutions (78.6% report onsite resources; 73.8% report availability of models, manikins, and devices). Most respondents (61%) report limited simulation activity within otolaryngology. Areas of simulation are broad, addressing technical and nontechnical skills related to clinical training (94%). Simulation is infrequently used for research, credentialing, or systems improvement. The majority of respondents (83.8%) expressed interest in participating in multicenter trials of simulation initiatives. Most respondents from otolaryngology residency programs have incorporated some simulation into their curriculum. Interest among program directors to participate in future multicenter trials appears high. Future research efforts in this area should aim to determine optimal simulators and simulation activities for training and assessment as well as how to best incorporate simulation into otolaryngology residency training programs. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  12. 28 CFR 115.233 - Resident education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Resident education. 115.233 Section 115... STANDARDS Standards for Community Confinement Facilities Training and Education § 115.233 Resident education... resident is transferred to a different facility. (c) The agency shall provide resident education in formats...

  13. 28 CFR 115.233 - Resident education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Resident education. 115.233 Section 115... STANDARDS Standards for Community Confinement Facilities Training and Education § 115.233 Resident education... resident is transferred to a different facility. (c) The agency shall provide resident education in formats...

  14. 28 CFR 115.233 - Resident education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Resident education. 115.233 Section 115... STANDARDS Standards for Community Confinement Facilities Training and Education § 115.233 Resident education... resident is transferred to a different facility. (c) The agency shall provide resident education in formats...

  15. Evaluation of Emergency Medicine Residents by Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tintinalli, Judith E.

    1989-01-01

    Emergency medicine residents at William Beaumont Hospital are evaluated quarterly by the nursing staff. The nurses discuss each resident and reach consensus on each evaluation item and copies are given to each resident. Although the residents' attitudes have not been favorable, overall their behavioral interactions have improved markedly.…

  16. Teaching physics to radiology residents.

    PubMed

    Hendee, William R

    2009-04-01

    The complexity of diagnostic imaging has expanded dramatically over the past two decades. Over the same period, the time and effort devoted to teaching physics (the science and technology of the discipline) have diminished. This paradox compromises the ability of future radiologists to master imaging technologies so that they are used in an efficient, safe, and cost-effective manner. This article addresses these issues. Efforts involving many professional organizations are under way to resolve the paradox of the expanding complexity of medical imaging contrasted with the declining emphasis on physics in radiology residency programs. These efforts should help to reestablish physics education as a core value in radiology residency programs.

  17. Conversations with Holocaust survivor residents.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Sandra P; LeNavenec, Carole Lynne; Aldiabat, Khaldoun

    2011-03-01

    Traumatic events in one's younger years can have an impact on how an individual copes with later life. One traumatic experience for Jewish individuals was the Holocaust. Some of these people are moving into long-term care facilities. It was within this context that the research question emerged: What are Holocaust survivor residents' perceptions of a life lived as they move into a long-term care facility? For this qualitative study, Holocaust survivors were individually interviewed. Findings emphasize that nursing care needs to ensure that Holocaust survivor residents participate in activities, receive timely health care, and receive recognition of their life experiences. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Burnout among plastic surgery residents

    PubMed Central

    Aldrees, Turki; Hassouneh, Basil; Alabdulkarim, Abdulaziz; Asad, Loujin; Alqaryan, Saleh; Aljohani, Emad; Alqahtani, Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To develop a more comprehensive explanation and understanding of the prevalence of and factors associated with burnout for residents of the Saudi Plastic Surgery Residency Program. Methods: This is a cross sectional study. Data was gathered using a survey, which was distributed during April 2015, among all 57 plastic surgery residents enrolled in training programs across all regions of Saudi Arabia, 38 of whom responded (60% response rate). The dependent variable was professional burnout, which was measured by 3 subscales of the validated Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). High scores on emotional exhaustion (EE) or depersonalization (DP) or low scores on personal accomplishment (PA) were taken to be indicative of professional burnout. Variables evaluating possible predictors of burnout, such as sociodemographic and professional characteristics, were also included. Results: The validated rate of high burnout status was 18%. Nearly three quarters (71%) of residents scored high in emotional exhaustion, and half (50%) scored high in depersonalization. A third (34%) scored low in personal accomplishment. However, only 5% were dissatisfied with the plastic surgery specialty as a career, and 69% would choose the same specialty again. Workload was not found to play a significant role in the development of burnout (mean 70 hours per week). Conclusion: Approximately half of plastic surgery trainees in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia have signs of professional burnout. PMID:28762436

  19. From Residency to Lifelong Learning.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Keith

    2015-11-01

    The residency training experience is the perfect environment for learning. The university/institution patient population provides a never-ending supply of patients with unique management challenges. Resources abound that allow the discovery of knowledge about similar situations. Senior teachers provide counseling and help direct appropriate care. Periodic testing and evaluations identify deficiencies, which can be corrected with future study. What happens, however, when the resident graduates? Do they possess all the knowledge they'll need for the rest of their career? Will medical discovery stand still limiting the need for future study? If initial certification establishes that the physician has the skills and knowledge to function as an independent physician and surgeon, how do we assure the public that plastic surgeons will practice lifelong learning and remain safe throughout their career? Enter Maintenance of Certification (MOC). In an ideal world, MOC would provide many of the same tools as residency training: identification of gaps in knowledge, resources to correct those deficiencies, overall assessment of knowledge, feedback about communication skills and professionalism, and methods to evaluate and improve one's practice. This article discusses the need; for education and self-assessment that extends beyond residency training and a commitment to lifelong learning. The American Board of Plastic Surgery MOC program is described to demonstrate how it helps the diplomate reach the goal of continuous practice improvement.

  20. Machiavelli and the Chief Resident.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raviglione, Mario C.

    1990-01-01

    Precepts from Machiavelli's "The Prince" are used in giving advice to chief residents on how to balance their responsibilities in working for the welfare of both the housestaff and the institution. Subject discussions include the difficulties of introducing change, setting good examples, and supervising former colleagues and peers. (GLR)

  1. Student Expenses in Residency Interviewing

    PubMed Central

    Walling, Anne; Nilsen, Kari; Callaway, Paul; Grothusen, Jill; Gillenwater, Cole; King, Samantha; Unruh, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Background The student costs of residency interviewing are of increasing concern but limited current information is available. Updated, more detailed information would assist students and residency programs in decisions about residency selection. The study objective was to measure the expenses and time spent in residency interviewing by the 2016 graduating class of the University of Kansas School of Medicine and assess the impact of gender, regional campus location, and primary care application. Methods All 195 students who participated in the 2016 National Residency Matching Program (NRMP) received a 33 item questionnaire addressing interviewing activity, expenses incurred, time invested and related factors. Main measures were self-reported estimates of expenses and time spent interviewing. Descriptive analyses were applied to participant characteristics and responses. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and chi-square tests compared students by gender, campus (main/regional), and primary care/other specialties. Analyses of variance (ANOVA) on the dependent variables provided follow-up tests on significant MANOVA results. Results A total of 163 students (84%) completed the survey. The average student reported 38 (1–124) applications, 16 (1–54) invitations, 11 (1–28) completed interviews, and spent $3,500 ($20–$12,000) and 26 (1–90) days interviewing. No significant differences were found by gender. After MANOVA and ANOVA analyses, non-primary care applicants reported significantly more applications, interviews, and expenditures, but less program financial support. Regional campus students reported significantly fewer invitations, interviews, and days interviewing, but equivalent costs when controlled for primary care application. Cost was a limiting factor in accepting interviews for 63% and time for 53% of study respondents. Conclusions Students reported investing significant time and money in interviewing. After controlling for other variables

  2. Microbial colonization of the hands of residents.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kris; Katz, Ben Z

    2006-05-01

    To determine whether carriage of resistant Gram-positive organisms by residents increases over time, the dominant hand of pediatric residents was cultured. Among first-year residents, 53 Gram-positive organisms were isolated; 12 were resistant to oxacillin, 13 to clindamycin. Six residents had organisms resistant to both; 14 carried at least one resistant to either. Among third-year residents, 46 Gram-positive organisms were cultured; 9 were resistant to oxacillin, 6 to clindamycin. Three residents carried organisms resistant to both; 10 carried at least one resistant to either. Colonization with resistant Gram-positive organisms did not increase with length of training.

  3. Diversity in Dermatology Residency Programs.

    PubMed

    Van Voorhees, Abby S; Enos, Clinton W

    2017-10-01

    Given the change in our population to one that is more racially and ethnically diverse, the topic of diversity in dermatology residency programs has gained attention. In a field that has become highly competitive, diversity is lagging behind. What are the reasons for this? The existing diversity among medical school matriculants is reflective of the applicant pool, and although modest, there has been an increase in applications and acceptances from minority populations. However, these proportions do not carry through to the population applying to dermatology residency. Making sense of this and planning how to recruit a more diverse applicant pool will improve the quality and cultural competency of future dermatologists. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Redesigning journal club in residency.

    PubMed

    Al Achkar, Morhaf

    2016-01-01

    The gap between production and implementation of knowledge is the main reason for the suboptimal quality of health care. To eliminate this gap and improve the quality of patient care, journal club (JC) in graduate medical education provides an opportunity for learning the skills of evidence-based medicine. JC, however, continues to face many challenges mainly due to poorly defined goals, inadequate preparation, and lack of interest. This article presents an innovative model to prepare and present JC based on three pillars: dialogical learning through group discussion, mentored residents as peer teachers, and including JC as part of a structured curriculum to learn evidence-based medicine. This engaging model has the potential to transform JC from a moribund session that is daunting for residents into a lively discussion to redefine clinical practice using the most current evidence.

  5. Resident Role Modeling: "It Just Happens".

    PubMed

    Sternszus, Robert; Macdonald, Mary Ellen; Steinert, Yvonne

    2016-03-01

    Role modeling by staff physicians is a significant component of the clinical teaching of students and residents. However, the importance of resident role modeling has only recently emerged, and residents' understanding of themselves as role models has yet to be explored. This study sought to understand residents' perceptions of themselves as role models, describe how residents learn about role modeling, and identify ways to improve resident role modeling. Fourteen semistructured interviews were conducted with residents in internal medicine, general surgery, and pediatrics at the McGill University Faculty of Medicine between April and September 2013. Interviews were audio-recorded and subsequently transcribed for analysis; iterative analysis followed principles of qualitative description. Four primary themes were identified through data analysis: residents perceived role modeling as the demonstration of "good" behaviors in the clinical context; residents believed that learning from their role modeling "just happens" as long as learners are "watching"; residents did not equate role modeling with being a role model; and residents learned about role modeling from watching their positive and negative role models. While residents were aware that students and junior colleagues learned from their modeling, they were often not aware of role modeling as it was occurring; they also believed that learning from role modeling "just happens" and did not always see themselves as role models. Helping residents view effective role modeling as a deliberate process rather than something that "just happens" may improve clinical teaching across the continuum of medical education.

  6. Global health training in ophthalmology residency programs.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Peter G; Feldman, Brad H; Lauer, Andreas K; Paul Chan, Robison V; Sun, Grace

    2015-01-01

    To assess current global health education and international electives in ophthalmology residency programs and barriers to global health implementation in ophthalmology resident education. A web-based survey regarding participation in global health and international electives was emailed to residency program directors at 116 accredited ophthalmology residency programs via an Association of University Professors in Ophthalmology (AUPO) residency program director listserv. Fifty-nine (51%) ophthalmology residency program directors responded. Thirty-seven program directors (63%) said global health was important to medical students when evaluating residency programs. Thirty-two program directors (55%) reported developing international electives. Reported barriers to resident participation in international electives were: 1) insufficient financial support, 2) inadequate resident coverage at home, and 3) lack of ACGME approval for international electives. Program directors requested more information about resident international electives, funding, and global ophthalmology educational resources. They requested ACGME recognition of international electives to facilitate resident participation. More than half (54%) of program directors supported international electives for residents. This survey demonstrates that program directors believe global health is an important consideration when medical students evaluate training programs. Despite perceived barriers to incorporating global health opportunities into residency training, program directors are interested in development of global health resources and plan to further develop global health opportunities. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. How do residents manage personal finances?

    PubMed

    Teichman, Joel M H; Cecconi, Patricia P; Bernheim, B Douglas; Novarro, Neva K; Monga, Manoj; DaRosa, Debra; Resnick, Martin I

    2005-02-01

    We examined three research questions: How do residents' debts and savings compare to the general public? How do surgical residents' financial choices compare to other residents? How may institutions help residents' personal financial decisions? The Survey of Consumer Finances was modified and piloted tested to elicit financial information. The instrument was completed by 612 residents at 8 programs. Only 60% of residents budgeted expenses, and 25% and 10% maintained cash balances <611 dollars and unpaid credit card balances >10,000 dollars, respectively. Compared with controls, residents held greater median ratios of debt to household income (2.46 vs. 1.06, P <0.0001), fewer assets to income (0.64 vs. 2.28, P <0.0001), less net wealth to income -1.43 vs. 0.90, P <0.0001), and lower retirement savings balance to household income (0.01 vs. 0.12, P <0.0001). Surgery residents were the least financially conservative group. Mean annual resident contributions to retirement accounts were $1532 higher at institutions with versus without retirement plans (P <0.01). Resident debts are higher and savings lower than the general public. This behavior is most common among surgery residents. Residents save more for retirement when they are eligible for tax-deferred retirement plans. Graduate medical programs should instruct residents on financial management.

  8. Hospitalist career decisions among internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Ratelle, John T; Dupras, Denise M; Alguire, Patrick; Masters, Philip; Weissman, Arlene; West, Colin P

    2014-07-01

    Hospital medicine is a rapidly growing field of internal medicine. However, little is known about internal medicine residents' decisions to pursue careers in hospital medicine (HM). To identify which internal medicine residents choose a career in HM, and describe changes in this career choice over the course of their residency education. Observational cohort using data collected from the annual Internal Medicine In-Training Examination (IM-ITE) survey. 16,781 postgraduate year 3 (PGY-3) North American internal medicine residents who completed the annual IM-ITE survey in 2009-2011, 9,501 of whom completed the survey in all 3 years of residency. Self-reported career plans for individual residents during their postgraduate year 1 (PGY-1), postgraduate year 2 (PGY-2) and PGY-3. Of the 16,781 graduating PGY-3 residents, 1,552 (9.3 %) reported HM as their ultimate career choice. Of the 951 PGY-3 residents planning a HM career among the 9,501 residents responding in all 3 years, 128 (13.5 %) originally made this decision in PGY-1, 192 (20.2 %) in PGY-2, and 631 (66.4 %) in PGY-3. Only 87 (9.1 %) of these 951 residents maintained a career decision of HM during all three years of residency education. Hospital medicine is a reported career choice for an important proportion of graduating internal medicine residents. However, the majority of residents do not finalize this decision until their final year.

  9. [Medical ethics in residency training].

    PubMed

    Civaner, Murat; Sarikaya, Ozlem; Balcioğlu, Harun

    2009-04-01

    Medical ethics education in residency training is one of the hot topics of continuous medical education debates. Its importance and necessity is constantly stressed in declarations and statements on national and international level. Parallel to the major structural changes in the organization and the finance model of health care system, patient-physician relationship, identity of physicianship, social perception and status of profession are changing. Besides, scientific developments and technological advancements create possibilities that never exists before, and bring new ethical dilemmas along with. To be able to transplant human organs has created two major problems for instance; procurement of organs in sufficient numbers, and allocating them to the patients in need by using some prioritizing criteria. All those new and challenging questions force the health care workers to find authentic and justifiable solutions while keeping the basic professional values. In that sense, proper medical ethics education in undergraduate and postgraduate term that would make physician-to-be's and student-physicians acquire the core professional values and skill to notice, analyze and develop justifiable solutions to ethical problems is paramount. This article aims to express the importance of medical ethics education in residency training, and to propose major topics and educational methods to be implemented into. To this aim, first, undergraduate medical education, physician's working conditions, the exam of selection for residency training, and educational environment were revised, and then, some topics and educational methods, which are oriented to educate physicians regarding the professional values that they should have, were proposed.

  10. Enhancing dermatology education: resident presentation opportunities.

    PubMed

    Park, Kelly K

    2015-09-01

    Dermatology residency is a time to maximize educational experiences, which include opportunities to attend academic meetings and present research and clinical cases. In this article, resident presentation opportunities at major academic dermatology meetings are reviewed.

  11. 7 CFR 273.3 - Residency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... individual is a resident of a shelter for battered women and children as defined in § 271.2 and was a member of a household containing the person who had abused him or her. Residents of shelters for battered...

  12. 38 CFR 51.110 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.110 Resident assessment. The...) Review of assessments. The nursing facility management must examine each resident no less than once every...

  13. 38 CFR 51.110 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.110 Resident assessment. The...) Review of assessments. The nursing facility management must examine each resident no less than once every...

  14. 38 CFR 51.110 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.110 Resident assessment. The...) Review of assessments. The nursing facility management must examine each resident no less than once every...

  15. 38 CFR 51.110 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.110 Resident assessment. The...) Review of assessments. The nursing facility management must examine each resident no less than once every...

  16. 38 CFR 51.110 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.110 Resident assessment. The...) Review of assessments. The nursing facility management must examine each resident no less than once every...

  17. Pharmacists teaching in family medicine residency programs

    PubMed Central

    Jorgenson, Derek; Muller, Andries; Whelan, Anne Marie; Buxton, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the percentage of family medicine residency programs that have pharmacists directly involved in teaching residents, the types and extent of teaching provided by pharmacists in family medicine residency programs, and the primary source of funding for the pharmacists. Design Web-based survey. Setting One hundred fifty-eight resident training sites within the 17 family medicine residency programs in Canada. Participants One hundred residency program directors who were responsible for overseeing the training sites within the residency programs were contacted to determine the percentage of training sites in which pharmacists were directly involved in teaching. Pharmacists who were identified by the residency directors were invited to participate in the Web-based survey. Main outcome measures The percentage of training sites for family medicine residency that have pharmacists directly involved in teaching residents. The types and the extent of teaching performed by the pharmacists who teach in the residency programs. The primary source of funding that supports the pharmacists’ salaries. Results More than a quarter (25.3%) of family medicine residency training sites include direct involvement of pharmacist teachers. Pharmacist teachers reported that they spend a substantial amount of their time teaching residents using a range of teaching modalities and topics, but have no formal pharmacotherapy curriculums. Nearly a quarter (22.6%) of the pharmacists reported that their salaries were primarily funded by the residency programs. Conclusion Pharmacists have a role in training family medicine residents. This is a good opportunity for family medicine residents to learn about issues related to pharmacotherapy; however, the role of pharmacists as educators might be optimized if standardized teaching methods, curriculums, and evaluation plans were in place. PMID:21918131

  18. 24 CFR 964.140 - Resident training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resident training. 964.140 Section... training. (a) Resident training opportunities. HUD encourages a partnership between the residents, the HA and HUD, as well as with the public and non-profit sectors to provide training opportunities for...

  19. 19 CFR 141.38 - Resident corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resident corporations. 141.38 Section 141.38... TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.38 Resident corporations. A power of attorney shall not be required if the person signing Customs documents on behalf of a resident corporation...

  20. 19 CFR 141.38 - Resident corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resident corporations. 141.38 Section 141.38... TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.38 Resident corporations. A power of attorney shall not be required if the person signing Customs documents on behalf of a resident corporation...

  1. 19 CFR 141.38 - Resident corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Resident corporations. 141.38 Section 141.38... TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.38 Resident corporations. A power of attorney shall not be required if the person signing Customs documents on behalf of a resident corporation...

  2. 19 CFR 141.38 - Resident corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resident corporations. 141.38 Section 141.38... TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.38 Resident corporations. A power of attorney shall not be required if the person signing Customs documents on behalf of a resident corporation...

  3. 19 CFR 141.38 - Resident corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resident corporations. 141.38 Section 141.38... TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.38 Resident corporations. A power of attorney shall not be required if the person signing Customs documents on behalf of a resident corporation...

  4. Sexual Health Education: A Psychiatric Resident's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waineo, Eva; Arfken, Cynthia L.; Morreale, Mary K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This report discusses psychiatric residents' perceptions of sexual health education and their opinions regarding curricular improvements. Methods: An anonymous, web-based survey was sent to residents in one general psychiatry program (N = 33). The response rate was 69.7%. Results: Residents reported inadequate experience in multiple…

  5. 28 CFR 115.333 - Resident education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Resident education. 115.333 Section 115... STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Training and Education § 115.333 Resident education. (a) During... provide comprehensive age-appropriate education to residents either in person or through video regarding...

  6. 28 CFR 115.333 - Resident education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Resident education. 115.333 Section 115... STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Training and Education § 115.333 Resident education. (a) During... provide comprehensive age-appropriate education to residents either in person or through video regarding...

  7. 28 CFR 115.333 - Resident education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Resident education. 115.333 Section 115... STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Training and Education § 115.333 Resident education. (a) During... provide comprehensive age-appropriate education to residents either in person or through video regarding...

  8. Toolbox for Evaluating Residents as Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coverdale, John H.; Ismail, Nadia; Mian, Ayesha; Dewey, Charlene

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors review existing assessment tools related to evaluating residents' teaching skills and teaching effectiveness. Methods: PubMed and PsycInfo databases were searched using combinations of keywords including "residents," "residents as teachers," "teaching skills," and "assessments" or "rating scales." Results: Eleven evaluation…

  9. Resident camp directors, spirituality, and wilderness

    Treesearch

    Michael Rule; Edward Udd

    2002-01-01

    A vast majority of resident camp directors in this study perceived wilderness to hold spiritual qualities. In addition, resident camp directors also valued educational components for campers and staff as important before they ventured into wilderness areas. Resident camp directors influence the lives of millions of youth and they are an important provider of wilderness...

  10. Perceived value and outcomes of residency projects.

    PubMed

    Murphy, J E; Downhour, N

    2001-05-15

    Residency program directors' attitudes toward residency projects were studied. A questionnaire about the residency project experience was mailed in January 2000 to 446 pharmacy practice residency program and specialty residency program directors in the program database of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. Recipients responded to opinion statements on a 5-point scale. Responses to the opinion statements were separated into seven categories for analysis. A total of 278 usable questionnaires were returned, for a raw response rate of 63.6%. During the preceding three years, residency directors had served as primary advisors on 917 projects; 171 had served as advisor on at least one of every type of project allowed in the accreditation standards. Of the 917 projects, 364 were presented at national professional meetings, 124 were published, and 484 were believed to have resulted in a positive change in pharmacy services. There were no significant differences in total response scores among any of the subgroups analyzed. There was strong agreement that residency projects were valuable and should continue to be part of the residency program experience. The directors' views of the importance of original research as a project option were more neutral. Overall residency program directors had positive perceptions of the value of residency projects to both residents and institutions and believed that they should continue to be a requirement of residency programs.

  11. Psychotherapy Training: Residents' Perceptions and Experiences.

    PubMed

    Kovach, Jessica G; Dubin, William R; Combs, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    This survey examined actual training hours in psychotherapy modalities as reported by residents, residents' perceptions of training needs, and residents' perceptions of the importance of different aspects of psychotherapy training. A brief, voluntary, anonymous, Internet-based survey was developed. All 14 program directors for Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accredited programs in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware provided email addresses for current categorical residents. The survey inquired about hours of time spent in various aspects of training, value assigned to aspects of training, residents' involvement in their own psychotherapy, and overall resident wellness. The survey was e-mailed to 328 residents. Of the 328 residents contacted, 133 (40.5%) responded. Median reported number of PGY 3 and 4 performed versus perceived ideal hours of supportive therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and psychodynamic therapy did not differ. Answers for clinical time utilizing these modalities ranged from "none or less than 1 h" per month to 20+ h per month. PGY 3 and 4 residents reported a median of "none or less than 1 h" per month performed of interpersonal, dialectical behavior therapy, couples/family/group, and child therapies but preferred more time using these therapies. Residents in all years of training preferred more hours of didactic instruction for all psychotherapies and for medication management. Residents ranked teaching modalities in the following order of importance: supervision, hours of psychotherapy performed, personal psychotherapy, readings, and didactic instruction. Residents engaged in their own psychotherapy were significantly more likely to rank the experiential aspects of psychotherapy training (personal psychotherapy, supervision, and hours performed) higher than residents not in psychotherapy. Current psychotherapy training for psychiatry residents is highly variable, but overall, residents want more

  12. Peer observation and feedback of resident teaching.

    PubMed

    Snydman, Laura; Chandler, Daniel; Rencic, Joseph; Sung, Yung-Chi

    2013-02-01

    Resident doctors (residents) play a significant role in the education of medical students. Morning work rounds provide an optimal venue to assess resident teaching. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of peer observation of resident work rounds, to evaluate resident perceptions of peer observation and to evaluate resident perceptions of peer feedback.   Twenty-four internal medicine residents were simultaneously observed by an attending physician and a peer while teaching during work rounds (between August2008 and May 2009). At year-end, residents received a survey to characterise their attitudes towards peer observation and feedback. Twenty-one residents (87.5%) completed the survey. Half (52.4%) felt that participating in the peer observation study stimulated their interest in teaching during work rounds. Prior to participation in the study, fewer than half (42.9%) felt comfortable being observed by their peers, compared with 71.4 percent after participation (p=0.02). The proportion of residents who felt comfortable giving feedback to peers increased from 26.3 to 65.0percent (p=0.004), and the proportion of residents who felt comfortable receiving feedback from peers increased from 76.2 to 95.2 percent (p=0.02). Peer observation and feedback of resident teaching during work rounds is feasible and rewarding for the residents involved. Comfort with regards to being observed by peers, with receiving feedback from peers and with giving feedback to peers significantly increased after the study. Most residents reported changes in their teaching behaviour resulting from feedback. Residents felt that observing a peer teach on work rounds was one of the most useful activities to improve their own teaching on work rounds. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2013.

  13. How do urology residents manage personal finances?

    PubMed

    Teichman, J M; Bernheim, B D; Espinosa, E A; Cecconi, P P; Meyer, J; Pearle, M S; Preminger, G M; Leveillee, R J

    2001-05-01

    To examine personal financial management among residents to answer three research questions: do residents make reasonable financial choices; why do some residents not save; and what steps can be taken to improve residents' personal financial decisions. Portions of the Federal Reserve Board's Survey of Consumer Finances were modified and piloted to elicit demographic, expense, saving, and income data. The final questionnaire was completed by 151 urology residents at 20 programs. Comparing residents with the general population in the same age and income categories, the median debt/household income ratio was 2.38 versus 0.64. Residents had greater educational debt, greater noneducational debt, and lower savings. Resident participation in retirement accounts was 100% at institutions with employer-matching 401k or 403b plans, 63% at institutions with nonmatching 401k or 403b plans, and 48% at institutions without retirement plans for residents (P = 0.002). Fifty-nine percent of residents budgeted expenses, 27% had cash balances below $1000, 51% had paid interest charges on credit cards within the previous year, and 12% maintained unpaid credit card balances greater than $10,000. The median resident income was $38,400. A significant minority of residents appear not to make reasonable financial choices. Some residents save little because of a failure to budget, indebtedness, high projected income growth, or insufficient attention to personal financial management. Residents save more when they are eligible for tax-deferred retirement plans, particularly when their institution matches their contributions. Many residents would benefit from instruction concerning prudent financial management.

  14. MX Resident Engineer Networking Guide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    FIGURES 6 INTRODUCTION ............................................................ 11 Background Approach Purpose Scope 2 SYSTEM OVERVIEW...RESIDENT ENGINEER NETWORKING GUIDE 1 INTRODUCTION Background The Network Analysis System (NAS) is not a new planning method. It has been used for more than...DEVELOPMENT RUN DATE 19MAY7’ 2359MRS S U M M A R I P A Y N L N T S S T A I I M E N I PROJECT START jAUG ?? PROJECT EXR 4 L1 SAMPLE PNOPLEM *ACTIVITT-YN

  15. Kinetics of resid hydrodesulfurization reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed, A.H.A.K.; Abbas, A.A.A.; Al'-Maiya, A.S.K.

    1987-07-01

    In this article the authors examine the results obtained in hydrodesulfurizing an atmospheric resis from Bai-Hassan crude on Ni-Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst at 320-420/sup 0/C, feedstock space velocity 0.37-2.6 h/sup -1/, pressure 6.1 MPa, and hydrogen/feed ratio 300 liters/liter, in a single-pass downflow reactor with a stationary bed of catalyst. Also, they give certain thermodynamic characteristics for desulfurization, demetalization, and deasphalting of this resid. The kinetic model describing most accurately the kinetics of the different reactions will be examined.

  16. A Time Study of Plastic Surgery Residents.

    PubMed

    Lau, Frank H; Sinha, Indranil; Jiang, Wei; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Eriksson, Elof

    2016-05-01

    Resident work hours are under scrutiny and have been subject to multiple restrictions. The studies supporting these changes have not included data on surgical residents. We studied the workday of a team of plastic surgery residents to establish prospective time-study data of plastic surgery (PRS) residents at a single tertiary-care academic medical center. Five trained research assistants observed all residents (n = 8) on a PRS service for 10 weeks and produced minute-by-minute activity logs. Data collection began when the team first met in the morning and continued until the resident being followed completed all non-call activities. We analyzed our data from 3 perspectives: 1) time spent in direct patient care (DPC), indirect patient care, and didactic activities; 2) time spent in high education-value activities (HEAs) versus low education-value activities; and 3) resident efficiency. We defined HEAs as activities that surgeons must master; other activities were LEAs. We quantified resident efficiency in terms of time fragmentation and time spent waiting. A total of 642.4 hours of data across 50 workdays were collected. Excluding call, residents worked an average of 64.2 hours per week. Approximately 50.7% of surgical resident time was allotted to DPC, with surgery accounting for the largest segment of this time (34.8%). Time spent on HEAs demonstrated trended upward with higher resident level (P = 0.086). Time in spent in surgery was significantly associated with higher resident levels (P < 0.0001); 57.7% of activities require 4 minutes or less, suggesting that resident work was highly fragmented. Residents spent 10.7% of their workdays waiting for other services. In this first-time study of PRS residents, we found that compared with medicine trainees, surgical residents spent 3.23 times more time on DPC. High education-value activities comprised most of our residents' workdays. Surgery was the leading component of both DPC and HEAs. Our residents were highly

  17. Marguerite Arnet Residence, exterior door detail, looking north. Adam ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Marguerite Arnet Residence, exterior door detail, looking north. - Adam & Bessie Arnet Homestead, Marguerite Arnet Residence, 560 feet northeast of Adam & Bessie Arnet Residence, Model, Las Animas County, CO

  18. Marguerite Arnet Residence, exterior window detail, looking north. Adam ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Marguerite Arnet Residence, exterior window detail, looking north. - Adam & Bessie Arnet Homestead, Marguerite Arnet Residence, 560 feet northeast of Adam & Bessie Arnet Residence, Model, Las Animas County, CO

  19. Operative Landscape at Canadian Neurosurgery Residency Programs.

    PubMed

    Tso, Michael K; Dakson, Ayoub; Ahmed, Syed Uzair; Bigder, Mark; Elliott, Cameron; Guha, Daipayan; Iorio-Morin, Christian; Kameda-Smith, Michelle; Lavergne, Pascal; Makarenko, Serge; Taccone, Michael S; Wang, Bill; Winkler-Schwartz, Alexander; Sankar, Tejas; Christie, Sean D

    2017-07-01

    Background Currently, the literature lacks reliable data regarding operative case volumes at Canadian neurosurgery residency programs. Our objective was to provide a snapshot of the operative landscape in Canadian neurosurgical training using the trainee-led Canadian Neurosurgery Research Collaborative. Anonymized administrative operative data were gathered from each neurosurgery residency program from January 1, 2014, to December 31, 2014. Procedures were broadly classified into cranial, spine, peripheral nerve, and miscellaneous procedures. A number of prespecified subspecialty procedures were recorded. We defined the resident case index as the ratio of the total number of operations to the total number of neurosurgery residents in that program. Resident number included both Canadian medical and international medical graduates, and included residents on the neurosurgery service, off-service, or on leave for research or other personal reasons. Overall, there was an average of 1845 operative cases per neurosurgery residency program. The mean numbers of cranial, spine, peripheral nerve, and miscellaneous procedures were 725, 466, 48, and 193, respectively. The nationwide mean resident case indices for cranial, spine, peripheral nerve, and total procedures were 90, 58, 5, and 196, respectively. There was some variation in the resident case indices for specific subspecialty procedures, with some training programs not performing carotid endarterectomy or endoscopic transsphenoidal procedures. This study presents the breadth of neurosurgical training within Canadian neurosurgery residency programs. These results may help inform the implementation of neurosurgery training as the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons residency training transitions to a competence-by-design curriculum.

  20. Public Health Education for Emergency Medicine Residents

    PubMed Central

    Betz, Marian E.; Bernstein, Steven L.; Gutman, Deborah; Tibbles, Carrie D.; Joyce, Nina; Lipton, Robert; Schweigler, Lisa; Fisher, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Emergency medicine (EM) has an important role in public health, but the ideal approach for teaching public health to EM residents is unclear. As part of the national regional public health–medicine education centers-graduate medical education (RPHMEC-GM) initiative from the CDC and the American Association of Medical Colleges, three EM programs received funding to create public health curricula for EM residents. Curricula approaches varied by residency. One program used a modular, integrative approach to combine public health and EM clinical topics during usual residency didactics, one partnered with local public health organizations to provide real-world experiences for residents, and one drew on existing national as well as departmental resources to seamlessly integrate more public health–oriented educational activities within the existing residency curriculum. The modular and integrative approaches appeared to have a positive impact on resident attitudes toward public health, and a majority of EM residents at that program believed public health training is important. Reliance on pre-existing community partnerships facilitated development of public health rotations for residents. External funding for these efforts was critical to their success, given the time and financial restraints on residency programs. The optimal approach for public health education for EM residents has not been defined. PMID:21961671

  1. 2003 survey of Canadian radiation oncology residents

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Don; Fairchild, Alysa; Keyes, Mira

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncology's popularity as a career in Canada has surged in the past 5 years. Consequently, resident numbers in Canadian radiation oncology residencies are at all-time highs. This study aimed to survey Canadian radiation oncology residents about their opinions of their specialty and training experiences. Methods and Materials: Residents of Canadian radiation oncology residencies that enroll trainees through the Canadian Resident Matching Service were identified from a national database. Residents were mailed an anonymous survey. Results: Eight of 101 (7.9%) potential respondents were foreign funded. Fifty-two of 101 (51.5%) residents responded. A strong record of graduating its residents wasmore » the most important factor residents considered when choosing programs. Satisfaction with their program was expressed by 92.3% of respondents, and 94.3% expressed satisfaction with their specialty. Respondents planning to practice in Canada totaled 80.8%, and 76.9% plan to have academic careers. Respondents identified job availability and receiving adequate teaching from preceptors during residency as their most important concerns. Conclusions: Though most respondents are satisfied with their programs and specialty, job availability and adequate teaching are concerns. In the future, limited time and resources and the continued popularity of radiation oncology as a career will magnify the challenge of training competent radiation oncologists in Canada.« less

  2. Current perspectives on chief residents in psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Warner, Christopher H; Rachal, James; Breitbach, Jill; Higgins, Michael; Warner, Carolynn; Bobo, William

    2007-01-01

    The authors examine qualitative data from outgoing chief residents in psychiatry from the 2004-2005 academic year to 1) determine common characteristics between programs, 2) examine the residents' perspectives on their experiences, and 3) determine their common leadership qualities. The authors sent out self-report surveys via e-mail to 89 outgoing chief residents who attended the APA/Lilly Chief Resident Executive Leadership Program. Fifty-three (60%) chief residents responded. Although most chief residents are senior residents, over 20% are in their third postgraduate year. Two-thirds of programs have more than one chief resident each year. Most chief residents believe that their "participating" leadership style, existing leadership skills, and interpersonal skills contributed to their overall positive experiences. Successfully performing duties as a chief resident entails functioning in a variety of roles and demands attention to leadership qualities of the individual. Developing existing leadership skills, clarifying expectations, and providing mentorship to chief residents will ensure successful transition into practice, and the advancement of the field of psychiatry.

  3. Perioperative self-reflection among surgical residents.

    PubMed

    Peshkepija, Andi N; Basson, Marc D; Davis, Alan T; Ali, Muhammad; Haan, Pam S; Gupta, Rama N; Hardaway, John C; Nebeker, Cody A; McLeod, Michael K; Osmer, Robert L; Anderson, Cheryl I

    2017-09-01

    We studied prevalence and predictors of meaningful self-reflection among surgical residents and with prompting/structured interventions, sought to improve/sustain resident skills. Residents from six programs recorded 1032 narrative self-reflective comments (120 residents), using a web-based platform. If residents identified something learned or to be improved, self-reflection was deemed meaningful. Independent variables PGY level, resident/surgeon gender, study site/Phase1: July2014-August2015 vs. Phase2: September2015-September2016) were analyzed. Meaningful self-reflection was documented in 40.6% (419/1032) of entries. PGY5's meaningfully self-reflected less than PGY1-4's, 26.1% vs. 49.6% (p = 0.002). In multivariate analysis, resident narratives during Phase 2 were 4.7 times more likely to engage in meaningful self-reflection compared to Phase1 entries (p < 0.001). Iterative changes during Phase2 showed a 236% increase in meaningful self-reflection, compared to Phase1. Surgical residents uncommonly practice meaningful self-reflection, even when prompted, and PGY5/chief residents reflect less than more junior residents. Substantial/sustained improvements in resident self-reflection can occur with both training and interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Creating a Culture of Wellness in Residency.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Emma K; Kumar, Anupam A; Smith, Stephanie M

    2018-04-17

    Despite increased awareness and recognition of the prevalence of physician burnout and the associated risks of depression and suicide, there is a paucity of actionable guidelines for residency programs to mitigate these risks for their residents. In this Invited Commentary, the authors acknowledge that, although there are inherent barriers to resident wellness, there are numerous modifiable barriers that present opportunities for programs to enable culture change and improve resident wellbeing. The authors frame the discussion with a personal narrative written by a resident in their internal medicine program who experienced burnout, depression, and suicidality during his intern year. They aim to inspire residency programs and hospital leadership to identify and intervene upon the modifiable barriers to wellness for residents in their programs in order to shape meaningful cultural change.

  5. [Part-time residency training in Israel].

    PubMed

    Fishbain, Dana; Levi, Baruch; Borow, Malke; Ashkenazi, Shai; Lindner, Arie

    2012-08-01

    Full-time work has long been perceived as a cornerstone of medical residency, the consensus being that a resident must apply the bulk of his time and attention to his professional training. Demographic and cultural changes that have taken place over the last several years, specifically the rise in the number of female doctors and the importance of leisure time to the younger generation, have intensified the need to find new and innovative ways to deal with the plight of the resident population. One idea, already in effect in many Western countries, is the institution of part-time residency programs. The possibility of fulfilling residency requirements on a part-time basis is intended to assist medical residents in integrating their professional development with their personal and family life, without compromising the quality of their training. A number of research studies conducted over the last several years in countries that allow part-time residency, among them the United States, England and Switzerland, aimed to examine the quality of part-time training. The various studies evinced a high level of satisfaction from the program both by the residents themselves and their supervisors, and in many aspects those doing residency part-time received higher appraisals than their full-time colleagues. Some of the residents polled noted that they would have totally foregone the practice of medicine had there not been an option to complete residency part-time. In light of the experience throughout the world and the changing landscape in Israel, the Scientific Council of the Israeli Medical Association decided to examine the issue and its various aspects, and weighed all the considerations in favor and against part-time residency. Recently, the Scientific Council approved the launch of a pilot program to allow part-time residency in several fields that were carefully selected according to specific criteria. Once the Ministry of Health completes the LegisLation process, part

  6. Does medical school research productivity predict a resident's research productivity during residency?

    PubMed

    Kohlert, Scott; Zuccaro, Laura; McLean, Laurie; Macdonald, Kristian

    2017-04-27

    Research productivity is an important component of the CanMEDS Scholar role and is an accreditation requirement of Canadian Otolaryngology training programs. Our objective was to determine if an association exists between publication rates before and during Otolaryngology residency. We obtained the names for all certified Canadian Otolaryngologists who graduated between 1998 and 2013 inclusive, and conducted a Medline search for all of their publications. Otolaryngologists were subgrouped based on year of residency graduation and the number of articles published pre-residency and during residency (0 or ≥1). Chi-squared analyses were used to evaluate whether publications pre-residency and year of graduation were associated with publications during residency. We obtained data for 312 Canadian Otolaryngologists. Of those 312 graduates, 46 (14.7%) had no identifiable publications on PubMed and were excluded from the final data analysis. Otolaryngology residents had a mean 0.65 (95% CI 0.50-0.80) publications before residency and 3.35 (95% CI 2.90-3.80) publications during residency. Between 1998 and 2013, mean publication rates before and during residency both increased significantly (R 2  = 0.594 and R 2  = 0.759, respectively), whereas publication rates after residency graduation has stagnated (R 2  = 0.023). The odds of publishing during residency was 5.85 times higher (95% CI 2.69-12.71) if a resident published prior to residency (p < 0.0001). The Spearman correlation coefficient between publications before and during residency is 0.472 (p < 0.0001). Residents who publish at least one paper before residency are nearly six times as likely to publish during residency than those who did not publish before residency. These findings may help guide Otolaryngology program selection committees in ranking the best CaRMS candidates.

  7. An Assessment of Radiology Residency Program Websites.

    PubMed

    Hansberry, David R; Bornstein, Jonathan; Agarwal, Nitin; McClure, Kristen E; Deshmukh, Sandeep P; Long, Suzanne

    2018-04-01

    When prospective radiology residents decide where to apply to residency, many will use the Internet as a resource to garner information. Therefore, it is important for residency programs to produce and maintain an informative and comprehensive website. Here, we review 179 radiology residency program websites for 19 criteria including various aspects related to the residency application process, benefits, didactics, research, clinical training, and faculty leadership. We evaluated 179 radiology residency program websites for the inclusion of 19 different criteria. Criteria for information not available directly on the website and links with no information were considered not present. Only 12 of the 179 (6.7%) program websites had at least 80% of the 19 criteria. In addition, 41 programs (23%) had less than 50% of the criteria listed on their websites. Websites ranged from having 16% of the criteria to as much as 95%. Although previous studies have shown that prospective radiology resident applicants are influenced by intangibles like current resident satisfaction and academic reputation, they have also shown that applicants are influenced by the educational curriculum, clinical training, program resources, research opportunities, and quality of faculty. Therefore, it is imperative to provide online resources for prospective candidates in an attempt for residency programs to remain competitive in recruiting high-quality US medical student graduates. These findings suggest there is room for improving the comprehensiveness of information provided on radiology residency program websites. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Neurocritical care education during neurology residency

    PubMed Central

    Drogan, O.; Manno, E.; Geocadin, R.G.; Ziai, W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Limited information is available regarding the current state of neurocritical care education for neurology residents. The goal of our survey was to assess the need and current state of neurocritical care training for neurology residents. Methods: A survey instrument was developed and, with the support of the American Academy of Neurology, distributed to residency program directors of 132 accredited neurology programs in the United States in 2011. Results: A response rate of 74% (98 of 132) was achieved. A dedicated neuroscience intensive care unit (neuro-ICU) existed in 64%. Fifty-six percent of residency programs offer a dedicated rotation in the neuro-ICU, lasting 4 weeks on average. Where available, the neuro-ICU rotation was required in the vast majority (91%) of programs. Neurology residents' exposure to the fundamental principles of neurocritical care was obtained through a variety of mechanisms. Of program directors, 37% indicated that residents would be interested in performing away rotations in a neuro-ICU. From 2005 to 2010, the number of programs sending at least one resident into a neuro-ICU fellowship increased from 14% to 35%. Conclusions: Despite the expansion of neurocritical care, large proportions of US neurology residents have limited exposure to a neuro-ICU and neurointensivists. Formal training in the principles of neurocritical care may be highly variable. The results of this survey suggest a charge to address the variability of resident education and to develop standardized curricula in neurocritical care for neurology residents. PMID:22573636

  9. Improving the medical school-residency transition.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Helen; Skinner, Bethany; Marzano, David; Fitzgerald, James; Curran, Diana; Hammoud, Maya

    2017-10-01

    In response to calls to improve the continuum between undergraduate and graduate medical education, many medical schools are creating electives designed to prepare students for residency training. There is a need for data that link improvements from these residency preparation courses to residency itself. Data is needed that links improvements from these residency preparation courses to residency OBJECTIVE: To examine senior medical student performance on the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics (APGO) Preparation for Residency Knowledge Assessment before and after an obstetrics and gynaecology residency preparation elective, and to determine whether the knowledge improvements persisted to the start of the residency. All 13 students enrolled in the course completed the APGO knowledge assessment on the first and last day of the elective. Three months later, the students were asked to re-take the assessment immediately prior to the start of their residency. There was improvement in mean scores from the pre-test score of 66.4 per cent to the post-test score of 77.4 per cent. At the time of the pre-test, three of the 13 students (23%) had passing scores (70% or greater), and at the time of the post-test, 11 of the 13 (85%) had passing scores. Nine of the 13 students (69%) completed the APGO knowledge assessment immediately prior to the start of their residency. Those nine students had a mean pre-residency score of 76.4 per cent. Eight of the nine students (89%) passed the pre-residency test. Our data support the value of residency preparation electives for improving knowledge, and suggest that senior medical school electives can help to bridge the continuum between undergraduate and graduate medical education. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  10. Assessing the Culture of Residency Using the C - Change Resident Survey: Validity Evidence in 34 U.S. Residency Programs.

    PubMed

    Pololi, Linda H; Evans, Arthur T; Civian, Janet T; Shea, Sandy; Brennan, Robert T

    2017-07-01

    A practical instrument is needed to reliably measure the clinical learning environment and professionalism for residents. To develop and present evidence of validity of an instrument to assess the culture of residency programs and the clinical learning environment. During 2014-2015, we surveyed residents using the C - Change Resident Survey to assess residents' perceptions of the culture in their programs. Residents in all years of training in 34 programs in internal medicine, pediatrics, and general surgery in 14 geographically diverse public and private academic health systems. The C - Change Resident Survey assessed residents' perceptions of 13 dimensions of the culture: Vitality, Self-Efficacy, Institutional Support, Relationships/Inclusion, Values Alignment, Ethical/Moral Distress, Respect, Mentoring, Work-Life Integration, Gender Equity, Racial/Ethnic Minority Equity, and self-assessed Competencies. We measured the internal reliability of each of the 13 dimensions and evaluated response process, content validity, and construct-related evidence validity by assessing relationships predicted by our conceptual model and prior research. We also assessed whether the measurements were sensitive to differences in specialty and across institutions. A total of 1708 residents completed the survey [internal medicine: n = 956, pediatrics: n = 411, general surgery: n = 311 (51% women; 16% underrepresented in medicine minority)], with a response rate of 70% (range across programs, 51-87%). Internal consistency of each dimension was high (Cronbach α: 0.73-0.90). The instrument was able to detect significant differences in the learning environment across programs and sites. Evidence of validity was supported by a good response process and the demonstration of several relationships predicted by our conceptual model. The C - Change Resident Survey assesses the clinical learning environment for residents, and we encourage further study of validity in different

  11. Variable residence time vortex combustor

    DOEpatents

    Melconian, Jerry O.

    1987-01-01

    A variable residence time vortex combustor including a primary combustion chamber for containing a combustion vortex, and a plurality of louvres peripherally disposed about the primary combustion chamber and longitudinally distributed along its primary axis. The louvres are inclined to impel air about the primary combustion chamber to cool its interior surfaces and to impel air inwardly to assist in driving the combustion vortex in a first rotational direction and to feed combustion in the primary combustion chamber. The vortex combustor also includes a second combustion chamber having a secondary zone and a narrowed waist region in the primary combustion chamber interconnecting the output of the primary combustion chamber with the secondary zone for passing only lower density particles and trapping higher density particles in the combustion vortex in the primary combustion chamber for substantial combustion.

  12. Nutritional situation of Beijing residents.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X H

    1992-01-01

    Beijing is the capital of China with the population of 10.32 million in 1990 and the area of 1687.8 km2. It is the economic and cultural center of the country. Since the founding of new China, the development of Beijing city has been very fast. The gross national product (GNP) of Beijing in 1988 is 2.78 times the average GNP of the whole country. The sanitary institution has increased 71 times from 1949 to 1989. The prevalence of infectious diseases decreased significantly. The infant mortality is 11.6 per thousand approaching the figure of developed countries. The main food products increased rapidly. The grain, meat and egg increased from 100.7 kg and 0.48 kg per capita per year in 1949 to 217.1 kg and 20.17 kg in 1988 respectively. The food consumption of residents have been increasing consistently with the increasing of food production in Beijing. The food available in Beijing is well both in quantity and in quality. The results of the nutritional survey in 1985 showed that the daily average energy intake was 2549 kcal per capita. The average protein intake was 70g per person per day. The fat intake as the percentage of the total energy was 25.7. The average nutrients intake of Beijing residents meets the Chinese RDA basically. The nutritional status of people living in the city is good in general. But there are still some nutritional problem exist. Zn and Fe deficiencies anemia are common in infants and children along with the decreasing rate of breast feeding. Riboflavin, Zn and Ca intakes are inadequate in a lot of adults and the elderly.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Understanding how residents' preferences for supervisory methods change throughout residency training: a mixed-methods study.

    PubMed

    Olmos-Vega, Francisco; Dolmans, Diana; Donkers, Jeroen; Stalmeijer, Renée E

    2015-10-16

    A major challenge for clinical supervisors is to encourage their residents to be independent without jeopardising patient safety. Residents' preferences according to level of training on this regard have not been completely explored. This study has sought to investigate which teaching methods of the Cognitive Apprenticeship (CA) model junior, intermediate and senior residents preferred and why, and how these preferences differed between groups. We invited 301 residents of all residency programmes of Javeriana University, Bogotá, Colombia, to participate. Each resident was asked to complete a Maastricht Clinical Teaching Questionnaire (MCTQ), which, being based on the teaching methods of CA, asked residents to rate the importance to their learning of each teaching method and to indicate which of these they preferred the most and why. A total of 215 residents (71 %) completed the questionnaire. All concurred that all CA teaching methods were important or very important to their learning, regardless of their level of training. However, the reasons for their preferences clearly differed between groups: junior and intermediate residents preferred teaching methods that were more supervisor-directed, such as modelling and coaching, whereas senior residents preferred teaching methods that were more resident-directed, such as exploration and articulation. The results indicate that clinical supervision (CS) should accommodate to residents' varying degrees of development by attuning the configuration of CA teaching methods to each level of residency training. This configuration should initially vest more power in the supervisor, and gradually let the resident take charge, without ever discontinuing CS.

  14. Resident work-hour rules: a survey of residents' and program directors' opinions and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Immerman, Igor; Kubiak, Erik N; Zuckerman, Joseph D

    2007-12-01

    In July 2003, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) established nationwide guidelines for resident working environments and duty hours. Following these guidelines became a requirement for all accredited residency programs. Two years after implementation, we conducted a national survey to assess the opinions and attitudes of orthopedic residents and program directors toward the ACGME work-hour regulations and the effects of these regulations on resident education, resident quality of life, and patient care. Nine hundred seventy-six residents (30% response rate) and 85 program directors (56% response rate) completed the questionnaire. For resident education, junior residents were more likely than senior residents and program directors to perceive the work-hour regulations as having a positive effect on education. There was overall agreement among the 3 groups that resident quality of life had improved as a result of work-hour regulations. For patient care, junior residents viewed the new regulations positively for surgical training and patient care, whereas senior residents and program directors disagreed. This survey showed meaningful differences in the attitudes and opinions of junior residents, senior residents, and program directors toward the new ACGME work-hour regulations.

  15. Obstetrics and gynaecology chief resident attitudes toward teaching junior residents under normal working conditions.

    PubMed

    Gil, Karen M; Savitski, Jennifer L; Bazan, Sara; Patterson, Laurene R; Kirven, Melissa

    2009-09-01

    This study aimed to identify factors that chief residents believe impact the teaching of junior residents under normal working conditions and the areas in which they believe education on the role of resident as teacher would be beneficial. Obstetrics and gynaecology (O&G) chief residents were asked to rate the importance of teaching various skills, how often conflict situations arose, and to identify training that would be helpful through a national web-based survey. An e-mail was sent to coordinators of the Residency Review Committee (RRC) O&G residency programmes with a request that they forward the link to their chief residents three times from January through March 2006. Responses were received from 204 postgraduate Year 4 (PGY4) residents (18% of all PGY4 residents) from 133 programmes (54% of all residency programmes) and 33 states. Teaching junior residents how to prioritise patient care and obtain critical information in an emergent situation was considered very to extremely important by 97%. Conflict situations with junior residents were reported to occur between one and five times by 41-58%; an additional 26-28% reported that these situations occurred six or more times. Residents felt it would be helpful to extremely helpful to have training in resolving conflicts that involved patient care (48-59%), as well as in resolving conflict among junior residents, communicating effectively with them and becoming an effective leader (65-78%). The skills that chief residents considered most important to teach junior residents involved direct patient care. Chief residents would like training in how to resolve conflict with, and among, junior residents, and in how to become an effective leader.

  16. National trends in pediatric resident recruitment.

    PubMed

    Piatt, J P; Bergeson, P S

    1992-08-01

    Primary care residency programs throughout the nation are having increasing difficulty recruiting sufficient residents. Only 65% of pediatric residency positions are filled with medical graduates from the United States. We sent a questionnaire to pediatric residency program directors throughout the country to assess what changes pediatric programs had implemented in response to matching concerns. Forty-one percent had recruited non-house officer professionals to perform resident-type work. Such professionals included osteopathic and/or foreign-trained physicians (55%) and moonlighters (49%). House staff work hours had been reduced in 35% of programs and on-call frequency in 33%. Sixty-one percent had made significant changes in their recruiting practices in the past 5 years that are described herein. Annual recruiting budgets varied from nothing to over $75,000. This survey reveals widespread reduction in resident work load and increased intensity in the recruiting process throughout the country.

  17. [Residency in family medicine: problems and solutions].

    PubMed

    Boulé, Richard; Girard, Gilles

    2003-04-01

    To identify the problems encountered by residents during training and the solutions they proposed. Qualitative study. Family practice program at Sherbrooke University. Sixty-eight residents in the Family practice program between 1999 and 2000. We used the nominal group technique with four groups of participants. Then we held five 3-hour discussion groups to explore difficulties and solutions in depth. Finally, data were validated with a written questionnaire. At least 20% of respondents confirmed 65 difficulties and 61 solutions. Three major themes emerged: the many demands of the residence program, residents' personal experience of the program, and the lack of time for personal life. Publication of these results could help residents develop proactive adaptive strategies to deal with the stress of their training programs. Certain adjustments will be made by the program administration to make it easier for residents to manage their stress.

  18. Women and minorities in orthopaedic residency programs.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Kimberly; Wood, V Jamaica; Haynes, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Women and underrepresented minorities make up smaller proportions of orthopaedic residency programs than their numbers in medical school would predict, according to our evaluation of self-reported orthopaedic residency data from 1998 and 2001, as well as information on medical students published in 2002. Based on race, ethnicity, and sex, comparisons were made between students entering and graduating from medical school and those in orthopaedic residency programs. With few exceptions, the percentages of women and underrepresented minorities were statistically significantly lower among those training in orthopaedic residency programs compared with those same groups entering and graduating from medical school. The percentage of women and minorities in orthopaedic residency programs remained constant between 1998 and 2001. Further study is necessary to determine whether fewer students of color and women apply to orthopaedic residency programs because of lack of interest, lack of appropriate mentoring and role models, or other factors.

  19. Women residents, women physicians and medicine's future.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Karen

    2007-08-01

    The number of women in medicine has increased dramatically in the last few decades, and women now represent half of all incoming medical students. Yet residency training still resembles the historical model when there were few women in medicine. This article reviews the issues facing women in residency today. Data suggest that the experience of female residents is more negative than that of males. Unique challenges facing female residents include the existence of gender bias and sexual harassment, a scarcity of female mentors in leadership positions, and work/family conflicts. Further research is needed to understand the experience of female residents and to identify barriers that hinder their optimal professional and personal development. Structural and cultural changes to residency programs are needed to better accommodate the needs of female trainees.

  20. Suicidal thoughts among medical residents with burnout.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Frank; Dillingh, Gea; Bakker, Arnold; Prins, Jelle

    2008-01-01

    Recent research showed that medical residents have a high risk for developing burnout. The present study investigates the prevalence of burnout and its relationship with suicidal thoughts among medical residents. All Dutch medical residents (n = 5126) received a self-report questionnaire. Burnout was measured with the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Residents were asked about the frequency of suicidal thoughts. Response rate was 41.3% (n = 2115). 432 Residents (20.6%) were classified as burnout. 12% reported having suicidal thoughts at least 1 time during their residency, and 1% many times. Suicidal thoughts were substantially more prevalent in the group with burnout in comparison to non-burnout (20.5% vs. 7.6%; chi(2) = 182.9, p < .001). Knowledge about the relationship between burnout and suicidal thoughts among these young medical professionals could be important for suicide prevention.

  1. The cost of resident scholarly activity and its effect on resident clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Schott, Nicholas J; Emerick, Trent D; Metro, David G; Sakai, Tetsuro

    2013-11-01

    Scholarly activity is an important aspect of the academic training of future anesthesiologists. However, residents' scholarly activity may reduce training caseloads and increase departmental costs. We conducted this study within a large academic anesthesiology residency program with data from the 4 graduating classes of 2009 through 2012. Scholarly activity included peer-reviewed manuscripts, case reports, poster presentations at conferences, book chapters, or any other publications. It was not distinguished whether a resident was the principal investigator or a coinvestigator on a project. The following data were collected on each resident: months spent on a resident research rotation, number of scholarly projects completed, number of research conferences attended, and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case entries. Comparison was made between residents electing a resident research rotation with those who did not for (1) scholarly projects, (2) research conference attendance, and (3) Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case numbers. Cost to the department for extra clinical coverage during residents' time spent on research activities was calculated using an estimated average cost of $675 ± $176 (mean ± SD) per day with local certified registered nurse anesthetist pay scales. Sixty-eight residents were included in the analyses. Twenty-four residents (35.3%) completed resident research rotations with an average duration of 3.7 months. Residents who elected resident research rotations completed more scholarly projects (5 projects [4-6]: median [25%-75% interquartile range] vs 2 [0-3]; P < 0.0001), attended more research conferences (2 conferences [2-4] vs 1 [0-2]; P < 0.0001), but experienced fewer cases (980 cases [886-1333] vs 1182 [930-1420]; P ≤ 0.002) compared with those who did not elect resident research rotations. The estimated average cost to the department per resident who elected a resident research rotation was $13

  2. Resident research in internal medicine training programs.

    PubMed

    Alguire, P C; Anderson, W A; Albrecht, R R; Poland, G A

    1996-02-01

    To determine how well medical residency programs are prepared to meet the new Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accreditation guidelines for resident scholarly activity. Cross-sectional study using a mailed survey. Program directors of all ACGME-accredited internal medicine residency programs. Program directors were asked to list the scholarly activities and products of their residents and their programs' minimal expectations for resident research; available academic, faculty, technical, and personnel support for resident research; perceived barriers to resident research; and the desired educational and skill outcomes of resident research. The responses of university-based training programs were compared with those of non-university-based programs. 271 program directors returned the survey, yielding a response rate of 65%. Ninety-seven percent of all programs have established scholarly guidelines consistent with accreditation requirements. Although only 37% of programs reported having an organized, comprehensive research curriculum, 70% taught skills important to research. Technical support and resources were generally available for resident research; the most frequently cited barrier to resident research was lack of resident time. University-based and non-university-based training programs differed in important ways. Generally, non-university-based programs had more research activity and structure, and they exceeded university-based programs in the number of oral and poster presentations given at local, state, and national professional meetings. Most programs have in place the basic elements conducive to resident research. Program directors have identified and teach educational outcomes and skills that are likely to have lifelong benefits for most of their graduates.

  3. Motherhood during residency training: challenges and strategies.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Allyn; Gold, Michelle; Jensen, Phyllis; Jedrzkiewicz, Michelle

    2005-07-01

    To determine what factors enable or impede women in a Canadian family medicine residency program from combining motherhood with residency training. To determine how policies can support these women, given that in recent decades the number of female family medicine residents has increased. Qualitative study using in-person interviews. McMaster University Family Medicine Residency Program. Twenty-one of 27 family medicine residents taking maternity leave between 1994 and 1999. Semistructured interviews. The research team reviewed transcripts of audiotaped interviews for emerging themes; consensus was reached on content and meaning. NVIVO software was used for data analysis. Long hours, unpredictable work demands, guilt because absences from work increase workload for colleagues, and residents' high expectations of themselves cause pregnant residents severe stress. This stress continues upon return to work; finding adequate child care is an added stress. Residents report receiving less support from colleagues and supervisors upon return to work; they associate this with no longer being visibly pregnant. Physically demanding training rotations put additional strain on pregnant residents and those newly returned to work. Flexibility in scheduling rotations can help accommodate needs at home. Providing breaks, privacy, and refrigerators at work can help maintain breastfeeding. Allowing residents to remain involved in academic and clinical work during maternity leave helps maintain clinical skills, build new knowledge, and promote peer support. Pregnancy during residency training is common and becoming more common. Training programs can successfully enhance the experience of motherhood during residency by providing flexibility at work to facilitate a healthy balance among the competing demands of family, work, and student life.

  4. Resident guide to advocacy in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Park, Kelly K

    2015-12-01

    Many opportunities exist for residents to get involved in advocacy in dermatology, from national to grassroots levels. Residents also should be aware of opportunities to get involved in patient advocacy and become familiar with the myriad of patient advocacy groups that exist. These groups offer support and education for patients and initiate research efforts for specific dermatologic conditions that provide support for patients beyond what can be offered during a standard office visit. The value of resident involvement in advocacy also is discussed.

  5. International educational opportunities for dermatology residents.

    PubMed

    Chacon, Anna H

    2015-05-01

    International resident opportunities in dermatology allow residents to become immersed in different systems of medical care and expose physicians to different dermatologic conditions, cultures, and traditions that are prevalent in each country. Due to the prevalence of some dermatologic conditions in only certain regions, international opportunities expose residents to a variety of skin pathology and disease as well as a rich and diverse experience abroad.

  6. Pharmaceutical marketing: implications for medical residency training.

    PubMed

    Anastasio, G D; Little, J M

    1996-01-01

    An educational intervention was developed to improve family practice residents' ability to obtain useful information from pharmaceutical representatives. The curriculum is based on the traditional one-on-one drug detail. The objectives are to develop residents' skills in controlling the interview, promote skills for critically analyzing drug-promotional material, and discuss ethical issues. The contents include an assessment tool, suggested readings, and interview questions with rationale. After 5 years, residents' confidence in all areas of the curriculum improved significantly.

  7. [Career Satisfaction of Medical Residents in Portugal].

    PubMed

    Martins, Maria João; Laíns, Inês; Brochado, Bruno; Oliveira-Santos, Manuel; Teixeira, Pedro Pinto; Brandão, Mariana; Cerqueira, Rui João; Castro-Ferreira, Ricardo; Bernardes, Carlos; Menezes, Miguel Nobre; Baptista, Bernardo Soares; Ladeiras-Lopes, Ricardo; Rei, Mariana Cruz; Rosa, Gilberto Pires da; Martins, José Luís; Mendonça Sanches, Maria; Ferreira-Pinto, Manuel J; Rato, Margarida; Costa e Silva, Miguel; Policiano, Catarina; Beato, João; Barbosa-Breda, João; Torres, João Pimentel; Leal, Inês; Rosa, Sílvia Aguiar; Ribeiro, Bárbara Carvalho; Costa, Francisco Rego; Palmela, Carolina; Gonçalves, Tiago Cúrdia; Morais, Luis; Marques, Tiago Reis

    2015-01-01

    The satisfaction with the medical profession has been identified as an essential factor for the quality of care, the wellbeing of patients and the healthcare systems' stability. Recent studies have emphasized a growing discontent of physicians, mainly as a result of changes in labor relations. To assess the perception of Portuguese medical residents about: correspondence of residency with previous expectations; degree of satisfaction with the specialty, profession and place of training; reasons for dissatisfaction; opinion regarding clinical practice in Portugal and emigration intents. Cross-sectional study. Data collection was conducted through the "Satisfaction with Specialization Survey", created in an online platform, designed for this purpose, between May and August 2014. From a total population of 5788 medical residents, 804 (12.25 %) responses were obtained. From this sample, 77% of the responses were from residents in the first three years. Results showed that 90% of the residents are satisfied with their specialty, 85% with the medical profession and 86% with their place of training. Nevertheless, results showed a decrease in satisfaction over the final years of residency. The overall assessment of the clinical practice scenario in Portugal was negative and 65% of residents have plans to emigrate after completing their residency. Portuguese residents revealed high satisfaction levels regarding their profession. However, their views on Portuguese clinical practice and the results concerning the intent to emigrate highlight the need to take steps to reverse this scenario.

  8. Predicting resident confidence to lead family meetings.

    PubMed

    Butler, D J; Holloway, R L; Gottlieb, M

    1998-05-01

    Family physicians frequently encounter patients' family members in family meetings regarding health care. Although residents are expected to learn how to interview families, no quantitative studies have examined variables associated with building residents' confidence in their ability to lead family meetings. The current study sought to clarify the relationship between a number of training, participant, and situational components and resident confidence. All family practice residents (n = 90) in a five-residency program system were sent a survey that examined their experience in and perceived competence to conduct family meetings. Responses were analyzed with a hierarchical regression analysis and an ex post facto univariate analysis. Residents with higher perceived confidence in their ability to run a family meeting were male, had specific training for leading family meetings, had participated in and initiated more family meetings, perceived stronger family physician faculty support, and had more family systems training than lower-confidence residents. The results highlight the experiential, curricular, and environmental variables that are associated with building resident confidence to lead family meetings. Residents may benefit from early exposure to the skills needed for family meetings and from reinforcement of these skills through observations of skilled practitioners, the expectation that they will initiate meetings, and the opportunity to debrief meetings with supportive faculty. Family meeting curricula should include conflict management skills and incorporate input from other specialists and hospital personnel who meet with families.

  9. Ophthalmology resident surgical competency: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Binenbaum, Gil; Volpe, Nicholas J

    2006-07-01

    To describe the prevalence, management, and career outcomes of ophthalmology residents who struggle with surgical competency and to explore related educational issues. Fourteen-question written survey. Fifty-eight program directors at Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education-accredited, United States ophthalmology residency programs, representing a total of 2179 resident graduates, between 1991 and 2000. Study participants completed a mailed, anonymous survey whose format combined multiple choice and free comment questions. Number of surgically challenged residents, types of problems identified, types of remediation, final departmental decision at the end of residency, known career outcomes, and residency program use of microsurgical skills laboratories and applicant screening tests. One hundred ninety-nine residents (9% overall; 10% mean per program) were labeled as having trouble mastering surgical skills. All of the programs except 2 had encountered such residents. The most frequently cited problems were poor hand-eye coordination (24%) and poor intraoperative judgment (22%). Most programs were supportive and used educational rather than punitive measures, the most common being extra practice-laboratory time (32%), scheduling cases with the best teaching surgeon (23%), and counseling (21%). Nearly one third (31%) of residents were believed to have overcome their difficulties before graduation. Other residents were encouraged to pursue medical ophthalmology (22%) or to obtain further surgical training through a fellowship (21%) or a supervised practice setting (12%); these residents were granted a departmental statement of satisfactory completion of residency for Board eligibility. Twelve percent were asked to leave residency. Of reported career outcomes, 92% of residents were practicing ophthalmology, 65% as surgical and 27% as medical ophthalmologists. Ninety-eight percent of residency programs had microsurgical practice facilities, 64% had a formal

  10. Allergy education in otolaryngology residency: a survey of program directors and residents.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Sarah E; Franzese, Christine; Lin, Sandra Y

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey program directors of the accredited otolaryngology residency programs and resident attendees of the 2013 American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy (AAOA) Basic/MOC Course regarding resident education and participation as well as assessment of competency in otolaryngic allergy and immunotherapy. A multiple-choice questionnaire was sent to all accredited otolaryngology residency training programs in the United States as part of resident attendance at the 2013 AAOA CORE Basic/MOC Course. Following this, a similar multiple-choice survey was sent to all resident attendees from the programs that responded positively. Program directors reported that 73% of their academic institutions offer allergy testing and immunotherapy. More PDs than residents indicated that residents participate in allergy practice and perform/interpret skin testing and in vitro testing, and more residents (85%) than program directors (63%) reported inadequate or no allergy training. Program directors and residents equally indicated that residents do not calculate immunotherapy vial formulations or administer immunotherapy injections. The majority of program directors indicated that resident competency in allergy was assessed through direct observation, whereas residents more commonly perceived that no assessment of competency was being performed for any portion of allergy practice. This survey demonstrates a discrepancy between program directors and residents regarding resident involvement and adequacy of training in the allergy practice. Although the majority of otolaryngology residencies report offering otolaryngic allergy services and education, the vast majority of residents report inadequate allergy training and less participation in an allergy practice compared to the majority of program directors. © 2013 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  11. Use of social media by residency program directors for resident selection.

    PubMed

    Cain, Jeff; Scott, Doneka R; Smith, Kelly

    2010-10-01

    Pharmacy residency program directors' attitudes and opinions regarding the use of social media in residency recruitment and selection were studied. A 24-item questionnaire was developed, pilot tested, revised, and sent to 996 residency program directors via SurveyMonkey.com. Demographic, social media usage, and opinions on social media data were collected and analyzed. A total of 454 residency program directors completed the study (response rate, 46.4%). The majority of respondents were women (58.8%), were members of Generation X (75.4%), and worked in a hospital or health system (80%). Most respondents (73%) rated themselves as either nonusers or novice users of social media. Twenty percent indicated that they had viewed a pharmacy residency applicant's social media information. More than half (52%) had encountered e-professionalism issues, including questionable photos and posts revealing unprofessional attitudes, and 89% strongly agreed or agreed that information voluntarily published online was fair game for judgments on character, attitudes, and professionalism. Only 4% of respondents had reviewed applicants' profiles for residency selection decisions. Of those respondents, 52% indicated that the content had no effect on resident selection. Over half of residency program directors were unsure whether they will use social media information for future residency selection decisions. Residency program directors from different generations had different views regarding social media information and its use in residency applicant selections. Residency program directors anticipated using social media information to aid in future decisions for resident selection and hiring.

  12. Putting Residents First: Strategies Developed by CNAs to Prevent and Manage Resident-to-Resident Violence in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Snellgrove, Susan; Beck, Cornelia; Green, Angela; McSweeney, Jean C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Resident-to-resident violence (RRV) in nursing homes (NHs) is common and threatens the safety and quality of life of both residents and caregivers. The purpose of this portion of a larger qualitative study was to explore strategies developed by certified nurses’ assistants (CNAs) to prevent and manage RRV in NHs. Design and Methods: Semistructured interviews were used to collect data. Data were analyzed utilizing content analysis and constant comparison. Results: Analysis revealed one overriding theme, “Putting Residents First” which the CNAs described as a conscious effort to put themselves or a beloved family member in the place of the resident while administering care. Within this theme, there were three related subthemes: (a) Knowing the Residents, (b) Keeping Residents Safe, and (c) Spending Quality Time. Implications: Together, these themes suggest that the formulation of strategies for decreasing and managing RRV was influenced significantly by the ability of the CNAs to empathize with the residents for whom they were caring. The results indicate that in the absence of evidence-based interventions, CNAs have developed their own strategies for the management and prevention of RRV. These strategies may provide a foundation for the development and testing of interventions aimed at preventing and managing RRV in NHs. PMID:26055786

  13. Contemporary Trends in Radiation Oncology Resident Research.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vivek; Burt, Lindsay; Gimotty, Phyllis A; Ojerholm, Eric

    2016-11-15

    To test the hypothesis that recent resident research productivity might be different than a decade ago, and to provide contemporary information about resident scholarly activity. We compiled a list of radiation oncology residents from the 2 most recent graduating classes (June 2014 and 2015) using the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology annual directories. We queried the PubMed database for each resident's first-authored publications from postgraduate years (PGY) 2 through 5, plus a 3-month period after residency completion. We abstracted corresponding historical data for 2002 to 2007 from the benchmark publication by Morgan and colleagues (Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2009;74:1567-1572). We tested the null hypothesis that these 2 samples had the same distribution for number of publications using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. We explored the association of demographic factors and publication number using multivariable zero-inflated Poisson regression. There were 334 residents publishing 659 eligible first-author publications during residency (range 0-17; interquartile range 0-3; mean 2.0; median 1). The contemporary and historical distributions were significantly different (P<.001); contemporary publication rates were higher. Publications accrued late in residency (27% in PGY-4, 59% in PGY-5), and most were original research (75%). In the historical cohort, half of all articles were published in 3 journals; in contrast, the top half of contemporary publications were spread over 10 journals-most commonly International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (17%), Practical Radiation Oncology (7%), and Radiation Oncology (4%). Male gender, non-PhD status, and larger residency size were associated with higher number of publications in the multivariable analysis. We observed an increase in first-author publications during training compared with historical data from the mid-2000s. These contemporary figures may be useful to medical students

  14. Promoting mental health competency in residency training.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Nerissa S; Sullivan, Paula D; Hus, Anna M; Downs, Stephen M

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the effect our developmental-behavioral pediatrics (DBP) curricular model had on residents' comfort with handling mental health issues. From August 2007 to January 2010, residents participating in the Indiana University DBP rotation completed a self-assessment questionnaire at baseline and at rotation end. Residents rated their comfort with the identification, treatment, and counseling of mental health problems using a 5-point scale. Ninety-four residents completed both self-assessments. At baseline, categorical pediatric residents possessed higher comfort levels toward identification (mean 2.8 vs. 2.3 for non-categorical pediatrics residents, p<0.05), treatment (2.6 vs. 2.2, p<0.05) and counseling of mental health issues (2.7 vs. 2.1, p<0.005). Residents who were parents were also more comfortable. At rotation end, all residents showed significant improvements in self-rated comfort (4.0 vs. 2.6 for identification, p≤0.05; 4.0 vs. 2.4 for treatment, p≤0.05; and 4.0 vs. 2.4 for counseling, p≤0.05). This remained true regardless of being a categorical pediatric resident, a parent, or primary care-oriented. Our curricular model promotes residents' comfort with handling common mental health issues in practice. Increasing residents' comfort may influence the frequency of active discussion of mental health issues during well-child visits and lead to earlier diagnosis and needed treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Radiology resident teaching skills improvement: impact of a resident teacher training program.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Andrea

    2011-04-01

    Teaching is considered an essential competency for residents to achieve during their training. Instruction in teaching skills may assist radiology residents in becoming more effective teachers and increase their overall satisfaction with teaching. The purposes of this study were to survey radiology residents' teaching experiences during residency and to assess perceived benefits following participation in a teaching skills development course. Study participants were radiology residents with membership in the American Alliance of Academic Chief Residents in Radiology or the Siemens AUR Radiology Resident Academic Development Program who participated in a 1.5-hour workshop on teaching skills development at the 2010 Association of University Radiologists meeting. Participants completed a self-administered, precourse questionnaire that addressed their current teaching strategies, as well as the prevalence and structure of teaching skills training opportunities at their institutions. A second postcourse questionnaire enabled residents to evaluate the seminar and assessed new knowledge and skill acquisition. Seventy-eight residents completed the precourse and postcourse questionnaires. The vast majority of respondents indicated that they taught medical students (72 of 78 [92.3%]). Approximately 20% of residency programs (17 of 78) provided residents with formal didactic programs on teaching skills. Fewer than half (46.8%) of the resident respondents indicated that they received feedback on their teaching from attending physicians (36 of 77), and only 18% (13 of 78) routinely gave feedback to their own learners. All of the course participants agreed or strongly agreed that this workshop was helpful to them as teachers. Few residency programs had instituted resident teacher training curricula. A resident teacher training workshop was perceived as beneficial by the residents, and they reported improvement in their teaching skills. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by

  16. Orthopaedic resident and program director opinions of resident duty hours: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Mir, Hassan R; Cannada, Lisa K; Murray, Jayson N; Black, Kevin P; Wolf, Jennifer M

    2011-12-07

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) established national guidelines for resident duty hours in July 2003. Following an Institute of Medicine report in December 2008, the ACGME recommended further restrictions on resident duty hours that went into effect in July 2011. We conducted a national survey to assess the opinions of orthopaedic residents and of directors of residency and fellowship programs in the U.S. regarding the 2003 and 2011 ACGME resident duty-hour regulations and the effects of these regulations on resident education and patient care. A fifteen-item questionnaire was electronically distributed by the Candidate, Resident, and Fellow Committee of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) to all U.S. orthopaedic residents (n = 3860) and directors of residency programs (n = 184) and fellowship programs (n = 496) between January and April 2011. Thirty-four percent (1314) of the residents and 27% (185) of the program directors completed the questionnaire. Statistical analyses were performed to detect differences between the responses of residents and program directors and between the responses of junior and senior residents. The responses of orthopaedic residents and program directors differed significantly (p < 0.001) for fourteen of the fifteen survey items. The responses of residents and program directors were divergent for questions regarding the 2003 rules. Overall, 71% of residents thought that the eighty-hour work week was appropriate, whereas only 38% of program directors agreed (p < 0.001). Most program directors (70%) did not think that the 2003 duty-hour rules had improved patient care, whereas only 24% of residents responded in the same way (p < 0.001). The responses of residents and program directors to questions regarding the 2011 duty-hour rules were generally compatible, but the degree to which they perceived the issues was different. Only 18% of residents and 19% of program directors thought

  17. Selected Health Practices Among Ohio's Rural Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, G. Howard; Pugh, Albert

    Using a stratified random sample of 12 of Ohio's 88 counties, this 1967 study had as its objectives (1) to measure the level of participation in selected health practices by Ohio's rural residents, (2) to compare the level of participation in selected health practices of farm and rural nonfarm residents, and (3) to examine levels of participation…

  18. A Sexuality Curriculum for Gynecology Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Stephen B.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The summary report of an educational research program conducted with the obstetrics and gynecology residents at University Hospitals of Cleveland in 1976 is presented. The goals were to provide residents with basic knowledge about female sexual problems, assess skill and comfort in interviewing patients with sexual problems, document the effects…

  19. Emotional intelligence in orthopedic surgery residents.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kevin; Petrisor, Brad; Bhandari, Mohit

    2014-04-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is the ability to understand and manage emotions in oneself and others. It was originally popularized in the business literature as a key attribute for success that was distinct from cognitive intelligence. Increasing focus is being placed on EI in medicine to improve clinical and academic performance. Despite the proposed benefits, to our knowledge, there have been no previous studies on the role of EI in orthopedic surgery. We evaluated baseline data on EI in a cohort of orthopedic surgery residents. We asked all orthopedic surgery residents at a single institution to complete an electronic version of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). We used completed questionnaires to calculate total EI scores and 4 branch scores. Data were analyzed according to a priori cutoff values to determine the proportion of residents who were considered competent on the test. Data were also analyzed for possible associations with age, sex, race and level of training. Thirty-nine residents (100%) completed the MSCEIT. The mean total EI score was 86 (maximum score 145). Only 4 (10%) respondents demonstrated competence in EI. Junior residents (p = 0.026), Caucasian residents (p = 0.009) and those younger than 30 years (p = 0.008) had significantly higher EI scores. Our findings suggest that orthopedic residents score low on EI based on the MSCEIT. Optimizing resident competency in noncognitive skills may be enhanced by dedicated EI education, training and testing.

  20. 20th Annual Residence Hall Construction Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agron, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Even in difficult economic times, colleges and universities continue to invest in residence hall construction projects as a way to attract new students and keep existing ones on campus. According to data from "American School & University"'s 20th annual Residence Hall Construction Report, the median new project completed in 2008 was…

  1. Arthroscopic training resources in orthopedic resident education.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Ryan; John, Tamara; Lawler, Jeffrey; Moorman, Claude; Nicandri, Gregg

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of use, perceived effectiveness, and preference for arthroscopic surgical skill training resources. An electronic survey was sent to orthopedics residents, residency program directors, and orthopedic sports medicine attending physicians in the United States. The frequency and perceived effectiveness of 10 types of adjunctive arthroscopic skills training was assessed. Residents and faculty members were asked to rate their confidence in resident ability to perform common arthroscopic procedures. Surveys were completed by 40 of 152 (26.3%) orthopedic residency program directors, 70 of 426 (16.4%) sports medicine faculty, and 235 of 3,170 (7.4%) orthopedic residents. The use of adjunctive methods of training varied from only 9.8% of programs with virtual reality training to 80.5% of programs that used reading of published materials to develop arthroscopic skill. Practice on cadaveric specimens was viewed as the most effective and preferred adjunctive method of training. Residents trained on cadaveric specimens reported increased confidence in their ability to perform arthroscopic procedures. The resources for developing arthroscopic surgical skill vary considerably across orthopedic residency programs in the United States. Adjunctive training methods were perceived to be effective at supplementing traditional training in the operating room. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. Accommodating to Restrictions on Residents' Working Hours.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Henry W., Jr.; Seltzer, Vicki L.

    1991-01-01

    In response to New York State legislation limiting house staff working hours, a survey of obstetrics and gynecology resident programs (n=26) was conducted. Results were used to construct a prototype call schedule and a hypothetical monthly schedule indicating how a single resident would function without violating any state regulations. (MSE)

  3. Study of Teaching Residents How to Teach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Janine C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The effectiveness of a teaching skills program for residents at Louisiana State University Medical Center was evaluated among 22 residents in obstetrics and gynecology, medicine, and family medicine who were randomly assigned to control and experimental groups. There was greater increase in the scores of the experimental than the control groups.…

  4. 28 CFR 115.351 - Resident reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Resident reporting. 115.351 Section 115.351 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Reporting § 115.351 Resident reporting. (a) The agency shall...

  5. 28 CFR 115.251 - Resident reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Resident reporting. 115.251 Section 115.251 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Community Confinement Facilities Reporting § 115.251 Resident reporting. (a) The...

  6. 28 CFR 115.351 - Resident reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Resident reporting. 115.351 Section 115.351 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Reporting § 115.351 Resident reporting. (a) The agency shall...

  7. 28 CFR 115.251 - Resident reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Resident reporting. 115.251 Section 115.251 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Community Confinement Facilities Reporting § 115.251 Resident reporting. (a) The...

  8. 28 CFR 115.351 - Resident reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Resident reporting. 115.351 Section 115.351 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Reporting § 115.351 Resident reporting. (a) The agency shall...

  9. 28 CFR 115.251 - Resident reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Resident reporting. 115.251 Section 115.251 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Community Confinement Facilities Reporting § 115.251 Resident reporting. (a) The...

  10. Current Practices in Resident Assistant Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Virginia Albaneso

    2016-01-01

    Developing resident assistant (RA) training is a challenge for most housing and residence life staff. Grounded in the author's doctoral research on the curricular design of RA training programs, this study summarizes current practices in three types of RA training programs--preservice training, in-service training, and academic courses--and…

  11. Medication Refusal: Resident Rights, Administration Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Haskins, Danielle R; Wick, Jeannette Y

    2017-12-01

    Occasionally, residents actively or passively refuse to take medications. Residents may refuse medication for a number of reasons, including religious beliefs, dietary restrictions, misunderstandings, cognitive impairment, desire to self-harm, or simple inconvenience. This action creates a unique situation for pharmacists and long-term facility staff, especially if patients have dementia. Residents have the legal right to refuse medications, and long-term care facilities need to employ a process to resolve disagreement between the health care team that recommends the medication and the resident who refuses it. In some cases, simple interventions like selecting a different medication or scheduling medications in a different time can address and resolve the resident's objection. If the medical team and the resident cannot resolve their disagreement, often an ethics consultation is helpful. Documenting the resident's refusal to take any or all medications, the health care team's actions and any other outcomes are important. Residents' beliefs may change over time, and the health care team needs to be prepared to revisit the issue as necessary.

  12. Medical Decision-Making by Psychiatry Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Mallakh, Rif; Zinner, Jill; Mackey, Amanda; Tamas, Rebecca L.; Martin, Chanley M.; Dalton, Jerad; Dhaliwal, Nitu; Luddington, Nicole; Numan, Farhad U.; Nunes, Ross; Taylor, Stephen; Ye, Lu

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Several conspiring factors have resulted in an increase in the level of medical burden in psychiatric patients. Psychiatry residents require increasing levels of medical sophistication. To assess the medical decision-making of psychiatry residents, the authors examined the outcome in subjects initially seen in the emergency psychiatric…

  13. 36 CFR 72.73 - Residency requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Residency requirements. 72.73 Section 72.73 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR URBAN PARK AND RECREATION RECOVERY ACT OF 1978 Post-Completion Compliance Responsibilities § 72.73 Residency...

  14. Suicide Intervention Skills among Japanese Medical Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujisawa, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yuriko; Kato, Takahiro A.; Hashimoto, Naoki; Sato, Ryoko; Aoyama-Uehara, Kumi; Fukasawa, Maiko; Tomita, Masayuki; Watanabe, Koichiro; Kashima, Haruo; Otsuka, Kotaro

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Patient suicide is a tragic occurrence, and it can be a demoralizing experience for medical residents. Few studies, however, have assessed suicide management skills among these front-line healthcare professionals. This study evaluated the self-assessed competence and confidence of medical residents with regard to the management of…

  15. 7 CFR 273.3 - Residency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... resident of a shelter for battered women and children as defined in § 271.2 and was a member of a household containing the person who had abused him or her. Residents of shelters for battered women and children shall...

  16. Current Perspectives on Chief Residents in Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Christopher H.; Rachal, James; Breitbach, Jill; Higgins, Michael; Warner, Carolynn; Bobo, William

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors examine qualitative data from outgoing chief residents in psychiatry from the 2004-2005 academic year to 1) determine common characteristics between programs, 2) examine the residents' perspectives on their experiences, and 3) determine their common leadership qualities. Method: The authors sent out self-report surveys via…

  17. Creating a Career Hotline for Rural Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heppner, Mary J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a career information hotline for rural and farm residents affected by the farm crisis as one way a university career center and extension division can make resources more generally available to residents. Discusses typical callers and benefits to the career center. (Author/ABL)

  18. Adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

    PubMed

    Schor, Nina F

    2012-08-21

    As it is currently configured, completion of child neurology residency requires performance of 12 months of training in adult neurology. Exploration of whether or not this duration of training in adult neurology is appropriate for what child neurology is today must take into account the initial reasons for this requirement and the goals of adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

  19. Delinking resident duty hours from patient safety

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Patient safety is a powerful motivating force for change in modern medicine, and is often cited as a rationale for reducing resident duty hours. However, current data suggest that resident duty hours are not significantly linked to important patient outcomes. We performed a narrative review and identified four potential explanations for these findings. First, we question the relevance of resident fatigue in the creation of harmful errors. Second, we discuss factors, including workload, experience, and individual characteristics, that may be more important determinants of resident fatigue than are duty hours. Third, we describe potential adverse effects that may arise from – and, therefore, counterbalance any potential benefits of – duty hour reductions. Fourth, we explore factors that may mitigate any risks to patient safety associated with using the services of resident trainees. In summary, it may be inappropriate to justify a reduction in working hours on the grounds of a presumed linkage between patient safety and resident duty hours. Better understanding of resident-related factors associated with patient safety will be essential if improvements in important patient safety outcomes are to be realized through resident-focused strategies. PMID:25561349

  20. Resident Performance and Sleep Deprivation: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asken, Michael J.; Raham, David C.

    1983-01-01

    A review of the literature on resident performance and sleep deprivation suggests that current research is sparse and inconclusive, and existing research suggests potentially severe negative effects. It is proposed that justifications for sleep-depriving night call schedules remain untested, and their use as part of residency training should be…

  1. Community Residences for Mentally Retarded People: A Study of Seven Community Residences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehbring, Kurt; Ogren, Ciele

    The report describes the distinctive characteristics and styles of seven community residences for retarded children or adults and provides a comparative analysis with emphasis on common themes of successful group homes. The homes are compared in terms of original initiation of the residence; the development of the residence; operations (such as…

  2. How Residents Learn From Patient Feedback: A Multi-Institutional Qualitative Study of Pediatrics Residents' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bogetz, Alyssa L; Orlov, Nicola; Blankenburg, Rebecca; Bhavaraju, Vasudha; McQueen, Alisa; Rassbach, Caroline

    2018-04-01

    Residents may view feedback from patients and their families with greater skepticism than feedback from supervisors and peers. While discussing patient and family feedback with faculty may improve residents' acceptance of feedback and learning, specific strategies have not been identified. We explored pediatrics residents' perspectives of patient feedback and identified strategies that promote residents' reflection on and learning from feedback. In this multi-institutional, qualitative study conducted in June and July 2016, we conducted focus groups with a purposive sample of pediatrics residents after their participation in a randomized controlled trial in which they received written patient feedback and either discussed it with faculty or reviewed it independently. Focus group transcripts were audiorecorded, transcribed, and analyzed for themes using the constant comparative approach associated with grounded theory. Thirty-six of 92 (39%) residents participated in 7 focus groups. Four themes emerged: (1) residents valued patient feedback but felt it may lack the specificity they desire; (2) discussing feedback with a trusted faculty member was helpful for self-reflection; (3) residents identified 5 strategies faculty used to facilitate their openness to and acceptance of patient feedback (eg, help resident overcome emotional responses to feedback and situate feedback in the context of lifelong learning); and (4) residents' perceptions of feedback credibility improved when faculty observed patient encounters and solicited feedback on the resident's behalf prior to discussions. Discussing patient feedback with faculty provided important scaffolding to enhance residents' openness to and reflection on patient feedback.

  3. Conducting a successful residency research project.

    PubMed

    Barletta, Jeffrey F

    2008-08-15

    The residency research project can be a challenging endeavor for pharmacy residents since they typically have limited experience in this area. Furthermore, as the number of accredited residency programs has increased, so has the demand for preceptors with research experience. This review is intended to assist the resident and preceptor by providing steps and guidance with conducting a successful residency research project. Items such as idea generation, proposing the right type of project, departmental review, and project management skills are discussed and guidance with writing the research protocol is provided. Items that must be addressed in every research protocol are described and a generalized protocol template is presented. In addition, the institutional review board review process is described and tips and pointers for obtaining approval are included. Finally, useful tools and resources are provided that can be used up front or throughout each phase of the research project.

  4. Child Neurology Education for Pediatric Residents.

    PubMed

    Albert, Dara V F; Patel, Anup D; Behnam-Terneus, Maria; Sautu, Beatriz Cunill-De; Verbeck, Nicole; McQueen, Alisa; Fromme, H Barrett; Mahan, John D

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the current state of child neurology education during pediatric residency provides adequate preparation for pediatric practice. A survey was sent to recent graduates from 3 pediatric residency programs to assess graduate experience, perceived level of competence, and desire for further education in child neurology. Responses from generalists versus subspecialists were compared. The response rate was 32%, half in general pediatric practice. Only 22% feel very confident in approaching patients with neurologic problems. This may represent the best-case scenario as graduates from these programs had required neurology experiences, whereas review of Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education-accredited residency curricula revealed that the majority of residencies do not. Pediatric neurologic problems are common, and pediatric residency graduates do encounter such problems in practice. The majority of pediatricians report some degree of confidence; however, some clear areas for improvement are apparent.

  5. Accreditation of residency training in the US.

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    In the US, accreditation and certification of residency training are functions of separate public sector agencies. Accrediting decisions are made directly by 26 Residency Review Committees, which represent the primary medical specialties and function under the authority of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. The accrediting bodies may consider only educational issues and are prohibited by the government from controlling physician supply. Only the programme, not the institution in which it is conducted, is accredited. The US residency is a structured educational programme that is expected to provide comparable experience to all enrolled residents. Length of training may vary from two to six years depending on the specialty. Additional training may be obtained in subspecialty programmes, which are subsets of the primary specialty residencies and are also reviewed for accreditation. These have increased in significant number in recent years as subspecialisation has proliferated in the US. PMID:8935597

  6. Is Canadian surgical residency training stressful?

    PubMed

    Aminazadeh, Nasser; Farrokhyar, Forough; Naeeni, Amir; Naeeni, Marjan; Reid, Susan; Kashfi, Arash; Kahnamoui, Kamyar

    2012-08-01

    Surgical residency has the reputation of being arduous and stressful. We sought to determine the stress levels of surgical residents, the major causes of stress and the coping mechanisms used. We developed and distributed a survey among surgical residents across Canada. A total of 169 participants responded: 97 (57%) male and 72 (43%) female graduates of Canadian (83%) or foreign (17%) medical schools. In all, 87% reported most of the past year of residency as somewhat stressful to extremely stressful, with time pressure (90%) being the most important stressor, followed by number of working hours (83%), residency program (73%), working conditions (70%), caring for patients (63%) and financial situation (55%). Insufficient sleep and frequent call was the component of residency programs that was most commonly rated as highly stressful (31%). Common coping mechanisms included staying optimistic (86%), engaging in enjoyable activities (83%), consulting others (75%) and exercising (69%). Mental or emotional problems during residency were reported more often by women (p = 0.006), who were also more likely than men to seek help (p = 0.026), but men reported greater financial stress (p = 0.036). Foreign graduates reported greater stress related to working conditions (p < 0.001), residency program (p = 0.002), caring for family members (p = 0.006), discrimination (p < 0.001) and personal and family safety (p < 0.001) than Canadian graduates. Time pressure and working hours were the most common stressors overall, and lack of sleep and call frequency were the most stressful components of the residency program. Female sex and graduating from a non-Canadian medical school increased the likelihood of reporting stress in certain areas of residency.

  7. Pregnancy and the Plastic Surgery Resident.

    PubMed

    Garza, Rebecca M; Weston, Jane S; Furnas, Heather J

    2017-01-01

    Combining pregnancy with plastic surgery residency has historically been difficult. Two decades ago, 36 percent of plastic surgery program directors surveyed actively discouraged pregnancy among residents, and 33 percent of women plastic surgeons suffered from infertility. Most alarmingly, 26 percent of plastic surgery trainees had had an elective abortion during residency. With increasing numbers of women training in plastic surgery, this historical lack of support for pregnancy deserves further attention. To explore the current accommodations made for the pregnant plastic surgery resident, an electronic survey was sent to 88 plastic surgery program directors in the United States. Fifty-four responded, for a response rate of 61.36 percent. On average, a director trained a total of 7.91 women among 17.28 residents trained over 8.19 years. Of the women residents, 1.43 were pregnant during a director's tenure, with 1.35 of those residents taking maternity leave. An average 1.75 male residents took paternity leave. Approximately one-third of programs had a formal maternity/paternity leave policy (36.54 percent) which, in most cases, was limited to defining allowed weeks of leave, time required to fulfill program requirements, and remuneration during leave. This survey of plastic surgery directors is a first step in defining the challenges training programs face in supporting the pregnant resident. Directors provided comments describing their challenges accommodating an absent resident in a small program and complying with the American Board of Plastic Surgery's required weeks of training per year. A discussion of these challenges is followed by suggested solutions.

  8. Evolution of the Pathology Residency Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Suzanne Z.; Black-Schaffer, W. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The required medical knowledge and skill set for the pathologist of 2020 are different than in 2005. Pathology residency training curriculum must accordingly change to fulfill the needs of these ever-changing requirements. In order to make rational curricular adjustments, it is important for us to know the current trajectory of resident training in pathology—where we have been, what our actual current training curriculum is now—to understand how that might change in anticipation of meeting the needs of a changing patient and provider population and to fit within the evolving future biomedical and socioeconomic health-care setting. In 2013, there were 143 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited pathology residency training programs in the United States, with approximately 2400 residents. There is diversity among residency training programs not only with respect to the number of residents but also in training venue(s). To characterize this diversity among pathology residency training programs, a curriculum survey was conducted of pathology residency program directors in 2013 and compared with a similar survey taken almost 9 years previously in 2005 to identify trends in pathology residency curriculum. Clinical pathology has not changed significantly in the number of rotations over 9 years; however, anatomic pathology has changed dramatically, with an increase in the number of surgical pathology rotations coupled with a decline in stand-alone autopsy rotations. With ever-expanding medical knowledge that the graduating pathology resident must know, it is necessary to (1) reflect upon what are the critical need subjects, (2) identify areas that have become of lesser importance, and then (3) prioritize training accordingly. PMID:28725779

  9. [Problematizing the multidisciplinary residency in oncology: a practical teaching protocol from the perspective of nurse residents].

    PubMed

    Melo, Myllena Cândida de; Queluci, Gisella de Carvalho; Gouvêa, Mônica Villela

    2014-08-01

    To investigate practical teaching of nurse residents in a multidisciplinary residency in oncology. A qualitative descriptive study grounded in the problematization methodology and its steps, represented by the Maguerez Arch. Data were analyzed using content analysis. Potentiating and limiting elements of the residency guided the design of a practical teaching protocol from the perspective of residents, structured in three stages: Welcoming and ambience; Nursing care for problem situations; and, Evaluation process. Systematization of practical teaching promoted the autonomy of individuals and the approximation of teaching to reality, making residency less strenuous, stressful and distressing.

  10. Pediatric dermatology training during residency: a survey of the 2014 graduating residents.

    PubMed

    Akhavan, Alaleh; Murphy-Chutorian, Blair; Friedman, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of pediatric dermatology is considered a core competency of dermatology training and should be expected of all practicing dermatologists. While the numbers of both pediatric dermatology fellowships and board certified pediatric dermatologists in the workforce have increased over the years, recent reports suggest that there is a gap in pediatric dermatology education during dermatology residency. The goal of this study is to assess the current state of pediatric education during residency, as well as the clinical experience, satisfaction and expectations of graduating dermatology residents. A 31-question self-report survey was distributed electronically to 294 third-year dermatology residents with questions pertaining to demographics, didactic education, resident experience in pediatric dermatology training, satisfaction with pediatric training and future plans. One hundred and twenty-three residents responded (41.8% response rate) representing approximately 29.1% of the total number of graduating residents. 69 (56.1%) residents reported academic time specifically devoted to pediatric dermatology, the majority (79.7%) of which was led by pediatric dermatologists. 82% of residents reported dedicated pediatric dermatology clinics at their program. 86.8% of respondents felt that their training in pediatric dermatology will allow them to confidently see pediatric dermatology patients in practice. This survey highlights a promising state of pediatric dermatology training among current graduating dermatology residents. The majority of current graduating dermatology residents are satisfied with their pediatric dermatology education, feel confident treating pediatric patients, and plan to see pediatric patients in clinical practice. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Surgical residency training and international volunteerism: a national survey of residents from 2 surgical specialties.

    PubMed

    Matar, Wadih Y; Trottier, Daniel C; Balaa, Fady; Fairful-Smith, Robin; Moroz, Paul

    2012-08-01

    Many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) lack basic surgical resources, resulting in avoidable disability and mortality. Recently, residents in surgical training programs have shown increasing interest in overseas elective experiences to assist surgical programs in LMICs. The purpose of this study was to survey Canadian surgical residents about their interest in international volunteerism. We sent a web-based survey to all general and orthopedic surgery residents enrolled in surgical training programs in Canada. The survey assessed residents' interests, attitudes and motivations, and perceived barriers and aids with respect to international volunteerism. In all, 361 residents completed the survey for a response rate of 38.0%. Half of the respondents indicated that the availability of an international surgery elective would have positively influenced their selection of a residency program. Excluding the 18 residents who had volunteered during residency, 63.8% of the remaining residents confirmed an interest in international volunteering with "contributing to an important cause," "teaching" and "tourism/cultural enhancement" as the leading reasons for their interest. Perceived barriers included "lack of financial support" and "lack of available organized opportunities." All (100%) respondents who had done an international elective during residency confirmed that they would pursue such work in the future. Administrators of Canadian surgical programs should be aware of strong resident interest in global health care and accordingly develop opportunities by encouraging faculty mentorships and resources for global health teaching.

  12. Residents' responsibilities: Adopting a wider view.

    PubMed

    Schattner, Ami

    2017-12-01

    Current ACGME regulations have limited residents' weekly hours and continuous working hours, a marked change, despite its uncertain effects on physician well-being and quality of care. Although residency programs in internal medicine and family medicine have adapted schedules to conform to these regulations, increasing evidence is accumulating to suggest that these training experiences are not adequately preparing the next generation of practicing primary care and hospital-based physicians. Data from an array of sources continue to demonstrate significant deficiencies in six areas of residents' responsibilities towards their patients: diminished patient "face time" and direct patient care; focus on patients' "reason for hospitalization" or "reason for visit" at the expense of possible neglect of patients' "secondary" medical problems; limited attention to patients' emotional or contextual problems and limited empathy; deficient implementation of the essential constituents of patient-centered care; neglect of habitual "reflective practice"; and excessive distinction between inpatient and outpatient responsibilities, leading to missed opportunities for inpatient residents to be aware of and attend to patients' post-discharge course although new information and readmissions related to the index hospitalization are prevalent. Thus, redesigning residency programs to widen residents' outlook and cover these inseparable components of high-quality care, may infuse the often fatigued and burnt-out residents with purpose and fulfillment, finally incorporating the missing elements of patient-centered care as integral parts of patients' admissions and therefore, of physicians' future careers.

  13. Do otolaryngology residency applicants relocate for training?

    PubMed

    Gebhard, Grant M; Hauser, Leah J; Dally, Miranda J; Weitzenkamp, David A; Cabrera-Muffly, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    To determine whether there is an association between the geographic location of an applicant's undergraduate school, medical school, and residency program among matched otolaryngology residency applicants. Observational. Otolaryngology residency program applications to our institution from 2009 to 2013 were analyzed. The geographic location of each applicant's undergraduate education and medical education were collected. Online public records were queried to determine the residency program location of matched applicants. Applicants who did not match or who attended medical school outside the United States were excluded. Metro area, state, and region were determined according to US Census Bureau definitions. From 2009 to 2013, 1,089 (78%) of 1,405 applicants who matched into otolaryngology residency applied to our institution. The number of subjects who attended medical school and residency in the same geographic region was 241 (22%) for metropolitan area, 305 (28%) for state, and 436 (40%) for region. There was no difference in geographic location retention by gender or couples match status of the subject. United States Medical Licensing Exam step 1 scores correlated with an increased likelihood of subjects staying within the same geographic region (P = .03). Most otolaryngology applicants leave their previous geographic area to attend residency. Based on these data, the authors recommend against giving weight to geography as a factor when inviting applicants to interview. NA. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. Prognostic value of resident clinical performance ratings.

    PubMed

    Williams, Reed G; Dunnington, Gary L

    2004-10-01

    This study investigated the concurrent and predictive validity of end-of-rotation (EOR) clinical performance ratings. Surgeon EOR ratings of residents were collected and compared with end-of-year (EOY) progress decisions and to EOR and EOY confidential judgments of resident ability to provide patient care without direct supervision. Eighty percent to 85% of EOR ratings were Excellent or Very Good. Five percent or fewer were Fair or Poor. Almost all residents receiving Excellent or Very Good EOR ratings also received positive EOR judgments about ability to provide patient care without direct supervision. Residents rated Fair or Poor received negative EOR judgments about ability to provide patient care without direct supervision. As the cumulative percent of Good, Fair, and Poor EOR ratings increased, the number of residents promoted without stipulations at the end of the year decreased and the percentage of faculty members who judged the residents capable of providing effective patient care without direct supervision at the end of the year declined. All residents receiving 40% or more EOR ratings below Very Good had stipulations associated with their promotion. Despite use of descriptive anchors on the scale, clinical performance ratings have no direct meaning. Their meaning needs to be established in the same manner as is done in setting normal values for diagnostic tests, ie, by establishing the relationship between EOR ratings and practice outcomes.

  15. Suicide intervention skills among Japanese medical residents.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yuriko; Kato, Takahiro A; Hashimoto, Naoki; Sato, Ryoko; Aoyama-Uehara, Kumi; Fukasawa, Maiko; Tomita, Masayuki; Watanabe, Koichiro; Kashima, Haruo; Otsuka, Kotaro

    2013-11-01

    Patient suicide is a tragic occurrence, and it can be a demoralizing experience for medical residents. Few studies, however, have assessed suicide management skills among these front-line healthcare professionals. This study evaluated the self-assessed competence and confidence of medical residents with regard to the management of potentially suicidal patients and assessed the correlation with the residents' background characteristics. The authors conducted a multicenter, cross-sectional survey of 114 medical residents in Japan, using a modified version of the Suicide Intervention Response Inventory (SIRI-2), the Medical Outcomes Study 8-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-8), and a 5-point Likert scale to assess confidence in suicide management. A majority (89.5%) of the residents rated their confidence in managing suicidal patients as Not At All Confident or Rather Not Confident, although most were close to completing their psychiatric rotation. Results on the SIRI-2 suggested intermediate competence in managing suicidal behavior, as compared with that of other healthcare professionals. Competence as indicated by the SIRI-2 score was weakly and negatively correlated with the score for self-perceived Vitality on the SF-8 scale. Insufficient skills and lack of confidence in the management of suicidal patients was observed in this sample of Japanese medical residents, thus highlighting the need for improved suicide-management programs for junior medical residents in Japanese hospitals.

  16. Problem neurology residents: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Tabby, David S; Majeed, Muhammed H; Schwartzman, Robert J

    2011-06-14

    Problem residents are found across most medical specialties at a prevalence of about 10%. This study was designed to explore the prevalence and causes of problem neurology residents and to compare neurology programs' responses and outcomes. Directors of 126 US neurology residency programs were sent an electronic survey. We collected data on demographics, first and all "identifiers" of problem residents, and year of training in which the problem was found. We asked about observable signs, etiology, and who performed remediation. We asked what resources were used and what outcomes occurred. Ninety-five program directors completed surveys (75% response rate). Almost all neurology programs have problem residents (81%). Age, sex, marital status, being a US native, or attending a US medical school had no effect on problem status. Being a parent carried a lower likelihood of problems (32%). Most commonly the problem is acted on during the first year of training. Faculty members without defined educational roles were the most frequent first identifiers. Program directors were the most common remediators. The most common remediation techniques were increasing supervision and assigning a faculty mentor. Graduate medical education office and psychiatric or psychological counseling services were most often used. Eleven percent of problem residents required a program for impaired physicians and 14% required a leave of absence. Sixteen percent were dismissed from their programs. The prevalence of problem residents in neurology is similar to other disciplines, and various resources are available to remediate them.

  17. Canadian residents' perceived manager training needs.

    PubMed

    Stergiopoulos, Vicky; Lieff, Susan; Razack, Saleem; Lee, A Curtis; Maniate, Jerry M; Hyde, Stacey; Taber, Sarah; Frank, Jason R

    2010-01-01

    Despite widespread endorsement for administrative training during residency, teaching and learning in this area remains intermittent and limited in most programmes. To inform the development of a Manager Train-the-Trainer program for faculty, the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada undertook a survey of perceived Manager training needs among postgraduate trainees. A representative sample of Canadian specialty residents received a web-based questionnaire in 2009 assessing their perceived deficiencies in 13 Manager knowledge and 11 Manager skill domains, as determined by gap scores (GSs). GSs were defined as the difference between residents' perceived current and desired level of knowledge or skill in selected Manager domains. Residents' educational preferences for furthering their Manager knowledge and skills were also elicited. Among the 549 residents who were emailed the survey, 199 (36.2%) responded. Residents reported significant gaps in most knowledge and skills domains examined. Residents' preferred educational methods for learning Manager knowledge and skills included workshops, web-based formats and interactive small groups. The results of this national survey, highlighting significant perceived gaps in multiple Manager knowledge and skills domains, may inform the development of Manager curricula and faculty development activities to address deficiencies in training in this important area.

  18. [French national survey on neurology resident training].

    PubMed

    Weiss, N; Guiraud, V; Zuber, M; Touzé, E

    2009-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the neurology specialty has changed because of the explosion of information and new treatment modalities that became available, and has consequently become more complex and diversified. The satisfaction of residents concerning their training and the competencies that they acquire has never been thoroughly assessed in France. We conducted a national survey in order to assess (1) the methods for training and validation; (2) the level of knowledge that residents perceived to have acquired in different domains; and (3) their satisfaction towards training and their wishes. One hundred and eight residents replied to the survey. The main sources of training were local teaching (74%), personal work (61%), scientific (57%) and didactic (54%) papers. Residents seemed unable to acquire knowledge on all domains of the curriculum established at a national level, particularly for neurophysiology, neuropsychology, comatose state and sleep disorders, oncology and psychiatry. Even postgraduate year four residents were not fully competent with several technical tools, particularly neurophysiological tests. Fifty eight percent of residents were satisfied with their training, but 16% were not and 26% were half-hearted. Overall the residents were in favor of more standardization in their training, national-level certification, and would be keen on having access to clinics and the use of a follow-up monitoring chart. Our results suggest that it would be useful to better identify the competencies that every neurologist should acquire and to use appropriate tools to reach these objectives.

  19. Residents' breastfeeding knowledge, comfort, practices, and perceptions: results of the Breastfeeding Resident Education Study (BRESt).

    PubMed

    Esselmont, Elizabeth; Moreau, Katherine; Aglipay, Mary; Pound, Catherine M

    2018-05-22

    Physicians have a significant impact on new mothers' breastfeeding practices. However, physicians' breastfeeding knowledge is suboptimal. This knowledge deficit could be the result of limited breastfeeding education in residency. This study aimed to explore pediatric residents' breastfeeding knowledge, comfort level, clinical practices, and perceptions. It also investigated the level and type of education residents receive on breastfeeding and their preferences for improving it. Descriptive, cross-sectional, self-reported online questionnaires were sent to all residents enrolled in a Canadian general pediatric residency program, as well as to their program directors. Resident questionnaires explored breastfeeding knowledge, comfort level, clinical practices, perceptions, educational experiences and educational preferences. Program director questionnaires collected data on current breastfeeding education in Canadian centers. For the resident survey, breastfeeding knowledge was calculated as the percent of correct responses. Demographic factors independently associated with overall knowledge score were identified by multiple linear regression. Descriptive statistics were used for the program director survey. Overall, 201 pediatric residents, and 14 program directors completed our surveys. Residents' mean overall breastfeeding knowledge score was 71% (95% CI: 69-79%). Only 4% (95% CI: 2-8%) of residents were very comfortable evaluating latch, teaching parents breastfeeding positioning, and addressing parents' questions regarding breastfeeding difficulties. Over a quarter had not observed a patient breastfeed. Nearly all agreed or strongly agreed that breastfeeding promotion is part of their role. Less than half reported receiving breastfeeding education during residency and almost all wanted more interactive breastfeeding education. According to pediatric program directors, most of the breastfeeding education residents receive is didactic. Less than a quarter of

  20. Are neurology residents interested in headache?

    PubMed

    Gago-Veiga, A B; Santos-Lasaosa, S; Viguera Romero, J; Pozo-Rosich, P

    The years of residency are the pillars of the subsequent practice in every medical specialty. The aim of our study is to evaluate the current situation, degree of involvement, main interests, and perceived quality of the training received by Spanish residents of neurology, specifically in the area of headache. A self-administered survey was designed by the Headache Study Group of the Spanish Society of Neurology (GECSEN) and was sent via e-mail to all residents who were members of the Society as of May 2015. Fifty-three residents completed the survey (N = 426, 12.4%): 6% were first year residents, 25.5% second year, 23.5% third year, and 45% fourth year residents, all from 13 different Spanish autonomous communities. The areas of greatest interest are, in this order: Vascular neurology, headache, and epilepsy. Of them, 85% believe that the area of headache is undervalued. More than half of residents (52.8%) do not rotate in specific Headache Units and only 35.8% complete their training dominating anaesthetic block and toxin infiltration techniques. Of them, 81.1% believe that research is scarce or absent; 69.8% have never made a poster/presentation, 79.3% have not published and only 15% collaborate on research projects in this area. Lastly, 40% believe that they have not received adequate training. Headache is among the areas that interest our residents the most; however, we believe that we must improve their training both at a patient healthcare level and as researchers. Thus, increasing the number of available courses, creating educational web pages, involving residents in research, and making a rotation in a specialised unit mandatory are among the fundamental objectives of the GECSEN. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Program for developing leadership in pharmacy residents.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Patrick D

    2012-07-15

    An innovative, structured approach to incorporating leadership development activities into pharmacy residency training is described. The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) has called for increased efforts to make leadership development an integral component of the training of pharmacy students and new practitioners. In 2007, The Nebraska Medical Center (TNMC) took action to systematize leadership training in its pharmacy residency programs by launching a new Leadership Development Series. Throughout the residency year, trainees at TNMC participate in a variety of activities: (1) focused group discussions of selected articles on leadership concepts written by noted leaders of the past and present, (2) a two-day offsite retreat featuring trust-building exercises and physical challenges, (3) a self-assessment designed to help residents identify and use their untapped personal strengths, (4) training on the effective application of different styles of communication and conflict resolution, and (5) education on the history and evolution of health-system pharmacy, including a review and discussion of lectures by recipients of ASHP's Harvey A. K. Whitney Award. Feedback from residents who have completed the series has been positive, with many residents indicating that it has stimulated their professional growth and helped prepared them for leadership roles. A structured Leadership Development Series exposes pharmacy residents to various leadership philosophies and principles and, through the study of Harvey A. K. Whitney Award lectures, to the thoughts of past and present pharmacy leaders. Residents develop an increased self-awareness through a resident fall retreat, a StrengthsFinder assessment, and communication and conflict-mode assessment tools.

  2. 26 CFR 301.7701(b)-4 - Residency time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... for tax purposes on the alien's residency starting date. The residency starting date for an alien who... present in the United States. The residency starting date for an alien who meets the lawful permanent... permanent resident. The residency starting date for an alien who satisfies both the substantial presence...

  3. 24 CFR 964.100 - Role of resident council.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Role of resident council. 964.100... Role of resident council. The role of a resident council is to improve the quality of life and resident... environment for families living in public housing. Resident councils may actively participate through a...

  4. 24 CFR 964.100 - Role of resident council.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Role of resident council. 964.100... Role of resident council. The role of a resident council is to improve the quality of life and resident... environment for families living in public housing. Resident councils may actively participate through a...

  5. 24 CFR 964.100 - Role of resident council.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Role of resident council. 964.100... Role of resident council. The role of a resident council is to improve the quality of life and resident... environment for families living in public housing. Resident councils may actively participate through a...

  6. 24 CFR 964.100 - Role of resident council.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Role of resident council. 964.100... Role of resident council. The role of a resident council is to improve the quality of life and resident... environment for families living in public housing. Resident councils may actively participate through a...

  7. Continuous Certification Within Residency: An Educational Model.

    PubMed

    Rachlin, Susan; Schonberger, Alison; Nocera, Nicole; Acharya, Jay; Shah, Nidhi; Henkel, Jacqueline

    2015-10-01

    Given that maintaining compliance with Maintenance of Certification is necessary for maintaining licensure to practice as a radiologist and provide quality patient care, it is important for radiology residents to practice fulfilling each part of the program during their training not only to prepare for success after graduation but also to adequately learn best practices from the beginning of their professional careers. This article discusses ways to implement continuous certification (called Continuous Residency Certification) as an educational model within the residency training program. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Changes in Personal Relationships During Residency and Their Effects on Resident Wellness: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Law, Marcus; Lam, Michelle; Wu, Diana; Veinot, Paula; Mylopoulos, Maria

    2017-11-01

    Residency poses challenges for residents' personal relationships. Research suggests residents rely on family and friends for support during their training. The authors explored the impact of residency demands on residents' personal relationships and the effects changes in those relationships could have on their wellness. The authors used a constructivist grounded theory approach. In 2012-2014, they conducted semistructured interviews with a purposive and theoretical sample of 16 Canadian residents from various specialties and training levels. Data analysis occurred concurrently with data collection, allowing authors to use a constant comparative approach to explore emergent themes. Transcripts were coded; codes were organized into categories and then themes to develop a substantive theory. Residents perceived their relationships to be influenced by their evolving professional identity: Although personal relationships were important, being a doctor superseded them. Participants suggested they were forced to adapt their personal relationships, which resulted in the evolution of a hierarchy of relationships that was reinforced by the work-life imbalance imposed by their training. This poor work-life balance seemed to result in relationship issues and diminish residents' wellness. Participants applied coping mechanisms to manage the conflict arising from the adaptation and protect their relationships. To minimize the effects of identity dissonance, some gravitated toward relationships with others who shared their professional identity or sought social comparison as affirmation. Erosion of personal relationships could affect resident wellness and lead to burnout. Educators must consider how educational programs impact relationships and the subsequent effects on resident wellness.

  9. Resident Wellness and Social Support: Development and Cognitive Validation of a Resident Social Capital Assessment Tool.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Stephen J; Seabott, Heather M; Cunningham, Erika B; Helman, James D; Calderon, Alvin; Thirlby, Richard C; Schenarts, Kimberly D

    The purpose of this study is to develop and generate validity evidence for an instrument to measure social capital in residents. Mixed-methods, phased approach utilizing a modified Delphi technique, focus groups, and cognitive interviews. Four residency training institutions in Washington state between February 2016 and March 2017. General surgery, anesthesia, and internal medicine residents ranging from PGY-1 to PGY-6. The initial resident-focused instrument underwent revision via Delphi process with 6 experts; 100% expert consensus was achieved after 4 cycles. Three focus groups were conducted with 19 total residents. Focus groups identified 6 of 11 instrument items with mean quality ratings ≤4.0 on a 1-5 scale. The composite instrument rating of the draft version was 4.1 ± 0.5. After refining the instrument, cognitive interviews with the final version were completed with 22 residents. All items in the final version had quality ratings >4.0; the composite instrument rating was 4.8 ± 0.1. Social capital may be an important factor in resident wellness as residents rely upon each other and external social support to withstand fatigue, burnout, and other negative sequelae of rigorous training. This instrument for assessment of social capital in residents may provide an avenue for data collection and potentially, identification of residents at-risk for wellness degradation. Copyright © 2018 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Surgical residency training and international volunteerism: a national survey of residents from 2 surgical specialties

    PubMed Central

    Matar, Wadih Y.; Trottier, Daniel C.; Balaa, Fady; Fairful-Smith, Robin; Moroz, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Background Many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) lack basic surgical resources, resulting in avoidable disability and mortality. Recently, residents in surgical training programs have shown increasing interest in overseas elective experiences to assist surgical programs in LMICs. The purpose of this study was to survey Canadian surgical residents about their interest in international volunteerism. Methods We sent a web-based survey to all general and orthopedic surgery residents enrolled in surgical training programs in Canada. The survey assessed residents’ interests, attitudes and motivations, and perceived barriers and aids with respect to international volunteerism. Results In all, 361 residents completed the survey for a response rate of 38.0%. Half of the respondents indicated that the availability of an international surgery elective would have positively influenced their selection of a residency program. Excluding the 18 residents who had volunteered during residency, 63.8% of the remaining residents confirmed an interest in international volunteering with “contributing to an important cause,” “teaching” and “tourism/cultural enhancement” as the leading reasons for their interest. Perceived barriers included “lack of financial support” and “lack of available organized opportunities.” All (100%) respondents who had done an international elective during residency confirmed that they would pursue such work in the future. Conclusion Administrators of Canadian surgical programs should be aware of strong resident interest in global health care and accordingly develop opportunities by encouraging faculty mentorships and resources for global health teaching. PMID:22854155

  11. Resident and attending physician perception of maladaptive response to stress in residents.

    PubMed

    Riesenberg, Lee Ann; Berg, Katherine; Berg, Dale; Morgan, Charity J; Davis, Joshua; Davis, Robyn; Schaeffer, Arielle; Hargraves, Robert; Little, Brian W

    2014-01-01

    Residency stress has been shown to interfere with resident well-being and patient safety. We developed a survey research study designed to explore factors that may affect perception of a maladaptive response to stress. A 16-item survey with 12 Likert-type perception items was designed to determine how often respondents agreed or disagreed with statements regarding the resident on the trigger tape. A total of 438 respondents from multiple institutions completed surveys. Attending physicians were more likely than residents to agree that the resident on the trigger tape was impaired, p<0.0001; needed to seek professional counseling, p=0.0003; should be removed from the service, p=0.002; was not receiving adequate support from the attending physician, p=0.007; and was a risk to patient safety, p=0.02. Attending physicians were also less likely to agree that the resident was a good role model, p=0.001, and that the resident should be able to resolve these issues herself/himself, p<0.0001. Our data suggest that resident physicians may not be able to adequately detect maladaptive responses to stress and that attending physicians may be more adept at recognizing this problem. More innovative faculty and resident development workshops should be created to teach and encourage physicians to better observe and detect residents who are displaying maladaptive responses to stress.

  12. The Radiology Resident iPad Toolbox: an educational and clinical tool for radiology residents.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Emerson E; Kendrick, Michael; Strickland, Colin; Dodd, Gerald D

    2013-07-01

    Tablet computing and mobile resources are the hot topics in technology today, with that interest spilling into the medical field. To improve resident education, a fully configured iPad, referred to as the "Radiology Resident iPad Toolbox," was created and implemented at the University of Colorado. The goal was to create a portable device with comprehensive educational, clinical, and communication tools that would contain all necessary resources for an entire 4-year radiology residency. The device was distributed to a total of 34 radiology residents (8 first-year residents, 8 second-year residents, 9 third-year residents, and 9 fourth-year residents). This article describes the process used to develop and deploy the device, provides a distillation of useful applications and resources decided upon after extensive evaluation, and assesses the impact this device had on resident education. The Radiology Resident iPad Toolbox is a cost-effective, portable, educational instrument that has increased studying efficiency; improved access to study materials such as books, radiology cases, lectures, and web-based resources; and increased interactivity in educational conferences and lectures through the use of audience-response software, with questions geared toward the new ABR board format. This preconfigured tablet fully embraces the technology shift into mobile computing and represents a paradigm shift in educational strategy. Copyright © 2013 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Confidence, knowledge, and skills at the beginning of residency. A survey of pathology residents.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Cindy M; Nolan, Norris J

    2015-01-01

    To document the pathology learning experiences of pathology residents prior to residency and to determine how confident they were in their knowledge and technical skills. An online survey was distributed to all pathology residency program directors in the United States, who were requested to forward the survey link to their residents. Data were obtained on pathology electives, grossing experience, and frozen section experience. Likert scale questions assessed confidence level in knowledge and skills. In total, 201 pathology residents responded (8% of residents in the United States). Prior to starting residency, most respondents had exposure to anatomic pathology through elective rotations. Few respondents had work-related experience. Most did not feel confident in their pathology-related knowledge or skills, and many did not understand what pathology resident duties entail. Respondents gained exposure to pathology primarily through elective rotations, and most felt the elective experience prepared them for pathology residency. However, elective time may be enhanced by providing opportunities for students to increase hands-on experience and understanding of resident duties. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  14. Anesthesiology resident personality type correlates with faculty assessment of resident performance.

    PubMed

    Schell, Randall M; Dilorenzo, Amy N; Li, Hsin-Fang; Fragneto, Regina Y; Bowe, Edwin A; Hessel, Eugene A

    2012-11-01

    To study the association between anesthesiology residents' personality preference types, faculty evaluations of residents' performance, and knowledge. Convenience sample and prospective study. Academic department of anesthesiology. Consenting anesthesiology residents (n = 36). All participants completed the Myers Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI®). All residents' 6-month summation of daily focal evaluations completed by faculty [daily performance score (DPS); 1 = unsatisfactory, 2 = needs improvement, 3 = meets expectations, 4 = exceeds expectations], as well as a global assessment of performance (GAP) score based on placement of each resident into perceived quartile compared with their peers (ie,1 = first, or top, quartile) by senior faculty (n = 7) who also completed the MBTI, were obtained. The resident MBTI personality preferences were compared with the DPS and GAP scores, the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) I and II scores, and faculty MBTI personality type. There was no association between personality preference type and performance on standardized examinations (USMLE I, II). The mean GAP score was better (higher quartile score) for Extraverts than Introverts (median 2.0 vs 2.6, P = 0.0047) and for Sensing versus Intuition (median 2.0 vs 2.6, P = 0.0206) preference. Faculty evaluator MBTI preference type did not influence the GAP scores they assigned residents. Like GAP, the DPS was better for residents with Sensing versus Intuition preference (median 3.5 vs 3.3, P = 0.0111). No difference in DPS was noted between Extraverts and Introverts. Personality preference type was not associated with resident performance on standardized examinations, but it was associated with faculty evaluations of resident performance. Residents with Sensing personality preference were evaluated more favorably on global and focal faculty evaluations than those residents who chose the Intuition preference. Extraverted residents were evaluated more favorably on

  15. Identifying Gaps and Launching Resident Wellness Initiatives: The 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit.

    PubMed

    Zaver, Fareen; Battaglioli, Nicole; Denq, William; Messman, Anne; Chung, Arlene; Lin, Michelle; Liu, Emberlynn L

    2018-03-01

    Burnout, depression, and suicidality among residents of all specialties have become a critical focus for the medical education community, especially among learners in graduate medical education. In 2017 the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) updated the Common Program Requirements to focus more on resident wellbeing. To address this issue, one working group from the 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit (RWCS) focused on wellness program innovations and initiatives in emergency medicine (EM) residency programs. Over a seven-month period leading up to the RWCS event, the Programmatic Initiatives workgroup convened virtually in the Wellness Think Tank, an online, resident community consisting of 142 residents from 100 EM residencies in North America. A 15-person subgroup (13 residents, two faculty facilitators) met at the RWCS to develop a public, central repository of initiatives for programs, as well as tools to assist programs in identifying gaps in their overarching wellness programs. An online submission form and central database of wellness initiatives were created and accessible to the public. Wellness Think Tank members collected an initial 36 submissions for the database by the time of the RWCS event. Based on general workplace, needs-assessment tools on employee wellbeing and Kern's model for curriculum development, a resident-based needs-assessment survey and an implementation worksheet were created to assist residency programs in wellness program development. The Programmatic Initiatives workgroup from the resident-driven RWCS event created tools to assist EM residency programs in identifying existing initiatives and gaps in their wellness programs to meet the ACGME's expanded focus on resident wellbeing.

  16. A novel resident-as-teacher training program to improve and evaluate obstetrics and gynecology resident teaching skills.

    PubMed

    Ricciotti, Hope A; Dodge, Laura E; Head, Julia; Atkins, K Meredith; Hacker, Michele R

    2012-01-01

    Residents play a significant role in teaching, but formal training, feedback, and evaluation are needed. Our aims were to assess resident teaching skills in the resident-as-teacher program, quantify correlations of faculty evaluations with resident self-evaluations, compare resident-as-teacher evaluations with clinical evaluations, and evaluate the resident-as-teacher program. The resident-as-teacher training program is a simulated, videotaped teaching encounter with a trained medical student and standardized teaching evaluation tool. Evaluations from the resident-as-teacher training program were compared to evaluations of resident teaching done by faculty, residents, and medical students from the clinical setting. Faculty evaluation of resident teaching skills in the resident-as-teacher program showed a mean total score of 4.5 ± 0.5 with statistically significant correlations between faculty assessment and resident self-evaluations (r = 0.47; p < 0.001). However, resident self-evaluation of teaching skill was lower than faculty evaluation (mean difference: 0.4; 95% CI 0.3-0.6). When compared to the clinical setting, resident-as-teacher evaluations were significantly correlated with faculty and resident evaluations, but not medical student evaluations. Evaluations from both the resident-as-teacher program and the clinical setting improved with duration of residency. The resident-as-teacher program provides a method to train, give feedback, and evaluate resident teaching.

  17. Resident Evaluation and Remediation: A Comprehensive Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jim S.; Siewert, Bettina; Boiselle, Phillip M.

    2010-01-01

    Background A comprehensive evaluation and remediation program is an essential component of any residency program. The evaluation system should identify problems accurately and early and allow residents with problems to be assigned to a remediation program that effectively deals with them. Elements of a proactive remediation program include a process for outlining deficiencies, providing resources for improvement, communicating clear goals for acceptable performance, and reevaluating performance against these goals. Intervention In recognition of the importance of early detection and prompt remediation of the struggling resident, we sought to develop a multifaceted approach to resident evaluation with the aim of early identification and prompt remediation of difficulties. This article describes our comprehensive evaluation program and remediation program, which uses resources within our radiology department and institutional graduate medical education office. Discussion An effective evaluation system should identify problems accurately and early, whereas a proactive remediation program should effectively deal with issues once they are identified. PMID:21975628

  18. Residence Conditions on Community Treatment Orders.

    PubMed

    Dawson, John; O'Reilly, Richard

    2015-11-01

    To identify the clinical reasons and legal authority for including a residential placement condition in a community treatment order (CTO). We describe the clinical reasons for imposing a residence condition and discuss how this is authorized by the laws of the Canadian provinces (using Ontario as the main example). A residence condition can facilitate numerous benefits, including: regular access to a person by a clinical team; continuing therapeutic relations; supervision of medication; provision of general medical care; and reduction in substance use, risks of victimization, and other unintended harm. A resident condition can be lawfully imposed when it clearly fits the purposes of the CTO legislation and stops short of authorizing detention in a community facility. In certain circumstances, a residence condition is clinically justified and a lawful aspect of a CTO.

  19. A national curriculum for ophthalmology residency training

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Ashok Kumar; Honavar, Santosh G; Azad, Rajvardhan; Verma, Lalit

    2018-01-01

    We present a residency curriculum for Ophthalmology in India. The document derives from a workshop by the All India Ophthalmological Society (AlOS) which adapted the International Council of Ophthalmology residency curriculum and refined and customized it based on inputs by the residency program directors who participated in the work shop. The curriculum describes the course content, lays down the minimum requirements of infrastructure and mandates diagnostic and therapeutic procedures required for optimal training. It emphasises professionalism, management, research methodology, community ophthalmology as integral to the curriculum. The proposed national ophthalmology residency curriculum for India incorporates the required knowledge and skills for effective and safe practice of ophthalmology and takes into account the specific needs of the country. PMID:29785982

  20. The Residency Application Abyss: Insights and Advice

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Douglas P.; Oatts, Julius T.; Fields, Barry G.; Huot, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Most medical students apply for residency training upon completion of medical school. The choice of specialty is one of a student’s first major career decisions, and the application process often results in considerable anxiety, as it is competitive, unpredictable, and requires a significant investment of time and money. This article, which addresses several important facets of the residency application using both experiential and evidence-based data, is organized chronologically into sections that describe a logical approach to applying for residency: choice of a specialty, the personal statement, the interview day, and developing a rank list. A list of relevant websites is also included. This paper is a resource that provides timely and tangible guidance to medical students applying for residency training. PMID:21966036

  1. Protecting Your Residence Hall Furniture Investment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiens, Janet

    2003-01-01

    Asserting that residence hall furniture takes abuse simply through use, discusses a three-part approach--student involvement and education, creating the right environment, and ongoing maintenance--that helps reduce normal wear and tear. (EV)

  2. 42 CFR 435.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... supplementary payment (SSP). For individuals of any age who are receiving an SSP, the State of residence is the State paying the SSP. (g) Individuals receiving Title IV-E payments. For individuals of any age who are...

  3. Challenges of pediatric residency training in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsuen-Chiuan; Harasym, Peter H

    2006-01-01

    A crisis in pediatric residency training today has raised serious concerns about the healthcare quality for children in Taiwan. The purpose of this study was to document the problems and to propose possible solutions for improvement. The problems include: 1) manpower shortage due to the difficulty of recruiting pediatric residents; 2) heavy workload that hinders learning; 3) lack of assessment and poor program planning; and 4) inadequate institutional and financial support. As a result, physicians' competencies are not guaranteed at the end of residency training, even with the pediatric board certification. Possible solutions may include: 1) conducting research on physician manpower statistics, work hours and environment; 2) establishing a Residency Program Review Committee and provision of standards for accreditation; 3) defining the competencies mandated as a general pediatrician and developing a set of measurable qualitative standards; 4) encouraging new programs with flexibility (e.g., primary care); and 5) pursuing adequate institutional and financial supports.

  4. Neurosurgical Resident Training in Germany.

    PubMed

    Stienen, Martin N; Gempt, Jens; Gautschi, Oliver P; Demetriades, Andreas K; Netuka, David; Kuhlen, Dominique E; Schaller, Karl; Ringel, Florian

    2017-07-01

    Introduction  Efficient neurosurgical training is of paramount importance to provide continuing high-quality medical care to patients. In this era of law-enforced working hour restrictions, however, maintaining high-quality training can be a challenge and requires some restructuring. We evaluated the current status of resident training in Germany. Methods  An electronic survey was sent to European neurosurgical trainees between June 2014 and March 2015. The responses of German trainees were compared with those of trainees from other European countries. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the effect size of the relationship between a trainee being from Germany and the outcome (e.g., satisfaction, working time). Results  Of 532 responses, 95 were from German trainees (17.8%). In a multivariate analysis corrected for baseline group differences, German trainees were 29% as likely as non-German trainees to be satisfied with clinical lectures given at their teaching facility (odds ratio [OR]: 0.29; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.18-0.49; p  < 0.0001). The satisfaction rate with hands-on operating room exposure was 73.9% and equal to the rate in Europe (OR: 0.94; 95% CI, 0.56-1.59; p  = 0.834). German trainees were 2.3 times as likely to perform a lumbar spine intervention as the primary surgeon within the first year of training (OR: 2.27; 95% CI, 1.42-3.64; p  = 0.001). However, they were less likely to perform a cervical spine procedure within 24 months of training (OR: 0.38; 95% CI, 0.17-0.82; p  = 0.014) and less likely to perform a craniotomy within 36 months of training (OR: 0.49; 95% CI, 0.31-0.79; p  = 0.003). Only 25.6% of German trainees currently adhere to the weekly limit of 48 hours as requested from the European Working Time Directive 2003/88/EC, and in an international comparison, German trainees were twice as likely to work > 50 hours per week (OR: 2.13; 95% CI, 1.25-3.61; p  = 0.005). This working time

  5. Residents' experiences of abuse, discrimination and sexual harassment during residency training. McMaster University Residency Training Programs.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, D J; Liutkus, J F; Risdon, C L; Griffith, L E; Guyatt, G H; Walter, S D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of psychological abuse, physical assault, and discrimination on the basis of gender and sexual orientation, and to examine the prevalence and impact of sexual harassment in residency training programs. DESIGN: Self-administered questionnaire. SETTING: McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. PARTICIPANTS: Residents in seven residency training programs during the academic year from July 1993 to June 1994. Of 225 residents 186 (82.7%) returned a completed questionnaire, and 50% of the respondents were women. OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence of psychological abuse, physical assault and discrimination on the basis of gender and sexual orientation experienced by residents during medical training, prevalence and residents' perceived frequency of sexual harassment. RESULTS: Psychological abuse was reported by 50% of the residents. Some of the respondents reported physical assault, mostly by patients and their family members (14.7% reported assaults by male patients and family members, 9.8% reported assaults by female patients and family members), 5.4% of the female respondents reported assault by male supervising physicians. Discrimination on the basis of gender was reported to be common and was experienced significantly more often by female residents than by male residents (p < 0.01). Ten respondents, all female, reported having experienced discrimination on the basis of their sexual orientation. Most of the respondents experienced sexual harassment, especially in the form of sexist jokes, flirtation and unwanted compliments on their dress or figure. On average, 40% of the respondents, especially women (p < 0.01), reported experiencing offensive body language and receiving sexist teaching material and unwanted compliments on their dress. Significantly more female respondents than male respondents stated that they had reported events of sexual harassment to someone (p < 0.001). The most frequent emotional reactions to sexual harassment were

  6. Residents' experiences of abuse, discrimination and sexual harassment during residency training. McMaster University Residency Training Programs.

    PubMed

    Cook, D J; Liutkus, J F; Risdon, C L; Griffith, L E; Guyatt, G H; Walter, S D

    1996-06-01

    To assess the prevalence of psychological abuse, physical assault, and discrimination on the basis of gender and sexual orientation, and to examine the prevalence and impact of sexual harassment in residency training programs. Self-administered questionnaire. McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. Residents in seven residency training programs during the academic year from July 1993 to June 1994. Of 225 residents 186 (82.7%) returned a completed questionnaire, and 50% of the respondents were women. Prevalence of psychological abuse, physical assault and discrimination on the basis of gender and sexual orientation experienced by residents during medical training, prevalence and residents' perceived frequency of sexual harassment. Psychological abuse was reported by 50% of the residents. Some of the respondents reported physical assault, mostly by patients and their family members (14.7% reported assaults by male patients and family members, 9.8% reported assaults by female patients and family members), 5.4% of the female respondents reported assault by male supervising physicians. Discrimination on the basis of gender was reported to be common and was experienced significantly more often by female residents than by male residents (p < 0.01). Ten respondents, all female, reported having experienced discrimination on the basis of their sexual orientation. Most of the respondents experienced sexual harassment, especially in the form of sexist jokes, flirtation and unwanted compliments on their dress or figure. On average, 40% of the respondents, especially women (p < 0.01), reported experiencing offensive body language and receiving sexist teaching material and unwanted compliments on their dress. Significantly more female respondents than male respondents stated that they had reported events of sexual harassment to someone (p < 0.001). The most frequent emotional reactions to sexual harassment were embarassment (reported by 24.0%), anger (by 23.4%) and frustration (20

  7. Contemporary Trends in Radiation Oncology Resident Research

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Vivek; Burt, Lindsay; Gimotty, Phyllis A.

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that recent resident research productivity might be different than a decade ago, and to provide contemporary information about resident scholarly activity. Methods and Materials: We compiled a list of radiation oncology residents from the 2 most recent graduating classes (June 2014 and 2015) using the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology annual directories. We queried the PubMed database for each resident's first-authored publications from postgraduate years (PGY) 2 through 5, plus a 3-month period after residency completion. We abstracted corresponding historical data for 2002 to 2007 from the benchmark publication by Morgan and colleagues (Int Jmore » Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2009;74:1567-1572). We tested the null hypothesis that these 2 samples had the same distribution for number of publications using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. We explored the association of demographic factors and publication number using multivariable zero-inflated Poisson regression. Results: There were 334 residents publishing 659 eligible first-author publications during residency (range 0-17; interquartile range 0-3; mean 2.0; median 1). The contemporary and historical distributions were significantly different (P<.001); contemporary publication rates were higher. Publications accrued late in residency (27% in PGY-4, 59% in PGY-5), and most were original research (75%). In the historical cohort, half of all articles were published in 3 journals; in contrast, the top half of contemporary publications were spread over 10 journals—most commonly International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (17%), Practical Radiation Oncology (7%), and Radiation Oncology (4%). Male gender, non-PhD status, and larger residency size were associated with higher number of publications in the multivariable analysis. Conclusion: We observed an increase in first-author publications during training compared with historical data from the mid-2000s

  8. Technical skills rotation for general surgery residents.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Ray I; Martinez, Jose M; Iglesias, Alberto R; Lo Menzo, Emanuele; Hutson, Duane; Sleeman, Danny; Livingstone, Alan S; Madan, Atul K

    2010-06-15

    Technical skills are an important part of any general surgery residency curriculum. With the demands of limited work weeks, it is imperative that educators create novel methods of teaching technical skills to their residents. Our program utilizes a dedicated month to help accomplish this. This study hypothesized that general surgery residents would report a positive effect of a dedicated technical skills rotation. Residents who had undergone a 1 mo rotation in technical skills during their first year were asked to fill out a survey concerning their experience. During the 1-mo rotation, the residents had almost no clinical responsibilities. Teaching of technical skills was performed with various activities, including video content (VC), virtual reality simulators (VR), open foam procedures (OF), laparoscopic box trainers (BT), surgical equipment in-service (SE), and animate sessions (AS). Responses were given on a Likert scale (1-10) with higher numbers being more positive responses. There were seven residents in this study. The residents gave a very positive response to the overall rotation (9.4) and exposure to laparoscopic procedures (9.6). The other responses were enthusiastic as well: exposure to open procedures (8.9) and preparation for operative room (9.4). After their rotation, the residents were comfortable performing a laparoscopic cholecystectomy (9.2), a hand-sewn anastomosis (8.7), and a stapled anastomosis (9.4). The residents found theses activities helpful in increasing order: VC (7.8), VR (8.0), BT (9.0), ES (9.7), OF (9.8), and AS (9.8). A 1-mo dedicated technical skills rotations was perceived to be extremely positive by the residents. The residents felt very comfortable performing a laparoscopic cholecystectomy, a hand-sewn anastomosis, and a stapled anastomosis. With the 80-h work week, alternatives to learning technical skills in the operating room are essential. Further studies need to be performed to determine if this rotation aids in

  9. Adolescent medicine training in pediatric residency programs.

    PubMed

    Fox, Harriette B; McManus, Margaret A; Klein, Jonathan D; Diaz, Angela; Elster, Arthur B; Felice, Marianne E; Kaplan, David W; Wibbelsman, Charles J; Wilson, Jane E

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an assessment of pediatric residency training in adolescent medicine. We conducted 2 national surveys: 1 of pediatric residency program directors and the other of faculty who are responsible for the adolescent medicine block rotation for pediatric residents to elicit descriptive and qualitative information concerning the nature of residents' ambulatory care training experience in adolescent medicine and the workforce issues that affect the experience. Required adolescent medicine topics that are well covered pertain to normal development, interviewing, and sexual issues. Those least well covered concern the effects of violence, motor vehicle safety, sports medicine, and chronic illness. Shortages of adolescent medicine specialists, addictions counselors, psychiatrists, and other health professionals who are knowledgeable about adolescents frequently limit pediatric residency training in adolescent medicine. Considerable variation exists in the timing of the mandatory adolescent medicine block rotation, the clinic sites used for ambulatory care training, and the range of services offered at the predominant training sites. In addition, residents' continuity clinic experience often does not include adolescent patients; thus, pediatric residents do not have opportunities to establish ongoing therapeutic relationships with adolescents over time. Both program and rotation directors had similar opinions about adolescent medicine training. Significant variation and gaps exist in adolescent medicine ambulatory care training in pediatric residency programs throughout the United States. For addressing the shortcomings in many programs, the quality of the block rotation should be improved and efforts should be made to teach adolescent medicine in continuity, general pediatric, and specialty clinics. In addition, renewed attention should be given to articulating the core competencies needed to care for adolescents.

  10. Mobile technology in radiology resident education.

    PubMed

    Korbage, Aiham C; Bedi, Harprit S

    2012-06-01

    The authors hypothesized that ownership of a mobile electronic device would result in more time spent learning radiology. Current trends in radiology residents' studying habits, their use of electronic and printed radiology learning resources, and how much of the funds allotted to them are being used toward printed vs electronic education tools were assessed in this study. A survey study was conducted among radiology residents across the United States from June 13 to July 5, 2011. Program directors listed in the Association of Program Directors in Radiology e-mail list server received an e-mail asking for residents to participate in an online survey. The questionnaire consisted of 12 questions and assessed the type of institution, the levels of training of the respondents, and book funds allocated to residents. It also assessed the residents' study habits, access to portable devices, and use of printed and electronic radiology resources. Radiology residents are adopters of new technologies, with 74% owning smart phones and 37% owning tablet devices. Respondents spend nearly an equal amount of time learning radiology from printed textbooks as they do from electronic resources. Eighty-one percent of respondents believe that they would spend more time learning radiology if provided with tablet devices. There is considerable use of online and electronic resources and mobile devices among the current generation of radiology residents. Benefits, such as more study time, may be obtained by radiology programs that incorporate tablet devices into the education of their residents. Copyright © 2012 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Induction process of trainees in pathology residency

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Imran; Ali, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of the induction process of pathology residency at The Aga Khan University hospital. The Department of Postgraduate Medical Education was established in 1985. The induction process is an exhaustive exercise that includes an admission test held simultaneously in Karachi, Hyderabad, Lahore, and Rawalpindi, followed by an interview of the shortlisted candidates. The pathology residency program was started 25 years ago and since then the induction process has undergone major changes with the course of time. PMID:27313487

  12. Emergency Medicine Resident Perceptions of Medical Professionalism.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, Joshua; Gatewood, Medley O; Ilgen, Jonathan S; Schaninger, Caitlin; Strote, Jared

    2016-05-01

    Medical professionalism is a core competency for emergency medicine (EM) trainees; but defining professionalism remains challenging, leading to difficulties creating objectives and performing assessment. Because professionalism is dynamic, culture-specific, and often taught by modeling, an exploration of trainees' perceptions can highlight their educational baseline and elucidate the importance they place on general conventional professionalism domains. To this end, our objective was to assess the relative value EM residents place on traditional components of professionalism. We performed a cross-sectional, multi-institutional survey of incoming and graduating EM residents at four programs. The survey was developed using the American Board of Internal Medicine's "Project Professionalism" and the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education definition of professionalism competency. We identified 27 attributes within seven domains: clinical excellence, humanism, accountability, altruism, duty and service, honor and integrity, and respect for others. Residents were asked to rate each attribute on a 10-point scale. We analyzed data to assess variance across attributes as well as differences between residents at different training levels or different institutions. Of the 114 residents eligible, 100 (88%) completed the survey. The relative value assigned to different professional attributes varied considerably, with those in the altruism domain valued significantly lower and those in the "respect for others" and "honor and integrity" valued significantly higher (p<0.001). Significant differences were found between interns and seniors for five attributes primarily in the "duty and service" domain (p<0.05). Among different residencies, significant differences were found with attributes within the "altruism" and "duty and service" domains (p<0.05). Residents perceive differences in the relative importance of traditionally defined professional attributes and this may

  13. NRC/AMRMC Resident Research Associateship Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2018-05-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-2-0010 TITLE: NRC/AMRMC Resident Research Associateship Program PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Howard Gamble CONTRACTING...ORGANIZATION: NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES Washington, DC 20001 REPORT DATE: May 2018 TYPE OF REPORT: Final PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research ...1. REPORT DATE May 2018 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED 6 Feb 2012 - 28 Feb 2018 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NRC/AMRMC Resident Research Associateship

  14. Marguerite Arnet Residence, interior walls and front door, and door ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Marguerite Arnet Residence, interior walls and front door, and door leading to next room - Adam & Bessie Arnet Homestead, Marguerite Arnet Residence, 560 feet northeast of Adam & Bessie Arnet Residence, Model, Las Animas County, CO

  15. Marguerite Arnet Residence, exterior roof structure detail, looking northwest. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Marguerite Arnet Residence, exterior roof structure detail, looking northwest. - Adam & Bessie Arnet Homestead, Marguerite Arnet Residence, 560 feet northeast of Adam & Bessie Arnet Residence, Model, Las Animas County, CO

  16. 24 CFR 964.117 - Resident council partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... § 964.117 Resident council partnerships. A resident council may form partnerships with outside organizations, provided that such relationships are complementary to the resident council in its duty to...

  17. 24 CFR 964.117 - Resident council partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... § 964.117 Resident council partnerships. A resident council may form partnerships with outside organizations, provided that such relationships are complementary to the resident council in its duty to...

  18. 24 CFR 964.117 - Resident council partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... § 964.117 Resident council partnerships. A resident council may form partnerships with outside organizations, provided that such relationships are complementary to the resident council in its duty to...

  19. 24 CFR 964.117 - Resident council partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... § 964.117 Resident council partnerships. A resident council may form partnerships with outside organizations, provided that such relationships are complementary to the resident council in its duty to...

  20. 24 CFR 964.117 - Resident council partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... § 964.117 Resident council partnerships. A resident council may form partnerships with outside organizations, provided that such relationships are complementary to the resident council in its duty to...

  1. Implementing a resident acute care surgery service: Improving resident education and patient care.

    PubMed

    Kantor, Olga; Schneider, Andrew B; Rojnica, Marko; Benjamin, Andrew J; Schindler, Nancy; Posner, Mitchell C; Matthews, Jeffrey B; Roggin, Kevin K

    2017-03-01

    To simulate the duties and responsibilities of an attending surgeon and allow senior residents more intraoperative and perioperative autonomy, our program created a new resident acute care surgery consult service. We structured resident acute care surgery as a new admitting and inpatient consult service managed by chief and senior residents with attending supervision. When appropriate, the chief resident served as a teaching assistant in the operation. Outcomes were recorded prospectively and reviewed at weekly quality improvement conferences. The following information was collected: (1) teaching assistant case logs for senior residents preimplentation (n = 10) and postimplementation (n = 5) of the resident acute care surgery service; (2) data on the proportion of each case performed independently by residents; (3) resident evaluations of the resident acute care surgery versus other general operative services; (4) consult time for the first 12 months of the service (June 2014 to June 2015). During the first year after implementation, the number of total teaching assistant cases logged among graduating chief residents increased from a mean of 13.4 ± 13.0 (range 4-44) for preresident acute care surgery residents to 30.8 ± 8.8 (range 27-36) for postresident acute care surgery residents (P < .01). Of 323 operative cases, the residents performed an average of 82% of the case independently. There was a significant increase in the satisfaction with the variety of cases (mean 5.08 vs 4.52, P < .01 on a 6-point Likert scale) and complexity of cases (mean 5.35 vs 4.94, P < .01) on service evaluations of resident acute care surgery (n = 27) in comparison with other general operative services (n = 127). In addition, creation of a 1-team consult service resulted in a more streamlined consult process with average consult time of 22 minutes for operative consults and 25 minutes for nonoperative consults (range 5-90 minutes). The implementation of a

  2. Informatics and Technology in Resident Education.

    PubMed

    Niehaus, William

    2017-05-01

    Biomedical or clinical informatics is the transdisciplinary field that studies and develops effective uses of biomedical data, information technology innovations, and medical knowledge for scientific inquiry, problem solving, and decision making, with an emphasis on improving human health. Given the ongoing advances in information technology, the field of informatics is becoming important to clinical practice and to residency education. This article will discuss how informatics is specifically relevant to residency education and the different ways to incorporate informatics into residency education, and will highlight applications of current technology in the context of residency education. How informatics can optimize communication for residents, promote information technology use, refine documentation techniques, reduce medical errors, and improve clinical decision making will be reviewed. It is hoped that this article will increase faculty and trainees' knowledge of the field of informatics, awareness of available technology, and will assist practitioners to maximize their ability to provide quality care to their patients. This article will also introduce the idea of incorporating informatics specialists into residency programs to help practitioners deliver more evidenced-based care and to further improve their efficiency. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Neurosurgery Residency Websites: A Critical Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Skovrlj, Branko; Silvestre, Jason; Ibeh, Chinwe; Abbatematteo, Joseph M; Mocco, J

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the accessibility of educational and recruitment content of Neurosurgery Residency Websites (NRWs). Program lists from the Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database (FREIDA), Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS), and the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) were accessed for the 2015 Match. These databases were assessed for accessibility of information and responsive program contacts. Presence of online recruitment and education variables was assessed, and correlations between program characteristics and website comprehensiveness were made. All 103 neurosurgery residency programs had an NRW. The AANS database provided the most number of viable website links with 65 (63%). No links existed for 5 (5%) programs. A minority of programs contacts responded via e-mail (46%). A minority of recruitment (46%) and educational (49%) variables were available on the NRWs. Larger programs, as defined by the number of yearly residency spots and clinical faculty, maintained greater online content than smaller programs. Similar trends were seen with programs affiliated with a ranked medical school and hospital. Multiple prior studies have demonstrated that medical students applying to neurosurgery rely heavily on residency program websites. As such, the paucity of content on NRWs allows for future opportunity to optimize online resources for neurosurgery training. Making sure that individual programs provide relevant content, make the content easier to find and adhere to established web design principles could increase the usability of NRWs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Resident Physician Burnout: Is There Hope?

    PubMed Central

    McCray, Laura W.; Cronholm, Peter F.; Bogner, Hillary R.; Gallo, Joseph J.; Neill, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Prevalent among resident physicians, burnout has been associated with absenteeism, low job satisfaction, and medical errors. Little is known about the number and quality of interventions used to combat burnout. Methods We performed a systematic review of the literature using MEDLINE and PubMed databases. We included English-language articles published between 1966 and 2007 identified using combinations of the following medical subject heading terms: burnout, intervention studies, program evaluation, internship and residency, graduate medical education, medical student, health personnel, physician, resident physician, resident work hours, and work hour limitations. Additional articles were also identified from the reference lists of manuscripts. The quality of research was graded with the Strength of Evidence Taxonomy (SORT) from highest (level A) to lowest (level C). Results Out of 190 identified articles, 129 were reviewed. Nine studies met inclusion criteria, only two of which were randomized, controlled trials. Interventions included workshops, a resident assistance program, a self-care intervention, support groups, didactic sessions, or stress-management/coping training either alone or in various combinations. None of the studied interventions achieved an A-level SORT rating. Conclusions Despite the potentially serious personal and professional consequences of burnout, few interventions exist to combat this problem. Prospective, controlled studies are needed to examine the effect of interventions to manage burnout among resident physicians. PMID:18830837

  5. [Medical residency program: perceptions of medical residents in hospitals of Lima and Callao].

    PubMed

    Miní, Elsy; Medina, Julio; Peralta, Verónica; Rojas, Luis; Butron, Joece; Gutiérrez, Ericson L

    2015-01-01

    In order to rate the medical residency training program from the perceptions of residents, a structured survey, based on international literature, was applied to 228 participants. 48.2% of residents rated their training as “good,” 36.4% as “fair” and 15.4% as “poor”. Most of the residents had low supervision while on call, were overworked and did not have rest after being on call. Having a good annual curriculum (OR: 8.5; 95% CI: 4.1 to 7.4) and university promotion of research (OR 2.4, 95% CI: 1.1 to 5.2) were independent factors associated with higher ratings of training. In conclusion, the rating of residents about their training is mostly good, but this percentage does not exceed 50%. Training authorities could use these results to propose improvements in training programs for medical residents in Peru.

  6. Canadian Plastic Surgery Resident Work Hour Restrictions: Practices and Perceptions of Residents and Program Directors.

    PubMed

    McInnes, Colin W; Vorstenbosch, Joshua; Chard, Ryan; Logsetty, Sarvesh; Buchel, Edward W; Islur, Avinash

    2018-02-01

    The impact of resident work hour restrictions on training and patient care remains a highly controversial topic, and to date, there lacks a formal assessment as it pertains to Canadian plastic surgery residents. To characterize the work hour profile of Canadian plastic surgery residents and assess the perspectives of residents and program directors regarding work hour restrictions related to surgical competency, resident wellness, and patient safety. An anonymous online survey developed by the authors was sent to all Canadian plastic surgery residents and program directors. Basic summary statistics were calculated. Eighty (53%) residents and 10 (77%) program directors responded. Residents reported working an average of 73 hours in hospital per week with 8 call shifts per month and sleep 4.7 hours/night while on call. Most residents (88%) reported averaging 0 post-call days off per month and 61% will work post-call without any sleep. The majority want the option of working post-call (63%) and oppose an 80-hour weekly maximum (77%). Surgical and medical errors attributed to post-call fatigue were self-reported by 26% and 49% of residents, respectively. Residents and program directors expressed concern about the ability to master surgical skills without working post-call. The majority of respondents oppose duty hour restrictions. The reason is likely multifactorial, including the desire of residents to meet perceived expectations and to master their surgical skills while supervised. If duty hour restrictions are aggressively implemented, many respondents feel that an increased duration of training may be necessary.

  7. Does resident ranking during recruitment accurately predict subsequent performance as a surgical resident?

    PubMed

    Fryer, Jonathan P; Corcoran, Noreen; George, Brian; Wang, Ed; Darosa, Debra

    2012-01-01

    While the primary goal of ranking applicants for surgical residency training positions is to identify the candidates who will subsequently perform best as surgical residents, the effectiveness of the ranking process has not been adequately studied. We evaluated our general surgery resident recruitment process between 2001 and 2011 inclusive, to determine if our recruitment ranking parameters effectively predicted subsequent resident performance. We identified 3 candidate ranking parameters (United States Medical Licensing Examination [USMLE] Step 1 score, unadjusted ranking score [URS], and final adjusted ranking [FAR]), and 4 resident performance parameters (American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination [ABSITE] score, PGY1 resident evaluation grade [REG], overall REG, and independent faculty rating ranking [IFRR]), and assessed whether the former were predictive of the latter. Analyses utilized Spearman correlation coefficient. We found that the URS, which is based on objective and criterion based parameters, was a better predictor of subsequent performance than the FAR, which is a modification of the URS based on subsequent determinations of the resident selection committee. USMLE score was a reliable predictor of ABSITE scores only. However, when we compared our worst residence performances with the performances of the other residents in this evaluation, the data did not produce convincing evidence that poor resident performances could be reliably predicted by any of the recruitment ranking parameters. Finally, stratifying candidates based on their rank range did not effectively define a ranking cut-off beyond which resident performance would drop off. Based on these findings, we recommend surgery programs may be better served by utilizing a more structured resident ranking process and that subsequent adjustments to the rank list generated by this process should be undertaken with caution. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery

  8. Personal Therapy in Psychiatry Residency Training: A National Survey of Canadian Psychiatry Residents.

    PubMed

    Hadjipavlou, George; Halli, Priyanka; Hernandez, Carlos A Sierra; Ogrodniczuk, John S

    2016-02-01

    The authors collected nationally representative data on Canadian residents' experiences with and perspectives on personal psychotherapy in their psychiatric training. A 43-item questionnaire was distributed electronically to all current psychiatry residents in Canada (N = 839). Four hundred residents from every program across Canada returned the survey (response rate 47.7%). The prevalence of personal therapy at any time was 55.3%, with 42.8% receiving personal therapy during residency. Of residents who undertook personal psychotherapy, 59.3% engaged in weekly therapy, 74.1% received psychodynamic psychotherapy, and 81.5% participated in long-term therapy (>1 year). Personal growth, self-understanding, and professional development were the most common reasons for engaging in personal therapy; however, one-third of residents did so to alleviate symptoms of depression, anxiety, or other mental health concerns. Time was the most important factor impeding residents from personal therapy; only 8.8% found stigma to act as a barrier. The vast majority of residents rated their experience with personal therapy as having a positive or very positive impact on their personal life (84.8%) and overall development as psychiatrists (81.8%). For 64% of respondents, personal therapy had an important or very important role in psychiatry residency training. Residents who received personal therapy rated themselves as better able to understand what happens moment by moment during therapy sessions, detect and deal with patients' emotional reactions, and constructively use their personal reactions to patients. Interest in personal therapy remains strong among psychiatry trainees in Canada. Residents who engaged in psychotherapy endorsed greater confidence in psychotherapy and rated their psychotherapy skills more favorably than those who had never been in the patient role, supporting the view of personal therapy as an important adjunct to psychotherapy training during residency.

  9. Effect of the learning climate of residency programs on faculty's teaching performance as evaluated by residents.

    PubMed

    Lombarts, Kiki M J M H; Heineman, Maas Jan; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; Arah, Onyebuchi A

    2014-01-01

    To understand teaching performance of individual faculty, the climate in which residents' learning takes place, the learning climate, may be important. There is emerging evidence that specific climates do predict specific outcomes. Until now, the effect of learning climate on the performance of the individual faculty who actually do the teaching was unknown. THIS STUDY: (i) tested the hypothesis that a positive learning climate was associated with better teaching performance of individual faculty as evaluated by residents, and (ii) explored which dimensions of learning climate were associated with faculty's teaching performance. We conducted two cross-sectional questionnaire surveys amongst residents from 45 residency training programs and multiple specialties in 17 hospitals in the Netherlands. Residents evaluated the teaching performance of individual faculty using the robust System for Evaluating Teaching Qualities (SETQ) and evaluated the learning climate of residency programs using the Dutch Residency Educational Climate Test (D-RECT). The validated D-RECT questionnaire consisted of 11 subscales of learning climate. Main outcome measure was faculty's overall teaching (SETQ) score. We used multivariable adjusted linear mixed models to estimate the separate associations of overall learning climate and each of its subscales with faculty's teaching performance. In total 451 residents completed 3569 SETQ evaluations of 502 faculty. Residents also evaluated the learning climate of 45 residency programs in 17 hospitals in the Netherlands. Overall learning climate was positively associated with faculty's teaching performance (regression coefficient 0.54, 95% confidence interval: 0.37 to 0.71; P<0.001). Three out of 11 learning climate subscales were substantially associated with better teaching performance: 'coaching and assessment', 'work is adapted to residents' competence', and 'formal education'. Individual faculty's teaching performance evaluations are positively

  10. Orthopedic resident work-shift analysis: are we making the best use of resident work hours?

    PubMed

    Hamid, Kamran S; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Hsu, Eugene; Edgerton, Colston A; Hobson, David R; Lang, Jason E

    2014-01-01

    Surgery programs have been tasked to meet rising demands in patient surgical care while simultaneously providing adequate resident training in the midst of increasing resident work-hour restrictions. The purpose of this study was to quantify orthopedic surgery resident workflow and identify areas needing improved resident efficiency. We hypothesize that residents spend a disproportionate amount of time involved in activities that do not relate directly to patient care or maximize resident education. We observed 4 orthopedic surgery residents on the orthopedic consult service at a major tertiary care center for 72 consecutive hours (6 consecutive shifts). We collected minute-by-minute data using predefined work-task criteria: direct new patient contact, direct existing patient contact, communications with other providers, documentation/administrative time, transit time, and basic human needs. A seventh category comprised remaining less-productive work was termed as standby. In a 720-minute shift, residents spent on an average: 191 minutes (26.5%) performing documentation/administrative duties, 167.0 minutes (23.2%) in direct contact with new patient consults, 129.6 minutes (17.1%) in communication with other providers regarding patients, 116.2 (16.1%) minutes in standby, 63.7 minutes (8.8%) in transit, 32.6 minutes (4.5%) with existing patients, and 20 minutes (2.7%) attending to basic human needs. Residents performed an additional 130 minutes of administrative work off duty. Secondary analysis revealed residents were more likely to perform administrative work rather than directly interact with existing patients (p = 0.006) or attend to basic human needs (p = 0.003). Orthopedic surgery residents spend a large proportion of their time performing documentation/administrative-type work and their workday can be operationally optimized to minimize nonvalue-adding tasks. Formal workflow analysis may aid program directors in systematic process improvements to better align

  11. 1. July 1988 EAST (MAIN) ELEVATION, PROTECTION ASSISTANT'S RESIDENCE (BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. July 1988 EAST (MAIN) ELEVATION, PROTECTION ASSISTANT'S RESIDENCE (BUILDING 1092) - Glacier Ranger Station, Protection Assistant's Residence, Washington State Route 542, Glacier, Whatcom County, WA

  12. 42 CFR 413.343 - Resident assessment data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Prospective Payment for Skilled Nursing Facilities § 413.343 Resident assessment data. (a) Submission of resident assessment data...

  13. 42 CFR 413.343 - Resident assessment data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Prospective Payment for Skilled Nursing Facilities § 413.343 Resident assessment data. (a) Submission of resident assessment data...

  14. Evaluation of otolaryngology residency program websites.

    PubMed

    Svider, Peter F; Gupta, Amar; Johnson, Andrew P; Zuliani, Giancarlo; Shkoukani, Mahdi A; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Folbe, Adam J

    2014-10-01

    Prior to applying or interviewing, most prospective applicants turn to the Internet when evaluating residency programs, making maintenance of a comprehensive website critical. While certain "intangibles" such as reputation may not be communicated effectively online, residency websites are invaluable for conveying other aspects of a program. Prior analyses have reported that certain criteria such as research experience and didactics are important considerations for applicants. To evaluate the comprehensiveness of otolaryngology residency websites. Review of otolaryngology residency program websites. Websites of 99 civilian residency programs were searched for the presence of 23 criteria. Presence of 23 criteria for application process, incentives, instruction, research, clinical training, and other. Only 5 programs contained at least three-quarters of the criteria analyzed; on average programs reported less than 50% of information sought. Among the 99 residency program websites, a description of the following criteria was noted: comprehensive faculty listing (88%), didactics (80%), contact e-mail (77%), current residents (74%), description of facilities (70%), intern schedule (70%), research requirements (69%), otolaryngology rotation schedule (64%), other courses (61%), ERAS (Electronic Residency Application Service) link (55%), year-to-year responsibility progression (47%), call schedule (40%), active/past research projects (37%), area information (34%), message from the program director (33%) or chair (23%), selection criteria (30%), salary (directly on site) (23%), surgical statistics (18%), parking (9%), and meal allowance (7%). The mean (SD) percentage present of factors encompassing "clinical training" was 55% (23%), significantly higher than the mean (SD) percentage of factors covered under the "incentives" category (19% [11%]; P = .01). The proportion of overall criteria present on websites did not differ on organizing programs by region (range, 42

  15. The urology residency matching program in practice.

    PubMed

    Teichman, J M; Anderson, K D; Dorough, M M; Stein, C R; Optenberg, S A; Thompson, I M

    2000-06-01

    We evaluate behaviors and attitudes among resident applicants and program directors related to the American Urological Association (AUA) residency matching program and recommend changes to improve the match. Written questionnaires were mailed to 519 resident applicants and 112 program directors after the 1999 American Urological Association match. Subjects were asked about their observations, behaviors and opinions towards the match. Questionnaires were returned by 230 resident applicants and 94 program directors (44% and 83% response rates, respectively.) Of the resident applicants 75% spent $1,001 to $5,000 for interviewing. Of the program directors 47% recalled that applicants asked how programs would rank the applicant and 61% of applicants recalled that program directors asked applicants how they would rank programs. Dishonesty was acknowledged by 31% of program directors and 44% of resident applicants. Of program directors 82% thought applicants "lied", while 67% of applicants thought that programs "lied" (quotations indicate questionnaire language). Participants characterized their own dishonesty as "just playing the game" or they "did not feel badly." Of program directors 81% and of applicants 61% were "skeptical" or "did not believe" when informed they were a "high" or "number 1" selection. Being asked about marital status was recalled by 91% of male and 100% of female (p = 0. 02), if they had children by 53% of male and 67% of female, (p = 0. 03), and intent to have children by 25% of male and 62% of female (p <0.001), applicants, respectively. Free-form comments were written by 132 resident applicants and 28 program directors. The most frequent comments suggested the need to improve ethical behavior, modify the process so applications could be transmitted electronically and modify interviews to reduce applicant financial burden. Nine female applicants commented on their perceptions of sexual discrimination during the interviews. Resident applicants and

  16. Elective time during dermatology residency: A survey of residents and program directors.

    PubMed

    Uppal, Pushpinder; Shantharam, Rohini; Kaufmann, Tara Lynn

    2017-12-15

    Elective time during residency training provides residents with exposure to different subspecialties. This opportunity gives residents the chance tonurture growth in particular areas of interest and broaden their knowledge base in certain topics in dermatology by having the chance to work withexperts in the field. The purpose of this study was to assess the views of residency program directors and dermatology residents on the value of elective time through a cross sectional survey. An eight-questionIRB exempt survey was sent out to 113 residency program directors via email through the American Professors of Dermatology (APD) program director listserv. Program directors were asked to forward a separate set of 9 questions to their residents. The majority of programs that responded allowed for some elective time within their schedule, often duringthe PGY 4 (3rd year of dermatology training), but the amount of time allowed widely varied among many residency programs. Overall, residents and program directors agree that elective is important in residencytraining, but no standardization is established across programs.

  17. A preliminary report on resident emergency psychiatry training from a survey of psychiatry chief residents.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Jeffrey I; Dzara, Kristina; Mazhar, Mir Nadeem; Behere, Aniruddh

    2011-03-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements stipulate that psychiatry residents need to be educated in the area of emergency psychiatry. Existing research investigating the current state of this training is limited, and no research to date has assessed whether the ACGME Residency Review Committee requirements for psychiatry residency training are followed by psychiatry residency training programs. We administered, to chief resident attendees of a national leadership conference, a 24-item paper survey on the types and amount of emergency psychiatry training provided by their psychiatric residency training programs. Descriptive statistics were used in the analysis. Of 154 surveys distributed, 111 were returned (72% response rate). Nearly one-third of chief resident respondents indicated that more than 50% of their program's emergency psychiatry training was provided during on-call periods. A minority indicated that they were aware of the ACGME program requirements for emergency psychiatry training. While training in emergency psychiatry occurred in many programs through rotations-different from the on-call period-direct supervision was available during on-call training only about one-third of the time. The findings suggest that about one-third of psychiatry residency training programs do not adhere to the ACGME standards for emergency psychiatry training. Enhanced knowledge of the ACGME requirements may enhance psychiatry residents' understanding on how their programs are fulfilling the need for more emergency psychiatry training. Alternative settings to the on-call period for emergency psychiatry training are more likely to provide for direct supervision.

  18. Factors associated with general surgery residents' desire to leave residency programs: a multi-institutional study.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Edward; Galante, Joseph; Kaji, Amy H; Nguyen, Virginia; Nelson, M Timothy; Sidwell, Richard A; Hartranft, Thomas; Jarman, Benjamin; Melcher, Marc; Reeves, Mark; Reid, Christopher; Jacobsen, Garth R; Thompson, Jonathan; Are, Chandrakanth; Smith, Brian; Arnell, Tracey; Hines, Oscar J; de Virgilio, Christian

    2014-09-01

    General surgical residency continues to experience attrition. To date, work hour amendments have not changed the annual rate of attrition. To determine how often categorical general surgery residents seriously consider leaving residency. At 13 residency programs, an anonymous survey of 371 categorical general surgery residents and 10-year attrition rates for each program. Responses from those who seriously considered leaving surgical residency were compared with those who did not. Factors associated with the desire to leave residency. The survey response rate was 77.6%. Overall, 58.0% seriously considered leaving training. The most frequent reasons for wanting to leave were sleep deprivation on a specific rotation (50.0%), an undesirable future lifestyle (47.0%), and excessive work hours on a specific rotation (41.4%). Factors most often cited that kept residents from leaving were support from family or significant others (65.0%), support from other residents (63.5%), and perception of being better rested (58.9%). On univariate analysis, older age, female sex, postgraduate year, training in a university program, the presence of a faculty mentor, and lack of Alpha Omega Alpha status were associated with serious thoughts of leaving surgical residency. On multivariate analysis, only female sex was significantly associated with serious thoughts of leaving residency (odds ratio, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3; P = .003). Eighty-six respondents were from historically high-attrition programs, and 202 respondents were from historically low-attrition programs (27.8% vs 8.4% 10-year attrition rate, P = .04). Residents from high-attrition programs were more likely to seriously consider leaving residency (odds ratio, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.0-3.0; P = .03). A majority of categorical general surgery residents seriously consider leaving residency. Female residents are more likely to consider leaving. Thoughts of leaving seem to be associated with work conditions on specific rotations

  19. Career Interests of Canadian Psychiatry Residents: What Makes Residents Choose a Research Career?

    PubMed

    Laliberté, Vincent; Rapoport, Mark J; Andrew, Melissa; Davidson, Marla; Rej, Soham

    2016-02-01

    Training future clinician-researchers remains a challenge faced by Canadian psychiatry departments. Our objectives were to determine the prevalence of residents interested in pursuing research and other career options as part of their practice, and to identify the factors associated with interest in research. Data from a national online survey of 207 Canadian psychiatry residents from a total of 853 (24.3% response rate) were examined. The main outcome was interest in research as part of residents' future psychiatrist practice. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify demographic and vocational variables associated with research interest. Interest in research decreases by 76% between the first and fifth year of psychiatry residency (OR 0.76 per year, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.97). Training in a department with a residency research track did not correlate with increased research interest (χ2 = 0.007, df = 1, P = 0.93). Exposing and engaging psychiatry residents in research as early as possible in residency training appears key to promoting future research interest. Psychiatry residency programs and research tracks could consider emphasizing research training initiatives and protected research time early in residency. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Operative time and cost of resident surgical experience: effect of instituting an otolaryngology residency program.

    PubMed

    Pollei, Taylor R; Barrs, David M; Hinni, Michael L; Bansberg, Stephen F; Walter, Logan C

    2013-06-01

    Describe the procedure length difference between surgeries performed by an attending surgeon alone compared with the resident surgeon supervised by the same attending surgeon. Case series with chart review. Tertiary care center and residency program. Six common otolaryngologic procedures performed between August 1994 and May 2012 were divided into 2 cohorts: attending surgeon alone or resident surgeon. This division coincided with our July 2006 initiation of an otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residency program. Operative duration was compared between cohorts with confounding factors controlled. In addition, the direct result of increased surgical length on operating room cost was calculated and applied to departmental and published resident case log report data. Five of the 6 procedures evaluated showed a statistically significant increase in surgery length with resident involvement. Operative time increased 6.8 minutes for a cricopharyngeal myotomy (P = .0097), 11.3 minutes for a tonsillectomy (P < .0001), 27.4 minutes for a parotidectomy (P = .028), 38.3 minutes for a septoplasty (P < .0001), and 51 minutes for tympanomastoidectomy (P < .0021). Thyroidectomy showed no operative time difference. Cost of increased surgical time was calculated per surgery and ranged from $286 (cricopharyngeal myotomy) to $2142 (mastoidectomy). When applied to reported national case log averages for graduating residents, this resulted in a significant increase of direct training-related costs. Resident participation in the operating room results in increased surgical length and additional system cost. Although residency is a necessary part of surgical training, associated costs need to be acknowledged.

  1. Repeated Hospital Transfers and Associated Outcomes by Residency Time Among Nursing Home Residents in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsiu-Hsin; Tsai, Yun-Fang; Liu, Chia-Yih

    2016-11-01

    Nursing home residents' repeated transfers to hospital are costly and can lead to in-hospital complications and high mortality for frail residents. However, no research has examined the trajectory of residents' symptoms over their nursing home residency and its relationship to hospital transfer. The purpose of this retrospective chart-review study was to examine associations between nursing home residents' characteristics, including length of residency, and repeated hospital transfers as well as the trajectory of transfers during residency. For this retrospective study, we reviewed 583 residents' charts in 6 randomly selected nursing homes from northern Taiwan. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, chi-squared tests, and 1-way analysis of variance. About half of nursing home residents who had been transferred to hospital (n = 320) were transferred more than twice during their residency (50.97%). Residents who had been transferred 1, 2, 3, or ≥4 times differed significantly in length of residency (F = 3.85, P = .01), physical status (F = 2.65, P = .05), medical history of pneumonia (χ 2  = 13.03, P = .01), and fractures (χ 2  = 8.52, P = .04). Residents with different numbers of transfers differed significantly in their reasons for transfer, that is, falls (χ 2  = 13.01, P = .01) and tube problems (χ 2  = 8.87, P = .03). Among 705 total transfers, fever was the top reason for transfer, and transfer prevalence increased with nursing home residency. To decrease the chance of residents' hospital transfer, nursing home staff should be educated about recognizing and managing fever symptoms, infection-control programs such as influenza vaccination should be initiated, and fall-prevention/education programs should be started when residents first relocate to nursing homes. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neuroscience and humanistic psychiatry: a residency curriculum.

    PubMed

    Griffith, James L

    2014-04-01

    Psychiatry residencies with a commitment to humanism commonly prioritize training in psychotherapy, cultural psychiatry, mental health policy, promotion of human rights, and similar areas reliant upon dialogue and collaborative therapeutic relationships. The advent of neuroscience as a defining paradigm for psychiatry has challenged residencies with a humanistic focus due to common perceptions that it would entail constriction of psychiatric practice to diagnostic and psychopharmacology roles. The author describes a neuroscience curriculum that has taught psychopharmacology effectively, while also advancing effectiveness of language-based and relationship-based therapeutics. In 2000, the George Washington University psychiatry residency initiated a neuroscience curriculum consisting of (1) a foundational postgraduate year 2 seminar teaching cognitive and social neuroscience and its integration into clinical psychopharmacology, (2) advanced seminars that utilized a neuroscience perspective in teaching specific psychotherapeutic skill sets, and (3) case-based teaching in outpatient clinical supervisions that incorporated a neuroscience perspective into traditional psychotherapy supervisions. Curricular assessment was conducted by (1) RRC reaccreditation site visit feedback, (2) examining career trajectories of residency graduates, (3) comparing PRITE exam Somatic Treatments subscale scores for 2010-2012 residents with pre-implementation residents, and (4) postresidency survey assessment by 2010-2012 graduates. The 2011 RRC site visit report recommended a "notable practice" citation for "innovative neurosciences curriculum." Three of twenty 2010-2012 graduates entered neuroscience research fellowships, as compared to none before the new curriculum. PRITE Somatic Treatments subscale scores improved from the 23rd percentile to the 62nd percentile in pre- to post-implementation of curriculum (p < .001). Recent graduates rated effectiveness of clinical

  3. Applicants' choice of an ophthalmology residency program.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Salman J; Kwagyan, John; Jones, Leslie S

    2013-02-01

    To determine the factors most important to applicants when selecting an ophthalmology residency program. Cross-sectional survey. All 595 applicants who submitted a rank list to the Ophthalmology Residency Matching Program for the 2012 match. Participants anonymously completed a 25-item questionnaire after the submission of their rank lists. A multiple-choice format and ordinal scale were used to query applicants on demographics, career plans, and the importance of factors related to program characteristics. One question allowed a free text response to identify factors that caused the applicant to rank a program lower than other programs or not at all (i.e., "red flag"). Factors important to applicants when creating their rank lists. The response rate was 37% (218/595). The 3 most important factors affecting rank lists were resident-faculty relationships, clinical and surgical volume, and diversity of training. The fourth most important was the interview experience with faculty; poor interview experience was the most frequently cited "red flag." Age, gender, and marital status did not affect how applicants rated factors. Applicants planning a post-residency fellowship or an academic career placed greater importance on opportunities for resident research and a program's prestige (P<0.0001). Female and ethnic minority applicants placed greater importance on the diversity of faculty and residents by gender or ethnicity (P<0.0001). Applicants rated educational and interpersonal factors as more important than geographic factors when selecting an ophthalmology residency program. Future career plans and demographic factors influenced the rating of specific factors. The results of this study provide a useful resource to programs preparing for the match. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Forensic Pathology Education in Pathology Residency

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Wayne K.; Domen, Ronald E.

    2017-01-01

    Forensic pathology is a fundamental part of anatomic pathology training during pathology residency. However, the lack of information on forensic teaching suggests the highly variable nature of forensic education. A survey of pathology residency program directors was performed to determine key aspects of their respective forensic rotations and curriculum. A total of 38.3% of programs from across the country responded, and the survey results show 5.6% don’t require a forensic pathology rotation. In those that do, most forensic pathology rotations are 4 weeks long, are done at a medical examiner’s office, and require set prerequisites. A total of 21.1% of responding programs have residents who are not receiving documented evaluations for this rotation. While 39.6% of programs have a defined forensics curriculum, as many as 15% do not. Furthermore, nearly 43% of programs place no limit on counting forensic autopsies when applying for pathology board examinations. Our survey confirmed the inconsistent nature of forensic pathology training in resident education. Additionally, our curriculum was reorganized to create a more robust educational experience. A pre- and post-forensic lecture quiz and Resident In-Service Examination scores were analyzed to determine our curriculum’s impact and effectiveness. Analysis of our pre- and post-lecture quiz showed an improved overall average as well as an increase in Resident In-Service Examination scores, indicating improved general forensic pathology knowledge. Using this knowledge, along with changes in our curriculum, we generated a number of recommendations for improving forensic pathology education in pathology residency. PMID:28913415

  5. Texting preferences in a Paediatric residency.

    PubMed

    Draper, Lauren; Kuklinski, Cadence; Ladley, Amy; Adamson, Greg; Broom, Matthew

    2017-12-01

    Text messaging is ubiquitous among residents, but remains an underused educational tool. Though feasibility has been demonstrated, evidence of its ability to improve standardised test scores and provide insight on resident texting preferences is lacking. The authors set out to evaluate: (1) satisfaction with a hybrid question-and-answer (Q&A) texting format; and (2) pre-/post-paediatric in-training exam (ITE) performance. A prospective study with paediatrics and internal medicine-paediatrics residents. Residents were divided into subgroups: adolescent medicine (AM) and developmental medicine (DM). Messages were derived from ITE questions and sent Monday-Friday with a 20 per cent variance in messages specific to the sub-group. Residents completed surveys gauging perceptions of the programme, and pre- and post-programme ITE scores were analysed. Forty-one residents enrolled and 32 (78%) completed a post-programme survey. Of those, 21 (66%) preferred a Q&A format with an immediate text response versus information-only texts. The percentage change in ITE scores between 2013 and 2014 was significant. Comparing subgroups, there was no significant difference between the percentage change in ITE scores. Neither group performed significantly better on either the adolescent or developmental sections of the ITE. Text messaging… remains an underused educational tool CONCLUSIONS: Overall, participants improved their ITE scores, but no improvement was seen in the targeted subgroups on the exam. Although Q&A texts are preferred by residents, further assessment is required to assess the effect on educational outcomes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  6. Measuring Resident Physicians' Performance of Preventive Care

    PubMed Central

    Palonen, Katri P; Allison, Jeroan J; Heudebert, Gustavo R; Willett, Lisa L; Kiefe, Catarina I; Wall, Terry C; Houston, Thomas K

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has suggested various methods for evaluation of practice-based learning and improvement competency, but data on implementation of these methods are limited. OBJECTIVE To compare medical record review and patient surveys on evaluating physician performance in preventive services in an outpatient resident clinic. DESIGN Within an ongoing quality improvement project, we collected baseline performance data on preventive services provided for patients at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Internal Medicine Residents' ambulatory clinic. PARTICIPANTS Seventy internal medicine and medicine-pediatrics residents from the UAB Internal Medicine Residency program. MEASUREMENTS Resident- and clinic-level comparisons of aggregated patient survey and chart documentation rates of (1) screening for smoking status, (2) advising smokers to quit, (3) cholesterol screening, (4) mammography screening, and (5) pneumonia vaccination. RESULTS Six hundred and fifty-nine patient surveys and 761 charts were abstracted. At the clinic level, rates for screening of smoking status, recommending mammogram, and for cholesterol screening were similar (difference <5%) between the 2 methods. Higher rates for pneumonia vaccination (76% vs 67%) and advice to quit smoking (66% vs 52%) were seen on medical record review versus patient surveys. However, within-resident (N=70) comparison of 2 methods of estimating screening rates contained significant variability. The cost of medical record review was substantially higher ($107 vs $17/physician). CONCLUSIONS Medical record review and patient surveys provided similar rates for selected preventive health measures at the clinic level, with the exception of pneumonia vaccination and advising to quit smoking. A large variation among individual resident providers was noted. PMID:16499544

  7. Resident away rotations allow adaptive neurosurgical training.

    PubMed

    Gephart, Melanie Hayden; Derstine, Pamela; Oyesiku, Nelson M; Grady, M Sean; Burchiel, Kim; Batjer, H Hunt; Popp, A John; Barbaro, Nicholas M

    2015-04-01

    Subspecialization of physicians and regional centers concentrate the volume of certain rare cases into fewer hospitals. Consequently, the primary institution of a neurological surgery training program may not have sufficient case volume to meet the current Residency Review Committee case minimum requirements in some areas. To ensure the competency of graduating residents through a comprehensive neurosurgical education, programs may need for residents to travel to outside institutions for exposure to cases that are either less common or more regionally focused. We sought to evaluate off-site rotations to better understand the changing demographics and needs of resident education. This would also allow prospective monitoring of modifications to the neurosurgery training landscape. We completed a survey of neurosurgery program directors and query of data from the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education to characterize the current use of away rotations in neurosurgical education of residents. We found that 20% of programs have mandatory away rotations, most commonly for exposure to pediatric, functional, peripheral nerve, or trauma cases. Most of these rotations are done during postgraduate year 3 to 6, lasting 1 to 15 months. Twenty-six programs have 2 to 3 participating sites and 41 have 4 to 6 sites distinct from the host program. Programs frequently offset potential financial harm to residents rotating at a distant site by support of housing and transportation costs. As medical systems experience fluctuating treatment paradigms and demographics, over time, more residency programs may adapt to meet the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education case minimum requirements through the implementation of away rotations.

  8. The Importance of Research during Pharmacy Residency Training

    PubMed Central

    Stranges, Paul M.; Burke, John M.; Micek, Scott; Pitlick, Matthew K.; Wenger, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Practice-related projects and pharmacy practice research are requirements to complete postgraduate pharmacy residency programs. Many residents will complete residencies without fully developing the skills needed to perform research required for new clinical and academic positions. Many studies have quantified successes and identified characteristics that may be associated with successful resident publication. There are many benefits to gaining research and publication skills during residency training for the resident, preceptor/mentors, and the residency program. Published works have also suggested approaches than can be taken to improve research within a residency program. The aims of this article are to discuss the publication rates of resident research projects, suggest ways to improve residency research, review benefits of residency research, and briefly review research training alternatives. PMID:26594260

  9. Resident partnerships: an effective strategy for training in primary care.

    PubMed

    Adam, P; Williamson, H A; Zweig, S C; Delzell, J E

    1997-06-01

    To facilitate resident training in the ambulatory setting, a few family practice residency programs use a partnership system to train residents. Partnerships are pairs of residents from the same year that rotate together on inpatient services. We identified and characterized the advantages and disadvantages of partnership programs in family practice residencies. We conducted a national survey of family practice residencies, followed by phone interviews with residency directors of programs with partnerships. A total of 305 of 407 (75%) residencies responded; 10 programs fit our definition of partnership. Program directors were positive about resident partnerships. Benefits included improved outpatient continuity, enhanced medical communication skills, and emotional and intellectual support. Disadvantages were decreased inpatient exposure and difficulty coordinating residents' schedules. Directors were favorable about partnerships, which seem to be an underutilized technique to improve residency training.

  10. Protected Time for Research During Orthopaedic Residency Correlates with an Increased Number of Resident Publications.

    PubMed

    Williams, Benjamin R; Agel, Julie A; Van Heest, Ann E

    2017-07-05

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires orthopaedic residency programs to promote scholarship and research, which manifest differently among programs. We assess the impact of protected research time during orthopaedic residency on the number of resident publications. Rotation schedules and resident names were collected from 125 ACGME-accredited U.S. orthopaedic residency programs. Protected research time was classified as 1 of 3 types: (1) block time, (2) longitudinal time, or (3) no dedicated time. In April 2016, we searched residents in postgraduate year (PGY)-3 to PGY-5 on pubmed.gov to generate all orthopaedic publications with a PubMed identifier published during residency. Each publication's 2015 Thomson Reuters Journal Citation Reports 5-Year Journal Impact Factor and resident first authorship were noted. The number of PubMed identifiers for each program was summed and was divided by the number of residents in PGY-3 to PGY-5, giving a mean number of publications per resident. The relationship between output and program research time was compared using t tests and analysis of variance (ANOVA). A total of 1,690 residents were included, with an overall mean number (and standard deviation) of 1.2 ± 2.4 publications per resident. Eighty-seven programs reported block time, 14 programs reported longitudinal time, and 24 programs reported no time. There was a significant difference (p = 0.02) in the mean number of publications per resident when compared between programs with protected time (1.1 ± 1.2 publications) and programs with no protected time (0.6 ± 0.5 publication). One-way ANOVA demonstrated a significant mean difference across the 3 groups (p < 0.001), with longitudinal time correlating with significantly greater output at 1.9 ± 1.8 publications than block time at 1.0 ± 1.0 publication or no time at 0.6 ± 0.5 publication, a difference that persisted when adjusted to include only impact factors of >0 and exclude case

  11. Comparison of Male vs Female Resident Milestone Evaluations by Faculty During Emergency Medicine Residency Training

    PubMed Central

    Dayal, Arjun; O’Connor, Daniel M.; Qadri, Usama

    2017-01-01

    Importance Although implicit bias in medical training has long been suspected, it has been difficult to study using objective measures, and the influence of sex and gender in the evaluation of medical trainees is unknown. The emergency medicine (EM) milestones provide a standardized framework for longitudinal resident assessment, allowing for analysis of resident performance across all years and programs at a scope and level of detail never previously possible. Objective To compare faculty-observed training milestone attainment of male vs female residency training Design, Setting, and Participants This multicenter, longitudinal, retrospective cohort study took place at 8 community and academic EM training programs across the United States from July 1, 2013, to July 1, 2015, using a real-time, mobile-based, direct-observation evaluation tool. The study examined 33 456 direct-observation subcompetency evaluations of 359 EM residents by 285 faculty members. Main Outcomes and Measures Milestone attainment for male and female EM residents as observed by male and female faculty throughout residency and analyzed using multilevel mixed-effects linear regression modeling. Results A total of 33 456 direct-observation evaluations were collected from 359 EM residents (237 men [66.0%] and 122 women [34.0%]) by 285 faculty members (194 men [68.1%] and 91 women [31.9%]) during the study period. Female and male residents achieved similar milestone levels during the first year of residency. However, the rate of milestone attainment was 12.7% (0.07 levels per year) higher for male residents through all of residency (95% CI, 0.04-0.09). By graduation, men scored approximately 0.15 milestone levels higher than women, which is equivalent to 3 to 4 months of additional training, given that the average resident gains approximately 0.52 levels per year using our model (95% CI, 0.49-0.54). No statistically significant differences in scores were found based on faculty evaluator gender

  12. Pediatric residents' perspectives on reducing work hours and lengthening residency: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Mary Beth; Sectish, Theodore C; Elliott, Marc N; Klein, David; Landrigan, Christopher P; Bogart, Laura M; Amrock, Stephen; Burke, Ann; Chiang, Vincent W; Schuster, Mark A

    2012-07-01

    In 2011, the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education increased restrictions on resident duty-hours. Additional changes have been considered, including greater work-hours restrictions and lengthening residency. Program directors tend to oppose further restrictions; however, residents' views are unclear. We sought to determine whether residents support these proposals, and if so why. We surveyed US pediatric residents from a probability sample of 58 residency programs. We used multivariate logistic regression to determine predictors of support for (1) a 56-hour workweek and (2) the addition of 1 year to residency to achieve a 56-hour week. Fifty-seven percent of sampled residents participated (n = 1469). Forty-one percent of respondents supported a 56-hour week, with 28% neutral and 31% opposed. Twenty-three percent of all residents would be willing to lengthen training to reduce hours. The primary predictors of support for a 56-hour week were beliefs that it would improve education (odds ratio [OR] 8.6, P < .001) and quality of life (OR 8.7, P < .001); those who believed patient care would suffer were less likely to support it (OR 0.10, P < .001). Believing in benefits to education without decrement to patient care also predicted support for a 56-hour-week/4-year program. Pediatric residents who support further reductions in work-hours believe reductions have positive effects on patient care, education, and quality of life. Most would not lengthen training to reduce hours, but a minority prefers this schedule. If evidence mounts showing that reducing work-hours benefits education and patient care, pediatric residents' support for the additional year may grow.

  13. A survey of residency program directors in anesthesiology regarding mentorship of residents.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Laura Shank; Donnelly, Melanie J

    2016-09-01

    Mentorship of residents has been extensively studied within many academic specialties, but not anesthesia. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of formal mentorship programs among anesthesia residency programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in the United States by surveying residency directors. The secondary goals of the study are to describe the programs that exist and identify areas that residency directors think should be the focus of mentoring. Our survey was designed based on previous surveys administered to residency program directors from other specialties. After determination of exempt status by our institutional review board, the survey was administered via e-mail to program directors of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited anesthesiology residencies. Response rate was 34% (45/131). The sample consisted of mainly university-based programs (93%). Most (88%) had a mentorship program in place. There was little consistency between methods of forming faculty-resident mentor pairs. Most mentors (84%) and mentees (79%) did not evaluate their programs. Nearly all program directors agree that mentorship is an important tool for resident development (90.6%) and that it is important to have a mentor during training (90.6%). Program directors identified the areas of career planning, professionalism, and achieving a balance between personal, career, and family demands to be the most valuable subjects to address in a mentoring relationship. Anesthesiology is currently underrepresented in the trainee mentoring literature. There is significant support for mentorship during resident training; however, the low rates of training for faculty and minimal evaluation by residents and faculty raise the question as to the efficacy of the existing programs. There is a need for more investigation of anesthesia residents' goals and perceptions of mentorship, and a more detailed evaluation of

  14. Relationship between pharmacy residency examination rank and specialty choice for French pharmacy residency-admitted students

    PubMed Central

    Fardel, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the link between the rank at the national pharmacy residency examination and the choice of pharmacy specialty for hospital residency-admitted French pharmacy students. Methods: Examination ranks as well as the pharmacy residency specialty to which residency candidates are finally admitted were collected for all students (n=1948) having successfully passed the national French pharmacy residency examination over the period 2013-2016. Students were categorized by their pharmacy specialty for residency, i.e., “Medical Biology” (n=591), “Hospital Pharmacy” (n=1175) and “Pharmaceutical Innovation and Research” (n=182), and medians of examination ranks as well as limit ranks (the rank of the last admitted postulant) by specialty were compared. Results: Examination ranks for pharmacy residency-admitted students were found to significantly differ according to the nature of the specialty in which students were finally admitted. “Medical Biology” has the lowest examination ranks (and appears thus as the most selective specialty), followed by “Hospital Pharmacy” and ended by “Pharmaceutical Innovation and Research”, that has the highest examination ranks (and appears thus as the least selective specialty). Limit examination ranks were additionally shown to discriminate university hospitals in which residents were assigned. Conclusion: Specialty choice for hospital residency-admitted French pharmacy candidates is closely associated with their rank at the national pharmacy residency examination, which can be assumed as reflecting their academic level. By this way, an implicit hierarchy of French pharmacy residency specialties according to the academic level of postulants can likely be drawn. PMID:28503227

  15. Residency schedule, burnout and patient care among first-year residents.

    PubMed

    Block, Lauren; Wu, Albert W; Feldman, Leonard; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Desai, Sanjay V

    2013-09-01

    The 2011 US Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) mandates reaffirm the need to design residency schedules to augment patient safety and minimise resident fatigue. To evaluate which elements of the residency schedule were associated with resident burnout and fatigue and whether resident burnout and fatigue were associated with lower perceived quality of patient care. A cross-sectional survey of first-year medicine residents at three hospitals in May-June 2011 assessed residency schedule characteristics, including hours worked, adherence to 2003 work-hour regulations, burnout and fatigue, trainee-reported quality of care and medical errors. Response rate was 55/76 (72%). Forty-two of the 55 respondents (76%) met criteria for burnout and 28/55 (51%) for fatigue. After adjustment for age, gender and residency programme, an overnight call was associated with higher burnout and fatigue scores. Adherence to the 80 h working week, number of days off and leaving on time were not associated with burnout or fatigue. Residents with high burnout scores were more likely to report making errors due to excessive workload and fewer reported that the quality of care provided was satisfactory. Burnout and fatigue were prevalent among residents in this study and associated with undesirable personal and perceived patient-care outcomes. Being on a rotation with at least 24 h of overnight call was associated with higher burnout and fatigue scores, but adherence to the 2003 ACGME work-hour requirements, including the 80 h working week, leaving on time at the end of shifts and number of days off in the previous month, was not. Residency schedule redesign should include efforts to reduce characteristics that are associated with burnout and fatigue.

  16. "Phantom" publications among plastic surgery residency applicants.

    PubMed

    Chung, Christina K; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Lee, Gordon K

    2012-04-01

    Previous studies in other medical specialties have shown a significant percentage of publications represented in residency applications are not actually published. A comprehensive evaluation of applicants to plastic surgery residency over an extended period has not been previously reported in the literature. The purpose of our study was to determine the incidence of misrepresented or "phantom" publications in plastic surgery residency applicants and to identify possible predisposing characteristics. We used the Electronic Residency Application Services database to our plastic surgery residency program during a 4-year period from 2006 to 2009. Applicant demographic information and listed citations were extracted. Peer-reviewed journal article citations were verified using robust methods including PubMed, Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Knowledge, and Google. Unverifiable articles were categorized as phantom publications and then evaluated with respect to applicant demographic information and characteristics. During the 4-year study period, there were 804 applications (average, 201 applicants per year). There was a total of 4725 publications listed; of which, 1975 had been categorized as peer-reviewed journal articles. Two hundred seventy-six (14%) of peer-reviewed publications could not be verified and were categorized as phantom publications. There was an overall significant positive trend in percentage of phantom publications during the 4 application years (P = 0.005). A positive predictive factor for having phantom publications was being a foreign medical graduate (P = 0.02). A negative predictive factor for phantom publications was being a female applicant (P = 0.03). There also appeared to be a positive correlation with the number of publications listed and likelihood of phantom publications. Among plastic surgery residency applicants, we found a significant percentage of unverifiable publications. There are several possible explanations for

  17. Stress and burnout among Swiss dental residents.

    PubMed

    Divaris, Kimon; Lai, Caroline S; Polychronopoulou, Argy; Eliades, Theodore; Katsaros, Christos

    2012-01-01

    Stress and burnout have been well-documented in graduate medical and undergraduate dental education, but studies among dental graduate students and residents are sparse. The purpose of this investigation was to examine perceived stressors and three dimensions of burnout among dental residents enrolled in the University of Bern, Switzerland. Thirty-six residents enrolled in five specialty programmes were administered the Graduate Dental Environment Stress (GDES30) questionnaire and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). Individual stress items and overall GDES30 scores were used to quantify perceived stress. To measure burnout, proportions of burnout "cases" and MBI subscale scores were computed in the domains of emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP) and reduced personal accomplishment (PA). Analyses relied on descriptive and bi-variate methods. The mean GDES30 score was 2.1 (SD = 0.4). "Lack of leisure time", "meeting the research requirement of the programme" and "completing graduation requirements" emerged as the top three stressors. Thirty-six percent of respondents were burnout "cases" on the PA scale, while this proportion was 17% for EE and 8% for DP. Both stress and burnout levels increased according to year of study, whereas younger residents and females had consistently higher stress and burnout scores compared to older ones and males. Overall, low levels of perceived stress and burnout were found among this group of Swiss dental residents.

  18. Satisfaction and gender issues in otolaryngology residency.

    PubMed

    Wynn, Rhoda; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Lucente, Frank E

    2005-06-01

    To evaluate the otolaryngology residency experience with attention to operative experience, career guidance, and gender. Otolaryngology residents were anonymously surveyed by mail about their residency experience. The 22-item survey was scored on a 5-point ordinal Likert scale. Responses were analyzed with respect to gender and postgraduate year (PGY) level. Complete surveys were returned by 261 otolaryngology residents (24% female). PGY level correlated with confidence that surgical skills were appropriate (P = 0.003), establishment of solid career network (P = 0.003), and confidence that surgical abilities are adequate for practice (P = 0.028). Female residents reported less confidence that surgical skills were appropriate (P = 0.050) and that surgical abilities were adequate for postresidency practice (P = 0.035). Women were encouraged to enter private practice more often (P = 0.012), were less likely to have a solid career network ( P = 0.025), and were less confident about being able to run their own practice (P = 0.036) Significant differences exist for several questions regarding surgical confidence and career issues, even after correction for PGY level.

  19. Gout treatment: survey of Brazilian rheumatology residents.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Rodrigo Balbino Chaves; Vargas-Santos, Ana Beatriz; Pereira, Leticia Rocha; Coutinho, Evandro Silva Freire; da Rocha Castelar-Pinheiro, Geraldo

    2017-05-01

    To assess the current practices in gout management among Brazilian rheumatology residents. We performed a cross-sectional online survey among all the rheumatology residents and those rheumatologists who had just completed their training (post-residency (PR)) regarding their approach to gout management. Results were compared with the 2012 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) gout guidelines and with the responses of a previous survey with a representative sample of practicing Brazilian rheumatologists (RHE). We received 224 responses (83%) from 271 subjects. Among all respondents, the first-choice treatment for gout flares was the combination of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug + colchicine for otherwise healthy patients. A target serum urate <6 mg/dL for patients without tophi was reported by >75%. Less than 70% reported starting allopurinol at low doses (≤100 mg/day) for patients with normal renal function and <50% reported maintaining urate-lowering therapy indefinitely for patients without tophi. Among residents and PR, the residency stage was the main predictor of concordance with the ACR guidelines, with PR achieving the greatest rates. Reported practices were commonly concordant with the 2012 ACR gout guidelines, especially among PR. However, some important aspects of gout management need improvement. These results will guide the development of a physician education program to improve the management of gout patients in Brazil.

  20. Value of a regional family practice residency training program site: perceptions of residents, nurses, and physicians.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Sarah; Mullett, Jennifer; Beerman, Steve

    2014-09-01

    To examine the perceptions of residents, nurses, and physicians about the effect of a regional family practice residency site on the delivery of health services in the community, as well as on the community health care providers. Interviews and focus groups were conducted. Nanaimo, BC. A total of 16 residents, 15 nurses, and 20 physicians involved with the family practice residency training program at the Nanaimo site. A series of semistructured interviews and focus groups was conducted. Transcripts of interviews and focus groups were analyzed thematically by the research team. Overall, participants agreed that having a family practice residency training site in the community contributed to community life and to the delivery of health services in the following ways: increased community capacity and social capital; motivated positive relationships and attitudes in the hospital and community settings; improved communication and teamwork, as well as accessibility and understanding of the health care system; increased the standard of care; and facilitated the recruitment and retention of family physicians. This family practice residency training site was beneficial for the community it served. Future planning for distributed medical education sites should take into account the effects of these sites on the health care community and ensure that they continue to be positive influences. Further research in this area could focus on patients' perceptions of how residency programs affect their care, as well as on the effect of residency programs on wait times and workload for physicians and nurses. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  1. Teaching "Global Mental Health:" Psychiatry Residency Directors' Attitudes and Practices regarding International Opportunities for Psychiatry Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belkin, Gary S.; Yusim, Anna; Anbarasan, Deepti; Bernstein, Carol Ann

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors surveyed Psychiatry Residency Training Directors' (RTDs') attitudes about the role and feasibility of international rotations during residency training. Method: A 21-question survey was electronically distributed that explored RTDs' beliefs about the value, use, and availability of international clinical and research…

  2. What Do We Teach Psychiatric Residents about Suicide? A National Survey of Chief Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, Bengi B.; Coverdale, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Because of the clinical significance of patient suicide for trainees and current limited information on this essential educational subject, the authors sought to determine what topics involving the care of suicidal patients were taught to residents in psychiatry training programs. Methods: Chief residents of psychiatry training programs…

  3. Career Interests of Canadian Psychiatry Residents: What Makes Residents Choose a Research Career?

    PubMed Central

    Laliberté, Vincent; Rapoport, Mark J.; Andrew, Melissa; Davidson, Marla

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Training future clinician-researchers remains a challenge faced by Canadian psychiatry departments. Our objectives were to determine the prevalence of residents interested in pursuing research and other career options as part of their practice, and to identify the factors associated with interest in research. Method: Data from a national online survey of 207 Canadian psychiatry residents from a total of 853 (24.3% response rate) were examined. The main outcome was interest in research as part of residents’ future psychiatrist practice. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify demographic and vocational variables associated with research interest. Results: Interest in research decreases by 76% between the first and fifth year of psychiatry residency (OR 0.76 per year, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.97). Training in a department with a residency research track did not correlate with increased research interest (χ2 = 0.007, df = 1, P = 0.93). Conclusions: Exposing and engaging psychiatry residents in research as early as possible in residency training appears key to promoting future research interest. Psychiatry residency programs and research tracks could consider emphasizing research training initiatives and protected research time early in residency. PMID:27253699

  4. Resident-to-Resident Aggression in Nursing Homes: Results from a Qualitative Event Reconstruction Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillemer, Karl; Chen, Emily K.; Van Haitsma, Kimberly S.; Teresi, Jeanne; Ramirez, Mildred; Silver, Stephanie; Sukha, Gail; Lachs, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Despite its prevalence and negative consequences, research on elder abuse has rarely considered resident-to-resident aggression (RRA) in nursing homes. This study employed a qualitative event reconstruction methodology to identify the major forms of RRA that occur in nursing homes. Design and methods: Events of RRA were identified within…

  5. Factors influencing resident's decision to reside in gated and guarded community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsudin, Zarina; Shamsudin, Shafiza; Zainal, Rozlin

    2017-10-01

    Gated communities are residential areas developed with restricted access with strictly controlled entrances and surrounded by a close perimeter of wall or fences. Developers, conscious of the need to fulfill the requirement of living in modern and sophisticated lifestyle and gated properties become the trend and mushroomed over the past decade. Nowadays, it is obvious that gated and guarded communities become almost a dominant feature of Malaysia housing development projects. The focus of this paper is to identify the factors contribute resident's decision to reside in gated and guarded community and to study social interaction among gated communities' residents. 150 questionnaires were distributed to the residents of selected gated and guarded community area in order to achieve the objectives and analyzed by using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) and descriptive analysis. The result was tabulated and presented in charts and graphs for a clear and better understanding. The five main factors contribute to resident decision to reside in gated communities were identified and ranked; there are privacy, security, location, lifestyle and prestige. Besides, the residents are feeling neutral towards the facilities and services provided in their gated and guarded residential area. A comprehensive improvement towards the facilities and services is needed to reach higher satisfaction from the residents.

  6. Proposed model for interaction between residents and residency training programs, and pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Razack, S; Arbour, L; Hutcheon, R

    1999-03-01

    Medical residents in training are as much targets of pharmaceutical-industry marketing as are physicians in practice. This interaction is often subtle and takes the form of sponsorship of meals at academic events, support for conference travel, books, and items such as pens and notepads. Most residency programs direct little time towards training in ethics and the critical analysis of pharmaceutical-industry marketing. We propose a model for the relationship between residents and residency programs, and the pharmaceutical industry that addresses the need for such interaction to be viewed in light of the patient-centered ethic of professional conduct and the ideal of unbiased medical practice. A committee of residents at different levels of training and two staff physicians received the mandate to examine this issue. The committee developed a set of guidelines and a proposed schema for the handling of funds from pharmaceutical companies (still not implemented). Each residency program would develop a common fund for money donated by pharmaceutical companies. This fund would be administered by a committee with defined priorities. The presence of residents on this committee under staff preceptorship would serve as a springboard for education on the subject. Guidelines for acknowledgement of sponsorship, solicitation of funds, gifts for care of patients, ongoing education, and the wider applicability of these proposals were also developed. Residents' interaction with the pharmaceutical industry during training could have lifelong influence on medical practice. We hope that our model will promote critical appraisal of the potential risks and benefits of this interaction.

  7. Does Psychiatry Residency Training Reflect the "Real World" of Psychiatry Practice? A Survey of Residency Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Timothy; Fava, Maurizio; Alpert, Jonathan E.; Vorono, Sienna; Sanders, Kathy M.; Mischoulon, David

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors determine whether Massachusetts General Hospital's residency graduates believed their training reflected their current practice activities. Method: The authors surveyed 134 graduates from MGH and MGH-McLean residency classes from 1983 to 2003. Subjects ranked their satisfaction with different components of training on a…

  8. Residency selection process: description and annotated bibliography.

    PubMed Central

    Aaron, P R; Frye, T L

    1979-01-01

    Specialty and residency training choices of medical students will affect the quality, mode, and geographic location of their future practice; the importance of such choices should not be underestimated. Medical school librarians have largely ignored the opportunity to interact with both medical students and medical school officials in providing sources needed to assist these career decisions, and for the most part students and administrators have ignored the opportunity to utilize the medical library in this process. This article presents an overview of the processes and procedures in which third- and fourth-year medical students are involved in selecting specialty and residency training, and provides a detailed description of the resources which the medical student should consult in order to make thoughtful, informed career decisions. The article urges medical school advisers and medical librarians to work as partners in providing information on specialty and residency selection to medical students. PMID:385087

  9. A pediatric residency research requirement to improve collaborative resident and faculty publication productivity.

    PubMed

    Kurahara, David K; Kogachi, Kaitlin; Yamane, Maya; Ly, Catherine L; Foster, Jennifer H; Masaki-Tesoro, Traci; Murai, Daniel; Rudoy, Raul

    2012-08-01

    Involvement in a research project can teach training physicians about the scientific process involved in medicine. For this reason, the University of Hawai'i pediatrics department developed a Residency Research Requirement and Program (RRRP) in 2001. We studied a 14-year time period before and after the RRRP was initiated, and found a greater then ten-fold increase in resident publications and faculty involvement in these projects. Many of these manuscripts were the result of resident collaboration and this also increased significantly. The residents who later went into fellowship training were found to be more likely to publish their work. An RRRP encourages residents and faculty to become involved in research publications and other scholarly activities. Its development may help to motivate training physicians to learn important research skills.

  10. Conditions for exercising residents' voting rights in long-term care residences: a prospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Bosquet, Antoine; El Massioui, Farid; Mahé, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    To assess voting conditions in long-term care settings, we conducted a multicenter survey after the 2009 European elections in France. A questionnaire about voting procedures and European elections was proposed in 146 out of 884 randomized facilities. Sixty-four percent of facilities answered the questionnaire. Four percent of residents voted (national turnout: 40%), by proxy (58%) or at polling places (42%). Abstention related to procedural issues was reported in 32% of facilities. Sixty-seven percent of establishments had voting procedures, and 53% declared that they assessed residents' capacity to vote. Assistance was proposed to residents for voter registration, for proxy voting, and for voting at polling places, respectively, in 33%, 87%, and 80% of facilities. This survey suggests that residents may be disenfranchised and that more progress should be made to protect the voting rights of residents in long-term care facilities.

  11. Identifying inaccuracies on emergency medicine residency applications

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Eric D; Shockley, Lee; Kass, Lawrence; Howes, David; Tupesis, Janis P; Weaver, Christopher; Sayan, Osman R; Hogan, Victoria; Begue, Jason; Vrocher, Diamond; Frazer, Jackie; Evans, Timothy; Hern, Gene; Riviello, Ralph; Rivera, Antonio; Kinoshita, Keith; Ferguson, Edward

    2005-01-01

    Background Previous trials have showed a 10–30% rate of inaccuracies on applications to individual residency programs. No studies have attempted to corroborate this on a national level. Attempts by residency programs to diminish the frequency of inaccuracies on applications have not been reported. We seek to clarify the national incidence of inaccuracies on applications to emergency medicine residency programs. Methods This is a multi-center, single-blinded, randomized, cohort study of all applicants from LCME accredited schools to involved EM residency programs. Applications were randomly selected to investigate claims of AOA election, advanced degrees and publications. Errors were reported to applicants' deans and the NRMP. Results Nine residencies reviewed 493 applications (28.6% of all applicants who applied to any EM program). 56 applications (11.4%, 95%CI 8.6–14.2%) contained at least one error. Excluding "benign" errors, 9.8% (95% CI 7.2–12.4%), contained at least one error. 41% (95% CI 35.0–47.0%) of all publications contained an error. All AOA membership claims were verified, but 13.7% (95%CI 4.4–23.1%) of claimed advanced degrees were inaccurate. Inter-rater reliability of evaluations was good. Investigators were reluctant to notify applicants' dean's offices and the NRMP. Conclusion This is the largest study to date of accuracy on application for residency and the first such multi-centered trial. High rates of incorrect data were found on applications. This data will serve as a baseline for future years of the project, with emphasis on reporting inaccuracies and warning applicants of the project's goals. PMID:16105178

  12. Applicants’ Choice of an Ophthalmology Residency Program

    PubMed Central

    Yousuf, Salman J.; Kwagyan, John; Jones, Leslie S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the factors most important to applicants when selecting an ophthalmology residency program. Design Cross-sectional survey. Participants All 595 applicants who submitted a rank list to the Ophthalmology Residency Matching Program for the 2012 match. Methods Participants anonymously completed a 25-item questionnaire after the submission of their rank lists. A multiple-choice format and ordinal scale were used to query applicants on demographics, career plans, and the importance of factors related to program characteristics. One question allowed a free text response to identify factors that caused the applicant to rank a program lower than other programs or not at all (i.e., “red flag”). Main Outcome Measures Factors important to applicants when creating their rank lists. Results The response rate was 37% (218/595). The 3 most important factors affecting rank lists were resident–faculty relationships, clinical and surgical volume, and diversity of training. The fourth most important was the interview experience with faculty; poor interview experience was the most frequently cited “red flag.” Age, gender, and marital status did not affect how applicants rated factors. Applicants planning a post-residency fellowship or an academic career placed greater importance on opportunities for resident research and a program's prestige (P<0.0001). Female and ethnic minority applicants placed greater importance on the diversity of faculty and residents by gender or ethnicity (P<0.0001). Conclusions Applicants rated educational and interpersonal factors as more important than geographic factors when selecting an ophthalmology residency program. Future career plans and demographic factors influenced the rating of specific factors. The results of this study provide a useful resource to programs preparing for the match. PMID:23084123

  13. Adoption of information technology by resident physicians.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Selene G; Nazarian, David G; Lim, Charles K

    2004-04-01

    The Internet represents a technological revolution that is transforming our society. In the healthcare industry, physicians have been typified as slow adopters of information technology. However, young physicians, having been raised in a computer-prevalent society, may be more likely to embrace technology. We attempt to characterize the use and acceptance of the Internet and information technology among resident physicians in a large academic medical center and to assess concerns regarding privacy, security, and credibility of information on the Internet. A 41-question survey was distributed to 150 pediatric, medical, and surgical residents at an urban, academic medical center. One hundred thirty-five residents completed the survey (response rate of 90%). Responses were evaluated and statistical analysis was done. The majority of resident physicians in our survey have adopted the tools of information technology. Ninety-eight percent used the Internet and 96% use e-mail. Two-thirds of the respondents used the Internet for healthcare-related purposes and a similar percentage thought that the Internet has affected their practice of medicine positively. The majority of residents thought that Internet healthcare services such as electronic medical records, peer-support websites, and remote patient monitoring would be beneficial for the healthcare industry. However, they are concerned about the credibility, privacy, and security of health and medical information online. The majority of resident physicians in our institution use Internet and information technology in their practice of medicine. Most think that the Internet will continue to have a beneficial role in the healthcare industry.

  14. Publication misrepresentation among anesthesiology residency applicants.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Stephanie A; Long, Timothy R; Rose, Steven H

    2011-03-01

    Publication misrepresentation has been documented among applicants for residency positions in several specialties. However, these data are not available for anesthesiology applicants. Our purpose in this study was to document the prevalence of publication misrepresentation among applicants to a single anesthesiology residency, to compare anesthesiology publication misrepresentation data with similar data in other specialties, and to determine how often publication misrepresentation leads to an unfair competitive advantage in the application process. Applications to the Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education anesthesiology core residency in Rochester, Minnesota, were reviewed for publication misrepresentations using Medline and PubMed databases, Mayo Clinic library databases, and/or review by a qualified medical librarian. Misrepresented publications underwent further review to identify fraudulent publications and/or citation errors that provide an unfair competitive advantage. The authors found that 2.4% of the applications (13 of 532) included fraudulent publications, 6.6% of the applications with at least 1 publication (13 of 197) included ≥1 that was fraudulent, and 2.9% of all cited publications (15 of 522) were fraudulent. In addition, 0.9% of the applications (5 of 532) contained a citation error that, although not grossly fraudulent, could have favorably affected the applicant's competitiveness for a residency position. Misrepresented publications were fairly common among anesthesiology residency applicants. However, only a small percentage of applicants listed misrepresented publications that were clearly fraudulent or contained a citation error that conferred a competitive advantage. Identification of fraudulent publications on Electronic Residency Application Service applications is important to maintain the integrity of the application process.

  15. Nursing Effort and Quality of Care for Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arling, Greg; Kane, Robert L.; Mueller, Christine; Bershadsky, Julie; Degenholtz, Howard B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between nursing home staffing level, care received by individual residents, and resident quality-related care processes and functional outcomes. Design and Methods: Nurses recorded resident care time for 5,314 residents on 156 units in 105 facilities in four states (Colorado,…

  16. 28 CFR 115.278 - Disciplinary sanctions for residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-resident sexual abuse or following a criminal finding of guilt for resident-on-resident sexual abuse. (b... imposed. (d) If the facility offers therapy, counseling, or other interventions designed to address and... other benefits. (e) The agency may discipline a resident for sexual contact with staff only upon a...

  17. 28 CFR 115.278 - Disciplinary sanctions for residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-resident sexual abuse or following a criminal finding of guilt for resident-on-resident sexual abuse. (b... imposed. (d) If the facility offers therapy, counseling, or other interventions designed to address and... other benefits. (e) The agency may discipline a resident for sexual contact with staff only upon a...

  18. 28 CFR 115.278 - Disciplinary sanctions for residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-resident sexual abuse or following a criminal finding of guilt for resident-on-resident sexual abuse. (b... imposed. (d) If the facility offers therapy, counseling, or other interventions designed to address and... other benefits. (e) The agency may discipline a resident for sexual contact with staff only upon a...

  19. Student Residence Classification: Revision and Review of Regulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nussbaum, Tom; Close, Catherine

    This report proposes regulations for the implementation of California's Uniform Student Residency Act by the state's community colleges. First, background information is provided on three laws: (1) the Uniform Student Residency Act, which establishes rules for use in classifying college students as residents or non-residents; (2) legislation…

  20. 24 CFR 964.120 - Resident management corporation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resident management corporation... § 964.120 Resident management corporation requirements. A resident management corporation must consist... resident council, so long as each such council: (1) Approves the establishment of the corporation; and (2...

  1. 24 CFR 990.295 - Resident Management Corporation operating subsidy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Resident Management Corporation... Managed by Resident Management Corporations (RMCs) § 990.295 Resident Management Corporation operating subsidy. (a) General. This part applies to all projects managed by a Resident Management Corporation (RMC...

  2. 24 CFR 964.120 - Resident management corporation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resident management corporation... § 964.120 Resident management corporation requirements. A resident management corporation must consist... resident council, so long as each such council: (1) Approves the establishment of the corporation; and (2...

  3. 24 CFR 964.120 - Resident management corporation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Resident management corporation... § 964.120 Resident management corporation requirements. A resident management corporation must consist... resident council, so long as each such council: (1) Approves the establishment of the corporation; and (2...

  4. 24 CFR 990.295 - Resident Management Corporation operating subsidy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resident Management Corporation... Managed by Resident Management Corporations (RMCs) § 990.295 Resident Management Corporation operating subsidy. (a) General. This part applies to all projects managed by a Resident Management Corporation (RMC...

  5. 24 CFR 990.295 - Resident Management Corporation operating subsidy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resident Management Corporation... Managed by Resident Management Corporations (RMCs) § 990.295 Resident Management Corporation operating subsidy. (a) General. This part applies to all projects managed by a Resident Management Corporation (RMC...

  6. 24 CFR 964.120 - Resident management corporation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resident management corporation... § 964.120 Resident management corporation requirements. A resident management corporation must consist... resident council, so long as each such council: (1) Approves the establishment of the corporation; and (2...

  7. 24 CFR 964.120 - Resident management corporation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resident management corporation... § 964.120 Resident management corporation requirements. A resident management corporation must consist... resident council, so long as each such council: (1) Approves the establishment of the corporation; and (2...

  8. 24 CFR 990.295 - Resident Management Corporation operating subsidy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resident Management Corporation... Managed by Resident Management Corporations (RMCs) § 990.295 Resident Management Corporation operating subsidy. (a) General. This part applies to all projects managed by a Resident Management Corporation (RMC...

  9. 24 CFR 990.295 - Resident Management Corporation operating subsidy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resident Management Corporation... Managed by Resident Management Corporations (RMCs) § 990.295 Resident Management Corporation operating subsidy. (a) General. This part applies to all projects managed by a Resident Management Corporation (RMC...

  10. 24 CFR 963.10 - Eligible resident-owned businesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Eligible resident-owned businesses... URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING-CONTRACTING WITH RESIDENT-OWNED BUSINESSES Contracting With Resident-Owned Businesses § 963.10 Eligible resident-owned businesses. To be eligible for the alternative...

  11. 31 CFR 515.335 - Permanent resident alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Permanent resident alien. 515.335... Definitions § 515.335 Permanent resident alien. As used in § 515.208, the term permanent resident alien means an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence into the United States. [61 FR 37386, July 18...

  12. 31 CFR 515.335 - Permanent resident alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permanent resident alien. 515.335... Definitions § 515.335 Permanent resident alien. As used in § 515.208, the term permanent resident alien means an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence into the United States. [61 FR 37386, July 18...

  13. 22 CFR 42.22 - Returning resident aliens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Returning resident aliens. 42.22 Section 42.22... Returning resident aliens. (a) Requirements for returning resident status. An alien shall be classifiable as... presented that: (1) The alien had the status of an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence at the...

  14. 31 CFR 515.335 - Permanent resident alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permanent resident alien. 515.335... Definitions § 515.335 Permanent resident alien. As used in § 515.208, the term permanent resident alien means an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence into the United States. [61 FR 37386, July 18...

  15. 22 CFR 42.22 - Returning resident aliens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Returning resident aliens. 42.22 Section 42.22... Returning resident aliens. (a) Requirements for returning resident status. An alien shall be classifiable as... presented that: (1) The alien had the status of an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence at the...

  16. 22 CFR 42.22 - Returning resident aliens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Returning resident aliens. 42.22 Section 42.22... Returning resident aliens. (a) Requirements for returning resident status. An alien shall be classifiable as... presented that: (1) The alien had the status of an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence at the...

  17. 22 CFR 42.22 - Returning resident aliens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Returning resident aliens. 42.22 Section 42.22... Returning resident aliens. (a) Requirements for returning resident status. An alien shall be classifiable as... presented that: (1) The alien had the status of an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence at the...

  18. 22 CFR 42.22 - Returning resident aliens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Returning resident aliens. 42.22 Section 42.22... Returning resident aliens. (a) Requirements for returning resident status. An alien shall be classifiable as... presented that: (1) The alien had the status of an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence at the...

  19. 31 CFR 515.335 - Permanent resident alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Permanent resident alien. 515.335... Definitions § 515.335 Permanent resident alien. As used in § 515.208, the term permanent resident alien means an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence into the United States. [61 FR 37386, July 18...

  20. 31 CFR 515.335 - Permanent resident alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permanent resident alien. 515.335... Definitions § 515.335 Permanent resident alien. As used in § 515.208, the term permanent resident alien means an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence into the United States. [61 FR 37386, July 18...

  1. Financial Implications of Residency Programs for Sponsoring Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiberger, Michael H.

    1997-01-01

    Explores cost implications of residency programs within the Veterans Administration health care system, particularly the costs and benefits of residencies in family medicine, osteopathic medicine, and general dentistry, because they resemble optometric residencies most closely. Costs of an existing vision therapy residency are examined, and…

  2. 24 CFR 902.50 - Resident service and satisfaction assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resident service and satisfaction... URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING ASSESSMENT SYSTEM PHAS Indicator #4: Resident Service and Satisfaction § 902.50 Resident service and satisfaction assessment. (a) Objective. The objective of the Resident...

  3. Pediatric Oncology Branch - training- resident electives | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Resident Electives Select pediatric residents may be approved for a 4-week elective rotation at the Pediatric Oncology Branch. This rotation emphasizes the important connection between research and patient care in pediatric oncology. The resident is supervised directly by the Branch’s attending physician and clinical fellows. Residents attend daily in-patient and out-patient

  4. 24 CFR 964.225 - Resident management requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resident management requirements... Program § 964.225 Resident management requirements. The following requirements apply when a HA and its residents are interested in providing for resident performance of several management functions in one or...

  5. Advanced laparoscopic fellowship and general surgery residency can coexist without detracting from surgical resident operative experience.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Shanu N; Cogbill, Thomas H; O'Heron, Colette T; Mathiason, Michelle A

    2008-01-01

    Concern has been voiced that general surgery residents who train at institutions that also offer advanced laparoscopic fellowships may receive inadequate advanced laparoscopic operative experience. The purpose of our study was to compare the operative experience of general surgery residents who graduated from our institution before initiation of an advanced laparoscopic fellowship with the experience of those who graduated after the fellowship began. Operative case logs of surgery residents who graduated from 2000 through 2007 and of advanced laparoscopic fellows from 2004 through 2007 were reviewed. Surgery resident experience with basic and nonbariatric advanced laparoscopic cases during the 4 years before the fellowship was compared with the experience during the 4 years after the fellowship began. Residents who graduated before 2004 performed a mean of 140.5 +/- 19.4 basic and 77.0 +/- 17.8 advanced laparoscopic cases during their 5-year residency, compared with 193.3 +/- 34.5 basic (p = 0.003) and 113.3 +/- 23.5 advanced cases (p = 0.005) performed by those who graduated in 2004 or later. The number of nonbariatric advanced laparoscopic cases performed by each graduating surgical resident during the chief year ranged from 26 to 47 cases from 2000 to 2003 and from 36 to 69 cases from 2004 to 2007. Fellows reported from 40 to 85 nonbariatric advanced laparoscopic cases annually. General surgery residents did not experience a reduction in the total number of basic and nonbariatric advanced laparoscopic cases with the addition of an advanced laparoscopic fellowship, nor did they perform fewer cases during the chief year. As the result of a cooperative venture between the surgery residency and fellowship directors as well as an expansion of the total number of laparoscopic cases performed at our institution because of changes in clinical practice, surgery residents reported an increase in the number of laparoscopic cases while a successful fellowship was

  6. An Evidence-based, Longitudinal Curriculum for Resident Physician Wellness: The 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Jacob; Tango, Jennifer; Walker, Ian; Waranch, Chris; McKamie, Joshua; Poonja, Zafrina

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Physicians are at much higher risk for burnout, depression, and suicide than their non-medical peers. One of the working groups from the May 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit (RWCS) addressed this issue through the development of a longitudinal residency curriculum to address resident wellness and burnout. Methods A 30-person (27 residents, three attending physicians) Wellness Curriculum Development workgroup developed the curriculum in two phases. In the first phase, the workgroup worked asynchronously in the Wellness Think Tank – an online resident community – conducting a literature review to identify 10 core topics. In the second phase, the workgroup expanded to include residents outside the Wellness Think Tank at the live RWCS event to identify gaps in the curriculum. This resulted in an additional seven core topics. Results Seventeen foundational topics served as the framework for the longitudinal resident wellness curriculum. The curriculum includes a two-module introduction to wellness; a seven-module “Self-Care Series” focusing on the appropriate structure of wellness activities and everyday necessities that promote physician wellness; a two-module section on physician suicide and self-help; a four-module “Clinical Care Series” focusing on delivering bad news, navigating difficult patient encounters, dealing with difficult consultants and staff members, and debriefing traumatic events in the emergency department; wellness in the workplace; and dealing with medical errors and shame. Conclusion The resident wellness curriculum, derived from an evidence-based approach and input of residents from the Wellness Think Tank and the RWCS event, provides a guiding framework for residency programs in emergency medicine and potentially other specialties to improve physician wellness and promote a culture of wellness. PMID:29560063

  7. Trends in Urology Residents' Exposure to Operative Urotrauma: A Survey of Residency Program Directors.

    PubMed

    Parker, Daniel C; Kocher, Neil; Mydlo, Jack H; Simhan, Jay

    2016-01-01

    To determine longitudinal trends in resident exposure to urotrauma and to assess whether presence of Genitourinary Reconstructive Surgeon (GURS) faculty has impacted exposure and career choice. An identical, 31-question multiple-choice survey was sent to program directors of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited urology residency programs in 2006 and 2013. The areas of focus included program demographics, extent of urotrauma exposure, program director perceptions regarding educational value of urotrauma, and impact of GURS fellowship trained faculty. Responses were de-identified, compiled, and compared for differences. Response rates were 57% (64/112) and 43% (53/123) for the 2006 and 2013 survey, respectively (P = .03). Trauma Level 1 designation (56/64 [89%] vs 44/53 [88%], P = .84) and presence of GURS faculty (22/64 [34%] vs 22/53 [43%], P = .43) were similar between survey periods. Although survey respondents felt urotrauma volume had remained constant (34/64 [53%] vs 30/53 [56%], P = .71), more recent respondents reported that conservative management strategies negatively impacted resident exposure (14/64 [22%] vs 23/53 [43%], P = .01). Residencies with GURS faculty in 2013 (22/53, 42%) were positively associated with residents publishing urotrauma literature (9/22 [41%] vs 4/31 [13%], P = .02), the presence of multidisciplinary trauma and urology conferences (3/22 [14%] vs 0/31 [0%], P = .03), and residents matriculating to GURS fellowships (15/22 [68%] vs 10/31 [32%], P = .009). Many contemporary urology residencies report poor resident exposure to urotrauma during training. Although presence of GURS faculty may influence resident career choice, additional strategies may be warranted to expose residents to urotrauma during training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of a Short Video-Based Resident-as-Teacher Training Toolkit on Resident Teaching.

    PubMed

    Ricciotti, Hope A; Freret, Taylor S; Aluko, Ashley; McKeon, Bri Anne; Haviland, Miriam J; Newman, Lori R

    2017-10-01

    To pilot a short video-based resident-as-teacher training toolkit and assess its effect on resident teaching skills in clinical settings. A video-based resident-as-teacher training toolkit was previously developed by educational experts at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School. Residents were recruited from two academic hospitals, watched two videos from the toolkit ("Clinical Teaching Skills" and "Effective Clinical Supervision"), and completed an accompanying self-study guide. A novel assessment instrument for evaluating the effect of the toolkit on teaching was created through a modified Delphi process. Before and after the intervention, residents were observed leading a clinical teaching encounter and scored using the 15-item assessment instrument. The primary outcome of interest was the change in number of skills exhibited, which was assessed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Twenty-eight residents from two academic hospitals were enrolled, and 20 (71%) completed all phases of the study. More than one third of residents who volunteered to participate reported no prior formal teacher training. After completing two training modules, residents demonstrated a significant increase in the median number of teaching skills exhibited in a clinical teaching encounter, from 7.5 (interquartile range 6.5-9.5) to 10.0 (interquartile range 9.0-11.5; P<.001). Of the 15 teaching skills assessed, there were significant improvements in asking for the learner's perspective (P=.01), providing feedback (P=.005), and encouraging questions (P=.046). Using a resident-as-teacher video-based toolkit was associated with improvements in teaching skills in residents from multiple specialties.

  9. An Evidence-based, Longitudinal Curriculum for Resident Physician Wellness: The 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Jacob; Tango, Jennifer; Walker, Ian; Waranch, Chris; McKamie, Joshua; Poonja, Zafrina; Messman, Anne

    2018-03-01

    Physicians are at much higher risk for burnout, depression, and suicide than their non-medical peers. One of the working groups from the May 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit (RWCS) addressed this issue through the development of a longitudinal residency curriculum to address resident wellness and burnout. A 30-person (27 residents, three attending physicians) Wellness Curriculum Development workgroup developed the curriculum in two phases. In the first phase, the workgroup worked asynchronously in the Wellness Think Tank - an online resident community - conducting a literature review to identify 10 core topics. In the second phase, the workgroup expanded to include residents outside the Wellness Think Tank at the live RWCS event to identify gaps in the curriculum. This resulted in an additional seven core topics. Seventeen foundational topics served as the framework for the longitudinal resident wellness curriculum. The curriculum includes a two-module introduction to wellness; a seven-module "Self-Care Series" focusing on the appropriate structure of wellness activities and everyday necessities that promote physician wellness; a two-module section on physician suicide and self-help; a four-module "Clinical Care Series" focusing on delivering bad news, navigating difficult patient encounters, dealing with difficult consultants and staff members, and debriefing traumatic events in the emergency department; wellness in the workplace; and dealing with medical errors and shame. The resident wellness curriculum, derived from an evidence-based approach and input of residents from the Wellness Think Tank and the RWCS event, provides a guiding framework for residency programs in emergency medicine and potentially other specialties to improve physician wellness and promote a culture of wellness.

  10. Toward a Resident Personal Finance Curriculum: Quantifying Resident Financial Circumstances, Needs, and Interests.

    PubMed

    McKillip, Ryan; Ernst, Michael; Ahn, James; Tekian, Ara; Shappell, Eric

    2018-04-26

    Introduction Resident financial health has been linked to wellness and resiliency, yet financial literacy among residents is highly variable. While some medical school curricula include budgeting and student loan education, content on managing finances as a resident is usually lacking. We sought to quantitatively assess residents' financial circumstances, needs, and interests to inform the design of a resident personal finance curriculum. Methods Surveys were sent to residents in eight specialties at an academic medical center. Likert-type responses allowed respondents to rate their level of comfort (1 = Very Uncomfortable, 7 = Very Comfortable) and interest (1 = Very Uninterested, 7 = Very Interested) in various personal finance topics including budgeting, loan repayment, disability insurance, life insurance, home buying, and retirement planning. Details regarding financial circumstances, including assets, liabilities, and insurance, were also collected. Results of questions that utilized a Likert-type scale are reported as median (interquartile range). Results Of 346 residents surveyed, 144 (41.6%) responded. Residents were from Internal Medicine (56, 38.9%), Pediatrics (34, 23.6%), Emergency Medicine (18, 12.5%), and other specialties (36, 25.0%). Ninety-one (63.2%) reported educational loans, with an average balance of $191,730. Credit card balances exceeding $3,000 were reported by 11 (7.6%) respondents. One-hundred-two (70.1%) reported emergency savings, but only 65 (45.1%) reported having a retirement account (average balance $27,608). Respondents rated highest comfort levels with budgeting (5[4-6]), and lowest level of comfort with disability insurance (2[2-4]) and home buying (2[2-5]). Interest in learning each topic was high (6[5-7]), with retirement planning (6[5-7]), investing (6[5-7]), and home buying (6[5-7]) the topics of highest interest. Conclusion These results highlight the deficits in personal finance literacy among residents. Future work should

  11. General surgery residency program websites: usefulness and usability for resident applicants.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Eugene F; Leibrandt, Thomas J; Zonno, Alan J; Simpson, Mary Christina; Morris, Jon B

    2004-01-01

    To assess the content of general surgery residency program websites, the websites' potential as tools in resident recruitment, and their "usability." The homepages of general surgery residency programs were evaluated for accessibility, ease-of-use, adherence to established principles of website design, and content. Investigators completed a questionnaire on aspects of their online search, including number of mouse-clicks used, number of errors encountered, and number of returns to the residency homepage. The World Wide Web listings on the Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database (FREIDA) of the American Medical Association (AMA). A total of 251 ACGME-accredited general surgery residency programs. One hundred sixty-seven programs (67%) provided a viable link to the program's website. Evaluators found an average of 5.9 of 16 content items; 2 (1.2%) websites provided as many as 12 content items. Five of the 16 content items (program description, conference schedules, listing of faculty, caseload, and salary) were found on more than half of the sites. An average of 24 mouse-clicks was required to complete the questionnaire for each site. Forty-six sites (28%) generated at least 1 error during our search. The residency homepage was revisited an average of 5 times during each search. On average, programs adhered to 6 of the 10 design principles; only 6 (3.6%) sites adhered to all 10 design principles. Two of the 10 design principles (use of familiar fonts, absence of frames) were adhered to in more than half of the sites. Our overall success rate when searching residency websites was 38%. General surgery residency programs do not use the World Wide Web optimally, particularly for users who are potential residency candidates. The usability of these websites could be increased by providing relevant content, making that content easier to find, and adhering to established web design principles.

  12. Practice management education during surgical residency.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kory; Lebron, Ricardo A; Mangram, Alicia; Dunn, Ernest

    2008-12-01

    Surgical education has undergone radical changes in the past decade. The introductions of laparoscopic surgery and endovascular techniques have required program directors to alter surgical training. The 6 competencies are now in place. One issue that still needs to be addressed is the business aspect of surgical practice. Often residents complete their training with minimal or no knowledge on coding of charges or basic aspects on how to set up a practice. We present our program, which has been in place over the past 2 years and is designed to teach the residents practice management. The program begins with a series of 10 lectures given monthly beginning in August. Topics include an introduction to types of practices available, negotiating a contract, managed care, and marketing the practice. Both medical and surgical residents attend these conferences. In addition, the surgical residents meet monthly with the business office to discuss billing and coding issues. These are didactic sessions combined with in-house chart reviews of surgical coding. The third phase of the practice management plan has the coding team along with the program director attend the outpatient clinic to review in real time the evaluation and management coding of clinic visits. Resident evaluations were completed for each of the practice management lectures. The responses were recorded on a Likert scale. The scores ranged from 4.1 to 4.8 (average, 4.3). Highest scores were given to lectures concerning negotiating employee agreements, recruiting contracts, malpractice insurance, and risk management. The medical education department has tracked resident coding compliance over the past 2 years. Surgical coding compliance increased from 36% to 88% over a 12-month period. The program director who participated in the educational process increased his accuracy from 50% to 90% over the same time period. When residents finish their surgical training they need to be ready to enter the world of business

  13. Progression of emergency medicine resident productivity.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Daniel F; Silvestri, Salvatore; Sun, Joanne Y; Papa, Linda

    2007-09-01

    To evaluate the progression in productivity of emergency medicine (EM) residents by postgraduate year, as measured by hourly work in relative value units (RVUs). This retrospective study was conducted at an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited EM residency with a postgraduate year (PGY) 1-2-3 configuration. A query of an electronic billing database composed of more than 230,000 visits from academic years July 2003 to December 2006, representing at least four classes at each PGY level, was conducted. The main outcome was change in productivity in RVUs generated per hour, compared by resident PGY level. This measure encompasses not only volume of patients seen but also patient acuity in terms of evaluation and management services and procedures provided and supported by documentation adequate for coding. Descriptive statistics and Tukey's test were used for data analysis. Over the three-year study period, 70 EM residents were assessed at various levels of training. Productivity, as measured by mean RVUs generated per hour, was 2.51 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.20 to 2.82) for PGY-1 residents, 3.51 (95% CI = 3.12 to 3.90) for PGY-2 residents, and 3.61 (95% CI = 3.41 to 3.80) for PGY-3 residents (p < 0.001). Patient acuity (RVUs generated per patient) increased 5%-8% with each PGY progression: 3.05 (95% CI = 2.96 to 3.13) for PGY-1, 3.20 (95% CI = 3.09 to 3.31) for PGY-2, and 3.46 (95% CI = 3.42 to 3.50) for PGY-3 (p < 0.001). There was a statistically significant increase in productivity (p < 0.001) and acuity (p = 0.03) from PGY-1 to PGY-2, with acuity also increasing between PGY-2 and PGY-3 (p < 0.001). Hourly work productivity and acuity increased with experience within this ACGME-accredited EM residency. The progression in workload and acuity by PGY is measurable and commensurate with the graduated level of responsibility desired in an EM program.

  14. A new type of rural nurse residency.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Deana L; Monserud, Maria; Hudzinski, Dionetta

    2008-01-01

    The Rural Nurse Internship program is a distance education-based nurse residency designed to meet the needs of rural hospitals across the country. Nurses learn to perform the generalist role by practicing crisis assessment and management in six subnursing specialties. The collaborative yearlong residency provides preceptors, mentors, monthly seminars, and just-in-time information to novice nurses in their own hospitals using instructional technologies. Expert rural nurses teach novice employees using a standardized curriculum. Hospitals individualize the program to meet employee and hospital needs.

  15. Association of Time to Attrition in Surgical Residency With Individual Resident and Programmatic Factors.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Heather L; Abelson, Jonathan S; Symer, Matthew M; Mao, Jialin; Michelassi, Fabrizio; Bell, Richard; Sedrakyan, Art; Sosa, Julie A

    2018-02-21

    Attrition in general surgery residency remains high, and attrition that occurs in the later years is the most worrisome. Although several studies have retrospectively investigated the timing of attrition, no study to date has prospectively evaluated a national cohort of residents to understand which residents are at risk for attrition and at what point during residency. To prospectively evaluate individual resident and programmatic factors associated with the timing of attrition during general surgery residency. This longitudinal, national cohort study administered a survey to all categorical general surgery interns from the class of 2007-2008 during their first 30 days of residency and linked the data with 9-year follow-up data assessing program completion. Data were collected from June 1, 2007, through June 30, 2016. Kaplan-Meier curves evaluating time to attrition during the 9 years after the start of residency. Among our sample of 836 residents (306 women [36.6%] and 528 men [63.2%]; gender unknown in 2), cumulative survival analysis demonstrated overall attrition for the cohort of 20.8% (n = 164). Attrition was highest in the first postgraduate year (67.6% [n = 111]; absolute rate, 13.3%) but continued during the next 6 years, albeit at a lower rate. Beginning in the first year, survival analysis demonstrated higher attrition among Hispanic compared with non-Hispanic residents (21.1% vs 12.4%; P = .04) and at military programs compared with academic or community programs after year 1 (32.3% vs 11.0% or 13.5%; P = .01). Beginning in year 4 of residency, higher attrition was encountered among women compared with men (23.3% vs 17.4%; P = .05); at year 5, at large compared with small programs (26.0% vs 18.4%; P = .04). Race and program location were not associated with attrition. Although attrition was highest during the internship year, late attrition persists, particularly among women and among residents in large programs. These results

  16. Creating objective and measurable postgraduate year 1 residency graduation requirements.

    PubMed

    Starosta, Kaitlin; Davis, Susan L; Kenney, Rachel M; Peters, Michael; To, Long; Kalus, James S

    2017-03-15

    The process of developing objective and measurable postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) residency graduation requirements and a progress tracking system is described. The PGY1 residency accreditation standard requires that programs establish criteria that must be met by residents for successful completion of the program (i.e., graduation requirements), which should presumably be aligned with helping residents to achieve the purpose of residency training. In addition, programs must track a resident's progress toward fulfillment of residency goals and objectives. Defining graduation requirements and establishing the process for tracking residents' progress are left up to the discretion of the residency program. To help standardize resident performance assessments, leaders of an academic medical center-based PGY1 residency program developed graduation requirement criteria that are objective, measurable, and linked back to residency goals and objectives. A system for tracking resident progress relative to quarterly progress targets was instituted. Leaders also developed a focused, on-the-spot skills assessment termed "the Thunderdome," which was designed for objective evaluation of direct patient care skills. Quarterly data on residents' progress are used to update and customize each resident's training plan. Implementation of this system allowed seamless linkage of the training plan, the progress tracking system, and the specified graduation requirement criteria. PGY1 residency requirements that are objective, that are measurable, and that attempt to identify what skills the resident must demonstrate in order to graduate from the program were developed for use in our residency program. A system for tracking the residents' progress by comparing residents' performance to predetermined quarterly benchmarks was developed. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 42 CFR 488.335 - Action on complaints of resident neglect and abuse, and misappropriation of resident property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Action on complaints of resident neglect and abuse... on complaints of resident neglect and abuse, and misappropriation of resident property. (a) Investigation. (1) The State must review all allegations of resident neglect and abuse, and misappropriation of...

  18. Is past academic productivity predictive of radiology resident academic productivity?

    PubMed

    Patterson, Stephanie K; Fitzgerald, James T; Boyse, Tedric D; Cohan, Richard H

    2002-02-01

    The authors performed this study to determine whether academic productivity in college and medical school is predictive of the number of publications produced during radiology residency. The authors reviewed the records of 73 radiology residents who completed their residency from 1990 to 2000. Academic productivity during college, medical school, and radiology residency, other postgraduate degrees, and past careers other than radiology were tabulated. The personal essay attached to the residency application was reviewed for any stated academic interest. Residents were classified as being either previously productive or previously unproductive. Publication rates during residency and immediately after residency were compared for the two groups. For the productive residents, a correlation analysis was used to examine the relationship between past frequency of publication and type of previous activity. Least-squares regression analysis was used to investigate the relationship between preresidency academic productivity, advanced degrees, stated interest in academics, and other careers and radiology residency publications. There was no statistically significant difference in the number of articles published by those residents who were active and those who were not active before residency (P = .21). Only authorship of papers as an undergraduate was weakly predictive of residency publication. These selected measures of academic productivity as an undergraduate and during medical school are not helpful for predicting publication during residency. There was no difference in publication potential between those residents who were academically productive in the past and those who were not.

  19. It depends on your perspective: Resident satisfaction with operative experience.

    PubMed

    Perone, Jennifer A; Fankhauser, Grant T; Adhikari, Deepak; Mehta, Hemalkumar B; Woods, Majka B; Tyler, Douglas S; Brown, Kimberly M

    2017-02-01

    Resident satisfaction is a key performance metric for surgery programs; we studied factors influencing resident satisfaction in operative cases, and the concordance of faculty and resident perceptions on these factors. Resident and faculty were separately queried on satisfaction immediately following operative cases. Statistical significance of the associations between resident and faculty satisfaction and case-related factors were tested by Chi-square or Fisher's exact test. Residents and faculty were very satisfied in 56/87 (64%) and 36/87 (41%) of cases respectively. Resident satisfaction was associated with their perceived role as surgeon (p < 0.04), performing >50% of the case (p < 0.01), autonomy (p < 0.03), and PGY year 4-5(p < 0.02). Faculty taking over the case was associated with both resident and faculty dissatisfaction. Faculty satisfaction was associated with resident preparation (p < 0.01), faculty perception of resident autonomy (p < 0.01), and faculty familiarity with resident's skills (p < 0.01). Resident and faculty satisfaction are associated with the resident's competent performance of the case, suggesting interventions to optimize resident preparation for a case or faculty's ability to facilitate resident autonomy will improve satisfaction with OR experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Development and implementation of a residency project advisory board.

    PubMed

    Dagam, Julie K; Iglar, Arlene; Kindsfater, Julie; Loeb, Al; Smith, Chad; Spexarth, Frank; Brierton, Dennis; Woller, Thomas

    2017-06-15

    The development and implementation of a residency project advisory board (RPAB) to manage multiple pharmacy residents' yearlong projects across several residency programs are described. Preceptor and resident feedback during our annual residency program review and strategic planning sessions suggested the implementation of a more-coordinated approach to the identification, selection, and oversight of all components of the residency project process. A panel of 7 department leaders actively engaged in residency training and performance improvement was formed to evaluate the residency project process and provide recommendations for change. These 7 individuals would eventually constitute the RPAB. The primary objective of the RPAB at Aurora Health Care is to provide oversight and a structured framework for the selection and execution of multiple residents' yearlong projects across all residency programs within our organization. Key roles of the RPAB include developing expectations, coordinating residency project ideas, and providing oversight and feedback. The development and implementation of the RPAB resulted in a significant overhaul of our entire yearlong resident project process. Trends toward success were realized after the first year of implementation, including consistent expectations, increased clarity and engagement in resident project ideas, and more projects meeting anticipated endpoints. The development and implementation of an RPAB have provided a framework to optimize the organization, progression, and outcomes of multiple pharmacy resident yearlong projects in all residency programs across our pharmacy enterprise. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Facebook Use between College Resident Advisors' and Their Residents: A Mixed Methods Approach.

    PubMed

    Kacvinsky, Lauren E; Moreno, Megan A

    2014-01-01

    Facebook use is nearly ubiquitous among college students. Studies have shown links between Facebook displays of depression or problem drinking and risk of these problems. This project aimed to determine whether Facebook could be used to help Resident Advisors (RAs) identify college students at risk for depression or problem drinking. Interviews were conducted with college freshmen to investigate whether they were Facebook "friends" with their RA. Focus groups were conducted with RAs to determine their views on Facebook friending their dormitory residents and using Facebook to help identify at-risk students. 72 freshmen were interviewed and 25 RAs participated in focus groups; both agreed it is common for RAs and residents to be Facebook friends. RAs commonly noted references to depression and problem drinking on residents' Facebook pages, which often led to in-person discussions with the resident. This study provides support that RAs use Facebook to identify issues that may impact their student residents. RAs emphasized benefits of in-person interactions in order to provide support and obtain additional details about the situation. Universities could consider whether providing RA education about Facebook interactions with residents merits encouragement within their existing RA training programs.

  2. Changes in Personal Relationships During Residency and Their Effects on Resident Wellness: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Michelle; Wu, Diana; Veinot, Paula; Mylopoulos, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Residency poses challenges for residents’ personal relationships. Research suggests residents rely on family and friends for support during their training. The authors explored the impact of residency demands on residents’ personal relationships and the effects changes in those relationships could have on their wellness. Method The authors used a constructivist grounded theory approach. In 2012–2014, they conducted semistructured interviews with a purposive and theoretical sample of 16 Canadian residents from various specialties and training levels. Data analysis occurred concurrently with data collection, allowing authors to use a constant comparative approach to explore emergent themes. Transcripts were coded; codes were organized into categories and then themes to develop a substantive theory. Results Residents perceived their relationships to be influenced by their evolving professional identity: Although personal relationships were important, being a doctor superseded them. Participants suggested they were forced to adapt their personal relationships, which resulted in the evolution of a hierarchy of relationships that was reinforced by the work–life imbalance imposed by their training. This poor work–life balance seemed to result in relationship issues and diminish residents’ wellness. Participants applied coping mechanisms to manage the conflict arising from the adaptation and protect their relationships. To minimize the effects of identity dissonance, some gravitated toward relationships with others who shared their professional identity or sought social comparison as affirmation. Conclusions Erosion of personal relationships could affect resident wellness and lead to burnout. Educators must consider how educational programs impact relationships and the subsequent effects on resident wellness. PMID:28445221

  3. Automated medical resident rotation and shift scheduling to ensure quality resident education and patient care.

    PubMed

    Smalley, Hannah K; Keskinocak, Pinar

    2016-03-01

    At academic teaching hospitals around the country, the majority of clinical care is provided by resident physicians. During their training, medical residents often rotate through various hospitals and/or medical services to maximize their education. Depending on the size of the training program, manually constructing such a rotation schedule can be cumbersome and time consuming. Further, rules governing allowable duty hours for residents have grown more restrictive in recent years (ACGME 2011), making day-to-day shift scheduling of residents more difficult (Connors et al., J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 137:710-713, 2009; McCoy et al., May Clin Proc 86(3):192, 2011; Willis et al., J Surg Edu 66(4):216-221, 2009). These rules limit lengths of duty periods, allowable duty hours in a week, and rest periods, to name a few. In this paper, we present two integer programming models (IPs) with the goals of (1) creating feasible assignments of residents to rotations over a one-year period, and (2) constructing night and weekend call-shift schedules for the individual rotations. These models capture various duty-hour rules and constraints, provide the ability to test multiple what-if scenarios, and largely automate the process of schedule generation, solving these scheduling problems more effectively and efficiently compared to manual methods. Applying our models on data from a surgical residency program, we highlight the infeasibilities created by increased duty-hour restrictions placed on residents in conjunction with current scheduling paradigms.

  4. Reproductive Psychiatry Residency Training: A Survey of Psychiatric Residency Program Directors.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Lauren M; MacLean, Joanna V; Barzilay, Erin Murphy; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Miller, Laura; Yang, Sarah Nagle

    2018-04-01

    The reproductive life cycle has unique influences on the phenotypic expression of mental illness in women. Didactic and clinical training focused on these sex-specific influences should be a vital component of the education of future psychiatrists. The authors sought to determine the current state of and attitudes toward reproductive psychiatry in resident education. The authors administered a web-based survey to psychiatry residency training directors. They assessed the availability of both mandated and optional didactic and clinical training experiences in reproductive psychiatry. Fifty residency program directors answered the survey, for a response rate of 28%. More than half of residency program directors (59%) reported requiring some training in reproductive psychiatry. Both the breadth and depth of topics covered varied greatly among programs. Lack of time (48%) and lack of qualified faculty (26%) were the most frequently cited barriers to more training. Only 40% of residency directors surveyed agreed that all residents should be competent in reproductive psychiatry. These findings suggest that specific training in reproductive psychiatry is inconsistent in US residency programs, and that training that does exist varies considerably in clinical time and content. Given that women comprise more than 50% of all psychiatric patients and most women will menstruate, give birth, and undergo menopause, future psychiatrists would benefit from more systematic instruction in this area. The authors propose the development of a national, standardized reproductive psychiatry curriculum to address this gap and aid in producing psychiatrists competent to treat women at all stages of life.

  5. Resident Wellness Matters: Optimizing Resident Education and Wellness Through the Learning Environment.

    PubMed

    Jennings, M L; Slavin, Stuart J

    2015-09-01

    The problem of poor mental health in residency is well established. Burnout, depression, and suicidal ideation are prevalent among resident physicians, and these problems appear to persist into practice. Leaders in graduate medical education such as policy makers at the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and directors of individual programs and institutions should acknowledge these important issues and take steps to address them. The ACGME's Clinical Learning Environment Review (CLER) Program currently outlines an expectation that institutions both educate residents about burnout and measure burnout annually. The CLER Program could go further by expecting institutions to create quality initiatives to enhance resident wellness and increase resident engagement. The ACGME should also call for and support research in this area. Leaders or directors of individual programs and institutions should consider wellness initiatives that both (1) identify and address suboptimal aspects of the learning environment and (2) train residents in resilience skills. Efforts to improve the residency learning environment could be guided by the work of Maslach and Leiter, who describe six categories of work stress that can contribute to burnout: (1) workload, (2) control, (3) balance between effort and reward, (4) community, (5) fairness, and (6) values.

  6. Internal medicine residents' clinical and didactic experiences after work hour regulation: a survey of chief residents.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Leora I; Krumholz, Harlan M; Huot, Stephen J; Green, Michael L

    2006-09-01

    Work hour regulations for house staff were intended in part to improve resident clinical and educational performance. To characterize the effect of work hour regulation on internal medicine resident inpatient clinical experience and didactic education. Cross-sectional mail survey. Chief residents at all accredited U.S. internal medicine residency programs outside New York. The response rate was 62% (202/324). Most programs (72%) reported no change in average patient load per intern after work hour regulation. Many programs (48%) redistributed house staff admissions through the call cycle. The number of admissions per intern on long call (the day interns have the most admitting responsibility) decreased in 31% of programs, and the number of admissions on other days increased in 21% of programs. Residents on outpatient rotations were given new ward responsibilities in 36% of programs. Third-year resident ward and float time increased in 34% of programs, while third-year elective time decreased in 22% of programs. The mean weekly hours allotted to educational activities did not change significantly (12.7 vs 12.4, P = .12), but 56% of programs reported a decrease in intern attendance at educational activities. In response to work hour regulation, many internal medicine programs redistributed rather than reduced residents' inpatient clinical experience. Hours allotted to educational activities did not change; however, most programs saw a decrease in intern attendance at conferences, and many reduced third-year elective time.

  7. Analysis of PGY-1 Pharmacy Resident Candidate Letters of Recommendation at an Academically Affiliated Residency Program.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Milena M; Masic, Dalila; Gettig, Jacob P

    2018-04-01

    Letters of recommendation (LORs) are a critical component for differentiating among similarly qualified pharmacy residency candidates. These letters contain information that is difficult to ascertain from curricula vitae and pharmacy school transcripts. LOR writers may use any words or phrases appropriate for each candidate as there is no set framework for LORs. The objective of this study was to characterize descriptive themes in postgraduate year 1 (PGY-1) pharmacy residency candidates' LORs and to examine which themes of PGY-1 pharmacy residency candidates' LORs are predictive of an interview invitation at an academically affiliated residency program. LORs for candidates from the Pharmacy Online Residency Centralized Application System (PhORCAS) from 2013 and 2014 for the Midwestern University PGY-1 Pharmacy Residency were analyzed. LOR characteristics and descriptive themes were collected. All scores for candidate characteristics and overall PhORCAS recommendation were also recorded. A total of 351 LORs for 111 candidates from 2013 (n = 47 candidates) and 2014 (n = 64 candidates) were analyzed; 36 (32.4%) total candidates were offered an interview. Themes that were identified as predictors of an interview included a higher median (interquartile range) number of standout words (3 words [1.3-4] vs 3.8 words [2.5-5.5], P < .01) and teaching references (3.7 words [2.7-6] vs 5.7 words [3.7-7.8], P = .01). For this residency program, standout words and teaching references were important when offering interviews.

  8. Protected Resident Research Time Does Not Increase the Quantity or Quality of Residency Program Research Publications: A Comparison of 3 Orthopedic Residencies.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Chad A; Hoffman, Jeffery D; Balazs, George C; Johnson, Anthony E; Potter, Benjamin K; Belmont, Philip J

    The effect of dedicated resident research time in terms of residency program research productivity remains largely unknown. We hypothesize that the quantity and quality of a residency program's peer-reviewed publications (PRPs) increase proportionately with the amount of dedicated research time given to residents. Three residency programs (P1, P2, and P3) were examined. P1 has a mandatory research year for all residents between postgraduate years 3 and 4. P2 has an elective research year for 1 resident between postgraduate years 2 and 3. P3 has no dedicated research time for residents. All publications produced by residents and staff at each program from January 2007 through December were recorded from PUBMED. SCImago Journal Rankings were used as a proxy to measure research quality. There was no significant difference in the number of publications produced between the institutions on a per-staff (p = 0.27) and per-resident (p = 0.80) basis. There were no residents at P3 who graduated without at least 1 PRP, whereas there were 7 residents from P1 and 8 residents from P2 who graduated without a PRP. There were no significant differences between programs in terms of the SCImago Journal Ranking for the journals containing their publications (p = 0.135). Residency programs with dedicated research time did not produce significantly (p > 0.05) more, or higher quality, PRPs than residencies without dedicated research time. It may be that the quantity and quality of PRPs is related more to faculty engagement, research interest, and mentorship at individual programs rather than the number of residents given dedicated time to complete research. Level 3. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Results of the 2005-2008 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey of Chief Residents in the United States: Clinical Training and Resident Working Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gondi, Vinai, E-mail: gondi@humonc.wisc.edu; Bernard, Johnny Ray; Jabbari, Siavash

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To document clinical training and resident working conditions reported by chief residents during their residency. Methods and Materials: During the academic years 2005 to 2006, 2006 to 2007, and 2007 to 2008, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology conducted a nationwide survey of all radiation oncology chief residents in the United States. Chi-square statistics were used to assess changes in clinical training and resident working conditions over time. Results: Surveys were completed by representatives from 55 programs (response rate, 71.4%) in 2005 to 2006, 60 programs (75.9%) in 2006 to 2007, and 74 programs (93.7%) in 2007 tomore » 2008. Nearly all chief residents reported receiving adequate clinical experience in commonly treated disease sites, such as breast and genitourinary malignancies; and commonly performed procedures, such as three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Clinical experience in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy increased over time (p < 0.001), whereas clinical experience in endovascular brachytherapy (p <0.001) decreased over time. The distribution of gynecologic and prostate brachytherapy cases remained stable, while clinical case load in breast brachytherapy increased (p = 0.006). A small but significant percentage of residents reported receiving inadequate clinical experience in pediatrics, seeing 10 or fewer pediatric cases during the course of residency. Procedures involving higher capital costs, such as particle beam therapy and intraoperative radiotherapy, and infrequent clinical use, such as head and neck brachytherapy, were limited to a minority of institutions. Most residency programs associated with at least one satellite facility have incorporated resident rotations into their clinical training, and the majority of residents at these programs find them valuable experiences. The majority of residents reported working 60 or fewer hours per week on required clinical

  10. 36 CFR 59.4 - Residency requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Residency requirements. 59.4 Section 59.4 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND PROGRAM OF ASSISTANCE TO STATES; POST-COMPLETION COMPLIANCE...

  11. 36 CFR 59.4 - Residency requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Residency requirements. 59.4 Section 59.4 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND PROGRAM OF ASSISTANCE TO STATES; POST-COMPLETION COMPLIANCE...

  12. 36 CFR 59.4 - Residency requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Residency requirements. 59.4 Section 59.4 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND PROGRAM OF ASSISTANCE TO STATES; POST-COMPLETION COMPLIANCE...

  13. 36 CFR 59.4 - Residency requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Residency requirements. 59.4 Section 59.4 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND PROGRAM OF ASSISTANCE TO STATES; POST-COMPLETION COMPLIANCE...

  14. 36 CFR 59.4 - Residency requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Residency requirements. 59.4 Section 59.4 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND PROGRAM OF ASSISTANCE TO STATES; POST-COMPLETION COMPLIANCE...

  15. Mobbing Exposure of Anaesthesiology Residents in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Aykut, Gülnihal; Efe, Esra Mercanoğlu; Bayraktar, Selcan; Şentürk, Sinem; Başeğmez, İrem; Özkumit, Özlem; Kabak, Elmas; Yavaşçaoğlu, Belgin; Bilgin, Hülya

    2016-01-01

    Objective In recent years, psychological problems that are caused by working conditions, like burn out syndrome, are more commonly observed. In our study, we aimed to evaluate mobbing exposure, factors causing mobbing and precautions for mobbing in residency students who are educated in anaesthesiology and reanimation clinics in Turkey. Methods After obtaining consent from the ethics committee, we sent our questionnaires to the secretariats of the departments by postal mail. Completed questionnaires were collected in our department’s secretariat blindly and randomly mixed. One hundred and one participants were returned the questionnaires. Data was statistically analysed in SPSS 21.0 software programme. Results During residency programme, sated to have experienced mobbing one or more time. Interestingly, 5.9% participants complained of physical mobbing. Mobbing exposure was more common in females. The most serious new onset psychosomatic symptoms stated during residency were committing suicide (2%), addiction (16%), severe depression (18%), panic attack (8%), more accidents (7%) and tendency of violence (15%). In mobbing group there was statistically significant dissatisfaction rate. Conclusion In professions where mobbing is common, incidences of psychiatric diseases and suicide attempts are high are increased. Who are under risk for experiencing mobbing should be noticed carefully to ensure good judgement and problems should be inspected objectively in a detailed manner. Anesthesiology societies and other medical professional societies should establish mobbing committees. Thus, mobbing problems can be resolved and healthy career oppurtunities can be presented to residents. PMID:27909591

  16. Mobbing Exposure of Anaesthesiology Residents in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aykut, Gülnihal; Efe, Esra Mercanoğlu; Bayraktar, Selcan; Şentürk, Sinem; Başeğmez, İrem; Özkumit, Özlem; Kabak, Elmas; Yavaşçaoğlu, Belgin; Bilgin, Hülya

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, psychological problems that are caused by working conditions, like burn out syndrome, are more commonly observed. In our study, we aimed to evaluate mobbing exposure, factors causing mobbing and precautions for mobbing in residency students who are educated in anaesthesiology and reanimation clinics in Turkey. After obtaining consent from the ethics committee, we sent our questionnaires to the secretariats of the departments by postal mail. Completed questionnaires were collected in our department's secretariat blindly and randomly mixed. One hundred and one participants were returned the questionnaires. Data was statistically analysed in SPSS 21.0 software programme. During residency programme, sated to have experienced mobbing one or more time. Interestingly, 5.9% participants complained of physical mobbing. Mobbing exposure was more common in females. The most serious new onset psychosomatic symptoms stated during residency were committing suicide (2%), addiction (16%), severe depression (18%), panic attack (8%), more accidents (7%) and tendency of violence (15%). In mobbing group there was statistically significant dissatisfaction rate. In professions where mobbing is common, incidences of psychiatric diseases and suicide attempts are high are increased. Who are under risk for experiencing mobbing should be noticed carefully to ensure good judgement and problems should be inspected objectively in a detailed manner. Anesthesiology societies and other medical professional societies should establish mobbing committees. Thus, mobbing problems can be resolved and healthy career oppurtunities can be presented to residents.

  17. Sexuality and intimacy among care home residents.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Paul; Horne, Maria; Brown, Laura J E; Dickinson, Tommy; Wilson, Christine Brown

    Discussing sexuality and intimacy with older people can be problematic, so it is not uncommon that their needs go unrecognised. This article identifies barriers to addressing sexuality and intimacy needs, and outlines some simple strategies to raise awareness of them among older care home residents and staff, thereby facilitating a discussion to enable such needs to be met.

  18. [Motivation and satisfaction of residents in urology].

    PubMed

    Enzmann, T; Buxel, H; Benzing, F

    2010-08-01

    To address the increasing shortage of qualified residents, which leads to further discontent and additional on-call rotations for the remaining physicians, an analysis of the current situation was performed. Stress in the daily working routine, not enough free time, too little pay, or too little compensatory time off for overtime as well as inadequate options for continuing education were reported to be the main elements of dissatisfaction. The economic pressure of day-to-day work continues to define the physician's role and places demands on the medical staff by burdening them with nonmedical and administrative tasks.The major causes mentioned were staff shortage and lack of support provided by supervisors and the administration. For this reason, human resource development should be considered a strategic and central goal. This requires a normative, cross-functional approach at all levels of management and inclusion of personnel departments in the strategic processes of the hospital. The most important aspects for resident satisfaction were the work environment, acceptable work-life balance and remuneration, compensation for overtime, and quality of available continuing education, which is often rated as being insufficient.Effective strategies to improve the motivation of residents comprise offering opportunities for structured continuing education, optimizing the everyday work processes, and involving employees in social networks. The establishment of feedback strategies, including recognition of residents' achievements, will help to ensure their loyalty and identification with their clinic. This can serve as a preventive measure to offset any potential willingness to change jobs.

  19. 42 CFR 436.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false State residence. 436.403 Section 436.403 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS ELIGIBILITY IN GUAM, PUERTO RICO, AND THE VIRGIN ISLANDS General Eligibility...

  20. The Counselor-in-Residence Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beale, Andrew V.; Copenhaver, Rebecca C.; Leone, Susan D.; Grinnan, Carolyn D.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a counselor-in-residence program designed to increase collaborative relations between a university and area public schools. The program allows school counselors to work at the university level as faculty members so as to enhance professional study and interaction and to allow visitations to other schools. (RJM)

  1. Dermatology Residents are Prescribing Tanning Bed Treatment.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kathryn L; Huang, Karen E; Huang, William W; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-07-15

    Although 90% of dermatologists discourage the use of tanning beds, about half of psoriasis patients report using tanning beds and most of these note improvement. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if dermatology residents are advocating the tanning bed use to their patients.

  2. Educational contracts in family medicine residency training.

    PubMed Central

    Mahood, S.; Rojas, R.; Andres, D.; Zagozeski, C.; White, G.; Bradel, T.

    1994-01-01

    An educational contract for family medicine residency training and evaluation addresses many of the difficulties and challenges of current postgraduate medical education. This article identifies important principles for developing a contractual approach; describes the contract used in one program and its implementation; and discusses its theory, advantages, and limitations. Images p550-a PMID:8199512

  3. Coping Behaviors of Residence Hall Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkes, Ben

    2017-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examined tertiary-level residence-hall directors' reported coping behaviors for three systems of stress: environmental, personal, and work. It surveyed a convenience sample of 128 respondents using the Brief COPE scale (Carver, 1997). Reported length of service, genders, and hall populations were matched with 28 types of…

  4. An Author in Residence? Why Bother?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blubaugh, Penny

    In October 1999 young adult author, Adam Rapp, was the first author-in-residence at Ridgewood High School, located outside Chicago. During his week at Ridgewood, Adam did readings and question and answer sessions for area 7th and 8th graders who came to the high school on field trips. He talked with the staff of the high school literary magazine…

  5. Teaching Psychiatric Residents about Women and Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Jeanne L.; Mazure, Carolyn; Siggins, Lorraine D.; Waxman, Merle; Jacobs, Selby C.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this project was to develop a seminar on women as leaders within an academic department of psychiatry and to evaluate its effectiveness. Methods: A seminar was offered as an elective to all residents within the Yale University Department of Psychiatry. Didactic presentations and open discussion were structured around the…

  6. 45 CFR 400.25 - Residency requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Residency requirements. 400.25 Section 400.25 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT, ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT PROGRAM General...

  7. Interior moisture design loads for residences

    Treesearch

    Anton TenWolde; Iain S. Walker

    2001-01-01

    This paper outlines a methodology to obtain design values for indoor boundary conditions for moisture design calculations for residences. This is part of a larger effort by ASHRAE Standard Project Committee 160P, Design Criteria for Moisture Control in Buildings, to formulate criteria for moisture design loads, analysis techniques, and material and building performance...

  8. Resident perceptions of Vermont State Parks

    Treesearch

    Herbert E. Echelberger; Thomas A. More

    1992-01-01

    This report describes results of a survey to determine Vermont residents' opinions about their state park system. Over 400 responses were obtained from current park users and nearly 300 came from non-users. Results suggest that both day and overnight state park users are quite satisfied with the quality of services and facilities at the Vermont park they had most...

  9. [Resident evaluation of general surgery training programs].

    PubMed

    Espinoza G, Ricardo; Danilla E, Stefan; Valdés G, Fabio; San Francisco R, Ignacio; Llanos L, Osvaldo

    2009-07-01

    The profile of the general surgeon has changed, aiming to incorporate new skills and to develop new specialties. To assess the quality of postgraduate General Surgery training programs given by Chilean universities, the satisfaction of students and their preferences after finishing the training period. A survey with multiple choice and Likert type questions was designed and applied to 77 surgery residents, corresponding to 59% of all residents of general surgery specialization programs of Chilean universities. Fifty five per cent of residents financed with their own resources the specialization program. Thirty nine percent disagreed partially or totally with the objectives and rotations of programs. The opportunity to perform surgical interventions and the support by teachers was well evaluated. However, 23% revealed teacher maltreatment. Fifty six percent performed research activities, 73% expected to continue training in a derived specialty and 69% was satisfied with the training program. Residents considered that the quality and dedication of professors and financing of programs are issues that must be improved. The opportunity to perform surgical interventions, obtaining a salary for their work and teacher support is considered of utmost importance.

  10. An Attitudinal Survey of Pennsylvania's Rural Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Rural Pennsylvania, Harrisburg.

    Telephone surveys of 844 residents in 42 rural Pennsylvania counties established baseline data on rural opinions about 14 public policy issues. Concerning government spending, respondents felt that too little was spent on job creation, aging issues, child care, education, health services, and farming and agriculture; funding was about right for…

  11. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to participate in experimental research, and to formulate an advance directive as specified in.... (g) Examination of survey results. A resident has the right to— (1) Examine the results of the most recent VA survey with respect to the facility. The facility management must make the results available...

  12. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to participate in experimental research, and to formulate an advance directive as specified in.... (g) Examination of survey results. A resident has the right to— (1) Examine the results of the most recent VA survey with respect to the facility. The facility management must make the results available...

  13. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to participate in experimental research, and to formulate an advance directive as specified in.... (g) Examination of survey results. A resident has the right to— (1) Examine the results of the most recent VA survey with respect to the facility. The facility management must make the results available...

  14. 42 CFR 483.10 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., to refuse to participate in experimental research, and to formulate an advance directive as specified... advocacy groups such as the State survey and certification agency, the State licensure office, the State... statement that the resident may file a complaint with the State survey and certification agency concerning...

  15. 42 CFR 483.10 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., to refuse to participate in experimental research, and to formulate an advance directive as specified... advocacy groups such as the State survey and certification agency, the State licensure office, the State... statement that the resident may file a complaint with the State survey and certification agency concerning...

  16. 42 CFR 483.10 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., to refuse to participate in experimental research, and to formulate an advance directive as specified... advocacy groups such as the State survey and certification agency, the State licensure office, the State... statement that the resident may file a complaint with the State survey and certification agency concerning...

  17. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to participate in experimental research, and to formulate an advance directive as specified in.... (g) Examination of survey results. A resident has the right to— (1) Examine the results of the most recent VA survey with respect to the facility. The facility management must make the results available...

  18. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to participate in experimental research, and to formulate an advance directive as specified in.... (g) Examination of survey results. A resident has the right to— (1) Examine the results of the most recent VA survey with respect to the facility. The facility management must make the results available...

  19. 24 CFR 582.310 - Resident rent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resident rent. 582.310 Section 582.310 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES SHELTER PLUS...

  20. 24 CFR 582.310 - Resident rent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Resident rent. 582.310 Section 582.310 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES SHELTER PLUS...

  1. 24 CFR 582.310 - Resident rent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Resident rent. 582.310 Section 582.310 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES SHELTER PLUS...

  2. Annotated Psychodynamic Bibliography for Residents in Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    CALIGOR, EVE

    1996-01-01

    The author provides an annotated bibliography to introduce psychodynamic psychotherapy and psychoanalysis to residents in psychiatry. The emphasis of the selection is on relevance to practice. The entries are grouped by topic, levels of difficulty are noted, and readings are identified as being of either current or historic relevance. PMID:22700303

  3. 42 CFR 483.20 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... additional assessment performed on the care areas triggered by the completion of the Minimum Data Set (MDS.... (f) Automated data processing requirement—(1) Encoding data. Within 7 days after a facility completes...) Transmitting data. Within 7 days after a facility completes a resident's assessment, a facility must be capable...

  4. 42 CFR 483.20 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... additional assessment performed on the care areas triggered by the completion of the Minimum Data Set (MDS.... (f) Automated data processing requirement—(1) Encoding data. Within 7 days after a facility completes...) Transmitting data. Within 7 days after a facility completes a resident's assessment, a facility must be capable...

  5. 42 CFR 483.20 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... additional assessment performed on the care areas triggered by the completion of the Minimum Data Set (MDS.... (f) Automated data processing requirement—(1) Encoding data. Within 7 days after a facility completes...) Transmitting data. Within 7 days after a facility completes a resident's assessment, a facility must be capable...

  6. 42 CFR 483.20 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... additional assessment performed on the care areas triggered by the completion of the Minimum Data Set (MDS.... (f) Automated data processing requirement—(1) Encoding data. Within 7 days after a facility completes...) Transmitting data. Within 7 days after a facility completes a resident's assessment, a facility must be capable...

  7. 42 CFR 483.20 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... additional assessment performed on the care areas triggered by the completion of the Minimum Data Set (MDS.... (f) Automated data processing requirement—(1) Encoding data. Within 7 days after a facility completes...) Transmitting data. Within 7 days after a facility completes a resident's assessment, a facility must be capable...

  8. [Motivation and learning strategies in pediatric residents].

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda-Vildósola, Ana Carolina; Carrada-Legaria, Sol; Reyes-Lagunes, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Motivation is an internal mood that moves individuals to act, points them in certain directions, and maintains them in activities, playing a very important role in self-regulated learning and academic performance. Our objective was to evaluate motivation and self-regulation of knowledge in pediatric residents in a third-level hospital, and to determine if there are differences according to the type of specialty and sociodemographic variables. All residents who agreed to participate responded to the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire. Cronbach alpha was performed to determine reliability. The mean value of each subscale was compared with Student's t test or ANOVA, correlation of subscales with Pearson test. A value of p≤0.05 was considered significant. We included 118 residents. The questionnaire was highly reliable (α=0.939). There were no significant differences in motivation or learning strategies according to sex, marital status, or age. Those residents studying a second or third specialization had significantly higher scores in elaboration, critical thinking, and peer learning. There were significant correlations between intrinsic motivation and self-efficacy with the development of knowledge strategies such as elaboration, critical thinking, and metacognitive self-regulation. Our students present average-to-high scores of motivation and knowledge strategies, with a significant difference according to type of specialization. There is a high correlation between motivation and knowledge strategies.

  9. Resident Outdoor Education: An Experimental Venture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South-Western City School District, Grove City, OH.

    The document discusses a 5-day outdoor education program held in the spring of 1968 for 31 fifth graders from Prairie Lincoln Elementary School, Grove City, Ohio; site of the self-supporting resident experience ($23 estimated cost per student) was The Columbus Presbytery Camp, Lancaster, Ohio. As reported, the primary purpose of the outdoor…

  10. Matrilocal residence is ancestral in Austronesian societies

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Fiona M.; Gray, Russell D.; Greenhill, Simon J.; Mace, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    The nature of social life in human prehistory is elusive, yet knowing how kinship systems evolve is critical for understanding population history and cultural diversity. Post-marital residence rules specify sex-specific dispersal and kin association, influencing the pattern of genetic markers across populations. Cultural phylogenetics allows us to practise ‘virtual archaeology’ on these aspects of social life that leave no trace in the archaeological record. Here we show that early Austronesian societies practised matrilocal post-marital residence. Using a Markov-chain Monte Carlo comparative method implemented in a Bayesian phylogenetic framework, we estimated the type of residence at each ancestral node in a sample of Austronesian language trees spanning 135 Pacific societies. Matrilocal residence has been hypothesized for proto-Oceanic society (ca 3500 BP), but we find strong evidence that matrilocality was predominant in earlier Austronesian societies ca 5000–4500 BP, at the root of the language family and its early branches. Our results illuminate the divergent patterns of mtDNA and Y-chromosome markers seen in the Pacific. The analysis of present-day cross-cultural data in this way allows us to directly address cultural evolutionary and life-history processes in prehistory. PMID:19324748

  11. Postgraduate general dentistry residency: a clinical model.

    PubMed

    Gowan, J

    1995-01-01

    Dental graduates today are expected to be knowledgeable in many more areas than their predecessors. Changing technology and increased competition require entering the dental profession with more experience and skills. One approach to achieving this skill level is a postgraduate general dentistry residency in a clinical setting during the year following dental school graduation (PGY1). The clinical residency provides new dentists with additional hands-on training and reinforces classroom learning. HealthPartners was selected as a clinical rotation for residents in the advanced general dentistry program at the University of Minnesota Dental School. The program provides dental graduates in PGY1 training in all areas of practice. The HealthPartners rotation is highly unique. It is a staff model HMO with a clinical, multi-specialty setting. Today, HealthPartners--a Minnesota-based healthcare organization--has 116,000 members with prepaid dental benefits. Residents trained in the program develop increased skills in all areas of dental practice. In addition, they develop a good working knowledge in the basic sciences. Methods of instruction include didactic training in the form of seminars, lectures, and clinical training in HealthPartners' dental clinics.

  12. Student Residences: From Housing to Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parameswaran, Ashvin; Bowers, Jack

    2014-01-01

    There is a long history of universities perceiving residences as pivotal in the learning process. Over the last 50 years, the nature and efficacy of residential environments as an educational tool have been extensively researched. However, within some sections of the tertiary residential sector, in the United States, the United Kingdom, New…

  13. Drug Information Residency Rotation with Pharmaceutical Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Richard L.

    1986-01-01

    Program objectives of a drug information rotation at the Upjohn Company include improving communication between the pharmaceutical industry and hospital pharmacy/academia, exposing the resident to the challenges the industry encounters, improving proficiency in drug information practice, and providing insight into the working relationships of…

  14. 2009 Canadian Radiation Oncology Resident Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Debenham, Brock, E-mail: debenham@ualberta.net; Banerjee, Robyn; Fairchild, Alysa

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Statistics from the Canadian post-MD education registry show that numbers of Canadian radiation oncology (RO) trainees have risen from 62 in 1999 to approximately 150 per year between 2003 and 2009, contributing to the current perceived downturn in employment opportunities for radiation oncologists in Canada. When last surveyed in 2003, Canadian RO residents identified job availability as their main concern. Our objective was to survey current Canadian RO residents on their training and career plans. Methods and Materials: Trainees from the 13 Canadian residency programs using the national matching service were sought. Potential respondents were identified through individual programmore » directors or chief resident and were e-mailed a secure link to an online survey. Descriptive statistics were used to report responses. Results: The eligible response rate was 53% (83/156). Similar to the 2003 survey, respondents generally expressed high satisfaction with their programs and specialty. The most frequently expressed perceived weakness in their training differed from 2003, with 46.5% of current respondents feeling unprepared to enter the job market. 72% plan on pursuing a postresidency fellowship. Most respondents intend to practice in Canada. Fewer than 20% of respondents believe that there is a strong demand for radiation oncologists in Canada. Conclusions: Respondents to the current survey expressed significant satisfaction with their career choice and training program. However, differences exist compared with the 2003 survey, including the current perceived lack of demand for radiation oncologists in Canada.« less

  15. Training Neighborhood Residents to Conduct a Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Back, Susan Malone; Tseng, Wan-Chun; Li, Jiaqi; Wang, Yuanhua; Phan, Van Thanh; Yeter, Ibrahim Halil

    2015-01-01

    As a requirement for a federal neighborhood revitalization grant, the authors trained resident interviewers and coordinated the conduct of more than 1000 door-to-door interviews of a stratified random sample. The targeted area was a multiethnic, lower income neighborhood that continues to experience the effects of past segregation. Monitoring and…

  16. Levels and Causes of Stress Among Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Allan J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Medical and dental residents at the University of Rochester Medical Center were surveyed with a brief symptom inventory to measure stress and its causes. Significantly elevated stress showed for rotations in the emergency room, greater frequency of being on call, and reduced sleep. (Author/MLW)

  17. Residence Halls: Making Campus a Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curley, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the reasons for and advantages to transforming college campuses from commuter to residential facilities or expanding existing facilities, suggesting that the design for new student residence facilities must provide for a wide variety of functions above and beyond the spaces required for sleeping and bathing. Incorporating study lounges,…

  18. 36 CFR 72.73 - Residency requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PARK AND RECREATION RECOVERY ACT OF 1978 Post-Completion Compliance Responsibilities § 72.73 Residency... assistance. This prohibition applies to both regularly scheduled and special events. The general provisions... differentials. Post-completion compliance responsibilities of the recipient should continue to ensure that...

  19. 36 CFR 72.73 - Residency requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PARK AND RECREATION RECOVERY ACT OF 1978 Post-Completion Compliance Responsibilities § 72.73 Residency... assistance. This prohibition applies to both regularly scheduled and special events. The general provisions... differentials. Post-completion compliance responsibilities of the recipient should continue to ensure that...

  20. 36 CFR 72.73 - Residency requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PARK AND RECREATION RECOVERY ACT OF 1978 Post-Completion Compliance Responsibilities § 72.73 Residency... assistance. This prohibition applies to both regularly scheduled and special events. The general provisions... differentials. Post-completion compliance responsibilities of the recipient should continue to ensure that...

  1. 36 CFR 72.73 - Residency requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PARK AND RECREATION RECOVERY ACT OF 1978 Post-Completion Compliance Responsibilities § 72.73 Residency... assistance. This prohibition applies to both regularly scheduled and special events. The general provisions... differentials. Post-completion compliance responsibilities of the recipient should continue to ensure that...

  2. Florida Residents' Preferred Approach to Sexuality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard-Barr, Elissa M.; Moore, Michele Johnson

    2007-01-01

    Although there is widespread support for sexuality education, whether to use an abstinence-only or comprehensive approach is hotly debated. This study assessed Florida residents preferred approach to school-based sexuality education. The 641 respondents were selected by random digit dialing, using methods to ensure ethnic and geographic…

  3. Improving Health Care for Assisted Living Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Mach, John R., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to explore how medical care is delivered to older people in assisted living (AL) settings and to suggest ways for improving it. Design and Methods: We present a review of the limited research available on health care for older AL residents and on building testable models of better ways to organize primary…

  4. A Psychomotor Skills Course for Orthopaedic Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippert, Frederick G.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The course described and evaluated here was developed at the University of Washington School of Medicine to teach 20 orthopaedic residents operative techniques, instrument usage, and safety precautions outside of the operating room without hazard to the patient or regard to time constraints. (JT)

  5. Measuring Resident Well-Being: Impostorism and Burnout Syndrome in Residency

    PubMed Central

    Legassie, Jenny; Zibrowski, Elaine M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Assessing resident well-being is becoming increasingly important from a programmatic standpoint. Two measures that have been used to assess this are the Clance Impostor Scale (CIS) and the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS). However, little is known about the relationship between the two phenomena. Objectives To explore the prevalence and association between impostorism and burnout syndrome in a sample of internal medicine residents. Design Anonymous, cross-sectional postal survey. Participants Forty-eight internal medicine residents (postgraduate year [PGY] 1–3) at the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry (62.3% response rate). Measurements and Main Results Short demographic questionnaire, CIS and MBI-HSS. Impostorism and burnout syndrome were identified in 43.8% and 12.5% of residents, respectively. With the exception of a negative correlation between CIS scores and the MBI’s personal accomplishment subscale (r = −.30; 95% CI −.54 to −.02), no other significant relations were identified. Foreign-trained residents were more likely to score as impostors (odds ratio [OR] 10.7; 95% CI 1.2 to 98.2) while senior residents were more likely to experience burnout syndrome (OR 16.5 95% CI 1.6 to 168.5). Conclusions Both impostorism and burnout syndrome appear to be threats to resident well-being in our program. The lack of relationship between the two would suggest that programs and researchers wishing to address the issue of resident distress should consider using both measures. The finding that foreign-trained residents appear to be more susceptible to impostorism warrants further study. PMID:18612750

  6. Ontario Radiation Oncology Residents' Needs in the First Postgraduate Year-Residents' Perspective Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Szumacher, Ewa; Warner, Eiran; Zhang Liying

    Purpose: To assess radiation oncology residents' needs and satisfaction in their first postgraduate year (PGY-1) in the province of Ontario. Methods and Materials: Of 62 radiation oncology residents, 58 who had completed their PGY-1 and were either enrolled or had graduated in 2006 were invited to participate in a 31-item survey. The questionnaire explored PGY-1 residents' needs and satisfaction in four domains: clinical workload, faculty/learning environment, stress level, and discrimination/harassment. The Fisher's exact and Wilcoxon nonparametric tests were used to determine relationships between covariate items and summary scores. Results: Of 58 eligible residents, 44 (75%) responded. Eighty-four percent of residentsmore » felt that their ward and call duties were appropriate. More than 50% of respondents indicated that they often felt isolated from their radiation oncology program. Only 77% agreed that they received adequate feedback, and 40% received sufficient counseling regarding career planning. More than 93% of respondents thought that faculty members had contributed significantly to their learning experience. Approximately 50% of residents experienced excessive stress and inadequate time for leisure or for reading the medical literature. Less than 10% of residents indicated that they had been harassed or experienced discrimination. Eighty-three percent agreed or strongly agreed that their PGY-1 experience had been outstanding. Conclusions: Most Ontario residents were satisfied with their PGY-1 training program. More counseling by radiation oncology faculty members should be offered to help residents with career planning. The residents might also benefit from more exposure to 'radiation oncology' and an introduction to stress management strategies.« less

  7. Measuring resident well-being: impostorism and burnout syndrome in residency.

    PubMed

    Legassie, Jenny; Zibrowski, Elaine M; Goldszmidt, Mark A

    2008-07-01

    Assessing resident well-being is becoming increasingly important from a programmatic standpoint. Two measures that have been used to assess this are the Clance Impostor Scale (CIS) and the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS). However, little is known about the relationship between the two phenomena. To explore the prevalence and association between impostorism and burnout syndrome in a sample of internal medicine residents. Anonymous, cross-sectional postal survey. Forty-eight internal medicine residents (postgraduate year [PGY] 1-3) at the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry (62.3% response rate). Short demographic questionnaire, CIS and MBI-HSS. Impostorism and burnout syndrome were identified in 43.8% and 12.5% of residents, respectively. With the exception of a negative correlation between CIS scores and the MBI's personal accomplishment subscale (r = -.30; 95% CI -.54 to -.02), no other significant relations were identified. Foreign-trained residents were more likely to score as impostors (odds ratio [OR] 10.7; 95% CI 1.2 to 98.2) while senior residents were more likely to experience burnout syndrome (OR 16.5 95% CI 1.6 to 168.5). Both impostorism and burnout syndrome appear to be threats to resident well-being in our program. The lack of relationship between the two would suggest that programs and researchers wishing to address the issue of resident distress should consider using both measures. The finding that foreign-trained residents appear to be more susceptible to impostorism warrants further study.

  8. The Relationship Between Academic Motivation and Lifelong Learning During Residency: A Study of Psychiatry Residents.

    PubMed

    Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Wiljer, David; Yufe, Shira; Knox, Matthew K; Fefergrad, Mark; Silver, Ivan; Harris, Ilene; Tekian, Ara

    2016-10-01

    To examine the relationship between lifelong learning (LLL) and academic motivation for residents in a psychiatry residency program, trainee factors that influence LLL, and psychiatry residents' LLL practices. Between December 2014 and February 2015, 105 of 173 (61%) eligible psychiatry residents from the Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, completed a questionnaire with three study instruments: an LLL needs assessment survey, the Jefferson Scale of Physician Lifelong Learning (JeffSPLL), and the Academic Motivation Scale (AMS). The AMS included a relative autonomy motivation score (AMS-RAM) measuring the overall level of intrinsic motivation (IM). A significant correlation was observed between JeffSPLL and AMS-RAM scores (r = 0.39, P < .001). Although there was no significant difference in JeffSPLL and AMS-RAM scores based on respondents' level of training (senior vs. junior resident), gender, or age, analysis of AMS subdomains showed that junior residents had a significantly higher score on the extrinsic motivation identification domain (mean difference [M] = 0.38; 95% confidence interval [CI] [0.01, 0.75]; P = .045; d = 0.44) compared with senior residents. Clinician scientist stream (CSS) residents had significantly higher JeffSPLL scores compared with non-CSS residents (M = 3.15; 95% CI [0.52, 5.78]; P = .020; d = 0.57). The use of rigorous measures to study LLL and academic motivation confirmed prior research documenting the positive association between IM and LLL. The results suggest that postgraduate curricula aimed at enhancing IM, for example, through support for learning autonomously, could be beneficial to cultivating LLL in learners.

  9. The Role of Regional Conferences in Research Resident Career Development: The California Psychiatry Research Resident Retreat.

    PubMed

    Besterman, Aaron D; Williams, Jody K; Reus, Victor I; Pato, Michele T; Voglmaier, Susan M; Mathews, Carol A

    2017-04-01

    For psychiatry research resident career development, there is a recognized need for improved cross-institutional mentoring and networking opportunities. One method to address this need is via regional conferences, open to current and recently graduated research residents and their mentors. With this in mind, we developed the biennial California Psychiatry Research Resident Retreat (CPRRR) and collected feedback from participants to 1) Assess resident satisfaction, 2) Determine the utility of the retreat as a networking and mentorship tool, and 3) Identify areas for improvement. We gathered survey data from resident attendees at the two first CPRRRs. We analyzed the data to look for trends in satisfaction as well as areas that need improvement. Thirty-two residents from five California training programs attended the CPRRR in 2013 while 33 attended from six programs in 2015. The residents were from all years of training, but concentrated in their second and third years. Approximately 41% and 49% of the attendees were female and 53% and 39% had an MD/PhD in 2013 and 2015, respectively. Twenty-four and 32 residents provided anonymous feedback in 2013 and 2015, respectively. Mean feedback scores were very high (> 4/5) for overall satisfaction, peer- and faculty-networking, the keynote speaker and the flash talks for both years. Mean feedback scores for the ethics debates and mentoring sessions were somewhat lower (≤ 4/5), however, both showed significant improvement from 2013 to 2015. The CPRRRs appear to be an effective mechanism for providing psychiatry research residents with a meaningful cross-institutional opportunity for networking and mentorship. Feedback-driven changes to the CPRRRs improved participant satisfaction for several components of the conference. Future efforts will be aimed at broadening mentorship and networking opportunities, optimizing teaching approaches for research ethics, and considering different feedback-gathering approaches to allow for

  10. Current integrated cardiothoracic surgery residents: a Thoracic Surgery Residents Association survey.

    PubMed

    Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang; LaPar, Damien J; Stephens, Elizabeth H; Berfield, Kathleen S; Odell, David D; DeNino, Walter F

    2015-03-01

    After approval by the Thoracic Surgery Residency Review Committee in 2007, 6-year integrated cardiothoracic surgery (I-6) residency programs have gained in popularity. We sought to assess and objectively quantify the level of satisfaction I-6 residents have with their training and to identify areas of improvement for future curriculum development. A completely anonymous, electronic survey was created by the Thoracic Surgery Residents Association that asked the responders to provide demographic information, specialty interest, and lifestyle priorities, and to rate their experience and satisfaction with I-6 residency. The survey was distributed nationwide to all residents in I-6 programs approved by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Of a total of 88 eligible I-6 residents, 49 completed the survey (55.7%). Career choice satisfaction was high (75.5%), as was overall satisfaction with integrated training (83.7%). The majority (77.6%) were interested in cardiac surgery. Overall, the responders reported sufficient time for life outside of the hospital (57.1%), but experienced conflicts between work obligations and personal life at least sometimes (75.5%). Early exposure to cardiothoracic surgery was reported as the dominant advantage of the I-6 model, whereas variable curriculum structure and unclear expectations along with poor integration with general surgery training ranked highest among perceived disadvantages. Current I-6 residents are largely satisfied with the integrated training model and report a reasonable work/life balance. The focused nature of training is the primary perceived advantage of the integrated pathway. Curriculum variability and poor integration with general surgery training are identified by residents as primary areas of concern. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Learning style preferences of surgical residency applicants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Roger H; Gilbert, Timothy

    2015-09-01

    The learning style preferences of general surgery residents have been previously reported; there is evidence that residents who prefer read/write learning styles perform better on the American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE). However, little is known regarding the learning style preferences of applicants to general surgery residency and their impact on educational outcomes. In this study, the preferred learning styles of surgical residency applicants were determined. We hypothesized that applicant rank data are associated with specific learning style preferences. The Fleming VARK learning styles inventory was offered to all general surgery residency applicants that were interviewed at a university hospital-based program. The VARK model categorizes learners as visual (V), aural (A), read/write (R), kinesthetic (K), or multimodal (MM). Responses on the inventory were scored to determine the preferred learning style for each applicant. Applicant data, including United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) scores, class rank, interview score, and overall final applicant ranking, were examined for association with preferred learning styles. Sixty-seven applicants were interviewed. Five applicants were excluded due to not completing the VARK inventory or having incomplete applicant data. The remaining 62 applicants (92%) were included for analysis. Most applicants (57%) had a multimodal preference. Sixty-nine percent of all applicants had some degree of preference for kinesthetic learning. There were statistically significant differences between applicants of different learning styles in terms of USMLE step 1 scores (P = 0.001) and USMLE step 2 clinical knowledge scores (P = 0.01), but not for class ranks (P = 0.27), interview scores (P = 0.20), or final ranks (P = 0.14). Multiple comparison analysis demonstrated that applicants with aural preferences had higher USMLE 1 scores (233.2) than those with kinesthetic (211.8, P = 0.005) or multimodal

  12. Career Ladder and Curriculum Guide: Housing Management. Resident Selection and Occupancy Trainee, Resident Security Aide, Resident Security Officer, Security Officer II, Community Security Aide. Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Archibald; Hailey, Pleasant L., Jr.

    This instructor's manual contains job analysis and training curriculum for the positions of Resident Selection and Occupancy Trainee, Resident Security Aide, Resident Security Officer, Security Officer II, and Community Security Aide. The two sections of the manual and their parts are as follows: Section I: A Model Curriculum for Resident…

  13. Attitudes Toward Research During Residency: A Survey of Canadian Residents in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Aisling A; Posner, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Obstetrics and Gynecology (Ob/Gyn) residency programs in Canada mandate participation in scholarly research activity, yet there remains a lack of literature on trainees' opinions regarding its value, feasibility, and perceived effect on future practice. An understanding of resident attitudes toward research during residency is essential in effectively engaging trainees and fostering a robust research community in the field. We sought to identify factors reported to influence involvement in resident research, including perceived barriers. Anonymous data were collected via an online survey distributed to all residents enrolled in accredited Ob/Gyn residency programs throughout Canada. The 10-minute, previously piloted questionnaire covered questions related to demographic information, research experience, career goals, current research activities, opinions on research environment, and opinions regarding the effect of research on future practice. Descriptive statistics were used to describe demographics, research background, and current research activities. Categorical variables were compared using the chi-square analysis and continuous variables were compared using the Mann-Whitney rank sum tests. A total of 175 residents completed the survey; 61% agreed/strongly agreed that they participate in research solely because it is mandated by their program, 22% felt that their training environment did not promote research, 19% disagreed/strongly disagreed that research is a positive experience, while 70% agreed/strongly agreed that they would prefer to complete another educational activity other than a research project. Time constraints owing to residency duties, time constraints owing to personal reasons, and lack of statistical knowledge were reported as barriers to research involvement by 97%, 90%, and 74% of trainees, respectively. Residents with graduate degrees were less likely to report lack of training on research design as a moderate/extreme barrier (7% vs 32%, p

  14. Residency Program Directors' Interview Methods and Satisfaction With Resident Selection Across Multiple Specialties.

    PubMed

    VanOrder, Tonya; Robbins, Wayne; Zemper, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Competition for postdoctoral training positions is at an all-time high, and residency program directors continue to have little direction when it comes to structuring an effective interview process. To examine whether a relationship existed between interview methods used and program director satisfaction with resident selection decisions and whether programs that used methods designed to assess candidate personal characteristics were more satisfied with their decisions. Residency directors from the Statewide Campus System at the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine were invited to complete a 20-item survey regarding their recent interview methods and proportion of resident selections later regretted. Data analyses examined relationships between interview methods used, frequency of personal characteristics evaluated, and subsequent satisfaction with selected residents. Of the 186 program director surveys distributed, 83 (44.6%) were returned, representing 11 clinical specialty areas. In total, 69 responses (83.1%) were from programs accredited by the American Osteopathic Association only, and 14 (16.9%) were from programs accredited dually by the American Osteopathic Association and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. The most frequent interview method reported was faculty or peer resident interview. No statistically significant correlational relationships were found between type of interview methods used and subsequent satisfaction with selected residents, either within or across clinical specialties. Although program directors rated ethical behavior/honesty as the most highly prioritized characteristic in residents, 27 (32.5%) reported using a specific interview method to assess this trait. Program directors reported later regrets concerning nearly 1 of every 12 resident selection decisions. The perceived success of an osteopathic residency program's interview process does not appear to be related to methods used and is not

  15. General Surgery Resident Satisfaction on Cardiothoracic Rotations.

    PubMed

    Lussiez, Alisha; Bevins, Jack; Plaska, Andrew; Rosin, Vadim; Reddy, Rishindra M

    2016-01-01

    General surgery residents' exposure to cardiothoracic (CT) surgery rotations has decreased, which may affect resident satisfaction. We surveyed general surgery graduates to assess the relationships among rotation satisfaction, CT disease exposure, rotation length, mentorship, and mistreatment. A survey assessing CT curriculum, exposure, mentorship, and satisfaction was forwarded to general surgery graduates from 17 residency programs. A Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to assess statistical significance of ordinal level data. Statistical significance was defined as p < 0.05. This study was conducted at the University of Michigan Health System in Ann Arbor, MI, a tertiary care center. The survey was sent to approximately 1300 graduates of general surgery residency programs who graduated between the years of 1999 to 2014. A total of 94 responses were completed and received. Receiving adequate exposure to CT procedures and disease management was significantly associated with higher satisfaction ratings for all procedures, particularly thoracotomy incisions (p < 0.001), empyemas and pleural effusions (p < 0.001), and lung cancer care (p < 0.001). The absence of mistreatment and good/very good mentorship were both positively associated with higher reported satisfaction (p = 0.018 and p < 0.001, respectively). Increased length of time on CT rotation was neither associated with improved levels of satisfaction nor with an improvement in the quality of mentorship. Rotation satisfaction is positively associated with procedure exposure, better mentorship, and the absence of mistreatment. Longer rotation length was not associated with satisfaction. Shorter rotations are not detrimental to training if they have focused clinical exposure and invested mentors to maximize resident satisfaction. These specific markers of rotation quality are useful in curricular design. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Burnout during residency training: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Waguih William; Lederer, Sara; Mandili, Carla; Nikravesh, Rose; Seligman, Laurie; Vasa, Monisha; Ogunyemi, Dotun; Bernstein, Carol A

    2009-12-01

    Burnout is a state of mental and physical exhaustion related to work or care giving activities. Burnout during residency training has gained significant attention secondary to concerns regarding job performance and patient care. This article reviews the relevant literature on burnout in order to provide information to educators about its prevalence, features, impact, and potential interventions. Studies were identified through a Medline and PsychInfo search from 1974 to 2009. Fifty-one studies were identified. Definition and description of burnout and measurement methods are presented followed by a thorough review of the studies. An examination of the burnout literature reveals that it is prevalent in medical students (28%-45%), residents (27%-75%, depending on specialty), as well as practicing physicians. Psychological distress and physical symptoms can impact work performance and patient safety. Distress during medical school can lead to burnout, which in turn can result in negative consequences as a working physician. Burnout also poses significant challenges during early training years in residency. Time demands, lack of control, work planning, work organization, inherently difficult job situations, and interpersonal relationships, are considered factors contributing to residents' burnout. Potential interventions include workplace-driven and individual-driven measures. Workplace interventions include education about burnout, workload modifications, increasing the diversity of work duties, stress management training, mentoring, emotional intelligence training, and wellness workshops. Individual-driven behavioral, social, and physical activities include promoting interpersonal professional relations, meditation, counseling, and exercise. Educators need to develop an active awareness of burnout and ought to consider incorporating relevant instruction and interventions during the process of training resident physicians.

  17. Remediation plans in family medicine residency

    PubMed Central

    Audétat, Marie-Claude; Voirol, Christian; Béland, Normand; Fernandez, Nicolas; Sanche, Gilbert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess use of the remediation instrument that has been implemented in training sites at the University of Montreal in Quebec to support faculty in diagnosing and remediating resident academic difficulties, to examine whether and how this particular remediation instrument improves the remediation process, and to determine its effects on the residents’ subsequent rotation assessments. Design A multimethods approach in which data were collected from different sources: remediation plans developed by faculty, program statistics for the corresponding academic years, and students’ academic records and rotation assessment results. Setting Family medicine residency program at the University of Montreal. Participants Family medicine residents in academic difficulty. Main outcome measures Assessment of the content, process, and quality of remediation plans, and students’ academic and rotation assessment results (successful, below expectations, or failure) both before and after the remediation period. Results The framework that was developed for assessing remediation plans was used to analyze 23 plans produced by 10 teaching sites for 21 residents. All plans documented cognitive problems and implemented numerous remediation measures. Although only 48% of the plans were of good quality, implementation of a remediation plan was positively associated with the resident’s success in rotations following the remediation period. Conclusion The use of remediation plans is well embedded in training sites at the University of Montreal. The residents’ difficulties were mainly cognitive in nature, but this generally related to deficits in clinical reasoning rather than knowledge gaps. The reflection and analysis required to produce a remediation plan helps to correct many academic difficulties and normalize the academic career of most residents in difficulty. Further effort is still needed to improve the quality of plans and to support teachers.

  18. 28 CFR 115.216 - Residents with disabilities and residents who are limited English proficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., for example, residents who are deaf or hard of hearing, those who are blind or have low vision, or... intellectual disabilities, limited reading skills, or who are blind or have low vision. An agency is not...

  19. 28 CFR 115.216 - Residents with disabilities and residents who are limited English proficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., for example, residents who are deaf or hard of hearing, those who are blind or have low vision, or... intellectual disabilities, limited reading skills, or who are blind or have low vision. An agency is not...

  20. 28 CFR 115.316 - Residents with disabilities and residents who are limited English proficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., for example, residents who are deaf or hard of hearing, those who are blind or have low vision, or... intellectual disabilities, limited reading skills, or who are blind or have low vision. An agency is not...

  1. 28 CFR 115.316 - Residents with disabilities and residents who are limited English proficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., for example, residents who are deaf or hard of hearing, those who are blind or have low vision, or... intellectual disabilities, limited reading skills, or who are blind or have low vision. An agency is not...

  2. 28 CFR 115.216 - Residents with disabilities and residents who are limited English proficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., for example, residents who are deaf or hard of hearing, those who are blind or have low vision, or... intellectual disabilities, limited reading skills, or who are blind or have low vision. An agency is not...

  3. 28 CFR 115.316 - Residents with disabilities and residents who are limited English proficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., for example, residents who are deaf or hard of hearing, those who are blind or have low vision, or... intellectual disabilities, limited reading skills, or who are blind or have low vision. An agency is not...

  4. Would you admit your mother to the residency service? Introducing the JCHIMP resident safety column.

    PubMed

    Foster, Paul N

    2014-01-01

    There remain tremendous opportunities to improve the stability and safety of American health care. Within this context, residents and residency programs face two essential questions: how to reduce the risk to patients resulting from resident inexperience, and how to change our programs to create the safer physician of the future? The spread of side-by-side teaching and non-teaching services creates a natural setting to study these questions and improve both services. When asked the question, "Would you admit your mother to the resident service?", many of us respond, "It depends". We are focusing this column on helping programs answer this question definitively in the positive, share potential best practices, and underscore community hospital's contribution to our understanding of patient safety.

  5. Teaching "global mental health": psychiatry residency directors' attitudes and practices regarding international opportunities for psychiatry residents.

    PubMed

    Belkin, Gary S; Yusim, Anna; Anbarasan, Deepti; Bernstein, Carol Ann

    2011-11-01

    The authors surveyed Psychiatry Residency Training Directors' (RTDs') attitudes about the role and feasibility of international rotations during residency training. A 21-question survey was electronically distributed that explored RTDs' beliefs about the value, use, and availability of international clinical and research experiences during residency. Of 171 RTDs, 59 (34.5%) completed the survey; 83% of respondents rated the importance of global mental health education as 3-or-above on a scale of 1 (least important) to 5 (most important), but only 42% indicated that such opportunities were made available. The value of such opportunities was thought to lie primarily in professional development and cultural exposure, less so for enhancing core knowledge competencies. Obstacles to such opportunities included lack of accreditation, financial resources, and faculty/administrative support and supervision. RTD respondents endorsed the value of international experiences during residency, but their availability and educational impact are not fully supported.

  6. Association of General Surgery Resident Remediation and Program Director Attitudes With Resident Attrition.

    PubMed

    Schwed, Alexander C; Lee, Steven L; Salcedo, Edgardo S; Reeves, Mark E; Inaba, Kenji; Sidwell, Richard A; Amersi, Farin; Are, Chandrakanth; Arnell, Tracey D; Damewood, Richard B; Dent, Daniel L; Donahue, Timothy; Gauvin, Jeffrey; Hartranft, Thomas; Jacobsen, Garth R; Jarman, Benjamin T; Melcher, Marc L; Mellinger, John D; Morris, Jon B; Nehler, Mark; Smith, Brian R; Wolfe, Mary; Kaji, Amy H; de Virgilio, Christian

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies of resident attrition have variably included preliminary residents and likely overestimated categorical resident attrition. Whether program director attitudes affect attrition has been unclear. To determine whether program director attitudes are associated with resident attrition and to measure the categorical resident attrition rate. This multicenter study surveyed 21 US program directors in general surgery about their opinions regarding resident education and attrition. Data on total resident complement, demographic information, and annual attrition were collected from the program directors for the study period of July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2015. The general surgery programs were chosen on the basis of their geographic location, previous collaboration with some coauthors, prior work in surgical education and research, or a program director willing to participate. Only categorical surgical residents were included in the study; thus, program directors were specifically instructed to exclude any preliminary residents in their responses. Five-year attrition rates (2010-2011 to 2014-2015 academic years) as well as first-time pass rates on the General Surgery Qualifying Examination and General Surgery Certifying Examination of the American Board of Surgery (ABS) were collected. High- and low-attrition programs were compared. The 21 programs represented different geographic locations and 12 university-based, 3 university-affiliated, and 6 independent program types. Programs had a median (interquartile range [IQR]) number of 30 (20-48) categorical residents, and few of those residents were women (median [IQR], 12 [5-17]). Overall, 85 of 966 residents (8.8%) left training during the study period: 15 (17.6%) left after postgraduate year 1, 34 (40.0%) after postgraduate year 2, and 36 (42.4%) after postgraduate year 3 or later. Forty-four residents (51.8%) left general surgery for another surgical discipline, 21 (24.7%) transferred to a different surgery

  7. The importance of clinical research skills according to PharmD students, first-year residents, and residency directors.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Heather D; Saseen, Joseph J

    Research has a prominent role within the field of pharmacy practice. However, no studies have assessed the importance of research methods in pharmacy education from the perspective of students, residents, or residency directors. Questionnaires were administered online in spring 2014 to four respondent groups: University of Colorado fourth year PharmD (P4) students, post graduate year 1 (PGY1) residents, and PGY1 and post-graduate year 2 (PGY2) residency directors. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize respondents; t-tests and chi-square tests were used to compare groups of respondents. Respondents included 255 PGY1 residency directors, 155 PGY2 residency directors, 35 PGY1 residents, and 87 P4 students. Response rates ranged from 26% (residency directors) to nearly 60% (P4 students and PGY1 residents). PGY1 residents and PGY1/PGY2 residency directors ranked research experience lowest among ten characteristics with respect to their importance when competing for a residency or being a successful resident. Among six specific clinical research skills, PGY1 residents and PGY1/PGY2 residency directors ranked "identifying and writing a research question" as the most important for successfully completing a residency research project or when selecting a PGY1/PGY2 resident. Perceived importance of clinical research skills by P4 students, current residents, and residency program directors is low. This is in opposition to opinions from several national organizations that proclaim the importance of clinical research skills in doctor of pharmacy curricula. Pharmacy programs must continue to further develop clinical research skills and abilities of future graduates while being cognizant of these perception barriers when developing strategies to enhance research experiences within their curricular programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Blended Learning in Obstetrics and Gynecology Resident Education: Impact on Resident Clinical Performance.

    PubMed

    Ghareeb, Allen; Han, Heeyoung; Delfino, Kristin; Taylor, Funminiyi

    2016-01-01

    Effects of residents' blended learning on their clinical performance have rarely been reported. A blended learning pilot program was instituted at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine's Obstetrics and Gynecology program. One of the modules was chronic hypertension in pregnancy. We sought to evaluate if the resident blended learning was transferred to their clinical performance six months after the module. A review of patient charts demonstrated inadequate documentation of history, evaluation, and counseling of patients with chronic hypertension at the first prenatal visit by Obstetrics and Gynecology (OB/GYN) residents. A blended learning module on chronic hypertension in pregnancy was then provided to the residents. A retrospective chart review was then performed to assess behavioral changes in the OB/GYN residents. This intervention was carried out at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Southern Illinois University. All 16 OB/GYN residents were enrolled in this module as part of their educational curriculum. A query of all prenatal patients diagnosed with chronic hypertension presenting to the OB/GYN resident clinics four months prior to the implementation of the blended learning module (March 2015-June 2015) and six months after (July 20, 2015-February 2016) was performed. Data were collected from outpatient charts utilizing the electronic medical record. Data were abstracted from resident documentation at the first prenatal visit. The residents thought that the blended learning module was applicable to performance improvement in the real-world setting. Patients evaluated before ( n = 10) and after ( n = 7) the intervention were compared. After the intervention, there was an increase in assessment of baseline liver enzymes, referral for electrocardiogram, and early assessment for diabetes in the obese patients. More patients were provided a blood pressure cuff after the module (71.4% vs. 20%). Data were provided to the residents in an

  9. Residency exposures and anticipated future involvement in community settings.

    PubMed

    Goldshore, Matthew A; Solomon, Barry S; Downs, Stephen M; Pan, Richard; Minkovitz, Cynthia S

    2014-01-01

    To assess how exposures to community activities in residency impact anticipated future involvement in community child health settings. Prospective cohort study of pediatric residents from 10 programs (12 sites) who completed training between 2003 and 2009. Residents reported annual participation for ≥ 8 days in each of 7 community activities (eg, community settings, child health advocacy) in the prior year. At the start and end of residency, residents reported anticipated involvement in 10 years in 8 community settings (eg, school, shelter). Anticipated involvement was dichotomized: moderate/substantial ("high") versus none/limited ("low"). Logistic regression modeled whether residency exposures independently influenced anticipated future involvement at the end of residency. A total of 683 residents completed surveys at the start and end of residency (66.8% participation). More than half of trainees reported ≥ 8 days' of involvement in community settings (65.6%) or child health advocacy (53.6%) in residency. Fewer anticipated high involvement in at least 1 community setting at the end of residency than at the start (65.5% vs 85.6%, P < .001). Participation in each community activity mediated but did not moderate relations between anticipated involvement at the start and end of residency. In multivariate models, exposure to community settings in residency was associated with anticipated involvement at end of residency (adjusted odds ratio 1.5; 95% confidence interval 1.2, 2.0). No other residency exposures were associated. Residents who anticipate high involvement in community pediatrics at the start of residency participate in related opportunities in training. Exposure to community settings during residency may encourage community involvement after training. Copyright © 2014 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Program Characteristics Influencing Allopathic Students' Residency Selection.

    PubMed

    Stillman, Michael D; Miller, Karen Hughes; Ziegler, Craig H; Upadhyay, Ashish; Mitchell, Charlene K

    2016-04-01

    Medical students must consider many overt variables when entering the National Resident Matching Program. However, changes with the single graduate medical education accreditation system have caused a gap in knowledge about more subtle considerations, including what, if any, influence the presence of osteopathic physician (ie, DO) and international medical graduate (IMG) house officers has on allopathic students' residency program preferences. Program directors and selection committee members may assume students' implicit bias without substantiating evidence. To reexamine which program characteristics affect US-trained allopathic medical students' residency selection, and to determine whether the presence of DO and IMG house officers affects the program choices of allopathic medical students. Fourth-year medical students from 4 allopathic medical schools completed an online survey. The Pearson χ(2) statistic was used to compare demographic and program-specific traits that influence ranking decisions and to determine whether school type (private vs public), valuing a residency program's prestige, or interest in a competitive specialty dictated results. Qualitative data were analyzed using the Pandit variation of the Glaser and Strauss constant comparison. Surveys were completed by 323 of 577 students (56%). Students from private vs public institutions were more likely to value a program's prestige (160 [93%] vs 99 [72%]; P<.001) and research opportunities (114 [66%] vs 57 [42%]; P<.001), and they were less likely to consider their prospects of being accepted (98 [57%] vs 111 [81%]; P<.001). A total of 33 (10%) and 52 (16%) students reported that the presence of DO or IMG trainees, respectively, would influence their final residency selection, and these percentages were largely unchanged among students interested in programs' prestige or in entering a competitive specialty. Open-ended comments were generally optimistic about diversification of the physician

  11. Universal problems during residency: abuse and harassment.

    PubMed

    Nagata-Kobayashi, Shizuko; Maeno, Tetsuhiro; Yoshizu, Misaki; Shimbo, Takuro

    2009-07-01

    Perceived abuse or harassment during residency has a negative impact on residents' health and well-being. This issue pertains not only to Western countries, but also to those in Asia. In order to launch strong international preventive measures against this problem, it is necessary to establish the generality and cultural specificity of this problem in different countries. Therefore, we investigated mistreatment among resident doctors in Japan. In 2007, a multi-institutional, cross-sectional survey was conducted at 37 hospitals. A total of 619 residents (409 men, 210 women) were recruited. Prevalence of mistreatment in six categories was evaluated: verbal abuse; physical abuse; academic abuse; sexual harassment; gender discrimination, and alcohol-associated harassment. In addition, alleged abusers, the emotional effects of abusive experiences, and reluctance to report the abuse to superiors were investigated. Male and female responses were statistically compared using chi-square analysis. A total of 355 respondents (228 men, 127 women) returned a completed questionnaire (response rate 57.4%). Mistreatment was reported by 84.8% of respondents (n = 301). Verbal abuse was the most frequently experienced form of mistreatment (n = 256, 72.1%), followed by alcohol-associated harassment (n = 184, 51.8%). Among women, sexual harassment was also often reported (n = 74, 58.3%). Doctors were most often reported as abusers (n = 124, 34.9%), followed by patients (n = 77, 21.7%) and nurses (n = 61, 17.2%). Abuse was reported to have occurred most frequently during surgical rotations (n = 98, 27.6%), followed by rotations in departments of internal medicine (n = 76, 21.4%), emergency medicine (n = 41, 11.5%) and anaesthesia (n = 40, 11.3%). Very few respondents reported their experiences of abuse to superiors (n = 36, 12.0%). The most frequent emotional response to experiences of abuse was anger (n = 84, 41.4%). Mistreatment during residency is a universal phenomenon. Deliberation

  12. Preparedness of Entering Pediatric Dentistry Residents: Advanced Pediatric Program Directors' and First-Year Residents' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Rutkauskas, John; Seale, N Sue; Casamassimo, Paul; Rutkauskas, John S

    2015-11-01

    For children to receive needed oral health care, adequate training at both the predoctoral and postdoctoral levels of dental education is required, but previous studies have found inadequacies in predoctoral education that lead to general dentists' unwillingness to treat certain young populations. As another way of assessing predoctoral preparation, the aim of this study was to determine the perspectives of first-year residents and pediatric program directors about residents' preparedness to enter advanced education programs in pediatric dentistry. Surveys were sent to all 74 U.S. program directors and 360 first-year residents. The survey focused on procedures related to prevention, behavior management, restorative procedures, pulp therapy, sedation, and surgery, as well as treating patients funded by Medicaid and with special health care needs. Among the first-year residents, 173 surveys were returned for a 48% response rate; 61 directors returned surveys for an 82% response rate. Only half of the residents (55%) reported feeling adequately prepared for their first year in residency; less than half cited adequate preparation to place stainless steel crowns (SSCs) (42%) and perform pulpotomies (45%). Far fewer felt adequately prepared to provide treatment for children six months to three years of age, including examinations (29%), infant oral exams (27%), and children with severe caries (37%). The program directors were even less positive about the adequacy of residents' preparation. Only 17% deemed them adequately prepared to place SSCs and 13% to perform pulpotomies. Approximately half reported their first-year residents were inadequately prepared to treat very young children and children with severe caries (55% each). This study found that the perceived inadequacy of predoctoral education in pediatric dentistry was consistent at both the learner and educator levels, supporting previous studies identifying inadequacies in this area.

  13. Graduates-of-foreign-dermatology residencies and military dermatology residencies and women in academic dermatology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jashin J; Davis, Kristy F; Ramirez, Claudia C; Alonso, Carol A; Berman, Brian; Tyring, Stephen K

    2009-05-15

    It is well known that there is a growing shortage of academic dermatologists in the U.S. The number of graduates of foreign dermatology residencies (GFDR) and graduates of military dermatology residencies (GMDR) who take full-time academic dermatology positions are currently unknown. It is likely that a higher proportion of GFDRs and GMDRs are more likely to enter academics and practice medical dermatology. The percentage of women in academic dermatology has not been reported since 1994. To determine the total number of GFDRs, GMDRs, and women who are full-time faculty members at U.S. dermatology residency programs. The educational background of all full-time faculty members of the 107 U.S. dermatology residency programs that were active as of December 2004 were determined through extensive Internet searches, telephone, and email correspondences with residency coordinators and faculty members. Pure PhDs, physicians who did not complete a dermatology residency program at an allopathic school, PharmDs, DDSs, and FNPs were excluded. The University of Puerto Rico was not considered a foreign residency program. As of December 2004, there were 988 full-time dermatology faculty members in the US, 813 of which met our inclusion criteria. There were 30 GFDRs, accounting for 3.7 percent of full-time academic dermatologists. There were 29 GMDRs, accounting for 3.6 percent of all full-time academic dermatologists. Women accounted for 44.42 percent of academic dermatologists and 15.9 percent (14/107) of dermatology chairs/chiefs. GFDRs, GMDRs, and women comprise important proportions of full-time faculty members at U.S. dermatology residency programs.

  14. Exposing physicians to reduced residency work hours did not adversely affect patient outcomes after residency.

    PubMed

    Jena, Anupam B; Schoemaker, Lena; Bhattacharya, Jay

    2014-10-01

    In 2003, work hours for physicians-in-training (residents) were capped by regulation at eighty hours per week, leading to the hotly debated but unexplored issue of whether physicians today are less well trained as a result of these work-hour reforms. Using a unique database of nearly all hospitalizations in Florida during 2000-09 that were linked to detailed information on the medical training history of the physician of record for each hospitalization, we studied whether hospital mortality and patients' length-of-stay varied according to the number of years a physician was exposed to the 2003 duty-hour regulations during his or her residency. We examined this database of practicing Florida physicians, using a difference-in-differences analysis that compared trends in outcomes of junior physicians (those with one-year post-residency experience) pre- and post-2003 to a control group of senior physicians (those with ten or more years of post-residency experience) who were not exposed to these reforms during their residency. We found that the duty-hour reforms did not adversely affect hospital mortality and length-of-stay of patients cared for by new attending physicians who were partly or fully exposed to reduced duty hours during their own residency. However, assessment of the impact of the duty-hour reforms on other clinical outcomes is needed. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  15. Teaching psychotherapy to psychiatric residents in Israel.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Arieh Y

    2007-01-01

    This work examines the rationale for, and the feasibility of teaching psychotherapy to psychiatric residents, and the "what if" of dropping it from the curriculum. Psychotherapy is one of the pillars of psychiatry. However, current economic constraints and the increasing weight of phenomenological and biological psychiatry make it more difficult to prioritize and allocate resources to its teaching. The term psychotherapy encompasses several techniques, some of which are extremely effective. It often confounds skills, attitudes, theory, body of knowledge and specific practices. Looking at each component separately, a stepped curriculum for teaching is outlined; alternatives to traditional theories are offered; and the need to allocate time and resources for teaching and learning are shown as the rate-limiting factor for the survival of psychotherapy within psychiatry. Not limited to residents, the debate about psychotherapy in psychiatry concerns the profession's core identity and its traditional person-centered nature.

  16. Otolaryngology residency selection process. Medical student perspective.

    PubMed

    Stringer, S P; Cassisi, N J; Slattery, W H

    1992-04-01

    In an effort to improve the otolaryngology matching process at the University of Florida, Gainesville, we sought to obtain the medical student's perspective of the current system. All students who interviewed here over a 3-year period were surveyed regarding the application, interview, and ranking process. In addition, suggestions for improving the system were sought from the students. The application and interviewing patterns of the students surveyed were found to be similar to those of the entire otolaryngology residency applicant pool. We were unable to identify any factors that influence a student's rank list that could be prospectively used to help select applicants for interview. A variety of suggestions for improvements in the match were received, several of which could easily be instituted. A uniform interview invitation date as requested by the students could be rapidly implemented and would provide benefits for both the students and the residency programs.

  17. Hedgehog and Resident Vascular Stem Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Ciaran J.; Hakimjavadi, Roya; Fitzpatrick, Emma; Kennedy, Eimear; Walls, Dermot; Morrow, David; Redmond, Eileen M.; Cahill, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog pathway is a pivotal morphogenic driver during embryonic development and a key regulator of adult stem cell self-renewal. The discovery of resident multipotent vascular stem cells and adventitial progenitors within the vessel wall has transformed our understanding of the origin of medial and neointimal vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) during vessel repair in response to injury, lesion formation, and overall disease progression. This review highlights the importance of components of the Hh and Notch signalling pathways within the medial and adventitial regions of adult vessels, their recapitulation following vascular injury and disease progression, and their putative role in the maintenance and differentiation of resident vascular stem cells to vascular lineages from discrete niches within the vessel wall. PMID:26064136

  18. Florida manatee now resident in the Bahamas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, James P.

    2000-01-01

    In January 2000, both the Bahamas National Trust and the Save the Manatee Club received reports of a manatee at Bullocks Harbor, Great Harbour Cay, Bahamas. Under permit with the Bahamas’ Department of Fisheries, I visited Great Harbour Cay from 25 to 27 February 2000 to make a field assessment of the manatee, interview local residents, and provide management recommendations. Detailed below are findings from this trip and a review of this individual’s interesting history.

  19. The Need for an Aerospace Pharmacy Residency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayuse, T.; Schuyler, C.; Bayuse, Tina M.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph poster presentation reviews the rationale for a call for a new program in residency for aerospace pharmacy. Aerospace medicine provides a unique twist on traditional medicine, and a specialty has evolved to meet the training for physicians, and it is becoming important to develop such a program for training in pharmacy designed for aerospace. The reasons for this specialist training are outlined and the challenges of developing a program are reviewed.

  20. Urban food environments and residents' shopping behaviors.

    PubMed

    Cannuscio, Carolyn C; Tappe, Karyn; Hillier, Amy; Buttenheim, Alison; Karpyn, Allison; Glanz, Karen

    2013-11-01

    Food environments may promote or undermine healthy behaviors, but questions remain regarding how individuals interact with their local food environments. This study incorporated an urban food environment audit as well as an examination of residents' food shopping behaviors within that context. In 2010, the research team audited the variety and healthfulness of foods available in 373 Philadelphia stores, using the validated Nutrition Environment Measures Survey in Stores (NEMS-S); higher scores indicate more diverse and healthful food inventories. The team also surveyed urban residents (n=514) regarding their food shopping. Descriptive and multivariate analyses (conducted in 2012) assessed variation in retail food environments and in shoppers' store choices. Corner and convenience stores were common (78.6% of food retail outlets) and had the lowest mean NEMS-S scores of any store type. Most participants (94.5%) did their primary food shopping at higher-scoring chain supermarkets, and the majority of participants did not shop at the supermarket closest to home. Supermarket offerings varied, with significantly fewer healthful foods at supermarkets closest to the homes of disadvantaged residents. In multivariate analyses, participants were significantly more likely to shop at supermarkets closest to home if those supermarkets had higher NEMS-S scores. These data suggest that, when possible, shoppers chose supermarkets that offered more variety and more healthful foods. Findings from this study also reinforce concern regarding unhealthy immediate food environments for disadvantaged residents, who disproportionately relied on nearby stores with more limited food items. Interventions to improve nutrition and health should address not only food store proximity but also diversity of healthful foods available. © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

  1. Unverifiable publications in otolaryngology residency applications.

    PubMed

    Ishman, Stacey L; Smith, David F; Skinner, Margaret L; Vigilar, Maria V C; Mettel, Tiffany L; Cavey, Roxann M; Benke, James R; Donahue, Rachel L; Ishii, Lisa E

    2012-08-01

    To determine the prevalence of unverifiable ("ghost") publications in applications to an otolaryngology residency program through the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS), correlate with applicant characteristics, and determine if incidence changed after the addition of PubMed (PMID) numbers in 2008. Cross-sectional study of residency applications before and after inclusion of PMID numbers at an academic otolaryngology program. Applications for 2007 and 2008 were reviewed. Publications were verified against Medline, Google Scholar, PubMed, ISI Web of Science, and Google. Ghost publications were defined as journals, books, abstracts, or posters that could not be verified as presented, published, or including the applicant author. In total, 489 applications were reviewed: 243 before PMID numbers were requested and 246 after. Of 2300 listed publications, 125 (5%) were not actual publications and 460 (20%) were in pending status. Forty-five percent (775/1715) could not be verified: 660 of 953 (69%) abstracts/posters, 18 of 47 (38%) chapters, and 97 of 715 (14%) journal articles. Abstracts/posters and book chapters were hardest to verify. The proportion of overall reported publications that could be verified was lower following the addition of PMID to the ERAS application (P = .0003), and the proportion of verifiable journal articles was unchanged from 86.0% to 86.9% (P = .62). Unlike previous findings, gender and medical school ranking were not associated with ghost publications. A substantial number of publications, especially book chapters and posters/abstracts, listed on otolaryngology residency applications could not be verified. The addition of the PMID to applications did not reduce the number of ghost journal publications.

  2. Personal finances of residents at three Canadian universities

    PubMed Central

    Teichman, Joel M.H.; Matsumoto, Edward; Smart, Michael; Smith, Aspen E.; Tongco, Wayne; Hosking, Denis E.; MacNeily, Andrew E.; Jewett, Michael A.S.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives To address 3 research questions (What financial choices do residents make? Are the financial choices of residents similar to those of the general public? Are the financial choices of surgical residents reasonable?), we examined financial data from Canadian residents. Methods A written survey was administered to 338 residents (103 of them surgical residents) at 3 Canadian training institutions (University of Toronto, Queen's University and University of Manitoba). Resident household cash flows, assets and liabilities were characterized. Finances for residents were compared with those of the general public, by means of the Survey of Household Spending and Survey of Financial Security. Results Median resident income was $45 000 annually (Can$ throughout). With a working spouse, median household income was $87 500. Among residents, 62% had educational debt (median $37 500), 39% maintained unpaid credit-card balances (median $1750), 36% did not budget expenses, 25% maintained cash reserves < $275, and 22% contributed neither to retirement nor nonretirement investments. Residents spent more on vehicles compared with members of the general public (median $17 500 v. $10 720, p = 0.002) and on monthly housing (median $875 v. $729, p < 0.001), respectively. Residents were more likely to carry student loans than people in the general population (61% v. 21%), more likely to carry vehicle loans (74% v. 29%) and less likely to carry credit-card debts (39% v. 50%, respectively). Surgical residents had income expectations after graduation higher than current billings justified. Fewer surgical (69%) than anesthesiology residents (88%, p < 0.05) contributed to Registered Retirement Savings Plans. Conclusions From this limited sample, residents spend more than age- and income-matched members of the general public. Many residents save too little, fail to budget, and carry high educational and credit-card debts. Surgical residents' expectations of future income may be

  3. Personal finances of residents at three Canadian universities.

    PubMed

    Teichman, Joel M H; Matsumoto, Edward; Smart, Michael; Smith, Aspen E; Tongco, Wayne; Hosking, Denis E; MacNeily, Andrew E; Jewett, Michael A S

    2005-02-01

    To address 3 research questions (What financial choices do residents make? Are the financial choices of residents similar to those of the general public? Are the financial choices of surgical residents reasonable?), we examined financial data from Canadian residents. A written survey was administered to 338 residents (103 of them surgical residents) at 3 Canadian training institutions (University of Toronto, Queen's University and University of Manitoba). Resident household cash flows, assets and liabilities were characterized. Finances for residents were compared with those of the general public, by means of the Survey of Household Spending and Survey of Financial Security. Median resident income was 45,000 dollars annually (Can dollars throughout). With a working spouse, median household income was 87,500 dollars. Among residents, 62% had educational debt (median 37,500 dollars), 39% maintained unpaid credit-card balances (median 1750 dollars), 36% did not budget expenses, 25% maintained cash reserves <275 dollars, and 22% contributed neither to retirement nor nonretirement investments. Residents spent more on vehicles compared with members of the general public (median 17,500 dollars v. 10,720 dollars, p = 0.002) and on monthly housing (median 875 dollars v. 729 dollars, p < 0.001), respectively. Residents were more likely to carry student loans than people in the general population (61% v. 21%), more likely to carry vehicle loans (74% v. 29%) and less likely to carry credit-card debts (39% v. 50%, respectively). Surgical residents had income expectations after graduation higher than current billings justified. Fewer surgical (69%) than anesthesiology residents (88%, p < 0.05) contributed to Registered Retirement Savings Plans. From this limited sample, residents spend more than age- and income-matched members of the general public. Many residents save too little, fail to budget, and carry high educational and credit-card debts. Surgical residents' expectations

  4. Residents-as-teachers programs in psychiatry: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Charlene M; Coverdale, John H; Ismail, Nadia J; Culberson, John W; Thompson, Britta M; Patton, Cynthia S; Friedland, Joan A

    2008-02-01

    Because psychiatry residents have important roles as teachers and significant opportunities to contribute to medical student education, we set out to: identify all randomized control trials (RCT) for residents' teaching skills programs in psychiatry and to identify the efficacy of those interventions for improving teaching skills; identify the strengths and weaknesses of the available studies across medical disciplines; and identify currently available methods for enhancing residents' teaching skills for residents training in psychiatry. The published English-language literature was searched using PubMed, Social Sciences Index, and PsycINFO databases, with key search words including: residents, teaching skills, residents as teachers, psychiatry, and assessments. Both RCT and controlled, nonrandomized trials of residents' teaching programs directed to enhance residents' teaching skills were selected and critically appraised. Of 13 trials identified and reviewed, most included residents in internal medicine. Only one included psychiatry residents and assessed their ability to teach interviewing skills to medical students. Along with other studies, this study demonstrated improvement in residents' teaching skills. Overall, interventions and outcome measures were heterogeneous while the quality of methodologies varied. Five studies were of higher quality, representing examples of quality educational research. Several described group differences, blinding, good follow-up, and use of valid, reliable tools. Only one trial exists that incorporated psychiatry residents. Significant opportunity to advance educational research in this field exists. Psychiatry residency program directors should incorporate high-quality methodologies and can benefit from the findings of trials in other disciplines.

  5. Variable Operative Experience in Hand Surgery for Plastic Surgery Residents.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Jason; Lin, Ines C; Levin, Lawrence Scott; Chang, Benjamin

    Efforts to standardize hand surgery training during plastic surgery residency remain challenging. We analyze the variability of operative hand experience at U.S. plastic surgery residency programs. Operative case logs of chief residents in accredited U.S. plastic surgery residency programs were analyzed (2011-2015). Trends in fold differences of hand surgery case volume between the 10th and 90th percentiles of residents were assessed graphically. Percentile data were used to calculate the number of residents achieving case minimums in hand surgery for 2015. Case logs from 818 plastic surgery residents were analyzed of which a minority were from integrated (35.7%) versus independent/combined (64.3%) residents. Trend analysis of fold differences in case volume demonstrated decreasing variability among procedure categories over time. By 2015, fold differences for hand reconstruction, tendon cases, nerve cases, arthroplasty/arthrodesis, amputation, arterial repair, Dupuytren release, and neoplasm cases were below 10-fold. Congenital deformity cases among independent/combined residents was the sole category that exceeded 10-fold by 2015. Percentile data suggested that approximately 10% of independent/combined residents did not meet case minimums for arterial repair and congenital deformity in 2015. Variable operative experience during plastic surgery residency may limit adequate exposure to hand surgery for certain residents. Future studies should establish empiric case minimums for plastic surgery residents to ensure hand surgery competency upon graduation. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Leadership for All: An Internal Medicine Residency Leadership Development Program.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jared M; Wininger, David A; Martin, Bryan

    2016-10-01

    Developing effective leadership skills in physicians is critical for safe patient care. Few residency-based models of leadership training exist. We evaluated residents' readiness to engage in leadership training, feasibility of implementing training for all residents, and residents' acceptance of training. In its fourth year, the Leadership Development Program (LDP) consists of twelve 90-minute modules (eg, Team Decision Making and Bias, Leadership Styles, Authentic Leadership) targeting all categorical postgraduate year (PGY) 1 residents. Modules are taught during regularly scheduled educational time. Focus group surveys and discussions, as well as annual surveys of PGY-1s assessed residents' readiness to engage in training. LDP feasibility was assessed by considering sustainability of program structures and faculty retention, and resident acceptance of training was assessed by measuring attendance, with the attendance goal of 8 of 12 modules. Residents thought leadership training would be valuable if content remained applicable to daily work, and PGY-1 residents expressed high levels of interest in training. The LDP is part of the core educational programming for PGY-1 residents. Except for 2 modules, faculty presenters have remained consistent. During academic year 2014-2015, 45% (13 of 29) of categorical residents participated in at least 8 of 12 modules, and 72% (21 of 29) participated in at least 7 of 12. To date, 125 categorical residents have participated in training. Residents appeared ready to engage in leadership training, and the LDP was feasible to implement. The attendance goal was not met, but attendance was sufficient to justify program continuation.

  7. Increasing Residency Research Output While Cultivating Community Research Collaborations.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Sally P

    2018-06-01

    Having a research curriculum in addition to hosting a resident research day stimulates research activity in residency programs. Research collaborations outside an individual residency program may also promote research in residency. This paper describes a community-wide health research forum that engages faculty and residents in research while bringing together potential research collaborators from the community. A yearly research forum has been held at a large community-based family medicine residency program for the past 10 years. This forum invites both residency faculty and residents to present scholarly works, and also invites researchers from the community to present health-related research. Presenters outside the residency come from hospital systems, the local university, other residency programs, and community private physicians. Peer-reviewed research publications have increased greatly since the advent of the research forum in 2006, with six publications from 1997-2006 and 26 from 2007-2016. Greater increases in numbers of peer reviewed presentations were also seen. Collaborative research has occurred between residency faculty and multiple departments at the local university including the business school, social work, public health, physiology, and statistics. There are now 28 collaborative projects completed or in progress. Development and implementation of a regional health research event has been a success in increasing faculty and resident research productivity. The even greater success however, is the progress made in advancing research collaborations between the local university and the residency program.

  8. Implementation of a "Flipped Classroom" for Neurosurgery Resident Education.

    PubMed

    Girgis, Fady; Miller, Jonathan P

    2018-01-01

    Engaging residents across a multiyear training spectrum is challenging given the heterogeneity of experience and limited time available for educational activities. A "flipped classroom" model, in which residents prepare ahead of time for mentored topic discussions, has potential advantages. We implemented a curriculum consisting of topics distributed across the specialty. Weekly, each resident was randomly assigned to research a specific aspect of an assigned topic appropriate to his or her level of experience: junior residents about what characterizes each clinical entity, midlevel residents about when to intervene, and chief residents about how to administer treatment. Residents completed an anonymous survey 6 months after implementation. Board examination performance was assessed before and after implementation. A total of 12 residents participated in the program. Weekly, 1.75±0.40 hours were spent in preparation, with senior residents reporting less time than junior residents. All residents indicated that the accumulation of experience across 7 years of residency was a major advantage of this program, and all preferred it to lectures. Performance on the board examination significantly increased after implementation (from 316±36 to 468±45, p<0.05). The flipped classroom is a viable approach to resident education and is associated with increased engagement and improved performance using validated knowledge-assessment tools.

  9. Teaching strategies used by internal medicine residents on the wards.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dustin T; Kohlwes, R Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Residents serve as teachers to interns and students in most internal medicine residency programs. The purpose of our study is to explore what internal medicine residents perceive as effective teaching strategies in the inpatient setting and to formulate a guideline for preparing residents to lead their ward teams. Housestaff identified as excellent teaching residents were recruited from a large internal medicine residency program. Focus groups were formed and interviews were conducted using open-ended questions. Transcripts of the interviews were reviewed, analyzed, and compared for accuracy by two investigators. The transcripts were then coded to categorize data into similar subjects from which recurrent themes in resident teaching were identified. Twenty-two residents participated in four focus group interviews held in 2008. We identified five principal themes for effective teaching by residents: (T)aking advantage of teaching opportunities, (E)mpowering learners, (A)ssuming the role of leader, (C)reating a learning environment, and (H)abituating the practice of teaching. Strategies for effective teaching by residents exist. The TEACH mnemonic is a resident-identified method of instruction. Use of this tool could enable residency programs to create instructional curricula to prepare their residents and interns to take on the roles of team leaders and teachers.

  10. Making residency work hour rules work.

    PubMed

    Cohen, I Glenn; Czeisler, Charles A; Landrigan, Christopher P

    2013-01-01

    In July 2011, the ACGME implemented new rules that limit interns to 16 hours of work in a row, but continue to allow 2nd-year and higher resident physicians to work for up to 28 consecutive hours. Whether the ACGME's 2011 work hour limits went too far or did not go far enough has been hotly debated. In this article, we do not seek to re-open the debate about whether these standards get matters exactly right. Instead, we wish to address the issue of effective enforcement. That is, now that new work hour limits have been established, and given that the ACGME has been unable to enforce work hour limits effectively on its own, what is the best way to make sure the new limits are followed in order to reduce harm to residents, patients, and others due to sleep-deprived residents? We focus on three possible national approaches to the problem, one rooted in funding, one rooted in disclosure, and one rooted in tort law. © 2013 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  11. Misrepresentation of publications by radiology residency applicants.

    PubMed

    Baker, D R; Jackson, V P

    2000-09-01

    The authors' purpose was to determine the extent of misrepresentation of research publications by radiology resident applicants. The authors reviewed 379 consecutive applications, including curricula vitae, for a radiology residency program in 1996. All reported publications and "in-press" articles were checked by means of a MEDLINE search. Of the 379 applicants, 108 were from medical schools in the United States, and 271 were from international medical schools. Seventy-three applicants listed articles published or in press on their applications (24 U.S., 49 international applicants). Of 286 separate citations in the applications, 105 were found with the MEDLINE search, and 181 were not found. Of the latter, 168 cited journals were not indexed in MEDLINE or the applicants did not include sufficient information to verify their existence. Thirteen citations (from eight applicants; three U.S., five international) were not found even though they cited journals indexed by MEDLINE. Of all applicants reporting publications, 11% likely misrepresented them on their applications. A large percentage of citations, however, could not be verified because of insufficient information in the citation or claimed publication in a journal not available on MEDLINE. Radiology residency program directors should be aware of this uncommon, but important, problem.

  12. Tickborne Powassan virus infections among Wisconsin residents.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Diep K Hoang; Staples, J Erin; Sotir, Mark J; Warshauer, David M; Davis, Jeffrey P

    2010-04-01

    Powassan virus (POWV) is a tickborne Flavivirus that causes a rare but potentially life-threatening illness. The first reported case of POWV infection in a Wisconsin resident occurred in 2003. Enhanced surveillance and testing detected 2 additional cases. Patient specimens with a positive or equivocal immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody to an arbovirus were sent from commercial laboratories to the Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene and forwarded to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for confirmatory testing. Patients with laboratory confirmed POWV infections were interviewed to obtain demographic, clinical, and epidemiologic information. POWV infections were confirmed in 3 adult Wisconsin residents in 2003, 2006, and 2007; illness onsets occurred during May and June. Two patients were hospitalized and all survived. One patient had a dual infection with POWV and Anaplasma phaghocytophilum. Specimens from all 3 patients were initially reported as positive for IgM antibody to either St Louis encephalitis or California serogroup viruses; POWV-specific antibody was detected during confirmatory testing at the CDC. Each patient had exposures to known or likely tick habitats in different counties within 30 days before illness onset. These are the first diagnosed human POWV infections in Wisconsin. Because all 3 patients were initially identified as having other arboviral infections using commercial screening kits, routine confirmatory testing is essential for proper diagnosis of most arboviral infections. Wisconsin residents should be educated regarding risks of acquiring and ways to prevent POWV infection and other tickborne diseases when spending time outdoors.

  13. Physical aggressive resident behavior during hygienic care.

    PubMed

    Farrell Miller, M

    1997-05-01

    Management of aggressive behavior has been identified as a concern for nursing staff who provide institutional care for cognitively impaired elderly. The Omnibus Reconciliation Act (OBRA '87) mandates a trial reduction in the use of chemical and physical restraints, and the development of nursing interventions for the management of behavioral disorders of institutionalized cognitively impaired elderly. Most skilled nursing facilities, however, are limited in their ability to provide environmental and behavioral programs to manage aggressive patient behavior. For the purposes of this study, physically aggressive behavior was identified as threatened or actual aggressive patient contact which has taken place between a patient and a member of the nursing staff. This study explored the nursing staff's responses to patient physical aggression and the effects that physical aggression had on them and on nursing practice from the perspective of the nursing staff. Nursing staff employed on one Dementia Special Care Unit (DSCU) were invited to participate. Interviews with nursing staff were analyzed using qualitative descriptive methods described by Miles and Huberman (1994). Nursing staff reported that they were subjected to aggressive patient behaviors ranging from verbal threats to actual physical violence. Nursing staff reported that showering a resident was the activity of daily living most likely to provoke patient to staff physical aggression. The findings revealed geropsychiatric nursing practices for the management of physically aggressive residents, and offered recommendations for improving the safety of nursing staff and residents on a secured DSCU.

  14. [Experiences of bullying in medical residents].

    PubMed

    Ortiz-León, Silvia; Jaimes-Medrano, Aurora Leonila; Tafoya-Ramos, Silvia Aracely; Mujica-Amaya, María Luisa; Olmedo-Canchola, Víctor Hugo; Carrasco-Rojas, José Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Harassment and abuse are forms of persistent intimidating behavior against a person and in medical practice those are accepted and justified at all levels of education and are considered specific to the hospital culture. To identify the frequency of harassment and some factors related to its existence on residents of medical specialties in Mexico City. A linear study was carried out in which a total of 260 interns pertaining to the following medical specialties: surgery, internal medicine, gynecology and obstetrics, and pediatrics participated. The study took place in three general hospitals in Mexico City. Two evaluations with Leymann Inventory of Psychological-Terrorization (LIPT-60) with 6 months between assessments were performed. Comparison between the first and second evaluations did not show differences in any of the harassment measurements obtained. Of all residents, 265 (98.5%) claimed to have experienced some type of harassing behavior against them at least once during the previous 6 months, with a 1.4 (±0.5) average intensity, showing no difference between men and women. Women received a higher grade than men on the communication block scale. Harassing behaviors that obtained the highest average values were evident intimidation and occupational discredit. Among all harassment measurements, the specialty of gynecology and obstetrics showed the highest grade. The hospital influenced the reported harassment. The most common harassing behaviors were occupational discredit, verbal threats, shouting, and mockery. The high frequency of harassment that medical residents experience during their hospital training deserves our attention.

  15. Blended Learning in Obstetrics and Gynecology Resident Education: Impact on Resident Clinical Performance

    PubMed Central

    Ghareeb, Allen; Han, Heeyoung; Delfino, Kristin; Taylor, Funminiyi

    2016-01-01

    Problem Effects of residents’ blended learning on their clinical performance have rarely been reported. A blended learning pilot program was instituted at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine's Obstetrics and Gynecology program. One of the modules was chronic hypertension in pregnancy. We sought to evaluate if the resident blended learning was transferred to their clinical performance six months after the module. Intervention A review of patient charts demonstrated inadequate documentation of history, evaluation, and counseling of patients with chronic hypertension at the first prenatal visit by Obstetrics and Gynecology (OB/GYN) residents. A blended learning module on chronic hypertension in pregnancy was then provided to the residents. A retrospective chart review was then performed to assess behavioral changes in the OB/GYN residents. Context This intervention was carried out at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Southern Illinois University. All 16 OB/GYN residents were enrolled in this module as part of their educational curriculum. A query of all prenatal patients diagnosed with chronic hypertension presenting to the OB/GYN resident clinics four months prior to the implementation of the blended learning module (March 2015–June 2015) and six months after (July 20, 2015–February 2016) was performed. Data were collected from outpatient charts utilizing the electronic medical record. Data were abstracted from resident documentation at the first prenatal visit. Outcome The residents thought that the blended learning module was applicable to performance improvement in the real-world setting. Patients evaluated before (n = 10) and after (n = 7) the intervention were compared. After the intervention, there was an increase in assessment of baseline liver enzymes, referral for electrocardiogram, and early assessment for diabetes in the obese patients. More patients were provided a blood pressure cuff after the module (71.4% vs. 20%). Data

  16. Atmospheric Residence Times of Continental Aerosols.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balkanski, Yves Jacques

    The global atmospheric distributions of ^{222}Rn and ^{210 }Pb are simulated with a three-dimensional model of atmospheric transport based on the meteorology of the NASA GISS^1>=neral circulation model. The short-lived radioactive gas ^ {222}Rn (half-life = 3.8d) is emitted almost exclusively from land, at a relatively uniform rate; hence it is an excellent tracer of continental influences. Lead -210 is produced by decay of ^{222} Rn and immediately condenses to preexisting aerosol surfaces. It provides an excellent measure of aerosol residence times in the atmosphere because its source is accurately defined by the ^{222} Rn distribution. Results from the three-dimensional model are compared to measurements of ^ {222}Rn and ^{210 }Pb atmospheric concentrations to evaluate model's long-range transport over oceanic regions and to study the deposition mechanisms of atmospheric aerosols. Model results for ^{222} Rn are used to examine the long-range transport of continental air over two selected oceanic regions, the subantartic Indian Ocean and the North Pacific. It is shown that fast transport of air from southern Africa causes substantial continental pollution at southern mid-latitudes, a region usually regarded as pristine. Air over the North Pacific is heavily impacted by continental influences year round, but the altitude at which the transport occurs varies seasonally. Observations of aerosols at island sites, which are commonly used as diagnostics of continental influences, may be misleading because they do not account for influences at high altitude and because aerosols are efficiently scavenged by deposition during transport. The study of ^{210}Pb focuses on defining the residence times of submicron aerosols in the troposphere. Scavenging in wet convective updrafts is found to provide the dominant sink on a global scale. The globally averaged residence time for ^{210 }Pb-containing aerosols in the troposphere is 7 days. The average increase in residence time

  17. Training on the clock: family medicine residency directors' responses to resident duty hours reform.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lars E; Johnson, Hillary; Pugno, Perry A; Bazemore, Andrew; Phillips, Robert L

    2006-12-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's 2003 restrictions on resident duty hours (RDH) raised concerns among educators about potential negative impacts on residents' training. In the early wake of these restrictions, little is known about how RDH reform impacts training in primary care. The authors surveyed family medicine (FM) residency program directors (PDs) for their perceptions of the impact of RDH regulations on training in primary care. All PDs of 472 FM residency programs were asked via list-serve to complete an anonymous Internet-based survey in the fall of 2004. The survey solicited PDs' opinions about changes in staff and in residents' training experiences with respect to implementation of RDH regulations. Descriptive and qualitative analyses were conducted. There were 369 partial and 328 complete responses, for a response rate of 69% (328/472). Effects of the RDH regulations are varied. Fifty percent of FMPDs report increased patient-care duties for attendings, whereas 42% report no increase. Nearly 80% of programs hired no additional staff. Sixty percent of programs eliminated postcall clinics, and nearly 40% implemented a night-float system. Administrative hassles and losses of professionalism, educational opportunity, and continuity of care were common concerns, but a sizeable minority feel that residents will be better off under the new regulations. Many FMPDs cited increased faculty burden and the risk of lower-quality educational experiences for their trainees. Innovations for increasing the effectiveness of teaching may ultimately compensate for lost educational time. If not, alternatives such as extending the length of residency must be considered.

  18. DETERMINANTS OF SPECIALTY CHOICE OF RESIDENT DOCTORS; CASE STUDY--AMONG RESIDENT DOCTORS IN NIGERIA.

    PubMed

    Osuoji, Roland I; Adebanji, Atinuke; Abdulsalam, Moruf A; Oludara, Mobolaji A; Abolarinwa, Abimbola A

    2015-01-01

    This study examined medical specialty selection by Nigerian resident doctors using a marketing research approach to determine the selection criteria and the role of perceptions, expected remuneration, and job placement prospects of various specialties in the selection process. Data were from the Community of residents from April 2014 to July 2014. The cohort included 200 residents, but only 171 had complete information. Data were obtained from a cross section of resident doctors in the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital and at the 2014 Ordinary General Meeting of the National Association of Resident Doctors(NARD) where representatives from over 50 Teaching hospitals in Nigeria attended. Using a client behaviour model as a framework, a tripartite questionnaire was designed and administered to residents to deduce information on their knowledge about and interests in various specialties, their opinions of sixteen specialties, and the criteria they used in specialty selection. A total of 171 (85.5%) questionnaires were returned. ln many instances, consistency between selection criteria and perceptions of a specialty were accompanied by interest in pursuing the specialty. Job security, job availability on completion of programme, duration of training and qualifying examinations were highly correlated with p value < 0.05. Results of the Principal Component Analysis show two components (with Eigen values greater than one) explaining 65.3% of the total variance. The first component had placement and training and practice related variables loaded on it while the second component was loaded with job security and financial remuneration related variables. Using marketing research concepts for medical specialty selection (Weissmanet al 2012) stipulates that choice of speciality is influenced by criteria and perception. This study shows that job security expected financial remuneration, and examination requirements for qualification are major determinants of the choice of

  19. Competence in pediatric urology upon graduation from residency: perceptions of residents, program directors and pediatric urologists.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, Jennifer J; Macneily, Andrew E; Samarasekera, Dinesh; Beiko, Darren; Afshar, Kourosh

    2008-06-01

    We aimed to clarify the scope of pediatric urological procedures that Canadian urology residents are perceived to be competent to perform upon graduation. We conducted a survey from April 2005 to June 2006 of urology residency program directors (UPDs), senior urology residents (SURs) and Pediatric Urologists of Canada (PUC) members from all 12 Canadian training programs. Questions focused on which of 23 pediatric urological procedures the 3 study groups perceived urology residents would be competent to perform upon completion of residency without further fellowship training. Procedures were based on the "A," "B" and "C" lists of procedures (least complex to most complex) as outlined in the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada Objectives of Training in Urology. Response rates were 12/12 (100%), 41/53 (77%) and 17/23 (74%) for UPDs, SURs and PUC members, respectively. Average exposure to pediatric urology during residency was 5.4 (range 3-9) months and considered sufficient by 75% of UPDs and 69% of SURs, but only 41% of PUC members (p = 0.05). Overall, the 3 groups disagreed on the level of competence for performing level "A" and "B" procedures, with significant disagreement between PUC members and UPDs as well as SURs (p < 0.005). PUC members perceive Canadian urology residents' exposure to pediatric urology as insufficient and their competence for procedures of low to moderate complexity as inadequate. Further investigation regarding exposure to and competence in other emerging subspecialty spheres of urology may be warranted. Ongoing assessment of the objectives for training in pediatric urology is required.

  20. Teaching residents to use asthma devices. Assessing family residents' skills and a brief intervention.

    PubMed Central

    Kelcher, S.; Brownoff, R.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate an educational program for family medicine residents on using selected inhaler devices for delivery of asthma medications. DESIGN: A prospective analysis using pretests and posttests of a nonrandomized study group and control group. The study group of residents was given an instructional manual and a set of devices for home study, followed by a 1-hour tutorial session with a clinical instructor that included a video and hands-on practice. SETTING: Family medicine centres in Edmonton hospitals. PARTICIPANTS: The study group consisted of a convenience sample of 23 first- and second-year family medicine residents at the Misericordia Hospital Family Medicine Centre. The control group consisted of a convenience sample of 22 first- and second-year family medicine residents at the Royal Alexandra Hospital Family Medicine Centre. Nine residents did not take the posttest; one was absent because of injury, one missed the in-service, and seven had left the city on other rotations, had completed their program, or declined to participate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Improvements in scores on a multiple-choice test and in techniques of using the devices. RESULTS: Using an average of scores on seven different devices, only 36% of residents showed adequate knowledge of how to use the devices on the pretest. Posttest scores improved for both the control (P < 0.001) and study (P < 0.001) groups, but improvement was significantly greater for the study group (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Residents lacked adequate knowledge of asthma devices. More study is needed to confirm the long-term effectiveness of formal teaching about the devices. Images Figure 1 PMID:7888821

  1. Inequality in healthcare costs between residing and non-residing patients: evidence from Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hieu M

    2017-05-12

    Place of residence has been shown to impact health. To date, however, previous studies have only focused on the variability in health outcomes and healthcare costs between urban and rural patients. This study takes a different approach and investigates cost inequality facing non-residing patients - patients who do not reside in the regions in which the hospitals are located. Understanding the sources for this inequality is important, as they are directly related to healthcare accessibility in developing countries. The causal impact of residency status on individual healthcare spending is documented with a quasi-experimental design. The propensity score matching method is applied to a unique patient-level dataset (n = 900) collected at public general and specialist hospitals across North Vietnam. Propensity score matching shows that Vietnamese patients who do not reside in the regions in which the hospitals are located are expected to pay about 15 million Vietnamese dongs (approximately 750 USD) more than those who do, a sizable gap, given the distribution of total healthcare costs for the overall sample. This estimate is robust to alternative matching specifications. The obtained discrepancy is empirically attributable to the differences in three potential contributors, namely spending on accompanying relatives, "courtesy funds," and days of hospitalization. The present study finds that there is significant inequality in healthcare spending between residing and non-residing patients at Vietnamese hospitals and that this discrepancy can be partially explained by both institutional and non-institutional factors. These factors signal practical channels through which policymakers can improve healthcare accessibility.

  2. Adam and Bessie Arnet Residence, overall view from rocks above, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Adam and Bessie Arnet Residence, overall view from rocks above, looking southeast. - Adam & Bessie Arnet Homestead, Adam & Bessie Arnet Residence, 18 feet west of Generator House, Model, Las Animas County, CO

  3. Adam and Bessie Arnet Residence, interior detail of jacal wall ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Adam and Bessie Arnet Residence, interior detail of jacal wall construction in west jacal room - Adam & Bessie Arnet Homestead, Adam & Bessie Arnet Residence, 18 feet west of Generator House, Model, Las Animas County, CO

  4. Annual State of Connecticut Obstetrics and Gynecology Resident Research Day.

    PubMed

    Seagle, Brandon-Luke L; Ballard, Jennifer; Kakar, Freshta; Panarelli, Erin; Samuelson, Robert; Shahabi, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    To increase opportunities for Obstetrics and Gynecology(Ob/Gyn) residents to present their research, an Annual State of Connecticut Ob/Gyn Resident Research Day (RRD) was created. At the first annual RRD, 33 residents, representing five of six Connecticut Ob/Gyn residency programs, presented 39 poster and eight oral presentations. RRD evaluators rated the overall symposium and the quality of resident oral and poster presentations as either "excellent" or "above average." Residency program directors reported that the symposium was "very helpful" for evidencing resident scholarship as required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). Surveyed residents reported that the symposium promoted their research and was a valuable investment of their time. An annual specialty-specific, statewide RRD was created, experienced good participation, and was well evaluated. The annual, statewide Ob/Gyn RRD may serve as a model for development of other specialty-specific, statewide RRD events.

  5. View from west to east of PAR site resident engineer's ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from west to east of PAR site resident engineer's office building (REOB) - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Resident Engineers Office Building, Southeast of intersection of PAR Access Road & Fourth Avenue, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  6. Work-hour restrictions as an ethical dilemma for residents.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Robert O; Austin, Mary T; Tarpley, John L; Griffin, Marie R; Lomis, Kimberly D

    2006-04-01

    We propose that the standardized work-hour limitations have created an ethical dilemma for residents. A survey tool was designed to assess factors that influence the number of hours residents work and report. The program directors of pediatrics, internal medicine, and general surgery at our institution supported their residents' participation. A voluntary, anonymous survey of these residents was performed. One hundred seventy of 265 eligible residents were surveyed. Eighty-one percent of residents surveyed responded. Eighty percent of respondents reported exceeding work-hour restrictions at least once within the past 6 months. The factor of greatest influence measured was concern for patient care (80%). Forty-nine percent of respondents admitted underreporting their work hours. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education work-hour restrictions have created an ethical dilemma for residents. Our data show that a significant number of residents feel compelled to exceed work-hour regulations and report those hours falsely.

  7. 24 CFR 964.15 - HUD policy on resident management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... corporation. Potential benefits of resident-managed entities include improved quality of life, experiencing the dignity of meaningful work, enabling residents to choose where they want to live, and meaningful...

  8. Identifying areas of weakness in thoracic surgery residency training: a comparison of the perceptions of residents and program directors.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Janet P; Schofield, Adam; Paolucci, Elizabeth Oddone; Schieman, Colin; Kelly, Elizabeth; Servatyari, Ramin; Dixon, Elijah; Ball, Chad G; Grondin, Sean C

    2014-01-01

    To identify core thoracic surgery procedures that require increased emphasis during thoracic surgery residency for residents to achieve operative independence and to compare the perspectives of residents and program directors in this regard. A modified Delphi process was used to create a survey that was distributed electronically to all Canadian thoracic surgery residents (12) and program directors (8) addressing the residents' ability to perform 19 core thoracic surgery procedures independently after the completion of residency. Residents were also questioned about the adequacy of their operative exposure to these 19 procedures during their residency training. A descriptive summary including calculations of frequencies and proportions was conducted. The perceptions of the 2 groups were then compared using the Fisher exact test employing a Bonferroni correction. The relationship between residents' operative exposure and their perceived operative ability was explored in the same fashion. The response rate was 100% for residents and program directors. No statistical differences were found between residents' and program directors' perceptions of residents' ability to perform the 19 core procedures independently. Both groups identified lung transplantation, first rib resection, and extrapleural pneumonectomy as procedures for which residents were not adequately prepared to perform independently. Residents' subjective ratings of operative exposure were in good agreement with their reported operative ability for 13 of 19 procedures. This study provides new insight into the perceptions of thoracic surgery residents and their program directors regarding operative ability. This study points to good agreement between residents and program directors regarding residents' surgical capabilities. This study provides information regarding potential weaknesses in thoracic surgery training, which may warrant an examination of the curricula of existing programs as well as a

  9. Family practice residents' maternity leave experiences and benefits.

    PubMed

    Gjerdingen, D K; Chaloner, K M; Vanderscoff, J A

    1995-09-01

    A growing number of residents are having babies during residency training. While many businesses are working to improve maternity conditions and benefits for their employees, residency programs are often not prepared to accommodate pregnant residents. This study was conducted to examine the maternity leave experiences of women who delivered infants during their family practice residency training. Program directors from each of the 394 family practice residency programs listed in the 1993 Directory of Family Practice Residency Programs were asked to distribute surveys to female residents who gave birth during their residency training and had returned to work by the time of the study. Of 199 known eligible residents, 171 (86%) completed surveys; these women represented 127 programs located in 36 states and Puerto Rico. Only 56.8% of women were aware of their program having a written maternity leave policy. The average length of maternity leave was 8 weeks; 76% had leaves of 10 weeks or less. For many, the maternity leave was derived from more than one source, including vacation, sick time, or a mother-child elective. Nearly all (88.3%) the women breast-fed, and the mean duration of breast-feeding was more than 19 weeks. In general, participants believed that having a baby during residency was somewhat difficult. Problems frequently encountered by women after their return to work included sleep deprivation and tiredness, difficulty arranging for child care, guilt about child care, and breast-feeding. Factors that detracted most from the childbirth experience were too little sleep, problems arranging for child care, and lack of support from the partner, residency faculty, and other residents. Having a baby during residency is somewhat difficult for the average female resident. Factors that may ease this difficulty include getting adequate sleep and receiving support from one's partner, faculty, and other residents.

  10. Longitudinal Outcomes of an Institutionally Developed Nurse Residency Program

    PubMed Central

    Cline, Debbie; La Frentz, Kelly; Fellman, Bryan; Summers, Barbara; Brassil, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    Nurse residency programs are widely implemented to enhance integration of new graduate nurses entering the workforce. This article presents a retrospective analysis of 10 years of residency data from an internally developed residency program that utilized the Casey-Fink Graduate Nurse Experience Survey. Outcomes of this program were similar to those from studies using commercially available products, suggesting an internally developed residency curricula may be equally beneficial to the development of new graduate nurses. PMID:28727624

  11. Pediatric Oncology Branch - training- resident electives | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Resident Electives Select pediatric residents may be approved for a 4-week elective rotation at the Pediatric Oncology Branch. This rotation emphasizes the important connection between research and patient care in pediatric oncology. The resident is supervised directly by the Branch’s attending physician and clinical fellows. Residents attend daily in-patient and out-patient rounds, multiple weekly Branch conferences, and are expected to research relevant topics and present a 30-minute talk toward the end of their rotation.

  12. Perceptions, training experiences, and preferences of surgical residents toward laparoscopic simulation training: a resident survey.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Shohan; Zevin, Boris; Grantcharov, Teodor P; Roberts, Kurt E; Duffy, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Simulation training for surgical residents can shorten learning curves, improve technical skills, and expedite competency. Several studies have shown that skills learned in the simulated environment are transferable to the operating room. Residency programs are trying to incorporate simulation into the resident training curriculum to supplement the hands-on experience gained in the operating room. Despite the availability and proven utility of surgical simulators and simulation laboratories, they are still widely underutilized by surgical trainees. Studies have shown that voluntary use leads to minimal participation in a training curriculum. Although there are several simulation tools, there is no clear evidence of the superiority of one tool over the other in skill acquisition. The purpose of this study was to explore resident perceptions, training experiences, and preferences regarding laparoscopic simulation training. Our goal was to profile resident participation in surgical skills simulation, recognize potential barriers to voluntary simulator use, and identify simulation tools and tasks preferred by residents. Furthermore, this study may help to inform whether mandatory/protected training time, as part of the residents' curriculum is essential to enhance participation in the simulation laboratory. A cross-sectional study on general surgery residents (postgraduate years 1-5) at Yale University School of Medicine and the University of Toronto via an online questionnaire was conducted. Overall, 67 residents completed the survey. The institutional review board approved the methods of the study. Overall, 95.5% of the participants believed that simulation training improved their laparoscopic skills. Most respondents (92.5%) perceived that skills learned during simulation training were transferrable to the operating room. Overall, 56.7% of participants agreed that proficiency in a simulation curriculum should be mandatory before operating room experience. The

  13. 8 CFR 1235.11 - Admission of conditional permanent residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Admission of conditional permanent residents. (a) General—(1) Conditional residence based on family... anniversary of the marriage upon which the immigrant visa is based occurred after the issuance of the visa and... proceedings. However, in a case where conditional residence was based on a marriage, removal proceedings may...

  14. 8 CFR 1235.11 - Admission of conditional permanent residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Admission of conditional permanent residents. (a) General—(1) Conditional residence based on family... anniversary of the marriage upon which the immigrant visa is based occurred after the issuance of the visa and... proceedings. However, in a case where conditional residence was based on a marriage, removal proceedings may...

  15. 8 CFR 1235.11 - Admission of conditional permanent residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Admission of conditional permanent residents. (a) General—(1) Conditional residence based on family... anniversary of the marriage upon which the immigrant visa is based occurred after the issuance of the visa and... proceedings. However, in a case where conditional residence was based on a marriage, removal proceedings may...

  16. 8 CFR 1235.11 - Admission of conditional permanent residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Admission of conditional permanent residents. (a) General—(1) Conditional residence based on family... anniversary of the marriage upon which the immigrant visa is based occurred after the issuance of the visa and... proceedings. However, in a case where conditional residence was based on a marriage, removal proceedings may...

  17. Nurses' perceptions of nurse residency: identifying barriers to implementation.

    PubMed

    Wierzbinski-Cross, Heather; Ward, Kristin; Baumann, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to describe the benefits and components of successful nurse residency programs, as well as gain insight into the perceptions of staff nurses, nurse educators, and nurse leaders regarding value, feasibility, and barriers to implementing nurse residency programs in acute care settings. This study has important implications for implementing an effective residency program.

  18. An Analysis of Court Decisions On Residence Requirements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Odus V.

    1977-01-01

    The courts have generally upheld the right of institutions of higher education to require certain classes of individuals to reside in on-campus residence units. This report examines eight recent cases in which the issue of required on-campus residence has been raised. (Author)

  19. Burnout Comparison among Residents in Different Medical Specialties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martini, Shahm; Arfken, Cynthia L.; Churchill, Amy; Balon, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate resident burnout in relation to work and home-related factors. Method: Maslach Burnout Inventory was mailed to residents in eight different medical specialties, with a response rate of 35%. Results: Overall, 50% of residents met burnout criteria, ranging from 75% (obstetrics/gynecology) to 27% (family medicine). The first…

  20. How Prepared Are Psychiatry Residents for Treating Nicotine Dependence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prochaska, Judith J.; Fromont, Sebastien C.; Hall, Sharon M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Nicotine dependence is the most prevalent substance abuse disorder among adult psychiatric patients and a leading cause of death and disability. The authors examined the extent to which psychiatry residents are prepared to treat nicotine dependence in clinical practice. Methods: Residents from five psychiatry residency programs in…

  1. Training in Psychiatric Genomics during Residency: A New Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winner, Joel G.; Goebert, Deborah; Matsu, Courtenay; Mrazek, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors ascertained the amount of training in psychiatric genomics that is provided in North American psychiatric residency programs. Methods: A sample of 217 chief residents in psychiatric residency programs in the United States and Canada were identified by e-mail and surveyed to assess their training in psychiatric genetics and…

  2. Structural Analysis of the Resident Assistant Cultural Diversity Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Vanessa D.; Kang, Young-Shin; Thompson, George F.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the five-factor structure of the Resident Assistant Cultural Diversity (RACD) instrument, which assesses resident assistant (RA) confidence in addressing issues of cultural diversity in college and university residence halls. The instrument has five components that explore RA confidence: (1) belief in the need for cultural…

  3. Resident Transitions to Assisted Living: A Role for Social Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Noelle LeCrone; Koenig, Terry; Dabelko-Schoeny, Holly

    2012-01-01

    This study explored key aspects of resident transitions to assisted living (AL), including the frequency and importance of preadmission resident education and the potential role of social workers in this setting. To examine the factors that may help or hinder resident transitions to AL, a written survey was administered to a statewide,…

  4. E-Learning and Medical Residents, a Qualitative Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segerman, Jill; Crable, Elaine; Brodzinski, James

    2016-01-01

    Medical education helps ensure doctors acquire skills and knowledge needed to care for patients. However, resident duty hour restrictions have impacted the time residents have available for medical education, leaving resident educators searching for alternate options for effective medical education. Classroom situated e-learning, a blended…

  5. A Behavioral Weight Control Program for Residence Hall Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domke, Jane A.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Compared a weight control treatment specifically tailored to the needs of residence hall students with a standardized behavioral procedure. Although posttreatment results indicated a very slight and nonsignificant advantage for the residence hall condition, this was not true at follow-up. Suggests the residence hall procedure may be overly…

  6. 24 CFR 902.52 - Distribution of survey to residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Distribution of survey to residents... § 902.52 Distribution of survey to residents. (a) Sampling. A statistically valid number of units will be chosen to receive the Resident Service and Satisfaction Survey. These units will be randomly...

  7. RESIDENCE TIME DISTRIBUTION OF FLUIDS IN STIRRED ANNULAR PHOTOREACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When gases flow through an annular photoreactor at constant rate, some of the gas spends more or less than the average residence time in the reactor. This spread of residence time can have an important effect on the performance of the reactor. this study tested how the residence...

  8. 25 CFR 700.339 - Residency on life estate leases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Residency on life estate leases. 700.339 Section 700.339... Life Estate Leases § 700.339 Residency on life estate leases. (a) No person may reside on a life estate lease other than the life tenant, his or her spouse, and minor dependents and such persons who are...

  9. 25 CFR 700.339 - Residency on life estate leases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Residency on life estate leases. 700.339 Section 700.339... Life Estate Leases § 700.339 Residency on life estate leases. (a) No person may reside on a life estate lease other than the life tenant, his or her spouse, and minor dependents and such persons who are...

  10. 24 CFR 598.610 - Resident benefit standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Resident benefit standards. 598.610... Empowerment Zone Grants § 598.610 Resident benefit standards. The project or activity described in an... meet one of the following three standards of resident benefit for determining the amount of HUD EZ...

  11. 25 CFR 700.339 - Residency on life estate leases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Residency on life estate leases. 700.339 Section 700.339... Life Estate Leases § 700.339 Residency on life estate leases. (a) No person may reside on a life estate lease other than the life tenant, his or her spouse, and minor dependents and such persons who are...

  12. 25 CFR 700.339 - Residency on life estate leases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Residency on life estate leases. 700.339 Section 700.339... Life Estate Leases § 700.339 Residency on life estate leases. (a) No person may reside on a life estate lease other than the life tenant, his or her spouse, and minor dependents and such persons who are...

  13. 25 CFR 700.339 - Residency on life estate leases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Residency on life estate leases. 700.339 Section 700.339... Life Estate Leases § 700.339 Residency on life estate leases. (a) No person may reside on a life estate lease other than the life tenant, his or her spouse, and minor dependents and such persons who are...

  14. Selection Factors among International Medical Graduates and Psychiatric Residency Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiroma, Paulo R.; Alarcon, Renato D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors examine the association between the selection factors used in a psychiatric residency program and subsequent clinical and academic performance among international medical graduate (IMG) candidates. Methods: The authors completed a retrospective review of application files and residency evaluations of 50 IMG residents who…

  15. 24 CFR 1710.10 - Single-family residence exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Single-family residence exemption... Requirements § 1710.10 Single-family residence exemption. (a) General. The sale of a lot which meets the... zoned for single-family residences or, in the absence of a zoning ordinance, limited exclusively by...

  16. Burnout, Perceived Stress, and Depression among Cardiology Residents in Argentina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, Silvina V.; Diez, Juan Cruz Lopez; Arazi, Hernan Cohen; Linetzky, Bruno; Guinjoan, Salvador; Grancelli, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Because medical residency is a stressful time for training physicians, placing residents at increased risk for psychological distress, the authors studied the prevalence of burnout, perceived stress, and depression in cardiology residents in Argentina and examined the association between sociodemographic characteristics and these…

  17. Teaching Psychodynamics to Psychiatric Residents through Psychiatric Outpatient Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardoso Zoppe, Eva Helena C.; Schoueri, Patricia; Castro, Monica; Neto, Francisco Lotufo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluates whether a course that was designed for first-year psychiatric residents and that specifically addressed psychodynamic principles fostered residents' progress in knowledge, skills, and attitudes regarding these concepts. Methods: The course was given in the 2005 academic year to all residents (N=18) in their first…

  18. Teachers' Perceptions of Difficulties in Teaching Ethics in Residencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Carson; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of responses of 63 medical faculty involved in formal ethics teaching programs for medical residents indicated such perceived problems as time constraints resulting from residents' heavy schedules; attitudes of residents; logistical problems; time demands on faculty; lack of reinforcement for teaching ethics; and deficiencies in faculty…

  19. for Residents: A Literature Review and Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wamsley, Maria A.; Julian, Katherine A.; O'Sullivan, Patricia; Satterfield, Jason M.; Satre, Derek D.; McCance-Katz, Elinore; Batki, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Resident physicians report insufficient experience caring for patients with substance use disorders (SUDs). Resident training in Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) has been recommended. We describe the development of a standardized patient (SP) assessment to measure SBIRT skills, resident perceptions of…

  20. 42 CFR 413.343 - Resident assessment data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... such other assessments that are necessary to account for changes in patient care needs. (c... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Resident assessment data. 413.343 Section 413.343... Skilled Nursing Facilities § 413.343 Resident assessment data. (a) Submission of resident assessment data...