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Sample records for lawsonia intracellularis serpulina

  1. Evidence of host adaptation in Lawsonia intracellularis infections

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lawsonia intracellularis is the causative agent of proliferative enteropathy, an endemic disease in pigs and an emerging concern in horses. Enterocyte hyperplasia is a common lesion in every case but there are differences regarding clinical and pathological presentations among affected species. We hypothesize that host susceptibility to L. intracellularis infection depends on the species of origin of the bacterial isolate. The objective of this study was to evaluate the susceptibilities of pigs and horses to L. intracellularis infection using either a porcine or an equine isolate. Materials and methods Twelve foals and eighteen pigs were equally divided into three groups and infected with either a porcine or an equine isolate (109L. Intracellularis/challenged animal), and a saline solution (negative control group). The animals were monitored regarding clinical signs, average of daily weight gain, fecal shedding of the bacteria by PCR and humoral serological response. Results Foals infected with the equine isolate developed moderate to severe clinical signs and maintained a lower average of weight gain compared to control foals. Fecal quantitative PCR in equine isolate-infected foals revealed higher amounts of bacterial DNA associated with longer duration of shedding compared with porcine isolate-infected foals. All four foals infected with the equine isolate demonstrated higher IgG titers in the serum compared with porcine isolate-infected foals. In the pig trial, diarrhea and seroconversion were only observed in animals infected with the porcine isolate. Pathological changes typical of proliferative enteropathy were observed in the necropsied foal infected with equine isolate and in the two necropsied pigs infected with the porcine isolate. Conclusions Evident clinical signs, longer periods of bacterial shedding and stronger serologic immune responses were observed in animals infected with species-specific isolates. These results show that host

  2. Generation of a monoclonal antibody against Mycoplasma spp. following accidental contamination during production of a monoclonal antibody against Lawsonia intracellularis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jeong-Min; Lee, Ji-Hye; Yeh, Jung-Yong

    2012-03-01

    This report describes Mycoplasma contamination of Lawsonia intracellularis cultures that led to the unintended acquisition of a monoclonal antibody against Mycoplasma spp. during the attempted generation of a monoclonal antibody against L. intracellularis.

  3. Occurrence of Lawsonia Intracellularis and Brachyspira spp. infection in swine suffering from diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Pławińska, J; Jakubowski, T; Rzewuska, M; Binek, M

    2004-01-01

    Principal aim of this study was to examine fecal samples from pigs suffering from diarrhea for the presence of Lawsonia intracellularis, Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and Brachyspira pilosicoli. The molecular techniques such as PCR and nested PCR were employed to detect the presence of p78 fragment of genomic DNA specific for Lawsonia intracellularis as well as fragment of tlyA gene specific for Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and 16S rDNA gene of Brachyspira pilosicoli. We assumed that about 25% of pigs were infected with Lawsonia intracellularis, about 10% with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and only 0,8% with Brachyspira pilosicoli. In about 3% mixed infection with L. intracellularis and B. hyodysenteriae was observed. Results were comparable in herds that differed in quantity, breeding technology, hygienic standards and preventive treatment with different chemotherapeutics.

  4. Proliferative Enteropathy caused by Lawsonia intracellularis in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Ohta, T; Kimura, K; Katsuda, K; Kobayashi, H; Mikami, O; Haritani, M; Onodera, T

    Proliferative enteropathy (PE) is an infectious disease caused by Lawsonia intracellularis (Li), an obligate intracellular bacterium. PE is endemic in swine herds and has been reported in a variety of mammals including horses, hamsters, rabbits, rats, guinea pigs, ferrets, foxes, dogs, sheep, deer and non-human primates. Avian cases are reported only in ratite birds, including emus and ostriches. Some studies show an absence of Lawsonia spp. infection in chickens. In this study, we performed morphological and bacteriological examinations on the intestines of two broiler chickens that had been condemned at a poultry slaughter plant in Japan due to intestinal haemorrhage, which was a result of focal coccidial enteritis. Histopathology revealed proliferation of the villous epithelium in the small and/or large intestines, especially the caeca, regardless of coccidial lesions. Warthin-Starry silver staining and immunohistochemistry using anti-Li monoclonal antibody revealed numerous bacteria and/or antigens in the villous epithelium. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of curved rods, morphologically compatible with Li, in the apical cytoplasm of the epithelium. Polymerase chain reaction products specific for Li were amplified from DNA samples extracted from formalin-fixed and paraffin wax-embedded tissue. These results suggest that Li can cause PE, characterized by proliferation of the villous epithelium, in chickens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Lawsonia intracellularis-associated ulcerative and necro-hemorrhagic enteritis in 5 weanling foals

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Luis G.; ter Woort, Federica; Baird, John D.; Tatiersky, Laetitia; DeLay, Josepha; van Dreumel, Tony

    2013-01-01

    This report describes 5 cases of fatal Lawsonia intracellularis-associated ulcerative and necro-hemorrhagic enteritis in weanling Thoroughbred and Standardbred foals. The lesions are similar to those of the L. intracellularis-associated ulcerative and necro-hemorrhagic enteritis syndrome in pigs. Two foals had concurrent severe typhlo-colitis as a result of a large burden of encysted cyathostomes. The clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic challenges, and the potential complications encountered during the management of such cases are discussed. PMID:24155489

  6. Seroprevalence of Lawsonia intracellularis antibodies in intensive pig farms in China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Porcine proliferative enteropathy caused by Lawsonia intracellularis (L. intracellularis) is a major concern to the pig industry worldwide. Although 8.3 billion pigs are produced each year in China, few reports on the prevalence of L.intracellularis infection are available. The aim of the current study was to estimate the seroprevalence of L. intracellularis antibodies in intensive pig farms in China. Results A total of 1060 serum samples were collected from 14 commercial pig farms located throughout China. Animals from all age groups were sampled including pre-weaning piglets, weaners, fattening pigs, adult sows and boars. Antibodies against L. intracellularis were detected using a specific blocking ELISA. Of the 1060 serum samples, 602 were identified as positive using the ELISA test. The apparent seroprevalence of L. intracellularis seropositivity was 57% (95% CI 50 to 64%). The true prevalence (that is, prevalence corrected for the imperfect sensitivity and specificity of the testing method) was 77% (95% CI 70 to 83%). Conclusions The highest true prevalence was observed in sows and boars, suggesting that within a herd these stock classes are a reservoir for infection. The prevalence of L. intracellularis seropositivity in local breed pigs was significantly less than that in imported breeds. A higher seroprevalence was found in pigs in herds in Central and Northern China, which may correspond to the greater use of the intensive production systems in these areas. We conclude that L. intracellularis is widely prevalent in commercial pigs in China. PMID:24774304

  7. Lawsonia intracellularis in the feces of wild rodents and stray cats captured around equine farms.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jeong-Min; Seo, Myung-Ji; Yeh, Jung-Yong

    2017-08-11

    Proliferative enteropathy is a global enteric disease of particular importance in pigs. The causative bacterium, Lawsonia intracellularis, has a wide range of susceptible host species. Recently, L. intracellularis has been recognized as an etiologic agent of an emerging enteric disease in foals called equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). The presence of L. intracellularis in nonruminant wildlife has raised questions regarding the role of these species in EPE transmission. This study investigated exposure to L. intracellularis in wild rodents and feral cats from eight farms with confirmed EPE. Serum (42) and fecal (40) samples from resident foals and fecal samples (131), intestinal mucosa tissues (14), and mesenteric lymph nodes (14) from wild and feral animals were collected for the evaluation of the farm status and the molecular detection of L. intracellularis following the diagnosis of EPE in index cases. Fresh feces from wild rodents and feral cats were collected from the ground while walking the premises or after trapping the animals using live traps. A total of 3 brown rats, 7 house mice, 1 striped field mouse, 2 grey red-backed voles, and 3 feral cats showed evidence of prior exposure to L. intracellularis. Our data add to increasing evidence demonstrating the potential for L. intracellularis transmission and infection in wild rodents and feral cats and provide possible evidence of interspecies transmission. The exposure of wild rodents and feral cats provides potential evidence for the spillover of L. intracellularis to wildlife species and raises the question of spillback to horses. Additionally, these animals may represent an indicator of environmental exposure or may be actively involved in the transmission of L. intracellularis to foals by acting as potential reservoir/amplifier hosts. This study is the first to demonstrate the magnitude of L. intracellularis shedding in the feces of wild rodents and feral cats and to indicate the significant

  8. Colonisation and shedding of Lawsonia intracellularis in experimentally inoculated rodents and in wild rodents on pig farms.

    PubMed

    Collins, A M; Fell, S; Pearson, H; Toribio, J-A

    2011-06-02

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an intracellular bacterium causing proliferative enteropathy in various animal species, and is considered an economically important pathogen of pigs. Rats and mice have been implicated as external vectors for a wide range of pig pathogens, including L. intracellularis. Previous studies have demonstrated L. intracellularis infection and proliferative enteropathy in rodents, but did not show the duration of shedding or the number of L. intracellularis shed by infected rodents, and therefore the infection risk that rodents pose to pigs. In this study, the number of L. intracellularis shed in the faeces and intestinal mucosa of wild rats trapped on pig farms was determined by a quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction assay. The prevalence of L. intracellularis in wild rats trapped on pig farms with endemic proliferative enteropathy (PE) was very high (≥ 70.6%), and large numbers of L. intracellularis were shed (10(10)/g of faeces) in a small proportion of wild rats. The duration of colonisation in laboratory rats and mice challenged with porcine isolates of L. intracellularis was also shown. Faecal shedding of L. intracellularis persisted for 14-21 days in rats and mice that were mildly affected with histological lesions of PE. The humoral immune response to L. intracellularis persisted for 40 days in both species. This study demonstrates that rodents may be an important reservoir of L. intracellularis on piggeries, and hence rodent control is important in disease eradication programs on pig farms.

  9. Intestinal absorption and histomorphometry of Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) experimentally infected with Lawsonia intracellularis.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, Fabio Augusto; Borges, Elizabeth Lage; de Oliveira, Juliana Saes Vilaça; Guedes, Roberto Mauricio Carvalho

    2010-10-26

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the intestinal absorption and histomorphometry of hamsters experimentally infected with Lawsonia intracellularis and correlate these parameters with severity of infection based on immunohistochemistry. Sixty hamsters were equally divided into control and inoculated groups which were orally infected with intestinal mucosa homogenate from pigs naturally infected with L. intracellularis. The intestinal absorption of glucose, sodium, potassium and chloride was evaluated in live animals (25 inoculated and 25 control) on day 26 after inoculation. In this procedure, a standard solution was infused into the cranial jejunum and collected at the terminal ileum. The experimental infection was confirmed by gross and histopathological examination and L. intracellularis antigen labeling by immunohistochemistry. Histomorphometry analysis demonstrated positive correlation between intestinal crypt depth and severity of infection based on immunohistochemistry. Infected animals had significantly lower intestinal absorption of glucose, potassium and chloride. These results indicate a lower intestinal absorption as an important mechanism of diarrhea in hamsters experimentally infected with L. intracellularis. Therefore, malabsorption should be considered as the main mechanism involved in the physiopathology of the diarrhea in L. intracellularis infected animals.

  10. Search for Lawsonia intracellularis and Bilophila wadsworthia in malabsorption-diseased chickens

    PubMed Central

    McOrist, Steven; Keller, Linda; McOrist, Alexandra L.

    2003-01-01

    Proliferative enteropathy is an important enteric disease caused by Lawsonia intracellularis. A wide range of host species can be infected by the same bacterium, yet the clinico-pathologic features among these hosts remains almost identical. The disease has been recognized regularly among ratites, but not in other avian families, such as galliforms, even though these suffer uncharacterized enteric conditions. Fresh ileum-colon contents were obtained from 228, 3- to 8-week-old chickens with enteric disease, kept at 14 large commercial farms in the southern USA. DNA was extracted from each sample and subjected to polymerase chain reactions (PCR) with primers specific to eubacterial DNA, L. intracellularis, and Bilophila wadsworthia. All chicken samples were positive for eubacterial DNA, 29 chickens (13%) were positive for B. wadsworthia DNA, and none were positive for L. intracellularis DNA. Given the ubiquitous nature of L. intracellularis, we consider it likely that some avian families do not carry the necessary mechanism for L. intracellularis viability. Bilophila wadsworthia appears to be a consistent member of the colonic flora of some host animals. Neither bacterium appears to be associated with malabsorption syndromes in chickens. PMID:12889732

  11. PREVALENCE OF ANTIBODY TO AND DNA OF LAWSONIA INTRACELLULARIS IN SAMPLES FROM WILD ANIMALS IN KOREA.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Mukter; Oh, Yeonsu; Cho, Ho-Seong

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated the prevalence of Lawsonia intracellularis infection in three wild animal species in Korea; the Korean water deer ( Hydropotes inermis ), Siberian roe deer ( Capreolus pygargus ), and raccoon dogs ( Nyctereutes procyonoides ). We collected 136 sera and 109 fecal samples from individuals in 10 Wildlife Rescue and Conservation Centers. Serum samples were tested for anti- L. intracellularis antibodies using a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (bELISA), and fecal samples were subjected to a real-time PCR assay for L. intracellularis . Thirty-five (25.7%) sera and 36 (33.0%) fecal samples were positive. We found a higher proportion of positive sera (64.7%, χ(2)=15.439, P<0.01) and feces (58.8%, χ(2)=6.126, P<0.05) in raccoon dogs (χ(2)=11.855, P<0.01) than in the other species (20% positive sera and 29% positive feces in Korean water deer; 20% positive sera and 25% positive feces in Siberian roe deer). Our data indicate infection by L. intracellularis in Korean water deer, Siberian roe deer, and raccoon dogs throughout the country. It is imperative to know whether these infected animal species are natural hosts for L. intracellularis in addition to domestic pigs ( Sus scrofa domesticus).

  12. The influence of diet on Lawsonia intracellularis colonization in pigs upon experimental challenge.

    PubMed

    Boesen, Henriette T; Jensen, Tim K; Schmidt, Anja S; Jensen, Bent B; Jensen, Søren M; Møller, Kristian

    2004-10-05

    The objective of this investigation was to study if different feeding strategies influence experimental infections of pigs with Lawsonia intracellularis, the causative agent of proliferative enteropathy. In three sequential trials, a total of 144 weaned pigs were fed five different diets all made from a standard diet based on wheat and barley as carbohydrate source and soybean as protein source. The five diets were: a standard diet (fine ground and pelleted), the standard diet fed as fermented liquid feed, the standard diet added 1.8% formic acid, the standard diet added 2.4% lactic acid and a diet similar to the standard diet (made from the same ingredients), but fed coarse ground. Twenty-four pigs on each diet were orally inoculated with L. intracellularis and growth performance and faecal excretion of bacteria were monitored. Twenty-four pigs fed the standard diet were included as not experimentally infected controls. Pigs in the first two trials were sacrificed 4 weeks post-inoculation, whereas animals in the third trial were sacrificed after 5 weeks. Pigs in all experimentally infected groups excreted L. intracellularis. The fermented liquid diet delayed the excretion of L. intracellularis and furthermore, pigs fed the standard diet supplemented with lactic acid had limited pathological lesions when the intestines were examined 4 weeks after inoculation. The growth performance was reduced in pigs experimentally challenged with L. intracellularis, however the prevalence and severity of diarrhea was limited.

  13. Proteomic analysis of Lawsonia intracellularis reveals expression of outer membrane proteins during infection.

    PubMed

    Watson, Eleanor; Alberdi, M Pilar; Inglis, Neil F; Lainson, Alex; Porter, Megan E; Manson, Erin; Imrie, Lisa; Mclean, Kevin; Smith, David G E

    2014-12-05

    Lawsonia intracellularis is the aetiological agent of the commercially significant porcine disease, proliferative enteropathy. Current understanding of host-pathogen interaction is limited due to the fastidious microaerophilic obligate intracellular nature of the bacterium. In the present study, expression of bacterial proteins during infection was investigated using a mass spectrometry approach. LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of two isolates of L. intracellularis from heavily-infected epithelial cell cultures and database mining using fully annotated L. intracellularis genome sequences identified 19 proteins. According to the Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) functional classification, proteins were identified with roles in cell metabolism, protein synthesis and oxidative stress protection; seven proteins with putative or unknown function were also identified. Detailed bioinformatic analyses of five uncharacterised proteins, which were expressed by both isolates, identified domains and motifs common to other outer membrane-associated proteins with important roles in pathogenesis including adherence and invasion. Analysis of recombinant proteins on Western blots using immune sera from L. intracellularis-infected pigs identified two proteins, LI0841 and LI0902 as antigenic. The detection of five outer membrane proteins expressed during infection, including two antigenic proteins, demonstrates the potential of this approach to interrogate L. intracellularis host-pathogen interactions and identify novel targets which may be exploited in disease control.

  14. In vitro antimicrobial activity against 10 North American and European Lawsonia intracellularis isolates.

    PubMed

    Wattanaphansak, Suphot; Singer, Randall S; Gebhart, Connie J

    2009-03-02

    The objective of this study was to determine the in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of antimicrobials against 10 isolates of Lawsonia intracellularis, the etiological agent of proliferative enteropathy (PE). Antimicrobials tested included carbadox, chlortetracycline, lincomycin, tiamulin, tylosin and valnemulin. The MIC of each antimicrobial against L. intracellularis was determined using a tissue culture system and was identified as the lowest concentration that inhibited 99% of L. intracellularis growth, as compared to the antimicrobial-free control. Each antimicrobial concentration was evaluated for both intracellular and extracellular activity against L. intracellularis, an obligately intracellular bacterium. When tested for intracellular activity, carbadox, tiamulin, and valnemulin were the most active antimicrobials with MICs of < or =0.5microg/ml. Tylosin (MICs ranging from 0.25 to 32microg/ml) and chlortetracycline (MICs ranging from 0.125 to 64microg/ml) showed intermediate activities and lincomycin (MICs ranging from 8 to >128mIcog/ml) showed the least activity. When tested for extracellular activity, valnemulin (MICs ranging from 0.125 to 4microg/ml) was the most active against most L. intracellularis isolates. Chlortetracycline (MICs ranging from 16 to 64microg/ml), tylosin (MICs ranging from 1 to >128microg/ml), and tiamulin (MICs ranging from 1 to 32microg/ml) showed intermediate activities. Lincomycin (MICs ranging from 32 to >128microg/ml) showed the least activity. Our in vitro results showed that each L. intracellularis isolate had a different antimicrobial sensitivity pattern and these data can be utilized as an in vitro guideline for the further antimicrobial evaluation of field L. intracellularis isolates.

  15. Within-day repeatability for absolute quantification of Lawsonia intracellularis bacteria in feces from growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Ken Steen; Pedersen, Klaus H; Hjulsager, Charlotte; Larsen, Lars Erik; Ståhl, Marie; Stege, Helle; Angen, Øystein; Nielsen, Jens Peter

    2012-09-01

    Absolute quantification of Lawsonia intracellularis by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is now possible on a routine basis. Poor repeatability of quantification can result in disease status misclassification of individual pigs when a single fecal sample is obtained. The objective of the current study was to investigate overall variation within a day for fecal numbers of L. intracellularis bacteria determined by real-time PCR in growing pigs. From each of 30 pigs with an infection of L. intracellularis, 5 fecal samples were collected within 1 day. A total of 150 fecal samples were obtained and subjected to quantitative PCR (qPCR) testing. Mean fecal dry matter content was 14.3% (standard deviation = 4.5%). Two pigs (6.7%) alternated between being L. intracellularis qPCR positive and negative. For 28 pigs, the excreting levels of L. intracellularis were within the dynamic range of the qPCR assay at all sampling points. For these 28 pigs, the mean excretion level of L. intracellularis was 6.1 log(10) bacteria/g feces (standard deviation = 1.2 log(10) bacteria/g feces). The maximum observed difference between 2 fecal samples from the same pig was 1.1 log(10) bacteria/g feces. The average standard deviation for individual pigs was 0.27 log(10) bacteria/g feces. The average coefficient of variation within pigs was 0.04, ranging from 0.006 to 0.08. The results imply that absolute quantification of L. intracellularis by qPCR has acceptable repeatability within 1 day. However, a population-specific proportion of pigs alternating between positive and negative test results must be expected.

  16. Seroprevalence of Lawsonia intracellularis in different swine populations in 3 provinces in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Paradis, Marie-Anne; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Rajic, Andrijana; Ravel, André; Wilson, Jeff B.; Aramini, Jeff; McClure, Carol A.; Dick, C. Paul

    2007-01-01

    Porcine proliferative enteropathy caused by Lawsonia intracellularis is an important enteric disease in swine throughout the world. Information regarding the distribution of this pathogen in Canadian swine herds would be beneficial for the creation of control protocols. Pigs from Ontario, Quebec, and Alberta were tested by using an indirect immunofluorescence assay for antibodies to L. intracellularis. Pig seroprevalence was calculated as the proportion of pigs positive from total pigs tested in the targeted population. Seroprevalence (± standard error [sχ̄]) in market hogs in Ontario from farrow-finish (FF) farms and finishing (FIN) farms were significantly different at 77% (sχ̄ = 7%) and 29% (sχ̄ = 15%), respectively. Seroprevalence for sows and gilts in FF and farrowing and nursery (FAR + NUR) farms in Ontario were 90% (sχ̄ = 3%) and 93% (sχ̄ = 6%), respectively. Seroprevalence in breeding females in Quebec from FF and FAR farms was 82% (sχ̄ = 5%) and 87% (sχ̄ = 3%), respectively. Seroprevalence (57%, sχ̄ = 8%) in finishing pigs in Alberta from FF farms was significantly different from that of multisite (MS) farms and FIN farms, 6% (sχ̄ = 6%) and 9% (sχ̄ = 5%), respectively. Lawsonia intracellularis appears to be widespread in Canada and the seroprevalence on FF farms is higher than that on FIN and MS farms, possibly due to the presence of breeding females or management differences. PMID:17310623

  17. Efficacy of gallium maltolate against Lawsonia intracellularis infection in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, F; Allen, A L; Alcorn, J; Clark, C R; Vannucci, F A; Pusterla, N; Mapes, S M; Ball, K R; Dowling, P M; Thompson, J; Bernstein, L R; Gebhart, C J; Hamilton, D L

    2014-12-01

    Antimicrobial efficacy against Lawsonia intracellularis is difficult to evaluate in vitro, thus, the effects of gallium maltolate's (GaM) were investigated in a rabbit model for equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). Juvenile (5-6-week-old) does were infected with 3.0 × 10(8) L. intracellularis/rabbit and allocated into three groups (n = 8). One week postinfection, one group was treated with GaM, 50 mg/kg; one, with doxycycline, 5 mg/kg; and one with a sham-treatment (control). Feces and blood were collected daily and weekly, respectively, to verify presence of L. intracellularis fecal shedding using qPCR, and seroconversion using immunoperoxidase monolayer assay. Rabbits were sacrificed after 1 week of treatment to collect intestinal tissues focusing on EPE-affected sections. Intestinal lesions were confirmed via immunohistochemistry. No difference was noted between treatments regarding EPE-lesions in jejunum (P = 0.51), ileum (P = 0.74), and cecum (P = 0.35), or in L. intracellularis fecal shedding (P = 0.64). GaM and doxycycline appear to have similar efficacy against EPE in infected rabbits.

  18. Further investigation of exposure to Lawsonia intracellularis in wild and feral animals captured on horse properties with equine proliferative enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Pusterla, Nicola; Mapes, Samantha; Gebhart, Connie

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the exposure to Lawsonia intracellularis in wild birds, mice, rabbits, raccoons, coyotes and squirrels, and feral cats and pigs on 10 farms with confirmed equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). Serum samples from all resident foals (417 samples) as well as fecal (461) and serum (106) samples from wild and feral animals were collected for serological and molecular detection of L. intracellularis following the diagnosis of EPE in index cases. A total of three cats from two farms, three mice from two farms and eight cottontail rabbits from one farm had evidence of prior exposure to L. intracellularis. These animals may be an indicator of environmental exposure or may be actively involved in the transmission of L. intracellularis to foals by acting as a potential reservoir/amplifier host. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Two Lawsonia intracellularis Isolates Associated with Proliferative Hemorrhagic Enteropathy and Porcine Intestinal Adenomatosis in South Korea▿

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Jung-Yong; Lee, Ji-Hye; Yeh, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Aeran; Lee, Ji Youn; Hwang, Jeong-Min; Kang, Bo-Kyu; Kim, Jong-Man; Choi, In-Soo; Lee, Joong-Bok

    2011-01-01

    This study represents the first published data on antimicrobial susceptibility of Asian isolates of Lawsonia intracellularis. We assessed MICs of 16 antimicrobials for two isolates of L. intracellularis recovered from diseased pigs in South Korea, one from a finisher pig with acute proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy in 2002 and the other from a grower pig with porcine intestinal adenomatosis in 2010. Tylosin and tilmicosin were found to be the most active against L. intracellularis both intracellularly (MICs, 0.25 to 0.5 μg/ml and 0.125 μg/ml, respectively) and extracellularly (MICs, 0.25 to 0.5 μg/ml and 1 μg/ml, respectively). PMID:21690283

  20. Species-specificity of equine and porcine Lawsonia intracellularis isolates in laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Francesca; Vannucci, Fabio A; Allen, Andrew L; Pusterla, Nicola; Antonopoulos, Aphroditi J; Ball, Katherine R; Thompson, Julie; Dowling, Patricia M; Hamilton, Don L; Gebhart, Connie J

    2013-10-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis infection causes proliferative enteropathy (PE) in many mammalian species, with porcine and equine proliferative enteropathy (PPE and EPE) known worldwide. Hamsters are a well-published animal model for PPE infection studies in pigs. There is no laboratory animal model for EPE infection studies and it is not known whether there is species-specificity for equine or porcine isolates of L. intracellularis in animal models. The objective of this study was to determine whether it is possible to generate typical EPE lesions in hamsters after inoculation with an equine strain of L. intracellularis (EPE strain) and whether it is comparatively possible to generate PPE lesions in rabbits after inoculation with a porcine strain of L. intracellularis (PPE strain). In 2 separate trials, 4-week-old and 3-week-old weanling golden Syrian hamsters were challenged with EPE strains and compared to uninfected (both trials) and PPE-infected controls (Trial 2 only). Concurrently, 6 female New Zealand white juvenile rabbits were infected with PPE strain and observed concomitantly to 8 similar rabbits infected with EPE strain for a different experiment. Hamsters and rabbits were observed for 21 to 24 days post-infection (DPI), depending on the experiment. Neither infected species developed clinical signs. The presence of disease was assessed with diagnostic techniques classically used for pigs and horses: immune-peroxidase monolayer assay on sera; quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) detection of molecular DNA in feces; and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain and immunohistochemistry (IHC) on intestinal tissues. Our results showed that EPE-challenged hamsters do not develop infection when compared with PPE controls (IHC, P = 0.009; qPCR, P = 0.0003). Conversely, PPE-challenged rabbits do not develop typical intestinal lesions in comparison to EPE-challenged rabbits, with serological response at 14 DPI being significantly lower (P = 0.0023). In conclusion

  1. Species-specificity of equine and porcine Lawsonia intracellularis isolates in laboratory animals

    PubMed Central

    Sampieri, Francesca; Vannucci, Fabio A.; Allen, Andrew L.; Pusterla, Nicola; Antonopoulos, Aphroditi J.; Ball, Katherine R.; Thompson, Julie; Dowling, Patricia M.; Hamilton, Don L.; Gebhart, Connie J.

    2013-01-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis infection causes proliferative enteropathy (PE) in many mammalian species, with porcine and equine proliferative enteropathy (PPE and EPE) known worldwide. Hamsters are a well-published animal model for PPE infection studies in pigs. There is no laboratory animal model for EPE infection studies and it is not known whether there is species-specificity for equine or porcine isolates of L. intracellularis in animal models. The objective of this study was to determine whether it is possible to generate typical EPE lesions in hamsters after inoculation with an equine strain of L. intracellularis (EPE strain) and whether it is comparatively possible to generate PPE lesions in rabbits after inoculation with a porcine strain of L. intracellularis (PPE strain). In 2 separate trials, 4-week-old and 3-week-old weanling golden Syrian hamsters were challenged with EPE strains and compared to uninfected (both trials) and PPE-infected controls (Trial 2 only). Concurrently, 6 female New Zealand white juvenile rabbits were infected with PPE strain and observed concomitantly to 8 similar rabbits infected with EPE strain for a different experiment. Hamsters and rabbits were observed for 21 to 24 days post-infection (DPI), depending on the experiment. Neither infected species developed clinical signs. The presence of disease was assessed with diagnostic techniques classically used for pigs and horses: immune-peroxidase monolayer assay on sera; quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) detection of molecular DNA in feces; and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain and immunohistochemistry (IHC) on intestinal tissues. Our results showed that EPE-challenged hamsters do not develop infection when compared with PPE controls (IHC, P = 0.009; qPCR, P = 0.0003). Conversely, PPE-challenged rabbits do not develop typical intestinal lesions in comparison to EPE-challenged rabbits, with serological response at 14 DPI being significantly lower (P = 0.0023). In conclusion

  2. Changes in the Porcine Intestinal Microbiome in Response to Infection with Salmonella enterica and Lawsonia intracellularis

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Randall S.; Gebhart, Connie J.; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Johnson, Timothy; Isaacson, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a leading cause of food borne illness. Recent studies have shown that S. enterica is a pathogen capable of causing alterations to the composition of the intestinal microbiome. A recent prospective study of French pork production farms found a statistically significant association between Lawsonia intracellularis and carriage of S. enterica. In the current study the composition of the gut microbiome was determined in pigs challenged with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and or L. intracellularis and compared to non-challenged control pigs. Principal coordinate analysis demonstrated that there was a disruption in the composition of the gut microbiome in the colon and cecum of pigs challenged with either pathogen. The compositions of the microbiomes of challenged pigs were similar to each other but differed from the non-challenged controls. There also were statistically significant increases in Anaerobacter, Barnesiella, Pediococcus, Sporacetigenium, Turicibacter, Catenibacterium, Prevotella, Pseudobutyrivibrio, and Xylanibacter in the challenged pigs. To determine if these changes were specific to experimentally challenged pigs, we determined the compositions of the fecal microbiomes of naturally infected pigs that were carriers of S. enterica. Pigs that were frequent shedders of S. enterica were shown to have similar fecal microbiomes compared to non-shedders or pigs that shed S. enterica infrequently. In a comparison of the differentially abundant bacteria in the naturally infected pigs compared to experimentally challenged pigs, 9 genera were differentially abundant and each exhibited the same increase or decrease in abundance between the two groups. Thus, there were similar changes in the GI microbiome associated with carriage of S. enterica regardless of whether the pigs were experimentally challenged with S. enterica or acquired it naturally. PMID:26461107

  3. Comprehensive miRNA expression profiles in the ilea of Lawsonia intracellularis-infected pigs

    PubMed Central

    LI, Hongyi; ZHANG, Mao; ZHENG, Enqin

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the miRNA expression profiles in Lawsonia intracellularis-infected porcine intestines, infected pigs were first identified using PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction). Then, RNA from infected intestines and control tissues were isolated and subjected to microarray analysis and RT-PCR. Results showed that a total of 83 miRNAs were differentially expressed between the infected samples and controls, out of which 53 were upregulated and 30 were downregulated. Validation using RT-PCR showed a high degree of confidence for the obtained data. Using the current miRBase release 21.0, nine groups of miRNAs were located in the same cluster, and three groups of miRNAs were found to belong to the same family. Interestingly, except for ssc-miR-10a-5p, all clustered miRNAs and the family members exhibited the same expression patterns. Pathway analysis of the putative gene targets of the differentially expressed miRNAs showed that they were involved in the immune response, amino acid metabolism and cell communication/growth/motility. Thus, the results indicate that altered miRNA expression profiles can affect immunity, metabolism and cellular processes. PMID:27916787

  4. Comparative genome sequencing identifies a prophage-associated genomic island linked to host adaptation of Lawsonia intracellularis infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an obligate intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of proliferative enteropathy (PE). The disease is endemic in pigs, emerging in horses and has also been reported in a variety of other animal species, including nonhuman primates. Comparing the whole genome sequences of a homologous porcine L. intracellularis isolate cultivated for 10 and 60 passages in vitro, we identified a 18-kb prophage-associated genomic island in the passage 10 (pathogenic variant) that was lost in the passage 60 (non-pathogenic variant). This chromosomal island comprises 15 genes downstream from the prophage DLP12 integrase gene. The prevalence of this genetic element was evaluated in 12 other L. intracellularis isolates and in 53 infected animals and was found to be conserved in all porcine isolates cultivated for up to 20 passages and was lost in isolates cultivated for more than 40 passages. Furthermore, the prophage region was also present in 26 fecal samples derived from pigs clinically affected with both acute and chronic forms of the disease. Nevertheless, equine L. intracellularis isolates evaluated did not harbor this genomic island regardless of the passage in vitro. Additionally, fecal samples from 21 clinically affected horses and four wild rabbits trapped in horse farms experiencing PE outbreaks did not show this prophage-associated island. Although the presence of this prophage-associated island was not essential for a virulent L. intracellularis phenotype, this genetic element was porcine isolate-specific and potentially contributed to the ecological specialization of this organism for the swine host. PMID:23826661

  5. Down-regulation of mechanisms involved in cell transport and maintenance of mucosal integrity in pigs infected with Lawsonia intracellularis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an obligate intracellular bacterium, responsible for the disease complex known as proliferative enteropathy (PE). L. intracellularis is associated with intestinal crypt epithelial cell proliferation but the mechanisms responsible are yet to be defined. Microarray analysis was used to investigate the host-pathogen interaction in experimentally infected pigs to identify pathways that may be involved. Ileal samples originating from twenty-eight weaner pigs experimentally challenged with a pure culture of L. intracellularis (strain LR189/5/83) were subjected to microarray analysis. Microarray transcriptional signatures were validated using immunohistochemistry and quantitative real time PCR of selected genes at various time points post challenge. At peak of infection (14 days post challenge) 86% of altered transcripts were down regulated, particularly those involved in maintenance of mucosal integrity and regulation of cell transport. Among the up-regulated transcripts, CD163 and CDK1 were novel findings and considered to be important, due to their respective roles in innate immunity and cellular proliferation. Overall, targeted cellular mechanisms included those that are important in epithelial restitution, migration and protection; maintenance of stable inter-epithelial cell relationships; cell transport of nutrients and electrolytes; innate immunity; and cell cycle. PMID:24885874

  6. Detection of Lawsonia intracellularis by real-time PCR in the feces of free-living animals from equine farms with documented occurrence of equine proliferative enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Pusterla, Nicola; Mapes, Samantha; Rejmanek, Daniel; Gebhart, Connie

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether Lawsonia intracellularis was present in the feces of free-living animals collected on two equine premises with documented occurrence of equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). Fresh feces from black-tailed jackrabbits (Lepus californicus, n=100), striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis, n=22), feral cats (Felis catus, n=14), Brewer's Blackbirds (Euphagus cyanocephalus, n=10), Virginian opossums (Didelphis virginiana, n=9), raccoons (Procyon lotor, n=4), California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi, n=3), and coyotes (Canis latrans, n=2) were collected from August 2006 to January 2007 either from the ground while walking the premises or after trapping the animals using live traps. Nucleic acid purified from feces was directly processed for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis using a real-time PCR assay targeting the aspartate ammonia lyase gene of L. intracellularis. Purified DNA samples were also precipitated, preamplified for L. intracellularis, and analyzed using the same real-time PCR assay, to increase the detection limit to one L. intracellularis organism per extracted sample. Feces from jackrabbits, striped skunks, Virginian opossums, and coyotes tested PCR positive for L. intracellularis, whereas all feces from feral cats, Brewer's Blackbirds, raccoons, and ground squirrels tested PCR negative for L. intracellularis. PCR testing on DNA extracted directly from feces was positive for L. intracellularis in six of 164 fecal samples. When DNA purification from feces was followed by a precipitation and preamplification step, five additional fecal samples tested PCR positive for L. intracellularis (11/164). The largest number of PCR positive L. intracellularis fecal samples was observed in striped skunks, followed by Virginian opossums, jackrabbits, and coyotes. This is the first description of L. intracellularis in these four species. Because the fecal samples were collected at equine farms with confirmed

  7. Attenuation of virulence of Lawsonia intracellularis after in vitro passages and its effects on the experimental reproduction of porcine proliferative enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, Fabio A; Beckler, Dana; Pusterla, Nicola; Mapes, Samantha M; Gebhart, Connie J

    2013-02-22

    Non-pathogenic Lawsonia intracellularis variants have been obtained through multiple passages in cell culture but there is no information regarding the number of passages necessary to attenuate a pathogenic isolate. The present study evaluated the susceptibility of pigs to L. intracellularis after 10, 20 and 40 passages in vitro. Three groups (six animals/group) were inoculated with pure culture of L. intracellularis on passage 10, 20 or 40 and one group with placebo. The animals were monitored for clinical signs, fecal shedding and serological IgG response during 28 days post-inoculation. Gross and histologic lesions and the level of infection based on the amount of L. intracellularis-specific antigen in the intestinal mucosa identified by immunohistochemistry were evaluated in two animals from each group on days 14, 21 and 28. Animals inoculated with passages 10 and 20 demonstrated proliferative lesions typical of porcine proliferative enteropathy associated with the presence of Lawsonia-specific antigen in the intestinal mucosa. Passage 40-inoculated pigs did not show proliferative lesions or presence of Lawsonia antigen at any time point throughout the study. Similar patterns of the fecal shedding were observed in passage 10 and 20-infected pigs but those infected with passage 40 shed for a short period. Serological IgG responses in passage 10 and 20-inoculated pigs were detected from day 14 post-infection but not at all in passage 40-inoculated animals. These results demonstrate attenuation of the virulence properties of L. intracellularis between 20 and 40 cell passages in vitro. This information will be valuable for design of future experimental models and for studying the mechanisms involved in the attenuation of L. intracellularis virulence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. An outbreak of Lawsonia intracellularis infection in a standardbred herd in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    McGurrin, M. Kimberly J.; Vengust, Modest; Arroyo, Luis G.; Baird, John D.

    2007-01-01

    An outbreak of protein-losing enteropathy associated with Lawsonia intracelluaris infection was diagnosed in 6 standardbred foals from a farm in Ontario. Wildlife exposure may have been involved in the perpetuation of disease in this outbreak. The clinical presentation, treatment, outcomes, and pathological findings are described. PMID:17966333

  9. Sub-isotypic differences in the immunoglobulin G response to Lawsonia intracellularis in vaccinated, seropositive, and equine proliferative enteropathy-affected horses.

    PubMed

    Page, Allen E; Stills, Harold F; Horohov, David W

    2014-12-15

    In the horse, Lawsonia intracellularis infection results in equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). While upwards of 100% of weanlings on an endemic farm may seroconvert, only a small percentage (approximately 5%) will develop clinical disease. Cell-mediated immune mechanisms likely play a role in resistance to L. intracellularis and the absence of a L. intracellularis-specific IFN-γ response has been associated with the development of EPE. The goal of this study was to determine whether protection from clinical EPE is associated with the induction of a systemic IgG sub-isotypic response consistent with a Th1-type cytokine response. To describe their L. intracellularis/EPE status, horses enrolled in this study were placed into one of three categories: seropositive-only, vaccinated, and presumptive clinical EPE. An existing ELISA method was modified to detect L. intracellularis-specific IgG(a), IgG(b), and IgG(t) antibodies using the mouse anti-equine hybridomas CVS-48, CVS-39, and CVS-40, respectively. Additionally, the existing ELISA method was used to quantify total IgG antibodies specific for L. intracellularis for comparison between the groups. Total L. intracellularis-specific IgG was found to be significantly higher (p<0.05) in presumptive clinical EPE cases (n=21) when compared with seropositive (exposed but unaffected) (n=36) and vaccinated horses (n=27). Further, a similar pattern for IgG(a) was seen in that the presumptive clinical EPE horses had significantly more L. intracellularis-specific IgG(a) (p<0.05) than the seropositive or vaccinated horses. With IgG(b), however, the vaccinated horses had significantly more IgG(b) (p<0.05) than the presumptive clinical or seropositive horses. No L. intracellularis-specific IgG(t) was detected in samples from any of the groups. While the results presented here with respect to IgG(a) response in the presumptive clinical EPE group were expected, a higher concentration of IgG(a) was anticipated in the seropositive

  10. Lawsonia intracellularis exploits β-catenin/Wnt and Notch signalling pathways during infection of intestinal crypt to alter cell homeostasis and promote cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Yang W.; Bengtsson, Rebecca J.; MacIntyre, Neil; Guthrie, Jack; Finlayson, Heather; Smith, Sionagh H.; Archibald, Alan L.; Ait-Ali, Tahar

    2017-01-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes proliferative enteropathy (PE) in pigs. L. intracellularis infection causes extensive intestinal crypt cell proliferation and inhibits secretory and absorptive cell differentiation. However, the affected host upstream cellular pathways leading to PE are still unknown. β-catenin/Wnt signalling is essential in maintaining intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation and self-renewal capacity, while Notch signalling governs differentiation of secretory and absorptive lineage specification. Therefore, in this report we used immunofluorescence (IF) and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RTqPCR) to examine β-catenin/Wnt and Notch-1 signalling levels in uninfected and L. intracellularis infected pig ileums at 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days post challenge (dpc). We found that while the significant increase in Ki67+ nuclei in crypts at the peak of L. intracellularis infection suggested enhanced cell proliferation, the expression of c-MYC and ASCL2, promoters of cell growth and ISC proliferation respectively, was down-regulated. Peak infection also coincided with enhanced cytosolic and membrane-associated β-catenin staining and induction of AXIN2 and SOX9 transcripts, both encoding negative regulators of β-catenin/Wnt signalling and suggesting a potential alteration to β-catenin/Wnt signalling levels, with differential regulation of the expression of its target genes. We found that induction of HES1 and OLFM4 and the down-regulation of ATOH1 transcript levels was consistent with the increased Notch-1 signalling in crypts at the peak of infection. Interestingly, the significant down-regulation of ATOH1 transcript levels coincided with the depletion of MUC2 expression at 14 dpc, consistent with the role of ATOH1 in promoting goblet cell maturation. The lack of significant change to LGR5 transcript levels at the peak of infection suggested that the crypt hyperplasia was not due to the expansion

  11. Experimental reproduction of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2)-associated enteritis in pigs infected with PCV2 alone or concurrently with Lawsonia intracellularis or Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Opriessnig, T; Madson, D M; Roof, M; Layton, S M; Ramamoorthy, S; Meng, X J; Halbur, P G

    2011-01-01

    Porcine circovirus (PCV)-associated disease (PCVAD) has emerged to become one of the most economically important pig diseases globally. One of the less commonly recognized clinical manifestations of PCVAD is PCV2 type 2 (PCV2)-associated enteritis in growing pigs; however, experimental confirmation of the ability of PCV2 alone or PCV2 coinfection with other agent(s) to induce enteritis is lacking. In this study, 120 specific-pathogen-free (SPF) pigs were divided randomly into six groups: controls (negative control pigs), PCV2 (inoculated with PCV2), LAW (inoculated with Lawsonia intracellularis), SALM (inoculated with Salmonella typhimurium), PCV2-LAW (concurrently inoculated with PCV2 and Lawsonia intracellularis) and PCV2-SALM (concurrently inoculated with PCV2 and Salmonella typhimurium). One half of the pigs in each group were subject to necropsy examination 14 days postinoculation (dpi) and the remaining pigs were examined at 28 dpi. The average daily weight gain was not different (P>0.05) between groups. Individual pigs inoculated orally with PCV2 regardless of coinfection status (2/10 PCV2, 1/10 PCV2-LAW, 3/10 PCV2-SALM) developed PCVAD with diarrhoea and reduced weight gain or weight loss between 14 and 28 dpi. Those pigs had characteristic microscopic lesions in lymphoid and enteric tissues associated with abundant PCV2 antigen. Enteric lesions were characterized by necrosuppurative and proliferative enteritis with crypt elongation and epithelial hyperplasia in LAW and PCV2-LAW pigs by 14 dpi, ulcerative and necrosuppurative colitis in SALM and PCV2-SALM pigs by 14 dpi, and lymphohistiocytic enteritis with depletion of Peyer's patches in PCV2, PCV2-SALM and PCV2-LAW pigs by 28 dpi. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report documenting that under experimental conditions, PCV2 can induce enteritis independently from other enteric pathogens and that oral challenge is a potentially important route and perhaps the natural route of PCV2 transmission in

  12. Maternal short-chain fructo-oligosaccharide supplementation increases intestinal cytokine secretion, goblet cell number, butyrate concentration and Lawsonia intracellularis humoral vaccine response in weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Le Bourgot, Cindy; Le Normand, Laurence; Formal, Michèle; Respondek, Frédérique; Blat, Sophie; Apper, Emmanuelle; Ferret-Bernard, Stéphanie; Le Huërou-Luron, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Prebiotic supplementation modulates immune system development and function. However, less is known about the effects of maternal prebiotic consumption on offspring intestinal defences and immune system responsiveness. We investigated the effects of maternal short-chain fructo-oligosaccharide (scFOS) supplementation on mucin-secreting cells, ileal secretory IgA and cytokine secretion of weaned offspring and their humoral response to an oral vaccine against obligate intracellular Lawsonia intracellularis. Sows were fed a control diet (CTRL) or scFOS-supplemented diet during the last third of gestation and throughout lactation. At weaning, each litter was divided into two groups receiving a post-weaning CTRL or scFOS diet for a month. Pigs from the four groups were either non-vaccinated (n 16) or vaccinated (n 117) at day 33. Biomarkers related to intestinal defences and immune parameters were analysed 3 weeks later. SCFA production was assessed over time in suckling and weaned pigs. Maternal scFOS supplementation improved ileal cytokine secretions (interferon (IFN)-γ, P<0·05; IL-4, P=0·07) and tended to increase caecal goblet cell number (P=0·06). It increased IgA vaccine response in the serum (P<0·01) and ileal mucosa (P=0·08). Higher bacterial fermentative activity was observed during lactation (total faecal SCFA, P<0·001) and after weaning (colonic butyrate, P=0·10) in pigs from scFOS-supplemented mothers. No synergistic effect between maternal and post-weaning scFOS supplementation was observed. Therefore, maternal scFOS supplementation has long-lasting consequences by strengthening gut defences and immune response to a vaccine against an intestinal obligate intracellular pathogen. Prebiotic consumption by gestating and lactating mothers is decisive in modulating offspring intestinal immunity.

  13. A randomised clinical trial on the efficacy of oxytetracycline dose through water medication of nursery pigs on diarrhoea, faecal shedding of Lawsonia intracellularis and average daily weight gain.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Inge; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Holm, Anders; Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Nielsen, Jens Peter

    2016-01-01

    Oral treatment with antimicrobials is widely used in pig production for the control of gastrointestinal infections. Lawsonia intracellularis (LI) causes enteritis in pigs older than six weeks of age and is commonly treated with antimicrobials. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of three oral dosage regimens (5, 10 and 20mg/kg body weight) of oxytetracycline (OTC) in drinking water over a five-day period on diarrhoea, faecal shedding of LI and average daily weight gain (ADG). A randomised clinical trial was carried out in four Danish pig herds. In total, 539 animals from 37 batches of nursery pigs were included in the study. The dosage regimens were randomly allocated to each batch and initiated at presence of assumed LI-related diarrhoea. In general, all OTC doses used for the treatment of LI infection resulted in reduced diarrhoea and LI shedding after treatment. Treatment with a low dose of 5mg/kg OTC per kg body weight, however, tended to cause more watery faeces and resulted in higher odds of pigs shedding LI above detection level when compared to medium and high doses (with odds ratios of 5.5 and 8.4, respectively). No association was found between the dose of OTC and the ADG. In conclusion, a dose of 5mg OTC per kg body weight was adequate for reducing the high-level LI shedding associated with enteropathy, but a dose of 10mg OTC per kg body weight was necessary to obtain a maximum reduction in LI shedding.

  14. Prevalence and risk factors for Lawsonia intracellularis, Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and Salmonella spp. in finishing pigs in Polish farrow-to-finish swine herds.

    PubMed

    Dors, A; Pomorska-Mól, M; Czyżewska, E; Wasyl, D; Pejsak, Z

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the herd-level, within-herd prevalence, the frequency of mixed infections and risk factors for L. intracellularis, B. hyodysenteriae and Salmonella spp. in selected farrow-to-finish Polish pig herds. A total of 254 pooled fecal samples were collected from 9 to 24 week-old pigs in 70 herds. Real time PCR for detection of L. intracellularis and B. hyodysenteriae was performed. For Salmonella spp. bacteriological examination was performed. The herd-level prevalences of L. intracellularis, B. hyodysenteriae and Salmonella spp. among examined herds were 65.7%, 1.4% and 8.6%, respectively. The within-herd prevalences (in positive herds) for L. intracellularis, B. hyodysenteriae and Salmonella spp. were 51.5%, 75.0% and 30.4%, respectively. All herds with diarrhea observed during sampling were infected with L. intracellularis and 60% of herds with no diarrhea at the moment of sampling were infected with L. intracellularis (p=0.035). In herds with more than 200 sows the prevalence of Salmonella spp. was significantly higher compared to herds with less than 200 sows (p=0.027). In herds where all-in/all-out (AIAO) was respected, prevalence of L. intracellularis was significantly lower than in herds where this rule was not kept (p=0.024). Obtained results confirm that L. intracellularis is the major cause of bacterial diarrhea in finishing pigs. The present study identified AIAO and herd size as a risk factor, at the herd level, for L. intracellularis and Salmonella spp., respectively.

  15. Production of an inducible sucrase activity by Serpulina hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, N S; Stanton, T B

    1994-01-01

    Strains of Serpulina hyodysenteriae and Serpulina innocens produced a cell-associated sucrase activity when grown in a medium containing sucrose. S. hyodysenteriae B204 sucrase activity cleaved sucrose and, to a lesser extent, raffinose and had a pH optimum of 5.7 to 6.2. This is the first report of an inducible enzyme produced by either S. hyodysenteriae or S. innocens. Images PMID:7944375

  16. The cytotoxic properties of Serpulina hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed

    Binek, M; Szynkiewicz, Z; Spohr de Faundez, I; Wójcik, U; Klimuszko, D; Rzewuska, M

    1995-01-01

    Examination of colonic enterocytes inoculate with pure culture of S. hyodysenteriae by phase-contrast microscopy revealed that only few spirochaetes adhere to epithelial cells. S. hyodysenteriae was observed to be highly motile, showed corkscrew-like movement which might suggest that bacteria were trying to penetrate and damaged the host cells. The pattern of motility provide evidence of a chemotaxis. Supernatant of S.hyodysenteriae lysate were found to cause CTE in CHO, Vero and PK-15 culture. This support the hypothesis that damage is consistent with the presence of toxin. Inhibition activity of serpulinas hemolysin preparation with streptolysin S inhibitors confirms the suggestion that the mechanism by which S. hyodysenteriae toxin effects the cells seems to be similar to the action of streptococcal toxin S.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of gallium maltolate in Lawsonia intracellularis-infected and uninfected rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, F; Alcorn, J; Allen, A L; Clark, C R; Vannucci, F A; Pusterla, N; Mapes, S; Ball, K R; Dowling, P M; Thompson, J; Bernstein, L R; Gebhart, C J; Hamilton, D L

    2014-10-01

    Oral gallium maltolate (GaM) pharmacokinetics (PK) and intestinal tissue (IT) concentrations of elemental gallium ([Ga]) and iron ([Fe]) were investigated in a rabbit model of equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). New Zealand white does (uninfected controls and EPE-infected, n = 6/group) were given a single oral GaM dose (50 mg/kg). Serial blood samples were collected from 0 to 216 h post-treatment (PT) and IT samples after euthanasia. Serology, qPCR, and immunohistochemistry confirmed, or excluded, EPE. Blood and IT [Ga] and [Fe] were determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. PK parameters were estimated through noncompartmental approaches. For all statistical comparisons on [Ga] and [Fe] α = 5%. The Ga log-linear terminal phase rate constant was lower in EPE rabbits vs. uninfected controls [0.0116 ± 0.004 (SD) vs. 0.0171 ± 0.0028 per hour; P = 0.03]; but half-life (59.4 ± 24.0 vs. 39.4 ± 10.8 h; P = 0.12); Cmax (0.50 ± 0.21 vs. 0.59 ± 0.42 μg/mL; P = 0.45); tmax (1.75 ± 0.41 vs. 0.9 ± 0.37 h; P = 0.20); and oral clearance (6.743 ± 1.887 vs. 7.208 ± 2.565 L/h; P = 0.74) were not. IT's [Ga] and [Fe] were higher (P < 0.0001) in controls. In conclusion, although infection reduces IT [Ga] and [Fe], a 48 h GaM dosing interval is appropriate for multidose studies in EPE rabbits.

  18. Diagnostic and epidemiological features of Lawsonia intracellularis enteropathy in 2 foals

    PubMed Central

    Dauvillier, Julie; Picandet, Valérie; Harel, Josée; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Desrosiers, Robert; Jean, Daniel; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Two clinical cases of equine proliferative enteropathy are described. Both foals had a positive fecal polymerase chain reaction, but shedding of the bacterium stopped < 4 days after therapy was initiated. One foal was serologically positive 3 days after onset of clinical signs and remained positive for more than 6 months. PMID:16898113

  19. Relationship between Ileal symbiont intracellularis and porcine proliferative enteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, G F; Ward, G E; Murtaugh, M P; Rose, R; Gebhart, C J

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between Ileal symbiont (IS) intracellularis, formerly known as a Campylobacter-like organism, and porcine proliferative enteritis (PE) was studied by use of pigs with experimentally transmitted PE. Twenty one pigs were experimentally inoculated with homogenized ileal mucosa from a pig that died with PE, and 7 were maintained as uninoculated controls. Fecal samples were collected, and pigs were necropsied weekly postinoculation. Light microscopy and electron microscopy were used to examine tissues for lesions of PE and infectious agents. DNA was extracted from the fecal samples and assayed for the presence of sequences specific for IS intracellularis by dot blot hybridization and polymerase chain reaction amplification. IS intracellularis was detected by the polymerase chain reaction in the feces of 20 of 21 inoculated pigs but not in the feces of uninoculated pigs. Seven inoculated pigs but no uninoculated pigs were detected shedding IS intracellularis by dot blot hybridization. Shedding was detected 1 to 5 weeks after inoculation, and clinical signs were seen in the second to fifth weeks after inoculation. Few pigs without lesions of PE were found to shed IS intracellularis. There was a highly significant association between the presence of IS intracellularis in feces or tissue and the presence of microscopic proliferative lesions and between the severity of the lesions of PE and the percentage of IS intracellularis-infected intestinal crypts. Pigs that ceased shedding IS intracellularis were significantly less likely to have proliferative lesions. These and previous reports are consistent with the hypothesis that IS intracellularis is a necessary causative agent of PE. Images PMID:8225599

  20. Inhibitors of osteoclastogenesis from Lawsonia inermis leaves.

    PubMed

    Cuong, Nguyen Xuan; Nhiem, Nguyen Xuan; Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Nam, Nguyen Hoai; Dat, Nguyen Tien; Anh, Hoang Le Tuan; Huong, Le Mai; Kiem, Phan Van; Minh, Chau Van; Won, Ji-Hee; Chung, Won-Yoon; Kim, Young Ho

    2010-08-15

    Ten phenolic compounds (1-10) were isolated from a methanol extract of Lawsonia inermis leaves including two new ones, lawsoniasides A (1) and B (2). Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods (NMR and FTICRMS) in combination with acid hydrolysis and GC analyses. Compounds 4 and 5 showed a significant inhibition on receptor activator for nuclear factor-kappaB ligand-induced osteoclast formation in murine bone-marrow macrophages. 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Development of an experimental model allowing discrimination between virulent and avirulent isolates of Serpulina (Treponema) hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed Central

    Achacha, M; Messier, S; Mittal, K R

    1996-01-01

    Variation in virulence among different strains of Serpulina hyodysenteriae was studied by oral inoculation of specific pathogen free piglets and CD-1 mice. Piglets infected with serotype 2 reference strain B204 and an untypable field strain LHV-90-9-I had severe diarrhea tainted intermittently with mucus and fresh blood. The piglets inoculated with B169, B8044, B6933, and ACK300-8 reference strains representing serotypes 3, 5, 6, and 7 respectively developed moderate diarrhea. However, reference strains B234 and A-1 of serotypes 1 and 4, respectively, failed to cause any diarrhea. None of the S. hyodysenteriae strains caused diarrhea in mice. The results indicate a great variation in virulence among strains of different serotypes of S. hyodysenteriae. Mice were less susceptible to infection with S. hyodysenteriae. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8825993

  2. A species-specific periplasmic flagellar protein of Serpulina (Treponema) hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z; Dumas, F; Dubreuil, D; Jacques, M

    1993-01-01

    We have previously reported that a 46-kDa protein present in an outer membrane protein preparation seemed to be a species-specific antigen of Serpulina hyodysenteriae (Z. S. Li, N. S. Jensen, M. Bélanger, M.-C. L'Espérance, and M. Jacques, J. Clin. Microbiol. 30:2941-2947, 1992). The objective of this study was to further characterize this antigen. A Western blot (immunoblot) analysis and immunogold labeling with a monospecific antiserum against this protein confirmed that the protein was present in all S. hyodysenteriae reference strains but not in the nonpathogenic organism Serpulina innocens. The immunogold labeling results also indicated that the protein was associated with the periplasmic flagella of S. hyodysenteriae. N-terminal amino acid sequencing confirmed that the protein was in fact a periplasmic flagellar sheath protein. The molecular mass of this protein, first estimated to be 46 kDa by Western blotting, was determined to be 44 kDa when the protein was evaluated more precisely by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the protein was glycosylated, as determined by glycoprotein staining and also by N-glycosidase F treatment. Five other periplasmic flagellar proteins of S. hyodysenteriae, which may have been the core proteins and had molecular masses of 39, 35, 32, 30, and 29 kDa, were antigenically related and cross-reacted with the periplasmic flagellar proteins of S. innocens. Finally, serum from a pig experimentally infected with S. hyodysenteriae recognized the 44-kDa periplasmic flagellar sheath protein. Our results suggest that the 44-kDa periplasmic flagellar sheath protein of S. hyodysenteriae is a species-specific glycoprotein antigen. Images PMID:8253687

  3. Lawsonia inermis - an alternative treatment for hyperthyroidism?

    PubMed

    Zumrutdal, E; Karateke, F; Daglioglu, K; Gulkaya, M; Colak, O; Koksal, F

    2014-01-01

    The goal of our study was to determine the effects of Lawsonia inermis (L. inermis) in mice, in which hyperthyroidism had been caused by thyroid stimulant hormone (TSH). The first phase of the study aimed to detect the effects of L. inermis on the amount of ionized hydrogen (pH) in cells. For this aim, the effect of L. inermis on pH levels in the liver tissues of mice, in whom Escherichia coli (E. coli) had caused peritonitis, was examined. In the second phase of the study, the effect of L. inermis on the serum T4 levels in the 24th and 48th hour in mice, whose thyroid cells showed an increased activity by TSH was measured. In the first phase, in mice, in whom E.coli had caused peritonitis, the pH in the liver tissue of the group that had been given L. inermis was found to be significantly alkaline (p<0.05). In the second phase, in mice, in whom TSH had caused hyperthyroidism, it was noted that serum total T4 levels were significantly lower than in the group that had been given L. inermis in the 48th hour (p<0.05). In our study, we detected that L. inermis significantly decreased serum total T4 levels in the 48th hour in mice in whom TSH had caused hyperthyroidism. These results suggest that L. inermis can be used as an alternative treatment for the Graves' disease (Tab. 2, Fig. 1, Ref. 34).

  4. Identification of a gene sequence encoding a putative pyruvate oxidoreductase in Serpulina pilosicoli.

    PubMed

    Rayment, S J; Lee, B J; Hampson, D J; Livesley, M A

    1998-09-01

    Serpulina pilosicoli is a recently described species of intestinal spirochaete which can be identified using a species-specific monoclonal antibody BJL/AC1 reactive with a 29-kDa protein located in the cell envelope. A genomic library of the type strain of S. pilosicoli P43/6/78T was created in lambda zap express and screened using BJL/AC1. Single positive clones were isolated and excised into the phagemid vector pBK-CMV. Phagemid DNA was purified and a single clone was selected for sequencing. The size of spirochaetal DNA insert was determined by digestion with restriction endonucleases EcoRI and PstI as being approximately 2.6 kb. The nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the protein with which the antibody reacted was determined by cycle sequencing. The insert contained an open reading frame of 285 nucleotides. Translation of the nucleotide sequence into amino acid (aa) residues showed a sequence of 275 aa. Comparison of this sequence with databases revealed homology to pyruvate oxidoreductases from various organisms found in the gastroinestinal tract. These included the pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR) alpha submit of Helicobacter pylori (38.8% identity in 250 aa), pyruvate-flavodoxin oxidoreductase of Escherichia coli (28.7% identify in 258 aa) and Giardia intestinalis (25.1% identity in 251 aa). A significant level of homology was also observed with hyperthermophilic bacteria such as the POR of Thermatoga maritima (38.6% in 254 aa) and the 2-ketovalerate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase of Pyrococcus furiosus (34% in 262 aa).

  5. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for measuring ileal symbiont intracellularis-specific immunoglobulin G response in sera of pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Holyoake, P K; Cutler, R S; Caple, I W; Monckton, R P

    1994-01-01

    Proliferative enteritis (PE) is a common intestinal disease on pig farms. The disease is caused by ileal symbiont (IS) intracellularis (Campylobacter-like organisms) bacteria. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to measure IS intracellularis-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) response in the sera of pigs. The antigen used in the ELISA was filtered, percoll gradient-purified IS intracellularis extracted from the intestines of pigs affected with proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy. The antibody responses of pigs challenged with intestinal homogenates from pigs affected with proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy containing IS intracellularis or percoll-gradient purified IS intracellularis were low and variable. The low IgG titers measured in challenged pigs support previous findings that IgG plays a minor role in the immune response of pigs to IS intracellularis. On a farm in which infection was endemic, pigs seroconverted at between 7 and 24 weeks of age. High IgG titers, indicative of maternally acquired antibody, were present in 3-week-old pigs. The IgG titers in piglets were lowest at 6 weeks of age, which approximates the age of onset of clinical disease. These results suggest that IgG plays a role in determining the susceptibilities of pigs to natural infection. Measurements of seroconversion by the ELISA might aid in epidemiological investigations of PE in naturally infected herds. However, the variable antibody responses in experimentally challenged pigs would seem to limit its usefulness as an antemortem diagnostic test for PE. PMID:7989553

  6. The prevalence of Serpulina pilosicoli in humans and domestic animals in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Trott, D J; Combs, B G; Mikosza, A S; Oxberry, S L; Robertson, I D; Passey, M; Taime, J; Sehuko, R; Alpers, M P; Hampson, D J

    1997-12-01

    In a survey of five villages in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea, Serpulina pilosicoli was isolated from rectal swabs from 113 of 496 individuals (22.8%). Colonization rates ranged from 22.6-30.1% in four of the villages but was only 8.6% in the other village. In comparison colonization was demonstrated in only 5 of 54 indigenous people (9.3%) and none of 76 non-indigenous people living in an urban environment in the same region. Colonization did not relate to reported occurrence of diarrhoea, age, sex, or length of time resident in a village. A second set of 94 faecal specimens was collected from 1 village 6 weeks after the first set. S. pilosicoli was isolated from 27 of 29 individuals (93.1%) who were positive on the first sampling and from 7 of 65 individuals (10.8%) who previously were negative. In this case, isolates were significantly more common in watery stools than in normal stools. The annual incidence of infection in the village was calculated as 93.6%, with an average duration of infection of 117 days. S. pilosicoli could not be isolated from any village pig (n = 126) despite its confirmed presence in 17 of 50 commercial pigs (34.0%) sampled at a local piggery. Four of 76 village dogs (5.3%) and 1 of 2 village ducks were colonized with S. pilosicoli, suggesting the possibility of cross transmission between humans and animals.

  7. The prevalence of Serpulina pilosicoli in humans and domestic animals in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed Central

    Trott, D. J.; Combs, B. G.; Mikosza, A. S.; Oxberry, S. L.; Robertson, I. D.; Passey, M.; Taime, J.; Sehuko, R.; Alpers, M. P.; Hampson, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    In a survey of five villages in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea, Serpulina pilosicoli was isolated from rectal swabs from 113 of 496 individuals (22.8%). Colonization rates ranged from 22.6-30.1% in four of the villages but was only 8.6% in the other village. In comparison colonization was demonstrated in only 5 of 54 indigenous people (9.3%) and none of 76 non-indigenous people living in an urban environment in the same region. Colonization did not relate to reported occurrence of diarrhoea, age, sex, or length of time resident in a village. A second set of 94 faecal specimens was collected from 1 village 6 weeks after the first set. S. pilosicoli was isolated from 27 of 29 individuals (93.1%) who were positive on the first sampling and from 7 of 65 individuals (10.8%) who previously were negative. In this case, isolates were significantly more common in watery stools than in normal stools. The annual incidence of infection in the village was calculated as 93.6%, with an average duration of infection of 117 days. S. pilosicoli could not be isolated from any village pig (n = 126) despite its confirmed presence in 17 of 50 commercial pigs (34.0%) sampled at a local piggery. Four of 76 village dogs (5.3%) and 1 of 2 village ducks were colonized with S. pilosicoli, suggesting the possibility of cross transmission between humans and animals. PMID:9440442

  8. Population genetic analysis of Serpulina pilosicoli and its molecular epidemiology in villages in the eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Trott, D J; Mikosza, A S; Combs, B G; Oxberry, S L; Hampson, D J

    1998-07-01

    The population genetics of Serpulina pilosicoli and its molecular epidemiology in villages in the Eastern Highlands province of Papua New Guinea were investigated. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) was used to analyse 164 isolates from humans and animals. These were divided into 33 electrophoretic types (ETs), four of which contained 65% of the isolates. The mean genetic diversity (n = number of ETs) for 145 human isolates was 0.18, and the mean number of alleles at five polymorphic loci was 2.6. The species appeared to be recombinant, as there was a lack of linkage disequilibrium, and 25% of all the possible combinations of alleles was present in the population. PFGE analysis using the enzymes M/ul and Sa/l divided 157 of the isolates into 99 PFGE types, demonstrating the existence of considerable strain diversity in a geographically restricted area. The two techniques were in excellent agreement; however, PFGE was more discriminatory for strain typing than was MLEE. Nine out of 19 (47.4%) culture-positive individuals were colonized by the same PFGE type of S. pilosicoli when retested after 6 weeks. For three individuals, the PFGE profiles of the second isolate differed from the first in only one or two DNA bands, while the other seven individuals were colonized with distinct PFGE types on each occasion. In two cases, strains with the same PFGE pattern were isolated from humans and dogs, suggesting that cross-species transmission of S. pilosicoli may occur naturally and that the infection can be zoonotic.

  9. Comparison between the effect of Lawsonia inermis and flubendazole on Strongyloides species using scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Khadiga Ahmed; Ibrahim, Ayman Nabil; Ahmed, Mona Abdel-Fattah; Hetta, Mona Hafez

    2016-06-01

    Strongyloides species is a helminth of worldwide distribution primarily in tropical and subtropical regions. It is the only soil-transmitted helminth with the ability for autoinfection so; it may lead to severe systemic manifestations especially in immunosuppressed patients. Chemotherapy is currently considered the best therapeutic option for strongyloidiasis but some drugs are expensive and others have side effects as nausea, diarrhea and headache. Strongyloides larva is resistant to most chemical agents so, search for plant extracts may provide other effective but less expensive treatment. Lawsonia inermis Linn, popularly known as Henna, has been proven to have antihelminthic, antibacterial and antifungal properties. The current study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of Lawsonia inermis on Strongyloides spp. In vitro using scanning electron microscopy. Fifty Strongyloides species. larvae and free living females were incubated with different concentrations of Lawsonia (1, 10, 100 mg/ml), for different incubation periods (24, 48, 72 and 96 h) in comparison to the same concentrations of flubendazole at the same different time points. The results showed that Lawsonia inermis in a concentration of 10 mg/ml incubated with Strongyloides spp. female for 24 h affected the parasite cuticular surface in the form of transverse and longitudinal fissures and transverse depression in comparison to no cuticular change with flubendazole (100 mg/ml). This suggests that Lawsonia inermis may be a promising phytotherapeutic agent for strongyloidiasis.

  10. Molluscicidal activity of Lawsonia inermis and its binary and tertiary combinations with other plant derived molluscicides.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Singh, D K

    2001-03-01

    Molluscicidal activity of leaf, bark and seed of Lawsonia inermis against Lymnaea acuminata and Indoplanorbis exustus was studied. Highest toxicity was observed in the seed of Lawsonia inermis. Toxicity of binary (1:1) and tertiary (1:1:1) combinations of the essential oil of cedar (Cedrus deodara Roxh) and neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss), powder from bulb of garlic (Allium sativum Linn), and oleoresin extracted from rhizome of ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc) with Lawsonia inermis and Embelia ribes fruit powder were studied against L. acuminata and I. exustus. L. inermis seed powder in combination with Cedrus deodara oil and Azadirachta indica oil was more toxic than their individual components and other combinations.

  11. Phytochemical, toxicological and antimicrobial evaluation of Lawsonia inermis extracts against clinical isolates of pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gull, Iram; Sohail, Maria; Aslam, Muhammad Shahbaz; Amin Athar, Muhammad

    2013-12-01

    The emerging resistance of pathogen against the currently available antimicrobial agents demands the search of new antimicrobial agents. The use of medicinal plants as natural substitute is the paramount area of research to overwhelm the drug resistance of infectious agents. Scientists have not made enough effort on the evaluation of safety of medicinal plant yet. In the present study antimicrobial activity of Lawsonia inermis is investigated against clinical isolates of seven bacteria including four Gram negative (Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Klebsiella spp., Shigella sonnei) and three Gram positive (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis) using disc diffusion method. Four types of Lawsonia inermis extracts were prepared using methanol, chloroform, acetone and water as extraction solvents, while DMSO (Dimethyl sulfoxide) and water as dissolution solvents. The rate and extent of bacterial killing was estimated by time-kill kinetic assay at 1× MIC of each bacterial isolate. The overall safety of Lawsonia inermis extracts was assessed in mice. Lawsonia inermis displayed noteworthy antimicrobial activity against both gram positive and gram negative bacterial strains used in the study. The minimum value of MIC for different bacterial strains ranged from 2.31 mg/ml to 9.27 mg/ml. At 1x MIC of each bacterial isolate, 3log10 decrease in CFU was recorded after 6 hours of drug exposure and no growth was observed in almost all tested bacteria after 24 hours of exposure. No sign of toxidrome were observed during in vivo toxicity evaluation in mice at 300 mg/kg concentration. In conclusion, the present study provides the scientific rational for medicinal use of Lawsonia inermis. The use of Lawsonia inermis extracts is of great significance as substitute antimicrobial agent in therapeutics.

  12. Phytochemical, toxicological and antimicrobial evaluation of lawsonia inermis extracts against clinical isolates of pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The emerging resistance of pathogen against the currently available antimicrobial agents demands the search of new antimicrobial agents. The use of medicinal plants as natural substitute is the paramount area of research to overwhelm the drug resistance of infectious agents. Scientists have not made enough effort on the evaluation of safety of medicinal plant yet. Methods In the present study antimicrobial activity of Lawsonia inermis is investigated against clinical isolates of seven bacteria including four Gram negative (Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Klebsiella spp., Shigella sonnei) and three Gram positive (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis) using disc diffusion method. Four types of Lawsonia inermis extracts were prepared using methanol, chloroform, acetone and water as extraction solvents, while DMSO (Dimethyl sulfoxide) and water as dissolution solvents. The rate and extent of bacterial killing was estimated by time-kill kinetic assay at 1× MIC of each bacterial isolate. The overall safety of Lawsonia inermis extracts was assessed in mice. Results Lawsonia inermis displayed noteworthy antimicrobial activity against both gram positive and gram negative bacterial strains used in the study. The minimum value of MIC for different bacterial strains ranged from 2.31 mg/ml to 9.27 mg/ml. At 1x MIC of each bacterial isolate, 3log10 decrease in CFU was recorded after 6 hours of drug exposure and no growth was observed in almost all tested bacteria after 24 hours of exposure. No sign of toxidrome were observed during in vivo toxicity evaluation in mice at 300 mg/kg concentration. Conclusion In conclusion, the present study provides the scientific rational for medicinal use of Lawsonia inermis. The use of Lawsonia inermis extracts is of great significance as substitute antimicrobial agent in therapeutics. PMID:24289297

  13. Lawsonia inermis L. (henna): ethnobotanical, phytochemical and pharmacological aspects.

    PubMed

    Badoni Semwal, Ruchi; Semwal, Deepak Kumar; Combrinck, Sandra; Cartwright-Jones, Catherine; Viljoen, Alvaro

    2014-08-08

    The use of Lawsonia inermis L. (henna) for medicinal and cosmetic purposes is inextricably linked to ancient and modern cultures of North Africa and Asia. Literature and artwork indicates that Lawsonia inermis played an important holistic role in the daily lives of some ancient cultures, providing psychological and medicinal benefits, as well as being used for personal adornment. Although henna was historically applied to the hands and feet to protect against fungal pathogens and to hair to combat lice and dandruff, other traditional uses include the treatment of liver and digestive disorders, reduction of tissue loss in leprosy, diabetic foot disorders and ulcers. Almost 70 phenolic compounds have been isolated from various parts of the plant. Naphthaquinones, which include the dyeing principle lawsone, have been linked to many of the pharmacological activities. The terpene, β-ionone is largely responsible for the pungent odour of the essential oil isolated from the flowers. In addition to other volatile terpenes, some non-volatile terpenoids, a single sterol, two alkaloids and two dioxin derivatives have also been isolated from the plant. Henna is a pharmacologically important plant with significant in vitro and in vivo biological activities. Although a myriad of pharmacological activities have been documented, the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities are the most thoroughly investigated. Some incidents of adverse reactions following application to the skin have been reported, but these are mainly confined to cases involving individuals with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and reactions to adulterants added to henna products. Adulteration of henna is very common and may have resulted in unwarranted scientific findings. Phytochemical profiling studies of the plant, which are crucial for the establishment of proper quality control protocols, are lacking and hamper the development of medicinal products. Although many in vitro studies have been

  14. Pharmacognostic Specifications and Lawsone Content of Lawsonia inermis Leaves.

    PubMed

    Charoensup, Rawiwan; Duangyod, Thidarat; Palanuvej, Chanida; Ruangrungsi, Nijsiri

    2017-01-01

    Lawsonia inermis L. has been used as a traditional or folk medicine for the treatment of a wide range of skin infectious diseases. The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacognostic specifications and lawsone contents of L. inermis leaves. The pharmacognostic specifications of L. inermis leaves from 12 sources were evaluated according to the WHO guideline of quality control method for medicinal plant materials. The lawsone contents were analyzed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) coupled with densitometry and image analysis. Microscopic evaluation of L. inermis powders showed the fragment of mesophyll, fragment of parenchyma, epidermis layer with stomata, and the rosette crystal of calcium oxalate. Physicochemical parameters revealed that total ash, acid-insoluble ash, loss on drying, and water content should be not <6.98, 1.12, 8.08, and 9.86% of dried weight, respectively, whereas ethanol and water extractive values should be not < 19.67 and 23.06% of dried weight, respectively. The content of lawsone in L. inermis leaves by TLC-densitometry was found to be 0.76 ± 0.05 g/100 g of dried crude drug, whereas the lawsone content evaluation by TLC image analysis was found to be 0.87 ± 0.11 g/100 g of dried crude drug. The validation of the methods revealed that both TLC-densitometry and TLC image analysis showed a good sensitivity and accuracy for lawsone quantitation in L. inermis. The pharmacognostic specifications could be used as the standardization data of L. inermis leaves, and the development of TLC method could be applied to determine lawsone content in this plant material. The pharmacognostic specification of Lawsonia inermis leaves could be used as the standardization data of L. inermis leaves in Thailand.Both TLC-densitometry and TLC image analysis showed a good sensitivity and accuracy for lawsone quantitation. Abbreviations Used: LOD: Limit of detection; LOQ: Limit of quantitation; RSD: Relative standard deviation; TLC: Thin layer

  15. Pharmacognostic Specifications and Lawsone Content of Lawsonia inermis Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Charoensup, Rawiwan; Duangyod, Thidarat; Palanuvej, Chanida; Ruangrungsi, Nijsiri

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lawsonia inermis L. has been used as a traditional or folk medicine for the treatment of a wide range of skin infectious diseases. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacognostic specifications and lawsone contents of L. inermis leaves. Materials and Methods: The pharmacognostic specifications of L. inermis leaves from 12 sources were evaluated according to the WHO guideline of quality control method for medicinal plant materials. The lawsone contents were analyzed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) coupled with densitometry and image analysis. Results: Microscopic evaluation of L. inermis powders showed the fragment of mesophyll, fragment of parenchyma, epidermis layer with stomata, and the rosette crystal of calcium oxalate. Physicochemical parameters revealed that total ash, acid-insoluble ash, loss on drying, and water content should be not <6.98, 1.12, 8.08, and 9.86% of dried weight, respectively, whereas ethanol and water extractive values should be not < 19.67 and 23.06% of dried weight, respectively. The content of lawsone in L. inermis leaves by TLC-densitometry was found to be 0.76 ± 0.05 g/100 g of dried crude drug, whereas the lawsone content evaluation by TLC image analysis was found to be 0.87 ± 0.11 g/100 g of dried crude drug. The validation of the methods revealed that both TLC-densitometry and TLC image analysis showed a good sensitivity and accuracy for lawsone quantitation in L. inermis. Conclusion: The pharmacognostic specifications could be used as the standardization data of L. inermis leaves, and the development of TLC method could be applied to determine lawsone content in this plant material. SUMMARY The pharmacognostic specification of Lawsonia inermis leaves could be used as the standardization data of L. inermis leaves in Thailand.Both TLC-densitometry and TLC image analysis showed a good sensitivity and accuracy for lawsone quantitation. Abbreviations Used: LOD: Limit of detection; LOQ: Limit

  16. [Advances in studies on chemical constituents and biological activities of Lawsonia inermis].

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Gao, Wen-Qin; Zhao, Yu-Qing

    2013-03-01

    Lawsonia inermis is a single-species genus of the Lythraceae family, its leaves, stem bark, roots, flowers and seeds have been used in traditional medicine. It has been paid more attention by scholars from many countries because of their various types of compounds and significant physiological activities. The plant is reported to contain quinones, phenylpropanoids, flavonoids, terpenoids, phenolic compounds and fatty acids. Modern pharmacological studies have demonstrated that the plant performs antimicrobial, antioxidant, anticancer and antiparasitic activity. This article mainly summarizes the research advances of chemical constituents and biological activities of Lawsonia inermis, for its further development and utilization.

  17. Antibacterial activity of Lawsonia inermis Linn (Henna) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Habbal, O; Hasson, S S; El-Hag, A H; Al-Mahrooqi, Z; Al-Hashmi, N; Al-Bimani, Z; Al-Balushi, M S; Al-Jabri, A A

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the antibacterial activity of henna (Lawsonia inermis Linn) obtained from different regions of Oman against a wide array of micro-organisms. Fresh henna samples were obtained from different regions of Oman as leaves and seeds. 100 g fresh and dry leaves and 50 g of fresh and dry seeds were separately soaked in 500 mL of ethanol for three days, respectively, with frequent agitation. The mixture was filtered, and the crude extract was collected. The crude extract was then heated, at 48 °C in a water bath to evaporate its liquid content. The dry crude henna extract was then tested for its antibacterial activity using well-diffusion antibiotic susceptibility technique. Henna extracts were investigated for their antibacterial activity at different concentrations against a wide array of different micro-organisms including a laboratory standard bacterial strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (NCTC 10662) (P. aeruginosa) and eleven fresh clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa obtained from patients attending the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH). 2-Hydroxy-p-Nathoqinone-Tech (2-HPNT, MW=174.16, C10H6O3) was included as control (at 50% concentration) along with the henna samples tested. Henna samples demonstrated antibacterial activity against all isolates but the highest susceptibility was against P. aeruginosa with henna samples obtained from Al-sharqyia region. Omani henna from Al-sharqyia region demonstrates high in vitro anti-P. aeruginosa activity compared with many henna samples from different regions of Oman.

  18. The evidence based wound healing activity of Lawsonia inermis Linn.

    PubMed

    Nayak, B Shivananda; Isitor, Godwin; Davis, E M; Pillai, G K

    2007-09-01

    The ethanol extract of Lawsonia inermis (200 mg/kg/day) was used to evaluate the wound healing activity on rats using excision, incision and dead space wound models. The animals were divided into three groups of six each in the excision model and two groups of six each in the incision model and dead space models. The topical application was made in the case of excision wound model, whereas, oral treatment was done with incision and dead space wound models. The following differences were noted in the group of experimental animals which were treated with an extract of L. inermis when compared with the control and reference standard animals: a high rate of wound contraction (p < 0.001), a decrease in the period of epithelialization (p < 0.001), high skin breaking strength (p < 0.001), a significant increase in the granulation tissue weight (p < 0.001) and hydroxyproline content (p < 0.05). The extract-treated animals showed 71% reduction in the wound area when compared with controls which was 58%. Histological studies of the tissue obtained on day 10 from the extract-treated group showed increased well organized bands of collagen, more fibroblasts and few inflammatory cells when compared with the controls which showed inflammatory cells, scanty collagen fibres and fibroblasts. Enhanced wound contraction, increased skin breaking strength, hydroxyproline and histological findings suggest the use of L. inermis in the management of wound healing.

  19. New cytotoxic compounds from flowers of Lawsonia inermis L.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Gao, Wenqin; Cao, Jiaqing; Bi, Xiuli; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Xiaoshu; Xia, Xichun; Zhao, Yuqing

    2014-04-01

    Three new compounds, a bicoumarin A (1), a biflavonoid A (2), and a biquinone A (3), as well as 12 other known compounds, were isolated from the flower of Lawsonia inermis L. The structures were elucidated by spectral analysis and new compounds 2 and 3 then were further confirmed by ECD calculations and single-crystal X-ray diffraction crystallography respectively. The cytotoxicity of the compounds against four cancer cell lines, including MCF-7, Hela, HCT-116, and HT-29 were evaluated using MTT assay. The IC50 values of compounds 3 and 5 against MCF-7, Hela, HCT-116, and HT-29 were 2.24, 1.42, 24.29, and 7.02 μM and 6.1, 2.44, 5.58, and 10.21 μM respectively. The two compounds exhibited stronger inhibitory activities than the positive control 5-fluorouracil (IC50=7.34, 11.50, 36.17, 18.83 μM) against the four tested cell lines. These results demonstrated that compounds from the flowers of L. inermis L. showed cytotoxic activity on MCF-7, Hela, HCT-116, and HT-29 cell lines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Antifungal activity of the Algerian Lawsonia inermis (henna).

    PubMed

    Rahmoun, Nadjib; Boucherit-Otmani, Zahia; Boucherit, Kebir; Benabdallah, Mohammed; Choukchou-Braham, Noureddine

    2013-01-01

    Lawsonia inermis Linn. (Lythraceae) or henna has been used since the earliest times as a medicine, preservative, and cosmetic. It has long been recommended in traditional medicine as an astringent, purgative, and abortifacient. Lawsone and six extracts of L. inermis plant, used by Algerian traditional healers to treat infectious diseases, were screened for their antifungal activity against filamentous fungi. Water and five organic extracts - DMSO, ethanol, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and di-ethyl ether - of L. inermis leaves, collected in the area of Adrar (Algeria), were prepared by soaking 25 g of powdered plant in 100 mL of solvent. The extracts were screened for antifungal activity using the poisoned food technique against five filamentous fungi. Results demonstrated that the best yield (8.03%) was obtained with the ethanol extract. The commercial lawsone showed potentially interesting MICs against the strains Fusarium oxysporum (12 µg/mL) and Aspergillus flavus (50 µg/mL). The ethanol extract showed the only interesting MIC (230 µg/mL of crude extract) against the strain F. oxysporum compared with other extracts. These results suggest that the Algerian L. inermis plant has antifungal activity that can be related to the presence of lawsone in the leaves plant. The results can be exploited largely in research of new antifungal drugs.

  1. Micropropagation of commercially cultivated Henna (Lawsonia inermis) using nodal explants.

    PubMed

    Ram, Kheta; Shekhawat, N S

    2011-07-01

    Lawsonia inermis Linn. (Mehandi) is cultivated as cash crop in India particularly in Sojat area of Pali district, Rajasthan. Present investigation describes an efficient regeneration system for elite genotype of L. inermis using nodal segments. Optimum response in terms of percent cultures responding, days to bud break and average shoot length was observed on MS medium supplemented with 6-benzylaminopurine (BA; 2.0 mg l(-1)). Shoot multiplication was influenced by plant growth regulators, repeated transfer of explants and addition of ammonium sulphate. Maximum shoots were regenerated on MS medium supplemented with BA (0.25 mg l(-1)), kinetin (Kn; 0.25 mg l(-1)), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA; 0.1 mg l(-1)) and ammonium sulphate (150 mg l(-1)). To reduce resources, time and labours costs, we have also attempted ex vitro rooting of shoots. About 95 % shoots were rooted ex vitro on soilrite after treatment with indole-3-butyric acid (IBA; 300 mg l(-1)) and 2-naphthoxy acetic acid (NOA; 100 mg l(-1)) and establishment in soil successfully.

  2. Two new dioxin derivatives from the aerial parts of Lawsonia alba.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Bina S; Uddin, Nizam; Begum, Sabira

    2009-01-01

    From the aerial parts of Lawsonia alba two new dioxin derivatives, namely 12-[2'-(1', 4'-dioxin-5', 6'-dione)-8''E-undecenyl-dodecanoate and 5-[1'-(docosa-2'E, 5'E-dienyl)]-1,4-dioxin-2,3-dione, were isolated and characterised on the basis of spectroscopic methods.

  3. Protein glycation inhibitory activities of Lawsonia inermis and its active principles.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Nighat; Choudhary, Muhammed Iqbal; Khan, Ambrin

    2009-02-01

    The protein glycation inhibitory activity of ethanolic extract of Lawsonia inermis (henna) plant tissues was evaluated in vitro using the model system of bovine serum albumin and glucose. Protein oxidation and glycation are posttranslational modifications that are implicated in the pathological development of many age-related disease processes. This study investigated the effects of Lawsonia inermis ethanolic extract and its components, on protein damage induced by a free radical generator in in vitro assay system. We found that alcoholic extract of Lawsonia inermis can effectively protect against protein damage and showed that its action is mainly due to Lawsone. In addition, the presence of gallic acid also plays an important role in the protective activity against protein oxidation and glycation. Two known compounds, namely, Lawsone and gallic acid previously isolated from this plant were subjected to glycation bioassay for the first time. It was found that the alcoholic extract, lawsone (1) and gallic acid (2) showed significant inhibition of Advanced Glycated End Products (AGEs) formation and exhibit 77.95%, 79.10% and 66.98% inhibition at a concentration of 1500 microg/mL, 1000 microg/mL and 1000 microM respectively. Lawsonia inermis, compounds 1 and 2 were found to be glycation inhibitors with IC(50) 82.06 +/- 0.13 microg/mL, 67.42 +/- 1.46 microM and 401.7 +/- 6. 23 microM respectively. This is the first report on the glycation activity of these compounds and alcoholic extract of Lawsonia inermis.

  4. Antibacterial activity of Lawsonia inermis Linn (Henna) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Habbal, O; Hasson, SS; El-Hag, AH; Al-Mahrooqi, Z; Al-Hashmi, N; Al-Bimani, Z; Al-Balushi, MS; Al-Jabri, AA

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antibacterial activity of henna (Lawsonia inermis Linn) obtained from different regions of Oman against a wide array of micro-organisms. Methods Fresh henna samples were obtained from different regions of Oman as leaves and seeds. 100 g fresh and dry leaves and 50 g of fresh and dry seeds were separately soaked in 500 mL of ethanol for three days, respectively, with frequent agitation. The mixture was filtered, and the crude extract was collected. The crude extract was then heated, at 48 °C in a water bath to evaporate its liquid content. The dry crude henna extract was then tested for its antibacterial activity using well-diffusion antibiotic susceptibility technique. Henna extracts were investigated for their antibacterial activity at different concentrations against a wide array of different micro-organisms including a laboratory standard bacterial strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (NCTC 10662) (P. aeruginosa) and eleven fresh clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa obtained from patients attending the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH). 2-Hydroxy-p-Nathoqinone-Tech (2-HPNT, MW=174.16, C10H6O3) was included as control (at 50% concentration) along with the henna samples tested. Results Henna samples demonstrated antibacterial activity against all isolates but the highest susceptibility was against P. aeruginosa with henna samples obtained from Al-sharqyia region. Conclusions Omani henna from Al-sharqyia region demonstrates high in vitro anti-P. aeruginosa activity compared with many henna samples from different regions of Oman. PMID:23569753

  5. Antibacterial activity of Phyllantus emblica, Coriandrum sativum, Culinaris medic, Lawsonia alba and Cucumis sativus.

    PubMed

    Khan, Dawood Ali; Hassan, Fouzia; Ullah, Hanif; Karim, Sabiha; Baseer, Abdul; Abid, Mobasher Ali; Ubaidi, Muhammad; Khan, Shujaat Ali; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2013-01-01

    Present study deals with the demonstration of the antibacterial activity of very common medicinal plants of Pakistani origin i.e., Phyllantus emblica, Coriandrum sativum, Culinaris medic, Lawsonia alba and Cucumis sativus. The extracts were prepared in crude form by the use of hydro-alcoholic solution and were screened for antibacterial activity against various bacterial species by disk diffusion method. Assay was performed using clinical isolates of B. cereus, S. aureus, P. aeruginosa and E. coli. Crude extract of Phyllantus emblica fruit exhibited strong activity against standard cultures of all studied bacteria. Lawsonia alba showed good activity against standard cultures of all the used microorganisms. Coriandrum sativum was effective only against Bacillus cereus, while Cucumis sativus and Culinaris medic showed poor activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa only. Hence, Phyllantus emblica exhibited strong antibacterial activity against a wide range of bacteria it means that Phyllantus emblica extract contains some compounds which have broad spectrum of bactericidal activity.

  6. An endophytic fungus, Gibberella moniliformis from Lawsonia inermis L. produces lawsone, an orange-red pigment.

    PubMed

    Sarang, Hatnagar; Rajani, Pijakala; Vasanthakumari, Madhugiri Mallaiah; Kumara, Patel Mohana; Siva, Ramamoorthy; Ravikanth, Gudasalamani; Uma Shaanker, R

    2017-07-01

    Lawsone (2-hydroxy-1, 4-napthoquinone), also known as hennotannic acid, is an orange red dye used as a popular skin and hair colorant. The dye is produced in the leaves of Lawsonia inermis L, often referred to as the "henna" tree. In this study, we report the production of lawsone by an endophytic fungus, Gibberella moniliformis isolated from the leaf tissues of Lawsonia inermis. The fungus produced the orange-red dye in potato dextrose agar and broth, independent of the host tissue. Presence of lawsone was confirmed spectrometrically using HPLC and ESI-MS/MS analysis. The fragmentation pattern of lawsone was identical to both standard lawsone and that extracted from plant tissue. This is a first report of lawsone being produced by an endophytic fungus, independent of the host tissue. The study opens up interesting questions on the possible biosynthetic pathway through which lawsone is produced by the fungus.

  7. Proteinaceous protease inhibitor from Lawsonia inermis: purification, characterization and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Dabhade, Arvind; Patel, Priti; Pati, Ulhas

    2013-10-01

    A thermo-stable, proteinaceous protease inhibitor (LPI) from Lawsonia inermis is reported. The LPI was purified from Lawsonia inermis seeds by subsequent ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion exchange chromatography (DEAE-Cellulose) and gel permeation chromatography (Sephadex-50). The purified protease inhibitor is effective against a wide range of proteases viz. papain, trypsin, pepsin and metallo-protease. The apparent molecular weight of the protease inhibitor is 19 kDa, determined by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. The protease inhibitor was found to be stable at 70 degrees C for 30 min. It was also examined for antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 7926 and Staphylococcus aureus NCIM 2079; the IC50 values of the purified LPI were 11.4 microg/mL and 16.6 microg/mL respectively.

  8. The Abortificient Effects of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Lawsonia Inermis on BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Esteki, Ramin; Miraj, Sepideh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction According to the traditional beliefs of certain cultures, Lawsonia inermis has been reported to cause the abortion or termination of an undesirable pregnancy. The present study was undertaken with the goal of studying the effect of Lawsonia inermis extract on abortion in pregnant BALB/c mice in 2013 in Shahrekord, Iran. Methods This research study used an experimental methodology and was conducted in 2013 in Shahrekord, Iran. Forty female BALB/c mice (30–40 gm, 8–12 weeks old) were randomly assigned to 4 groups. One male mouse was included for each two female mice (1:2) and they were maintained in a protective cage habitat. Pregnancy of the mice was confirmed by means of a vaginal smear. The doses of 1 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg of the hydroalcoholic extract of Lawsonia inermis were injected intraperitoneally into pregnant mice beginning on the first day and continuing through the seventh day of pregnancy. The control group did not receive any treatment, but was left completely unadministered. On the eighteenth day of pregnancy, the uterine tubes of mice were removed. The subsequent embryonic absorption is considered to be an abortion. The data were analyzed using SPSS software version 22 using Fisher’s exact test and the Kruskal-Wallis H tests. Results Abortions were observed more often in the experimental groups (p< 0.01). The mean of the serum estrogen level was significantly higher in the case control groups (p< 0.01) and the mean of progesterone level was also significantly lower in the experimental groups (p< 0.01). Conclusion The use of Lawsonia inermis during pregnancy may cause abortion and therefore it should be considered as contraindication or use with caution. PMID:27504174

  9. New potent accelerator of neurite outgrowth from Lawsonia inermis flower under non-fasting condition.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yoshimi; Nakashima, Souichi; Nakamura, Seikou; Yano, Mamiko; Akiyama, Masanori; Imai, Kayo; Kimura, Tomohito; Nakata, Akiko; Tani, Miyuki; Matsuda, Hisashi

    2016-07-01

    The methanolic extract of Lawsonia inermis L. (henna) showed accelerative effects on nerve growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells under non-fasting conditions. To elucidate the active constituents responsible for the neuronal differentiation, we conducted a search of the constituents and examined their accelerative effects on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. We isolated a new acetophenone glycoside, inermioside A, which exerted a significant accelerative effect on neurite outgrowth. We also confirmed the activities of nine known compounds, including quercetin and lalioside. In addition, we found that quercetin, one of the active constituents, increased Vav3 mRNA expression.

  10. Isolation, oxygen sensitivity, and virulence of NADH oxidase mutants of the anaerobic spirochete Brachyspira (Serpulina) hyodysenteriae, etiologic agent of swine dysentery.

    PubMed

    Stanton, T B; Rosey, E L; Kennedy, M J; Jensen, N S; Bosworth, B T

    1999-11-01

    Brachyspira (Serpulina) hyodysenteriae, the etiologic agent of swine dysentery, uses the enzyme NADH oxidase to consume oxygen. To investigate possible roles for NADH oxidase in the growth and virulence of this anaerobic spirochete, mutant strains deficient in oxidase activity were isolated and characterized. The cloned NADH oxidase gene (nox; GenBank accession no. U19610) on plasmid pER218 was inactivated by replacing 321 bp of coding sequence with either a gene for chloramphenicol resistance (cat) or a gene for kanamycin resistance (kan). The resulting plasmids, respectively, pCmDeltaNOX and pKmDeltaNOX, were used to transform wild-type B. hyodysenteriae B204 cells and generate the antibiotic-resistant strains Nox-Cm and Nox-Km. PCR and Southern hybridization analyses indicated that the chromosomal wild-type nox genes in these strains had been replaced, through allelic exchange, by the inactivated nox gene containing cat or kan. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western immunoblot analysis revealed that both nox mutant cell lysates were missing the 48-kDa Nox protein. Soluble NADH oxidase activity levels in cell lysates of Nox-Cm and Nox-Km were reduced 92 to 96% compared to the activity level in parent strain B204. In an aerotolerance test, cells of both nox mutants were at least 100-fold more sensitive to oxygen exposure than were cells of the wild-type parent strain B204. In swine experimental infections, both nox mutants were less virulent than strain B204 in that fewer animals were colonized by the mutant cells and infected animals displayed mild, transient signs of disease, with no deaths. These results provide evidence that NADH oxidase serves to protect B. hyodysenteriae cells against oxygen toxicity and that the enzyme, in that role, contributes to the pathogenic ability of the spirochete.

  11. Hemolytic anemia after ingestion of the natural hair dye Lawsonia inermis (henna) in a dog.

    PubMed

    Jardes, Daniel J; Ross, Linda A; Markovich, Jessica E

    2013-01-01

    To describe the clinical presentation and case management of a dog that developed hemolytic anemia and evidence of renal tubular dysfunction after ingestion of a natural hair dye containing Lawsonia inermis (henna). To review cases of henna toxicity reported in the human literature. An 8-year-old female spayed Border Collie was presented 5 days after ingestion of a box of natural hair dye. The dog was showing signs of lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and weakness. A serum biochemistry profile, complete blood count, and urinalysis demonstrated evidence of renal tubular dysfunction and a regenerative anemia without spherocytosis. The dog was treated with a transfusion of packed RBCs and IV fluids, resulting in significant clinical improvement. Repeat diagnostics showed resolution of the anemia and no lasting evidence of tubular dysfunction. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case in the veterinary literature of toxicity following ingestion of Lawsonia inermis (henna). Henna ingestion was associated with the development of hemolytic anemia and acute kidney injury. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2013.

  12. Alpha amylase enzyme inhibitory and anti-inflammatory effect of Lawsonia inermis.

    PubMed

    Imam, Hasan; Mahbub, Nasir Uddin; Khan, Md Forhad; Hana, Humayera Kabir; Sarker, Md Moklesur Rahman

    2013-12-01

    Previously it was reported elsewhere that Lawsonia inermis have anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect in experimental animals. The in vitro porcine alpha amylase inhibitory effect was investigated of this plant methanolic extracts and consequently hypoglycemic effect by quantitatively determining the maltose from the maltose standard curve while the anti-inflammatory effect by acetic acid induced writhing test in mice. Acarbose (10 microg mL(-1)) and Diclofenac sodium (20 mg kg(-1)) were used as reference hypoglycemic and anti-inflammatory drugs, respectively, for this study. The methanolic leaves extract of the plant significantly inhibited (60.97% compared to untreated) enzymatic activity of the amylase at 10 microg mL(-1) dose (p < 0.05) also reduced the chemically induced nociceptive pain stimuli significantly at all doses (p < 0.01). Carbohydrates, glycosides, flavonoids, saponins and tannins were found to have in phytochemical screening of the extract which are thought to bring these effects. For the conclusive purpose, it is suggesting from the result that the pharmacological properties of this Lawsonia inermis can elicit hypoglycemic effect by inhibiting alpha-amylase enzyme and can reduce neurogenic pain stimulus. It gives the notion that how this group of patient would be therapeutically benefitted by decreasing both these effects by the same agent which is easy available.

  13. Antimalarial actions of Lawsonia inermis, Tithonia diversifolia and Chromolaena odorata in combination.

    PubMed

    Afolayan, Funmilayo I D; Adegbolagun, Olayemi M; Irungu, Beatrice; Kangethe, Lucy; Orwa, Jennifer; Anumudu, Chiaka I

    2016-09-15

    Chromolaena odorata, Tithonia diversifolia and Lawsonia inermis are medicinal plants used in treating malaria in traditional medicine system. Previous studies however showed that their dichloromethane, methanol (1:1) extracts were more active against Plasmodium parasite than the aqueous extracts. To determine the in vitro and in vivo antiplasmodial activity of dichloromethane, methanol (1:1) extracts of Chromolaena odorata, Tithonia diversifolia and Lawsonia inermis in combination and evaluate their safety using acute limit toxicity test. Dichloromethane, methanol (1:1) extracts of Chromolaena odorata, Tithonia diversifolia and Lawsonia inermis leaves were combined at ratios 1:1, 1:3, 3:1, 1:5 and 5:1 using in vitro semi-automated microdilution technique against P. falciparum Chloroquine sensitive (D6) and Chloroquine resistant (W2) strains, with chloroquine and artemisinin as controls. The in vivo antiplasmodial activity of the crude extracts was carried out singly, and in combination at the different combination ratios on Plasmodium berghei Anka infected Swiss albino mice using Peters' 4-day suppressive test. Acute toxicity test was done in mice at 5000mg/kg. The in vitro combination of L. inermis and T. diversifolia (1:1) extracts against P. falciparum showed the highest synergy with IC50 of 0.43±0.02µg/mL and 2.55±0.19µg/mL against D6 and W2 respectively; while the combination of C. odorata with T. diversifolia and L. inermis were antagonistic. A synergy with chemosuppression of 83.6% against P. berghei infected mice was observed in L. inermis and T. diversifolia (1:1) treated animals. In contrast to the in vitro result, combination of C. odorata with T. diversifolia and L. inermis showed some degrees of synergy in vivo. Extracts were not toxic at the concentration tested. These findings rationalized the use of these plants in combination as antimalarials in traditional medicine. However, the combination of Chromolaena odorata with other medicinal plants

  14. Study of Henna (Lawsonia inermis) as Natural Corrosion Inhibitor for Aluminum Alloy in Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nik, W. B. Wan; Zulkifli, F.; Sulaiman, O.; Samo, K. B.; Rosliza, R.

    2012-09-01

    Commercial henna (Lawsonia inermis) was investigated to inhibit the corrosion of aluminum alloy through immersion in seawater. The aluminum alloy (5083) was prepared in size of 25mm × 25mm × 3mm. The immersion test was conducted in seawater with different concentration of henna, 100ppm, 300ppm, 500ppm for duration of 60 days. Four characterizations were performed in this study which was weight loss study, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and adsorption isotherm. The results indicated that henna has major constituents of lawsone which contributed to the chemisorptions or adsorption process by forming an isolation layers on the aluminum alloy surface which follows the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. It was found that the protection layer attached on metal was not permanent and precipitation occurred as the time increases. The highest inhibition efficiency was found at 88% (500ppm). This research found that henna is an excellent natural inhibitor for aluminum alloy in seawater.

  15. Antileishmanial activity of some plants growing in Algeria: Juglans regia, Lawsonia inermis and Salvia officinalis.

    PubMed

    Serakta, M; Djerrou, Z; Mansour-Djaalab, H; Kahlouche-Riachi, F; Hamimed, S; Trifa, W; Belkhiri, A; Edikra, N; Hamdi Pacha, Y

    2013-01-01

    The current study was undertaken to evaluate in vitro the antileishmanial activity of three plants growing wild in Algeria : Juglans regia, Lawsonia inermis and Salvia officinalis. The hydroalcoholic extracts of these plants were tested on the growth of the promastigotes of Leishmania major. The plant extract effects were compared with three controls : CRL1 composed of 1 ml RPMI inoculated with 10(6) of promastigotes, CRL2 composed of 1 ml RPMI inoculated with 10(6) of promastigotes and 100 µl of hydroalcoholic solvent, CRL3 composed of 1 ml RPMI inoculated with 10(6) of promastigotes and 100 µl of Glucantim as a reference drug in the management of leishmaniasis. The results showed that both J. regia and L. inermis extracts reduced the promastigotes number significantly (P<0.01). however, S. officinalis showed a total inhibition of the Leishmania major growth.

  16. Bioassay-guided isolation of urease and α-chymotrypsin inhibitory constituents from the stems of Lawsonia alba Lam. (Henna).

    PubMed

    Uddin, Nizam; Siddiqui, Bina Shaheen; Begum, Sabira; Ali, Muhammad Imran; Marasini, Bishnu P; Khan, Ajmal; Choudhary, M Iqbal

    2013-01-01

    Seven constituents were isolated from the stems of Lawsonia alba Lam., following an activity-guided isolation, which include two new constituents, namely lawsorosemarinol (1) and lawsofructose (2), one known compound 2-(β-d-glucopyranosyloxy)-1, 4-naphthoquinone (3) and four compounds, 4-hydroxy coumarine (4), 3-(4-hyroxyphenyl)-triacontyl-(Z)-propenoate (5), 3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-triacontyl-(Z)-propenoate (6) and 7-hydroxy-4-methyl coumarin (7) first time isolated from Lawsonia alba. Their structure elucidation was based on spectroscopic data analyses. Compounds 3 and 7 showed a moderate inhibition of urease activity, while rest of them showed less than 50% inhibition. These compounds did not show any significant inhibition against α-chymotrypsin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of analgesic, anti-inflammatory and CNS depressant activities of methanolic extract of Lawsonia inermis barks in mice.

    PubMed

    Nesa, Luthfun; Munira, Shirajum; Mollika, Shabnam; Islam, Monirul; Choin, Habibullah; Chouduri, Aktar Uzzaman; Naher, Nazmun

    2014-07-01

    The study was carried out to assess the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and CNS depressant activity of the methanolic extract of the Lawsonia inermis barks (MELIB). Anti-inflammatory effects of MEBLI were studied using carrageenan-induced inflammatory method at the dose of 300 and 500 mg/kg b.wt., p.o. Analgesic activity was measured using acetic acid-induced writhing model and formalin-induced licking and biting in mice. The CNS depressant activity was evaluated by observing the reduction of locomotor and exploratory activities in the open field and hole cross tests at a dose of 300 and 500 mg/kg body weight. Statistical analysis showed that dose of 500 mg/kg exhibited higher analgesic activity against acetic acid-induced pain in mice than the standard drug diclofenac sodium. Furthermore, doses of 300 and 500 mg/kg caused higher percent of protection (91.16% and 95.03%, respectively) of licking and biting of formalin-induced mice than diclophenac sodium (70.72%). The Lawsonia inemis methanolic extract (300 and 500 mg/kg) also exhibited sustained inhibition (54.97% and 65.56%) of paw edema at the 4(th) hour compared with standard indomethacin (74.17%). Besides, the plant extract also had significant (p<0.05) dose-dependent CNS depressant activity. this study recommends that the methanolic extract of Lawsonia inermis barks has significant analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and CNS depressant properties.

  18. Antioxidant and hepatoprotective potential of Lawsonia inermis L. leaves against 2-acetylaminofluorene induced hepatic damage in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Kaur, Paramjeet; Chandel, Madhu; Singh, Amrit Pal; Jain, Arpana; Kaur, Satwinderjeet

    2017-01-18

    Lawsonia inermis (Lythraceae) is an ethnomedicinal plant, traditionally known for curing several ailments such as skin diseases, bacterial infections, jaundice, renal lithiases and inflammation etc. The present work deals with assessment of in vitro antioxidant and in vivo hepatoprotective potential of butanolic fraction (But-LI) of Lawsonia inermis L. leaves. Antioxidant activity was evaluated using deoxyribose degradation, lipid peroxidation inhibition and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. In vivo protective potential of But-LI was assessed at 3 doses [100, 200 & 400 mg/kg body weight (bw)] against 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF) induced hepatic damage in male Wistar rats. But-LI effectively scavenged hydroxyl radicals in deoxyribose degradation assay (IC50 149.12 μg/ml). Fraction also inhibited lipid peroxidation and demonstrated appreciable reducing potential in FRAP assay. Treatment of animals with 2-AAF resulted in increased hepatic parameters such as SGOT (2.22 fold), SGPT (1.72 fold), ALP (5.68 fold) and lipid peroxidation (2.94 fold). Different concentration of But-LI demonstrated pronounced protective effects via decreasing levels of SGOT, SGPT, ALP and lipid peroxidation altered by 2-AAF treatment. But-LI administration also restored the normal liver architecture as evident from histopathological studies. The present experimental findings revealed that phytoconstituents of Lawsonia inermis L. possess potential to effectively protect rats from the 2-AAF induced hepatic damage in vivo possibly by inhibition of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation.

  19. Screening of Ethanol, Petroleum Ether and Chloroform Extracts of Medicinal Plants, Lawsonia inermis L. and Mimosa pudica L. for Antibacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Akter, A; Neela, F A; Khan, M S I; Islam, M S; Alam, M F

    2010-05-01

    Organic extracts (ethanol, petroleum ether and chloroform) of two medicinal plants Lawsonia inermis L. and Mimosa pudica L. were proven for antibacterial properties against 15 Gram-positive and Gram-negative human pathogenic bacteria. Among the three types of extracts tested, ethanol extract was found to possess maximum antibacterial activity. The diameter of the zone of inhibition of bacterial growth showed that Gram-negative bacteria are more sensitive than Gram-positive bacteria to plant extracts. Between the two plants species studied, Lawsonia inermis extract showed more antibacterial activity compared to Mimosa pudica extract.

  20. Screening of Ethanol, Petroleum Ether and Chloroform Extracts of Medicinal Plants, Lawsonia inermis L. and Mimosa pudica L. for Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Akter, A.; Neela, F. A.; Khan, M. S. I.; Islam, M. S.; Alam, M. F.

    2010-01-01

    Organic extracts (ethanol, petroleum ether and chloroform) of two medicinal plants Lawsonia inermis L. and Mimosa pudica L. were proven for antibacterial properties against 15 Gram-positive and Gram-negative human pathogenic bacteria. Among the three types of extracts tested, ethanol extract was found to possess maximum antibacterial activity. The diameter of the zone of inhibition of bacterial growth showed that Gram-negative bacteria are more sensitive than Gram-positive bacteria to plant extracts. Between the two plants species studied, Lawsonia inermis extract showed more antibacterial activity compared to Mimosa pudica extract. PMID:21188055

  1. Preparation of antibacterial PVA and PEO nanofibers containing Lawsonia Inermis (henna) leaf extracts.

    PubMed

    Avci, H; Monticello, R; Kotek, R

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about health issues and environmental pollution stimulate research to find new health and hygiene related products with healing properties and minimum negative effect on the environment. Development of new, natural antibacterial agents has become one of the most important research areas to combat some pathogens such as Gram- positive and Gram-negative bacteria, fungi, algae, yeast, and some microorganisms which cause serious human infections. Lawsonia Inermis (henna) leaf extracts for preparation of antibacterial poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanofibers via electrospinning technique were investigated. PEO and PVA based electrospun fibers containing henna extract were verified by the appearance of FTIR peaks corresponding to the pure extract. Our study demonstrates that 2.793 wt.% Li in PVA and PEO based solutions showed bactericidal effects against Staphylococcus aureus and bacteriostatic action to Escherichia coli. Concentrations of henna leaf extract strongly impacted antibacterial activities against both bacteria. Henna leaves have a great potential to be used as a source of a potent eco-friendly antimicrobial agent.

  2. Antioxidant Activity and Teratogenicity Evaluation of Lawsonia Inermis in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jafarzadeh, Lobat; Seifi, Neda; Shahinfard, Najmeh; Sedighi, Mehrnoosh; Kheiri, Soleiman; Shirzad, Hedayatollah

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim Lawsonia inermis is a medicinal plant with abortive properties. There has been no scientific study to evaluate the teratogenicity of this plant. This study was performed to determine the antioxidant activity and the possible side effect of L. inermis hydroalcoholic extract on development of congenital abnormalities in BALB/c mice. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, 120 female mature BALB/c mice were assigned to four groups and after mating and confirming the vaginal plug, the animals in the first group (G1) were kept with no intervention, and the second (G2), third (G3) and fourth (G4) groups were intraperitoneally (ip) injected with respectively saline (0.3 ml), and 10 and 100 mg/kg of L. inermis extract (for 7 days). On the 19th day, caesarean section was performed on the mice and embryos were examined for abnormalities. Their height and weight were measured. Data were analysed by ANOVA and post-hoc least significant difference tests. Results There were significant differences between G3 and G4, and G1 (p<0.001); no significant difference was seen between G3 and G4. At 100 mg/kg dose of L. inermis, the parietal bones were absent in 90% of embryos and more extra ribs were observed in both G3 and G4 (p = 0.01). Conclusion L. inermis may have teratogenicity and should be used cautiously during pregnancy. PMID:26155492

  3. Antioxidant Activity of Lawsonia inermis Extracts Inhibits Chromium(VI)-Induced Cellular and DNA Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Gunjan; Rajkumar, V.; Kumar, R. Ashok; Mathew, Lazar

    2011-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is a very strong oxidant which consequently causes high cytotoxicity through oxidative stress. Prevention of Cr(VI)-induced cellular damage has been sought in this study in aqueous and methanolic extracts of Lawsonia inermis Linn. (Lythraceae), commonly known as Henna. The extracts showed significant (P < .05) potential in scavenging free radicals (DPPH• and ABTS•+) and Fe3+, and in inhibiting lipid peroxidation. DNA damage caused by exposure of pBR322 to Cr(VI)-UV is markedly inhibited by both extracts in varying degrees. A distinct decline in Cr(VI)-induced cytotoxicity was noticed in MDA-MB-435S (human breast carcinoma) cells with an increase in dosage of both extracts individually. Furthermore, both extracts proved to contain a high content of phenolic compounds which were found to have a strong and significant (P < .05) positive correlation to the radical scavenging potential, lipid peroxidation inhibition capacity and cyto-protective efficiency against Cr(VI)-induced oxidative cellular damage. HPLC analysis identified some of the major phenolic compounds in both extracts, which might be responsible for the antioxidant potential and the properties of DNA and cyto-protection. This study contributes to the search for natural resources that might yield potent therapeutic drugs against Cr(VI)-induced oxidative cell damage. PMID:20008460

  4. The effect of co-administration of Lawsonia inermis extract and octreotide on experimental hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hamid, N M; Mohafez, O M; Nazmy, M H; Farhan, A; Thabet, K

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the effect of Lawsonia inermis total methanolic extract (LIE) and octreotide (OC) on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression, depending on somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR-2) and Alfa fetoprotein (AFP) perturbations. Sixty albino mice, divided into five groups (12/each); all except control were injected with single diethyl nitrosamine (DENA) dose of 90 mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneally (IP). DENA group was killed at the last day of week 18. LIE group was given 200 mg/100 ml drinking water from first day of DENA injection until end of week 18. OC group received OC (0.1 mg/kg body weight, twice daily by subcutaneous injection, SC from the first day of week 17 till end of week 18. LIE + OC was given medications till the last day of week 18. Serum AFP, liver tissue SSTR-2 mRNA, its protein expression, reduced glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were analyzed. A significant increase in plasma AFP and hepatic mRNA, associated to liver tissue neoplastic changes, SSTR-2 expression and MDA with decreased hepatic GSH were observed in DENA group. These changes were significantly improved by LIE and/or OC. LIE and/or OC treatment has effective chemopreventive action due to their ability to alleviate oxidative stress, desensitizing cellular growth receptor to SST.

  5. SPME-GC-MS analysis of commercial henna samples (Lawsonia inermis L.).

    PubMed

    Mengoni, Tamara; Peregrina, Dolores Vargas; Censi, Roberta; Cortese, Manuela; Ricciutelli, Massimo; Maggi, Filippo; Di Martino, Piera

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to provide a characterisation of volatile constituents from different commercial batches of henna (Lawsonia inermis) leaves of different geographic origin. Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used for the purpose. A total of 72 components were identified by GC-MS in the headspace of different henna samples which proved to differ considerably from each other, because they were characterised by different classes of components, mainly aliphatic compounds (9.0-64.7%), terpenoids (5.8-45.5%) and aromatics (7.9-45.2%), with alkanes (0.9-18.5%), aldehydes (2.1-18.8%) and carboxylic acids (3.1-29.3%), monoterpenes (3.4-30.0%) and sesquiterpenes (0.8-23.7%) and phenyl propanoids (0.6-43.1%), being the most abundant, respectively. Major representatives of these groups were n-hexadecane (0.5-4.7%), (2E)-hexenal (0.5-11.7%) and acetic acid (2.8-24.5%), limonene (0.8-14.7%), carvol (3.8-7.1%), geranyl acetone (1.4-7.9%) and (E)-caryophyllene (3.3-8.4%), and (E)-anethole (0.6-35.0%), respectively. We assume that factors such as the manufacturing process, the storage conditions and the different geographic origin of the samples may contribute to such variability.

  6. An ancient plant Lawsonia inermis (henna): determination of in vitro antifungal activity against dermatophytes species.

    PubMed

    Gozubuyuk, G S; Aktas, E; Yigit, N

    2014-12-01

    World is endowed with a rich wealth of medicinal plants. There is a widespread belief that green medicines are healthier and more harmless or safer than synthetic ones. Medicinal plants have been used to cure a number of diseases. The ancient plant Lawsonia inermis or henna is used as medicinal plant because of its attributed strong fungicidal, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antibacterial, virucidal, antiparasitic, antiamoebiasis, astringent, antihemorrhagic, hypotensive, sedative, anticancer effect and possible anti-sweating properties. In this study, we investigated antifungal activity of L. inermis against clinical dermatophytes species. This study was carried out using 70 clinical isolates of dermatophytes representing six different species; 44 Trichophyton rubrum, 8 Trichophyton mentagrophytes, 6 Microsporum canis, 6 Trichophyton tonsurans, 4 Epidermophyton floccosum, and 2 Trichophyton violaceum. The antifungal activity of L. inermis (henna) was determined by agar diffusion method and henna was used as paste form. Henna paste showed the high antifungal activity against all dermatophytes species (20 to 50mm inhibition zone). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Chemical fingerprinting of Lawsonia inermis L. using HPLC, HPTLC and densitometry.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Francesca Romana; Multari, Giuseppina; Giambenedetti, Massimo; Federici, Elena

    2008-01-01

    Lawsonia inermis L. is a natural red colouring agent, commonly named "Henna", which is used to dye skin and hair. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of L. inermis that is commercially available as a raw plant material or preparation in order to guarantee good quality products. To develop a simple protocol for the qualification of different samples labelled as L. inermis by using the HPTLC densitometry method and to identify possible adulterations with other plants. Samples of leaves of L. inermis were extracted with methanol. Two chromatographic methods were developed to determine the chemical fingerprinting of L. inermis. The first was based on HPTLC identification followed by densitometric measurements at 337 nm. The second was based on RP-HPLC separation with gradient elution and photodiode array detection at 337 nm. Samples of Cassia obovata Collad., and Indigofera tinctoria L., were treated in the same way. The simplicity of the sample preparation, and the possibility of analysing several samples of herbal products simultaneously in a short time, make HPTLC the method of choice. The HPTLC method was feasible for the comprehensive quality evaluation of herbal products. From the comparison of their "fingerprint", it was possible to detect substitution of plants that are different from those declared on the label. The HPTLC may be used as a rapid method by which to control the quality of raw plant materials and formulations based on the title plant.

  8. Evaluation of analgesic, anti-inflammatory and CNS depressant activities of methanolic extract of Lawsonia inermis barks in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nesa, Luthfun; Munira, Shirajum; Mollika, Shabnam; Islam, Monirul; choin, Habibullah; Chouduri, Aktar Uzzaman; Naher, Nazmun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The study was carried out to assess the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and CNS depressant activity of the methanolic extract of the Lawsonia inermis barks (MELIB). Materials and Methods: Anti-inflammatory effects of MEBLI were studied using carrageenan-induced inflammatory method at the dose of 300 and 500 mg/kg b.wt., p.o. Analgesic activity was measured using acetic acid-induced writhing model and formalin-induced licking and biting in mice. The CNS depressant activity was evaluated by observing the reduction of locomotor and exploratory activities in the open field and hole cross tests at a dose of 300 and 500 mg/kg body weight. Results: Statistical analysis showed that dose of 500 mg/kg exhibited higher analgesic activity against acetic acid-induced pain in mice than the standard drug diclofenac sodium. Furthermore, doses of 300 and 500 mg/kg caused higher percent of protection (91.16% and 95.03%, respectively) of licking and biting of formalin-induced mice than diclophenac sodium (70.72%). The Lawsonia inemis methanolic extract (300 and 500 mg/kg) also exhibited sustained inhibition (54.97% and 65.56%) of paw edema at the 4th hour compared with standard indomethacin (74.17%). Besides, the plant extract also had significant (p<0.05) dose-dependent CNS depressant activity. Conclusion: this study recommends that the methanolic extract of Lawsonia inermis barks has significant analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and CNS depressant properties. PMID:25068143

  9. Natural dye extract of lawsonia inermis seed as photo sensitizer for titanium dioxide based dye sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ananth, S; Vivek, P; Arumanayagam, T; Murugakoothan, P

    2014-07-15

    Natural dye extract of lawsonia inermis seed were used as photo sensitizer to fabricate titanium dioxide nanoparticles based dye sensitized solar cells. Pure titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in anatase phase were synthesized by sol-gel technique and pre dye treated TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized using modified sol-gel technique by mixing lawsone pigment rich natural dye during the synthesis itself. This pre dye treatment with natural dye has yielded colored TiO2 nanoparticles with uniform adsorption of natural dye, reduced agglomeration, less dye aggregation and improved morphology. The pure and pre dye treated TiO2 nanoparticles were subjected to structural, optical, spectral and morphological studies. Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC) fabricated using the pre dye treated and pure TiO2 nanoparticles sensitized by natural dye extract of lawsonia inermis seed showed a promising solar light to electron conversion efficiency of 1.47% and 1% respectively. The pre dye treated TiO2 based DSSC showed an improved efficiency of 47% when compared to that of conventional DSSC.

  10. [Hemolytic anemia after voluntary ingestion of henna (Lawsonia inermis) decoction by a young girl with G6PD deficiency].

    PubMed

    Perinet, I; Lioson, E; Tichadou, L; Glaizal, M; de Haro, L

    2011-06-01

    Henna (Lawsonia inermis) is a shrub bearing leaves that are crushed and used for cosmetic purposes in Asia and Africa. In several countries, henna decoction is ingested as a traditional drug to induce abortion. One component of Henna, known as Lawsone, can induce hemolysis in G6PD-deficient patients after cutaneous exposure or ingestion. The purpose of this report is to describe a case of severe hemolytic anemia after voluntary ingestion of Henna decoction to induce abortion. This complication led to diagnosis of partial moderate G6PD-deficiency in the 17-year-old patient living in Mayotte in the Indian Ocean. This report emphasizes the life-threatening hazards associated with some plant extracts used as traditional medicines.

  11. Inhibitors of melanogenesis in B16 melanoma 4A5 cells from flower buds of Lawsonia inermis (Henna).

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Souichi; Oda, Yoshimi; Nakamura, Seikou; Liu, Jiang; Onishi, Koko; Kawabata, Miki; Miki, Hisako; Himuro, Yugo; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Matsuda, Hisashi

    2015-07-01

    The methanolic extract of Lawsonia inermis L. (henna) showed significant inhibitory activity toward melanogenesis in B16 melanoma 4A5 cells. Among the constituents isolated from the methanolic extract, luteolin, quercetin, and (±)-eriodictyol showed stronger inhibitory activity than the reference compound, arbutin. Several structure-activity relationships of the flavonoids were suggested, and OGlc

  12. Polyphenolic contents and antioxidant activities of Lawsonia inermis leaf extracts obtained by microwave-assisted hydrothermal method.

    PubMed

    Zohourian, Tayyebeh Haleh; Quitain, Armando T; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Goto, Motonobu

    2011-01-01

    Extracts obtained by microwave-assisted hydrothermal extraction of Lawsonia inermis leaves were evaluated for the presence of polyphenolic compounds and antioxidant activities. Extraction experiments were performed in temperature-controlled mode at a range of 100 to 200 degrees C, and extraction time of 5 to 30 min, and microwave-controlled mode at a power from 300-700 W, in irradiation time of 30 to 120 s. Polyphenolic contents were measured using Folin-Ciocalteau method, while antioxidant properties were analyzed using DPPH radical scavenging activities (RSA) expressed in BHA equivalents. Results showed that best values of RSA were obtained at mild temperature range of 100-120 degrees C. Controlling microwave power at short irradiation time gave better results than temperature-controlled treatment as well. Furthermore, comparison with the result obtained at room temperature confirmed that the use of microwave was more effective for extracting polar components that normally possess higher antioxidant activities.

  13. Safety and efficacy of hydroalcoholic extract from Lawsonia inermis leaves on lipid profile in alloxan-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Surender; Verma, Nishikant; Karwasra, Ritu; Kalra, Prerna; Kumar, Rohit; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Dyslipidemia is one of the most common risk factor for cardiac-related disorders in diabetes mellitus. Diabetic dyslipidemia is characterized by hypertriglyceridemia, low high density lipoprotein and elevated low density lipoprotein concentration. Aim: To explore the effect of Lawsonia inermis hydroalcoholic extract (LIHE) for diabetic dyslipidemic activity along with its safety profile. Materials and Methods: LIHE administered at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg in rats after induction of hyperglycemia by alloxan. Insulin (1 IU/kg), glibenclamide (2.5 mg/kg), and metformin (100 mg/kg) were used as positive control and 1% gum acacia as normal control. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance, followed by Dunnett's t-test. Results: The percentage reduction in blood glucose level of LIHE at dose of 400 mg/kg was 39.08% on day 21 when compared to baseline (day 0), which is comparable to glibenclamide (44.77%) and metformin (46.30%). Decrease in blood glucose level exhibited significant improvement in lipid profile, plasma albumin, total plasma protein and serum creatinine. Conclusion: Results of this study demonstrated that LIHE significantly improved lipid and lipoprotein pattern observed in diabetic rats and this could be due to improvement in insulin secretion or action, thus has potential to be used in treatment of diabetes mellitus associated dyslipidemia. PMID:26730149

  14. Antibacterial activity of sequentially extracted organic solvent extracts of fruits, flowers and leaves of Lawsonia inermis L. from Jaffna.

    PubMed

    Jeyaseelan, E Christy; Jenothiny, S; Pathmanathan, M K; Jeyadevan, J P

    2012-10-01

    To reveal the antibacterial activity of sequentially extracted different cold organic solvent extracts of fruits, flowers and leaves of Lawsonia inermis (L. against) some pathogenic bacteria. Powders of fruits, flowers and leaves of L. inermis were continuously extracted with dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate and ethanol at ambient temperature. The dried extracts were prepared into different concentrations and tested for antibacterial activity by agar well diffusion method, and also the extracts were tested to determine the available phytochemicals. Except DCM extract of flower all other test extracts revealed inhibitory effect on all tested bacteria and their inhibitory effect differed significantly (P<0.05). The highest inhibitory effect was showed by ethyl acetate extract of flower against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), and ethyl acetate extract of fruit on Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis). The ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts of flower, fruit and leaf expressed inhibition even at 1 mg/100 µl against all test bacteria. Among the tested phytochemicals flavonoids were detected in all test extracts except DCM extract of flower. The study demonstrated that the ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts of fruit and flower of L. inermis are potentially better source of antibacterial agents compared to leaf extracts of respective solvents.

  15. Antibacterial activity of sequentially extracted organic solvent extracts of fruits, flowers and leaves of Lawsonia inermis L. from Jaffna

    PubMed Central

    Jeyaseelan, E Christy; Jenothiny, S; Pathmanathan, MK; Jeyadevan, JP

    2012-01-01

    Objective To reveal the antibacterial activity of sequentially extracted different cold organic solvent extracts of fruits, flowers and leaves of Lawsonia inermis (L. against) some pathogenic bacteria. Methods Powders of fruits, flowers and leaves of L. inermis were continuously extracted with dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate and ethanol at ambient temperature. The dried extracts were prepared into different concentrations and tested for antibacterial activity by agar well diffusion method, and also the extracts were tested to determine the available phytochemicals. Results Except DCM extract of flower all other test extracts revealed inhibitory effect on all tested bacteria and their inhibitory effect differed significantly (P<0.05). The highest inhibitory effect was showed by ethyl acetate extract of flower against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), and ethyl acetate extract of fruit on Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis). The ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts of flower, fruit and leaf expressed inhibition even at 1 mg/100 µl against all test bacteria. Among the tested phytochemicals flavonoids were detected in all test extracts except DCM extract of flower. Conclusions The study demonstrated that the ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts of fruit and flower of L. inermis are potentially better source of antibacterial agents compared to leaf extracts of respective solvents. PMID:23569850

  16. Effects of Lawsonia inermis L. (Henna) leaves’ methanolic extract on carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Musab Awad; Eldin, Imad Mohamed Taj; Mohammed, Abd-Elwahab Hassan; Hassan, Hozeifa Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Natural products with therapeutic properties such as plants, minerals, and animal products, for many years, were the main sources of drugs for the treatment of numerous diseases; hence selection of Lawsonia inermis L. (Henna) to study its hepatoprotective activity was considered. Objectives: This was an attempt to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of L. inermis leaves’ methanolic extract on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Materials and Methods: The L. inermis leaves’ methanolic extract, which obtained by maceration, was orally administered in doses of 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg to the tested animals to assess its effects on serum levels of hepatotoxicity parameters, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bilirubin, and total proteins along with histopathological liver sections examination, while silymarin (25 mg/kg), a potent hepatoprotective drug, was used as standard control. Results: The two doses of the plant extract showed dose-dependent hepatoprotective effect, as evident by the significant reduction (P < 0.05) in serum levels of AST, ALT, ALP, and bilirubin along with the improvement in histopathological liver sections compared to CCl4-only treated animals. Conclusion: As experimentally evident, it could be concluded that this plant material could provide a hepatoprotective effect that could be attributed to its antioxidant properties. PMID:27069719

  17. Effect of Lawsonia inermis on tumor expression induced by Dalton’s lymphoma ascites in Swiss albino mice

    PubMed Central

    Priya, R.; Ilavenil, S.; Kaleeswaran, B.; Srigopalram, S.; Ravikumar, S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was investigating experimentally the possible antitumor effect of ethanol extract of root of Lawsonia inermis against Dalton’s lymphoma ascites (DLA) bearing mice. Mice were administered with L. inermis at a dosage of 180 mg/kg of body weight for 15 days after 24 h of DLA inoculation. The ethanolic root extract of L. inermis reverted the increased number of the WBC count, platelets and lymphocytes and decreased the number of the RBC count, hemoglobin content and monocytes. The effect of root extract of L. inermis also increased the pathophysiological marker enzyme, lipid profile and decreased the enzymic and non enzymic antioxidants. A histopathological result shows the loss of liver hepatocytes and kidney architecture in DLA bearing mice. However, mice treatment with L. inermis extract improves the liver and kidney function and rearranges more or less normal architecture. The present work indicates that the ethanol extract of L. inermis exhibited significant antitumor activity. PMID:23961147

  18. Effects of Lawsonia inermis L. (Henna) leaves' methanolic extract on carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Musab Awad; Eldin, Imad Mohamed Taj; Mohammed, Abd-Elwahab Hassan; Hassan, Hozeifa Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Natural products with therapeutic properties such as plants, minerals, and animal products, for many years, were the main sources of drugs for the treatment of numerous diseases; hence selection of Lawsonia inermis L. (Henna) to study its hepatoprotective activity was considered. This was an attempt to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of L. inermis leaves' methanolic extract on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. The L. inermis leaves' methanolic extract, which obtained by maceration, was orally administered in doses of 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg to the tested animals to assess its effects on serum levels of hepatotoxicity parameters, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bilirubin, and total proteins along with histopathological liver sections examination, while silymarin (25 mg/kg), a potent hepatoprotective drug, was used as standard control. The two doses of the plant extract showed dose-dependent hepatoprotective effect, as evident by the significant reduction (P < 0.05) in serum levels of AST, ALT, ALP, and bilirubin along with the improvement in histopathological liver sections compared to CCl4-only treated animals. As experimentally evident, it could be concluded that this plant material could provide a hepatoprotective effect that could be attributed to its antioxidant properties.

  19. Lousicidal activity of synthesized silver nanoparticles using Lawsonia inermis leaf aqueous extract against Pediculus humanus capitis and Bovicola ovis.

    PubMed

    Marimuthu, Sampath; Rahuman, Abdul Abdul; Santhoshkumar, Thirunavukkarasu; Jayaseelan, Chidambaram; Kirthi, Arivarasan Vishnu; Bagavan, Asokan; Kamaraj, Chinnaperumal; Elango, Gandhi; Zahir, Abdul Abduz; Rajakumar, Govindasamy; Velayutham, Kanayairam

    2012-11-01

    In the present work, we describe inexpensive, nontoxic, unreported and simple procedure for synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) using leaf aqueous extract of Lawsonia inermis as eco-friendly reducing and capping agent. The aim of the present study was to assess the lousicidal activity of synthesized Ag NPs against human head louse, Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae), and sheep body louse, Bovicola ovis Schrank (Phthiraptera: Trichodectidae). Direct contact method was conducted to determine the potential of pediculocidal activity and impregnated method was used with slight modifications to improve practicality and efficiency of tested materials of synthesized Ag NPs against B. ovis. The synthesized Ag NPs characterized with the UV showing peak at 426 nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra clearly shows that the diffraction peaks in the pattern indexed as the silver with lattice constants. XRD analysis showed intense peaks at 2θ values of 38.34°, 44.59°, 65.04°, and 77.77° corresponding to (111), (200), (220), and (311) Bragg's reflection based on the fcc structure of Ag NPs. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra of Ag NPs exhibited prominent peaks at 3,422.13, 2,924.12, 2,851.76, 1,631.41, 1,381.60, 1,087.11, and 789.55 cm(-1). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrograph showed mean size of 59.52 nm and aggregates of spherical shape Ag NPs. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) showed the complete chemical composition of the synthesized Ag NPs. In pediculocidal activity, the results showed that the optimal times for measuring percent mortality effects of synthesized Ag NPs were 26, 61, 84, and 100 at 5, 10, 15, and 20 min, respectively. The average percent mortality for synthesized Ag NPs was 33, 84, 91, and 100 at 10, 15, 20, and 35 min, respectively against B. ovis. The maximum activity was observed in the aqueous leaf extract of L. inermis, 1 mM AgNO(3) solution, and synthesized Ag NPs against P. humanus

  20. Protective effects of ethyl acetate fraction of Lawsonia inermis fruits extract against carbon tetrachloride-induced oxidative damage in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Hsouna, Anis Ben; Mongi, Saoudi; Culioli, Gérald; Blache, Yves; Ghlissi, Zohra; Chaabane, Rim; El Feki, Abdelfattah; Jaoua, Samir; Trigui, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the antioxidant properties of different fractions obtained from the fruits of Lawsonia inermis, a widely used medicinal plant, against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced oxidative stress in rat liver. The results show that several fractions obtained from L. inermis fruits possessed important antioxidant activity. Among them, the ethyl acetate (EA) fraction showed the highest antioxidant activity. Then, EA fraction was selected for the purification of potential antioxidant compounds. The hepatoprotective effects of EA fraction and its most active constituent, gallic acid (GA), were evaluated against CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. CCl4 induced oxidative stress by a significant rise in serum marker enzymes. However, pretreatment of rats with EA fraction of fruits of L. inermis at a dose of 250 mg kg(-1)body weight and GA significantly lowered some serum biochemical parameters (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and lactate dehydrogenase) in treated rats. A significant reduction in hepatic thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and an increase in antioxidant enzymes namely superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase by treatment with plant extract and GA, against CCl4-treated rats, were observed. Histopathological examinations showed extensive liver injuries, characterized by extensive hepatocellular necrosis, vacuolization, and inflammatory cell infiltration. This potential antioxidant activity is comparable to those of the major purified antioxidant compound, GA. Based on these results, it was observed that fruits of L. inermis protect liver from oxidative stress induced by CCl4 and thus help in evaluation of traditional claim on this plant. © The Author(s) 2013.

  1. 1,5-Diphenylpent-3-en-1-ynes and methyl naphthalene carboxylates from Lawsonia inermis and their anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Liou, Jing-Ru; El-Shazly, Mohamed; Du, Ying-Chi; Tseng, Chao-Neng; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Chuang, Yueh-Lin; Hsu, Yu-Ming; Hsieh, Pei-Wen; Wu, Chin-Chun; Chen, Shu-Li; Hou, Ming-Feng; Chang, Fang-Rong; Wu, Yang-Chang

    2013-04-01

    Lawsonia inermis (Lythraceae) known as henna is one of the most popular and ancient plants used in cosmetics and hair dying. It is cultivated for its leaves but other parts such as seeds, flowers, stem bark and roots are also used in traditional medicine for millennia. Henna tattoo paste also proved to be beneficial for wound healing and in several skin diseases suggesting potent anti-inflammatory activity. To evaluate henna anti-inflammatory activity, 31 compounds, including three 1,5-diphenylpent-3-en-1-yne derivatives, lawsochylin A-C and three methyl naphthalene carboxylates, lawsonaphthoate A-C, were isolated from the stems and leaves of henna utilizing a bioassay-guided fractionation. The structures of the compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic data. Two compounds, lawsochylin A and lawsonaphthoate A showed potent anti-inflammatory activity by inhibition of superoxide anion generation (IC(50)=1.80 and 1.90 μg/ml) and elastase release (IC(50)=1.58 and 3.17 μg/ml) of human neutrophils in response to fMLP or cytochalasin B. Moreover, the known compounds, luteolin, apigenin, 4S-4-hydroxy-α-tetralone, and 2-butoxysuccinic acid, also showed potent inhibition of superoxide anion generation (IC(50)=0.75-1.78 μg/ml) and elastase release (IC(50)=1.62-3.61 μg/ml). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Antiproliferative and Apoptosis Inducing Effects of Non-Polar Fractions from Lawsonia inermis L. in Cervical (HeLa) Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Kaur, Paramjeet; Kumar, Subodh; Kaur, Satwinderjeet

    2015-04-01

    Two non-polar fractions viz. hexane (Hex-LI) and chloroform fraction (CHCl3-LI) of Lawsonia inermis were studied for their antiproliferative potential in various cancer cell lines viz. HeLa, MCF-7, A549 and C6 glioma cells. Both the fractions showed more than 60 % of growth inhibition in all the tested cell lines at highest tested concentration. In clonogenic assay, different concentrations of Hex-LI and CHCl3-LI decreased the number and size of colonies as compared to control in HeLa cells. The apoptotic effects as nuclear condensation, fragmentation were visualized with Hoechst-33342 staining of HeLa cells using confocal microscope. Both fractions induced apoptotic cell death in human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells as evident from flow cytometric analysis carried out using Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide dyes. CHCl3-LI treated cells significantly induced apoptosis (25.43 %) in comparison to control. Results from Neutral Comet assay demonstrated that both fractions induced double stranded breaks (DSB's) in HeLa cells. Our data indicated that Hex-LI and CHCl3-LI treated cells showed significant increase of 32.2 and 18.56 % reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in DCFH-DA assay respectively. Further, experimental studies to decipher exact pathway via which these fractions induce cell death are in progress.

  3. Modulatory effect of henna leaf (Lawsonia inermis) on drug metabolising phase I and phase II enzymes, antioxidant enzymes, lipid peroxidation and chemically induced skin and forestomach papillomagenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Trisha; Rao, A R; Yadava, P K

    2003-03-01

    Henna leaf (Lawsonia inermis), commonly known as Mehndi is cultivated throughout India and is a very popular natural dye to color hand and hair. It is an integral part of indigenous culture, and is also known for its medicinal value. The effect of 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight of 80% ethanolic extract of the fresh leaves of Lawsonia inermis were examined on drug metabolizing phase-I and phase-II enzymes, antioxidant enzymes, glutathione content, lactate dehydrogenase and lipid peroxidation in the liver of 7 weeks old Swiss albino mice. Also anticarcinogenic potential of Henna leaf extract was studied adopting the protocol of benzo(a)pyrene induced forestomach and 7,12 dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated and croton oil-promoted skin papillomagenesis. Our primary findings reveal the 'duel-acting' nature of henna leaf as deduced from its potential to induce only the phase-II enzyme activity, associated mainly with carcinogen detoxification in liver of mice and inhibit the phase I enzyme activities. The hepatic glutathione S-transferase and DT-diaphorase specific activities were elevated above basal (p < 0.005) level by Lawsonia inermis extract treatment. With reference to antioxidant enzymes the investigated doses were effective in increasing the hepatic glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities significantly (from p < 0.05 to p < 0.005) at both the dose levels. Reduced glutathione (GSH) measured as non-protein sulphydryl was found to be significantly elevated in liver (p < 0.005) and in all the extrahepatic organs studied (from p < 0.05 to p < 0.005). Among the extrahepatic organs examined (forestomach, kidney and lung) glutathione S-transferase and DT-diaphorase level were increased in a dose independent manner (from p < 0.05 to p < 0.005). Chemopreventive response was measured by the average number of papillomas per mouse (tumor burden) as well as percentage of tumor bearing animals and tumor multiplicity. There was a

  4. Preliminary investigation of the effects of topical mixture of Lawsonia inermis L. and Ricinus communis L. leaves extract in treatment of osteoarthritis using MIA model in rats.

    PubMed

    Ziaei, Atousa; Sahranavard, Shamim; Gharagozlou, Mohammad Javad; Faizi, Mehrdad

    2016-05-03

    Many plants have been introduced in Iranian traditional medicine for treatment of different joint problems including knee pain. Topical application of the mixture of Lawsonia inermis L. leaves (Henna) with aqueous extract of Ricinus communis L. leaves have been mentioned to have significant effects on reducing knee pain. The present study was designed to evaluate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of the mixture of these two herbs in male rats. We induced knee osteoarthritis as a model of chronic pain by intra-articular injection of mono sodium iodoacetate (MIA). Mechanical allodynia, hotplate latency test, spontaneous movements and gait analysis were used for the evaluation of analgesic activity. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by measuring the diameter and the volume of the injected paw compared to contralateral paw. These tests were monitored at days 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 of MIA administration. Histopathological evaluations were also used to assess the efficacy of the treatment on inflammation and lesions in knee tissue. In all tests, diclofenac topical gel was used as a positive control. The herbal extracts, their mixture, and vehicle or diclofenac gel were administered daily for 14 days by topical route. The mixture of these two extracts significantly reduced the knee joint width and volume of the injected paws and also improved foot prints in gait analysis after 3 days of MIA injection. Analysis of mechanical allodynia (after 21 days), hotplate latency test (after 10 days), spontaneous movements (after 7 days) and in positive control group (after 3 days in all tests and in mechanical allodynia after 14 days) compared to the vehicle group, showed significant effects. Topical usage of the selected formulation made significant histopathological changes on the knee of the rats. Compared to the vehicle group, the tests and diclofenac groups showed less reactions characterized by negligible edema and a few scattered inflammatory lymphoid

  5. Cytotoxicity of spherical gold nanoparticles synthesised using aqueous extracts of aerial roots of Rhaphidophora aurea (Linden ex Andre) intertwined over Lawsonia inermis and Areca catechu on MCF-7 cell line.

    PubMed

    Jannathul Firdhouse, Mubarak; Lalitha, Pottail

    2017-02-01

    A facile synthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) using the aqueous extracts of the aerial roots of Rhaphidophora aurea (Linden ex Andre) intertwined over Lawsonia inermis and Areca catechu was carried out under different conditions, namely room temperature, higher temperature, sonication, solar irradiation and pH variation. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 536 and 575 nm obtained in UV-visible spectrum revealed the formation of AuNP's. The sharp SPR band of the synthesised nanogold indicates the formation of spherical-shaped and uniform-sized nanoparticles. The TEM analysis revealed spherical nanogold particles of size 35 and 10 nm for MM and MP extracts. The secondary metabolites present in the aqueous extract are suggested to be responsible for the reduction of metal ions to metal nanoparticles as evidenced from results of FTIR analysis. Rapid synthesis of GNPs by sunlight is the production of microscopic grains of gold due to the dissociation of gold chloride. This may induce the reaction between secondary metabolites and gold chloride solutions and results in GNPs. The cytotoxic activity of the synthesised nanogold studied against human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed significant activity at higher concentration.

  6. Examining the anti-candidal activity of 10 selected Indian herbs and investigating the effect of Lawsonia inermis extract on germ tube formation, protease, phospholipase, and aspartate dehydrogenase enzyme activity in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Sripathy; Muthuraman, Sundararaman

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study is to identify potential anti-candidal agents from natural resources and elucidate the effect of Lawsonia inermis extract on major virulent factors of Candida albicans. Plants, the most abundant and readily available resource of diverse bioactives, were chosen for the anti-candidal screening study. Ten different plants that were proven to have antimicrobial activity but not explored much for anti-candidal activity were chosen for this study. Ethyl acetate extract of these plant leaves were tested for the anti-candidal activity. Extracts with good anti-candidal activity were further screened for its effect in C. albicans germ tube formation and enzyme (protease, phospholipase, and aspartate dehydrogenase) activity. Among 10 plants screened, L. inermis extract showed complete inhibition of C. albicans. On further evaluation, this extract completely inhibited C. albicans germ tube formation in serum until the end of incubation period (3 h). This extract also exhibited dose-dependent inhibitory activity against two major virulent enzymes of C. albicans, proteases (27-33%) and phospholipases (44.5%). In addition to it, this extract completely inhibited both the isoforms of constitutive candidal enzyme aspartate dehydrogenase, thereby affecting amino acid biosynthesis. Thus, this study confirms the anti-candidal potential of L. inermis and hence can be considered further for development of anti-candidal drug.

  7. Examining the anti-candidal activity of 10 selected Indian herbs and investigating the effect of Lawsonia inermis extract on germ tube formation, protease, phospholipase, and aspartate dehydrogenase enzyme activity in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, Sripathy; Muthuraman, Sundararaman

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study is to identify potential anti-candidal agents from natural resources and elucidate the effect of Lawsonia inermis extract on major virulent factors of Candida albicans. Materials and Methods: Plants, the most abundant and readily available resource of diverse bioactives, were chosen for the anti-candidal screening study. Ten different plants that were proven to have antimicrobial activity but not explored much for anti-candidal activity were chosen for this study. Ethyl acetate extract of these plant leaves were tested for the anti-candidal activity. Extracts with good anti-candidal activity were further screened for its effect in C. albicans germ tube formation and enzyme (protease, phospholipase, and aspartate dehydrogenase) activity. Results: Among 10 plants screened, L. inermis extract showed complete inhibition of C. albicans. On further evaluation, this extract completely inhibited C. albicans germ tube formation in serum until the end of incubation period (3 h). This extract also exhibited dose-dependent inhibitory activity against two major virulent enzymes of C. albicans, proteases (27–33%) and phospholipases (44.5%). In addition to it, this extract completely inhibited both the isoforms of constitutive candidal enzyme aspartate dehydrogenase, thereby affecting amino acid biosynthesis. Conclusion: Thus, this study confirms the anti-candidal potential of L. inermis and hence can be considered further for development of anti-candidal drug. PMID:26997722

  8. Chemoprevention of skin cancer: effect of Lawsonia inermis L. (Henna) leaf powder and its pigment artifact, lawsone in the Epstein- Barr virus early antigen activation assay and in two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Govind J; Rao, G Subba; Sridhar, Rajagopalan; Ichiishi, Eiichiro; Takasaki, Midori; Suzuki, Nobutaka; Konoshima, Takao; Iida, Akira; Tokuda, Harukuni

    2013-12-01

    In continuation of our studies with chemoprevention potential of plant-derived naphthoquinone derivatives, leaf powder of the medicinal plant Lawsonia inermis L, commonly known as 'henna', was evaluated by its inhibition of the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV-EA) activation induced by the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in Raji cells. Lawsone (2-hydroxy- 1,4-naphthoquinone), the reddish orange pigment artifact formed during the extraction or preparation of the dye from henna leaves and believed to be the active component, was also assessed in this in vitro assay. Both showed a profound inhibition (>88%) of EBV-EA activation. In the in vivo two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis study using UV-B radiation for initiation and TPA for tumor promotion, oral feeding of henna (0.0025%) in drinking water ad libitum decreased tumor incidence by 66% and multiplicity by 40% when compared to the positive control at 10 weeks of treatment. Similarly, in the above mouse model, orally fed lawsone (0.0025%) decreased tumor incidence by 72% and multiplicity by 50%. The tumor inhibitory trend continued throughout the 20-week test period. Similar antitumor activities were observed when henna (0.5 mg/ml) was applied topically on the back skin in the UV-B initiated, TPA promoted and peroxynitrite initiated, TPA promoted mouse skin carcinogenesis models. Topically applied lawsone (0.015 mg/ml) also exhibited similar protection against tumor formation in the 7,12-dimtehylbenz(a)anthracene induced and TPA promoted skin cancer in mice. Also, there was a delay of 1 to 2 weeks in tumor appearance in both henna and lawsone treated groups compared to control in all three test models. This study ascertains the skin cancer chemopreventive activity of henna leaf powder and lawsone when administered by either oral (through drinking water) or topical (by application on the back skin) routes. Further, it emphasizes the need for the evaluation of these henna-derived green

  9. The rabbit as an infection model for equine proliferative enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sampieri, Francesca; Allen, Andrew L.; Pusterla, Nicola; Vannucci, Fabio A.; Antonopoulos, Aphroditi J.; Ball, Katherine R.; Thompson, Julie; Dowling, Patricia M.; Hamilton, Don L.; Gebhart, Connie J.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the susceptibility of rabbits to Lawsonia intracellularis obtained from a case of clinical equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). This is a preliminary step toward developing a rabbit infection model for studying pathogenesis and therapy of EPE in horses. Nine does were equally assigned to 3 groups. Animals in 2 groups (Group 1 and Group 2) were orally inoculated with different doses of cell-cultured L. intracellularis. Controls (Group 3) were sham-inoculated. Feces and blood were collected before the rabbits were infected and at 7, 14, and 21 days post-infection (DPI). Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers were measured using an immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA) and fecal samples were analyzed with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). A doe from each group was euthanized at 7, 14, and 21 DPI for collection and evaluation of intestinal samples. Tissues were stained by routine hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) method and immunohistochemistry (IHC) with L. intracellularis-specific mouse monoclonal antibody. At 14 DPI, serologic responses were detected in both infected groups, which maintained high titers through to 21 DPI. Lawsonia intracellularis DNA was detected in the feces of Group 2 on 7 DPI and in both infected groups on 14 DPI. Gross lesions were apparent in Group 1 and Group 2 on 14 DPI. Immunohistochemistry confirmed L. intracellularis antigen within cells of rabbits in Group 1 and Group 2 on 7, 14, and 21 DPI. No lesions, serologic response, shedding, or IHC labeling were found in Group 3 rabbits. This study describes an EPE rabbit model that simulates natural infection, as typical lesions, immune response, and fecal shedding were present. PMID:24082402

  10. The rabbit as an infection model for equine proliferative enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Francesca; Allen, Andrew L; Pusterla, Nicola; Vannucci, Fabio A; Antonopoulos, Aphroditi J; Ball, Katherine R; Thompson, Julie; Dowling, Patricia M; Hamilton, Don L; Gebhart, Connie J

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the susceptibility of rabbits to Lawsonia intracellularis obtained from a case of clinical equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). This is a preliminary step toward developing a rabbit infection model for studying pathogenesis and therapy of EPE in horses. Nine does were equally assigned to 3 groups. Animals in 2 groups (Group 1 and Group 2) were orally inoculated with different doses of cell-cultured L. intracellularis. Controls (Group 3) were sham-inoculated. Feces and blood were collected before the rabbits were infected and at 7, 14, and 21 days post-infection (DPI). Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers were measured using an immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA) and fecal samples were analyzed with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). A doe from each group was euthanized at 7, 14, and 21 DPI for collection and evaluation of intestinal samples. Tissues were stained by routine hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) method and immunohistochemistry (IHC) with L. intracellularis-specific mouse monoclonal antibody. At 14 DPI, serologic responses were detected in both infected groups, which maintained high titers through to 21 DPI. Lawsonia intracellularis DNA was detected in the feces of Group 2 on 7 DPI and in both infected groups on 14 DPI. Gross lesions were apparent in Group 1 and Group 2 on 14 DPI. Immunohistochemistry confirmed L. intracellularis antigen within cells of rabbits in Group 1 and Group 2 on 7, 14, and 21 DPI. No lesions, serologic response, shedding, or IHC labeling were found in Group 3 rabbits. This study describes an EPE rabbit model that simulates natural infection, as typical lesions, immune response, and fecal shedding were present.

  11. Prevalence of swine viral and bacterial pathogens in rodents and stray cats captured around pig farms in Korea.

    PubMed

    Truong, Quang Lam; Seo, Tae Won; Yoon, Byung-Il; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol; Han, Jeong Hee; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2013-12-30

    In 2008, 102 rodents and 24 stray cats from the areas around 9 pig farms in northeast South Korea were used to determine the prevalence of the following selected swine pathogens: ten viral pathogens [porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), rotavirus, classical swine fever virus (CSFV), porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), porcine parvovirus (PPV), pseudorabies virus (PRV) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV)] and four bacterial pathogens (Brucella, Leptospira, Salmonella and Lawsonia intracellularis). In total, 1,260 tissue samples from 102 rodents and 24 stray cats were examined by specific PCR and RT-PCR assays, including tissue samples of the brain, tonsils, lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, spleen, small intestine, large intestine and mesenteric lymph nodes. The percentages of PCR-positive rodents for the porcine pathogens were as follows: 63.7% for Leptospira, 39.2% for Brucella, 6.8% for Salmonella, 15.7% for L. intracellularis, 14.7% for PCV2 and 3.9% for EMCV. The percentages of PCR-positive stray cats for the swine pathogens were as follows: 62.5% for Leptospira, 25% for Brucella, 12.5% for Salmonella, 12.5% for L. intracellularis and 4.2% for PEDV. These results may be helpful for developing control measures to prevent the spread of infectious diseases of pigs.

  12. Equine proliferative enteropathy: a cause of weight loss, colic, diarrhoea and hypoproteinaemia in foals on three breeding farms in Canada.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, J P; Drolet, R; Parsons, D; Leguillette, R; Sauvageau, R; Shapiro, J; Houle, L; Hallé, G; Gebhart, C J

    2000-09-01

    Proliferative enteropathy (PE) is a transmissible enteric disease caused by Lawsonia intracellularis. An outbreak of equine PE was diagnosed in foals from 3 breeding farms. Most foals had been weaned prior to the appearance of clinical signs, which included depression, rapid and marked weight loss, subcutaneous oedema, diarrhoea and colic. Poor body condition with a rough haircoat and a potbellied appearance were common findings in affected foals. Respiratory tract infection, dermatitis and intestinal parasitism were also found in some foals. Haematological and plasma biochemical abnormalities included hypoproteinaemia, transient leucocytosis, anaemia and increased serum creatinine kinase concentration. Postmortem diagnosis of PE was confirmed on 4 foals based on the presence of characteristic intracellular bacteria within the apical cytoplasm of proliferating crypt epithelial cells of the intestinal mucosa, using silver stains, and by results of PCR analysis and immunohistochemistry. Antemortem diagnosis of equine PE was based on the clinical signs, hypoproteinaemia and the exclusion of common enteric infections. Faecal PCR analysis was positive for the presence of L. intracellularis in 6 of 18 foals tested while the serum of all 7 foals with PE serologically evaluated had antibodies against L. intracellularis. Most foals were treated with erythromycin estolate alone or combined with rifampin for a minimum of 21 days. Additional symptomatic treatments were administered when indicated. All but one foal treated with erythromycin survived the infection. This study indicates that equine PE should be included in the differential diagnosis of outbreaks of rapid weight loss, diarrhoea, colic and hypoproteinaemia in weanling foals.

  13. Microarray and cytokine analyses of field cases of pigs with diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, M; Andersson, M; Lindberg, R; Fossum, C; Jensen-Waern, M

    2011-12-15

    This field study explored the cytokine expression in intestinal tissue and serum from 19 diarrhoeic and 9 healthy pigs in herds with a long-time history of Lawsonia intracellularis-infection. The disease, proliferative enteropathy (PE), is associated with diarrhoea and poor performance in growers and haemorrhagic diarrhoea and sudden death in finisher pigs, but the immunopathology is poorly understood. Histopathology, demonstration of L. intracellularis and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in intestinal tissue by PCR, and detection of serum antibodies to L. intracellularis, were performed. The presence of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IFN-α, IFN-γ, TNF-α and TGF-β in sera was determined by immunoassays, and intestinal mRNA expression of these cytokines plus IL-12p40 was determined by qPCR. Intestinal specimens from pigs with intestinal adenomatosis (n=2), proliferative haemorrhagic enteropathy or swine dysentery (n=2), and controls (n=2) were analysed by a genome wide porcine microarray. The clinical signs of PE were not always supported by the subsequent analyses, and the presence of PCV2 may have contributed to an increased mRNA expression for IFN-γ in intestinal specimens from some pigs. The limited gene expression in the microarray analyses and the limited expression of cytokines in both sera and intestines, indicate that the immune response is poorly activated in the initial course of an infection with L. intracellularis. However, the gene encoding for insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) was up-regulated in two pigs with prominent mucosal proliferation.

  14. Elevated fat skatole levels in immunocastrated, surgically castrated and entire male pigs with acute dysentery.

    PubMed

    Skrlep, Martin; Batorek, Nina; Bonneau, Michel; Fazarinc, Gregor; Segula, Blaž; Candek-Potokar, Marjeta

    2012-12-01

    Boar taint is due to androstenone and skatole (3-methyl-indole) accumulation in fat tissues. During a study to investigate the effect of immunocastration on fattening pigs, an outbreak of acute dysentery occurred caused by Lawsonia intracellularis and Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and resulted in cachexia and high mortality. Low androstenone levels in the immunocastrates (0.25 ± 0.04 μg/g liquid fat) suggested that the immunocastration had been effective, but unusually high skatole concentrations in fat tissues were found not only in entire males, but also in surgical castrates and immunocastrates (0.22 ± 0.15, 0.14 ± 0.08 and 0.18 ± 0.14 μg/g liquid fat, respectively). The findings suggest that boar taint can arise in cases of intestinal infections, even in castrated pigs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Detection of enteric pathogens in Turkey flocks affected with severe enteritis, in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Moura-Alvarez, Joelma; Nuñez, Luis F N; Astolfi-Ferreira, Claudete S; Knöbl, Terezinha; Chacón, Jorge L; Moreno, Andrea M; Jones, Richard C; Ferreira, Antonio J Piantino

    2014-08-01

    Twenty-two flocks of turkeys affected by enteric problems, with ages between 10 and 104 days and located in the Southern region of Brazil, were surveyed for turkey by PCR for turkey astrovirus type 2 (TAstV-2), turkey coronavirus (TCoV), hemorrhagic enteritis virus (HEV), rotavirus, reovirus, Salmonella spp., and Lawsonia intracellularis (Li) infections. Eleven profiles of pathogen combination were observed. The most frequently encountered pathogen combinations were TCoV-Li, followed by TCoV-TAstV-2-Li, TCoV-TastV-2. Only TCoV was detected as the sole pathogen in three flocks. Eight and 19 flocks of the 22 were positive for TAstV-2 and TCoV, respectively. Six were positive for Salmonella spp. and L. intracellularis was detected in 12 turkey flocks. Reovirus and HEV were not detected in this survey. These results throw new light on the multiple etiology of enteritis in turkeys. The implications of these findings and their correlation with the clinical signs are comprehensively discussed, illustrating the complexity of the enteric diseases.

  16. Serologic follow-up of a repopulated swine herd after an outbreak of proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Roberto M C; Gebhart, Connie J; Armbruster, Greg A; Roggow, Brian D

    2002-10-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an obligate intracellular organism that causes porcine proliferative enteropathy, a widespread infectious disease. Very little is known about the immune response and the epidemiologic features of the disease in the field. The aims of this study were to evaluate the duration and titers of antibody specific for L. intracellularis in gilts after an outbreak of proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy (PHE), to evaluate maternal antibodies in piglets, and to evaluate seroconversion and fecal shedding in growing-finishing pigs. Thirty-six gilts in a herd that had recently experienced an outbreak of PHE, including 13 that had recovered, were bled 3 wk after the beginning of the outbreak and then every 3 wk until they became seronegative in 2 consecutive tests. Fourteen piglets from 5 gilts seropositive at farrowing and 5 piglets from 2 sows that remained seronegative were bled once or twice at the farrowing house and then every 3 wk until they reached market age. Fecal samples from these pigs were tested by polymerase chain reaction at 7 wk of age and then on the days of blood collection. After the PHE outbreak, the gilts had high serum antibody levels; the levels decreased over time, but antibody was still detectable for up to 3 mo in some animals. Four piglets from sows that were seropositive at farrowing had detectable passive antibodies up to 5 wk of age. Some nursery pigs started shedding L. intracellularis around 7 wk of age; peak shedding was observed between 13 and 16 wk. Antibody was not detected until 16 wk of age and was more often detected between 19 and 22 wk.

  17. Development and validation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the diagnosis of porcine proliferative enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Wattanaphansak, Suphot; Asawakarn, Tanong; Gebhart, Connie J; Deen, John

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a sonicated pure culture of Lawsonia intracellularis as the antigen (So-ELISA). A total of 332 serum samples, consisting of 232 experimentally infected animals and 100 animals naturally infected with L. intracellularis, were used to assess the diagnostic sensitivity. Three hundred and fifty-five sera from uninfected animals were used to determine the diagnostic specificity. The receiver operating characteristic and mean +3 standard deviation of optical density (OD) values from uninfected animals were used for selecting cut-off points. The diagnostic accuracy of So-ELISA was considered to be high as the area under the curve index was 0.991 with 0.0029 standard error. The optimal cut-off for So-ELISA was set at 0.45 OD with 89.8% sensitivity and 99.4% specificity based on a combination of good sensitivity and high specificity. No cross-reactivity was found in sera from pigs exposed to Brachyspira pilosicoli, B. hyodysenteriae, Campylobacter mucosalis, C. jejuni, or C. coli. Inter- and intracoefficient of variation of all control sera tested with So-ELISA was less than 10%. The observed agreements between So-ELISA and the immunoperoxidase monolayer assay tested with experimental challenge animals and field samples were 95.08% with 0.88 kappa and 90.65% with 0.74 kappa value, respectively. So-ELISA was able to detect the seroconversion of infected animals at 2 to 4 weeks after exposure to L. intracellularis. Based on the validation results, So-ELISA could be used as an alternative serology for proliferative enteropathy diagnosis.

  18. Evaluating the risk of pathogen transmission from wild animals to domestic pigs in Australia.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Hayley E; Toribio, Jenny-Ann L M L; Lapidge, Steven J; Hernández-Jover, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Wild animals contribute to endemic infection in livestock as well as the introduction, reintroduction and maintenance of pathogens. The source of introduction of endemic diseases to a piggery is often unknown and the extent of wildlife contribution to such local spread is largely unexplored. The aim of the current study was to quantitatively assess the probability of domestic pigs being exposed to different pathogens from wild animals commonly found around commercial piggeries in Australia. Specifically, this study aims to quantify the probability of exposure to the pathogens Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp. from European starlings (Sturnus vulgarus); Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, Lawsonia intracellularis and Salmonella spp. from rats (Rattus rattus and Rattus norvegicus); and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Leptospira spp., Brucella suis and L. intracellularis from feral pigs (Sus scrofa). Exposure assessments, using scenario trees and Monte Carlo stochastic simulation modelling, were conducted to identify potential pathways of introduction and calculate the probabilities of these pathways occurring. Input parameters were estimated from a national postal survey of commercial pork producers and from disease detection studies conducted for European starlings, rats and feral pigs in close proximity to commercial piggeries in Australia. Based on the results of the exposure assessments, rats presented the highest probability of exposure of pathogens to domestic pigs at any point in time, and L. intracellularis (median 0.13, 5% and 95%, 0.05-0.23) and B. hyodysenteriae (median 0.10, 0.05-0.19) were the most likely pathogens to be transmitted. Regarding European starlings, the median probability of exposure of domestic pigs to pathogenic E. coli at any point in time was estimated to be 0.03 (0.02-0.04). The highest probability of domestic pig exposure to feral pig pathogens at any point in time was found to be for M. hyopneumoniae (median 0.013, 0

  19. Prevalence of Campylobacter spp. relative to other enteric pathogens in grow-finish pigs with diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Burrough, Eric; Terhorst, Samantha; Sahin, Orhan; Zhang, Qijing

    2013-08-01

    Salmonella spp., Lawsonia intracellularis, and Brachyspira spp. are pathogens commonly associated with diarrhea in growing and finishing pigs. Brachyspira spp. infection has recently reemerged as a significant concern due to an increase in the incidence of swine dysentery; however, the mechanisms underlying this increase in dysentery remain largely unknown. Pigs are also well-recognized as potential carriers of Campylobacter spp., particularly Campylobacter coli, yet enteric disease in swine associated with infection by these bacteria is considered uncommon and diagnosis has historically been based upon exclusion of other causes. Accordingly, Campylobacter culture is often excluded in routine diagnostic testing of cases of porcine enterocolitis and the incidence of infection is therefore largely unknown. In this study, feces from 155 cases of clinical diarrhea in grow-finish pigs submitted to the Iowa State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory were cultured for Campylobacter spp. in addition to other testing as indicated for routine diagnostic investigation. Campylobacter culture was positive from 82.6% (128/155) of samples with C. coli accounting for 75% of isolates and Campylobacter jejuni for the remaining 25%. In 14.8% (23/155) of cases a Campylobacter spp. was the sole infectious agent detected; however, there was no association with any particular Campylobacter spp. Interestingly, for those cases with a laboratory diagnosis of Brachyspira-associated disease, 100% (15/15) were also culture positive for Campylobacter spp. suggesting a possible interrelationship between these bacteria in the pig gut. No association was noted between Campylobacter culture results and infection with either Salmonella spp. or L. intracellularis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dyeing behaviour of gamma irradiated cotton fabric using Lawson dye extracted from henna leaves (Lawsonia inermis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Fazal-ur; Adeel, Shahid; Qaiser, Summia; Ahmad Bhatti, Ijaz; Shahid, Muhammad; Zuber, Mohammad

    2012-11-01

    Dyeing behavior of gamma irradiated cotton fabric using Lawson dye extracted from henna leaves has been investigated. Cotton and dye powder are irradiated to different absorbed doses of 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 kGy using Cs-137 gamma irradiator. The dyeing parameters such as dyeing time, electrolyte (salt) concentration and mordant concentrations using copper and iron as mordants are optimized. Dyeing is performed using un-irradiated and irradiated cotton with dye solutions and their color strength values are evaluated in CIE Lab system using Spectraflash -SF650. Methods suggested by International Standard Organization (ISO) have been employed to investigate the colourfastness properties such as colourfastness to light, washing and rubbing of irradiated dyed fabric. It is found that gamma ray treatment of cotton dyed with extracts of henna leaves has significantly improved the color strength as well as enhanced the rating of fastness properties.

  1. Free radical scavenging and reducing power of Lawsonia inermis L. seeds.

    PubMed

    Philip Jacob, P; Madhumitha, G; Mary Saral, A

    2011-06-01

    To determine the antioxidant activity, total phenolic and flavonoid content of Petroleum ether extract (PE), Dichloromethane extract (DCM), Ethanol extract (ET) and aqueous extract (AQ) of henna seeds. Total antioxidant assay (phosphomolybenum method), DPPH radical scavenging assay, reducing power assay and lipid peroxidation inhibition assay were used to ascertain the potential of seeds as an antioxidant. In all the assays carried out ET showed a greater potential to scavenge DPPH radical, reduce MO (VI) to MO (V) complex and Fe (III) to Fe (II) and to inhibit lipid peroxidation. The IC(50) of ET was far greater than that of the standard, ascorbic acid (AS) in the lipid peroxidation assay. The activity of AQ was lesser when compared with that of ET but greater than PE and DCM. The amount of phenolics and flavonoids were present in higher amounts in ET followed by AQ. Trace amounts of phenolics were detected in PE and DCM, but the amount of flavonoids were below the detection level. The study showed that the antioxidant activity and the concentrations of phenolics and flavonoids are proportionate to each other. Ethanolic extract of henna seeds are efficient antioxidants, which can be utilized for further isolation of active compounds and pharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2011 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative Tissue Stainability of Lawsonia inermis (Henna) and Eosin as Counterstains to Hematoxylin in Brain Tissues.

    PubMed

    Alawa, Judith N; Gideon, Gbenga O; Adetiba, Bamidele; Alawa, Clement B

    2015-04-01

    We hyposthesized that henna staining could provide an alternative to eosin when used as a counterstain to hematoxylin for understanding basic neurohistological principles. Therefore, this study was aimed at investigating the suitability of henna as counterstain to hematoxylin for the demonstration of the layer stratification and cellular distribution in the brain tissue. Henna stained nervous tissue by reacting with the basic elements in proteins via its amino groups. It stained the neuropil and connective tissue membranes brown and effectively outlined the perikarya of neurons with no visible nuclei demonstrating that it is an acidic dye. Henna as a counterstain to hematoxylin demonstrated reliability as a new neurohistological stain. It facilitated identification of cortical layer stratification and cellular distribution in brain tissue sections from Wistar rats. This was comparable to standard hematoxylin and eosin staining as morphological and morphometrical analyses of stained cells did not show significant differences in size or number. This study presents a method for staining with henna and demonstrates that although henna and eosin belong to different dye groups (anthraquinone and xanthenes, respectively) based on their chromophores, they share similar staining techniques and thus could be used interchangeably in neurohistology.

  3. Disease risks associated with free-ranging wild boar in Saskatchewan

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Glenna F.; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Godson, Dale L.; Wilkins, Wendy; Bollinger, Trent K.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the disease status of Saskatchewan’s feral wild boar population. Whole carcasses, tissue samples, and/or serum from 81 hunter-killed boars from Saskatchewan were submitted to the Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative (CWHC) between 2009 and 2014. Serological tests were negative for PRRS, H1N1, and H3N2 swine influenza, PCV-2, and TGE/PRCV in 22/22 boars and for Toxoplasma gondii and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in 20/20 boars. Of 20 boars whose sera were tested 20 were positive for Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, with 7 positive for, among other strains, serotype 14; 16 were positive for Lawsonia intracellularis, 1 was positive and 6 were suspicious for Salmonella spp. Polymerase chain reaction tests were negative for PRRS and PCV2 in 58/58 boars and positive for Torque teno virus in 1/8 boars. Digestion assays were negative for Trichinella spp. in 22/22 boars. The high seroprevalence of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 14 is noteworthy as this serotype has not been previously reported in North America. PMID:26246630

  4. Exposure of feral swine (Sus scrofa) in the United States to selected pathogens.

    PubMed

    Baroch, John A; Gagnon, Carl A; Lacouture, Sonia; Gottschalk, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Feral swine (Sus scrofa) are widely distributed in the United States. In 2011 and 2012, serum samples and tonsils were recovered from 162 and 37 feral swine, respectively, in the US to evaluate exposure to important swine endemic pathogens. Antibodies against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) were found in 2.5% and 25.3% of tested sera, respectively. Positive serological reactions against Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae have been detected in 19.7% and 69.7% of animals. More than 15% of animals presented antibodies against these 2 pathogens simultaneously. Most animals were also seropositive for Lawsonia intracellularis. Feral swine can also be involved in transmission of zoonotic agents. Almost 50% of animals possessed antibodies against Salmonella. In addition, 94.4% of animals were carriers of Streptococcus suis in their tonsils. In conclusion, feral swine may be considered as a potential reservoir for different endemic diseases in domestic pigs, as well as for important zoonotic agents.

  5. The European ban on growth-promoting antibiotics and emerging consequences for human and animal health.

    PubMed

    Casewell, Mark; Friis, Christian; Marco, Enric; McMullin, Paul; Phillips, Ian

    2003-08-01

    Following the ban of all food animal growth-promoting antibiotics by Sweden in 1986, the European Union banned avoparcin in 1997 and bacitracin, spiramycin, tylosin and virginiamycin in 1999. Three years later, the only attributable effect in humans has been a diminution in acquired resistance in enterococci isolated from human faecal carriers. There has been an increase in human infection from vancomycin-resistant enterococci in Europe, probably related to the increased in usage of vancomycin for the treatment of methicillin-resistant staphylococci. The ban of growth promoters has, however, revealed that these agents had important prophylactic activity and their withdrawal is now associated with a deterioration in animal health, including increased diarrhoea, weight loss and mortality due to Escherichia coli and Lawsonia intracellularis in early post-weaning pigs, and clostridial necrotic enteritis in broilers. A directly attributable effect of these infections is the increase in usage of therapeutic antibiotics in food animals, including that of tetracycline, aminoglycosides, trimethoprim/sulphonamide, macrolides and lincosamides, all of which are of direct importance in human medicine. The theoretical and political benefit of the widespread ban of growth promoters needs to be more carefully weighed against the increasingly apparent adverse consequences.

  6. Evaluation of lincomycin in drinking water for treatment of induced porcine proliferative enteropathy using a Swine challenge model.

    PubMed

    Bradford, James R; Winkelman, Nathan L; Moreira, Frederico P; Elfring, Gregory D

    2004-01-01

    A single-location, challenge-model study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of lincomycin against porcine proliferative enteropathy when administered through the drinking water at 125 and 250 mg/gallon. The primary variables of interest were pig removal rate, diarrhea scores, demeanor scores, and abdominal appearance scores. Ancillary performance variables examined included average daily feed intake, average daily gain, and feed per gain. After a 3-day acclimation period, pigs were challenged on 2 consecutive days with a mucosal homogenate containing a total dose of 1.4 x 10(9) cells of Lawsonia intracellularis. Five days later, when porcine proliferative enteropathy was well established, drinking water medicated with 125 mg (L125) or 250 mg (L250) lincomycin/gallon was provided to two groups of pigs for 10 days. Pigs were observed for 13 days following the treatment period. A third group of pigs served as controls and received unmedicated drinking water throughout the study. The L250 group experienced a significantly lower (P < .05) pig removal rate than the control group over the 23-day observation period. Additionally, for every primary variable, the L250 group experienced a significantly decreased (P < .01) number of abnormal days compared with the control group. The L125 group showed a significant reduction (P < .05) in abnormal demeanor and abnormal abdominal appearance scores compared with controls.

  7. Disease risks associated with free-ranging wild boar in Saskatchewan.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Glenna F; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Godson, Dale L; Wilkins, Wendy; Bollinger, Trent K

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the disease status of Saskatchewan's feral wild boar population. Whole carcasses, tissue samples, and/or serum from 81 hunter-killed boars from Saskatchewan were submitted to the Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative (CWHC) between 2009 and 2014. Serological tests were negative for PRRS, H1N1, and H3N2 swine influenza, PCV-2, and TGE/PRCV in 22/22 boars and for Toxoplasma gondii and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in 20/20 boars. Of 20 boars whose sera were tested 20 were positive for Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, with 7 positive for, among other strains, serotype 14; 16 were positive for Lawsonia intracellularis, 1 was positive and 6 were suspicious for Salmonella spp. Polymerase chain reaction tests were negative for PRRS and PCV2 in 58/58 boars and positive for Torque teno virus in 1/8 boars. Digestion assays were negative for Trichinella spp. in 22/22 boars. The high seroprevalence of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 14 is noteworthy as this serotype has not been previously reported in North America.

  8. Survey of the large-animal diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine regarding knowledge and clinical use of polymerase chain reaction: implications for veterinary education.

    PubMed

    Pusterla, Nicola; Mapes, Samantha; Leutenegger, Christian M

    2006-01-01

    A questionnaire was developed to document the knowledge base of large-animal diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) regarding polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology and to identify the common use of this technology in equine practice. Ninety-three of the 278 mailed questionnaires were returned, for an overall response rate of 33.4%. Ninety respondents (99%) reported being familiar with the general principles of nucleic acid probe technology; however, only 52 (57%) knew the difference between conventional (traditional) and real-time (second-generation) PCR. The majority of the respondents (88%) emphasized the need for continuing education on molecular diagnostics. Eighty-four (92%) of the respondents regularly use PCR (conventional and/or real-time) for the detection of equine pathogens, and 80 (88%) commonly submit their samples to university/state veterinary laboratories. Blood, nasal swabs, and feces are the three equine specimens most commonly submitted for PCR analysis of Streptococcus equi, Lawsonia intracellularis, Neorickettsia risticii, equine herpesvirus 1/4, Rhodococcus equi, Sarcocystis neurona, and equine influenza virus. Diplomates reported costs associated with molecular diagnostics and unreliability of PCR as the most common limitations of PCR. Didactic training in veterinary curricula and during continuing-education opportunities continues to be necessary to produce veterinarians who have an understanding of the clinical applications of molecular diagnostics.

  9. 21 CFR 558.600 - Tiamulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Sponsor (i) (ii) 35 1. For control of swine dysentery associated with Brachyspira (formerly Serpulina or... history of swine dysentery but where signs of disease have not yet occurred or following approved... chlortetracycline, and control of swine dysentery associated with Brachyspira (formerly Serpulina or Treponema...

  10. 21 CFR 558.600 - Tiamulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Sponsor (i) (ii) 35 1. For control of swine dysentery associated with Brachyspira (formerly Serpulina or... history of swine dysentery but where signs of disease have not yet occurred or following approved... chlortetracycline, and control of swine dysentery associated with Brachyspira (formerly Serpulina or Treponema...

  11. In-vitro antimicrobial activity of Lawsonia inermis Linn (henna). A pilot study on the Omani henna.

    PubMed

    Habbal, Omar A; Al-Jabri, Ali A; El-Hag, Abdulghaffar H; Al-Mahrooqi, Zahra H; Al-Hashmi, Nasser A

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the antimicrobial activity of henna's fresh and dry leaves and seeds obtained from Oman. This study was carried out at the College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Sultanate of Oman during the period January-June, 2004. Crude extracts of fresh and dry leaves and seeds were investigated for their antimicrobial activity against 3 standard bacterial strains namely: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Eleven different bacterial strains were obtained from patients attending the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Sultanate of Oman. In addition, one Candida albicans (C. albicans) species was used for testing the antifungal activity of the Omani henna sample. All fresh and dry leaves and seeds of the Omani henna demonstrated antibacterial activity against all 3 standard strains and the 11 patients' isolated strains. Henna dry leaves demonstrated the best in-vitro antimicrobial activity and in particular against Shigella sonnei. However, henna fresh and dry seeds failed to show any activity against C. albicans. Omani henna does possess, in-vitro antibacterial activity against a wide spectrum of bacterial strains and C. albicans.

  12. Lead exposure from the use of Lawsonia inermis (henna) in temporary paint-on-tattooing and hair dying.

    PubMed

    Jallad, Karim N; Espada-Jallad, Cyntia

    2008-07-01

    This study reports the evaluation of a number of spectroscopic techniques used in identifying and quantifying the presence of lead in twelve commercial and traditional henna samples. The lead levels found in henna were low with concentrations ranging from 2.29 ppm to 65.98 ppm. Henna is used as a traditional cosmetic and remedy in the Middle East, Far East, and North Africa. The very low concentrations of lead measured in these henna samples were reassuring; however, the cumulative effects of prolonged lead exposure may be of concern. Thus, the use of henna especially among children may constitute a public health risk.

  13. Clinical cystoisosporosis associated to porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV, Suid herpesvirus 2) infection in fattening pigs.

    PubMed

    Basso, Walter; Marti, Hanna; Hilbe, Monika; Sydler, Titus; Stahel, Anina; Bürgi, Esther; Sidler, Xaver

    2017-09-21

    Cystoisospora (syn. Isospora) suis is the causative agent of neonatal porcine coccidiosis and one of the main causes of diarrhoea in suckling piglets worldwide. Infection with porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV, Suid herpesvirus 2) causes inclusion body rhinitis in pigs. In a Swiss pig herd (n=2 boars, 7 sows, 2 gilts, 18 finishing pigs, 30 fattening pigs, 54 suckling piglets), an outbreak of PCMV infection with high morbidity in all age categories, characterized by fever, anorexia, reduced general condition, respiratory signs and increased piglet mortality, was diagnosed by histopathology and molecular methods. Five fattening pigs (age~17weeks) additionally showed diarrhoea, not typical for PCMV infections, and one fattener had to be euthanized due to poor condition. Histopathologically, severe fibrinopurulent jejunoileitis with extensive atrophy and fusion of intestinal villi, loss of goblet cells and crypt abscesses associated to C. suis infection were present. In the liver, herpesvirus intranuclear inclusion bodies were observed and PCMV was confirmed by PCR/sequencing. No further infectious causes of diarrhoea (i.e. Rotavirus A; TGEV; PEDV; PCV-2; enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli or Lawsonia intracellularis) were detected in the euthanized fattener. Coproscopically, C. suis oocysts were identified in the faeces from further fatteners with diarrhoea. While C. suis usually produces disease only in suckling piglets, its association with severe intestinal lesions and diarrhoea in ~17-week-old fatteners was surprising. It is supposed that the underlying PCMV infection might have contributed to the presentation of clinical cystoisosporosis in fattening pigs. The interaction mechanisms between these two pathogens are unknown. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Survey for selected pathogens in wild pigs (Sus scrofa) from Guam, Marianna Islands, USA.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Christopher A; DeNicola, Anthony; Dubey, J P; Hill, Dolores E; Berghaus, Roy D; Yabsley, Michael J

    2017-06-01

    Pigs (Sus scrofa) were introduced to Guam in the 1600's and are now present in high densities throughout the island. Wild pigs are reservoirs for pathogens of concern to domestic animals and humans. Exposure to porcine parvovirus, transmissible gastroenteritis, and Leptospira interrogans has been documented in domestic swine but data from wild pigs are lacking. The close proximity of humans, domestic animals, and wild pigs, combined with the liberal hunting of wild pigs, results in frequent opportunities for pathogen transmission. From February-March 2015, blood, tissue and ectoparasite samples were collected from 47 wild pigs. Serologic testing found exposure to Brucella spp. (2%), Toxoplasma gondii (11%), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus (13%), porcine circovirus type 2 (36%), pseudorabies virus (64%), Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (93%), Lawsonia intracellularis (93%), and porcine parvovirus (94%). Eleven (24%) samples had low titers (1:100) to Leptospira interrogans serovars Bratislava (n=6), Icterohaemorrhagiae (n=6), Pomona (n=2), and Hardjo (n=1). Kidney samples from nine pigs with Leptospira antibodies were negative for Leptospira antigens. Numerous pigs had Metastrongylus lungworms and three had Stephanurus dentatus. Lice (Hematopinus suis) and ticks (Amblyomma breviscutatum) were also detected. No antibodies to Influenza A viruses were detected. In contrast to the previous domestic swine survey, we found evidence of numerous pathogens in wild pigs including new reports of pseudorabies virus, PRRS virus, Brucella, and Leptospira in pigs on Guam. These findings highlight that domestic swine-wild pig interactions should be prevented and precautions are needed when handling wild pigs to minimize the risk of pathogen transmission. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. 21 CFR 558.600 - Tiamulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dysentery associated with Brachyspira (formerly Serpulina or Treponema) hyodysenteriae susceptible to tiamulin Feed continuously as sole ration on premises with a history of swine dysentery but where signs of... Pasteurella multocida susceptible to chlortetracycline, and control of swine dysentery associated...

  16. Certain canine weakly beta-hemolytic intestinal spirochetes are phenotypically and genotypically related to spirochetes associated with human and porcine intestinal spirochetosis.

    PubMed Central

    Duhamel, G E; Muniappa, N; Mathiesen, M R; Johnson, J L; Toth, J; Elder, R O; Doster, A R

    1995-01-01

    Four canine weakly beta-hemolytic intestinal spirochetes associated with intestinal spirochetosis (IS-associated WBHIS) were compared with IS-associated human and porcine WBHIS and the type species for Serpulina hyodysenteriae and S. innocens by using phenotypic and genotypic parameters. The IS-associated canine, human, and porcine WBHIS belonged to a phyletic group distinct from but related to previously described Serpulina type species. PMID:7559984

  17. Intrinsic water use efficiency controls the adaptation to high salinity in a semi-arid adapted plant, henna (Lawsonia inermis L.).

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, Nieves; Olmos, Enrique; Bardisi, Enas; García-De la Garma, Jesús; López-Berenguer, Carmen; Rubio-Asensio, José Salvador

    2014-03-01

    Adaptation to salinity of a semi-arid inhabitant plant, henna, is studied. The salt tolerance mechanisms are evaluated in the belief that gas exchange (water vapor and CO2) should play a key role on its adaptation to salt stress because of the strong evaporation conditions and soil water deficit in its natural area of distribution. We grow henna plants hydroponically under controlled climate conditions and expose them to control (0mM NaCl), and two levels of salinity; medium (75mM NaCl) and high (150mM NaCl). Relative growth rate (RGR), biomass production, whole plant and leaf structure and ultrastructure adaptation, gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, nutrients location in leaf tissue and its balance in the plant are studied. RGR and total biomass decreased as NaCl concentration increased in the nutrient solution. At 75mM NaCl root biomass was not affected by salinity and RGR reached similar values to control plants at the end of the experiment. At this salinity level henna plant responded to salinity decreasing shoot to root ratio, increasing leaf specific mass (LSM) and intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE), and accumulating high concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) in leaves and root. At 150mM NaCl growth was severely reduced but plants reached the reproductive phase. At this salinity level, no further decrease in shoot to root ratio or increase in LSM was observed, but plants increased iWUE, maintaining water status and leaf and root Na(+) and Cl(-) concentrations were lower than expected. Moreover, plants at 150mM NaCl reallocated carbon to the root at the expense of the shoot. The effective PSII quantum yield [Y(II)] and the quantum yield of non-regulated energy dissipation [Y(NO)] were recovered over time of exposure to salinity. Overall, iWUE seems to be determinant in the adaptation of henna plant to high salinity level, when morphological adaptation fails.

  18. Characterization of Antileishmanial Compounds from Lawsonia inermis L. Leaves Using Semi-High Resolution Antileishmanial Profiling Combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Kashif; Iqbal, Javeid; Staerk, Dan; Kongstad, Kenneth T.

    2017-01-01

    This work describes an analytical platform based on semi-high-resolution antileishmanial profiling combined with hyphenation of high-performance liquid chromatography – high-resolution mass spectrometry – solid-phase extraction – nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, i.e., semiHR-antileishmanial assay/HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR. The platform enables fast pinpointing of HPLC peaks representing Leishmania tropica inhibitors in complex matrices, with subsequent structural identification of targeted inhibitors. Active analytes were cumulatively trapped on SPE cartridges and the structures elucidated by analysis of NMR spectra obtained in the HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR mode. This led to the identification of six known compounds 2,4,6-trihydroxyacetophenone-2-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (1), lalioside (2), luteolin-4′-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (3), apigenin-4′-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (4), luteolin (5), and apigenin (6). IC50 of the active compounds were determined with luteolin being the most potent inhibitor with an IC50 value of 4.15 μg/ml. The platform proved to be an efficient method for the identification of L. tropica inhibitors. PMID:28620306

  19. Batch medication of intestinal infections in nursery pigs-A randomised clinical trial on the efficacy of treatment strategy, type of antibiotic and bacterial load on average daily weight gain.

    PubMed

    Weber, Nicolai Rosager; Pedersen, Ken Steen; Hansen, Christian Fink; Denwood, Matthew; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Nielsen, Jens Peter

    2017-02-01

    Previous research projects have demonstrated the need for better diagnostic tools to support decisions on medication strategies for infections caused by Escherichia coli F4 (F4) and F18 (F18), Lawsonia intracellularis (LI) and Brachyspira pilosicoli (PILO). This study was carried out as a randomised clinical trial in three Danish pig herds and included 1047 nursery pigs, distributed over 10 batches and 78 pens. The objectives of this study were: (1) to assess the effect of four 5-day treatment strategies (initiated at clinical outbreak of diarrhoea or at fixed time points 14, 21, or 28days after weaning) on average daily weight gain (ADG); (2) to compare the effect of treatment with doxycycline or tylosine on diarrhoea prevalence, pathogenic bacterial load, and ADG; (3) to evaluate PCR testing of faecal pen floor samples as a diagnostic tool for determining the optimal time of treatment. (1) The four treatment strategies had a significant overall effect on ADG (p=0.01). Pigs starting treatment 14days after weaning had a significantly higher ADG (42 g) compared to pigs treated on day 28 (p=0.01). (2) When measured 2days after treatment, doxycycline treatment resulted in fewer LI-positive pens (p=0.004), lower excretion levels of LI (p=0.013), and fewer pens with a high level of LI (p=0.031) compared to pens treated with tylosine. There was no significant difference in F4, F18 and PILO levels after treatment with the two antibiotic compounds. There was a significant difference (p=0.04) of mean diarrhoea prevalence on day 21 of the study between pens treated with tylosine (0.254, 95% CI: 0.184-0.324), and doxycycline (0.167, 95% CI: 0.124-0.210). The type of antibiotic compound was not found to have a significant effect on ADG (p=0.209). (3) Pigs starting treatment on day 14 in pens where F4, F18, LI or PILO were detected by qPCR on the pen floor had a statistically significant increase in ADG (66g) compared to pigs treated on day 14 in pens where no enteric pathogens

  20. Effect of feeding sodium butyrate in the late finishing period on Salmonella carriage, seroprevalence, and growth of finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Walia, Kavita; Argüello, Hector; Lynch, Helen; Leonard, Finola C; Grant, Jim; Yearsley, Dermot; Kelly, Sinead; Duffy, Geraldine; Gardiner, Gillian E; Lawlor, Peadar G

    2016-09-01

    Pork is an important source of human salmonellosis and low-cost on-farm control measures may provide a useful element in reducing the prevalence of this pathogen in food. This study investigated the effectiveness of dietary supplementation with sodium butyrate administered to finisher pigs for ∼4-weeks prior to slaughter to control Salmonella shedding on highly contaminated farms. Two trials (A and B) were conducted on two commercial pig farms, which had a history of high Salmonella seroprevalence. In both trials, pens (14 pens of 12 pigs/pen in Trial A and 12 pens of 12-17 pigs/pen in Trial B) were randomly assigned to a control (finisher feed without additive) or a treatment group (the same feed with 3kg sodium butyrate/t) for 24-28days, depending on the trial. Faeces were collected from each pig on days 0, 12 and 24/28, and blood, caecal digesta and ileocaecal/mesenteric lymph nodes were collected from the slaughterhouse. Pigs were weighed at the start and end of the trials, feed intake was recorded, and carcass quality parameters were recorded at slaughter. In Trial A, Salmonella shedding was reduced in the treatment compared to the control group at the end of the trial (30% versus 57% probability of detecting Salmonella in faeces, respectively; p<0.001). This reflected the serology results, with detection of a lower seroprevalence in the treatment compared to the control group using the 20% optical density cut-off (69.5% versus 89%; p=0.001). However, no effect on faecal shedding or seroprevalance was observed in Trial B, which may be explained by the detection of a concomitant infection with Lawsonia intracellularis. No significant differences in Salmonella recovery rates were observed in the caecal digesta or lymph nodes in either trial. Furthermore, feed intake, weight gain, and feed conversion efficiency (FCE) did not differ between groups (p>0.05) in either trial. Numerical improvements in weight gain and FCE were found with sodium butyrate treatment

  1. Effector prediction in host-pathogen interaction based on a Markov model of a ubiquitous EPIYA motif

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Effector secretion is a common strategy of pathogen in mediating host-pathogen interaction. Eight EPIYA-motif containing effectors have recently been discovered in six pathogens. Once these effectors enter host cells through type III/IV secretion systems (T3SS/T4SS), tyrosine in the EPIYA motif is phosphorylated, which triggers effectors binding other proteins to manipulate host-cell functions. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the distribution pattern of EPIYA motif in broad biological species, to predict potential effectors with EPIYA motif, and to suggest roles and biological functions of potential effectors in host-pathogen interactions. Results A hidden Markov model (HMM) of five amino acids was built for the EPIYA-motif based on the eight known effectors. Using this HMM to search the non-redundant protein database containing 9,216,047 sequences, we obtained 107,231 sequences with at least one EPIYA motif occurrence and 3115 sequences with multiple repeats of the EPIYA motif. Although the EPIYA motif exists among broad species, it is significantly over-represented in some particular groups of species. For those proteins containing at least four copies of EPIYA motif, most of them are from intracellular bacteria, extracellular bacteria with T3SS or T4SS or intracellular protozoan parasites. By combining the EPIYA motif and the adjacent SH2 binding motifs (KK, R4, Tarp and Tir), we built HMMs of nine amino acids and predicted many potential effectors in bacteria and protista by the HMMs. Some potential effectors for pathogens (such as Lawsonia intracellularis, Plasmodium falciparum and Leishmania major) are suggested. Conclusions Our study indicates that the EPIYA motif may be a ubiquitous functional site for effectors that play an important pathogenicity role in mediating host-pathogen interactions. We suggest that some intracellular protozoan parasites could secrete EPIYA-motif containing effectors through secretion systems similar to the

  2. No Clear Effect of Initiating Vaccination against Common Endemic Infections on the Amounts of Prescribed Antimicrobials for Danish Weaner and Finishing Pigs during 2007–2013

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Amanda Brinch; de Knegt, Leonardo Víctor; Nielsen, Liza Rosenbaum; Alban, Lis

    2017-01-01

    It is often stated that vaccines may help reduce antimicrobial use in swine production. However, limited evidence is available outside clinical trials. We studied the change in amounts of antimicrobials prescribed for weaners and finishers in herds following initiation of vaccination against five common endemic infections: Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, porcine circovirus type II, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and Lawsonia intracellularis. Comparison was made to the change after a randomly selected date in herds not vaccinating against each of the infections. Danish sow herds initiating vaccination during 2007–2013 were included (69–334 herds, depending on the analysis). Danish sow herds with no use of the vaccine in question were included as non-exposed herds (130–570 herds, depending on the analysis). Antimicrobial prescriptions for weaners in sow herds and for finishers in receiving herds were extracted from the VetStat database for a period of 12 months before and 6–18 months after the first purchase of vaccine, or random date and quantified as average animal daily doses (ADDs) per 100 animals per day. The herd-level difference between ADD in the period after and before vaccination was the outcome in linear regression models for weaner pigs, and linear mixed-effects models for finishing pigs, taking into account sow herds delivering pigs to two or more finisher herds. Three plausible risk factors (Baseline ADD, purchase of specific vaccine, purchase of other vaccines) and five confounders (herd size, export and herd health status, year and season) were initially considered in all 10 models. The main significant effect in all models was the Baseline ADD; the higher the Baseline ADD was for weaner and finishing pigs, the larger the decrease in ADD was following vaccination (or random date for non-vaccinating herds). Regardless of vaccination status, almost equal proportions of herds experienced a

  3. 21 CFR 558.600 - Tiamulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dysentery associated with Brachyspira (formerly Serpulina or Treponema) hyodysenteriae susceptible to tiamulin Feed continuously as sole ration on premises with a history of swine dysentery but where signs of... Pasteurella multocida susceptible to chlortetracycline, and control of swine dysentery associated with...

  4. 21 CFR 558.600 - Tiamulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dysentery associated with Brachyspira (formerly Serpulina or Treponema) hyodysenteriae susceptible to tiamulin Feed continuously as sole ration on premises with a history of swine dysentery but where signs of... Pasteurella multocida susceptible to chlortetracycline, and control of swine dysentery associated with...

  5. Effect of Tetracycline Dose and Treatment Mode on Selection of Resistant Coliform Bacteria in Nursery Pigs.

    PubMed

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Damborg, Peter; Mellerup, Anders; Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Larsen, Inge; Holm, Anders; Nielsen, Jens Peter; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Angen, Øystein; Ahmed, Shahana; Folkesson, Anders; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2017-06-15

    This study describes the results of a randomized clinical trial investigating the effect of oxytetracycline treatment dose and mode of administration on the selection of antibiotic-resistant coliform bacteria in fecal samples from nursery pigs. Nursery pigs (pigs of 4 to 7 weeks of age) in five pig herds were treated with oxytetracycline for Lawsonia intracellularis-induced diarrhea. Each group was randomly allocated to one of five treatment groups: oral flock treatment with a (i) high (20 mg/kg of body weight), (ii) medium (10 mg/kg), or (iii) low (5 mg/kg) dose, (iv) oral pen-wise (small-group) treatment (10 mg/kg), and (v) individual intramuscular injection treatment (10 mg/kg). All groups were treated once a day for 5 days. In all groups, treatment caused a rise in the numbers and proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliform bacteria right after treatment, followed by a significant drop by the time that the pigs left the nursery unit. The counts and proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliforms did not vary significantly between treatment groups, except immediately after treatment, when the highest treatment dose resulted in the highest number of resistant coliforms. A control group treated with tiamulin did not show significant changes in the numbers or proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliforms. Selection for tetracycline-resistant coliforms was significantly correlated to selection for ampicillin- and sulfonamide-resistant strains but not to selection for cefotaxime-resistant strains. In conclusion, the difference in the dose of oxytetracycline and the way in which the drug was applied did not cause significantly different levels of selection of tetracycline-resistant coliform bacteria under the conditions tested.IMPORTANCE Antimicrobial resistance is a global threat to human health. Treatment of livestock with antimicrobials has a direct impact on this problem, and there is a need to improve the ways that we use antimicrobials in livestock

  6. Clinical utility and performance of sock sampling in weaner pig diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Ken Steen; Okholm, Elisabeth; Johansen, Markku; Angen, Øystein; Jorsal, Sven Erik; Nielsen, Jens Peter; Bækbo, Poul

    2015-07-01

    Low pathogen diarrhoea is a group-level diagnosis, characterised by non-haemorrhagic diarrhoea. In the current study, the apparent prevalence of low pathogen diarrhoea outbreaks in Danish herds was investigated along with the clinical utility of a laboratory examination for intestinal disease, agreement between three consecutive herd examinations from the same herd and agreement between quantitative PCR results from pooled faecal samples and sock samples. Twenty-four veterinarians submitted faecal and sock samples for quantitative PCR testing from outbreaks of diarrhoea in nursery pigs (n=38 herds) where the farmer or veterinarian had decided that antimicrobial treatment was necessary. The veterinarians were asked to fill in a questionnaire and participate in telephone interviews. The apparent prevalence of low pathogen diarrhoea was 0.18 (95% CL: 0.08-0.34). Agreement between the veterinarians' clinical aetiological diagnosis and the pooled faecal sample was 0.18 (95% CL: 0.08-0.34), and Cohen's Kappa was 0.03 (95% CL: -0.08 to 0.14). Antibiotic treatment or prevention strategies were changed in 0.63 (95% CL: 0.46-0.78) of the herds, and the veterinarians indicated that, for 0.32 (95% CL: 0.18-0.50) of the herds, changes were related to the diagnostic results from the laboratory examination performed in the study. In 0.16 (95% CL: 0.05-0.36) of the herds, the same infections were demonstrated at all three consecutive examinations. No herds had three consecutive diarrhoea outbreaks classified as low pathogen diarrhoea. For the quantitative results (log10 of the summed amounts of Lawsonia intracellularis, Brachyspira pilosicoli, Escherichia coli F4 and F18) agreement between pooled faecal samples and sock samples was evaluated. Lin's concordance correlation coefficient was 0.69 (95% CL: 0.48-0.82), and the mean difference between the two types of samples was -0.38 log10 bacteria/g faeces (SD=1.59log10 bacteria/g faeces; 95% CI: -0.90 to 0.14log10 bacteria/g faeces

  7. The prevalence of swine enteropathogens in Brazilian grower and finish herds.

    PubMed

    Viott, A M; Lage, A P; Cruz, E C C; Guedes, R M C

    2013-05-17

    Diarrhoea among growing and finishing pigs is an important problem in many herds. The prevalence of L. intracellularis, B. pilosicoli, B. hyodysenteriae, Salmonella spp., enterotoxigenic E. coli, Trichuris suis and the occurrence of mixed infection were investigated. Fecal samples for forty-six herds with diarrhea or a history of diarrhea were randomly collected in Minas Gerais state, Brazil. The enteric pathogens were detected by culture (E. coli and Salmonella sp.), PCR (L. intracellularis and Brachyspira spp.) and eggs counts (T. suis). The overall herd prevalence of L. intracellularis, Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium and enterotoxigenic E. coli were 19.56%, 6.52%, 10.86% respectively. Mixed infection was diagnosed in 30.43% of herds, and L. intracellularis and Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium are main pathogens association (10.87%). B. pilosicoli was diagnosed only in two herds, always associated with mixed infections. B. hyodysenteriae and T. suis were not demonstrated in any sample. These pathogens have been reported world-wide but studies regarding epidemiology in Brazil are few. This study contributes to establish of prevention programs for the control enteropathogens in grower finish herds in Brazil.

  8. The prevalence of swine enteropathogens in Brazilian grower and finish herds

    PubMed Central

    Viott, A.M.; Lage, A.P.; Cruz, E.C.C.; Guedes, R.M.C.

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhoea among growing and finishing pigs is an important problem in many herds. The prevalence of L. intracellularis, B. pilosicoli, B. hyodysenteriae, Salmonella spp., enterotoxigenic E. coli, Trichuris suis and the occurrence of mixed infection were investigated. Fecal samples for forty-six herds with diarrhea or a history of diarrhea were randomly collected in Minas Gerais state, Brazil. The enteric pathogens were detected by culture (E. coli and Salmonella sp.), PCR (L. intracellularis and Brachyspira spp.) and eggs counts (T. suis). The overall herd prevalence of L. intracellularis, Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium and enterotoxigenic E. coli were 19.56%, 6.52%, 10.86% respectively. Mixed infection was diagnosed in 30.43% of herds, and L. intracellularis and Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium are main pathogens association (10.87%). B. pilosicoli was diagnosed only in two herds, always associated with mixed infections. B. hyodysenteriae and T. suis were not demonstrated in any sample. These pathogens have been reported world-wide but studies regarding epidemiology in Brazil are few. This study contributes to establish of prevention programs for the control enteropathogens in grower finish herds in Brazil. PMID:24159297

  9. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of intestinal spirochetes colonizing chickens and allocation of known pathogenic isolates to three distinct genetic groups.

    PubMed

    McLaren, A J; Trott, D J; Swayne, D E; Oxberry, S L; Hampson, D J

    1997-02-01

    Infection with intestinal spirochetes has recently been recognized as a cause of lost production in the poultry industry. Little is known about these organisms, so a collection of 56 isolates originating from chickens in commercial flocks in Australia, the United States, The Netherlands, and the United Kingdom was examined. Strength of beta-hemolysis on blood agar, indole production, API ZYM enzyme profiles, and cellular morphology were determined, and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis was used to analyze the extent of genetic diversity among the isolates. The results were compared with those previously obtained for well-characterized porcine intestinal spirochetes. The chicken isolates were genetically heterogeneous. They were divided into 40 electrophoretic types distributed among six diverse genetic groups (groups b to g), with a mean genetic diversity of 0.587. Strains in two groups (groups d and e) may represent new species of Serpulina, and the groups contained only strains isolated from chickens. Three genetic groups contained isolates previously shown to be pathogenic for chickens. These corresponded to the proposed species "Serpulina intermedius," to an unnamed group (group e), and to Serpulina pilosicoli. Two of the chicken isolates (one "S. intermedius" and one S. pilosicoli isolate) were strongly beta-hemolytic, two (both "S. intermedius") had an intermediate level of beta-hemolysis, and the rest were weakly beta-hemolytic. Fourteen isolates of "S. intermedius" produced indole, as did one isolate from group d. Isolates identified as S. pilosicoli resembled porcine isolates of this species, having four to six periplasmic flagella inserted subterminally in a single row at each end of the cell, and had tapered cell ends. All other spirochetes were morphologically similar, having seven or more periplasmic flagella and blunt cell ends. The identification of three genetic groups containing pathogenic isolates provides an opportunity for more detailed

  10. PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROFILE OF SOME COLOURING PLANTS USED IN HOMOEOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, P.; Sunilkumar

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this paper deal with the physico chemical aspects of certain colouring plants namely. Bixa orellana Linn. (Leaves) and Lawsonia inermis Linn (Leaves). The determined data under the physico chemical, chromatographic and spectrophotometric studies can be taken as a pharmacopoeial standards. PMID:22557040

  11. alpha-Glucosidase inhibitory activity of Mangifera indica bark.

    PubMed

    Prashanth, D; Amit, A; Samiulla, D S; Asha, M K; Padmaja, R

    2001-08-01

    The ethanolic extracts of Lawsonia inermis leaves, Holarrhena antidysenterica bark, Swertia chirata whole plant and Mangifera indica bark were tested (in-vitro) for alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity. M. indica extract was found to be the most potent, with an IC(50) value of 314 microg/ml.

  12. Antioxidant and immunomodulatory constituents of henna leaves.

    PubMed

    Mikhaeil, Botros R; Badria, Farid A; Maatooq, Galal T; Amer, Mohamed M A

    2004-01-01

    The immunomodulatory bioassay-guided fractionation of the methanolic extract of henna (Lawsonia inermis L.; syn. Lawsonia alba L.) leaves resulted in the isolation of seven compounds; three have been isolated for the first time from the genus, namely p-coumaric acid, 2-methoxy-3-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone and apiin, along with the previously isolated compounds: lawsone, apigenin, luteolin, and cosmosiin. Structural elucidation of the isolated compounds was based upon their physical, chemical as well as spectroscopic characters. Their immuomodulatory profile was studied using an in vitro immunoassay, the lymphocyte transformation assay. The ABTS [2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethyl benzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)], free radical scavenging assay depicted that all isolated compounds exhibited antioxidant activity comparable to that of ascorbic acid.

  13. Complete genome sequence of Brachyspira murdochii type strain (56-150T)

    PubMed Central

    Pati, Amrita; Sikorski, Johannes; Gronow, Sabine; Munk, Christine; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Tio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Bruce, David; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Spring, Stefan; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Brachyspira murdochii Stanton et al. 1992 is a non-pathogenic, host-associated spirochete of the family Brachyspiraceae. Initially isolated from the intestinal content of a healthy swine, the ‘group B spirochaetes’ were first described as Serpulina murdochii. Members of the family Brachyspiraceae are of great phylogenetic interest because of the extremely isolated location of this family within the phylum ‘Spirochaetes’. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a type strain of a member of the family Brachyspiraceae and only the second genome sequence from a member of the genus Brachyspira. The 3,241,804 bp long genome with its 2,893 protein-coding and 40 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304710

  14. A Comparative Antimicrobial Study on the Essential Oil of the Leaves of Various Species of Cupressus

    PubMed Central

    Manivannan, R.; Kumar, M. Senthil; Jawahar, N.; Ganesh, E. Sai; Jubie, S.

    2005-01-01

    The essential oil of leaves of various cupressus species Viz., C.glauca, C.funebris, C.lawsonia, C. macrocarpa & C. sempervirens have been studied for their antimicrobial activity against certain gram positive [B. substilis, S.aureus], gram negative [E.coli, P.aeruginesa] and fungi (A.niger, A.flavus, C.albicans & A. fumigatus) using two fold serial dilution technique. Our results revealed that, all the species possess significant antibacterial & antifungal activities. PMID:22557167

  15. Prooxidant/antioxidant ratio (ProAntidex) as a better index of net free radical scavenging potential.

    PubMed

    Ling, Lai Teng; Palanisamy, Uma D; Cheng, Hwee Ming

    2010-11-03

    The antioxidant activity of several Malaysian plant extracts was analyzed simultaneously with their pro-oxidant capacity. This ratio represents an index (ProAntidex) of the net free radical scavenging ability of whole plant extracts. We observed that ethanolic extracts of Nephelium lappaceum peel, Fragaria x ananassa leaf, Lawsonia inermis leaf, Syzygium aqueum leaf and grape seed had a lower Pro-Antidex than the commercially available Emblica™ extract which is an antioxidant agent with very low pro-oxidant activity. Among the aqueous extracts, Lawsonia inermis leaf, Nephelium mutobile leaf and grape seed had lower pro-oxidant activity compared to the Emblica™ extract. Among these extracts, aqueous extract of Nephelium mutobile leaf had a very low index of 0.05 compared to 0.69 for Emblica™. Most of the extracts had a far lower ProAntidex compared to the Vitamin C. The index enables us to identify extracts with high net free radical scavenging activity potential. The ProAntidex is beneficial as a screening parameter to the food industries and healthcare.

  16. Urticaria and angioneurotic edema due to the temporary henna tattoo.

    PubMed

    Gulen, F; Zeyrek, D; Altinoz, S; Peker, E; Demir, E; Tanac, R

    2006-12-01

    Temporary henna tattoo, which has become popular among young people, is obtained from the mixture of the plants Lawsonia alba or Lawsonia inermis and paraphenylenediamine (PPD). In forming reactions frequent development of anti-PPD substance is noticed. A 13-year old boy who started itching, erythema, enduration on the application area, increasingly urticarial rash, conjunctivitis and swelling of the lips 48 h after being applied the temporary henna tattoo was hospitalized. He had a local reaction to henna tattoo when he was 5-year old. He was treated with parenteral corticosteroids and oral antihistaminic drugs. Skin reactions persisted for 18 days. The patient showed no early reaction to henna 10% and PPD 1% concentration in saline solution but did late reaction (after 48 h) to PPD in diameter of 12x13 mm in prick test in 3 weeks after the reaction. A case who developed angioneurotic edema and urticaria to temporary henna tattoo noticed that the henna tattoo is not an innocent application and young people need to be informed on this subject.

  17. Intestinal spirochete infections of chickens: a review of disease associations, epidemiology and control.

    PubMed

    Stephens, C P; Hampson, D J

    2001-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of intestinal spirochete infections of chickens. It focuses particularly on studies in Australia, where recent surveys of 136 layer and broiler breeder flocks have revealed a high rate of infection (>40%) with intestinal spirochetes. Infection was not detected in broiler flocks. Approximately 50% of isolates from infected flocks were Brachyspira (Serpulina) intermedia or B. pilosicoli, with the other isolates being B. innocens, B. murdochii or the proposed species 'B. pulli'. No isolates of B. alvinipulli were found. Intestinal spirochetes were significantly associated with wet litter problems and/or reduced egg production. Experimental infection of point-of-lay birds with either B. intermedia or B. pilosicoli caused reduced egg production, and, with B. intermedia, a significant increase in fecal moisture content. Infection with B. innocens caused no significant changes. In-water treatment of a flock with a mixed spirochete infection using lincospectin resulted in a slimy diarrhea lasting for 2-3 weeks, followed by absence of spirochetes for 3 months. Birds treated with tiamulin remained healthy, and had a reduced level of infection with intestinal spirochetes (30%) for 3 months. Trials are under way to test the efficacy of antimicrobials in point-of-lay chickens experimentally infected with either B. intermedia or B. pilosicoli.

  18. Summer surface waters in the Gulf of California: Prime habitat for biological N2 fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Angelicque E.; Prahl, Fredrick G.; Letelier, Ricardo M.; Popp, Brian N.

    2007-06-01

    We report significant rates of dinitrogen (N2) fixation in the central basins of the Gulf of California (GC) during July-August 2005. Mixing model estimates based upon δ15N values of particulate matter in the surface mixed layer indicate that N2 fixation provides as much as 35% to 48% of the phytoplankton-based nitrogen demand in the central Guaymas and Carmen basins. Microscopic analyses identify the responsible genera as the N2-fixing endosymbiont, Richelia intracellularis, with lesser contributions from the large nonheterocystous diazotroph Trichodesmium. Analyses of remotely sensed chlorophyll a and sea surface temperature indicate that primary production levels are elevated in regions of the GC where oceanographic conditions are ideal in summertime for the growth of N2-fixing organisms. These findings suggest that biological N2 fixation must be taken into account when assessing past and present nitrogen dynamics in this environmentally important region.

  19. Intra-amoeba multiplication induces chemotaxis and biofilm colonization and formation for Legionella.

    PubMed

    Bigot, Renaud; Bertaux, Joanne; Frere, Jacques; Berjeaud, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, a facultative intracellular bacterium, is the causative agent of legionellosis. In the environment this pathogenic bacterium colonizes the biofilms as well as amoebae, which provide a rich environment for the replication of Legionella. When seeded on pre-formed biofilms, L. pneumophila was able to establish and survive and was only found at the surface of the biofilms. Different phenotypes were observed when the L. pneumophila, used to implement pre-formed biofilms or to form mono-species biofilms, were cultivated in a laboratory culture broth or had grown intracellulary within the amoeba. Indeed, the bacteria, which developed within the amoeba, formed clusters when deposited on a solid surface. Moreover, our results demonstrate that multiplication inside the amoeba increased the capacity of L. pneumophila to produce polysaccharides and therefore enhanced its capacity to establish biofilms. Finally, it was shown that the clusters formed by L. pneumophila were probably related to the secretion of a chemotaxis molecular agent.

  20. Major Role of the Cyanobacterium Trichodesmium in Nutrient Cycling in the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Edward J.; Romans, Kristen

    1991-11-01

    The diazotrophic cyanobacterium Trichodesmium is a large (about 0.5 by 3 millimeters) phytoplankter that is common in tropical open-ocean waters. Measurements of abundance, plus a review of earlier observations, indicate that it, rather than the picophytoplankton, is the most important primary producer (about 165 milligrams of carbon per square meter per day) in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean. Furthermore, nitrogen fixation by Trichodesmium introduces the largest fraction of new nitrogen to the euphotic zone, approximately 30 milligrams of nitrogen per square meter per day, a value exceeding the estimated flux of nitrate across the thermocline. Inclusion of this organism, plus the abundant diazotrophic endosymbiont Richelia intracellularis that is present in some large diatoms, in biogeochemical studies of carbon and nitrogen may help explain the disparity between various methods of measuring productivity in the oligotrophic ocean. Carbon and nitrogen fixation by these large phytoplankters also introduces a new paradigm in the biogeochemistry of these elements in the sea.

  1. In vivo effects of nickel and cadmium in rats on lipid peroxidation and ceruloplasmin activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sole, J.; Huguet, J.; Arola, L.; Romeu, A. )

    1990-05-01

    Before Ni(II) and Cd(II), or any other metallic ion, can interact intracellulary, it must penetrate the cell membrane. The latter, therefore, is a primary target for toxic metals. Damage to cell membranes may allow a greater uptake of metal and thus injury may extend to more critical targets, although loss of plasmatic membrane functionality may be a crucial factor to explain the interactions of these metals with cellular components. In this sense the present study has been carried out. Factors that have been investigated in order to prove the membrane response of nickel and cadmium toxicity include lipid peroxidation, since divalent ions of transition metals can promote lipid peroxidation and this evidently contributes to the toxicity of certain metals and to metal interaction with ceruloplasmin, as its ferroxidase and scavenger of superoxide radicals activities are important protective mechanisms in vivo against peroxidative damage.

  2. Allergic contact dermatitis to para-phenylenediamine in a tattoo: a case report.

    PubMed

    Turan, Hakan; Okur, Mesut; Kaya, Ertugrul; Gun, Emrah; Aliagaoglu, Cihangir

    2013-06-01

    It is highly popular among children and young adults to have temporary henna tattoos on their bodies in different colors and figures. Henna is a greenish natural powder obtained from the flowers and dry leaves of Lawsonia alba plant and its allergenicity is very low. Henna is also used in combination with other coloring substances such as para-phenylenediamine in order to darken the color and create a permanent tattoo effect. Para-phenylenediamine is a substance with high allergenicity potential and may cause serious allergic reactions. Here, we aimed to draw attention to the potential harms of para-phenylenediamine containing temporary tattoos by presenting a child patient who developed allergic contact dermatitis after having a scorpion-shaped temporary tattoo on his forearm.

  3. Anna Pavala Sindhooram--an antiatherosclerotic Indian drug.

    PubMed

    Shanmugasundaram, K R; Seethapathy, P G; Shanmugasundaram, E R

    1983-05-01

    The procedure for the preparation of Anna Pavala Sindhooram (APS), a drug based on the concepts of Indian medicine for the prevention and reversal of the atherosclerotic disease process is described in detail. The uniformity in the composition of samples of the drug obtained in 10 batches, prepared over a period of 5 years is evident from the chemical analysis of the mineral constituents. The possibility of iodine, copper, iron, calcium and magnesium present in the Anna Pavala Sindhooram, acting metabolically to reduce hypercholesterolemia is discussed. The ingredients used are green vitriol (Annabedi or ferrous sulphate), coral reef (Corallium rubrum or Pavalam), leaves of Acalypha indica (Kuppaimeni), Lippia nodiflora (Poduthalai), Vinca rosea (Nityakalyani), Lawsonia alba (maruthondri) and Cynodon dactylon (Arugampul) and the flowers of Hibiscus rosasinensis (Chemparathampoo) and the ripe fruits of Phyllanthus emblica (nellikkai). Sindhooram is the chief therapeutic form of herbo-mineral preparations used in the Sidha system of Indian medicine.

  4. Occurrence of pathogens in wild rodents caught on Swedish pig and chicken farms.

    PubMed

    Backhans, A; Jacobson, M; Hansson, I; Lebbad, M; Lambertz, S Thisted; Gammelgård, E; Saager, M; Akande, O; Fellström, C

    2013-09-01

    A total of 207 wild rodents were caught on nine pig farms, five chicken farms and five non-farm locations in Sweden and surveyed for a selection of bacteria, parasites and viruses. Lawsonia intracellularia and pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica were only detected in rodents on pig farms (9% and 8% prevalence, respectively) which indicate that these agents are more likely to be transmitted to rodents from pigs or the environment on infected farms. Brachyspira hyodysenteriae (1%), Brachyspira intermedia (2%), Campylobacter jejuni (4%), Campylobacter upsaliensis (2%), leptospires (7%) and encephalomyocarditis virus (9%) were also detected from rodents not in contact with farm animals. Giardia and Cryptosporidium spp. were common, although no zoonotic types were verified, and Salmonella enterica was isolated from 1/11 mice on one farm but not detected by PCR from any of the rodents. Trichinella spp. and Toxoplasma gondii were not detected.

  5. [Temporary tatooing: black henna or harkous?].

    PubMed

    Kharfi, M; El Fekih, N; Zayan, F; Mrad, S; Kamoun, M R

    2009-10-01

    Contact sensitization to natural henna (Lawsonia inermis) long used as a skin dye in powder or paste form has rarely, if ever, been observed. Recently a number of anaphylactoid reactions to PPD contained in paints used for temporary tattoos have been described. The purpose of this article is to present 8 cases involving 4 children and 4 adults who developed contact dermatitis after temporary tattoo using "harkous" that contains no henna. The authors review the literature about temporary tattooing. "Harkous" is a mixture of nut gall and clove to which PPD is sometimes added. Many reports have described cases of contact dermatitis due to "black henna". Most of these cases have involved tourists returning from trips.

  6. Acute renal failure and intravascular hemolysis following henna ingestion.

    PubMed

    Qurashi, Hala E A; Qumqumji, Abbas A A; Zacharia, Yasir

    2013-05-01

    The powder of henna plant (Lawsonia inermis Linn.) is extensively used as a decorative skin paint for nail coloring and as a hair dye. Most reports of henna toxicity have been attributed to adding a synthetic dye para-phenylenediamine (PPD). PPD is marketed as black henna added to natural henna to accentuate the dark color and shorten the application time. PPD toxicity is well known and extensively reported in medical literature. We report a case of a young Saudi male who presented with characteristic features of acute renal failure and intravascular hemolysis following ingestion of henna mixture. Management of PPD poisoning is only supportive and helpful only if instituted early. Diagnosis requires a high degree of clinical suspicion, as the clinical features are quite distinctive.

  7. Topical henna for capecitabine induced hand-foot syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Idris; Guzin, Gonullu

    2008-04-01

    Capecitabine is a chemotherapeutic drug for use in cancers. Hand-foot syndrome (HFS) is side effect of capecitabine which can lead the cessation of the therapy or dose reduction. Henna (Lawsonia inermis) is a traditionally used plant of Middle-East that is applied on hands and feet. Some of cancer patients in capecitabine treatment who developed HFS, we recommended to apply henna. In these patients, six patients were grade 3 HFS and four were grade 2 HFS. Complete response (CR) were seen in four of grade 3 HFS and all of grade 2; two grade 3 HFS improved to grade 1. So far, in the chemotherapy, there was no need of dose reduction and also no side effect of henna seen. Clinical improvement in these patients may relate to anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and analgesic effects of henna. Prospective studies are needed to show this therapeutic effect of henna.

  8. Allergic contact dermatitis to pure henna.

    PubMed

    Polat, Muhterem; Dikilitaş, Meltem; Oztaş, Pinar; Alli, Nuran

    2009-01-15

    Henna is a naturally occurring brown dye made from the leaves of the tree Lawsonia inermis. The active ingredient of henna is lawsone (2-hydroxy-1, 4-naphthoquinone). It is traditionally used in Islamic and Hindu cultures as a hair coloring and as a dye for decorating the nails or making temporary skin tattoos. Actually, henna has a very low allergic potential. In most cases, allergic reactions not caused by henna, but by the chemical coloring additives that are added to henna mixtures. These additives include agents such as daiminotoluenes and diaminobenzenes. In this article, we report a case of allergic contact dermatitis from pure henna that is also used for the relief of rheumatic pain.

  9. Allergic contact dermatitis from temporary henna tattoo.

    PubMed

    Jovanovic, Dragan L; Slavkovic-Jovanovic, Maja R

    2009-01-01

    Temporary henna tattooing has been very popular during recent years. Henna (Lawsonia inermis) is a plant from the Lythraceae family. For henna tattooing, henna dye is used. It is a dark green powder, made from the leaves of the plant, used for hair dyeing and body tattooing. Very often, para-phenylenediamine (PPD) is added to henna dye to make color blacker and to speed up dyeing. PPD may be a very potent contact sensitizer. We report a 9-year-old boy with allergic contact dermatitis due to temporary henna tattooing. Patch testing showed a positive reaction to PPD. After the treatment with topical corticosteroid and oral antihistamines, the lesion cleared with discrete residual hypopigmentation.

  10. A quantitative ethnobotanical survey of phytocosmetics used in the tropical island of Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Mahomoodally, M Fawzi; Ramjuttun, Poorneeka

    2016-12-04

    With a net turnover worth of £181 billion, the cosmetic industry is a leading worldwide business with a very lucrative future. Nonetheless, due to recent concerns regarding toxicity of synthetic cosmetics, herbal products have come into the limelight of cosmetology. The tropical island of Mauritius has a well-anchored diversity of indigenous plant species which are exploited for various purposes but no study has been designed to (i) quantitatively document, (ii) assess the effectiveness, and (iii) study the incidence of adverse effects and perception associated with the use of herbal products for cosmetic applications. Data was collected from herbal users via face-to-face interviews using semi-structured questionnaire. Quantitative ethnobotanical indices (fidelity level (FL), variety of use (VU) and relative frequency of citation (RFC)) were calculated. Twenty five herbs belonging to 21 families were recorded in use for 29 different cosmetics applications. Many of the documented species represented well-known plants, although we also recorded a few plants being exploited for new cosmetic applications. Plants with the highest RFC were Curcuma longa L. (0.45), Lawsonia inermis L. (0.42) and Aloe vera (L.) Burm.f. (0.42). A total of 8 plants were reported to score 100% with respect to the FL. Interestingly, Lawsonia inermis L. being the highly cited plant species showed a clear dominance as a popular phytocosmetic and which has also been extensively documented for its pharmacological properties. Moreover, it was found that 25% of the respondents experienced adverse effects; with pruritus (11%) being the most reported condition. It was also observed that participants perceived herbs/herbal products to be free from adverse effects. Most of the plants reported have been described in previous studies for their bioactive components which tend to justify their use as phytocosmetics. Further research should be geared to explore the potential of these plant products for the

  11. Chemical composition and inhibitory effects of water extract of Henna leaves on reactive oxygen species, DNA scission and proliferation of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish; Chandel, Madhu; Kaur, Paramjeet; Pandit, Kritika; Kaur, Varinder; Kaur, Sandeep; Kaur, Satwinderjeet

    2016-01-01

    From the centuries, Lawsonia inermis L. (Henna) is utilized in traditional health care system as a medicinal and cosmetic agent. The present study was intended to assess antiradical, DNA protective and antiproliferative activity of water extract of Lawsonia inermis L. leaves (W-LI). Antioxidant activity was estimated using various in vitro assays such as DPPH, ABTS, superoxide anion radical scavenging, FRAP, deoxyribose degradation and DNA protection assay. Growth inhibitory effects of W-LI were assessed using MTT assay against different cancer cell lines viz. HeLa, MCF-7, A549, C6 and COLO-205. From the results of antioxidant assays, it was found that W-LI quenched DPPH and ABTS cation radicals with IC50 value of 352.77 µg/ml and 380.87 µg/ml respectively. It demonstrated hydroxyl radical scavenging potential of 59.75 % at highest test dose of 1000 µg/ml in deoxyribose degradation assay. The results of FRAP assay showed that W-LI also possesses significant reducing activity. Extract inhibited hydroxyl radical induced pBR322 plasmid DNA strand scission, thus conferring DNA protection. Growth inhibition of various cancer cell lines was achieved to the varying extent on treatment with W-LI. Further, it was observed that activity was quite promising against colon cancer COLO-205 cells (GI50 121.03 µg/ml). HPLC profiling of W-LI revealed the presence of different polyphenolic compounds such as ellagic acid, catechin, quercetin, kaempferol etc. which might be contributing towards antioxidant and cytotoxic activity. The present study demonstrated that polyphenols rich W-LI extract from leaves of L. inermis possesses ability to inhibit oxidative radicals and cancer cells proliferation. PMID:28337113

  12. Antimicrobial Efficacy of Henna Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rubiay, Kathem K.; Jaber, Nawres N; Alrubaiy, Laith K.

    2008-01-01

    Lawsonia inermis (henna plant) has been used in herbal medicine for ages. However, the medical benefits of this plant have been discussed in only a few publications. In this study, the antibacterial effects of water, alcoholic and oily extracts of Lawsonia inermis leaves against bacterial cultures isolated from various skin diseases were investigated and compared with Tetracycline, Ampicillin, Gentamicin and Ciprofloxacin antibiotics. Cultures of Staphylococcus aureus Staphylococcus epidermidis (Co-agulase negative staphylococci or CONS), ß-hemolytic streptococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa species were obtained from 74 (35 females, 39 males) patients with different skin infections who attended the Dermatology outpatient clinic in Basra General Hospital. The bacterial isolates were treated with L. inermis extracts in vitro. Alcoholic and oily extracts were more effective than the water extract which had no effects using standard method of NCCL, 2000. Alcoholic extracts had the highest antibacterial activity with a MIC of 0.125-0.150 µg/ml against ß-hemolytic streptococci and against CONS was 0.125-175 µg/ml .Oily extracts had a MIC of 0.25-0.30 µg/ml against Staphylococcus epidermidis (cons). Both alcoholic and oily extracts had the same MIC (0.5 µg/ml) on Staphylococcus aureus. However, alcoholic extracts were more effective on Pseudomonas aeruginosa with a MIC of 0.5-0.57 µg/ml than oily extract (MIC of 0.20-0.28 µg/ml). However, there were no statically differences between the effects of oily and alcoholic henna extracts (p= 0.050). When comparing the extracts’ MICs with those of antibiotics, alcoholic extracts showed pronounced antibacterial effects against the isolated bacteria in vitro but oily extracts had much similar MICs to those of antibiotics and there are significant difference between effect of both extracts and antibiotics p>0.050. PMID:22334837

  13. Antimicrobial efficacy of henna extracts.

    PubMed

    Al-Rubiay, Kathem K; Jaber, Nawres N; Alrubaiy, Laith K

    2008-10-01

    Lawsonia inermis (henna plant) has been used in herbal medicine for ages. However, the medical benefits of this plant have been discussed in only a few publications. In this study, the antibacterial effects of water, alcoholic and oily extracts of Lawsonia inermis leaves against bacterial cultures isolated from various skin diseases were investigated and compared with Tetracycline, Ampicillin, Gentamicin and Ciprofloxacin antibiotics. Cultures of Staphylococcus aureus Staphylococcus epidermidis (Co-agulase negative staphylococci or CONS), ß-hemolytic streptococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa species were obtained from 74 (35 females, 39 males) patients with different skin infections who attended the Dermatology outpatient clinic in Basra General Hospital. The bacterial isolates were treated with L. inermis extracts in vitro. Alcoholic and oily extracts were more effective than the water extract which had no effects using standard method of NCCL, 2000.Alcoholic extracts had the highest antibacterial activity with a MIC of 0.125-0.150 µg/ml against ß-hemolytic streptococci and against CONS was 0.125-175 µg/ml .Oily extracts had a MIC of 0.25-0.30 µg/ml against Staphylococcus epidermidis (cons). Both alcoholic and oily extracts had the same MIC (0.5 µg/ml) on Staphylococcus aureus. However, alcoholic extracts were more effective on Pseudomonas aeruginosa with a MIC of 0.5-0.57 µg/ml than oily extract (MIC of 0.20-0.28 µg/ml). However, there were no statically differences between the effects of oily and alcoholic henna extracts (p= 0.050).When comparing the extracts' MICs with those of antibiotics, alcoholic extracts showed pronounced antibacterial effects against the isolated bacteria in vitro but oily extracts had much similar MICs to those of antibiotics and there are significant difference between effect of both extracts and antibiotics p>0.050.

  14. Diversity and distribution of diazotrophic communities in the South China Sea deep basin with mesoscale cyclonic eddy perturbations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Zhao, Zihao; Sun, Jun; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2011-12-01

    The South China Sea (SCS) is an oligotrophic subtropical marginal ocean with a deep basin and a permanently stratified central gyre. Upwelling and nitrogen fixation provide new nitrogen for primary production in the SCS. This study was aimed at an investigation of phylogenetic diversity and quantification of the diazotroph community in the SCS deep basin, which is characterized by frequent mesoscale eddies. The diazotroph community had a relatively low diversity but a distinct spatial heterogeneity of diversity in the SCS deep basin. The potential for nitrogen fixation consistently occurred during cyclonic eddies, although upwelling of nutrient-replete deep water might have alleviated nitrogen limitation in the SCS. However, diazotrophic proteobacteria were dominant, but neither Trichodesmium nor heterocystous cyanobacterial diatom symbionts. Quantitative PCR analysis using probe-primer sets developed in this study revealed that the nif H gene of the two dominant alpha- and gammaproteobacterial groups was at the highest abundance (up to 10(4) to 10(5)  copies L(-1) ). Trichodesmium thiebautii was detected with an average density of 10(2)  trichomes L(-1) in the euphotic waters, while Richelia intracellularis was observed sporadically under the microscope. The unicellular cyanobacterial groups A and B were not detected in our libraries. Our results suggested that diazotrophic proteobacteria were significant components potentially contributing to nitrogen fixation in this oligotrophic marginal ocean ecosystem.

  15. Novel Lipid Biomarkers for Past Oceanic N2 Fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bale, N. J.; Hopmans, E. C.; Villareal, T. A.; Zell, C. I.; Sinninghe Damsté, , J.; Schouten, S.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria play important roles in the biogeochemical cycles of aquatic systems. Both heterocystous and non-heterocystous N2-fixing cyanobacteria are symbiotic with marine diatoms and thrive in low nutrient environments. These associations are significant exporters of carbon to the deep-sea, but suitable tracers for reconstructing their importance in past environments are lacking. We recently analyzed the heterocyst glycolipids (HGs) of the heterocystous Richelia intracellularis symbiont of the marine diatoms Hemiaulus hauckii and H. membranaceus and found unique C5 glycolipids with C30-32 carbon chains, a structure different from the C6 glycolipids detected in freshwater heterocystous cyanobacteria. We developed a high performance liquid chromatography/ multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) method specific for trace analysis of long chain C5 HGs and applied it to suspended particulate matter (SPM) and surface sediment from the Amazon plume, a region known to harbor marine diatoms carrying heterocystous cyanobacteria as endosymbionts. C5 HGs were detected in both SPM and sediments demonstrating their biomarker potential. They were not detected in SPM or sediment from freshwater settings in the region. Rather, limnetic SPM and sediments contained C6 HGs which are established biomarkers for free-living heterocystous cyanobacteria. Glycolipids have been found preserved in sediments of up to 49 Ma old. Our development of the C5 biomarkers has the potential to improve our knowledge of the contribution of symbiotic cyanobacteria to the paleo-N-cycle.

  16. Hybrids of [TSAO-T]-[foscarnet]: The first conjugate of foscarnet with a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor through a labile covalent ester bond.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Sonsoles; Lobatón, Esther; De Clercq, Erik; Koontz, Dianna L; Mellors, John W; Balzarini, Jan; Camarasa, María-José

    2004-06-17

    This paper describes the first example of combination of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors such as TSAO derivatives and foscarnet (PFA) in a single molecule through a labile covalent ester bond. The essential criteria in the design of these hybrids [TSAO-T]-[PFA] was to explore if the conjugation of foscarnet with the highly lipophilic TSAO derivative may facilitate the penetration of the conjugates through the cell membrane and if the hybrids escape extracellular hydrolysis and regenerate the parent inhibitors intracellulary. Several [TSAO-T]-[PFA] conjugates proved markedly inhibitory to HIV-1. Some of them also showed potent activity against PFA-resistant HIV-1 strains but fewer had detectable inhibitory activity against TSAO-resistant HIV-1 strains. These results indicated a pivotal role of the TSAO component of the hybrid but not the PFA component in the activity of the conjugates. Moreover, stability studies of the [TSAO-T]-[PFA] conjugates demonstrated that the compounds were stable in PBS whereas some of the conjugates regenerated the parent inhibitors in extracts from CEM cells.

  17. Glycine Transporter Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomäus, Ingo; Milan-Lobo, Laura; Nicke, Annette; Dutertre, Sébastien; Hastrup, Hanne; Jha, Alok; Gether, Ulrik; Sitte, Harald H.; Betz, Heinrich; Eulenburg, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Different Na+/Cl−-dependent neurotransmitter transporters of the SLC6a family have been shown to form dimers or oligomers in both intracellular compartments and at the cell surface. In contrast, the glycine transporters (GlyTs) GlyT1 and -2 have been reported to exist as monomers in the plasma membrane based on hydrodynamic and native gel electrophoretic studies. Here, we used cysteine substitution and oxidative cross-linking to show that of GlyT1 and GlyT2 also form dimeric complexes within the plasma membrane. GlyT oligomerization at the cell surface was confirmed for both GlyT1 and GlyT2 by fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy. Endoglycosidase treatment and surface biotinylation further revealed that complex-glycosylated GlyTs form dimers located at the cell surface. Furthermore, substitution of tryptophan 469 of GlyT2 by an arginine generated a transporter deficient in dimerization that was retained intracellulary. Based on these results and GlyT structures modeled by using the crystal structure of the bacterial homolog LeuTAa, as a template, residues located within the extracellular loop 3 and at the beginning of transmembrane domain 6 are proposed to contribute to the dimerization interface of GlyTs. PMID:18252709

  18. Action spectra and chromatic mechanisms of cells in the median ocelli of dragonflies.

    PubMed

    Chappell, R L; DeVoe, R D

    1975-04-01

    Spectral sensitivities were recorded intracellulary in median ocelli of Anax junius, Aeschnatuberculifera, and Libellulapulcella. All cells had peak sensitivities at 360 and 500 nm while UV-blue+green cells found only in Anax had a third peak sensitivity at 440 nm. Ratios of UV-to-green sensitivities varied from cell to cell in each ocellus, but no UV-only or green-only cells were recorded. Half of the cells tested had a reverse Purkinje shift: They were more sensitive in the green at low illuminations but more sensitive in the UV at high illuminations; their intensity-response curves at 370 and 520 nm crossed but became parallel for large responses. Wave-lengths 420 nm and shorter elicited a family of low intensity-response curves with one slope; wavelengths 440 nm and longer elicities a family of curves with another slope. Orange-adapting lights selectively adapted sensitivity in the green, but UV-adapting lights had little selective effect. Amounts of log-selective adaptation were proportional to log orange-adapting intensity. It is concluded that two spectral mechanisms can be recorded from each cell, possibly by coupling of UV and green cells or possibly because each cell contains two visual pigments. Selective chromatic adaptations may provide the ocellus with a kind of "authomatic color control," while the reverse Purkinje shift could extend the ocellus' sensitivity to prevailing skylight.

  19. Action spectra and chromatic mechanisms of cells in the median ocelli of dragonflies

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Spectral sensitivities were recorded intracellulary in median ocelli of Anax junius, Aeschnatuberculifera, and Libellulapulcella. All cells had peak sensitivities at 360 and 500 nm while UV-blue+green cells found only in Anax had a third peak sensitivity at 440 nm. Ratios of UV-to- green sensitivities varied from cell to cell in each ocellus, but no UV- only or green-only cells were recorded. Half of the cells tested had a reverse Purkinje shift: They were more sensitive in the green at low illuminations but more sensitive in the UV at high illuminations; their intensity-response curves at 370 and 520 nm crossed but became parallel for large responses. Wave-lengths 420 nm and shorter elicited a family of low intensity-response curves with one slope; wavelengths 440 nm and longer elicities a family of curves with another slope. Orange-adapting lights selectively adapted sensitivity in the green, but UV-adapting lights had little selective effect. Amounts of log-selective adaptation were proportional to log orange-adapting intensity. It is concluded that two spectral mechanisms can be recorded from each cell, possibly by coupling of UV and green cells or possibly because each cell contains two visual pigments. Selective chromatic adaptations may provide the ocellus with a kind of "authomatic color control," while the reverse Purkinje shift could extend the ocellus' sensitivity to prevailing skylight. PMID:1151320

  20. Cloning and Expression of Gumboro VP2 Antigen in Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Mohammad; Yakhchali, Bagher; Ghamarian, Abdolreza; Enayati, Somayeh; Khodabandeh, Mahvash; Khalaj, Vahid

    2013-01-01

    Background Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV) causes a highly immunosuppressive disease in chickens and is a pathogen of major economic importance to the poultry industry worldwide. The VP2 protein is the major host-protective immunogen of IBDV and has been considered as a potential subunit vaccine against the disease. VP2 coding sequence was cloned in an inducible fungal vector and the protein was expressed in Aspergillus niger (A. niger). Methods Aiming at a high level of expression, a multicopy AMA1-pyrG-based episomal construct driven by a strong inducible promoter, glaA, was prepared and used in transformation of A. niger pyrG-protoplasts. SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis was carried out to confirm the expression of the protein. Results A number of pyrG + positive transformants were isolated and the presence of expression cassette was confirmed. Western blot analysis of one of these recombinant strains using monospecific anti-VP2 antibodies demonstrated the successful expression of the protein. The recombinant protein was also detected by serum obtained from immunized chicken. Conclusion In the present study, we have generated a recombinant A. niger strain expressing VP2 protein intracellulary. This recombinant strain of A. niger may have potential applications in oral vaccination against IBDV in poultry industry. PMID:23626875

  1. Relationship between Legionella pneumophila and Acanthamoeba polyphaga: Physiological status and susceptibility to chemical inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, J.; Farrell, I. ); Brown, M.R.W.; Collier, P.J.; Gilbert, P. )

    1992-08-01

    Survival studies were conducted on Legionella pneumophila cells that had been grown intracellulary in Acanthamoeba polyphaga and then exposed to polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), benzisothiazolone (BIT), and 5-chloro-N-methylisothiazolone (CMIT). Susceptibilities were also determined for L. pneumophila grown under iron-sufficient and iron-depleted conditions. BIT was relatively ineffective against cells to PHMB and CMIT. The activities of all three biocides were greatly reduced against L. pneumophila grown in amoebae. PHMB (1 [times] MIC) gave 99.99% reductions in viability for cultures grown in broth within 6 h and no detectable survivors at 24 h but only 90 and 99.9% killing at 6 h and 24 h, respectively, for cells grown in amoebae. The antimicrobial properties of the three biocides against A. polyphaga were also determined. The majority of amoebae recovered from BIT treatment, but few, if any, survived CMIT treatment or exposure of PHMB. This study not only shows the profound effect that intra-amoebal growth has on the physiological status and antimicrobial susceptibility of L. pneumophila but also reveals PHMB to be a potential biocide for effective water treatment. In this respect, PHMB has significant activity, below its recommended use concentrations, against both the host amoeba and L. pneumophila.

  2. Tylosin-responsive chronic diarrhea in dogs.

    PubMed

    Westermarck, Elias; Skrzypczak, Teresa; Harmoinen, Jaana; Steiner, Jõrg M; Ruaux, Craig G; Williams, David A; Eerola, Erkki; Sundbäck, Pernilla; Rinkinen, Minna

    2005-01-01

    Fourteen dogs had shown chronic or intermittent diarrhea for more than 1 year. Diarrhea had been successfully treated with tylosin for at least 6 months but recurred when treatment was withdrawn on at least 2 occasions. Tylosin-responsive diarrhea (TRD) affects typically middle-aged, large-breed dogs and clinical signs indicate that TRD affects both the small and large intestine. Treatment with tylosin eliminated diarrhea in all dogs within 3 days and in most dogs within 24 hours. Tylosin administration controlled diarrhea in all dogs, but after it was discontinued, diarrhea reappeared in 12 (85.7%) of 14 dogs within 30 days. Prednisone given for 3 days did not completely resolve diarrhea. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG did not prevent the relapse of diarrhea in any of 9 dogs so treated. The etiology of TRD, a likely form of antibiotic-responsive diarrhea (ARD) is unclear. The following reasons for chronic diarrhea were excluded or found to be unlikely: parasites, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, inflammatory bowel disease, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, enteropathogenic bacteria (Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp., Yersinia spp., or Lawsoni intracellularis), and Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin and Clostridium difficile A toxin. A possible etiologic factor is a specific enteropathogenic organism that is a common resident in the canine gastrointestinal tract and is sensitive to tylosin but difficult to eradicate. Additional studies are required to identify the specific cause of TRD.

  3. The Madagascar Bloom - a serendipitous study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srokosz, M. A.; Quartly, G.

    2012-12-01

    The late austral summer (February-April) phytoplankton bloom that occurs east of Madagascar, exhibits significant interannual variability and at its largest extent covers ~1% of the world's ocean surface area. The bloom raises many intriguing questions about how it begins, is sustained, propagates to the east, exports carbon and ends. It has been observed and studied using satellite ocean colour observations, but the lack of in situ data makes it difficult to address these questions. Here we describe observations that were made on a cruise in February 2005 serendipitously. These show clearly for the first time the existence of both a deep chlorophyll maximum at ~70-110m depths (seen in SeaSoar fluorimeter data) and a surface chlorophyll signature (seen in SeaWiFS satellite ocean colour data). The observations also show the modulation of biological signature at the surface by the eddy field, but not apparently of the deep chlorophyll maximum. In situ observations indicate that Trichodesmium dominates the bloom nearer to Madagascar, while the diatom Rhizosolenia clevei (and its symbiont Richelia intracellularis) dominates further from the island. In addition, SeaSoar Optical Plankton Counter (OPC), temperature and salinity data suggest that the surface bloom seen in the SeaWiFS data is confined to the shallow (~30m) mixed layer. It is hypothesised that the interannual variability in bloom intensity may be due to variations in coastal upwelling and thus the supply of iron, which is a micronutrient that can limit diazotroph growth.

  4. The Madagascar Bloom: A serendipitous study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srokosz, M. A.; Quartly, G. D.

    2013-01-01

    The late austral summer (February-April) phytoplankton bloom that occurs east of Madagascar exhibits significant interannual variability and at its largest extent covers ~1% of the world's ocean surface area. The bloom raises many intriguing questions about how it begins, is sustained, propagates to the east, exports carbon, and ends. It has been observed and studied using satellite ocean color observations, but the lack of in situ data makes it difficult to address these questions. Here we describe observations that were made serendipitously on a cruise in February 2005. These show clearly for the first time the simultaneous existence of a deep chlorophyll maximum at ~70-110 m depths (seen in SeaSoar fluorimeter data) and a surface chlorophyll signature [seen in Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) satellite ocean color data]. The observations also show the modulation of the biological signature at the surface by the eddy field but not of the deep chlorophyll maximum. Trichodesmium dominates the bloom nearer to Madagascar, while the diatom Rhizosolenia clevei (and its symbiont Richelia intracellularis) dominates further from the island. The surface bloom seen in the SeaWiFS data is confined to the shallow (~30 m) mixed layer. It is hypothesized that the interannual variability in bloom intensity may be due to variations in coastal upwelling and thus the supply of iron, which is a micronutrient that can limit diazotroph growth.

  5. Actinide Biocolloid Formation in Brine by Halophilic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Harris, R.; Beveridge, T.J.; Brady, P.V.; Papenguth, H.W.

    1999-07-28

    We examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WFP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell Surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited volubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellulary as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis, of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloids that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide.

  6. [Henna symbolic tattoo and real dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Lamchahab, F-Z; Guerrouj, B; Benomar, S; Ait Ourhroui, M; Senouci, K; Hassam, B; Benzekri, L

    2011-06-01

    Henna, or Lawsonia inermis, has been used since antiquity by women in the Orient for dyeing the hair, hands, and feet. Contact dermatitis to pure henna is very rare, most often caused by additives such as perfume oils or paraphenylenediamine (PPD). We report the case of a girl who presented contact dermatitis to henna associated with eczema to draw attention to the dangers related to its use. A 12-year-old girl developed erythematovesicular and edematous lesions with very itchy burning, suggestive of contact dermatitis, 48 hours after application of black henna. Lesions were located at the tattooing site exactly following the original design. The patient also had eczema lesions on the left cheek after contact with the tattooed hand. The lesions were improved by treatment with level II corticosteroids. Today, henna has become very popular in Western countries. PPD is added to reduce the fixation time or to obtain a darker color. It can cause severe systemic reactions. The most common allergic reaction is contact dermatitis. Treatment is based on topical steroids. Better legislation on temporary tattooing practices and control preparations as well as regular annual information aimed at the general public are essential. This observation raises awareness of the importance of information on the serious risks of a labile tattoo, most particularly for the young. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Determination of heavy metal contents by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) in some medicinal plants from Pakistani and Malaysian origin.

    PubMed

    Akram, Sobia; Najam, Rahila; Rizwani, Ghazala H; Abbas, Syed Atif

    2015-09-01

    This study depicts a profile of existence of heavy metals (Cu, Ni, Zn, Cd, Hg, Mn, Fe, Na, Ca, and Mg) in some important herbal plants like (H. Integrifolia, D. regia, R. communis, C. equisetifolia, N. oleander, T. populnea, M. elengi, H. schizopetalus, P. pterocarpum) from Pakistan and an antidiabetic Malaysian herbal drug product containing (Punica granatum L. (Mast) Hook, Momordica charantia L., Tamarindus indica L., Lawsonia inermis L.) using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Heavy metals in these herbal plants and Malaysian product were in the range of 0.02-0.10 ppm of Cu, 0.00-0.02 ppm of Ni, 0.02-0.29 ppm of Zn, 0.00-0.04 ppm of Cd, 0.00-1.33 ppm of Hg, 0.00-0.54 ppm of Mn, 0.22-3.16 ppm of Fe, 0.00-9.17 ppm of Na, 3.27-15.63 ppm of Ca and 1.85-2.03 ppm of Mg. All the metals under study were within the prescribed limits except mercury. Out of 10 medicinal plants/product under study 07 were beyond the limit of mercury permissible limits. Purpose of this study is to determine heavy metals contents in selected herbal plants and Malaysian product, also to highlight the health concerns related to the presence of toxic levels of heavy metals.

  8. Role of anaerobic fungi in wheat straw degradation and effects of plant feed additives on rumen fermentation parameters in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dagar, S S; Singh, N; Goel, N; Kumar, S; Puniya, A K

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, rumen microbial groups, i.e. total rumen microbes (TRM), total anaerobic fungi (TAF), avicel enriched bacteria (AEB) and neutral detergent fibre enriched bacteria (NEB) were evaluated for wheat straw (WS) degradability and different fermentation parameters in vitro. Highest WS degradation was shown for TRM, followed by TAF, NEB and least by AEB. Similar patterns were observed with total gas production and short chain fatty acid profiles. Overall, TAF emerged as the most potent individual microbial group. In order to enhance the fibrolytic and rumen fermentation potential of TAF, we evaluated 18 plant feed additives in vitro. Among these, six plant additives namely Albizia lebbeck, Alstonia scholaris, Bacopa monnieri, Lawsonia inermis, Psidium guajava and Terminalia arjuna considerably improved WS degradation by TAF. Further evaluation showed A. lebbeck as best feed additive. The study revealed that TAF plays a significant role in WS degradation and their fibrolytic activities can be improved by inclusion of A. lebbeck in fermentation medium. Further studies are warranted to elucidate its active constituents, effect on fungal population and in vivo potential in animal system.

  9. Synthesis, spectral characterization, molecular structure and pharmacological studies of N'-(1, 4-naphtho-quinone-2yl) isonicotinohyWdrazide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha Rani, P. R.; Fernandez, Annette; George, Annie; Remadevi, V. K.; Sudarsanakumar, M. R.; Laila, Shiny P.; Arif, Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    A simple and efficient procedure was employed for the synthesis of N'-(1,4-naphtho-quinone-2-yl) isonicotinohydrazide (NIH) by the reaction of 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthaquinone (lawsone) and isonicotinoyl hydrazine in methanol using ultrasonic irradiation. Lawsone is the principal dye, isolated from the leaves of henna (Lawsonia inermis). Structural modification was done on the molecule aiming to get a more active derivative. The structure of the parent compound and the derivative was characterized by elemental analyses, infrared, electronic, 1H, 13C NMR and GC-MS spectra. The fluorescence spectral investigation of the compound was studied in DMSO and ethanol. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that NIH crystallizes in monoclinic space group. The DNA cleavage study was monitored by gel electrophoresis method. The synthesized compound was found to have significant antioxidant activity against DPPH radical (IC50 = 58 μM). The in vitro cytotoxic studies of the derivative against two human cancer cell lines MCF-7 (human breast cancer) and HCT-15 (human colon carcinoma cells) using MTT assay revealed that the compound exhibited higher cytotoxic activity with a lower IC50 value indicating its efficiency in killing the cancer cells even at low concentrations. These results suggest that the structural modifications performed on lawsone could be considered a good strategy to obtain a more active drug.

  10. Determination of the Moisture-Sorption Isotherms and Isosteric Heat of Henna Leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennaceur, S.; Draoui, B.; Touati, B.; Benseddik, A.; Saad, A.; Bennamoun, L.

    2015-01-01

    Equilibrium moisture desorption and adsorption isotherms of Lawsonia inermis L. (commonly known as henna) leaves at temperatures of 30, 40 and 50°C with a water activity ranging from 0.057 to 0.898 were obtained by the gravimetric-static method. It was established that when the temperature of these leaves increases, their moisture content increases too with a hysteresis effect. The experimental data on the sorption of the indicated leaves were compared with the corresponding calculation data obtained with the use of the GAB, modified BET, Henderson-Thompson, modified Halsey, modified Oswin, and Peleg models. Evaluation of these models on the basis of statistical processing of the data obtained with them, including the calculus of the standard error and the correlation coefficient, has shown that the GAB and Peleg models represent sorption curves more adequately. The net isosteric heats of desorption and adsorption of henna leaves were determined by the sorption isotherms constructed using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. An expression for predicting these thermodynamic properties of plants is proposed.

  11. Side-effects of henna and semi-permanent 'black henna' tattoos: a full review.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Anton C

    2013-07-01

    Henna, the dried and powdered leaf of Lawsonia inermis, is widely used as a dye for the skin, hair, and nails, and as an expression of body art, especially in Islamic and Hindu cultures. As it stains the skin reddish-brown, it is also called red henna. Black henna is the combination of red henna with p-phenylenediamine (PPD), and is used for temporary 'black henna tattoos'. This article provides a full review of the side-effects of topical application of red and black henna, both cutaneous (allergic and non-allergic) and systemic. Red henna appears to be generally safe, with rare instances of contact allergy and type I hypersensitivity reactions. In children with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, topical application of henna may cause life-threatening haemolysis. Black henna tattoos will induce contact allergy to its ingredient PPD at an estimated frequency of 2.5%. Once sensitized, the patients may experience allergic contact dermatitis from the use of hair dyes containing PPD. There are often cross-reactions to other hair dyes, dyes used in textiles, local anaesthetics, and rubber chemicals. The sensitization of children to PPD may have important consequences for health and later career prospects. Systemic toxicity of black henna has been reported in certain African countries. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Hypersensitivity reactions due to black henna tattoos and their components: are the clinical pictures related to the immune pathomechanism?

    PubMed

    Calogiuri, Gianfranco; Di Leo, Elisabetta; Butani, Lavjay; Pizzimenti, Stefano; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Macchia, Luigi; Nettis, Eustachio

    2017-01-01

    Hypersensitivity to para-phenylenediamine (PPD) and related compounds induced by temporary black henna tattoos has become a serious health problem worldwide. Different patterns of sensitization with various clinical aspects are described in literature due to PPD associated to henna tattoo and these manifestations are likely correlated with the immunological and dermatological pathomechanisms involved. Henna is the Persian name of the plant Lawsonia inermis, Fam. Lythraceae. It is a woody shrub that grow in regions of North Africa, South Asia, India and Sri Lanka. Nowadays it is rather frequent to see temporary "tattoos" performed with henna. To make tattoos darker and long-lasting PPD has been associated to henna in tattoo drawings mixtures, so obtaining "black henna". In these years there has been a rise of contact sensitization to PPD and in medical literature an increased number of cases have been reported on temporary henna tattoo application. Here we review the various clinical patterns related to PPD and henna tattoo, to investigate the possible link between clinic-morphological pictures and the immunological response to PPD and henna. The literature underlines that different clinical manifestations are related to black henna containing PPD, and its derivative products may cause delayed-type as well as immediate-type reactions. Further studies are needed to investigate the relationship between clinical and morphological aspects of PPD contact dermatitis and the T cell subsets predominance.

  13. The effect of methanolic extract of Tamarindus indica Linn. on the growth of clinical isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Muthu, Shankar Esaki; Nandakumar, Subhadra; Rao, Usha Anand

    2005-12-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Pseudomonas pseudomallei) causes melioidosis, a life-threatening infection common among paddy cultivators in Southeast Asian countries. No plant materials have been investigated for its activity against B. pseudomallei. Therefore, a preliminary study was carried out using disc diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) methods to evaluate the anti-B. pseudomallei activity of five Indian medicinal plants documented to have been used for several ailments in the ancient Indian scriptures. The leaf extracts of Tamarindus indica, Lawsonia inermis, and Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, the rhizome extracts of Curcuma longa and the seeds of Vigna radiata were prepared using methanol as solvent. The disc diffusion and MIC methods were used to assess the anti-B. pseudomallei activity of the plants tested. Only methanol leaf extracts of Tamarindus indica exhibited anti-B. pseudomallei activity starting from disc concentrations of 150 mug by the disc diffusion method. The other plants failed to show any zone of inhibition. MIC assay revealed that the MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) for B. pseudomallei were 125 mug/ml. Our preliminary finding showed that methanolic extracts of Tamarindus indica has anti-B. pseudomallei inhibitory potentials under in vitro conditions. Extensive animal studies may be required before investigating the role of Tamarindus indica for treating melioidosis.

  14. Assessment of antioxidant capacity and cytotoxicity of selected Malaysian plants.

    PubMed

    Ling, Lai Teng; Radhakrishnan, Ammu Kutty; Subramaniam, Thavamanithevi; Cheng, Hwee Ming; Palanisamy, Uma D

    2010-03-25

    Thirteen Malaysian plants; Artocarpus champeden, Azadirachta indica, Fragaria x ananassa, Garcinia mangostana, Lawsonia inermis, Mangifera indica, Nephelium lappaceum, Nephelium mutobile, Peltophorum pterocarpum, Psidium guajava and Syzygium aqueum, selected for their use in traditional medicine, were subjected to a variety of assays. Antioxidant capability, total phenolic content, elemental composition, as well as it cytotoxity to several cell lines of the aqueous and ethanolic extracts from different parts of these selected Malaysian plants were determined. In general, the ethanolic extracts were better free radical scavengers than the aqueous extracts and some of the tested extracts were even more potent than a commercial grape seed preparation. Similar results were seen in the lipid peroxidation inhibition studies. Our findings also showed a strong correlation of antioxidant activity with the total phenolic content. These extracts when tested for its heavy metals content, were found to be below permissible value for nutraceutical application. In addition, most of the extracts were found not cytotoxic to 3T3 and 4T1 cells at concentrations as high as 100 microg/mL. We conclude that although traditionally these plants are used in the aqueous form, its commercial preparation could be achieved using ethanol since a high total phenolic content and antioxidant activity is associated with this method of preparation.

  15. Gut Health of Pigs: Challenge Models and Response Criteria with a Critical Analysis of the Effectiveness of Selected Feed Additives — A Review

    PubMed Central

    Adewole, D. I.; Kim, I. H.; Nyachoti, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The gut is the largest organ that helps with the immune function. Gut health, especially in young pigs has a significant benefit to health and performance. In an attempt to maintain and enhance intestinal health in pigs and improve productivity in the absence of in-feed antibiotics, researchers have evaluated a wide range of feed additives. Some of these additives such as zinc oxide, copper sulphate, egg yolk antibodies, mannan-oligosaccharides and spray dried porcine plasma and their effectiveness are discussed in this review. One approach to evaluate the effectiveness of these additives in vivo is to use an appropriate disease challenge model. Over the years, researchers have used a number of challenge models which include the use of specific strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, bacteria lipopolysaccharide challenge, oral challenge with Salmonella enteric serotype Typhimurium, sanitation challenge, and Lawsonia intercellularis challenge. These challenge models together with the criteria used to evaluate the responses of the animals to them are also discussed in this review. PMID:26954144

  16. Management of corm-rot disease of Gladiolus by plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Tariq; Nawaz Khan, Salik; Javaid, Arshad

    2010-07-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of aqueous extracts of six plant species, namely Azadirachta indica A. Juss. (neem), Alstonia scholaris (L.) R. Br., Lawsonia alba Lam., Allium cepa L., A. sativum L. and Zingiber officinale Roscoe, and a systemic fungicide carbendazim 50% (w/w) WP, to manage the corm-rot disease of Gladiolus (Gladiolus grandiflorus L.) caused by a fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. gladioli (Massey) Snyd. & Hans. Fusarium inoculation showed 80% disease incidence with 54 disease lesions per corm. Recommended dose of the chemical fungicide carbendazim significantly reduced the disease incidence to 13% and number of lesions to six per corm. Plant extract treatments exhibited variable effects on the incidence and severity of the disease. In general, all the test plant extracts managed the corm-rot disease to some extent. Aqueous bulb extracts of A. sativum and A. cepa and the rhizome extract of Z. officinale showed better disease management potential than that of the recommended dose of carbendazim. Fusarium inoculation significantly declined shoot growth. In general, carbendazim, as well as aqueous extracts, enhanced shoot growth to variable extents as compared to the Fusarium control.

  17. A preliminary pilot survey on head lice, pediculosis in Sharkia Governorate and treatment of lice with natural plant extracts.

    PubMed

    El-Basheir, Zeinab M; Fouad, Mahmoud A H

    2002-12-01

    Twelve different representative areas in Sharkia Governorate were surveyed for head lice, Pediculus humanus capitis. The pre-valence was investigated among 120 houses containing 2,448 individual, with different age, sex and socioeconomic status. Examination was done by naked eye aided with hand-lens. A total of 137 individuals were infested. Infestation rates were higher in the rural areas with low socioeconomic levels, concrete houses with over-crowded family members. Children had significantly higher infestation rates than adults. Males had lower infestation rates than females. However, the hair length and permanent hair washing were the factors accounted for both age and sex difference in prevalence of pediculosis. Head lice infestations were found all over the year, but increased in summer and spring. One hundred infested patients (90 females and 10 males) with different aged and hair length were treated with tour mixed cream from plants Lawsonia alba L. (Henna). Trigonella faemum-gracanum (Fenugreek), Hibiscus cannabinus (Hibiscus) and Artemisia cina (Wormseed). The head lice completely disappeared within a week among those patients treated by henna mixed with aqueous extract of sheah (100%) or mixed with helba (75%) or with karkada (50%).

  18. Gut Health of Pigs: Challenge Models and Response Criteria with a Critical Analysis of the Effectiveness of Selected Feed Additives - A Review.

    PubMed

    Adewole, D I; Kim, I H; Nyachoti, C M

    2016-07-01

    The gut is the largest organ that helps with the immune function. Gut health, especially in young pigs has a significant benefit to health and performance. In an attempt to maintain and enhance intestinal health in pigs and improve productivity in the absence of in-feed antibiotics, researchers have evaluated a wide range of feed additives. Some of these additives such as zinc oxide, copper sulphate, egg yolk antibodies, mannan-oligosaccharides and spray dried porcine plasma and their effectiveness are discussed in this review. One approach to evaluate the effectiveness of these additives in vivo is to use an appropriate disease challenge model. Over the years, researchers have used a number of challenge models which include the use of specific strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, bacteria lipopolysaccharide challenge, oral challenge with Salmonella enteric serotype Typhimurium, sanitation challenge, and Lawsonia intercellularis challenge. These challenge models together with the criteria used to evaluate the responses of the animals to them are also discussed in this review.

  19. Quantification of p-phenylenediamine and 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone in henna tattoos.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Pablo J; Borrego, Leopoldo; Pulido-Melián, Elisenda; González-Díaz, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    Very few studies are available in which the components of henna products used by tattoo artists have been analysed. The aim of this study was to quantify the amounts of lawsone (2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone, the active ingredient in henna) and p-phenylenediamine (PPD) in products used by tattoo artists and in commercial henna preparations used as hair dyes or to create temporary tattoos. We used high-performance liquid chromatography to detect and quantify lawsone and PPD concentrations in three products used by henna tattoo artists, 11 commercially available henna preparations, and a batch of henna leaves (Lawsonia inermis). The henna leaves contained 1.85-1.87% lawsone. Only one of the three preparations used by tattoo artists contained lawsone (0.21-0.35%), and all three were adulterated with PPD (1-64%). Of the 11 commercial henna preparations analysed, nine contained lawsone (1-2%) and two contained PPD (2% and 12%). Products purporting to be henna, but that in fact contain no henna, are being offered. Moreover, these products may contain PPD, which is associated with health risks, especially severe allergic reactions. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Guerrillero Heroico--a lasting impression.

    PubMed

    Shah, S H A; Clarke, T; Packer, J

    2011-06-01

    What once was simply a cultural tradition is fast becoming a popular phenomenon amongst Western tourists. Temporary henna tattoo designs performed by street or beach vendors are prevalent throughout the Middle East and Asia, particularly in holiday resorts. The public may be mistaken in thinking that the fashionable trend comes without significant risk. The main ingredient in the temporary tattooing method is henna (Lawsonia inermis), a flowering plant with dyeing properties that takes only several hours to be absorbed but provides an effect lasting around ten to fifteen days on the recipient's skin. The side effects of henna tattoos are well documented in the literature, although it is not clear whether the side effects directly relate to the henna ingredient or the additives used to prolong the designs. The most commonly noted complications include allergic contact dermatitis, infection, hypertrophic and keloid scarring and temporary or permanent hypo- or hyperpigmentation. In very rare cases, type 1 hypersensitivity reactions (angioedema and anaphylaxis) have been reported. The following case report highlights several of these complications and the relevant management. Copyright © 2010 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficacy of different methanolic plant extracts on anti-methanogenesis, rumen fermentation and gas production kinetics in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sirohi, S.K.; Goel, N.; Pandey, P.

    2012-01-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of methanolic extracts of three plants, mehandi (Lawsonia inermis), jaiphal (Myristica fragrans) and green chili (Capsicum annuum) on methanogenesis, rumen fermentation and fermentation kinetic parameters by in vitro gas production techniques. Single dose of each plant extract (1 ml / 30 ml buffered rumen fluid) and two sorghum fodder containing diets (high and low fiber diets) were used for evaluating the effect on methanogenesis and rumen fermentation pattern, while sequential incubations (0, 1, 2, 3, 6 9, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72 and 96 h) were carried out for gas production kinetics. Results showed that methane production was reduced, ammonia nitrogen was increased significantly, while no significant effect was found on pH and protozoal population following addition of different plant extracts in both diets except mehandi. Green chili significantly reduced digestibility of dry matter, total fatty acid and acetate concentration at incubation with sorghum based high and low fiber diets. Among all treatments, green chili increased potential gas production, while jaiphal decreased the gas production rate constant significantly. The present results demonstrate that methanolic extracts of different plants are promising rumen modifying agents. They have the potential to modulate the methane production, potential gas production, gas production rate constant, dry matter digestibility and microbial biomass synthesis. PMID:26623296

  2. Pseudomoniasis phytotherapy: a review on most important Iranian medicinal plants effective on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Bahmani, Mahmoud; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Hassanzadazar, Hassan; Taherikalani, Morovat

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, aerobic bacterium found in water and soil. It is a normal flora in skin and gastrointestinal tract of human beings. P. aeruginosa as an opportunistic pathogen involved in nosocomial infections having multiple pathogenic factors and shows high rate of resistance to different antibiotics. The aim of this study was to identify the most important native medicinal plants of Iran effective on P. aeruginosa. Materials and Methods: All required information was obtained by searching keywords such as P. aeruginosa, medicinal plant extracts or essential oils in published articles in authentic scientific databases such as Science Direct, Wiley-Blackwell, Springer, Google scholar, Scientific Information Database (SID) and Magiran. Results: According to the literature review, our results showed 12 different native medicinal plants were effective against P. aeruginosa in Iran including Eucalyptus camadulensis, Marticaria chamomilla, Ferula gummosa Boiss, Lawsonia inermis, Ocimumgra tissimum, Allium sativum, Satureja hortensis L, Satureja bachtiarica Bunge, Satureja khuzestanica (Jamzad), Thymus daenensis Celak, Thymus carmanicus Jalals and Camellia sinensis. Conclusion: Phytochemical analysis has shown that bioactive compounds of medicinal plants with their antioxidant and antimicrobial properties can be good alternatives for the synthetic medicines in food and drug industry. PMID:28149496

  3. Quantification of para-phenylenediamine and heavy metals in henna dye.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ik-Joon; Lee, Mu-Hyoung

    2006-07-01

    Henna (Lawsonia inermis, family Lythraceae) is a shrub cultivated in India, Sri Lanka and North Africa and contains the active dye lawsone (2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone). Henna dye is obtained from the dried leaves, which are powdered and mixed with oil or water and are used to prepare hair and body dyes. Temporary henna tattoos are readily available worldwide, last on the skin for several weeks and offer a self-limited, convenient alternative to a permanent tattoo. The addition of para-phenylenediamine (PPD), which is widely recognised as a sensitizer, increases the risk of allergic contact dermatitis from henna tattoo mixtures, and a number of cases have been reported. We examined 15 henna samples available in Korea for the presence of PPD and heavy metals such as nickel, cobalt, chromium, lead and mercury using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), mercury analyser and inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy. PPD, nickel and cobalt were detected in 3, 11 and 4 samples, respectively.

  4. Phytoplankton community structure in the VAHINE mesocosm experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, Karine; Cornet, Véronique; Caffin, Mathieu; Rodier, Martine; Desnues, Anne; Berthelot, Hugo; Turk-Kubo, Kendra; Heliou, Jules

    2016-09-01

    The VAHINE mesocosm experiment was designed to trigger a diazotroph bloom and to follow the subsequent transfer of diazotroph-derived nitrogen (DDN) in the rest of the food web. Three mesocosms (50 m3) located inside the Nouméa lagoon (New Caledonia, southwestern Pacific) were enriched with dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) in order to promote N2 fixation in these low-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (LNLC) waters. Initially, the diazotrophic community was dominated by diatom diazotroph associations (DDAs), mainly by Rhizosolenia/Richelia intracellularis, and by Trichodesmium, which fueled enough DDN to sustain the growth of other diverse diatom species and Synechococcus populations that were well adapted to limiting DIP levels. After DIP fertilization (1 µM) on day 4, an initial lag time of 10 days was necessary for the mesocosm ecosystems to start building up biomass. However, changes in community structure were already observed during this first period, with a significant drop of both Synechococcus and diatom populations, while Prochlorococcus benefited from DIP addition. At the end of this first period, corresponding to when most added DIP was consumed, the diazotroph community changed drastically and became dominated by Cyanothece-like (UCYN-C) populations, which were accompanied by a monospecific bloom of the diatom Cylindrotheca closterium. During the second period, biomass increased sharply together with primary production and N2-fixation fluxes near tripled. Diatom populations, as well as Synechococcus and nanophytoeukaryotes, showed a re-increase towards the end of the experiment, showing efficient transfer of DDN to non-diazotrophic phytoplankton.

  5. New estimation of N2 fixation in the western and central Pacific Ocean and its marginal seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozaki, Takuhei; Furuya, Ken; Kodama, Taketoshi; Kitajima, Satoshi; Takeda, Shigenobu; Takemura, Toshihiko; Kanda, Jota

    2010-03-01

    The distribution of N2 fixation was examined using a 15N2 tracer with accompanying measurements of abundance of Trichodesmium spp. and Richelia intracellularis, nitrate plus nitrite (N+N) and soluble reactive phosphorus at the nanomolar level, and primary production in the western and central Pacific Ocean. N2 fixation occurred only in >˜20°C oligotrophic (i.e., N+N < 100 nM) waters except at a station in the equatorial upwelling zone where N+N was 1880 nM. High N2 fixation rates were observed in the Kuroshio and East China Sea (KECS) and near Fiji and other isolated islands with concomitant high abundance of Trichodesmium spp. In contrast, N2 fixation in the western and central oligotrophic North Pacific (WCONP) was significantly lower, and Trichodesmium spp. were rarely observed. These observations hint that KECS and waters around isolated islands are N2 fixation "hot spots" because of the occurrence of Trichodesmium spp. The average N2 fixation rate in the KECS of 232 ± 54.8 (±SE, n = 13) μmol N m-2 d-1 was almost 1 order of magnitude higher than that in the WCONP of 39.2 ± 7.51 (n = 26) μmol N m-2 d-1. On the basis of these estimates and reported values obtained using 15N2, depth-integrated N2 fixation in the North Pacific was estimated to be 2.6 ± 0.3 × 109 (n = 63) mol N d-1, which is less than half of previous estimates. This difference was ascribed primarily to the unavailability of N2 fixation rates in the WCONP, which occupies a vast area of the subtropical North Pacific, and the use of data obtained in the hot spots which represent small areas that likely led to the previous overestimation.

  6. Effect of copper and lead on two consortia of phototrophic microorganisms and their capacity to sequester metals.

    PubMed

    Burgos, A; Maldonado, J; De Los Rios, A; Solé, A; Esteve, I

    2013-09-15

    bioaccumulate them, extra- and intracellulary.

  7. Nitrogen fixation in an anticyclonic eddy in the oligotrophic North Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Fong, Allison A; Karl, David M; Lukas, Roger; Letelier, Ricardo M; Zehr, Jonathan P; Church, Matthew J

    2008-06-01

    Mesoscale physical processes (for example eddies, frontal meanders and planetary waves) can play important roles in controlling ocean biogeochemistry. We examined spatial variations in upper ocean (0-100 m) nutrient inventories, N(2) fixing microorganism diversity and abundance, and rates of N(2) fixation in an anticyclonic eddy near Station ALOHA (22 degrees 45' N, 158 degrees 00' W) in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG). In July 2005, satellite-based sea surface altimetry and ocean color observation revealed an anticyclonic eddy with enhanced chlorophyll in the upper ocean in the vicinity of Station ALOHA. Within the eddy, near-surface ocean chlorophyll concentrations were approximately 5-fold greater than in the surrounding waters. Inventories of nitrate and phosphate in the eddy were similar to the concentrations historically observed at Station ALOHA, while silicic acid inventories were significantly depleted (one-way analysis of variance, P<0.01). Quantitative PCR determinations of nifH gene copies revealed relatively high abundances of several N(2) fixing cyanobacteria, including Trichodesmium spp., Crocosphaera watsonii and Richelia intracellularis. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) amplified nitrogenase (nifH) gene transcripts were cloned and sequenced to examine the diversity of active N(2) fixing microorganisms; these clone libraries were dominated by sequence-types 97%-99% identical to the filamentous cyanobacteria Trichodesmium spp. Near-surface ocean rates of N(2) fixation were 2-18 times greater (averaging 8.6+/-5.6 nmol N per l per day) than previously reported measurements at Station ALOHA. These results suggest that mesoscale physical variability can play an important role in modifying the abundances of N(2) fixing microorganisms and associated rates of N(2) fixation in open ocean ecosystems.

  8. Mode-actions of the Na(+)-Ca2+ exchanger: from genes to mechanisms to a new strategy in brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Fang, Y; Rong, M; He, L; Zhou, C

    1998-01-01

    Mode-actions of the Na(+)-Ca2+ exchanger from genes to mechanisms to a new strategy for brain disorders were comparatively studied in oxidative stress. In transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells steadily expressing the Na(+)-Ca2+ exchanger's gene, Ca(2+)-efflux via an active mode of the Na(+)-Ca2+ exchanger was elicited by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) after preincubation of the cell with a Ca(2+)-free medium, whereas Ca(2+)-influx via a reverse mode of the Na(+)-Ca2+ exchanger was dramatically evoked by H2O2 after preincubation of the cell with a Ca2+ medium, as a prelude to neuronal death. According to [45Ca2+] uptake of transfected CHO cells at given time intervals or extracellular Na+[Na+]o gradients, hyperbola, logarithmic and sigmoid curve equations of the Na(+)-Ca2+ exchanger's mode-actions were respectively defined in the absence and the presence of H2O2. The Na(+)-Ca2+ exchanger's conformational transition in oxidative stress was dominated by adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent cytoskeletal redox modification, cation-pi interactions and secondary Ca2+ activation. These mechanisms were used to generate an intracellulary distributed tetra-cluster (named VISA931) for rescuing G-protein agonist-sensitive signal transduction and cortico-cerebral somatosensory evoke potential (SEP) from oxidation via activating forward operation of the Na(+)-Ca2+ exchanger, the beta-adrenergic and the P2-purinergic receptors, blocking Ca2+ influx and catalyzing the dismutation of superoxide anions (O2-.) to H2O2. In conclusion, knowledge-based drug design is a new strategy for developing promising candidates of neuroprotective agents.

  9. Copper-free azide-alkyne cycloaddition of targeting peptides to porous silicon nanoparticles for intracellular drug uptake.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang-Fang; Mäkilä, Ermei M; Kaasalainen, Martti H; Liu, Dongfei; Sarparanta, Mirkka P; Airaksinen, Anu J; Salonen, Jarno J; Hirvonen, Jouni T; Santos, Hélder A

    2014-01-01

    Porous silicon (PSi) has been demonstrated as a promising drug delivery vector for poorly water-soluble drugs. Here, a simple and efficient method based on copper-free click chemistry was used to introduce targeting moieties to PSi nanoparticles in order to enhance the intracellular uptake and tumor specific targeting hydrophobic drug delivery. Two RGD derivatives (RGDS and iRGD) with azide-terminated groups were conjugated to bicyclononyne-functionalized PSi nanoparticles via copper-free azide-alkyne cycloaddition. The surface functionalization was performed in aqueous solution at 37 °C for 30 min resulting in conjugation efficiencies of 15.2 and 3.4% (molar ratios) and the nanoparticle size increased from 165.6 nm to 179.6 and 188.8 nm for RGDS and iRGD, respectively. The peptides modification enhanced the cell uptake efficiency of PSi nanoparticles in EA.hy926 cells. PSi-RGDS and PSi-iRGD nanoparticles loaded with sorafenib showed a similar trend for the in vitro antiproliferation activity compared to sorafenib dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide. Furthermore, sorafenib-loaded PSi-RGDS deliver the drug intracellulary efficiently due to the higher surface conjugation ratio, resulting in enhanced in vitro antiproliferation effect. Our results highlight the surface functionalization methodology for PSi nanoparticles applied here as a universal method to introduce functional moieties onto the surface of PSi nanoparticles and demonstrate their potential active targeting properties for anticancer drug delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Entrance and survival of Brucella pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in human macrophages and epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Anett K; Nymo, Ingebjørg H; Briquemont, Benjamin; Sørensen, Karen K; Godfroid, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Marine mammal Brucella spp. have been isolated from pinnipeds (B. pinnipedialis) and cetaceans (B. ceti) from around the world. Although the zoonotic potential of marine mammal brucellae is largely unknown, reports of human disease exist. There are few studies of the mechanisms of bacterial intracellular invasion and multiplication involving the marine mammal Brucella spp. We examined the infective capacity of two genetically different B. pinnipedialis strains (reference strain; NTCT 12890 and a hooded seal isolate; B17) by measuring the ability of the bacteria to enter and replicate in cultured phagocytes and epithelial cells. Human macrophage-like cells (THP-1), two murine macrophage cell lines (RAW264.7 and J774A.1), and a human malignant epithelial cell line (HeLa S3) were challenged with bacteria in a gentamicin protection assay. Our results show that B. pinnipedialis is internalized, but is then gradually eliminated during the next 72-96 hours. Confocal microscopy revealed that intracellular B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain colocalized with lysosomal compartments at 1.5 and 24 hours after infection. Intracellular presence of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain was verified by transmission electron microscopy. By using a cholesterol-scavenging lipid inhibitor, entrance of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in human macrophages was significantly reduced by 65.8 % (± 17.3), suggesting involvement of lipid-rafts in intracellular entry. Murine macrophages invaded by B. pinnipedialis do not release nitric oxide (NO) and intracellular bacterial presence does not induce cell death. In summary, B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain can enter human and murine macrophages, as well as human epithelial cells. Intracellular entry of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain involves, but seems not to be limited to, lipid-rafts in human macrophages. Brucella pinnipedialis does not multiply or survive for prolonged periods intracellulary.

  11. Entrance and Survival of Brucella pinnipedialis Hooded Seal Strain in Human Macrophages and Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Briquemont, Benjamin; Sørensen, Karen K.; Godfroid, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Marine mammal Brucella spp. have been isolated from pinnipeds (B. pinnipedialis) and cetaceans (B. ceti) from around the world. Although the zoonotic potential of marine mammal brucellae is largely unknown, reports of human disease exist. There are few studies of the mechanisms of bacterial intracellular invasion and multiplication involving the marine mammal Brucella spp. We examined the infective capacity of two genetically different B. pinnipedialis strains (reference strain; NTCT 12890 and a hooded seal isolate; B17) by measuring the ability of the bacteria to enter and replicate in cultured phagocytes and epithelial cells. Human macrophage-like cells (THP-1), two murine macrophage cell lines (RAW264.7 and J774A.1), and a human malignant epithelial cell line (HeLa S3) were challenged with bacteria in a gentamicin protection assay. Our results show that B. pinnipedialis is internalized, but is then gradually eliminated during the next 72 – 96 hours. Confocal microscopy revealed that intracellular B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain colocalized with lysosomal compartments at 1.5 and 24 hours after infection. Intracellular presence of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain was verified by transmission electron microscopy. By using a cholesterol-scavenging lipid inhibitor, entrance of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in human macrophages was significantly reduced by 65.8 % (± 17.3), suggesting involvement of lipid-rafts in intracellular entry. Murine macrophages invaded by B. pinnipedialis do not release nitric oxide (NO) and intracellular bacterial presence does not induce cell death. In summary, B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain can enter human and murine macrophages, as well as human epithelial cells. Intracellular entry of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain involves, but seems not to be limited to, lipid-rafts in human macrophages. Brucella pinnipedialis does not multiply or survive for prolonged periods intracellulary. PMID:24376851

  12. Free heme and sickle hemoglobin polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunova, Veselina V.

    This work investigates further the mechanism of one of the most interesting of the protein self-assembly systems---the polymerization of sickle hemoglobin and the role of free heme in it. Polymerization of sickle hemoglobin is the primary event in the pathology of a chronic hemolytic condition called sickle cell anemia with complex pathogenesis, unexplained variability and symptomatic treatment. Auto-oxidation develops in hemoglobin solutions exposed to room temperature and causes release of ferriheme. The composition of such solutions is investigated by mass spectrometry. Heme dimers whose amount corresponds to the initial amounts of heme released from the protein are followed. Differences in the dimer peak height are established for hemoglobin variants A, S and C and depending on the exposure duration. The effects of free heme on polymerization kinetics are studied. Growth rates and two characteristic parameters of nucleation are measured for stored Hb S. After dialysis of polymerizing solutions, no spherulites are detected at moderately high supersaturation and prolonged exposure times. The addition of 0.16-0.26 mM amounts of heme to dialyzed solutions leads to restoration of polymerization. The measured kinetic parameters have higher values compared to the ones before dialysis. The amount of heme in non-dialyzed aged solution is characterized using spectrophotometry. Three methods are used: difference in absorbance of dialyzed and non-dialyzed solutions, characteristic absorbance of heme-albumin complex and absorbance of non-dialyzed solutions with added potassium cyanide. The various approaches suggest the presence of 0.12 to 0.18 mM of free ferriheme in such solutions. Open questions are whether the same amounts of free heme are present in vivo and whether the same mechanism operates intracellulary. If the answer to those questions is positive, then removal of free heme from erythrocytes can influence their readiness to sickle.

  13. Ethnopharmacological survey of home remedies used for treatment of hair and scalp and their methods of preparation in the West Bank-Palestine.

    PubMed

    Zaid, Abdel Naser; Jaradat, Nidal Amin; Eid, Ahmad Mustafa; Al Zabadi, Hamzeh; Alkaiyat, Abdulsalam; Darwish, Saja Adam

    2017-07-05

    Natural products have many uses and purposes, including those linked to pharmaceutics and cosmetics. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of natural remedies for the treatment of hair and scalp disorders in the West Bank, Palestine. An ethnopharmacological survey of herbal remedies and other natural products used in cosmetics and cosmeceuticals was carried out in the West Bank, Palestine. A questionnaire was distributed to 267 herbalists, traditional healers, hairdressers and rural dwellers. Collected information included: the names of plants and other natural products, the parts used, hair conditions, diseases and problems for which these products were used and also their methods of preparation. To identify the most important species used, the factor of informant's consensus (Fic), fidelity level (Fl) and the use-value (UV) were calculated. Collected data showed that 41 plants are utilized for the treatment of hair and scalp disorders, belonging to 27 families; among them Lamiaceae and Rosaceae, which were the most commonly used. Plant oils and their fruits are the most commonly used parts. Hair loss, dandruff, split hair endings and lice treatment, are reported as the most treated disorders. The number of plant species used consisted of 19, 14, 13, and again 13 with a factor of informant's consensus (Fic) for these disorders corresponding to 0.93, 0.94, 0.95 and 0.92, respectively. Fl was 100% for many plants; the highest UV value (0.84) was registered for Lawsonia inermis, which belongs to the Lythraceae family. This study showed that many natural remedies are still used in Palestine for the treatment of scalp and hair disorders as well as for cosmeceutical purposes. This study is of great importance as it allows us to have a greater perspective on our folkloric use of these natural products. A combined scientific effort between informants and the scientific community, working in this field, may help in the discovery of new cosmetics, cosmeceutical

  14. Ethno-medicinal knowledge and plants traditionally used to treat anemia in Tanzania: a cross sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Peter, Emanuel L; Rumisha, Susan F; Mashoto, Kijakazi O; Malebo, Hamisi M

    2014-07-03

    Indigenous communities have often served as rich repositories of empirical knowledge on medicinal plants used for anemia. Use of these plants need to be validated with respect to their efficacy and safety so as to provide scientific basis of their use. Quantifying presence of medicinal plants used for anemia treatment, validating indigenous knowledge and extent of its use in rural Mkuranga district, Tanzania is the main focus of this paper. A cross sectional study conducted in May and December 2013 at Mkuranga District of Coastal region of Tanzania. Forty key informants including traditional healers, religious leaders, community members and healthcare workers were interviewed using semi structured questionnaire. Eight focus group discussions were also conducted. Both interviews and focus group discussion gathered data on socio-demographics, general knowledge of anemia and plants used to correct anemia. In a brief field visit, all plants mentioned during the interview were collected and later identified. Both NVivo 10 and STATA softwares were employed for statistical analysis. Out of 40 participants, 31 were traditional healers, majority were male (77.4%). Mean age of the participants was 55.7±15 years. About 45% had no any formal education and majority (80%) were married. Twenty eight plant species are used to treat anemia. Hibiscus sabdariffa was the most mentioned species. The species belongs to 24 families, with Euphorbiaceae (14.3%) having the largest number. Lawsonia inermis, Aloe sp, Uvaria acuminata, Parinari curatellifolia, Ozoroa reticulata, Manihot esculenta, Canthium sp and Afzelia quanzensis were the plant species in which their claimed use for anemia were novel. People in rural areas of Mkuranga district possess a rich traditional knowledge of medicinal plants species for anemia treatment. Researches on these plants showed promising anti-anemic activity. Analysis and documentation of this knowledge has not only helped the analysis and recognition of

  15. Plant utilization against digestive system disorder in Southern Assam, India.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Prakash Roy; Choudhury, Manabendra Dutta; Ningthoujam, Sanjoy Singh; Mitra, Abhijit; Nath, Deepa; Talukdar, Anupam Das

    2015-12-04

    Being one of the most common types of life threatening diseases in Southern Assam, India, the digestive system disorders (DSD) have gained much attention in recent decades. Traditional beliefs and inadequate income of mass population result in the use of alternative phytotherapies to treat the diseases. The present paper documents the medicinal knowledge and utilization of plants for treatment of digestive system disorders in Southern Assam, India by Disease Consensus Index (DCI). It also determines the most suitable plant species used to treat digestive system disorders in the study area. The study was based on ethnomedicinal field survey covering a period of 1 year from 2014-2015. The ethnomedicinal information was collected by using semi-structured questionnaires from different traditional Bengali people having knowledge on medicinal plants. Collected data were analyzed by calculating DCI. During the survey, 29 informants were interviewed and a total of 49 plants under 46 genera belonging to 33 families were listed. Data analysis revealed that Litsea glutinosa, Momordica charantia, Andrographis paniculata, Lawsonia inermis, Cleome viscosa, Psidium guajava, Ageratum conyzoides, Cuscuta reflexa, Cynodon dactylon and Carica papaya are the most prominent plants among the people of Southern Assam for treating DSD. This explorative survey emphasizes the need to preserve and document the traditional healing practices for managing DSD inviting for more imminent scientific research on the plants to determine their efficacy as well as safety. With the help of statistical analysis (DCI), we propose 10 priority plants for DSD in present work. Systematic pharmacological study with these plants may contribute significant result. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Self-reported use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) products in topical treatment of diabetic foot disorders by diabetic patients in Jeddah, Western Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is little published on current Saudi diabetic patients' practices when they are exposed to foot disorders such as open wound, ulcer, and skin cracks. These factors are usually influenced by local culture and communities beliefs. The aim of the current study was to identify the pattern of patients' use of CAM products in dealing with diabetic foot disorders topically in a group of diabetic patients. Findings A Cross-sectional descriptive study of a representative cohort of diabetic patients living in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia was designed. A pre-designed questionnaire to identify local diabetics' practices in dealing topically with foot disorders including open wound, chronic ulcer, and skin cracks was designed. Questionnaire was administered by a group of trained nutrition female students to diabetics face to face living in their neighborhood. A total of 1634 Saudi diabetics were interviewed. Foot disorders occurred in approximately two thirds of the respondents 1006 (61.6%). Out of the 1006 patients who had foot disorders, 653 reported trying some sort of treatment as 307 patients (47.1%) used conventional topical medical treatment alone, 142 (21.7%) used CAM products alone, and 204 (31.2%) used both treatments. The most commonly used CAM product by the patients was Honey (56.6%) followed by Commiphora Molmol (Myrrh) in (37.4%) and Nigellia Sativa (Black seed) in (35.1%). The least to be used was Lawsonia inermis (Henna) in (12.1%). Ten common natural preparations used topically to treat diabetic foot disorders were also identified. Conclusions The use of CAM products in topical treatment of diabetic foot disorders is fairly common among Saudi diabetic patients. Honey headed the list as a solo topical preparation or in combination with other herbs namely black seeds and myrrh. The efficacy of the most common products needs further research. PMID:20925956

  17. Preliminary evaluation of hepatoprotective potential of the polyherbal formulation

    PubMed Central

    Arka, Ghosh; Anindita, Kundu; Ankit, Seth; Kumar, Singh Anil; Kumar, Maurya Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant and hepatoprotective effects of the polyherbal formulation (PHF)containing Cajanus cajan (L.)Millsp., Lawsonia inermis L. Linn, Mimosa pudica L., Uraria picta (Jacq.)DC. and Operculina turpethum (L.)Silva Manso on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)induced acute liver damage in albino rats. Materials and Methods: The groups of animals were administered with PHF at the doses 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg b.w. (per oral [p.o.])once in a day for 7 days and at day 6th and 7th the animals were administrated with Carbon tetrachloride (1.0 mL/kg b.w. 50% v/v with olive oil,; p.o.). The effect of PHF on serum glutamine pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), serum glutamine oxaloacetate transaminase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP)and total bilirubin were determined in CCl4 - induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Further, the effects of PHF on glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD)level and lipid peroxidation (LPO)activity were also investigated. Results: The results demonstrated that PHF (400 mg/kg b.w.)significantly reduces the CCl4 induced increase in level of serum SGPT, serum ALP and total bilirubin. PHF (400 mg/kg b.w.)prevents the depletion level of GSH and decrease in the activity of SOD in CCl4 -induced liver injury in rats. In addition, PHF also showed a significant decrease in the LPO levels signifying the potent antioxidant activity. Conclusion: All our findings suggest that PHF could protect the liver cells from CCl4 - induced liver damages and the mechanism may be through the anti-oxidative effect of PHF. PMID:26401397

  18. Systematic analysis of in vitro photo-cytotoxic activity in extracts from terrestrial plants in Peninsula Malaysia for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Ong, Cheng Yi; Ling, Sui Kiong; Ali, Rasadah Mat; Chee, Chin Fei; Samah, Zainon Abu; Ho, Anthony Siong Hock; Teo, Soo Hwang; Lee, Hong Boon

    2009-09-04

    One hundred and fifty-five extracts from 93 terrestrial species of plants in Peninsula Malaysia were screened for in vitro photo-cytotoxic activity by means of a cell viability test using a human leukaemia cell-line HL60. These plants which can be classified into 43 plant families are diverse in their type of vegetation and their natural habitat in the wild, and may therefore harbour equally diverse metabolites with potential pharmaceutical properties. Of these, 29 plants, namely three from each of the Clusiaceae, Leguminosae, Rutaceae and Verbenaceae families, two from the Piperaceae family and the remaining 15 are from Acanthaceae, Apocynaceae, Bignoniaceae, Celastraceae, Chrysobalanaceae, Irvingiaceae, Lauraceae, Lythraceae, Malvaceae, Meliaceae, Moraceae, Myristicaceae, Myrsinaceae, Olacaceae and Sapindaceae. Hibiscus cannabinus (Malvaceae), Ficus deltoidea (Moraceae), Maranthes corymbosa (Chrysobalanaceae), Micromelum sp., Micromelum minutum and Citrus hystrix (Rutaceae), Cryptocarya griffithiana (Lauraceae), Litchi chinensis (Sapindaceae), Scorodocarpus bornensis (Olacaceae), Kokoona reflexa (Celastraceae), Irvingia malayana (Irvingiaceae), Knema curtisii (Myristicaceae), Dysoxylum sericeum (Meliaceae), Garcinia atroviridis, Garcinia mangostana and Calophyllum inophyllum (Clusiaceae), Ervatamia hirta (Apocynaceae), Cassia alata, Entada phaseoloides and Leucaena leucocephala (Leguminosae), Oroxylum indicum (Bignoniaceae), Peronema canescens,Vitex pubescens and Premna odorata (Verbenaceae), Piper mucronatum and Piper sp. (Piperaceae), Ardisia crenata (Myrsinaceae), Lawsonia inermis (Lythraceae), Strobilanthes sp. (Acanthaceae) were able to reduce the in vitro cell viability by more than 50% when exposed to 9.6J/cm(2) of a broad spectrum light when tested at a concentration of 20 microg/mL. Six of these active extracts were further fractionated and bio-assayed to yield four photosensitisers, all of which are based on the pheophorbide-a and -b core structures

  19. Cytotoxicity of lawsone and cytoprotective activity of antioxidants in catalase mutant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sauriasari, Rani; Wang, Da-Hong; Takemura, Yoko; Tsutsui, Ken; Masuoka, Noriyoshi; Sano, Kuniaki; Horita, Masako; Wang, Bing-Ling; Ogino, Keiki

    2007-06-03

    Lawsone is an active naphthoquinone derivative isolated from henna (Lawsonia inermis L.), a widely used hair dye. Previous study on the toxicity of lawsone remains unclear since the involvement of oxidative stress and the kind of ROS (reactive oxygen species) involved have not been fully resolved yet. This present study reports the cytotoxic effects of lawsone and henna. We carried out CAT assay (a zone of inhibition test of bacterial growth and colony-forming efficiency test of transformant Escherichia coli strains that express mammalian catalase gene derived from normal catalase mice (Cs(a)) and catalase-deficient mutant mice (Cs(b))), Ames mutagenicity assay and H(2)O(2) generation assay. Lawsone generated H(2)O(2) slightly in phosphate buffer system and was not mutagenic in Ames assay using TA 98, TA 100 and TA 102, both in the absence and presence of metabolic activation. Lawsone exposure inhibited the growth of both Cs(a) and Cs(b) strains in a dose-dependent manner. Mean zone diameter for Cs(a) was 9.75+/-0.96 mm and 12.75+/-1.5 mm for Cs(b). Natural henna leaves did not show toxic effects, whereas two out of four samples of marketed henna products were shown toxicity effects. Catalase abolished zone of inhibition (ZOI) of marketed henna products, eliminated ZOI of lawsone in a dose-dependent manner and low concentration of exogenous MnSOD and Cu/ZnSOD eliminated the toxicity. Histidine and DTPA, the metal chelator; BHA and low concentration of capsaicin, the inducer of NADH-quinone reductase, effectively protected Cs(a) and Cs(b) against lawsone in this study. We suggest that lawsone cytotoxicity is probably mediated, at least in part, by the release of O(2)(-), H(2)O(2) and OH(-).

  20. Evaluation of Antifungal Efficacy of Ethanolic Crude Lawsone and Listerine Mouthwash in Uncontrolled Diabetics and Denture Wearers - A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chintamaneni, Rajalakshmi; Chennupati, Anuradha; Nahar, Prashant; Chaluvadi, Rattaiah Setty; Vemugunta, Ramakrishna; Prabhat, Meka Venkata Poorna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lawsonia Inermis (LI) is a shrub cultivated throughout India. Many in vitro studies have been done on antifungal activity of LI, although none of the studies have been conducted invivo. Aim To evaluate the antifungal efficacy of ethanolic extract of crude lawsone in comparison with listerine mouth wash in known diabetics and wearing dentures. Materials and Methods A total of 60 subjects were taken and randomly divided into two groups of 30 each. Group 1 received crude lawsone mouthwash and Group 2 received listerine mouth wash. Oral rinse technique was performed. Each subject was given distilled water at baseline and Colony Forming Units (CFU) of candidal species was determined. Post therapeutic samples were then collected 1hr and 1week following drug usage and they were further advised to use given mouth washes twice daily with volume of 5ml/rinse for 30 seconds and CFU was evaluated. Results Crude lawsone mouthwash showed superior antifungal activity when compared to listerine mouthwash. On individual comparison of both mouth washes at baseline, 1hr and 1week highly significant results were obtained using inferential statistics. The inter group comparison was done using independent t-test where lawsone was considered to be more effective in reducing CFU, at 1hr and 1week of using the mouth wash (p<0.01). Subjective symptoms like taste and smell were determined by chi square test where good taste was felt for lawsone and olfactory satisfaction was good with listerine (p<0.01). Burning sensation was found to be more with listerine mouth wash. Conclusion The present study revealed superior antifungal activity with ethanolic extract of crude lawsone mouth wash compared with listerine mouthwash. PMID:27504419

  1. An investigation of electrospun Henna leaves extract-loaded chitosan based nanofibrous mats for skin tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Iman; Pakravan, Mehdi; Rahimi, Hoda; Bahador, Abbas; Farshadzadeh, Zahra; Haririan, Ismael

    2017-06-01

    Wound healing characteristics of some plant extracts have been well known for many years, and they have been utilized for such applications in traditional way. Recently electrospun nanofibrous mats showed promising properties for tissue engineering and especially for skin repair. It is expected that incorporation of plant extracts into such structures could provide higher performance and synergistic effect for biomedical and wound healing applications. The final purpose of this study is to fabricate chitosan based nanofiber mats loaded with a traditional plant extract of Lawsonia inermis (Henna) leaves to enhance the antibacterial efficacy and wound healing of the precursor nanofibers. The morphology, structure, mechanical properties and swelling and weight loss degree of the electrospun nanofibers have been investigated in this study. Antibacterial activity, cell biocompatibility evaluations and in vivo wound healing activity of the abovementioned mats were also studied. The FESEM images of Henna leaves extract-loaded nanofibers proved that homogeneous, smooth and defect free nanofibers of 64-87nm in diameter have been prepared. Presence of Henna extract in the electrospun fibers was approved by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. Incorporation of Henna extract into the nanofiber mats exhibited significant synergistic antibacterial activity against bacterial cells. It was well supported by the results of cell viability and proliferation of human foreskin fibroblast cells on the prepared scaffolds. Therefore, the results of this work showed that Henna leaves extract incorporated chitosan nonwoven mats have a great potential to be used as the biodegradable, biobased and antibacterial wound healing dressings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Rapid analysis of the skin irritant p-phenylenediamine (PPD) in henna products using atmospheric solids analysis probe mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiyang; Nkosi, Thobile A N; Combrinck, Sandra; Viljoen, Alvaro M; Cartwright-Jones, Catherine

    2016-09-05

    Henna (Lawsonia inermis) is applied to stain keratin, present in hair, skin and fingernails, a red-orange or rust colour. Producers of temporary tattoos mix the aromatic amine compound, para-phenylenediamine (PPD) into natural henna to create 'black henna' that rapidly stains the skin black. However, PPD may cause severe delayed hypersensitivity reactions following skin contact. This study proposes a rapid direct-analysis method to detect and identify PPD using an atmospheric solids analysis probe (ASAP) coupled to a Q-ToF mass spectrometer (MS). Since laborious, multistep methods of analysis to determine PPD are undesirable, due to the instability of the compound in solution, a screening method involving no sample preparation steps was developed. Experiments were carried out to optimise the corona current, sample cone voltage, source temperature, and desolvation gas temperature to determine ideal ASAP-Q-ToF-MS analysing conditions. Eleven of the 109 henna samples, originating from various countries, tested positive for PPD when henna products were screened using ASAP-MS, without any form of sample preparation other than grinding. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-ToF-MS) was subsequently used to confirm the results from ASAP and to determine the concentrations of PPD in henna products. The allergen was detected in the same eleven samples, with concentrations ranging from 0.05-4.21% (w/w). It can be concluded that the sensitivity of the ASAP-MS technique is sufficient (limit of detection=0.025% w/w) to allow screening of henna samples for the presence of PPD. This relatively new technique can be applied to commercial products without extraction, sample treatment or chromatographic separation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. From body art to anticancer activities: perspectives on medicinal properties of henna.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Rohan; Dandawate, Prasad; Vyas, Alok; Padhye, Subhash; Biersack, Bernhard; Schobert, Rainer; Ahmad, Aamir; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2012-12-01

    Nature has been a rich source of therapeutic agents for thousands of years and an impressive number of modern drugs have been isolated from natural sources based on the uses of these plants in traditional medicine. Henna is one such plant commonly known as Persian Henna or Lawsonia inermis, a bushy, flowering tree, commonly found in Australia, Asia and along the Mediterranean coasts of Africa. Paste made from the leaves of Henna plant has been used since the Bronze Age to dye skin, hairs and fingernails especially at the times of festivals. In recent times henna paste has been used for body art paintings and designs in western countries. Despite such widespread use in dyeing and body art painting, Henna extracts and constituents possess numerous biological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and anticancer activities. The active coloring and biologically active principle of Henna is found to be Lawsone (2- hydroxy-1, 4-naphthoquinone) which can serve as a starting building block for synthesizing large number of therapeutically useful compounds including Atovaquone, Lapachol and Dichloroallyl lawsone which have been shown to possess potent anticancer activities. Some other analogs of Lawsone have been found to exhibit other beneficial biological properties such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antitubercular and antimalarial. The ability of Lawsone to undergo the redox cycling and chelation of trace metal ions has been thought to be partially responsible for some of its biological activities. Despite such diverse biological properties and potent anticancer activities the compound has remained largely unexplored and hence in the present review we have summarized the chemistry and biological activities of Lawsone along with its analogs and metal complexes.

  4. Effect of plant secondary compounds on in vitro methane, ammonia production and ruminal protozoa population.

    PubMed

    Bhatta, R; Saravanan, M; Baruah, L; Sampath, K T; Prasad, C S

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of secondary plant metabolites from 38 sources to serve as antimethanogenic additives in ruminant diets. The effect of leaf tannins from these different plant sources on rumen fermentation, protozoal populations and methanogenesis was also studied. Samples (200 mg dry matter, DM) were incubated without and with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-6000 (400 mg DM) as a tannin binder during 24-h incubation in the in vitro Hohenheim gas system. In the leaf samples, total phenol (g kg(-1) DM) was maximum in Pimenta officinalis (312) followed by Oenothera lamarckiana (185) and Lawsonia inermis (105). Of the 38 samples, condensed tannins exceeded 4.0 g kg(-1) in only Alpinia galanga (7.50), Cinnamomum verum (4.58), Pelargonium graveolens (18.7) and Pimenta officinalis (23.2) and were not detected in seven samples. When the bioactivity of the leaf samples was assessed using the tannin bioassay, the percentage increase in the amount of gas produced during incubation of samples with the tannin-binding agent PEG-6000 over the amount produced during incubation without the tannin binder ranged from nil (zero) to 367%, with the highest being recorded with A. galanga leaves. The ratio of methane reduction per ml of total gas reduction was maximum with Rauvolfia serpentina (131.8) leaves, followed by Indigofera tinctoria (16.8) and Withania somnifera (10.2) leaves. Total and differential protozoal counts increased with added PEG in twenty-two samples, maximum being in Pimenta officinalis. Increased accumulation of total volatile fatty acids during incubation with added PEG-6000 was recorded, and the values ranged from zero to 61%. However, the increase was significant in only 11 of the 38 tannin sources tested indicating noninterference of tannin on in vitro fermentation of carbohydrates by the majority of samples tested. Conversely, in 26 of 38 plant sources, the leaf tannins reduced N-digestibility as evidenced by increased

  5. Desulfobaculum xiamenensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a member of the family Desulfovibrionaceae isolated from marine mangrove sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chao; Gao, Zhaoming; Qin, Qiwei; Li, Fuying; Ruan, Lingwei

    2012-07-01

    A taxonomic study was carried out on strain P1(T), which was isolated from mangrove sediment samples collected from Qinglan Port (Hainan, China). Cells were curved rods, that were motile, with a single polar flagellum. The strain was non-spore-forming with a cell size of 0.6×1.5-2.2 µm. Catalase and oxidase activities were not detected. Growth was observed in the temperature range 22-44 °C (optimum, 35-40 °C) and pH range 5.5-8.5 (optimum, pH 7.0). NaCl was required for growth and tolerated at up to 3.5% (w/v) (optimum, 0.5%). Strain P1(T) utilized hydrogen, succinate, L-malate, citrate, oxalate, DL-lactate, pyruvate, or cysteine as electron donors, and sulfate or sulfite as electron acceptors. Fermentation products from pyruvate were acetate, H(2) and CO(2). Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain P1(T) formed a distinct evolutionary lineage within the family Desulfovibrionaceae. Strain P1(T) was most closely related to members of the genera Desulfovibrio (92.0-94.3% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Desulfocurvus (91.1%), Bilophila (87.9%) and Lawsonia (86.0%) of the family Desulfovibrionaceae. The DNA G+C content of strain P1(T) was 64.5 mol% and the major cellular fatty acids were iso-C(15:0) (18.8%), anteiso-C(15:0) (5.0%), C(16:0) (14.2%) and iso-C(17:1)ω9c (24.4%). The predominant menaquinone was MK-7 (97%). Major polar lipids were phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol. Strain P1(T) was distinguishable from members of phylogenetically related genera by differences in several phenotypic properties. On the basis of the phenotypic and phylogenetic data, strain P1(T) represents a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Desulfobaculum xiamenensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Desulfobaculum xiamenensis is P1(T) (=CGMCC 1.5166(T)=DSM 24233(T)).

  6. Global analysis of gene expression dynamics within the marine microbial community during the VAHINE mesocosm experiment in the southwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfreundt, Ulrike; Spungin, Dina; Bonnet, Sophie; Berman-Frank, Ilana; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2016-07-01

    phosphatase was expressed prominently only between days 12 and 23 in different organisms, suggesting that the microbial community was not limited by phosphate, even before the fertilization on day 4, whereas the post-fertilization community was. We observed high expression of the Synechococcus sqdB gene, only transiently lowered following phosphate fertilization. SqdB encodes UDP-sulfoquinovose synthase, possibly enabling marine picocyanobacteria to minimize their phosphorus requirements by substitution of phospholipids with sulphur-containing glycerolipids. This result suggests a link between sqdB expression and phosphate availability in situ. Gene expression of diazotrophic cyanobacteria was mainly attributed to Trichodesmium and Richelia intracellularis (diatom-diazotroph association) in the Nouméa lagoon and initially in M1. UCYN-A (Candidatus Atelocyanobacterium) transcripts were the third most abundant and declined both inside and outside after day 4, consistent with 16S- and nifH-based analyses. Transcripts related to the Epithemia turgida endosymbiont and Cyanothece ATCC 51142 increased during the second half of the experiment.

  7. Specificity and Control of Choline–O-Sulfate Transport in Filamentous Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Bellenger, Nicole; Nissen, Per; Wood, Trudy C.; Segel, Irwin H.

    1968-01-01

    Choline-O-sulfate uptake by Penicillium notatum showed the following characteristics. (i) Transport was mediated by a permease which is highly specific for choline-O-sulfate. No significant inhibition of transport was caused by choline, choline-O-phosphate, acetylcholine, ethanolamine-O-phosphate, ethanolamine-O-sulfate, methanesulfonyl choline, 2-aminoethane thiosulfate, or the monomethyl or dimethyl analogues of choline-O-sulfate. Similarly, no significant inhibition was caused by any common sulfur amino acid or inorganic sulfur compound. Mutants lacking the inorganic sulfate permease possessed the choline-O-sulfate permease at wild-type levels. (ii) Choline-O-sulfate transport obeyed saturation kinetics (Km = 10−4 to 3 × 10−4m; Vmax = 1 to 6 μmoles per g per min). The kinetics of transport between 10−9 and 10−1m external choline-O-sulfate showed that only one saturable mechanism is present. (iii) Transport was sensitive to 2,4-dinitrophenol, azide, N-ethylmaleimide, p-chloromercuribenzoate, and cyanide. Ouabain, phloridzin, and eserine had no effect. (iv) Transport was pH-dependent with an optimum at pH 6. Variations in the ionic strength of the incubation medium had no effect. (v) Transport was temperature-dependent with a Q10 of greater than 2 between 3 and 40 C. Transport decreased rapidly above 40 C. (vi) Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (sodium salts, pH 6) had no effect, nor was there any stimulation by metal or nonmetal ions. Cu++, Ag+, and Hg++ were inhibitory. (vii) The initial rate at which the ester is transported was independent of intracellular hydrolysis. After long periods of incubation (> 10 min), a significant proportion of the transported choline-O-sulfate was hydrolyzed intracellulary. In the presence of 5 × 10−3m external choline-O-sulfate, the mycelia accumulated choline-O-sulfate to an apparent intracellular concentration of 0.075 m by 3 hr. Transport was unidirectional. No efflux or exchange of 35S-choline-O-sulfate was observed

  8. Total phenol, antioxidant and free radical scavenging activities of some medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Dhan; Suri, Samiksha; Upadhyay, Garima; Singh, Brahma N

    2007-02-01

    Phenols, a major group of antioxidant phytochemicals, have profound importance due to their biological and free radical scavenging activities. To identify their potential sources, extracts of some plants were studied for their total phenolic content (TPC), antioxidant (AOA) and free radical scavenging activities (FRSA) by different methods at multiple concentrations followed by specific phenolic composition. The amount of TPC varied from 2.8 mg/g (Withania somnifera, roots) to 107.8 mg/g (Cassia fistula, fruits) and the AOA from 24.2% (Curcuma zeoderia, leaves) to 96.9% (Trewia nudiflora, leaves). Bark of Azadirachta indica, fruits of C. fistula, and leaves and fruits of T. nudiflora were found to have high TPC (89.8- 107.8 mg/g) and high AOA (84.8-96.9%). Promising plant parts were studied for their FRSA and reducing power (RP), where the bark of A. indica, Casuarina equisetifolia and Cinnamomum zeylanicum, flowers of Indigofera tinctoria, fruits of Lawsonia inermis, and fruits and leaves of T. nudiflora showed a very low inhibitory concentration value ranging from 0.14 to 0.26 mg/ml, efficiency concentration value from 6.1 to 11.6 mg/mg DPPH and reducing power value from 0.6 to 2.8 ascorbic acid equivalents (ASE/ml), and reasonably high values (8.5 -16.2) of anti-radical power (ARP), indicating their strong FRSA. They also showed better inhibition of hydroxyl radical induced deoxyribose degradation than that of reference standard. Fruits of C. fistula with high phenols (107.8 mg/g) showed poor reducing power (5.9 ASE/ml) and ARP (4.7); in contrast, the bark of C. equisetifolia and fruits of L. inermis were with comparatively lower phenols (72.1 and 75.8 mg/g) but exhibited good ARP (16.2 and 14.4) and reducing power (0.7 and 0.6 ASE/ ml, respectively). Some of the plants were also found effective in protecting plasmid DNA nicking induced by hydroxyl radicals generated by Fenton's reaction. They were further assayed for their specific phenolic composition through

  9. The treatment of jaundice with medicinal plants in indigenous communities of the Sub-Himalayan region of Uttarakhand, India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Jyotsana; Gairola, Sumeet; Gaur, R D; Painuli, R M

    2012-08-30

    , external and magico-religious remedies for jaundice, respectively by various communities in different parts of India. Most widely used hepatoprotective plant species for treatment of jaundice in India is Boerhavia diffusa L. followed by Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers, Saccharum officinarum L., Phyllanthus amarus Schumach. & Thonn., Ricinus communis L., Andrographis paniculata (Burm. f.) Nees., Oroxylum indicum (L.) Kurz, Lawsonia inermis L. and Eclipta prostrata (L.) L. The plants recorded in the present survey have also been discussed in relation to pharmacological studies and hepatoprotective phytoconstituents present in them. Most of the recorded plants have shown hepatoprotective effects on experimental animals in earlier studies but more studies are needed to assess hepatoprotective properties of some recorded medicinal plants viz., Averrhoa carambola L., Ehretia laevis Roxb., Holarrhena pubescens Wall., Mangifera indica L., Ocimum americanum L., Oroxylum indicum (L.) Kurz, Physalis divaricata D. Don, Solanum incanum L., Sphaeranthus senegalensis DC. and Tribulus terrestris L.. The plants enumerated in this study with high number of citations and wider distributions have given some useful leads for further biomedical research. Nevertheless more phytochemical, pharmaceutical and clinical studies are needed to evaluate hepatoprotective properties, efficacy and safety of all the claimed medicinal plants. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Switching between hydrophobic and wettable conditions in soil: experiments to assess the influence of cracks, roots and subsurface drainage impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanek, E.; Walsh, R. P. D.; Shakesby, R. A.

    2012-04-01

    Although much is known about soil hydrophobicity, assessments of the overall hydrological and erosional significance of the soil property in areas affected by it are greatly hampered by a lack of knowledge on switching between hydrophobic and hydrophilic states. This arises mainly because of (1) the destructive nature of methods of assessing hydrophobicity, (2) its often high local spatial variability and (3) difficulties of relating hydrophobicity results to meaningful soil moisture values. Also, very little is known about the influence which cracks and holes through hydrophobic soil and the presence or absence of subsurface impeding layers have on the 3D pattern and speed of hydrophobicity change during wetting and drying cycles. These issues form the focus of the present paper, which was carried out as part of the EU DESIRE Project. A laboratory experimental approach was adopted. Three different soils of equal initial hydrophibicity class when dry (18 % MED), but of contrasting texture and total carbon content, were investigated: (1) from the scrub-covered (dominated by Erica umbellata, Calluna vulgaris and Pterospartum tridentatum) Vale Torto catchment in Gois municipality, central Portugal (an area where the impacts of prescribed fire were being assessed); (2) soil around a Chamaecyparis lawsonia tree in South Wales; and (3) a vegetated coastal sand-dune location at Nicholaston, Gower Peninsula, South Wales. For the experiments, 106 samples of sieved (< 2 mm), dried soil were placed to a depth of 10 cm in standardized transparent pots (16.5 cm high, top diameter 16 cm, basal diameter 11 cm). Equal numbers of samples were prepared with either (i) five simulated holes, (ii) two simulated linear cracks (in both cases extending downwards to the sample base) and (iii) control soil samples without cracks or holes). Samples were also either (i) sealed at the base to create subsurface impeded drainage or (ii) provided with unimpeded basal drainage by insertion of