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Sample records for layer growth kinetics

  1. The kinetic boundary layer around an absorbing sphere and the growth of small droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Widder, M.E.; Titulaer, U.M. )

    1989-06-01

    Deviations from the classical Smoluchowski expression for the growth rate of a droplet in a supersaturated vapor can be expected when the droplet radius is not large compared to the mean free path of a vapor molecule. The growth rate then depends significantly on the structure of the kinetic boundary layer around a sphere. The authors consider this kinetic boundary layer for a dilute system of Brownian particles. For this system a large class of boundary layer problems for a planar wall have been solved. They show how the spherical boundary layer can be treated by a perturbation expansion in the reciprocal droplet radius. In each order one has to solve a finite number of planar boundary layer problems. The first two corrections to the planar problem are calculated explicitly. For radii down to about two velocity persistence lengths (the analog of the mean free path for a Brownian particle) the successive approximations for the growth rate agree to within a few percent. A reasonable estimate of the growth rate for all radii can be obtained by extrapolating toward the exactly known value at zero radius. Kinetic boundary layer effects increase the time needed for growth from 0 to 10 (or 2{1/2}) velocity persistence lengths by roughly 35% (or 175%).

  2. The Powder-Pack Nitriding Process: Growth Kinetics of Nitride Layers on Pure Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Silva, I.; Ortiz-Dominguez, M.; Elias-Espinosa, M.; Vega-Morón, R. C.; Bravo-Bárcenas, D.; Figueroa-López, U.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the growth kinetics of nitride layers that develop during the powder-pack nitriding process on the surface of ARMCO pure iron was estimated. The powder-pack nitriding of pure iron was performed according to the Pulnieren© (H.E.F. Durferrit) method using a "Pulnier" powder and an activator, at 798-848 K with different exposure times (2-12 h) for each temperature. In addition, for the entire set of nitriding conditions, three different activator/"Pulnier" powder ratios (0.20, 0.25, and 0.35) were used to evaluate the activation level during the growth of nitride layers. The kinetics of the nitride layers over the surface of ARMCO pure iron were estimated by two mathematical approaches, that consider the mass balance equations at the growth interphases. The resulting expressions for the effective diffusion coefficients in the nitride layers were evaluated as a function of nitriding temperatures and activator/"Pulnier" powder ratio. Finally, based on the experimental parameters ascribed to the powder-pack nitriding process, two expressions were proposed to estimate the nitride layer thicknesses at 798 and 823 K after 9 h of exposure for each temperature, to validate the diffusion models used in this work.

  3. Growth kinetics of cubic carbide free layers in graded cemented carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Liu-Yong; Liu, Yi-Min; Huang, Ji-Hua; Zhang, Shou-Quan; Zhao, Xing-Ke

    2012-01-01

    In order to reveal the formation mechanism of cubic carbide free layers (CCFL), graded cemented carbides with CCFL in the surface zone were fabricated by a one-step sintering procedure in vacuum, and the analysis on microstructure and element distribution were performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA), respectively. A new physical model and kinetic equation were established based on experimental results. Being different from previous models, this model suggests that nitrogen diffusion outward is only considered as an induction factor, and the diffusion of titanium through liquid phase plays a dominative role. The driving force of diffusion is expressed as the differential value between nitrogen partial pressure and nitrogen equilibrium pressure essentially. Simulation results by the kinetic equation are in good agreement with experimental values, and the effect of process parameters on the growth kinetics of CCFL can also be explained reasonably by the current model.

  4. From atoms to layers: in situ gold cluster growth kinetics during sputter deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartzkopf, Matthias; Buffet, Adeline; Körstgens, Volker; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Schlage, Kai; Benecke, Gunthard; Perlich, Jan; Rawolle, Monika; Rothkirch, André; Heidmann, Berit; Herzog, Gerd; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Röhlsberger, Ralf; Gehrke, Rainer; Stribeck, Norbert; Roth, Stephan V.

    2013-05-01

    The adjustment of size-dependent catalytic, electrical and optical properties of gold cluster assemblies is a very significant issue in modern applied nanotechnology. We present a real-time investigation of the growth kinetics of gold nanostructures from small nuclei to a complete gold layer during magnetron sputter deposition with high time resolution by means of in situ microbeam grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (μGISAXS). We specify the four-stage growth including their thresholds with sub-monolayer resolution and identify phase transitions monitored in Yoneda intensity as a material-specific characteristic. An innovative and flexible geometrical model enables the extraction of morphological real space parameters, such as cluster size and shape, correlation distance, layer porosity and surface coverage, directly from reciprocal space scattering data. This approach enables a large variety of future investigations of the influence of different process parameters on the thin metal film morphology. Furthermore, our study allows for deducing the wetting behavior of gold cluster films on solid substrates and provides a better understanding of the growth kinetics in general, which is essential for optimization of manufacturing parameters, saving energy and resources.The adjustment of size-dependent catalytic, electrical and optical properties of gold cluster assemblies is a very significant issue in modern applied nanotechnology. We present a real-time investigation of the growth kinetics of gold nanostructures from small nuclei to a complete gold layer during magnetron sputter deposition with high time resolution by means of in situ microbeam grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (μGISAXS). We specify the four-stage growth including their thresholds with sub-monolayer resolution and identify phase transitions monitored in Yoneda intensity as a material-specific characteristic. An innovative and flexible geometrical model enables the extraction

  5. From atoms to layers: in situ gold cluster growth kinetics during sputter deposition.

    PubMed

    Schwartzkopf, Matthias; Buffet, Adeline; Körstgens, Volker; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Schlage, Kai; Benecke, Gunthard; Perlich, Jan; Rawolle, Monika; Rothkirch, André; Heidmann, Berit; Herzog, Gerd; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Röhlsberger, Ralf; Gehrke, Rainer; Stribeck, Norbert; Roth, Stephan V

    2013-06-07

    The adjustment of size-dependent catalytic, electrical and optical properties of gold cluster assemblies is a very significant issue in modern applied nanotechnology. We present a real-time investigation of the growth kinetics of gold nanostructures from small nuclei to a complete gold layer during magnetron sputter deposition with high time resolution by means of in situ microbeam grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (μGISAXS). We specify the four-stage growth including their thresholds with sub-monolayer resolution and identify phase transitions monitored in Yoneda intensity as a material-specific characteristic. An innovative and flexible geometrical model enables the extraction of morphological real space parameters, such as cluster size and shape, correlation distance, layer porosity and surface coverage, directly from reciprocal space scattering data. This approach enables a large variety of future investigations of the influence of different process parameters on the thin metal film morphology. Furthermore, our study allows for deducing the wetting behavior of gold cluster films on solid substrates and provides a better understanding of the growth kinetics in general, which is essential for optimization of manufacturing parameters, saving energy and resources.

  6. Synthesis of Graphene Layers from Metal-Carbon Melts: Nucleation and Growth Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Shaahin

    A new method for growth of large-area graphene, which can lead to a scalable low-cost high-throughput production technology, was demonstrated. The method is based on growing of graphene films on the surface of metal-carbon melts and involves dissolving carbon in a molten metal at a specified temperature and then allowing the dissolved carbon to nucleate and grow on top of the melt at a lower temperature. The synthesized graphene layers were subjected to detailed microscopic and Raman spectroscopic characterizations. The deconvolution of the Raman 2D band was used to accurately determine the number of atomic planes in the resulting graphene layers and access their quality. The results indicated that the technology can provide bulk graphite films, few-layer graphene as well as high-quality single layer graphene on metals. It was also shown that upon cooling of supersaturated metal-carbon melts; graphite would also grow inside the melt either with flake or sphere morphology, depending on the solidification rate and degree of supersaturation. At small solidification rates, graphite crystals are normally bounded by faceted low index basal and prismatic planes which grow by lateral movement of ledges produced by 2D-nucleation or dislocations. At higher growth rates, however, both interfaces become kinetically rough, and growth becomes limited by diffusion of carbon to the growing interface. The roughening transition from faceted to non-faceted was found to depend on the driving force and nature of growing plane. Due to high number of C-C dangling bonds in prismatic face, its roughening transition occurs at smaller driving forces. At intermediate rates, the prismatic interfaces become rough and grow faster while the basal plane is still faceted, leading to formation of flake graphite. At higher growth rates, both interfaces grow with a relatively similar rate leading to initiation of graphite sphere formation, which later grows by a multi-stage growth mechanism. An

  7. Growth Kinetics in Epitaxial Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessinger, Uwe

    Growth kinetics in heteroepitaxial growth are related to the nucleation and growth of atomic-height islands during the deposition of a material on a dissimilar substrate. Experimental measurements of the initial morphology of CaF_2 films deposited on Si(111) substrates were performed. These measurements consisted of photoemission spectroscopy and diffraction, which give sub-nanometer scale information averaged over the entire sample, and plan-view transmission electron microscopy, which gives localized information on a scale of several nanometers. These results, combined with others in the literature, revealed four distinct growth morphologies dependent on the deposition rate, substrate temperature and spacing between atomic-height steps on the surface, two of which had not been previously explained. A model based on two extant theories of homoepitaxial growth kinetics was developed to explain the different observed growth morphologies for the heteroepitaxial system CaF_2/Si(111). The first theory deals with whether the initial nucleation will occur at substrate steps or through adatom collisions on flat terraces, while the second deals with the nucleation of subsequent layers as these initial atomic islands increase in size. In extending these theories to heteroepitaxy, very different rates of upper-layer nucleation for the different size islands that nucleated at steps and on terraces are predicted. By applying this theory to CaF_2/Si(111), the diffusion barriers for CaF_2 molecule migration both on the reacted Si-Ca-F interface layer and on subsequent CaF_2 layers was extracted. The four different growth morphologies are explained within a common framework. The theory is quite general, and should apply to most heteroepitaxial systems. These theories were extended to predict a means by which the upper-layer nucleation may be inhibited while the underlying layer is completed. This method involves initiating the growth at conditions favoring many, small islands on

  8. Simulation of the growth kinetics of boride layers formed on Fe during gas boriding in H2-BCl3 atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulka, M.; Makuch, N.; Pertek, A.; Małdziński, L.

    2013-03-01

    The modeling of the boriding kinetics is considered as a necessary tool to select the suitable process parameters for obtaining boride layer of an adequate thickness. Therefore, the simulation of the growth kinetics of boride layers has gained much attention for last years. The majority of the published works described the kinetics of the pack-boriding or paste-boriding. In this study, the model of growth kinetics of two-phase boride layer (FeB+Fe2B) on pure Fe was proposed for gas boriding. Displacements of the two interfaces (FeB/Fe2B and Fe2B/substrate) resulted from a difference of the arrival flux of interstitial boron atoms to one phase and the departure flux of the boron atoms from this phase to the second phase. The mass balance equations were formulated. The measurements of thickness of both zones (FeB and Fe2B), for different temperature of boriding, were used for calculations. Based on the experimental data, the parabolic growth constants AFeB and B versus the temperature of boriding were determined. The linear relationships were accepted. As a consequence, the activation energies (QFeB and Q) were calculated. The calculated values were comparable to other data derived from gas boriding. The presented model can predict the thicknesses of the FeB and Fe2B zones (XFeB and Y, respectively) formed on pure Fe during gas boriding. Additionally, the diffusion annealing after boriding was analyzed. This process was carried out in order to obtain a single-phase boride layer (Fe2B). The relationship between the reduction in FeB zone (dXFeB) and the growth in Fe2B phase (dY) was determined. The time tXFeB=0, needed for the total elimination of FeB phase in the boride layer was calculated and compared to the experimental data.

  9. Nonlinear Response of Layer Growth Dynamics in the Mixed Kinetics-Bulk-Transport Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vekilov, Peter G.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Rosenberger, Franz

    1996-01-01

    In situ high-resolution interferometry on horizontal facets of the protein lysozyme reveal that the local growth rate R, vicinal slope p, and tangential (step) velocity v fluctuate by up to 80% of their average values. The time scale of these fluctuations, which occur under steady bulk transport conditions through the formation and decay of step bunches (macrosteps), is of the order of 10 min. The fluctuation amplitude of R increases with growth rate (supersaturation) and crystal size, while the amplitude of the v and p fluctuations changes relatively little. Based on a stability analysis for equidistant step trains in the mixed transport-interface-kinetics regime, we argue that the fluctuations originate from the coupling of bulk transport with nonlinear interface kinetics. Furthermore, step bunches moving across the interface in the direction of or opposite to the buoyancy-driven convective flow increase or decrease in height, respectively. This is in agreement with analytical treatments of the interaction of moving steps with solution flow. Major excursions in growth rate are associated with the formation of lattice defects (striations). We show that, in general, the system-dependent kinetic Peclet number, Pe(sub k) , i.e., the relative weight of bulk transport and interface kinetics in the control of the growth process, governs the step bunching dynamics. Since Pe(sub k) can be modified by either forced solution flow or suppression of buoyancy-driven convection under reduced gravity, this model provides a rationale for the choice of specific transport conditions to minimize the formation of compositional inhomogeneities under steady bulk nutrient crystallization conditions.

  10. Modified growth kinetics of ion induced yttrium--silicide layers during subsequent thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, T.L.; Mayer, J.W. )

    1991-12-02

    Yttrium and amorphous silicon bilayers were irradiated with 600-keV inert ions between {minus}190 and 265 {degree}C. Ion-induced YSi{sub 1.7} layers occurred in those samples irradiated above {ge} (R18)205 {degree}C. These ion-mixed samples were thermally annealed at temperatures between 325 and 380 {degree}C. The diffusion-limited growth was observed only in those samples which had an ion-induced YSi{sub 1.7} layer present prior to thermal annealing. This type of growth is distinctly different from the interface limited, nonuniform, and irreproducible growth seen during typical thermal annealing of yttrium and silicon bilayers. This type of growth still occurred in those samples annealed after ion irradiations at {le}190 {degree}C.

  11. Influence of C60 co-deposition on the growth kinetics of diindenoperylene-From rapid roughening to layer-by-layer growth in blended organic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorch, C.; Novák, J.; Banerjee, R.; Weimer, S.; Dieterle, J.; Frank, C.; Hinderhofer, A.; Gerlach, A.; Carla, F.; Schreiber, F.

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the growth of the two phase-separating materials diindenoperylene (DIP) and buckminsterfullerene C60 with different mixing ratio in real-time and in situ by X-ray scattering experiments. We found that at room temperature, mixtures with an excess of DIP show a growth mode which is very close to the perfect layer-by-layer limit with DIP crystallites forming over the entire film thickness. An unexpected increase in the island size is observed for these mixtures as a function of film thickness. On the other hand, equimolar and C60 dominated mixtures grow with poor crystallinity but form very smooth films. Additionally, it is observed that higher substrate temperatures lead to an increase in the length scale of phase separation with film thickness.

  12. Kinetics of low-pressure, low-temperature graphene growth: toward single-layer, single-crystalline structure.

    PubMed

    Mehdipour, Hamid; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken

    2012-11-27

    Graphene grown on metal catalysts with low carbon solubility is a highly competitive alternative to exfoliated and other forms of graphene, yet a single-layer, single-crystal structure remains a challenge because of the large number of randomly oriented nuclei that form grain boundaries when stitched together. A kinetic model of graphene nucleation and growth is developed to elucidate the effective controls of the graphene island density and surface coverage from the onset of nucleation to the full monolayer formation in low-pressure, low-temperature CVD. The model unprecedentedly involves the complete cycle of the elementary gas-phase and surface processes and shows a precise quantitative agreement with the recent low-energy electron diffraction measurements and also explains numerous parameter trends from a host of experimental reports. These agreements are demonstrated for a broad pressure range as well as different combinations of precursor gases and supporting catalysts. The critical role of hydrogen in controlling the graphene nucleation and monolayer formation is revealed and quantified. The model is generic and can be extended to even broader ranges of catalysts and precursor gases/pressures to enable the as yet elusive effective control of the crystalline structure and number of layers of graphene using the minimum amounts of matter and energy.

  13. Growth and dissolution kinetics of tetragonal lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaco, L. A.; Rosenberger, F.

    1993-01-01

    The growth and dissolution kinetics of lysozyme in a 25 ml solution bridge inside a closed growth cell was investigated. It was found that, under all growth conditions, the growth habit forming (110) and (101) faces grew through layer spreading with different growth rate dependence on supersaturation/temperature. On the other hand, (100) faces which formed only at low temperatures underwent a thermal roughening transition around 12 C.

  14. High In-content InGaN layers synthesized by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy: Growth conditions, strain relaxation, and In incorporation kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Valdueza-Felip, S. Bellet-Amalric, E.; Pouget, S.; Monroy, E.; Wang, Y.; Chauvat, M.-P.; Ruterana, P.; Lorenz, K.; Alves, E.

    2014-12-21

    We report the interplay between In incorporation and strain relaxation kinetics in high-In-content In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (x = 0.3) layers grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy. For In mole fractions x = 0.13–0.48, best structural and morphological qualities are obtained under In excess conditions, at In accumulation limit, and at a growth temperature where InGaN decomposition is active. Under such conditions, in situ and ex situ analyses of the evolution of the crystalline structure with the layer thickness point to an onset of misfit relaxation after the growth of 40 nm, and a gradual relaxation during more than 200 nm, which results in an inhomogeneous strain distribution along the growth axis. This process is associated with a compositional pulling effect, i.e., indium incorporation is partially inhibited in presence of compressive strain, resulting in a compositional gradient with increasing In mole fraction towards the surface.

  15. Domain Growth Kinetics in Stratifying Foam Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiran; Sharma, Vivek

    2015-03-01

    Baking bread, brewing cappuccino, pouring beer, washing dishes, shaving, shampooing, whipping eggs and blowing bubbles all involve creation of aqueous foam films. Typical foam films consist of two surfactant-laden surfaces that are μ 5 nm - 10 micron apart. Sandwiched between these interfacial layers is a fluid that drains primarily under the influence of viscous and interfacial forces, including disjoining pressure. Interestingly, for certain low molecular weight surfactants, a layered ordering of micelles inside the foam films (thickness <100 nm) leads to a stepwise thinning phenomena called stratification. We experimentally elucidate the influence of these different driving forces, and confinement on drainage kinetics of horizontal stratifying foam films. Thinner, darker domains spontaneously grow within foam films. Quantitative characterization of domain growth visualized in a using Scheludko-type thin film cell and a theoretical model based on lubrication analysis, provide critical insights into hydrodynamics of thin foam films, and the strength and nature of surface forces, including supramolecular oscillatory structural forces.

  16. Domain growth kinetics in stratifying foam films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiran; Sharma, Vivek

    2015-11-01

    Baking bread, brewing cappuccino, pouring beer, washing dishes, shaving, shampooing, whipping eggs and blowing bubbles all involve creation of aqueous foam films. Typical foam films consist of two surfactant-laden surfaces that are ~ 5 nm - 10 micron apart. Sandwiched between these interfacial layers is a fluid that drains primarily under the influence of viscous and interfacial forces, including disjoining pressure. Interestingly, a layered ordering of micelles inside the foam films (thickness <100 nm) leads to a stepwise thinning phenomena called stratification, which results in a thickness-dependent variation in reflected light intensity, visualized as progressively darker shades of gray. Thinner, darker domains spontaneously grow within foam films. We show that the domain expansion dynamics exhibit two distinct growth regimes with characteristic scaling laws. Though several studies have focused on the expansion dynamics of isolated domains that exhibit a diffusion-like scaling, the change in expansion kinetics observed after domains contact with the Plateau border has not been reported and analyzed before.

  17. Kinetic-based layer response to RMPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Cole, A. J.

    2012-10-01

    Plasma toroidal rotation can prevent reconnection of resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields near rational surfaces. A low collisionality kinetic toroidal model of RMP-flutter-induced electron density and thermal transport in toroidally flowing plasmas has been developed [1]. Since this electron transport is non-ambipolar, it produces a co-current toroidal torque on the plasma. This low collisionality torque differs from fluid-based cylindrical results [2] in three key ways: the effective electron collision frequency is increased because only untrapped electrons carry parallel currents, this effect increases the singular layer width, and electron temperature gradient effects are included. A Te gradient torque is caused by the parallel electron thermal force which is usually neglected in Ohm's law. It changes the perpendicular electron flow where the torque at the rational surface vanishes to where (e/Te)(dφ/dr)=dpe/dr+cTdTe/dr in which cT is 0.71 for Z=1. The cT!=0 effect moves the radial location for RMP field penetration and hence reconnection to smaller radii relative to theories [2] that neglect the thermal force.[4pt] [1] J.D. Callen, A.J. Cole and C.C. Hegna, UW-CPTC 11-15R (2012).[0pt] [2] F.L. Waelbroeck et al., Nucl. Fusion 52, 074004 (2012).

  18. Growth kinetics for temperature-controlled atomic layer deposition of GaN using trimethylgallium and remote-plasma-excited NH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pansila, P.; Kanomata, K.; Miura, M.; Ahmmad, B.; Kubota, S.; Hirose, F.

    2015-12-01

    Fundamental surface reactions in the atomic layer deposition of GaN with trimethylgallium (TMG) and plasma-excited NH3 are investigated by multiple-internal-reflection infrared absorption spectroscopy (MIR-IRAS) at surface temperatures varying from room temperature (RT) to 400 °C. It is found that TMG is saturated at RT on GaN surfaces when the TMG exposure exceeds 8 × 104 Langmuir (L), where 1 L corresponds to 1.33 × 10-4 Pa s (or 1.0 × 10-6 Torr s), and its saturation density reaches the maximum value at RT. Nitridation with the plasma-excited NH3 on the TMG-saturated GaN surface is investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The nitridation becomes effective at surface temperatures in excess of 100 °C. The reaction models of TMG adsorption and nitridation on the GaN surface are proposed in this paper. Based on the surface analysis, a temperature-controlled ALD process consisting of RT-TMG adsorption and nitridation at 115 °C is examined, where the growth per cycle of 0.045 nm/cycle is confirmed. XPS analysis indicates that all N atoms are bonded as GaN. Atomic force microscopy indicates an average roughness of 0.23 nm. We discuss the reaction mechanism of GaN ALD in the low-temperature region at around 115 °C with TMG and plasma-excited NH3.

  19. Kinetics of microbial growth on pentachlorophenol.

    PubMed Central

    Klecka, G M; Maier, W J

    1985-01-01

    Batch and fed-batch experiments were conducted to examine the kinetics of pentachlorophenol utilization by an enrichment culture of pentachlorophenol-degrading bacteria. The Haldane modification of the Monod equation was found to describe the relationship between the specific growth rate and substrate concentration. Analysis of the kinetic parameters indicated that the maximum specific growth rate and yield coefficients are low, with values of 0.074 h-1 and 0.136 g/g, respectively. The Monod constant (Ks) was estimated to be 60 micrograms/liter, indicating a high affinity of the microorganisms for the substrate. However, high concentrations (KI = 1,375 micrograms/liter) were shown to be inhibitory for metabolism and growth. These kinetic parameters can be used to define the optimal conditions for the removal of pentachlorophenol in biological treatment systems. PMID:3977315

  20. Transport and Growth Kinetics in Microgravity Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otalora, F.; Garcia-Ruiz, J. M.; Carotenuto, L.; Castagnolo, D.; Novella, M. L.; Chernov, A. A.

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic coupling between mass transport and incorporation of growth units into the surface of a crystal growing from solution in microgravity is used to derive quantitative information on the crystal growth kinetics. To this end, new procedures for experiment preparation, interferometric data processing and model fitting have been developed. The use of experimental data from the bulk diffusive maw transport together with a model for steady state stagnant crystal growth allows the detailed quantitative understanding of the kinetics of both the concentration depletion zone around the crystal and the growth of the crystal interface. The protein crystal used in the experiment is shown to be growing in the mixed kinetic regime (0.2 x 10(exp -6) centimeters per second less than beta R/D less than 0.9 x 10(exp -6) centimeters per second).

  1. Protein crystal growth - Growth kinetics for tetragonal lysozyme crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, M. L.; Snyder, R. S.; Naumann, R.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported from theoretical and experimental studies of the growth rate of lysozyme as a function of diffusion in earth-gravity conditions. The investigations were carried out to form a comparison database for future studies of protein crystal growth in the microgravity environment of space. A diffusion-convection model is presented for predicting crystal growth rates in the presence of solutal concentration gradients. Techniques used to grow and monitor the growth of hen egg white lysozyme are detailed. The model calculations and experiment data are employed to discuss the effects of transport and interfacial kinetics in the growth of the crystals, which gradually diminished the free energy in the growth solution. Density gradient-driven convection, caused by presence of the gravity field, was a limiting factor in the growth rate.

  2. Morphological stability and kinetics in crystal growth from vapors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz

    1990-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: (1) microscopy image storage and processing system; (2) growth kinetics and morphology study with carbon tetrabromide; (3) photothermal deflection vapor growth setup; (4) bridgman growth of iodine single crystals; (5) vapor concentration distribution measurement during growth; and (6) Monte Carlo modeling of anisotropic growth kinetics and morphology. A collection of presentations and publications of these results are presented.

  3. Kinetics of powder layer shrinkage during electron-beam treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyazeva, A.

    2016-10-01

    When layerwise synthesis of new material occurs, only thin surface area, thin melt film or thin powder layer undergo essential changes. To describe the behaviour of thin layer where temperature and composition change, a model similar to shallow-water theory is suggested. The equations for thin layer behaviour are deduced for the Maxwell model of viscoelastic body in the approximation of incompressibility. The hydrodynamic part of the problem is coupled with thermal-kinetical one.

  4. Growth morphology with anisotropic surface kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiao, Rong-Fu; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Rosenberger, Franz

    1990-01-01

    The morphological evolution of crystals growing from an incongruent vapor phase is studied using a Monte Carlo model, and the full range of growth morphologies is recovered. The diffusion in the bulk nutrient and the anisotropy in the interface kinetics are morphologically destabilizing and stabilizing, respectively. For a given set of simulation parameters and lattice symmetries there is a critical size, which scales linearly with the mean free path in the vapor, beyond which a crystal cannot retain its stable, macroscopically faceted growth shape. Surface diffusion stabilizes faceted growth on the shorter scale of the mean surface diffusion length. In simulations with a uniform drift superimposed on the random walk nutrient transport, crystal faces oriented toward the drift show enhanced morphological stability compared to the purely diffusive situation. Rotational drifts with periodic reversal of direction are morphologically stabilizing for all crystal facets.

  5. Volume Diffusion Growth Kinetics and Step Geometry in Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Ramachandran, Narayanan

    1998-01-01

    The role of step geometry in two-dimensional stationary volume diff4sion process used in crystal growth kinetics models is investigated. Three different interface shapes: a) a planar interface, b) an equidistant hemispherical bumps train tAx interface, and c) a train of right angled steps, are used in this comparative study. The ratio of the super-saturation to the diffusive flux at the step position is used as a control parameter. The value of this parameter can vary as much as 50% for different geometries. An approximate analytical formula is derived for the right angled steps geometry. In addition to the kinetic models, this formula can be utilized in macrostep growth models. Finally, numerical modeling of the diffusive and convective transport for equidistant steps is conducted. In particular, the role of fluid flow resulting from the advancement of steps and its contribution to the transport of species to the steps is investigated.

  6. Epitaxial growth of silicon for layer transfer

    DOEpatents

    Teplin, Charles; Branz, Howard M

    2015-03-24

    Methods of preparing a thin crystalline silicon film for transfer and devices utilizing a transferred crystalline silicon film are disclosed. The methods include preparing a silicon growth substrate which has an interface defining substance associated with an exterior surface. The methods further include depositing an epitaxial layer of silicon on the silicon growth substrate at the surface and separating the epitaxial layer from the substrate substantially along the plane or other surface defined by the interface defining substance. The epitaxial layer may be utilized as a thin film of crystalline silicon in any type of semiconductor device which requires a crystalline silicon layer. In use, the epitaxial transfer layer may be associated with a secondary substrate.

  7. Characterizing the Growth Kinetics in Estrogen Responsive ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    There is a need to develop high-throughput screening (HTS) tests capable of testing thousands of environmental chemicals for endocrine disrupting potential. The estrogen signaling pathway is a known xenobiotic target that has been implicated in a variety of adverse health effects including reproductive deficits and cancer promotion. Using real-time measurements of growth kinetics by electrode impedance, the estrogen-responsive human ductal carcinoma cell line, T47D, was treated with 2000 chemicals of environmental relevance. Cells were treated in concentration response and measurements of cellular impedance were recorded every hour for six days. Exponential impedance, signifying increased proliferation, was observed by prototypical estrogen receptor agonists (17β-estradiol, genestein, bisphenol-A, nonylphenol, 4-tert-octylphenol). Several compounds, including bisphenol-A and genestein, induced cell proliferation at comparable levels to 17β-estradiol, although at much higher concentrations. Progestins, and mineralocortocoids (progesterone, dihydrotestosterone, aldosterone) invoked a biphasic impedance signature. In conclusion, the real-time nature of this assay allows for rapid detection of differential growth characteristics shows potential, in combination with other ToxCast HTS assays, to detect environmental chemicals with potential endocrine activity. [This abstract does not necessarily reflect Agency policy]. Several compounds, including bisphenol-A and

  8. Budget of Turbulent Kinetic Energy in a Shock Wave Boundary-Layer Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vyas, Manan; Waindim, Mbu; Gaitonde, Datta

    2016-01-01

    Implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES) of a shock wave boundary-layer interaction (SBLI) was performed. Quantities present in the exact equation of the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) transport were accumulated. These quantities will be used to calculate the components of TKE-like production, dissipation, transport, and dilatation. Correlations of these terms will be presented to study the growth and interaction between various terms. A comparison with its RANS (Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes) counterpart will also be presented.

  9. Temperature dependence of protein solubility-determination, application to crystallization, and growth kinetics studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz

    1993-01-01

    A scintillation method was developed for determinations of the temperature dependence of the solubility, and of nucleation induction times of proteins, in 50-100 mu(l) volumes of solution. Solubility data for lysozyme and horse serum albumin were obtained for various combinations of pH and precipitant concentrations. These data and the nucleation induction information were used for dynamic crystallization control, that is, for the controlled separation of nucleation and growth stages. Individual lysozyme and horse serum albumin crystals were grown in 15-20 mu(l) solution volumes contained in x-ray capillaries. The morphology and kinetics of the growth and dissolution of lysozyme in aqueous solutions with 2.5 percent NaCl and at pH = 4.5 was studied in situ with a depth resolution of 300 A (4 unit cells) by high resolution optical microscopy and digital image processing. The bulk super- or under saturation, sigma, of the solution inside a closed growth cell was controlled by temperature. The growth habit was bound by (110) and (101) faces that grew through layer spreading, although with different growth rate dependencies on supersaturation/temperature. At sigma less than 10 (obtained at higher temperatures) growth was purely kinetic ally controlled, with impurity effects (macrostep formation and kinetic hindrance) becoming significant for sigma less than 2. At sigma greater than 10 (lower temperatures), anisotropies in the interfacial kinetics were more pronounced, with interfacial kinetics and bulk transport becoming equally important to the growth morphology. Growth rates were growth history dependent. The formation of striations (layers of irregularly incorporated solution) was unambiguously correlated with growth temperature variations. Etching exposed dislocations and various high-index faces whose growth morphologies were studied during return to the steady state growth form. Growth steps were observed to originate from two-dimensional nuclei or from outcrops

  10. Modeling the growth of an altered layer in mineral weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Fábio D. A. Aarão

    2015-10-01

    A stochastic reaction-diffusion model on a lattice is introduced to describe the growth kinetics of an altered layer in the weathering of a mineral. Particles R represent H2O that permanently fills the outer surface and diffuse on M (mineral) and A (altered) sites with coefficients DM and DA , respectively. The transformation M + R → A occurs with rate r, representing the irreversible formation of the altered material in a region of molecular size, viz. the lattice site of size a. These assumptions agree with predictions of the interfacial dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism, although the model does not describe the chemistry of dissolution reactions or precipitation processes. Scaling concepts are used to distinguish kinetic regimes and their crossovers, and are supported by simulation results. In the short time reactive regime, the thickness of the altered layer increases linearly in time and filling of that layer by particles R is high. In the long time diffusive regime, the altered layer thickness grows as (DA t) 1 / 2 . Modeling of single crystals require very small values of DM , which produces atomically narrow interfaces between the altered material and the mineral and absence of R in the latter, in agreement with recent experimental results. If r growth velocity of the altered layer by a factor lAM / a , but no fluid in the bulk mineral. Estimates of the order of magnitude of transformation rates and of diffusion coefficients are obtained by application of the model to some recently studied systems: calcite dissolution, labradorite weathering, and silicate glass weathering. Effects of dissolution of the altered layer are analyzed. Significant differences between the model and leached layer theories are discussed.

  11. Diamagnetic boundary layers - A kinetic theory. [for collisionless magnetized plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemaire, J.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1976-01-01

    A kinetic theory is presented for boundary layers associated with MHD tangential 'discontinuities' in a collisionless magnetized plasma, such as those observed in the solar wind. The theory consists of finding self-consistent solutions of Vlasov's equation and Maxwell's equation for stationary one-dimensional boundary layers separating two Maxwellian plasma states. Layers in which the current is carried by electrons are found to have a thickness of the order of a few electron gyroradii, but the drift speed of the current-carrying electrons is found to exceed the Alfven speed, and accordingly such layers are not stable. Several types of layers in which the current is carried by protons are discussed; in particular, cases are considered in which the magnetic-field intensity, direction, or both, changed across the layer. In every case, the thickness was of the order of a few proton gyroradii, and the field changed smoothly, although the characteristics depended somewhat on the boundary conditions. The drift speed was always less than the Alfven speed, consistent with stability of such structures. These results are consistent with observations of boundary layers in the solar wind near 1 AU.

  12. Interneurons targeting similar layers receive synaptic inputs with similar kinetics.

    PubMed

    Cossart, Rosa; Petanjek, Zdravko; Dumitriu, Dani; Hirsch, June C; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Esclapez, Monique; Bernard, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    GABAergic interneurons play diverse and important roles in controlling neuronal network dynamics. They are characterized by an extreme heterogeneity morphologically, neurochemically, and physiologically, but a functionally relevant classification is still lacking. Present taxonomy is essentially based on their postsynaptic targets, but a physiological counterpart to this classification has not yet been determined. Using a quantitative analysis based on multidimensional clustering of morphological and physiological variables, we now demonstrate a strong correlation between the kinetics of glutamate and GABA miniature synaptic currents received by CA1 hippocampal interneurons and the laminar distribution of their axons: neurons that project to the same layer(s) receive synaptic inputs with similar kinetics distributions. In contrast, the kinetics distributions of GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic events received by a given interneuron do not depend upon its somatic location or dendritic arborization. Although the mechanisms responsible for this unexpected observation are still unclear, our results suggest that interneurons may be programmed to receive synaptic currents with specific temporal dynamics depending on their targets and the local networks in which they operate.

  13. Influence of deformation on dolomite rim growth kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helpa, Vanessa; Rybacki, Erik; Grafulha Morales, Luiz Fernando; Dresen, Georg

    2015-04-01

    Using a gas-deformation apparatus stacks of oriented calcite (CaCO3) and magnesite (MgCO3) single crystals were deformed at T = 750° C and P = 400 MPa to examine the influence of stress and strain on magnesio-calcite and dolomite (CaMg[CO3]2) growth kinetics. Triaxial compression and torsion tests performed at constant stresses between 7 and 38 MPa and test durations between 4 and 171 hours resulted in bulk strains of 0.03-0.2 and maximum shear strains of 0.8-5.6, respectively. The reaction rims consist of fine-grained (2-7 μm) dolomite with palisade-shaped grains growing into magnesite reactants and equiaxed granular dolomite grains next to calcite. In between dolomite and pure calcite, magnesio-calcite grains evolved with an average grain size of 20-40 μm. Grain boundaries tend to be straighter at high bulk strains and equilibrium angles at grain triple junctions are common within the magnesio-calcite layer. Transmission electron microscopy shows almost dislocation free palisades and increasing dislocation density within granular dolomite towards the magnesio-calcite boundary. Within magnesio-calcite grains, dislocations are concentrated at grain boundaries. Variation of time at fixed stress (˜17 MPa) yields a parabolic time dependence of dolomite rim width, indicating diffusion-controlled growth, similar to isostatic rim growth behavior. In contrast, the magnesio-calcite layer growth is enhanced compared to isostatic conditions. Triaxial compression at given time shows no significant change of dolomite rim thickness (11±2 μm) and width of magnesio-calcite layers (33±5 μm) with increasing stress. In torsion experiments, reaction layer thickness and grain size decrease from the center (low stress/strain) to the edge (high strain/stress) of samples. Chemical analysis shows nearly stoichiometric composition of dolomite palisades, but enhanced Ca content within granular grains, indicating local disequilibrium with magnesio-calcite, in particular for twisted

  14. Large-scale epitaxial growth kinetics of graphene: A kinetic Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Huijun; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2015-08-28

    Epitaxial growth via chemical vapor deposition is considered to be the most promising way towards synthesizing large area graphene with high quality. However, it remains a big theoretical challenge to reveal growth kinetics with atomically energetic and large-scale spatial information included. Here, we propose a minimal kinetic Monte Carlo model to address such an issue on an active catalyst surface with graphene/substrate lattice mismatch, which facilitates us to perform large scale simulations of the growth kinetics over two dimensional surface with growth fronts of complex shapes. A geometry-determined large-scale growth mechanism is revealed, where the rate-dominating event is found to be C{sub 1}-attachment for concave growth-front segments and C{sub 5}-attachment for others. This growth mechanism leads to an interesting time-resolved growth behavior which is well consistent with that observed in a recent scanning tunneling microscopy experiment.

  15. Anion exchange kinetics of nanodimensional layered metal hydroxides: use of isoconversional analysis.

    PubMed

    Majoni, Stephen; Hossenlopp, Jeanne M

    2010-12-16

    Anion exchange reactions of nanodimensional layered metal hydroxide compounds are utilized to create materials with targeted physical and chemical properties and also as a means for controlled release of intercalated anions. The kinetics of this important class of reaction are generally characterized by model-based approaches. In this work, a different approach based on isothermal, isoconversional analysis was utilized to determine effective activation energies with respect to extent of reaction. Two different layered metal hydroxide materials were chosen for reaction with chloride anions, using a temperature range of 30-60 °C. The concentrations of anions released into solution and the changes in polycrystalline solid phases were evaluated using model-based (Avrami-Erofe'ev nucleation-growth model) and model-free (integral isoconversional) methods. The results demonstrate the utility of the isoconversional approach for identifying when fitting to a single model is not appropriate, particularly for characterizing the temperature dependence of the reaction kinetics.

  16. Kinetic and chemical stability of graphene oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Si; Bongiorno, Angelo; Bongiorno's lab Team

    2014-03-01

    Chemical functionalization of graphene holds great promise to open new applications of graphene in technology. Here we combine density functional theory (DFT) and Monte Carlo calculations to study both the stability and structure of graphene layers functionalized with epoxide and hydroxyl species. Our calculations show that sparse functionalizations of graphene are unstable in air at room temperature. However, oxygen groups diffuse and are prone to form dense agglomerates. To investigate these phenomena, we use DFT calculations to first map the interaction of functionalities on graphene, and then to device a simple energy scheme to both compute the Gibbs free energy of formation of arbitrary functionalizations of graphene and predict the structure resulting from diffusion and agglomeration processes. We find that the stability of graphene oxide increases for increasing both the O:C ratio and ageing time. The structure of the aged layers consists of a non-homogeneous phase of highly oxidized regions surrounded by areas of pristine graphene. Within the oxidized domains, formation of energetically stable motifs reduces the likelihood of occurrence of decomposition reactions, thereby enhancing the kinetic stability of the oxidized layer.

  17. Optimal Growth in Hypersonic Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2016-01-01

    The linear form of the parabolized linear stability equations is used in a variational approach to extend the previous body of results for the optimal, nonmodal disturbance growth in boundary-layer flows. This paper investigates the optimal growth characteristics in the hypersonic Mach number regime without any high-enthalpy effects. The influence of wall cooling is studied, with particular emphasis on the role of the initial disturbance location and the value of the spanwise wave number that leads to the maximum energy growth up to a specified location. Unlike previous predictions that used a basic state obtained from a self-similar solution to the boundary-layer equations, mean flow solutions based on the full Navier-Stokes equations are used in select cases to help account for the viscous- inviscid interaction near the leading edge of the plate and for the weak shock wave emanating from that region. Using the full Navier-Stokes mean flow is shown to result in further reduction with Mach number in the magnitude of optimal growth relative to the predictions based on the self-similar approximation to the base flow.

  18. Growth of Listeria monocytogenes in Salmon Roe - a kinetic analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the growth kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes in unsalted and salted (3%) salmon roe. Growth curves, developed using inoculated samples incubated at constant temperatures between 5 and 30 degrees C, were analyzed by curve-fitting to the Huang and Baran...

  19. Electrodeposition of a Pt monolayer film: using kinetic limitations for atomic layer epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Brimaud, Sylvain; Behm, R Jürgen

    2013-08-14

    A new and facile one-step method to prepare a smooth Pt monolayer film on a metallic substrate in the absence of underpotential deposition-type stabilizations is presented as a general approach and applied to the growth of Pt monolayer films on Au. The strongly modified electronic properties of these films were demonstrated by in situ IR spectroscopy at the electrified solid-liquid interface with adsorbed carbon monoxide serving as a probe molecule. The Pt monolayer on Au is kinetically stabilized by adsorbed CO, inhibiting further Pt deposition in higher layers.

  20. The Growth Kinetics of Salmonella Enteritidis in Raw Ground Beef.

    PubMed

    Sabike, Islam I; Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Edris, Abobakr M

    2015-01-01

    The growth kinetics of Salmonella Enteritidis in raw beef has been little studied so far. Thus, this study aimed to clarify the growth kinetics of the pathogen in ground beef using a growth model. When Salmonella cells inoculated at various initial doses into ground beef were incubated at a given temperature (24℃), the maximum population (Nmax) of the microbe at the stationary phase varied with the doses. This relationship was expressed with a polynomialequation for Nmax using the initial dose. The combination of the growth model and the polynomial equation successfully predicted Salmonella growth at a given initial dose. When Salmonella cells inoculated in ground beef were incubated at various constant temperatures, the growth curves of the pathogen and natural microflora (NM) were well described with the growth model. The rate constant of growth and the Nmax values for Salmonella and NM were then analyzed kinetically. From these results, growth curves of Salmonella and NM in ground beef stored at dynamic temperatures were successfully predicted. Competition between Salmonella and NM in ground beef was also found during the storage. This study could give usable information on the growth of Salmonella and NM in ground beef at various temperatures.

  1. Nonlinear Transient Growth and Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Parabolized stability equations (PSE) are used in a variational approach to study the optimal, non-modal disturbance growth in a Mach 3 at plate boundary layer and a Mach 6 circular cone boundary layer. As noted in previous works, the optimal initial disturbances correspond to steady counter-rotating streamwise vortices, which subsequently lead to the formation of streamwise-elongated structures, i.e., streaks, via a lift-up effect. The nonlinear evolution of the linearly optimal stationary perturbations is computed using the nonlinear plane-marching PSE for stationary perturbations. A fully implicit marching technique is used to facilitate the computation of nonlinear streaks with large amplitudes. To assess the effect of the finite-amplitude streaks on transition, the linear form of plane- marching PSE is used to investigate the instability of the boundary layer flow modified by spanwise periodic streaks. The onset of bypass transition is estimated by using an N- factor criterion based on the amplification of the streak instabilities. Results show that, for both flow configurations of interest, streaks of sufficiently large amplitude can lead to significantly earlier onset of transition than that in an unperturbed boundary layer without any streaks.

  2. Pattern formation and growth kinetics in eutectic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Jing

    Growth patterns during liquid/solid phase transformation are governed by simultaneous effects of heat and mass transfer mechanisms, creation of new interfaces, jump of the crystallization units from liquid to solid and their rearrangement in the solid matrix. To examine how the above processes influence the scale of microstructure, two eutectic systems are chosen for the study: a polymeric system polyethylene glycol-p-dibromobenzene (PEG-DBBZ) and a simple molecular system succinonitrile (SCN)-camphor. The scaling law for SCN-camphor system is found to follow the classical Jackson-Hunt model of circular rod eutectic, where the diffusion in the liquid and the interface energy are the main physics governing the two-phase pattern. In contrast, a significantly different scaling law is observed for the polymer system. The interface kinetics of PEG phase and its solute concentration dependence thus have been critically investigated for the first time by directional solidification technique. A model is then proposed that shows that the two-phase pattern in polymers is governed by the interface diffusion and the interface kinetics. In SCN-camphor system, a new branch of eutectic, elliptical shape rod, is found in thin samples where only one layer of camphor rods is present. It is found that the orientation of the ellipse can change from the major axis in the direction of the thickness to the direction of the width as the velocity and/or the sample thickness is decreased. A theoretical model is developed that predicts the spacing and orientation of the elliptical rods in a thin sample. The single phase growth patterns of SCN-camphor system were also examined with emphasis on the three-dimensional single cell and cell/dendrite transition. For the 3D single cell in a capillary tube, the entire cell shape ahead of the eutectic front can be described by the Saffmann-Taylor finger only at extremely low growth rate. A 3D directional solidification model is developed to

  3. Pattern Formation and Growth Kinetics in Eutectic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Jing

    2007-01-01

    Growth patterns during liquid/solid phase transformation are governed by simultaneous effects of heat and mass transfer mechanisms, creation of new interfaces, jump of the crystallization units from liquid to solid and their rearrangement in the solid matrix. To examine how the above processes influence the scale of microstructure, two eutectic systems are chosen for the study: a polymeric system polyethylene glycol-p-dibromobenzene (PEG-DBBZ) and a simple molecular system succinonitrile (SCN)-camphor. The scaling law for SCN-camphor system is found to follow the classical Jackson-Hunt model of circular rod eutectic, where the diffusion in the liquid and the interface energy are the main physics governing the two-phase pattern. In contrast, a significantly different scaling law is observed for the polymer system. The interface kinetics of PEG phase and its solute concentration dependence thus have been critically investigated for the first time by directional solidification technique. A model is then proposed that shows that the two-phase pattern in polymers is governed by the interface diffusion and the interface kinetics. In SCN-camphor system, a new branch of eutectic, elliptical shape rodl, is found in thin samples where only one layer of camphor rods is present. It is found that the orientation of the ellipse can change from the major axis in the direction of the thickness to the direction of the width as the velocity and/or the sample thickness is decreased. A theoretical model is developed that predicts the spacing and orientation of the elliptical rods in a thin sample. The single phase growth patterns of SCN-camphor system were also examined with emphasis on the three-dimensional single cell and cell/dendrite transition. For the 3D single cell in a capillary tube, the entire cell shape ahead of the eutectic front can be described by the Saffmann-Taylor finger only at extremely low growth rate. A 3D directional solidification model is developed to

  4. Crystallization kinetics in poly(ethylene oxide) / layered silicates nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlopoulou, Eleni; Fotiadou, Sapfo; Papananou, Eleni; Chrissopoulou, Kiriaki; Anastasiadis, Spiros H.; Portale, Giuseppe; Bras, Wim

    2009-03-01

    We investigate the effect of inorganic clay on the crystalline characteristics and the crystallization kinetics of PEO in its intercalated nanocomposites with natural montmorillonite (Na+- MMT). The structure of the hybrids was investigated over multiple length scales by X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and polarizing optical microscopy (POM) as well as by DSC. The PEO within the galleries is completely amorphous whereas only the excess polymer outside the completely full galleries can crystallize at high PEO concentrations. The time resolved measurements reveal the effect of clay on crystallization. Even very small amount of the inorganic can cause a significant decrease of the spherulite size. The crystallization mechanism varies from sporadic nucleation for pure PEO to two-dimensional growth with predetermined nuclei at 10wt% clay with a higher activation barrier for low clay concentration. Sponsored by NATO's Scientific Affairs Division, by the Greek GSRT and by the EU.

  5. Janus particle rotator-to-lamellar nucleation and growth kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltran-Villegas, Daniel J.; Zhang, Yulei; Larson, Ronald G.

    2017-03-01

    We determine the free energy barrier, critical nucleus size, and kinetics of a Janus particle solid-solid transition by nucleation and growth of lamellar clusters within a metastable rotator phase. The transition involves negligible change in particle position and phase volume and entails only particle orientational ordering. Fast kinetics enable the analysis of unbiased crystal growth and shrinkage trajectories from Brownian dynamic simulations. By fitting simulation trajectories to a diffusion-migration equation, the nucleus free energy and growth coefficient as a function of nucleus size are extracted. Observed transition times are on the order of hundreds of characteristic particle rotation times. Lamellar crystal nuclei are oblate rather than spherical, but otherwise classical nucleation theory applies, with the bulk free energy contribution following closely the Maier-Saupe theory for purely orientational transitions and the interfacial energy contribution following trends from 3-dimensional Ising spin kinetics.

  6. [Growth and development kinetics of Bacillus thuringiensis in batch culture].

    PubMed

    Sakharova, Z V; Ignatenko, Iu N; Schulz, F; Khovrychev, M P; Rabotnova, I L

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics of Bacillus thuringiensis growth and its assimilation of nutrient substances were studied under the conditions of batch cultivation in a complex medium containing yeast extract and in a chemically defined medium with amino acids. The growth of B. thuringiensis can be divided into five phases: exponential growth; decelerated growth; stationary phase when protein crystals are formed; stationary phase when spores are formed; lysis of sporangia releasing spores. The first phase may in turn be subdivided into three stages according to changes in the specific growth rate and substrate assimilation: a high specific growth rate and no glucose assimilation; an abrupt drop in mu and the beginning of intensive glucose assimilation from the medium; a new rise in the specific growth rate. As follows from the results of studying the kinetics of B. thuringiensis growth in a chemically defined medium, the above changes in the exponential growth phase are due to the fact that the culture assimilates yeast extract components in the complex medium or amino acids in the chemically defined medium during this phase, and then starts to assimilate glucose and ammonium in the following phases of growth.

  7. Thermodynamic and kinetic control of the lateral Si wire growth

    SciTech Connect

    Dedyulin, Sergey N. Goncharova, Lyudmila V.

    2014-03-24

    Reproducible lateral Si wire growth has been realized on the Si (100) surface. In this paper, we present experimental evidence showing the unique role that carbon plays in initiating lateral growth of Si wires on a Si (100) substrate. Once initiated in the presence of ≈5 ML of C, lateral growth can be achieved in the range of temperatures, T = 450–650 °C, and further controlled by the interplay of the flux of incoming Si atoms with the size and areal density of Au droplets. Critical thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the growth are discussed in detail.

  8. An autocatalytic kinetic model for describing microbial growth during fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ibarz, Albert; Augusto, Pedro E D

    2015-01-01

    The mathematical modelling of the behaviour of microbial growth is widely desired in order to control, predict and design food and bioproduct processing, stability and safety. This work develops and proposes a new semi-empirical mathematical model, based on an autocatalytic kinetic, to describe the microbial growth through its biomass concentration. The proposed model was successfully validated using 15 microbial growth patterns, covering the three most important types of microorganisms in food and biotechnological processing (bacteria, yeasts and moulds). Its main advantages and limitations are discussed, as well as the interpretation of its parameters. It is shown that the new model can be used to describe the behaviour of microbial growth.

  9. Metastable Solution Thermodynamic Properties and Crystal Growth Kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Soojin; Myerson, Allan S.

    1996-01-01

    The crystal growth rates of NH4H2PO4, KH2PO4, (NH4)2SO4, KAl(SO4)2 central dot 12H2O, NaCl, and glycine and the nucleation rates of KBr, KCl, NaBr central dot 2H2O, (NH4)2Cl, and (NH4)2SO4 were expressed in terms of the fundamental driving force of crystallization calculated from the activity of supersaturated solutions. The kinetic parameters were compared with those from the commonly used kinetic expression based on the concentration difference. From the viewpoint of thermodynamics, rate expressions based on the chemical potential difference provide accurate kinetic representation over a broad range of supersaturation. The rates estimated using the expression based on the concentration difference coincide with the true rates of crystallization only in the concentration range of low supersaturation and deviate from the true kinetics as the supersaturation increases.

  10. Kinetic model of particle-inhibited grain growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Gary Scott

    The effects of second phase particles on matrix grain growth kinetics were investigated using Al2O3-SiC as a model system. In particular, the validity of the conclusion drawn from a previous kinetic analysis that the kinetics of particle-inhibited grain growth in Al2 O3-SiC samples with an intermediate volume fraction of second phase could be well quantified by a modified-Zener model was investigated. A critical analysis of assumptions made during the previous kinetic analysis revealed oversimplifications which affect the validity of the conclusion. Specifically, the degree of interaction between particles and grain boundaries was assumed to be independent of the mean second phase particle size and size distribution. In contrast, current measurements indicate that the degree of interaction in Al2O3-SiC is dependent on these parameters. An improved kinetic model for particle-inhibited grain growth in Al 2O3-SiC was developed using a modified-Zener approach. The comparison of model predictions with experimental grain growth data indicated that significant discrepancies (as much as 4--5 orders of magnitude) existed. Based on this, it was concluded that particles had a much more significant effect on grain growth kinetics than that caused by a simple reduction of the boundary driving force due to the removal of boundary area. Consequently, it was also concluded that the conclusion drawn from the earlier kinetic analysis regarding the validity of a modified-Zener model was incorrect. Discrepancies between model and experiment were found to be the result of a significant decrease in experimental growth rate constant not predicted by the model. Possible physical mechanisms for such a decrease were investigated. The investigation of a small amount of SiO2 on grain growth in Al2O3 indicated that the decrease was not the result of a decrease in grain boundary mobility due to impurity contamination by particles. By process of elimination and based on previous observations

  11. Growth Kinetics and Modeling of ZnO Nanoparticles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Penny S.; Maddox, Leone M.; Shapter, Joe G.; Voelcker, Nico H.; Ford, Michael J.; Waclawik, Eric R.

    2005-01-01

    The technique for producing quantum-sized zinc oxide (ZnO) particles is much safer than a technique that used hydrogen sulfide gas to produce cadmium sulfide and zinc sulfide nanoparticles. A further advantage of this method is the ability to sample the solution over time and hence determine the growth kinetics.

  12. Kinetic effects on the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability in ion-to-magnetohydrodynamic scale transverse velocity shear layers: Particle simulations

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, T. K. M.; Hasegawa, H.; Shinohara, I.

    2010-01-01

    Ion-to-magnetohydrodynamic scale physics of the transverse velocity shear layer and associated Kelvin–Helmholtz instability (KHI) in a homogeneous, collisionless plasma are investigated by means of full particle simulations. The shear layer is broadened to reach a kinetic equilibrium when its initial thickness is close to the gyrodiameter of ions crossing the layer, namely, of ion-kinetic scale. The broadened thickness is larger in B⋅Ω<0 case than in B⋅Ω>0 case, where Ω is the vorticity at the layer. This is because the convective electric field, which points out of (into) the layer for B⋅Ω<0 (B⋅Ω>0), extends (reduces) the gyrodiameters. Since the kinetic equilibrium is established before the KHI onset, the KHI growth rate depends on the broadened thickness. In the saturation phase of the KHI, the ion vortex flow is strengthened (weakened) for B⋅Ω<0 (B⋅Ω>0), due to ion centrifugal drift along the rotational plasma flow. In ion inertial scale vortices, this drift effect is crucial in altering the ion vortex size. These results indicate that the KHI at Mercury-like ion-scale magnetospheric boundaries could show clear dawn-dusk asymmetries in both its linear and nonlinear growth. PMID:20838425

  13. Half Layer By Half Layer Growth of a Blue Phosphorene Monolayer on a GaN(001) Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jiang; Cui, Ping; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2017-01-01

    Black phosphorene (BlackP), consisting of a vertically corrugated yet single layer of phosphorus atoms, is a latest member of the expanding two-dimensional (2D) materials family with high carrier mobility and immense application potentials. Blue phosphorene (BlueP), an allotrope of BlackP with appealing properties of its own, consists of a more flatly arranged layer of phosphorus atoms. To date, direct growth of either BlackP or BlueP remains a daunting challenge. Using first-principles approaches, here we establish a novel kinetic pathway for fabricating BlueP via epitaxial growth. Our systematic energetic studies reveal that both BlackP and BlueP monolayers can be readily stabilized on Cu(111), Au(111), and GaN(001) substrates. The semiconducting GaN(001) is further shown to be superior for fabricating BlueP, through an intriguing half-layer-by-half-layer (HLBHL) growth mechanism. Within this scheme, the GaN(001) surface is first preferentially covered by a half layer of phosphorus adatoms, followed by the addition of the other half. Once formed, such a BlueP monolayer is thermodynamically stable, as tested using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The HLBHL growth mechanism discovered here may enable mass production of high-quality BlueP, and could also be instrumental in achieving epitaxial growth of BlackP and other 2D materials.

  14. Nucleation and growth kinetics of biochemicals measured at high supersaturations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Amarjit J.; Kirwan, Donald J.

    1994-12-01

    A grid mixer device (characteristic micromixing time < 3 ms) was successfully used to measure both nucleation and growth kinetics of lovastatin in 60 vol% methanol and asparagine monohydrate in 50 vol% 2-propanol at 23°C at high supersaturations but in the absence of mixing limitations. The supersaturation ratios investigated were in the range 1.25-8.8 for the lovastatin system and 1.17-4.1 for the asparagine system. When plotted according to primary nucleation theory, the induction time and nucleation rate measurements for both systems exhibited a homogeneous nucleation region at high supersaturations and a heterogeneous nucleation region at low supersaturations. The values of interfacial free energy extracted from these measurements for lovastatin (1.4-1.6 mJ/m 2) and asparagine (4.5-6.1 mJ/m 2) were an order-of-magnitude lower than those for inorganic salts reflecting the weaker intermolecular bonding in such biochemical solutes. The measured crystal growth rates for both solutes over the entire range of supersaturation could be represented with a power law dependence on chemical potential driving force. The kinetic orders of crystal growth were found to be 6.7 and 2.9 for lovastatin and asparagine, respectively. These unusually high kinetic orders could be represented by a polynuclear surface nucleation growth mechanism. The activation energy for the growth of lovastatin was measured as 280 kJ/mol.

  15. Dendritic growth shapes in kinetic Monte Carlo models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumwiede, Tim R.; Schulze, Tim P.

    2017-02-01

    For the most part, the study of dendritic crystal growth has focused on continuum models featuring surface energies that yield six pointed dendrites. In such models, the growth shape is a function of the surface energy anisotropy, and recent work has shown that considering a broader class of anisotropies yields a correspondingly richer set of growth morphologies. Motivated by this work, we generalize nanoscale models of dendritic growth based on kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. In particular, we examine the effects of extending the truncation radius for atomic interactions in a bond-counting model. This is done by calculating the model’s corresponding surface energy and equilibrium shape, as well as by running KMC simulations to obtain nanodendritic growth shapes. Additionally, we compare the effects of extending the interaction radius in bond-counting models to that of extending the number of terms retained in the cubic harmonic expansion of surface energy anisotropy in the context of continuum models.

  16. Kinetic Roughening Transition and Energetics of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2004-01-01

    Interpretation of lysozyme crystal growth rates using well-established physical theories enabled the discovery of a phenomenon possibly indicative of kinetic roughening. For example, lysozyme crystals grown above a critical supersaturation sigma, (where supersaturation sigma = ln c/c(sub eq), c = the protein concentration and c(sub eq) = the solubility concentration) exhibit microscopically rough surfaces due to the continuous addition of growth units anywhere on the surface of a crystal. The rate of crystal growth, V(sub c), for the continuous growth process is determined by the continuous flux of macromolecules onto a unit area of the crystal surface, a, from a distance, xi, per unit time due to diffusion, and a probability of attachment onto the crystal surface, expressed. Based upon models applied, the energetics of lysozyme crystal growth was determined. The magnitudes of the energy barriers of crystal growth for both the (110) and (101) faces of tetragonal lysozyme crystals are compared. Finally, evidence supportive of the kinetic roughening hypothesis is presented.

  17. Kinetics of Denitrifying Growth by Fast-Growing Cowpea Rhizobia

    PubMed Central

    El Hassan, G. A.; Zablotowicz, R. M.; Focht, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    Two fast-growing strains of cowpea rhizobia (A26 and A28) were found to grow anaerobically at the expense of NO3−, NO2−, and N2O as terminal electron acceptors. The two major differences between aerobic and denitrifying growth were lower yield coefficients (Y) and higher saturation constants (Ks) with nitrogenous oxides as electron acceptors. When grown aerobically, A26 and A28 adhered to Monod kinetics, respectively, as follows: Ks, 3.4 and 3.8 μM; Y, 16.0 and 14.0 g · cells eq−1; μmax, 0.41 and 0.33 h−1. Yield coefficients for denitrifying growth ranged from 40 to 70% of those for aerobic growth. Only A26 adhered to Monod kinetics with respect to growth on all three nitrogenous oxides. The apparent Ks values were 41, 270, and 460 μM for nitrous oxide, nitrate, and nitrite, respectively; the Ks for A28 grown on nitrate was 250 μM. The results are kinetically and thermodynamically consistent in explaining why O2 is the preferred electron acceptor. Although no definitive conclusions could be drawn regarding preferential utilization of nitrogenous oxides, nitrite was inhibitory to both strains and effected slower growth. However, growth rates were identical (μmax, 0.41 h−1) when A26 was grown with either O2 or NO3− as an electron acceptor and were only slightly reduced when A28 was grown with NO3− (0.25 h−1) as opposed to O2 (0.33 h−1). PMID:16346745

  18. Growth kinetics of CaF2/Si(111) heteroepitaxy: An x-ray photoelectron diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denlinger, J. D.; Rotenberg, Eli; Hessinger, U.; Leskovar, M.; Olmstead, Marjorie A.

    1995-02-01

    Kinetic variations of the initial stages of CaF2 growth on Si(111) by molecular-beam epitaxy are studied with the in situ combination of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and diffraction. After the formation of a chemically reacted interface layer, the morphology of the subsequent bulk layers is found to be dependent on the substrate temperature and incident flux rate, as well as the initial interface structure. For substrate temperatures above ~600 °C, subsequent layers do not easily wet the interface layer, and a transition is observed from a three-dimensional island formation at low flux to a laminar growth following the coalescence of bilayer islands at higher flux. At lower substrate temperatures (~450 °C), a different stoichiometry and structure of the interface layer leads to laminar growth at all fluxes, but with a different bulk nucleation behavior. Crystalline heteroepitaxy is not observed when growth initiates at room temperature, but homoepitaxy does proceed at room temperature if the first few layers are deposited at a high temperature. The different growth regimes are discussed in terms of a kinetic model separating step and terrace nucleation where, contrary to homoepitaxy, step nucleation leads to islanded growth.

  19. Kinetic model for microbial growth and desulphurisation with Enterobacter sp.

    PubMed

    Liu, Long; Guo, Zhiguo; Lu, Jianjiang; Xu, Xiaolin

    2015-02-01

    Biodesulphurisation was investigated by using Enterobacter sp. D4, which can selectively desulphurise and convert dibenzothiophene into 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-HBP). The experimental values of growth, substrate consumption and product generation were obtained at 95 % confidence level of the fitted values using three models: Hinshelwood equation, Luedeking-Piret and Luedeking-Piret-like equations. The average error values between experimental values and fitted values were less than 10 %. These kinetic models describe all the experimental data with good statistical parameters. The production of 2-HBP in Enterobacter sp. was by "coupled growth".

  20. Role of Transport and Kinetics in Growth of Renal Stones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Iskovitz, Ilana

    2012-01-01

    Renal stone disease is not only a concern on earth but could conceivably pose as a serious risk to the astronauts health and safety in Space. In this paper, a combined transport-kinetics model for growth of calcium oxalate crystals is presented. The model is used to parametrically investigate the growth of renal calculi in urine with a focus on the coupled effects of transport and surface reaction on the ionic concentrations at the surface of the crystal and their impact on the resulting growth rates. It is shown that under nominal conditions of low solution supersaturation and low Damkohler number that typically exist on Earth, the surface concentrations of calcium and oxalate approach their bulk solution values in the urine and the growth rate is most likely limited by the surface reaction kinetics. But for higher solution supersaturations and larger Damkohler numbers that may be prevalent in the microgravity environment of Space, the calcium and oxalate surface concentrations tend to shift more towards their equilibrium or saturation values and thus the growth process may be limited by the transport through the medium. Furthermore, parametric numerical studies suggest that changes to the renal biochemistry of astronauts due in space may promote development of renal calculi during long duration space expeditions.

  1. Role of Step and Terrace Nucleation in Heteroepitaxial Growth Morphology: Growth Kinetics of CaF2/Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessinger, Uwe; Leskovar, M.; Olmstead, Marjorie A.

    1995-09-01

    The thickness uniformity and the spatial distribution of lattice relaxation in thin ( <8 nm) CaF2/Si(111) films, observed with photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, are seen to depend strongly on the initial nucleation kinetics. We develop a general model for heteroepitaxial growth that explains both these and literature results. Terrace or step nucleation leads to laminar films, although with different relaxation patterns; combined step and terrace nucleation leads to rough films due to different upper-layer nucleation rates on the differently sized islands.

  2. Physiological adaptation of growth kinetics in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, M; Takács, I; Tränckner, J

    2015-11-15

    Physiological adaptation as it occurs in bacterial cells at variable environmental conditions influences characteristic properties of growth kinetics significantly. However, physiological adaptation to growth related parameters in activated sludge modelling is not yet recognised. Consequently these parameters are regarded to be constant. To investigate physiological adaptation in activated sludge the endogenous respiration in an aerobic degradation batch experiment and simultaneous to that the maximum possible respiration in an aerobic growth batch experiment was measured. The activated sludge samples were taken from full scale wastewater treatment plants with different sludge retention times (SRTs). It could be shown that the low SRT sludge adapts by growth optimisation (high maximum growth rate and high decay rate) to its particular environment where a high SRT sludge adapts by survival optimization (low maximum growth rate and low decay rate). Thereby, both the maximum specific growth rate and the decay rate vary in the same pattern and are strongly correlated to each other. To describe the physiological state of mixed cultures like activated sludge quantitatively a physiological state factor (PSF) is proposed as the ratio of the maximum specific growth rate and the decay rate. The PSF can be expressed as an exponential function with respect to the SRT.

  3. Kinetic limitation of chemical ordering in Bi2Te3-x Se x layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Schreyeck, S; Brunner, K; Kirchner, A; Bass, U; Grauer, S; Schumacher, C; Gould, C; Karczewski, G; Geurts, J; Molenkamp, L W

    2016-04-13

    We study the chemical ordering in Bi2Te3-x Se x grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si substrates. We produce films in the full composition range from x = 0 to 3, and determine their material properties using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. By fitting the parameters of a kinetic growth model to these results, we obtain a consistent description of growth at a microscopic level. Our main finding is that despite the incorporation of Se in the central layer being much more probable than that of Te, the formation of a fully ordered Te-Bi-Se-Bi-Te layer is prevented by kinetic of the growth process. Indeed, the Se concentration in the central layer of Bi2Te2Se1 reaches a maximum of only ≈ 75% even under ideal growth conditions. A second finding of our work is that the intensity ratio of the 0 0 12 and 0 0 6 x-ray reflections serves as an experimentally accessible quantitative measure of the degree of ordering in these films.

  4. Kinetic limitation of chemical ordering in Bi2Te3-x Se x layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreyeck, S.; Brunner, K.; Kirchner, A.; Bass, U.; Grauer, S.; Schumacher, C.; Gould, C.; Karczewski, G.; Geurts, J.; Molenkamp, L. W.

    2016-04-01

    We study the chemical ordering in Bi2Te3-x Se x grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si substrates. We produce films in the full composition range from x  =  0 to 3, and determine their material properties using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. By fitting the parameters of a kinetic growth model to these results, we obtain a consistent description of growth at a microscopic level. Our main finding is that despite the incorporation of Se in the central layer being much more probable than that of Te, the formation of a fully ordered Te-Bi-Se-Bi-Te layer is prevented by kinetic of the growth process. Indeed, the Se concentration in the central layer of Bi2Te2Se1 reaches a maximum of only  ≈75% even under ideal growth conditions. A second finding of our work is that the intensity ratio of the 0 0 12 and 0 0 6 x-ray reflections serves as an experimentally accessible quantitative measure of the degree of ordering in these films.

  5. Analysis of Network Topologies Underlying Ethylene Growth Response Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Aaron M.; McCollough, Forest W.; Eldreth, Bryan L.; Binder, Brad M.; Abel, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Most models for ethylene signaling involve a linear pathway. However, measurements of seedling growth kinetics when ethylene is applied and removed have resulted in more complex network models that include coherent feedforward, negative feedback, and positive feedback motifs. The dynamical responses of the proposed networks have not been explored in a quantitative manner. Here, we explore (i) whether any of the proposed models are capable of producing growth-response behaviors consistent with experimental observations and (ii) what mechanistic roles various parts of the network topologies play in ethylene signaling. To address this, we used computational methods to explore two general network topologies: The first contains a coherent feedforward loop that inhibits growth and a negative feedback from growth onto itself (CFF/NFB). In the second, ethylene promotes the cleavage of EIN2, with the product of the cleavage inhibiting growth and promoting the production of EIN2 through a positive feedback loop (PFB). Since few network parameters for ethylene signaling are known in detail, we used an evolutionary algorithm to explore sets of parameters that produce behaviors similar to experimental growth response kinetics of both wildtype and mutant seedlings. We generated a library of parameter sets by independently running the evolutionary algorithm many times. Both network topologies produce behavior consistent with experimental observations, and analysis of the parameter sets allows us to identify important network interactions and parameter constraints. We additionally screened these parameter sets for growth recovery in the presence of sub-saturating ethylene doses, which is an experimentally-observed property that emerges in some of the evolved parameter sets. Finally, we probed simplified networks maintaining key features of the CFF/NFB and PFB topologies. From this, we verified observations drawn from the larger networks about mechanisms underlying ethylene

  6. Conductive layer for biaxially oriented semiconductor film growth

    DOEpatents

    Findikoglu, Alp T.; Matias, Vladimir

    2007-10-30

    A conductive layer for biaxially oriented semiconductor film growth and a thin film semiconductor structure such as, for example, a photodetector, a photovoltaic cell, or a light emitting diode (LED) that includes a crystallographically oriented semiconducting film disposed on the conductive layer. The thin film semiconductor structure includes: a substrate; a first electrode deposited on the substrate; and a semiconducting layer epitaxially deposited on the first electrode. The first electrode includes a template layer deposited on the substrate and a buffer layer epitaxially deposited on the template layer. The template layer includes a first metal nitride that is electrically conductive and has a rock salt crystal structure, and the buffer layer includes a second metal nitride that is electrically conductive. The semiconducting layer is epitaxially deposited on the buffer layer. A method of making such a thin film semiconductor structure is also described.

  7. Growth kinetics and processings of copper indium diselenide-based thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suku

    CuInSe2 (CIS)-based compound semiconductors are increasingly important absorber layer materials for thin film solar cells. A better understanding of the growth kinetics of CuInSe2 thin films as a function of the process parameters would benefit the development of this technology. The reaction kinetics for formation of CuInSe2 from the bilayer structure InSe/CuSe was studied in-situ by high-temperature X-ray diffraction. The reaction pathway produces a diffusion barrier layer that can be schematically represented as InSe|CuSe → InSe|CuInSe 2|CuSe. Two different analyses based on the Avrami and the parabolic rate laws suggest that the reaction is one-dimensional diffusion controlled. The estimated apparent activation energy from each model is 66.0 and 65.2 kJ/mol, respectively. The result demonstrates that the time-resolved high temperature X-ray diffraction provides a powerful method for studying the reaction kinetics of CuInSe2 growth. The thermodynamic driving force for formation of copper selenide phase and the grain size distribution in CuInSe2 films was investigated. Large grains (˜a few mum) were observed in the CuInSe2 films annealed with a CuSe layer while films annealed without this layer exhibited very small grain size (<0.2 mum). This result suggests a secondary grain growth mechanism driven by the surface-energy anisotropy is responsible for the increased grain size. Epitaxial growth of CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2 on (001) GaAs substrates was attempted. The result shows that the crystalline structure and its quality strongly depends on the film stoichiometry, especially the [Cu]/[III] atomic ratio, with Cu-rich compositions showing higher crystalline quality. A two-dimensional model of heat transfer in the growth reactor was developed for a rotating platen/substrate in the molecular beam epitaxial reactor that was used for film growth. Time-varying view factors were included in the model to solve the problem dynamically and to account for the fact that the

  8. Glass susceptibility: Growth kinetics and saturation under shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Saroj Kumar; Ramaswamy, Sriram

    2016-07-01

    We study the growth kinetics of glassy correlations in a structural glass by monitoring the evolution, within mode-coupling theory, of a suitably defined three-point function χC(t ,tw) with time t and waiting time tw. From the complete wave-vector-dependent equations of motion for domain growth, we pass to a schematic limit to obtain a numerically tractable form. We find that the peak value χCP of χC(t ,tw) , which can be viewed as a correlation volume, grows as tw0.5, and the relaxation time as tw0.8, following a quench to a point deep in the glassy state. These results constitute a theoretical explanation of the simulation findings of Parisi [J. Phys. Chem. B 103, 4128 (1999), 10.1021/jp983967m] and Kob and Barrat [Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 4581 (1997), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.78.4581], and they are also in qualitative agreement with Parsaeian and Castillo [Phys. Rev. E 78, 060105(R) (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevE.78.060105]. On the other hand, if the quench is to a point on the liquid side, the correlation volume grows to saturation. We present a similar calculation for the growth kinetics in a p -spin spin glass mean-field model where we find a slower growth, χCP˜tw0.13 . Further, we show that a shear rate γ ˙ cuts off the growth of glassy correlations when tw˜1 /γ ˙ for quench in the glassy regime and tw=min(tr,1 /γ ˙) in the liquid, where tr is the relaxation time of the unsheared liquid. The relaxation time of the steady-state fluid in this case is ∝γ˙-0.8 .

  9. Kinetic growth walk on critical percolation clusters and lattice animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, P. M.; Zhang, Z. Q.

    1984-03-01

    The statistics of recently proposed kinetic growth walk (KGW) model for linear polymers (or growing self avoiding walk (GSAW)) on two dimensional critical percolation clusters and lattice animals are studied using real-space renormalization group method. The correlation length exponents ν's are found to be ν{KGW/ Pc } = 0.68 and ν{KGW/LA} respectively for the critical percolation clusters and lattice animals. Close agreements are found between these results and a generalized Flory formula for linear polymers at theta point ν{KGW/F} = 2/bar d+1),, wherebar d is the fractal dimension of the fractal object F.

  10. Kinetic study on hot-wire-assisted atomic layer deposition of nickel thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Guangjie Shimizu, Hideharu; Momose, Takeshi; Shimogaki, Yukihiro

    2014-01-15

    High-purity Ni films were deposited using hot-wire-assisted atomic layer deposition (HW-ALD) at deposition temperatures of 175, 250, and 350 °C. Negligible amount of nitrogen or carbon contamination was detected, even though the authors used NH{sub 2} radical as the reducing agent and nickelocene as the precursor. NH{sub 2} radicals were generated by the thermal decomposition of NH{sub 3} with the assist of HW and used to reduce the adsorbed metal growth precursors. To understand and improve the deposition process, the kinetics of HW-ALD were analyzed using a Langmuir-type model. Unlike remote-plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition, HW-ALD does not lead to plasma-induced damage. This is a significant advantage, because the authors can supply sufficient NH{sub 2} radicals to deposit high-purity metallic films by adjusting the distance between the hot wire and the substrate. NH{sub 2} radicals have a short lifetime, and it was important to use a short distance between the radical generation site and substrate. Furthermore, the impurity content of the nickel films was independent of the deposition temperature, which is evidence of the temperature-independent nature of the NH{sub 2} radical flux and the reactivity of the NH{sub 2} radicals.

  11. Growth of oxide exchange bias layers

    DOEpatents

    Chaiken, A.; Michel, R.P.

    1998-07-21

    An oxide (NiO, CoO, NiCoO) antiferromagnetic exchange bias layer produced by ion beam sputtering of an oxide target in pure argon (Ar) sputtering gas, with no oxygen gas introduced into the system. Antiferromagnetic oxide layers are used, for example, in magnetoresistive readback heads to shift the hysteresis loops of ferromagnetic films away from the zero field axis. For example, NiO exchange bias layers have been fabricated using ion beam sputtering of an NiO target using Ar ions, with the substrate temperature at 200 C, the ion beam voltage at 1000V and the beam current at 20 mA, with a deposition rate of about 0.2 {angstrom}/sec. The resulting NiO film was amorphous. 4 figs.

  12. Growth of oxide exchange bias layers

    DOEpatents

    Chaiken, Alison; Michel, Richard P.

    1998-01-01

    An oxide (NiO, CoO, NiCoO) antiferromagnetic exchange bias layer produced by ion beam sputtering of an oxide target in pure argon (Ar) sputtering gas, with no oxygen gas introduced into the system. Antiferromagnetic oxide layers are used, for example, in magnetoresistive readback heads to shift the hysteresis loops of ferromagnetic films away from the zero field axis. For example, NiO exchange bia layers have been fabricated using ion beam sputtering of an NiO target using Ar ions, with the substrate temperature at 200.degree. C., the ion beam voltage at 1000V and the beam current at 20 mA, with a deposition rate of about 0.2 .ANG./sec. The resulting NiO film was amorphous.

  13. Parametric Investigation of the Isothermal Kinetics of Growth of Graphene on a Nickel Catalyst in the Process of Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futko, S. I.; Shulitskii, B. G.; Labunov, V. A.; Ermolaeva, E. M.

    2016-11-01

    A kinetic model of isothermal synthesis of multilayer graphene on the surface of a nickel foil in the process of chemical vapor deposition, on it, of hydrocarbons supplied in the pulsed regime is considered. The dependences of the number of graphene layers formed and the time of their growth on the temperature of the process, the concentration of acetylene, and the thickness of the nickel foil were calculated. The regime parameters of the process of chemical vapor deposition, at which single-layer graphene and bi-layer graphene are formed, were determined. The dynamics of growth of graphene domains at chemical-vapor-deposition parameters changing in wide ranges was investigated. It is shown that the time dependences of the rates of growth of single-layer graphene and bi-layer graphene are nonlinear in character and that they are determined by the kinetics of nucleation and growth of graphene and the diffusion flow of carbon atoms in the nickel foil.

  14. Kinetic 15N-isotope effects on algal growth

    PubMed Central

    Andriukonis, Eivydas; Gorokhova, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling is a standard technique for tracing material transfer in molecular, ecological and biogeochemical studies. The main assumption in this approach is that the enrichment with a heavy isotope has no effect on the organism metabolism and growth, which is not consistent with current theoretical and empirical knowledge on kinetic isotope effects. Here, we demonstrate profound changes in growth dynamics of the green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata grown in 15N-enriched media. With increasing 15N concentration (0.37 to 50 at%), the lag phase increased, whereas maximal growth rate and total yield decreased; moreover, there was a negative relationship between the growth and the lag phase across the treatments. The latter suggests that a trade-off between growth rate and the ability to adapt to the high 15N environment may exist. Remarkably, the lag-phase response at 3.5 at% 15N was the shortest and deviated from the overall trend, thus providing partial support to the recently proposed Isotopic Resonance hypothesis, which predicts that certain isotopic composition is particularly favorable for living organisms. These findings confirm the occurrence of KIE in isotopically enriched algae and underline the importance of considering these effects when using stable isotope labeling in field and experimental studies. PMID:28281640

  15. Kinetic 15N-isotope effects on algal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriukonis, Eivydas; Gorokhova, Elena

    2017-03-01

    Stable isotope labeling is a standard technique for tracing material transfer in molecular, ecological and biogeochemical studies. The main assumption in this approach is that the enrichment with a heavy isotope has no effect on the organism metabolism and growth, which is not consistent with current theoretical and empirical knowledge on kinetic isotope effects. Here, we demonstrate profound changes in growth dynamics of the green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata grown in 15N-enriched media. With increasing 15N concentration (0.37 to 50 at%), the lag phase increased, whereas maximal growth rate and total yield decreased; moreover, there was a negative relationship between the growth and the lag phase across the treatments. The latter suggests that a trade-off between growth rate and the ability to adapt to the high 15N environment may exist. Remarkably, the lag-phase response at 3.5 at% 15N was the shortest and deviated from the overall trend, thus providing partial support to the recently proposed Isotopic Resonance hypothesis, which predicts that certain isotopic composition is particularly favorable for living organisms. These findings confirm the occurrence of KIE in isotopically enriched algae and underline the importance of considering these effects when using stable isotope labeling in field and experimental studies.

  16. Troilite formation kinetics and growth mechanism in the solar nebula. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauretta, D. S.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Troilite formation via the reaction Fe(s) + H2S(g) + H2(g) is the major mechanism for S retention in grains in the solar nebula. Thermodynamic calculations predict that troilite condenses from a solar composition gas. We present experimental results on the kinetics and growth of troilite crystals on Fe metal at temperature (450-650 C) and composition (50-1000 ppm H2S in H2) conditions similar to those in the solar nebula. The fraction of Fe reacted (based on gravimetric data) is plotted at 450, 505, 575, and 650 C. The thickness change of unreacted iron (measured by optical microscopy) is plotted at 575 and 650 C vs. time. the weight change per unit area varies as the square root of time at the lower temperatures and varies linearly with time at the highest temperature. The growth behavior along the lower isotherms is due to diffusion. This behavior suggests sulfide diffusion to the metal-sulfide interface and suggests Fe(2+) diffusion to the sulfide-gas interface. The reaction along the highest isotherm appears to be interface controlled. The formation of troilite crystals is a rapid process forming measurable layers in a few hours. The crystalgrowth is complicated. Initially there are intergrowths of troilite into the pure Fe metal. As the reaction progresses two distinct layers of troilite crystals form. One is in contact with the Fe metal and consists of small randomly oriented crystals with pore space between them. The outermost layer contains large crystals that are all oriented in the same direction. The intergrowth layer is much smaller at 650 C than at 575 C. This suggest that FeS nucleation is inhibited at the higher temperature, accounting for the initially slower reaction rate. Once nucleated, the reaction kinetics are apparently controlled by the growth of the crystals at the interface.

  17. Domain and rim growth kinetics in stratifying foam films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiran; Yilixiati, Subinuer; Sharma, Vivek

    Foam films are freely standing thin liquid films that typically consist of two surfactant-laden surfaces that are ~5 nm - 10 micron apart. Sandwiched between these interfacial layers is a fluid that drains primarily under the influence of viscous and interfacial forces, including disjoining pressure. Interestingly, a layered ordering of micelles inside the foam films (thickness <100 nm) leads to a stepwise thinning phenomena called stratification, which results in a thickness-dependent variation in reflected light intensity, visualized as progressively darker shades of gray. Thinner, darker domains spontaneously grow within foam films. During the initial expansion, a rim forms near the contact line between the growing thinner domain and the surrounding region, which influences the dynamics of domain growth as well as stratification Using newly developed interferometry digitial imaging optical microscopy (IDIOM) technique, we capture the rim evolution dynamics. Finally, we also develop a theoretical model to describe both rim evolution and domain growth dynamics.

  18. Steps in Cu(111) thin films affect graphene growth kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, David L.; Gannett, Will; Keller, Mark W.

    2014-03-01

    The kinetics of chemical vapor deposition of graphene on Cu substrates depend on the relative rates of C diffusion on the surface, C attachment to graphene islands, and removal of C from the surface or from graphene islands by etching processes involving H atoms. Using Cu(111) thin films with centimeter-sized grains, we have grown graphene under a variety of conditions and examined the edges of graphene islands with SEM and AFM. The Cu surface shows a series of regular steps, roughly 2 nm in height, and the graphene islands are diamond-shaped with faster growth along the edges of Cu steps. In contrast, growth on polycrystalline Cu foils under the same conditions shows hexagonal graphene islands with smooth edges.

  19. Continuous growth kinetics of Candida utilis in pineapple cannery effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Prior, B.A.

    1984-01-01

    Candida utilis was grown on a pineapple cannery effluent as the sole carbon and energy source in a chemostat at dilution rates between 0.10 and 0.62 h/sup -1/ to determine the growth kinetics. The principal sugars in the effluent were sucrose, glucose, and fructose. The cell yield coefficient on carbohydrate varied with dilution rate and a maximum value of 0.63 was observed at a dilution rate of 0.33 h/sup -1/. The steady-state concentrations of carbohydrate, reducing sugar, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) appeared to follow Monod saturation kinetics with increasing dilution rate, although none of the measured parameters represented a pure substrate. The maximum specific growth rate and reducing sugar saturation constant were 0.64 h/sup -1/ and 0.060 g/L, respectively. A maximum cell mass productivity of 2.3 g/L h was observed at a dilution rate of 0.51 h/sup -1/. At this dilution rate, only 68% of the COD was removed. A 95% COD removal was attained at a dilution rate of 0.10 h/sup -1/. Optimal yeast productivity and COD reduction occurred at a dilution rate of 0.33 h/sup -1/.

  20. Kinetics of growth and sugar consumption in yeasts.

    PubMed

    van Dijken, J P; Weusthuis, R A; Pronk, J T

    1993-01-01

    An overview is presented of the steady- and transient state kinetics of growth and formation of metabolic byproducts in yeasts. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is strongly inclined to perform alcoholic fermentation. Even under fully aerobic conditions, ethanol is produced by this yeast when sugars are present in excess. This so-called 'Crabtree effect' probably results from a multiplicity of factors, including the mode of sugar transport and the regulation of enzyme activities involved in respiration and alcoholic fermentation. The Crabtree effect in S. cerevisiae is not caused by an intrinsic inability to adjust its respiratory activity to high glycolytic fluxes. Under certain cultivation conditions, for example during growth in the presence of weak organic acids, very high respiration rates can be achieved by this yeast. S. cerevisiae is an exceptional yeast since, in contrast to most other species that are able to perform alcoholic fermentation, it can grow under strictly anaerobic conditions. 'Non-Saccharomyces' yeasts require a growth-limiting supply of oxygen (i.e. oxygen-limited growth conditions) to trigger alcoholic fermentation. However, complete absence of oxygen results in cessation of growth and therefore, ultimately, of alcoholic fermentation. Since it is very difficult to reproducibly achieve the right oxygen dosage in large-scale fermentations, non-Saccharomyces yeasts are therefore not suitable for large-scale alcoholic fermentation of sugar-containing waste streams. In these yeasts, alcoholic fermentation is also dependent on the type of sugar. For example, the facultatively fermentative yeast Candida utilis does not ferment maltose, not even under oxygen-limited growth conditions, although this disaccharide supports rapid oxidative growth.

  1. Thermodynamic-kinetic simulation of constrained dendrite growth in steels

    SciTech Connect

    Miettinen, J.

    2000-04-01

    A model of constrained dendritic growth for steels, based on thermodynamic and kinetic theory, is presented. The model links thermodynamic chemical potential-equality equations to an existing, approximate treatment of constrained dendritic growth in multicomponent steels, taking into account the deviation from the local thermodynamic equilibrium of the phase interface caused by interface friction, capillarity, and solute trapping. Due to the thermodynamic approach, with a thermodynamic model and recently assessed data, the present treatment yields a more accurate determination of phase stabilities than the earlier methods. Depending on the steel composition and the growth conditions (growth rate and temperature gradient), the model determines the dendrite tip undercooling, the primary solid phase (ferrite or austenite), the stability of that phase, certain dimensions of the microstructure, and the solute accumulation ahead of the dendrite tip. A special optional calculations is that of the equally probable formation of ferrite and austenite in stainless steels. Calculations for testing the model and for validation it with experimental data are presented.

  2. Boundary-layer analysis for the convection/diffusion transition in dendritic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Huang, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    The supercooling dependence of dendritic growth kinetics under the influence of convective heat transport is investigated theoretically and experimentally with emphasis on theoretical prediction of the supercooling level at which the transition from diffusion-controlled to convection-controlled dendritic growth occurs. It is shown that the crossover between diffusive and convective transport depends on the relative thickness of the Stefan length compared with the thermal boundary layer. These lengths become equal at a supercooling which may be calculated from diffusion theory and fluid mechanics. It is also shown that the crossover supercooling varies weakly with the gravitational acceleration, melt viscosity, and the volumetric expansion coefficient.

  3. Theoretical consideration of the growth kinetics for GaAs and GaSb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, T.; Asahi, H.; Gonda, S.

    1992-05-01

    An extended MOMBE growth kinetics model is proposed, based on the Robertson model, to explain both the GaAs growth rate variation and modulated beam mass spectroscopy data reported by Martin and Whitehouse. In this model, we assume that (1) MEGa molecules react with ethyl-radicals to form DEGa, (2) excessive group-V molecules on the surface suppress the decomposition of DEGa and enhance the desorption of DEGa, (3) reaction of DEGa with ethyl-radicals to form TEGa is negligible, and (4) effective surface coverage of excessive group-V atoms during growth is determined by the double layer adsorption model including desorption parameters for group-V molecules. The first assumption (1) is found to be a dominant process to explain the behaviour of DEGa desorption at high temperatures. This model can reproduce the dependences of both growth rate and desorbing rate of Ga alkyls on substrate temperature during GaAs MOMBE growth. The use of Sb instead of As produces a significant change in the growth rate variation with substrate temperature and group-V flux for the growth of GaSb, in spite of the use of the same TEGa flow rate. This can be rationalized by the difference in the desorption parameters for Sb and As.

  4. Oil shale ash-layer thickness and char combustion kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Aldis, D.F.; Singleton, M.F.; Watkins, B.E.; Thorsness, C.B.; Cena, R.J.

    1992-04-15

    A Hot-Recycled-Solids (HRS) oil shale retort is being studied at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In the HRS process, raw shale is heated by mixing it with burnt retorted shale. Retorted shale is oil shale which has been heated in an oxygen deficient atmosphere to pyrolyze organic carbon, as kerogen into oil, gas, and a nonvolatile carbon rich residue, char. In the HRS retort process, the char in the spent shale is subsequently exposed to an oxygen environment. Some of the char, starting on the outer surface of the shale particle, is burned, liberating heat. In the HRS retort, the endothermic pyrolysis step is supported by heat from the exothermic char combustion step. The rate of char combustion is controlled by three resistances; the resistance of oxygen mass transfer through the gas film surrounding the solid particle, resistance to mass transfer through a ash layer which forms on the outside of the solid particles as the char is oxidized and the resistance due to the intrinsic chemical reaction rate of char and oxygen. In order to estimate the rate of combustion of the char in a typical oil shale particle, each of these resistances must be accurately estimated. We begin by modeling the influence of ash layer thickness on the over all combustion rate of oil shale char. We then present our experimental measurements of the ash layer thickness of oil shale which has been processed in the HRS retort.

  5. Enhanced charge separation and oxidation kinetics of BiVO4 photoanode by double layer structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lin; Xiong, Yuli; Dong, Hongmei; Peng, Huarong; Zhang, Yunhuai; Xiao, Peng

    2017-03-01

    Monoclinic bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) is a promising semiconductor for photoelectrochemical water splitting. Here, we developed a facile fabrication of BiVO4 double layer photoanode on the fluorine-doped tin oxide substrate by electrodeposition. The BiVO4 double layer photoanode is composed by a dense BiVO4 film as the inner layer and a nanoporous BiVO4 film as the outer layer. Compared to the BiVO4 single layer photoanode, the optimized BiVO4 double layer photoanode produced a much higher photocurrent of 1.15 mA/cm2 at 0.6 V vs. Ag/AgCl under AM 1.5G (100 mW/cm2) illumination. The results of the photoelectric conversion kinetics for different samples revealed that the charge separation and oxidation kinetics efficiencies for the BiVO4 double layer are 47.2% and 51.6% at 0.6 V vs. Ag/AgCl, while the values for BiVO4 single layer are 32.3% and 35.8%, respectively. The improved photoelectrochemical performance for BiVO4 double layer is mainly ascribed to the decrease of defect state at the interface after inserting a dense BiVO4 as an inner layer to prevent the recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs.

  6. Rethinking growth and decay kinetics in activated sludge - towards a new adaptive kinetics approach.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Michael; Jimenez, Jose; Pruden, Amy; Miller, Jennifer H; Metch, Jacob; Takács, Imre

    2017-02-01

    Growth kinetics in activated sludge modelling (ASM) are typically assumed to be the result of intrinsic growth and decay properties and thus process parameters are deemed to be constant. The activity change in a microbial population is expressed in terms of variance of the active biomass fraction and not actual shifts in bacterial cellular activities. This approach is limited, in that it does not recognise the reality that active biomass is highly physiologically adaptive. Here, a strong correlation between maximum specific growth rate (μmax) and decay rate (be) of ordinary heterotrophic organisms was revealed in both low solids retention times (SRT) and high SRT activated sludge systems. This relationship is indicative of physiological adaptation either for growth (high μmax and be) or survival optimization (low μmax and be). Further, the nitrifier decay process was investigated using molecular techniques to measure decay rates of ammonia oxidizing bacteria and nitrite oxidizing bacteria over a range of temperatures. This approach revealed decay rates 10-12% lower than values previously accepted and used in ASM. These findings highlight potential benefits of incorporating physiological adaptation of heterotrophic and nitrifying populations in future ASM.

  7. Kinetics of droplet growth observed in recent field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, F.; Wang, J.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols can indirectly influence global climate budget by changing the microphysical structure, lifetime, and coverage of clouds. While it is generally agreed that aerosol indirect effects act to cool the Earth-atmosphere system by increasing cloud reflectivity and coverage, the magnitudes of the indirect effects are poorly understood. The formation of cloud droplets from aerosol particles is kinetically controlled by the availability of water vapor, equilibrium water vapor pressure above the growing droplet surface, and both the gas phase and aerosol phase mass transfer resistances. It has been hypothesized that the formation of surface organic films or the delay in dissolution of solute could significantly delay the growth of cloud droplets. Such delay could lead to a higher maximum supersaturation within a rising cloud parcel, therefore higher droplet number concentration and smaller droplet size at constant liquid water content. When only a subset of the droplets experiences significant growth delay, the overall droplet size spectrum will be broadened, which facilitates the formation of precipitation. During three recent field campaigns (CalNex-LA, CARES, and Aerosol Intensive Observation Period at Brookhaven National Laboratory), the CCN activity and droplet growth of size selected particles ranging from 25 to 320 nm were characterized by a CCN counter under supersaturations from 0.1% to 0.8%. The three campaigns allow us to examine the droplet growth for many representative organic aerosol types, including biogenic SOA, anthropogenic SOA, and organic aerosols from biomass burning. The droplet growth of size-selected ambient particles inside the CCN counter was found to be influenced by a number of parameters, including particle critical supersaturation, heterogeneity in particle composition, and particle concentration. For example, reduced droplet growth due to water vapor depletion was observed when particle concentration was higher than 200 cm

  8. Growth Kinetics and Morphology of Barite Crystals Derived from Face-Specific Growth Rates

    DOE PAGES

    Godinho, Jose R. A.; Stack, Andrew G.

    2015-03-30

    Here we investigate the growth kinetics and morphology of barite (BaSO4) crystals by measuring the growth rates of the (001), (210), (010), and (100) surfaces using vertical scanning interferometry. Solutions with saturation indices 1.1, 2.1, and 3.0 without additional electrolyte, in 0.7 M NaCl, or in 1.3 mM SrCl2 are investigated. Face-specific growth rates are inhibited in the SrCl2 solution relative to a solution without electrolyte, except for (100). Contrarily, growth of all faces is promoted in the NaCl solution. The variation of face-specific rates is solution-specific, which leads to a. change of the crystal morphology and overall growth ratemore » of crystals. The measured face-specific growth rates are used to model the growth of single crystals. Modeled crystals have a morphology and size similar to those grown from solution. Based on the model the time dependence of surface area and growth rates is analyzed. Growth rates change with time due to surface area normalization for small crystals and large growth intervals. By extrapolating rates to crystals with large surfaces areas, time-independent growth rates are 0.783, 2.96, and 0.513 mmol∙m-2∙h-1, for saturation index 2.1 solutions without additional electrolyte, NaCl, and SrCl2, respectively.« less

  9. Growth Kinetics and Morphology of Barite Crystals Derived from Face-Specific Growth Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Godinho, Jose R. A.; Stack, Andrew G.

    2015-03-30

    Here we investigate the growth kinetics and morphology of barite (BaSO4) crystals by measuring the growth rates of the (001), (210), (010), and (100) surfaces using vertical scanning interferometry. Solutions with saturation indices 1.1, 2.1, and 3.0 without additional electrolyte, in 0.7 M NaCl, or in 1.3 mM SrCl2 are investigated. Face-specific growth rates are inhibited in the SrCl2 solution relative to a solution without electrolyte, except for (100). Contrarily, growth of all faces is promoted in the NaCl solution. The variation of face-specific rates is solution-specific, which leads to a. change of the crystal morphology and overall growth rate of crystals. The measured face-specific growth rates are used to model the growth of single crystals. Modeled crystals have a morphology and size similar to those grown from solution. Based on the model the time dependence of surface area and growth rates is analyzed. Growth rates change with time due to surface area normalization for small crystals and large growth intervals. By extrapolating rates to crystals with large surfaces areas, time-independent growth rates are 0.783, 2.96, and 0.513 mmol∙m-2∙h-1, for saturation index 2.1 solutions without additional electrolyte, NaCl, and SrCl2, respectively.

  10. The Study of Kinetics of Diffusion and Phase Formation in the Layered Iron-Beryllium System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuterbekov, K. A.; Nurkenov, S. A.; Kislitsin, S. B.; Kuketayev, T. A.; Nurakhmetov, T. N.

    2017-02-01

    The methods of Mössbauer spectroscopy with X-ray phase analysis and Rutherford backscattering of protons were used to study the kinetics of diffusion and phase transformations in the layered iron-beryllium system. For the first time, the authors suggested and implemented a method for retardation of diffusion and phase formation processes in the layered iron-beryllium system using the barrier layer. It was established that the barrier layer limits the zone of beryllium dissolution in the area of implanted layer. The impact of the barrier layer on kinetics of thermally induced processes of diffusion and phase transformations in the layered Fe-Be system was determined using the example of Fe (10 μm): O+ - Be (0.7 μm) - 57Fe (0.1 μm). The authors suggested and implemented a method for recovery of the distribution function of the admixture atom concentration in the solid matrix-admixture solution on the basis of the X-ray diffraction data. The kinetics of mutual diffusion was determined for Fe and Be atoms in the α-Fe(Be) solution for both sides of the layered systems with a barrier layer and without it using the suggested method for recovery of the distribution function of the Be atom concentration. It was established that for the system without a barrier layer, the share of iron atoms ends at tann 5 h on the coating side and at tann 7.5 h on the iron side, while for the barrier layer case - at tann 20 h on the coating side and at tann 40 h on the iron side.

  11. Kinetics of faceting of crystals in growth, etching, and equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, D. G.; Schmidt, L. D.; Aris, R.

    1993-03-01

    The faceting of crystals in equilibrium with the gas phase and also during crystal growth and etching conditions is studied using the Monte Carlo method. The dynamics of the transformation of unstable crystallographic orientations into hill and valley structures and the spatial patterns that develop are examined as functions of surface temperature, crystallographic orientation, and strength of interatomic potential for two transport processes: adsorption-desorption and surface diffusion. The results are compared with the continuum theory for facet formation. Thermodynamically unstable orientations break into hill and valley structures, and faceting exhibits three time regimes: disordering, facet nucleation, and coarsening of small facets to large facets. Faceting is accelerated as temperature increases, but thermal roughening can occur at high temperatures. Surface diffusion is the dominant mechanism at short times and small facets but adsorption-desorption becomes important at long times and large facets. Growth and etching promote faceting for conditions close to equilibrium but induce kinetic roughening for conditions far from equilibrium. Simultaneous irreversible growth and etching conditions with fast surface diffusion result in enhanced faceting.

  12. Arabidopsis thaliana root growth kinetics and lunisolar tidal acceleration.

    PubMed

    Fisahn, Joachim; Yazdanbakhsh, Nima; Klingele, Emile; Barlow, Peter

    2012-07-01

    • All living organisms on Earth are continually exposed to diurnal variations in the gravitational tidal force due to the Sun and Moon. • Elongation of primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings maintained at a constant temperature was monitored for periods of up to 14 d using high temporal- and spatial-resolution video imaging. The time-course of the half-hourly elongation rates exhibited an oscillation which was maintained when the roots were placed in the free-running condition of continuous illumination. • Correlation between the root growth kinetics collected from seedlings initially raised under several light protocols but whose roots were subsequently in the free-running condition and the lunisolar tidal profiles enabled us to identify that the latter is the probable exogenous determinant of the rhythmic variation in root elongation rate. Similar observations and correlations using roots of Arabidopsis starch mutants suggest a central function of starch metabolism in the response to the lunisolar tide. The periodicity of the lunisolar tidal signal and the concomitant adjustments in root growth rate indicate that an exogenous timer exists for the modulation of root growth and development. • We propose that, in addition to the sensitivity to Earthly 1G gravity, which is inherent to all animals and plants, there is another type of responsiveness which is attuned to the natural diurnal variations of the lunisolar tidal force.

  13. Budget of Turbulent Kinetic Energy in a Shock Wave Boundary-Layer Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vyas, Manan A.; Waindim, Mbu; Gaitonde, Datta V.

    2016-01-01

    Implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES) of a shock wave/boundary-layer interaction (SBLI) was performed. Quantities present in the exact equation of the turbulent kinetic energy transport were accumulated and used to calculate terms like production, dissipation, molecular diffusion, and turbulent transport. The present results for a turbulent boundary layer were validated by comparison with direct numerical simulation data. It was found that a longer development domain was necessary for the boundary layer to reach an equilibrium state and a finer mesh resolution would improve the predictions. In spite of these findings, trends of the present budget match closely with that of the direct numerical simulation. Budgets for the SBLI region are presented at key axial stations. These budgets showed interesting dynamics as the incoming boundary layer transforms and the terms of the turbulent kinetic energy budget change behavior within the interaction region.

  14. Selective growth of graphene in layer-by-layer via chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaehyun; An, Hyosub; Choi, Dong-Chul; Hussain, Sajjad; Song, Wooseok; An, Ki-Seok; Lee, Won-Jun; Lee, Naesung; Lee, Wan-Gyu; Jung, Jongwan

    2016-07-01

    Selective and precise control of the layer number of graphene remains a critical issue for the practical applications of graphene. First, it is highly challenging to grow a continuous and uniform few-layer graphene since once the monolayer graphene fully covers a copper (Cu) surface, the growth of the second layer stops, resulting in mostly nonhomogeneous films. Second, from the selective adlayer growth point of view, there is no clear pathway for achieving this. We have developed the selective growth of a graphene adlayer in layer-by-layer via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) which makes it possible to stack graphene on a specific position. The key idea is to deposit a thin Cu layer (~40 nm thick) on pre-grown monolayer graphene and to apply additional growth. The thin Cu atop the graphene/Cu substrate acts as a catalyst to decompose methane (CH4) gas during the additional growth. The adlayer is grown selectively on the pre-grown graphene, and the thin Cu is removed through evaporation during CVD, eventually forming large-area and uniform double layer graphene. With this technology, highly uniform graphene films with precise thicknesses of 1 to 5 layers and graphene check patterns with 1 to 3 layers were successfully demonstrated. This method provides precise LBL growth for a uniform graphene film and a technique for the design of new graphene devices.Selective and precise control of the layer number of graphene remains a critical issue for the practical applications of graphene. First, it is highly challenging to grow a continuous and uniform few-layer graphene since once the monolayer graphene fully covers a copper (Cu) surface, the growth of the second layer stops, resulting in mostly nonhomogeneous films. Second, from the selective adlayer growth point of view, there is no clear pathway for achieving this. We have developed the selective growth of a graphene adlayer in layer-by-layer via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) which makes it possible to stack graphene

  15. Kinetic transition during the growth of proeutectoid ferrite in Fe-C-Mn-Si quaternary steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guo-Hong; Heo, Yoon-Uk; Song, Eun-Ju; Suh, Dong-Woo

    2013-03-01

    The kinetics of ferrite growth in Fe-0.1C-1.5Mn-0.94Si (mass pct) quaternary steel is investigated through the characterization of isothermal growth behavior, the thermodynamic prediction of kinetic boundary and the diffusional growth simulations using DICTRA. The change in microstructural evolution from slow growth to fast one is consistent with the calculated change of interface condition from the partitioning local equilibrium (PLE) to the negligible partitioning local equilibrium (NPLE). Compared with the DICTRA simulation, the observed growth kinetics of ferrite are between the calculated ones assuming local equilibrium (LE) and paraequilibrium (PE) criterions. At temperatures below the PLE/NPLE kinetic boundary, the observed growth behavior can be reasonably described by kinetic transition from PE to NPLE condition as isothermal time elapses, taking into account the critical velocity of interface at which trans-interface diffusion of subsitutional element permits the transition from PE to NPLE growth.

  16. Release Kinetics of Paclitaxel and Cisplatin from Two and Three Layered Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    England, Christopher G.; Miller, M. Clarke; Kuttan, Ashani; Trent, John O.; Frieboes, Hermann B.

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles functionalized with biologically-compatible layers may achieve stable drug release while avoiding adverse effects in cancer treatment. We study cisplatin and paclitaxel release from gold cores functionalized with hexadecanethiol (TL) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) to form two-layer nanoparticles, or TL, PC, and high density lipoprotein (HDL) to form three-layer nanoparticles. Drug release was monitored for 14 days to assess long term effects of the core surface modifications on release kinetics. Release profiles were fitted to previously developed kinetic models to differentiate possible release mechanisms. The hydrophilic drug (cisplatin) showed an initial (5-hr.) burst, followed by a steady release over 14 days. The hydrophobic drug (paclitaxel) showed a steady release over the same time period. Two layer nanoparticles released 64.0 ± 2.5% of cisplatin and 22.3 ± 1.5% of paclitaxel, while three layer nanoparticles released the entire encapsulated drug. The Korsmeyer-Peppas model best described each release scenario, while the simplified Higuchi model also adequately described paclitaxel release from the two layer formulation. We conclude that functionalization of gold nanoparticles with a combination of TL and PC may help to modulate both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drug release kinetics, while the addition of HDL may enhance long term release of hydrophobic drug. PMID:25753197

  17. Cell and tissue kinetics of the subependymal layer in mouse brain following heavy charged particle irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, N.B.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Alpen, E.L.

    1988-12-01

    The following studies investigate the cellular response and cell population kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain exposed to heavy charged particle irradiation. Partial brain irradiation with helium and neon ions was confined to one cortex of the brain. Both the irradiated and the unirradiated contralateral cortex showed similar disturbances of the cell and tissue kinetics in the subependymal layers. The irradiated hemisphere exhibited histological damage, whereas the unirradiated side appeared normal histologically. This study concerns the cell population and cell cycle kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain, and the effects of charged particle irradiations on this cell population. Quantitative high resolution autoradiography was used to study the kinetic parameters in this cell layer. This study should help in understanding the effects of these high-energy heavy ions on normal mammalian brain tissue. The response of the mammalian brain exposure to charged particle ionizing radiation may be extremely variable. It varies from minimal physiological changes to overt tissue necrosis depending on a number of factors such as: the administered dose, dose-rate, the volume of the irradiated tissue, and the biological end-point being examined.

  18. Kinetics and mechanisms of crystal growth inhibition of indomethacin by model precipitation inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Dhaval

    Supersaturating Drug Delivery Systems (SDDS) could enhance oral bioavailability of poorly water soluble drugs (PWSD). Precipitation inhibitors (PIs) in SDDS could maintain supersaturation by inhibiting nucleation, crystal growth, or both. The mechanisms by which these effects are realized are generally unknown. The goal of this dissertation was to explore the mechanisms underpinning the effects of model PIs including hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrins (HP-beta-CD), hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) on the crystal growth of indomethacin, a model PWSD. At high degrees of supersaturation (S), the crystal growth kinetics of indomethacin was bulk diffusion-controlled, which was attributed to a high energy form deposited on the seed crystals. At lower S, indomethacin growth kinetics was surface integration-controlled. The effect of HP-beta-CD at high S was successfully modeled using the reactive diffusion layer theory. The superior effects of PVP and HPMC as compared to HP-beta-CD at high S were attributed to a change in the rate limiting step from bulk diffusion to surface integration largely due to prevention of the high energy form formation. The effects of PIs at low S were attributed to significant retardation of the surface integration rate, a phenomenon that may reflect the adsorption of PIs onto the growing surface. PVP was selected to further understand the relationship between adsorption and crystal growth inhibition. The Langmuir adsorption isotherm model fit the adsorption isotherms of PVP and N-vinylpyrrolidone well. The affinity and extent of adsorption of PVP were significantly higher than those of N-vinylpyrrolidone, which was attributed to cooperative interactions between PVP and indomethacin. The extent of PVP adsorption on a weight-basis was greater for higher molecular weight PVP but less on a molar-basis indicating an increased percentage of loops and tails for higher molecular weight PVPs. PVP significantly inhibited

  19. Exact solutions of kinetic equations in an autocatalytic growth model.

    PubMed

    Jędrak, Jakub

    2013-02-01

    Kinetic equations are introduced for the transition-metal nanocluster nucleation and growth mechanism, as proposed by Watzky and Finke [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 119, 10382 (1997)]. Equations of this type take the form of Smoluchowski coagulation equations supplemented with the terms responsible for the chemical reactions. In the absence of coagulation, we find complete analytical solutions of the model equations for the autocatalytic rate constant both proportional to the cluster mass, and the mass-independent one. In the former case, ξ(k)=s(k)(ξ(1))[proportionality]ξ(1)(k)/k was obtained, while in the latter, the functional form of s(k)(ξ(1)) is more complicated. In both cases, ξ(1)(t)=h(μ)(M(μ)(t)) is a function of the moments of the mass distribution. Both functions, s(k)(ξ(1)) and h(μ)(M(μ)), depend on the assumed mechanism of autocatalytic growth and monomer production, and not on other chemical reactions present in a system.

  20. Growth kinetics of Ge islands during Ga-surfactant-mediated ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition on Si(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portavoce, A.; Kammler, M.; Hull, R.; Reuter, M. C.; Copel, M.; Ross, F. M.

    2004-11-01

    The surfactant effect of Ga pre-deposited prior to ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of Ge on Si(001) is investigated using in situ transmission electron microscopy. Island shape, nucleation and growth kinetics, and the influence of growth temperature and pressure are studied. When 1 monolayer of Ga covers the surface, Ge island nucleation occurs after a 5-10× longer growth time than without Ga for the same growth temperature and pressure, and the island density then varies with time in a more complex way than for Ga-free growth. The islands formed have a different shape and aspect ratio compared to conventional hut and dome clusters, and the critical lateral size for dislocation nucleation is reduced. Ex situ medium energy ion scattering and x-ray photoelectron scattering measurements of the total amount of Ge deposited before island nucleation demonstrate that the Ga layer decreases the surface reactivity and inhibits Ge growth. We discuss a simple model in which the surfactant-mediated growth kinetics are principally driven by the balance between Ge deposition and Ga desorption. We show that Ga surfactant-mediated UHV CVD can be used to produce Ge quantum dots with a higher surface density and a thinner wetting layer than is possible using conventional CVD.

  1. Direct Observation of Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic Modeling of the Size Distribution and Growth Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Park, Chiwoo; Evans, James E.; Arslan, Ilke; Ristenpart, William D.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2014-01-08

    Direct observations of solution-phase nanoparticle growth using in situ liquid transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have demonstrated the importance of “non-classical” growth mechanisms, such as aggregation and coalescence, on the growth and final morphology of nanocrystals at the atomic and single nanoparticle scales. To date, groups have quantitatively interpreted the mean growth rate of nanoparticles in terms of the Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner (LSW) model for Ostwald ripening, but less attention has been paid to modeling the corresponding particle size distribution. Here we use in situ fluid stage scanning TEM to demonstrate that silver nanoparticles grow by a length-scale dependent mechanism, where individual nanoparticles grow by monomer attachment but ensemble-scale growth is dominated by aggregation. Although our observed mean nanoparticle growth rate is consistent with the LSW model, we show that the corresponding particle size distribution is broader and more symmetric than predicted by LSW. Following direct observations of aggregation, we interpret the ensemble-scale growth using Smoluchowski kinetics and demonstrate that the Smoluchowski model quantitatively captures the mean growth rate and particle size distribution.

  2. Determination of kinetic parameters of crystal growth rate of borax in aqueous solution by using the rotating disc technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Omer; Aslan, Fevzi; Ozdemir, Mustafa; Durgun, Mustafa

    2004-10-01

    Growth rate of polycrystalline disc of borax compressed at different pressure and rotated at various speed has been measured in a rotating disc crystallizer under well-defined conditions of supersaturation. It was found that the mass transfer coefficient, K, increased while overall growth rate constant, Kg, and surface reaction constant, kr, decreased with increasing smoothness of the disc. It was also determined that kinetic parameters (kr , r , K , g) of crystal growth rate of borax decreased with increasing rotating speed of the polycrystalline disc. The effectiveness factor was calculated from the growth rate data to evaluate the relative magnitude of the steps in series bulk diffusion through the mass transfer boundary layer and the surface integration. At low rotating speed of disc, the crystal growth rate of borax is mainly controlled by integration. However, both diffusion and integration steps affect the growth rate of borax at higher rotating speed of polycrystalline disc.

  3. Growth kinetics of forsterite reaction rims at high-pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihara, Yu; Maruyama, Genta; Nishi, Masayuki

    2016-08-01

    Growth kinetics of forsterite (Fo) reaction rims between periclase (Per) and enstatite (En) were studied experimentally at pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions of 3.0-11.1 GPa and 1473-1873 K, respectively. Pt markers originally placed at the Per-En interface were always observed at the Per-Fo interface, which indicates that Mg and O are the diffusing species in Fo rim growth (Mg-O coupled diffusion). The presence of some En inclusions in Fo grains and the growth rate of the Fo rim suggests that grain boundary diffusion is dominant rather than lattice diffusion. Considering the very fast grain boundary diffusion of O in olivine, the Mg-O coupled grain boundary diffusion in Fo is deduced to be rate-limited by the diffusivity of Mg. Based on an analysis of data collected under dry conditions, the product of the Mg grain boundary diffusion coefficient (Dgb) and the effective grain boundary width (δ) was determined to be δDgb = δDgb,0exp[-(E∗ + PV∗)/RT] with δDgb,0 = 10-9.68 ± 1.51 m3/s, E∗ = 379 ± 44 kJ/mol and V∗ = -1.9 ± 1.4 cm3/mol. Our results, combined with previously reported data on Mg lattice diffusion in Fo, suggest that for Mg, the significance of grain boundary diffusion increases with depth in the Earth's upper mantle, although lattice diffusion is still dominant for typical mantle grain sizes of 1-10 mm.

  4. Buoyant production and consumption of turbulence kinetic energy in cloud-topped mixed layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that studies of the entraining planetary boundary layer (PBL) have generally emphasized the role of buoyancy fluxes in driving entrainment. The buoyancy flux is proportional to the rate of conversion of the potential energy of the mean flow into the kinetic energy of the turbulence. It is not unusual for conversion to proceed in both directions simultaneously. This occurs, for instance, in both clear and cloudy convective mixed layers which are capped by inversions. A partitioning of the net conversion into positive parts, generating turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), and negative parts (TKE-consuming), would make it possible to include the positive part in the gross production rate, and closure would be achieved. Three different approaches to partitioning have been proposed. The present investigation is concerned with a comparison of the three partitioning theories. Particular attention is given to the cloud-topped mixed layer because in this case the differences between two partitioning approaches are most apparent.

  5. Surfactant-mediated layer-by-layer homoepitaxial growth of Cu/In/Cu(100) and Ag/Sb/Ag(111) systems: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ming; Zhao, Yu-Jun; Cao, Pei-Lin

    1998-04-01

    Two typical surfactant-mediated homoepitaxial metal systems, Cu/In/Cu(100) and Ag/Sb/Ag(111), are studied by using first-principles calculations and a kinetic Monte Carlo method. Our results confirm the validity of the model that Zhang and Lagally suggested for Cu/In/Cu(100) system. A repulsion model is proposed for the Ag/Sb/Ag(111) system where surface-substitutional Sb atoms repel diffusing Ag adatoms. The layer-by-layer growth for Ag/Sb/Ag(111) system is achieved with a repulsion model in kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. By comparing the two different growth models, the importance of the additional barrier ΔE and effectiveness of two ways of reducing ΔE are confirmed in determining film morphology.

  6. Deformation kinetics of layered personal protective material under impact via terahertz reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Anis; Rahman, Aunik; Mentzer, Mark A.

    2014-05-01

    Terahertz dynamic scanning reflectometry (TDSR) was used for measuring layered materials' deformation kinetics spectra. Multi-layered materials are used for protective devices such as helmet and body armor. An in-situ measurement of deformation profile and other dynamic characteristics is important when such material is subjected to ballistic impacts. Current instrumentation is limited in their abilities to provide sub-surface information in a non-destructive fashion. A high sensitivity TDSR has been used to measure dynamic surface deformation characteristics in real-time (in-situ) and also at post deformation (ex-situ). Real-time ballistic deformation kinetics was captured with a high speed measurement system. The kinetics spectra was used to compute a number of crucial parameters such as deformation length and its propagation profile, the relaxation position, and the macroscopic vibration profile. In addition, the loss of mass due to impact was quantified for accurate determination of the trauma causing energy. For non-metallic substrates, a transmitted beam was used to calibrate mass loss, a priori, of the laminate layers due to impact. Deformation kinetics information may then be used to formulate trauma diagnosis conditions from blunt hit via the Sturdivan criterion [1]. The basic difference in the proposed approach is that here diagnostic criteria are inferred by measuring the helmet itself; no need to draw blood or any biopsy from the patient.

  7. Label-free detection of biomolecular interactions using BioLayer interferometry for kinetic characterization.

    PubMed

    Concepcion, Joy; Witte, Krista; Wartchow, Charles; Choo, Sae; Yao, Danfeng; Persson, Henrik; Wei, Jing; Li, Pu; Heidecker, Bettina; Ma, Weilei; Varma, Ram; Zhao, Lian-She; Perillat, Donald; Carricato, Greg; Recknor, Michael; Du, Kevin; Ho, Huddee; Ellis, Tim; Gamez, Juan; Howes, Michael; Phi-Wilson, Janette; Lockard, Scott; Zuk, Robert; Tan, Hong

    2009-09-01

    The analysis of biomolecular interactions is key in the drug development process. Label-free biosensor methods provide information on binding, kinetics, concentration, and the affinity of an interaction. These techniques provide real-time monitoring of interactions between an immobilized ligand (such as a receptor) to an analyte in solution without the use of labels. Advances in biosensor design and detection using BioLayer Interferometry (BLI) provide a simple platform that enables label-free monitoring of biomolecular interactions without the use of flow cells. We review the applications of BLI in a wide variety of research and development environments for quantifying antibodies and proteins and measuring kinetics parameters.

  8. Structure and charging kinetics of electrical double layers at large electrode voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Cagle, Clint; Feng, Guang; Qiao, Rui; Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    The structure and charging kinetics of electrical double layers (EDLs) at interfaces of NaCl solutions and planar electrodes are studied by molecular dynamics (MD) and Poisson Nernst Planck (PNP) simulations. Based on the MD results and prior experimental data, we show that counterion packing in planar EDLs does not reach the steric limit at electrode voltages below 1 V. In addition, we demonstrate that a PNP model, when complemented with a Stern model, can be effectively used to capture the overall charging kinetics. However, the PNP/Stern model can only give a qualitative description of the fine features of the EDL.

  9. Isothermal Ice Crystallization Kinetics in the Gas-Diffusion Layer of a Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Dursch, Thomas J.; Ciontea, Monica A.; Radke, Clayton J.; Weber, Adam Z.

    2011-12-01

    Nucleation and growth of ice in the fibrous gas-diffusion layer (GDL) of a proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) are studied using isothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Isothermal crystallization rates and pseudo-steady-state nucleation rates are obtained as a function of subcooling from heat-flow and induction-time measurements. Kinetics of ice nucleation and growth are studied at two polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) loadings (0 and 10 wt %) in a commercial GDL for temperatures between 240 and 273 K. A nonlinear ice-crystallization rate expression is developed using Johnson–Mehl–Avrami–Kolmogorov (JMAK) theory, in which the heat-transfer-limited growth rate is determined from the moving-boundary Stefan problem. Induction times follow a Poisson distribution and increase upon addition of PTFE, indicating that nucleation occurs more slowly on a hydrophobic fiber than on a hydrophilic fiber. The determined nucleation rates and induction times follow expected trends from classical nucleation theory. Finally, a validated rate expression is now available for predicting ice-crystallization kinetics in GDLs.

  10. Isothermal ice crystallization kinetics in the gas-diffusion layer of a proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Dursch, T J; Ciontea, M A; Radke, C J; Weber, A Z

    2012-01-17

    Nucleation and growth of ice in the fibrous gas-diffusion layer (GDL) of a proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) are investigated using isothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Isothermal crystallization rates and pseudo-steady-state nucleation rates are obtained as a function of subcooling from heat-flow and induction-time measurements. Kinetics of ice nucleation and growth are studied at two polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) loadings (0 and 10 wt %) in a commercial GDL for temperatures between 240 and 273 K. A nonlinear ice-crystallization rate expression is developed using Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) theory, in which the heat-transfer-limited growth rate is determined from the moving-boundary Stefan problem. Induction times follow a Poisson distribution and increase upon addition of PTFE, indicating that nucleation occurs more slowly on a hydrophobic fiber than on a hydrophilic fiber. The determined nucleation rates and induction times follow expected trends from classical nucleation theory. A validated rate expression is now available for predicting ice-crystallization kinetics in GDLs.

  11. Phase transitions and kinetic properties of gold nanoparticles confined between two-layer graphene nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Wu, Nanhua; Chen, Jionghua; Wang, Jinjian; Shao, Jingling; Zhu, Xiaolei; Lu, Xiaohua; Guo, Lucun

    2016-11-01

    The thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors of gold nanoparticles confined between two-layer graphene nanosheets (two-layer-GNSs) are examined and investigated during heating and cooling processes via molecular dynamics (MD) simulation technique. An EAM potential is applied to represent the gold-gold interactions while a Lennard-Jones (L-J) potential is used to describe the gold-GNS interactions. The MD melting temperature of 1345 K for bulk gold is close to the experimental value (1337 K), confirming that the EAM potential used to describe gold-gold interactions is reliable. On the other hand, the melting temperatures of gold clusters supported on graphite bilayer are corrected to the corresponding experimental values by adjusting the εAu-C value. Therefore, the subsequent results from current work are reliable. The gold nanoparticles confined within two-layer GNSs exhibit face center cubic structures, which is similar to those of free gold clusters and bulk gold. The melting points, heats of fusion, and heat capacities of the confined gold nanoparticles are predicted based on the plots of total energies against temperature. The density distribution perpendicular to GNS suggests that the freezing of confined gold nanoparticles starts from outermost layers. The confined gold clusters exhibit layering phenomenon even in liquid state. The transition of order-disorder in each layer is an essential characteristic in structure for the freezing phase transition of the confined gold clusters. Additionally, some vital kinetic data are obtained in terms of classical nucleation theory.

  12. Growth kinetics and inhibition of growth of chemical vapor deposited thin tungsten films on silicon from tungsten hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leusink, G. J.; Kleijn, C. R.; Oosterlaken, T. G. M.; Janssen, G. C. A. M.; Radelaar, S.

    1992-07-01

    The growth kinetics and inhibition of growth of chemical vapor deposited thin W films on Si(100) from WF6 was studied with in situ growth stress and reflectivity measurements and ex situ weight gain measurements. A systematic series of experiments at varying WF6 flow, total pressure, and temperature show that the thickening kinetics and inhibition of the growth are controlled by two processes: WF6 diffusion through the gas phase and Si diffusion through the thickening columnar film. The steady state growth kinetics are controlled by WF6 diffusion in the gas phase whereas inhibition of the growth occurs at the transition from WF6 gas diffusion limited to Si solid state diffusion limited growth. A simple model based on WF6 gas phase diffusion and Si solid state diffusion is presented which gives a quantitative description of the experimental results.

  13. Dynamic layer rearrangement during growth of layered oxide films by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Luo, G; Tung, I C; Chang, S H; Luo, Z; Malshe, M; Gadre, M; Bhattacharya, A; Nakhmanson, S M; Eastman, J A; Hong, H; Jellinek, J; Morgan, D; Fong, D D; Freeland, J W

    2014-09-01

    The A(n+1)B(n)O(3n+1) Ruddlesden-Popper homologous series offers a wide variety of functionalities including dielectric, ferroelectric, magnetic and catalytic properties. Unfortunately, the synthesis of such layered oxides has been a major challenge owing to the occurrence of growth defects that result in poor materials behaviour in the higher-order members. To understand the fundamental physics of layered oxide growth, we have developed an oxide molecular beam epitaxy system with in situ synchrotron X-ray scattering capability. We present results demonstrating that layered oxide films can dynamically rearrange during growth, leading to structures that are highly unexpected on the basis of the intended layer sequencing. Theoretical calculations indicate that rearrangement can occur in many layered oxide systems and suggest a general approach that may be essential for the construction of metastable Ruddlesden-Popper phases. We demonstrate the utility of the new-found growth strategy by performing the first atomically controlled synthesis of single-crystalline La3Ni2O7.

  14. Direct atomic-scale observation of layer-by-layer oxide growth during magnesium oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, He; Wu, Shujing; Sheng, Huaping; Liu, Chun; Liu, Yu; Cao, Fan; Zhou, Zhichao; Zhao, Dongshan E-mail: dszhao@whu.edu.cn; Wang, Jianbo E-mail: dszhao@whu.edu.cn; Zhao, Xingzhong

    2014-04-07

    The atomic-scale oxide growth dynamics are directly revealed by in situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy during the oxidation of Mg surface. The oxidation process is characterized by the layer-by-layer growth of magnesium oxide (MgO) nanocrystal via the adatom process. Consistently, the nucleated MgO crystals exhibit faceted surface morphology as enclosed by (200) lattice planes. It is believed that the relatively lower surface energies of (200) lattice planes should play important roles, governing the growth mechanism. These results facilitate the understanding of the nanoscale oxide growth mechanism that will have an important impact on the development of magnesium or magnesium alloys with improved resistance to oxidation.

  15. Nucleation kinetics and crystal growth with fluctuating rates at the intermediate stage of phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, D. V.; Malygin, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Crystal growth kinetics accompanied by particle growth with fluctuating rates at the intermediate stage of phase transitions is analyzed theoretically. The integro-differential model of governing equations is solved analytically for size-independent growth rates and arbitrary dependences of the nucleation frequency on supercooling/supersaturation. Two important cases of Weber-Volmer-Frenkel-Zel'dovich and Mier nucleation kinetics are detailed. A Fokker-Plank type equation for the crystal-size density distribution function is solved explicitly.

  16. Adsorption of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles within layer-by-layer films: a kinetic study carried out using quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, Gustavo B; Paterno, Leonardo G; Afonso, André S; Faria, Ronaldo C; Pereira-da-Silva, Marcelo A; Morais, Paulo C; Soler, Maria A G

    2011-12-28

    The paper reports on the successful use of the quartz crystal microbalance technique to assess accurate kinetics and equilibrium parameters regarding the investigation of in situ adsorption of nanosized cobalt ferrite particles (CoFe(2)O(4)--10.5 nm-diameter) onto two different surfaces. Firstly, a single layer of nanoparticles was deposited onto the surface provided by the gold-coated quartz resonator functionalized with sodium 3-mercapto propanesulfonate (3-MPS). Secondly, the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique was used to build multilayers in which the CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticle-based layer alternates with the sodium sulfonated polystyrene (PSS) layer. The adsorption experiments were conducted by modulating the number of adsorbed CoFe(2)O(4)/PSS bilayers (n) and/or by changing the CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticle concentration while suspended as a stable colloidal dispersion. Adsorption of CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles onto the 3-MPS-functionalized surface follows perfectly a first order kinetic process in a wide range (two orders of magnitude) of nanoparticle concentrations. These data were used to assess the equilibrium constant and the adsorption free energy. Alternatively, the Langmuir adsorption constant was obtained while analyzing the isotherm data at the equilibrium. Adsorption of CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles while growing multilayers of CoFe(2)O(4)/PSS was conducted using colloidal suspensions with CoFe(2)O(4) concentration in the range of 10(-8) to 10(-6) (moles of cobalt ferrite per litre) and for different numbers of cycles n = 1, 3, 5, and 10. We found the adsorption of CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles within the CoFe(2)O(4)/PSS bilayers perfectly following a first order kinetic process, with the characteristic rate constant growing with the increase of CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticle concentration and decreasing with the rise of the number of LbL cycles (n). Additionally, atomic force microscopy was employed for assessing the LbL film roughness and thickness. We found the film

  17. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers

    DOEpatents

    Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2014-07-15

    Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

  18. Arbitrary amplitude double layers in warm dust kinetic Alfven wave plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gogoi, Runmoni; Devi, Nirupama

    2008-07-15

    Large amplitude electrostatic structures associated with low-frequency dust kinetic Alfvenic waves are investigated under the pressure (temperature) gradient indicative of dust dynamics. The set of equations governing the dust dynamics, Boltzmann electrons, ions and Maxwell's equation have been reduced to a single equation known as the Sagdeev potential equation. Parameter ranges for the existence of arbitrary amplitude double layers are observed. Exact analytical expressions for the energy integral is obtained and computed numerically through which sub-Alfvenic arbitrary amplitude rarefactive double layers are found to exist.

  19. Reduced kinetic mechanism of ignition for nonpremixed hydrogen/air in a supersonic mixing layer

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Y.; Niioka, T. . Inst. of Fluid Science)

    1994-11-01

    Transient ignition processes in a two-dimensional spatially evolving supersonic mixing layer consisting of a parallel nonpremixed airstream and a hydrogen stream both with temperatures higher than 1,000 K were investigated numerically by using the full chemistry and its reduced chemistry. A phenomenon different from that examined in previous studies, in which ignition of hydrogen/oxygen mixtures was considered, was found in the nonpremixed case examined here. It was shown that the concentration of O was greater than that of OH before ignition, but became smaller with the development of ignition process. Fourteen important reactions for ignition were obtained and verified using sensitivity analyses of ignition delay time and radical concentrations. Several different four-step and three-step reduced kinetic mechanisms were then deduced by introducing the steady-state approximation to different species. Comparison of these reduced kinetic mechanisms with the full chemistry showed that the steady-state approximation of O used in previous studies caused serious errors in the prediction of ignition delay time in supersonic flow, in which nonpremixed character is predominant and the transport phenomenon is important. Ignition locations predicted with the proper four-step and three-step reduced kinetic mechanisms were within 5% and 20% of those predicted with the full chemistry. Finally, these two reduced mechanisms were used to evaluate the effect of viscous dissipation on ignition in the supersonic shear layer. Good agreements between the results of the present reduced kinetic mechanisms and those of the full chemistry were obtained.

  20. Notes on Interface Growth Kinetics 50 Years after Burton, Cabrera and Frank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    This overview is devoted to some unresolved basic problems in crystal growth kinetics. The density wave approach to propagation of a spatially diffuse interface between a growing crystal and its simple (e.g., metallic) melt is discussed is Section 2. This approach allows for the calculation of kinetic coefficients and is an alternative to the localized interface concept in which each atom belongs to either a solid or a liquid. Sections 3 and 4 deals mainly with layer growth from solution. Mutual retardation of the growth steps via their bulk and d a c e diffusion fields is the major subject. The influence of solution flow on step bunching (Section 4) suggests the essential influence of bulk diffusion on the surface morphology. The flow within the solution boundary layer enhances step-step interaction, influences the step bunching process and the resulting step pattern morphology on the growing surface. Recent experiments on the rates at which strongly polygonized steps on protein and small molecule crystals propagate during growth from solution are analyzed in Section 5 . We have shown that the step segments may be "singular" and that "one-dimensional nucleation" may be the rate limiting stage for the segments that are shorter or comparable in length to the thermodynamically equilibrium interlink distance. In this case, the reciprocal dependence of the segment propagation rate on the segment length that follow from the Gibbs-Thompson law, should be replaced by an abrupt switch from zero to a finite constant velocity. Until recently, the Kossel crystal remained the only model used in crystal growth theory. In such Kossel Gibbs-Thomson law, should be replaced by an abrupt switch &om zero to a finite constant velocity. crystals, all kinks at the steps are identical and the kink rate is a linear function of the supersaturation. In the non-Kossel crystals, there may be several kink configurations characterized by different geometries and energies. These configurations

  1. Exploring growth kinetics of carbon nanotube arrays by in situ optical diagnostics and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Puretzky, Alexander A; Geohegan, David B; Pannala, Sreekanth; Rouleau, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Simple kinetic models of carbon nanotube growth have been able to successfully link together many experimental parameters involved in the growth of carbon nanotubes for practical applications including the prediction of growth rates, terminal lengths, number of walls, activation energies, and their dependences on the growth environment. The implications of recent experiments utilizing in situ monitoring of carbon nanotube growth on our past kinetic model are first reviewed. Then, sub-second pulsed feedstock gas introduction is discussed to explore the nucleation and initial growth of carbon nanotubes in the context of the kinetic model. Moreover, kinetic effects in "pulsed CVD" - using repeated pulsed gas introduction to stop and restart nanotube growth - are explored to understand renucleation, the origin of alignment in nanotube arrays, and incremental growth. Time-resolved reflectivity of the surface is used to remotely understand the kinetics of nucleation and the coordinated growth of arrays. This approach demonstrates that continuous vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes can be grown incrementally by pulsed CVD, and that the first exposure of fresh catalyst to feedstock gas is critical to nanotubes site density required for coordinated growth. Aligned nanotube arrays (as short as 60 nm) are shown to nucleate and grow within single, sub-second gas pulses. The multiple-pulse growth experiments (> 100 pulses) show that a high fraction of nanotubes renucleate on subsequent gas pulses.

  2. Underpotential deposition-mediated layer-by-layer growth of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jia Xu; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2015-05-19

    A method of depositing contiguous, conformal submonolayer-to-multilayer thin films with atomic-level control is described. The process involves the use of underpotential deposition of a first element to mediate the growth of a second material by overpotential deposition. Deposition occurs between a potential positive to the bulk deposition potential for the mediating element where a full monolayer of mediating element forms, and a potential which is less than, or only slightly greater than, the bulk deposition potential of the material to be deposited. By cycling the applied voltage between the bulk deposition potential for the mediating element and the material to be deposited, repeated desorption/adsorption of the mediating element during each potential cycle can be used to precisely control film growth on a layer-by-layer basis. This process is especially suitable for the formation of a catalytically active layer on core-shell particles for use in energy conversion devices such as fuel cells.

  3. Effects of penconazole on two yeast strains: growth kinetics and molecular studies.

    PubMed

    Jawich, Dalal; Lteif, Roger; Pfohl-Leszkowicz, Annie; Strehaiano, Pierre

    2006-05-01

    The aim of this study consisted to evaluate the impact of a pesticide (penconazole) on the growth kinetics and genotoxicity on two yeast strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Metschnikowia pulcherrima). When the penconazole was added at different phases of the growth of M. pulcherrima, no effect was noticed on the kinetics of yeast growth but DNA adducts were observed when penconazole was added in the exponential phase. Increasing doses (1-15 maximum residue limit) of the pesticide added at the beginning of the fermentation did not induce DNA adducts while kinetics were affected.

  4. Synthesis of layer-tunable graphene: A combined kinetic implantation and thermal ejection approach

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Gang; Zhang, Miao; Liu, Su; ...

    2015-05-04

    Layer-tunable graphene has attracted broad interest for its potentials in nanoelectronics applications. However, synthesis of layer-tunable graphene by using traditional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method still remains a great challenge due to the complex experimental parameters and the carbon precipitation process. Herein, by performing ion implantation into a Ni/Cu bilayer substrate, the number of graphene layers, especially single or double layer, can be controlled precisely by adjusting the carbon ion implant fluence. The growth mechanism of the layer-tunable graphene is revealed by monitoring the growth process is observed that the entire implanted carbon atoms can be expelled towards the substratemore » surface and thus graphene with designed layer number can be obtained. Such a growth mechanism is further confirmed by theoretical calculations. The proposed approach for the synthesis of layer-tunable graphene offers more flexibility in the experimental conditions. Being a core technology in microelectronics processing, ion implantation can be readily implemented in production lines and is expected to expedite the application of graphene to nanoelectronics.« less

  5. Synthesis of layer-tunable graphene: A combined kinetic implantation and thermal ejection approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Gang; Zhang, Miao; Liu, Su; Xie, Xiaoming; Ding, Guqiao; Wang, Yongqiang; Chu, Paul K.; Gao, Heng; Ren, Wei; Yuan, Qinghong; Zhang, Peihong; Wang, Xi; Di, Zengfeng

    2015-05-04

    Layer-tunable graphene has attracted broad interest for its potentials in nanoelectronics applications. However, synthesis of layer-tunable graphene by using traditional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method still remains a great challenge due to the complex experimental parameters and the carbon precipitation process. Herein, by performing ion implantation into a Ni/Cu bilayer substrate, the number of graphene layers, especially single or double layer, can be controlled precisely by adjusting the carbon ion implant fluence. The growth mechanism of the layer-tunable graphene is revealed by monitoring the growth process is observed that the entire implanted carbon atoms can be expelled towards the substrate surface and thus graphene with designed layer number can be obtained. Such a growth mechanism is further confirmed by theoretical calculations. The proposed approach for the synthesis of layer-tunable graphene offers more flexibility in the experimental conditions. Being a core technology in microelectronics processing, ion implantation can be readily implemented in production lines and is expected to expedite the application of graphene to nanoelectronics.

  6. Phase-field Model for Interstitial Loop Growth Kinetics and Thermodynamic and Kinetic Models of Irradiated Fe-Cr Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-06-15

    Microstructure evolution kinetics in irradiated materials has strongly spatial correlation. For example, void and second phases prefer to nucleate and grow at pre-existing defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and cracks. Inhomogeneous microstructure evolution results in inhomogeneity of microstructure and thermo-mechanical properties. Therefore, the simulation capability for predicting three dimensional (3-D) microstructure evolution kinetics and its subsequent impact on material properties and performance is crucial for scientific design of advanced nuclear materials and optimal operation conditions in order to reduce uncertainty in operational and safety margins. Very recently the meso-scale phase-field (PF) method has been used to predict gas bubble evolution, void swelling, void lattice formation and void migration in irradiated materials,. Although most results of phase-field simulations are qualitative due to the lake of accurate thermodynamic and kinetic properties of defects, possible missing of important kinetic properties and processes, and the capability of current codes and computers for large time and length scale modeling, the simulations demonstrate that PF method is a promising simulation tool for predicting 3-D heterogeneous microstructure and property evolution, and providing microstructure evolution kinetics for higher scale level simulations of microstructure and property evolution such as mean field methods. This report consists of two parts. In part I, we will present a new phase-field model for predicting interstitial loop growth kinetics in irradiated materials. The effect of defect (vacancy/interstitial) generation, diffusion and recombination, sink strength, long-range elastic interaction, inhomogeneous and anisotropic mobility on microstructure evolution kinetics is taken into account in the model. The model is used to study the effect of elastic interaction on interstitial loop growth kinetics, the interstitial flux, and sink

  7. The influence of crystal morphology on the kinetics of growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millan, A.; Sohnel, O.; Grases, F.

    1997-08-01

    The growth of several calcium oxalate monohydrate seeds in the presence and absence of additives (phytate, EDTA and citrate) has been followed by potentiometry measurements. Growth rates have been calculated from precipitate curves by a cubic spline method and represented in logarithmic plots versus supersaturation. Crystal growth kinetics were found to be dependent on crystal morphology, crystal perfection and degree of aggregation. Some seeds were dissolving in supersaturated solutions. Other seeds showed an initial growth phase of high-order kinetics. The effect of the additives was also different on each seed. Three alternative mechanisms for calcium oxalate crystal growth are proposed.

  8. Model-based predictions of solid state intermetallic compound layer growth in hybrid microelectronic circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Vianco, P.T.; Erickson, K.L.; Hopkins, P.L.

    1997-12-31

    A mathematical model was developed to quantitatively describe the intermetallic compound (IMC) layer growth that takes place between a Sn-based solder and a noble metal thick film conductor material used in hybrid microcircuit (HMC) assemblies. The model combined the reaction kinetics of the solder/substrate interaction, as determined from ancillary isothermal aging experiments, with a 2-D finite element mesh that took account of the porous morphology of the thick film coating. The effect of the porous morphology on the IMC layer growth when compared to the traditional 1-D computations was significant. The previous 1-D calculations under-predicted the nominal IMC layer thickness relative to the 2-D case. The 2-D model showed greater substrate consumption by IMC growth and lesser solder consumption that was determined with the 1-D computation. The new 2-D model allows the design engineer to better predict circuit aging and hence, the reliability of HMC hardware that is placed in the field.

  9. Carbon nanotube forests growth using catalysts from atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bingan; Zhang, Can; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Xie, Rongsi; Zhong, Guofang; Robertson, John; Bhardwaj, Sunil; Cepek, Cinzia

    2014-04-14

    We have grown carbon nanotubes using Fe and Ni catalyst films deposited by atomic layer deposition. Both metals lead to catalytically active nanoparticles for growing vertically aligned nanotube forests or carbon fibres, depending on the growth conditions and whether the substrate is alumina or silica. The resulting nanotubes have narrow diameter and wall number distributions that are as narrow as those grown from sputtered catalysts. The state of the catalyst is studied by in-situ and ex-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We demonstrate multi-directional nanotube growth on a porous alumina foam coated with Fe prepared by atomic layer deposition. This deposition technique can be useful for nanotube applications in microelectronics, filter technology, and energy storage.

  10. A theoretical study of surfactant action in the layer-by-layer homoepitaxial growth of metals: the case of In on Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ming; Qiu, Min; Zhao, Yu-Jun; Cao, Pei-Lin

    1998-02-01

    A surfactant-mediated homoepitaxial metal system, Cu/In/Cu(111), is studied by using first-principles calculations and the kinetic Monte Carlo method. A new repulsion model is proposed for the Cu/In/Cu(111) system where surface-substitutional In atoms repel diffusing Cu adatoms and build a repulsion network. This repulsion network results in an average increase of terrace barriers for adatoms Cu and enhanced island density. The layer-by-layer growth for the Cu/In/Cu(111) system is achieved with a repulsion model in a kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. The importance of the additional barrier ΔE is confirmed in determining film morphology.

  11. Modeling growth kinetics and statistical distribution of oligometastases.

    PubMed

    Withers, H Rodney; Lee, Steve P

    2006-04-01

    The kinetics of development of micrometastases, and especially of small numbers of metastases (oligometastases), was explored by using simple assumptions to develop concepts that may be useful for framing future research. The conclusions depend on the assumptions and hence must be considered speculative. It is assumed that beyond a threshold size for initiation of metastatic spread, which varies widely from tumor to tumor, the rate at which a primary tumor sheds new metastases increases exponentially, in parallel with its exponential growth. This increasing rate of release of new metastatic clonogens from the primary tumor is accompanied by a similar exponential growth of each of the micrometastases newly established at a secondary site. This creates a log-log linear relationship between the volume distribution of metastases and number of metastases, there being one largest metastasis followed by an exponentially expanding number of logarithmically smaller micrometastases. For example, if the micrometastases and the primary tumor grew at the same rate for 6 doublings after initiation of the first metastasis, then the primary tumor would have increased its volume by a factor of 64 (2(6)) and would be shedding metastatic clonogens at 64 times the initial rate. The first metastasis would undergo 6 doublings and contain 64 cells; the succeeding 2 metastases, released as the primary doubled in volume, would undergo 5 doublings and each would contain 32 cells; and so forth down to the 64 most recently developed single-cell metastases. However, the growth rate of metastases is expected to be faster than that of the primary tumor so that the rate of increase in volume of the micrometastases would be faster than the rate of increase in their numbers (through release of new metastases from the primary). Thus, although the log-log linear relationship is maintained, the slope of the volume frequency curve is changed; if the micrometastases grew 5 times faster than the primary

  12. Kinetic Alfven wave in the presence of kappa distribution function in plasma sheet boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, G. Ahirwar, G.; Shrivastava, J.

    2015-07-31

    The particle aspect approach is adopted to investigate the trajectories of charged particles in the electromagnetic field of kinetic Alfven wave. Expressions are found for the dispersion relation, damping/growth rate and associated currents in the presence of kappa distribution function. Kinetic effect of electrons and ions are included to study kinetic Alfven wave because both are important in the transition region. It is found that the ratio β of electron thermal energy density to magnetic field energy density and the ratio of ion to electron thermal temperature (T{sub i}/T{sub e}), and kappa distribution function affect the dispersion relation, damping/growth rate and associated currents in both cases(warm and cold electron limit).The treatment of kinetic Alfven wave instability is based on assumption that the plasma consist of resonant and non resonant particles. The resonant particles participate in an energy exchange process, whereas the non resonant particles support the oscillatory motion of the wave.

  13. Study of oxide and α-Zr(O) growth kinetics from high temperature steam oxidation of Zircaloy-4 cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawarn, Tapan K.; Banerjee, Suparna; Samanta, Akanksha; Rath, B. N.; Kumar, Sunil

    2015-12-01

    Oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 cladding of fuel pins of Indian pressurized heavy water reactors (IPHWRs) under a simulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) condition was investigated. The kinetic rate constants for the oxide and oxygen stabilized α-Zr phase growth were established from the isothermal metal-steam reaction at high temperatures (900-1200 °C) with soaking periods in the range of 60-900 s. Oxide and α-Zr(O) layer thickness were measured to derive the respective growth rates. The observed rates obeyed a parabolic law and Arrhenius expressions of rate constants were established. Percentage equivalent clad reacted (%ECR) was calculated using Baker-Just equation. Hydrogen estimation was carried out on the oxidized samples using inert gas fusion technique. The hydrogen pick up was found to be in the range 10-30 ppm. The measured values of oxide and α-Zr(O) layer thickness were compared with the results obtained using OXYCON, an indigenously developed model. The model predicts the oxide growth reasonably well but under predicts the α-Zr(O) growth significantly at thickness values higher than 80 μm.

  14. Pressure self-multiplication and the kinetics of phase transition in plastic layer experiencing plane deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguslavskii, Yu.; Achmetshackirova, Kh.; Drabkin, S.

    1998-09-01

    Based on the deformation theory of plasticity the problem of pressure distribution in a compressed layer at phase transition experiencing a plane plastic deformation is considered. It is found that in the pressure distribution near the phase boundaries anomalies emerge in the form of a “step” or a local maximum caused by volume jumps at phase transition. It is shown that these anomalies and differences in yield limits of the phases can lead to essential change of pressure in the center of the layer in comparison with its value in absence of phase transition, but under equal external load. The maximal value of external load admitting the considered solution is found. The kinetics of possible isothermal regimes of phase transition leading to change in the time-pressure distribution in the plastic layer is investigated.

  15. Kinetic aspects of the ion current layer in a reconnection outflow exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Zenitani, Seiji; Wada, Tomohide; Shinohara, Iku; Nagai, Tsugunobu

    2013-09-15

    Kinetic aspects of the ion current layer at the center of a reconnection outflow exhaust near the X-type region are investigated by a two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The layer consists of magnetized electrons and unmagnetized ions that carry a perpendicular electric current. The ion fluid appears to be nonideal, sub-Alfvénic, and nondissipative. The ion velocity distribution functions contain multiple populations, such as global Speiser ions, local Speiser ions, and trapped ions. The particle motion of the local Speiser ions in an appropriately rotated coordinate system explains the ion fluid properties very well. The trapped ions are the first demonstration of the regular orbits in the chaotic particle dynamics [Chen and Palmadesso, J. Geophys. Res. 91, 1499 (1986)] in self-consistent PIC simulations. They would be observational signatures in the ion current layer near reconnection sites.

  16. Notes on Interface Growth Kinetics 50 Years After Burton, Cabrera and Frank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    This is an overview of basic problems of crystal growth kinetics controlled by processes on the crystal interface with solution and melt. Included, also, are results on fundamental issues concerning morphological stability of crystal-solution interface that engage both interface kinetics and mass transport by diffusion and convection.

  17. Modified energetics and growth kinetics on H-terminated GaAs (110)

    SciTech Connect

    Galiana, B.; Benedicto, M.; Díez-Merino, L.; Tejedor, P.; Lorbek, S.; Hlawacek, G.; Teichert, C.

    2013-10-28

    Atomic hydrogen modification of the surface energy of GaAs (110) epilayers, grown at high temperatures from molecular beams of Ga and As{sub 4}, has been investigated by friction force microscopy (FFM). The reduction of the friction force observed with longer exposures to the H beam has been correlated with the lowering of the surface energy originated by the progressive de-relaxation of the GaAs (110) surface occurring upon H chemisorption. Our results indicate that the H-terminated GaAs (110) epilayers are more stable than the As-stabilized ones, with the minimum surface energy value of 31 meV/Å{sup 2} measured for the fully hydrogenated surface. A significant reduction of the Ga diffusion length on the H-terminated surface irrespective of H coverage has been calculated from the FFM data, consistent with the layer-by-layer growth mode and the greater As incorporation coefficient determined from real-time reflection high-energy electron diffraction studies. Arsenic incorporation through direct dissociative chemisorption of single As{sub 4} molecules mediated by H on the GaAs (110) surface has been proposed as the most likely explanation for the changes in surface kinetics observed.

  18. Island growth as a growth mode in atomic layer deposition: A phenomenological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puurunen, Riikka L.; Vandervorst, Wilfried

    2004-12-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has recently gained world-wide attention because of its suitability for the fabrication of conformal material layers with thickness in the nanometer range. Although the principles of ALD were realized about 40 years ago, the description of many physicochemical processes that occur during ALD growth is still under development. A constant amount of material deposited in an ALD reaction cycle, that is, growth-per-cycle (GPC), has been a paradigm in ALD through decades. The GPC may vary, however, especially in the beginning of the ALD growth. In this work, a division of ALD processes to four classes is proposed, on the basis of how the GPC varies with the number of ALD reaction cycles: linear growth, substrate-enhanced growth, and substrate-inhibited growth of type 1 and type 2. Island growth is identified as a likely origin for type 2 substrate-inhibited growth, where the GPC increases and goes through a maximum before it settles to a constant value characteristic of a steady growth. A simple phenomenological model is developed to describe island growth in ALD. The model assumes that the substrate is unreactive with the ALD reactants, except for reactive defects. ALD growth is assumed to proceed symmetrically from the defects, resulting islands of a conical shape. Random deposition is the growth mode on the islands. The model allows the simulation of GPC curves, surface fraction curves, and surface roughness, with physically significant parameters. When the model is applied to the zirconium tetrachloride/water and the trimethylaluminum/water ALD processes on hydrogen-terminated silicon, the calculated GPC curves and surface fractions agree with the experiments. The island growth model can be used to assess the occurrence of island growth, the size of islands formed, and point of formation of a continuous ALD-grown film. The benefits and limitations of the model and the general characteristics of type 2 substrate-inhibited ALD are

  19. Lateral epitaxial growth of two-dimensional layered semiconductor heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xidong; Wang, Chen; Shaw, Jonathan C; Cheng, Rui; Chen, Yu; Li, Honglai; Wu, Xueping; Tang, Ying; Zhang, Qinling; Pan, Anlian; Jiang, Jianhui; Yu, Ruqing; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2014-12-01

    Two-dimensional layered semiconductors such as MoS₂ and WSe₂ have attracted considerable interest in recent times. Exploring the full potential of these layered materials requires precise spatial modulation of their chemical composition and electronic properties to create well-defined heterostructures. Here, we report the growth of compositionally modulated MoS₂-MoSe₂ and WS₂-WSe₂ lateral heterostructures by in situ modulation of the vapour-phase reactants during growth of these two-dimensional crystals. Raman and photoluminescence mapping studies demonstrate that the resulting heterostructure nanosheets exhibit clear structural and optical modulation. Transmission electron microscopy and elemental mapping studies reveal a single crystalline structure with opposite modulation of sulphur and selenium distributions across the heterostructure interface. Electrical transport studies demonstrate that the WSe₂-WS₂ heterojunctions form lateral p-n diodes and photodiodes, and can be used to create complementary inverters with high voltage gain. Our study is an important advance in the development of layered semiconductor heterostructures, an essential step towards achieving functional electronics and optoelectronics.

  20. Nanostaircases: An atomic shadowing instability during epitaxial CrN(001) layer growth

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, J.R.; Gall, D.

    2005-08-01

    Epitaxial CrN(001) layers, 57 and 230 nm thick, were grown on MgO(001) at 700 deg. C by ultrahigh-vacuum magnetron sputter deposition in pure N{sub 2} discharges. An oblique deposition angle {alpha}=80 deg. was utilized to purposely increase the effect of atomic shadowing on surface morphological and microstructural evolution. The layers are single crystals with a surface morphology that is characterized by dendritic ridge patterns extending along orthogonal <110> directions superposed by square-shaped supermounds with <100> edges. The ridge patterns are due to a two-dimensional growth instability related to a gradient in the adatom density while the supermounds form due to atomic shadowing. The supermounds protrude out of the surface and capture a larger deposition flux than the surrounding layer. This leads to both vertical and lateral growth and the formation of inverted pyramids that are epitaxially embedded in a single crystalline matrix. The inverted pyramids are terminated by 1-3-nm-wide tilted voids that form nanostaircases due to kinetic faceting along orthogonal {l_brace}100{r_brace} planes.

  1. Layer-by-layer growth of Ag on Ag(111) induced by enhanced nucleation: A model study for surfactant-mediated growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, Georg; Servaty, Roland; Teichert, Christian; Poelsema, Bene; Comsa, George

    1993-08-01

    It has been reported that the growth mode of Ag on Ag(111), which is usually multilayer (3D), changes to layer-by-layer (2D) growth if Sb is used as a surfactant. In a model study on the clean system Ag/Ag(111) (without any surfactant) we find that two-dimensional layers do grow, if the substrate is prepared with an anomalously high density of Ag nuclei. As an enhanced density of nuclei is also observed in the presence of Sb, this effect may explain the mechanism for surfactant-induced layer-by-layer growth.

  2. Pulsed laser deposition of adherent hexagonal/cubic boron nitride layer systems at high growth rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weißmantel, Steffen; Reiße, Günter

    2002-09-01

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) films were prepared by ion-beam-assisted pulsed laser deposition (IAPLD) using a KrF excimer laser for ablation. The c-BN growth rates of 50 nm/min at relatively low substrate temperatures of 250 °C were achieved by using high laser energy densities of more than 30 J/cm 2 and at ion beam energies of 600-700 eV. Main advantage of IAPLD for the deposition of c-BN films is that at high laser energy densities the ratio of ions from the ion beam to ablated atoms and ions necessary for cubic film growth can be reduced to 0.14, since the ablated boron and nitrogen species themselves have high mean kinetic energies of 130-180 eV. By using pulsed laser deposited h-BN intermediate layers, 300-420 nm thick well-adherent c-BN films can be prepared on Si and WC hard metal substrates. The maximum c-BN film thickness of some 0.5 μm is limited by the accumulation of particulates, formed during the ablation process, in the films. The microstructure, stress, hardness and adhesion of such layer systems deposited at high growth rates are presented.

  3. Kinetic model for an auroral double layer that spans many gravitational scale heights

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Scott

    2014-12-15

    The electrostatic potential profile and the particle densities of a simplified auroral double layer are found using a relaxation method to solve Poisson's equation in one dimension. The electron and ion distribution functions for the ionosphere and magnetosphere are specified at the boundaries, and the particle densities are found from a collisionless kinetic model. The ion distribution function includes the gravitational potential energy; hence, the unperturbed ionospheric plasma has a density gradient. The plasma potential at the upper boundary is given a large negative value to accelerate electrons downward. The solutions for a wide range of dimensionless parameters show that the double layer forms just above a critical altitude that occurs approximately where the ionospheric density has fallen to the magnetospheric density. Below this altitude, the ionospheric ions are gravitationally confined and have the expected scale height for quasineutral plasma in gravity.

  4. The Effect of Growth Kinetics on the Development of Element- and Isotope Profiles in Single Mineral Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, E. B.; Mueller, T.

    2008-12-01

    The formation of a rock texture is the consequence of multiple interacting processes controlling the crystallization history of minerals, and is typically recorded in several ways and on different scales. Recent advances in microanalysis enable observation of compositional (elemental as well as isotopic) variations on progressively decreasing (sub-mm) scales, and theoretical approaches for simulating realistic, disequilibrium kinetic effects are becoming increasingly sophisticated. Here we present some new perspectives arising from the continuing development of our numerical approach for describing kinetically controlled element uptake and isotope fractionation during diffusion-controlled mineral growth. We assume a spherical grain growing under local equilibrium at the interface with a spherical matrix of a given size and composition. It has been shown previously that the uptake of a component in a growing crystal depends critically upon the ratio of the crystal growth rate (R) to the diffusivity (D) of that component in the growth medium. Highly compatible (or incompatible) elements potentially will be depleted (or accumulated) near the surface of the growing crystal, forming a disequilibrium compositional boundary layer against the advancing interface. Equilibration of this boundary layer with the bulk reservoir depends mainly on D of the species of interest, and because D is now known to vary with mass of an isotope of a given element, signficant isotope fractionation is predicted to occur during progressive mineral growth under some circumstances. In the present study we focus specifically on the role of crystal-growth kinetics [R=f(time)] in controlling isotope profiles recorded in crystals. We show that the amount of fractionation, and especially the shape of the resulting radial isotope profiles, is quite sensitive to the assumed growth law or history. Differences in the initial grain size - as might apply in the case of xenocrysts in magma - have a

  5. New observations and insights into the morphology and growth kinetics of hydrate films.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-Li; Sun, Chang-Yu; Liu, Bei; Li, Zhi-Yun; Chen, Guang-Jin; Sum, Amadeu K

    2014-02-19

    The kinetics of film growth of hydrates of methane, ethane, and methane-ethane mixtures were studied by exposing a single gas bubble to water. The morphologies, lateral growth rates, and thicknesses of the hydrate films were measured for various gas compositions and degrees of subcooling. A variety of hydrate film textures was revealed. The kinetics of two-dimensional film growth was inferred from the lateral growth rate and initial thickness of the hydrate film. A clear relationship between the morphology and film growth kinetics was observed. The shape of the hydrate crystals was found to favour heat or mass transfer and favour further growth of the hydrate film. The quantitative results on the kinetics of film growth showed that for a given degree of subcooling, the initial film thicknesses of the double hydrates were larger than that of pure methane or ethane hydrate, whereas the thickest hydrate film and the lowest lateral growth rate occurred when the methane mole fraction was approximately 0.6.

  6. Kinetics of the WF 6 and Si 2H 6 surface reactions during tungsten atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elam, J. W.; Nelson, C. E.; Grubbs, R. K.; George, S. M.

    2001-05-01

    The atomic layer deposition (ALD) of tungsten (W) films has been demonstrated using alternating exposures to tungsten hexafluoride (WF 6) and disilane (Si 2H 6). The present investigation explored the kinetics of the WF 6 and Si 2H 6 surface reactions during W ALD at 303-623 K using Auger electron spectroscopy techniques. The reaction of WF 6 with the Si 2H 6-saturated W surface proceeded to completion at 373-573 K. The WF 6 reaction displayed a reactive sticking coefficient of S=0.4 and required an exposure of 30 L (1 L=1×10 -6 Torr s) to achieve saturation at 573 K. The WF 6 exposures necessary to reach saturation increased with decreasing temperature. At surface temperatures <373 K, the WF 6 reaction did not consume all the silicon (Si) surface species remaining from the previous Si 2H 6 exposure. The reaction of Si 2H 6 with the WF 6-saturated W surface displayed three kinetic regimes. In the first region at low Si 2H 6 exposures⩽50 L, the Si 2H 6 reaction was independent of temperature and had a reactive sticking coefficient of S˜5×10 -2. In the second kinetic region at intermediate Si 2H 6 exposures of 50-300 L, the Si 2H 6 reaction showed an apparent saturation behavior with a Si thickness at saturation that increased with substrate temperature. At high Si 2H 6 exposures of 300-1×10 5 L, additional Si was deposited with an approximately logarithmic dependence on Si 2H 6 exposure. The Si 2H 6 reaction in this third kinetic region had an activation energy E=2.6 kcal/mol and the Si thickness deposited by a 1.6×10 5 L Si 2H 6 exposure increased with temperature from 3.0 Å at 303 K to 6.6 Å at 623 K. These kinetic results should help to explain W ALD growth rates observed at different reactant exposures and substrate temperatures.

  7. Kinetics of drug release from ointments: Role of transient-boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoming; Al-Ghabeish, Manar; Krishnaiah, Yellela S R; Rahman, Ziyaur; Khan, Mansoor A

    2015-10-15

    In the current work, an in vitro release testing method suitable for ointment formulations was developed using acyclovir as a model drug. Release studies were carried out using enhancer cells on acyclovir ointments prepared with oleaginous, absorption, and water-soluble bases. Kinetics and mechanism of drug release was found to be highly dependent on the type of ointment bases. In oleaginous bases, drug release followed a unique logarithmic-time dependent profile; in both absorption and water-soluble bases, drug release exhibited linearity with respect to square root of time (Higuchi model) albeit differences in the overall release profile. To help understand the underlying cause of logarithmic-time dependency of drug release, a novel transient-boundary hypothesis was proposed, verified, and compared to Higuchi theory. Furthermore, impact of drug solubility (under various pH conditions) and temperature on drug release were assessed. Additionally, conditions under which deviations from logarithmic-time drug release kinetics occur were determined using in situ UV fiber-optics. Overall, the results suggest that for oleaginous ointments containing dispersed drug particles, kinetics and mechanism of drug release is controlled by expansion of transient boundary layer, and drug release increases linearly with respect to logarithmic time.

  8. Time-Lapse Imaging to Examine the Growth Kinetics of Arabidopsis Seedlings in Response to Ethylene.

    PubMed

    Binder, Brad M

    2017-01-01

    Ethylene is well known to inhibit the growth of dark-grown eudicot seedlings. Most studies examine this inhibition after several days of exposure to ethylene. However, such end-point analysis misses transient responses and the dynamic nature of growth regulation. Here, high-resolution, time-lapse imaging is described as a method to gather data about ethylene growth kinetics and movement responses of the hypocotyls of dark-grown seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana. These methods allow for the characterization of short-term kinetic responses and can be modified for the analysis of roots and seedlings from other species.

  9. Two types of quasi-liquid layers on ice crystals are formed kinetically.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Harutoshi; Sazaki, Gen; Nagashima, Ken; Nakatsubo, Shunichi; Furukawa, Yoshinori

    2016-02-16

    Surfaces of ice are covered with thin liquid water layers, called quasi-liquid layers (QLLs), even below their melting point (0 °C), which govern a wide variety of phenomena in nature. We recently found that two types of QLL phases appear that exhibit different morphologies (droplets and thin layers) [Sazaki G. et al. (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109(4):1052-1055]. However, revealing the thermodynamic stabilities of QLLs remains a longstanding elusive problem. Here we show that both types of QLLs are metastable phases that appear only if the water vapor pressure is higher than a certain critical supersaturation. We directly visualized the QLLs on ice crystal surfaces by advanced optical microscopy, which can detect 0.37-nm-thick elementary steps on ice crystal surfaces. At a certain fixed temperature, as the water vapor pressure decreased, thin-layer QLLs first disappeared, and then droplet QLLs vanished next, although elementary steps of ice crystals were still growing. These results clearly demonstrate that both types of QLLs are kinetically formed, not by the melting of ice surfaces, but by the deposition of supersaturated water vapor on ice surfaces. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence that supersaturation of water vapor plays a crucially important role in the formation of QLLs.

  10. Two types of quasi-liquid layers on ice crystals are formed kinetically

    PubMed Central

    Asakawa, Harutoshi; Sazaki, Gen; Nagashima, Ken; Nakatsubo, Shunichi; Furukawa, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Surfaces of ice are covered with thin liquid water layers, called quasi-liquid layers (QLLs), even below their melting point (0 °C), which govern a wide variety of phenomena in nature. We recently found that two types of QLL phases appear that exhibit different morphologies (droplets and thin layers) [Sazaki G. et al. (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109(4):1052−1055]. However, revealing the thermodynamic stabilities of QLLs remains a longstanding elusive problem. Here we show that both types of QLLs are metastable phases that appear only if the water vapor pressure is higher than a certain critical supersaturation. We directly visualized the QLLs on ice crystal surfaces by advanced optical microscopy, which can detect 0.37-nm-thick elementary steps on ice crystal surfaces. At a certain fixed temperature, as the water vapor pressure decreased, thin-layer QLLs first disappeared, and then droplet QLLs vanished next, although elementary steps of ice crystals were still growing. These results clearly demonstrate that both types of QLLs are kinetically formed, not by the melting of ice surfaces, but by the deposition of supersaturated water vapor on ice surfaces. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence that supersaturation of water vapor plays a crucially important role in the formation of QLLs. PMID:26831089

  11. Desorption isotherms and mathematical modeling of thin layer drying kinetics of tomato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belghith, Amira; Azzouz, Soufien; ElCafsi, Afif

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there is an increased demand on the international market of dried fruits and vegetables with significant added value. Due to its important production, consumption and nutrient intake, drying of tomato has become a subject of extended and varied research works. The present work is focused on the drying behavior of thin-layer tomato and its mathematical modeling in order to optimize the drying processes. The moisture desorption isotherms of raw tomato were determined at four temperature levels namely 45, 50, 60 and 65 °C using the static gravimetric method. The experimental data obtained were modeled by five equations and the (GAB) model was found to be the best-describing these isotherms. The drying kinetics were experimentally investigated at 45, 55 and 65 °C and performed at air velocities of 0.5 and 2 m/s. In order to investigate the effect of the exchange surface on drying time, samples were dried into two different shapes: tomato halves and tomato quarters. The impact of various drying parameters was also studied (temperature, air velocity and air humidity). The drying curves showed only the preheating period and the falling drying rate period. In this study, attention was paid to the modeling of experimental thin-layer drying kinetics. The experimental results were fitted with four different models.

  12. Modeling of scale-dependent bacterial growth by chemical kinetics approach.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Haydee; Sánchez, Joaquín; Cruz, José-Manuel; Ayala, Guadalupe; Rivera, Marco; Buhse, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We applied the so-called chemical kinetics approach to complex bacterial growth patterns that were dependent on the liquid-surface-area-to-volume ratio (SA/V) of the bacterial cultures. The kinetic modeling was based on current experimental knowledge in terms of autocatalytic bacterial growth, its inhibition by the metabolite CO2, and the relief of inhibition through the physical escape of the inhibitor. The model quantitatively reproduces kinetic data of SA/V-dependent bacterial growth and can discriminate between differences in the growth dynamics of enteropathogenic E. coli, E. coli JM83, and Salmonella typhimurium on one hand and Vibrio cholerae on the other hand. Furthermore, the data fitting procedures allowed predictions about the velocities of the involved key processes and the potential behavior in an open-flow bacterial chemostat, revealing an oscillatory approach to the stationary states.

  13. Comprehensive kinetic analysis of the plasma-wall transition layer in a strongly tilted magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Tskhakaya, D. D.; Kos, L.

    2014-10-15

    The magnetized plasma-wall transition (MPWT) layer at the presence of the obliquity of the magnetic field to the wall consists of three sub-layers: the Debye sheath (DS), the magnetic pre-sheath (MPS), and the collisional pre-sheath (CPS) with characteristic lengths λ{sub D} (electron Debye length), ρ{sub i} (ion gyro-radius), and ℓ (the smallest relevant collision length), respectively. Tokamak plasmas are usually assumed to have the ordering λ{sub D}≪ρ{sub i}≪ℓ, when the above-mentioned sub-layers can be distinctly distinguished. In the limits of ε{sub Dm}(λ{sub D}/ρ{sub i})→0 and ε{sub mc}(ρ{sub i}/ℓ)→0 (“asymptotic three-scale (A3S) limits”), these sub-layers are precisely defined. Using the smallness of the tilting angle of the magnetic field to the wall, the ion distribution functions are found for three sub-regions in the analytic form. The equations and characteristic length-scales governing the transition (intermediate) regions between the neighboring sub-layers (CPS – MPS and MPS – DS) are derived, allowing to avoid the singularities arising from the ε{sub Dm}→0 and ε{sub mc}→0 approximations. The MPS entrance and the related kinetic form of the Bohm–Chodura condition are successfully defined for the first time. At the DS entrance, the Bohm condition maintains its usual form. The results encourage further study and understanding of physics of the MPWT layers in the modern plasma facilities.

  14. Mathematical Physics of the Propagation of a Laminar Aerodynamic Boundary Layer, Using the Kinetic Theory of Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deGraffenried, Albert L.

    2002-07-01

    The paper presents a derivation showing the propagation mechanisms fundamental to the growth of the laminar aerodynamic boundary layer. The molecular mechanisms basic to such growth are those presented by James Clerk Maxwell in his classic derivation of mu, the viscosity of a gas, based on the Kinetic Theory of Gases. Maxwell's derivation is modified by moving the scene of the analysis from a free-stream location (where he assumes a linear velocity gradient) to a location immediately adjacent an infinite flat plate, using an unknown velocity profile. Gas, initially quiescent above the flat plate, suddenly jumps to velocity U0 at time t=0+. The resultant growth of a boundary-layer velocity profile, vx)(y,t, is solved for in the following manner: a. Phi-up, the stream momentum crossing an element of area, da=dxdz per second per square centimeter, in an upward (+y) direction, is found by integrating through all volume below da, using an unknown velocity profile, vx)(y,t. Similarly, Phi-down, the stream momentum crossing da in a downward (-y) direction is found by integrating through all volume above da. The net stream momentum, Phy(y) equals Phi-up minus Phi-down. The acceleration, dvx/dt of an element of mass dm, equal to rho times dxdydz is set equal to minus the partial of Phi with respect to y, the net momentum-flux gradient, based on Newton's Law. In cylindrical coordinates, azimuth angle gamma is promptly integrated out. Elevation angle theta is integrated-out numerically, using a short BASIC program on a PC. Separation of Variables is assumed, specifically, vx)(y,t may be set equal to f1(y)f2(t), thus producing two separate integro-differential equations which are each set equal to a common constant, -Beta2. LaPlace transforming these two equations into the sy and st domains, applying the Method of Partial Fractions to the sy equation, the FORM of the solution is found, viz., exponential and hyperbolic functions. Boundary conditions are satisfied in order to

  15. Determining the Kinetic Parameters Characteristic of Microalgal Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez Sancho, Maria Eugenie; And Others

    1991-01-01

    An activity in which students obtain a growth curve for algae, identify the exponential and linear growth phases, and calculate the parameters which characterize both phases is described. The procedure, a list of required materials, experimental conditions, analytical technique, and a discussion of the interpretations of individual results are…

  16. Nanowire growth kinetics in aberration corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Yi -Chia; Panciera, Federico; Reuter, Mark C.; Stach, Eric A.; Ross, Frances M.

    2016-03-15

    Here, we visualize atomic level dynamics during Si nanowire growth using aberration corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy, and compare with lower pressure results from ultra-high vacuum microscopy. We discuss the importance of higher pressure observations for understanding growth mechanisms and describe protocols to minimize effects of the higher pressure background gas.

  17. An Estimation of Turbulent Kinetic Energy and Energy Dissipation Rate Based on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Similarity Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jongil; Arya, S. Pal; Shaohua, Shen; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Proctor, Fred H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Algorithms are developed to extract atmospheric boundary layer profiles for turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and energy dissipation rate (EDR), with data from a meteorological tower as input. The profiles are based on similarity theory and scalings for the atmospheric boundary layer. The calculated profiles of EDR and TKE are required to match the observed values at 5 and 40 m. The algorithms are coded for operational use and yield plausible profiles over the diurnal variation of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  18. Effect of Cross-Interaction between Ni and Cu on Growth Kinetics of Intermetallic Compounds in Ni/Sn/Cu Diffusion Couples during Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, K. K.; Ryu, J. B.; Park, C. Y.; Huh, J. Y.

    2008-01-01

    The solid-state, cross-interaction between the Ni layer on the component side and the Cu pad on the printed circuit board (PCB) side in ball grid array (BGA) solder joints was investigated by employing Ni(15 μm)/Sn(65 μm)/Cu ternary diffusion couples. The ternary diffusion couples were prepared by sequentially electroplating Sn and Ni on a Cu foil and were aged isothermally at 150, 180, and 200°C. The growth of the intermetallic compound (IMC) layer on the Ni side was coupled with that on the Cu side by the mass flux across the Sn layer that was caused by the difference in the Ni content between the (Cu1- x Ni x )6Sn5 layer on the Ni side and the (Cu1- y Ni y )6Sn5 layer on the Cu side. As the consequence of the coupling, the growth rate of the (Cu1- x Ni x )6 Sn5 layer on the Ni side was rapidly accelerated by decreasing Sn layer thickness and increasing aging temperature. Owing to the cross-interaction with the top Ni layer, the growth rate of the (Cu1- y Ni y )6Sn5 layer on the Cu side was accelerated at 150°C and 180°C but was retarded at 200°C, while the growth rate of the Cu3Sn layer was always retarded. The growth kinetic model proposed in an attempt to interpret the experimental results was able to reproduce qualitatively all of the important experimental observations pertaining to the growth of the IMC layers in the Ni/Sn/Cu diffusion couple.

  19. Monoculture parameters successfully predict coculture growth kinetics of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and two Bifidobacterium strains.

    PubMed

    Van Wey, A S; Cookson, A L; Roy, N C; McNabb, W C; Soboleva, T K; Shorten, P R

    2014-11-17

    Microorganisms rarely live in isolation but are most often found in a consortium. This provides the potential for cross-feeding and nutrient competition among the microbial species, which make it challenging to predict the growth kinetics in coculture. In this paper we developed a mathematical model to describe substrate consumption and subsequent microbial growth and metabolite production for bacteria grown in monoculture. The model characterized substrate utilization kinetics of 18 Bifidobacterium strains. Some bifidobacterial strains demonstrated preferential degradation of oligofructose in that sugars with low degree of polymerization (DP) (DP≤3 or 4) were metabolized before sugars of higher DP, or vice versa. Thus, we expanded the model to describe the preferential degradation of oligofructose. In addition, we adapted the model to describe the competition between human colonic bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262 and Bifidobacterium longum LMG 11047 or Bifidobacterium breve Yakult for inulin as well as cross-feeding of breakdown products from the extracellular hydrolysis of inulin by B. thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262. We found that the coculture growth kinetics could be predicted based on the respective monoculture growth kinetics. Using growth kinetics from monoculture experiments to predict coculture dynamics will reduce the number of in vitro experiments required to parameterize multi-culture models.

  20. Kinetics of monolayer graphene growth by segregation on Pd(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, H. S.; Murata, Y.; Kodambaka, S.; Ebnonnasir, A.; Ciobanu, C. V.; Nie, S.; McCarty, K. F.

    2014-03-10

    Using in situ low-energy electron microscopy and density functional theory calculations, we follow the growth of monolayer graphene on Pd(111) via surface segregation of bulk-dissolved carbon. Upon lowering the substrate temperature, nucleation of graphene begins on graphene-free Pd surface and continues to occur during graphene growth. Measurements of graphene growth rates and Pd surface work functions establish that this continued nucleation is due to increasing C adatom concentration on the Pd surface with time. We attribute this anomalous phenomenon to a large barrier for attachment of C adatoms to graphene coupled with a strong binding of the non-graphitic C to the Pd surface.

  1. Caprine Endometrial Mesenchymal Stromal Stem Cell: Multilineage Potential, Characterization, and Growth Kinetics in Breeding and Anestrous Stages

    PubMed Central

    Zarezadeh, Younes; Dianatpour, Mehdi; Zare, Shahrokh

    2017-01-01

    The endometrial layer of the uterus contains a population of cells with similar characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In the present study, caprine endometrial mesenchymal stromal stem cells (En-MSCs) characters and differentiation potential to chondrogenic, osteogenic, and adipogenic cell lines as well as their growth kinetics in breeding and anestrous stages were evaluated. En-MSCs were enzymatically isolated from endometrial layer of the uterus of adult goats and were cultured and subcultured until passage 4. The growth kinetics and population doubling time (PDT) of caprine En-MSCs in breeding and anestrous stages were determined. En-MSCs in passage 4 were used for the karyotyping and differentiation into chondrocytes, osteocytes, and adipocytes. The PDT in anestrus phase was 40.6 h and in cyclic goats was 53 h. En-MSCs were fibroblast-like in all passages. The number of chromosomes was normal (2n = 60) with no chromosomal instability. Chondrogenic, osteogenic, and adipogenic differentiation of En-MSCs was confirmed by staining with Alcian blue, Alizarin red, and Oil Red O, respectively. Caprine En-MSCs demonstrated to be an alternative source of MSCs for cell therapy purposes in regenerative medicine. PMID:28357151

  2. Flowtube experiments on diamond formation: separating the growth and nucleation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, L. R.; Hill, Michael W.

    1990-12-01

    We have done a series of experiments on diamond microcrystal formation in flowtubes. The system is designed to separate the discharge used to create atomic hydrogen from the organic molecules used as a carbon source. This creates a simplified chemical environment in which the species concentrations are kinetically rather than thermodynamically controlled. The flowtube enables us to examine kinetics of diamond formation under a variety of conditions and gives us some information about the rate of nucleation independently of the growth rate. 1.

  3. Investigating Zigzag Film Growth Behaviors in Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembly of Small Molecules through a High-Gravity Technique.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mengjiao; Jiang, Chao; Luo, Caijun; Zhang, Yajun; Shi, Feng

    2015-08-26

    The zigzag film growth behavior in the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly method is a ubiquitous phenomenon for which the growth mechanism was rarely investigated, especially for small molecules. To interpret the zigzag increasing manner, we hypothesized that the desorption kinetics of small molecules was dominant for the film growth behavior and demonstrated this hypotheis by introducing the high-gravity technique into the LbL assembly of a typical polyelectrolyte/small molecule system of polyethylenimine (PEI) and meso-tetra(4-carboxyphenyl)porphine (Por). The results showed that the high-gravity technique remarkably accelerated the desorption process of Por; the high-gravity LbL assembly provides a good platform to reveal the desorption kinetics of Por, which is tedious to study in conventional situation. We found that as much as 50 min is required for Por molecules to reach desorption equilibrium from the substrate to the bulk PEI solution for the conventional dipping method; however, the process could be accelerated and require only 100 s if a high-gravity field is used. Nonequilibrated desorption at 10 min for normal dipping and at 30 s for high-gravity-field-assisted assembly both exhibited a zigzag film growth, but after reaching desorption equilibrium at 100 s under a high-gravity field, film growth began to cycle between assembly and complete disassembly instead of LbL assembly. For the first time we have proven that the high-gravity technique can also accelerate the desorption process and demonstrated the desorption-dependent mechanism of small molecules for zigzag film growth behaviors.

  4. Post-deposition growth kinetics of Ge on Ge(0 0 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinkham, B. P.; Jenichen, B.; Kaganer, V. M.; Shayduk, R.; Braun, W.; Ploog, K. H.

    2008-07-01

    We study the nucleation and growth kinetics on the Ge(0 0 1) surface at elevated temperatures using in situ surface X-ray diffraction. The time evolution of characteristic length scales on the surface is analyzed through the widths of the different components of the integer-order (morphology sensitive) and fractional-order (reconstruction sensitive) diffraction peaks. We find an activation energy of 0.58 eV for Ge island nucleation during homoepitaxy, which implies a diffusion activation energy higher than that obtained for both adatom and dimer diffusion on Ge(0 0 1) in previous studies. Sub-monolayer homoepitaxial Ge islands coarsen according to a power law, with a relatively low time exponent of n=0.2. The coarsening of small 2×1 reconstruction domains on a flat surface prepared by deposition of an integer number of layers shows a strong temperature dependence, whereby the coarsening exponent decreases from 0.41 to 0.2 as the temperature is increased.

  5. Epitaxial growth of tungsten layers on MgO(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Pengyuan; Ozsdolay, Brian D.; Gall, Daniel

    2015-11-15

    Smooth single crystal W(001) layers were grown on MgO(001) substrates by magnetron sputtering at 900 °C. X-ray diffraction ω–2θ scans, ω-rocking curves, pole figures, and reciprocal space maps indicate a 45°-rotated epitaxial relationship: (001){sub W}‖(001){sub MgO} and [010]{sub W}‖[110]{sub MgO}, and a relaxed lattice constant of 3.167 ± 0.001 nm. A residual in-plane biaxial compressive strain is primarily attributed to differential thermal contraction after growth and decreases from −0.012 ± 0.001 to −0.001 ± 0.001 with increasing layer thickness d = 4.8–390 nm, suggesting relaxation during cooling by misfit dislocation growth through threading dislocation glide. The in-plane x-ray coherence length increases from 3.4 to 33.6 nm for d = 4.8–390 nm, while the out-of-plane x-ray coherence length is identical to the layer thickness for d ≤ 20 nm, but is smaller than d for d ≥ 49.7 nm, indicating local strain variations along the film growth direction. X-ray reflectivity analyses indicate that the root-mean-square surface roughness increases from 0.50 ± 0.05 to 0.95 ± 0.05 nm for d = 4.8–19.9 nm, suggesting a roughness exponent of 0.38, but remains relatively constant for d > 20 nm with a roughness of 1.00 ± 0.05 nm at d = 47.9 nm.

  6. Nanoporous anodic titanium dioxide layers as potential drug delivery systems: Drug release kinetics and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jarosz, Magdalena; Pawlik, Anna; Szuwarzyński, Michał; Jaskuła, Marian; Sulka, Grzegorz D

    2016-07-01

    Nanoporous anodic titanium dioxide (ATO) layers on Ti foil were prepared via a three step anodization process in an electrolyte based on an ethylene glycol solution with fluoride ions. Some of the ATO samples were heat-treated in order to achieve two different crystallographic structures - anatase (400°C) and a mixture of anatase and rutile (600°C). The structural and morphological characterizations of ATO layers were performed using a field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM). The hydrophilicity of ATO layers was determined with contact angle measurements using distilled water. Ibuprofen and gentamicin were loaded effectively inside the ATO nanopores. Afterwards, an in vitro drug release was conducted for 24h under a static and dynamic flow conditions in a phosphate buffer solution at 37°C. The drug concentrations were determined using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The absorbance of ibuprofen was measured directly at 222nm, whether gentamicin was determined as a complex with silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) at 394nm. Both compounds exhibited long term release profiles, despite the ATO structure. A new release model, based on the desorption of the drug from the ATO top surface followed by the desorption and diffusion of the drug from the nanopores, was derived. The proposed release model was fitted to the experimental drug release profiles, and kinetic parameters were calculated.

  7. Scrape-off layer modeling with kinetic or diffusion description of charge-exchange atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokar, M. Z.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen isotope atoms, generated by charge-exchange (c-x) of neutral particles recycling from the first wall of a fusion reactor, are described either kinetically or in a diffusion approximation. In a one-dimensional (1-D) geometry, kinetic calculations are accelerated enormously by applying an approximate pass method for the assessment of integrals in the velocity space. This permits to perform an exhaustive comparison of calculations done with both approaches. The diffusion approximation is deduced directly from the velocity distribution function of c-x atoms in the limit of charge-exchanges with ions occurring much more frequently than ionization by electrons. The profiles across the flux surfaces of the plasma parameters averaged along the main part of the scrape-off layer (SOL), beyond the X-point and divertor regions, are calculated from the one-dimensional equations where parallel flows of charged particles and energy towards the divertor are taken into account as additional loss terms. It is demonstrated that the heat losses can be firmly estimated from the SOL averaged parameters only; for the particle loss the conditions in the divertor are of importance and the sensitivity of the results to the so-called "divertor impact factor" is investigated. The coupled 1-D models for neutral and charged species, with c-x atoms described either kinetically or in the diffusion approximation, are applied to assess the SOL conditions in a fusion reactor, with the input parameters from the European DEMO project. It is shown that the diffusion approximation provides practically the same profiles across the flux surfaces for the plasma density, electron, and ion temperatures, as those obtained with the kinetic description for c-x atoms. The main difference between the two approaches is observed in the characteristics of these species themselves. In particular, their energy flux onto the wall is underestimated in calculations with the diffusion approximation by 20 % - 30

  8. Enhancing surface coverage and growth in layer-by-layer assembly of protein nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mohanta, Vaishakhi; Patil, Satish

    2013-10-29

    Thin films of bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanoparticles are fabricated via layer-by-layer assembly. The surface of BSA nanoparticles have two oppositely acting functional groups on the surface: amine (NH2) and carboxylate (COO(-)). The protonation and deprotonation of these functional groups at different pH vary the charge density on the particle surface, and entirely different growth can be observed by varying the nature of the complementary polymer and the pH of the particles. The complementary polymers used in this study are poly(dimethyldiallylammonium chloride) (PDDAC) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA). The assembly of BSA nanoparticles based on electrostatic interaction with PDDAC suffers from the poor loading of the nanoparticles. The assembly with PAA aided by a hydrogen bonding interaction shows tremendous improvement in the growth of the assembly over PDDAC. Moreover, the pH of the BSA nanoparticles was observed to affect the loading of nanoparticles in the LbL assembly with PAA significantly.

  9. Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction for Microbial Growth Kinetics of Mixed Culture System.

    PubMed

    Cotto, Ada; Looper, Jessica K; Mota, Linda C; Son, Ahjeong

    2015-11-01

    Microbial growth kinetics is often used to optimize environmental processes owing to its relation to the breakdown of substrate (contaminants). However, the quantification of bacterial populations in the environment is difficult owing to the challenges of monitoring a specific bacterial population within a diverse microbial community. Conventional methods are unable to detect and quantify the growth of individual strains separately in the mixed culture reactor. This work describes a novel quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based genomic approach to quantify each species in mixed culture and interpret its growth kinetics in the mixed system. Batch experiments were performed for both single and dual cultures of Pseudomonas putida and Escherichia coli K12 to obtain Monod kinetic parameters (μmax and Ks). The growth curves and kinetics obtained by conventional methods (i.e., dry weight measurement and absorbance reading) were compared with that obtained by qPCR assay. We anticipate that the adoption of this qPCR-based genomic assay can contribute significantly to traditional microbial kinetics, modeling practice, and the operation of bioreactors, where handling of complex mixed cultures is required.

  10. Crystal nucleation and cluster-growth kinetics in a model glass under shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokshin, Anatolii V.; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2010-08-01

    Crystal nucleation and growth processes induced by an externally applied shear strain in a model metallic glass are studied by means of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, in a range of temperatures. We observe that the nucleation-growth process takes place after a transient, induction regime. The critical cluster size and the lag-time associated with this induction period are determined from a mean first-passage time analysis. The laws that describe the cluster-growth process are studied as a function of temperature and strain rate. A theoretical model for crystallization kinetics that includes the time dependence for nucleation and cluster growth is developed within the framework of the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami scenario and is compared with the molecular dynamics data. Scalings for the cluster-growth laws and for the crystallization kinetics are also proposed and tested. The observed nucleation rates are found to display a nonmonotonic strain rate dependency.

  11. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of Epitaxial Thin Film Growth: Formation of Submonolayer Islands and Multilayer Mounds

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J. W.; Thiel, P. A.; Li, Maozhi

    2007-06-14

    We consider homoepitaxy (or low-misfit heteroepitaxy) via vapor deposition or MBE under UHV conditions. Thin film growth is initiated by nucleation and growth of 2D islands in the submonolayer regime. For atoms subsequently deposited on top of islands, a step edge barrier often inhibits downward transport and produces kinetic roughening during multilayer growth. Such unstable growth is characterized by the formation of 3D mounds (multilayer stacks of 2D islands). Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation of suitable atomistic lattice-gas models can address fundamental or general issues related to both submonolayer and multilayer film evolution, and can also provide a predictive tool for morphological evolution in specific systems. Examples of the successes of KMC modeling are provided for metal homoepitaxial film growth, specifically for contrasting behavior in the classic Ag/Ag(100) and Ag/Ag(111) systems.

  12. Reactive Dependent Growth Kinetics and Morphology of A-B Ternary Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wen-Qiang; Wang, Kai-Ming; Zhu, Yue-Jin

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we present Monte Carlo simulations of A-B-diblock-copolymer ternary mixtures simultaneously undergoing phase separation and reversible chemical reaction A + B ⇌ C. The results demonstrate that the competition of chemical reaction and thermal diffusion dynamics co-determine the self-assembling morphology and growth kinetics of the reactive ternary mixtures. The role of the chemical reaction on the growth kinetics count mainly on the copolymer-polymer interaction strength Jp. If Jp < 1.0, the introduction of chemical reaction speeds up the domain growth; while for Jp > 1.0, the chemical reaction slows down the domain growth. The domain growth exponent decreases linearly with increasing of the copolymer-polymer interaction strength. At a later stage, <1, 0> and <0, 1> oriented strip pattern formations are observed when Jp is strong.

  13. Relationship between kinetics of growth and production of exo-electrons: Case study with Geobacter toluenoxydans.

    PubMed

    Szöllősi, Attila; Narr, László; Kovács, Attila G; Styevkó, Gabriella

    2015-09-01

    Kinetics of growth and product formation of G. toluenoxydans DSMZ 19350 strain were investigated using sodium-acetate as substrate and Fe(3+)-ions and fumarate as electron acceptor. Response surface method was adapted for evaluation of growth of bacteria. Results showed that maximum growth was detected in the case of 2.2 g/L substrate concentration. Application of higher substrate concentration (>2.5 g/L sodium acetate) significantly inhibits the bacterial growth. Luong's model was found to be the most suitable to determine kinetic parameters (μ(max) = 0.033 1/h, KS = 0.205 g/L) of growth of G.toluenoxydans strain, and the growth was completely inhibited at substrate concentration higher than 3.1 g/L. In the case of product formation the Haldane model was used and kinetic parameters are μ(Pmax) = 0.123 mg/h, K(PS)= 0.184 g/L. Correlation between microbial growth and product formation was observed using the Luedeking-Piret empirical method. Both factors (growth and number of cells) affected significantly iron(III)-reduction, thus the product formation. These results are important and open the possibility to design a continuous MFC setting operating with G. toluenoxydans as biocatalyst.

  14. Crystallization of pumpkin seed globulin: growth and dissolution kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkin, Alexander J.; McPherson, Alexander

    1993-10-01

    Quasi-elastic light scattering was used to investigate the nucleation and crystallization of pumpkin ( Cucurbita) seed globulin. The diameter of the pumpkin globulin monomer was measured to be ≈ 5-6 nm. The supersaturation dependence of critical nucleus size was obtained, and this allowed an estimate of the interfacial free energy to be α ≈ 6.1 x 10 -2 erg/cm 2. The crystallization and dissolution kinetics were investigated for 4.9-16 mg/ml protein solutions containing 1-7% NaCl. The solubility data as a function of precipitant concentration and temperature were obtained and these will be utilized for optimization of the crystallization conditions for the pumpkin globulin.

  15. Growth of Zircone on Nanoporous Alumina Using Molecular Layer Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Robert A.; George, Steven M.; Kim, Yeongae; Hwang, Woonbong; Samberg, Meghan E.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.; Narayan, Roger J.

    2014-04-01

    Molecular layer deposition (MLD) is a sequential and self-limiting process that may be used to create hybrid organic/inorganic thin films from organometallic precursors and organic alcohol precursors. In this study, films of a zirconium-containing hybrid organic/inorganic polymer known as zircone were grown on nanoporous alumina using MLD. Scanning electron microscopy data showed obliteration of the pores in zircone-coated nanoporous alumina. An in vitro cell viability study indicated that the growth of human epidermal keratinocytes was the greatest on zircone-coated nanoporous alumina than on uncoated nanoporous alumina. Our results suggest that MLD may be used to create biocompatible coatings for use in many types of medical devices.

  16. Dependence of morphometric allometries on the growth kinetics of body parts.

    PubMed

    Nijhout, H Frederik

    2011-11-07

    As overall size varies, the sizes of body parts of many animals often appear to be related to each other by a power law, commonly called the allometric equation. Orderly scaling relationships among body parts are widespread in the animal world, but there is no general agreement about how these relationships come about. Presumably they depend on the patterns of growth of body parts, and simple analyses have shown that exponential growth can lead to size relationships that are well-described by the allometric equation. Exponential growth kinetics also allow for a simple biological interpretation of the coefficients of the power relationship. Nevertheless, many tissues do not grow with exponential kinetics, nor do they grow for the same period of time, and the consequences of more realistic growth patterns on the resulting allometric relationships of body parts are not well understood. In this paper I derive a set of allometric equations that assume different kinetics of growth: linear, exponential and sigmoidal. In these derivations I also include differences in development times as a variable, in addition to differences in the growth rates and initial sizes of the two structures whose allometric relationship is compared. I show how these equations can be used to deduce the effect of different causes of variation in absolute size on the resulting allometry. Variation in size can be due to variation in the duration of development, variation in growth rate or variation in initial size. I show that the meaning of the coefficients of the allometric equation depends on exactly how size variation comes about. I show that if two structures are assumed to grow with sigmoidal kinetics (logistic and Gompertz) the resulting allometric equations do not have a simple and intuitive structure and produce graphs that, over a sufficiently large range of sizes, can vary from linear, to sigmoidal to hump-shaped. Over a smaller range of absolute sizes, these sigmoid growth kinetics can

  17. Atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo study of atomic layer deposition derived from density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Mahdi; Elliott, Simon D

    2014-01-30

    To describe the atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactions of HfO2 from Hf(N(CH3)2)4 and H2O, a three-dimensional on-lattice kinetic Monte-Carlo model is developed. In this model, all atomistic reaction pathways in density functional theory (DFT) are implemented as reaction events on the lattice. This contains all steps, from the early stage of adsorption of each ALD precursor, kinetics of the surface protons, interaction between the remaining precursors (steric effect), influence of remaining fragments on adsorption sites (blocking), densification of each ALD precursor, migration of each ALD precursors, and cooperation between the remaining precursors to adsorb H2O (cooperative effect). The essential chemistry of the ALD reactions depends on the local environment at the surface. The coordination number and a neighbor list are used to implement the dependencies. The validity and necessity of the proposed reaction pathways are statistically established at the mesoscale. The formation of one monolayer of precursor fragments is shown at the end of the metal pulse. Adsorption and dissociation of the H2O precursor onto that layer is described, leading to the delivery of oxygen and protons to the surface during the H2O pulse. Through these processes, the remaining precursor fragments desorb from the surface, leaving the surface with bulk-like and OH-terminated HfO2, ready for the next cycle. The migration of the low coordinated remaining precursor fragments is also proposed. This process introduces a slow reordering motion (crawling) at the mesoscale, leading to the smooth and conformal thin film that is characteristic of ALD.

  18. Reduced-Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of Isolated Ge Crystals and Suspended Layers on Micrometric Si Pillars.

    PubMed

    Skibitzki, Oliver; Capellini, Giovanni; Yamamoto, Yuji; Zaumseil, Peter; Schubert, Markus Andreas; Schroeder, Thomas; Ballabio, Andrea; Bergamaschini, Roberto; Salvalaglio, Marco; Miglio, Leo; Montalenti, Francesco

    2016-10-05

    In this work, we demonstrate the growth of Ge crystals and suspended continuous layers on Si(001) substrates deeply patterned in high aspect-ratio pillars. The material deposition was carried out in a commercial reduced-pressure chemical vapor deposition reactor, thus extending the "vertical-heteroepitaxy" technique developed by using the peculiar low-energy plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactor, to widely available epitaxial tools. The growth process was thoroughly analyzed, from the formation of small initial seeds to the final coalescence into a continuous suspended layer, by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and μ-Raman spectroscopy. The preoxidation of the Si pillar sidewalls and the addition of hydrochloric gas in the reactants proved to be key to achieve highly selective Ge growth on the pillars top only, which, in turn, is needed to promote the formation of a continuous Ge layer. Thanks to continuum growth models, we were able to single out the different roles played by thermodynamics and kinetics in the deposition dynamics. We believe that our findings will open the way to the low-cost realization of tens of micrometers thick heteroepitaxial layer (e.g., Ge, SiC, and GaAs) on Si having high crystal quality.

  19. Modified Gompertz equation for electrotherapy murine tumor growth kinetics: predictions and new hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Electrotherapy effectiveness at different doses has been demonstrated in preclinical and clinical studies; however, several aspects that occur in the tumor growth kinetics before and after treatment have not yet been revealed. Mathematical modeling is a useful instrument that can reveal some of these aspects. The aim of this paper is to describe the complete growth kinetics of unperturbed and perturbed tumors through use of the modified Gompertz equation in order to generate useful insight into the mechanisms that underpin this devastating disease. Methods The complete tumor growth kinetics for control and treated groups are obtained by interpolation and extrapolation methods with different time steps, using experimental data of fibrosarcoma Sa-37. In the modified Gompertz equation, a delay time is introduced to describe the tumor's natural history before treatment. Different graphical strategies are used in order to reveal new information in the complete kinetics of this tumor type. Results The first stage of complete tumor growth kinetics is highly non linear. The model, at this stage, shows different aspects that agree with those reported theoretically and experimentally. Tumor reversibility and the proportionality between regions before and after electrotherapy are demonstrated. In tumors that reach partial remission, two antagonistic post-treatment processes are induced, whereas in complete remission, two unknown antitumor mechanisms are induced. Conclusion The modified Gompertz equation is likely to lead to insights within cancer research. Such insights hold promise for increasing our understanding of tumors as self-organizing systems and, the possible existence of phase transitions in tumor growth kinetics, which, in turn, may have significant impacts both on cancer research and on clinical practice. PMID:21029411

  20. Phosphate-limited continuous culture of Rhodotorula rubra: kinetics of transport, leakage, and growth.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, B R; Button, D K

    1979-01-01

    The phosphate-limited growth kinetics of Rhodotorula rubra, a small yeast of marine origin, were examined by analysis of 32P distributions in continuous cultures. Isotope relaxation procedures were used to identify unidirectional flows of Pi and organic phosphate among compartments modeled during growth. The concentrations of phosphates in these compartments at various growth rates were used, together with attendant flows, to produce a mathematical model of growth. Both Pi and phosphate-containing metabolic intermediates leaked from cells during growth. Total leakage ranged from 4 to 10% of influx and was comprised mostly of Pi. Transport capacity was at least 10 times that required for growth at saturating Pi concentrations, so that influx was linear with concentration during growth. This led to the realization that the curvature of Monod plots (Kmu = 12 nM mumax = 0.18/h, and the threshold At = 2.5 nM) is due to change in yield with growth rate. Growth rate related to Pi by the affinity, aA (= 0.43 liter/mg of cells.h) of cells for Pi and the growth rate-dependent yield. It was also specified by a series of kinetic constants that specified flow among the various compartments and equilibrium compartment concentrations as they were set by extracellular Pi. The importance of leakage by healthy cells to the organic chemistry of aquatic systems is noted. PMID:37231

  1. Kinetics of Ge-Se-In Film Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Stoilova, A.; Petkov, P.; Nedeva, Y.; Monchev, B.

    2010-01-21

    The processes of vacuum evaporation and condensation in the Ge-Se-In system were investigated. Thin amorphous films were deposited by modified thermal evaporation from previously synthesized non-crystalline (GeSe{sub y}){sub 1-x}In{sub x} ingots, where x = 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and y = 4, 5 and 6. The specific evaporation rate was determined by measuring of the mass of evaporator before evaporation and the mass of empty evaporator after evaporation in temperature range of evaporation (500-800) K. The substrate temperature was varied in the range (300-430) K to study the condensation process and specific condensation rate was determined by measuring of the substrate mass before and after condensation. The condensation energy of the (GeSe{sub y}){sub 1-x}In{sub x} layers steady increases at indium addition.The thin films studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron microdiffraction (EMD) reveal homogeneous and amorphous structure. The layer composition determined by Auger electron spectroscopy is close to that of the corresponded bulk samples.

  2. Kinetic growth mode of epitaxial GaAs on Si(001) micro-pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamaschini, Roberto; Bietti, Sergio; Castellano, Andrea; Frigeri, Cesare; Falub, Claudiu V.; Scaccabarozzi, Andrea; Bollani, Monica; von Känel, Hans; Miglio, Leo; Sanguinetti, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional, epitaxial GaAs crystals are fabricated on micro-pillars patterned into Si(001) substrates by exploiting kinetically controlled growth conditions in Molecular Beam Epitaxy. The evolution of crystal morphology during growth is assessed by considering samples with increasing GaAs deposit thickness. Experimental results are interpreted by a kinetic growth model, which takes into account the fundamental aspects of the growth and mutual deposition flux shielding between neighboring crystals. Different substrate pattern geometries with dissimilar lateral sizes and periodicities of the Si micro-pillars are considered and self-similar crystal structures are recognized. It is demonstrated that the top faceting of the GaAs crystals is tunable, which can pave the way to locally engineer compound semiconductor quantum structures on Si(001) substrates.

  3. The logistic growth of duckweed (Lemna minor) and kinetics of ammonium uptake.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Chen, You-Peng; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Zhao, Yun; Shen, Yu; Huang, Lei; Gao, Xu; Guo, Jin-Song

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models have been developed to describe nitrogen uptake and duckweed growth experimentally to study the kinetics of ammonium uptake under various concentrations. The kinetics of duckweed ammonium uptake was investigated using the modified depletion method after plants were grown for two weeks at different ammonium concentrations (0.5-14 mg/L) in the culture medium. The maximum uptake rate and Michaelis-Menten constant for ammonium were estimated as 0.082 mg/(g fresh weight x h) and 1.877 mg/L, respectively. Duckweed growth was assessed when supplied at different total nitrogen (TN) concentrations (1-5 mg/L) in the culture medium. The results showed that the intrinsic growth rate was from 0.22 to 0.26 d(-1), and TN concentrations had no significant influence on the duckweed growth rate.

  4. A growth kinetic model of Kluyveromyces marxianus cultures on cheese whey as substrate.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Luís G S; Luvizetto, Débora J; Ferreira, Luciane S; Rech, Rosane; Ayub, Marco A Z; Secchi, Argimiro R

    2004-01-01

    This work presents a multi-route, non-structured kinetic model for determination of microbial growth and substrate consumption in an experimental batch bioreactor in which beta-galactosidase is produced by Kluyveromyces marxianus growing on cheese whey. The main metabolic routes for lactose, and oxygen consumption, cell growth, and ethanol production are derived based on experimental data. When these individual rates are combined into a single growth rate, by rewriting the model equations, the model re-interpretation has a complexity similar to that of the usual variations of the Monod kinetic model, available in the literature. Furthermore, the proposed model is in good agreement with the experimental data for different growth temperatures, being acceptable for dynamic simulations, processes optimization, and implementations of model-based control technologies.

  5. Growth kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes and spoilage microorganisms in fresh-cut cantaloupe.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ting; Liu, Yanhong; Huang, Lihan

    2013-05-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the growth kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes and background microorganisms in fresh-cut cantaloupe. Fresh-cut cantaloupe samples, inoculated with three main serotypes (1/2a, 1/2b, and 4b) of L. monocytogenes, were incubated at different temperatures, ranging from 4 to 43 °C, to develop kinetic growth models. During storage studies, the population of both background microorganisms and L. monocytogenes began to increase almost immediately, with little or no lag phase for most growth curves. All growth curves, except for two growth curves of L. monocytogenes 1/2a at 4 °C, developed to full curves (containing exponential and stationary phases), and can be described by a 3-parameter logistic model. There was no significant difference (P = 0.28) in the growth behaviors and the specific growth rates of three different serotypes of L. monocytogenes inoculated to fresh-cut cantaloupe. The effect of temperature on the growth of L. monocytogenes and spoilage microorganisms was evaluated using three secondary models. For L. monocytogenes, the minimum and maximum growth temperatures were estimated by both the Ratkowsky square-root and Cardinal parameter models, and the optimum temperature and the optimum specific growth rate by the Cardinal parameter model. An Arrhenius-type model provided more accurate estimation of the specific growth rate of L. monocytogenes at temperatures <4 °C. The kinetic models developed in this study can be used by regulatory agencies and food processors for conducting risk assessment of L. monocytogenes in fresh-cut cantaloupe, and for estimating the shelf-life of fresh-cut products.

  6. On role of kinetic fluctuations in laminar-turbulent transition in chemically nonequilibrium boundary layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumin, Anatoli

    2015-11-01

    Zavol'skii and Reutov (1983), Luchini (2008, 2010), Fedorov (2010, 2012, 2014) explored potential role of kinetic fluctuations (KF) in incompressible and calorically perfect gas boundary layer flows. The results indicate that role of KF is comparable with other disturbance sources in flight experiments and in quiet wind tunnels. The analysis is based on the Landau and Lifshitz (1957) concept of fluctuating hydrodynamics representing the dissipative fluxes as an average and fluctuating parts. We are extending analysis of the receptivity problem to the fluctuating dissipative fluxes in chemically reacting nonequilibrium boundary layer flows of binary mixtures. There are new terms in the energy, and the species equations. The species conservation equation includes the dissipative diffusion flux and the species generation due to dissociation. The momentum equation includes fluctuating stress tensor. The energy equation includes fluctuating heat flux, energy flux due to diffusion of the species, and fluctuating dissipative flux due to viscosity. The effects are compared for the cases stemming from constraints of the HTV project (Klentzman and Tumin, AIAA Paper 2013-2882). Supported by AFOSR.

  7. Effect of wall growth on the kinetic modeling of nitrite oxidation in a CSTR.

    PubMed

    Dokianakis, Spiros N; Kornaros, Michael; Lyberatos, Gerasimos

    2006-03-05

    A simple kinetic model was developed for describing nitrite oxidation by autotrophic aerobic nitrifiers in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), in which mixed (suspended and attached) growth conditions prevail. The CSTR system was operated under conditions of constant nitrite feed concentration and varying volumetric flow rates. Experimental data from steady-state conditions in the CSTR system and from batch experiments were used for the determination of the model's kinetic parameters. Model predictions were verified against experimental data obtained under transient operating conditions, when volumetric flow rate and nitrite feed concentration disturbances were imposed on the CSTR. The presented kinetic modeling procedure is quite simple and general and therefore can also be applied to other mixed growth biological systems.

  8. Kinetic Roughening and Energetics of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystal Growth: A Preliminary Atomic Force Microscopy Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2004-01-01

    We examined particulars of crystal growth from measurements obtained at both microscopic and molecular levels. The crystal growth measurements performed at the microscopic level are well characterized by a model that balances the flux of macromolecules towards the crystal surface with the flux of the crystal surface. Numerical evaluation of model with measurements of crystal growth, in time, provided accurate estimates for the average growth velocities. Growth velocities thus obtained were also interpreted using well-established phenomenological theories. Moreover, we find that microscopic measurements of growth velocity measurements obtained as a function of temperature best characterizes changes in crystal growth modes, when present. We also examined the possibility of detecting a change in crystal growth modes at the molecular level using atomic force microscopy, AFM. From preliminary AFM measurements performed at various supersaturations, we find that magnitude of surface height fluctuations, h(x), increases with supersaturation. Further examination of surface height fluctuations using methods established for fluctuation spectroscopy also enabled the discovery of the existence of a characteristic length, c, which may possibly determine the mode of crystal growth. Although the results are preliminary, we establish the non- critical divergence of 5 and the root-mean-square (rms) magnitude of height-height fluctuations as the kinetic roughening transition temperatures are approached. Moreover, we also examine approximate models for interpreting the non-critical behavior of both 6 and rms magnitude of height-height fluctuations, as the solution supersaturation is increased towards the kinetic roughening supersaturation.

  9. Mathematical modeling and growth kinetics of Clostridium sporogenes in cooked beef

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium sporogenes PA 3679 is a common surrogate for proteolytic Clostridium botulinum for thermal process development and validation. However, little information is available concerning the growth kinetics of C. sporogenes in food. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the...

  10. Dynamic identification of growth and survival kinetic parameters of microorganisms in foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inverse analysis is a mathematical method used in predictive microbiology to determine the kinetic parameters of microbial growth and survival in foods. The traditional approach in inverse analysis relies on isothermal experiments that are time-consuming and labor-intensive, and errors are accumula...

  11. The Kinetic Scale Structure of the Low Latitude Boundary Layer: Initial MMS Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorelli, John; Gershman, Dan; Avanov, Levon; Pollock, Craig; Giles, Barbara; Gliese, Ulrik; Barrie, Alexander; Holland, Matthew; Salo, Chad; Dickson, Charles; Coffey, Victoria; Chandler, Michael; Sato, Yoshifumi; Strangeway, Robert; Russell, Christopher; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; Khotyainstev, Yuri; Torbert, Roy; Burch, James

    2016-04-01

    Since its launch in March of 2015, NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission has captured thousands of high resolution magnetopause crossings, routinely resolving the sub-Larmor radius structure of the magnetopause boundary layer for the first time. The primary goal of MMS is to understand the microphysics of magnetic reconnection, and it is well on its way to achieving this objective. However, MMS is also making routine measurements of the electron and ion gyroviscous and heat flux tensors with unprecedented resolution and accuracy. This opens up the possibility of directly observing the physical processes that facilitate momentum and energy transport across the magnetopause boundary layer under arbitrary conditions (e.g., magnetic field geometry and flow shear) far from the reconnection X line. Currently, our global magnetosphere fluid models (e.g., resistive or Hall MHD) do not include accurate descriptions of viscosity and heat flow, both of which are known to be critical players at the magnetopause (not just at the reconnection sites), and several groups are attempting to make progress on this difficult fluid closure problem. In this talk, we will address the fluid closure problem in the context of MMS observations of the Low Latitude Boundary Layer (LLBL), focusing on high resolution particle observations by the Fast Plasma Investigation (FPI). FPI electron bulk velocities are accurate enough to compute current density in both the high density magnetosheath and low density magnetosphere and have already revealed that the LLBL has a complex parallel current structure on the proton Larmor radius scale. We discuss the relationship between these parallel currents and the Hall electric field structures predicted by kinetic models. We also present first observations of the ion and electron gyroviscous and heat flux tensors in the LLBL and discuss implications for the fluid closure problem at Earth's magnetopause.

  12. Understanding the isothermal growth kinetics of cdse quantum dots through microfluidic reactor assisted combinatorial synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Basudev; Hong, Myung Hwan; Kang, Lee-Seung; Lee, Chan Gi

    2016-11-01

    With the use of a microfluidic-assisted combinatorial reactor, the synthesis of CdSe quantum dots was optimized by varying one parameter at a time, and the isothermal growth kinetics of CdSe quantum dots using various models was analyzed. To understand precisely the nucleation and growth characteristics of CdSe quantum dots (QDs), we synthesized the CdSe QDs using various experimental conditions. Different model equations, like acceleratory growth-time curves, sigmoidal growth-time curves or Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK), acceleratory growthtime curves based on diffusion, geometric model growth-time curves, and nth order growth-time curves were fitted. Among all growth models, the JMAK model with α = 1 - {e^{ - {{(kt)}^n}}}, and n = 1 was the best fitting model with the MATLAB interactive curve-fitting procedure were used. Errors associated with the best-fitting model and statistics for the goodness of fit were analyzed. Most of the models were not as good as the other than the proposed model. The errors associated with the proposed model were minimal, and the growth kinetics and other associated statistical factors are very similar, for all the variables investigated. The minimal error associated with the reproducibility and the similar data for growth kinetics for all studied parameters indicated that microfluidic-assisted combinatorial synthesis can be used in the industrial production of QDs. By using the proposed model to obtain an understanding of growth of QDs, their size and properties can be managed and simulated.

  13. Critical-layer nonlinearity in the resonance growth of three-dimensional waves in boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1990-01-01

    The nonlinear interactions of a triad of initially linear stability waves are addressed. The triad consisted of a single two-dimensional mode at a given frequency and two oblique modes with equal and opposite spanwise wave numbers. The oblique waves were at half the frequency and streamwise wave number of the two-dimensional mode. Attention was focused on the boundary-layer transition at low frequencies and high Reynolds numbers. A five-zoned structure and low-frequency scaling were used to derive the nonlinear-interaction equations. The initial nonlinear development of the waves was analyzed; the results indicated that the two-dimensional wave behaves according to linear theory. Nonlinear interactions caused exponential-of-an-exponential growth of the oblique modes. This resonant amplification of the subharmonic depended on the initial amplitude of the two-dimensional wave and on the initial phase angle between the two-dimensional wave and the oblique waves. The resonant growth of the oblique modes was more pronounced at lower frequencies than at higher frequencies. The results are in good agreement with experimental results and offer explanations of the observed process.

  14. Dynamics of layer-by-layer growth of a polyelectrolyte multilayer studied in situ using attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Owusu-Nkwantabisah, Silas; Gammana, Madhira; Tripp, Carl P

    2014-10-07

    Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) was used to study the dynamic layer-by-layer (LBL) growth of a sodium polyacrylate (NaPA)/poly(diallydimethylammonium) chloride (PDADMAC) multilayer on TiO2 particles. Molecular weights (Mw) used were 30 and 60 kDa for NaPA and 8.5 and 150 kDa for PDADMAC. IR spectra were recorded in situ as a function of time and were used to obtain the dynamic mass adsorbed and bound fraction of the polymers during each deposition step. For 30 kDa NaPA layers, the dynamics of adsorption show an initial rapid rise in mass followed by a slow increase toward a plateau value upon LBL with 150 kDa PDADMAC. In contrast, the 60 kDa NaPA layers achieve a plateau quickly and do not show a slow increase toward a plateau. In the case of LBL with 150 kDa PDADMAC, the dynamics of the bound fraction of polymer per layer suggest that polymer diffusion and conformational rearrangement occur for the layers of 30 kDa NaPA but not for the 60 kDa NaPA layers. Furthermore, PDADMAC adsorption profiles show that there is no diffusion of the PDADMAC layers and that PDADMAC flattens onto the underlying layer. A linear growth in the mass adsorbed per layer was observed for 150 kDa PDADMAC with both molecular weights of NaPA. In the case of 8.5 kDa PDADMAC, smaller growth increments and the desorption of underlying layers were observed. This work demonstrates the use of ATR-IR in obtaining the dynamics of LBL multilayer formation. Furthermore, it provides an example in which polymer diffusion during LBL film formation does not lead to exponential growth.

  15. Analytical solution of Luedeking-Piret equation for a batch fermentation obeying Monod growth kinetics.

    PubMed

    Garnier, Alain; Gaillet, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Not so many fermentation mathematical models allow analytical solutions of batch process dynamics. The most widely used is the combination of the logistic microbial growth kinetics with Luedeking-Piret bioproduct synthesis relation. However, the logistic equation is principally based on formalistic similarities and only fits a limited range of fermentation types. In this article, we have developed an analytical solution for the combination of Monod growth kinetics with Luedeking-Piret relation, which can be identified by linear regression and used to simulate batch fermentation evolution. Two classical examples are used to show the quality of fit and the simplicity of the method proposed. A solution for the combination of Haldane substrate-limited growth model combined with Luedeking-Piret relation is also provided. These models could prove useful for the analysis of fermentation data in industry as well as academia.

  16. Growth of Atomically Flat Ultra-Thin Ag Films on Si(111) by Introducing a √3 × √3-Ga Buffer Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jie-Hui; Jiang, Li-Qun; Qiu, Jing-Lan; Chen, Lan; Wu, Ke-Hui

    2014-12-01

    It is known that, when Ag is deposited on Si(111)-7×7 substrates in a conventional growth procedure at room temperature, no atomically flat Ag film could be obtained. We use scanning tunneling microscopy and low-energy electron diffraction to investigate the growth of ultra-thin Ag films on the Si(111) substrates at room temperature. Our study reveals that, upon introducing a Si(111)-√3 × √3-Ga buffer layer, atomically flat Ag films can easily grow on Si(111) with a critical thickness of two monolayers. Moreover, Ag film growth follows a layer-by-layer mode with further deposition. This novel growth behavior of Ag can be explained in terms of a free electron model (i.e., particle in a box) and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

  17. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of thermally activated magnetization reversal in dual-layer Exchange Coupled Composite recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumer, M. L.; Almudallal, A. M.; Mercer, J. I.; Whitehead, J. P.; Fal, T. J.

    The kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method developed for thermally activated magnetic reversal processes in single-layer recording media has been extended to study dual-layer Exchange Coupled Composition (ECC) media used in current and next generations of disc drives. The attempt frequency is derived from the Langer formalism with the saddle point determined using a variant of Bellman Ford algorithm. Complication (such as stagnation) arising from coupled grains having metastable states are addressed. MH-hysteresis loops are calculated over a wide range of anisotropy ratios, sweep rates and inter-layer coupling parameter. Results are compared with standard micromagnetics at fast sweep rates and experimental results at slow sweep rates.

  18. Kinetic characteristics and modelling of growth and substrate removal by Alcaligenes faecalis strain NR.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Zhao, Bin; An, Qiang; Wang, Xia; Zhang, Yi Xin

    2016-04-01

    Alcaligenes faecalis strain NR has the capability of simultaneous ammonium and organic carbon removal under sole aerobic conditions. The growth and substrate removal characteristics of A. faecalis strain NR were studied and appropriate kinetic models were developed. The maximum substrate removal rate of NH4 (+)-N and TOC were determined as 2.27 mg NH4 (+)-N/L/h and 30.00 mg TOC/L/h, respectively with initial NH4 (+)-N = 80 mg/L and TOC = 800 mg/L. Single-substrate models and double-substrate models based on Monod, Contois, Moser and Teissier were employed to describe the bioprocess kinetic coefficients. As a result, two double-substrate models, Teissier-Contois and Contois-Contois, were considered to be appropriate to model growth kinetics with both NH4 (+)-N and TOC as limiting substrates. The kinetic constants of maximum growth rate (μ max) and half-saturation constant (K S and B S) were obtained by solving multiple equations with regression. This work can be used to further understand and predict the performance of heterotrophic nitrifiers, and thus provides specific guidance of these functional strains in practical wastewater treatment process.

  19. Kinetics of cesium lead halide perovskite nanoparticle growth; focusing and de-focusing of size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koolyk, Miriam; Amgar, Daniel; Aharon, Sigalit; Etgar, Lioz

    2016-03-01

    In this work we study the kinetics of cesium lead halide perovskite nanoparticle (NP) growth; the focusing and de-focusing of the NP size distribution. Cesium lead halide perovskite NPs are considered to be attractive materials for optoelectronic applications. Understanding the kinetics of the formation of these all-inorganic perovskite NPs is critical for reproducibly and reliably generating large amounts of uniformly sized NPs. Here we investigate different growth durations for CsPbI3 and CsPbBr3 NPs, tracking their growth by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and size distribution analysis. As a result, we are able to provide a detailed model for the kinetics of their growth. It was observed that the CsPbI3 NPs exhibit focusing of the size distribution in the first 20 seconds of growth, followed by de-focusing over longer growth durations, while the CsPbBr3 NPs show de-focusing of the size distribution starting from the beginning of the growth. The monomer concentration is depleted faster in the case of CsPbBr3 than in the case of CsPbI3, due to faster diffusion of the monomers, which increases the critical radius and results in de-focusing of the population. Accordingly, focusing is not observed within 40 seconds of growth in the case of CsPbBr3. This study provides important knowledge on how to achieve a narrow size distribution of cesium lead halide perovskite NPs when generating large amounts of these promising, highly luminescent NPs.In this work we study the kinetics of cesium lead halide perovskite nanoparticle (NP) growth; the focusing and de-focusing of the NP size distribution. Cesium lead halide perovskite NPs are considered to be attractive materials for optoelectronic applications. Understanding the kinetics of the formation of these all-inorganic perovskite NPs is critical for reproducibly and reliably generating large amounts of uniformly sized NPs. Here we investigate different growth durations for CsPbI3 and CsPbBr3 NPs, tracking

  20. AxBAxB… pulsed atomic layer deposition: Numerical growth model and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muneshwar, Triratna; Cadien, Ken

    2016-02-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is widely used for the fabrication of advanced semiconductor devices and related nanoscale structures. During ALD, large precursor doses (>1000 L per pulse) are often required to achieve surface saturation, of which only a small fraction is utilized in film growth while the rest is pumped from the system. Since the metal precursor constitutes a significant cost of ALD, strategies to enhance precursor utilization are essential for the scaling of ALD processes. In the precursor reaction step, precursor physisorption is restricted by steric hindrance (mA1) from ligands on the precursor molecules. On reaction, some of these ligands are removed as by-products resulting in chemisorbed species with reduced steric hindrance (mA1 → mA2, where mA2 < mA1) and some of the initially hindered surface reaction sites becoming accessible for further precursor physisorption. To utilize these additional reaction sites, we propose a generalized AxBAxB… pulsed deposition where the total precursor dose (ΦA) is introduced as multiple x (x > 1, x ∈ I) short-pulses rather than a single pulse. A numerical first-order surface reaction kinetics growth model is presented and applied to study the effect of AxBAxB… pulsed ALD on the growth per cycle (GPC). The model calculations predict higher GPC for AxBAxB… pulsing than with ABAB… deposition. In agreement with the model predictions, with AxBAxB… pulsed deposition, the GPC was found to increase by ˜46% for ZrN plasma enhanced ALD (PEALD), ˜49% for HfO2 PEALD, and ˜8% for thermal Al2O3 ALD with respect to conventional ABAB… pulsed growth.

  1. Kinetics of cesium lead halide perovskite nanoparticle growth; focusing and de-focusing of size distribution.

    PubMed

    Koolyk, Miriam; Amgar, Daniel; Aharon, Sigalit; Etgar, Lioz

    2016-03-28

    In this work we study the kinetics of cesium lead halide perovskite nanoparticle (NP) growth; the focusing and de-focusing of the NP size distribution. Cesium lead halide perovskite NPs are considered to be attractive materials for optoelectronic applications. Understanding the kinetics of the formation of these all-inorganic perovskite NPs is critical for reproducibly and reliably generating large amounts of uniformly sized NPs. Here we investigate different growth durations for CsPbI3 and CsPbBr3 NPs, tracking their growth by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and size distribution analysis. As a result, we are able to provide a detailed model for the kinetics of their growth. It was observed that the CsPbI3 NPs exhibit focusing of the size distribution in the first 20 seconds of growth, followed by de-focusing over longer growth durations, while the CsPbBr3 NPs show de-focusing of the size distribution starting from the beginning of the growth. The monomer concentration is depleted faster in the case of CsPbBr3 than in the case of CsPbI3, due to faster diffusion of the monomers, which increases the critical radius and results in de-focusing of the population. Accordingly, focusing is not observed within 40 seconds of growth in the case of CsPbBr3. This study provides important knowledge on how to achieve a narrow size distribution of cesium lead halide perovskite NPs when generating large amounts of these promising, highly luminescent NPs.

  2. Edge-controlled growth and kinetics of single-crystal graphene domains by chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Ma, Teng; Ren, Wencai; Zhang, Xiuyun; Liu, Zhibo; Gao, Yang; Yin, Li-Chang; Ma, Xiu-Liang; Ding, Feng; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2013-12-17

    The controlled growth of large-area, high-quality, single-crystal graphene is highly desired for applications in electronics and optoelectronics; however, the production of this material remains challenging because the atomistic mechanism that governs graphene growth is not well understood. The edges of graphene, which are the sites at which carbon accumulates in the two-dimensional honeycomb lattice, influence many properties, including the electronic properties and chemical reactivity of graphene, and they are expected to significantly influence its growth. We demonstrate the growth of single-crystal graphene domains with controlled edges that range from zigzag to armchair orientations via growth-etching-regrowth in a chemical vapor deposition process. We have observed that both the growth and the etching rates of a single-crystal graphene domain increase linearly with the slanted angle of its edges from 0° to ∼19° and that the rates for an armchair edge are faster than those for a zigzag edge. Such edge-structure-dependent growth/etching kinetics of graphene can be well explained at the atomic level based on the concentrations of the kinks on various edges and allow the evolution and control of the edge and morphology in single-crystal graphene following the classical kinetic Wulff construction theory. Using these findings, we propose several strategies for the fabrication of wafer-sized, high-quality, single-crystal graphene.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of the kinetic effects on GaAs/GaAs(001) MBE growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageev, Oleg A.; Solodovnik, Maxim S.; Balakirev, Sergey V.; Mikhaylin, Ilya A.; Eremenko, Mikhail M.

    2017-01-01

    The molecular beam epitaxial growth of GaAs on the GaAs(001)-(2×4) surface is investigated using a kinetic Monte Carlo-based method. The developed algorithm permits to focus on the kinetic effects in a wide range of growth conditions and enables considerable computational speedup. The simulation results show that the growth rate has a dramatic influence upon both the island morphology and Ga surface diffusion length. The average island size reduces with increasing growth rate while the island density increases with increasing growth rate as well as As4/Ga beam equivalent pressure ratio. As the growth rate increases, the island density becomes weaker dependent upon the As4/Ga pressure ratio and approaches to a saturation value. We also discuss three characteristics of Ga surface diffusion, namely a diffusion length of a Ga adatom deposited first, an average diffusion length, and an island spacing as an average distance between islands. The calculations show that the As4/Ga pressure ratio dependences of these characteristics obey the same law, but with different coefficients. An increase of the As4/Ga pressure ratio leads to a decrease in both the diffusion length and island spacing. However, its influence becomes stronger with increasing growth rate for the first Ga adatom diffusion length and weaker for the average diffusion length and for the island spacing.

  4. A Kinetic Model for GaAs Growth by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, Kevin L.; Simon, John; Jain, Nikhil; Young, David L.; Ptak, Aaron J.

    2016-11-21

    Precise control of the growth of III-V materials by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) is complicated by the fact that the growth rate depends on the concentrations of nearly all inputs to the reactor and also the reaction temperature. This behavior is in contrast to metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE), which in common practice operates in a mass transport limited regime where growth rate and alloy composition are controlled almost exclusively by flow of the Group III precursor. In HVPE, the growth rate and alloy compositions are very sensitive to temperature and reactant concentrations, which are strong functions of the reactor geometry. HVPE growth, particularly the growth of large area materials and devices, will benefit from the development of a growth model that can eventually be coupled with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a specific reactor geometry. In this work, we develop a growth rate law using a Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) analysis, fitting unknown parameters to growth rate data from the literature that captures the relevant kinetic and thermodynamic phenomena of the HVPE process. We compare the L-H rate law to growth rate data from our custom HVPE reactor, and develop quantitative insight into reactor performance, demonstrating the utility of the growth model.

  5. Kinetics of grain-growth in wadsleyite: implications for point defect chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihara, Y.; Shinmei, T.; Karato, S.

    2003-12-01

    We investigate the kinetics of grain-growth in wadsleyite for two reasons. First, grain-growth kinetics controls the grain-size of wadsleyite in the mantle transition zone which in turn controls the rheology in that region. Second, the detailed knowledge of grain-growth kinetics will provide us with important constraints on the defect-related properties of this mineral which may control other properties such as diffusion, electrical conductivity and creep. We carried out the grain-growth experiments by using KIWI 1000-ton Kawai-type multi-anvil apparatus installed at Yale University. Starting material was synthesized from powdered San Carlos olivine. The grain-growth experiments were conducted at 15 GPa and 1100-1500° C for 1-24 hours. We used Mo, Ni and Re foil capsules, in order to control the oxygen fugacity by metal-oxide buffer. For ''wet'' experiments (water-saturated), a mixture of talc and brucite was packed into a capsule together with a wadsleyite sample separated by metal foils. We used a Au-Pd outer capsule which is known to be a good barrier for hydrogen diffusion. Water content in each sample was determined after an experiment by FTIR analysis of a doubly polished thin section. Grain-size was measured on a polished section using an intercept method. One of the difficulties in these experiments is to reduce the amount of water in wadsleyite. Even in nominally ''dry'' experiments in which no water is added, a significant amount of water (upto ˜25,000 H/106 Si) was detected, which comes presumably from some components in the sample assembly such as the cement. This water-uptake by wadsleyite can be minimized by surrounding it with a Au-Pd capsule. In this truly ''dry'' sample assembly, the water content of wadsleyite (after an experiment) is reduced to less than ˜100 H/106 Si, a water content similar to typical ''dry'' experiments on olivine. Compared at similar water content, the kinetics of grain-growth in wadsleyite is significantly slower than

  6. Recyclable Mg-Al layered double hydroxides for fluoride removal: Kinetic and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tomohito; Oba, Jumpei; Yoshioka, Toshiaki

    2015-12-30

    Mg-Al layered double hydroxides (LDHs) intercalated with NO3(-) (NO3 · Mg-Al LDH) and Cl(-) (Cl · Mg-Al LDH) were found to adsorb fluoride from aqueous solutions. Fluoride is removed by anion exchange in solution with NO3(-) and Cl(-) intercalated in the LDH interlayer. In both cases, the residual F concentration is lower than the effluent standards for F in Japan (8 mg/L). The rate-determining step in the removal of F using NO3 · Mg-Al and Cl · Mg-Al LDH is chemical adsorption involving F(-) anion exchange with intercalated NO3(-) and Cl(-) ions. The removal of F is described by pseudo-second-order reaction kinetics, with Langmuir-type adsorption. The values obtained for the maximum adsorption and the equilibrium adsorption constant are respectively 3.3 mmol g(-1) and 2.8 with NO3 · Mg-Al LDH, and 3.2 mmol g(-1) and 1.5 with Cl · Mg-Al LDH. The F in the F · Mg-Al LDH produced in these reactions was found to exchange with NO3(-) and Cl(-) ions in solution. The regenerated NO3 · Mg-Al and Cl · Mg-Al LDHs thus obtained can be used once more to capture aqueous F. This suggests that NO3 · Mg-Al and Cl · Mg-Al LDHs can be recycled and used repeatedly for F removal.

  7. Bi-layer kinetic inductance detectors for space observations between 80-120 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, A.; Goupy, J.; le Sueur, H.; Benoit, A.; Bourrion, O.; Calvo, M.; D'addabbo, A.; Dumoulin, L.; Levy-Bertrand, F.; Macías-Pérez, J.; Marnieros, S.; Ponthieu, N.; Monfardini, A.

    2015-08-01

    We have developed lumped element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs) that are sensitive in the frequency band from 80 to 120 GHz. In this work, we take advantage of the so-called proximity effect to reduce the superconducting gap of aluminium (Al), otherwise strongly suppressing the LEKID response for frequencies smaller than 100 GHz. We designed, produced, and optically tested various fully multiplexed arrays based on multi-layer combinations of Al and titanium (Ti). Their sensitivities were measured using a dedicated closed-circle 100 mK dilution cryostat and a sky simulator, which allowed us to reproduce realistic observation conditions. The spectral response was characterised with a Martin-Puplett interferometer up to THz frequencies and had a resolution of 3 GHz. We demonstrate that Ti-Al LEKID can reach an optical sensitivity of about 1.4 × 10-17 W/Hz0.5 (best pixel), or 2.2 × 10-17 W/Hz0.5 when averaged over the whole array. The optical background was set to roughly 0.4 pW per pixel, which is typical for future space observatories in this particular band. The performance is close to a sensitivity of twice the CMB photon noise limit at 100 GHz, which drove the design of the Planck HFI instrument. This figure remains the baseline for the next generation of millimetre-wave space satellites.

  8. Characterization of Cu buffer layers for growth of L10-FeNi thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuguchi, M.; Sekiya, S.; Takanashi, K.

    2010-05-01

    A Cu(001) layer was fabricated on a Au(001) layer to investigate the use of Cu as a buffer layer for growing L10-FeNi thin films. The epitaxial growth of a Cu buffer layer was observed using reflection high-energy electron diffraction. The flatness of the layer improved drastically with an increase in the substrate temperature although the layer was an alloy (AuCu3). An FeNi thin film was epitaxially grown on the AuCu3 buffer layer by alternate monatomic layer deposition and the formation of an L10-FeNi ordered alloy was expected. The AuCu3 buffer layer is thus a promising candidate material for the growth of L10-FeNi thin films.

  9. A kinetic model to simulate protein crystal growth in an evaporation-based crystallization platform

    SciTech Connect

    Talreja, S.; Kenis, P; Zukoski, C

    2007-01-01

    The quality, size, and number of protein crystals grown under conditions of continuous solvent extraction are dependent on the rate of solvent extraction and the initial protein and salt concentration. An increase in the rate of solvent extraction leads to a larger number of crystals. The number of crystals decreases, however, when the experiment is started with an initial protein concentration that is closer to the solubility boundary. Here we develop a kinetic model capable of predicting changes in the number and size of protein crystals as a function of time under continuous evaporation. Moreover, this model successfully predicts the initial condition of drops that will result in gel formation. We test this model with experimental crystal growth data of hen egg white lysozyme for which crystal nucleation and growth rate parameters are known from other studies. The predicted and observed rates of crystal growth are in excellent agreement, which suggests that kinetic constants for nucleation and crystal growth for different proteins can be extracted by applying a kinetic model in combination with observations from a few evaporation-based crystallization experiments.

  10. Kinetics of growth and caffeine demethylase production of Pseudomonas sp. in bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Gummadi, Sathyanarayana N; Santhosh, Devarai

    2010-09-01

    The effect of various initial caffeine concentrations on growth and caffeine demethylase production by Pseudomonas sp. was studied in bioreactor. At initial concentration of 6.5 g l(-1) caffeine, Pseudomonas sp. showed a maximum specific growth rate of 0.2 h(-1), maximum degradation rate of 1.1 g h(-1), and caffeine demethylase activity of 18,762 U g CDW(-1) (CDW: cell dry weight). Caffeine degradation rate was 25 times higher in bioreactor than in shake flask. For the first time, we show highest degradation of 75 g caffeine (initial concentration 20 g l(-1)) in 120 h, suggesting that the tested strain has potential for successful bioprocess for caffeine degradation. Growth kinetics showed substrate inhibition phenomenon. Various substrate inhibition models were fitted to the kinetic data, amongst which the double-exponential (R(2) = 0.94), Luong (R(2) = 0.92), and Yano and Koga 2 (R(2) = 0.94) models were found to be the best. The Luedeking-Piret model showed that caffeine demethylase production kinetics was growth related. This is the first report on production of high levels of caffeine demethylase in batch bioreactor with faster degradation rate and high tolerance to caffeine, hence clearly suggesting that Pseudomonas sp. used in this study is a potential biocatalyst for industrial decaffeination.

  11. Diffusivity in turbulent fluid containing two dominant scales, and compressible shear layer according to a kinetic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, P. M.

    1976-01-01

    The solution of the two nonequilibrium-degree kinetic equation was first determined for the effective length scale and turbulence energy for a spatially homogeneous turbulence field with two characteristic length scales, where the source for one family of eddies exists. This solution was applied to the evaluation of the eddy diffusivity in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine. The result was compared with another existing solution. This was carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining an effective length-scale equation within the context of the kinetic theory. A formulation and partial solution of the compressible plane shear layer are also presented.

  12. Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana root growth kinetics with high temporal and spatial resolution

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanbakhsh, Nima; Fisahn, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Background Methods exist to quantify the distribution of growth rate over the root axis. However, non-destructive, high-throughput evaluations of total root elongation in controlled environments and the field are lacking in growth studies. A new imaging approach to analyse total root elongation is described. Scope High pixel resolution of the images enables the study of growth in short time intervals and provides high temporal resolution. Using the method described, total root elongation rates are calculated from the displacement of the root tip. Although the absolute root elongation rate changes in response to growth conditions, this set-up enables root growth of Arabidopsis wild-type seedlings to be followed for more than 1 month after germination. The method provides an easy approach to decipher root extension rate and much simpler calculations compared with other methods that use segmental growth to address this question. Conclusions The high temporal resolution allows small modifications of total root elongation growth to be revealed. Furthermore, with the options to investigate growth of various mutants in diverse growth conditions the present tool allows modulations in root growth kinetics due to different biotic and abiotic stimuli to be unravelled. Measurements performed on Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type (Col0) plants revealed rhythms superimposed on root elongation. Results obtained from the starchless mutant pgm, however, present a clearly modified pattern. As expected, deviation is strongest during the dark period. PMID:20421235

  13. Estimation of the growth kinetics for the cooling crystallisation of paracetamol and ethanol solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Niall A.; Ó'Ciardhá, Clifford T.; Frawley, Patrick J.

    2011-08-01

    This work details the estimation of the growth kinetics of paracetamol in ethanol solutions for cooling crystallisation processes, by means of isothermal seeded batch experiments. The growth kinetics of paracetamol crystals were evaluated in isolation, with the growth rate assumed to be size independent. Prior knowledge of the Metastable Zone Width (MSZW) was required, so that supersaturation ratios of 1.7-1.1 could be induced in solution without the occurrence of nucleation. The technique involved the utilisation of two in-situ Process Analytical Techniques (PATs), with a Focused Beam Reflectance Measurement (FBRM ®) utilised to ensure that negligible nucleation occurred and an Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) probe employed for online monitoring of solute concentration. Initial Particle Size Distributions (PSDs) were used in conjunction with desupersaturation profiles to determine the growth rate as a function of temperature and supersaturation. Furthermore, the effects of seed loading and size on the crystal growth rate were investigated. A numerical model, incorporating the population balance equation and the method of moments, was utilised to describe the crystal growth process. Experimental parameters were compared to the model simulation, with the accuracy of the model validated by means of the final product PSDs and solute concentration.

  14. Catastrophic growth of gas hydrates in the presence of kinetic hydrate inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cha, Minjun; Shin, Kyuchul; Seo, Yutaek; Shin, Ju-Young; Kang, Seong-Pil

    2013-12-27

    The effect of the concentration of kinetic hydrate inhibitors, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and polyvinylcaprolactam (PVCap) on the onset and growth of synthetic natural gas hydrates is investigated by measuring the hydrate onset time and gas consumption rate. Although the hydrate onset time is extended by increasing the concentration from 0.5 to 3.0 wt % for both PVP and PVCap, the growth rate of hydrates shows that the different tendency depends on the type of kinetic hydrate inhibitor and its concentration. For PVCap solution, the hydrate growth was slow for more than 1000 min after the onset at the concentration of 0.5 and 1.5 wt %. However, the growth rate becames almost 8 times faster at the concentration of 3.0 wt %, representing the catastrophic growth of hydrate just after the hydrate onset. (13)C NMR spectra of hydrates formed at 3.0 wt % of PVP and PVCap indicate the existence of both structures I and II. Cage occupancy of methane in large cages of structure II decreases significantly when compared to that for pure water. These results suggest that increasing the concentration of KHI up to 3.0 wt % may induce the earlier appearance of catastrophic hydrate growth and the existence of metastable structure I; thus, there needs to be an upper limit for using KHI to manage the formation of gas hydrates.

  15. Kinetics and mechanisms of cadmium carbonate heteroepitaxial growth at the calcite (10 1bar 4) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Man; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kerisit, Sebastien

    2014-06-01

    Elucidating the kinetics and mechanisms of heteroepitaxial nucleation and growth at mineral-water interfaces is essential to understanding surface reactivity in geochemical systems. In the present work, the formation of heteroepitaxial cadmium carbonate coatings at calcite-water interfaces was investigated by exposing calcite (10 1bar 4) surfaces to Cd-bearing aqueous solutions. In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed as the primary technique. The AFM results indicate that the heteroepitaxial growth of cadmium carbonate proceeds via three different mechanisms depending on the initial supersaturation of the aqueous solution: advancement of existing steps, nucleation and growth of three-dimensional (3D) islands, and nucleation and spread of two-dimensional (2D) nuclei. The 3D islands and 2D nuclei exhibit different morphologies and growth kinetics. The effects of supersaturation on heteroepitaxial growth mechanisms can be interpreted in terms of the free energy barrier for nucleation. At low initial supersaturation, where 3D nucleation dominates, it is hypothesized, from the growth rate and morphology of the 3D islands observed with AFM, that the crystallization of the overgrowth follows a non-classical pathway involving the formation of a surface precursor that is not fully crystalline, whereas high supersaturation favors the formation of crystalline 2D nuclei whose morphology is based on the atomic structure of the calcite substrate. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images reveal that the atomic structure of the interface between the cadmium carbonate coating and calcite shows perfect, dislocation-free epitaxy.

  16. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Cadmium Carbonate Heteroepitaxial Growth at the Calcite (101¯4) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Man; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2014-06-01

    Elucidating the kinetics and mechanisms of heteroepitaxial nucleation and growth at mineral-water interfaces is essential to understanding surface reactivity in geochemical systems. In the present work, the formation of heteroepitaxial cadmium carbonate coatings at calcite-water interfaces was investigated by exposing calcite (10-14) surfaces to Cd-bearing aqueous solutions. In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed as the primary technique. The AFM results indicate that the heteroepitaxial growth of cadmium carbonate proceeds via three different mechanisms depending on the initial supersaturation of the aqueous solution: advancement of existing steps, nucleation and growth of three-dimensional (3D) islands, and nucleation and spread of two-dimensional (2D) nuclei. The 3D islands and 2D nuclei exhibit different morphologies and growth kinetics. The effects of supersaturation on heteroepitaxial growth mechanisms can be interpreted in terms of the free energy barrier for nucleation. At low initial supersaturation, where 3D nucleation dominates, it is hypothesized, from the growth rate and morphology of the 3D islands observed with AFM, that the crystallization of the overgrowth follows a non-classical pathway involving the formation of a surface precursor that is not fully crystalline, whereas high supersaturation favors the formation of crystalline 2D nuclei whose morphology is based on the atomic structure of the calcite substrate. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images reveal that the atomic structure of the interface between the cadmium carbonate coating and calcite shows perfect, dislocation-free epitaxy.

  17. Quantitative nucleation and growth kinetics of gold nanoparticles via model-assisted dynamic spectroscopic approach.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yao; Wang, Huixuan; Lin, Wenshuang; Lin, Liqin; Gao, Yixian; Yang, Feng; Du, Mingming; Fang, Weiping; Huang, Jiale; Sun, Daohua; Li, Qingbiao

    2013-10-01

    Lacking of quantitative experimental data and/or kinetic models that could mathematically depict the redox chemistry and the crystallization issue, bottom-to-up formation kinetics of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) remains a challenge. We measured the dynamic regime of GNPs synthesized by l-ascorbic acid (representing a chemical approach) and/or foliar aqueous extract (a biogenic approach) via in situ spectroscopic characterization and established a redox-crystallization model which allows quantitative and separate parameterization of the nucleation and growth processes. The main results were simplified as the following aspects: (I) an efficient approach, i.e., the dynamic in situ spectroscopic characterization assisted with the redox-crystallization model, was established for quantitative analysis of the overall formation kinetics of GNPs in solution; (II) formation of GNPs by the chemical and the biogenic approaches experienced a slow nucleation stage followed by a growth stage which behaved as a mixed-order reaction, and different from the chemical approach, the biogenic method involved heterogeneous nucleation; (III) also, biosynthesis of flaky GNPs was a kinetic-controlled process favored by relatively slow redox chemistry; and (IV) though GNPs formation consists of two aspects, namely the redox chemistry and the crystallization issue, the latter was the rate-determining event that controls the dynamic regime of the whole physicochemical process.

  18. Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth and Characterization of Thin Layers of Semiconductor Tin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    heating. The α-Sn layers were also characterized with high-resolution X-ray diffraction, Hall, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements...ARL-TR-7838 ● SEP 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth and Characterization of Thin Layers of...Laboratory Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth and Characterization of Thin Layers of Semiconductor Tin by P Folkes, P Taylor, C Rong, B Nichols

  19. Semirigorous synchronous sublattice algorithm for parallel kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of thin film growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Yunsic; Amar, Jacques G.

    2005-03-01

    The standard kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm is an extremely efficient method to carry out serial simulations of dynamical processes such as thin film growth. However, in some cases it is necessary to study systems over extended time and length scales, and therefore a parallel algorithm is desired. Here we describe an efficient, semirigorous synchronous sublattice algorithm for parallel kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The accuracy and parallel efficiency are studied as a function of diffusion rate, processor size, and number of processors for a variety of simple models of epitaxial growth. The effects of fluctuations on the parallel efficiency are also studied. Since only local communications are required, linear scaling behavior is observed, e.g., the parallel efficiency is independent of the number of processors for fixed processor size.

  20. Nonlinear Growth Kinetics of Breast Cancer Stem Cells: Implications for Cancer Stem Cell Targeted Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinfeng; Johnson, Sara; Liu, Shou; Kanojia, Deepak; Yue, Wei; Singn, Udai; Wang, Qian; Wang, Qi; Nie, Qing; Chen, Hexin

    2013-08-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in primary breast cancer tissues and cell lines. The CSC population varies widely among cancerous tissues and cell lines, and is often associated with aggressive breast cancers. Despite of intensive research, how the CSC population is regulated within a tumor is still not well understood so far. In this paper, we present a mathematical model to explore the growth kinetics of CSC population both in vitro and in vivo. Our mathematical models and supporting experiments suggest that there exist non-linear growth kinetics of CSCs and negative feedback mechanisms to control the balance between the population of CSCs and that of non-stem cancer cells. The model predictions can help us explain a few long-standing questions in the field of cancer stem cell research, and can be potentially used to predict the efficicacy of anti-cancer therapy.

  1. Intrinsic Kinetics Fluctuations as Cause of Growth Inhomogeneity in Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vekilov, Peter G.; Rosenberger, Franz

    1998-01-01

    Intrinsic kinetics instabilities in the form of growth step bunching during the crystallization of the protein lysozyme from solution were characterized by in situ high-resolution optical interferometry. Compositional variations (striations) in the crystal, which potentially decrease its utility, e.g., for molecular structure studies by diffraction methods, were visualized by polarized light reflection microscopy. A spatiotemporal correlation was established between the sequence of moving step bunches and the striations.

  2. Prediction of microbial growth rate versus biomass yield by a metabolic network with kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Adadi, Roi; Volkmer, Benjamin; Milo, Ron; Heinemann, Matthias; Shlomi, Tomer

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the factors that determine microbial growth rate under various environmental and genetic conditions is a major challenge of systems biology. While current genome-scale metabolic modeling approaches enable us to successfully predict a variety of metabolic phenotypes, including maximal biomass yield, the prediction of actual growth rate is a long standing goal. This gap stems from strictly relying on data regarding reaction stoichiometry and directionality, without accounting for enzyme kinetic considerations. Here we present a novel metabolic network-based approach, MetabOlic Modeling with ENzyme kineTics (MOMENT), which predicts metabolic flux rate and growth rate by utilizing prior data on enzyme turnover rates and enzyme molecular weights, without requiring measurements of nutrient uptake rates. The method is based on an identified design principle of metabolism in which enzymes catalyzing high flux reactions across different media tend to be more efficient in terms of having higher turnover numbers. Extending upon previous attempts to utilize kinetic data in genome-scale metabolic modeling, our approach takes into account the requirement for specific enzyme concentrations for catalyzing predicted metabolic flux rates, considering isozymes, protein complexes, and multi-functional enzymes. MOMENT is shown to significantly improve the prediction accuracy of various metabolic phenotypes in E. coli, including intracellular flux rates and changes in gene expression levels under different growth rates. Most importantly, MOMENT is shown to predict growth rates of E. coli under a diverse set of media that are correlated with experimental measurements, markedly improving upon existing state-of-the art stoichiometric modeling approaches. These results support the view that a physiological bound on cellular enzyme concentrations is a key factor that determines microbial growth rate.

  3. Linking genes to microbial growth kinetics: an integrated biochemical systems engineering approach.

    PubMed

    Koutinas, Michalis; Kiparissides, Alexandros; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Lam, Ming-Chi; Martins Dos Santos, Vitor A P; de Lorenzo, Victor; Pistikopoulos, Efstratios N; Mantalaris, Athanasios

    2011-07-01

    The majority of models describing the kinetic properties of a microorganism for a given substrate are unstructured and empirical. They are formulated in this manner so that the complex mechanism of cell growth is simplified. Herein, a novel approach for modelling microbial growth kinetics is proposed, linking biomass growth and substrate consumption rates to the gene regulatory programmes that control these processes. A dynamic model of the TOL (pWW0) plasmid of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 has been developed, describing the molecular interactions that lead to the transcription of the upper and meta operons, known to produce the enzymes for the oxidative catabolism of m-xylene. The genetic circuit model was combined with a growth kinetic model decoupling biomass growth and substrate consumption rates, which are expressed as independent functions of the rate-limiting enzymes produced by the operons. Estimation of model parameters and validation of the model's predictive capability were successfully performed in batch cultures of mt-2 fed with different concentrations of m-xylene, as confirmed by relative mRNA concentration measurements of the promoters encoded in TOL. The growth formation and substrate utilisation patterns could not be accurately described by traditional Monod-type models for a wide range of conditions, demonstrating the critical importance of gene regulation for the development of advanced models closely predicting complex bioprocesses. In contrast, the proposed strategy, which utilises quantitative information pertaining to upstream molecular events that control the production of rate-limiting enzymes, predicts the catabolism of a substrate and biomass formation and could be of central importance for the design of optimal bioprocesses.

  4. Growth kinetics of biopigment production by Thai isolated Monascus purpureus in a stirred tank bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kongruang, Sasithorn

    2011-01-01

    Monascus purpureus is a biopigment-producing fungi whose pigments can be used in many biotechnological and food industries. The growth kinetics of biopigment production were investigated in a liquid fermentation medium in a 5-l stirred tank bioreactor at 30°C, pH 7, for 8 days with 100 rpm agitation and 1.38 × 10(5) N/m(2) aeration. Thai Monascus purpureus strains TISTR 3002, 3180, 3090 and 3385 were studied for color production, growth kinetics and productivity. Citrinin as a toxic metabolite was measured from the Monascus fermentation broth. The biopigment productions were detected from fermentation broth by scanning spectra of each strain produced. Results showed a mixture of yellow, orange and red pigments with absorption peaks of pigments occurring at different wavelengths for the four strains. It was found that for each pigment color, the color production from the strains increased in the order TISTR 3002, 3180, 3090, 3385 with 3385 production being approximately 10 times that of 3002. Similar results were found for growth kinetics and productivity. HPLC results showed that citrinin was not produced under the culture conditions of this study. The L*, a* and b* values of the CIELAB color system were also obtained for the yellow, orange and red pigments produced from the TISTR 3002, 3180, 3090 and 3385 strains. The colors of the pigments ranged from burnt umber to deep red.

  5. Effect of clofibrate on the growth-kinetics of the murine P 1798(sc) lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Ubeira, F. M.; Seoane, R.; Puentes, E.; Faro, J.; Regueiro, B. J.

    1983-01-01

    Clofibrate (CPIB) is a drug applied as an antilipidaemic agent in mammals. In this work we have tested its efficacy in vivo on the growth kinetics of P 1798(sc) lymphoma transplanted to recipient (BALB/c x AKR)F1 mice. Our results show a facilitation of the tumour growth rate in treated recipients. This fact may be related to an effect of the agent on the recipient which produces a decrease in the immune response as was confirmed on testing CPIB on thymus-dependent antigens in haemolytic plaque assays. Images Figure 3 PMID:6351886

  6. Mg doping and its effect on the semipolar GaN(1122) growth kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Lahourcade, L.; Wirthmueller, A.; Monroy, E.; Chauvat, M. P.; Ruterana, P.; Laufer, A.; Eickhoff, M.

    2009-10-26

    We report the effect of Mg doping on the growth kinetics of semipolar GaN(1122) synthesized by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy. Mg tends to segregate on the surface, inhibiting the formation of the self-regulated Ga film which is used as a surfactant for the growth of undoped and Si-doped GaN(1122). We observe an enhancement of Mg incorporation in GaN(1122) compared to GaN(0001). Typical structural defects or polarity inversion domains found in Mg-doped GaN(0001) were not observed for the semipolar films investigated in the present study.

  7. Kinetic simulation of filament growth dynamics in memristive electrochemical metallization devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirkmann, Sven; Ziegler, Martin; Hansen, Mirko; Kohlstedt, Hermann; Trieschmann, Jan; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we report on kinetic Monte-Carlo calculations of resistive switching and the underlying growth dynamics of filaments in an electrochemical metallization device consisting of an Ag/TiO2/Pt sandwich-like thin film system. The developed model is not limited to (i) fast time scale dynamics and (ii) only one growth and dissolution cycle of metallic filaments. In particular, we present results from the simulation of consecutive cycles. We find that the numerical results are in excellent agreement with experimentally obtained data. Additionally we observe an unexpected filament growth mode that is in contradiction to the widely acknowledged picture of filament growth but consistent with recent experimental findings.

  8. In situ X-ray diffraction study on the growth kinetics of NiO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Meneses, C T; Almeida, J M A; Sasaki, J M

    2010-05-01

    The growth kinetics of NiO nanoparticles have been studied by in situ X-ray diffraction using two detection systems (conventional and imaging plate). NiO nanoparticles were formed by thermal decomposition after heating of an amorphous compound formed by the coprecipitation method. It was found that the detection method using an imaging plate is more efficient than the conventional detection mode for observing changes in the crystallite growth of nanocrystalline materials. Studies have been carried out to investigate the effects of the heating rates on the particles growth. The results suggest that the growth process of the particles is accelerated when the samples are treated at low heating rates. The evolution of particles size and the diffusion coefficient obtained from X-ray powder diffraction patterns are discussed in terms of the thermal conditions for the two types of detection.

  9. Turbulent kinetics of a large wind farm and their impact in the neutral boundary layer

    DOE PAGES

    Na, Ji Sung; Koo, Eunmo; Munoz-Esparza, Domingo; ...

    2015-12-28

    High-resolution large-eddy simulation of the flow over a large wind farm (64 wind turbines) is performed using the HIGRAD/FIRETEC-WindBlade model, which is a high-performance computing wind turbine–atmosphere interaction model that uses the Lagrangian actuator line method to represent rotating turbine blades. These high-resolution large-eddy simulation results are used to parameterize the thrust and power coefficients that contain information about turbine interference effects within the wind farm. Those coefficients are then incorporated into the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model in order to evaluate interference effects in larger-scale models. In the high-resolution WindBlade wind farm simulation, insufficient distance between turbines createsmore » the interference between turbines, including significant vertical variations in momentum and turbulent intensity. The characteristics of the wake are further investigated by analyzing the distribution of the vorticity and turbulent intensity. Quadrant analysis in the turbine and post-turbine areas reveals that the ejection motion induced by the presence of the wind turbines is dominant compared to that in the other quadrants, indicating that the sweep motion is increased at the location where strong wake recovery occurs. Regional-scale WRF simulations reveal that although the turbulent mixing induced by the wind farm is partly diffused to the upper region, there is no significant change in the boundary layer depth. The velocity deficit does not appear to be very sensitive to the local distribution of turbine coefficients. However, differences of about 5% on parameterized turbulent kinetic energy were found depending on the turbine coefficient distribution. Furthermore, turbine coefficients that consider interference in the wind farm should be used in wind farm parameterization for larger-scale models to better describe sub-grid scale turbulent processes.« less

  10. Turbulent kinetics of a large wind farm and their impact in the neutral boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Ji Sung; Koo, Eunmo; Munoz-Esparza, Domingo; Jin, Emilia Kyung; Linn, Rodman; Lee, Joon Sang

    2015-12-28

    High-resolution large-eddy simulation of the flow over a large wind farm (64 wind turbines) is performed using the HIGRAD/FIRETEC-WindBlade model, which is a high-performance computing wind turbine–atmosphere interaction model that uses the Lagrangian actuator line method to represent rotating turbine blades. These high-resolution large-eddy simulation results are used to parameterize the thrust and power coefficients that contain information about turbine interference effects within the wind farm. Those coefficients are then incorporated into the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model in order to evaluate interference effects in larger-scale models. In the high-resolution WindBlade wind farm simulation, insufficient distance between turbines creates the interference between turbines, including significant vertical variations in momentum and turbulent intensity. The characteristics of the wake are further investigated by analyzing the distribution of the vorticity and turbulent intensity. Quadrant analysis in the turbine and post-turbine areas reveals that the ejection motion induced by the presence of the wind turbines is dominant compared to that in the other quadrants, indicating that the sweep motion is increased at the location where strong wake recovery occurs. Regional-scale WRF simulations reveal that although the turbulent mixing induced by the wind farm is partly diffused to the upper region, there is no significant change in the boundary layer depth. The velocity deficit does not appear to be very sensitive to the local distribution of turbine coefficients. However, differences of about 5% on parameterized turbulent kinetic energy were found depending on the turbine coefficient distribution. Furthermore, turbine coefficients that consider interference in the wind farm should be used in wind farm parameterization for larger-scale models to better describe sub-grid scale turbulent processes.

  11. Structure and kinetics of formation of interphase layers of synthetic fatty acid aluminum soap at the water/oil interface

    SciTech Connect

    Chalykh, A.E.; Matveev, V.V.; Mityuk, D.Y.; Shal't, S.Y.; Tarasevich, B.N.

    1986-02-01

    The authors investigate the kinetics of formation of interphase layers (IL) at the interface between the phases: a 0.15% solution of aluminum soap of synthetic fatty acids (SFA) (fraction C/sub 17/-C/sub 21/) in n-decane/distilled water. The structure and the morphological properties of IL were investigated by transmission electron spectroscopy. The electron micrographs of the interphase layer of the soap at different stages of its formation show that the formation of a new phase starts with the appearance of small dispersed particles with spherical and fibrillar shapes. The results obtained supplement the authors' concepts about the mechanism of spontaneous microemulsification.

  12. Altered Cellular Kinetics in Growth Plate according to Alterations in Weight Bearing

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hoon; Kong, Sun Young; Kim, Hyun Woo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To examine the effects of change in weight bearing on the growth plate metabolism, a simulated animal model of weightlessness was introduced and the chondrocytes' cellular kinetics was evaluated. Materials and Methods Unloading condition on the hind-limb of Sprague-Dawley rats was created by fixing a tail and lifting the hind-limb. Six rats aged 6 weeks old were assigned to each group of unloading, reloading, and control groups of unloading or reloading. Unloading was maintained for three weeks, and then reloading was applied for another one week thereafter. Histomorphometry for the assessment of vertical length of the growth plate, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridin immunohistochemistry for cellular kinetics, and biotin nick end labeling transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay for chondrocytes apoptosis in the growth plate were performed. Results The vertical length of the growth plate and the proliferative potential of chondrocytes were decreased in the unloading group compared to those of control groups. Inter-group differences were more significant in the proliferative and hypertrophic zones. Reloading increased the length of growth plate and proliferative potential of chondrocytes. However, apoptotic changes in the growth plate were not affected by the alterations of weight bearing. Conclusion Alterations in the weight bearing induced changes in the chondrocytic proliferative potential of the growth plate, however, had no effects on the apoptosis. This may explain why non-weight bearing in various clinical situations hampers normal longitudinal bone growth. Further studies on the factors for reversibility of chondrocytic proliferation upon variable mechanical stresses are needed. PMID:22477008

  13. Effects of Alloying on Nanoscale Grain Growth in Substitutional Binary Alloy System: Thermodynamics and Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Haoran; Chen, Yuzeng; Liu, Feng

    2015-11-01

    Applying the regular solution model, the Gibbs free energy of mixing for substitutional binary alloy system was constructed. Then, thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, e.g., driving force and solute drag force, controlling nanoscale grain growth of substitutional binary alloy systems were derived and compared to their generally accepted definitions and interpretations. It is suggested that for an actual grain growth process, the classical driving force P = γ/D ( γ the grain boundary (GB) energy, D the grain size) should be replaced by a new expression, i.e., P^' = γ /D - Δ P . Δ P represents the energy required to adjust nonequilibrium solute distribution to equilibrium solute distribution, which is equivalent to the generally accepted solute drag force impeding GB migration. By incorporating the derived new driving force for grain growth into the classical grain growth model, the reported grain growth behaviors of nanocrystalline Fe-4at. pct Zr and Pd-19at. pct Zr alloys were analyzed. On this basis, the effect of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters ( i.e., P, Δ P and the GB mobility ( M GB)) on nanoscale grain growth, were investigated. Upon grain growth, the decrease of P is caused by the reduction of γ as a result of solute segregation in GBs; the decrease of Δ P is, however, due to the decrease of grain growth velocity; whereas the decrease of M GB is attributed to the enhanced difference of solute molar fractions between the bulk and the GBs as well as the increased activation energy for GB diffusion.

  14. Stepwise crystallization and the layered distribution in crystallization kinetics of ultra-thin poly(ethylene terephthalate) film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Biao; Xu, Jianquan; Sun, Shuzheng; Liu, Yue; Yang, Juping; Zhang, Li; Wang, Xinping

    2016-06-01

    Crystallization is an important property of polymeric materials. In conventional viewpoint, the transformation of disordered chains into crystals is usually a spatially homogeneous process (i.e., it occurs simultaneously throughout the sample), that is, the crystallization rate at each local position within the sample is almost the same. Here, we show that crystallization of ultra-thin poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films can occur in the heterogeneous way, exhibiting a stepwise crystallization process. We found that the layered distribution of glass transition dynamics of thin film modifies the corresponding crystallization behavior, giving rise to the layered distribution of the crystallization kinetics of PET films, with an 11-nm-thick surface layer having faster crystallization rate and the underlying layer showing bulk-like behavior. The layered distribution in crystallization kinetics results in a particular stepwise crystallization behavior during heating the sample, with the two cold-crystallization temperatures separated by up to 20 K. Meanwhile, interfacial interaction is crucial for the occurrence of the heterogeneous crystallization, as the thin film crystallizes simultaneously if the interfacial interaction is relatively strong. We anticipate that this mechanism of stepwise crystallization of thin polymeric films will allow new insight into the chain organization in confined environments and permit independent manipulation of localized properties of nanomaterials.

  15. A two Turbulence Kinetic Energy model as a scale-adaptive approach to modeling the planetary boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Ritthik; Stevens, Bjorn

    2016-03-01

    A two Turbulence Kinetic Energy (2TKE) model is developed to address the boundary layer "grey zone" problem. The model combines ideas from local and nonlocal models into a single energetically consistent framework. By applying the Reynolds averaging to the large eddy simulation (LES) equations that employ Deardorff's subgrid TKE, we arrive at a system of equations for the boundary layer quantities and two turbulence kinetic energies: one which encapsulates the TKE of large boundary-layer-scale eddies and another which represents the energy of eddies subgrid to the vertical grid size of a typical large-scale model. These two energies are linked via the turbulent cascade of energy from larger to smaller scales and are used to model the mixing in the boundary layer. The model is evaluated for three dry test cases and found to compare favorably to large eddy simulations. The usage of two TKEs for mixing helps reduce the dependency of the model on the vertical grid scale as well as on the free tropospheric stability and facilitates a smoother transition from convective to stable regimes. The usage of two TKEs representing two ranges of scales satisfies the prerequisite for modeling the boundary layer in the "grey zone": an idea that is explored further in a companion paper.

  16. Direct observation of kinetic traps associated with structural transformations leading to multiple pathways of S-layer assembly.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seong-Ho; Chung, Sungwook; Sanii, Babak; Comolli, Luis R; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; De Yoreo, James J

    2012-08-07

    The concept of a folding funnel with kinetic traps describes folding of individual proteins. Using in situ Atomic Force Microscopy to investigate S-layer assembly on mica, we show this concept is equally valid during self-assembly of proteins into extended matrices. We find the S-layer-on-mica system possesses a kinetic trap associated with conformational differences between a long-lived transient state and the final stable state. Both ordered tetrameric states emerge from clusters of the monomer phase, however, they then track along two different pathways. One leads directly to the final low-energy state and the other to the kinetic trap. Over time, the trapped state transforms into the stable state. By analyzing the time and temperature dependencies of formation and transformation we find that the energy barriers to formation of the two states differ by only 0.7 kT, but once the high-energy state forms, the barrier to transformation to the low-energy state is 25 kT. Thus the transient state exhibits the characteristics of a kinetic trap in a folding funnel.

  17. Quantifying the Nucleation and Growth Kinetics of Microwave Nanochemistry Enabled by in Situ High-Energy X-ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Gao, Min-Rui; Liu, Yuzi; Okasinski, John S; Ren, Yang; Sun, Yugang

    2016-01-13

    The fast reaction kinetics presented in the microwave synthesis of colloidal silver nanoparticles was quantitatively studied, for the first time, by integrating a microwave reactor with in situ X-ray diffraction at a high-energy synchrotron beamline. Comprehensive data analysis reveals two different types of reaction kinetics corresponding to the nucleation and growth of the Ag nanoparticles. The formation of seeds (nucleation) follows typical first-order reaction kinetics with activation energy of 20.34 kJ/mol, while the growth of seeds (growth) follows typical self-catalytic reaction kinetics. Varying the synthesis conditions indicates that the microwave colloidal chemistry is independent of concentration of surfactant. These discoveries reveal that the microwave synthesis of Ag nanoparticles proceeds with reaction kinetics significantly different from the synthesis present in conventional oil bath heating. The in situ X-ray diffraction technique reported in this work is promising to enable further understanding of crystalline nanomaterials formed through microwave synthesis.

  18. Release kinetics of platelet-derived and plasma-derived growth factors from autologous plasma rich in growth factors.

    PubMed

    Anitua, Eduardo; Zalduendo, Mari Mar; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Orive, Gorka

    2013-10-01

    Many studies have evaluated the biological effects of platelet rich plasma reporting the final outcomes on cell and tissues. However, few studies have dealt with the kinetics of growth factor delivery by plasma rich in growth factors. Venous blood was obtained from three healthy volunteers and processed with PRGF-Endoret technology to prepare autologous plasma rich in growth factors. The gel-like fibrin scaffolds were then incubated in triplicate, in a cell culture medium to monitor the release of PDGF-AB, VEGF, HGF and IGF-I during 8 days of incubation. A leukocyte-platelet rich plasma was prepared employing the same technology and the concentrations of growth factors and interleukin-1β were determined after 24h of incubation. After each period, the medium was collected, fibrin clot was destroyed and the supernatants were stored at -80°C until analysis. The growth factor delivery is diffusion controlled with a rapid initial release by 30% of the bioactive content after 1h of incubation and a steady state release when almost 70% of the growth factor content has been delivered. Autologous fibrin matrix retained almost 30% of the amount of the growth factors after 8 days of incubation. The addition of leukocytes to the formula of platelet rich plasma did not increase the concentration of the growth factors, while it drastically increased the presence of pro-inflammatory IL-1β. Further studies employing an in vitro inflammatory model would be interesting to study the difference in growth factors and pro-inflammatory cytokines between leukocyte-free and leukocyte-rich platelet rich plasma.

  19. Altered hypertrophic chondrocyte kinetics in GDF-5 deficient murine tibial growth plates.

    PubMed

    Mikic, B; Clark, R T; Battaglia, T C; Gaschen, V; Hunziker, E B

    2004-05-01

    The growth/differentiation factors (GDFs) are a subgroup of the bone morphogenetic proteins best known for their role in joint formation and chondrogenesis. Mice deficient in one of these signaling proteins, GDF-5, exhibit numerous skeletal abnormalities, including shortened limb bones. The primary aim of this study was determine whether GDF-5 deficiency would alter the growth rate in growth plates from the long bones in mice and, if so, how this is achieved. Stereologic and cell kinetic parameters in proximal tibial growth plates from 5-week-old female GDF-5 -/- mice and control littermates were examined. GDF-5 deficiency resulted in a statistically significant reduction in growth rate (-14%, p=0.03). The effect of genotype on growth rate was associated with an altered hypertrophic phase duration, with hypertrophic cells from GDF-5 deficient mice exhibiting a significantly longer phase duration compared to control littermates (+25%, p=0.006). These data suggest that one way in which GDF-5 might modulate the rate of endochondral bone growth could be by affecting the duration of the hypertrophic phase in growth plate chondrocytes.

  20. Integrating carbon nanotube forests into polysilicon MEMS: Growth kinetics, mechanisms, and adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Ubnoske, Stephen M.; Radauscher, Erich J.; Meshot, Eric R.; Stoner, Brian R.; Parker, Charles B.; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    2016-11-19

    The growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on polycrystalline silicon substrates was studied to improve the design of CNT field emission sources for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) applications and vacuum microelectronic devices (VMDs). Microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) was used for CNT growth, resulting in CNTs that incorporate the catalyst particle at their base. The kinetics of CNT growth on polysilicon were compared to growth on Si (100) using the model of Deal and Grove, finding activation energies of 1.61 and 1.54 eV for the nucleation phase of growth and 1.90 and 3.69 eV for the diffusion-limited phase on Si (100) and polysilicon, respectively. Diffusivity values for growth on polysilicon were notably lower than the corresponding values on Si (100) and the growth process became diffusion-limited earlier. Evidence favors a surface diffusion growth mechanism involving diffusion of carbon precursor species along the length of the CNT forest to the catalyst at the base. Explanations for the differences in activation energies and diffusivities were elucidated by SEM analysis of the catalyst nanoparticle arrays and through wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) of CNT forests. As a result, methods are presented to improve adhesion of CNT films during operation as field emitters, resulting in a 2.5× improvement.

  1. Integrating carbon nanotube forests into polysilicon MEMS: Growth kinetics, mechanisms, and adhesion

    DOE PAGES

    Ubnoske, Stephen M.; Radauscher, Erich J.; Meshot, Eric R.; ...

    2016-11-19

    The growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on polycrystalline silicon substrates was studied to improve the design of CNT field emission sources for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) applications and vacuum microelectronic devices (VMDs). Microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) was used for CNT growth, resulting in CNTs that incorporate the catalyst particle at their base. The kinetics of CNT growth on polysilicon were compared to growth on Si (100) using the model of Deal and Grove, finding activation energies of 1.61 and 1.54 eV for the nucleation phase of growth and 1.90 and 3.69 eV for the diffusion-limited phase on Si (100)more » and polysilicon, respectively. Diffusivity values for growth on polysilicon were notably lower than the corresponding values on Si (100) and the growth process became diffusion-limited earlier. Evidence favors a surface diffusion growth mechanism involving diffusion of carbon precursor species along the length of the CNT forest to the catalyst at the base. Explanations for the differences in activation energies and diffusivities were elucidated by SEM analysis of the catalyst nanoparticle arrays and through wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) of CNT forests. As a result, methods are presented to improve adhesion of CNT films during operation as field emitters, resulting in a 2.5× improvement.« less

  2. A phase-field model coupled with lattice kinetics solver for modeling crystal growth in furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Guang; Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Henager, Charles H.

    2014-02-02

    In this study, we present a new numerical model for crystal growth in a vertical solidification system. This model takes into account the buoyancy induced convective flow and its effect on the crystal growth process. The evolution of the crystal growth interface is simulated using the phase-field method. Two novel phase-field models are developed to model the crystal growth interface in vertical gradient furnaces with two temperature profile setups: 1) fixed wall temperature profile setup and 2) time-dependent temperature profile setup. A semi-implicit lattice kinetics solver based on the Boltzmann equation is employed to model the unsteady incompressible flow. This model is used to investigate the effect of furnace operational conditions on crystal growth interface profiles and growth velocities. For a simple case of macroscopic radial growth, the phase-field model is validated against an analytical solution. Crystal growth in vertical gradient furnaces with two temperature profile setups have been also investigated using the developed model. The numerical simulations reveal that for a certain set of temperature boundary conditions, the heat transport in the melt near the phase interface is diffusion dominant and advection is suppressed.

  3. Mixing layer growth and background air-quality measurements over the Colorado oil-shale area

    SciTech Connect

    Laulainen, N.S.; Whiteman, C.D.; Davis, W.E.; Thorp, J.M.

    1981-06-01

    The daily growth of convective boundary layers over the complex terrain of the oil shale areas of Colorado is a prominent feature of the meteorology of the region. The development of these layers was investigated using airsondes, rawinsondes, and aircraft. The deep growth of the layers in August, to heights in excess of 5500-m MSL on clear or partly cloudy days, is expected to have important implications for the dispersal of pollutants released in the region as the oil shale resource undergoes future development. Aircraft observations show that the present background air quality is good over the region and that pollutants, when present, become well mixed throughout the depth of the convective boundary layer. The layer therefore represents an important natural means of dilution for pollutants introduced into the atmosphere. Work is proceeding to incorporate the time-dependent convective boundary layer growth into air pollution models for the region.

  4. Dynamic kinetic analysis of growth of Listeria monocytogenes in a simulated comminuted, non-cured cooked pork product

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to directly construct a tertiary growth model for Listeria monocytogenes in cooked pork and simultaneously determine the kinetic parameters using a combination of dynamic and isothermal growth curves. Growth studies were conducted using a cocktail of 5 strains of L. ...

  5. CFD modelling of small particle dispersion: The influence of the turbulence kinetic energy in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlé, C.; van Beeck, J.; Rambaud, P.; Van Tendeloo, G.

    When considering the modelling of small particle dispersion in the lower part of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) using Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes simulations, the particle paths depend on the velocity profile and on the turbulence kinetic energy, from which the fluctuating velocity components are derived to predict turbulent dispersion. It is therefore important to correctly reproduce the ABL, both for the velocity profile and the turbulence kinetic energy profile. For RANS simulations with the standard k- ɛ model, Richards and Hoxey (1993. Appropriate boundary conditions for computational wind engineering models using the k-ɛ turbulence model. Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics 46-47, 145-153.) proposed a set of boundary conditions which result in horizontally homogeneous profiles. The drawback of this method is that it assumes a constant profile of turbulence kinetic energy, which is not always consistent with field or wind tunnel measurements. Therefore, a method was developed which allows the modelling of a horizontally homogeneous turbulence kinetic energy profile that is varying with height. By comparing simulations performed with the proposed method to simulations performed with the boundary conditions described by Richards and Hoxey (1993. Appropriate boundary conditions for computational wind engineering models using the k-ɛ turbulence model. Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics 46-47, 145-153.), the influence of the turbulence kinetic energy on the dispersion of small particles over flat terrain is quantified.

  6. Temperature-dependent growth kinetics of Escherichia coli ML 30 in glucose-limited continuous culture.

    PubMed Central

    Kovárová, K; Zehnder, A J; Egli, T

    1996-01-01

    Detailed comparison of growth kinetics at temperatures below and above the optimal temperature was carried out with Escherichia coli ML 30 (DSM 1329) in continuous culture. The culture was grown with glucose as the sole limiting source of carbon and energy (100 mg liter(-1) in feed medium), and the resulting steady-state concentrations of glucose were measured as a function of the dilution rate at 17.4, 28.4, 37, and 40 degrees C. The experimental data could not be described by the conventional Monod equation over the entire temperature range, but an extended form of the Monod model [mu = mu(max) x (s - s(min))/(Ks + s - s(min))], which predicts a finite substrate concentration at 0 growth rate (s(min)), provided a good fit. The two parameters mu(max) and s(min) were temperature dependent, whereas, surprisingly, fitting the model to the experimental data yielded virtually identical Ks values (approximately 33 microg liter(-1)) at all temperatures. A model that describes steady-state glucose concentrations as a function of temperature at constant growth rates is presented. In similar experiments with mixtures of glucose and galactose (1:1 mixture), the two sugars were utilized simultaneously at all temperatures examined, and their steady-state concentrations were reduced compared with to growth with either glucose or galactose alone. The results of laboratory-scale kinetic experiments are discussed with respect to the concentrations observed in natural environments. PMID:8755881

  7. Crystal growth kinetics in Lennard-Jones and Weeks-Chandler-Andersen systems along the solid-liquid coexistence line.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Ronald; Horbach, Jürgen

    2015-07-07

    Kinetics of crystal-growth is investigated along the solid-liquid coexistence line for the (100), (110), and (111) orientations of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) and Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA) fcc crystal-liquid interface, using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. A slowing down of the growth kinetics along the coexistence line is observed, which is due to the decrease of the melting enthalpy with increasing coexistence temperature and pressure. Other quantities such as the melting pressure and liquid self-diffusion coefficient have a comparatively lesser impact on the kinetic growth coefficient. Growth kinetics of the LJ and WCA potentials become similar at large values of the melting temperature and pressure, when both resemble a purely repulsive soft-sphere potential. Classical models of crystallization from the melt are in reasonable qualitative agreement with our simulation data. Finally, several one-phase empirical melting/freezing rules are studied with respect to their validity along the coexistence line.

  8. Evaluation of a kinetic model for computer simulation of growth and fermentation by Scheffersomyces (Pichia) stipitis fed D-xylose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scheffersomyces (formly Pichia) stipitis is a potential biocatalyst for converting lignocelluloses to ethanol because the yeast natively ferments xylose. An unstructured kinetic model based upon a system of linear differential equations has been formulated that describes growth and ethanol productio...

  9. A mathematical model of the kinetics of beta-amyloid fibril growth from the denatured state.

    PubMed Central

    Pallitto, M M; Murphy, R M

    2001-01-01

    Spontaneous conversion of beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) from soluble monomer to insoluble fibril may underlie the neurodegeneration associated with Alzheimer's disease. A complete description of Abeta self-association kinetics requires identification of the oligomeric species present and the pathway of association, as well as quantitation of rate constants and reaction order. Abeta was rendered monomeric and denatured by dissolution in 8 M urea, pH 10. "Refolding" and fibrillization were initiated by rapid dilution into phosphate-buffered saline, pH 7.4. The kinetics of growth were followed at three different concentrations, using size exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering, and static light scattering. A multi-step pathway for fibril formation and growth was postulated. This pathway included 1) rapid commitment to either stable monomer/dimer or unstable intermediate, 2) cooperative association of intermediate into a multimeric "nucleus," 3) elongation of the "nucleus" into filaments via addition of intermediate, 4) lateral aggregation of filaments into fibrils, and 5) fibril elongation via end-to-end association. Differential and algebraic equations describing this kinetic pathway were derived, and model parameters were determined by fitting the data. The utility of the model for identifying toxic Abeta oligomeric specie(s) is demonstrated. The model should prove useful for designing compounds that inhibit Abeta aggregation and/or toxicity. PMID:11509390

  10. Antifreeze effect of carboxylated ε-poly-L-lysine on the growth kinetics of ice crystals.

    PubMed

    Vorontsov, Dmitry A; Sazaki, Gen; Hyon, Suong-Hyu; Matsumura, Kazuaki; Furukawa, Yoshinori

    2014-08-28

    Some biological substances control the nucleation and growth of inorganic crystals. Antifreeze proteins, which prohibit ice crystal growth in living organisms, promise are also important as biological antifreezes for medical applications and in the frozen food industries. In this work, we investigated the crystallization of ice in the presence of a new cryoprotector, carboxylated ε-poly-L-lysine (COOH-PLL). In order to reveal the characteristics and the mechanism of its antifreeze effect, free-growth experiments of ice crystals were carried out in solutions with various COOH-PLL concentrations and degrees of supercooling, and the depression of the freezing point and growth rates of the tips of ice dendrites were obtained using optical microscopy. Hysteresis of growth rates and depression of the freezing point was revealed in the presence of COOH-PLL. The growth-inhibition effect of COOH-PLL molecules could be explained on the basis of the Gibbs-Thomson law and the use of Langmuir's adsorption isotherm. Theoretical kinetic curves for hysteresis calculated on the basis of Punin-Artamonova's model were in good agreement with experimental data. We conclude that adsorption of large biological molecules in the case of ice crystallization has a non-steady-state character and occurs more slowly than the process of embedding of crystal growth units.

  11. Kinetics of crystal nucleation and growth in Pd(40)Ni(40)P(20) glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drehman, A. J.; Greer, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of Pd(40)Ni(40)P(20) glass, produced by cooling the melt at 1 or 800 K/s, are heated in a differential scanning calorimeter to determine the crystallization kinetics. Optical microscopy shows that eutectic crystallization proceeds both by growth from the surface of the samples and by the growth of spherical regions around preexisting nuclei in the interior. A modified Kissinger (1957) analysis is used to obtain the activation energy for crystal growth (3.49 eV). The steady state homogeneous nucleation frequency at 590 K is about 10 million/cu m per sec. This is estimated to be the maximum nucleation frequency: it is too low to account for the observed population of quenched-in nuclei, which are therefore presumed to be heterogeneous. The major practical obstacle to glass formation in this system is heterogeneous nucleation.

  12. Nucleation and growth kinetics of struvite in a fluidized bed reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuiyan, M. Iqbal H.; Mavinic, D. S.; Beckie, R. D.

    2008-03-01

    Kinetics of struvite crystallization were studied to gain a better understanding of intentional struvite formation in fluidized bed reactors. Mechanisms controlling nucleation were studied in the laboratory by induction time experiments. pH monitoring proved to be an effective method of induction time determination, during the induction period. The induction period, when nucleation was the controlling process for struvite crystal formation, was found to be primarily reaction controlled, with minor transport influence. The metastable region for struvite was explored in this study. The solubility and supersolubility curves, which are the boundaries of the metastable region, were observed to be almost parallel straight lines in the concentration range studied. The growth rate of struvite determined in a fluidized bed reactor was mainly transport controlled. With the determination of the mass-transfer coefficient and surface-reaction coefficient for a specified condition, a two-step linear growth rate model for struvite growth determination in a fluidized bed reactor has been proposed.

  13. Growth kinetics of CVD TiO sub 2; Influence of carrier gas

    SciTech Connect

    Siefering, K.L.; Griffin, G.L. )

    1990-04-01

    This paper reports on the growth rate of TiO{sub 2} thin films deposited by the decomposition of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in the presence of N{sub 2} carrier gas. Experiments are performed at TTIP partial pressures between 0.005 and 0.7 torr and a substrate temperature of 573 K, conditions where second-order kinetics have previously been observed in the presence of TTIP alone. When 5 torr of N{sub 2} is present as a carrier gas, the kinetics become first order in TTIP concentration. By fitting the observed rates to the rate expression for the bimolecular reaction mechanism proposed in the earlier study, the authors obtain a value of {phi} = 0.43 for the relative efficiency of N{sub 2} for collisional energy transfer, compared to TTIP.

  14. Altered Cellular Kinetics in the Growth Plate of the Femoral Head of Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hoon; Kong, Sun Young

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Pathologic changes in the growth plate remain unknown in Legg-Calvé-Perthes (LCP) disease. Spontaneously hypertensive rats have proven to be a good model for studying LCP disease. This study investigated the histopathologic changes and the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in the growth plate of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Materials and Methods Sixty SHR rats were divided into two groups: those showing osteonecrosis (SHR+n group: 32), and those showing normal ossification (SHR-n group: 28). Thirty Wister Kyoto rats served as a control. For histomorphological measurement, the length of each zone of the growth plate was measured. Cell kinetics was measured by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridin (BrdU) immunohistochemistry and transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) immunohistochemistry was used to identify of expression of VEGF. Results The lengths of growth plates of the SHR+n group were significantly shorter in the initial growth period than those of the other groups. The lowest proliferative rate and the highest apoptosis rate were observed in the SHR+n group at the initial growth period. The expression of VEGF in the growth plate of the SHR group was lower than the control group, and it was lower in the SHR+n group than in the SHR-n group. Conclusion The growth plate of the SHR+n group was found to be affected by disease process of ischemic necrosis of the femoral head, and this might explain the relative overgrowth of the greater trochanter in the later stages of LCP disease. PMID:22477009

  15. The importance of growth kinetic analysis in determining bacterial susceptibility against antibiotics and silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Theophel, Karsten; Schacht, Veronika J; Schlüter, Michael; Schnell, Sylvia; Stingu, Catalina-Suzana; Schaumann, Reiner; Bunge, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Routine antibiotics susceptibility testing still relies on standardized cultivation-based analyses, including measurement of inhibition zones in conventional agar diffusion tests and endpoint turbidity-based measurements. Here, we demonstrate that common off-line monitoring and endpoint determination after 18-24 h could be insufficient for reliable growth-dependent evaluation of antibiotic susceptibility. Different minimal inhibitory concentrations were obtained in 20- and 48 h microdilution plate tests using an Enterococcus faecium clinical isolate (strain UKI-MB07) as a model organism. Hence, we used an on-line kinetic assay for simultaneous cultivation and time-resolved growth analysis in a 96-well format instead of off-line susceptibility testing. Growth of the Enterococcus test organism was delayed up to 30 h in the presence of 0.25 μg mL(-1) of vancomycin and 8 μg mL(-1) of fosfomycin, after which pronounced growth was observed. Despite the delayed onset of growth, treatment with fosfomycin, daptomycin, fusidic acid, cefoxitin, or gentamicin resulted in higher maximum growth rates and/or higher final optical density values compared with antibiotic-free controls, indicating that growth stimulation and hormetic effects may occur with extended exposure to sublethal antibiotic concentrations. Whereas neither maximum growth rate nor final cell density correlated with antibiotic concentration, the lag phase duration for some antibiotics was a more meaningful indicator of dose-dependent growth inhibition. Our results also reveal that non-temporal growth profiles are only of limited value for cultivation-based antimicrobial silver nanoparticle susceptibility testing. The exposure to Ag(0) nanoparticles led to plasma membrane damage in a concentration-dependent manner and induced oxidative stress in Enterococcus faecium UKI-MB07, as shown by intracellular ROS accumulation.

  16. Silicon carbon(001) gas-source molecular beam epitaxy from methyl silane and silicon hydride: The effects of carbon incorporation and surface segregation on growth kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foo, Yong-Lim

    Si1-yCy alloys were grown on Si(001) by gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy (GS-MBE) from Si2H6/CH3 SiH3 mixtures as a function of C concentration y (0 to 2.6 at %) and deposition temperature Ts (500--600°C). High-resolution x-ray diffraction reciprocal lattice maps show that all layers are in tension and fully coherent with their substrates. Film growth rates R decrease with both y and Ts, and the rate of decrease in R as a function of y increases rapidly with Ts. In-situ isotopically-tagged D2 temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) measurements reveal that C segregates to the second-layer during steady-state Si1-y Cy(001) growth. This, in turn, results in charge-transfer from Si surface dangling bonds to second-layer C atoms, which have a higher electronegativity than Si. From the TPD results, we obtain the coverage θ Si*(y, Ts) of Si* surface sites with C backbonds as well as H2 desorption energies Ed from both Si and Si* surface sites. This leads to an increase in the H2 desorption rate, and hence should yield higher film deposition rates, with increasing y and/or Ts during Si1-yCy(001) growth. The effect, however, is more than offset by the decrease in Si2H 6 reactive sticking probabilities at Si* surface sites. Film growth rates R(Ts, JSi2H6,J CH3SiH3 ) calculated using a simple transition-state kinetic model, together with measured kinetic parameters, were found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. At higher growth temperature (725 and 750°C), superlattice structures consisting of alternating Si-rich and C-rich sublayers form spontaneously during the gas-source molecular beam epitaxial growth of Si1-y Cy layers from constant Si2H6 and CH 3SiH3 precursor fluxes. The formation of a self-organized superstructure is due to a complex interaction among competing surface reactions. During growth of the initial Si-rich sublayer, C strongly segregates to the second layer resulting in charge transfer from surface Si atom dangling bonds of to C

  17. Quantum size effects in the low temperature layer-by-layer growth of Pb on Ge(0 0 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floreano, L.; Cvetko, D.; Bruno, F.; Bavdek, G.; Cossaro, A.; Gotter, R.; Verdini, A.; Morgante, A.

    2003-08-01

    The electronic properties of thin metallic films deviate from the corresponding bulk ones when the film thickness is comparable with the wavelength of the electrons at the Fermi level. This phenomenon, referred to as quantum size effect (QSE), is also expected to affect the film morphology and structure leading to the “electronic growth” of metals on semiconductors. Such effect may be observed when metals are grown on substrates held at low temperature and are manifested through the occurrence of “magical” thickness islands or critical thickness for layer-by-layer growth. In particular, layer-by-layer growth of Pb(1 1 1) films has been reported for deposition on Ge(0 0 1) below ∼130 K. An extremely flat morphology is preserved throughout deposition from four up to a dozen of monolayers. These flat films are shown to be metastable and to reorganize into large clusters uncovering the first Pb layer pseudomorphic to the underlying Ge(0 0 1) substrate already at room temperature. Indications of QSE induced structural variations of the growing films have been reported for Pb growth on both Si(1 1 1) and Ge(0 0 1). In the latter case, the apparent height of the Pb(1 1 1) monatomic step was shown to change in an oscillatory fashion by He atom scattering (HAS) during layer-by-layer growth at low temperature. The extent of the structural QSE has been obtained by a comparison of the HAS data with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and reflectivity experiments. Whereas step height variations as large as 20% have been measured by HAS reflectivity, the displacement of the atomic planes from their bulk position, as measured by XRD, has been found to mainly affect the topmost Pb layer, but with a lower extent, i.e. the QSE observed by HAS are mainly due to a perpendicular displacement of the topmost layer charge density. The effect of the variable surface relaxation on the surface vibration has been studied from the acoustic dispersion of the low energy phonons, as measured by

  18. Kinetics of gypsum nucleation and crystal growth from Dead Sea brine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznik, Itay J.; Gavrieli, Ittai; Ganor, Jiwchar

    2009-10-01

    The Dead Sea brine is supersaturated with respect to gypsum ( Ω = 1.42). Laboratory experiments and evaluation of historical data show that gypsum nucleation and crystal growth kinetics from Dead Sea brine are both slower in comparison with solutions at a similar degree of supersaturation. The slow kinetics of gypsum precipitation in the Dead Sea brine is mainly attributed to the low solubility of gypsum which is due to the high Ca 2+/SO 42- molar ratio (115), high salinity (˜280 g/kg) and to Na + inhibition. Experiments with various clay minerals (montmorillonite, kaolinite) indicate that these minerals do not serve as crystallization seeds. In contrast, calcite and aragonite which contain traces of gypsum impurities do prompt precipitation of gypsum but at a considerable slower rate than with pure gypsum. This implies that transportation inflow of clay minerals, calcite and local crystallization of minerals in the Dead Sea does not prompt significant heterogeneous precipitation of gypsum. Based on historical analyses of the Dead Sea, it is shown that over the last decades, as inflows to the lake decreased and its salinity increased, gypsum continuously precipitated from the brine. The increasing salinity and Ca 2+/SO 42- ratio, which results from the precipitation of gypsum, lead to even slower kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth, which resulted in an increasing degree of supersaturation with respect to gypsum. Therefore, we predict that as the salinity of the Dead Sea brine continues to increase (accompanied by Dead Sea water level decline), although gypsum will continuously precipitate, the degree of supersaturation will increase furthermore due to progressively slower kinetics.

  19. Does viscosity describe the kinetic barrier for crystal growth from the liquidus to the glass transition?

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Marcio Luis Ferreira; Zanotto, Edgar Dutra

    2010-11-07

    An analysis of the kinetic coefficient of crystal growth U(kin), recently proposed by Ediger et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 128, 034709 (2008)], indicates that the Stokes-Einstein/Eyring (SE/E) equation does not describe the diffusion process controlling crystal growth rates in fragile glass-forming liquids. U(kin) was defined using the normal growth model and tested for crystal data for inorganic and organic liquids covering a viscosity range of about 10(4)-10(12) Pa  s. Here, we revisit their interesting finding considering two other models: the screw dislocation (SD) and the two-dimensional surface nucleated (2D) growth models for nine undercooled oxide liquids, in a wider temperature range, from slightly below the melting point down to the glass transition region T(g), thus covering a wider viscosity range: 10(1)-10(13) Pa  s. We then propose and use normalized kinetic coefficients (M(kin)) for the SD and 2D growth models. These new kinetic coefficients restore the ability of viscosity to describe the transport part of crystal growth rates (M(kin)∼1/η and ξ∼1) from low to moderate viscosities (η<10(6) Pa  s), and thus the SE/E equation works well in this viscosity range for all systems tested. For strong glasses, the SE/E equation works well from low to high viscosities, from the melting point down to T(g)! However, for at least three fragile liquids, diopside (kink at 1.08T(g), η=1.6×10(8) Pa  s), lead metasilicate (kink at 1.14T(g), η=4.3×10(6) Pa  s), and lithium disilicate (kink at 1.11T(g), η=1.6×10(8) Pa  s), there are clear signs of a breakdown of the SE/E equation at these higher viscosities. Our results corroborate the findings of Ediger et al. and demonstrate that viscosity data cannot be used to describe the transport part of the crystal growth (via the SE/E equation) in fragile glasses in the neighborhood of T(g).

  20. Controllable growth of layered selenide and telluride heterostructures and superlattices using molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE PAGES

    Vishwanath, Suresh; Liu, Xinyu; Rouvimov, Sergei; ...

    2016-01-06

    Layered materials are an actively pursued area of research for realizing highly scaled technologies involving both traditional device structures as well as new physics. Lately, non-equilibrium growth of 2D materials using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is gathering traction in the scientific community and here we aim to highlight one of its strengths, growth of abrupt heterostructures, and superlattices (SLs). In this work we present several of the firsts: first growth of MoTe2 by MBE, MoSe2 on Bi2Se3 SLs, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) SLs, and lateral junction between a quintuple atomic layer of Bi2Te3 and a triple atomic layer of MoTe2.more » In conclusion, reflected high electron energy diffraction oscillations presented during the growth of TMD SLs strengthen our claim that ultrathin heterostructures with monolayer layer control is within reach.« less

  1. Interface engineering in epitaxial growth of layered oxides via a conducting layer insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Yu; Ma, Chao; Zhai, Xiaofang; Huang, Haoliang; Meng, Dechao; Wang, Jianlin; Fu, Zhengping; Peng, Ranran; Brown, Gail J.; Lu, Yalin

    2015-07-01

    There is a long-standing challenge in the fabrication of layered oxide epitaxial films due to their thermodynamic phase-instability and the large stacking layer number. Recently, the demand for high-quality thin films is strongly pushed by their promising room-temperature multiferroic properties. Here, we find that by inserting a conducting and lattice matched LaNiO3 buffer layer, high quality m = 5 Bi6FeCoTi3O18 epitaxial films can be fabricated using the laser molecular beam epitaxy, in which the atomic-scale sharp interface between the film and the metallic buffer layer explains the enhanced quality. The magnetic and ferroelectric properties of the high quality Bi6FeCoTi3O18 films are studied. This study demonstrates that insertion of the conducting layer is a powerful method in achieving high quality layered oxide thin films, which opens the door to further understand the underline physics and to develop new devices.

  2. Interface engineering in epitaxial growth of layered oxides via a conducting layer insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Yu; Meng, Dechao; Wang, Jianlin; Ma, Chao; Zhai, Xiaofang; Huang, Haoliang; Fu, Zhengping; Peng, Ranran; Brown, Gail J.; and others

    2015-07-06

    There is a long-standing challenge in the fabrication of layered oxide epitaxial films due to their thermodynamic phase-instability and the large stacking layer number. Recently, the demand for high-quality thin films is strongly pushed by their promising room-temperature multiferroic properties. Here, we find that by inserting a conducting and lattice matched LaNiO{sub 3} buffer layer, high quality m = 5 Bi{sub 6}FeCoTi{sub 3}O{sub 18} epitaxial films can be fabricated using the laser molecular beam epitaxy, in which the atomic-scale sharp interface between the film and the metallic buffer layer explains the enhanced quality. The magnetic and ferroelectric properties of the high quality Bi{sub 6}FeCoTi{sub 3}O{sub 18} films are studied. This study demonstrates that insertion of the conducting layer is a powerful method in achieving high quality layered oxide thin films, which opens the door to further understand the underline physics and to develop new devices.

  3. Growth kinetics of a diesel-degrading bacterial strain from petroleum-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Dahalan, S F A; Yunus, I; Johari, W L W; Shukor, M Y; Halmi, M I E; Shamaan, N A; Syed, M A

    2014-03-01

    A diesel-degrading bacterium was isolated from a diesel-contaminated site in Selangor, Malaysia. The isolate was tentatively identified as Acinetobacter sp. strain DRY12 based on partial 16S rDNA molecular phylogeny and Biolog GN microplate panels and Microlog database. Optimum growth occurred from 3 to 5% diesel and the strain was able to tolerate as high as 8% diesel. The optimal pH that supported growth of the bacterium was between pH 7.5 to 8.0. The isolate exhibited optimal growth in between 30 and 35 degrees C. The best nitrogen source was potassium nitrate (between 0.6 and 0.9% (w/v)) followed by ammonium chloride, sodium nitrite and ammonium sulphate in descending order. An almost complete removal of diesel components was seen from the reduction in hydrocarbon peaks observed using Solid Phase Microextraction Gas Chromatography analysis after 10 days of incubation. The best growth kinetic model to fit experimental data was the Haldane model of substrate inhibiting growth with a correlation coefficient value of 0.97. The maximum growth rate- micromax was 0.039 hr(-1) while the saturation constant or half velocity constant Ks and inhibition constant Ki, were 0.387% and 4.46%, respectively. MATH assays showed that 75% of the bacterium was found in the hexadecane phase indicating that the bacterium was hydrophobic. The characteristics of this bacterium make it useful for bioremediation works in the Tropics.

  4. Relationship between grain boundary complexion and grain growth kinetics in alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Shen J.

    2007-12-01

    This work investigated the effect of different grain boundary phases (complexions) on the grain growth kinetics of doped and undoped aluminas. This was achieved by relating quantitative grain growth kinetics to high-resolution electron microscopy of the grain boundaries. It was found that there are 6 different regimes into which the grain growth kinetics may be categorized. These regimes corresponded to the existence of six different grain boundary complexions. Grain boundaries in alumina were observed to show sub-monolayer adsorption, 'clean' intrinsic behavior, bilayer adsorption, multilayer adsorption, equilibrium thickness intergranular films, and wetting intergranular films. These different grain boundary types are listed in order of increasing grain boundary mobility. In general there is an increase in grain boundary mobility with an increase in the disorder within the core of the grain boundary. This broad range of grain boundaries produces a multiplicity of different microstructural effects that until now have been difficult to understand experimentally or theoretically. For example, abnormal grain growth in alumina simply results from the coexistence of two or more different complexions within the same microstructure. Therefore, there may be multiple distinct types of normal and abnormal grain growth behavior. Transitions from one type of boundary to another are chemically and thermally activated, and depend on the crystallography of the adjacent grains. It is found that the number of transitions that occur increases linearly with increasing grain size, and exponentially with temperature. In this regard, different dopants produce very different effects, which appear to be the major role of most dopants in affecting the grain boundary transport kinetics. Low energy planes and grain boundaries are the least likely to undergo such transitions. This experimental data compliments some theoretical derivations within the literature and has provided new insight

  5. Correlation between former alpha boundary growth kinetics and superplastic flow in Zn-22 pct Al

    SciTech Connect

    Yousefiani, A.; Mohamed, F.A.

    2000-01-01

    Former {alpha} boundaries (F{alpha}Bs) are residual grain boundaries that develop in Zn-22 pct Al during a heat treatment, which is normally applied to produce the fine structure necessary for micrograin superplasticity. They represent domains consisting of fine elongated {alpha} grains, which encompass groups of fine {alpha} (Al-rich) and {beta} (Zn-rich) phases (the superplastic microstructure). The results of a detailed investigation conducted on F{alpha}B growth kinetics in five grades of Zn-22 pct Al with various impurity contents reveal a direct correspondence between the level of impurities in the alloy and the characteristics associated with F{alpha}Bs (average size of F{alpha}Bs and the value of the F{alpha} B growth exponent). This correspondence, which, according to available evidence, is the result of impurity segregation at F{alpha}Bs, lends strong support to the interpretation of superplastic behavior at low stresses in terms of phenomena arising from boundary segregation. It is suggested that information on F{alpha}B growth kinetics in Zn-22 pct Al can be utilized to predict the low-stress superplastic characteristics of the alloy, such as the existence of region 1 or the occurrence of extensive cavitation.

  6. Model-driven experimental evaluation of struvite nucleation, growth and aggregation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, S C; Schneider, P A; Flood, A E

    2014-06-01

    Nutrient stewardship is emerging as an issue of global importance, which will drive the development of nutrient recovery in the near to medium future. This will impact wastewater treatment practices, environmental protection, sustainable agriculture and global food security. A modelling framework for precipitation-based nutrient recovery systems has been developed, incorporating non-ideal solution thermodynamics, a dynamic mass balance and a dynamic population balance to track the development of the precipitating particles. The mechanisms of crystal nucleation and growth and, importantly, aggregation are considered. A novel approach to the population balance embeds the nucleation rate into the model, enabling direct regression of its kinetic parameters. The case study chosen for the modelling framework is that of struvite precipitation, given its wide interest and commercial promise as one possible nutrient recovery pathway. Power law kinetic parameters for nucleation, crystal growth and particle aggregation rates were regressed from an ensemble data set generated from 14 laboratory seeded batch experiments using synthetic solutions. These experiments were highly repeatable, giving confidence to the regressed parameter values. The model successfully describes the dynamic responses of solution pH, the evolving particle size distribution subject to nucleation, growth and aggregation effects and the aqueous magnesium concentration in the liquid phase. The proposed modelling framework could well be extended to other, more complex systems, leading to an improved understanding and commensurately greater confidence in the design, operation and optimisation of large-scale nutrient recovery processes from complex effluents.

  7. Controlling the Growth of Au on Icosahedral Seeds of Pd by Manipulating the Reduction Kinetics

    DOE PAGES

    Lv, Tian; Yang, Xuan; Zheng, Yiqun; ...

    2016-03-29

    This article reports a systematic study of how Au atoms nucleate and grow on Pd icosahedral seeds with a multiply twinned structure. By manipulating the reduction kinetics, we obtained Pd–Au bimetallic nanocrystals with two distinct shapes and structures. Specifically, Pd@Au core–shell icosahedra were formed when a relatively fast reduction rate was used for the HAuCl4 precursor. At a slow reduction rate, in contrast, the nucleation and growth of Au atoms were mainly confined to one of the vertices of a Pd icosahedral seed, resulting in the formation of a Au icosahedron by sharing five adjacent faces with the Pd seed.more » The same growth pattern was observed for Pd icosahedral seeds with both sizes of 32 and 20 nm. Also, we have also investigated the effects of other kinetic parameters, including the concentration of reducing agent and reaction temperature, on the growth pathway undertaken by the Au atoms. In conclusion, we believe that the mechanistic insights obtained from this study can be extended to other systems, including the involvement of different metals and/or seeds with different morphologies.« less

  8. Controlling the Growth of Au on Icosahedral Seeds of Pd by Manipulating the Reduction Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Tian; Yang, Xuan; Zheng, Yiqun; Huang, Hongwen; Zhang, Lei; Tao, Jing; Pan, Likun; Xia, Younan

    2016-03-29

    This article reports a systematic study of how Au atoms nucleate and grow on Pd icosahedral seeds with a multiply twinned structure. By manipulating the reduction kinetics, we obtained Pd–Au bimetallic nanocrystals with two distinct shapes and structures. Specifically, Pd@Au core–shell icosahedra were formed when a relatively fast reduction rate was used for the HAuCl4 precursor. At a slow reduction rate, in contrast, the nucleation and growth of Au atoms were mainly confined to one of the vertices of a Pd icosahedral seed, resulting in the formation of a Au icosahedron by sharing five adjacent faces with the Pd seed. The same growth pattern was observed for Pd icosahedral seeds with both sizes of 32 and 20 nm. Also, we have also investigated the effects of other kinetic parameters, including the concentration of reducing agent and reaction temperature, on the growth pathway undertaken by the Au atoms. In conclusion, we believe that the mechanistic insights obtained from this study can be extended to other systems, including the involvement of different metals and/or seeds with different morphologies.

  9. The effect of Co alloying content on the kinetics of reaction zone growth in tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, A.; Tien, J. K.; Caulfield, T.; Petrasek, D. W.

    1988-01-01

    A Co-free modified superalloy similar in composition to Waspaloy is investigated in an effort to understand the effect of Co on reaction zone growth kinetics and verify the chemistry dependence of reaction zone growth in the matrix of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composites. The values of the parabolic rate constant, characterizing the kinetics of reaction zone growth, for the Waspaloy matrix and the C-free alloy as well as five other alloys from a previous study confirm the dependence of reaction zone growth kinetics on cobalt content of the matrix. The Co-free alloy composite exhibits the slowest reaction zone growth among all tungsten fiber reinforced composites studied to date.

  10. Nutritional versatility and growth kinetics of an Aeromonas hydrophila strain isolated from drinking water.

    PubMed Central

    van der Kooij, D; Hijnen, W A

    1988-01-01

    The nutritional versatility and growth kinetics of Aeromonas hydrophila were studied to determine the nature and the growth-promoting properties of organic compounds which may serve as substrates for the growth of this organism in drinking water during treatment and distribution. As an initial screening, a total of 69 different organic compounds were tested at a concentration of 2.5 g/liter as growth substrates for 10 A. hydrophila strains. Of these strains, strain M800 attained the highest maximum colony counts in various types of drinking water and river water and was therefore used in further measurements of growth at low substrate concentrations. A mixture of 21 amino acids and a mixture of 10 long-chain fatty acids, when added to drinking water, promoted growth of strain M800 at individual compound concentrations as low as 0.1 microgram of C per liter. Mixtures of 18 carbohydrates and 18 carboxylic acids clearly enhanced growth of the organism at individual compound concentrations above 1 microgram of C per liter. Growth measurements with 63 individual substrates at a concentration of 10 micrograms of C per liter gave growth rates of greater than or equal to 0.1/h with two amino acids, nine carbohydrates, and six long-chain fatty acids. Ks values were determined for arginine (less than or equal to 0.3 micrograms of C per liter), glucose (15.9 micrograms of C per liter), acetate (11.1 micrograms of C per liter), and oleate (2.1 micrograms of C per liter). The data obtained indicate that biomass components, such as amino acids and long-chain fatty acids, can promote multiplication of aeromonads in drinking water distribution systems at concentrations as low as a few micrograms per liter. PMID:3214162

  11. Silicide layer growth rates in Mo/Si multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, R.S.; Stearns, D.G. ); Viliardos, M.A.; Kassner, M.E. ); Vernon, S.P. ); Cheng, Y. )

    1993-12-01

    The thermal stability of sputter-deposited Mo/Si multilayers was investigated by annealing studies at relatively low temperatures ([similar to]250--350 [degree]C) for various times (0.5--3000 h). Two distinct stages of thermally activated Mo/Si interlayer growth were found: a primary surge, followed by a (slower) secondary steady-state growth in which the interdiffusion coefficient is constant. The interdiffusion coefficients for the interlayer formed by deposition of Mo-on-Si are higher than those of the interlayer formed by deposition of Si-on-Mo. Assuming that the activation energy is constant, an extrapolation of our results to ambient temperature finds that interlayer growth is negligible, suggesting long-term thermal stability in soft-x-ray projection lithography applications.

  12. Hafnium nitride buffer layers for growth of GaN on silicon

    DOEpatents

    Armitage, Robert D.; Weber, Eicke R.

    2005-08-16

    Gallium nitride is grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on (111) and (001) silicon substrates using hafnium nitride buffer layers. Wurtzite GaN epitaxial layers are obtained on both the (111) and (001) HfN/Si surfaces, with crack-free thickness up to 1.2 {character pullout}m. However, growth on the (001) surface results in nearly stress-free films, suggesting that much thicker crack-free layers could be obtained.

  13. Growth kinetics of physical vapor transport processes: Crystal growth of the optoelectronic material mercurous chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N. B.; Duval, W. M.

    1991-01-01

    Physical vapor transport processes were studied for the purpose of identifying the magnitude of convective effects on the crystal growth process. The effects of convection on crystal quality were were studied by varying the aspect ratio and those thermal conditions which ultimately affect thermal convection during physical vapor transport. An important outcome of the present study was the observation that the convection growth rate increased up to a certain value and then dropped to a constant value for high aspect ratios. This indicated that a very complex transport had occurred which could not be explained by linear stability theory. Better quality crystals grown at a low Rayleigh number confirmed that improved properties are possible in convectionless environments.

  14. Defect Reduction in Epitaxial Growth Using Superlattice Buffer Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    Katsuyama, Y. J. Yang and S. M. Bedair, Electron Dev. Lett., vol. 8, p. 240, 1987. 0 -15 -" Journal of (ryOstal (io iih 77 (108(,) ,xQ 9i4 S9 North-I...layer facilitat the csea of Gaosu 3 (5% in H2) + 500 sccm of H , and ed cross-sectional thickness measurements. trimethylgallium (TMG) + 500 sccm of H

  15. Hydromagnesite solubility product and growth kinetics in aqueous solution from 25 to 75 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Quentin; Bénézeth, Pascale; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Schott, Jacques

    2014-08-01

    Hydromagnesite Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·4H2O is the most widespread form of hydrated Mg-carbonate minerals. To better understand the factors controlling the precipitation of hydrated Mg-carbonates, we measured hydromagnesite solubility product at 25 and 50 °C and its growth rate between 25 and 75 °C, using natural hydromagnesite from a cave as seed material. The solubility products values derived in this study, Ksp-Hmgs = -37.08 ± 0.50 and -38.90 ± 0.54 at 25 and 50 °C, respectively, are in the upper range of published values. Hydromagnesite growth rate normalized to the BET surface area at 8 ⩽ pH ⩽ 10 is consistent with the direct and reversible attachment of the reactants at the solid surface being rate-limiting. It may be described by: RHmgs=A0·e(ΩHmgs1/5-1) where A0, the pre-exponential factor, and Ea, the activation energy, are equal to 5.12 × 10-7 mol/cm2/s and 45.5 ± 9 kJ/mol, respectively, and ΩHmgs stands for the saturation state of the solution with respect to hydromagnesite. Comparison of hydromagnesite growth rates with recently published magnesite growth rates (Saldi et al., 2009, 2012) show that: (1) hydromagnesite apparent growth activation energy is lower by more than 100 kJ/mol compared to the activation energy for magnesite obtuse step advancement, and (2) hydromagnesite growth rate constant extrapolated to 90 °C is 2.5 orders of magnitude higher than corresponding magnesite growth rate constant. Thus, our results confirm the long-standing hypothesis that the slow dehydration kinetics of the Mg2+ cation is responsible for the sluggish magnesite formation at low temperature, and that the kinetic barrier for hydromagnesite growth is much lower. Nevertheless, simulation of hydromagnesite and magnesite growth rates as a function of solution composition at 50 and 90 °C, and pH 7 and 9 reveal that, because of its much higher solubility, hydromagnesite would grow more quickly than magnesite in natural or industrial environments only at 50 °C and

  16. Surface structure and surface kinetics of InN grown by plasma-assisted atomic layer epitaxy: A HREELS study

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Ananta R. E-mail: anantaach@gmail.com; Thoms, Brian D.; Nepal, Neeraj; Eddy, Charles R.

    2015-03-15

    The surface bonding configuration and kinetics of hydrogen desorption from InN grown by plasma-assisted atomic layer epitaxy have been investigated. High resolution electron energy loss spectra exhibited loss peaks assigned to a Fuchs–Kliewer surface phonon, N-N and N-H surface species. The surface N-N vibrations are attributed to surface defects. The observation of N-H but no In-H surface species suggested N-terminated InN. Isothermal desorption data were best fit by the first-order desorption kinetics with an activation energy of (0.88 ± 0.06) eV and pre-exponential factor of (1.5 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 5 }s{sup −1}.

  17. Dynamic Scaling and Island Growth Kinetics in Pulsed Laser Deposition of SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eres, Gyula; Tischler, J. Z.; Rouleau, C. M.; Lee, Ho Nyung; Christen, H. M.; Zschack, P.; Larson, B. C.

    2016-11-01

    We use real-time diffuse surface x-ray diffraction to probe the evolution of island size distributions and its effects on surface smoothing in pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of SrTiO3 . We show that the island size evolution obeys dynamic scaling and two distinct regimes of island growth kinetics. Our data show that PLD film growth can persist without roughening despite thermally driven Ostwald ripening, the main mechanism for surface smoothing, being shut down. The absence of roughening is concomitant with decreasing island density, contradicting the prevailing view that increasing island density is the key to surface smoothing in PLD. We also report a previously unobserved crossover from diffusion-limited to attachment-limited island growth that reveals the influence of nonequilibrium atomic level surface transport processes on the growth modes in PLD. We show by direct measurements that attachment-limited island growth is the dominant process in PLD that creates step flowlike behavior or quasistep flow as PLD "self-organizes" local step flow on a length scale consistent with the substrate temperature and PLD parameters.

  18. Influence of heavy metals on microbial growth kinetics including lag time: mathematical modeling and experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Sengör, S Sevinç; Barua, Sutapa; Gikas, Petros; Ginn, Timothy R; Peyton, Brent; Sani, Rajesh K; Spycher, Nicolas F

    2009-10-01

    Heavy metals can significantly affect the kinetics of substrate biodegradation and microbial growth, including lag times and specific growth rates. A model to describe microbial metabolic lag as a function of the history of substrate concentration has been previously described by Wood et al. (Water Resour Res 31:553-563) and Ginn (Water Resour Res 35:1395-1408). In the present study, this model is extended by including the effect of heavy metals on metabolic lag by developing an inhibitor-dependent functional to account for the metabolic state of the microorganisms. The concentration of the inhibiting metal is explicitly incorporated into the functional. The validity of the model is tested against experimental data on the effects of zinc on Pseudomonas species isolated from Lake Coeur d'Alene sediments, Idaho, U.S.A., as well as the effects of nickel or cobalt on a mixed microbial culture collected from the aeration tank of a wastewater treatment plant in Athens, Greece. The simulations demonstrate the ability to incorporate the effect of metals on metabolism through lag, yield coefficient, and specific growth rates. The model includes growth limitation due to insufficient transfer of oxygen into the growth medium.

  19. Predicting crystal growth via a unified kinetic three-dimensional partition model.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Michael W; Gebbie-Rayet, James T; Hill, Adam R; Farida, Nani; Attfield, Martin P; Cubillas, Pablo; Blatov, Vladislav A; Proserpio, Davide M; Akporiaye, Duncan; Arstad, Bjørnar; Gale, Julian D

    2017-04-03

    Understanding and predicting crystal growth is fundamental to the control of functionality in modern materials. Despite investigations for more than one hundred years, it is only recently that the molecular intricacies of these processes have been revealed by scanning probe microscopy. To organize and understand this large amount of new information, new rules for crystal growth need to be developed and tested. However, because of the complexity and variety of different crystal systems, attempts to understand crystal growth in detail have so far relied on developing models that are usually applicable to only one system. Such models cannot be used to achieve the wide scope of understanding that is required to create a unified model across crystal types and crystal structures. Here we describe a general approach to understanding and, in theory, predicting the growth of a wide range of crystal types, including the incorporation of defect structures, by simultaneous molecular-scale simulation of crystal habit and surface topology using a unified kinetic three-dimensional partition model. This entails dividing the structure into 'natural tiles' or Voronoi polyhedra that are metastable and, consequently, temporally persistent. As such, these units are then suitable for re-construction of the crystal via a Monte Carlo algorithm. We demonstrate our approach by predicting the crystal growth of a diverse set of crystal types, including zeolites, metal-organic frameworks, calcite, urea and l-cystine.

  20. Kinetics of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis growth on high glucose concentrations.

    PubMed

    Berbert-Molina, M A; Prata, A M R; Pessanha, L G; Silveira, M M

    2008-11-01

    The kinetic and general growth features of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis were evaluated. Initial glucose concentration (S0) in fermentation media varied from 10 to 152 g/l. The results afforded to characterize four morphologically and physiologically well-defined culture phases, independent of S0 values: Phase I, vegetative growth; Phase II, transition to sporulation; Phase III, sporulation; and Phase IV, spores maturation and cell lysis. Important process parameters were also determined. The maximum specific growth rates (microX,m) were not affected with S0 up to 75 g/l (1.0-1.1 per hour), but higher glucose concentrations resulted in growth inhibition by substrate, revealed by a reduction in microX,m values. These higher S0 values led to longer Phases III and IV and delayed sporulation. Similar biomass concentrations (Xm=15.2-15.9 g/l) were achieved with S0 over 30.8 g/l, with increasing residual substrate, suggesting a limitation in some other nutrients and the use of glucose to form other metabolites. In this case, with S0 from 30.8 to 152 g/l, cell yield (YX/S) decreased from 0.58 to 0.41 g/g. On the other hand, with S0=10 g/l growth was limited by substrate, and YX/S has shown its maximum value (0.83 g/g).

  1. Growth behavior and kinetics of self-assembled silica-carbonate biomorphs.

    PubMed

    Kellermeier, Matthias; Melero-García, Emilio; Glaab, Fabian; Eiblmeier, Josef; Kienle, Lorenz; Rachel, Reinhard; Kunz, Werner; García-Ruiz, Juan Manuel

    2012-02-20

    Upon slow crystallization from silica-containing solutions or gels at elevated pH, alkaline-earth carbonates spontaneously self-assemble into remarkable nanocrystalline ultrastructures. These so-called silica biomorphs exhibit curved morphologies beyond crystallographic symmetry and ordered textures reminiscent of the hierarchical design found in many biominerals. The formation of these fascinating materials is thought to be driven by a dynamic coupling of the components' speciations in solution, which causes concerted autocatalytic mineralization of silica-stabilized nanocrystals over hours. In the present work, we have studied the precipitation kinetics of this unique system by determining growth rates of individual aggregates using video microscopy, and correlated the results with time-dependent data on the concentration of metal ions and pH acquired online during crystallization. In this manner, insight to the evolution of chemical conditions during growth was gained. It is shown that crystallization proceeds linearly with time and is essentially reaction controlled, which fits well in the proposed morphogenetic scenario, and thus, indirectly supports it. Measurements of the silica concentration in solution, combined with analyses of crystal aggregates isolated at distinct stages of morphogenesis, further demonstrate that the fraction of silica coprecipitated with carbonate during active growth is rather small. We discuss our findings with respect to the role of silica in the formation of biomorphs, and moreover, prove that the external silica skins that occasionally sheath the aggregates--previously supposed to be involved in the growth mechanism--originate from secondary precipitation after growth is already terminated.

  2. Dynamic Scaling and Island Growth Kinetics in Pulsed Laser Deposition of SrTiO3

    DOE PAGES

    Eres, Gyula; Tischler, J. Z.; Rouleau, C. M.; ...

    2016-11-11

    We use real-time diffuse surface x-ray diffraction to probe the evolution of island size distributions and its effects on surface smoothing in pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of SrTiO3. In this study, we show that the island size evolution obeys dynamic scaling and two distinct regimes of island growth kinetics. Our data show that PLD film growth can persist without roughening despite thermally driven Ostwald ripening, the main mechanism for surface smoothing, being shut down. The absence of roughening is concomitant with decreasing island density, contradicting the prevailing view that increasing island density is the key to surface smoothing in PLD.more » We also report a previously unobserved crossover from diffusion-limited to attachment-limited island growth that reveals the influence of nonequilibrium atomic level surface transport processes on the growth modes in PLD. We show by direct measurements that attachment-limited island growth is the dominant process in PLD that creates step flowlike behavior or quasistep flow as PLD “self-organizes” local step flow on a length scale consistent with the substrate temperature and PLD parameters.« less

  3. Kinetic boundary layers in gas mixtures: Systems described by nonlinearly coupled kinetic and hydrodynamic equations and applications to droplet condensation and evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Widder, M.E.; Titulaer, U.M. )

    1993-03-01

    The authors consider a mixture of heavy vapor molecules and a light carrier gas surrounding a liquid droplet. The vapor is described by a variant of the Klein-Kramers equation; the gas is described by the Navier-Stokes equations; the droplet acts as a heat source due to the released heat of condensation. The exchange of momentum and energy between the constituents of the mixture is taken into account by force terms in the kinetic equation and source terms in the Navier-Stokes equations. These are chosen to obtain maximal agreement with the irreversible thermodynamics of a gas mixture. The structure of the kinetic boundary layer around the sphere is determined from the self-consistent solution of this set of coupled equations with appropriate boundary conditions at the surface of the sphere. The kinetic equation is rewritten as a set of coupled moment equations. A complete set of solutions of these moment equations is constructed by numerical integration inward from the region far away from the droplet, where the background inhomogeneities are small. A technique developed earlier is used to deal with the numerical instability of the moment equations. The solutions obtained for given temperature and pressure profiles in the gas are then combined linearly such that they obey the boundary conditions at the droplet surface; from this solution source terms for the Navier-Stokes equation of the gas are constructed and used to determine improved temperature and pressure profiles for the background gas. For not too large temperature differneces between the droplet and the gas at infinity, self-consistency is reached after a few iterations. The method is applied to the condensation of droplets from a supersaturated vapor as well as to strong evaporation of droplets under the influence of an external heat source, where corrections of up to 40% are obtained.

  4. Layer-by-Layer Polyelectrolyte Assisted Growth of 2D Ultrathin MoS2 Nanosheets on Various 1D Carbons for Superior Li-Storage.

    PubMed

    Qu, Qunting; Qian, Feng; Yang, Siming; Gao, Tian; Liu, Weijie; Shao, Jie; Zheng, Honghe

    2016-01-20

    Transitional metal sulfide/carbon hybrids with well-defined structures could not only maximize the functional properties of each constituent but engender some unique synergistic effects, holding great promise for applications in Li-ion batteries and supercapacitors and for catalysis. Herein, a facile and versatile approach is developed to controllably grow 2D ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets with a large quantity of exposed edges onto various 1D carbons, including carbon nanotubes (CNTs), electrospun carbon nanofibers, and Te-nanowire-templated carbon nanofibers. The typical approach involves the employment of layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembled polyelectrolyte, which controls spatially the uniform growth and orientation of ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets on these 1D carbons irrespective of their surface properties. Such unique structures of the as-prepared CNTs@MoS2 hybrid are significantly favorable for the fast diffusions of both Li-ions and electrons, satisfying the kinetic requirements of high-power lithium ion batteries. As a result, CNTs@MoS2 hybrids exhibit excellent electrochemical performances for lithium storage, including a high reversible capacity (1027 mAh g(-1)), high-rate capability (610 mAh g(-1) at 5 C), and excellent cycling stability (negligible capacity loss after 200 continuous cycles).

  5. Growth of HgZnTe Layers by LPE Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    Solid solution mixtures of a wide band gap II-VI compound with one constituent being the semimetal HgTe may be tuned to yield narrow gap...experimental research into the narrow band gap range of this solid solution . In the present work the LPE of Hg1-xZnxTe was studied, focusing on the...evaluation of this technique as a tool for achieving epitaxial layers of the ’new material’, the solid solution Hg1-xZnxTe, with morphological, crystalline

  6. A kinetic model for the transport of electrons in a graphene layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermanian Kammerer, Clotilde; Méhats, Florian

    2016-12-01

    In this article, we propose a new numerical scheme for the computation of the transport of electrons in a graphene device. The underlying quantum model for graphene is a massless Dirac equation, whose eigenvalues display a conical singularity responsible for non-adiabatic transitions between the two modes. We first derive a kinetic model which takes the form of two Boltzmann equations coupled by a collision operator modeling the non-adiabatic transitions. This collision term includes a Landau-Zener transfer term and a jump operator whose presence is essential in order to ensure a good energy conservation during the transitions. We propose an algorithmic realization of the semi-group solving the kinetic model, by a particle method. We give analytic justification of the model and propose a series of numerical experiments studying the influences of the various sources of errors between the quantum and the kinetic models.

  7. Growth and Magnetic Properties of Mn-doped Germanium near the Kinetic Solubility Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Ozer, Mustafa M; Thompson, James R; Weitering, Harm H

    2012-01-01

    Growth of high-quality dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS) material is often compromised by the low solubility of magnetic dopants, leading to formation of precipitates. Here, we explore the feasibility of growing precipitate-free Mn-doped Ge at doping levels near the kinetic solubility limit. Ge:Mn DMS films were grown at low temperature so as to minimize precipitate formation. Meanwhile, epitaxial quality was maintained by employing a very low growth rate. The magnetic properties of these lightly doped films exhibit both interesting contrasts and similarities with those of heavily-doped DMS reported in the literature, indicating that the substitutional Mn contents are very similar. Films grown at 95 degree C are free of intermetallic precipitates, offering useful opportunities for studying the fundamentals of carrier mediated exchange and metal insulator transitions without complications arising from precipitate formation.

  8. Experimental Studies of the Growth Kinetics of Methane Clathrate Hydrates & Superfluid Hydrodynamics on the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botimer, Jeffrey David

    This thesis details the experimental findings of three distinct research projects. The first studies the growth kinetics of methane clathrate hydrates grown under the influence of multiple factors including surfactants, porous media, substrate wetting properties, and salt content. The second investigates the flow behaviors of superfluid helium through single, high aspect ratio nanopipes. The third models the frequency response of a quartz tuning fork in high pressure normal and superfluid helium and demonstrates how quartz tuning forks can be used as cheap, small, in situ, cryogenic pressure gauges. The first project reports studies of the kinetics of growth of methane hydrates from liquid water containing small amounts of surfactant (<500 ppm of sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS). The kinetics are monitored using simultaneous measurements of the uptake of methane detected by a pressure drop in the gas phase, and either visual observations of the amount of liquid water and solid phase in the reaction vessel, or in situ micro-Raman measurements or in situ NMR measurements. These diagnostics show that the uptake of methane and the conversion of liquid water to a solid phase do not occur simultaneously; the uptake of gas always lags the visual and spectroscopic signatures of the disappearance of liquid water and the formation of solid. The evidence suggests that the SDS causes water to form an intermediate immobile solid-like state before combining with the methane to form hydrate. The growth mechanism is related to the surfactant and disappears for low SDS concentrations (<25 ppm). Also reported are studies of the growth rates of methane hydrates as a function of substrate wetting properties, driving force, and growth media. The second project studies pressure driven flow of superfluid helium through single high aspect ratio glass nanopipes into a vacuum has been studied for a wide range of pressure drop (0--30 atm), reservoir temperature (0.8--2.5K), pipe lengths (1-30mm

  9. Direct dynamic kinetic analysis and computer simulation of growth of Clostridium perfringens in cooked turkey during cooling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research applied a new one-step methodology to directly construct a tertiary model for describing the growth of C. perfringens in cooked turkey meat under dynamically cooling conditions. The kinetic parameters of the growth models were determined by numerical analysis and optimization using mu...

  10. Heat and turbulent kinetic energy budgets for surface layer cooling induced by the passage of Hurricane Frances (2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Peisheng; Sanford, Thomas B.; Imberger, JöRg

    2009-12-01

    Heat and turbulent kinetic energy budgets of the ocean surface layer during the passage of Hurricane Frances were examined using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. In situ data obtained with the Electromagnetic-Autonomous Profiling Explorer (EM-APEX) floats were used to set up the initial conditions of the model simulation and to compare to the simulation results. The spatial heat budgets reveal that during the hurricane passage, not only the entrainment in the bottom of surface mixed layer but also the horizontal water advection were important factors determining the spatial pattern of sea surface temperature. At the free surface, the hurricane-brought precipitation contributed a negligible amount to the air-sea heat exchange, but the precipitation produced a negative buoyancy flux in the surface layer that overwhelmed the instability induced by the heat loss to the atmosphere. Integrated over the domain within 400 km of the hurricane eye on day 245.71 of 2004, the rate of heat anomaly in the surface water was estimated to be about 0.45 PW (1 PW = 1015 W), with about 20% (0.09 PW in total) of this was due to the heat exchange at the air-sea interface, and almost all the remainder (0.36 PW) was downward transported by oceanic vertical mixing. Shear production was the major source of turbulent kinetic energy amounting 88.5% of the source of turbulent kinetic energy, while the rest (11.5%) was attributed to the wind stirring at sea surface. The increase of ocean potential energy due to vertical mixing represented 7.3% of the energy deposited by wind stress.

  11. Kinetic modeling of the SWNT growth by CO disproportionation on CoMo catalysts.

    PubMed

    Monzon, A; Lolli, G; Cosma, S; Mohamed, S B; Resasco, D E

    2008-11-01

    A kinetic model has been developed to describe the growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) in the CoMoCAT method, which is based on the disproportionation of CO on supported CoMo catalysts. The model attempts to capture mathematically the different stages involved in this method: (i) catalyst activation or in-situ creation of active sites, i.e., reduced Co clusters by transformation of CoMoOx precursor species, or oxidized sites; (ii) CO decomposition over active sites, which increases the surface fugacity of carbon until reaching a certain threshold; (iii) nucleation of ordered forms of carbon; (iv) C diffusion (both across the surface and into the metal particle); (v) SWNT growth; (vi) termination, by either deactivation of the catalyst active sites or by increase in the carbon concentration at the metal/SWNT interface, approaching that of the metal/gas interface and eliminating the driving force for diffusion. Previous investigations have only explained the growth termination by the former. Here, we emphasize the possible contribution of the later and propose a novel "hindrance factor" to quantify the effect of nanotube interaction with its surroundings on the growth termination. To test the kinetic model and obtain typical values of the physical parameters, experiments have been conducted on a CoMo/SiO2 catalyst in a laboratory flow reactor, in which the rate of carbon deposition was continuously evaluated by the direct measurement of the CO2 evolution as a function of time. The experimental data are fitted very well with model.

  12. Shape transition of endotaxial islands growth from kinetically constrained to equilibrium regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhi-Peng; Tok, Engsoon; Foo, Yonglim

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • All Fe{sub 13}Ge{sub 8} islands will grow into Ge(0 0 1) substrate at temperatures from 350 to 675 °C. • Shape transition occurred from kinetically constrained to equilibrium regime. • All endotaxial islands can be clarified into two types. • The mechanisms of endotaxial growth and shape transition have been rationalized. - Abstract: A comprehensive study of Fe grown on Ge(0 0 1) substrates has been conducted at elevated temperatures, ranging from 350 to 675 °C. All iron germinide islands, with the same Fe{sub 13}Ge{sub 8} phase, grow into the Ge substrate with the same epitaxial relationship. Shape transition occurs from small square islands (low temperatures), to elongated orthogonal islands or orthogonal nanowires (intermediate temperatures), and then finally to large square orthogonal islands (high temperatures). According to both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigations, all islands can be defined as either type-I or type-II. Type-I islands usually form at kinetically constrained growth regimes, like truncated pyramids. Type-II islands usually appear at equilibrium growth regimes forming a dome-like shape. Based on a simple semi-quantitative model, type-II islands have a lower total energy per volume than type-I, which is considered as the dominant mechanism for this type of shape transition. Moreover, this study not only elucidates details of endotaxial growth in the Fe–Ge system, but also suggests the possibility of controlled fabrication of temperature-dependent nanostructures, especially in materials with dissimilar crystal structures.

  13. Growth kinetic models of five species of Lactobacilli and lactose consumption in batch submerged culture.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Fazlollah; Ardestani, Fatemeh; Najafpour, Ghasem

    Kinetic behaviors of five Lactobacillus strains were investigated with Contois and Exponential models. Awareness of kinetic behavior of microorganisms is essential for their industrial process design and scale up. The consistency of experimental data was evaluated using Excel software. L. bulgaricus was introduced as the most efficient strain with the highest biomass and lactic acid yield of 0.119 and 0.602gg(-1) consumed lactose, respectively. The biomass and carbohydrate yield of L. fermentum and L. lactis were slightly less and close to L. bulgaricus. Biomass and lactic acid production yield of 0.117 and 0.358 for L. fermentum and 0.114 and 0.437gg(-1) for L.actobacillus lactis were obtained. L. casei and L. delbrueckii had the less biomass yield, nearly 11.8 and 22.7% less than L. bulgaricus, respectively. L. bulgaricus (R(2)=0.9500 and 0.9156) and L. casei (R(2)=0.9552 and 0.8401) showed acceptable consistency with both models. The investigation revealed that the above mentioned models are not suitable to describe the kinetic behavior of L. fermentum (R(2)=0.9367 and 0.6991), L. delbrueckii (R(2)=0.9493 and 0.7724) and L. lactis (R(2)=0.8730 and 0.6451). Contois rate equation is a suitable model to describe the kinetic of Lactobacilli. Specific cell growth rate for L. bulgaricus, L. casei, L. fermentum, L. delbrueckii and L. lactis with Contois model in order 3.2, 3.9, 67.6, 10.4 and 9.8-fold of Exponential model.

  14. Theory of Crystal Growth, Kinetics of Dissolution and Transformation of Calcium Phosphates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingwu

    The kink density along a (01) step on the (001) face of a Kossel crystal is derived from a kinetic steady state approach by considering the elementary events at the step. When the kink formation energy, epsilon , is very high compared with the thermal energy kT, the kink density, rho, is found to be a function of the saturation ratio, S. For S > 1, rho = 2a-1S^ {1over 2}exp(-epsilon /kT) while for S < 1, rho = 2a^{-1}exp( -epsilon/kT)/(2-S)^ {1over 2}. This finding may provide a theoretical background for interpreting the observed growth kinetics of many sparingly soluble salts in aqueous solutions. The above approach is extended to analyze the configuration of a surface step of an AB crystal with NaCl type of lattice. It is found that the growth rate of an electrolyte crystal cannot be defined solely by the thermodynamic driving forces even when integration is the rate determining step. The rate also depends on the lattice ion activity ratio and relative frequencies of integration of A and B ions into kink sites on a step. At a given driving force, a maximum growth rate can be attained at a certain ratio of lattice ion activities. The dual constant composition (DCC) method is developed which enables the kinetics of phase transformation to be studied at constant driving forces. The applicability of this novel approach is verified in the investigation of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) to octacalcium phosphate (OCP) transformation. In these studies, the concentrations of total calcium and phosphate are maintained constant to within 2% with the pH held to within +/-0.003 during the reaction. The dissolution kinetics of DCPD and OCP has been investigated using CC method at 37^circ C over a wide range of experimental conditions. Both processes can be generally described by a combined volume and surface diffusion mechanism with varying degrees of volume resistance at different pH's and solution hydrodynamics. The decrease in the dissolution rate with the extent of

  15. The kinetic scale structure of the Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer: Implications of collisionless magnetic reconnection and first MMS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorelli, J.; Gershman, D. J.; Avanov, L. A.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.; Nakamura, R.; Chen, L. J.; Torbert, R. B.; Gliese, U.; Barrie, A. C.; Holland, M. P.; Chandler, M. O.; Coffey, V. N.; MacDonald, E.; Salo, C.; Dickson, C.; Saito, Y.; Russell, C. T.; Baumjohann, W.; Burch, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between magnetic reconnection and the Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer (PSBL) is still an open problem in magnetospheric physics. While one can understand observed PSBL velocity distributions on the basis of a simple steady state drift-kinetic model with prescribed electric and magnetic fields (e.g., Onsager et al. [1990,1991]), such models do not incorporate the kinetic scale dynamics at the reconnection site. For example, Shay et al. [2011] have argued that the out-of-plane quadrupole magnetic field pattern at the reconnection site can be viewed as an obliquely propagating kinetic Alfvén wave with very large parallel group velocity, the implication being that the field-aligned current structure should quickly become global, though still confined to field lines connected to the ion diffusion region at the reconnection site. This raises the very interesting question: How would such a global wave structure appear in the PSBL on the kinetic scale? Here, we present some first observations of the PSBL by NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission where Fast Plasma Investigation (FPI) Burst Data (30 ms and 150 ms resolution for 3D electron and ion velocity distributions, respectively) is available during intervals where lower resolution (4.5 s) Fast Survey distributions showed evidence of connection to a remote reconnection site. This allows us to test for the first time whether the quadrupole magnetic field structure near the reconnection site -- a local structure already observed by previous spacecraft -- does indeed support a global field-aligned current pattern around the magnetic separatrix. We will also probe for the first time the electron kinetic scale sub-structure of the PSBL and compare with electron-scale features observed near the magnetic separatrix at the dayside magnetopause.

  16. Controlled growth and kinetics of porous hydroxyapatite spheres by a template-directed method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qian Jun; Huang, Zhi Liang

    2007-03-01

    Porous hydroxyapatite (HA) spheres with high purity of phase and well-controlled pore size were grown by a template-directed method. We studied for the initial concentration of Ca-P how to control the chemical component of the products, and for the concentration of template how to control the aperture and the morphology of porous HA spheres. The experimental results indicated that the lower concentration of Ca-P was prone to pure HA phase and the aperture decreased gradually with the increase of the concentration of template. Correspondingly, the crystallization thermodynamics and template-directed growth kinetics were discussed in details. The solubility isotherms of HA and dicalcium phosphate (DCPD) were calculated based on classical crystallization theories of thermodynamics. The results suggested that there was a critical concentration of P=0.048 M in the case of Ca:P=5:3 and thus DCPD could be avoided only when P⩽0.048 M in this given reaction system. Kinetic analysis of HA crystal growth revealed that the template depressed the interfacial potential energy E, then enhanced the roughness on the surface of crystal nucleus and directed HA crystal to selectively grow along the [0 0 0 1] direction, and consequently governed the aperture of porous HA spheres. The experimental results were in agreement with the theoretical analysis.

  17. Macrotransport-solidification kinetics modeling of equiaxed dendritic growth. Part 1: Model development and discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Nastac, L.; Stefanescu, D.M.

    1996-12-01

    An analytical model that describes solidification of equiaxed dendrites has been developed for use in solidification kinetics-macrotransport modeling. It relaxes some of the assumptions made in previous models, such as the Dustin-Kurz, Rappaz-Thevoz, and Kanetkar-Stefanescu models. It is assumed that nuclei grow as unperturbed spheres until the radius of the sphere becomes larger than the minimum radius of instability. Then, growth of the dendrites is related to morphological instability and is calculated as a function of melt undercooling around the dendrite tips, which is controlled by the bulk temperature and the intrinsic volume average concentration of the liquid phase. When the general morphology of equiaxed dendrites is considered, the evolution of the fraction of solid is related to the interdendritic branching and dynamic coarsening (through the evolution of the specific interfacial areas) and to the topology and movement of the dendrite envelope (through the tip growth velocity and dendrite shape factor). The particular case of this model is the model for globulitic an overall solute and thermal balance around a growing equiaxed dendrite grain within a spherical closed system. Overall solute balance in the integral form is obtained by a complete analytical solution of the diffusion field in both liquid and solid phases. The bulk temperature is obtained from the solution of the macrotransport-solidification kinetics problem.

  18. Investigation of equilibration and growth of stepped surfaces by Kinetic Monte Carlo in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türkan, A.; Esen, M.; Tüzemen, A. Türker; Özdemir, M.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the equilibration and in the case of a particle flux to the surface, the growth of a one dimensional semi-conductor surface of "V" initial shape is investigated by kinetic Monte Carlo method. The initial surface is assumed to consist of atomic height steps separated by terraces. In Monte Carlo simulations, the following processes are considered: the diffusion of free particles on the surface, the attachment/detachment of particles to/from step edges from/to a terrace in front of a step or to a terrace above the step. In the simulations the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier is also taken into account. The equilibration of "V" initial shape at various temperatures is investigated. Moreover, the effect of particle bonding energy on the surface profile and on the evolution of the surface is also investigated. In the case of a particle flux to the surface, the surface profile and its growth kinetics are investigated at various temperatures and flux values.

  19. Nonlinear kinetic description of Raman growth using an envelope code, and comparisons with Vlasov simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benisti, Didier; Morice, Olivier; Gremillet, Laurent; Siminos, Evangelos; Strozzi, David

    2010-11-01

    Using a nonlinear kinetic analysis, we provide a theoretical description for the nonlinear Landau damping rate, frequency, and group velocity of a slowly varying electron plasma wave (EPW). In particular, we show that the nonlinear group velocity of the EPW is not the derivative of its frequency with respect to its wave number, and we discuss previous results on the nonlinear Landau damping rate and on the nonlinear frequency shift of the EPW. Our theoretical predictions are moreover very carefully compared against results from Vlasov simulations of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), and an excellent agreement is found between numerical and theoretical results. We use the previous analysis to derive envelope equations modeling SRS in the nonlinear kinetic regime. These equations provide very accurate predictions regarding threshold intensities for SRS and the growth time of SRS beyond threshold, provided that one uses the ansatz of self-optimization that we detail. Finally, we discuss saturation of SRS and, in particular, we derive growth rates for sidebands using a spectral method.

  20. Unravelling the ``Silicene'' Growth Mechanism Based on a Seeding Layer Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei; Zhou, Miao; Liu, Feng; Feng Liu Team

    Unlike sp2 graphene, silicon atoms prefer to form sp3 hybridized state that gives silicene a buckled geometry. To study how to grow flat silicene, we have investigated the structure and stability of multi-layer ``silicene'' using ab initiomethods by introducing a ``seeding layer'' of silicene on which additional ``silicene'' layers are grown. The buckling height and the isotropic strain of the seeding layer is shown to play a key in affecting the structure, in particular the flatness of the growing layers. A phase diagram in the parameter space of buckling height and in-plane strain of the seeding layer is constructed to guide the growth of additional ``silicene'' layer. Furthermore, in contrast to monolayer silicene growth on Ag substrate which exhibits various patterns, only the √3- √3 pattern is found stable using large supercell calculations. Our calculations suggest that thermodynamically no silicene structures can survive beyond three layers. These results will shed useful lights on experimental growth of flat and low-buckled silicene and help explain existing experimental results. This work was support by NSF-MRSEC (Grant # DMR-1121252) and DOE-BES (Grant # DE-FG02-o4ER46148).

  1. Characterization and growth of epitaxial layers of Gs exhibiting high resistivity for ionic implantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Either classical or low temperature epitaxial growth techniques can be used to control the deposition of buffer layers of GaAs on semiconducting substrates and to obtain the resistivity and purity desired. Techniques developed to study, as a function of thickness, the evolution of mobilities by photoHall, and the spectroscopy of shallow and deep centers by cathodoluminescence and current transients reveal one very pure layer of medium resistivity and high mobility, and another "dead layer" of elevated resistivity far from the surface. The highly resistive layer remains pure over several microns, which appears interesting for implantation.

  2. Effects of Kinetic Roughening and Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition on Lysozyme Crystal Growth Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Konnert, John; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2004-01-01

    We measured the growth velocities of the (110) face of tetragonal lysozyme, V (centimeters per second), at four different concentrations, c (milligrams per milliliter), as the solution temperature, T (Centigrade), was reduced. For a broad range of T dependent on c, we find that the growth velocities increased as the solution temperature was reduced. The initial increase in V is well characterized by the 2D nucleation model for crystal growth, yielding the magnitude of an effective barrier for growth, gamma(sub s) = 1.2 plus or minus 0.1 x 10(exp -13) erg/molecule. Below certain temperatures, T(sub cr), dependent on c, however, a kinetic roughening hypothesis that considers the continuous addition of molecules anywhere on the crystal surface better describes the observed growth velocities. The application of the continuous growth model, up to the solution cloud-point temperatures, T(sub cl), enabled the determinations of the crossover concentration, c(sub r), from estimated values of T(sub cr). For all conditions presented, we find that the crossover from growth by 2D nucleation to continuous addition occurs at a supersaturation, sigma (sub c), = 2.0 plus or minus 0.1. Moreover, we find the energy barrier for the continuous addition, E(sub c), within the temperature range T(sub cl) less than T less than T less than T (sub cr), to be 6 plus or minus 1 x 10(exp -13) erg/molecule. Further reduction of T below approximately 2-3 C of T(sub cl), also revealed a rapid slowing of crystal growth velocities. From quasi-elastic light scattering investigations, we find that the rapid diminishment of crystal growth velocities can be accounted for by the phase behavior of lysozyme solutions. Namely, we find the reversible formation of dense fluid proto-droplets comprised of lysozyme molecules to occur below approximately 0.3 C of T(sub cl). Hence, the rapid slowing of growth velocities may occur as a result of the sudden depletion of "mobile" molecules within crystal growth

  3. Three-layered architecture of the popliteal fascia that acts as a kinetic retinaculum for the hamstring muscles.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Masahiro; Yoshino, Hiroyuki; Fujimura, Akira; Hitomi, Jiro; Isogai, Sumio

    2016-09-01

    When patients report pain in the popliteal fossa upon knee extension, the pain is usually localized in the lower region of the popliteal fossa. However, some patients complain of pain in the upper region of the popliteal fossa as the knee is flexed, which motivated us to examine the role of the popliteal fascia as the retinaculum of the hamstring muscles. Thirty-four thighs from 19 Japanese cadavers were dissected. The popliteal fascia was defined as the single aponeurotic sheet covering the popliteal fossa. We found that the fascia acted as a three-layered retinaculum for the flexor muscles of the thigh and provided a secure route for neurovascular structures to the lower leg in any kinetic position of the knee joint. The superficial layer of the popliteal fascia covering the thigh was strongly interwoven with the epimysium of biceps femoris along its lateral aspect and with that of the semimembranosus along its medial aspect, ensuring that the flexor muscles remained in their correct positions. The intermediate layer arose from the medial side of biceps femoris and merged medially with the superficial layer. The profound layer stretched transversely between the biceps femoris and the semimembranosus. Moreover, we investigated the nerve distribution in the popliteal fascia using Sihler's staining and whole-mount immunostaining for neurofilaments. The three-layered fascia was constantly innervated by branches from the posterior femoral cutaneous or saphenous nerve. The nerves were closely related and distributed to densely packed collagen fibers in the superficial layer as free or encapsulated nerve endings, suggesting that the fascia is involved in pain in the upper region of the popliteal fossa.

  4. Three-dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of cubic transition metal nitride thin film growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, F.; Mastail, C.; Abadias, G.

    2016-02-01

    A three-dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model has been developed and used to simulate the microstructure and growth morphology of cubic transition metal nitride (TMN) thin films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering. Results are presented for the case of stoichiometric TiN, chosen as a representative TMN prototype. The model is based on a NaCl-type rigid lattice and includes deposition and diffusion events for both N and Ti species. It is capable of reproducing voids and overhangs, as well as surface faceting. Simulations were carried out assuming a uniform flux of incoming particles approaching the surface at normal incidence. The ballistic deposition model is parametrized with an interaction parameter r0 that mimics the capture distance at which incoming particles may stick on the surface, equivalently to a surface trapping mechanism. Two diffusion models are implemented, based on the different ways to compute the site-dependent activation energy for hopping atoms. The influence of temperature (300-500 K), deposition flux (0.1-100 monolayers/s), and interaction parameter r0 (1.5-6.0 Å) on the obtained growth morphology are presented. Microstructures ranging from highly porous, [001]-oriented straight columns with smooth top surface to rough columns emerging with different crystallographic facets are reproduced, depending on kinetic restrictions, deposited energy (seemingly captured by r0), and shadowing effect. The development of facets is a direct consequence of the diffusion model which includes an intrinsic (minimum energy-based) diffusion anisotropy, although no crystallographic diffusion anisotropy was explicitly taken into account at this stage. The time-dependent morphological evolution is analyzed quantitatively to extract the growth exponent β and roughness exponent α , as indicators of kinetic roughening behavior. For dense TiN films, values of α ≈0.7 and β =0.24 are obtained in good agreement with existing experimental data. At this

  5. Cell growth kinetics of Chlorella sorokiniana and nutritional values of its biomass.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kanhaiya; Dasgupta, Chitralekha Nag; Das, Debabrata

    2014-09-01

    The present study investigates the effects of different physico-chemical parameters for the growth of Chlorella sorokiniana and subsequently determination of nutritional values of its biomass. Most suitable temperature, light intensity, pH, and acetic acid concentration were 30°C, 100 μmol m(-2)s(-1), pH 7.5, and 34.8mM, respectively for the growth of this microorganism. Arrhenius growth activation energy, Ea was calculated as 7.08 kJ mol(-1). Monod kinetics constants: maximum specific growth rate (μ max) and substrate (acetic acid) affinity coefficient (Ks) were determined as 0.1 ± 0.01 h(-1) and 76 ± 8 mg L(-1), respectively. Stoichiometric analysis revealed the capture of 1.83 g CO2 and release of 1.9 g O2 for 1g algal biomass synthesis. Algal biomass of C. sorokiniana was found rich in protein and several important minerals such as Mg, Ca, and Fe. Astaxanthin and β-carotene were extracted and quantified using high performance liquid chromatography.

  6. Combined Experimental and Theoretical Approach to the Kinetics of Magnetite Crystal Growth from Primary Particles

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    It is now recognized that nucleation and growth of crystals can occur not only by the addition of solvated ions but also by accretion of nanoparticles, in a process called nonclassical crystallization. The theoretical framework of such processes has only started to be described, partly due to the lack of kinetic or thermodynamic data. Here, we study the growth of magnetite nanoparticles from primary particles—nanometer-sized amorphous iron-rich precursors—in aqueous solution at different temperatures. We propose a theoretical framework to describe the growth of the nanoparticles and model both a diffusion-limited and a reaction-limited pathway to determine which of these best describes the rate-limiting step of the process. We show that, based on the measured iron concentration and the related calculated concentration of primary particles at the steady state, magnetite growth is likely a reaction-limited process, and within the framework of our model, we propose a phase diagram to summarize the observations.

  7. Kinetic modelling of epitaxial film growth with up- and downward step barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, F. F.; Oliveira, T. J.; Ferreira, S. C.

    2011-09-01

    The formation of three-dimensional structures during the epitaxial growth of films is associated with the reflection of diffusing particles in descending terraces due to the presence of the so-called Ehrlich-Schwoebel (ES) barrier. We generalize this concept in a solid-on-solid growth model, in which a barrier dependent on the particle coordination (number of lateral bonds) exists whenever the particle performs an interlayer diffusion. The rules do not distinguish explicitly if the particle is executing a descending or an ascending interlayer diffusion. We show that the usual model, with a step barrier in descending steps, produces spurious, columnar and highly unstable morphologies if the growth temperature is varied in a usual range of mound formation experiments. Our model generates well-behaved mounded morphologies for the same ES barriers that produce anomalous morphologies in the standard model. Moreover, mounds are also obtained when the step barrier has an equal value for all particles independently of whether they are free or bonded. Kinetic roughening is observed at long times, when the surface roughness w and the characteristic length ξ scale as w ~ tβ and ξ ~ tζ, where β≈0.31 and ζ≈0.22, independently of the growth temperature.

  8. Process development for hydrogen production with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii based on growth and product formation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Lehr, Florian; Morweiser, Michael; Rosello Sastre, Rosa; Kruse, Olaf; Posten, Clemens

    2012-11-30

    Certain strains of microalgae are long known to produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii the oxygen-sensitive hydrogenase enzyme recombines electrons from the chloroplast electron transport chain with protons to form molecular hydrogen directly inside the chloroplast. A sustained hydrogen production can be obtained under low sulfur conditions in C. reinhardtii, reducing the net oxygen evolution by reducing the photosystem II activity and thereby overcoming the inhibition of the hydrogenases. The development of specially adapted hydrogen production strains led to higher yields and optimized biological process preconditions. So far sustainable hydrogen production required a complete exchange of the growth medium to establish sulfur-deprived conditions after biomass growth. In this work we demonstrate the transition from the biomass growth phase to the hydrogen production phase in a single batch culture only by exact dosage of sulfur. This eliminates the elaborate and energy intensive solid-liquid separation step and establishes a process strategy to proceed further versus large scale production. This strategy has been applied to determine light dependent biomass growth and hydrogen production kinetics to assess the potential of H₂ production with C. reinhardtii as a basis for scale up and further process optimization.

  9. Revealing the surface and bulk regimes of isothermal graphene growth on Ni with in situ kinetic measurements and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Puretzky, Alexander A; Merkulov, Igor A; Rouleau, Christopher M; Eres, Gyula; Geohegan, David B

    2014-01-01

    In situ optical diagnostics are used to reveal the isothermal nucleation and growth mechanisms of graphene on Ni across a wide temperature range (560 C < T < 840 C) by chemical vapor deposition from single, sub-second pulses of acetylene. An abrupt, two-orders of magnitude change in growth times (~ 100s to 1s) is revealed at T = 680 C. Below and above this temperature, similar sigmoidal kinetics are measured and attributed to autocatalytic growth reactions but by two different mechanisms, surface assembly and dissolution/precipitation, respectively. These data are used to develop a simple and general kinetic model for graphene growth that includes the nucleation phase and includes the effects of carbon solubility in metals, describes delayed nucleation, and allows the interpretation of the competition between surface and bulk growth modes. The sharp transition in growth kinetics at T = 680 C is explained by a change in defect site density required for nucleation due to a transition in the carbon-induced mobility of the Ni surface. The easily-implemented optical reflectivity diagnostics and the simple kinetic model described here allow a pathway to optimize the growth of graphene on metals with arbitrary carbon solubility.

  10. Quantifying Variability in Growth and Thermal Inactivation Kinetics of Lactobacillus plantarum

    PubMed Central

    Aryani, D. C.; den Besten, H. M. W.

    2016-01-01

    experimental variability with respect to the growth and thermal inactivation kinetics of Lactobacillus plantarum and to quantify the variability in thermal resistance attributed to growth history. The quantitative knowledge obtained on experimental, reproduction, and strain variabilities can be used to improve experimental designs and to adequately select strains for challenge growth and inactivation tests. Moreover, the integration of strain variability in prediction of microbial growth and inactivation kinetics will result in more realistic predictions of L. plantarum dynamics along the food production chain. PMID:27260362

  11. Influence of atomic layer deposition valve temperature on ZrN plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition growth

    SciTech Connect

    Muneshwar, Triratna Cadien, Ken

    2015-11-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) relies on a sequence of self-limiting surface reactions for thin film growth. The effect of non-ALD side reactions, from insufficient purging between pulses and from precursor self-decomposition, on film growth is well known. In this article, precursor condensation within an ALD valve is described, and the effect of the continuous precursor source from condensate evaporation on ALD growth is discussed. The influence of the ALD valve temperature on growth and electrical resistivity of ZrN plasma enhanced ALD (PEALD) films is reported. Increasing ALD valve temperature from 75 to 95 °C, with other process parameters being identical, decreased both the growth per cycle and electrical resistivity (ρ) of ZrN PEALD films from 0.10 to 0.07 nm/cycle and from 560 to 350 μΩ cm, respectively. Our results show that the non-ALD growth resulting from condensate accumulation is eliminated at valve temperatures close to the pressure corrected boiling point of precursor.

  12. Kinetics of octacalcium phosphate crystal growth in the presence of organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossl, Paul R.; Inskeep, William P.

    1992-05-01

    Octacalcium phosphate (OCP) is an important P solid phase in geochemical and biological systems and has been recognized as a precursor phase to the formation of thermodynamically more stable hydroxyapatite (HAP). Metastability of OCP with respect to HAP may be explained by precipitation kinetics and the influence of dissolved organic C (DOC) on crystal growth. Octacalcium phosphate precipitation was measured at pH 6.0 and 25°C in the absence and presence of organic acids commonly found in natural waters and soil solutions using a seeded crystal growth constant composition method. Rate constants for OCP precipitation were calculated from the following expression: Rate = kS(IAP 1/8 - K sp1/8) n, where k is the rate constant (L 7 mol -6 m -2 s -1), S is OCP seed crystal surface area (m 2 L -1), IAP = ion activity product, Ksp = OCP solubility constant (mol 8 L -8), and n is the rate reaction order. The rate constant for OCP precipitation in the absence of organic acids was 10 34.93·L 7 mol -6 m -2 s -1. Humic, fulvic, tannic, and citric acids were added to OCP crystal growth experiments at total soluble (C TS) C levels ranging from 20 μM to 2 mM. Inhibition of OCP precipitation was nearly complete (99% ) in the presence of 1.0 mM C TS as humic acid. At the same level of C TS, OCP precipitation was inhibited by 97,88, and 68% in the presence of fulvic, citric, and tannic acids, respectively. Inhibition of precipitation is caused by adsorption of organic acids onto OCP surfaces blocking active crystal growth sites. The ability of organic acids to inhibit OCP crystal growth is related to their hydrophobicity, functional group content, size, geometry, and orientation on the crystal surface. Precipitation kinetics and crystal growth inhibition by organic acids may explain the metastability of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) and OCP with respect to thermodynamically more stable HAP often observed in geochemical environments.

  13. Thermal transitions in dry and hydrated layer-by-layer assemblies exhibiting linear and exponential growth.

    PubMed

    Vidyasagar, Ajay; Sung, Choonghyun; Gamble, Randall; Lutkenhaus, Jodie L

    2012-07-24

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) assemblies are remarkable materials, known for their tunable mechanical, optical, and surface properties in nanoscale films. However, questions related to their thermal properties still remain unclear. Here, the thermal properties of a model LbL assembly of strong polyelectrolytes, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)/poly(styrene sulfonate) (PDAC/PSS), assembled from solutions of varying ionic strength (0-1.25 M NaCl) are investigated using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and modulated differential scanning calorimetry. Hydrated exponentially growing films (assembled from 0.25 to 1.25 M NaCl) exhibited distinct thermal transitions akin to a glass transition at 49-56 °C; linearly growing films (assembled without added salt) did not exhibit a transition in the temperature range investigated and were glassy. Results support the idea that exponentially growing films have greater segmental mobility than that of linearly growing films. On the other hand, all dry LbL assemblies investigated were glassy at room temperature and did not exhibit a T(g) up to 250 °C, independent of ionic strength. For the first time, thermal transitions such as T(g) values can be measured for LbL assemblies using QCM-D by monitoring fluctuations in changes in dissipation, allowing us to probe the film's internal structure as a function of film depth.

  14. Finite size effects in phase transformation kinetics in thin films and surface layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vladimir I.; Trofimov, Ilya V.; Kim, Jong-Il

    2004-02-01

    In studies of phase transformation kinetics in thin films, e.g. crystallization of amorphous films, until recent time is widely used familiar Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) statistical model of crystallization despite it is applicable only to an infinite medium. In this paper a model of transformation kinetics in thin films based on a concept of the survival probability for randomly chosen point during transformation process is presented. Two model versions: volume induced transformation (VIT) when the second-phase grains nucleate over a whole film volume and surface induced transformation (SIT) when they form on an interface with two nucleation mode: instantaneous nucleation at transformation onset and continuous one during all the process are studied. At VIT-process due to the finite film thickness effects the transformation profile has a maximum in a film middle, whereas that of the grains population reaches a minimum inhere, the grains density is always higher than in a volume material, and the thinner film the slower it transforms. The transformation kinetics in a thin film obeys a generalized KJMA equation with parameters depending on a film thickness and in limiting cases of extremely thin and thick film it reduces to classical KJMA equation for 2D- and 3D-system, respectively.

  15. The Influence of Kinetic Growth Factors on the Clumped Isotope Composition of Calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, J. D.; Watkins, J. M.; Tripati, A.; Ryerson, F. J.; DePaolo, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Clumped isotope paleothermometry is based on the association of 13C and 18O within carbonate minerals. Although the influence of temperature on equilibrium 13C-18O bond ordering has been studied, recent oxygen isotope studies of inorganic calcite demonstrate that calcite grown in laboratory experiments and in many natural settings does not form in equilibrium with water. It is therefore likely that the carbon and clumped isotope composition of these calcite crystals are not representative of true thermodynamic equilibrium. To isolate kinetic clumped isotope effects that arise at the mineral-solution interface, clumped isotopic equilibrium of DIC species must be maintained. This can be accomplished by dissolving the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) into the solution, thereby reducing the time required for isotopic equilibration of DIC species by approximately two orders of magnitude between pH 7.7 and 9.3. We conduct calcite growth experiments aimed specifically at measuring the pH-dependence of kinetic clumped isotope effects during non-equilibrium precipitation of calcite. We precipitated calcite from aqueous solution at a constant pH and controlled supersaturation over the pH range 7.7-9.3 in the presence of CA. For each experiment, a gas mixture of N2 and CO2 is bubbled through a beaker of solution without seed crystals. As CO2 from the gas dissolves into solution, calcite crystals grow on the beaker walls. The pH of the solution is maintained by use of an autotitrator with NaOH as the titrant. We control the temperature, pH, the pCO2 of the gas inflow, and the gas inflow rate, and monitor the total alkalinity, the pCO2 of the gas outflow, and the amount of NaOH added. A constant crystal growth rate of ~1.6 mmol/m2/hr is maintained over all experiments. Results from these experiments are compared to predictions from a recently-developed isotopic ion-by-ion growth model of calcite. The model describes the rate, temperature and pH dependence of oxygen isotope uptake

  16. Comparison between broilers and layers for growth and protein use by embryos.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Y; Yoshida, T; Tsushima, N

    2004-05-01

    Three experiments were conducted to compare the growth and protein utilization of embryo between broilers and layers. In experiments 1 and 2, the average weight of eggs was the same for broilers and layers. Nothing or an amino acid (AA) solution was injected into the eggs of broilers at d 7 of incubation, and the plasma AA concentration of newly hatched chicks was determined in broilers in experiment 1. In experiment 2, the same treatments as experiment 1 were used on layer breeder eggs. Plasma Tau, Thr, and Lys concentrations of hatched chicks increased when AA solution was injected in broilers breeder eggs (P < 0.05) but not in layers (P > 0.05). The AA ratio to Lys was reduced by AA injection in broilers but not in layers. In experiment 3, weights of embryos and egg were recorded, and CP contents were analyzed over time during incubation (d 0, 7, 14, and 19 of incubation) in broilers and layers using eggs of the same weight. There were no differences in the weights and CP contents of embryos and eggs from broilers and layers. On d 14 and 19 of incubation, weights and CP contents of embryo were higher in broilers than layers (P < 0.05). These results suggested that the egg protein content might be adequate for hatching but insufficient for maximum growth of embryos from broilers.

  17. Phosphate-intercalated Ca-Fe-layered double hydroxides: Crystal structure, bonding character, and release kinetics of phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Myong A.; Woo Kim, Tae; Paek, Mi-Jeong; Ha, Hyung-Wook; Choy, Jin-Ho; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2011-01-15

    The nitrate-form of Ca-Fe-layered double hydroxide (Ca-Fe-LDH) was synthesized via co-precipitation method, and its phosphate-intercalates were prepared by ion-exchange reaction. According to X-ray diffraction analysis, the Ca-Fe-LDH-NO{sub 3}{sup -} compound and its H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup -}-intercalate showed hexagonal layered structures, whereas the ion-exchange reaction with HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-} caused a frustration of the layer ordering of LDH. Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy clearly demonstrated that the Ca-Fe-LDH lattice with trivalent iron ions was well-maintained after the ion-exchange with HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup -}. Under acidic conditions, phosphate ions were slowly released from the Ca-Fe-LDH lattice and the simultaneous release of hydroxide caused the neutralization of acidic media. Fitting analysis based on kinetic models indicated a heterogeneous diffusion process of phosphates and a distinct dependence of release rate on the charge of phosphates. This study strongly suggested that Ca-Fe-LDH is applicable as bifunctional vector for slow release of phosphate fertilizer and for the neutralization of acid soil. -- Graphical abstract: We synthesized phosphate-intercalated Ca-Fe-LDH materials that can act as bifunctional inorganic vectors for the slow release of phosphate fertilizer and also the neutralization of acid soil. Fitting analysis based on kinetic models indicated a heterogeneous diffusion process of phosphates and a distinct dependence of release rate on the charge of phosphates. Display Omitted Research Highlights: {yields} The phosphate forms of Ca-Fe-layered double hydroxide (Ca-Fe-LDH) were synthesized via co-precipitation method. The crystal structure, bonding character, and release kinetics of phosphate of the phosphate-intercalates were investigated. These Ca-Fe-LDH materials are applicable as bifunctional vector for slow release of phosphate fertilizer and for the neutralization of acid soil.

  18. Growth kinetics of a single InP1-xAsx nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmand, Jean-Christophe; Glas, Frank; Patriarche, Gilles

    2010-06-01

    Semiconductor nanowires offer additional properties and more flexibility for many potential applications. However the precise control of their growth is very challenging and much more complex than for two-dimensional layers. Here, we present a method which provides detailed information on their formation. The method is implemented with In(P,As) nanowires grown by Au-catalyzed molecular beam epitaxy. Controlled and periodic modulations of the incident vapor phase are generated. Due to these modulations, the nanowires show small and short oscillations of composition along their growth axis. These oscillations furnish a time scale which is recorded in the nanowire solid phase. The instantaneous growth rate and the total length of the nanowire at any time of the growth are accessible. The experimental data are fitted with models. The adatom diffusion lengths on the different surfaces and the chemical potentials in the adsorbed and liquid phases are extracted. It appears that the vapor flux intercepted by the nanowire sidewalls is the dominant contribution to their elongation. We discuss which contribution allows one initiating their growth from the catalyst drop.

  19. Growth kinetics and energetics of a deep-sea hyperthermophilic methanogen under varying environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Ver Eecke, Helene C; Akerman, Nancy H; Huber, Julie A; Butterfield, David A; Holden, James F

    2013-10-01

    A hyperthermophilic deep-sea methanogen, Methanocaldococcus strain JH146, was isolated from 26°C hydrothermal fluid at Axial Volcano to model high temperature methanogenesis in the subseafloor. Emphasis was placed on defining growth kinetics, cell yields and growth energy demand (GE) across a range of conditions. The organism uses H2 and CO2 as its sole carbon and energy sources. At various temperatures, pHs, and chlorinities, its growth rates and cell yields co-varied while GE remained uniform at 1.69 × 10(-11) J cell(-1)s(-1) ± 0.68 × 10(-11) J cell(-1)s(-1) (s.d., n = 23). An exception was at superoptimal growth temperatures where GE increased to 7.25 × 10(-11) J cell(-1)s(-1) presumably due to heat shock. GE also increased from 5.1 × 10(-12) J cell(-1)s(-1) to 7.61 × 10(-11) J cell(-1)s(-1) as NH4 (+) concentrations decreased from 9.4 mM to 0.14 mM. JH146 did not fix N2 or assimilate NO3 (-), lacked the N2-fixing (cluster II) nifH gene, and became nitrogen limited below 0.14 mM NH4Cl. Nitrogen availability may impact growth in situ since ammonia concentrations at Axial Volcano are < 18 μM. Our approach contributes to refining bioenergetic and carbon flux models for methanogens and other organisms in hydrothermal vents and other environments.

  20. Low-temperature growth of silicon epitaxial layers codoped with erbium and oxygen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Shengurov, D. V.; Chalkov, V. Yu.; Denisov, S. A.; Shengurov, V. G.; Stepikhova, M. V.; Drozdov, M. N.; Krasilnik, Z. F.

    2013-03-15

    The fabrication technology and properties of light-emitting Si structures codoped with erbium and oxygen are reported. The layers are deposited onto (100) Si by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using an Er-doped silicon sublimation source. The partial pressure of the oxygen-containing gases in the growth chamber of the MBE facility before layer growth is lower than 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} Torr. The oxygen and erbium concentrations in the Si layers grown at 450 Degree-Sign C is {approx}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} and 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}, respectively. The silicon epitaxial layers codoped with erbium and oxygen have high crystal quality and yield effective photoluminescence and electroluminescence signals with the dominant optically active Er-1 center forming upon postgrowth annealing at a temperature of 800 Degree-Sign C.

  1. Monitoring Fatigue Crack Growth in Multi-Layered Tensile Specimens Using Guided Ultrasonic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostson, E.; Fromme, P.

    2010-02-01

    This contribution presents a study for the monitoring of fatigue crack growth at fastener holes in multi-layered aircraft structures using low frequency guided ultrasonic waves. The investigated model multi-layered structure consists of two adhesively bonded aluminum alloy tensile specimens. Guided ultrasonic waves were excited using multiple piezoelectric discs bonded to the surface of the multi-layered structure. The wave propagation in the tensile specimen was measured using a laser interferometer and compared to numerical simulations. Experiments and 3D Finite Element (FE) simulations show a change in the scattered field around fastener holes caused by a defect in the 2nd layer. During fatigue crack growth, changes in the amplitude of the ultrasonic signal at a single point were monitored and correlated to the optically measured crack length.

  2. Diffusion-induced growth of nanowires: Generalized boundary conditions and self-consistent kinetic equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskii, V. G.; Hervieu, Yu. Yu.

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we present a theoretical analysis of the diffusion-induced growth of "vapor-liquid-solid" nanowires, based on the stationary equations with generalized boundary conditions. We discuss why and how the earlier results are modified when the adatom chemical potential is discontinuous at the nanowire base. Several simplified models for the adatom diffusion flux are discussed, yielding the 1 /Rp radius dependence of the length, with p ranging from 0.5 to 2. The self-consistent approach is used to couple the diffusion transport with the kinetics of 2D nucleation under the droplet. This leads to a new growth equation that contains only two dimensional parameters and the power exponents p and q, where q=1 or 2 depends on the nucleus position. We show that this equation describes the size-dependent depression of the growth rate of narrow nanowires much better than the Gibbs-Thomson correction in several important cases. Overall, our equation fits very well the experimental data on the length-radius correlations of III-V and group IV nanowires obtained by different epitaxy techniques.

  3. Nonisothermal Austenite Grain Growth Kinetics in a Microalloyed X80 Linepipe Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Kumkum; Militzer, Matthias; Perez, Michel; Wang, Xiang

    2010-12-01

    Nonisothermal austenite grain growth kinetics under the influence of several combinations of Nb, Ti, and Mo containing complex precipitates has been studied in a microalloyed linepipe steel. The goal of this study is the development of a grain growth model to predict the austenite grain size in the weld heat affected zone (HAZ). Electron microscopy investigations of the as-received steel proved the presence of Ti-rich, Nb-rich, and Mo-rich precipitates. The steel has then been subjected to austenitizing heat treatments to selected peak temperatures at various heating rates that are typical for thermal cycles in the HAZ. Thermal cycles have a strong effect on the final austenite grain size. Using a mean field approach, a model is proposed for the dissolution of Nb-rich precipitates. This model has been coupled to a Zener-type austenite grain growth model in the presence of pinning particles. This coupling leads to accurate prediction of the austenite grain size along the nonisothermal heating path simulating selected thermal profiles of the HAZ.

  4. Pattern, growth, and aging in aggregation kinetics of a Vicsek-like active matter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Subir K.

    2017-01-01

    Via molecular dynamics simulations, we study kinetics in a Vicsek-like phase-separating active matter model. Quantitative results, for isotropic bicontinuous pattern, are presented on the structure, growth, and aging. These are obtained via the two-point equal-time density-density correlation function, the average domain length, and the two-time density autocorrelation function. Both the correlation functions exhibit basic scaling properties, implying self-similarity in the pattern dynamics, for which the average domain size exhibits a power-law growth in time. The equal-time correlation has a short distance behavior that provides reasonable agreement between the corresponding structure factor tail and the Porod law. The autocorrelation decay is a power-law in the average domain size. Apart from these basic similarities, the overall quantitative behavior of the above-mentioned observables is found to be vastly different from those of the corresponding passive limit of the model which also undergoes phase separation. The functional forms of these have been quantified. An exceptionally rapid growth in the active system occurs due to fast coherent motion of the particles, mean-squared-displacements of which exhibit multiple scaling regimes, including a long time ballistic one.

  5. Kinetics-controlled growth of bimetallic RhAg on Au nanorods and their catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wei; Guo, Xia; Xie, Fang; Zhu, Rui; Zhao, Qing; Yang, Jian

    2014-04-21

    Controlled growth of hybrid metallic nanocomposites for a desirable structure in a combination of selected components is highly important for their applications. Herein, the controllable growth of RhAg on the gold nanorods is achieved from the dumbbell-like RhAg-tipped nanorods to the brushy RhAg-coated nanorods, or the rod-like Au@Ag-Rh nanorattles. These different growth modes of RhAg on the gold nanorods are correlated with the reducing kinetics of RhCl₃ and AgNO₃. In view of the promising catalytic properties of Rh, the gold nanorods modified by RhAg in different structures are examined as catalysts for the oxidation of o-phenylenediamine. It is found that brushy RhAg-coated nanorods present a higher catalytic efficiency than dumbbell-like RhAg-tipped nanorods and rod-like Au@Ag-Rh nanorattles. These results would benefit the overgrowth control on the one-dimensional metallic nanorods and the rational design of new generation heterogeneous catalysts and optical devices.

  6. Effect of moderate electric field frequency on growth kinetics and metabolic activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    PubMed

    Loghavi, Laleh; Sastry, Sudhir K; Yousef, Ahmed E

    2008-01-01

    Moderate electric fields (MEF) have been previously shown to alter the metabolic activity of microbial cells; thus, the effect of frequency and electric field would be of considerable interest. We investigated herein the effects of MEF frequency on microbial growth kinetics and bacteriocin (Lacidin A) production of Lactobacillus acidophilus OSU 133 during fermentation. The following fermentation treatments were compared: conventional (for 40 h), MEF (1 V cm(-1), for 40 h), combination of MEF (1 V cm(-1), for the first 5 h) and conventional (for 35 h) at various frequency levels (45, 60, and 90 Hz) all at 30 degrees C, and control (conventional) fermentation at 37 degrees C. MEF treatments with purely sinusoidal waveforms at all frequencies at 30 degrees C produced a shorter lag phase than conventional fermentation. However, no lag phase reduction was found for a 60 Hz waveform that contained high-frequency harmonics. There was, however, a significant increase in the bacteriocin production under early MEF treatment at 60 Hz with high-frequency harmonics. On the basis of these observations, the fermentation process is accelerated by applying pure sinusoidal MEF at the early stage of growth while a significant increase in the bacteriocin production occurs when sinusoidal field at 60 Hz with harmonics is applied at the early stage of the growth.

  7. Growth and micro structural studies on Yittria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) and Strontium Titanate (STO) buffer layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivas, S.; Pinto, R.; Pai, S. P.; Dsousa, D. P.; Apte, P. R.; Kumar, D.; Purandare, S. C.; Bhatnagar, A. K.

    1995-01-01

    Microstructure of Yittria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) and Strontium Titanate (STO) of radio frequency magnetron sputtered buffer layers was studied at various sputtering conditions on Si (100), Sapphire and LaAlO3 (100) substrates. The effect of substrate temperatures up to 800 C and sputtering gas pressures in the range of 50 mTorr. of growth conditions was studied. The buffer layers of YSZ and STO showed a strong tendency for columnar growth was observed above 15 mTorr sputtering gas pressure and at high substrate temperatures. Post annealing of these films in oxygen atmosphere reduced the oxygen deficiency and strain generated during growth of the films. Strong c-axis oriented superconducting YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) thin films were obtained on these buffer layers using pulsed laser ablation technique. YBCO films deposited on multilayers of YSZ and STO were shown to have better superconducting properties.

  8. Growth Kinetics of In Situ Fabricated Dense NbC Coatings on Gray Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Liuliu; Xu, Yunhua; Zhao, Nana; Zhao, Ziyuan; Zhong, Lisheng; Song, Ke; Cai, Xiaolong; Wang, Juan

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, dense niobium carbide (NbC) coatings are fabricated by in situ techniques on gray cast iron (Fe) substrates at 1150 °C for 5 min, followed by a heat treatment at 990, 1010 and 1030 °C for 5, 10, 15 and 20 min. The microstructure, element composition and metallographic phase of the coating are characterized by scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive spectral and x-ray diffraction, respectively. Results show that the coating consists of NbC and α-Fe phases. NbC coating thickness ranges from 12.51 ± 1.4 to 29.17 ± 2.0 µm depending on the heat treatment temperature and time. In addition, the growth kinetics of dense niobium carbide coatings are estimated. A diffusion model based on Fick's laws is used to explore the carbon diffusion coefficients of the dense NbC coating in the range of heat treatment temperatures in which the experimental results of the kinetics of the niobium carbide coating are in good agreement with those estimated using diffusion model.

  9. Modeling of the Kinetics of Metal Film Growth on 5-Fold Surfaces of Icosohedral Quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. W.; Unal, B.; Fournee, V.; Ghosh, C.; Liu, D.-J.; Jenks, C. J.; Thiel, P. A.

    2007-03-01

    During submonolayer deposition of metals on 5-f icosohedral Al- Pd-Mn and Al-Cu-Fe surfaces, experimental evidence for several system points to heterogeneous nucleation of islands at specific ``dark star'' trap sites. We model this phenomenon using a mean-field rate equation formulation for Ag on Al-Pd-Mn, where data is available for both the flux and temperature dependence of the island density. We also utilize a more sophisticated kinetic Monte Carlo simulation approach to analyze an atomistic lattice-gas model (for an appropriate ``disordered-bond-network'' of nearest-neighbor adsorption sites) describing nucleation of starfish islands observed by STM for Al on Al-Cu-Fe. Finally, we briefly describe multilayer growth morphologies (which can display kinetic roughening or quantum size effects), but which also generally reflect the submonolayer island distribution. B. Unal et al. PRB 75 (2007); C. Ghosh et al. Phil. Mag. 86 (2006) 831; Surf. Sci. 600 (2006) 1110; V. Fournee et al. PRL 95 (2005) 155504.

  10. Controlling single and few-layer graphene crystals growth in a solid carbon source based chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Papon, Remi; Sharma, Subash; Shinde, Sachin M.; Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Tanemura, Masaki; Kalita, Golap

    2014-09-29

    Here, we reveal the growth process of single and few-layer graphene crystals in the solid carbon source based chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Nucleation and growth of graphene crystals on a polycrystalline Cu foil are significantly affected by the injection of carbon atoms with pyrolysis rate of the carbon source. We observe micron length ribbons like growth front as well as saturated growth edges of graphene crystals depending on growth conditions. Controlling the pyrolysis rate of carbon source, monolayer and few-layer crystals and corresponding continuous films are obtained. In a controlled process, we observed growth of large monolayer graphene crystals, which interconnect and merge together to form a continuous film. On the other hand, adlayer growth is observed with an increased pyrolysis rate, resulting few-layer graphene crystal structure and merged continuous film. The understanding of monolayer and few-layer crystals growth in the developed CVD process can be significant to grow graphene with controlled layer numbers.

  11. Kinetics of subdiffusive growth of new phase particles in supersaturated solid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Svetukhin, V. V. Sibatov, R. T.

    2015-04-15

    The kinetics of the subdiffusion-limited growth of spherical precipitates is studied. The process is described by the equation of anomalous diffusion with a fractional derivative with respect to time. It is shown that a decrease in the concentration of monomers is described by the law exp(−kt{sup 3α/2}) at the initial stage and the power law t{sup −α} at large times, where 0 < α ≤ 1 is the dispersion parameter coinciding with the order of time derivative in the subdiffusion equation. The time dependence of the size of a spherical precipitate is obtained. The results generalize the Ham diffusion theory and are in agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation data.

  12. Growth kinetics of an indigenous mixed microbial consortium during phenol degradation in a batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Pichiah; Pakshirajan, K; Saha, Prabirkumar

    2008-01-01

    Biodegradation of phenol by a mixed microbial culture, isolated from a sewage treatment plant, was investigated in batch shake flasks. A minimum concentration of 100 and a maximum of 800 mg 1(-1) of phenol in the media were adapted in the degradation study. The phenol degradation rate varied largely and was less than 10 mg l(-1)h(-1) at both extremes of the initial concentrations in the media. The degradation rate was maximum 15.7 mg l(-1)h(-1) at 400 mg l(-1) phenol. The culture followed substrate inhibition kinetics and the specific growth rate were fitted to Haldane and Han-Levenspiel models. Between the two models the Han-Levenspiel was found to be a better fit with a root mean square error of 0.0211. The biokinetics constants estimated using these models showed good potential of the mixed microbial culture in phenol degradation.

  13. Solution-growth kinetics and thermodynamics of nanoporous self-assembled molecular monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellec, Amandine; Arrigoni, Claire; Schull, Guillaume; Douillard, Ludovic; Fiorini-Debuisschert, Céline; Mathevet, Fabrice; Kreher, David; Attias, André-Jean; Charra, Fabrice

    2011-03-01

    The temperature and concentration dependences of the self-assembly onto graphite from solution of a series of molecular building blocks able to form nanoporous structures are analyzed experimentally by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy. It is shown that the commonly observed coexistence of dense and nanoporous domains results from kinetic blockades rather than a thermodynamic equilibrium. The ripening can be favored by high densities of domain boundaries, which can be obtained by cooling the substrate before the nucleation and growth. Then ripening at higher-temperature yields large defect-free domains of a single structure. This thermodynamically stable structure can be either the dense or the nanoporous one, depending on the tecton concentration in the supernatant solution. A sharp phase transition from dense to honeycomb structures is observed at a critical concentration. This collective phenomenon is explained by introducing interactions between adsorbed molecules in the thermodynamic description of the whole system.

  14. Solubility, phase transition, kinetic ripening and growth rates of porcine pancreatic α-amylase isoenzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boistelle, Roland; Astier, Jean Pierre; Marchis-Mouren, Guy; Desseaux, Véronique; Haser, Richard

    1992-09-01

    Two polymorphic modifications, A and B, of porcine pancreatic α-amylase were grown between 4 and 30°C. A and B crystals are made up by two isoenzymes so that four crystal varieties (AI, AII, BI, BII) exist. A and B are easily distinguished due to their typical crystal habits but there is no difference between AI and AII or BI and BII respectively at least as concerns their unit cells, crystal habits and solubilities for instance. On the other hand, the growth rates are somewhat different, even if the overall rate determining step is volume diffusion. The transition temperature between A and B polymorphs is 18°C, A being stable above this temperature. A and B can undergo a phase transition by slightly changing the temperature around the transition point. Kinetic ripening experiments show that ripening can be used for growing larger crystals at the expenses of smaller ones.

  15. Enhanced Generic Phase-field Model of Irradiation Materials: Fission Gas Bubble Growth Kinetics in Polycrystalline UO2

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin

    2012-05-30

    Experiments show that inter-granular and intra-granular gas bubbles have different growth kinetics which results in heterogeneous gas bubble microstructures in irradiated nuclear fuels. A science-based model predicting the heterogeneous microstructure evolution kinetics is desired, which enables one to study the effect of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the system on gas bubble microstructure evolution kinetics and morphology, improve the understanding of the formation mechanisms of heterogeneous gas bubble microstructure, and provide the microstructure to macroscale approaches to study their impact on thermo-mechanical properties such as thermo-conductivity, gas release, volume swelling, and cracking. In our previous report 'Mesoscale Benchmark Demonstration, Problem 1: Mesoscale Simulations of Intra-granular Fission Gas Bubbles in UO2 under Post-irradiation Thermal Annealing', we developed a phase-field model to simulate the intra-granular gas bubble evolution in a single crystal during post-irradiation thermal annealing. In this work, we enhanced the model by incorporating thermodynamic and kinetic properties at grain boundaries, which can be obtained from atomistic simulations, to simulate fission gas bubble growth kinetics in polycrystalline UO2 fuels. The model takes into account of gas atom and vacancy diffusion, vacancy trapping and emission at defects, gas atom absorption and resolution at gas bubbles, internal pressure in gas bubbles, elastic interaction between defects and gas bubbles, and the difference of thermodynamic and kinetic properties in matrix and grain boundaries. We applied the model to simulate gas atom segregation at grain boundaries and the effect of interfacial energy and gas mobility on gas bubble morphology and growth kinetics in a bi-crystal UO2 during post-irradiation thermal annealing. The preliminary results demonstrate that the model can produce the equilibrium thermodynamic properties and the morphology of gas bubbles at

  16. Comprehensive study of Al-induced layer-exchange growth for orientation-controlled Si crystals on SiO{sub 2} substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kurosawa, Masashi; Sadoh, Taizoh; Miyao, Masanobu

    2014-11-07

    Orientation-controlled crystalline Si films on insulating substrates are strongly required to achieve high-performance thin-film devices for next-generation electronics. We have comprehensively investigated the layer-exchange kinetics of Al-induced crystallization (AIC) in stacked structures, i.e., amorphous-Si/Al-oxide/Al/SiO{sub 2}-substrates, as a function of the air-exposure time of Al surfaces (t{sub air}: 0–24 h) to form Al-oxide interface-layers, the thickness of Al and Si layers (d{sub Al,} d{sub Si}: 50–200 nm), the annealing temperature (450–500 °C), and the annealing time (0–50 h). It has been clarified that longer t{sub air} (>60 min) and/or thinner d{sub Al} and d{sub Si} (<50 nm) lead to the (111) oriented growth; in contrast, shorter t{sub air} (<60 min) and/or thicker d{sub Al} and d{sub Si} (>100 nm) lead to the (100) oriented growth. No correlation between the annealing temperature and the crystal orientation is observed. Detailed analysis reveals that the layer-exchange kinetics are dominated by “supply-limited” processing, i.e., diffusion of Si atoms into Al layers through Al-oxide layer. Based on the growth rate dependent Si concentration profiles in Al layers, and the free-energy of Si at Al-oxide/Al or Al/SiO{sub 2} interfaces, a comprehensive model for layer-exchange growth is proposed. This well explains the experimental results of not only Si-AIC but also another material system such as gold-induced crystallization of Ge. In this way, a growth technique achieving the orientation-controlled Si crystals on insulating substrates is established from both technological and scientific points of view.

  17. Mathematical modelling of cell layer growth in a hollow fibre bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Lloyd A C; Whiteley, Jonathan P; Byrne, Helen M; Waters, Sarah L; Shipley, Rebecca J

    2017-04-07

    Generating autologous tissue grafts of a clinically useful volume requires efficient and controlled expansion of cell populations harvested from patients. Hollow fibre bioreactors show promise as cell expansion devices, owing to their potential for scale-up. However, further research is required to establish how to specify appropriate hollow fibre bioreactor operating conditions for expanding different cell types. In this study we develop a simple model for the growth of a cell layer seeded on the outer surface of a single fibre in a perfused hollow fibre bioreactor. Nutrient-rich culture medium is pumped through the fibre lumen and leaves the bioreactor via the lumen outlet or passes through the porous fibre walls and cell layer, and out via ports on the outer wall of the extra-capillary space. Stokes and Darcy equations for fluid flow in the fibre lumen, fibre wall, cell layer and extra-capillary space are coupled to reaction-advection-diffusion equations for oxygen and lactate transport through the bioreactor, and to a simple growth law for the evolution of the free boundary of the cell layer. Cells at the free boundary are assumed to proliferate at a rate that increases with the local oxygen concentration, and to die and detach from the layer if the local fluid shear stress or lactate concentration exceed critical thresholds. We use the model to predict operating conditions that maximise the cell layer growth for different cell types. In particular, we predict the optimal flow rate of culture medium into the fibre lumen and fluid pressure imposed at the lumen outlet for cell types with different oxygen demands and fluid shear stress tolerances, and compare the growth of the cell layer when the exit ports on the outside of the bioreactor are open with that when they are closed. Model simulations reveal that increasing the inlet flow rate and outlet fluid pressure increases oxygen delivery to the cell layer and, therefore, the growth rate of cells that are

  18. The kinetics of the hydrogen/deuterium exchange of epidermal growth factor receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Iloro, Ibon; Narváez, Daniel; Guillén, Nancy; Camacho, Carlos M; Guillén, Lalisse; Cora, Elsa; Pastrana-Ríos, Belinda

    2008-05-15

    Five highly homologous epidermal growth factor receptor ligands were studied by mass spectral analysis, hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange via attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, and two-dimensional correlation analysis. These studies were performed to determine the order of events during the exchange process, the extent of H/D exchange, and associated kinetics of exchange for a comparative analysis of these ligands. Furthermore, the secondary structure composition of amphiregulin (AR) and heparin-binding-epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) was determined. All ligands were found to have similar contributions of 3(10)-helix and random coil with varying contributions of beta-sheets and beta-turns. The extent of exchange was 40%, 65%, 55%, 65%, and 98% for EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha), AR, HB-EGF, and epiregulin (ER), respectively. The rate constants were determined and classified as fast, intermediate, and slow: for EGF the 0.20 min(-1) (Tyr), 0.09 min(-1) (Arg, beta-turns), and 1.88 x 10(-3) min(-1) (beta-sheets and 3(10)-helix); and for TGF-alpha 0.91 min(-1) (Tyr), 0.27 min(-1) (Arg, beta-turns), and 1.41 x 10(-4) min(-1) (beta-sheets). The time constants for AR 0.47 min(-1) (Tyr), 0.04 min(-1) (Arg), and 1.00 x 10(-4) min(-1) (buried 3(10)-helix, beta-turns, and beta-sheets); for HB-EGF 0.89 min(-1) (Tyr), 0.14 min(-1) (Arg and 3(10)-helix), and 1.00 x 10(-3) min(-1) (buried 3(10)-helix, beta-sheets, and beta-turns); and for epiregulin 0.16 min(-1) (Tyr), 0.03 min(-1) (Arg), and 1.00 x 10(-4) min(-1) (3(10)-helix and beta-sheets). These results provide essential information toward understanding secondary structure, H/D exchange kinetics, and solvation of these epidermal growth factor receptor ligands in their unbound state.

  19. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface growth during plasma deposition of silicon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Sumeet C.; Singh, Tejinder; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2009-07-01

    Based on an atomically detailed surface growth model, we have performed kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations to determine the surface chemical composition of plasma deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films as a function of substrate temperature. Our surface growth kinetic model consists of a combination of various surface rate processes, including silyl (SiH3) radical chemisorption onto surface dangling bonds or insertion into Si-Si surface bonds, SiH3 physisorption, SiH3 surface diffusion, abstraction of surface H by SiH3 radicals, surface hydride dissociation reactions, as well as desorption of SiH3, SiH4, and Si2H6 species into the gas phase. Transition rates for the adsorption, surface reaction and diffusion, and desorption processes accounted for in the KMC simulations are based on first-principles density-functional-theory computations of the corresponding optimal pathways on the H-terminated Si(001)-(2×1) surface. Results are reported for two types of KMC simulations. The first employs a fully ab initio database of activation energy barriers for the surface rate processes involved and is appropriate for modeling the early stages of growth. The second uses approximate rates for all the relevant processes to account properly for the effects on the activation energetics of interactions between species adsorbed at neighboring surface sites and is appropriate to model later stages of growth toward a steady state of the surface composition. The KMC predictions for the temperature dependence of the surface concentration of SiHx(s) (x =1,2,3) species, the surface hydrogen content, and the surface dangling-bond coverage are compared to experimental measurements on a-Si:H films deposited under operating conditions for which the SiH3 radical is the dominant deposition precursor. The predictions of both KMC simulation types are consistent with the reported experimental data, which are based on in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transformed

  20. A study on the growth curve of and maximum profit from layer-type cockerel chicks.

    PubMed

    Gang, F Y; Zhen, Y S

    1997-09-01

    1. 2900 commercial layer-type cockerel chicks were reared on the floor from 1-day-old to 9 weeks of age. 2. The growth curve of the cockerel chicks was [formula see text] 3. The feeding costs (US$) of layer-type cockerel chicks were described by the equation Y = a + bx + cx2 = 0.0657 - 0.0091x + 0.0069x2. 4. When the layer-type cockerel chicks' marketing price was US$0.82 per kg. (6.8 Renminbi per kg), the optimum marketing age for maximum profit margin was 5.9 weeks (41 to 42 d).

  1. Non-classical nuclei and growth kinetics of Cr precipitates in FeCr alloys during ageing

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Xin

    2014-01-10

    In this manuscript, we quantitatively calculated the thermodynamic properties of critical nuclei of Cr precipitates in FeCr alloys. The concentration profiles of the critical nuclei and nucleation energy barriers were predicted by the constrained shrinking dimer dynamics (CSDD) method. It is found that Cr concentration distribution in the critical nuclei strongly depend on the overall Cr concentration as well as temperature. The critical nuclei are non-classical because the concentration in the nuclei is smaller than the thermodynamic equilibrium value. These results are in agreement with atomic probe observation. The growth kinetics of both classical and non-classical nuclei was investigated by the phase field approach. The simulations of critical nucleus evolution showed a number of interesting phenomena: 1) a critical classical nucleus first shrinks toward its non-classical nucleus and then grows; 2) a non-classical nucleus has much slower growth kinetics at its earlier growth stage compared to the diffusion-controlled growth kinetics. 3) a critical classical nucleus grows faster at the earlier growth stage than the non-classical nucleus. All of these results demonstrate that it is critical to introduce the correct critical nuclei in order to correctly capture the kinetics of precipitation.

  2. Crossflow effects on the growth rate of inviscid Goertler vortices in a hypersonic boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Yibin; Hall, Philip

    1992-01-01

    The effects of crossflow on the growth rate of inviscid Goertler vortices in a hypersonic boundary layer with pressure gradient are studied. Attention is focused on the inviscid mode trapped in the temperature adjustment layer; this mode has greater growth rate than any other mode. The eigenvalue problem which governs the relationship between the growth rate, the crossflow amplitude, and the wavenumber is solved numerically, and the results are then used to clarify the effects of crossflow on the growth rate of inviscid Goertler vortices. It is shown that crossflow effects on Goertler vortices are fundamentally different for incompressible and hypersonic flows. The neutral mode eigenvalue problem is found to have an exact solution, and as a by-product, we have also found the exact solution to a neutral mode eigenvalue problem which was formulated, but unsolved before, by Bassom and Hall (1991).

  3. Image analysis and green tea color change kinetics during thin-layer drying.

    PubMed

    Shahabi, Mohammad; Rafiee, Shahin; Mohtasebi, Seyed Saeid; Hosseinpour, Soleiman

    2014-09-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of air temperature and air flow velocity on kinetics of color parameter changes during hot-air drying of green tea, to obtain the best model for hot-air drying of green tea, to apply a computer vision system and to study the color changes during drying. In the proposed computer vision system system, at first RGB values of the images were converted into XYZ values and then to Commission International d'Eclairage L*a*b* color coordinates. The obtained color parameters of L*, a* and b* were calibrated with Hunter-Lab colorimeter. These values were also used for calculation of the color difference, chroma, hue angle and browning index. The values of L* and b* decreased, while the values of a* and color difference (ΔE*ab ) increased during hot-air drying. Drying data were fitted to three kinetic models. Zero, first-order and fractional conversion models were utilized to describe the color changes of green tea. The suitability of fitness was determined using the coefficient of determination (R (2)) and root-mean-square error. Results showed that the fraction conversion model had more acceptable fitness than the other two models in most of color parameters.

  4. Phosphate-intercalated Ca-Fe-layered double hydroxides: Crystal structure, bonding character, and release kinetics of phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Myong A.; Woo Kim, Tae; Paek, Mi-Jeong; Ha, Hyung-Wook; Choy, Jin-Ho; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2011-01-01

    The nitrate-form of Ca-Fe-layered double hydroxide (Ca-Fe-LDH) was synthesized via co-precipitation method, and its phosphate-intercalates were prepared by ion-exchange reaction. According to X-ray diffraction analysis, the Ca-Fe-LDH-NO 3- compound and its H 2PO 4--intercalate showed hexagonal layered structures, whereas the ion-exchange reaction with HPO 42- caused a frustration of the layer ordering of LDH. Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy clearly demonstrated that the Ca-Fe-LDH lattice with trivalent iron ions was well-maintained after the ion-exchange with HPO 42- and H 2PO 4-. Under acidic conditions, phosphate ions were slowly released from the Ca-Fe-LDH lattice and the simultaneous release of hydroxide caused the neutralization of acidic media. Fitting analysis based on kinetic models indicated a heterogeneous diffusion process of phosphates and a distinct dependence of release rate on the charge of phosphates. This study strongly suggested that Ca-Fe-LDH is applicable as bifunctional vector for slow release of phosphate fertilizer and for the neutralization of acid soil.

  5. PAH growth initiated by propargyl addition: mechanism development and computational kinetics.

    PubMed

    Raj, Abhijeet; Al Rashidi, Mariam J; Chung, Suk Ho; Sarathy, S Mani

    2014-04-24

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) growth is known to be the principal pathway to soot formation during fuel combustion, as such, a physical understanding of the PAH growth mechanism is needed to effectively assess, predict, and control soot formation in flames. Although the hydrogen abstraction C2H2 addition (HACA) mechanism is believed to be the main contributor to PAH growth, it has been shown to under-predict some of the experimental data on PAHs and soot concentrations in flames. This article presents a submechanism of PAH growth that is initiated by propargyl (C3H3) addition onto naphthalene (A2) and the naphthyl radical. C3H3 has been chosen since it is known to be a precursor of benzene in combustion and has appreciable concentrations in flames. This mechanism has been developed up to the formation of pyrene (A4), and the temperature-dependent kinetics of each elementary reaction has been determined using density functional theory (DFT) computations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory and transition state theory (TST). H-abstraction, H-addition, H-migration, β-scission, and intramolecular addition reactions have been taken into account. The energy barriers of the two main pathways (H-abstraction and H-addition) were found to be relatively small if not negative, whereas the energy barriers of the other pathways were in the range of (6-89 kcal·mol(-1)). The rates reported in this study may be extrapolated to larger PAH molecules that have a zigzag site similar to that in naphthalene, and the mechanism presented herein may be used as a complement to the HACA mechanism to improve prediction of PAH and soot formation.

  6. Growth Optimization of YBa2NbO6 Buffer Layers (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    single crystals, and IBAD MgO buffered Inconel substrates has been investigated. X-ray diffraction confirms the epitaxial growth of highly h00 oriented...YBNO thin films on single crystal substrates and IBAD MgO buffered Inconel substrates. The best average surface roughness of the YBNO films...diffraction, crystal, buffered, inconel , epitaxial, films, substrates, layers, growth, investigated, sufficient, preliminary, critical 16. SECURITY

  7. Growth of nanotubular oxide layer on Ti-Ni alloys with different Ni contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Su; Tsuchiya, Hiroaki; Fujimoto, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    Anodization of near-equiatomic Ti-Ni alloys was performed in an ethylene glycol based electrolyte under various conditions in order to investigate the effects of crystal structure and chemical composition of the Ti-Ni alloy on the morphology of the resulting oxide layers. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that Ti-Ni substrates with Ni content lower than 50.0 at.% were in the martensitic phase, while substrates with Ni content higher than 50.0 at.% were in the austenitic phase. Oxide layers formed at 20 or 35 V for 5 min exhibited no distinct nanotubular structures; however, at 50 V, nanotubular oxide layers were formed. After anodization at 50 V for 20 min, the growth of an irregular-shaped porous layer underneath the nanotubular oxide layer was observed for Ti-Ni alloys with Ni content lower than 52.2 at.%, whereas the oxide layer consisted of only irregular-shaped porous structures for the Ti-52.5 at.% Ni alloy. Further anodization resulted in the formation of irregular-shaped porous oxide layers on all Ti-Ni alloys examined. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis indicated that this morphological transition is related to Ni accumulation in the vicinity of the interface between the bottoms of the oxide layers and the surfaces of the substrate alloys. Therefore, nanotubular oxide layers cannot be grown, and instead irregular-shaped porous oxide layers are formed underneath the nanotubular layers. These results indicate that the morphology of anodic oxide layers formed on the near-equiatomic Ti-Ni alloys is not affected by their crystal structure, but by Ni content and anodization time.

  8. Growth and decay of the Pd(1 1 1)-Pd 5O 4 surface oxide: Pressure-dependent kinetics and structural aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabasch, Harald; Unterberger, Werner; Hayek, Konrad; Klötzer, Bernhard; Kresse, Georg; Klein, Christof; Schmid, Michael; Varga, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Growth and decomposition of the Pd 5O 4 surface oxide on Pd(1 1 1) were studied at sample temperatures between 573 and 683 K and O 2 gas pressures between 10 -7 and 6 × 10 -5 mbar, by means of an effusive O 2 beam from a capillary array doser, scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS). Exposures beyond the p(2 × 2)O adlayer (saturation coverage 0.25) at 683 K (near thermodynamic equilibrium with respect to Pd 5O 4 surface oxide formation) lead to incorporation of additional oxygen into the surface. To initiate the incorporation, a critical pressure beyond the thermodynamic stability limit of the surface oxide is required. This thermodynamic stability limit is near 8.9 × 10 -6 mbar at 683 K, in good agreement with calculations by density functional theory. A controlled kinetic study was feasible by generating nuclei by only a short O 2 pressure pulse and then following further growth kinetics in the lower (10 -6 mbar) pressure range. Growth of the surface oxide layer at a lower temperature (573 K) studied by STM is characterized by a high degree of heterogeneity. Among various metastable local structures, a seam of disordered oxide formed at the step edges is a common structural feature characteristic of initial oxide growth. Further oxide nucleation appears to be favoured along the interface between the p(2 × 2)O structure and these disordered seams. Among the intermediate phases one specifically stable phase was detected both during growth and decomposition of the Pd 5O 4 layer. It is hexagonal with a distance of about 0.62 nm between the protrusions. Its well-ordered form is a (√{67}×√{67})R12.2° superstructure. Isothermal decay of the Pd 5O 4 oxide layer at 693 K involves at first a rearrangement into the (√{67}×√{67})R12.2° structure, indicating its high-temperature stability. This structure can break up into small clusters of uniform size and leaves a free metal surface area covered by a p(2 × 2)O adlayer

  9. Nonuniform Growth of Composite Layer-by-Layer Assembled Coatings via Three-Dimensional Expansion of Hydrophobic Magnetite Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Voronin, Denis V; Grigoriev, Dmitry; Möhwald, Helmuth; Shchukin, Dmitry G; Gorin, Dmitry A

    2015-12-30

    Nanocomposite coatings are promising for a range of practical applications, and layer-by-layer assembly (LbL) is a versatile tool for nanocomposite formation. However, conventional LbL is a quite laborious procedure taking a lot of time to reach a sufficient thickness of the coatings required for practical applications. Herein, we proposed a novel variant of the LbL approach based on the deposition of hydrophilic polyelectrolyte molecules from a polar solvent and hydrophobic magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) from a nonpolar dispersion medium with an intermediate washing in the same polar solvent. The composite multilayers formed in this way exhibit exponential growth of the thickness and mass. On the basis of quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and surface profile measurements, we propose a model describing the driving force of multilayer formation and the factors leading to nonlinear growth of their mass and thickness. The results allow one to expand the understanding of the mechanism of the LbL assembly in order to form multifunctional nanocomposites in a more efficient way.

  10. Temperature dependence of hole growth kinetics in aluminum-phthalocyanine-tetrasulfonate in hyperquenched glassy water.

    PubMed

    Dang, N C; Reinot, T; Reppert, M; Jankowiak, R

    2007-02-22

    The temperature (T) dependence of hole growth kinetics (HGK) data that span more than four decades of burn fluence are reported for aluminum-phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (APT) in fresh and annealed hyperquenched glassy water (HGW) for temperatures between 5 and 20 K. The highly dispersive HGK data are modeled by using the "master" equation based on the two level system (TLS) model described in 2000 by Reinot and Small [J. Chem. Phys. 2000, 113, 10207]. We have demonstrated that thermal line broadening is not enough to account for temperature-dependent HGK for temperatures greater than 10 K. To overcome the discrepancy, the hole growth model must account for thermal hole filling (THF) processes. For the first time, the "master" equation used for HGK simulations is modified to take into account both the temperature dependence of the (single site) absorption spectrum and THF processes, effectively turning off those TLS which do not participate in the hole burning process at higher temperatures. A single set of parameters, some of which were determined directly from the hole spectra, was found to provide satisfactory fits to the HGK data for APT in fresh and annealed HGW for holes burned in the 679.7-676.9 nm range from the high to low energy sides of the Qx absorption band. Furthermore, we propose that HGK modeling at high burn fluences requires that the TLS model be further modified to take into account the existence of extrinsic multiple level systems.

  11. Growth kinetics and competition between Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta in mesophilic anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Conklin, Anne; Stensel, H David; Ferguson, John

    2006-05-01

    Methanosarcina species with a high maximum specific growth rate (mumax) and high half-saturation coefficient (KS) and Methanosaeta species with a low mumax and low KS are the only known aceticlastic methanogens. Because of Methanosaeta's low KS, the low acetate concentrations in conventional, mesophilic anaerobic digestion yield Methanosaeta dominance. However, Methanosarcina absorbs increases in acetate more efficiently and thus promotes more stable digestion. This paper tests the hypothesis that decreasing digester feeding frequencies can increase Methanosarcina predominance. Two acetate-fed reactors were established at a 17-day solids retention time. One reactor was fed hourly, and one was fed once daily. Microscopic and molecular methods were used to verify that the hourly fed reactor enriched for Methanosaeta, while the daily fed reactor enriched for Methanosarcina. Growth and substrate-use kinetics were measured for each reactor. A digester overload condition was simulated, and the Methanosarcina-enriched reactor was found to perform better than the Methanosaeta-enriched reactor. These findings indicate that Methanosarcina dominance can be achieved with infrequent feedings, leading to more stable digestion.

  12. Growth kinetics of Salmonella spp. pre- and post-thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Vijay K; Marks, Harry M

    2006-05-25

    This paper reports estimated growth kinetic parameters for a cocktail of stationary phase Salmonella serotypes, pre- and post-thermal inactivation treatment. Cells were grown in brain-heart infusion broth at 25 or 37 degrees Celsius and then destruction of the cells was quantified at 55 degrees Celsius using a submerged coil heating apparatus. The surviving cells (about 1-2 log(10) cfu/ml) were subsequently grown at 25 or 37 degrees Celsius. The results indicated that lag phase duration times for the post- heat treated cells increased at 25 and 37 degrees Celsius by about 6.2 h and at least 3 to 4 h, respectively, and thus the increases appear to be truly different. However, when considering the ratios of the lag phase duration times for post-treated to pre-treated cells, a significant difference was not found, where estimated ratios could exceed 4. Estimated exponential growth rates, EGR, were not affected by the treatment, where for 37 degrees Celsius, EGR was estimated to be 0.9 log(10) (cfu/ml)/h, and at 25 degrees Celsius, the EGR was estimated at 0.45 log(10) (cfu/ml)/h.

  13. Estimation of the growth kinetic parameters of Bacillus cereus spores as affected by pulsed light treatment.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Juan S; de Fernando, Gonzalo García; Hierro, Eva; Hospital, Xavier F; Ordóñez, Juan A; Fernández, Manuela

    2015-06-02

    Quantitative microbial risk assessment requires the knowledge of the effect of food preservation technologies on the growth parameters of the survivors of the treatment. This is of special interest in the case of the new non-thermal technologies that are being investigated for minimal processing of foods. This is a study on the effect of pulsed light technology (PL) on the lag phase of Bacillus cereus spores surviving the treatment and the maximum growth rate (μmax) of the survivors after germination. The D value was estimated as 0.35 J/cm(2) and our findings showed that PL affected the kinetic parameters of the microorganism. A log linear relationship was observed between the lag phase and the intensity of the treatment. Increasing the lethality lengthened the mean lag phase and proportionally increased its variability. A polynomial regression was fitted between the μmax of the survivors and the inactivation achieved. The μmax decreased as intensity increased. From these data, and their comparison to published results on the effect of heat and e-beam irradiation on B. cereus spores, it was observed that the shelf-life of PL treated foods would be longer than those treated with heat and similar to irradiated ones. These findings offer information of interest for the implementation of PL for microbial decontamination in the food industry.

  14. Kinetic aspects of the thermostatted growth of ice from supercooled water in simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Volker C.; Rullich, Markus; Köhler, Christof; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    In experiments, the growth rate of ice from supercooled water is seen to increase with the degree of supercooling, that is, the lower the temperature, the faster the crystallization takes place. In molecular dynamics simulations of the freezing process, however, the temperature is usually kept constant by means of a thermostat that artificially removes the heat released during the crystallization by scaling the velocities of the particles. This direct removal of energy from the system replaces a more realistic heat-conduction mechanism and is believed to be responsible for the curious observation that the thermostatted ice growth proceeds fastest near the melting point and more slowly at lower temperatures, which is exactly opposite to the experimental findings [M. A. Carignano, P. B. Shepson, and I. Szleifer, Mol. Phys. 103, 2957 (2005), 10.1080/00268970500243796]. This trend is explained by the diffusion and the reorientation of molecules in the liquid becoming the rate-determining steps for the crystal growth, both of which are slower at low temperatures. Yet, for a different set of simulations, a kinetic behavior analogous to the experimental finding has been reported [H. Nada and Y. Furukawa, J. Crystal Growth 283, 242 (2005), 10.1016/j.jcrysgro.2005.05.057]. To clarify this apparent contradiction, we perform relatively long simulations of the TIP4P/Ice model in an extended range of temperatures. The temperature dependence of the thermostatted ice growth is seen to be more complex than was previously reported: The crystallization process is very slow close to the melting point at 270 K, where the thermodynamic driving force for the phase transition is weak. On lowering the temperature, the growth rate initially increases, but displays a maximum near 260 K. At even lower temperatures, the freezing process slows down again due to the reduced diffusivity in the liquid. The velocity of the thermostatted melting process, in contrast, shows a monotonic increase upon

  15. Growth kinetics of gamma-prime precipitates in a directionally solidified eutectic, gamma/gamma-prime-delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.

    1976-01-01

    A directionally solidified eutectic alloy (DSEA), of those viewed as potential candidates for the next generation of aircraft gas turbine blade materials, is studied for the gamma-prime growth kinetics, in the system Ni-Nb-Cr-Al, specifically: Ni-20 w/o Nb-6 w/o Cr-2.5 w/o Al gamma/gamma-prime-delta DSEA. Heat treatment, polishing and etching, and preparation for electron micrography are described, and the size distribution of gamma-prime phase following various anneals is plotted, along with gamma-prime growth kinetics in this specific DSEA, and the cube of gamma-prime particle size vs anneal time. Activation energies and coarsening kinetics are studied.

  16. Time-dependent density functional theory for the charging kinetics of electric double layer containing room-temperature ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Cheng; Zhao, Shuangliang; Liu, Honglai; Wu, Jianzhong

    2016-11-29

    Understanding the charging kinetics of electric double layers is of fundamental importance for the design and development of novel electrochemical devices such as supercapacitors and field-effect transistors. In this paper, we study the dynamic behavior of room-temperature ionic liquids using a classical time-dependent density functional theory that accounts for the molecular excluded volume effects, the electrostatic correlations, and the dispersion forces. While the conventional models predict a monotonic increase of the surface charge with time upon application of an electrode voltage, our results show that dispersion between ions results in a non-monotonic increase of the surface charge with the duration of charging. Finally and furthermore, we investigate the effects of van der Waals attraction between electrode/ionic-liquid interactions on the charging processes.

  17. Time-dependent density functional theory for the charging kinetics of electric double layer containing room-temperature ionic liquids

    DOE PAGES

    Lian, Cheng; Univ. of California, Riverside, CA; Zhao, Shuangliang; ...

    2016-11-29

    Understanding the charging kinetics of electric double layers is of fundamental importance for the design and development of novel electrochemical devices such as supercapacitors and field-effect transistors. In this paper, we study the dynamic behavior of room-temperature ionic liquids using a classical time-dependent density functional theory that accounts for the molecular excluded volume effects, the electrostatic correlations, and the dispersion forces. While the conventional models predict a monotonic increase of the surface charge with time upon application of an electrode voltage, our results show that dispersion between ions results in a non-monotonic increase of the surface charge with the durationmore » of charging. Finally and furthermore, we investigate the effects of van der Waals attraction between electrode/ionic-liquid interactions on the charging processes.« less

  18. Growth Kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes in Broth and Beef Frankfurters– Determination of Lag Phase Duration and Exponential Growth Rate under Isothermal Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to develop a new kinetic model to describe the isothermal growth of microorganisms. The new model was tested with Listeria monocytogenes in broth and frankfurters, and compared with two commonly used models - Baranyi and modified Gompertz models. Bias factor (BF)...

  19. Growth and Stress-induced Transformation of Zinc blende AlN Layers in Al-AlN-TiN Multilayers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Yadav, Satyesh K.; Wang, Jian; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Misra, Amit

    2015-01-01

    AlN nanolayers in sputter deposited {111}Al/AlN/TiN multilayers exhibit the metastable zinc-blende-structure (z-AlN). Based on density function theory calculations, the growth of the z-AlN is ascribed to the kinetically and energetically favored nitridation of the deposited aluminium layer. In situ nanoindentation of the as-deposited {111}Al/AlN/TiN multilayers in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope revealed the z-AlN to wurzite AlN phase transformation through collective glide of Shockley partial dislocations on every two {111} planes of the z-AlN. PMID:26681109

  20. Growth and stress-induced transformation of zinc blende AlN layers in Al-AlN-TiN multilayers

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Nan; Yadav, Satyesh K.; Wang, Jian; ...

    2015-12-18

    We report that AlN nanolayers in sputter deposited {111}Al/AlN/TiN multilayers exhibit the metastable zinc-blende-structure (z-AlN). Based on density function theory calculations, the growth of the z-AlN is ascribed to the kinetically and energetically favored nitridation of the deposited aluminium layer. In situ nanoindentation of the as-deposited {111}Al/AlN/TiN multilayers in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope revealed the z-AlN to wurzite AlN phase transformation through collective glide of Shockley partial dislocations on every two {111} planes of the z-AlN.

  1. New CVD-based method for the growth of high-quality crystalline zinc oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Florian; Madel, Manfred; Reiser, Anton; Bauer, Sebastian; Thonke, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    High-quality zinc oxide (ZnO) layers were grown using a new chemical vapour deposition (CVD)-based low-cost growth method. The process is characterized by total simplicity, high growth rates, and cheap, less hazardous precursors. To produce elementary zinc vapour, methane (CH4) is used to reduce a ZnO powder. By re-oxidizing the zinc with pure oxygen, highly crystalline ZnO layers were grown on gallium nitride (GaN) layers and on sapphire substrates with an aluminum nitride (AlN) nucleation layer. Using simple CH4 as precursor has the big advantage of good controllability and the avoidance of highly toxic gases like nitrogen oxides. In photoluminescence (PL) measurements the samples show a strong near-band-edge emission and a sharp line width at 5 K. The good crystal quality has been confirmed in high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) measurements. This new growth method has great potential for industrial large-scale production of high-quality single crystal ZnO layers.

  2. The Growth Behavior of Titanium Boride Layers in α and β Phase Fields of Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Xiaojun; Hu, Lingyun; Shuang, Yajing; Liu, Jianhua; Lai, Yanqing; Jiang, Liangxing; Li, Jie

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the commercially pure titanium was successfully electrochemical borided in a borax-based electrolyte. The process was carried out at a constant cathodic current density of 300 mA cm-2 and at temperatures of 1123 K and 1223 K (850 °C and 950 °C) for 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 5 hours. The growth behavior of titanium boride layers in the α phase field of titanium was compared with that in the β phase field. After boriding, the presence of both the TiB2 top layer and TiB whisker sub-layer was confirmed by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope. The relationship between the thickness of boride layers and boriding time was found to have a parabolic character in both α and β phase fields of titanium. The TiB whiskers showed ultra-fast growth rate in the β phase field. Its growth rate constant was found to be as high as 3.2002 × 10-13 m2 s-1. Besides, the chemical resistance of the TiB2 layer on the surface of titanium substrate was characterized by immersion tests in molten aluminum.

  3. GaAs buffer layer technique for vertical nanowire growth on Si substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiaoqing Parizi, Kokab B.; Huo, Yijie; Kang, Yangsen; Philip Wong, H.-S.; Li, Yang

    2014-02-24

    Gold catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid method is widely applied to III–V nanowire (NW) growth on Si substrate. However, the easy oxidation of Si, possible Si contamination in the NWs, high defect density in the NWs, and high sensitivity of the NW morphology to growth conditions largely limit its controllability. In this work, we developed a buffer layer technique by introducing a GaAs thin film with predefined polarity as a template. It is found that samples grown on these buffer layers all have high vertical NW yields in general, due to the single-orientation of the buffer layers. Low temperature buffer with smoother surface leads to highest yield of vertical NWs, while high temperature (HT) buffer with better crystallinity results in perfect NW quality. The defect-free property we observed here is very promising for optoelectronic device applications based on GaAs NW. Moreover, the buffer layers can eliminate Si contamination by preventing Si-Au alloy formation and by increasing the thickness of the Si diffusion barrier, thus providing more flexibility to vertical NW growth. The buffer layer technique we demonstrated here could be easily extended to other III-V on Si system for electronic and photonic applications.

  4. Biomineralization: Systematics of organic-directed controls on carbonate growth morphologies and kinetics determined by in situ AFM. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dove, P.M.

    1998-12-01

    During the three years of this project, tremendous progress has been made in understanding the microscopic kinetic controls on calcite growth and in investigations of amino acid controls on modifying crystal growth and dissolution. The project began with a focus on the aspartate-calcite system because previous studies have found that acidic matrix macromolecules involved in the regulation of biological crystal growth usually contain aspartic acid-rick domains. Indeed, several studies have shown that aspartate (Asp) modifies the growth morphology of calcite. Aspartate-rich proteins and {beta}-sheet polyaspartate adsorbed on sulfonated polystyrene surfaces were shown to stabilize {l_brace}0001{r_brace} growth surfaces. It was also shown that aspartate also stabilizes the prismatic {l_brace}1{bar 1}00{r_brace} growth forms. For the first time, the author has an understanding of the microscopic controls of aspartate on growth and dissolution.

  5. Controllable growth of layered selenide and telluride heterostructures and superlattices using molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Vishwanath, Suresh; Liu, Xinyu; Rouvimov, Sergei; Basile, Leonardo; Lu, Ning; Azcatl, Angelica; Magno, Katrina; Wallace, Robert M.; Kim, Moon; Idrobo, Juan -Carlos; Furdyna, Jacek K.; Jena, Debdeep; Xing, Huili Grace

    2016-01-06

    Layered materials are an actively pursued area of research for realizing highly scaled technologies involving both traditional device structures as well as new physics. Lately, non-equilibrium growth of 2D materials using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is gathering traction in the scientific community and here we aim to highlight one of its strengths, growth of abrupt heterostructures, and superlattices (SLs). In this work we present several of the firsts: first growth of MoTe2 by MBE, MoSe2 on Bi2Se3 SLs, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) SLs, and lateral junction between a quintuple atomic layer of Bi2Te3 and a triple atomic layer of MoTe2. In conclusion, reflected high electron energy diffraction oscillations presented during the growth of TMD SLs strengthen our claim that ultrathin heterostructures with monolayer layer control is within reach.

  6. Growth and micro structural studies on Yittria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) and Strontium Titanate (STO) buffer layers

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivas, S.; Bhatnagar, A.K.; Pinto, R.

    1994-12-31

    Microstructure of Yittria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) and Strontium Titanate (STO) of radio frequency magnetron sputtered buffer layers was studied at various sputtering conditions on Si<100>, Sapphire and LaAlO{sub 3} <100> substrates. The effect of substrate temperatures upto 800 C and sputtering gas pressures in the range of 50 mTorr. of growth conditions was studied. The buffer layers of YSZ and STO showed a strong tendency for columnar structure with variation growth conditions. The buffer layers of YSZ and STO showed orientation. The tendency for columnar growth was observed above 15 mTorr sputtering gas pressure and at high substrate temperatures. Post annealing of these films in oxygen atmosphere reduced the oxygen deficiency and strain generated during growth of the films. Strong c-axis oriented superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 9}O{sub 7-x} (YBCO) thin films were obtained on these buffer layers using pulsed laser ablation technique. YBCO films deposited on multilayers of YSZ and STO were shown to have better superconducting properties.

  7. Experimental study of water desorption isotherms and thin-layer convective drying kinetics of bay laurel leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghnimi, Thouraya; Hassini, Lamine; Bagane, Mohamed

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the desorption isotherms and the drying kinetics of bay laurel leaves ( Laurus Nobilis L.). The desorption isotherms were performed at three temperature levels: 50, 60 and 70 °C and at water activity ranging from 0.057 to 0.88 using the statistic gravimetric method. Five sorption models were used to fit desorption experimental isotherm data. It was found that Kuhn model offers the best fitting of experimental moisture isotherms in the mentioned investigated ranges of temperature and water activity. The Net isosteric heat of water desorption was evaluated using The Clausius-Clapeyron equation and was then best correlated to equilibrium moisture content by the empirical Tsami's equation. Thin layer convective drying curves of bay laurel leaves were obtained for temperatures of 45, 50, 60 and 70 °C, relative humidity of 5, 15, 30 and 45 % and air velocities of 1, 1.5 and 2 m/s. A non linear regression procedure of Levenberg-Marquardt was used to fit drying curves with five semi empirical mathematical models available in the literature, The R2 and χ2 were used to evaluate the goodness of fit of models to data. Based on the experimental drying curves the drying characteristic curve (DCC) has been established and fitted with a third degree polynomial function. It was found that the Midilli Kucuk model was the best semi-empirical model describing thin layer drying kinetics of bay laurel leaves. The bay laurel leaves effective moisture diffusivity and activation energy were also identified.

  8. Growth of homogeneous single-layer graphene on Ni-Ge binary substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Chen, Da; Lu, Zitong; Guo, Qinglei; Ye, Lin; Wei, Xing; Ding, Guqiao; Zhang, Miao; Di, Zengfeng; Liu, Su

    2014-02-01

    In contrast to the commonly used chemical vapor deposition growth that leads to multilayer graphene formation by carbon segregation from the Ni bulk, we designed a Ni-Ge binary system to directly grow graphene film on Ni-Ge binary substrate, via chemical vapor deposition with methane and hydrogen gas as precursors. Our system fully overcomes the fundamental limitations of Ni and yields homogenous single layer graphene over large areas. The chemical vapor deposition growth of graphene on Ni-Ge binary substrate shows that self limiting monolayer graphene growth can be obtained on these substrate.

  9. KINETICS OF GROWTH AND ETHANOL PRODUCTION ON DIFFERENT CARBON SUBSTRATES USING GENETICALLY ENGINEERED XYLOSE-FERMENTING YEAST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A (LNH-ST) strain was used for fermentation of glucose and xylose. Growth kinetics and ethanol productivity were calculated for batch fermentation on media containing different combinations of glucose and xylose to give a final sugar concentra...

  10. Direct synthesis of multilayer graphene on an insulator by Ni-induced layer exchange growth of amorphous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, H.; Toko, K.; Saitoh, N.; Yoshizawa, N.; Suemasu, T.

    2017-01-01

    Multilayer graphene (MLG) growth on arbitrary substrates is desired for incorporating carbon wiring and heat spreaders into electronic devices. We investigated the metal-induced layer exchange growth of a sputtered amorphous C layer using Ni as a catalyst. A MLG layer uniformly formed on a SiO2 substrate at 600 °C by layer exchange between the C and Ni layers. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy showed that the resulting MLG layer was highly oriented and contained relatively few defects. The present investigation will pave the way for advanced electronic devices integrated with carbon materials.

  11. Epitaxial growth of cadmium telluride films on silicon with a buffer silicon carbide layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, V. V.; Kukushkin, S. A.; Osipov, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    An epitaxial 1-3-μm-thick cadmium telluride film has been grown on silicon with a buffer silicon carbide layer using the method of open thermal evaporation and condensation in vacuum for the first time. The optimum substrate temperature was 500°C at an evaporator temperature of 580°C, and the growth time was 4 s. In order to provide more qualitative growth of cadmium telluride, a high-quality 100-nm-thick buffer silicon carbide layer was previously synthesized on the silicon surface using the method of topochemical substitution of atoms. The ellipsometric, Raman, X-ray diffraction, and electron-diffraction analyses showed a high structural perfection of the CdTe layer in the absence of a polycrystalline phase.

  12. Low temperature growth of high quality CdTe polycrystalline layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, I. R. B.; Suela, J.; Oliveira, J. E.; Ferreira, S. O.; Motisuke, P.

    2007-08-01

    We have investigated the growth of CdTe thin films on glass substrates by hot wall epitaxy. The layers have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, profilometry, x-ray diffraction and optical transmission. The grown samples are polycrystalline with a high preferential [1 1 1] orientation. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy reveal pyramidal grain shapes with a size of around 0.3 µm. The surface roughness increases with sample thickness and growth temperature, reaching about 200 nm for 10 µm thick layers grown at 300 °C. Samples with a thickness of 2 µm grown at 150 °C showed a roughness of less than 40 nm. Optical transmission measurements demonstrate layers with high optical quality.

  13. Modification of surface layer of magnesium oxide via partial dissolution and re-growth of crystallites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhiming; Wei, Lingyan; Yan, Tingting; Zhou, Ming

    2011-02-01

    A procedure to modify surface layer of metal oxide is presented. By way of partial dissolution and re-growth of crystallites, a new MgO surface layer on the “core” of the original MgO particles was formed. XRD analyses indicate that the new surface layer is different from the original MgO particles in crystallinity. Thus a higher reducibility of surface non-lattice oxygen species is generated. As the extent of dissolution and re-growth of crystallites increased, reducible surface non-lattice oxygen species increased, which led to a lowering of surface non-lattice oxygen concentration on the X%-MgO catalysts in the OCM reaction atmosphere. This is considered to be the major reason for decreasing of CO2 formation.

  14. Transitions metal dichalcogenides: Growth, fermiology studies, and few-layered transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Daniel

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs or TMDCs) have garnered much interest recently due to their weakly layered structures, allowing for mechanical exfoliation down to a single atomic layer. As such, it is pertinent to re-examine the bulk properties of these materials in order to completely understand and predict what is happening in the few-layered limit. A large majority of these systems were first investigated in the 1950s and 1960s. As such, many of the current growth methods rely on these reports, making new growth techniques for lowering defects of importance as well. In this thesis, both topics are taken into consideration and discussed, though the latter remains to be investigated in much more detail and should be the work of future research efforts. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  15. Layer-controlled stylolite growth and the creation and destruction of local seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, Daniel; Pataki Rood, Daisy; Beaudoin, Nicolas; Aleksans, Janis; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique

    2015-04-01

    Cores of carbonate Zechstein sediments in the Lean Gas Field in northern Germany show a dense set of sedimentary stylolites. We studied these structures in detail using scans of cores, thin-sections, roughness analysis, SEM-EDS studies and a set of numerical simulations in order to understand timing and depth of stylolite growth, the development of varying stylolite patterns and their influence on fluid flow. The studied cores have a depth of about 4000m and it is expected that they experienced a minor inversion in the Cretaceous so that their original depth may have been up to 4500m. We studied the roughness of the stylolites and used a stress inversion technique to determine the depth at which they grew. The determined depth of growth is in the order of 4150m with an error of plus-minus 300m. This value represents the latest stylolite activity and indicates that they have been active until late in the burial history. SEM and EDS analysis on stylolite thin sections shows that the stylolites separate strongly dedolomitized sections from sections that still contain a large amount of dolomite. In addition stylolite seams capture or shield dolomitized parts of the rock. Dissolution holes are also partly linked to stylolite teeth indicating that fluid flow is significantly influenced by the presence of stylolites. Stylolite shapes and thus potentially their sealing capacity vary significantly throughout the cores from flat stylolites to small wavy ones all the way to stylolites showing extreme spikes and teeth. Quite often dark layers seem to control stylolite shapes. In order to understand the influence of layers on stylolite growth we use a numerical model that can treat the dynamics of the process linking elasticity with a dissolution routine. In this model we find that layers that dissolve slower can pin stylolite teeth and thus develop extremely long and spiky geometries. Growth typically happens in two to three stages depending on whether or not the pinning layer

  16. Growth kinetics of AlN and GaN films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on R-plane sapphire substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekaran, R.; Moustakas, T. D.; Ozcan, A. S.; Ludwig, K. F.; Zhou, L.; Smith, David J.

    2010-08-15

    This paper reports the growth by molecular beam epitaxy of AlN and GaN thin films on R-plane sapphire substrates. Contrary to previous findings that GaN grows with its (1120) A-plane parallel to the (1102) R-plane of sapphire, our results indicate that the crystallographic orientation of the III-nitride films is strongly dependent on the kinetic conditions of growth for the GaN or AlN buffer layers. Thus, group III-rich conditions for growth of either GaN or AlN buffers result in nitride films having (1120) planes parallel to the sapphire surface, and basal-plane stacking faults parallel to the growth direction. The growth of these buffers under N-rich conditions instead leads to nitride films with (1126) planes parallel to the sapphire surface, with inclined c-plane stacking faults that often terminate threading dislocations. Moreover, electron microscope observations indicate that slight miscut ({approx}0.5 deg. ) of the R-plane sapphire substrate almost completely suppresses the formation of twinning defects in the (1126) GaN films.

  17. A Chemical-Adsorption Strategy to Enhance the Reaction Kinetics of Lithium-Rich Layered Cathodes via Double-Shell Surface Modification.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lichao; Li, Jiajun; Cao, Tingting; Wang, Huayu; Zhao, Naiqin; He, Fang; Shi, Chunsheng; He, Chunnian; Liu, Enzuo

    2016-09-21

    Sluggish surface reaction kinetics hinders the power density of Li-ion battery. Thus, various surface modification techniques have been applied to enhance the electronic/ionic transfer kinetics. However, it is challenging to obtain a continuous and uniform surface modification layer on the prime particles with structure integration at the interface. Instead of classic physical-adsorption/deposition techniques, we propose a novel chemical-adsorption strategy to synthesize double-shell modified lithium-rich layered cathodes with enhanced mass transfer kinetics. On the basis of experimental measurement and first-principles calculation, MoO2S2 ions are proved to joint the layered phase via chemical bonding. Specifically, the Mo-O or Mo-S bonds can flexibly rotate to bond with the cations in the layered phase, leading to the good compatibility between the thiomolybdate adsorption layer and layered cathode. Followed by annealing treatment, the lithium-excess-spinel inner shell forms under the thiomolybdate adsorption layer and functions as favorable pathways for lithium and electron. Meanwhile, the nanothick MoO3-x(SO4)x outer shell protects the transition metal from dissolution and restrains electrolyte decomposition. The double-shell modified sample delivers an enhanced discharge capacity almost twice as much as that of the unmodified one at 1 A g(-1) after 100 cycles, demonstrating the superiority of the surface modification based on chemical adsorption.

  18. High-throughput quantitative analysis with cell growth kinetic curves for low copy number mutant cells.

    PubMed

    Xing, James Z; Gabos, Stephan; Huang, Biao; Pan, Tianhong; Huang, Min; Chen, Jie

    2012-10-01

    The mutation rate in cells induced by environmental genotoxic hazards is very low and difficult to detect using traditional cell counting assays. The established genetic toxicity tests currently recognized by regulatory authorities, such as conventional Ames and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) assays, are not well suited for higher-throughput screening as they require large amounts of test compounds and are very time consuming. In this study, we developed a novel cell-based assay for quantitative analysis of low numbers of cell copies with HPRT mutation induced by an environmental mutagen. The HPRT gene mutant cells induced by the mutagen were selected by 6-thioguanine (6-TG) and the cell's kinetic growth curve monitored by a real-time cell electronic sensor (RT-CES) system. When a threshold is set at a certain cell index (CI) level, samples with different initial mutant cell copies take different amounts of time in order for their growth (or CI accumulation) to cross this threshold. The more cells that are initially seeded in the test well, the faster the cell accumulation and therefore the shorter the time required to cross this threshold. Therefore, the culture time period required to cross the threshold of each sample corresponds to the original number of cells in the sample. A mutant cell growth time threshold (MT) value of each sample can be calculated to predict the number of original mutant cells. For mutagenesis determination, the RT-CES assay displayed an equal sensitivity (p > 0.05) and coefficients of variation values with good correlation to conventional HPRT mutagenic assays. Most importantly, the RT-CES mutation assay has a higher throughput than conventional cellular assays.

  19. Growth kinetics of Pseudomonas alcaligenes C-0 relative to inoculation and 3-chlorobenzoate metabolism in soil.

    PubMed Central

    Focht, D D; Shelton, D

    1987-01-01

    Pseudomonas alcaligenes C-0 was isolated from activated sewage sludge by enrichment with 3-chlorobenzoate (3CB) as the sole carbon source. The carbon balance from [14C]3CB in pure culture could be accounted for in substrate, biomass, and CO2 from all sampling periods and inoculum densities (0.012, 0.092, 0.20, and 0.92 micrograms of dry cells X ml-1), and inorganic chloride was produced stoichiometrically. Monod parameters as determined in culture were compared with the kinetics of 3CB metabolism in soil with decreasing inoculum densities (1.9 X 10(-1), 1.9 X 10(-3), and 1.9 X 10(-5) micrograms of cells X g-1). 3CB was refractile to attack in soil by indigenous microflora, but it was completely metabolized upon inoculation with P. alcaligenes C-0. The saturation constant KS was much higher in soil than in culture, but the yield coefficient Y and the growth rate constant were the same in both systems: mu max = 0.32 h-1; Y = 34 micrograms cells X mumol-1; KS = 0.18 mM in culture and 6.0 mM in soil solution (1.1 mumol X g-1 of soil). The parameter estimates obtained from the highest inoculum density could be used for the lower inoculum densities with reasonable agreement between predicted and observed 3CB concentrations in soil, although the residual sum of squares was progressively higher. Since the growth rate of P. alcaligenes C-0 in soil was comparable to its growth rate in culture, inoculation should be a viable strategy for biodegradation of 3CB in soil if indigenous microflora are unable to exploit this metabolic niche. PMID:3662518

  20. Kinetics of Nucleation and Crystal Growth in Glass Forming Melts in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Delbert E.; Ray, Chandra S.

    1999-01-01

    The following list summarizes the most important results that have been consistently reported for glass forming melts in microgravity: (1) Glass formation is enhanced for melts prepared in space; (2) Glasses prepared in microgravity are more chemically homogeneous and contain fewer and smaller chemically heterogeneous regions than identical glasses prepared on earth; (3) Heterogeneities that are deliberately introduced such as Pt particles are more uniformly distributed in a glass melted in space than in a glass melted on earth; (4) Glasses prepared in microgravity are more resistant to crystallization and have a higher mechanical strength and threshold energy for radiation damage; and (5) Glasses crystallized in space have a different microstructure, finer grains more uniformly distributed, than equivalent samples crystallized on earth. The preceding results are not only scientifically interesting, but they have considerable practical implications. These results suggest that the microgravity environment is advantageous for developing new and improved glasses and glass-ceramics that are difficult to prepare on earth. However, there is no suitable explanation at this time for why a glass melted in microgravity will be more chemically homogeneous and more resistant to crystallization than a glass melted on earth. A fundamental investigation of melt homogenization, nucleation, and crystal growth processes in glass forming melts in microgravity is important to understanding these consistently observed, but yet unexplained results. This is the objective of the present research. A lithium disilicate (Li2O.2SiO2) glass will be used for this investigation, since it is a well studied system, and the relevant thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for nucleation and crystal growth at 1-g are available. The results from this research are expected to improve our present understanding of the fundamental mechanism of nucleation and crystal growth in melts and liquids, and to lead

  1. Growth Kinetics and Microstructure Evolution of Intermediate Phases in MoSi2-Si3N4-WSi2/Mo Diffusion Couples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Houan; Huang, Yu; Lin, Jia; Chen, Ying; Gu, Siyong

    2016-12-01

    The growth kinetics and silicon diffusion coefficients of intermediate silicide phases in MoSi2-3.5 vol.% Si3N4-5.0 vol.% WSi2/Mo diffusion couple prepared by spark plasma sintering were investigated in temperatures ranging from 1200 to 1500 °C. The intermediate silicide phases were characterized by x-ray diffraction. The microstructures and components of the MoSi2-Si3N4-WSi2/Mo composites were investigated using scanning electron microscope with energy-dispersive spectroscopy. A special microstructure with MoSi2 core surrounded by a thin layer of (Mo,W)Si2 ring was found in the MoSi2-Si3N4-WSi2 composites. The intermediate layers of Mo5Si3 and (Mo,W)5Si3 in the MoSi2-Si3N4-WSi2/Mo diffusion couples were formed at different diffusion stages, which grew parabolically. Activation energy of the growth of intermediate layers in MoSi2-3.5 vol.% Si3N4-5.0 vol.% WSi2/Mo diffusion couple was calculated to be 316 ± 23 kJ/mol. Besides, the hindering effect of WSi2 addition on the growth of intermediate layers was illustrated by comparing the silicon diffusion coefficients in MoSi2-3.5 vol.% Si3N4-5.0 vol.% WSi2/Mo and MoSi2-3.5 vol.% Si3N4/Mo diffusion couples. MoSi2-3.5 vol.% Si3N4-5.0 vol.% WSi2 coating on Mo substrate exhibited a better high-temperature oxidation resistance in air than that of MoSi2-3.5 vol.% Si3N4 coating.

  2. Growth Kinetics and Microstructure Evolution of Intermediate Phases in MoSi2-Si3N4-WSi2/Mo Diffusion Couples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Houan; Huang, Yu; Lin, Jia; Chen, Ying; Gu, Siyong

    2017-02-01

    The growth kinetics and silicon diffusion coefficients of intermediate silicide phases in MoSi2-3.5 vol.% Si3N4-5.0 vol.% WSi2/Mo diffusion couple prepared by spark plasma sintering were investigated in temperatures ranging from 1200 to 1500 °C. The intermediate silicide phases were characterized by x-ray diffraction. The microstructures and components of the MoSi2-Si3N4-WSi2/Mo composites were investigated using scanning electron microscope with energy-dispersive spectroscopy. A special microstructure with MoSi2 core surrounded by a thin layer of (Mo,W)Si2 ring was found in the MoSi2-Si3N4-WSi2 composites. The intermediate layers of Mo5Si3 and (Mo,W)5Si3 in the MoSi2-Si3N4-WSi2/Mo diffusion couples were formed at different diffusion stages, which grew parabolically. Activation energy of the growth of intermediate layers in MoSi2-3.5 vol.% Si3N4-5.0 vol.% WSi2/Mo diffusion couple was calculated to be 316 ± 23 kJ/mol. Besides, the hindering effect of WSi2 addition on the growth of intermediate layers was illustrated by comparing the silicon diffusion coefficients in MoSi2-3.5 vol.% Si3N4-5.0 vol.% WSi2/Mo and MoSi2-3.5 vol.% Si3N4/Mo diffusion couples. MoSi2-3.5 vol.% Si3N4-5.0 vol.% WSi2 coating on Mo substrate exhibited a better high-temperature oxidation resistance in air than that of MoSi2-3.5 vol.% Si3N4 coating.

  3. Effect of native microflora on the growth kinetics of salmonella enteritidis strain 04-137 in raw ground chicken.

    PubMed

    Zaher, Sakha M; Fujikawa, Hiroshi

    2011-05-01

    Effects of native microflora (NM) on growth kinetics of Salmonella Enteritidis strain 04-137 were studied in raw ground chicken. First, samples of ground chicken with high and low levels of NM (10(7.1) and 10(4.9) CFU/g, respectively) were spiked with Salmonella at doses ranging from 10(1) to 10(4) CFU/g. The growth kinetics, including the rate constant of growth, r, and the lag period, were similar, but the maximum cell level, N(max), was higher at higher initial Salmonella doses for both NM levels. Second, samples of ground chicken with high and low NM levels (10(6.8) and 10(4.7) CFU/g, respectively) were spiked with Salmonella and then stored at various constant temperatures ranging from 8 to 32°C. Both N(max) and r for Salmonella were higher at higher temperatures for both NM levels. Although r for total bacteria, which consisted of NM and Salmonella, was also higher at higher temperatures, N(max) was constant at all temperatures for both NM levels. Further, Salmonella growth was compared among samples of ground chicken with high and low NM levels and samples of sterilized chicken. Salmonella growth, characterized by both N(max) and r, was highest in sterilized chicken, followed by chicken with the low NM level. Our growth model successfully described and analyzed the growth of Salmonella and total bacteria in chicken at constant temperatures; using the data obtained, the model also successfully predicted the growth of Salmonella and total bacteria in chicken stored at dynamic temperatures. Our study clarified the effects that different doses of NM in ground chicken had on the growth kinetics of the Salmonella strain and demonstrated the usability of the growth model for foods with NM.

  4. Mathematical models to predict kinetic behavior and growth probabilities of Listeria monocytogenes on pork skin at constant and dynamic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soomin; Lee, Heeyoung; Lee, Joo-Yeon; Skandamis, Panagiotis; Park, Beom-Young; Oh, Mi-Hwa; Yoon, Yohan

    2013-11-01

    In this study, mathematical models were developed to predict the growth probability and kinetic behavior of Listeria monocytogenes on fresh pork skin during storage at different temperatures. A 10-strain mixture of L. monocytogenes was inoculated on fresh pork skin (3 by 5 cm) at 4 log CFU/cm(2). The inoculated samples were stored aerobically at 4, 7, and 10 °C for 240 h, at 15 and 20 °C for 96 h, and at 25 and 30 °C for 12 h. The Baranyi model was fitted to L. monocytogenes growth data on PALCAM agar to calculate the maximum specific growth rate, lag-phase duration, the lower asymptote, and the upper asymptote. The kinetic parameters were then further analyzed as a function of storage temperature. The model simulated growth of L. monocytogenes under constant and changing temperatures, and the performances of the models were evaluated by the root mean square error and bias factor (Bf). Of the 49 combinations (temperature × sampling time), the combinations with significant growth (P < 0.05) of L. monocytogenes were assigned a value of 1, and the combinations with nonsignificant growth (P > 0.05) were given a value of 0. These data were analyzed by logistic regression to develop a model predicting the probabilities of L. monocytogenes growth. At 4 to 10 °C, obvious L. monocytogenes growth was observable after 24 h of storage; but, at other temperatures, the pathogen had obvious growth after 12 h of storage. Because the root mean square error value (0.184) and Bf (1.01) were close to 0 and 1, respectively, the performance of the developed model was acceptable, and the probabilistic model also showed good performance. These results indicate that the developed model should be useful in predicting kinetic behavior and calculating growth probabilities of L. monocytogenes as a function of temperature and time.

  5. Optimized growth kinetics of Pichia pastoris and recombinant Candida rugosa LIP1 production by RSM.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Wei; Shieh, Chwen-Jen; Lee, Guan-Chiun; Akoh, Casimir C; Shaw, Jei-Fu

    2006-01-01

    A predictive model for Pichia pastoris expression of highly active recombinant Candida rugosa LIP1 was developed by combining the Gompertz function and response surface methodology (RSM) to evaluate the effect of yeast extract concentration, glucose concentration, temperature, and pH on specific responses. Each of the responses (maximum population densities, specific growth rate (mumax), protein concentration, and minimum lag phase duration) was determined using the modified Gompertz function. RSM and 4-factor-5-level central composite rotatable design (CCRD) were adopted to evaluate the effects of growth parameters, such as temperature (21.6-38.4 degrees C), glucose concentration (0.3-3.7%), yeast extract (0.16-1.84%), and pH (5.3-8.7) on the responses of P. pastoris growth kinetics. Based on ridge maximum analysis, the optimum population density conditions were: temperature 24.4 degrees C, glucose concentration 2.0%, yeast extract 1.5%, and pH 7.6. The optimum specific growth rate conditions were: temperature 28.9 degrees C, glucose concentration 2.0%, yeast extract 1.1%, and pH 6.9. The optimum protein concentration conditions were: temperature 24.2 degrees C, glucose concentration 1.9%, yeast extract 1.5%, and pH 7.6. Based on ridge minimum analysis, the minimal lag phase conditions were: temperature 32.3 degrees C, glucose concentration 2.1%, yeast extract 1.1%, and pH 5.4. For the predicted value, the maximum population density, specific growth rate, protein concentration, and minimum lag phase duration were 15.7 mg/ml, 3.4 h(-1), 0.78 mg/ml, and 4.2 h, and the actual values were 14.3 +/- 3.5 mg/ml, 3.6 +/- 0.6 h(-1), 0.72 +/- 0.2 mg/ml, and 4.4 +/- 1.6 h, respectively.

  6. Interfacial Layer Control by Dry Cleaning Technology for Polycrystalline and Single Crystalline Silicon Growth.

    PubMed

    Im, Dong-Hyun; Kong-Soo Lee; Kang, Yoongoo; Jeong, Myoungho; Park, Kwang Wuk; Lee, Soon-Gun; Ma, Jin-Won; Kim, Youngseok; Kim, Bonghyun; Im, Ki-Vin; Lim, Hanjin; Lee, Jeong Yong

    2016-05-01

    Native oxide removal prior to poly-Si contact and epitaxial growth of Si is the most critical technology to ensure process and device performances of poly-Si plugs and selective epitaxial growth (SEG) layers for DRAM, flash memory, and logic device. Recently, dry cleaning process for interfacial oxide removal has attracted a world-wide attention due to its superior passivation properties to conventional wet cleaning processes. In this study, we investigated the surface states of Si substrate during and after dry cleaning process, and the role of atomic elements including fluorine and hydrogen on the properties of subsequent deposited silicon layer using SIMS, XPS, and TEM analysis. The controlling of residual fluorine on the Si surface after dry cleaning is a key factor for clean interface. The mechanism of native oxide re-growth caused by residual fluorine after dry cleaning is proposed based on analytical results.

  7. Two-step epitaxial synthesis and layered growth mechanism of bisectional ZnO nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenduo; Zhang, Zheng; Liao, Qingliang; Yu, Tong; Shen, Yanwei; Li, Peifeng; Huang, Yunhua; Zhang, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Here a two-step epitaxial synthesis method of bisectional ZnO nanowire arrays (ZNWAs) on silicon substrates has been demonstrated incorporating hydrothermal growth (HG) and CVD process. The as-received well-aligned ZNWAs are confirmed to be single-crystal and growing along <001> direction, normal to the substrate. Interestingly, they show significant tapering behavior at the conjunctions, which is consistent with theoretical predictions. Therefore a layered growth mechanism is promoted involving the classical two-dimensional nucleation theory. In the proposed mechanism, the HG ZNWA provides nucleation sites for successive growth. The growth mechanism is verified by complementary investigation into conjunction morphology, which is dependent on regional Zn vapor pressure (ZVP) in the CVD process. Three types of conjunction morphologies are differentiated and the difference is explained with the growth model.

  8. Formation and Growth Kinetics of Reverted Austenite During Tempering of a High Co-Ni Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Marina; Ressel, Gerald; Méndez Martín, Francisca; Ploberger, Sarah; Marsoner, Stefan; Ebner, Reinhold

    2016-12-01

    It is well known that high Co-Ni steels exhibit excellent toughness. Since the good toughness in these steels is supposed to be related to thin layers of austenite between martensite crystals, this work presents an experimental study corroborated with diffusional calculations to characterize the evolution of reverted austenite. Atom probe measurements were conducted for analyzing the element distribution in austenite and martensite during tempering. These results were correlated with crystallographic information, which was obtained by using transmission electron microscopy investigations. Additionally, the experimental findings were compared with kinetic calculations with DICTRA™. The investigations reveal that reverted austenite formation during tempering is connected with a redistribution of Ni, Co, Cr, and Mo atoms. The austenite undergoes a Ni and Cr enrichment and a Co depletion, while in the neighboring martensite, a zone of Ni and Cr depletion and Co enrichment is formed. The changes in the chemical composition of austenite during tempering affect the stability of the austenite against phase transformation to martensite during plastic deformation and have thus decisive influence on the toughness of the material.

  9. A simple parameterization for the turbulent kinetic energy transport terms in the convective boundary layer derived from large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puhales, Franciano Scremin; Rizza, Umberto; Degrazia, Gervásio Annes; Acevedo, Otávio Costa

    2013-02-01

    In this work a parametrization for the transport terms of the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget equation, valid for a convective boundary layer (CBL) is presented. This is a hard task to accomplish from experimental data, especially because of the difficulty associated to the measurements of pressure turbulent fluctuations, which are necessary to determine the pressure correlation TKE transport term. Thus, employing a large eddy simulation (LES) a full diurnal planetary boundary layer (PBL) cycle was simulated. In this simulation a forcing obtained from experimental data is used, so that the numerical experiment represents a more realistic case than a stationary PBL. For this study all terms of the TKE budget equation were determined for a CBL. From these data, polynomials that describe the TKE transport terms’ vertical profiles were adjusted. The polynomials found are a good description of the LES data, and from them it is shown that a simple formulation that directly relates the transport terms to the TKE magnitude has advantages on other parameterizations commonly used in CBL numerical models. Furthermore, the present study shows that the TKE turbulent transport term dominates over the TKE transport by pressure perturbations and that for most of the CBL these two terms have opposite signs.

  10. Direct Dynamic Kinetic Analysis and Computer Simulation of Growth of Clostridium perfringens in Cooked Turkey during Cooling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lihan; Vinyard, Bryan T

    2016-03-01

    This research applied a new 1-step methodology to directly construct a tertiary model that describes the growth of Clostridium perfringens in cooked turkey meat under dynamically cooling conditions. The kinetic parameters of the growth models were determined by numerical analysis and optimization using multiple dynamic growth curves. The models and kinetic parameters were validated using independent growth curves obtained under various cooling conditions. The results showed that the residual errors (ε) of the predictions followed a Laplace distribution that is symmetric with respect to ε = 0. For residual errors, 90.6% are within ±0.5 Log CFU/g and 73.4% are ±0.25 Log CFU/g for all growth curves used for validation. For relative growth <1.0 Log CFU/g, 88.9% of the residual errors are within ±0.5 Log CFU/g, and 63.0% are within ±0.25 Log CFU/g. For relative growth of <2.0 Log CFU/g, 92.7% of the residual errors are within ±0.5 Log CFU/g, and 70.3% are within ±0.25 Log CFU/g. The scale and distribution of residual errors clearly suggests that the models and estimated kinetic parameters are reasonably accurate in predicting the growth of C. perfringens. Monte Carlo simulation was used to estimate the probabilities of >1.0 and 2.0 Log CFU/g relative growth of C. perfringens in the final products at the end of cooling. This probabilistic process analysis approach provides a new alternative for estimating and managing the risk of a product and can help the food industry and regulatory agencies assess the safety of cooked meat in the event of cooling deviation.

  11. Growth and characterization of polymer thin films grown using molecular layer deposition with heterobifunctional precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, Zachary Michael Conway

    In this work, growth of thin polymer films using molecular layer deposition with heterobifunctional precursors is investigated. Several growth phenomena are observed including: loss or gain of reactive sites as a result of precursor reactivity or vapor pressure; precursor diffusion and reaction within the porous polymer film; and crosslinking. Reactions were investigated using quartz crystal microbalance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and various ex situ techniques. Reactions involving 4-azidophenylisothiocyanate and 4-aminobenzonitrile were shown to stop growth after only a few cycles which is attributed to a loss in reactive sites which was modeled by an exponentially decaying growth rate. Growth of 4-carboxyphenylisothiocyanate with TMA and water was investigated as well. Active site multiplication as a result of the trifunctionality of the TMA molecule was proposed to explain the significantly higher growth rate for TMA/CI films. TMA/H2O/CI films showed the ability to crosslink through aluminum hydroxyl condensation reactions. Upon increasing the reaction temperature, reactant diffusion was observed in the form of mass removal upon TMA exposure. This same phenomena is thought to be occurring in films grown using Diels-Alder reactions in the third section of this thesis. These films showed a strong growth rate dependence upon reactant purge time and growth temperature. FTIR seems to weakly support Diels-Alder reaction, but it appears that the primary film growth mechanism is through CVD-like diffusion and condensation reactions.

  12. Development of Comprehensive Reduced Kinetic Models for Supersonic Reacting Shear Layer Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zambon, A. C.; Chelliah, H. K.; Drummond, J. P.

    2006-01-01

    Large-scale simulations of multi-dimensional unsteady turbulent reacting flows with detailed chemistry and transport can be computationally extremely intensive even on distributed computing architectures. With the development of suitable reduced chemical kinetic models, the number of scalar variables to be integrated can be decreased, leading to a significant reduction in the computational time required for the simulation with limited loss of accuracy in the results. A general MATLAB-based automated mechanism reduction procedure is presented to reduce any complex starting mechanism (detailed or skeletal) with minimal human intervention. Based on the application of the quasi steady-state (QSS) approximation for certain chemical species and on the elimination of the fast reaction rates in the mechanism, several comprehensive reduced models, capable of handling different fuels such as C2H4, CH4 and H2, have been developed and thoroughly tested for several combustion problems (ignition, propagation and extinction) and physical conditions (reactant compositions, temperatures, and pressures). A key feature of the present reduction procedure is the explicit solution of the concentrations of the QSS species, needed for the evaluation of the elementary reaction rates. In contrast, previous approaches relied on an implicit solution due to the strong coupling between QSS species, requiring computationally expensive inner iterations. A novel algorithm, based on the definition of a QSS species coupling matrix, is presented to (i) introduce appropriate truncations to the QSS algebraic relations and (ii) identify the optimal sequence for the explicit solution of the concentration of the QSS species. With the automatic generation of the relevant source code, the resulting reduced models can be readily implemented into numerical codes.

  13. Characterization of Cu buffer layers for growth of L1{sub 0}-FeNi thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuguchi, M.; Sekiya, S.; Takanashi, K.

    2010-05-15

    A Cu(001) layer was fabricated on a Au(001) layer to investigate the use of Cu as a buffer layer for growing L1{sub 0}-FeNi thin films. The epitaxial growth of a Cu buffer layer was observed using reflection high-energy electron diffraction. The flatness of the layer improved drastically with an increase in the substrate temperature although the layer was an alloy (AuCu{sub 3}). An FeNi thin film was epitaxially grown on the AuCu{sub 3} buffer layer by alternate monatomic layer deposition and the formation of an L1{sub 0}-FeNi ordered alloy was expected. The AuCu{sub 3} buffer layer is thus a promising candidate material for the growth of L1{sub 0}-FeNi thin films.

  14. Kinetics of Nucleation and Crystal Growth in Glass Forming Melts in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Delbert E.; Ray, Chandra S.

    2003-01-01

    This flight definition project has the specific objective of investigating the kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth in high temperature inorganic oxide, glass forming melts in microgravity. It is related to one1 of our previous NASA projects that was concerned with glass formation for high temperature containerless melts in microgravity. The previous work culminated in two experiments which were conducted aboard the space shuttle in 1983 and 1985 and which consisted of melting (at 1500 C) and cooling levitated 6 to 8 mm diameter spherical samples in a Single Axis Acoustic Levitator (SAAL) furnace. Compared to other types of materials, there have been relatively few experiments, 6 to 8, conducted on inorganic glasses in space. These experiments have been concerned with mass transport (alkali diffusion), containerless melting, critical cooling rate for glass formation, chemical homogeneity, fiber pulling, and crystallization of glass forming melts. One of the most important and consistent findings in all of these experiments has been that the glasses prepared in microgravity are more resistant to crystallization (better glass former) and more chemically homogeneous than equivalent glasses made on earth (1g). The chemical composition of the melt appears relatively unimportant since the same general results have been reported for oxide, fluoride and chalcogenide melts. These results for space-processed glasses have important implications, since glasses with a higher resistance to crystallization or higher chemical homogeneity than those attainable on earth can significantly advance applications in areas such as fiber optics communications, high power laser glasses, and other photonic devices where glasses are the key functional materials. The classical theories for nucleation and crystal growth for a glass or melt do not contain any parameter that is directly dependent upon the g-value, so it is not readily apparent why glasses prepared in microgravity should be

  15. Optimizing pentacene thin-film transistor performance: Temperature and surface condition induced layer growth modification.

    PubMed

    Lassnig, R; Hollerer, M; Striedinger, B; Fian, A; Stadlober, B; Winkler, A

    2015-11-01

    In this work we present in situ electrical and surface analytical, as well as ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies on temperature and surface condition induced pentacene layer growth modifications, leading to the selection of optimized deposition conditions and entailing performance improvements. We prepared p(++)-silicon/silicon dioxide bottom-gate, gold bottom-contact transistor samples and evaluated the pentacene layer growth for three different surface conditions (sputtered, sputtered + carbon and unsputtered + carbon) at sample temperatures during deposition of 200 K, 300 K and 350 K. The AFM investigations focused on the gold contacts, the silicon dioxide channel region and the highly critical transition area. Evaluations of coverage dependent saturation mobilities, threshold voltages and corresponding AFM analysis were able to confirm that the first 3-4 full monolayers contribute to the majority of charge transport within the channel region. At high temperatures and on sputtered surfaces uniform layer formation in the contact-channel transition area is limited by dewetting, leading to the formation of trenches and the partial development of double layer islands within the channel region instead of full wetting layers. By combining the advantages of an initial high temperature deposition (well-ordered islands in the channel) and a subsequent low temperature deposition (continuous film formation for low contact resistance) we were able to prepare very thin (8 ML) pentacene transistors of comparably high mobility.

  16. Growth of uniform CaGe2 films by alternating layer molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinsong; Katoch, Jyoti; Ahmed, Adam S.; Pinchuk, Igor V.; Young, Justin R.; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel; Pelz, Jonathan; Kawakami, Roland K.

    2017-02-01

    Layered Zintl phase van der Waals (vdW) materials are of interest due to their strong spin-orbit coupling and potential for high mobility. Here, we report the successful growth of large area CaGe2 films, as a model of layered Zintl phase materials, on atomically flat Ge(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using an alternating layer growth (ALG) protocol. Reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) patterns of the Ge buffer layer and CaGe2 indicate high quality two dimensional surfaces, which is further confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), showing atomically flat and uniform CaGe2 films. The appearance of Laue oscillations in X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Kiessig fringes in the X-ray reflectivity (XRR), which are absent in co-deposited CaGe2, confirms the uniformity of the CaGe2 film and the smoothness of the interface. These results demonstrate a novel method of deposition of CaGe2 that could be also applied to other layered Zintl phase vdW materials. Also, the high quality of the CaGe2 film is promising for the exploration of novel properties of germanane.

  17. Optimizing pentacene thin-film transistor performance: Temperature and surface condition induced layer growth modification

    PubMed Central

    Lassnig, R.; Hollerer, M.; Striedinger, B.; Fian, A.; Stadlober, B.; Winkler, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present in situ electrical and surface analytical, as well as ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies on temperature and surface condition induced pentacene layer growth modifications, leading to the selection of optimized deposition conditions and entailing performance improvements. We prepared p++-silicon/silicon dioxide bottom-gate, gold bottom-contact transistor samples and evaluated the pentacene layer growth for three different surface conditions (sputtered, sputtered + carbon and unsputtered + carbon) at sample temperatures during deposition of 200 K, 300 K and 350 K. The AFM investigations focused on the gold contacts, the silicon dioxide channel region and the highly critical transition area. Evaluations of coverage dependent saturation mobilities, threshold voltages and corresponding AFM analysis were able to confirm that the first 3–4 full monolayers contribute to the majority of charge transport within the channel region. At high temperatures and on sputtered surfaces uniform layer formation in the contact–channel transition area is limited by dewetting, leading to the formation of trenches and the partial development of double layer islands within the channel region instead of full wetting layers. By combining the advantages of an initial high temperature deposition (well-ordered islands in the channel) and a subsequent low temperature deposition (continuous film formation for low contact resistance) we were able to prepare very thin (8 ML) pentacene transistors of comparably high mobility. PMID:26543442

  18. Growth and optical characteristics of high-quality ZnO thin films on graphene layers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Suk In; Tchoe, Youngbin; Baek, Hyeonjun; Hyun, Jerome K.; Yi, Gyu-Chul E-mail: gcyi@snu.ac.kr; Heo, Jaehyuk; Jo, Janghyun; Kim, Miyoung; Kim, Nam-Jung E-mail: gcyi@snu.ac.kr

    2015-01-01

    We report the growth of high-quality, smooth, and flat ZnO thin films on graphene layers and their photoluminescence (PL) characteristics. For the growth of high-quality ZnO thin films on graphene layers, ZnO nanowalls were grown using metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy on oxygen-plasma treated graphene layers as an intermediate layer. PL measurements were conducted at low temperatures to examine strong near-band-edge emission peaks. The full-width-at-half-maximum value of the dominant PL emission peak was as narrow as 4 meV at T = 11 K, comparable to that of the best-quality films reported previously. Furthermore, the stimulated emission of ZnO thin films on the graphene layers was observed at the low excitation energy of 180 kW/cm{sup 2} at room temperature. Their structural and optical characteristics were investigated using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and PL spectroscopy.

  19. Transient Growth Analysis of Compressible Boundary Layers with Parabolized Stability Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2016-01-01

    The linear form of parabolized linear stability equations (PSE) is used in a variational approach to extend the previous body of results for the optimal, non-modal disturbance growth in boundary layer flows. This methodology includes the non-parallel effects associated with the spatial development of boundary layer flows. As noted in literature, the optimal initial disturbances correspond to steady counter-rotating stream-wise vortices, which subsequently lead to the formation of stream-wise-elongated structures, i.e., streaks, via a lift-up effect. The parameter space for optimal growth is extended to the hypersonic Mach number regime without any high enthalpy effects, and the effect of wall cooling is studied with particular emphasis on the role of the initial disturbance location and the value of the span-wise wavenumber that leads to the maximum energy growth up to a specified location. Unlike previous predictions that used a basic state obtained from a self-similar solution to the boundary layer equations, mean flow solutions based on the full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are used in select cases to help account for the viscous-inviscid interaction near the leading edge of the plate and also for the weak shock wave emanating from that region. These differences in the base flow lead to an increasing reduction with Mach number in the magnitude of optimal growth relative to the predictions based on self-similar mean-flow approximation. Finally, the maximum optimal energy gain for the favorable pressure gradient boundary layer near a planar stagnation point is found to be substantially weaker than that in a zero pressure gradient Blasius boundary layer.

  20. Discovery of Novel Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Receptor Inhibitors with Unique Time-Dependent Binding Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This letter describes a series of small molecule inhibitors of IGF-1R with unique time-dependent binding kinetics and slow off-rates. Structure–activity and structure–kinetic relationships were elucidated and guided further optimizations within the series, culminating in compound 2. With an IGF-1R dissociative half-life (t1/2) of >100 h, compound 2 demonstrated significant and extended PD effects in conjunction with tumor growth inhibition in xenograft models at a remarkably low and intermittent dose, which correlated with the observed in vitro slow off-rate properties. PMID:24900721

  1. Effect of surface energy and seed layer annealing temperature on ZnO seed layer formation and ZnO nanowire growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji-Sub; Mahmud, Imtiaz; Shin, Han Jae; Park, Min-Kyu; Ranjkesh, Amid; Lee, Do Kyung; Kim, Hak-Rin

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the effects of surface energy and seed layer annealing temperature (Tannealing) on seed layer growth and hydrothermally-grown zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires (NWs). In this work, by varying the ultraviolet ozone (UVO) treatment times on a silicon surface, the surface energy conditions for the seed layer formation changed and the seed layer was annealed under different Tannealing conditions. Under a lower surface energy condition of the substrate, with increasing Tannealing, the coverage density and the average thickness of the seed layer increased, but island-like growth was observed. This case was inevitably accompanied by an increase in surface roughness, which resulted in agglomerated low density growth of ZnO NWs. After sufficient UVO treatment, hydroxyl groups on the silicon surface activated the ZnO seed layer formation in the chemical reaction and increased the bonding energy between the active nucleation sites of the seed layer and the substrate surface. This ensured higher coverage density of the seed layer with lower surface roughness under the same Tannealing condition, thereby providing the ZnO NW growth with an enhanced density and aspect ratio as well as good crystallinity.

  2. Temperature-dependent subsurface growth during atomic layer deposition on polypropylene and cellulose fibers.

    PubMed

    Jur, Jesse S; Spagnola, Joseph C; Lee, Kyoungmi; Gong, Bo; Peng, Qing; Parsons, Gregory N

    2010-06-01

    Nucleation and subsequent growth of aluminum oxide by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on polypropylene fiber substrates is strongly dependent on processing temperature and polymer backbone structure. Deposition on cellulose cotton, which contains ample hydroxyl sites for ALD nucleation and growth on the polymer backbone, readily produces a uniform and conformal coating. However, similar ALD processing on polypropylene, which contains no readily available active sites for growth initiation, results in a graded and intermixed polymer/inorganic interface layer. The structure of the polymer/inorganic layer depends strongly on the process temperature, where lower temperature (60 degrees C) produced a more abrupt transition. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images of polypropylene fibers coated at higher temperature (90 degrees C) show that non-coalesced particles form in the near-surface region of the polymer, and the particles grow in size and coalesce into a film as the number of ALD cycles increases. Quartz crystal microbalance analysis on polypropylene films confirms enhanced mass uptake at higher processing temperatures, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data also confirm heterogeneous mixing between the aluminum oxide and the polypropylene during deposition at higher temperatures. The strong temperature dependence of film nucleation and subsurface growth is ascribed to a relatively large increase in bulk species diffusivity that occurs upon the temperature-driven free volume expansion of the polypropylene. These results provide helpful insight into mechanisms for controlled organic/inorganic thin film and fiber materials integration.

  3. Epitaxial growth of AlN films via plasma-assisted atomic layer epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Nepal, N.; Qadri, S. B.; Hite, J. K.; Mahadik, N. A.; Mastro, M. A.; Eddy, C. R. Jr.

    2013-08-19

    Thin AlN layers were grown at 200–650 °C by plasma assisted atomic layer epitaxy (PA-ALE) simultaneously on Si(111), sapphire (1120), and GaN/sapphire substrates. The AlN growth on Si(111) is self-limited for trimethyaluminum (TMA) pulse of length > 0.04 s, using a 10 s purge. However, the AlN nucleation on GaN/sapphire is non-uniform and has a bimodal island size distribution for TMA pulse of ≤0.03 s. The growth rate (GR) remains almost constant for T{sub g} between 300 and 400 °C indicating ALE mode at those temperatures. The GR is increased by 20% at T{sub g} = 500 °C. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurement shows that the ALE AlN layers grown at T{sub g} ≤ 400 °C have no clear band edge related features, however, the theoretically estimated band gap of 6.2 eV was measured for AlN grown at T{sub g} ≥ 500 °C. X-ray diffraction measurements on 37 nm thick AlN films grown at optimized growth conditions (T{sub g} = 500 °C, 10 s purge, 0.06 s TMA pulse) reveal that the ALE AlN on GaN/sapphire is (0002) oriented with rocking curve full width at the half maximum (FWHM) of 670 arc sec. Epitaxial growth of crystalline AlN layers by PA-ALE at low temperatures broadens application of the material in the technologies that require large area conformal growth at low temperatures with thickness control at the atomic scale.

  4. Iron phthalocyanine in non-aqueous medium forming layer-by-layer films: growth mechanism, molecular architecture and applications.

    PubMed

    Alessio, Priscila; Rodríguez-Méndez, Maria Luz; De Saja Saez, Jose Antonio; Constantino, Carlos José Leopoldo

    2010-04-28

    The application of organic thin films as transducer elements in electronic devices has been widely exploited, with the electrostatic layer-by-layer (LbL) technique being one of the most powerful tools to produce such films. The conventional LbL method, however, is restricted in many cases to water soluble compounds. Here, an alternative way to produce LbL films containing iron phthalocyanine (FePc) in non-aqueous media (chloroform) is presented. This film fabrication was made possible by exploiting the specific interactions between Fe and NH(2) groups from PAH, poly(allylamine hydrochloride) used as the supporting layer, leading to the formation of bilayers structured as (PAH/FePc)(n). We have also incorporated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in LbL films with (PAH/FePc/AgNP)(n) trilayers, making it possible to achieve the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) phenomenon. The molecular architecture of the LbL films was determined through different techniques. The growth was monitored with UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, their morphology characterized by optical and scanning electron (SEM) microscopes, and their molecular organization determined using FTIR. The electrochemical properties of the LbL films were successfully applied in detecting dopamine in KCl aqueous solutions at different concentrations using cyclic voltammetry. The results confirmed that the LbL films from FePc in non-aqueous media keep their electroactivity, while showing an interesting electrocatalytic effect. The SERS phenomenon suggested that FePc aggregates might be directly involved in the maintenance of the electroactivity of the LbL films.

  5. Classification and kinetic analysis of viscosity growth processes for NaOH-gelatinized rice starches.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hisashi; Sawai, Nozomi; Seo, Kanako

    2013-09-12

    Using capillary viscometry, viscosity growth processes were studied for non-glutinous rice starches gelatinized with different NaOH solution concentrations. The viscosity-time data series generally conformed to sigmoid curves with an arbitrary inflection point (IP) for each curve, and were analyzed using a kinetic model that incorporated a first-order reaction rate equation and a mixing rule of a power-law type. The shapes of curves were classified with the exponent ν or the ratio η(*)/ηG, where η(*) and ηG were viscosities at IP and at equilibrium, respectively. It was argued that these parameters were related to the complex formation arising from NaOH-starch interactions. The rate constant K defined uniformly for an entire process increased with NaOH concentration and was power-law dependent. Furthermore, it was suggested that gelatinization evolved non-uniformly over time. A non-uniform analysis was then performed by disassembling the entire process into several elementary stages and revealed the evolutionary process for K.

  6. Kinetics of Diffusional Droplet Growth in a Liquid/Liquid Two-Phase System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Fradkov, V. E.

    1996-01-01

    We address the problem of diffusional interactions in a finite sized cluster of spherical particles for volume fractions, V(sub v) in the range 0-0.01. We determined the quasi-static monopole diffusion solution for n particles distributed at random in a continuous matrix. A global mass conservation condition is employed, obviating the need for any external boundary condition. The numerical results provide the instantaneous (snapshot) growth or shrinkage rate of each particle, precluding the need for extensive time-dependent computations. The close connection between these snapshot results and the coarsegrained kinetic constants are discussed. A square-root dependence of the deviations of the rate constants from their zero volume fraction value is found for the higher V(sub v) investigated. This behavior is consistent with predictions from diffusion Debye-Huckel screening theory. By contrast, a cube-root dependence, reported in earlier numerical studies, is found for the lower V(sub v) investigated. The roll-over region of the volume fraction where the two asymptotics merge depends on the number of particles, n, alone. A theoretical estimate for the roll-over point predicts that the corresponding V(sub v) varies as n(sup -2), in good agreement with the numerical results.

  7. Mechanism and kinetics of biofilm growth process influenced by shear stress in sewers.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hainan; Xu, Jingwei; Huang, Wei; He, Qiang; Ni, Bingjie; Wang, Yinliang

    2016-01-01

    Sewer biofilms play an important role in the biotransformation of substances for methane and sulfide emission in sewer networks. The dynamic flows and the particular shear stress in sewers are the key factors determining the growth of the sewer biofilm. In this work, the development of sewer biofilm with varying shear stress is specifically investigated to gain a comprehensive understanding of the sewer biofilm dynamics. Sewer biofilms were cultivated in laboratory-scale gravity sewers under different hydraulic conditions with the corresponding shell stresses are 1.12 Pa, 1.29 Pa and 1.45 Pa, respectively. The evolution of the biofilm thickness were monitored using microelectrodes, and the variation in total solids (TS) and extracellular polymer substance (EPS) levels in the biofilm were also measured. The results showed that the steady-state biofilm thickness were highly related to the corresponding shear stresses with the biofilm thickness of 2.4 ± 0.1 mm, 2.7 ± 0.1 mm and 2.2 ± 0.1 mm at shear stresses of 1.12 Pa, 1.29 Pa and 1.45 Pa, respectively, which the chemical oxygen demand concentration is 400 mg/L approximately. Based on these observations, a kinetic model for describing the development of sewer biofilms was developed and demonstrated to be capable of reproducing all the experimental data.

  8. Different antibacterial activity of novel theophylline-based ionic liquids - Growth kinetic and cytotoxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Andrzej; Ławniczak, Łukasz; Cłapa, Tomasz; Narożna, Dorota; Selwet, Marek; Pęziak, Daria; Markiewicz, Bartosz; Chrzanowski, Łukasz

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate novel theophylline-based ionic liquids and their cytotoxic effects towards model Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli, respectively). Growth kinetics, respiratory rates and dehydrogenase activities were studied in the presence of ionic liquids at concentrations ranging from 10 to 1000mg/L. Additionally, the influence of ionic liquids on bacterial cells associated with specific interactions based on the structure of cell wall was evaluated. This effect was assessed by viability tests and scanning electron microscope observations. The obtained results confirmed that ionic liquids exhibit different levels of toxicity in relation to Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Those effects are associated with the chemical structure of the cationic species of the ionic liquids and their critical micelle concentration value. It was established that the presence of an alkyl or allyl group increased the toxicity, whereas the presence of an aryl group in the cation decreased the toxic effect of ILs. Results presented in this study also revealed unexpected effects of self-aggregation of E. coli cells. Overall, it was established that the studied ILs exhibited higher toxicity towards Gram-positive bacteria due to different interactions between the ILs and the cell membranes. These findings may be of importance for the design of ILs with targeted antimicrobial properties.

  9. Cell growth kinetics of the human cell line Colo-205 irradiated with photons and astatine-211 alpha-particles.

    PubMed

    Palm, S; Andersson, H; Bäck, T; Claesson, I; Delle, U; Hultborn, R; Jacobsson, L; Köpf, I; Lindegren, S

    2000-01-01

    Cell growth kinetics following Astatine-211 (211At, alpha-particle emitter) and photon irradiation were studied for the human colorectal cell line Colo-205. A growth assay using 96-well plates was chosen. The growth kinetics could be simulated by assuming certain fractions of cells with various proliferative capacities, i.e. from none up to 5 cell doublings, in addition to the defined survivors with remaining unlimited clonogenic capacity. No significant difference in cell growth characteristics was seen between 211At and photon irradiation. The cell doubling time, as calculated from the increment in optical density, was compared with the results from BrdU experiments in the early phases of growth (Tpot = 18.5 +/- 0.6 h for LDR (low dose rate) photon irradiated and 20.3 +/- 0.8 hours for sham-irradiated cells 40-45 hours post-irradiation) confirming the transient accelerated growth of irradiated cells. No statistically significant difference in growth was found between LDR, MDR (medium dose rate) and HDR (high dose rate) photon irradiation.

  10. Thin Layer Drying Kinetics of By-Products from Olive Oil Processing

    PubMed Central

    Montero, Irene; Miranda, Teresa; Arranz, Jose Ignacio; Rojas, Carmen Victoria

    2011-01-01

    The thin-layer behavior of by-products from olive oil production was determined in a solar dryer in passive and active operation modes for a temperature range of 20–50 °C. The increase in the air temperature reduced the drying time of olive pomace, sludge and olive mill wastewater. Moisture ratio was analyzed to obtain effective diffusivity values, varying in the oil mill by-products from 9.136 × 10−11 to 1.406 × 10−9 m2/s in forced convection (ma = 0.22 kg/s), and from 9.296 × 10−11 to 6.277 × 10−10 m2/s in natural convection (ma = 0.042 kg/s). Diffusivity values at each temperature were obtained using the Fick’s diffusion model and, regardless of the convection, they increased with the air temperature. The temperature dependence on the effective diffusivity was determined by an Arrhenius type relationship. The activation energies were found to be 38.64 kJ/mol, 30.44 kJ/mol and 47.64 kJ/mol for the olive pomace, the sludge and the olive mill wastewater in active mode, respectively, and 91.35 kJ/mol, 14.04 kJ/mol and 77.15 kJ/mol in natural mode, in that order. PMID:22174639

  11. Coupling between hydration layer dynamics and unfolding kinetics of HP-36.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy; Chakraborty, Sudip; Bagchi, Biman

    2006-08-28

    We have performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous solutions of HP-36 at 300 K in its native state, as well as at high temperatures to explore the unfolding dynamics of the protein and its correlation with the motion of water around it. On increasing the temperature a partially unfolded molten globule state is formed where the smallest alpha helix (helix 2) unfolds into a coil. It is observed that the unfolding is initiated around the residue Phe-18 which shows a sharp displacement during unfolding. We have noticed that the unfolding of the protein affects the density of water near the protein surface. Besides, the dynamics of water in the protein hydration layer has been found to be strongly correlated with the time evolution of the unfolding process. We have introduced and calculated a displacement time correlation function to monitor the change in water motion relative to the protein backbone during unfolding. We find that the unfolding of helix 2 is associated with an increase in mobility of water around it as compared to water around the other two helices. We have also explored the microscopic aspects of secondary structure specific and site specific solvation dynamics of the protein. The calculations reveal that unfolding influences the solvation dynamics of the protein molecule in a heterogeneous manner depending on the location of the polar probe residues. This seems to be in agreement with recent experimental findings.

  12. Thin layer drying kinetics of by-products from olive oil processing.

    PubMed

    Montero, Irene; Miranda, Teresa; Arranz, Jose Ignacio; Rojas, Carmen Victoria

    2011-01-01

    The thin-layer behavior of by-products from olive oil production was determined in a solar dryer in passive and active operation modes for a temperature range of 20-50 °C. The increase in the air temperature reduced the drying time of olive pomace, sludge and olive mill wastewater. Moisture ratio was analyzed to obtain effective diffusivity values, varying in the oil mill by-products from 9.136 × 10(-11) to 1.406 × 10(-9) m(2)/s in forced convection (m(a) = 0.22 kg/s), and from 9.296 × 10(-11) to 6.277 × 10(-10) m(2)/s in natural convection (m(a) = 0.042 kg/s). Diffusivity values at each temperature were obtained using the Fick's diffusion model and, regardless of the convection, they increased with the air temperature. The temperature dependence on the effective diffusivity was determined by an Arrhenius type relationship. The activation energies were found to be 38.64 kJ/mol, 30.44 kJ/mol and 47.64 kJ/mol for the olive pomace, the sludge and the olive mill wastewater in active mode, respectively, and 91.35 kJ/mol, 14.04 kJ/mol and 77.15 kJ/mol in natural mode, in that order.

  13. Controlling Interfacial Reactions and Intermetallic Compound Growth at the Interface of a Lead-free Solder Joint with Layer-by-Layer Transferred Graphene.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yong-Ho; Lee, Jong-Dae; Yoon, Taeshik; Lee, Chang-Woo; Kim, Taek-Soo

    2016-03-02

    The immoderate growth of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) formed at the interface of a solder metal and the substrate during soldering can degrade the mechanical properties and reliability of a solder joint in electronic packaging. Therefore, it is critical to control IMC growth at the solder joints between the solder and the substrate. In this study, we investigated the control of interfacial reactions and IMC growth by the layer-by-layer transfer of graphene during the reflow process at the interface between Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu (in wt %) lead-free solder and Cu. As the number of graphene layers transferred onto the surface of the Cu substrate increased, the thickness of the total IMC (Cu6Sn5 and Cu3Sn) layer decreased. After 10 repetitions of the reflow process for 50 s above 217 °C, the melting temperature of Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu, with a peak temperature of 250 °C, the increase in thickness of the total IMC layer at the interface with multiple layers of graphene was decreased by more than 20% compared to that at the interface of bare Cu without graphene. Furthermore, the average diameter of the Cu6Sn5 scallops at the interface with multiple layers of graphene was smaller than that at the interface without graphene. Despite 10 repetitions of the reflow process, the growth of Cu3Sn at the interface with multiple layers of graphene was suppressed by more than 20% compared with that at the interface without graphene. The multiple layers of graphene at the interface between the solder metal and the Cu substrate hindered the diffusion of Cu atoms from the Cu substrate and suppressed the reactions between Cu and Sn in the solder. Thus, the multiple layers of graphene transferred at the interface between dissimilar metals can control the interfacial reaction and IMC growth occurring at the joining interface.

  14. Nucleation and growth in materials and on surfaces: Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and rate equation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Feng

    This dissertation is organized in two parts, the first part is about fundamental characteristics of multiple dimensional systems, the second part is about parallel KMC calculation of coarsening process. In Part I, we first study the fundamental characteristics of nucleation and growth in 3 dimensional (3D) systems using a simplified model of nucleation and growth. One of the main goals of this work is to compare with previous work on 2D nucleation and growth in order to understand the effects of dimensionality. The scaling of the average island-size, island density, monomer density, island-size distribution (ISD), capture number distribution (CND), and capture zone distribution (CZD) are studied as a function of the fraction of occupied sites (coverage) and the ratio D/F of the monomer hopping rate D to the (per site) monomer creation rate F. Our model may be viewed as a simple model of the early-stages of vacancy cluster nucleation and growth under irradiation. Good agreement is found between our mean-field (MF) rate-equation results for the average island and monomer densities and our simulation results. In addition, we find that due to the decreased influence of correlations and fluctuations in 3D as compared to 2D, the scaled CND depends only weakly on the island-size. As a result the scaled ISD is significantly sharper than obtained in 2D and diverges with increasing D/F. However, the scaled ISD obtained in kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations appears to diverge more slowly with increasing D/F than the MF prediction while the divergence occurs at a value of the scaled island-size which is somewhat beyond the MF prediction. These results are supported by an analysis of the asymptotic CND. The final goal for understanding the mechanism of nucleation and growth is to develop a theory to concisely and precisely disclose the law underlying the nucleation and growth process. From the theoretical point view, dimension can be taken as a variable to develop theory. In

  15. Flow non-normality-induced transient growth in superposed Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid layers.

    PubMed

    Camporeale, C; Gatti, F; Ridolfi, L

    2009-09-01

    In recent years non-normality and transient growths have attracted much interest in fluid mechanics. Here, we investigate these topics with reference to the problem of interfacial instability in superposed Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid layers. Under the hypothesis of the lubrication theory, we demonstrate the existence of significant transient growths in the parameter space region where the dynamical system is asymptotically stable, and show how they depend on the main physical parameters. In particular, the key role of the density ratio is highlighted.

  16. Growth and structure of ultrathin praseodymium oxide layers on ruthenium(0001).

    PubMed

    Höcker, Jan; Krisponeit, Jon-Olaf; Cambeis, Julian; Zakharov, Alexei; Niu, Yuran; Wei, Gang; Colombi Ciacchi, Lucio; Falta, Jens; Schaefer, Andreas; Flege, Jan Ingo

    2017-02-01

    The growth, morphology, structure, and stoichiometry of ultrathin praseodymium oxide layers on Ru(0001) were studied using low-energy electron microscopy and diffraction, photoemission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. At a growth temperature of 760 °C, the oxide is shown to form hexagonally close-packed (A-type) Pr2O3(0001) islands that are up to 3 nm high. Depending on the local substrate step density, the islands either adopt a triangular shape on sufficiently large terraces or acquire a trapezoidal shape with the long base aligned along the substrate steps.

  17. Comparative studies on phosphorus uptake and growth kinetics of the microalga Tetraselmis subcordiformis and the macroalga Ulva pertusa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Chunrong; Dong, Shuanglin

    2004-04-01

    Short-term uptake experiments and long-term semicontinuous culture experiments were performed under the condition of phosphorus (P) limitation to estimate and compare the P uptake and growth kinetics of the microalga Tetraselmis subcordiformis and the macroalga Ulva pertusa. Two new parameters, the maximum specific uptake rate ( V {m/sp}) and the maximal growth efficiency (β), are introduced to achieve uniformity for the comparison of nutrient uptake and growth efficiency between microalgae and macroalgae. T. subcordiformis possesses 3 times lower half saturation uptake constant, 4 times higher maximal growth rate and 20 times higher maximum specific uptake rate than U. pertusa, while U. pertusa possesses 4 times higher maximal growth efficiency than T. subcordiformis.

  18. A kinetic model for estimating the boron activation energies in the FeB and Fe2B layers during the gas-boriding of Armco iron: Effect of boride incubation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keddam, M.; Kulka, M.; Makuch, N.; Pertek, A.; Małdziński, L.

    2014-04-01

    The present work deals with a simulation of the growth kinetics of boride layers grown on Armco iron substrate. The formed boride layers (FeB + Fe2B) are obtained by the gas-boriding in the temperature range of 1073-1273 K during a time duration ranging from 80 to 240 min. The used approach solves the mass balance equations at the two growing fronts: (FeB/Fe2B) and (Fe2B/Fe) under certain assumptions. To consider the effect of the incubation times for the borides formation, the temperature-dependent function Φ(T) was incorporated in the model. The following input data: (the boriding temperature, the treatment time, the upper and lower values of boron concentrations in FeB and Fe2B and the experimental parabolic growth constants) are needed to determine the boron activation energies in the FeB and Fe2B layers. The obtained values of boron activation energies were then compared with the values available in the literature. Finally, a good agreement was obtained between the simulated values of boride layers thicknesses and the experimental ones in the temperature range of 1073-1273 K.

  19. High frequency guided waves for hidden fatigue crack growth monitoring in multi-layer aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Henry; Fromme, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Varying loading conditions of aircraft structures result in stress concentration at fastener holes, where multi-layered components are connected, possibly leading to the development of fatigue cracks. High frequency guided waves propagating along the structure allow for the non-destructive testing of such components, e.g., aircraft wings. However, the sensitivity for the detection of small, potentially hidden, fatigue cracks has to be ascertained. The type of multi-layered model structure investigated consists of two adhesively bonded aluminium plate-strips. Fatigue experiments were carried out. The sensitivity of the high frequency guided wave modes to monitor fatigue crack growth at a fastener hole during cyclic loading was investigated, using both standard pulse-echo equipment and laser interferometry. The sensitivity and repeatability of the measurements were ascertained, having the potential for fatigue crack growth monitoring at critical and difficult to access fastener locations from a stand-off distance.

  20. Spiral Growth of Few-Layer MoS2 by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xi; Tomer, Dushyant; Li, Lian

    Monolayer and few-layer transition metal dichalcogenide MoS2 are grown by chemical vapor deposition on SiO2/Si substrates using MoO3 and S powder as precursors. Before growth, the substrates are pretreated with perylene-3, 4, 9, 10-tetracarboxylic acid tetrapotassium salt to promote nucleation. Monolayer MoS2 islands are triangularly shaped with sizes ranging from a few to tens of micrometers, which also exhibits the characteristic Raman bands at 403.36 and 385.05 cm-1 corresponding to the A1g and E2g modes, respectively. Atomic force microscopy imaging further confirms the monolayer thickness to be 0.8 nm. For few-layer MoS2 films, triangular spirals are observed with both left- and right-handed chirality. Raman spectra showed interesting features of these growth spirals, the details of which will be presented at the meeting. NSF DMR-1508560.

  1. Montane forest root growth and soil organic layer depth as potential factors stabilizing Cenozoic global change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, Christopher E.; Taylor, Lyla L.; Girardin, Cecile A. J.; Malhi, Yadvinder; Beerling, David J.

    2014-02-01

    Tree roots and their symbiotic fungal partners are believed to play a major role in regulating long-term global climate, but feedbacks between global temperature and biotic weathering have not yet been explored in detail. In situ field data from a 3000 m altitudinal transect in Peru show fine root growth decreases and organic layer depth increases with the cooler temperatures that prevail at increased altitude. We hypothesize that this observation suggests a negative feedback: as global temperatures rise, the soil organic layer will shrink, and more roots will grow in the mineral layer, thereby accelerating weathering and reducing atmospheric CO2. We examine this mechanism with a process-based biological weathering model and demonstrate that this negative feedback could have contributed to moderating long-term global Cenozoic climate during major Cenozoic CO2 changes linked to volcanic degassing and tectonic uplift events.

  2. In-situ observation of impurity diffusion boundary layer in silicon Czochralski growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakimoto, Koichi; Eguchi, Minoru; Watanabe, Hisao; Hibiya, Taketoshi

    1990-01-01

    In-situ observation of the impurity diffusion boundary layer during single crystal growth of indium-doped silicon was carried out by X-ray radiography. The difference in the transmitted X-ray image compared with molten silicon just beneath the crystal-melt interface was attributed to the concentration of indium impurities having a larger absorption coefficient. The intensity profile of the transmitted X-ray can be reproduced by a transmittance calculation that considers the meniscus shape and impurity distribution. The impurity distribution profile near the crystal-melt interface was estimated using the Burton-Prim-Slichter (BPS) equation. The observed impurity diffusion boundary layer thickness was about 0.5 mm. It was found that the boundary layer thickness was not constant in the radial direction, which cannot be explained by the BPS theory, since it is based on a one-dimensional calculation.

  3. Comparison of Epitaxial Growth Techniques for III-V Layer Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-22

    FOR Ill-V LAYER STRUCTURES DTIC byS ELECTE G. B. STRINGFELLOW MAY 2 819S2 A Prepared for Publication in the Proceedings of croissance de cristaux et de...epitaxial growth techniques have been used for semiconductors, including liquid phase epitaxy (LPE), chloride vapor phase epitaxy (CIVPE) using...MBE (GSMBE), organometallic MBE (OMMBE or MOMBE), and chemical beam epitaxy (CBE). II. LIQUID PHASE EPITAXY The first technique listed, LPE, was one of

  4. Integration of in situ RHEED with magnetron sputter deposition for atomic layer controlled growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podkaminer, Jacob P.

    Epitaxial thin films continue to be one of the most promising topics within electronic materials research. Sputter deposition is one process by which these films can be formed and is a widely used growth technique for a large range of technologically important material systems. Epitaxial films of carbides, nitrides, metals, oxides and more can all be formed during the sputter process which offers the ability to deposit smooth and uniform films from the research level up to an industrial scale. This tunable kinematic deposition process excels in easily adapting for a large range of environments and growth procedures. Despite the vast advantages associated with sputter deposition, there is a significant lack of in situ analysis options during sputtering. In particular, the area of real time atomic layer control is severely deficient. Atomic layer controlled growth of epitaxial thin films and artificially layered superlattices is critical for both understanding their emergent phenomena and engineering novel material systems and devices. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is one of the most common in situ analysis techniques during thin film deposition that is rarely used during sputtering due to the strong permanent magnets in magnetron sputter sources and their effect on the RHEED electron beam. In this work we have solved this problem and designed a novel way to deter the effect of the magnets for a wide range of growth geometries and demonstrate the ability for the first time to have layer by layer control during sputter deposition by in situ RHEED. A novel growth chamber that can seamlessly change between pulsed laser deposition and sputtering with RHEED for the growth of complex heterostructures has been designed and implemented. Epitaxial thin films of LaAlO3, La1-xSrxMnO3, and SrRuO3 have all been deposited by sputtering and shown to exhibit clear and extended RHEED oscillations. To solve the magnet issue, a finite element model has been

  5. Sputtering temperature dependent growth kinetics and CO2 sensing properties of ZnO deposited over porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, L.; Holguín-Momaca, J. T.; Karthik, T. V. K.; Olive-Méndez, S. F.; Campos-Alvarez, J.; Agarwal, V.

    2016-10-01

    We report the growth kinetics and sensing properties of ZnO deposited over macro-porous silicon substrates at 400 and 600 °C using magnetron-sputtering technique. Scanning electron microscopy was employed to investigate the morphology and the particle size of the ZnO nanoparticles (NPs). The grain growth kinetics was analyzed with the help of the phenomenological equation rn =k0 texp(- Q / RT) finding an activation energy Q = 13.92 kJ/mol. The grain growth exponent (n = 2.85) for the growth at 400 °C corresponds to an Ostwald ripening process, while the growth at 600 °C is described by n = 1.66 implying a higher growth rate attributed to a high surface diffusion of add-atoms contributing to the formation of larger grains. The sensing response of the complete structure has been tested at different temperatures. The highest sensitivity, S ∼10, was obtained at a sensor temperature of 300 °C on the ZnO NPs sputtered on to the porous silicon substrate at 400 °C. The high response is attributed to the infiltration, uniform and homogenous distribution of the ZnO NPs into the pores. ZnO NPs sputtered at 400 °C are found to be smaller than those grown at 600 °C, exhibiting a larger surface-area/volume ratio and hence increasing the oxygen adsorption resulting in an enhanced CO2 sensitivity.

  6. Influence of layering on the formation and growth of solution pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrus, Karine; Szymczak, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    In karst systems, hydraulic conduits called solution pipes (or wormholes) are formed as a result of the dissolution of limestone rocks by the water surcharged with CO2. The solution pipes are the end result of a positive feedback between spatial variations in porosity in the rock matrix and the local dissolution rate. Here, we investigate numerically the effect of rock stratification on the solution pipe growth, using a simple model system with a number of horizontal layers, which are less porous than the rest of the matrix. Stratification is shown to affect the resulting piping patterns in a variety of ways. First of all, it enhances the competition between the pipes, impeding the growth of the shorter ones and enhancing the flow in the longer ones, which therefore grow longer. This is reflected in the change of the pipe length distribution, which becomes steeper as the porosity contrast between the layers is increased. Additionally, stratification affects the shapes of individual solution pipes, with characteristic widening of the profiles in between the layers and narrowing within the layers. These results are in qualitative agreement with the piping morphologies observed in nature.

  7. Wafer-scale growth of MoS2 thin films by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Pyeon, Jung Joon; Kim, Soo Hyun; Jeong, Doo Seok; Baek, Seung-Hyub; Kang, Chong-Yun; Kim, Jin-Sang; Kim, Seong Keun

    2016-05-19

    The wafer-scale synthesis of MoS2 layers with precise thickness controllability and excellent uniformity is essential for their application in the nanoelectronics industry. Here, we demonstrate the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of MoS2 films with Mo(CO)6 and H2S as the Mo and S precursors, respectively. A self-limiting growth behavior is observed in the narrow ALD window of 155-175 °C. Long H2S feeding times are necessary to reduce the impurity contents in the films. The as-grown MoS2 films are amorphous due to the low growth temperature. Post-annealing at high temperatures under a H2S atmosphere efficiently improves the film properties including the crystallinity and chemical composition. An extremely uniform film growth is achieved even on a 4 inch SiO2/Si wafer. These results demonstrate that the current ALD process is well suited for the synthesis of MoS2 layers for application in industry.

  8. Growth kinetics of enstatite reaction rims studied on nano-scale, Part I: Methodology, microscopic observations and the role of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milke, Ralf; Dohmen, Ralf; Becker, Hans-Werner; Wirth, Richard

    2007-11-01

    The kinetics of (Mg, Fe)SiO3 pyroxene layer growth within silicate thin films with total thickness <1 μm was studied experimentally at 0.1 MPa total pressure, controlled fO2 and temperatures from 1,000 to 1,300°C. The starting samples were produced by pulsed laser deposition. Layer thickness before and after the experiments and layer composition as well as microstructures, grain size and shape of the interfaces were determined by Rutherford back scattering and transmission electron microscopy assisted by focused ion beam milling. Due to the miniaturization of the starting samples and the use of high resolution analytical methods the experimentally accessible temperature range for rim growth experiments was extended by about 300°C towards lower temperatures. The thickness of the layers at a given temperature increases proprotional to the square root of time, indicating a diffusion-controlled growth mechanism. The temperature dependence of rim growth yields an apparent activation energy of 426 ± 34 kJ/mol. The small grain size in the orthopyroxene rims implies a significant contribution of grain boundary diffusion to the bulk diffusion properties of the polycrystalline rims. Based on microstructural observations diffusion scenarios are discussed for which the SiO2 component behaves immobile relative to the MgO component. Volume diffusion data for Mg in orthopyroxene from the literature indicate that the measured diffusivity is probably controlled by the mobility of oxygen. The observed reaction rates are consistent with earlier results from dry high-temperature experiments on orthopyroxene rim growth. Compared to high pressure experiments at 1,000°C and low water fugacities, reaction rates are 3-4 orders of magnitude smaller. This observation is taken as direct evidence for a strong effect of small amounts of water on diffusion in silicate polycrystals. In particular SiO2 changes from an immobile component at dry conditions to an extremely mobile component even

  9. Decoupling high surface recombination velocity and epitaxial growth for silicon passivation layers on crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landheer, Kees; Kaiser, Monja; Verheijen, Marcel A.; Tichelaar, Frans D.; Poulios, Ioannis; Schropp, Ruud E. I.; Rath, Jatin K.

    2017-02-01

    We have critically evaluated the deposition parameter space of very high frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition discharges near the amorphous to crystalline transition for intrinsic a-Si:H passivation layers on Si (1 1 1) wafers. Using a low silane concentration in the SiH4-H2 feedstock gas mixture that created amorphous material just before the transition, we have obtained samples with excellent surface passivation. Also, an a-Si:H matrix was grown with embedded local epitaxial growth of crystalline cones on a Si (1 1 1) substrate, as was revealed with a combined scanning electron and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy study. This local epitaxial growth was introduced by a decrease of the silane concentration in the feedstock gas or an increase in discharge power at low silane concentration. Together with the samples on Si (1 1 1) substrates, layers were co-deposited on Si (1 0 0) substrates. This resulted in void-rich, mono-crystalline epitaxial layers on Si (1 0 0). The epitaxial growth on Si (1 0 0) was compared to the local epitaxial growth on Si (1 1 1). The sparse surface coverage of cones seeded on the Si (1 1 1) substrate is most probably enabled by a combination of nucleation at steps and kinks in the {1 1 1} surface and intense ion bombardment at low silane concentration. The effective carrier lifetime of this sample is low and does not increase upon post-deposition annealing. Thus, sparse local epitaxial growth on Si (1 1 1) is enough to obstruct crystalline silicon surface passivation by amorphous silicon.

  10. Ground Layer Plant Species Turnover and Beta Diversity in Southern-European Old-Growth Forests

    PubMed Central

    Sabatini, Francesco Maria; Burrascano, Sabina; Tuomisto, Hanna; Blasi, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Different assembly processes may simultaneously affect local-scale variation of species composition in temperate old-growth forests. Ground layer species diversity reflects chance colonization and persistence of low-dispersal species, as well as fine-scale environmental heterogeneity. The latter depends on both purely abiotic factors, such as soil properties and topography, and factors primarily determined by overstorey structure, such as light availability. Understanding the degree to which plant diversity in old-growth forests is associated with structural heterogeneity and/or to dispersal limitation will help assessing the effectiveness of silvicultural practices that recreate old-growth patterns and structures for the conservation or restoration of plant diversity. We used a nested sampling design to assess fine-scale species turnover, i.e. the proportion of species composition that changes among sampling units, across 11 beech-dominated old-growth forests in Southern Europe. For each stand, we also measured a wide range of environmental and structural variables that might explain ground layer species turnover. Our aim was to quantify the relative importance of dispersal limitation in comparison to that of stand structural heterogeneity while controlling for other sources of environmental heterogeneity. For this purpose, we used multiple regression on distance matrices at the within-stand extent, and mixed effect models at the extent of the whole dataset. Species turnover was best predicted by structural and environmental heterogeneity, especially by differences in light availability and in topsoil nutrient concentration and texture. Spatial distances were significant only in four out of eleven stands with a relatively low explanatory power. This suggests that structural heterogeneity is a more important driver of local-scale ground layer species turnover than dispersal limitation in southern European old-growth beech forests. PMID:24748155

  11. Ground layer plant species turnover and beta diversity in southern-European old-growth forests.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Francesco Maria; Burrascano, Sabina; Tuomisto, Hanna; Blasi, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Different assembly processes may simultaneously affect local-scale variation of species composition in temperate old-growth forests. Ground layer species diversity reflects chance colonization and persistence of low-dispersal species, as well as fine-scale environmental heterogeneity. The latter depends on both purely abiotic factors, such as soil properties and topography, and factors primarily determined by overstorey structure, such as light availability. Understanding the degree to which plant diversity in old-growth forests is associated with structural heterogeneity and/or to dispersal limitation will help assessing the effectiveness of silvicultural practices that recreate old-growth patterns and structures for the conservation or restoration of plant diversity. We used a nested sampling design to assess fine-scale species turnover, i.e. the proportion of species composition that changes among sampling units, across 11 beech-dominated old-growth forests in Southern Europe. For each stand, we also measured a wide range of environmental and structural variables that might explain ground layer species turnover. Our aim was to quantify the relative importance of dispersal limitation in comparison to that of stand structural heterogeneity while controlling for other sources of environmental heterogeneity. For this purpose, we used multiple regression on distance matrices at the within-stand extent, and mixed effect models at the extent of the whole dataset. Species turnover was best predicted by structural and environmental heterogeneity, especially by differences in light availability and in topsoil nutrient concentration and texture. Spatial distances were significant only in four out of eleven stands with a relatively low explanatory power. This suggests that structural heterogeneity is a more important driver of local-scale ground layer species turnover than dispersal limitation in southern European old-growth beech forests.

  12. Structure and growth kinetics of the oxidation process of Fe(001) whisker surfaces over a 10-decade pressure range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Salvador; Robach, Odile; Balmes, Olivier; Isern, Helena; Popa, Iona; Ackerman, Marcelo

    2010-10-01

    Fe(001) surfaces of whiskers of good crystalline quality were oxidized in a pressure range from 10 - 7 mbar to 1 bar at different temperatures. Epitaxial Fe 3O 4 and FeO thin films with negligible strain were grown depending on the oxidation temperatures. The kinetics of the oxide thickness growth was measured and compared with the predictions of the Fromhold-Cook theory for oxidation of metals. Some discrepancies were found and a possible explanation is presented.

  13. Adsorption and photodegradation kinetics of herbicide 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid with MgFeTi layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Kim Phuong; Beak, Min-wook; Huy, Bui The; Lee, Yong-Ill

    2016-03-01

    The calcined layered double hydroxides (cLDHs) Ti-doped and undoped MgFe for this study were prepared by co-precipitation method followed by calcination at 500 °C. The as-prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectrum (DRS) techniques and tested for adsorption and photodegradation (including photocatalytic and photo-Fenton-like) of 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) in aqueous solutions under visible light irradiation. In the range of studied operating conditions, the as-prepared samples exhibited excellent photo-Fenton-like activity, leading to more than 80-95% degradation of 2,4,5-T at initial concentration of 100 mg L(-1) with 4 g calcined LDHs per liter, was accomplished in 360 min, while 2,4,5-T half-life time was as short as 99-182 min. The kinetics of adsorption and photodegradation of 2,4,5-T were also discussed. These results offered a green, low cost and high efficiency photocatalyst for environmental remediation.

  14. Kinetics of Nucleation and Crystal Growth in Glass Forming Melts in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Delbert E.; Ray, Chandra S.

    2001-01-01

    This flight definition project has the specific objective of investigating the kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth in high temperature inorganic oxide, glass forming melts in microgravity. It is related to one of our previous NASA projects that was concerned with glass formation for high temperature containerless melts in microgravity. The previous work culminated in two experiments which were conducted aboard the space shuttle in 1983 and 1985 and which consisted of melting (at 1500 C) and cooling levitated 6 to 8 mm diameter spherical samples in a Single Axis Acoustic Levitator (SAAL) furnace. Compared to other types of materials, there have been relatively few experiments, 6 to 8, conducted on inorganic glasses in space. These experiments have been concerned with mass transport (alkali diffusion), containerless melting, critical cooling rate for glass formation, chemical homogeneity, fiber pulling, and crystallization of glass forming melts. One of the most important and consistent findings in all of these experiments has been that the glasses prepared in microgravity are more resistant to crystallization (better glass former) and more chemically homogeneous than equivalent glasses made on Earth (1 g). The chemical composition of the melt appears relatively unimportant since the same general results have been reported for oxide, fluoride and chalcogenide melts. These results for space-processed glasses have important implications, since glasses with a higher resistance to crystallization or higher chemical homogeneity than those attainable on Earth can significantly advance applications in areas such as fiber optics communications, high power laser glasses, and other photonic devices where glasses are the key functional materials.

  15. Growth of high-crystalline, single-layer hexagonal boron nitride on recyclable platinum foil.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gwangwoo; Jang, A-Rang; Jeong, Hu Young; Lee, Zonghoon; Kang, Dae Joon; Shin, Hyeon Suk

    2013-04-10

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is gaining significant attention as a two-dimensional dielectric material, along with graphene and other such materials. Herein, we demonstrate the growth of highly crystalline, single-layer h-BN on Pt foil through a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition method that allowed h-BN to be grown over a wide area (8 × 25 mm(2)). An electrochemical bubbling-based method was used to transfer the grown h-BN layer from the Pt foil onto an arbitrary substrate. This allowed the Pt foil, which was not consumed during the process, to be recycled repeatedly. The UV-visible absorption spectrum of the single-layer h-BN suggested an optical band gap of 6.06 eV, while a high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image of the same showed the presence of distinct hexagonal arrays of B and N atoms, which were indicative of the highly crystalline nature and single-atom thickness of the h-BN layer. This method of growing single-layer h-BN over large areas was also compatible with use of a sapphire substrate.

  16. Vapour phase growth and grain boundary structure of molybdenum disulphide atomic layers.

    PubMed

    Najmaei, Sina; Liu, Zheng; Zhou, Wu; Zou, Xiaolong; Shi, Gang; Lei, Sidong; Yakobson, Boris I; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Lou, Jun

    2013-08-01

    Single-layered molybdenum disulphide with a direct bandgap is a promising two-dimensional material that goes beyond graphene for the next generation of nanoelectronics. Here, we report the controlled vapour phase synthesis of molybdenum disulphide atomic layers and elucidate a fundamental mechanism for the nucleation, growth, and grain boundary formation in its crystalline monolayers. Furthermore, a nucleation-controlled strategy is established to systematically promote the formation of large-area, single- and few-layered films. Using high-resolution electron microscopy imaging, the atomic structure and morphology of the grains and their boundaries in the polycrystalline molybdenum disulphide atomic layers are examined, and the primary mechanisms for grain boundary formation are evaluated. Grain boundaries consisting of 5- and 7- member rings are directly observed with atomic resolution, and their energy landscape is investigated via first-principles calculations. The uniformity in thickness, large grain sizes, and excellent electrical performance signify the high quality and scalable synthesis of the molybdenum disulphide atomic layers.

  17. Nucleation and growth of ZnO on PMMA by low-temperature atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Napari, Mari Malm, Jari; Lehto, Roope; Julin, Jaakko; Arstila, Kai; Sajavaara, Timo; Lahtinen, Manu

    2015-01-15

    ZnO films were grown by atomic layer deposition at 35 °C on poly(methyl methacrylate) substrates using diethylzinc and water precursors. The film growth, morphology, and crystallinity were studied using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The uniform film growth was reached after several hundreds of deposition cycles, preceded by the precursor penetration into the porous bulk and island-type growth. After the full surface coverage, the ZnO films were stoichiometric, and consisted of large grains (diameter 30 nm) with a film surface roughness up to 6 nm (RMS). The introduction of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} seed layer enhanced the initial ZnO growth substantially and changed the surface morphology as well as the crystallinity of the deposited ZnO films. Furthermore, the water contact angles of the ZnO films were measured, and upon ultraviolet illumination, the ZnO films on all the substrates became hydrophilic, independent of the film crystallinity.

  18. Layered Plant-Growth Media for Optimizing Gaseous, Liquid and Nutrient Requirements: Modeling, Design and Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinse, R.; Jones, S. B.; Bingham, G.; Bugbee, B.

    2006-12-01

    Rigorous management of restricted root zones utilizing coarse-textured porous media greatly benefits from optimizing the gas-water balance within plant-growth media. Geophysical techniques can help to quantify root- zone parameters like water content, air-filled porosity, temperature and nutrient concentration to better address the root systems performance. The efficiency of plant growth amid high root densities and limited volumes is critically linked to maintaining a favorable water content/air-filled porosity balance while considering adequate fluxes to replenish water at decreasing hydraulic conductivities during uptake. Volumes adjacent to roots also need to be optimized to provide adequate nutrients throughout the plant's life cycle while avoiding excessive salt concentrations. Our objectives were to (1) design and model an optimized root zone system using optimized porous media layers, (2) verify our design by monitoring the water content distribution and tracking nutrient release and transport, and (3) mimic water and nutrient uptake using plants or wicks to draw water from the root system. We developed a unique root-zone system using layered Ottawa sands promoting vertically uniform water contents and air-filled porosities. Watering was achieved by maintaining a shallow saturated layer at the bottom of the column and allowing capillarity to draw water upward, where coarser particle sizes formed the bottom layers with finer particles sizes forming the layers above. The depth of each layer was designed to optimize water content based on measurements and modeling of the wetting water retention curves. Layer boundaries were chosen to retain saturation between 50 and 85 percent. The saturation distribution was verified by dual-probe heat-pulse water-content sensors. The nutrient experiment involved embedding slow release fertilizer in the porous media in order to detect variations in electrical resistivity versus time during the release, diffusion and uptake of

  19. Batch growth kinetics of an indigenous mixed microbial culture utilizing m-cresol as the sole carbon source.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Pichiah; Pakshirajan, K; Saha, Prabirkumar

    2009-02-15

    An indigenous mixed microbial culture, isolated from a sewage treatment plant located in Guwahati was used to study biodegradation of m-cresol in batch shake flasks. m-Cresol concentration in the growth media was varied from 100mg/L to 900mg/L. The degradation kinetics was found to follow a three-half-order model at all initial m-cresol concentrations with regression values greater than 0.97. A maximum observed specific degradation rate of 0.585h(-1) was observed at 200mg/L m-cresol concentration in the medium. In the range of m-cresol concentrations used in the study, specific growth rate of the culture and specific degradation rates were observed to follow substrate inhibition kinetics. These two rates were fitted to kinetic models of Edward, Haldane, Luong, Han-Levenspiel, and Yano-Koga that are used to explain substrate inhibition on growth of microbial culture. Out of these models Luong and Han-Levenspiel models fitted the experimental data best with lowest root mean square error values. Biokinetic constants estimated from these two models showed good potential of the indigenous mixed culture in degrading m-cresol in wastewaters.

  20. Growth rate of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing layers with the foliation approach.

    PubMed

    Poujade, Olivier; Peybernes, Mathieu

    2010-01-01

    For years, astrophysicists, plasma fusion, and fluid physicists have puzzled over Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing layers. In particular, strong discrepancies in the growth rates have been observed between experiments and numerical simulations. Although two phenomenological mechanisms (mode-coupling and mode-competition) have brought some insight on these differences, convincing theoretical arguments are missing to explain the observed values. In this paper, we provide an analytical expression of the growth rate compatible with both mechanisms and is valid for a self-similar, low Atwood Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing subjected to a constant or time-varying acceleration. The key step in this work is the presentation of foliated averages and foliated turbulent spectra highlighted in our three-dimensional numerical simulations. We show that the exact value of the Rayleigh-Taylor growth rate not only depends upon the acceleration history but is also bound to the power-law exponent of the foliated spectra at large scales.

  1. Growth rate of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing layers with the foliation approach

    SciTech Connect

    Poujade, Olivier; Peybernes, Mathieu

    2010-01-15

    For years, astrophysicists, plasma fusion, and fluid physicists have puzzled over Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing layers. In particular, strong discrepancies in the growth rates have been observed between experiments and numerical simulations. Although two phenomenological mechanisms (mode-coupling and mode-competition) have brought some insight on these differences, convincing theoretical arguments are missing to explain the observed values. In this paper, we provide an analytical expression of the growth rate compatible with both mechanisms and is valid for a self-similar, low Atwood Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing subjected to a constant or time-varying acceleration. The key step in this work is the presentation of foliated averages and foliated turbulent spectra highlighted in our three-dimensional numerical simulations. We show that the exact value of the Rayleigh-Taylor growth rate not only depends upon the acceleration history but is also bound to the power-law exponent of the foliated spectra at large scales.

  2. MBE growth technology for high quality strained III-V layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, Frank J. (Inventor); Liu, John K. (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    III-V films are grown on large automatically perfect terraces of III-V substrates which have a different lattice constant, with temperature and Group II and V arrival rates chosen to give a Group III element stable surface. The growth is pulsed to inhibit Group III metal accumulation to low temperature, and to permit the film to relax to equilibrium. The method of the invention 1) minimizes starting step density on sample surface; 2) deposits InAs and GaAs using an interrupted growth mode (0.25 to 2 mono-layers at a time); 3) maintains the instantaneous surface stoichiometry during growth (As-stable for GaAs, In-stable for InAs); and 4) uses time-resolved RHEED to achieve aspects (1)-14 (3).

  3. Unintentional gallium incorporation in InGaN layers during epitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kun; Ren, Huaijin; Ikeda, Masao; Liu, Jianping; Ma, Yi; Gao, Songxin; Tang, Chun; Li, Deyao; Zhang, Liquan; Yang, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Unintentional gallium incorporation was observed and investigated in the epitaxial growth of InGaN by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. InGaN was grown without intentional gallium precursor and the gallium incorporation rate was found not dependent on TEGa source but was significantly influenced by temperature and TMIn source flow. The source of the unintentional gallium incorporation is confirmed to be from the flow distributor of the reactor. The incorporation mechanism was analyzed to be the diffusion of resultant of transmetalation reaction between TMIn or its decomposed products (for example DMIn) and residual gallium. Due to the unintentional gallium incorporation, the growth rate and indium content of InGaN layer are determined by indium source, gallium source and the growth temperature.

  4. Growth of MgO on multi-layered graphene and Mg in PVA matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marka, Sandeep K.; Mohiddon, Md. Ahamad; Prasad, Muvva D.; Srikanth, Vadali V. S. S.

    2015-07-01

    An easy and low temperature in-situ growth of MgO micro-rods on multi-layered graphene (MLG) in poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) matrix is elucidated. MLG decked with nanosized fragments of MgO and PVA are used as the starting materials to form MgO micro-rods (width = ∼1 μm and length = ∼4 μm) and MLG filled PVA composite film. Simple solution mixing, spin coating and simple drying processes are used to obtain the PVA composite. The growth mechanism of MgO micro-rods and the role of PVA in the growth of MgO micro-rods are explained on the basis of the observed morphological, structural and phase characteristics and a further controlled synthesis experiment, respectively.

  5. Effects of adhesion layer on Ag nanorod growth mode and morphology using glancing angle physical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Matthew P.; McKinney, Casey S.; Serrano, Joel M.; Mullen, Thomas J.; Stagon, Stephen P.

    2017-01-01

    This letter reports on the transition from a non-wetting to an effectively wetting growth mode of silver (Ag) nanorods when an adhesion layer is used during glancing angle physical vapor deposition growth. When deposited onto a silicon substrate without an adhesion layer, Ag nanorods grow from partially interconnected non-wetting islands with diameters of ˜100 nm, although many connect with their neighbors due to small rod-to-rod spacing. When a 1 nm thick Cr adhesion layer is used, which is shown not to completely coat the substrate, the growth mode becomes effectively wetting through the coalescence of closely spaced nuclei, and both Ag nanorod diameter and spacing increase. Alternatively, when a thicker 10 nm Cr adhesion layer is used, the growth mode becomes mixed, as both small effective wetting regions and film gaps exist. For the cases of no adhesion layer and 1 nm Cr adhesion layer, the nanorods are oriented at ˜23° from the substrate but lay down onto the substrate when a 10 nm thick Cr adhesion layer is used. Thin film adhesion tests demonstrate that both 1 nm and 10 nm Cr adhesion layers offer an enhanced performance over no adhesion layer or a glancing angle adhesion layer.

  6. The mathematical properties of the quasi-chemical model for microorganism growth-death kinetics in foods.

    PubMed

    Ross, E W; Taub, I A; Doona, C J; Feeherry, F E; Kustin, K

    2005-03-15

    Knowledge of the mathematical properties of the quasi-chemical model [Taub, Feeherry, Ross, Kustin, Doona, 2003. A quasi-chemical kinetics model for the growth and death of Staphylococcus aureus in intermediate moisture bread. J. Food Sci. 68 (8), 2530-2537], which is used to characterize and predict microbial growth-death kinetics in foods, is important for its applications in predictive microbiology. The model consists of a system of four ordinary differential equations (ODEs), which govern the temporal dependence of the bacterial life cycle (the lag, exponential growth, stationary, and death phases, respectively). The ODE system derives from a hypothetical four-step reaction scheme that postulates the activity of a critical intermediate as an antagonist to growth (perhaps through a quorum sensing biomechanism). The general behavior of the solutions to the ODEs is illustrated by several examples. In instances when explicit mathematical solutions to these ODEs are not obtainable, mathematical approximations are used to find solutions that are helpful in evaluating growth in the early stages and again near the end of the process. Useful solutions for the ODE system are also obtained in the case where the rate of antagonist formation is small. The examples and the approximate solutions provide guidance in the parameter estimation that must be done when fitting the model to data. The general behavior of the solutions is illustrated by examples, and the MATLAB programs with worked examples are included in the appendices for use by predictive microbiologists for data collected independently.

  7. Co-optimizing carbon nanotube synthesis: control of diameter, structural quality, and growth kinetics along with simultaneous cost minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshot, Eric R.; Plata, Desireé L.; Reddy, Christopher M.; Gschwend, Philip M.; Hart, A. John

    2009-03-01

    We employ a decoupled CVD method that not only facilitates control of mean diameter and structural quality of vertically aligned CNTs, but also co-optimization of kinetics for efficient growth to ``forest'' heights of several millimeters. The growth substrate temperature (Ts) governs agglomeration of the catalyst film which primarily determines CNT diameter, while structural quality monotonically increases with Ts. Independent heating (Tp) of the reactant mixture generates a strikingly diverse population of active hydrocarbons. These analyses, in concert with real-time laser measurements of forest growth rate and height suggest that select products of gas treatment promote growth, while excessive gas-phase pyrolysis of hydrocarbons adversely affects the CNT structure. Further, we directly inject select compounds in the absence of thermal treatment, thus minimizing energetic costs.

  8. Atmospheric pressure flow reactor / aerosol mass spectrometer studies of tropospheric aerosol nucleat and growth kinetics. Final report, June, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this program was to determine the mechanisms and rates of growth and transformation and growth processes that control secondary aerosol particles in both the clear and polluted troposphere. The experimental plan coupled an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer to provide simultaneous measurement of condensed and particle phases. The first task investigated the kinetics of tropospheric particle growth and transformation by measuring vapor accretion to particles (uptake coefficients, including mass accommodation coefficients and heterogeneous reaction rate coefficients). Other work initiated investigation of aerosol nucleation processes by monitoring the appearance of submicron particles with the AMS as a function of precursor gas concentrations. Three projects were investigated during the program: (1) Ozonolysis of oleic acid aerosols as model of chemical reactivity of secondary organic aerosol; (2) Activation of soot particles by measurement deliquescence in the presence of sulfuric acid and water vapor; (3) Controlled nucleation and growth of sulfuric acid aerosols.

  9. About the interest of a zooplankton compartment in pond systems: methodology to study the growth kinetic of Daphnia pulex on Scenedesmus sp.

    PubMed

    Liady, M N D; Tangou, T T; Fiogbe, E D; Cauchie, H-M; Vasel, J-L

    2015-01-01

    A reliable characterization of cladocerans' growth kinetic on their substrates is crucial for the estimation of their biochemical conversion rate in pond models. Although many studies reported cladocerans' growth inhibitions by high chlorophyceae contents, their growth kinetics had continued to be described in many pond system models by Monod-type kinetic, which describes growth saturation by high substrate contents, but fails to explain the disappearance of cladocerans observed during chlorophyceae's bloom periods. This study aimed to develop a methodology and assess whether growth-inhibition-type models used to describe microbial growth kinetics can be applicable to cladocerans. Experiments were carried out using Daphnia pulex populations and Scenedesmus sp. First, biomass of D. pulex was measured through digital image processing (DIP) during growth experiments. Then, three candidate models (i.e., Andrews, Edward and Haldane models), along with the Monod model, were fitted to the observed data and compared. The results showed that the DIP technique provided reliable results for estimating the biomass of D. pulex. Our findings show that the candidate growth inhibition-type models satisfactorily described D. pulex's growth kinetic (86% variance accounted for). Scenesdemus sp. were not strong inhibitors of the growth of D. pulex (high inhibition constant and low half-saturation constant found).

  10. Crack Growth Prediction Methodology for Multi-Site Damage: Layered Analysis and Growth During Plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark Anthony

    1999-01-01

    A finite element program has been developed to perform quasi-static, elastic-plastic crack growth simulations. The model provides a general framework for mixed-mode I/II elastic-plastic fracture analysis using small strain assumptions and plane stress, plane strain, and axisymmetric finite elements. Cracks are modeled explicitly in the mesh. As the cracks propagate, automatic remeshing algorithms delete the mesh local to the crack tip, extend the crack, and build a new mesh around the new tip. State variable mapping algorithms transfer stresses and displacements from the old mesh to the new mesh. The von Mises material model is implemented in the context of a non-linear Newton solution scheme. The fracture criterion is the critical crack tip opening displacement, and crack direction is predicted by the maximum tensile stress criterion at the crack tip. The implementation can accommodate multiple curving and interacting cracks. An additional fracture algorithm based on nodal release can be used to simulate fracture along a horizontal plane of symmetry. A core of plane strain elements can be used with the nodal release algorithm to simulate the triaxial state of stress near the crack tip. Verification and validation studies compare analysis results with experimental data and published three-dimensional analysis results. Fracture predictions using nodal release for compact tension, middle-crack tension, and multi-site damage test specimens produced accurate results for residual strength and link-up loads. Curving crack predictions using remeshing/mapping were compared with experimental data for an Arcan mixed-mode specimen. Loading angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees were analyzed. The maximum tensile stress criterion was able to predict the crack direction and path for all loading angles in which the material failed in tension. Residual strength was also accurately predicted for these cases.

  11. Growth of thick GaN layers on laser-processed sapphire substrate by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Koji; Aida, Hideo; Kim, Seong-Woo; Ikejiri, Kenjiro; Doi, Toshiro; Yamazaki, Tsutomu

    2014-10-01

    A 600 μm thick GaN layer was successfully grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy by replacing the standard sapphire substrate with that processed by a focused laser beam within the substrate. The effects of the laser processing on the curvature and cracking of the GaN layer were investigated. Microscopic observations of the interior of the thick GaN layer revealed that the laser-processed substrate suppressed the generation of microcracks in the GaN layer. In addition, the laser processing was also found to reduce the change in the curvature during the GaN layer growth in comparison to that on the standard substrate. It is shown that the overlapping microcracks observed in the GaN layer on the standard sapphire substrate lead to serious cracking after thick GaN layer growth.

  12. Direct Observation of the Layer-by-Layer Growth of ZnO Nanopillar by In situ High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xing; Cheng, Shaobo; Deng, Shiqing; Wei, Xianlong; Zhu, Jing; Chen, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Catalyst-free methods are important for the fabrication of pure nanowires (NWs). However, the growth mechanism remains elusive due to the lack of crucial information on the growth dynamics at atomic level. Here, the noncatalytic growth process of ZnO NWs is studied through in situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy. We observe the layer-by-layer growth of ZnO nanopillars along the polar [0001] direction under electron beam irradiation, while no growth is observed along the radial directions, indicating an anisotropic growth mechanism. The source atoms are mainly from the electron beam induced damage of the sample and the growth is assisted by subsequent absorption and then diffusion of atoms along the side surface to the top (0002) surface. The different binding energy on different ZnO surface is the main origin for the anisotropic growth. Additionally, the coalescence of ZnO nanocrystals related to the nucleation stage is uncovered to realize through the rotational motions and recrystallization. Our in situ results provide atomic-level detailed information about the dynamic growth and coalescence processes in the noncatalytic synthesis of ZnO NW and are helpful for understanding the vapor-solid mechanism of catalyst-free NW growth. PMID:28098261

  13. Quantification of epidermal growth factor receptor expression level and binding kinetics on cell surfaces by surface plasmon resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fenni; Wang, Shaopeng; Yin, Linliang; Yang, Yunze; Guan, Yan; Wang, Wei; Xu, Han; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-10-06

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, also known as ErbB-1 or HER-1) is a membrane bound protein that has been associated with a variety of solid tumors and the control of cell survival, proliferation, and metabolism. Quantification of the EGFR expression level in cell membranes and the interaction kinetics with drugs are thus important for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Here we report mapping of the distribution and interaction kinetics of EGFR in their native environment with the surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) technique. The monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody was used as a model drug in this study. The binding of the antibody to EGFR overexpressed A431 cells was monitored in real time, which was found to follow the first-order kinetics with an association rate constant (ka) and dissociation rate constant (kd) of (2.7 ± 0.6) × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and (1.4 ± 0.5) × 10(-4) s(-1), respectively. The dissociation constant (KD) was determined to be 0.53 ± 0.26 nM with up to seven-fold variation among different individual A431 cells. In addition, the averaged A431 cell surface EGFR density was found to be 636/μm(2) with an estimation of 5 × 10(5) EGFR per cell. Additional measurement also revealed that different EGFR positive cell lines (A431, HeLa, and A549) show receptor density dependent anti-EGFR binding kinetics. The results demonstrate that SPRi is a valuable tool for direct quantification of membrane protein expression level and ligand binding kinetics at single cell resolution. Our findings show that the local environment affects the drug-receptor interactions, and in situ measurement of membrane protein binding kinetics is important.

  14. Influence of hydrogen pre-growth flow on indium incorporation into InGaN layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernecki, Robert; Grzanka, Ewa; Strak, Pawel; Targowski, Greg; Krukowski, Stanislaw; Perlin, Piotr; Suski, Tadeusz; Leszczynski, Mike

    2017-04-01

    In metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) hydrogen is not commonly used in the carrier gas during growth of InGaN layers since it interferes with indium incorporation. However, hydrogen leads to a smoother surface morphology of the growing layers which is beneficial in many optoelectronic devices. The influence of hydrogen on indium incorporation was studied here. This study concludes that hydrogen alters the state of the GaN surface to the one, that does not favor indium incorporation. However, this change of the surface state by hydrogen is not immediate but occurs during the exposition of the GaN surface to H2 flow and leading to a significant In-content gradient in the InGaN layer grown with 1% (of total flow) of hydrogen in the carrier gas. We showed, that indium content on the GaN/InGaN interface is different in the case, when hydrogen is present or absent during pre-growth vent. For the InGaN sample grown without hydrogen in the carrier gas, In-content gradient was not observed.

  15. Increasing the indium incorporation efficiency during InGaN layer growth by suppressing the dissociation of NH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Zhao, D. G.; Jiang, D. S.; Chen, P.; Zhu, J. J.; Liu, Z. S.; Liu, W.; Liang, F.; Li, X.; Liu, S. T.; Zhang, L. Q.; Yang, H.

    2017-02-01

    Three series of InGaN samples with different growth pressures are grown in a vertical metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system and the indium incorporation efficiency during InGaN layer growth is investigated. It is found that the indium content in InGaN layer decreases when the NH3 flow rate increases at a higher growth pressure and it increases with the NH3 flow rate at a lower growth pressure, This may be attributed to the higher dissociation rate of NH3 into N2 and H2 at a higher growth pressure, leading to a higher H2 concentration in reactor during InGaN growth. Therefore, changing growth conditions to suppress the dissociation of NH3 into N2 and H2 can increase the indium incorporation efficiency during InGaN film growth.

  16. Growth and characterization of epitaxial aluminum layers on gallium-arsenide substrates for superconducting quantum bits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournet, J.; Gosselink, D.; Miao, G.-X.; Jaikissoon, M.; Langenberg, D.; McConkey, T. G.; Mariantoni, M.; Wasilewski, Z. R.

    2016-06-01

    The quest for a universal quantum computer has renewed interest in the growth of superconducting materials on semiconductor substrates. High-quality superconducting thin films will make it possible to improve the coherence time of superconducting quantum bits (qubits), i.e., to extend the time a qubit can store the amplitude and phase of a quantum state. The electrical losses in superconducting qubits highly depend on the quality of the metal layers the qubits are made from. Here, we report on the epitaxy of single-crystal Al (011) layers on GaAs (001) substrates. Layers with 110 nm thickness were deposited by means of molecular beam epitaxy at low temperature and monitored by in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction performed simultaneously at four azimuths. The single-crystal nature of the layers was confirmed by ex situ high-resolution x-ray diffraction. Differential interference contrast and atomic force microscopy analysis of the sample’s surface revealed a featureless surface with root mean square roughness of 0.55 nm. A detailed in situ study allowed us to gain insight into the nucleation mechanisms of Al layers on GaAs, highlighting the importance of GaAs surface reconstruction in determining the final Al layer crystallographic orientation and quality. A highly uniform and stable GaAs (001)-(2× 4) reconstruction reproducibly led to a pure Al (011) phase, while an arsenic-rich GaAs (001)-(4× 4) reconstruction yielded polycrystalline films with an Al (111) dominant orientation. The near-atomic smoothness and single-crystal character of Al films on GaAs, in combination with the ability to trench GaAs substrates, could set a new standard for the fabrication of superconducting qubits.

  17. Growth and superconductivity of REBCO bulk processed by a seed/buffer layer/precursor construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Li, T.; Cheng, L.; Yan, S. B.; Sun, L. J.; Yao, X.; Yoshida, Y.; Ikuta, H.

    2010-12-01

    The buffer layer has been used, for the first time, in the cold-seeding melt-growth (MG) process for REBCO superconductor bulks. In this modified method, a mini pellet was inserted between the seed and the bulk precursor. Notably, the chemical contamination, from the seed material (either REBCO films or SmBCO/NdBCO crystals), was mostly absorbed by the mini pellet. Thus a uniformly high Tc REBCO bulk was readily gained. Secondly, the higher limits of the maximum processing temperature (Tmax) were evidently raised, which is promisingly beneficial for broadening the growth window and overcoming the self-nucleation in the growth of large-sized bulk. In short, the success of this work is that it protects the bulk from seed-induced contamination, and breaks the limit of Tmax caused by the intrinsic properties of the seed material. By means of this simple seed/buffer layer/precursor construction, we successfully fabricated a large single grain of GdBCO bulk superconductor with a diameter of 56 mm.

  18. Epitaxial Growth of Perovskite Strontium Titanate on Germanium via Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Edward L; Edmondson, Bryce I; Hu, Shen; Ekerdt, John G

    2016-07-26

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a commercially utilized deposition method for electronic materials. ALD growth of thin films offers thickness control and conformality by taking advantage of self-limiting reactions between vapor-phase precursors and the growing film. Perovskite oxides present potential for next-generation electronic materials, but to-date have mostly been deposited by physical methods. This work outlines a method for depositing SrTiO3 (STO) on germanium using ALD. Germanium has higher carrier mobilities than silicon and therefore offers an alternative semiconductor material with faster device operation. This method takes advantage of the instability of germanium's native oxide by using thermal deoxidation to clean and reconstruct the Ge (001) surface to the 2×1 structure. 2-nm thick, amorphous STO is then deposited by ALD. The STO film is annealed under ultra-high vacuum and crystallizes on the reconstructed Ge surface. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is used during this annealing step to monitor the STO crystallization. The thin, crystalline layer of STO acts as a template for subsequent growth of STO that is crystalline as-grown, as confirmed by RHEED. In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to verify film stoichiometry before and after the annealing step, as well as after subsequent STO growth. This procedure provides framework for additional perovskite oxides to be deposited on semiconductors via chemical methods in addition to the integration of more sophisticated heterostructures already achievable by physical methods.

  19. Effect of amorphous carbon layers on the growth of diamond in dual-frequency plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinke, P.; Klemberg-Sapieha, J. E.; Martinu, L.

    1994-11-01

    In the present work we study the growth of diamond in a dual-mode microwave/radio frequency plasma. We investigate the effect of the thickness of predeposited hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films and of ion bombardment of the nucleation process and on the crystal quality. The deposits are characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and by scanning electron microscopy. The XPS spectra of the C(1s) carbon peak and of the plasmon features confirm the presence of an amorphous, carbonaceous phase and of silicon carbide on the surface. Radio frequency biasing during the initial stage of diamond growth leads to a lower crystal quality, but to a higher nucleation density N(sub D). Without biasing, good quality, predominantly (100) oriented diamond crystals are obtained on a Si(100) surface. The N(sub D) values are found to increase with the thickness of the predeposited a-C:H layer. Evolution of the nucleus size distributions indicates that the a-C:H film contributes to the carbon supply, enhancing the nucleation efficiency and shortening the incubation time of seed crystals. Before a continuous layer is formed, the growth of crystals is determined by the interaction with the gas phase as well as by the amount of carbon available on the surface.

  20. Birth order dependent growth cone segregation determines synaptic layer identity in the Drosophila visual system

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Abhishek; Ertekin, Deniz; Lee, Chi-Hon; Hummel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The precise recognition of appropriate synaptic partner neurons is a critical step during neural circuit assembly. However, little is known about the developmental context in which recognition specificity is important to establish synaptic contacts. We show that in the Drosophila visual system, sequential segregation of photoreceptor afferents, reflecting their birth order, lead to differential positioning of their growth cones in the early target region. By combining loss- and gain-of-function analyses we demonstrate that relative differences in the expression of the transcription factor Sequoia regulate R cell growth cone segregation. This initial growth cone positioning is consolidated via cell-adhesion molecule Capricious in R8 axons. Further, we show that the initial growth cone positioning determines synaptic layer selection through proximity-based axon-target interactions. Taken together, we demonstrate that birth order dependent pre-patterning of afferent growth cones is an essential pre-requisite for the identification of synaptic partner neurons during visual map formation in Drosophila. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13715.001 PMID:26987017

  1. Birth order dependent growth cone segregation determines synaptic layer identity in the Drosophila visual system.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Abhishek; Ertekin, Deniz; Lee, Chi-Hon; Hummel, Thomas

    2016-03-17

    The precise recognition of appropriate synaptic partner neurons is a critical step during neural circuit assembly. However, little is known about the developmental context in which recognition specificity is important to establish synaptic contacts. We show that in the Drosophila visual system, sequential segregation of photoreceptor afferents, reflecting their birth order, lead to differential positioning of their growth cones in the early target region. By combining loss- and gain-of-function analyses we demonstrate that relative differences in the expression of the transcription factor Sequoia regulate R cell growth cone segregation. This initial growth cone positioning is consolidated via cell-adhesion molecule Capricious in R8 axons. Further, we show that the initial growth cone positioning determines synaptic layer selection through proximity-based axon-target interactions. Taken together, we demonstrate that birth order dependent pre-patterning of afferent growth cones is an essential pre-requisite for the identification of synaptic partner neurons during visual map formation in Drosophila.

  2. New insight into the ZnO sulfidation reaction: mechanism and kinetics modeling of the ZnS outward growth.

    PubMed

    Neveux, Laure; Chiche, David; Pérez-Pellitero, Javier; Favergeon, Loïc; Gay, Anne-Sophie; Pijolat, Michèle

    2013-02-07

    Zinc oxide based materials are commonly used for the final desulfurization of synthesis gas in Fischer-Tropsch based XTL processes. Although the ZnO sulfidation reaction has been widely studied, little is known about the transformation at the crystal scale, its detailed mechanism and kinetics. A model ZnO material with well-determined characteristics (particle size and shape) has been synthesized to perform this study. Characterizations of sulfided samples (using XRD, TEM and electron diffraction) have shown the formation of oriented polycrystalline ZnS nanoparticles with a predominant hexagonal form (wurtzite phase). TEM observations also have evidenced an outward development of the ZnS phase, showing zinc and oxygen diffusion from the ZnO-ZnS internal interface to the surface of the ZnS particle. The kinetics of ZnO sulfidation by H(2)S has been investigated using isothermal and isobaric thermogravimetry. Kinetic tests have been performed that show that nucleation of ZnS is instantaneous compared to the growth process. A reaction mechanism composed of eight elementary steps has been proposed to account for these results, and various possible rate laws have been determined upon approximation of the rate-determining step. Thermogravimetry experiments performed in a wide range of H(2)S and H(2)O partial pressures have shown that the ZnO sulfidation reaction rate has a nonlinear variation with H(2)S partial pressure at the same time no significant influence of water vapor on reaction kinetics has been observed. From these observations, a mixed kinetics of external interface reaction with water desorption and oxygen diffusion has been determined to control the reaction kinetics and the proposed mechanism has been validated. However, the formation of voids at the ZnO-ZnS internal interface, characterized by TEM and electron tomography, strongly slows down the reaction rate. Therefore, the impact of the decreasing ZnO-ZnS internal interface on reaction kinetics has been

  3. Dynamic determination of kinetic parameters, computer simulation, and probabilistic analysis of growth of Clostridium perfringens in cooked beef during cooling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lihan

    2015-02-16

    The objective of this research was to develop a new one-step methodology that uses a dynamic approach to directly construct a tertiary model for prediction of the growth of Clostridium perfringens in cooked beef. This methodology was based on simultaneous numerical analysis and optimization of both primary and secondary models using multiple dynamic growth curves obtained under different conditions. Once the models were constructed, the bootstrap method was used to calculate the 95% confidence intervals of kinetic parameters, and a Monte Carlo simulation method was developed to validate the models using the growth curves not previously used in model development. The results showed that the kinetic parameters obtained from this study accurately matched the common characteristics of C. perfringens, with the optimum temperature being 45.3°C. The results also showed that the predicted growth curves matched accurately with experimental observations used in validation. The mean of residuals of the predictions is -0.02logCFU/g, with a standard deviation of only 0.23logCFU/g. For relative growths <1logCFU/g, the residuals of predictions are <0.4logCFU/g. Overall, 74% of the residuals of predictions are <0.2logCFU/g, 7.7% are >0.4logCFU/g, while only 1.5% are >0.8logCFU/g. In addition, the dynamic model also accurately predicted four isothermal growth curves arbitrarily chosen from the literature. Finally, the Monte Carlo simulation was used to provide the probability of >1 and 2logCFU/g relative growths at the end of cooling. The results of this study will provide a new and accurate tool to the food industry and regulatory agencies to assess the safety of cooked beef in the event of cooling deviation.

  4. Thermal Growth and Performance of Manganese Cobaltite Spinel Protection Layers on Ferritic Stainless Steel SOFC Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhenguo; Xia, Guanguang; Simner, Steven P.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2005-08-01

    To protect solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) from chromium poisoning and improve metallic interconnect stability, manganese cobaltite spinel protection layers with a nominal composition of Mn1.5Co1.5O4 were thermally grown on Crofer22 APU, a ferritic stainless steel. Thermal, electrical and electrochemical investigations indicated that the spinel protection layers not only significantly decreased the contact area specific resistance (ASR) between a LSF cathode and the stainless steel interconnect, but also inhibited the sub-scale growth on the stainless steel by acting as a barrier to the inward diffusion of oxygen. A long-term thermal cycling test demonstrated excellent structural and thermomechanical stability of these spinel protection layers, which also acted as a barrier to outward chromium cation diffusion to the interconnect surface. The reduction in the contact ASR and prevention of Cr migration achieved by application of the spinel protection layers on ferritic stainless steel resulted in improved stability and electrochemical performance of SOFCs.

  5. The role of Ag buffer layer in Fe islands growth on Ge (111) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Tsu-Yi Wu, Jia-Yuan; Jhou, Ming-Kuan; Hsu, Hung-Chan

    2015-05-07

    Sub-monolayer iron atoms were deposited at room temperature on Ge (111)-c(2 × 8) substrates with and without Ag buffer layers. The behavior of Fe islands growth was investigated by using scanning tunneling microscope (STM) after different annealing temperatures. STM images show that iron atoms will cause defects and holes on substrates at room temperature. As the annealing temperature rises, iron atoms pull out germanium to form various kinds of alloyed islands. However, the silver layer can protect the Ag/Ge(111)-(√3×√3) reconstruction from forming defects. The phase diagram shows that ring, dot, and triangular defects were only found on Ge (111)-c(2 × 8) substrates. The kinds of islands found in Fe/Ge system are similar to Fe/Ag/Ge system. It indicates that Ge atoms were pulled out to form islands at high annealing temperatures whether there was a Ag layer or not. But a few differences in big pyramidal or strip islands show that the silver layer affects the development of islands by changing the surface symmetry and diffusion coefficient. The structure characters of various islands are also discussed.

  6. Electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical behavior of the TCNQ(0/)(-) couple on a glassy carbon electrode. Layer-by-layer nucleation and growth.

    PubMed

    Gómez, L; Rodríguez-Amaro, R

    2006-08-15

    On the basis of the electrochemical results obtained for thin films of 7,7,8,8- tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) on a glassy carbon electrode, the reduction and oxidation of the [TCNQ](0/)(-) couple in KCl aqueous media occurs via a mechanism involving layer-by-layer nucleation and growth. In situ recorded UV-visible spectroelectrochemical data allow two different crystal structures for the oxidized form of TCNQ to be discriminated.

  7. Activation of oxygen-mediating pathway using copper ions: fine-tuning of growth kinetics in gold nanorod overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenqi; Zhang, Hui; Wen, Tao; Yan, Jiao; Hou, Shuai; Shi, Xiaowei; Hu, Zhijian; Ji, Yinglu; Wu, Xiaochun

    2014-10-21

    Growth kinetics plays an important role in the shape control of nanocrystals (NCs). Herein, we presented a unique way to fine-tune the growth kinetics via oxidative etching activated by copper ions. For the overgrowth of gold nanorods (Au NRs), competitive adsorption of dissolved oxygen on rod surface was found to slow down the overgrowth rate. Copper ions were able to remove the adsorbed oxygen species from the Au surface via oxidative etching, thus exposing more reaction sites for Au deposition. In this way, copper ions facilitated the overgrowth process. Furthermore, Cu(2+) rather than Cu(+) acted as the catalyst for the oxidative etching. Comparative study with Ag(+) indicated that Cu(2+) cannot regulate NC shapes via an underpotential deposition mechanism. In contrast, Ag(+) led to the formation of Au tetrahexahedra (THH) and a slight decrease of the growth rate at similar growth conditions. Combining the distinct roles of the two ions enabled elongated THH to be produced. Copper ions activating the O2 pathway suggested that dissolved oxygen has a strong affinity for the Au surface. Moreover, the results of NC-sensitized singlet oxygen ((1)O2) indicated that the absorbed oxygen species on the surface of Au NCs bounded with low-index facets mainly existed in the form of molecular O2.

  8. Kinetic analysis of platelet-derived growth factor receptor/phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt signaling in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Shin; Schneider, Ian C; Haugh, Jason M

    2003-09-26

    Isoforms of the serine-threonine kinase Akt coordinate multiple cell survival pathways in response to stimuli such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Activation of Akt is a multistep process, which relies on the production of 3'-phosphorylated phosphoinositide (PI) lipids by PI 3-kinases. To quantitatively assess the kinetics of PDGF receptor/PI 3-kinase/Akt signaling in fibroblasts, a systematic study of this pathway was performed, and a mechanistic mathematical model that describes its operation was formulated. We find that PDGF receptor phosphorylation exhibits positive cooperativity with respect to PDGF concentration, and its kinetics are quantitatively consistent with a mechanism in which receptor dimerization is initially mediated by the association of two 1:1 PDGF/PDGF receptor complexes. Receptor phosphorylation is transient at high concentrations of PDGF, consistent with the loss of activated receptors upon endocytosis. By comparison, Akt activation responds to lower PDGF concentrations and exhibits more sustained kinetics. Further analysis and modeling suggest that the pathway is saturated at the level of PI 3-kinase activation, and that the p110alpha catalytic subunit of PI 3-kinase contributes most to PDGF-stimulated 3'-PI production. Thus, at high concentrations of PDGF the kinetics of 3'-PI production are limited by the turnover rate of these lipids, while the Akt response is additionally influenced by the rate of Akt deactivation.

  9. A novel MOCVD reactor for growth of high-quality GaN-related LED layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shaolin; Liu, Sheng; Zhang, Zhi; Yan, Han; Gan, Zhiyin; Fang, Haisheng

    2015-04-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN), a direct bandgap semiconductor widely used in bright light-emitting diodes (LEDs), is mostly grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) method. A good reactor design is critical for the production of high-quality GaN thin films. In this paper, we presented a novel buffered distributed spray (BDS) MOCVD reactor with vertical gas sprayers and horizontal gas inlets. Experiments based on a 36×2″ BDS reactor were conducted to examine influence of the process parameters, such as the operating pressure and the gas flow rate, on the growth efficiency and on the layer thickness uniformity. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and photoluminescence (PL) are further conducted to evaluate quality of the epitaxial layers and to check performance of the reactor. Results show that the proposed novel reactor is of high performance in growing high-quality thin films, including InGaN/GaN multiquantum wells (MQWs) structures.

  10. Growth of delta-doped layers on silicon CCD/S for enhanced ultraviolet response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor); Grunthaner, Paula J. (Inventor); Grunthaner, Frank J. (Inventor); Terhune, Robert W. (Inventor); Hecht, Michael H. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The backside surface potential well of a backside-illuminated CCD is confined to within about half a nanometer of the surface by using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) to grow a delta-doped silicon layer on the back surface. Delta-doping in an MBE process is achieved by temporarily interrupting the evaporated silicon source during MBE growth without interrupting the evaporated p+ dopant source (e.g., boron). This produces an extremely sharp dopant profile in which the dopant is confined to only a few atomic layers, creating an electric field high enough to confine the backside surface potential well to within half a nanometer of the surface. Because the probability of UV-generated electrons being trapped by such a narrow potential well is low, the internal quantum efficiency of the CCD is nearly 100% throughout the UV wavelength range. Furthermore, the quantum efficiency is quite stable.

  11. Pattern selection in a boundary-layer model of dendritic growth in the presence of impurities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karma, A.; Kotliar, B. G.

    1985-01-01

    Presently analyzed, in the context of a boundary-layer model, is the problem of pattern selection in dendritic growth in a situation where impurities are present in the undercooled liquid. It is found that the tip-velocity selection criterion that has been proposed recently for the geometrical model and the boundary-layer model of a pure substance can be extended, in a nontrivial way, to this more complex situation where two coupled diffusion fields (temperature and solute) determine the interface dynamics. This model predicts a sharp enhancement of tip velocity in good qualitative agreement with experiment. This agreement is consistent with the conjecture that a solvability condition can be used to determine the operating point of the dendrite in the full nonlocal problem.

  12. Selective growth of Pb islands on graphene/SiC buffer layers

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. T.; Miao, Y. P.; Ma, D. Y.; Hu, T. W.; Ma, F. E-mail: kwxu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Chu, Paul K.; Xu, K. W. E-mail: kwxu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

    2015-02-14

    Graphene is fabricated by thermal decomposition of silicon carbide (SiC) and Pb islands are deposited by Pb flux in molecular beam epitaxy chamber. It is found that graphene domains and SiC buffer layer coexist. Selective growth of Pb islands on SiC buffer layer rather than on graphene domains is observed. It can be ascribed to the higher adsorption energy of Pb atoms on the 6√(3) reconstruction of SiC. However, once Pb islands nucleate on graphene domains, they will grow very large owing to the lower diffusion barrier of Pb atoms on graphene. The results are consistent with first-principle calculations. Since Pb atoms on graphene are nearly free-standing, Pb islands grow in even-number mode.

  13. In situ and time resolved quantification of the kinetics and mechanisms of CaCO3 nucleation and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Blanco, J. D.; Shaw, S.; Benning, L. G.

    2009-04-01

    The crystal chemistry, occurrence and relevance of amorphous CaCO3 and its crystalline polymorphs in inorganic and organic environments have been studied for decades and are nowadays relatively well known [1]. However, due to the fast kinetics of the reactions that take place in solution [2], there is virtually no quantitative data available about the kinetics and mechanisms of the nucleation, growth and transformation of these phases in aqueous solutions. In this study we demonstrate that in situ and time resolved synchrotron-based Energy Dispersive X-Ray Diffraction combined with the corresponding solution chemistry and imaging can be successfully applied to evaluate quantitatively kinetic rates and mechanisms of the crystallization and transformation of CaCO3 phases in solution. The precipitation of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) and its crystallization to vaterite and calcite was followed in closed thermostated reactors at temperatures between 7.5 and 40˚ C with the time-resolved data collected every 15 secs. The growth/decay of vaterite and calcite diffraction peaks was fitted using a Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov model [3] to evaluate the kinetics and mechanisms of crystallization [4]. The results show that vaterite grows fast via a 3D growth process following a first order reaction and the subsequent transformation to calcite takes place slower, being controlled by the dissolution of the vaterite precursor. From the temperature dependent data apparent activation energies of nucleation and crystallization for both crystalline CaCO3 polymorphs have been calculated. In addition, wet chemical data and imaging also confirm these findings. Finally, this approach was applied also to other carbonate systems (i.e., dolomite , Ca/Mg carbonates). [1] Reeder R. (1983) Rev. Mineral, 11. [2] Ogino et al. (1987) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 51, 2757-2767. [3] Johnson, P.F. and Mehl, R.F. (1939) Reaction kinetics in processes of nucleation and growth. American Institute

  14. Kinetics of copper growth on graphene revealed by time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodas, M.; Siffalovic, P.; Jergel, M.; Pelletta, M.; Halahovets, Y.; Vegso, K.; Kotlar, M.; Majkova, E.

    2017-01-01

    Metal growth on graphene has many applications. Transition metals are known to favor three-dimensional (3D) cluster growth on graphene. Copper is of particular interest for cost-effective surface-supported catalysis applications and as a contact material in electronics. This paper presents an in situ real-time study of Cu growth kinetics on graphene covering all stages preceding formation of a continuous film performed by laboratory-based grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) technique. In particular, nucleation and 3D cluster growth, coalescence, and percolation stages were identified. The cluster nucleation saturates after reaching a density of 1012c m-2 at ≈1 monolayer thickness. A Kratky plot and a paracrystal model with cumulative structural disorder were necessary to evaluate properly cluster growth and coalescence, respectively. The power law scaling constants 0.27 ±0.05 and 0.81 ±0.02 of the temporal evolution of Cu cluster size suggest the growth of isolated clusters and dynamic cluster coalescence keeping the cluster shape, respectively. Coalescence and percolation thresholds occur at Cu thicknesses of 2 ±0.4 and 8.8 ±0.7 nm , respectively. This paper demonstrates the potential of laboratory-based in situ GISAXS as a vital diagnostic tool for tailoring a large variety of Cu nanostructures on graphene based on an in situ Cu growth monitoring which is applicable in a broad range of deposition times.

  15. Nucleation, growth, and strain relaxation of lattice-mismatched 3-5 semiconductor epitaxial layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welser, R. E.; Guido, L. J.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the early stages of evolution of highly strained 2-D InAs layers and 3-D InAs islands grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on (100) and (111)B GaAs substrates. The InAs epilayer/GaAs substrate combination has been chosen because the lattice-mismatch is severe (approximately 7.2 percent), yet these materials are otherwise very similar. By examining InAs-on-GaAs composites instead of the more common In(x)Ga(1-x)As alloy we remove an additional degree of freedom (x) and thereby simplify data interpretation. A matrix of experiments is described in which the MOCVD growth parameters - susceptor temperature, Thin flux, and AsH3 flux - have been varied over a wide range. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis have been employed to observe the thin film surface morphology. In the case of 3-D growth, we have extracted activation energies and power-dependent exponents that characterize the nucleation process. As a consequence, optimized growth conditions have been identified for depositing approximately 250 A thick (100) and (111)B oriented InAs layers with relatively smooth surfaces. Together with preliminary data on the strain relaxation of these layers, the above results on the evolution of thin InAs films indicate that the (111)B orientation is particularly promising for yielding lattice-mismatched films that are fully relaxed with only misfit dislocations at the epilayer/substrate interface.

  16. Highly Oriented Growth of Piezoelectric Thin Films on Silicon Using Two-Dimensional Nanosheets as Growth Template Layer.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh D; Yuan, Huiyu; Houwman, Evert P; Dekkers, Matthijn; Koster, Gertjan; Ten Elshof, Johan E; Rijnders, Guus

    2016-11-16

    Ca2Nb3O10 (CNOns) and Ti0.87O2 (TiOns) metal oxide nanosheets (ns) are used as a buffer layer for epitaxial growth of piezoelectric capacitor stacks on Si and Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si (Pt/Si) substrates. Highly (001)- and (110)-oriented Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 (PZT) films are achieved by utilizing CNOns and TiOns, respectively. The piezoelectric capacitors are characterized by polarization and piezoelectric hysteresis loops and by fatigue measurements. The devices fabricated with SrRuO3 top and bottom electrodes directly on nanosheets/Si have ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties well comparable with devices that use more conventional oxide buffer layers (stacks) such as YSZ, CeO2/YSZ, or SrTiO3 on Si. The devices grown on nanosheets/Pt/Si with Pt top electrodes show significantly improved polarization fatigue properties over those of similar devices grown directly on Pt/Si. The differences in properties are ascribed to differences in the crystalline structures and the density of the films. These results show a route toward the fabrication of single crystal piezoelectric thin films and devices with high quality, long-lifetime piezoelectric capacitor structures on nonperovskite and even noncrystalline substrates such as glass or polished metal surfaces.

  17. On the scaling analysis of the solute boundary layer in idealized growth configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garandet, J. P.; Duffar, T.; Favier, J. J.

    1990-11-01

    A scaling procedure is applied to the equation governing chemical transport in idealized Czochralski and horizontal Bridgman growth experiments. Our purpose is to get a fair estimate of the solute boundary layer in front of the solidification interface. The results are very good in the Czochralski type configuration, the maximum error with respect to the semi-analytical solution of Burton, Prim and Schlichter being of the order of 20%. In the Bridgman type configuration, our predictions compare well with the values of the numerical simulations; however, more data would be needed for a definite conclusion to be drawn.

  18. Optimization of growth medium for Sporosarcina pasteurii in bio-based cement pastes to mitigate delay in hydration kinetics.

    PubMed

    Williams, Sarah L; Kirisits, Mary Jo; Ferron, Raissa Douglas

    2016-04-01

    Microbial-induced calcium carbonate precipitation has been identified as a novel method to improve durability and remediate cracks in concrete. One way to introduce microorganisms to concrete is by replacing the mixing water with a bacterial culture in nutrient medium. In the literature, yeast extract often has been used as a carbon source for this application; however, severe retardation of hydration kinetics has been observed when yeast extract is added to cement. This study investigates the suitability of alternative carbon sources to replace yeast extract for microbial-induced calcium carbonate precipitation in cement-based materials. A combination of meat extract and sodium acetate was identified as a suitable replacement in growth medium for Sporosarcina pasteurii; this alternative growth medium reduced retardation by 75 % (as compared to yeast extract) without compromising bacterial growth, urea hydrolysis, cell zeta potential, and ability to promote calcium carbonate formation.

  19. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of type A streptococcal exotoxin: kinetics and regulation during growth of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Houston, C W; Ferretti, J J

    1981-01-01

    We describe the detection and quantitation of type A streptococcal exot