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Sample records for lawsonia intracellularis serpulina

  1. Evidence of host adaptation in Lawsonia intracellularis infections

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lawsonia intracellularis is the causative agent of proliferative enteropathy, an endemic disease in pigs and an emerging concern in horses. Enterocyte hyperplasia is a common lesion in every case but there are differences regarding clinical and pathological presentations among affected species. We hypothesize that host susceptibility to L. intracellularis infection depends on the species of origin of the bacterial isolate. The objective of this study was to evaluate the susceptibilities of pigs and horses to L. intracellularis infection using either a porcine or an equine isolate. Materials and methods Twelve foals and eighteen pigs were equally divided into three groups and infected with either a porcine or an equine isolate (109L. Intracellularis/challenged animal), and a saline solution (negative control group). The animals were monitored regarding clinical signs, average of daily weight gain, fecal shedding of the bacteria by PCR and humoral serological response. Results Foals infected with the equine isolate developed moderate to severe clinical signs and maintained a lower average of weight gain compared to control foals. Fecal quantitative PCR in equine isolate-infected foals revealed higher amounts of bacterial DNA associated with longer duration of shedding compared with porcine isolate-infected foals. All four foals infected with the equine isolate demonstrated higher IgG titers in the serum compared with porcine isolate-infected foals. In the pig trial, diarrhea and seroconversion were only observed in animals infected with the porcine isolate. Pathological changes typical of proliferative enteropathy were observed in the necropsied foal infected with equine isolate and in the two necropsied pigs infected with the porcine isolate. Conclusions Evident clinical signs, longer periods of bacterial shedding and stronger serologic immune responses were observed in animals infected with species-specific isolates. These results show that host

  2. Generation of a monoclonal antibody against Mycoplasma spp. following accidental contamination during production of a monoclonal antibody against Lawsonia intracellularis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jeong-Min; Lee, Ji-Hye; Yeh, Jung-Yong

    2012-03-01

    This report describes Mycoplasma contamination of Lawsonia intracellularis cultures that led to the unintended acquisition of a monoclonal antibody against Mycoplasma spp. during the attempted generation of a monoclonal antibody against L. intracellularis.

  3. Lawsonia intracellularis-associated ulcerative and necro-hemorrhagic enteritis in 5 weanling foals

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Luis G.; ter Woort, Federica; Baird, John D.; Tatiersky, Laetitia; DeLay, Josepha; van Dreumel, Tony

    2013-01-01

    This report describes 5 cases of fatal Lawsonia intracellularis-associated ulcerative and necro-hemorrhagic enteritis in weanling Thoroughbred and Standardbred foals. The lesions are similar to those of the L. intracellularis-associated ulcerative and necro-hemorrhagic enteritis syndrome in pigs. Two foals had concurrent severe typhlo-colitis as a result of a large burden of encysted cyathostomes. The clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic challenges, and the potential complications encountered during the management of such cases are discussed. PMID:24155489

  4. Seroprevalence of Lawsonia intracellularis antibodies in intensive pig farms in China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Porcine proliferative enteropathy caused by Lawsonia intracellularis (L. intracellularis) is a major concern to the pig industry worldwide. Although 8.3 billion pigs are produced each year in China, few reports on the prevalence of L.intracellularis infection are available. The aim of the current study was to estimate the seroprevalence of L. intracellularis antibodies in intensive pig farms in China. Results A total of 1060 serum samples were collected from 14 commercial pig farms located throughout China. Animals from all age groups were sampled including pre-weaning piglets, weaners, fattening pigs, adult sows and boars. Antibodies against L. intracellularis were detected using a specific blocking ELISA. Of the 1060 serum samples, 602 were identified as positive using the ELISA test. The apparent seroprevalence of L. intracellularis seropositivity was 57% (95% CI 50 to 64%). The true prevalence (that is, prevalence corrected for the imperfect sensitivity and specificity of the testing method) was 77% (95% CI 70 to 83%). Conclusions The highest true prevalence was observed in sows and boars, suggesting that within a herd these stock classes are a reservoir for infection. The prevalence of L. intracellularis seropositivity in local breed pigs was significantly less than that in imported breeds. A higher seroprevalence was found in pigs in herds in Central and Northern China, which may correspond to the greater use of the intensive production systems in these areas. We conclude that L. intracellularis is widely prevalent in commercial pigs in China. PMID:24774304

  5. Colonisation and shedding of Lawsonia intracellularis in experimentally inoculated rodents and in wild rodents on pig farms.

    PubMed

    Collins, A M; Fell, S; Pearson, H; Toribio, J-A

    2011-06-02

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an intracellular bacterium causing proliferative enteropathy in various animal species, and is considered an economically important pathogen of pigs. Rats and mice have been implicated as external vectors for a wide range of pig pathogens, including L. intracellularis. Previous studies have demonstrated L. intracellularis infection and proliferative enteropathy in rodents, but did not show the duration of shedding or the number of L. intracellularis shed by infected rodents, and therefore the infection risk that rodents pose to pigs. In this study, the number of L. intracellularis shed in the faeces and intestinal mucosa of wild rats trapped on pig farms was determined by a quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction assay. The prevalence of L. intracellularis in wild rats trapped on pig farms with endemic proliferative enteropathy (PE) was very high (≥ 70.6%), and large numbers of L. intracellularis were shed (10(10)/g of faeces) in a small proportion of wild rats. The duration of colonisation in laboratory rats and mice challenged with porcine isolates of L. intracellularis was also shown. Faecal shedding of L. intracellularis persisted for 14-21 days in rats and mice that were mildly affected with histological lesions of PE. The humoral immune response to L. intracellularis persisted for 40 days in both species. This study demonstrates that rodents may be an important reservoir of L. intracellularis on piggeries, and hence rodent control is important in disease eradication programs on pig farms.

  6. Intestinal absorption and histomorphometry of Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) experimentally infected with Lawsonia intracellularis.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, Fabio Augusto; Borges, Elizabeth Lage; de Oliveira, Juliana Saes Vilaça; Guedes, Roberto Mauricio Carvalho

    2010-10-26

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the intestinal absorption and histomorphometry of hamsters experimentally infected with Lawsonia intracellularis and correlate these parameters with severity of infection based on immunohistochemistry. Sixty hamsters were equally divided into control and inoculated groups which were orally infected with intestinal mucosa homogenate from pigs naturally infected with L. intracellularis. The intestinal absorption of glucose, sodium, potassium and chloride was evaluated in live animals (25 inoculated and 25 control) on day 26 after inoculation. In this procedure, a standard solution was infused into the cranial jejunum and collected at the terminal ileum. The experimental infection was confirmed by gross and histopathological examination and L. intracellularis antigen labeling by immunohistochemistry. Histomorphometry analysis demonstrated positive correlation between intestinal crypt depth and severity of infection based on immunohistochemistry. Infected animals had significantly lower intestinal absorption of glucose, potassium and chloride. These results indicate a lower intestinal absorption as an important mechanism of diarrhea in hamsters experimentally infected with L. intracellularis. Therefore, malabsorption should be considered as the main mechanism involved in the physiopathology of the diarrhea in L. intracellularis infected animals.

  7. PREVALENCE OF ANTIBODY TO AND DNA OF LAWSONIA INTRACELLULARIS IN SAMPLES FROM WILD ANIMALS IN KOREA.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Mukter; Oh, Yeonsu; Cho, Ho-Seong

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated the prevalence of Lawsonia intracellularis infection in three wild animal species in Korea; the Korean water deer ( Hydropotes inermis ), Siberian roe deer ( Capreolus pygargus ), and raccoon dogs ( Nyctereutes procyonoides ). We collected 136 sera and 109 fecal samples from individuals in 10 Wildlife Rescue and Conservation Centers. Serum samples were tested for anti- L. intracellularis antibodies using a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (bELISA), and fecal samples were subjected to a real-time PCR assay for L. intracellularis . Thirty-five (25.7%) sera and 36 (33.0%) fecal samples were positive. We found a higher proportion of positive sera (64.7%, χ(2)=15.439, P<0.01) and feces (58.8%, χ(2)=6.126, P<0.05) in raccoon dogs (χ(2)=11.855, P<0.01) than in the other species (20% positive sera and 29% positive feces in Korean water deer; 20% positive sera and 25% positive feces in Siberian roe deer). Our data indicate infection by L. intracellularis in Korean water deer, Siberian roe deer, and raccoon dogs throughout the country. It is imperative to know whether these infected animal species are natural hosts for L. intracellularis in addition to domestic pigs ( Sus scrofa domesticus).

  8. Proteomic analysis of Lawsonia intracellularis reveals expression of outer membrane proteins during infection.

    PubMed

    Watson, Eleanor; Alberdi, M Pilar; Inglis, Neil F; Lainson, Alex; Porter, Megan E; Manson, Erin; Imrie, Lisa; Mclean, Kevin; Smith, David G E

    2014-12-05

    Lawsonia intracellularis is the aetiological agent of the commercially significant porcine disease, proliferative enteropathy. Current understanding of host-pathogen interaction is limited due to the fastidious microaerophilic obligate intracellular nature of the bacterium. In the present study, expression of bacterial proteins during infection was investigated using a mass spectrometry approach. LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of two isolates of L. intracellularis from heavily-infected epithelial cell cultures and database mining using fully annotated L. intracellularis genome sequences identified 19 proteins. According to the Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) functional classification, proteins were identified with roles in cell metabolism, protein synthesis and oxidative stress protection; seven proteins with putative or unknown function were also identified. Detailed bioinformatic analyses of five uncharacterised proteins, which were expressed by both isolates, identified domains and motifs common to other outer membrane-associated proteins with important roles in pathogenesis including adherence and invasion. Analysis of recombinant proteins on Western blots using immune sera from L. intracellularis-infected pigs identified two proteins, LI0841 and LI0902 as antigenic. The detection of five outer membrane proteins expressed during infection, including two antigenic proteins, demonstrates the potential of this approach to interrogate L. intracellularis host-pathogen interactions and identify novel targets which may be exploited in disease control.

  9. The influence of diet on Lawsonia intracellularis colonization in pigs upon experimental challenge.

    PubMed

    Boesen, Henriette T; Jensen, Tim K; Schmidt, Anja S; Jensen, Bent B; Jensen, Søren M; Møller, Kristian

    2004-10-05

    The objective of this investigation was to study if different feeding strategies influence experimental infections of pigs with Lawsonia intracellularis, the causative agent of proliferative enteropathy. In three sequential trials, a total of 144 weaned pigs were fed five different diets all made from a standard diet based on wheat and barley as carbohydrate source and soybean as protein source. The five diets were: a standard diet (fine ground and pelleted), the standard diet fed as fermented liquid feed, the standard diet added 1.8% formic acid, the standard diet added 2.4% lactic acid and a diet similar to the standard diet (made from the same ingredients), but fed coarse ground. Twenty-four pigs on each diet were orally inoculated with L. intracellularis and growth performance and faecal excretion of bacteria were monitored. Twenty-four pigs fed the standard diet were included as not experimentally infected controls. Pigs in the first two trials were sacrificed 4 weeks post-inoculation, whereas animals in the third trial were sacrificed after 5 weeks. Pigs in all experimentally infected groups excreted L. intracellularis. The fermented liquid diet delayed the excretion of L. intracellularis and furthermore, pigs fed the standard diet supplemented with lactic acid had limited pathological lesions when the intestines were examined 4 weeks after inoculation. The growth performance was reduced in pigs experimentally challenged with L. intracellularis, however the prevalence and severity of diarrhea was limited.

  10. In vitro antimicrobial activity against 10 North American and European Lawsonia intracellularis isolates.

    PubMed

    Wattanaphansak, Suphot; Singer, Randall S; Gebhart, Connie J

    2009-03-02

    The objective of this study was to determine the in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of antimicrobials against 10 isolates of Lawsonia intracellularis, the etiological agent of proliferative enteropathy (PE). Antimicrobials tested included carbadox, chlortetracycline, lincomycin, tiamulin, tylosin and valnemulin. The MIC of each antimicrobial against L. intracellularis was determined using a tissue culture system and was identified as the lowest concentration that inhibited 99% of L. intracellularis growth, as compared to the antimicrobial-free control. Each antimicrobial concentration was evaluated for both intracellular and extracellular activity against L. intracellularis, an obligately intracellular bacterium. When tested for intracellular activity, carbadox, tiamulin, and valnemulin were the most active antimicrobials with MICs of < or =0.5microg/ml. Tylosin (MICs ranging from 0.25 to 32microg/ml) and chlortetracycline (MICs ranging from 0.125 to 64microg/ml) showed intermediate activities and lincomycin (MICs ranging from 8 to >128mIcog/ml) showed the least activity. When tested for extracellular activity, valnemulin (MICs ranging from 0.125 to 4microg/ml) was the most active against most L. intracellularis isolates. Chlortetracycline (MICs ranging from 16 to 64microg/ml), tylosin (MICs ranging from 1 to >128microg/ml), and tiamulin (MICs ranging from 1 to 32microg/ml) showed intermediate activities. Lincomycin (MICs ranging from 32 to >128microg/ml) showed the least activity. Our in vitro results showed that each L. intracellularis isolate had a different antimicrobial sensitivity pattern and these data can be utilized as an in vitro guideline for the further antimicrobial evaluation of field L. intracellularis isolates.

  11. Efficacy of gallium maltolate against Lawsonia intracellularis infection in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, F; Allen, A L; Alcorn, J; Clark, C R; Vannucci, F A; Pusterla, N; Mapes, S M; Ball, K R; Dowling, P M; Thompson, J; Bernstein, L R; Gebhart, C J; Hamilton, D L

    2014-12-01

    Antimicrobial efficacy against Lawsonia intracellularis is difficult to evaluate in vitro, thus, the effects of gallium maltolate's (GaM) were investigated in a rabbit model for equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). Juvenile (5-6-week-old) does were infected with 3.0 × 10(8) L. intracellularis/rabbit and allocated into three groups (n = 8). One week postinfection, one group was treated with GaM, 50 mg/kg; one, with doxycycline, 5 mg/kg; and one with a sham-treatment (control). Feces and blood were collected daily and weekly, respectively, to verify presence of L. intracellularis fecal shedding using qPCR, and seroconversion using immunoperoxidase monolayer assay. Rabbits were sacrificed after 1 week of treatment to collect intestinal tissues focusing on EPE-affected sections. Intestinal lesions were confirmed via immunohistochemistry. No difference was noted between treatments regarding EPE-lesions in jejunum (P = 0.51), ileum (P = 0.74), and cecum (P = 0.35), or in L. intracellularis fecal shedding (P = 0.64). GaM and doxycycline appear to have similar efficacy against EPE in infected rabbits.

  12. Further investigation of exposure to Lawsonia intracellularis in wild and feral animals captured on horse properties with equine proliferative enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Pusterla, Nicola; Mapes, Samantha; Gebhart, Connie

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the exposure to Lawsonia intracellularis in wild birds, mice, rabbits, raccoons, coyotes and squirrels, and feral cats and pigs on 10 farms with confirmed equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). Serum samples from all resident foals (417 samples) as well as fecal (461) and serum (106) samples from wild and feral animals were collected for serological and molecular detection of L. intracellularis following the diagnosis of EPE in index cases. A total of three cats from two farms, three mice from two farms and eight cottontail rabbits from one farm had evidence of prior exposure to L. intracellularis. These animals may be an indicator of environmental exposure or may be actively involved in the transmission of L. intracellularis to foals by acting as a potential reservoir/amplifier host.

  13. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Two Lawsonia intracellularis Isolates Associated with Proliferative Hemorrhagic Enteropathy and Porcine Intestinal Adenomatosis in South Korea▿

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Jung-Yong; Lee, Ji-Hye; Yeh, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Aeran; Lee, Ji Youn; Hwang, Jeong-Min; Kang, Bo-Kyu; Kim, Jong-Man; Choi, In-Soo; Lee, Joong-Bok

    2011-01-01

    This study represents the first published data on antimicrobial susceptibility of Asian isolates of Lawsonia intracellularis. We assessed MICs of 16 antimicrobials for two isolates of L. intracellularis recovered from diseased pigs in South Korea, one from a finisher pig with acute proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy in 2002 and the other from a grower pig with porcine intestinal adenomatosis in 2010. Tylosin and tilmicosin were found to be the most active against L. intracellularis both intracellularly (MICs, 0.25 to 0.5 μg/ml and 0.125 μg/ml, respectively) and extracellularly (MICs, 0.25 to 0.5 μg/ml and 1 μg/ml, respectively). PMID:21690283

  14. Species-specificity of equine and porcine Lawsonia intracellularis isolates in laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Francesca; Vannucci, Fabio A; Allen, Andrew L; Pusterla, Nicola; Antonopoulos, Aphroditi J; Ball, Katherine R; Thompson, Julie; Dowling, Patricia M; Hamilton, Don L; Gebhart, Connie J

    2013-10-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis infection causes proliferative enteropathy (PE) in many mammalian species, with porcine and equine proliferative enteropathy (PPE and EPE) known worldwide. Hamsters are a well-published animal model for PPE infection studies in pigs. There is no laboratory animal model for EPE infection studies and it is not known whether there is species-specificity for equine or porcine isolates of L. intracellularis in animal models. The objective of this study was to determine whether it is possible to generate typical EPE lesions in hamsters after inoculation with an equine strain of L. intracellularis (EPE strain) and whether it is comparatively possible to generate PPE lesions in rabbits after inoculation with a porcine strain of L. intracellularis (PPE strain). In 2 separate trials, 4-week-old and 3-week-old weanling golden Syrian hamsters were challenged with EPE strains and compared to uninfected (both trials) and PPE-infected controls (Trial 2 only). Concurrently, 6 female New Zealand white juvenile rabbits were infected with PPE strain and observed concomitantly to 8 similar rabbits infected with EPE strain for a different experiment. Hamsters and rabbits were observed for 21 to 24 days post-infection (DPI), depending on the experiment. Neither infected species developed clinical signs. The presence of disease was assessed with diagnostic techniques classically used for pigs and horses: immune-peroxidase monolayer assay on sera; quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) detection of molecular DNA in feces; and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain and immunohistochemistry (IHC) on intestinal tissues. Our results showed that EPE-challenged hamsters do not develop infection when compared with PPE controls (IHC, P = 0.009; qPCR, P = 0.0003). Conversely, PPE-challenged rabbits do not develop typical intestinal lesions in comparison to EPE-challenged rabbits, with serological response at 14 DPI being significantly lower (P = 0.0023). In conclusion

  15. Species-specificity of equine and porcine Lawsonia intracellularis isolates in laboratory animals

    PubMed Central

    Sampieri, Francesca; Vannucci, Fabio A.; Allen, Andrew L.; Pusterla, Nicola; Antonopoulos, Aphroditi J.; Ball, Katherine R.; Thompson, Julie; Dowling, Patricia M.; Hamilton, Don L.; Gebhart, Connie J.

    2013-01-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis infection causes proliferative enteropathy (PE) in many mammalian species, with porcine and equine proliferative enteropathy (PPE and EPE) known worldwide. Hamsters are a well-published animal model for PPE infection studies in pigs. There is no laboratory animal model for EPE infection studies and it is not known whether there is species-specificity for equine or porcine isolates of L. intracellularis in animal models. The objective of this study was to determine whether it is possible to generate typical EPE lesions in hamsters after inoculation with an equine strain of L. intracellularis (EPE strain) and whether it is comparatively possible to generate PPE lesions in rabbits after inoculation with a porcine strain of L. intracellularis (PPE strain). In 2 separate trials, 4-week-old and 3-week-old weanling golden Syrian hamsters were challenged with EPE strains and compared to uninfected (both trials) and PPE-infected controls (Trial 2 only). Concurrently, 6 female New Zealand white juvenile rabbits were infected with PPE strain and observed concomitantly to 8 similar rabbits infected with EPE strain for a different experiment. Hamsters and rabbits were observed for 21 to 24 days post-infection (DPI), depending on the experiment. Neither infected species developed clinical signs. The presence of disease was assessed with diagnostic techniques classically used for pigs and horses: immune-peroxidase monolayer assay on sera; quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) detection of molecular DNA in feces; and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain and immunohistochemistry (IHC) on intestinal tissues. Our results showed that EPE-challenged hamsters do not develop infection when compared with PPE controls (IHC, P = 0.009; qPCR, P = 0.0003). Conversely, PPE-challenged rabbits do not develop typical intestinal lesions in comparison to EPE-challenged rabbits, with serological response at 14 DPI being significantly lower (P = 0.0023). In conclusion

  16. Changes in the Porcine Intestinal Microbiome in Response to Infection with Salmonella enterica and Lawsonia intracellularis

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Randall S.; Gebhart, Connie J.; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Johnson, Timothy; Isaacson, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a leading cause of food borne illness. Recent studies have shown that S. enterica is a pathogen capable of causing alterations to the composition of the intestinal microbiome. A recent prospective study of French pork production farms found a statistically significant association between Lawsonia intracellularis and carriage of S. enterica. In the current study the composition of the gut microbiome was determined in pigs challenged with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and or L. intracellularis and compared to non-challenged control pigs. Principal coordinate analysis demonstrated that there was a disruption in the composition of the gut microbiome in the colon and cecum of pigs challenged with either pathogen. The compositions of the microbiomes of challenged pigs were similar to each other but differed from the non-challenged controls. There also were statistically significant increases in Anaerobacter, Barnesiella, Pediococcus, Sporacetigenium, Turicibacter, Catenibacterium, Prevotella, Pseudobutyrivibrio, and Xylanibacter in the challenged pigs. To determine if these changes were specific to experimentally challenged pigs, we determined the compositions of the fecal microbiomes of naturally infected pigs that were carriers of S. enterica. Pigs that were frequent shedders of S. enterica were shown to have similar fecal microbiomes compared to non-shedders or pigs that shed S. enterica infrequently. In a comparison of the differentially abundant bacteria in the naturally infected pigs compared to experimentally challenged pigs, 9 genera were differentially abundant and each exhibited the same increase or decrease in abundance between the two groups. Thus, there were similar changes in the GI microbiome associated with carriage of S. enterica regardless of whether the pigs were experimentally challenged with S. enterica or acquired it naturally. PMID:26461107

  17. Comprehensive miRNA expression profiles in the ilea of Lawsonia intracellularis-infected pigs

    PubMed Central

    LI, Hongyi; ZHANG, Mao; ZHENG, Enqin

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the miRNA expression profiles in Lawsonia intracellularis-infected porcine intestines, infected pigs were first identified using PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction). Then, RNA from infected intestines and control tissues were isolated and subjected to microarray analysis and RT-PCR. Results showed that a total of 83 miRNAs were differentially expressed between the infected samples and controls, out of which 53 were upregulated and 30 were downregulated. Validation using RT-PCR showed a high degree of confidence for the obtained data. Using the current miRBase release 21.0, nine groups of miRNAs were located in the same cluster, and three groups of miRNAs were found to belong to the same family. Interestingly, except for ssc-miR-10a-5p, all clustered miRNAs and the family members exhibited the same expression patterns. Pathway analysis of the putative gene targets of the differentially expressed miRNAs showed that they were involved in the immune response, amino acid metabolism and cell communication/growth/motility. Thus, the results indicate that altered miRNA expression profiles can affect immunity, metabolism and cellular processes. PMID:27916787

  18. Comparative genome sequencing identifies a prophage-associated genomic island linked to host adaptation of Lawsonia intracellularis infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an obligate intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of proliferative enteropathy (PE). The disease is endemic in pigs, emerging in horses and has also been reported in a variety of other animal species, including nonhuman primates. Comparing the whole genome sequences of a homologous porcine L. intracellularis isolate cultivated for 10 and 60 passages in vitro, we identified a 18-kb prophage-associated genomic island in the passage 10 (pathogenic variant) that was lost in the passage 60 (non-pathogenic variant). This chromosomal island comprises 15 genes downstream from the prophage DLP12 integrase gene. The prevalence of this genetic element was evaluated in 12 other L. intracellularis isolates and in 53 infected animals and was found to be conserved in all porcine isolates cultivated for up to 20 passages and was lost in isolates cultivated for more than 40 passages. Furthermore, the prophage region was also present in 26 fecal samples derived from pigs clinically affected with both acute and chronic forms of the disease. Nevertheless, equine L. intracellularis isolates evaluated did not harbor this genomic island regardless of the passage in vitro. Additionally, fecal samples from 21 clinically affected horses and four wild rabbits trapped in horse farms experiencing PE outbreaks did not show this prophage-associated island. Although the presence of this prophage-associated island was not essential for a virulent L. intracellularis phenotype, this genetic element was porcine isolate-specific and potentially contributed to the ecological specialization of this organism for the swine host. PMID:23826661

  19. Down-regulation of mechanisms involved in cell transport and maintenance of mucosal integrity in pigs infected with Lawsonia intracellularis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an obligate intracellular bacterium, responsible for the disease complex known as proliferative enteropathy (PE). L. intracellularis is associated with intestinal crypt epithelial cell proliferation but the mechanisms responsible are yet to be defined. Microarray analysis was used to investigate the host-pathogen interaction in experimentally infected pigs to identify pathways that may be involved. Ileal samples originating from twenty-eight weaner pigs experimentally challenged with a pure culture of L. intracellularis (strain LR189/5/83) were subjected to microarray analysis. Microarray transcriptional signatures were validated using immunohistochemistry and quantitative real time PCR of selected genes at various time points post challenge. At peak of infection (14 days post challenge) 86% of altered transcripts were down regulated, particularly those involved in maintenance of mucosal integrity and regulation of cell transport. Among the up-regulated transcripts, CD163 and CDK1 were novel findings and considered to be important, due to their respective roles in innate immunity and cellular proliferation. Overall, targeted cellular mechanisms included those that are important in epithelial restitution, migration and protection; maintenance of stable inter-epithelial cell relationships; cell transport of nutrients and electrolytes; innate immunity; and cell cycle. PMID:24885874

  20. Detection of Lawsonia intracellularis by real-time PCR in the feces of free-living animals from equine farms with documented occurrence of equine proliferative enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Pusterla, Nicola; Mapes, Samantha; Rejmanek, Daniel; Gebhart, Connie

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether Lawsonia intracellularis was present in the feces of free-living animals collected on two equine premises with documented occurrence of equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). Fresh feces from black-tailed jackrabbits (Lepus californicus, n=100), striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis, n=22), feral cats (Felis catus, n=14), Brewer's Blackbirds (Euphagus cyanocephalus, n=10), Virginian opossums (Didelphis virginiana, n=9), raccoons (Procyon lotor, n=4), California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi, n=3), and coyotes (Canis latrans, n=2) were collected from August 2006 to January 2007 either from the ground while walking the premises or after trapping the animals using live traps. Nucleic acid purified from feces was directly processed for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis using a real-time PCR assay targeting the aspartate ammonia lyase gene of L. intracellularis. Purified DNA samples were also precipitated, preamplified for L. intracellularis, and analyzed using the same real-time PCR assay, to increase the detection limit to one L. intracellularis organism per extracted sample. Feces from jackrabbits, striped skunks, Virginian opossums, and coyotes tested PCR positive for L. intracellularis, whereas all feces from feral cats, Brewer's Blackbirds, raccoons, and ground squirrels tested PCR negative for L. intracellularis. PCR testing on DNA extracted directly from feces was positive for L. intracellularis in six of 164 fecal samples. When DNA purification from feces was followed by a precipitation and preamplification step, five additional fecal samples tested PCR positive for L. intracellularis (11/164). The largest number of PCR positive L. intracellularis fecal samples was observed in striped skunks, followed by Virginian opossums, jackrabbits, and coyotes. This is the first description of L. intracellularis in these four species. Because the fecal samples were collected at equine farms with confirmed

  1. An outbreak of Lawsonia intracellularis infection in a standardbred herd in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    McGurrin, M. Kimberly J.; Vengust, Modest; Arroyo, Luis G.; Baird, John D.

    2007-01-01

    An outbreak of protein-losing enteropathy associated with Lawsonia intracelluaris infection was diagnosed in 6 standardbred foals from a farm in Ontario. Wildlife exposure may have been involved in the perpetuation of disease in this outbreak. The clinical presentation, treatment, outcomes, and pathological findings are described. PMID:17966333

  2. Lawsonia intracellularis exploits β-catenin/Wnt and Notch signalling pathways during infection of intestinal crypt to alter cell homeostasis and promote cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Yang W.; Bengtsson, Rebecca J.; MacIntyre, Neil; Guthrie, Jack; Finlayson, Heather; Smith, Sionagh H.; Archibald, Alan L.; Ait-Ali, Tahar

    2017-01-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes proliferative enteropathy (PE) in pigs. L. intracellularis infection causes extensive intestinal crypt cell proliferation and inhibits secretory and absorptive cell differentiation. However, the affected host upstream cellular pathways leading to PE are still unknown. β-catenin/Wnt signalling is essential in maintaining intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation and self-renewal capacity, while Notch signalling governs differentiation of secretory and absorptive lineage specification. Therefore, in this report we used immunofluorescence (IF) and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RTqPCR) to examine β-catenin/Wnt and Notch-1 signalling levels in uninfected and L. intracellularis infected pig ileums at 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days post challenge (dpc). We found that while the significant increase in Ki67+ nuclei in crypts at the peak of L. intracellularis infection suggested enhanced cell proliferation, the expression of c-MYC and ASCL2, promoters of cell growth and ISC proliferation respectively, was down-regulated. Peak infection also coincided with enhanced cytosolic and membrane-associated β-catenin staining and induction of AXIN2 and SOX9 transcripts, both encoding negative regulators of β-catenin/Wnt signalling and suggesting a potential alteration to β-catenin/Wnt signalling levels, with differential regulation of the expression of its target genes. We found that induction of HES1 and OLFM4 and the down-regulation of ATOH1 transcript levels was consistent with the increased Notch-1 signalling in crypts at the peak of infection. Interestingly, the significant down-regulation of ATOH1 transcript levels coincided with the depletion of MUC2 expression at 14 dpc, consistent with the role of ATOH1 in promoting goblet cell maturation. The lack of significant change to LGR5 transcript levels at the peak of infection suggested that the crypt hyperplasia was not due to the expansion

  3. A randomised clinical trial on the efficacy of oxytetracycline dose through water medication of nursery pigs on diarrhoea, faecal shedding of Lawsonia intracellularis and average daily weight gain.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Inge; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Holm, Anders; Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Nielsen, Jens Peter

    2016-01-01

    Oral treatment with antimicrobials is widely used in pig production for the control of gastrointestinal infections. Lawsonia intracellularis (LI) causes enteritis in pigs older than six weeks of age and is commonly treated with antimicrobials. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of three oral dosage regimens (5, 10 and 20mg/kg body weight) of oxytetracycline (OTC) in drinking water over a five-day period on diarrhoea, faecal shedding of LI and average daily weight gain (ADG). A randomised clinical trial was carried out in four Danish pig herds. In total, 539 animals from 37 batches of nursery pigs were included in the study. The dosage regimens were randomly allocated to each batch and initiated at presence of assumed LI-related diarrhoea. In general, all OTC doses used for the treatment of LI infection resulted in reduced diarrhoea and LI shedding after treatment. Treatment with a low dose of 5mg/kg OTC per kg body weight, however, tended to cause more watery faeces and resulted in higher odds of pigs shedding LI above detection level when compared to medium and high doses (with odds ratios of 5.5 and 8.4, respectively). No association was found between the dose of OTC and the ADG. In conclusion, a dose of 5mg OTC per kg body weight was adequate for reducing the high-level LI shedding associated with enteropathy, but a dose of 10mg OTC per kg body weight was necessary to obtain a maximum reduction in LI shedding.

  4. Prevalence and risk factors for Lawsonia intracellularis, Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and Salmonella spp. in finishing pigs in Polish farrow-to-finish swine herds.

    PubMed

    Dors, A; Pomorska-Mól, M; Czyżewska, E; Wasyl, D; Pejsak, Z

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the herd-level, within-herd prevalence, the frequency of mixed infections and risk factors for L. intracellularis, B. hyodysenteriae and Salmonella spp. in selected farrow-to-finish Polish pig herds. A total of 254 pooled fecal samples were collected from 9 to 24 week-old pigs in 70 herds. Real time PCR for detection of L. intracellularis and B. hyodysenteriae was performed. For Salmonella spp. bacteriological examination was performed. The herd-level prevalences of L. intracellularis, B. hyodysenteriae and Salmonella spp. among examined herds were 65.7%, 1.4% and 8.6%, respectively. The within-herd prevalences (in positive herds) for L. intracellularis, B. hyodysenteriae and Salmonella spp. were 51.5%, 75.0% and 30.4%, respectively. All herds with diarrhea observed during sampling were infected with L. intracellularis and 60% of herds with no diarrhea at the moment of sampling were infected with L. intracellularis (p=0.035). In herds with more than 200 sows the prevalence of Salmonella spp. was significantly higher compared to herds with less than 200 sows (p=0.027). In herds where all-in/all-out (AIAO) was respected, prevalence of L. intracellularis was significantly lower than in herds where this rule was not kept (p=0.024). Obtained results confirm that L. intracellularis is the major cause of bacterial diarrhea in finishing pigs. The present study identified AIAO and herd size as a risk factor, at the herd level, for L. intracellularis and Salmonella spp., respectively.

  5. Diagnostic and epidemiological features of Lawsonia intracellularis enteropathy in 2 foals

    PubMed Central

    Dauvillier, Julie; Picandet, Valérie; Harel, Josée; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Desrosiers, Robert; Jean, Daniel; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Two clinical cases of equine proliferative enteropathy are described. Both foals had a positive fecal polymerase chain reaction, but shedding of the bacterium stopped < 4 days after therapy was initiated. One foal was serologically positive 3 days after onset of clinical signs and remained positive for more than 6 months. PMID:16898113

  6. Pharmacokinetics of gallium maltolate in Lawsonia intracellularis-infected and uninfected rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, F; Alcorn, J; Allen, A L; Clark, C R; Vannucci, F A; Pusterla, N; Mapes, S; Ball, K R; Dowling, P M; Thompson, J; Bernstein, L R; Gebhart, C J; Hamilton, D L

    2014-10-01

    Oral gallium maltolate (GaM) pharmacokinetics (PK) and intestinal tissue (IT) concentrations of elemental gallium ([Ga]) and iron ([Fe]) were investigated in a rabbit model of equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). New Zealand white does (uninfected controls and EPE-infected, n = 6/group) were given a single oral GaM dose (50 mg/kg). Serial blood samples were collected from 0 to 216 h post-treatment (PT) and IT samples after euthanasia. Serology, qPCR, and immunohistochemistry confirmed, or excluded, EPE. Blood and IT [Ga] and [Fe] were determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. PK parameters were estimated through noncompartmental approaches. For all statistical comparisons on [Ga] and [Fe] α = 5%. The Ga log-linear terminal phase rate constant was lower in EPE rabbits vs. uninfected controls [0.0116 ± 0.004 (SD) vs. 0.0171 ± 0.0028 per hour; P = 0.03]; but half-life (59.4 ± 24.0 vs. 39.4 ± 10.8 h; P = 0.12); Cmax (0.50 ± 0.21 vs. 0.59 ± 0.42 μg/mL; P = 0.45); tmax (1.75 ± 0.41 vs. 0.9 ± 0.37 h; P = 0.20); and oral clearance (6.743 ± 1.887 vs. 7.208 ± 2.565 L/h; P = 0.74) were not. IT's [Ga] and [Fe] were higher (P < 0.0001) in controls. In conclusion, although infection reduces IT [Ga] and [Fe], a 48 h GaM dosing interval is appropriate for multidose studies in EPE rabbits.

  7. Relationship between Ileal symbiont intracellularis and porcine proliferative enteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, G F; Ward, G E; Murtaugh, M P; Rose, R; Gebhart, C J

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between Ileal symbiont (IS) intracellularis, formerly known as a Campylobacter-like organism, and porcine proliferative enteritis (PE) was studied by use of pigs with experimentally transmitted PE. Twenty one pigs were experimentally inoculated with homogenized ileal mucosa from a pig that died with PE, and 7 were maintained as uninoculated controls. Fecal samples were collected, and pigs were necropsied weekly postinoculation. Light microscopy and electron microscopy were used to examine tissues for lesions of PE and infectious agents. DNA was extracted from the fecal samples and assayed for the presence of sequences specific for IS intracellularis by dot blot hybridization and polymerase chain reaction amplification. IS intracellularis was detected by the polymerase chain reaction in the feces of 20 of 21 inoculated pigs but not in the feces of uninoculated pigs. Seven inoculated pigs but no uninoculated pigs were detected shedding IS intracellularis by dot blot hybridization. Shedding was detected 1 to 5 weeks after inoculation, and clinical signs were seen in the second to fifth weeks after inoculation. Few pigs without lesions of PE were found to shed IS intracellularis. There was a highly significant association between the presence of IS intracellularis in feces or tissue and the presence of microscopic proliferative lesions and between the severity of the lesions of PE and the percentage of IS intracellularis-infected intestinal crypts. Pigs that ceased shedding IS intracellularis were significantly less likely to have proliferative lesions. These and previous reports are consistent with the hypothesis that IS intracellularis is a necessary causative agent of PE. Images PMID:8225599

  8. Development of an experimental model allowing discrimination between virulent and avirulent isolates of Serpulina (Treponema) hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed Central

    Achacha, M; Messier, S; Mittal, K R

    1996-01-01

    Variation in virulence among different strains of Serpulina hyodysenteriae was studied by oral inoculation of specific pathogen free piglets and CD-1 mice. Piglets infected with serotype 2 reference strain B204 and an untypable field strain LHV-90-9-I had severe diarrhea tainted intermittently with mucus and fresh blood. The piglets inoculated with B169, B8044, B6933, and ACK300-8 reference strains representing serotypes 3, 5, 6, and 7 respectively developed moderate diarrhea. However, reference strains B234 and A-1 of serotypes 1 and 4, respectively, failed to cause any diarrhea. None of the S. hyodysenteriae strains caused diarrhea in mice. The results indicate a great variation in virulence among strains of different serotypes of S. hyodysenteriae. Mice were less susceptible to infection with S. hyodysenteriae. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8825993

  9. A species-specific periplasmic flagellar protein of Serpulina (Treponema) hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z; Dumas, F; Dubreuil, D; Jacques, M

    1993-01-01

    We have previously reported that a 46-kDa protein present in an outer membrane protein preparation seemed to be a species-specific antigen of Serpulina hyodysenteriae (Z. S. Li, N. S. Jensen, M. Bélanger, M.-C. L'Espérance, and M. Jacques, J. Clin. Microbiol. 30:2941-2947, 1992). The objective of this study was to further characterize this antigen. A Western blot (immunoblot) analysis and immunogold labeling with a monospecific antiserum against this protein confirmed that the protein was present in all S. hyodysenteriae reference strains but not in the nonpathogenic organism Serpulina innocens. The immunogold labeling results also indicated that the protein was associated with the periplasmic flagella of S. hyodysenteriae. N-terminal amino acid sequencing confirmed that the protein was in fact a periplasmic flagellar sheath protein. The molecular mass of this protein, first estimated to be 46 kDa by Western blotting, was determined to be 44 kDa when the protein was evaluated more precisely by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the protein was glycosylated, as determined by glycoprotein staining and also by N-glycosidase F treatment. Five other periplasmic flagellar proteins of S. hyodysenteriae, which may have been the core proteins and had molecular masses of 39, 35, 32, 30, and 29 kDa, were antigenically related and cross-reacted with the periplasmic flagellar proteins of S. innocens. Finally, serum from a pig experimentally infected with S. hyodysenteriae recognized the 44-kDa periplasmic flagellar sheath protein. Our results suggest that the 44-kDa periplasmic flagellar sheath protein of S. hyodysenteriae is a species-specific glycoprotein antigen. Images PMID:8253687

  10. Identification of a gene sequence encoding a putative pyruvate oxidoreductase in Serpulina pilosicoli.

    PubMed

    Rayment, S J; Lee, B J; Hampson, D J; Livesley, M A

    1998-09-01

    Serpulina pilosicoli is a recently described species of intestinal spirochaete which can be identified using a species-specific monoclonal antibody BJL/AC1 reactive with a 29-kDa protein located in the cell envelope. A genomic library of the type strain of S. pilosicoli P43/6/78T was created in lambda zap express and screened using BJL/AC1. Single positive clones were isolated and excised into the phagemid vector pBK-CMV. Phagemid DNA was purified and a single clone was selected for sequencing. The size of spirochaetal DNA insert was determined by digestion with restriction endonucleases EcoRI and PstI as being approximately 2.6 kb. The nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the protein with which the antibody reacted was determined by cycle sequencing. The insert contained an open reading frame of 285 nucleotides. Translation of the nucleotide sequence into amino acid (aa) residues showed a sequence of 275 aa. Comparison of this sequence with databases revealed homology to pyruvate oxidoreductases from various organisms found in the gastroinestinal tract. These included the pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR) alpha submit of Helicobacter pylori (38.8% identity in 250 aa), pyruvate-flavodoxin oxidoreductase of Escherichia coli (28.7% identify in 258 aa) and Giardia intestinalis (25.1% identity in 251 aa). A significant level of homology was also observed with hyperthermophilic bacteria such as the POR of Thermatoga maritima (38.6% in 254 aa) and the 2-ketovalerate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase of Pyrococcus furiosus (34% in 262 aa).

  11. Molluscicidal activity of Lawsonia inermis and its binary and tertiary combinations with other plant derived molluscicides.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Singh, D K

    2001-03-01

    Molluscicidal activity of leaf, bark and seed of Lawsonia inermis against Lymnaea acuminata and Indoplanorbis exustus was studied. Highest toxicity was observed in the seed of Lawsonia inermis. Toxicity of binary (1:1) and tertiary (1:1:1) combinations of the essential oil of cedar (Cedrus deodara Roxh) and neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss), powder from bulb of garlic (Allium sativum Linn), and oleoresin extracted from rhizome of ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc) with Lawsonia inermis and Embelia ribes fruit powder were studied against L. acuminata and I. exustus. L. inermis seed powder in combination with Cedrus deodara oil and Azadirachta indica oil was more toxic than their individual components and other combinations.

  12. Pharmacognostic Specifications and Lawsone Content of Lawsonia inermis Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Charoensup, Rawiwan; Duangyod, Thidarat; Palanuvej, Chanida; Ruangrungsi, Nijsiri

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lawsonia inermis L. has been used as a traditional or folk medicine for the treatment of a wide range of skin infectious diseases. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacognostic specifications and lawsone contents of L. inermis leaves. Materials and Methods: The pharmacognostic specifications of L. inermis leaves from 12 sources were evaluated according to the WHO guideline of quality control method for medicinal plant materials. The lawsone contents were analyzed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) coupled with densitometry and image analysis. Results: Microscopic evaluation of L. inermis powders showed the fragment of mesophyll, fragment of parenchyma, epidermis layer with stomata, and the rosette crystal of calcium oxalate. Physicochemical parameters revealed that total ash, acid-insoluble ash, loss on drying, and water content should be not <6.98, 1.12, 8.08, and 9.86% of dried weight, respectively, whereas ethanol and water extractive values should be not < 19.67 and 23.06% of dried weight, respectively. The content of lawsone in L. inermis leaves by TLC-densitometry was found to be 0.76 ± 0.05 g/100 g of dried crude drug, whereas the lawsone content evaluation by TLC image analysis was found to be 0.87 ± 0.11 g/100 g of dried crude drug. The validation of the methods revealed that both TLC-densitometry and TLC image analysis showed a good sensitivity and accuracy for lawsone quantitation in L. inermis. Conclusion: The pharmacognostic specifications could be used as the standardization data of L. inermis leaves, and the development of TLC method could be applied to determine lawsone content in this plant material. SUMMARY The pharmacognostic specification of Lawsonia inermis leaves could be used as the standardization data of L. inermis leaves in Thailand.Both TLC-densitometry and TLC image analysis showed a good sensitivity and accuracy for lawsone quantitation. Abbreviations Used: LOD: Limit of detection; LOQ: Limit

  13. The prevalence of Serpulina pilosicoli in humans and domestic animals in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Trott, D J; Combs, B G; Mikosza, A S; Oxberry, S L; Robertson, I D; Passey, M; Taime, J; Sehuko, R; Alpers, M P; Hampson, D J

    1997-12-01

    In a survey of five villages in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea, Serpulina pilosicoli was isolated from rectal swabs from 113 of 496 individuals (22.8%). Colonization rates ranged from 22.6-30.1% in four of the villages but was only 8.6% in the other village. In comparison colonization was demonstrated in only 5 of 54 indigenous people (9.3%) and none of 76 non-indigenous people living in an urban environment in the same region. Colonization did not relate to reported occurrence of diarrhoea, age, sex, or length of time resident in a village. A second set of 94 faecal specimens was collected from 1 village 6 weeks after the first set. S. pilosicoli was isolated from 27 of 29 individuals (93.1%) who were positive on the first sampling and from 7 of 65 individuals (10.8%) who previously were negative. In this case, isolates were significantly more common in watery stools than in normal stools. The annual incidence of infection in the village was calculated as 93.6%, with an average duration of infection of 117 days. S. pilosicoli could not be isolated from any village pig (n = 126) despite its confirmed presence in 17 of 50 commercial pigs (34.0%) sampled at a local piggery. Four of 76 village dogs (5.3%) and 1 of 2 village ducks were colonized with S. pilosicoli, suggesting the possibility of cross transmission between humans and animals.

  14. The prevalence of Serpulina pilosicoli in humans and domestic animals in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed Central

    Trott, D. J.; Combs, B. G.; Mikosza, A. S.; Oxberry, S. L.; Robertson, I. D.; Passey, M.; Taime, J.; Sehuko, R.; Alpers, M. P.; Hampson, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    In a survey of five villages in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea, Serpulina pilosicoli was isolated from rectal swabs from 113 of 496 individuals (22.8%). Colonization rates ranged from 22.6-30.1% in four of the villages but was only 8.6% in the other village. In comparison colonization was demonstrated in only 5 of 54 indigenous people (9.3%) and none of 76 non-indigenous people living in an urban environment in the same region. Colonization did not relate to reported occurrence of diarrhoea, age, sex, or length of time resident in a village. A second set of 94 faecal specimens was collected from 1 village 6 weeks after the first set. S. pilosicoli was isolated from 27 of 29 individuals (93.1%) who were positive on the first sampling and from 7 of 65 individuals (10.8%) who previously were negative. In this case, isolates were significantly more common in watery stools than in normal stools. The annual incidence of infection in the village was calculated as 93.6%, with an average duration of infection of 117 days. S. pilosicoli could not be isolated from any village pig (n = 126) despite its confirmed presence in 17 of 50 commercial pigs (34.0%) sampled at a local piggery. Four of 76 village dogs (5.3%) and 1 of 2 village ducks were colonized with S. pilosicoli, suggesting the possibility of cross transmission between humans and animals. PMID:9440442

  15. Population genetic analysis of Serpulina pilosicoli and its molecular epidemiology in villages in the eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Trott, D J; Mikosza, A S; Combs, B G; Oxberry, S L; Hampson, D J

    1998-07-01

    The population genetics of Serpulina pilosicoli and its molecular epidemiology in villages in the Eastern Highlands province of Papua New Guinea were investigated. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) was used to analyse 164 isolates from humans and animals. These were divided into 33 electrophoretic types (ETs), four of which contained 65% of the isolates. The mean genetic diversity (n = number of ETs) for 145 human isolates was 0.18, and the mean number of alleles at five polymorphic loci was 2.6. The species appeared to be recombinant, as there was a lack of linkage disequilibrium, and 25% of all the possible combinations of alleles was present in the population. PFGE analysis using the enzymes M/ul and Sa/l divided 157 of the isolates into 99 PFGE types, demonstrating the existence of considerable strain diversity in a geographically restricted area. The two techniques were in excellent agreement; however, PFGE was more discriminatory for strain typing than was MLEE. Nine out of 19 (47.4%) culture-positive individuals were colonized by the same PFGE type of S. pilosicoli when retested after 6 weeks. For three individuals, the PFGE profiles of the second isolate differed from the first in only one or two DNA bands, while the other seven individuals were colonized with distinct PFGE types on each occasion. In two cases, strains with the same PFGE pattern were isolated from humans and dogs, suggesting that cross-species transmission of S. pilosicoli may occur naturally and that the infection can be zoonotic.

  16. Antibacterial activity of Phyllantus emblica, Coriandrum sativum, Culinaris medic, Lawsonia alba and Cucumis sativus.

    PubMed

    Khan, Dawood Ali; Hassan, Fouzia; Ullah, Hanif; Karim, Sabiha; Baseer, Abdul; Abid, Mobasher Ali; Ubaidi, Muhammad; Khan, Shujaat Ali; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2013-01-01

    Present study deals with the demonstration of the antibacterial activity of very common medicinal plants of Pakistani origin i.e., Phyllantus emblica, Coriandrum sativum, Culinaris medic, Lawsonia alba and Cucumis sativus. The extracts were prepared in crude form by the use of hydro-alcoholic solution and were screened for antibacterial activity against various bacterial species by disk diffusion method. Assay was performed using clinical isolates of B. cereus, S. aureus, P. aeruginosa and E. coli. Crude extract of Phyllantus emblica fruit exhibited strong activity against standard cultures of all studied bacteria. Lawsonia alba showed good activity against standard cultures of all the used microorganisms. Coriandrum sativum was effective only against Bacillus cereus, while Cucumis sativus and Culinaris medic showed poor activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa only. Hence, Phyllantus emblica exhibited strong antibacterial activity against a wide range of bacteria it means that Phyllantus emblica extract contains some compounds which have broad spectrum of bactericidal activity.

  17. The Abortificient Effects of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Lawsonia Inermis on BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Esteki, Ramin; Miraj, Sepideh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction According to the traditional beliefs of certain cultures, Lawsonia inermis has been reported to cause the abortion or termination of an undesirable pregnancy. The present study was undertaken with the goal of studying the effect of Lawsonia inermis extract on abortion in pregnant BALB/c mice in 2013 in Shahrekord, Iran. Methods This research study used an experimental methodology and was conducted in 2013 in Shahrekord, Iran. Forty female BALB/c mice (30–40 gm, 8–12 weeks old) were randomly assigned to 4 groups. One male mouse was included for each two female mice (1:2) and they were maintained in a protective cage habitat. Pregnancy of the mice was confirmed by means of a vaginal smear. The doses of 1 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg of the hydroalcoholic extract of Lawsonia inermis were injected intraperitoneally into pregnant mice beginning on the first day and continuing through the seventh day of pregnancy. The control group did not receive any treatment, but was left completely unadministered. On the eighteenth day of pregnancy, the uterine tubes of mice were removed. The subsequent embryonic absorption is considered to be an abortion. The data were analyzed using SPSS software version 22 using Fisher’s exact test and the Kruskal-Wallis H tests. Results Abortions were observed more often in the experimental groups (p< 0.01). The mean of the serum estrogen level was significantly higher in the case control groups (p< 0.01) and the mean of progesterone level was also significantly lower in the experimental groups (p< 0.01). Conclusion The use of Lawsonia inermis during pregnancy may cause abortion and therefore it should be considered as contraindication or use with caution. PMID:27504174

  18. Antileishmanial activity of some plants growing in Algeria: Juglans regia, Lawsonia inermis and Salvia officinalis.

    PubMed

    Serakta, M; Djerrou, Z; Mansour-Djaalab, H; Kahlouche-Riachi, F; Hamimed, S; Trifa, W; Belkhiri, A; Edikra, N; Hamdi Pacha, Y

    2013-01-01

    The current study was undertaken to evaluate in vitro the antileishmanial activity of three plants growing wild in Algeria : Juglans regia, Lawsonia inermis and Salvia officinalis. The hydroalcoholic extracts of these plants were tested on the growth of the promastigotes of Leishmania major. The plant extract effects were compared with three controls : CRL1 composed of 1 ml RPMI inoculated with 10(6) of promastigotes, CRL2 composed of 1 ml RPMI inoculated with 10(6) of promastigotes and 100 µl of hydroalcoholic solvent, CRL3 composed of 1 ml RPMI inoculated with 10(6) of promastigotes and 100 µl of Glucantim as a reference drug in the management of leishmaniasis. The results showed that both J. regia and L. inermis extracts reduced the promastigotes number significantly (P<0.01). however, S. officinalis showed a total inhibition of the Leishmania major growth.

  19. Isolation, oxygen sensitivity, and virulence of NADH oxidase mutants of the anaerobic spirochete Brachyspira (Serpulina) hyodysenteriae, etiologic agent of swine dysentery.

    PubMed

    Stanton, T B; Rosey, E L; Kennedy, M J; Jensen, N S; Bosworth, B T

    1999-11-01

    Brachyspira (Serpulina) hyodysenteriae, the etiologic agent of swine dysentery, uses the enzyme NADH oxidase to consume oxygen. To investigate possible roles for NADH oxidase in the growth and virulence of this anaerobic spirochete, mutant strains deficient in oxidase activity were isolated and characterized. The cloned NADH oxidase gene (nox; GenBank accession no. U19610) on plasmid pER218 was inactivated by replacing 321 bp of coding sequence with either a gene for chloramphenicol resistance (cat) or a gene for kanamycin resistance (kan). The resulting plasmids, respectively, pCmDeltaNOX and pKmDeltaNOX, were used to transform wild-type B. hyodysenteriae B204 cells and generate the antibiotic-resistant strains Nox-Cm and Nox-Km. PCR and Southern hybridization analyses indicated that the chromosomal wild-type nox genes in these strains had been replaced, through allelic exchange, by the inactivated nox gene containing cat or kan. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western immunoblot analysis revealed that both nox mutant cell lysates were missing the 48-kDa Nox protein. Soluble NADH oxidase activity levels in cell lysates of Nox-Cm and Nox-Km were reduced 92 to 96% compared to the activity level in parent strain B204. In an aerotolerance test, cells of both nox mutants were at least 100-fold more sensitive to oxygen exposure than were cells of the wild-type parent strain B204. In swine experimental infections, both nox mutants were less virulent than strain B204 in that fewer animals were colonized by the mutant cells and infected animals displayed mild, transient signs of disease, with no deaths. These results provide evidence that NADH oxidase serves to protect B. hyodysenteriae cells against oxygen toxicity and that the enzyme, in that role, contributes to the pathogenic ability of the spirochete.

  20. Screening of Ethanol, Petroleum Ether and Chloroform Extracts of Medicinal Plants, Lawsonia inermis L. and Mimosa pudica L. for Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Akter, A.; Neela, F. A.; Khan, M. S. I.; Islam, M. S.; Alam, M. F.

    2010-01-01

    Organic extracts (ethanol, petroleum ether and chloroform) of two medicinal plants Lawsonia inermis L. and Mimosa pudica L. were proven for antibacterial properties against 15 Gram-positive and Gram-negative human pathogenic bacteria. Among the three types of extracts tested, ethanol extract was found to possess maximum antibacterial activity. The diameter of the zone of inhibition of bacterial growth showed that Gram-negative bacteria are more sensitive than Gram-positive bacteria to plant extracts. Between the two plants species studied, Lawsonia inermis extract showed more antibacterial activity compared to Mimosa pudica extract. PMID:21188055

  1. Preparation of antibacterial PVA and PEO nanofibers containing Lawsonia Inermis (henna) leaf extracts.

    PubMed

    Avci, H; Monticello, R; Kotek, R

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about health issues and environmental pollution stimulate research to find new health and hygiene related products with healing properties and minimum negative effect on the environment. Development of new, natural antibacterial agents has become one of the most important research areas to combat some pathogens such as Gram- positive and Gram-negative bacteria, fungi, algae, yeast, and some microorganisms which cause serious human infections. Lawsonia Inermis (henna) leaf extracts for preparation of antibacterial poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanofibers via electrospinning technique were investigated. PEO and PVA based electrospun fibers containing henna extract were verified by the appearance of FTIR peaks corresponding to the pure extract. Our study demonstrates that 2.793 wt.% Li in PVA and PEO based solutions showed bactericidal effects against Staphylococcus aureus and bacteriostatic action to Escherichia coli. Concentrations of henna leaf extract strongly impacted antibacterial activities against both bacteria. Henna leaves have a great potential to be used as a source of a potent eco-friendly antimicrobial agent.

  2. Natural dye extract of lawsonia inermis seed as photo sensitizer for titanium dioxide based dye sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ananth, S; Vivek, P; Arumanayagam, T; Murugakoothan, P

    2014-07-15

    Natural dye extract of lawsonia inermis seed were used as photo sensitizer to fabricate titanium dioxide nanoparticles based dye sensitized solar cells. Pure titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in anatase phase were synthesized by sol-gel technique and pre dye treated TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized using modified sol-gel technique by mixing lawsone pigment rich natural dye during the synthesis itself. This pre dye treatment with natural dye has yielded colored TiO2 nanoparticles with uniform adsorption of natural dye, reduced agglomeration, less dye aggregation and improved morphology. The pure and pre dye treated TiO2 nanoparticles were subjected to structural, optical, spectral and morphological studies. Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC) fabricated using the pre dye treated and pure TiO2 nanoparticles sensitized by natural dye extract of lawsonia inermis seed showed a promising solar light to electron conversion efficiency of 1.47% and 1% respectively. The pre dye treated TiO2 based DSSC showed an improved efficiency of 47% when compared to that of conventional DSSC.

  3. Effects of Lawsonia inermis L. (Henna) leaves’ methanolic extract on carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Musab Awad; Eldin, Imad Mohamed Taj; Mohammed, Abd-Elwahab Hassan; Hassan, Hozeifa Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Natural products with therapeutic properties such as plants, minerals, and animal products, for many years, were the main sources of drugs for the treatment of numerous diseases; hence selection of Lawsonia inermis L. (Henna) to study its hepatoprotective activity was considered. Objectives: This was an attempt to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of L. inermis leaves’ methanolic extract on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Materials and Methods: The L. inermis leaves’ methanolic extract, which obtained by maceration, was orally administered in doses of 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg to the tested animals to assess its effects on serum levels of hepatotoxicity parameters, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bilirubin, and total proteins along with histopathological liver sections examination, while silymarin (25 mg/kg), a potent hepatoprotective drug, was used as standard control. Results: The two doses of the plant extract showed dose-dependent hepatoprotective effect, as evident by the significant reduction (P < 0.05) in serum levels of AST, ALT, ALP, and bilirubin along with the improvement in histopathological liver sections compared to CCl4-only treated animals. Conclusion: As experimentally evident, it could be concluded that this plant material could provide a hepatoprotective effect that could be attributed to its antioxidant properties. PMID:27069719

  4. Safety and efficacy of hydroalcoholic extract from Lawsonia inermis leaves on lipid profile in alloxan-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Surender; Verma, Nishikant; Karwasra, Ritu; Kalra, Prerna; Kumar, Rohit; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Dyslipidemia is one of the most common risk factor for cardiac-related disorders in diabetes mellitus. Diabetic dyslipidemia is characterized by hypertriglyceridemia, low high density lipoprotein and elevated low density lipoprotein concentration. Aim: To explore the effect of Lawsonia inermis hydroalcoholic extract (LIHE) for diabetic dyslipidemic activity along with its safety profile. Materials and Methods: LIHE administered at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg in rats after induction of hyperglycemia by alloxan. Insulin (1 IU/kg), glibenclamide (2.5 mg/kg), and metformin (100 mg/kg) were used as positive control and 1% gum acacia as normal control. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance, followed by Dunnett's t-test. Results: The percentage reduction in blood glucose level of LIHE at dose of 400 mg/kg was 39.08% on day 21 when compared to baseline (day 0), which is comparable to glibenclamide (44.77%) and metformin (46.30%). Decrease in blood glucose level exhibited significant improvement in lipid profile, plasma albumin, total plasma protein and serum creatinine. Conclusion: Results of this study demonstrated that LIHE significantly improved lipid and lipoprotein pattern observed in diabetic rats and this could be due to improvement in insulin secretion or action, thus has potential to be used in treatment of diabetes mellitus associated dyslipidemia. PMID:26730149

  5. Antiproliferative and Apoptosis Inducing Effects of Non-Polar Fractions from Lawsonia inermis L. in Cervical (HeLa) Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Kaur, Paramjeet; Kumar, Subodh; Kaur, Satwinderjeet

    2015-04-01

    Two non-polar fractions viz. hexane (Hex-LI) and chloroform fraction (CHCl3-LI) of Lawsonia inermis were studied for their antiproliferative potential in various cancer cell lines viz. HeLa, MCF-7, A549 and C6 glioma cells. Both the fractions showed more than 60 % of growth inhibition in all the tested cell lines at highest tested concentration. In clonogenic assay, different concentrations of Hex-LI and CHCl3-LI decreased the number and size of colonies as compared to control in HeLa cells. The apoptotic effects as nuclear condensation, fragmentation were visualized with Hoechst-33342 staining of HeLa cells using confocal microscope. Both fractions induced apoptotic cell death in human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells as evident from flow cytometric analysis carried out using Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide dyes. CHCl3-LI treated cells significantly induced apoptosis (25.43 %) in comparison to control. Results from Neutral Comet assay demonstrated that both fractions induced double stranded breaks (DSB's) in HeLa cells. Our data indicated that Hex-LI and CHCl3-LI treated cells showed significant increase of 32.2 and 18.56 % reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in DCFH-DA assay respectively. Further, experimental studies to decipher exact pathway via which these fractions induce cell death are in progress.

  6. The rabbit as an infection model for equine proliferative enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sampieri, Francesca; Allen, Andrew L.; Pusterla, Nicola; Vannucci, Fabio A.; Antonopoulos, Aphroditi J.; Ball, Katherine R.; Thompson, Julie; Dowling, Patricia M.; Hamilton, Don L.; Gebhart, Connie J.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the susceptibility of rabbits to Lawsonia intracellularis obtained from a case of clinical equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). This is a preliminary step toward developing a rabbit infection model for studying pathogenesis and therapy of EPE in horses. Nine does were equally assigned to 3 groups. Animals in 2 groups (Group 1 and Group 2) were orally inoculated with different doses of cell-cultured L. intracellularis. Controls (Group 3) were sham-inoculated. Feces and blood were collected before the rabbits were infected and at 7, 14, and 21 days post-infection (DPI). Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers were measured using an immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA) and fecal samples were analyzed with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). A doe from each group was euthanized at 7, 14, and 21 DPI for collection and evaluation of intestinal samples. Tissues were stained by routine hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) method and immunohistochemistry (IHC) with L. intracellularis-specific mouse monoclonal antibody. At 14 DPI, serologic responses were detected in both infected groups, which maintained high titers through to 21 DPI. Lawsonia intracellularis DNA was detected in the feces of Group 2 on 7 DPI and in both infected groups on 14 DPI. Gross lesions were apparent in Group 1 and Group 2 on 14 DPI. Immunohistochemistry confirmed L. intracellularis antigen within cells of rabbits in Group 1 and Group 2 on 7, 14, and 21 DPI. No lesions, serologic response, shedding, or IHC labeling were found in Group 3 rabbits. This study describes an EPE rabbit model that simulates natural infection, as typical lesions, immune response, and fecal shedding were present. PMID:24082402

  7. The rabbit as an infection model for equine proliferative enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Francesca; Allen, Andrew L; Pusterla, Nicola; Vannucci, Fabio A; Antonopoulos, Aphroditi J; Ball, Katherine R; Thompson, Julie; Dowling, Patricia M; Hamilton, Don L; Gebhart, Connie J

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the susceptibility of rabbits to Lawsonia intracellularis obtained from a case of clinical equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). This is a preliminary step toward developing a rabbit infection model for studying pathogenesis and therapy of EPE in horses. Nine does were equally assigned to 3 groups. Animals in 2 groups (Group 1 and Group 2) were orally inoculated with different doses of cell-cultured L. intracellularis. Controls (Group 3) were sham-inoculated. Feces and blood were collected before the rabbits were infected and at 7, 14, and 21 days post-infection (DPI). Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers were measured using an immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA) and fecal samples were analyzed with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). A doe from each group was euthanized at 7, 14, and 21 DPI for collection and evaluation of intestinal samples. Tissues were stained by routine hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) method and immunohistochemistry (IHC) with L. intracellularis-specific mouse monoclonal antibody. At 14 DPI, serologic responses were detected in both infected groups, which maintained high titers through to 21 DPI. Lawsonia intracellularis DNA was detected in the feces of Group 2 on 7 DPI and in both infected groups on 14 DPI. Gross lesions were apparent in Group 1 and Group 2 on 14 DPI. Immunohistochemistry confirmed L. intracellularis antigen within cells of rabbits in Group 1 and Group 2 on 7, 14, and 21 DPI. No lesions, serologic response, shedding, or IHC labeling were found in Group 3 rabbits. This study describes an EPE rabbit model that simulates natural infection, as typical lesions, immune response, and fecal shedding were present.

  8. Microarray and cytokine analyses of field cases of pigs with diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, M; Andersson, M; Lindberg, R; Fossum, C; Jensen-Waern, M

    2011-12-15

    This field study explored the cytokine expression in intestinal tissue and serum from 19 diarrhoeic and 9 healthy pigs in herds with a long-time history of Lawsonia intracellularis-infection. The disease, proliferative enteropathy (PE), is associated with diarrhoea and poor performance in growers and haemorrhagic diarrhoea and sudden death in finisher pigs, but the immunopathology is poorly understood. Histopathology, demonstration of L. intracellularis and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in intestinal tissue by PCR, and detection of serum antibodies to L. intracellularis, were performed. The presence of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IFN-α, IFN-γ, TNF-α and TGF-β in sera was determined by immunoassays, and intestinal mRNA expression of these cytokines plus IL-12p40 was determined by qPCR. Intestinal specimens from pigs with intestinal adenomatosis (n=2), proliferative haemorrhagic enteropathy or swine dysentery (n=2), and controls (n=2) were analysed by a genome wide porcine microarray. The clinical signs of PE were not always supported by the subsequent analyses, and the presence of PCV2 may have contributed to an increased mRNA expression for IFN-γ in intestinal specimens from some pigs. The limited gene expression in the microarray analyses and the limited expression of cytokines in both sera and intestines, indicate that the immune response is poorly activated in the initial course of an infection with L. intracellularis. However, the gene encoding for insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) was up-regulated in two pigs with prominent mucosal proliferation.

  9. Elevated fat skatole levels in immunocastrated, surgically castrated and entire male pigs with acute dysentery.

    PubMed

    Skrlep, Martin; Batorek, Nina; Bonneau, Michel; Fazarinc, Gregor; Segula, Blaž; Candek-Potokar, Marjeta

    2012-12-01

    Boar taint is due to androstenone and skatole (3-methyl-indole) accumulation in fat tissues. During a study to investigate the effect of immunocastration on fattening pigs, an outbreak of acute dysentery occurred caused by Lawsonia intracellularis and Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and resulted in cachexia and high mortality. Low androstenone levels in the immunocastrates (0.25 ± 0.04 μg/g liquid fat) suggested that the immunocastration had been effective, but unusually high skatole concentrations in fat tissues were found not only in entire males, but also in surgical castrates and immunocastrates (0.22 ± 0.15, 0.14 ± 0.08 and 0.18 ± 0.14 μg/g liquid fat, respectively). The findings suggest that boar taint can arise in cases of intestinal infections, even in castrated pigs.

  10. Detection of enteric pathogens in Turkey flocks affected with severe enteritis, in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Moura-Alvarez, Joelma; Nuñez, Luis F N; Astolfi-Ferreira, Claudete S; Knöbl, Terezinha; Chacón, Jorge L; Moreno, Andrea M; Jones, Richard C; Ferreira, Antonio J Piantino

    2014-08-01

    Twenty-two flocks of turkeys affected by enteric problems, with ages between 10 and 104 days and located in the Southern region of Brazil, were surveyed for turkey by PCR for turkey astrovirus type 2 (TAstV-2), turkey coronavirus (TCoV), hemorrhagic enteritis virus (HEV), rotavirus, reovirus, Salmonella spp., and Lawsonia intracellularis (Li) infections. Eleven profiles of pathogen combination were observed. The most frequently encountered pathogen combinations were TCoV-Li, followed by TCoV-TAstV-2-Li, TCoV-TastV-2. Only TCoV was detected as the sole pathogen in three flocks. Eight and 19 flocks of the 22 were positive for TAstV-2 and TCoV, respectively. Six were positive for Salmonella spp. and L. intracellularis was detected in 12 turkey flocks. Reovirus and HEV were not detected in this survey. These results throw new light on the multiple etiology of enteritis in turkeys. The implications of these findings and their correlation with the clinical signs are comprehensively discussed, illustrating the complexity of the enteric diseases.

  11. Serologic follow-up of a repopulated swine herd after an outbreak of proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Roberto M C; Gebhart, Connie J; Armbruster, Greg A; Roggow, Brian D

    2002-10-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an obligate intracellular organism that causes porcine proliferative enteropathy, a widespread infectious disease. Very little is known about the immune response and the epidemiologic features of the disease in the field. The aims of this study were to evaluate the duration and titers of antibody specific for L. intracellularis in gilts after an outbreak of proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy (PHE), to evaluate maternal antibodies in piglets, and to evaluate seroconversion and fecal shedding in growing-finishing pigs. Thirty-six gilts in a herd that had recently experienced an outbreak of PHE, including 13 that had recovered, were bled 3 wk after the beginning of the outbreak and then every 3 wk until they became seronegative in 2 consecutive tests. Fourteen piglets from 5 gilts seropositive at farrowing and 5 piglets from 2 sows that remained seronegative were bled once or twice at the farrowing house and then every 3 wk until they reached market age. Fecal samples from these pigs were tested by polymerase chain reaction at 7 wk of age and then on the days of blood collection. After the PHE outbreak, the gilts had high serum antibody levels; the levels decreased over time, but antibody was still detectable for up to 3 mo in some animals. Four piglets from sows that were seropositive at farrowing had detectable passive antibodies up to 5 wk of age. Some nursery pigs started shedding L. intracellularis around 7 wk of age; peak shedding was observed between 13 and 16 wk. Antibody was not detected until 16 wk of age and was more often detected between 19 and 22 wk.

  12. Evaluating the risk of pathogen transmission from wild animals to domestic pigs in Australia.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Hayley E; Toribio, Jenny-Ann L M L; Lapidge, Steven J; Hernández-Jover, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Wild animals contribute to endemic infection in livestock as well as the introduction, reintroduction and maintenance of pathogens. The source of introduction of endemic diseases to a piggery is often unknown and the extent of wildlife contribution to such local spread is largely unexplored. The aim of the current study was to quantitatively assess the probability of domestic pigs being exposed to different pathogens from wild animals commonly found around commercial piggeries in Australia. Specifically, this study aims to quantify the probability of exposure to the pathogens Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp. from European starlings (Sturnus vulgarus); Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, Lawsonia intracellularis and Salmonella spp. from rats (Rattus rattus and Rattus norvegicus); and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Leptospira spp., Brucella suis and L. intracellularis from feral pigs (Sus scrofa). Exposure assessments, using scenario trees and Monte Carlo stochastic simulation modelling, were conducted to identify potential pathways of introduction and calculate the probabilities of these pathways occurring. Input parameters were estimated from a national postal survey of commercial pork producers and from disease detection studies conducted for European starlings, rats and feral pigs in close proximity to commercial piggeries in Australia. Based on the results of the exposure assessments, rats presented the highest probability of exposure of pathogens to domestic pigs at any point in time, and L. intracellularis (median 0.13, 5% and 95%, 0.05-0.23) and B. hyodysenteriae (median 0.10, 0.05-0.19) were the most likely pathogens to be transmitted. Regarding European starlings, the median probability of exposure of domestic pigs to pathogenic E. coli at any point in time was estimated to be 0.03 (0.02-0.04). The highest probability of domestic pig exposure to feral pig pathogens at any point in time was found to be for M. hyopneumoniae (median 0.013, 0

  13. Comparative Tissue Stainability of Lawsonia inermis (Henna) and Eosin as Counterstains to Hematoxylin in Brain Tissues.

    PubMed

    Alawa, Judith N; Gideon, Gbenga O; Adetiba, Bamidele; Alawa, Clement B

    2015-04-01

    We hyposthesized that henna staining could provide an alternative to eosin when used as a counterstain to hematoxylin for understanding basic neurohistological principles. Therefore, this study was aimed at investigating the suitability of henna as counterstain to hematoxylin for the demonstration of the layer stratification and cellular distribution in the brain tissue. Henna stained nervous tissue by reacting with the basic elements in proteins via its amino groups. It stained the neuropil and connective tissue membranes brown and effectively outlined the perikarya of neurons with no visible nuclei demonstrating that it is an acidic dye. Henna as a counterstain to hematoxylin demonstrated reliability as a new neurohistological stain. It facilitated identification of cortical layer stratification and cellular distribution in brain tissue sections from Wistar rats. This was comparable to standard hematoxylin and eosin staining as morphological and morphometrical analyses of stained cells did not show significant differences in size or number. This study presents a method for staining with henna and demonstrates that although henna and eosin belong to different dye groups (anthraquinone and xanthenes, respectively) based on their chromophores, they share similar staining techniques and thus could be used interchangeably in neurohistology.

  14. Dyeing behaviour of gamma irradiated cotton fabric using Lawson dye extracted from henna leaves (Lawsonia inermis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Fazal-ur; Adeel, Shahid; Qaiser, Summia; Ahmad Bhatti, Ijaz; Shahid, Muhammad; Zuber, Mohammad

    2012-11-01

    Dyeing behavior of gamma irradiated cotton fabric using Lawson dye extracted from henna leaves has been investigated. Cotton and dye powder are irradiated to different absorbed doses of 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 kGy using Cs-137 gamma irradiator. The dyeing parameters such as dyeing time, electrolyte (salt) concentration and mordant concentrations using copper and iron as mordants are optimized. Dyeing is performed using un-irradiated and irradiated cotton with dye solutions and their color strength values are evaluated in CIE Lab system using Spectraflash -SF650. Methods suggested by International Standard Organization (ISO) have been employed to investigate the colourfastness properties such as colourfastness to light, washing and rubbing of irradiated dyed fabric. It is found that gamma ray treatment of cotton dyed with extracts of henna leaves has significantly improved the color strength as well as enhanced the rating of fastness properties.

  15. Disease risks associated with free-ranging wild boar in Saskatchewan

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Glenna F.; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Godson, Dale L.; Wilkins, Wendy; Bollinger, Trent K.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the disease status of Saskatchewan’s feral wild boar population. Whole carcasses, tissue samples, and/or serum from 81 hunter-killed boars from Saskatchewan were submitted to the Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative (CWHC) between 2009 and 2014. Serological tests were negative for PRRS, H1N1, and H3N2 swine influenza, PCV-2, and TGE/PRCV in 22/22 boars and for Toxoplasma gondii and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in 20/20 boars. Of 20 boars whose sera were tested 20 were positive for Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, with 7 positive for, among other strains, serotype 14; 16 were positive for Lawsonia intracellularis, 1 was positive and 6 were suspicious for Salmonella spp. Polymerase chain reaction tests were negative for PRRS and PCV2 in 58/58 boars and positive for Torque teno virus in 1/8 boars. Digestion assays were negative for Trichinella spp. in 22/22 boars. The high seroprevalence of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 14 is noteworthy as this serotype has not been previously reported in North America. PMID:26246630

  16. Evaluation of lincomycin in drinking water for treatment of induced porcine proliferative enteropathy using a Swine challenge model.

    PubMed

    Bradford, James R; Winkelman, Nathan L; Moreira, Frederico P; Elfring, Gregory D

    2004-01-01

    A single-location, challenge-model study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of lincomycin against porcine proliferative enteropathy when administered through the drinking water at 125 and 250 mg/gallon. The primary variables of interest were pig removal rate, diarrhea scores, demeanor scores, and abdominal appearance scores. Ancillary performance variables examined included average daily feed intake, average daily gain, and feed per gain. After a 3-day acclimation period, pigs were challenged on 2 consecutive days with a mucosal homogenate containing a total dose of 1.4 x 10(9) cells of Lawsonia intracellularis. Five days later, when porcine proliferative enteropathy was well established, drinking water medicated with 125 mg (L125) or 250 mg (L250) lincomycin/gallon was provided to two groups of pigs for 10 days. Pigs were observed for 13 days following the treatment period. A third group of pigs served as controls and received unmedicated drinking water throughout the study. The L250 group experienced a significantly lower (P < .05) pig removal rate than the control group over the 23-day observation period. Additionally, for every primary variable, the L250 group experienced a significantly decreased (P < .01) number of abnormal days compared with the control group. The L125 group showed a significant reduction (P < .05) in abnormal demeanor and abnormal abdominal appearance scores compared with controls.

  17. The European ban on growth-promoting antibiotics and emerging consequences for human and animal health.

    PubMed

    Casewell, Mark; Friis, Christian; Marco, Enric; McMullin, Paul; Phillips, Ian

    2003-08-01

    Following the ban of all food animal growth-promoting antibiotics by Sweden in 1986, the European Union banned avoparcin in 1997 and bacitracin, spiramycin, tylosin and virginiamycin in 1999. Three years later, the only attributable effect in humans has been a diminution in acquired resistance in enterococci isolated from human faecal carriers. There has been an increase in human infection from vancomycin-resistant enterococci in Europe, probably related to the increased in usage of vancomycin for the treatment of methicillin-resistant staphylococci. The ban of growth promoters has, however, revealed that these agents had important prophylactic activity and their withdrawal is now associated with a deterioration in animal health, including increased diarrhoea, weight loss and mortality due to Escherichia coli and Lawsonia intracellularis in early post-weaning pigs, and clostridial necrotic enteritis in broilers. A directly attributable effect of these infections is the increase in usage of therapeutic antibiotics in food animals, including that of tetracycline, aminoglycosides, trimethoprim/sulphonamide, macrolides and lincosamides, all of which are of direct importance in human medicine. The theoretical and political benefit of the widespread ban of growth promoters needs to be more carefully weighed against the increasingly apparent adverse consequences.

  18. Exposure of feral swine (Sus scrofa) in the United States to selected pathogens.

    PubMed

    Baroch, John A; Gagnon, Carl A; Lacouture, Sonia; Gottschalk, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Feral swine (Sus scrofa) are widely distributed in the United States. In 2011 and 2012, serum samples and tonsils were recovered from 162 and 37 feral swine, respectively, in the US to evaluate exposure to important swine endemic pathogens. Antibodies against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) were found in 2.5% and 25.3% of tested sera, respectively. Positive serological reactions against Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae have been detected in 19.7% and 69.7% of animals. More than 15% of animals presented antibodies against these 2 pathogens simultaneously. Most animals were also seropositive for Lawsonia intracellularis. Feral swine can also be involved in transmission of zoonotic agents. Almost 50% of animals possessed antibodies against Salmonella. In addition, 94.4% of animals were carriers of Streptococcus suis in their tonsils. In conclusion, feral swine may be considered as a potential reservoir for different endemic diseases in domestic pigs, as well as for important zoonotic agents.

  19. 21 CFR 558.600 - Tiamulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Sponsor (i) (ii) 35 1. For control of swine dysentery associated with Brachyspira (formerly Serpulina or... history of swine dysentery but where signs of disease have not yet occurred or following approved... chlortetracycline, and control of swine dysentery associated with Brachyspira (formerly Serpulina or...

  20. 21 CFR 558.600 - Tiamulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dysentery associated with Brachyspira (formerly Serpulina or Treponema) hyodysenteriae susceptible to tiamulin Feed continuously as sole ration on premises with a history of swine dysentery but where signs of... Pasteurella multocida susceptible to chlortetracycline, and control of swine dysentery associated...

  1. 21 CFR 558.600 - Tiamulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dysentery associated with Brachyspira (formerly Serpulina or Treponema) hyodysenteriae susceptible to tiamulin Feed continuously as sole ration on premises with a history of swine dysentery but where signs of... Pasteurella multocida susceptible to chlortetracycline, and control of swine dysentery associated...

  2. Intrinsic water use efficiency controls the adaptation to high salinity in a semi-arid adapted plant, henna (Lawsonia inermis L.).

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, Nieves; Olmos, Enrique; Bardisi, Enas; García-De la Garma, Jesús; López-Berenguer, Carmen; Rubio-Asensio, José Salvador

    2014-03-01

    Adaptation to salinity of a semi-arid inhabitant plant, henna, is studied. The salt tolerance mechanisms are evaluated in the belief that gas exchange (water vapor and CO2) should play a key role on its adaptation to salt stress because of the strong evaporation conditions and soil water deficit in its natural area of distribution. We grow henna plants hydroponically under controlled climate conditions and expose them to control (0mM NaCl), and two levels of salinity; medium (75mM NaCl) and high (150mM NaCl). Relative growth rate (RGR), biomass production, whole plant and leaf structure and ultrastructure adaptation, gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, nutrients location in leaf tissue and its balance in the plant are studied. RGR and total biomass decreased as NaCl concentration increased in the nutrient solution. At 75mM NaCl root biomass was not affected by salinity and RGR reached similar values to control plants at the end of the experiment. At this salinity level henna plant responded to salinity decreasing shoot to root ratio, increasing leaf specific mass (LSM) and intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE), and accumulating high concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) in leaves and root. At 150mM NaCl growth was severely reduced but plants reached the reproductive phase. At this salinity level, no further decrease in shoot to root ratio or increase in LSM was observed, but plants increased iWUE, maintaining water status and leaf and root Na(+) and Cl(-) concentrations were lower than expected. Moreover, plants at 150mM NaCl reallocated carbon to the root at the expense of the shoot. The effective PSII quantum yield [Y(II)] and the quantum yield of non-regulated energy dissipation [Y(NO)] were recovered over time of exposure to salinity. Overall, iWUE seems to be determinant in the adaptation of henna plant to high salinity level, when morphological adaptation fails.

  3. Effector prediction in host-pathogen interaction based on a Markov model of a ubiquitous EPIYA motif

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Effector secretion is a common strategy of pathogen in mediating host-pathogen interaction. Eight EPIYA-motif containing effectors have recently been discovered in six pathogens. Once these effectors enter host cells through type III/IV secretion systems (T3SS/T4SS), tyrosine in the EPIYA motif is phosphorylated, which triggers effectors binding other proteins to manipulate host-cell functions. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the distribution pattern of EPIYA motif in broad biological species, to predict potential effectors with EPIYA motif, and to suggest roles and biological functions of potential effectors in host-pathogen interactions. Results A hidden Markov model (HMM) of five amino acids was built for the EPIYA-motif based on the eight known effectors. Using this HMM to search the non-redundant protein database containing 9,216,047 sequences, we obtained 107,231 sequences with at least one EPIYA motif occurrence and 3115 sequences with multiple repeats of the EPIYA motif. Although the EPIYA motif exists among broad species, it is significantly over-represented in some particular groups of species. For those proteins containing at least four copies of EPIYA motif, most of them are from intracellular bacteria, extracellular bacteria with T3SS or T4SS or intracellular protozoan parasites. By combining the EPIYA motif and the adjacent SH2 binding motifs (KK, R4, Tarp and Tir), we built HMMs of nine amino acids and predicted many potential effectors in bacteria and protista by the HMMs. Some potential effectors for pathogens (such as Lawsonia intracellularis, Plasmodium falciparum and Leishmania major) are suggested. Conclusions Our study indicates that the EPIYA motif may be a ubiquitous functional site for effectors that play an important pathogenicity role in mediating host-pathogen interactions. We suggest that some intracellular protozoan parasites could secrete EPIYA-motif containing effectors through secretion systems similar to the

  4. No Clear Effect of Initiating Vaccination against Common Endemic Infections on the Amounts of Prescribed Antimicrobials for Danish Weaner and Finishing Pigs during 2007–2013

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Amanda Brinch; de Knegt, Leonardo Víctor; Nielsen, Liza Rosenbaum; Alban, Lis

    2017-01-01

    It is often stated that vaccines may help reduce antimicrobial use in swine production. However, limited evidence is available outside clinical trials. We studied the change in amounts of antimicrobials prescribed for weaners and finishers in herds following initiation of vaccination against five common endemic infections: Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, porcine circovirus type II, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and Lawsonia intracellularis. Comparison was made to the change after a randomly selected date in herds not vaccinating against each of the infections. Danish sow herds initiating vaccination during 2007–2013 were included (69–334 herds, depending on the analysis). Danish sow herds with no use of the vaccine in question were included as non-exposed herds (130–570 herds, depending on the analysis). Antimicrobial prescriptions for weaners in sow herds and for finishers in receiving herds were extracted from the VetStat database for a period of 12 months before and 6–18 months after the first purchase of vaccine, or random date and quantified as average animal daily doses (ADDs) per 100 animals per day. The herd-level difference between ADD in the period after and before vaccination was the outcome in linear regression models for weaner pigs, and linear mixed-effects models for finishing pigs, taking into account sow herds delivering pigs to two or more finisher herds. Three plausible risk factors (Baseline ADD, purchase of specific vaccine, purchase of other vaccines) and five confounders (herd size, export and herd health status, year and season) were initially considered in all 10 models. The main significant effect in all models was the Baseline ADD; the higher the Baseline ADD was for weaner and finishing pigs, the larger the decrease in ADD was following vaccination (or random date for non-vaccinating herds). Regardless of vaccination status, almost equal proportions of herds experienced a

  5. Effect of feeding sodium butyrate in the late finishing period on Salmonella carriage, seroprevalence, and growth of finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Walia, Kavita; Argüello, Hector; Lynch, Helen; Leonard, Finola C; Grant, Jim; Yearsley, Dermot; Kelly, Sinead; Duffy, Geraldine; Gardiner, Gillian E; Lawlor, Peadar G

    2016-09-01

    Pork is an important source of human salmonellosis and low-cost on-farm control measures may provide a useful element in reducing the prevalence of this pathogen in food. This study investigated the effectiveness of dietary supplementation with sodium butyrate administered to finisher pigs for ∼4-weeks prior to slaughter to control Salmonella shedding on highly contaminated farms. Two trials (A and B) were conducted on two commercial pig farms, which had a history of high Salmonella seroprevalence. In both trials, pens (14 pens of 12 pigs/pen in Trial A and 12 pens of 12-17 pigs/pen in Trial B) were randomly assigned to a control (finisher feed without additive) or a treatment group (the same feed with 3kg sodium butyrate/t) for 24-28days, depending on the trial. Faeces were collected from each pig on days 0, 12 and 24/28, and blood, caecal digesta and ileocaecal/mesenteric lymph nodes were collected from the slaughterhouse. Pigs were weighed at the start and end of the trials, feed intake was recorded, and carcass quality parameters were recorded at slaughter. In Trial A, Salmonella shedding was reduced in the treatment compared to the control group at the end of the trial (30% versus 57% probability of detecting Salmonella in faeces, respectively; p<0.001). This reflected the serology results, with detection of a lower seroprevalence in the treatment compared to the control group using the 20% optical density cut-off (69.5% versus 89%; p=0.001). However, no effect on faecal shedding or seroprevalance was observed in Trial B, which may be explained by the detection of a concomitant infection with Lawsonia intracellularis. No significant differences in Salmonella recovery rates were observed in the caecal digesta or lymph nodes in either trial. Furthermore, feed intake, weight gain, and feed conversion efficiency (FCE) did not differ between groups (p>0.05) in either trial. Numerical improvements in weight gain and FCE were found with sodium butyrate treatment

  6. Clinical utility and performance of sock sampling in weaner pig diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Ken Steen; Okholm, Elisabeth; Johansen, Markku; Angen, Øystein; Jorsal, Sven Erik; Nielsen, Jens Peter; Bækbo, Poul

    2015-07-01

    Low pathogen diarrhoea is a group-level diagnosis, characterised by non-haemorrhagic diarrhoea. In the current study, the apparent prevalence of low pathogen diarrhoea outbreaks in Danish herds was investigated along with the clinical utility of a laboratory examination for intestinal disease, agreement between three consecutive herd examinations from the same herd and agreement between quantitative PCR results from pooled faecal samples and sock samples. Twenty-four veterinarians submitted faecal and sock samples for quantitative PCR testing from outbreaks of diarrhoea in nursery pigs (n=38 herds) where the farmer or veterinarian had decided that antimicrobial treatment was necessary. The veterinarians were asked to fill in a questionnaire and participate in telephone interviews. The apparent prevalence of low pathogen diarrhoea was 0.18 (95% CL: 0.08-0.34). Agreement between the veterinarians' clinical aetiological diagnosis and the pooled faecal sample was 0.18 (95% CL: 0.08-0.34), and Cohen's Kappa was 0.03 (95% CL: -0.08 to 0.14). Antibiotic treatment or prevention strategies were changed in 0.63 (95% CL: 0.46-0.78) of the herds, and the veterinarians indicated that, for 0.32 (95% CL: 0.18-0.50) of the herds, changes were related to the diagnostic results from the laboratory examination performed in the study. In 0.16 (95% CL: 0.05-0.36) of the herds, the same infections were demonstrated at all three consecutive examinations. No herds had three consecutive diarrhoea outbreaks classified as low pathogen diarrhoea. For the quantitative results (log10 of the summed amounts of Lawsonia intracellularis, Brachyspira pilosicoli, Escherichia coli F4 and F18) agreement between pooled faecal samples and sock samples was evaluated. Lin's concordance correlation coefficient was 0.69 (95% CL: 0.48-0.82), and the mean difference between the two types of samples was -0.38 log10 bacteria/g faeces (SD=1.59log10 bacteria/g faeces; 95% CI: -0.90 to 0.14log10 bacteria/g faeces

  7. The prevalence of swine enteropathogens in Brazilian grower and finish herds.

    PubMed

    Viott, A M; Lage, A P; Cruz, E C C; Guedes, R M C

    2013-05-17

    Diarrhoea among growing and finishing pigs is an important problem in many herds. The prevalence of L. intracellularis, B. pilosicoli, B. hyodysenteriae, Salmonella spp., enterotoxigenic E. coli, Trichuris suis and the occurrence of mixed infection were investigated. Fecal samples for forty-six herds with diarrhea or a history of diarrhea were randomly collected in Minas Gerais state, Brazil. The enteric pathogens were detected by culture (E. coli and Salmonella sp.), PCR (L. intracellularis and Brachyspira spp.) and eggs counts (T. suis). The overall herd prevalence of L. intracellularis, Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium and enterotoxigenic E. coli were 19.56%, 6.52%, 10.86% respectively. Mixed infection was diagnosed in 30.43% of herds, and L. intracellularis and Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium are main pathogens association (10.87%). B. pilosicoli was diagnosed only in two herds, always associated with mixed infections. B. hyodysenteriae and T. suis were not demonstrated in any sample. These pathogens have been reported world-wide but studies regarding epidemiology in Brazil are few. This study contributes to establish of prevention programs for the control enteropathogens in grower finish herds in Brazil.

  8. The prevalence of swine enteropathogens in Brazilian grower and finish herds

    PubMed Central

    Viott, A.M.; Lage, A.P.; Cruz, E.C.C.; Guedes, R.M.C.

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhoea among growing and finishing pigs is an important problem in many herds. The prevalence of L. intracellularis, B. pilosicoli, B. hyodysenteriae, Salmonella spp., enterotoxigenic E. coli, Trichuris suis and the occurrence of mixed infection were investigated. Fecal samples for forty-six herds with diarrhea or a history of diarrhea were randomly collected in Minas Gerais state, Brazil. The enteric pathogens were detected by culture (E. coli and Salmonella sp.), PCR (L. intracellularis and Brachyspira spp.) and eggs counts (T. suis). The overall herd prevalence of L. intracellularis, Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium and enterotoxigenic E. coli were 19.56%, 6.52%, 10.86% respectively. Mixed infection was diagnosed in 30.43% of herds, and L. intracellularis and Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium are main pathogens association (10.87%). B. pilosicoli was diagnosed only in two herds, always associated with mixed infections. B. hyodysenteriae and T. suis were not demonstrated in any sample. These pathogens have been reported world-wide but studies regarding epidemiology in Brazil are few. This study contributes to establish of prevention programs for the control enteropathogens in grower finish herds in Brazil. PMID:24159297

  9. PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROFILE OF SOME COLOURING PLANTS USED IN HOMOEOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, P.; Sunilkumar

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this paper deal with the physico chemical aspects of certain colouring plants namely. Bixa orellana Linn. (Leaves) and Lawsonia inermis Linn (Leaves). The determined data under the physico chemical, chromatographic and spectrophotometric studies can be taken as a pharmacopoeial standards. PMID:22557040

  10. alpha-Glucosidase inhibitory activity of Mangifera indica bark.

    PubMed

    Prashanth, D; Amit, A; Samiulla, D S; Asha, M K; Padmaja, R

    2001-08-01

    The ethanolic extracts of Lawsonia inermis leaves, Holarrhena antidysenterica bark, Swertia chirata whole plant and Mangifera indica bark were tested (in-vitro) for alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity. M. indica extract was found to be the most potent, with an IC(50) value of 314 microg/ml.

  11. A Comparative Antimicrobial Study on the Essential Oil of the Leaves of Various Species of Cupressus

    PubMed Central

    Manivannan, R.; Kumar, M. Senthil; Jawahar, N.; Ganesh, E. Sai; Jubie, S.

    2005-01-01

    The essential oil of leaves of various cupressus species Viz., C.glauca, C.funebris, C.lawsonia, C. macrocarpa & C. sempervirens have been studied for their antimicrobial activity against certain gram positive [B. substilis, S.aureus], gram negative [E.coli, P.aeruginesa] and fungi (A.niger, A.flavus, C.albicans & A. fumigatus) using two fold serial dilution technique. Our results revealed that, all the species possess significant antibacterial & antifungal activities. PMID:22557167

  12. Major Role of the Cyanobacterium Trichodesmium in Nutrient Cycling in the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Edward J.; Romans, Kristen

    1991-11-01

    The diazotrophic cyanobacterium Trichodesmium is a large (about 0.5 by 3 millimeters) phytoplankter that is common in tropical open-ocean waters. Measurements of abundance, plus a review of earlier observations, indicate that it, rather than the picophytoplankton, is the most important primary producer (about 165 milligrams of carbon per square meter per day) in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean. Furthermore, nitrogen fixation by Trichodesmium introduces the largest fraction of new nitrogen to the euphotic zone, approximately 30 milligrams of nitrogen per square meter per day, a value exceeding the estimated flux of nitrate across the thermocline. Inclusion of this organism, plus the abundant diazotrophic endosymbiont Richelia intracellularis that is present in some large diatoms, in biogeochemical studies of carbon and nitrogen may help explain the disparity between various methods of measuring productivity in the oligotrophic ocean. Carbon and nitrogen fixation by these large phytoplankters also introduces a new paradigm in the biogeochemistry of these elements in the sea.

  13. In vivo effects of nickel and cadmium in rats on lipid peroxidation and ceruloplasmin activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sole, J.; Huguet, J.; Arola, L.; Romeu, A. )

    1990-05-01

    Before Ni(II) and Cd(II), or any other metallic ion, can interact intracellulary, it must penetrate the cell membrane. The latter, therefore, is a primary target for toxic metals. Damage to cell membranes may allow a greater uptake of metal and thus injury may extend to more critical targets, although loss of plasmatic membrane functionality may be a crucial factor to explain the interactions of these metals with cellular components. In this sense the present study has been carried out. Factors that have been investigated in order to prove the membrane response of nickel and cadmium toxicity include lipid peroxidation, since divalent ions of transition metals can promote lipid peroxidation and this evidently contributes to the toxicity of certain metals and to metal interaction with ceruloplasmin, as its ferroxidase and scavenger of superoxide radicals activities are important protective mechanisms in vivo against peroxidative damage.

  14. Intra-amoeba multiplication induces chemotaxis and biofilm colonization and formation for Legionella.

    PubMed

    Bigot, Renaud; Bertaux, Joanne; Frere, Jacques; Berjeaud, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, a facultative intracellular bacterium, is the causative agent of legionellosis. In the environment this pathogenic bacterium colonizes the biofilms as well as amoebae, which provide a rich environment for the replication of Legionella. When seeded on pre-formed biofilms, L. pneumophila was able to establish and survive and was only found at the surface of the biofilms. Different phenotypes were observed when the L. pneumophila, used to implement pre-formed biofilms or to form mono-species biofilms, were cultivated in a laboratory culture broth or had grown intracellulary within the amoeba. Indeed, the bacteria, which developed within the amoeba, formed clusters when deposited on a solid surface. Moreover, our results demonstrate that multiplication inside the amoeba increased the capacity of L. pneumophila to produce polysaccharides and therefore enhanced its capacity to establish biofilms. Finally, it was shown that the clusters formed by L. pneumophila were probably related to the secretion of a chemotaxis molecular agent.

  15. Indigenous knowledge system for treatment of trypanosomiasis in Kaduna state of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Atawodi, S E; Ameh, D A; Ibrahim, S; Andrew, J N; Nzelibe, H C; Onyike, E O; Anigo, K M; Abu, E A; James, D B; Njoku, G C; Sallau, A B

    2002-02-01

    A survey was carried out in Kaduna State of Nigeria to establish the indigenous knowledge system for treating trypanosomiasis in domestic animals. Questionnaire and interviews were, respectively, administered to, or conducted with about 200 livestock farmers and traders spread around the state. Data obtained revealed the use of several plants either alone or in combination, for the treatment and management of trypasonomiasis. The most common plants encountered were Adansonia digitata, Terminalia avicennoides, Khaya senegalensis, Cissus populnea, Tamarindus indica, Lawsonia inermis, Boswellia dalzielli, Pseudocedrela kotschi, Syzyium quinensis, Sterculia setigera, Afzelia africana, Prosopis africana, Lancea kerstingii. The method of preparation and mode of administration of some of these plants in the treatment of trypanosomiasis are reviewed and discussed.

  16. Anna Pavala Sindhooram--an antiatherosclerotic Indian drug.

    PubMed

    Shanmugasundaram, K R; Seethapathy, P G; Shanmugasundaram, E R

    1983-05-01

    The procedure for the preparation of Anna Pavala Sindhooram (APS), a drug based on the concepts of Indian medicine for the prevention and reversal of the atherosclerotic disease process is described in detail. The uniformity in the composition of samples of the drug obtained in 10 batches, prepared over a period of 5 years is evident from the chemical analysis of the mineral constituents. The possibility of iodine, copper, iron, calcium and magnesium present in the Anna Pavala Sindhooram, acting metabolically to reduce hypercholesterolemia is discussed. The ingredients used are green vitriol (Annabedi or ferrous sulphate), coral reef (Corallium rubrum or Pavalam), leaves of Acalypha indica (Kuppaimeni), Lippia nodiflora (Poduthalai), Vinca rosea (Nityakalyani), Lawsonia alba (maruthondri) and Cynodon dactylon (Arugampul) and the flowers of Hibiscus rosasinensis (Chemparathampoo) and the ripe fruits of Phyllanthus emblica (nellikkai). Sindhooram is the chief therapeutic form of herbo-mineral preparations used in the Sidha system of Indian medicine.

  17. Occurrence of pathogens in wild rodents caught on Swedish pig and chicken farms.

    PubMed

    Backhans, A; Jacobson, M; Hansson, I; Lebbad, M; Lambertz, S Thisted; Gammelgård, E; Saager, M; Akande, O; Fellström, C

    2013-09-01

    A total of 207 wild rodents were caught on nine pig farms, five chicken farms and five non-farm locations in Sweden and surveyed for a selection of bacteria, parasites and viruses. Lawsonia intracellularia and pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica were only detected in rodents on pig farms (9% and 8% prevalence, respectively) which indicate that these agents are more likely to be transmitted to rodents from pigs or the environment on infected farms. Brachyspira hyodysenteriae (1%), Brachyspira intermedia (2%), Campylobacter jejuni (4%), Campylobacter upsaliensis (2%), leptospires (7%) and encephalomyocarditis virus (9%) were also detected from rodents not in contact with farm animals. Giardia and Cryptosporidium spp. were common, although no zoonotic types were verified, and Salmonella enterica was isolated from 1/11 mice on one farm but not detected by PCR from any of the rodents. Trichinella spp. and Toxoplasma gondii were not detected.

  18. Chemical composition and inhibitory effects of water extract of Henna leaves on reactive oxygen species, DNA scission and proliferation of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish; Chandel, Madhu; Kaur, Paramjeet; Pandit, Kritika; Kaur, Varinder; Kaur, Sandeep; Kaur, Satwinderjeet

    2016-01-01

    From the centuries, Lawsonia inermis L. (Henna) is utilized in traditional health care system as a medicinal and cosmetic agent. The present study was intended to assess antiradical, DNA protective and antiproliferative activity of water extract of Lawsonia inermis L. leaves (W-LI). Antioxidant activity was estimated using various in vitro assays such as DPPH, ABTS, superoxide anion radical scavenging, FRAP, deoxyribose degradation and DNA protection assay. Growth inhibitory effects of W-LI were assessed using MTT assay against different cancer cell lines viz. HeLa, MCF-7, A549, C6 and COLO-205. From the results of antioxidant assays, it was found that W-LI quenched DPPH and ABTS cation radicals with IC50 value of 352.77 µg/ml and 380.87 µg/ml respectively. It demonstrated hydroxyl radical scavenging potential of 59.75 % at highest test dose of 1000 µg/ml in deoxyribose degradation assay. The results of FRAP assay showed that W-LI also possesses significant reducing activity. Extract inhibited hydroxyl radical induced pBR322 plasmid DNA strand scission, thus conferring DNA protection. Growth inhibition of various cancer cell lines was achieved to the varying extent on treatment with W-LI. Further, it was observed that activity was quite promising against colon cancer COLO-205 cells (GI50 121.03 µg/ml). HPLC profiling of W-LI revealed the presence of different polyphenolic compounds such as ellagic acid, catechin, quercetin, kaempferol etc. which might be contributing towards antioxidant and cytotoxic activity. The present study demonstrated that polyphenols rich W-LI extract from leaves of L. inermis possesses ability to inhibit oxidative radicals and cancer cells proliferation. PMID:28337113

  19. Novel Lipid Biomarkers for Past Oceanic N2 Fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bale, N. J.; Hopmans, E. C.; Villareal, T. A.; Zell, C. I.; Sinninghe Damsté, , J.; Schouten, S.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria play important roles in the biogeochemical cycles of aquatic systems. Both heterocystous and non-heterocystous N2-fixing cyanobacteria are symbiotic with marine diatoms and thrive in low nutrient environments. These associations are significant exporters of carbon to the deep-sea, but suitable tracers for reconstructing their importance in past environments are lacking. We recently analyzed the heterocyst glycolipids (HGs) of the heterocystous Richelia intracellularis symbiont of the marine diatoms Hemiaulus hauckii and H. membranaceus and found unique C5 glycolipids with C30-32 carbon chains, a structure different from the C6 glycolipids detected in freshwater heterocystous cyanobacteria. We developed a high performance liquid chromatography/ multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) method specific for trace analysis of long chain C5 HGs and applied it to suspended particulate matter (SPM) and surface sediment from the Amazon plume, a region known to harbor marine diatoms carrying heterocystous cyanobacteria as endosymbionts. C5 HGs were detected in both SPM and sediments demonstrating their biomarker potential. They were not detected in SPM or sediment from freshwater settings in the region. Rather, limnetic SPM and sediments contained C6 HGs which are established biomarkers for free-living heterocystous cyanobacteria. Glycolipids have been found preserved in sediments of up to 49 Ma old. Our development of the C5 biomarkers has the potential to improve our knowledge of the contribution of symbiotic cyanobacteria to the paleo-N-cycle.

  20. Cloning and Expression of Gumboro VP2 Antigen in Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Mohammad; Yakhchali, Bagher; Ghamarian, Abdolreza; Enayati, Somayeh; Khodabandeh, Mahvash; Khalaj, Vahid

    2013-01-01

    Background Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV) causes a highly immunosuppressive disease in chickens and is a pathogen of major economic importance to the poultry industry worldwide. The VP2 protein is the major host-protective immunogen of IBDV and has been considered as a potential subunit vaccine against the disease. VP2 coding sequence was cloned in an inducible fungal vector and the protein was expressed in Aspergillus niger (A. niger). Methods Aiming at a high level of expression, a multicopy AMA1-pyrG-based episomal construct driven by a strong inducible promoter, glaA, was prepared and used in transformation of A. niger pyrG-protoplasts. SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis was carried out to confirm the expression of the protein. Results A number of pyrG + positive transformants were isolated and the presence of expression cassette was confirmed. Western blot analysis of one of these recombinant strains using monospecific anti-VP2 antibodies demonstrated the successful expression of the protein. The recombinant protein was also detected by serum obtained from immunized chicken. Conclusion In the present study, we have generated a recombinant A. niger strain expressing VP2 protein intracellulary. This recombinant strain of A. niger may have potential applications in oral vaccination against IBDV in poultry industry. PMID:23626875

  1. Relationship between Legionella pneumophila and Acanthamoeba polyphaga: Physiological status and susceptibility to chemical inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, J.; Farrell, I. ); Brown, M.R.W.; Collier, P.J.; Gilbert, P. )

    1992-08-01

    Survival studies were conducted on Legionella pneumophila cells that had been grown intracellulary in Acanthamoeba polyphaga and then exposed to polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), benzisothiazolone (BIT), and 5-chloro-N-methylisothiazolone (CMIT). Susceptibilities were also determined for L. pneumophila grown under iron-sufficient and iron-depleted conditions. BIT was relatively ineffective against cells to PHMB and CMIT. The activities of all three biocides were greatly reduced against L. pneumophila grown in amoebae. PHMB (1 [times] MIC) gave 99.99% reductions in viability for cultures grown in broth within 6 h and no detectable survivors at 24 h but only 90 and 99.9% killing at 6 h and 24 h, respectively, for cells grown in amoebae. The antimicrobial properties of the three biocides against A. polyphaga were also determined. The majority of amoebae recovered from BIT treatment, but few, if any, survived CMIT treatment or exposure of PHMB. This study not only shows the profound effect that intra-amoebal growth has on the physiological status and antimicrobial susceptibility of L. pneumophila but also reveals PHMB to be a potential biocide for effective water treatment. In this respect, PHMB has significant activity, below its recommended use concentrations, against both the host amoeba and L. pneumophila.

  2. Action spectra and chromatic mechanisms of cells in the median ocelli of dragonflies.

    PubMed

    Chappell, R L; DeVoe, R D

    1975-04-01

    Spectral sensitivities were recorded intracellulary in median ocelli of Anax junius, Aeschnatuberculifera, and Libellulapulcella. All cells had peak sensitivities at 360 and 500 nm while UV-blue+green cells found only in Anax had a third peak sensitivity at 440 nm. Ratios of UV-to-green sensitivities varied from cell to cell in each ocellus, but no UV-only or green-only cells were recorded. Half of the cells tested had a reverse Purkinje shift: They were more sensitive in the green at low illuminations but more sensitive in the UV at high illuminations; their intensity-response curves at 370 and 520 nm crossed but became parallel for large responses. Wave-lengths 420 nm and shorter elicited a family of low intensity-response curves with one slope; wavelengths 440 nm and longer elicities a family of curves with another slope. Orange-adapting lights selectively adapted sensitivity in the green, but UV-adapting lights had little selective effect. Amounts of log-selective adaptation were proportional to log orange-adapting intensity. It is concluded that two spectral mechanisms can be recorded from each cell, possibly by coupling of UV and green cells or possibly because each cell contains two visual pigments. Selective chromatic adaptations may provide the ocellus with a kind of "authomatic color control," while the reverse Purkinje shift could extend the ocellus' sensitivity to prevailing skylight.

  3. Action spectra and chromatic mechanisms of cells in the median ocelli of dragonflies

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Spectral sensitivities were recorded intracellulary in median ocelli of Anax junius, Aeschnatuberculifera, and Libellulapulcella. All cells had peak sensitivities at 360 and 500 nm while UV-blue+green cells found only in Anax had a third peak sensitivity at 440 nm. Ratios of UV-to- green sensitivities varied from cell to cell in each ocellus, but no UV- only or green-only cells were recorded. Half of the cells tested had a reverse Purkinje shift: They were more sensitive in the green at low illuminations but more sensitive in the UV at high illuminations; their intensity-response curves at 370 and 520 nm crossed but became parallel for large responses. Wave-lengths 420 nm and shorter elicited a family of low intensity-response curves with one slope; wavelengths 440 nm and longer elicities a family of curves with another slope. Orange-adapting lights selectively adapted sensitivity in the green, but UV-adapting lights had little selective effect. Amounts of log-selective adaptation were proportional to log orange-adapting intensity. It is concluded that two spectral mechanisms can be recorded from each cell, possibly by coupling of UV and green cells or possibly because each cell contains two visual pigments. Selective chromatic adaptations may provide the ocellus with a kind of "authomatic color control," while the reverse Purkinje shift could extend the ocellus' sensitivity to prevailing skylight. PMID:1151320

  4. Diversity and distribution of diazotrophic communities in the South China Sea deep basin with mesoscale cyclonic eddy perturbations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Zhao, Zihao; Sun, Jun; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2011-12-01

    The South China Sea (SCS) is an oligotrophic subtropical marginal ocean with a deep basin and a permanently stratified central gyre. Upwelling and nitrogen fixation provide new nitrogen for primary production in the SCS. This study was aimed at an investigation of phylogenetic diversity and quantification of the diazotroph community in the SCS deep basin, which is characterized by frequent mesoscale eddies. The diazotroph community had a relatively low diversity but a distinct spatial heterogeneity of diversity in the SCS deep basin. The potential for nitrogen fixation consistently occurred during cyclonic eddies, although upwelling of nutrient-replete deep water might have alleviated nitrogen limitation in the SCS. However, diazotrophic proteobacteria were dominant, but neither Trichodesmium nor heterocystous cyanobacterial diatom symbionts. Quantitative PCR analysis using probe-primer sets developed in this study revealed that the nif H gene of the two dominant alpha- and gammaproteobacterial groups was at the highest abundance (up to 10(4) to 10(5)  copies L(-1) ). Trichodesmium thiebautii was detected with an average density of 10(2)  trichomes L(-1) in the euphotic waters, while Richelia intracellularis was observed sporadically under the microscope. The unicellular cyanobacterial groups A and B were not detected in our libraries. Our results suggested that diazotrophic proteobacteria were significant components potentially contributing to nitrogen fixation in this oligotrophic marginal ocean ecosystem.

  5. Hybrids of [TSAO-T]-[foscarnet]: The first conjugate of foscarnet with a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor through a labile covalent ester bond.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Sonsoles; Lobatón, Esther; De Clercq, Erik; Koontz, Dianna L; Mellors, John W; Balzarini, Jan; Camarasa, María-José

    2004-06-17

    This paper describes the first example of combination of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors such as TSAO derivatives and foscarnet (PFA) in a single molecule through a labile covalent ester bond. The essential criteria in the design of these hybrids [TSAO-T]-[PFA] was to explore if the conjugation of foscarnet with the highly lipophilic TSAO derivative may facilitate the penetration of the conjugates through the cell membrane and if the hybrids escape extracellular hydrolysis and regenerate the parent inhibitors intracellulary. Several [TSAO-T]-[PFA] conjugates proved markedly inhibitory to HIV-1. Some of them also showed potent activity against PFA-resistant HIV-1 strains but fewer had detectable inhibitory activity against TSAO-resistant HIV-1 strains. These results indicated a pivotal role of the TSAO component of the hybrid but not the PFA component in the activity of the conjugates. Moreover, stability studies of the [TSAO-T]-[PFA] conjugates demonstrated that the compounds were stable in PBS whereas some of the conjugates regenerated the parent inhibitors in extracts from CEM cells.

  6. The Madagascar Bloom - a serendipitous study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srokosz, M. A.; Quartly, G.

    2012-12-01

    The late austral summer (February-April) phytoplankton bloom that occurs east of Madagascar, exhibits significant interannual variability and at its largest extent covers ~1% of the world's ocean surface area. The bloom raises many intriguing questions about how it begins, is sustained, propagates to the east, exports carbon and ends. It has been observed and studied using satellite ocean colour observations, but the lack of in situ data makes it difficult to address these questions. Here we describe observations that were made on a cruise in February 2005 serendipitously. These show clearly for the first time the existence of both a deep chlorophyll maximum at ~70-110m depths (seen in SeaSoar fluorimeter data) and a surface chlorophyll signature (seen in SeaWiFS satellite ocean colour data). The observations also show the modulation of biological signature at the surface by the eddy field, but not apparently of the deep chlorophyll maximum. In situ observations indicate that Trichodesmium dominates the bloom nearer to Madagascar, while the diatom Rhizosolenia clevei (and its symbiont Richelia intracellularis) dominates further from the island. In addition, SeaSoar Optical Plankton Counter (OPC), temperature and salinity data suggest that the surface bloom seen in the SeaWiFS data is confined to the shallow (~30m) mixed layer. It is hypothesised that the interannual variability in bloom intensity may be due to variations in coastal upwelling and thus the supply of iron, which is a micronutrient that can limit diazotroph growth.

  7. The Madagascar Bloom: A serendipitous study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srokosz, M. A.; Quartly, G. D.

    2013-01-01

    The late austral summer (February-April) phytoplankton bloom that occurs east of Madagascar exhibits significant interannual variability and at its largest extent covers ~1% of the world's ocean surface area. The bloom raises many intriguing questions about how it begins, is sustained, propagates to the east, exports carbon, and ends. It has been observed and studied using satellite ocean color observations, but the lack of in situ data makes it difficult to address these questions. Here we describe observations that were made serendipitously on a cruise in February 2005. These show clearly for the first time the simultaneous existence of a deep chlorophyll maximum at ~70-110 m depths (seen in SeaSoar fluorimeter data) and a surface chlorophyll signature [seen in Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) satellite ocean color data]. The observations also show the modulation of the biological signature at the surface by the eddy field but not of the deep chlorophyll maximum. Trichodesmium dominates the bloom nearer to Madagascar, while the diatom Rhizosolenia clevei (and its symbiont Richelia intracellularis) dominates further from the island. The surface bloom seen in the SeaWiFS data is confined to the shallow (~30 m) mixed layer. It is hypothesized that the interannual variability in bloom intensity may be due to variations in coastal upwelling and thus the supply of iron, which is a micronutrient that can limit diazotroph growth.

  8. Actinide Biocolloid Formation in Brine by Halophilic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Harris, R.; Beveridge, T.J.; Brady, P.V.; Papenguth, H.W.

    1999-07-28

    We examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WFP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell Surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited volubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellulary as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis, of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloids that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide.

  9. Gut Health of Pigs: Challenge Models and Response Criteria with a Critical Analysis of the Effectiveness of Selected Feed Additives — A Review

    PubMed Central

    Adewole, D. I.; Kim, I. H.; Nyachoti, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The gut is the largest organ that helps with the immune function. Gut health, especially in young pigs has a significant benefit to health and performance. In an attempt to maintain and enhance intestinal health in pigs and improve productivity in the absence of in-feed antibiotics, researchers have evaluated a wide range of feed additives. Some of these additives such as zinc oxide, copper sulphate, egg yolk antibodies, mannan-oligosaccharides and spray dried porcine plasma and their effectiveness are discussed in this review. One approach to evaluate the effectiveness of these additives in vivo is to use an appropriate disease challenge model. Over the years, researchers have used a number of challenge models which include the use of specific strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, bacteria lipopolysaccharide challenge, oral challenge with Salmonella enteric serotype Typhimurium, sanitation challenge, and Lawsonia intercellularis challenge. These challenge models together with the criteria used to evaluate the responses of the animals to them are also discussed in this review. PMID:26954144

  10. Assessment of antioxidant capacity and cytotoxicity of selected Malaysian plants.

    PubMed

    Ling, Lai Teng; Radhakrishnan, Ammu Kutty; Subramaniam, Thavamanithevi; Cheng, Hwee Ming; Palanisamy, Uma D

    2010-03-25

    Thirteen Malaysian plants; Artocarpus champeden, Azadirachta indica, Fragaria x ananassa, Garcinia mangostana, Lawsonia inermis, Mangifera indica, Nephelium lappaceum, Nephelium mutobile, Peltophorum pterocarpum, Psidium guajava and Syzygium aqueum, selected for their use in traditional medicine, were subjected to a variety of assays. Antioxidant capability, total phenolic content, elemental composition, as well as it cytotoxity to several cell lines of the aqueous and ethanolic extracts from different parts of these selected Malaysian plants were determined. In general, the ethanolic extracts were better free radical scavengers than the aqueous extracts and some of the tested extracts were even more potent than a commercial grape seed preparation. Similar results were seen in the lipid peroxidation inhibition studies. Our findings also showed a strong correlation of antioxidant activity with the total phenolic content. These extracts when tested for its heavy metals content, were found to be below permissible value for nutraceutical application. In addition, most of the extracts were found not cytotoxic to 3T3 and 4T1 cells at concentrations as high as 100 microg/mL. We conclude that although traditionally these plants are used in the aqueous form, its commercial preparation could be achieved using ethanol since a high total phenolic content and antioxidant activity is associated with this method of preparation.

  11. Role of anaerobic fungi in wheat straw degradation and effects of plant feed additives on rumen fermentation parameters in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dagar, S S; Singh, N; Goel, N; Kumar, S; Puniya, A K

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, rumen microbial groups, i.e. total rumen microbes (TRM), total anaerobic fungi (TAF), avicel enriched bacteria (AEB) and neutral detergent fibre enriched bacteria (NEB) were evaluated for wheat straw (WS) degradability and different fermentation parameters in vitro. Highest WS degradation was shown for TRM, followed by TAF, NEB and least by AEB. Similar patterns were observed with total gas production and short chain fatty acid profiles. Overall, TAF emerged as the most potent individual microbial group. In order to enhance the fibrolytic and rumen fermentation potential of TAF, we evaluated 18 plant feed additives in vitro. Among these, six plant additives namely Albizia lebbeck, Alstonia scholaris, Bacopa monnieri, Lawsonia inermis, Psidium guajava and Terminalia arjuna considerably improved WS degradation by TAF. Further evaluation showed A. lebbeck as best feed additive. The study revealed that TAF plays a significant role in WS degradation and their fibrolytic activities can be improved by inclusion of A. lebbeck in fermentation medium. Further studies are warranted to elucidate its active constituents, effect on fungal population and in vivo potential in animal system.

  12. A preliminary pilot survey on head lice, pediculosis in Sharkia Governorate and treatment of lice with natural plant extracts.

    PubMed

    El-Basheir, Zeinab M; Fouad, Mahmoud A H

    2002-12-01

    Twelve different representative areas in Sharkia Governorate were surveyed for head lice, Pediculus humanus capitis. The pre-valence was investigated among 120 houses containing 2,448 individual, with different age, sex and socioeconomic status. Examination was done by naked eye aided with hand-lens. A total of 137 individuals were infested. Infestation rates were higher in the rural areas with low socioeconomic levels, concrete houses with over-crowded family members. Children had significantly higher infestation rates than adults. Males had lower infestation rates than females. However, the hair length and permanent hair washing were the factors accounted for both age and sex difference in prevalence of pediculosis. Head lice infestations were found all over the year, but increased in summer and spring. One hundred infested patients (90 females and 10 males) with different aged and hair length were treated with tour mixed cream from plants Lawsonia alba L. (Henna). Trigonella faemum-gracanum (Fenugreek), Hibiscus cannabinus (Hibiscus) and Artemisia cina (Wormseed). The head lice completely disappeared within a week among those patients treated by henna mixed with aqueous extract of sheah (100%) or mixed with helba (75%) or with karkada (50%).

  13. Pseudomoniasis phytotherapy: a review on most important Iranian medicinal plants effective on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Bahmani, Mahmoud; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Hassanzadazar, Hassan; Taherikalani, Morovat

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, aerobic bacterium found in water and soil. It is a normal flora in skin and gastrointestinal tract of human beings. P. aeruginosa as an opportunistic pathogen involved in nosocomial infections having multiple pathogenic factors and shows high rate of resistance to different antibiotics. The aim of this study was to identify the most important native medicinal plants of Iran effective on P. aeruginosa. Materials and Methods: All required information was obtained by searching keywords such as P. aeruginosa, medicinal plant extracts or essential oils in published articles in authentic scientific databases such as Science Direct, Wiley-Blackwell, Springer, Google scholar, Scientific Information Database (SID) and Magiran. Results: According to the literature review, our results showed 12 different native medicinal plants were effective against P. aeruginosa in Iran including Eucalyptus camadulensis, Marticaria chamomilla, Ferula gummosa Boiss, Lawsonia inermis, Ocimumgra tissimum, Allium sativum, Satureja hortensis L, Satureja bachtiarica Bunge, Satureja khuzestanica (Jamzad), Thymus daenensis Celak, Thymus carmanicus Jalals and Camellia sinensis. Conclusion: Phytochemical analysis has shown that bioactive compounds of medicinal plants with their antioxidant and antimicrobial properties can be good alternatives for the synthetic medicines in food and drug industry. PMID:28149496

  14. Synthesis, spectral characterization, molecular structure and pharmacological studies of N'-(1, 4-naphtho-quinone-2yl) isonicotinohyWdrazide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha Rani, P. R.; Fernandez, Annette; George, Annie; Remadevi, V. K.; Sudarsanakumar, M. R.; Laila, Shiny P.; Arif, Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    A simple and efficient procedure was employed for the synthesis of N'-(1,4-naphtho-quinone-2-yl) isonicotinohydrazide (NIH) by the reaction of 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthaquinone (lawsone) and isonicotinoyl hydrazine in methanol using ultrasonic irradiation. Lawsone is the principal dye, isolated from the leaves of henna (Lawsonia inermis). Structural modification was done on the molecule aiming to get a more active derivative. The structure of the parent compound and the derivative was characterized by elemental analyses, infrared, electronic, 1H, 13C NMR and GC-MS spectra. The fluorescence spectral investigation of the compound was studied in DMSO and ethanol. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that NIH crystallizes in monoclinic space group. The DNA cleavage study was monitored by gel electrophoresis method. The synthesized compound was found to have significant antioxidant activity against DPPH radical (IC50 = 58 μM). The in vitro cytotoxic studies of the derivative against two human cancer cell lines MCF-7 (human breast cancer) and HCT-15 (human colon carcinoma cells) using MTT assay revealed that the compound exhibited higher cytotoxic activity with a lower IC50 value indicating its efficiency in killing the cancer cells even at low concentrations. These results suggest that the structural modifications performed on lawsone could be considered a good strategy to obtain a more active drug.

  15. Determination of heavy metal contents by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) in some medicinal plants from Pakistani and Malaysian origin.

    PubMed

    Akram, Sobia; Najam, Rahila; Rizwani, Ghazala H; Abbas, Syed Atif

    2015-09-01

    This study depicts a profile of existence of heavy metals (Cu, Ni, Zn, Cd, Hg, Mn, Fe, Na, Ca, and Mg) in some important herbal plants like (H. Integrifolia, D. regia, R. communis, C. equisetifolia, N. oleander, T. populnea, M. elengi, H. schizopetalus, P. pterocarpum) from Pakistan and an antidiabetic Malaysian herbal drug product containing (Punica granatum L. (Mast) Hook, Momordica charantia L., Tamarindus indica L., Lawsonia inermis L.) using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Heavy metals in these herbal plants and Malaysian product were in the range of 0.02-0.10 ppm of Cu, 0.00-0.02 ppm of Ni, 0.02-0.29 ppm of Zn, 0.00-0.04 ppm of Cd, 0.00-1.33 ppm of Hg, 0.00-0.54 ppm of Mn, 0.22-3.16 ppm of Fe, 0.00-9.17 ppm of Na, 3.27-15.63 ppm of Ca and 1.85-2.03 ppm of Mg. All the metals under study were within the prescribed limits except mercury. Out of 10 medicinal plants/product under study 07 were beyond the limit of mercury permissible limits. Purpose of this study is to determine heavy metals contents in selected herbal plants and Malaysian product, also to highlight the health concerns related to the presence of toxic levels of heavy metals.

  16. Determination of the Moisture-Sorption Isotherms and Isosteric Heat of Henna Leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennaceur, S.; Draoui, B.; Touati, B.; Benseddik, A.; Saad, A.; Bennamoun, L.

    2015-01-01

    Equilibrium moisture desorption and adsorption isotherms of Lawsonia inermis L. (commonly known as henna) leaves at temperatures of 30, 40 and 50°C with a water activity ranging from 0.057 to 0.898 were obtained by the gravimetric-static method. It was established that when the temperature of these leaves increases, their moisture content increases too with a hysteresis effect. The experimental data on the sorption of the indicated leaves were compared with the corresponding calculation data obtained with the use of the GAB, modified BET, Henderson-Thompson, modified Halsey, modified Oswin, and Peleg models. Evaluation of these models on the basis of statistical processing of the data obtained with them, including the calculus of the standard error and the correlation coefficient, has shown that the GAB and Peleg models represent sorption curves more adequately. The net isosteric heats of desorption and adsorption of henna leaves were determined by the sorption isotherms constructed using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. An expression for predicting these thermodynamic properties of plants is proposed.

  17. Effect of copper and lead on two consortia of phototrophic microorganisms and their capacity to sequester metals.

    PubMed

    Burgos, A; Maldonado, J; De Los Rios, A; Solé, A; Esteve, I

    2013-09-15

    bioaccumulate them, extra- and intracellulary.

  18. New estimation of N2 fixation in the western and central Pacific Ocean and its marginal seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozaki, Takuhei; Furuya, Ken; Kodama, Taketoshi; Kitajima, Satoshi; Takeda, Shigenobu; Takemura, Toshihiko; Kanda, Jota

    2010-03-01

    The distribution of N2 fixation was examined using a 15N2 tracer with accompanying measurements of abundance of Trichodesmium spp. and Richelia intracellularis, nitrate plus nitrite (N+N) and soluble reactive phosphorus at the nanomolar level, and primary production in the western and central Pacific Ocean. N2 fixation occurred only in >˜20°C oligotrophic (i.e., N+N < 100 nM) waters except at a station in the equatorial upwelling zone where N+N was 1880 nM. High N2 fixation rates were observed in the Kuroshio and East China Sea (KECS) and near Fiji and other isolated islands with concomitant high abundance of Trichodesmium spp. In contrast, N2 fixation in the western and central oligotrophic North Pacific (WCONP) was significantly lower, and Trichodesmium spp. were rarely observed. These observations hint that KECS and waters around isolated islands are N2 fixation "hot spots" because of the occurrence of Trichodesmium spp. The average N2 fixation rate in the KECS of 232 ± 54.8 (±SE, n = 13) μmol N m-2 d-1 was almost 1 order of magnitude higher than that in the WCONP of 39.2 ± 7.51 (n = 26) μmol N m-2 d-1. On the basis of these estimates and reported values obtained using 15N2, depth-integrated N2 fixation in the North Pacific was estimated to be 2.6 ± 0.3 × 109 (n = 63) mol N d-1, which is less than half of previous estimates. This difference was ascribed primarily to the unavailability of N2 fixation rates in the WCONP, which occupies a vast area of the subtropical North Pacific, and the use of data obtained in the hot spots which represent small areas that likely led to the previous overestimation.

  19. Free heme and sickle hemoglobin polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunova, Veselina V.

    This work investigates further the mechanism of one of the most interesting of the protein self-assembly systems---the polymerization of sickle hemoglobin and the role of free heme in it. Polymerization of sickle hemoglobin is the primary event in the pathology of a chronic hemolytic condition called sickle cell anemia with complex pathogenesis, unexplained variability and symptomatic treatment. Auto-oxidation develops in hemoglobin solutions exposed to room temperature and causes release of ferriheme. The composition of such solutions is investigated by mass spectrometry. Heme dimers whose amount corresponds to the initial amounts of heme released from the protein are followed. Differences in the dimer peak height are established for hemoglobin variants A, S and C and depending on the exposure duration. The effects of free heme on polymerization kinetics are studied. Growth rates and two characteristic parameters of nucleation are measured for stored Hb S. After dialysis of polymerizing solutions, no spherulites are detected at moderately high supersaturation and prolonged exposure times. The addition of 0.16-0.26 mM amounts of heme to dialyzed solutions leads to restoration of polymerization. The measured kinetic parameters have higher values compared to the ones before dialysis. The amount of heme in non-dialyzed aged solution is characterized using spectrophotometry. Three methods are used: difference in absorbance of dialyzed and non-dialyzed solutions, characteristic absorbance of heme-albumin complex and absorbance of non-dialyzed solutions with added potassium cyanide. The various approaches suggest the presence of 0.12 to 0.18 mM of free ferriheme in such solutions. Open questions are whether the same amounts of free heme are present in vivo and whether the same mechanism operates intracellulary. If the answer to those questions is positive, then removal of free heme from erythrocytes can influence their readiness to sickle.

  20. Phytoplankton community structure in the VAHINE mesocosm experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, Karine; Cornet, Véronique; Caffin, Mathieu; Rodier, Martine; Desnues, Anne; Berthelot, Hugo; Turk-Kubo, Kendra; Heliou, Jules

    2016-09-01

    The VAHINE mesocosm experiment was designed to trigger a diazotroph bloom and to follow the subsequent transfer of diazotroph-derived nitrogen (DDN) in the rest of the food web. Three mesocosms (50 m3) located inside the Nouméa lagoon (New Caledonia, southwestern Pacific) were enriched with dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) in order to promote N2 fixation in these low-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (LNLC) waters. Initially, the diazotrophic community was dominated by diatom diazotroph associations (DDAs), mainly by Rhizosolenia/Richelia intracellularis, and by Trichodesmium, which fueled enough DDN to sustain the growth of other diverse diatom species and Synechococcus populations that were well adapted to limiting DIP levels. After DIP fertilization (1 µM) on day 4, an initial lag time of 10 days was necessary for the mesocosm ecosystems to start building up biomass. However, changes in community structure were already observed during this first period, with a significant drop of both Synechococcus and diatom populations, while Prochlorococcus benefited from DIP addition. At the end of this first period, corresponding to when most added DIP was consumed, the diazotroph community changed drastically and became dominated by Cyanothece-like (UCYN-C) populations, which were accompanied by a monospecific bloom of the diatom Cylindrotheca closterium. During the second period, biomass increased sharply together with primary production and N2-fixation fluxes near tripled. Diatom populations, as well as Synechococcus and nanophytoeukaryotes, showed a re-increase towards the end of the experiment, showing efficient transfer of DDN to non-diazotrophic phytoplankton.

  1. Self-reported use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) products in topical treatment of diabetic foot disorders by diabetic patients in Jeddah, Western Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is little published on current Saudi diabetic patients' practices when they are exposed to foot disorders such as open wound, ulcer, and skin cracks. These factors are usually influenced by local culture and communities beliefs. The aim of the current study was to identify the pattern of patients' use of CAM products in dealing with diabetic foot disorders topically in a group of diabetic patients. Findings A Cross-sectional descriptive study of a representative cohort of diabetic patients living in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia was designed. A pre-designed questionnaire to identify local diabetics' practices in dealing topically with foot disorders including open wound, chronic ulcer, and skin cracks was designed. Questionnaire was administered by a group of trained nutrition female students to diabetics face to face living in their neighborhood. A total of 1634 Saudi diabetics were interviewed. Foot disorders occurred in approximately two thirds of the respondents 1006 (61.6%). Out of the 1006 patients who had foot disorders, 653 reported trying some sort of treatment as 307 patients (47.1%) used conventional topical medical treatment alone, 142 (21.7%) used CAM products alone, and 204 (31.2%) used both treatments. The most commonly used CAM product by the patients was Honey (56.6%) followed by Commiphora Molmol (Myrrh) in (37.4%) and Nigellia Sativa (Black seed) in (35.1%). The least to be used was Lawsonia inermis (Henna) in (12.1%). Ten common natural preparations used topically to treat diabetic foot disorders were also identified. Conclusions The use of CAM products in topical treatment of diabetic foot disorders is fairly common among Saudi diabetic patients. Honey headed the list as a solo topical preparation or in combination with other herbs namely black seeds and myrrh. The efficacy of the most common products needs further research. PMID:20925956

  2. From body art to anticancer activities: perspectives on medicinal properties of henna.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Rohan; Dandawate, Prasad; Vyas, Alok; Padhye, Subhash; Biersack, Bernhard; Schobert, Rainer; Ahmad, Aamir; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2012-12-01

    Nature has been a rich source of therapeutic agents for thousands of years and an impressive number of modern drugs have been isolated from natural sources based on the uses of these plants in traditional medicine. Henna is one such plant commonly known as Persian Henna or Lawsonia inermis, a bushy, flowering tree, commonly found in Australia, Asia and along the Mediterranean coasts of Africa. Paste made from the leaves of Henna plant has been used since the Bronze Age to dye skin, hairs and fingernails especially at the times of festivals. In recent times henna paste has been used for body art paintings and designs in western countries. Despite such widespread use in dyeing and body art painting, Henna extracts and constituents possess numerous biological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and anticancer activities. The active coloring and biologically active principle of Henna is found to be Lawsone (2- hydroxy-1, 4-naphthoquinone) which can serve as a starting building block for synthesizing large number of therapeutically useful compounds including Atovaquone, Lapachol and Dichloroallyl lawsone which have been shown to possess potent anticancer activities. Some other analogs of Lawsone have been found to exhibit other beneficial biological properties such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antitubercular and antimalarial. The ability of Lawsone to undergo the redox cycling and chelation of trace metal ions has been thought to be partially responsible for some of its biological activities. Despite such diverse biological properties and potent anticancer activities the compound has remained largely unexplored and hence in the present review we have summarized the chemistry and biological activities of Lawsone along with its analogs and metal complexes.

  3. Preliminary evaluation of hepatoprotective potential of the polyherbal formulation

    PubMed Central

    Arka, Ghosh; Anindita, Kundu; Ankit, Seth; Kumar, Singh Anil; Kumar, Maurya Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant and hepatoprotective effects of the polyherbal formulation (PHF)containing Cajanus cajan (L.)Millsp., Lawsonia inermis L. Linn, Mimosa pudica L., Uraria picta (Jacq.)DC. and Operculina turpethum (L.)Silva Manso on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)induced acute liver damage in albino rats. Materials and Methods: The groups of animals were administered with PHF at the doses 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg b.w. (per oral [p.o.])once in a day for 7 days and at day 6th and 7th the animals were administrated with Carbon tetrachloride (1.0 mL/kg b.w. 50% v/v with olive oil,; p.o.). The effect of PHF on serum glutamine pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), serum glutamine oxaloacetate transaminase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP)and total bilirubin were determined in CCl4 - induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Further, the effects of PHF on glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD)level and lipid peroxidation (LPO)activity were also investigated. Results: The results demonstrated that PHF (400 mg/kg b.w.)significantly reduces the CCl4 induced increase in level of serum SGPT, serum ALP and total bilirubin. PHF (400 mg/kg b.w.)prevents the depletion level of GSH and decrease in the activity of SOD in CCl4 -induced liver injury in rats. In addition, PHF also showed a significant decrease in the LPO levels signifying the potent antioxidant activity. Conclusion: All our findings suggest that PHF could protect the liver cells from CCl4 - induced liver damages and the mechanism may be through the anti-oxidative effect of PHF. PMID:26401397

  4. Desulfobaculum xiamenensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a member of the family Desulfovibrionaceae isolated from marine mangrove sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chao; Gao, Zhaoming; Qin, Qiwei; Li, Fuying; Ruan, Lingwei

    2012-07-01

    A taxonomic study was carried out on strain P1(T), which was isolated from mangrove sediment samples collected from Qinglan Port (Hainan, China). Cells were curved rods, that were motile, with a single polar flagellum. The strain was non-spore-forming with a cell size of 0.6×1.5-2.2 µm. Catalase and oxidase activities were not detected. Growth was observed in the temperature range 22-44 °C (optimum, 35-40 °C) and pH range 5.5-8.5 (optimum, pH 7.0). NaCl was required for growth and tolerated at up to 3.5% (w/v) (optimum, 0.5%). Strain P1(T) utilized hydrogen, succinate, L-malate, citrate, oxalate, DL-lactate, pyruvate, or cysteine as electron donors, and sulfate or sulfite as electron acceptors. Fermentation products from pyruvate were acetate, H(2) and CO(2). Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain P1(T) formed a distinct evolutionary lineage within the family Desulfovibrionaceae. Strain P1(T) was most closely related to members of the genera Desulfovibrio (92.0-94.3% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Desulfocurvus (91.1%), Bilophila (87.9%) and Lawsonia (86.0%) of the family Desulfovibrionaceae. The DNA G+C content of strain P1(T) was 64.5 mol% and the major cellular fatty acids were iso-C(15:0) (18.8%), anteiso-C(15:0) (5.0%), C(16:0) (14.2%) and iso-C(17:1)ω9c (24.4%). The predominant menaquinone was MK-7 (97%). Major polar lipids were phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol. Strain P1(T) was distinguishable from members of phylogenetically related genera by differences in several phenotypic properties. On the basis of the phenotypic and phylogenetic data, strain P1(T) represents a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Desulfobaculum xiamenensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Desulfobaculum xiamenensis is P1(T) (=CGMCC 1.5166(T)=DSM 24233(T)).

  5. Global analysis of gene expression dynamics within the marine microbial community during the VAHINE mesocosm experiment in the southwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfreundt, Ulrike; Spungin, Dina; Bonnet, Sophie; Berman-Frank, Ilana; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2016-07-01

    phosphatase was expressed prominently only between days 12 and 23 in different organisms, suggesting that the microbial community was not limited by phosphate, even before the fertilization on day 4, whereas the post-fertilization community was. We observed high expression of the Synechococcus sqdB gene, only transiently lowered following phosphate fertilization. SqdB encodes UDP-sulfoquinovose synthase, possibly enabling marine picocyanobacteria to minimize their phosphorus requirements by substitution of phospholipids with sulphur-containing glycerolipids. This result suggests a link between sqdB expression and phosphate availability in situ. Gene expression of diazotrophic cyanobacteria was mainly attributed to Trichodesmium and Richelia intracellularis (diatom-diazotroph association) in the Nouméa lagoon and initially in M1. UCYN-A (Candidatus Atelocyanobacterium) transcripts were the third most abundant and declined both inside and outside after day 4, consistent with 16S- and nifH-based analyses. Transcripts related to the Epithemia turgida endosymbiont and Cyanothece ATCC 51142 increased during the second half of the experiment.

  6. Specificity and Control of Choline–O-Sulfate Transport in Filamentous Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Bellenger, Nicole; Nissen, Per; Wood, Trudy C.; Segel, Irwin H.

    1968-01-01

    Choline-O-sulfate uptake by Penicillium notatum showed the following characteristics. (i) Transport was mediated by a permease which is highly specific for choline-O-sulfate. No significant inhibition of transport was caused by choline, choline-O-phosphate, acetylcholine, ethanolamine-O-phosphate, ethanolamine-O-sulfate, methanesulfonyl choline, 2-aminoethane thiosulfate, or the monomethyl or dimethyl analogues of choline-O-sulfate. Similarly, no significant inhibition was caused by any common sulfur amino acid or inorganic sulfur compound. Mutants lacking the inorganic sulfate permease possessed the choline-O-sulfate permease at wild-type levels. (ii) Choline-O-sulfate transport obeyed saturation kinetics (Km = 10−4 to 3 × 10−4m; Vmax = 1 to 6 μmoles per g per min). The kinetics of transport between 10−9 and 10−1m external choline-O-sulfate showed that only one saturable mechanism is present. (iii) Transport was sensitive to 2,4-dinitrophenol, azide, N-ethylmaleimide, p-chloromercuribenzoate, and cyanide. Ouabain, phloridzin, and eserine had no effect. (iv) Transport was pH-dependent with an optimum at pH 6. Variations in the ionic strength of the incubation medium had no effect. (v) Transport was temperature-dependent with a Q10 of greater than 2 between 3 and 40 C. Transport decreased rapidly above 40 C. (vi) Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (sodium salts, pH 6) had no effect, nor was there any stimulation by metal or nonmetal ions. Cu++, Ag+, and Hg++ were inhibitory. (vii) The initial rate at which the ester is transported was independent of intracellular hydrolysis. After long periods of incubation (> 10 min), a significant proportion of the transported choline-O-sulfate was hydrolyzed intracellulary. In the presence of 5 × 10−3m external choline-O-sulfate, the mycelia accumulated choline-O-sulfate to an apparent intracellular concentration of 0.075 m by 3 hr. Transport was unidirectional. No efflux or exchange of 35S-choline-O-sulfate was observed

  7. Total phenol, antioxidant and free radical scavenging activities of some medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Dhan; Suri, Samiksha; Upadhyay, Garima; Singh, Brahma N

    2007-02-01

    Phenols, a major group of antioxidant phytochemicals, have profound importance due to their biological and free radical scavenging activities. To identify their potential sources, extracts of some plants were studied for their total phenolic content (TPC), antioxidant (AOA) and free radical scavenging activities (FRSA) by different methods at multiple concentrations followed by specific phenolic composition. The amount of TPC varied from 2.8 mg/g (Withania somnifera, roots) to 107.8 mg/g (Cassia fistula, fruits) and the AOA from 24.2% (Curcuma zeoderia, leaves) to 96.9% (Trewia nudiflora, leaves). Bark of Azadirachta indica, fruits of C. fistula, and leaves and fruits of T. nudiflora were found to have high TPC (89.8- 107.8 mg/g) and high AOA (84.8-96.9%). Promising plant parts were studied for their FRSA and reducing power (RP), where the bark of A. indica, Casuarina equisetifolia and Cinnamomum zeylanicum, flowers of Indigofera tinctoria, fruits of Lawsonia inermis, and fruits and leaves of T. nudiflora showed a very low inhibitory concentration value ranging from 0.14 to 0.26 mg/ml, efficiency concentration value from 6.1 to 11.6 mg/mg DPPH and reducing power value from 0.6 to 2.8 ascorbic acid equivalents (ASE/ml), and reasonably high values (8.5 -16.2) of anti-radical power (ARP), indicating their strong FRSA. They also showed better inhibition of hydroxyl radical induced deoxyribose degradation than that of reference standard. Fruits of C. fistula with high phenols (107.8 mg/g) showed poor reducing power (5.9 ASE/ml) and ARP (4.7); in contrast, the bark of C. equisetifolia and fruits of L. inermis were with comparatively lower phenols (72.1 and 75.8 mg/g) but exhibited good ARP (16.2 and 14.4) and reducing power (0.7 and 0.6 ASE/ ml, respectively). Some of the plants were also found effective in protecting plasmid DNA nicking induced by hydroxyl radicals generated by Fenton's reaction. They were further assayed for their specific phenolic composition through

  8. Switching between hydrophobic and wettable conditions in soil: experiments to assess the influence of cracks, roots and subsurface drainage impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanek, E.; Walsh, R. P. D.; Shakesby, R. A.

    2012-04-01

    Although much is known about soil hydrophobicity, assessments of the overall hydrological and erosional significance of the soil property in areas affected by it are greatly hampered by a lack of knowledge on switching between hydrophobic and hydrophilic states. This arises mainly because of (1) the destructive nature of methods of assessing hydrophobicity, (2) its often high local spatial variability and (3) difficulties of relating hydrophobicity results to meaningful soil moisture values. Also, very little is known about the influence which cracks and holes through hydrophobic soil and the presence or absence of subsurface impeding layers have on the 3D pattern and speed of hydrophobicity change during wetting and drying cycles. These issues form the focus of the present paper, which was carried out as part of the EU DESIRE Project. A laboratory experimental approach was adopted. Three different soils of equal initial hydrophibicity class when dry (18 % MED), but of contrasting texture and total carbon content, were investigated: (1) from the scrub-covered (dominated by Erica umbellata, Calluna vulgaris and Pterospartum tridentatum) Vale Torto catchment in Gois municipality, central Portugal (an area where the impacts of prescribed fire were being assessed); (2) soil around a Chamaecyparis lawsonia tree in South Wales; and (3) a vegetated coastal sand-dune location at Nicholaston, Gower Peninsula, South Wales. For the experiments, 106 samples of sieved (< 2 mm), dried soil were placed to a depth of 10 cm in standardized transparent pots (16.5 cm high, top diameter 16 cm, basal diameter 11 cm). Equal numbers of samples were prepared with either (i) five simulated holes, (ii) two simulated linear cracks (in both cases extending downwards to the sample base) and (iii) control soil samples without cracks or holes). Samples were also either (i) sealed at the base to create subsurface impeded drainage or (ii) provided with unimpeded basal drainage by insertion of