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Sample records for layered carbon lattices

  1. Phyllotaxis of flux lattices in layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Levitov, L.S. )

    1991-01-14

    The geometry of a flux lattice pinned by superconducting layers is studied. Under variation of magnetic field the lattice undergoes an infinite sequence of continuous transitions corresponding to different ways of selection of shortest distances. All possible lattices form a hierarchical structure identified as the hierarchy of Farey numbers. It is shown that dynamically accessible lattices are characterized by pairs of consecutive Fibonacci numbers.

  2. Buried Porous Silicon-Germanium Layers in Monocrystalline Silicon Lattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Robert W. (Inventor); George, Thomas (Inventor); Jones, Eric W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Monocrystalline semiconductor lattices with a buried porous semiconductor layer having different chemical composition is discussed and monocrystalline semiconductor superlattices with a buried porous semiconductor layers having different chemical composition than that of its monocrystalline semiconductor superlattice are discussed. Lattices of alternating layers of monocrystalline silicon and porous silicon-germanium have been produced. These single crystal lattices have been fabricated by epitaxial growth of Si and Si-Ge layers followed by patterning into mesa structures. The mesa structures are strain etched resulting in porosification of the Si-Ge layers with a minor amount of porosification of the monocrystalline Si layers. Thicker Si-Ge layers produced in a similar manner emitted visible light at room temperature.

  3. Lattice-Matched Semiconductor Layers on Single Crystalline Sapphire Substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang; King, Glen; Park, Yeonjoon

    2009-01-01

    SiGe is an important semiconductor alloy for high-speed field effect transistors (FETs), high-temperature thermoelectric devices, photovoltaic solar cells, and photon detectors. The growth of SiGe layer is difficult because SiGe alloys have different lattice constants from those of the common Si wafers, which leads to a high density of defects, including dislocations, micro-twins, cracks, and delaminations. This innovation utilizes newly developed rhombohedral epitaxy of cubic semiconductors on trigonal substrates in order to solve the lattice mismatch problem of SiGe by using trigonal single crystals like sapphire (Al2O3) as substrate to give a unique growth-orientation to the SiGe layer, which is automatically controlled at the interface upon sapphire (0001). This technology is different from previous silicon on insulator (SOI) or SGOI (SiGe on insulator) technologies that use amorphous SiO2 as the growth plane. A cubic semiconductor crystal is a special case of a rhombohedron with the inter-planar angle, alpha = 90 deg. With a mathematical transformation, all rhombohedrons can be described by trigonal crystal lattice structures. Therefore, all cubic lattice constants and crystal planes (hkl) s can be transformed into those of trigonal crystal parameters. These unique alignments enable a new opportunity of perfect lattice matching conditions, which can eliminate misfit dislocations. Previously, these atomic alignments were thought to be impossible or very difficult. With the invention of a new x-ray diffraction measurement method here, growth of cubic semiconductors on trigonal crystals became possible. This epitaxy and lattice-matching condition can be applied not only to SiGe (111)/sapphire (0001) substrate relations, but also to other crystal structures and other materials, including similar crystal structures which have pointgroup rotational symmetries by 120 because the cubic (111) direction has 120 rotational symmetry. The use of slightly miscut (less than

  4. Nonlocal optical properties in periodic lattice of graphene layers.

    PubMed

    Chern, Ruey-Lin; Han, Dezhuan

    2014-02-24

    Based on the effective medium model, nonlocal optical properties in periodic lattice of graphene layers with the period much less than the wavelength are investigated. Strong nonlocal effects are found in a broad frequency range for TM polarization, where the effective permittivity tensor exhibits the Lorentzian resonance. The resonance frequency varies with the wave vector and coincides well with the polaritonic mode. Nonlocal features are manifest on the emergence of additional wave and the occurrence of negative refraction. By examining the characters of the eigenmode, the nonlocal optical properties are attributed to the excitation of plasmons on the graphene surfaces.

  5. Asymptotically optimal unsaturated lattice cubature formulae with bounded boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanov, M D

    2013-07-31

    This paper describes a new algorithm for constructing lattice cubature formulae with bounded boundary layer. These formulae are unsaturated (in the sense of Babenko) both with respect to the order and in regard to the property of asymptotic optimality on W{sub 2}{sup m}-spaces, m element of (n/2,∞). Most of the results obtained apply also to W{sub 2}{sup μ}(R{sup n})-spaces with a hypoelliptic multiplier of smoothness μ. Bibliography: 6 titles.

  6. Growth of coincident site lattice matched semiconductor layers and devices on crystalline substrates

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew G; Ptak, Aaron J

    2013-08-13

    Methods of fabricating a semiconductor layer or device and said devices are disclosed. The methods include but are not limited to providing a substrate having a crystalline surface with a known lattice parameter (a). The method further includes growing a crystalline semiconductor layer on the crystalline substrate surface by coincident site lattice matched epitaxy, without any buffer layer between the crystalline semiconductor layer and the crystalline surface of the substrate. The crystalline semiconductor layer will be prepared to have a lattice parameter (a') that is related to the substrate lattice parameter (a). The lattice parameter (a') maybe related to the lattice parameter (a) by a scaling factor derived from a geometric relationship between the respective crystal lattices.

  7. Method of producing buried porous silicon-geramanium layers in monocrystalline silicon lattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Robert W. (Inventor); George, Thomas (Inventor); Jones, Eric W. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Lattices of alternating layers of monocrystalline silicon and porous silicon-germanium have been produced. These single crystal lattices have been fabricated by epitaxial growth of Si and Si--Ge layers followed by patterning into mesa structures. The mesa structures are stain etched resulting in porosification of the Si--Ge layers with a minor amount of porosification of the monocrystalline Si layers. Thicker Si--Ge layers produced in a similar manner emitted visible light at room temperature.

  8. Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Enzymes on Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-06-01

    The use of Layer-by-layer techniques for immobilizing several types of enzymes, e.g. glucose oxidase (GOx), horse radish oxidases(HRP), and choline oxidase(CHO) on carbon nanotubes and their applications for biosenseing are presented. The enzyme is immobilized on the negatively charged CNT surface by alternatively assembling a cationic polydiallyldimethyl-ammonium chloride (PDDA) layer and a enzyme layer. The sandwich-like layer structure (PDDA/enzyme/PDDA/CNT) formed by electrostatic assembling provides a favorable microenvironment to keep the bioactivity of enzyme and to prevent enzyme molecule leakage. The morphologies and electrocatalytic acitivity of the resulted enzyme film were characterized using TEM and electrochemical techniques, respectively. It was found that these enzyme-based biosensors are very sensitive, selective for detection of biomolecules, e.g. glucose, choline.

  9. Isolation of two physiologically induced variant strains of Bacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a and characterization of their S-layer lattices.

    PubMed Central

    Sára, M; Pum, D; Küpcü, S; Messner, P; Sleytr, U B

    1994-01-01

    During growth of Bacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a in continuous culture on complex medium, the chemical properties of the S-layer glycoprotein and the characteristic oblique lattice were maintained only if glucose was used as the sole carbon source. With increased aeration, amino acids were also metabolized, accompanied by liberation of ammonium and by changes in the S-layer protein. Depending on the stage of fermentation at which oxygen limitation was relieved, two different variants, one with a more delicate oblique S-layer lattice (variant 3a/V1) and one with a square S-layer lattice (variant 3a/V2), were isolated. During the switch from the wild-type strain to a variant or from variant 3a/V2 to variant 3a/V1, monolayers of two types of S-layer lattices could be demonstrated on the surfaces of single cells. S-layer proteins from variants had different molecular sizes and a significantly lower carbohydrate content than S-layer proteins from the wild-type strain did. Although the S-layer lattices from the wild-type and variant strains showed quite different protein mass distributions in two- and three-dimensional reconstructions, neither the amino acid composition nor the pore size, as determined by permeability studies, was significantly changed. Peptide mapping and N-terminal sequencing results strongly indicated that the three S-layer proteins are encoded by different genes and are not derived from a universal precursor form. Images PMID:8300538

  10. Double layer capacitance of carbon foam electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Delnick, F.M.; Ingersoll, D.; Firsich, D.

    1993-11-01

    We have evaluated a wide variety of microcellular carbon foams prepared by the controlled pyrolysis and carbonization of several polymers including: polyacrylonitrile (PAN), polymethacrylonitrile (PMAN), resorcinol/formaldehyde (RF), divinylbenzene/methacrylonitrile (DVB), phenolics (furfuryl/alcohol), and cellulose polymers such as Rayon. The porosity may be established by several processes including: Gelation (1-5), phase separation (1-3,5-8), emulsion (1,9,10), aerogel/xerogel formation (1,11,12,13), replication (14) and activation. In this report we present the complex impedance analysis and double layer charging characteristics of electrodes prepared from one of these materials for double layer capacitor applications, namely activated cellulose derived microcellular carbon foam.

  11. Double layer capacitance of carbon foam electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delnick, F. M.; Ingersoll, D.; Firsich, D.

    We have evaluated a wide variety of microcellular carbon foams prepared by the controlled pyrolysis and carbonization of several polymers including: polyacrylonitrile (PAN), polymethacrylonitrile (PMAN), resorcinol/formaldehyde (RF), divinylbenzene/methacrylonitrile (DVB), phenolics (furfuryl/alcohol), and cellulose polymers such as Rayon. The porosity may be established by several processes including: gelation (1-5), phase separation (1-3,5-8), emulsion (1,9,10), aerogel/xerogel formation (1,11,12,13), replication (14), and activation. In this report we present the complex impedance analysis and double layer charging characteristics of electrodes prepared from one of these materials for double layer capacitor applications, namely activated cellulose derived microcellular carbon foam.

  12. Layered solid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture

    DOEpatents

    Li, Bingyun; Jiang, Bingbing; Gray, McMahan L; Fauth, Daniel J; Pennline, Henry W; Richards, George A

    2014-11-18

    A solid sorbent for the capture and the transport of carbon dioxide gas is provided having at least one first layer of a positively charged material that is polyethylenimine or poly(allylamine hydrochloride), that captures at least a portion of the gas, and at least one second layer of a negatively charged material that is polystyrenesulfonate or poly(acryclic acid), that transports the gas, wherein the second layer of material is in juxtaposition to, attached to, or crosslinked with the first layer for forming at least one bilayer, and a solid substrate support having a porous surface, wherein one or more of the bilayers is/are deposited on the surface of and/or within the solid substrate. A method of preparing and using the solid sorbent is provided.

  13. Layered solid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bingyun; Jiang, Bingbing; Gray, McMahan L; Fauth, Daniel J; Pennline, Henry W; Richards, George A

    2013-02-25

    A solid sorbent for the capture and the transport of carbon dioxide gas is provided having at least one first layer of a positively charged material that is polyethylenimine or poly(allylamine hydrochloride), that captures at least a portion of the gas, and at least one second layer of a negatively charged material that is polystyrenesulfonate or poly(acryclic acid), that transports the gas, wherein the second layer of material is in juxtaposition to, attached to, or crosslinked with the first layer for forming at least one bilayer, and a solid substrate support having a porous surface, wherein one or more of the bilayers is/are deposited on the surface of and/or within the solid substrate. A method of preparing and using the solid sorbent is provided.

  14. Coincident site lattice-matched growth of semiconductors on substrates using compliant buffer layers

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew

    2016-08-23

    A method of producing semiconductor materials and devices that incorporate the semiconductor materials are provided. In particular, a method is provided of producing a semiconductor material, such as a III-V semiconductor, on a silicon substrate using a compliant buffer layer, and devices such as photovoltaic cells that incorporate the semiconductor materials. The compliant buffer material and semiconductor materials may be deposited using coincident site lattice-matching epitaxy, resulting in a close degree of lattice matching between the substrate material and deposited material for a wide variety of material compositions. The coincident site lattice matching epitaxial process, as well as the use of a ductile buffer material, reduce the internal stresses and associated crystal defects within the deposited semiconductor materials fabricated using the disclosed method. As a result, the semiconductor devices provided herein possess enhanced performance characteristics due to a relatively low density of crystal defects.

  15. Columnar structured FePt films epitaxially grown on large lattice mismatched intermediate layer.

    PubMed

    Dong, K F; Deng, J Y; Peng, Y G; Ju, G; Chow, G M; Chen, J S

    2016-09-30

    The microstructure and magnetic properties of the FePt films grown on large mismatched ZrN (15.7%) intermediate layer were investigated. With using ZrN intermediate layer, FePt 10 nm films exhibited (001) texture except for some weaker FePt (110) texture. Good epitaxial relationships of FePt (001) <100>//ZrN (001) <100>//TiN (001) <100> among FePt and ZrN/TiN were revealed from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. As compared with TiN intermediate layer, although FePt-SiO2-C films grown on ZrN/TiN intermediate layer showed isotropic magnetic properties, the large interfacial energy and lattice mismatch between FePt and ZrN would lead to form columnar structural FePt films with smaller grain size and improved isolation. By doping ZrN into the TiN layer, solid solution of ZrTiN was formed and the lattice constant is increased comparing with TiN and decreased comparing with ZrN. Moreover, FePt-SiO2-C films grown on TiN 2 nm-20 vol.% ZrN/TiN 3 nm intermediate layer showed an improved perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Simultaneously, columnar structure with smaller grain size retained.

  16. Columnar structured FePt films epitaxially grown on large lattice mismatched intermediate layer

    PubMed Central

    Dong, K. F.; Deng, J. Y.; Peng, Y. G.; Ju, G.; Chow, G. M.; Chen, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure and magnetic properties of the FePt films grown on large mismatched ZrN (15.7%) intermediate layer were investigated. With using ZrN intermediate layer, FePt 10 nm films exhibited (001) texture except for some weaker FePt (110) texture. Good epitaxial relationships of FePt (001) <100>//ZrN (001) <100>//TiN (001) <100> among FePt and ZrN/TiN were revealed from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. As compared with TiN intermediate layer, although FePt-SiO2-C films grown on ZrN/TiN intermediate layer showed isotropic magnetic properties, the large interfacial energy and lattice mismatch between FePt and ZrN would lead to form columnar structural FePt films with smaller grain size and improved isolation. By doping ZrN into the TiN layer, solid solution of ZrTiN was formed and the lattice constant is increased comparing with TiN and decreased comparing with ZrN. Moreover, FePt-SiO2-C films grown on TiN 2 nm-20 vol.% ZrN/TiN 3 nm intermediate layer showed an improved perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Simultaneously, columnar structure with smaller grain size retained. PMID:27686046

  17. Columnar structured FePt films epitaxially grown on large lattice mismatched intermediate layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, K. F.; Deng, J. Y.; Peng, Y. G.; Ju, G.; Chow, G. M.; Chen, J. S.

    2016-09-01

    The microstructure and magnetic properties of the FePt films grown on large mismatched ZrN (15.7%) intermediate layer were investigated. With using ZrN intermediate layer, FePt 10 nm films exhibited (001) texture except for some weaker FePt (110) texture. Good epitaxial relationships of FePt (001) <100>//ZrN (001) <100>//TiN (001) <100> among FePt and ZrN/TiN were revealed from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. As compared with TiN intermediate layer, although FePt-SiO2-C films grown on ZrN/TiN intermediate layer showed isotropic magnetic properties, the large interfacial energy and lattice mismatch between FePt and ZrN would lead to form columnar structural FePt films with smaller grain size and improved isolation. By doping ZrN into the TiN layer, solid solution of ZrTiN was formed and the lattice constant is increased comparing with TiN and decreased comparing with ZrN. Moreover, FePt-SiO2-C films grown on TiN 2 nm-20 vol.% ZrN/TiN 3 nm intermediate layer showed an improved perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Simultaneously, columnar structure with smaller grain size retained.

  18. Multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, John P.; Friedmann, Thomas A.

    1998-01-01

    A multi-layer resistive carbon film field emitter device for cold cathode field emission applications. The multi-layered film of the present invention consists of at least two layers of a conductive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, where the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure can be a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film can be a plurality of carbon layers, where adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced.

  19. Multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, J.P.; Friedmann, T.A.

    1998-10-13

    A multi-layer resistive carbon film field emitter device for cold cathode field emission applications is disclosed. The multi-layered film of the present invention consists of at least two layers of a conductive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, where the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure can be a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film can be a plurality of carbon layers, where adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced. 8 figs.

  20. Large changes of graphene conductance as a function of lattice orientation between stacked layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunsoo; Qi, Yabing; Kwon, Sangku; Salmeron, Miquel; Park, Jeong Young

    2015-01-01

    Using the conductive tip of an atomic force microscope as an electrode, we found that the electrical conductance of graphite terraces separated by steps can vary by large factors of up to 100, depending on the relative lattice orientation of the surface and subsurface layers. This effect can be attributed to interlayer interactions that, when stacked commensurately in a Bernal sequence (ABAB…), cause the band gap to open. Misaligned layers, on the other hand, behave like graphene. Angular misorientations of a few degrees were found to cause large increases in the conductance of the top layer, with the maximum occurring around 30°. These results suggest new applications for graphene multilayers by stacking layers at various angles to control the resistance of the connected graphene ribbons in devices.

  1. Strength, hardness, and lattice vibrations of Z-carbon and W-carbon: First-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiping; Gao, Faming; Xu, Ziming

    2012-04-01

    The strength, hardness, and lattice vibrations of two superhard carbon allotropies, Z-carbon and W-carbon are investigated by first-principles calculations. Phonon dispersion calculations indicate that Z-carbon and W-carbon are dynamically stable at least up to 300 GPa. The strength calculations reveal that the failure mode in Z-carbon is dominated by the tensile type, and the [010] direction is the weakest one. In W-carbon, the failure mode is dominated by the shear type, and the (101)[111¯] direction is the weakest one. Although the ideal strength of diamond is distinctly greater than that of Z-carbon and W-carbon, the tensile strength and shear strength for Z-carbon and W-carbon show much lower anisotropies than that of diamond. The hardness calculations indicate that the average hardness of Z-carbon is less than that of diamond but greater than that of the W-carbon, M-carbon, and body-centered-tetragonal-C4 carbon. The simulated Raman spectra show that the Ag modes at 1094 cm-1 for Z-carbon and 1109.7 cm-1 for W-carbon are in agreement with that of 1082 cm-1 observed in the experiment of cold-compressed graphite at 9.8 GPa.

  2. Effect of interfacial layer on water flow in nanochannels: Lattice Boltzmann simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yakang; Liu, Xuefeng; Liu, Zilong; Lu, Shuangfang; Xue, Qingzhong

    2016-04-01

    A novel interfacial model was proposed to understand water flow mechanism in nanochannels. Based on our pore-throat nanochannel model, the effect of interfacial layer on water flow in nanochannels was quantitatively studied using Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). It is found that both the permeability of nanochannel and water velocity in the nanochannel dramatically decrease with increasing the thickness of interfacial layer. The permeability of nanochannel with pore radius of 10 nm decreases by about three orders of magnitude when the thickness of interfacial layer is changed from 0 nm to 3 nm gradually. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that the cross-section shape has a great effect on the water flow inside nanochannel and the effect of interfacial layer on the permeability of nanochannel has a close relationship with cross-section shape when the pore size is smaller than 12 nm. Besides, both pore-throat ratio and throat length can greatly affect water flow in nanochannels, and the influence of interfacial layer on water flow in nanochannels becomes more evident with increasing pore-throat ratio and throat length. Our theoretical results provide a simple and effective method to study the flow phenomena in nano-porous media, particularly to quantitatively study the interfacial layer effect in nano-porous media.

  3. Photochemical bonding of epithelial cell-seeded collagen lattice to rat muscle layer for esophageal tissue engineering: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Barbara P.; Sato, M.; Vacanti, Joseph P.; Kochevar, Irene E.; Redmond, Robert W.

    2005-04-01

    Bilayered tube structures consist of epithelial cell-seeded collagen lattice and muscle layer have been fabricated for esophageal tissue engineering. Good adhesion between layers in order to facilitate cell infiltration and neovascularization in the collagen lattice is required. Previous efforts include using other bioglues such as fibrin glue and silicone tube as the physical support. However, the former is subjected to chances of transmitting blood-born infectious disease and is time consuming while the latter requires a second surgical procedure. The current project aimed to bond the cell-seeded collagen lattice to muscle layer using photochemical bonding, which has previously been demonstrated a rapid and non-thermal procedure in bonding collagenous tissues. Rat esophageal epithelial cells were seeded on collagen lattice and together with the latissimus dorsi muscle layer, were exposed to a photosensitizer rose Bengal at the bonding surface. An argon laser was used to irradiate the approximated layers. Bonding strength was measured during the peeling test of the collagen layer from the muscle layer. Post-bonding cell viability was assessed using a modified NADH-diaphorase microassay. A pilot in vivo study was conducted by directly bonding the cell-seeded collagen layer onto the muscle flap in rats and the structures were characterized histologically. Photochemical bonding was found to significantly increase the adherence at the bonding interface without compromising the cell viability. This indicates the feasibility of using the technique to fabricate multi-layered structures in the presence of living cells. The pilot animal study demonstrated integration of the collagen lattice with the muscle layer at the bonding interface although the subsequent surgical manipulation disturbed the integration at some region. This means that an additional procedure removing the tube could be avoided if the approximation and thus the bonding are optimized. Cell infiltration

  4. Discharge rates of porous carbon double layer capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenmann, E.T.

    1995-10-01

    Double layer capacitors with porous carbon electrodes have very low frequency response limits and correspondingly low charge-discharge rates. Impedance measurements of various commercial double layer capacitors and of carbon electrodes prepared from selected precursor materials were found to yield similar, yet subtly different characteristics. Through modeling with the traditional transmission line equivalent circuit for porous electrodes, a resistive layer can be identified, which forms on carbon films during carbonization and survives the activation procedure. A method for determining the power-to-energy ratio of electrochemical capacitors has been developed. These findings help define new ways for optimizing the properties of double layer capacitors.

  5. Spectroscopy of dipolar fermions in layered two-dimensional and three-dimensional lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Hazzard, Kaden R. A.; Rey, Ana Maria; Gorshkov, Alexey V.

    2011-09-15

    Motivated by ongoing measurements at JILA, we calculate the recoil-free spectra of dipolar interacting fermions, for example ultracold heteronuclear molecules, in a one-dimensional lattice of two-dimensional layers or ''pancakes'', spectroscopically probing transitions between different internal (e.g., rotational) states. We additionally incorporate p-wave interactions and losses, which are important for reactive molecules such as KRb. Moreover, we consider other sources of spectral broadening: interaction-induced quasiparticle lifetimes and the different polarizabilities of the rotational states used for the spectroscopy. Although our main focus is molecules, some of the calculations are also useful for optical lattice atomic clocks. For example, understanding the p-wave shifts between identical fermions and small dipolar interactions coming from the excited clock state is necessary to reach future precision goals. Finally, we consider the spectra in a deep three-dimensional lattice and show how they give a great deal of information about static correlation functions, including all the moments of the density correlations between nearby sites. The range of correlations measurable depends on spectroscopic resolution and the dipole moment.

  6. Layered Kondo lattice model for quantum critical beta-YbAlB4.

    PubMed

    Nevidomskyy, Andriy H; Coleman, P

    2009-02-20

    We analyze the magnetic and electronic properties of the quantum critical heavy fermion superconductor beta-YbAlB4, calculating the Fermi surface and the angular dependence of the extremal orbits relevant to the de Haas-van Alphen measurements. Using a combination of the realistic materials modeling and single-ion crystal field analysis, we are led to propose a layered Kondo lattice model for this system, in which two-dimensional boron layers are Kondo coupled via interlayer Yb moments in a Jz=+/-5/2 state. This model fits the measured single-ion magnetic susceptibility and predicts a substantial change in the electronic anisotropy as the system is pressure tuned through the quantum critical point.

  7. Simulation of arrested salt wedges with a multi-layer Shallow Water Lattice Boltzmann model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestininzi, P.; Montessori, A.; La Rocca, M.; Sciortino, G.

    2016-10-01

    The ability to accurately and efficiently model the intrusion of salt wedges into river beds is crucial to assay its interaction with human activities and the natural environment. We present a 2D multi-layer Shallow Water Lattice Boltzmann (SWLB) model able to predict the salt wedge intrusion in river estuaries. The formulation usually employed for the simulation of gravity currents is here equipped with proper boundary conditions to handle both the downstream seaside outlet and the upstream river inlet. Firstly, the model is validated against highly accurate semi-analytical solutions of the steady state 1D two-layer Shallow Water model. Secondly, the model is applied to a more complex, fully 3D geometry, to assess its capability to handle realistic cases. The simple formulation proposed for the shear interlayer stress is proven to be consistent with the general 3D viscous solution. In addition to the accuracy, the model inherits the efficiency of the Lattice Boltzmann approach to fluid dynamics problems.

  8. Local atomic arrangements and lattice distortions in layered Ge-Sb-Te crystal structures

    PubMed Central

    Lotnyk, Andriy; Ross, Ulrich; Bernütz, Sabine; Thelander, Erik; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Insights into the local atomic arrangements of layered Ge-Sb-Te compounds are of particular importance from a fundamental point of view and for data storage applications. In this view, a detailed knowledge of the atomic structure in such alloys is central to understanding the functional properties both in the more commonly utilized amorphous–crystalline transition and in recently proposed interfacial phase change memory based on the transition between two crystalline structures. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy allows direct imaging of local arrangement in the crystalline lattice with atomic resolution. However, due to the non-trivial influence of thermal diffuse scattering on the high-angle scattering signal, a detailed examination of the image contrast requires comparison with theoretical image simulations. This work reveals the local atomic structure of trigonal Ge-Sb-Te thin films by using a combination of direct imaging of the atomic columns and theoretical image simulation approaches. The results show that the thin films are prone to the formation of stacking disorder with individual building blocks of the Ge2Sb2Te5, Ge1Sb2Te4 and Ge3Sb2Te6 crystal structures intercalated within randomly oriented grains. The comparison with image simulations based on various theoretical models reveals intermixed cation layers with pronounced local lattice distortions, exceeding those reported in literature. PMID:27220411

  9. Local atomic arrangements and lattice distortions in layered Ge-Sb-Te crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotnyk, Andriy; Ross, Ulrich; Bernütz, Sabine; Thelander, Erik; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Insights into the local atomic arrangements of layered Ge-Sb-Te compounds are of particular importance from a fundamental point of view and for data storage applications. In this view, a detailed knowledge of the atomic structure in such alloys is central to understanding the functional properties both in the more commonly utilized amorphous–crystalline transition and in recently proposed interfacial phase change memory based on the transition between two crystalline structures. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy allows direct imaging of local arrangement in the crystalline lattice with atomic resolution. However, due to the non-trivial influence of thermal diffuse scattering on the high-angle scattering signal, a detailed examination of the image contrast requires comparison with theoretical image simulations. This work reveals the local atomic structure of trigonal Ge-Sb-Te thin films by using a combination of direct imaging of the atomic columns and theoretical image simulation approaches. The results show that the thin films are prone to the formation of stacking disorder with individual building blocks of the Ge2Sb2Te5, Ge1Sb2Te4 and Ge3Sb2Te6 crystal structures intercalated within randomly oriented grains. The comparison with image simulations based on various theoretical models reveals intermixed cation layers with pronounced local lattice distortions, exceeding those reported in literature.

  10. Lattice Boltzmann method for short-pulsed laser transport in a multi-layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2015-04-01

    We construct a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for transient radiative transfer in one-dimensional multi-layered medium with distinct refractive index in each layer. The left boundary is irradiated normally by a short-pulsed laser. The Fresnel interfaces conditions, which incorporate reflection and refraction, are used at the boundaries and the interfaces. Based on the Fresnel's law and Snell's law, the interfacial intensity formulas are introduced. The collimated and diffuse intensities are treated individually. At a transient time step, the collimated component is first solved by LBM and then embedded into the transient radiative transfer equation as a source term. To keep the consistency of the directions in all the layers, angular interpolation of the intensities at the interfaces is adopted. The transient radiative transfer in a two-layer medium is first investigated, and the time-resolved results are validated by comparing with those by the Monte Carlo method (MCM). Of particular interest, the angular intensities along the slab at different times are presented to illustrate a variety of interesting phenomena, and the discontinuous nature of the intensity at the interfaces is discussed. The effects of various parameters on the time-resolved signals are examined.

  11. Nucleation, growth, and strain relaxation of lattice-mismatched 3-5 semiconductor epitaxial layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welser, R. E.; Guido, L. J.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the early stages of evolution of highly strained 2-D InAs layers and 3-D InAs islands grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on (100) and (111)B GaAs substrates. The InAs epilayer/GaAs substrate combination has been chosen because the lattice-mismatch is severe (approximately 7.2 percent), yet these materials are otherwise very similar. By examining InAs-on-GaAs composites instead of the more common In(x)Ga(1-x)As alloy we remove an additional degree of freedom (x) and thereby simplify data interpretation. A matrix of experiments is described in which the MOCVD growth parameters - susceptor temperature, Thin flux, and AsH3 flux - have been varied over a wide range. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis have been employed to observe the thin film surface morphology. In the case of 3-D growth, we have extracted activation energies and power-dependent exponents that characterize the nucleation process. As a consequence, optimized growth conditions have been identified for depositing approximately 250 A thick (100) and (111)B oriented InAs layers with relatively smooth surfaces. Together with preliminary data on the strain relaxation of these layers, the above results on the evolution of thin InAs films indicate that the (111)B orientation is particularly promising for yielding lattice-mismatched films that are fully relaxed with only misfit dislocations at the epilayer/substrate interface.

  12. Constructing Two Distinct Spin Liquid States in a Layered Cubic Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin; Beach, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    We construct a family of short-range resonating-valence-bond wave functions on a layered cubic lattice, allowing for a tunable anisotropy in the amplitudes assigned to nearest-neighbour valence bonds along one axis. Monte Carlo simulations reveal that four phases are stabilized over the full range of the anisotropy parameter. They are separated from one another by a sequence of continuous quantum phase transitions. An antiferromagnetic phase, centered on the perfect isotropy point, intervenes between two distinct quantum spin liquid states. One of them is continuously deformable to the two-dimensional U(1) spin liquid, which is known to exhibit critical bond correlations. The other has both spin and bond correlations that decay exponentially. The existence of this second phase is proof that, contrary to expectations, neither a bipartite lattice structure nor a conventional Marshall sign rule is an impediment to realizing a fully gapped quantum spin liquid. This work was supported by a Discovery grant from NSERC of Canada. Simulations were performed on the computing facilities of WestGrid and on a local cluster generously made available to us by John P. Davis.

  13. Turbulent boundary layer control through spanwise wall oscillation using Kagome lattice structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, James; Santer, Matthew; Morrison, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    It is well established that a reduction in skin-friction and turbulence intensity can be achieved by applying in-plane spanwise forcing to a surface beneath a turbulent boundary layer. It has also been shown in DNS (M. Quadrio, P. Ricco, & C. Viotti; J. Fluid Mech; 627, 161, 2009), that this phenomenon is significantly enhanced when the forcing takes the form of a streamwise travelling wave of spanwise perturbation. In the present work, this type of forcing is generated by an active surface comprising a compliant structure, based on a Kagome lattice geometry, supporting a membrane skin. The structural design ensures negligible wall normal displacement while facilitating large in-plane velocities. The surface is driven pneumatically, achieving displacements of 3 mm approximately, at frequencies in excess of 70 Hz for a turbulent boundary layer at Reτ ~ 1000 . As the influence of this forcing on boundary layer is highly dependent on the wavenumber and frequency of the travelling wave, a flat surface was designed and optimised to allow these forcing parameters to be varied, without reconfiguration of the experiment. Simultaneous measurements of the fluid and surface motion are presented, and notable skin-friction drag reduction is demonstrated. Airbus support agreement IW202838 is gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Mixed-layer carbon cycling at the Kuroshio Extension Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassbender, Andrea J.; Sabine, Christopher L.; Cronin, Meghan F.; Sutton, Adrienne J.

    2017-02-01

    Seven years of data from the NOAA Kuroshio Extension Observatory (KEO) surface mooring, located in the North Pacific Ocean carbon sink region, were used to evaluate drivers of mixed-layer carbon cycling. A time-dependent mass balance approach relying on two carbon tracers was used to diagnostically evaluate how surface ocean processes influence mixed-layer carbon concentrations over the annual cycle. Results indicate that the annual physical carbon input is predominantly balanced by biological carbon uptake during the intense spring bloom. Net annual gas exchange that adds carbon to the mixed layer and the opposing influence of net precipitation that dilutes carbon concentrations make up smaller contributions to the annual mixed-layer carbon budget. Decomposing the biological term into annual net community production (aNCP) and calcium carbonate production (aCaCO3) yields 7 ± 3 mol C m-2 yr-1 aNCP and 0.5 ± 0.3 mol C m-2 yr-1 aCaCO3, giving an annually integrated particulate inorganic carbon to particulate organic carbon production ratio of 0.07 ± 0.05, as a lower limit. Although we find that vertical physical processes dominate carbon input to the mixed layer at KEO, it remains unclear how horizontal features, such as eddies, influence carbon production and export by altering nutrient supply as well as the depth of winter ventilation. Further research evaluating linkages between Kuroshio Extension jet instabilities, eddy activity, and nutrient supply mechanisms is needed to adequately characterize the drivers and sensitivities of carbon cycling near KEO.

  15. Intrinsic half-metallicity in fractal carbon nitride honeycomb lattices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aizhu; Zhao, Mingwen

    2015-09-14

    Fractals are natural phenomena that exhibit a repeating pattern "exactly the same at every scale or nearly the same at different scales". Defect-free molecular fractals were assembled successfully in a recent work [Shang et al., Nature Chem., 2015, 7, 389-393]. Here, we adopted the feature of a repeating pattern in searching two-dimensional (2D) materials with intrinsic half-metallicity and high stability that are desirable for spintronics applications. Using first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that the electronic properties of fractal frameworks of carbon nitrides have stable ferromagnetism accompanied by half-metallicity, which are highly dependent on the fractal structure. The ferromagnetism increases gradually with the increase of fractal order. The Curie temperature of these metal-free systems estimated from Monte Carlo simulations is considerably higher than room temperature. The stable ferromagnetism, intrinsic half-metallicity, and fractal characteristics of spin distribution in the carbon nitride frameworks open an avenue for the design of metal-free magnetic materials with exotic properties.

  16. Lattice Strain Mapping of Platinum Nanoparticles on Carbon and SnO2 Supports

    PubMed Central

    Daio, Takeshi; Staykov, Aleksandar; Guo, Limin; Liu, Jianfeng; Tanaka, Masaki; Matthew Lyth, Stephen; Sasaki, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    It is extremely important to understand the properties of supported metal nanoparticles at the atomic scale. In particular, visualizing the interaction between nanoparticle and support, as well as the strain distribution within the particle is highly desirable. Lattice strain can affect catalytic activity, and therefore strain engineering via e.g. synthesis of core-shell nanoparticles or compositional segregation has been intensively studied. However, substrate-induced lattice strain has yet to be visualized directly. In this study, platinum nanoparticles decorated on graphitized carbon or tin oxide supports are investigated using spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-corrected STEM) coupled with geometric phase analysis (GPA). Local changes in lattice parameter are observed within the Pt nanoparticles and the strain distribution is mapped. This reveals that Pt nanoparticles on SnO2 are more highly strained than on carbon, especially in the region of atomic steps in the SnO2 lattice. These substrate-induced strain effects are also reproduced in density functional theory simulations, and related to catalytic oxygen reduction reaction activity. This study suggests that tailoring the catalytic activity of electrocatalyst nanoparticles via the strong metal-support interaction (SMSI) is possible. This technique also provides an experimental platform for improving our understanding of nanoparticles at the atomic scale. PMID:26283473

  17. Microscopic model calculations for the magnetization process of layered triangular-lattice quantum antiferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Daisuke; Marmorini, Giacomo; Danshita, Ippei

    2015-01-16

    Magnetization processes of spin-1/2 layered triangular-lattice antiferromagnets (TLAFs) under a magnetic field H are studied by means of a numerical cluster mean-field method with a scaling scheme. We find that small antiferromagnetic couplings between the layers give rise to several types of extra quantum phase transitions among different high-field coplanar phases. Especially, a field-induced first-order transition is found to occur at H≈0.7H_{s}, where H_{s} is the saturation field, as another common quantum effect of ideal TLAFs in addition to the well-established one-third plateau. Our microscopic model calculation with appropriate parameters shows excellent agreement with experiments on Ba_{3}CoSb_{2}O_{9} [T. Susuki et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 267201 (2013)]. Given this fact, we suggest that the Co^{2+}-based compounds may allow for quantum simulations of intriguing properties of this simple frustrated model, such as quantum criticality and supersolid states.

  18. Carbon kagome lattice and orbital-frustration-induced metal-insulator transition for optoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanping; Sun, Y Y; Wang, H; West, D; Xie, Yuee; Zhong, J; Meunier, V; Cohen, Marvin L; Zhang, S B

    2014-08-22

    A three-dimensional elemental carbon kagome lattice, made of only fourfold-coordinated carbon atoms, is proposed based on first-principles calculations. Despite the existence of 60° bond angles in the triangle rings, widely perceived to be energetically unfavorable, the carbon kagome lattice is found to display exceptional stability comparable to that of C(60). The system allows us to study the effects of triangular frustration on the electronic properties of realistic solids, and it demonstrates a metal-insulator transition from that of graphene to a direct gap semiconductor in the visible blue region. By minimizing s-p orbital hybridization, which is an intrinsic property of carbon, not only the band edge states become nearly purely frustrated p states, but also the band structure is qualitatively different from any known bulk elemental semiconductors. For example, the optical properties are similar to those of direct-gap semiconductors GaN and ZnO, whereas the effective masses are comparable to or smaller than those of Si.

  19. Impact of Boundary Layer Processes on Carbon Budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath-Spangler, E. L.; Denning, A.

    2011-12-01

    Previous work has shown the importance of turbulent mixing within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and entrainment at the top of this layer for the carbon budget. In addition to the impact of carbon flux dilution by a deeper mixing layer, the modification to the vegetative environment at the land surface by PBL processes greatly impacts the vegetative response. Plants adapt to warmer, drier conditions by adjusting fluxes of carbon and water vapor in order to minimize transpiration while also maximizing carbon assimilation. However, a lot of work remains to be done in order to better simulate PBL processes and depth. Relatively few observations exist of PBL depth and even fewer exist of the processes at the PBL top. PBL depth can be estimated using the backscatter from the LIDAR onboard the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite. Using an automated method, millions of estimates can be derived to which model results can be compared. Using these estimates as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) observations from a network of towers throughout the continental United States and southern Canada, simulations from a coupled ecosystem-atmosphere model are evaluated using various strengths of an entrainment parameterization. This analysis sheds some light on the spatial heterogeneity of boundary layer processes and the influence on surface carbon fluxes and the carbon budget.

  20. Capacitance of carbon-based electrical double-layer capacitors.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hengxing; Zhao, Xin; Qiao, Zhenhua; Jung, Jeil; Zhu, Yanwu; Lu, Yalin; Zhang, Li Li; MacDonald, Allan H; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2014-01-01

    Experimental electrical double-layer capacitances of porous carbon electrodes fall below ideal values, thus limiting the practical energy densities of carbon-based electrical double-layer capacitors. Here we investigate the origin of this behaviour by measuring the electrical double-layer capacitance in one to five-layer graphene. We find that the capacitances are suppressed near neutrality, and are anomalously enhanced for thicknesses below a few layers. We attribute the first effect to quantum capacitance effects near the point of zero charge, and the second to correlations between electrons in the graphene sheet and ions in the electrolyte. The large capacitance values imply gravimetric energy storage densities in the single-layer graphene limit that are comparable to those of batteries. We anticipate that these results shed light on developing new theoretical models in understanding the electrical double-layer capacitance of carbon electrodes, and on opening up new strategies for improving the energy density of carbon-based capacitors.

  1. Capacitance of carbon-based electrical double-layer capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hengxing; Zhao, Xin; Qiao, Zhenhua; Jung, Jeil; Zhu, Yanwu; Lu, Yalin; Zhang, Li Li; MacDonald, Allan H.; Ruoff, Rodney S.

    2014-02-01

    Experimental electrical double-layer capacitances of porous carbon electrodes fall below ideal values, thus limiting the practical energy densities of carbon-based electrical double-layer capacitors. Here we investigate the origin of this behaviour by measuring the electrical double-layer capacitance in one to five-layer graphene. We find that the capacitances are suppressed near neutrality, and are anomalously enhanced for thicknesses below a few layers. We attribute the first effect to quantum capacitance effects near the point of zero charge, and the second to correlations between electrons in the graphene sheet and ions in the electrolyte. The large capacitance values imply gravimetric energy storage densities in the single-layer graphene limit that are comparable to those of batteries. We anticipate that these results shed light on developing new theoretical models in understanding the electrical double-layer capacitance of carbon electrodes, and on opening up new strategies for improving the energy density of carbon-based capacitors.

  2. InP substrate evaluation by MOVPE growth of lattice matched epitaxial layers.

    SciTech Connect

    Overberg, Mark E.; Cederberg, Jeffrey George

    2010-09-01

    InP substrates form the starting point for a wide variety of semiconductor devices. The surface morphology produced during epitaxy depends critically on the starting substrate. We evaluated (1 0 0)-oriented InP wafers from three different vendors by growing thick (5 mu m) lattice-matched epilayers of InP, Gain As, and AlInAs. We assessed the surfaces with differential interference contrast microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Wafers with near singular (1 0 0) orientations produced inferior surfaces in general. Vicinal substrates with small misorientations improved the epitaxial surface for InP dramatically, reducing the density of macroscopic defects while maintaining a low RMS roughness. GaInAs and AlInAs epitaxy step-bunched forming undulations along the miscut direction. Sulfur-doped wafers were considered for singular (1 0 0) and for 0.2 degrees misorientation toward (1 1 0). We found that mound defects observed for InP and GaInAs layers on iron-doped singular wafers were absent for singular sulfur-doped wafers. These observations support the conclusion that dislocation termination at the surface and expansion of the step spiral lead to the macroscopic defects observed.

  3. Dynamic behaviors of liquid droplets on a gas diffusion layer surface: Hybrid lattice Boltzmann investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jie; Huang, Jun-Jie

    2015-07-01

    Water management is one of the key issues in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Fundamentally, it is related to dynamic behaviors of droplets on a gas diffusion layer (GDL) surface, and consequently they are investigated in this work. A two-dimensional hybrid method is employed to implement numerical simulations, in which the flow field is solved by using the lattice Boltzmann method and the interface between droplet and gas is captured by solving the Cahn-Hilliard equation directly. One or two liquid droplets are initially placed on the GDL surface of a gas channel, which is driven by the fully developed Poiseuille flow. At a fixed channel size, the effects of viscosity ratio of droplet to gas ( μ ∗ ), Capillary number (Ca, ratio of gas viscosity to surface tension), and droplet interaction on the dynamic behaviors of droplets are systematically studied. By decreasing viscosity ratio or increasing Capillary number, the single droplet can detach from the GDL surface easily. On the other hand, when two identical droplets stay close to each other or a larger droplet is placed in front of a smaller droplet, the removal of two droplets is promoted.

  4. 3D Flow Simulation Using Lattice Boltzmann Method on Real Carbonate Core-Plug Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, A.; Faisal, T. F.; Chevalier, S.; Jouini, M. S.; Jouiad, M.; Sassi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Digital Rock Physics (DRP) is a novel technology that could be used to generate accurate, fast and cost effective special core analysis (SCAL) properties to support reservoir characterization and simulation tools. This work focuses on running numerical simulations using the Lattice Boltzmann algorithm on reconstructed volume from microCT images of carbonate core-plug samples at different resolutions. The porous media was first reconstructed from the retrieved image slices. Then the open-source software, Palabos was used to run the Lattice Boltzmann algorithm to simulate single phase flow in the medium and determine the permeability. The results were analyzed according to the resolutions of the original microCT images and the scale of the micro-plug.

  5. Carbon additives for electrical double layer capacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingarth, D.; Cericola, D.; Mornaghini, F. C. F.; Hucke, T.; Kötz, R.

    2014-11-01

    Electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs) are inherently high power devices when compared to rechargeable batteries. While capacitance and energy storage ability are mainly increased by optimizing the electrode active material or the electrolyte, the power capability could be improved by including conductive additives in the electrode formulations. This publication deals with the use of four different carbon additives - two carbon blacks and two graphites - in standard activated carbon based EDLC electrodes. The investigations include: (i) physical characterization of carbon powder mixtures such as surface area, press density, and electrical resistivity measurements, and (ii), electrochemical characterization via impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry of full cells made with electrodes containing 5 wt.% of carbon additive and compared to cells made with pure activated carbon electrodes in organic electrolyte. Improved cell performance was observed in both impedance and cyclic voltammetry responses. The results are discussed considering the main characteristics of the different carbon additives, and important considerations about electrode structure and processability are drawn.

  6. Stability of organic carbon in deep soil layers controlled by fresh carbon supply.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Sébastien; Barot, Sébastien; Barré, Pierre; Bdioui, Nadia; Mary, Bruno; Rumpel, Cornelia

    2007-11-08

    The world's soils store more carbon than is present in biomass and in the atmosphere. Little is known, however, about the factors controlling the stability of soil organic carbon stocks and the response of the soil carbon pool to climate change remains uncertain. We investigated the stability of carbon in deep soil layers in one soil profile by combining physical and chemical characterization of organic carbon, soil incubations and radiocarbon dating. Here we show that the supply of fresh plant-derived carbon to the subsoil (0.6-0.8 m depth) stimulated the microbial mineralization of 2,567 +/- 226-year-old carbon. Our results support the previously suggested idea that in the absence of fresh organic carbon, an essential source of energy for soil microbes, the stability of organic carbon in deep soil layers is maintained. We propose that a lack of supply of fresh carbon may prevent the decomposition of the organic carbon pool in deep soil layers in response to future changes in temperature. Any change in land use and agricultural practice that increases the distribution of fresh carbon along the soil profile could however stimulate the loss of ancient buried carbon.

  7. Lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As window layers for indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Wilt, David M.; Flood, Dennis J.

    1993-01-01

    The efficiency of indium phosphide (InP) solar cells is limited by its high surface recombination velocity (approximately 10(exp 7) cm/s). This might be reduced by a wide-bandgap window layer. The performance of InP solar cells with wide-bandgap (1.8 eV) lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As as a window layer was calculated. Because the required window layer thickness is less than the critical layer thickness, growth of strained (pseudomorphic) layers without interfacial misfit dislocations should be possible. Calculations using the PC-lD numerical code showed that the efficiencies of baseline and optimized p(+)n (p-on-n) cells are increased to more than 22 and 24 percent, (air mass zero (AMO), 25 C), respectively for a lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As window layer of 10-nm thickness. Currently, most cell development work has been focused on n(+)p (n-on-p) structures although comparatively little improvement has been found for n(+)p cells.

  8. Carbon vaporization into a nonequilibrium, stagnation-point boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, T.

    1978-01-01

    The heat transfer to the stagnation point of an ablating carbonaceous heat shield, where both the gas-phase boundary layer and the heterogeneous surface reactions are not in chemical equilibrium, is examined. Specifically, the nonequilibrium changes in the mass fraction profiles of carbon species calculated for frozen flow are studied. A set of equations describing the steady-state, nonequilibrium laminar boundary layer in the axisymmetric stagnation region, over an ablating graphite surface, is solved, with allowance for the effects of finite rate of carbon vaporization.

  9. Lattice constants of pure methane and carbon dioxide hydrates at low temperatures. Implementing quantum corrections to classical molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Costandy, Joseph; Michalis, Vasileios K; Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N; Stubos, Athanassios K; Economou, Ioannis G

    2016-03-28

    We introduce a simple correction to the calculation of the lattice constants of fully occupied structure sI methane or carbon dioxide pure hydrates that are obtained from classical molecular dynamics simulations using the TIP4PQ/2005 water force field. The obtained corrected lattice constants are subsequently used in order to obtain isobaric thermal expansion coefficients of the pure gas hydrates that exhibit a trend that is significantly closer to the experimental behavior than previously reported classical molecular dynamics studies.

  10. Lattice constants of pure methane and carbon dioxide hydrates at low temperatures. Implementing quantum corrections to classical molecular dynamics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costandy, Joseph; Michalis, Vasileios K.; Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N.; Stubos, Athanassios K.; Economou, Ioannis G.

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a simple correction to the calculation of the lattice constants of fully occupied structure sI methane or carbon dioxide pure hydrates that are obtained from classical molecular dynamics simulations using the TIP4PQ/2005 water force field. The obtained corrected lattice constants are subsequently used in order to obtain isobaric thermal expansion coefficients of the pure gas hydrates that exhibit a trend that is significantly closer to the experimental behavior than previously reported classical molecular dynamics studies.

  11. Plasma polymerized thin coating as a protective layer of carbon nanotubes grafted on carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einig, A.; Rumeau, P.; Desrousseaux, S.; Magga, Y.; Bai, J. B.

    2013-04-01

    Nanoparticles addition is widely studied to improve properties of carbon fiber reinforced composites. Here, hybrid carbon fiber results from grafting of carbon nanotubes (CNT) by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) on the carbon fiber for mechanical reinforcement and conductive properties. Both tows and woven fabrics made of the hybrid fibers are added to the matrix for composite processing. However handling hybrid fibers may induce unwilling health risk due to eventual CNT release and a protective layer is required. A thin coating layer is deposited homogeneously by low pressure plasma polymerization of an organic monomer without modifying the morphology and the organization of grafted CNTs. The polymeric layer effect on the electrical behavior of hybrid fiber is assessed by conductivity measurements. Its influence on the mechanical properties is also studied regarding the interface adhesion between fiber and matrix. The protective role of layer is demonstrated by means of friction constraints applied to the hybrid fiber.

  12. Energy dissipation in intercalated carbon nanotube forests with metal layers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests were synthesized to study their quasi-static mechanical properties in a layered configuration with metallization. The top and bottom surfaces of CNT forests were metalized with Ag, Fe, and In using paste, sputtering, and thermal evaporation, respectiv...

  13. WS2 layer formation on multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitby, R. L. D.; Hsu, W. K.; Boothroyd, C. B.; Brigatti, K. S.; Kroto, H. W.; Walton, D. R. M.

    Time-dependent powder X-ray-diffraction analyses reveal that the conversion of WO3 into WS2 on carbon nanotube surfaces in the presence of H2S is a one-step process. The WS2 layers grow simultaneously along the tube in the radial and axial directions.

  14. Carbon and nitrogen abundances determined from transition layer lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika; Mena-Werth, Jose

    1992-01-01

    The possibility of determining relative carbon, nitrogen, and silicon abundances from the emission-line fluxes in the lower transition layers between stellar chromospheres and coronae is explored. Observations for main-sequence and luminosity class IV stars with presumably solar element abundances show that for the lower transition layers Em = BT sup -gamma. For a given carbon abundance the constants gamma and B in this relation can be determined from the C II and C IV emission-line fluxes. From the N V and S IV lines, the abundances of these elements relative to carbon can be determined from their surface emission-line fluxes. Ratios of N/C abundances determined in this way for some giants and supergiants agree within the limits of errors with those determined from molecular bands. For giants, an increase in the ratio of N/C at B-V of about 0.8 is found, as expected theoretically.

  15. The reactivity of lattice carbon and nitrogen species in molybdenum (oxy)carbonitrides prepared by single-source routes

    SciTech Connect

    AlShalwi, M.; Hargreaves, J.S.J.; Liggat, J.J.; Todd, D.

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molybdenum (oxy)carbonitrides have been prepared from single source routes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrogen species are more reactive than carbon species within the carbonitrides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reactivity of nitrogen species is a function of carbonitride composition. -- Abstract: Molybdenum (oxy)carbonitrides of different compositions have been prepared from hexamethylenetetramine molybdate and ethylenediamine molybdate precursors and the reactivity of the lattice carbon and nitrogen species within them has been determined by temperature programmed reduction and thermal volatilisation studies. Nitrogen is found to be much more reactive than carbon and the nature of its reactivity is influenced by composition with the presence of carbon enhancing the reactivity of nitrogen. The difference in reactivity observed indicates that molybdenum carbonitrides are not suitable candidates as reagents for which the simultaneous loss of nitrogen and carbon from the lattice would be desirable.

  16. Convergent beam electron diffraction study of lattice distortion in InGaAs/GaAs strained-layer superlattices grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Q. H.; Fung, K. K.; York, P. K.; Fernandez, G. E.; Eades, J. A.; Coleman, J. J.

    1990-11-01

    The intensities of sidebands in convergent beam electron diffraction reflections from plan-view specimens of strain modulated InGaAs/GaAs superlattices are dependent on the natural lattice mismatch, the ratio of the thicknesses of the superlattice layers, the period (sum of layer thicknesses) of the superlattice, and the g vectors of the reflections. The intensities of kinematic higher-order Laue zone (HOLZ) reflections have been calculated from a simple model based on alternate contraction and expansion of lattice spacings of the superlattice layers. An accurate estimate of the In content of InGaAs can be deduced from the elastic strains in the superlattice layers so obtained.

  17. Carbon Nanostructure Examined by Lattice Fringe Analysis of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Tomasek, Aaron J.; Street, Kenneth; Thompson, William K.

    2002-01-01

    The dimensions of graphitic layer planes directly affect the reactivity of soot towards oxidation and growth. Quantification of graphitic structure could be used to develop and test correlations between the soot nanostructure and its reactivity. Based upon transmission electron microscopy images, this paper provides a demonstration of the robustness of a fringe image analysis code for determining the level of graphitic structure within nanoscale carbon, i.e. soot. Results, in the form of histograms of graphitic layer plane lengths, are compared to their determination through Raman analysis.

  18. Carbon Nanostructure Examined by Lattice Fringe Analysis of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Tomasek, Aaron J.; Street, Kenneth; Thompson, William K.; Hull, David R.

    2003-01-01

    The dimensions of graphitic layer planes directly affect the reactivity of soot towards oxidation and growth. Quantification of graphitic structure could be used to develop and test correlations between the soot nanostructure and its reactivity. Based upon transmission electron microscopy images, this paper provides a demonstration of the robustness of a fringe image analysis code for determining the level of graphitic structure within nanoscale carbon, i.e., soot. Results, in the form of histograms of graphitic layer plane lengths, are compared to their determination through Raman analysis.

  19. Diameter Dependence of Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Study from Ab Initio.

    PubMed

    Yue, Sheng-Ying; Ouyang, Tao; Hu, Ming

    2015-10-22

    The effects of temperature, tube length, defects, and surface functionalization on the thermal conductivity (κ) of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were well documented in literature. However, diameter dependence of thermal conductivity of SWCNTs received less attentions. So far, diverse trends of the diameter dependence have been discussed by different methods and all the previous results were based on empirical interatomic potentials. In this paper, we emphasize to clarify accurate κ values of SWCNTs with different diameters and in-plane κ of graphene. All the studies were under the framework of anharmonic lattice dynamics and Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) based on first principle calculations. We try to infer the right trend of diameter dependent thermal conductivity of SWCNTs. We infer that graphene is the limitation as SWCNT with an infinite diameter. We analyzed the thermal conductivity contributions from each phonon mode in SWCNTs to explain the trend. Meanwhile, we also identify the extremely low thermal conductivity of ultra-thin SWCNTs.

  20. Carbon nanotube forests growth using catalysts from atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bingan; Zhang, Can; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Xie, Rongsi; Zhong, Guofang; Robertson, John; Bhardwaj, Sunil; Cepek, Cinzia

    2014-04-14

    We have grown carbon nanotubes using Fe and Ni catalyst films deposited by atomic layer deposition. Both metals lead to catalytically active nanoparticles for growing vertically aligned nanotube forests or carbon fibres, depending on the growth conditions and whether the substrate is alumina or silica. The resulting nanotubes have narrow diameter and wall number distributions that are as narrow as those grown from sputtered catalysts. The state of the catalyst is studied by in-situ and ex-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We demonstrate multi-directional nanotube growth on a porous alumina foam coated with Fe prepared by atomic layer deposition. This deposition technique can be useful for nanotube applications in microelectronics, filter technology, and energy storage.

  1. Morphological and electrical characteristics of biofunctionalized layers on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Villamizar, Raquel A; Braun, Julia; Gompf, Bruno; Dressel, Martin; Rius, F Xavier

    2009-09-15

    In this study we have investigated the morphology and electrical characteristics of protein layers non-covalently adsorbed onto an irregular network of carbon nanotubes (CNT). The layer system presents a prototype for an ion-sensitive field-effect transistor based on CNT-networks. The complementary characterization techniques AFM and ellipsometry give the overall morphology of the functionalized layer system and in combination with concentration dependent measurements a detailed image of the adsorption dynamics. The advantage of CNT-based FETs is their huge surface area, which makes them extremely sensitive even to weak adsorption processes. The here-presented comparative investigations clearly show that significant changes in the transport properties of the CNTs occur much below one monolayer. This sensitivity is an important condition for the future development of efficient biodevices with optimal performance parameters for the detection of pathogenic microorganisms.

  2. Layer-by-layer assembled carbon nanotube-acetylcholinesterase/biopolymer renewable interfaces: SPR and electrochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Arugula, Mary A; Kirsch, Jeffrey S; Yang, Xiaoyun; Olsen, Eric; Simonian, Aleksandr L

    2015-02-03

    Developing simple, reliable, and cost-effective methods of renewing an inhibited biocatalyst (e.g., enzymatic interfaces) on biosensors is needed to advance multiuse, reusable sensor applications. We report a method for the renewal of layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembled inhibition-based enzymatic interfaces in multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) armored acetylcholinesterase (AChE) biosensors. The self-assembly process of MWCNT dispersed enzymes/biopolymers was investigated using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The LbL fabrication consisted of alternating cushion layers of positively charged CNT-polyethylenimine (CNT-PEI) and negatively charged CNT-deoxyribonucleic acid (CNT-DNA) and a functional interface consisting of alternating layers of CNT-PEI and negatively charged CNT-acetylcholine esterase (CNT-AChE, pH 7.4). The observed SPR response signal increased while assembling the different layers, indicating the buildup of multiple layers on the Au surface. A partial desorption of the top enzymatic layer in the LbL structure was observed with a desorption strategy employing alkaline treatment. This indicates that the strong interaction of CNT-biopolymer conjugates with the Au surface was a result of both electrostatic interactions between biopolymers and the surface binding energy from CNTs: the closer the layers are to the Au surface, the stronger the interactions. In contrast, a similar LbL assembly of soluble enzyme/polyelectrolytes resulted in stronger desorption on the surface after the alkaline treatment; this led to the investigation of AChE layer removal, permanently inhibited after pesticide exposure on glassy carbon (GC) electrodes, while keeping the cushion layers intact. The desorption strategy permitted the SPR and electrochemical electrode surfaces to be regenerated multiple times by the subsequent self-assembly of fresh PEI/AChE layers. Flow-mode electrochemical amperometric analysis demonstrated good stability toward the determination of

  3. Method of depositing multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, John P.; Friedmann, Thomas A.

    1999-01-01

    A novel field emitter device for cold cathode field emission applications, comprising a multi-layer resistive carbon film. The multi-layered film of the present invention is comprised of at least two layers of a resistive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, such that the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure comprises a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film comprises a plurality of carbon layers, wherein adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced. Field emitters made according the present invention display improved electron emission characteristics in comparison to conventional field emitter materials.

  4. Method of depositing multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, J.P.; Friedmann, T.A.

    1999-08-10

    A novel field emitter device is disclosed for cold cathode field emission applications, comprising a multi-layer resistive carbon film. The multi-layered film of the present invention is comprised of at least two layers of a resistive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, such that the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure comprises a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film comprises a plurality of carbon layers, wherein adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced. Field emitters made according the present invention display improved electron emission characteristics in comparison to conventional field emitter materials. 8 figs.

  5. Covalent layer-by-layer functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes by click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; He, Hongkun; Gao, Chao; Wu, Jiayan

    2009-05-19

    The covalent functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by layer-by-layer (LbL) click chemistry is reported. The clickable polymers of poly(2-azidoethyl methacrylate) and poly(propargyl methacrylate) were synthesized at first by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of 2-azidoethyl methacrylate and reverse addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of propargyl methacrylate, respectively. The two polymers were then alternately coated on alkyne-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes using Cu(I)-catalyzed click reaction of Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between azides and alkynes. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements confirm that the quantity and thickness of the clicked polymer shell on MWNTs can be well controlled by adjusting the cycles or numbers of click reaction and the polymer shell is uniform and even. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier tranform infrared (FTIR) measurements showed that there were still a great amount of residual azido groups on the surfaces of the functionalized MWNTs after clicking three layers of polymers. Furthermore, alkyne-modified rhodamine B and monoalkyne-terminated polystyrene were subsequently used to functionalize the clickable polymer grafted MWNTs, giving rise to fluorescent carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and CNT-based polystyrene brushes, respectively. It demonstrates that the residual azido groups on the surfaces of MWNTs are available for further click reaction with various functional molecules.

  6. Carbon transport in the bottom boundary layer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lohrenz, S.E.; Asper, V.L.

    1997-09-01

    The authors objective was to characterize distributions of chloropigment fluorescence in relation to physical processes in the benthic boundary layer in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) Ocean Margins Program`s (OMP) goal of quantifying carbon transport across the continental shelf. Their approach involved participation in the Ocean Margins Program (OMP) field experiment on the continental shelf off Cape Hatteras by conducting multi-sensor fluorescence measurements of photosynthetic pigments. Specific tasks included (1) pre- and post-deployment calibration of multiple fluorescence sensors in conjunction with Woods Hole personnel; (2) collection and analysis of photosynthetic pigment concentrations and total particulate carbon in water column samples to aid in interpretation of the fluorescence time-series during the field experiment; (3) collaboration in the analysis and interpretation of 1994 and 1996 time-series data in support of efforts to quantify pigment and particulate organic carbon transport on the continental shelf off Cape Hatteras. This third component included analysis of data obtained with a multi-sensor fiber-optic fluorometer in the benthic boundary layer of the inner shelf off Cape Hatteras during summer 1994.

  7. Aqueous Chemical Solution Deposition of Novel, Thick and Dense Lattice-Matched Single Buffer Layers Suitable for YBCO Coated Conductors: Preparation and Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Vyshnavi; Van Steenberge, Sigelinde; Lommens, Petra; Van Driessche, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    In this work we present the preparation and characterization of cerium doped lanthanum zirconate (LCZO) films and non-stoichiometric lanthanum zirconate (LZO) buffer layers on metallic Ni-5% W substrates using chemical solution deposition (CSD), starting from aqueous precursor solutions. La2Zr2O7 films doped with varying percentages of Ce at constant La concentration (La0.5CexZr1−xOy) were prepared as well as non-stoichiometric La0.5+xZr0.5−xOy buffer layers with different percentages of La and Zr ratios. The variation in the composition of these thin films enables the creation of novel buffer layers with tailored lattice parameters. This leads to different lattice mismatches with the YBa2Cu3O7−x (YBCO) superconducting layer on top and with the buffer layers or substrate underneath. This possibility of minimized lattice mismatch should allow the use of one single buffer layer instead of the current complicated buffer architectures such as Ni-(5% W)/LZO/LZO/CeO2. Here, single, crack-free LCZO and non-stoichiometric LZO layers with thicknesses of up to 140 nm could be obtained in one single CSD step. The crystallinity and microstructure of these layers were studied by XRD, and SEM and the effective buffer layer action was studied using XPS depth profiling.

  8. Defect chemistry and charge transport properties of mixed bismuth oxides with layer lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanduz, Ahmet Cengiz

    Undoped SrBi2Ta2O9 (SBT) displays a broad ionic conductivity plateau and p-type conductivity at lower and higher oxygen activities, respectively, which is consistent with an oxide that has a net acceptor center concentration of 1--2%. Undoped SrBi2Nb 2O9 (SBN) displays n-type conductivity behaviour that is consistent with that of an oxide which has a net donor center concentration of 1--2% SBN also undergoes an unprecedented abrupt conductivity rise at very low oxygen activities. Recent structural studies indicate that there is substantial place exchange between Bi3+ and Sr2+ in the alternating layers of the structure and that there is significant distortion of Ta (Nb) octahedral environment. In a crystal with a 'homogeneous' unit cell the cation place exchange would be self-compensating. Defect chemistry studies suggest that in SBN and SBT, where there are two distinct layers, Bi ˙Sr and Sr 'Bi are locally compensated by strontium vacancies in the perovskite-like layers and by oxygen vacancies in the bismuth oxide layers, respectively. In SBT, where electron density is low due to its large band gap, oxygen vacancies in the bismuth oxide layers dominate the total conductivity. In SBN, which due to its easier reducibility is expected to have a lower band gap, n-type conductivity prevails. SBN displays thermally activated electron mobility. Superior ferroelectric fatigue resistance of SBT is attributed to the following: (i) large band gap and (ii) heavy donor presence suppress electron and oxygen vacancy formation in the perovskite-like layers; (iii) electron mobility is thermally activated; (iv) oxygen vacancies in the bismuth oxide layers can not enter the perovskite-like layer. Thus there are no mobile defects that could drift to the domain walls and pin their movement.

  9. Characterization of few-layered graphene grown by carbon implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kin Kiong; McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Jamieson, David N.

    2014-02-21

    Graphene is considered to be a very promising material for applications in nanotechnology. The properties of graphene are strongly dependent on defects that occur during growth and processing. These defects can be either detrimental or beneficial to device performance depending on defect type, location and device application. Here we present experimental results on formation of few-layered graphene by carbon ion implantation into nickel films and characteristics of graphene devices formed by graphene transfer and lithographic patterning. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to determine the number of graphene layers formed and identify defects arising from the device processing. The graphene films were cleaned by annealing in vacuum. Transport properties of cleaned graphene films were investigated by fabrication of back-gated field-effect transistors, which exhibited high hole and electron mobility of 1935 and 1905 cm2/Vs, respectively.

  10. Amorphous carbon buffer layers for separating free gallium nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altakhov, A. S.; Gorbunov, R. I.; Kasharina, L. A.; Latyshev, F. E.; Tarala, V. A.; Shreter, Yu. G.

    2016-11-01

    The possibility of using amorphous diamond-like carbon (DLC) films for self-separation of gallium nitride (GaN) layers grown by hydride vapor-phase epitaxy has been analyzed. DLC films have been synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition under low pressure on sapphire (Al2O3) substrates with a (0001) crystallographic orientation. The samples have been studied by the methods of Raman scattering and X-ray diffraction analysis. It is shown that thin DLC films affect only slightly the processes of nucleation and growth of gallium nitride films. Notably, the strength of the "GaN film-Al2O3" substrate interface decreases, which facilitates separation of the GaN layers.

  11. Ultralight anisotropic foams from layered aligned carbon nanotube sheets.

    PubMed

    Faraji, Shaghayegh; Stano, Kelly L; Yildiz, Ozkan; Li, Ang; Zhu, Yuntian; Bradford, Philip D

    2015-10-28

    In this work, we present large scale, ultralight aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) structures which have densities an order of magnitude lower than CNT arrays, have tunable properties and exhibit resiliency after compression. By stacking aligned sheets of carbon nanotubes and then infiltrating with a pyrolytic carbon (PyC), resilient foam-like materials were produced that exhibited complete recovery from 90% compressive strain. With density as low as 3.8 mg cm(-3), the foam structure is over 500 times less dense than bulk graphite. Microscopy revealed that PyC coated the junctions among CNTs, and also increased CNT surface roughness. These changes in the morphology explain the transition from inelastic behavior to foam-like recovery of the layered CNT sheet structure. Mechanical and thermal properties of the foams were tuned for different applications through variation of PyC deposition duration while dynamic mechanical analysis showed no change in mechanical properties over a large temperature range. Observation of a large and linear electrical resistance change during compression of the aligned CNT/carbon (ACNT/C) foams makes strain/pressure sensors a relevant application. The foams have high oil absorption capacities, up to 275 times their own weight, which suggests they may be useful in water treatment and oil spill cleanup. Finally, the ACNT/C foam's high porosity, surface area and stability allow for demonstration of the foams as catalyst support structures.

  12. Ab initio lattice dynamics and thermochemistry of layered bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3).

    PubMed

    Zurhelle, Alexander F; Deringer, Volker L; Stoffel, Ralf P; Dronskowski, Richard

    2016-03-23

    We present density-functional theory calculations of the lattice dynamics of bismuth telluride, yielding force constants, mean-square displacements and partial densities of phonon states which corroborate and complement previous nuclear inelastic scattering experiments. From these data, we derive an element- and energy-resolved view of the vibrational anharmonicity, quantified by the macroscopic Grüneisen parameter γ which results in 1.56. Finally, we calculate thermochemical properties in the quasiharmonic approximation, especially the heat capacity at constant pressure and the enthalpy of formation for bismuth telluride; the latter arrives at ΔHf (Bi2Te3)  =  -102 kJ mol(-1) at 298 K.

  13. Spin excitations and thermodynamics of the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on the layered honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, Artem A.; Ihle, Dieter; Plakida, Nikolay M.

    2017-03-01

    We present a spin-rotation-invariant Green-function theory for the dynamic spin susceptibility in the spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on a stacked honeycomb lattice. Employing a generalized mean-field approximation for arbitrary temperatures, the thermodynamic quantities (two-spin correlation functions, internal energy, magnetic susceptibility, staggered magnetization, Néel temperature, correlation length) and the spin-excitation spectrum are calculated by solving a coupled system of self-consistency equations for the correlation functions. The temperature dependence of the magnetic (uniform static) susceptibility is ascribed to antiferromagnetic short-range order. The Néel temperature is calculated for arbitrary interlayer couplings. Our results are in a good agreement with numerical computations for finite clusters and with available experimental data on the β-Cu2V2O2 compound.

  14. Lattice-matched HfN buffer layers for epitaxy of GaN on Si

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, Robert; Yang, Qing; Feick, Henning; Gebauer, Joerg; Weber, Eicke R.; Shinkai, Satoko; Sasaki, Katsutaka

    2002-05-08

    Gallium nitride is grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on (111) and (001) silicon substrates using sputter-deposited hafnium nitride buffer layers. Wurtzite GaN epitaxial layers are obtained on both the (111) and (001) HfN/Si surfaces, with crack-free thickness up to 1.2 (mu)m. Initial results for GaN grown on the (111) surface show a photoluminescence peak width of 17 meV at 11 K, and an asymmetric x-ray rocking curve width of 20 arcmin. Wurtzite GaN on HfN/Si(001) shows reduced structural quality and peculiar low-temperature luminescence features. However, growth on the (001) surface results in nearly stress-free films, suggesting that much thicker crack-free layers could be obtained.

  15. High quality InAlN single layers lattice-matched to GaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Gacevic, Z.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Calleja, E.; Estrade, S.

    2011-07-18

    We report on properties of high quality {approx}60 nm thick InAlN layers nearly in-plane lattice-matched to GaN, grown on c-plane GaN-on-sapphire templates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Excellent crystalline quality and low surface roughness are confirmed by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. High annular dark field observations reveal a periodic in-plane indium content variation (8 nm period), whereas optical measurements evidence certain residual absorption below the band-gap. The indium fluctuation is estimated to be {+-} 1.2% around the nominal 17% indium content via plasmon energy oscillations assessed by electron energy loss spectroscopy with sub-nanometric spatial resolution.

  16. Crystal Lattice Defects in MBE Grown Si Layers Heavily Doped with Er

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, N. D.; Werner, P.; Vdovin, V. I.; Denisov, D. V.; Sobolev, N. A.; Gösele, U.

    The main types of crystal structure defects in [Er]>2×1019 doped layers are: (i) spherical Er and (ii) ellipsoidal ErSi precipitates, as well as (iii) ErSi2 platelets on {111} planes. In the sample with [Er]=4x1019, small complexes consisting of tiny Er precipitates and four petals of ErSi2 platelets have been found additionally. The layer with [Er]= 8×1018 cm-3 was defect free. The formation of silicides from a supersaturated solid solution and Er precipitates is accompanied by the emission of vacancies V resulting in the formation of pores, V-V and V-Er complexes.

  17. Active Layer Soil Carbon and Nutrient Mineralization, Barrow, Alaska, 2012

    DOE Data Explorer

    Stan D. Wullschleger; Holly M. Vander Stel; Colleen Iversen; Victoria L. Sloan; Richard J. Norby; Mallory P. Ladd; Jason K. Keller; Ariane Jong; Joanne Childs; Deanne J. Brice

    2015-10-29

    This data set consists of bulk soil characteristics as well as carbon and nutrient mineralization rates of active layer soils manually collected from the field in August, 2012, frozen, and then thawed and incubated across a range of temperatures in the laboratory for 28 day periods in 2013-2015. The soils were collected from four replicate polygons in each of the four Areas (A, B, C, and D) of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Soil samples were coincident with the established Vegetation Plots that are located in center, edge, and trough microtopography in each polygon. Data included are 1) bulk soil characteristics including carbon, nitrogen, gravimetric water content, bulk density, and pH in 5-cm depth increments and also by soil horizon, 2) carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus mineralization rates for soil horizons incubated aerobically (and in one case both aerobically and anaerobically) for 28 days at temperatures that included 2, 4, 8, and 12 degrees C. Additional soil and incubation data are forthcoming. They will be available when published as part of another paper that includes additional replicate analyses.

  18. Carbon Doping of Compound Semiconductor Epitaxial Layers Grown by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition Using Carbon Tetrachloride.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Brian Thomas

    1990-01-01

    A dilute mixture of CCl_4 in high purity H_2 has been used as a carbon dopant source for rm Al_ {x}Ga_{1-x}As grown by low pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). To understand the mechanism for carbon incorporation from CCl_4 doping and to provide experimental parameters for the growth of carbon doped device structures, the effects of various crystal growth parameters on CCl _4 doping have been studied, including growth temperature, growth rate, V/III ratio, Al composition, and CCl_4 flow rate. Although CCl _4 is an effective p-type dopant for MOCVD rm Al_{x}Ga_ {1-x}As, injection of CCl_4 into the reactor during growth of InP resulted in no change in the carrier concentration or carbon concentration. Abrupt, heavy carbon doping spikes in GaAs have been obtained using CCl_4 without a dopant memory effect. By annealing samples with carbon doping spikes grown within undoped, n-type, and p-type GaAs, the carbon diffusion coefficient in GaAs at 825 ^circC has been estimated and has been found to depend strongly on the GaAs background doping. Heavily carbon doped rm Al_{x}Ga _{1-x}As/GaAs superlattices have been found to be more stable against impurity induced layer disordering (IILD) than Mg or Zn doped superlattices, indicating that the low carbon diffusion coefficient limits the IILD process. Carbon doping has been used in the base region on an Npn AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT). Transistors with 3 x 10 μm self-aligned emitter fingers have been fabricated which exhibit a current gain cutoff frequency of f_ {rm t} = 26 GHz.

  19. Electronic structure and lattice dynamics at the interface of single layer FeSe and SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Towfiq; Balatsky, Alexander; Zhu, Jian-Xin

    Recent discovery of high-temperature superconductivity with the superconducting energy gap opening at temperatures close to or above the liquid nitrogen boiling point in the single-layer FeSe grown on SrTiO3 has attracted significant interest. It suggests that the interface effects can be utilized to enhance the superconductivity. It has been shown recently that the coupling between the electrons in FeSe and vibrational modes at the interface play an important role. Here we report on a detailed study of electronic structure and lattice dynamics in the single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 interface by using the state-of-art electronic structure method within the density functional theory. The nature of the vibrational modes at the interface and their coupling to the electronic degrees of freedom are analyzed. In addition, the effect of hole and electron doping in SrTiO3 on the electron-mode coupling strength is also considered. This work was carried out under the auspices of the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. DOE at LANL under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396, and was supported by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  20. Local boundary reflections in lattice Boltzmann schemes: Spurious boundary layers and their impact on the velocity, diffusion and dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, Irina; Roux, Laetitia; Silva, Goncalo

    2015-10-01

    This work demonstrates that in advection-diffusion Lattice Boltzmann schemes, the local mass-conserving boundary rules, such as bounce-back and local specular reflection, may modify the transport coefficients predicted by the Chapman-Enskog expansion when they enforce to zero not only the normal, but also the tangential boundary flux. In order to accommodate it to the bulk solution, the system develops a Knudsen-layer correction to the non-equilibrium part of the population solution. Two principal secondary effects-(i) decrease in the diffusion coefficient, and (ii) retardation of the average advection velocity, obtained in a closed analytical form, are proportional, respectively, to freely assigned diagonal weights for equilibrium mass and velocity terms. In addition, due to their transverse velocity gradients, the boundary layers affect the longitudinal diffusion coefficient similarly to Taylor dispersion, as they grow as the square of the Péclet number. These numerical artifacts can be eliminated or reduced by a proper space distribution of the free-tunable collision eigenvalue in two-relaxation-time schemes.

  1. A novel two-dimensional MgB6 crystal: metal-layer stabilized boron kagome lattice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Sheng-Yi; Li, Xian-Bin; Tian, Wei Quan; Chen, Nian-Ke; Wang, Yeliang; Zhang, Shengbai; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2015-01-14

    Based on first-principles calculations, we designed for the first time a boron-kagome-based two-dimensional MgB6 crystal, in which two boron kagome layers sandwich a triangular magnesium layer. The two-dimensional lattice is metallic with several bands across the Fermi level, and among them a Dirac point appears at the K point of the first Brillouin zone. This metal-stabilized boron kagome system displays electron-phonon coupling, with a superconductivity critical transition temperature of 4.7 K, and thus it is another possible superconducting Mg-B compound besides MgB2. Furthermore, the proposed 2D MgB6 can also be used for hydrogen storage after decoration with Ca. Up to five H2 molecules can be attracted by one Ca with an average binding energy of 0.225 eV. The unique properties of 2D MgB6 will spur broad interest in nanoscience and technology.

  2. Confinement of vibrational modes within crystalline lattices using thin amorphous layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagolini, Luigi; Mattoni, Alessandro; Lusk, Mark T.

    2017-04-01

    It is possible to confine vibrational modes to a crystal by encapsulating it within thin disordered layers with the same average properties as the crystal. This is not due to an impedance mismatch between materials but, rather, to higher order moments in the distribution of density and stiffness in the disordered phase—i.e. it is a result of material substructure. The concept is elucidated in an idealized one-dimensional setting and then demonstrated for a realistic nanocrystalline geometry. This offers the prospect of specifically engineering higher order property distributions as an alternate means of managing phonons.

  3. Confinement of vibrational modes within crystalline lattices using thin amorphous layers.

    PubMed

    Bagolini, Luigi; Mattoni, Alessandro; Lusk, Mark T

    2017-04-12

    It is possible to confine vibrational modes to a crystal by encapsulating it within thin disordered layers with the same average properties as the crystal. This is not due to an impedance mismatch between materials but, rather, to higher order moments in the distribution of density and stiffness in the disordered phase-i.e. it is a result of material substructure. The concept is elucidated in an idealized one-dimensional setting and then demonstrated for a realistic nanocrystalline geometry. This offers the prospect of specifically engineering higher order property distributions as an alternate means of managing phonons.

  4. Graphene coated with controllable N-doped carbon layer by molecular layer deposition as electrode materials for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yao; Gao, Zhe; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Shichao; Qin, Yong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, graphene is coated with nitrogen-doped carbon layer, which is produced by a carbonization process of aromatic polyimide (PI) films deposited on the surfaces of graphene by molecular layer deposition (MLD). The utilization of MLD not only allows uniform coating of PI layers on the surfaces of pristine graphene without any surface treatment, but also enables homogenous dispersion of doped nitrogen atoms in the carbonized products. The as-prepared N-doped carbon layer coated graphene (NC-G) exhibited remarkable capacitance performance as electrode materials for supercapacitor, showing a high specific capacitance of 290.2 F g-1 at current density of 1 A g-1 in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolyte, meanwhile maintaining good rate performance and stable cycle capability. The NC-G synthesized by this way represents an alternative promising candidate as electrode material for supercapacitors.

  5. Clocking the anisotropic lattice dynamics of multi-walled carbon nanotubes by four-dimensional ultrafast transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Gaolong; Sun, Shuaishuai; Li, Zhongwen; Tian, Huanfang; Yang, Huaixin; Li, Jianqi

    2015-02-12

    Recent advances in the four-dimensional ultrafast transmission electron microscope (4D-UTEM) with combined spatial and temporal resolutions have made it possible to directly visualize structural dynamics of materials at the atomic level. Herein, we report on our development on a 4D-UTEM which can be operated properly on either the photo-emission or the thermionic mode. We demonstrate its ability to obtain sequences of snapshots with high spatial and temporal resolutions in the study of lattice dynamics of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). This investigation provides an atomic level description of remarkable anisotropic lattice dynamics at the picosecond timescales. Moreover, our UTEM measurements clearly reveal that distinguishable lattice relaxations appear in intra-tubular sheets on an ultrafast timescale of a few picoseconds and after then an evident lattice expansion along the radial direction. These anisotropic behaviors in the MWCNTs are considered arising from the variety of chemical bonding, i.e. the weak van der Waals bonding between the tubular planes and the strong covalent sp(2)-hybridized bonds in the tubular sheets.

  6. Clocking the anisotropic lattice dynamics of multi-walled carbon nanotubes by four-dimensional ultrafast transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Gaolong; Sun, Shuaishuai; Li, Zhongwen; Tian, Huanfang; Yang, Huaixin; Li, Jianqi

    2015-02-01

    Recent advances in the four-dimensional ultrafast transmission electron microscope (4D-UTEM) with combined spatial and temporal resolutions have made it possible to directly visualize structural dynamics of materials at the atomic level. Herein, we report on our development on a 4D-UTEM which can be operated properly on either the photo-emission or the thermionic mode. We demonstrate its ability to obtain sequences of snapshots with high spatial and temporal resolutions in the study of lattice dynamics of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). This investigation provides an atomic level description of remarkable anisotropic lattice dynamics at the picosecond timescales. Moreover, our UTEM measurements clearly reveal that distinguishable lattice relaxations appear in intra-tubular sheets on an ultrafast timescale of a few picoseconds and after then an evident lattice expansion along the radial direction. These anisotropic behaviors in the MWCNTs are considered arising from the variety of chemical bonding, i.e. the weak van der Waals bonding between the tubular planes and the strong covalent sp2-hybridized bonds in the tubular sheets.

  7. The outer layers of cool, non-Mira carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.

    1991-01-01

    The outer layers and near circumstellar envelope (CSE) of a typical carbon star have been studied using available data from theoretical and empirical models. An attempt is made to match the density-velocity structure of the photosphere-chromosphere region to values from the radio CO observations, which arise from the outer CSE. It is concluded that the stellar atmosphere includes a relatively thin high-temperature region close to hydrostatic equilibrium and a much more extended cooler region of outflowing gas and dust. To extend the outer photosphere and chromosphere to match the mass loss density appears to require an injection of energy and momentum by some mechanism rather close to the stellar surface.

  8. Limiting factors for carbon based chemical double layer capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, M. Frank; Johnson, C.; Owens, T.; Stevens, B.

    1993-01-01

    The Chemical Double Layer (CDL) capacitor improves energy storage density dramatically when compared with conventional electrolytic capacitors. When compared to batteries, the CDL Capacitor is much less energy dense; however, the power density is orders of magnitude better. As a result, CDL-battery combinations present an interesting pulse power system with many potential applications. Due to the nature of the CDL it is inherently a low voltage device. The applications of the CDL can be tailored to auxiliary energy and burst mode storages which require fast charge/discharge cycles. Typical of the applications envisioned are power system backup, directed energy weapons concepts, electric automobiles, and electric actuators. In this paper, we will discuss some of the general characteristics of carbon-based CDL technology describing the structure, performance parameters, and methods of construction. Further, analytical and experimental results which define the state of the art are presented and described in terms of impact on applications.

  9. Development of spin-on carbon hardmasks with comparable etch resistance to Amorphous Carbon Layer (ACL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Hwan-Sung; Yoon, Kyong-Ho; Kim, Min-Soo; Oh, Seung Bae; Song, Jee-Yun; Tokareva, Nataliya; Kim, Jong-Seob; Chang, Tuwon

    2008-11-01

    In recent microlithography of semiconductor fabrication, spin-on hardmask (SOH) process continue to gain popularity as it replaces the traditional SiON/ACL hardmask scheme which suffers from high CoO, low productivity, particle contamination, and layer alignment issues. In the SOH process, organic polymer with high carbon content is spin-cast to form a carbon hardmask film. In the previous papers, we reported the development of organic SOH materials and their application in sub-70 nm lithography. In this paper, we describe the synthesis of organic polymers with very high carbon contents (>92 wt.%) and the evaluation of the spin-coated films for the hardmask application. The high carbon content of the polymer ensures improved etch resistance which amounts to >90% of ACL's resistance. However, as the carbon content of the polymers increases, the solubility in common organic solvents becomes lower. Here we report the strategies to improve the solubility of the high carbon content resins and optimization of the film properties for the SOH application.

  10. Point-like and line-like melting of the vortex lattice in the universal phase diagram of layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, A.E.

    1997-11-01

    The phase diagram of layered superconductors in the vortex state is studied by Monte Carlo simulations of the three-dimensional uniformly frustrated XY model with different anisotropy parameters. In the London regime the phase diagram of layered superconductors is shown to be universal if plotted in scaled temperature and field with the field scale being the two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) crossover field B{sub cr}. We find a very broad crossover region between quasi-two-dimensional and line-like melting regimes ranging from {approximately}B{sub cr} to {approximately}10B{sub cr}. The region is characterized by several distinct features: (i) the melting of the lattice occurs when the Josephson energy is suppressed to 64{percent} of its bare value; (ii) the latent heat at the transition does not change much with the anisotropy parameter; (iii) the jump of the Josephson energy at the transition is equal to the jump of the in-plane energy. The entropy jump reaches a maximum value of 0.45k{sub B}/vortex/layer at a field {approximately}10B{sub cr} and decreases with decreasing field due to an increase in the transition temperature. This behavior is found to be in a good agreement with experimental observations after the renormalization due to the temperature dependence of superconducting parameters is taken into account. The pancake alignment above the transition increases with increasing of the Josephson coupling. At high fields the melting is accompanied by a significant drop in the coupling energy and the destruction of vortex lines, while at small fields the vortex lines preserve at the transition. In the studied region of parameters we find that the line liquid does not have superconductivity along the direction of magnetic field in the thermodynamic limit. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Multifunctional carbon nanotube thin film composites by layer-by-layer assembly technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Bong Sup

    Polymeric layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly offers a pathway for multifunctional/multicomponent materials with molecular-scale control of stratified structures. Among the wide variety nanoscale building blocks such as nanowires and nanodots, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are regarded as one of the most versatile because of their superior mechanical and electrical properties as well as geometrical perfection. In this thesis, LBL assembled SWNT thin film nanocomposites with high mechanical strength/toughness and with high electrical/optical properties are presented. Exceptional exfoliation state of SWNTs and controlled nm-thick layered structures are the basis for achieving tunable physical properties. Highly anisotropic features of SWNTs are translated into 2 dimensional alignments by meniscus combing technique during LBL assemblies. Advanced LBL assemblies by dewetting methods are also introduced, which significantly accelerate the process with improved lateral organization of nanowires. Furthermore, SWNT composite coating on commodity cotton yarns produced intelligent electronic textiles (e-textiles) with intrinsic humidity sensibility. This e-textile has been further combined with antigen/antibody sensing capability in order to develop a selective albumin biosensor which provides a direct route for the application of these materials as wearable biomonitoring and telemedicine sensors.

  12. Anisotropy measurement of pyrolytic carbon layers of coated particles

    SciTech Connect

    Vesyolkin, Ju. A. Ivanov, A. S.; Trushkina, T. V.

    2015-12-15

    Equipment at the National Research Center Kurchatov Institute intended for the anisotropy determination of pyrolytic carbon layers in coated particles (CPs) of the GT-MGR reactor is tested and calibrated. The dependence of the anisotropy coefficient on the size of the measurement region is investigated. The results of measuring the optical anisotropy factor (OPTAF) for an aluminum mirror, rutile crystal, and available CP samples with the known characteristics measured previously using ORNL equipment (United States) are presented. In addition, measurements of CP samples prepared at VNIINM are performed. A strong dependence of the data on the preparation quality of metallographic sections is found. Our investigations allow us to make the conclusion on the working capacity of the existing equipment for measuring the anisotropy of pyrolytic carbon CP coatings using the equipment at the Kurchatov Institute with the relative error of about 1%. It is shown that the elimination of the errors caused by the stochastic fluctuations in a measuring path by mathematical processing of the signal allows us to decrease the relative error of OPTAF measurements to ∼0.3%.

  13. Anisotropy measurement of pyrolytic carbon layers of coated particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesyolkin, Ju. A.; Ivanov, A. S.; Trushkina, T. V.

    2015-12-01

    Equipment at the National Research Center Kurchatov Institute intended for the anisotropy determination of pyrolytic carbon layers in coated particles (CPs) of the GT-MGR reactor is tested and calibrated. The dependence of the anisotropy coefficient on the size of the measurement region is investigated. The results of measuring the optical anisotropy factor (OPTAF) for an aluminum mirror, rutile crystal, and available CP samples with the known characteristics measured previously using ORNL equipment (United States) are presented. In addition, measurements of CP samples prepared at VNIINM are performed. A strong dependence of the data on the preparation quality of metallographic sections is found. Our investigations allow us to make the conclusion on the working capacity of the existing equipment for measuring the anisotropy of pyrolytic carbon CP coatings using the equipment at the Kurchatov Institute with the relative error of about 1%. It is shown that the elimination of the errors caused by the stochastic fluctuations in a measuring path by mathematical processing of the signal allows us to decrease the relative error of OPTAF measurements to ~0.3%.

  14. Nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond and multi-layer-graphene-like hybrid carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeng, Yonhua; Yeh, Shoupu; Fang, Wei Cheng; Chu, Yuehchieh

    2014-03-01

    Nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond (N-UNCD) and multi-layer-graphene-like hybrid carbon films have been synthesized by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) on oxidized silicon which is pre-seeded with diamond nanoparticles. MPECVD of N-UNCD on nanodiamond seeds produces a base layer, from which carbon structures nucleate and grow perpendicularly to form standing carbon platelets. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering measurements reveal that these carbon platelets are comprised of ultrananocrystalline diamond embedded in multilayer-graphene-like carbon structures. The hybrid carbon films are of low electrical resistivity. UNCD grains in the N-UNCD base layer and the hybrid carbon platelets serve as high-density diamond nuclei for the deposition of an electrically insulating UNCD film on it. Biocompatible carbon-based heaters made of low-resistivity hybrid carbon heaters encapsulated by insulating UNCD for possible electrosurgical applications have been demonstrated.

  15. Atomic migration of carbon in hard turned layers of carburized bearing steel

    DOE PAGES

    Bedekar, Vikram; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Guo, Wei; ...

    2016-01-01

    In grain finement and non-equilibrium there is carbon segregation within grain boundaries alters the mechanical performance of hard turning layers in carburized bearing steel. Moreover, an atom probe tomography (APT) study on the nanostructured hard turning layers reveals carbon migration to grain boundaries as a result of carbide decomposition during severe plastic deformation. In addition, samples exposed to different cutting speeds show that the carbon migration rate increases with the cutting speed. For these two effects lead to an ultrafine carbon network structure resulting in increased hardness and thermal stability in the severely deformed surface layer.

  16. Catalytic properties of composite amorphous carbon-platinum layers in fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nechitailov, A. A. Zvonareva, T. K.; Remenyuk, A. D.; Tolmachev, V. A.; Goryachev, D. N.; El'tsina, O. S.; Belyakov, L. V.; Sreseli, O. M.

    2008-10-15

    Catalytic properties of composite amorphous carbon-platinum layers produced by magnetron cosputtering have been studied. The layers were characterized by electron microscopy, IR spectroscopy, ellipsometry, gravimetry, and spectrophotometric chemical analysis. The catalytic activity of the layers was studied in an air-hydrogen fuel cell by measuring its load and power characteristics.

  17. Assembling carbon quantum dots to a layered carbon for high-density supercapacitor electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guanxiong; Wu, Shuilin; Hui, Liwei; Zhao, Yuan; Ye, Jianglin; Tan, Ziqi; Zeng, Wencong; Tao, Zhuchen; Yang, Lihua; Zhu, Yanwu

    2016-01-01

    It is found that carbon quantum dots (CQDs) self-assemble to a layer structure at ice crystals-water interface with freeze- drying. Such layers interconnect with each other, forming a free-standing CQD assembly, which has an interlayer distance of about 0.366 nm, due to the existence of curved carbon rings other than hexagons in the assembly. CQDs are fabricated by rupturing C60 by KOH activation with a production yield of ~15 wt.%. The CQDs obtained have an average height of 1.14 nm and an average lateral size of 7.48 nm, and are highly soluble in water. By packaging annealed CQD assembly to high density (1.23 g cm−3) electrodes in supercapacitors, a high volumetric capacitance of 157.4 F cm−3 and a high areal capacitance of 0.66 F cm−2 (normalized to the loading area of electrodes) are demonstrated in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolyte with a good rate capability. PMID:26754463

  18. Wind-driven, double-gyre, ocean circulation in a reduced-gravity, 2.5-layer, lattice Boltzmann model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, L. H.; Feng, S. D.; Luo, D. H.; Gao, S. T.

    2006-07-01

    A coupled lattice Boltzmann (LB) model with second-order accuracy is applied to the reduced-gravity, shallow water, 2.5-layer model for wind-driven double-gyre ocean circulation. By introducing the second-order integral approximation for the collision operator, the model becomes fully explicit. The Coriolis force and other external forces axe included in the model with second-order accuracy, which is consistent with the discretization accuracy of the LB equation. The feature of the multiple equilibria solutions is found in the numerical experiments under different Reynolds numbers based on this LB scheme. With the Reynolds number increasing from 3000 to 4000, the solution of this model is destabilized from the anti-syminetric double-gyre solution to the subtropic gyre solution and then to the subpolar gyre solution. The transitions between these equilibria. states are also found in some parameter ranges. The time-dependent variability of the circulation based on this LB simulation is also discussed for varying viscosity regimes. The flow of this model exhibits oscillations with different timescales varying from subannual to interannual. The corresponding statistical oscillation modes are obtained by spectral analysis. By analyzing the spatio-temporal structures of these modes, it is found that the subannual oscillation with a 9-month period originates from the barotropic Rossby basin mode. and the interannual oscillations with periods ranging from 1.5 years to 4.6 years originate from the recirculation gyre modes, which include the barotropic and the baroclinic recirculation gyre modes.

  19. Lattice-Boltzmann Simulations of Multiphase Flows in Gas-Diffusion-Layer (GDL) of a PEM Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjeea, Shiladitya; Cole, J Vernon; Jainb, Kunal; Gidwania, Ashok

    2008-11-01

    Improved power density and freeze-thaw durability in automotive applications of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs) requires effective water management at the membrane. This is controlled by a porous hydrophobic gas-diffusion-layer (GDL) inserted between the membrane catalyst layer and the gas reactant channels. The GDL distributes the incoming gaseous reactants on the catalyst surface and removes excess water by capillary action. There is, however, limited understanding of the multiphase, multi-component transport of liquid water, vapor and gaseous reactants within these porous materials. This is due primarily to the challenges of in-situ diagnostics for such thin (200 -“ 300 {microns}), optically opaque (graphite) materials. Transport is typically analyzed by fitting Darcy's Law type expressions for permeability, in conjunction with capillary pressure relations based on formulations derived for media such as soils. Therefore, there is significant interest in developing predictive models for transport in GDLs and related porous media. Such models could be applied to analyze and optimize systems based on the interactions between cell design, materials, and operating conditions, and could also be applied to evaluating material design concepts. Recently, the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) has emerged as an effective tool in modeling multiphase flows in general, and flows through porous media in particular. This method is based on the solution of a discrete form of the well-known Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE) for molecular distribution, tailored to recover the continuum Navier-Stokes flow. The kinetic theory basis of the method allows simple implementation of molecular forces responsible for liquid-gas phase separation and capillary effects. The solution advances by a streaming and collision type algorithm that makes it suitable to implement for domains with complex boundaries. We have developed both single and multiphase LB models and applied them to

  20. Design and application of carbon nanomaterials for photoactive and charge transport layers in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Sunghwan; Jun, Gwang Hoon; Jeon, Seokwoo; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2016-04-01

    Commercialization of organic solar cell (OSC) has faltered due to their low power conversion efficiency (PCE) compared to inorganic solar cell. Low electrical conductivity, low charge mobility, and short-range light absorption of most organic materials limit the PCE of OSCs. Carbon nanomaterials, especially carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphenes, are of great interest for use in OSC applications due to their high electrical conductivity, mobility, and unique optical properties for enhancing the performance of OSCs. In this review, recent progress toward the integration of carbon nanomaterials into OSCs is described. The role of carbon nanomaterials and strategies for their integration into various layers of OSCs, including the photoactive layer and charge transport layer, are discussed. Based on these, we also discuss the prospects of carbon nanomaterials for specific OSC layers to maximize the PCE.

  1. Design and application of carbon nanomaterials for photoactive and charge transport layers in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sunghwan; Jun, Gwang Hoon; Jeon, Seokwoo; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Commercialization of organic solar cell (OSC) has faltered due to their low power conversion efficiency (PCE) compared to inorganic solar cell. Low electrical conductivity, low charge mobility, and short-range light absorption of most organic materials limit the PCE of OSCs. Carbon nanomaterials, especially carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphenes, are of great interest for use in OSC applications due to their high electrical conductivity, mobility, and unique optical properties for enhancing the performance of OSCs. In this review, recent progress toward the integration of carbon nanomaterials into OSCs is described. The role of carbon nanomaterials and strategies for their integration into various layers of OSCs, including the photoactive layer and charge transport layer, are discussed. Based on these, we also discuss the prospects of carbon nanomaterials for specific OSC layers to maximize the PCE.

  2. Considerably improved photovoltaic performance of carbon nanotube-based solar cells using metal oxide layers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feijiu; Kozawa, Daichi; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Hiraoka, Kazushi; Mouri, Shinichiro; Ohno, Yutaka; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2015-02-18

    Carbon nanotube-based solar cells have been extensively studied from the perspective of potential application. Here we demonstrated a significant improvement of the carbon nanotube solar cells by the use of metal oxide layers for efficient carrier transport. The metal oxides also serve as an antireflection layer and an efficient carrier dopant, leading to a reduction in the loss of the incident solar light and an increase in the photocurrent, respectively. As a consequence, the photovoltaic performance of both p-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/n-Si and n-SWNT/p-Si heterojunction solar cells using MoOx and ZnO layers is improved, resulting in very high photovoltaic conversion efficiencies of 17.0 and 4.0%, respectively. These findings regarding the use of metal oxides as multifunctional layers suggest that metal oxide layers could improve the performance of various electronic devices based on carbon nanotubes.

  3. Considerably improved photovoltaic performance of carbon nanotube-based solar cells using metal oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feijiu; Kozawa, Daichi; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Hiraoka, Kazushi; Mouri, Shinichiro; Ohno, Yutaka; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2015-02-01

    Carbon nanotube-based solar cells have been extensively studied from the perspective of potential application. Here we demonstrated a significant improvement of the carbon nanotube solar cells by the use of metal oxide layers for efficient carrier transport. The metal oxides also serve as an antireflection layer and an efficient carrier dopant, leading to a reduction in the loss of the incident solar light and an increase in the photocurrent, respectively. As a consequence, the photovoltaic performance of both p-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/n-Si and n-SWNT/p-Si heterojunction solar cells using MoOx and ZnO layers is improved, resulting in very high photovoltaic conversion efficiencies of 17.0 and 4.0%, respectively. These findings regarding the use of metal oxides as multifunctional layers suggest that metal oxide layers could improve the performance of various electronic devices based on carbon nanotubes.

  4. Method of evaluating the integrity of the outer carbon layer of triso-coated reactor fuel particles

    DOEpatents

    Caputo, Anthony J.; Costanzo, Dante A.; Lackey, Jr., Walter J.; Layton, Frank L.; Stinton, David P.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for determining defective final layers of carbon on triso-coated fuel particles and the like. Samples of the particles are subjected to a high temperature treatment with gaseous chlorine and thereafter radiographed. The chlorine penetrates through any defective carbon layer and reacts with the underlying silicon carbide resulting in the volatilization of the silicon as SiCl.sub.4 leaving carbon as a porous layer. This porous carbon layer is easily detected by the radiography.

  5. Formation of complex Al-N-C layer in aluminium by successive carbon and nitrogen implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uglov, V. V.; Cherenda, N. N.; Khodasevich, V. V.; Sokol, V. A.; Abramov, I. I.; Danilyuk, A. L.; Wenzel, A.; Gerlach, J.; Rauschenbach, B.

    1999-01-01

    The results of Auger electron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy of the surface layer of aluminium after successive implantation by carbon and nitrogen ions are presented in this work. The energy of implanted ions is 40 keV. The implantation dose varies in the range (3.3-6.5) × 10 17 ions/cm 2. The findings show that successive implantation leads to the formation of two main layers in aluminium. The first layer is AlNC x (0 < x < 0.5) layer with violated hcp. AlN structure, where carbon atoms form bonds with nitrogen atoms. The second layer contains disoriented Al 4C 3 precipitates and carbon atoms migrated from the first layer. The mechanism of migration is discussed.

  6. Epitaxial growth of group III nitrides on silicon substrates via a reflective lattice-matched zirconium diboride buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolle, J.; Roucka, R.; Tsong, I. S. T.; Ritter, C.; Crozier, P. A.; Chizmeshya, A. V. G.; Kouvetakis, J.

    2003-04-01

    Growth of metallic and reflecting ZrB2 films is conducted on Si(111) substrates at 900 °C using a single-source unimolecular precursor Zr(BH4)4 in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber. Epitaxial growth of ZrB2(0001) is accomplished despite the very large lattice mismatch between ZrB2 and Si(111). High-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images of the sharp ZrB2/Si(111) interface show a heteroepitaxial relationship involving a "magic mismatch" of coincidence lattices. The GaN films grown on the ZrB2/Si(111) template is virtually homoepitaxy because of the very small lattice mismatch, 0.6%, between the in-plane lattice parameters of ZrB2(0001) and GaN(0001).

  7. Surface modification of carbon post arrays by atomic layer deposition of ZnO film.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Ae; Byun, Young-Chul; Singh, Umesh; Cho, Hyoung J; Kim, Hyoungsub

    2011-08-01

    The applicability of atomic layer deposition (ALD) process to the carbon microelectromechanical system technology was studied for a surface modification method of the carbon post electrodes. A conformal coating of the ALD-ZnO film was successfully demonstrated on the carbon post arrays which were fabricated by the traditional photolithography and subsequent two-step pyrolysis. A significant Zn diffusion into the underlying carbon posts was observed during the ALD process. The addition of a sputter-deposited ZnO interfacial layer efficiently blocked the Zn diffusion without altering the microstructure and surface morphology of the ALD-ZnO film.

  8. Suppression of tin precipitation in SiSn alloy layers by implanted carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Gaiduk, P. I.; Lundsgaard Hansen, J. Nylandsted Larsen, A.

    2014-06-09

    By combining transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, we have identified carbon related suppression of dislocations and tin precipitation in supersaturated molecular-beam epitaxial grown SiSn alloy layers. Secondary ion mass spectrometry has exposed the accumulation of carbon in the SiSn layers after high temperature carbon implantation and high temperature thermal treatment. Strain-enhanced separation of point defects and formation of dopant-defect complexes are suggested to be responsible for the effects. The possibility for carbon assisted segregation-free high temperature growth of heteroepitaxial SiSn/Si and GeSn/Si structures is argued.

  9. Optical properties of spray coated layers with carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenc, Zofia; Krzeminski, Jakub; Wroblewski, Grzegorz; Salbut, Leszek

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes as well as graphene are allotropic forms of carbon. Graphene is a two dimensional (2D) form of atomic-scale, hexagonal lattice, while carbon nanotube is a cylindrical nanostructure composed of a rolled sheet of graphene lattice at specific and discrete angles. Both of discussed materials have a high potential for modern engineering, especially in organic and printed electronics. High transparency in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum and low electrical resistance are desirable features in various applications and may be fulfilled with studied carbon nanomaterials. They have chances to become an important technological improvement in customers electronic devices by applying them to electrodes production in flexible screens and light sources. Graphene end carbon nanotubes are conceptually similar. However, characteristic properties of these two substances are different. In the article authors present the results of the transmission in visible electromagnetic spectrum characteristics of different samples. This parameter and the resistance of electrodes are tested, analysed and compared. Characteristics of optical transmittance against resistance with the optimal point of that relationship are presented in paper. Moreover, dependency of graphene nanoplatelets agglomerates arrangement against type of nano-fillers is shown. Two groups of tested inks contain graphene nanoplatelets with different fillers diameters. The third group contains carbon nanotubes. Described parameters are important for production process and results of analysis can be used by technologists working with elastic electronics.

  10. Relative permeabilities of supercritical CO2 and brine in carbon sequestration by a two-phase lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jian.-Fei.; He, S.; Zu, Y. Q.; Lamy-Chappuis, B.; Yardley, B. W. D.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the migration of supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2 ) in realistic sandstone rocks under conditions of saline aquifers, with applications to the carbon geological storage, has been investigated by a two-phase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). Firstly the digital images of sandstone rocks were reproduced utilizing the X-ray computed microtomography (micro-CT), and high resolutions (up to 2.5 μm) were applied to the pore-scale LBM simulations. For the sake of numerical stability, the digital images were "cleaned" by closing the dead holes and removing the suspended particles in sandstone rocks. In addition, the effect of chemical reactions occurred in the carbonation process on the permeability was taken into account. For the wetting brine and non-wetting supercritical CO2 flows, they were treated as the immiscible fluids and were driven by pressure gradients in sandstone rocks. Relative permeabilities of brine and supercritical CO2 in sandstone rocks were estimated. Particularly the dynamic saturation was applied to improve the reliability of the calculations of the relative permeabilities. Moreover, the effects of the viscosity ratio of the two immiscible fluids and the resolution of digital images on the relative permeability were systematically investigated.

  11. Quantitative determination of lattice fluoride effects on the solubility and crystallinity of carbonated apatites with incorporated fluoride.

    PubMed

    Yan, G; Moribe, K; Otsuka, M; Papangkorn, K; Higuchi, W I

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the effects of fluoride on the solubility and crystallinity of carbonated apatites (CAPs) after its incorporation into the crystal lattice using the metastable equilibrium solubility (MES) distribution method. Fluoride-incorporated CAPs (F-CAPs) of two different carbonate levels (3 and 5%) and fluoride contents from 0 to 20,000 µg/g were synthesized. X-ray diffraction experiments and Rietveld analysis were conducted to obtain crystallite microstrain and unit cell parameters. Acetate buffer MES solution media were prepared at two solution fluoride concentrations (0.2 and 2.0 mg/l) and at two pHs (5.0 and 5.7). The unit cell a-axis values of the F-CAPs were found to decrease as the fluoride content increased, consistent with the fluoride being incorporated into the crystal lattice. The fluoride concentrations in the MES solution media were high enough to provide a 'swamping' effect such that the fluoride released from the F-CAPs during dissolution was minimal in changing the solution fluoride concentration. Employing the MES distribution superposition method, it was shown that the surface complex possessing the fluorapatite (FAP) stoichiometry [Ca10(PO4)6F2] accounted for the MES distribution behavior of all experiments. In addition, the mean pIFAP [the value of -log(aCa(10)aPO4(6)aF(2)) calculated from the ionic activity product based on FAP stoichiometry of the MES dissolution media in which 50% of the F-CAPs had dissolved] correlated well with the crystallite microstrain parameters of the F-CAPs. The incorporated fluoride in the F-CAPs showed only modest effects on F-CAP crystallinity and solubility.

  12. Carbon-Nanotube Conductive Layers for Thin-Film Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2005-01-01

    Thin, transparent layers comprising mats of carbon nanotubes have been proposed for providing lateral (that is, inplane) electrical conductivities for collecting electric currents from the front surfaces of the emitter layers of thin-film solar photovoltaic cells. Traditionally, thin, semitransparent films of other electrically conductive materials (usually, indium tin oxide, zinc oxide, or cadmium sulfide) have been used for this purpose. As in the cases of the traditional semitransparent conductive films, the currents collected by the nanotube layers would, in turn, be further collected by front metal contact stripes. Depending on details of a specific solar-cell design, the layer of carbon nanotubes would be deposited in addition to, or instead of, a semitransparent layer of one of these traditional conductive materials (see figure). The proposal is expected to afford the following advantages: The electrical conductivity of the carbon- nanotube layer would exceed that of the corresponding semitransparent layer of traditional electrically conductive material. The greater electrical conductivity of the carbon-nanotube layer would make it possible to retain adequate lateral electrical conductivity while reducing the thickness of, or eliminating entirely, the traditional semitransparent conductive layer. As a consequence of thinning or elimination of the traditional semitransparent conductive layer, less light would be absorbed, so that more of the incident light would be available for photovoltaic conversion. The greater electrical conductivity of the carbon-nanotube layer would make it possible to increase the distance between front metal contact stripes, in addition to (or instead of) thinning or eliminating the layer of traditional semitransparent conductive material. Consequently, the fraction of solar-cell area shadowed by front metal contact stripes would be reduced again, making more of the incident light available for photovoltaic conversion. The electrical

  13. Influence of the microporous layer on carbon corrosion in the catalyst layer of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spernjak, Dusan; Fairweather, Joseph; Mukundan, Rangachary; Rockward, Tommy; Borup, Rodney L.

    2012-09-01

    Corrosion of the catalyst support reduces PEM fuel cell performance via catalyst layer (CL) degradation (loss of porosity, catalyst connectivity, and active catalyst surface area). Carbon corrosion was investigated in a segmented cell for cathode gas diffusion layers (GDLs) with and without a microporous layer (MPL) to investigate the spatial aspects of GDL effect on corrosion. The cells were aged in situ using an accelerated stress test (AST) for carbon-support corrosion consisting of consecutive holds at 1.3 V. Carbon corrosion was quantified by measuring CO2 evolution during the AST. Performance degradation was substantial both with and without cathode MPL, but the degradation of the CL after prolonged corrosion was lower in the presence of an MPL. This was corroborated by better cell performance, higher remaining Pt active area, lower kinetic losses and smaller Pt particle size. The cell with an MPL showed increasingly nonuniform current distribution with corrosion time, which is correlated to the distribution of the Pt particle growth across the active area. This cell also showed an increase in mass-transport resistance due to MPL degradation. Without an MPL, GDL carbon fibers caused localized thinning in the cathode CL, originating from the combined effects of compression and corrosion.

  14. Design of multiple-layer microwave absorbing structure based on rice husk and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seng, Lee Yeng; Wee, F. H.; Rahim, H. A.; AbdulMalek, MohamedFareq; You, Y. K.; Liyana, Z.; Ezanuddin, A. A. M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a multiple-layered microwave absorber using rice husk and carbon nanotube composite. The dielectric properties of each layer composite were measured and analysed. The different layer of microwave absorber enables to control the microwave absorption performance. The microwave absorption performances are demonstrated through measurements of reflectivity over the frequency range 2-18 GHz. An improvement of microwave absorption <-20 dB is observed with respect to a high lossy composite placed at bottom layer of multiple layers. Reflectivity evaluations indicate that the composites display a great potential application as wideband electromagnetic wave absorbers.

  15. Atomic Layer Deposition on Carbon Nanotubes and their Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stano, Kelly Lynn

    Global issues related to energy and the environment have motivated development of advanced material solutions outside of traditional metals ceramics, and polymers. Taking inspiration from composites, where the combination of two or more materials often yields superior properties, the field of organic-inorganic hybrids has recently emerged. Carbon nanotube (CNT)-inorganic hybrids have drawn widespread and increasing interest in recent years due to their multifunctionality and potential impact across several technologically important application areas. Before the impacts of CNT-inorganic hybrids can be realized however, processing techniques must be developed for their scalable production. Optimization in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods for synthesis of CNTs and vertically aligned CNT arrays has created production routes both high throughput and economically feasible. Additionally, control of CVD parameters has allowed for growth of CNT arrays that are able to be drawn into aligned sheets and further processed to form a variety of aligned 1, 2, and 3-dimensional bulk assemblies including ribbons, yarns, and foams. To date, there have only been a few studies on utilizing these bulk assemblies for the production of CNT-inorganic hybrids. Wet chemical methods traditionally used for fabricating CNT-inorganic hybrids are largely incompatible with CNT assemblies, since wetting and drying the delicate structures with solvents can destroy their structure. It is therefore necessary to investigate alternative processing strategies in order to advance the field of CNT-inorganic hybrids. In this dissertation, atomic layer deposition (ALD) is evaluated as a synthetic route for the production of large-scale CNT-metal oxide hybrids as well as pure metal oxide architectures utilizing CNT arrays, ribbons, and ultralow density foams as deposition templates. Nucleation and growth behavior of alumina was evaluated as a function of CNT surface chemistry. While highly graphitic

  16. Long wavelength emitting GaInN quantum wells on metamorphic GaInN buffer layers with enlarged in-plane lattice parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Däubler, J. Passow, T.; Aidam, R.; Köhler, K.; Kirste, L.; Kunzer, M.; Wagner, J.

    2014-09-15

    Metamorphic (i.e., linear composition graded) GaInN buffer layers with an increased in-plane lattice parameter, grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, were used as templates for metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) grown GaInN/GaInN quantum wells (QWs), emitting in the green to red spectral region. A composition pulling effect was observed allowing considerable higher growth temperatures for the QWs for a given In composition. The internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of the QWs was determined by temperature and excitation power density dependent photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. An increase in IQE by a factor of two was found for green emitting QWs grown on metamorphic GaInN buffer compared to reference samples grown on standard GaN buffer layers. The ratio of room temperature to low temperature intensity PL of the red emitting QWs were found to be comparable to the PL efficiency of green emitting QWs, both grown on metamorphic GaInN buffers. The excitation density and well width dependence of the IQE indicate a reduction of the quantum confined Stark effect upon growth on GaInN buffer layers with increased in-plane lattice parameter.

  17. Atomic-layer-deposition-assisted formation of carbon nanoflakes on metal oxides and energy storage application.

    PubMed

    Guan, Cao; Zeng, Zhiyuan; Li, Xianglin; Cao, Xiehong; Fan, Yu; Xia, Xinhui; Pan, Guoxiang; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Hong Jin

    2014-01-29

    Nanostructured carbon is widely used in energy storage devices (e.g., Li-ion and Li-air batteries and supercapacitors). A new method is developed for the generation of carbon nanoflakes on various metal oxide nanostructures by combining atomic layer deposition (ALD) and glucose carbonization. Various metal oxide@nanoflake carbon (MO@f-C) core-branch nanostructures are obtained. For the mechanism, it is proposed that the ALD Al2 O3 and glucose form a composite layer. Upon thermal annealing, the composite layer becomes fragmented and moves outward, accompanied by carbon deposition on the alumina skeleton. When tested as electrochemical supercapacitor electrode, the hierarchical MO@f-C nanostructures exhibit better properties compared with the pristine metal oxides or the carbon coating without ALD. The enhancement can be ascribed to increased specific surface areas and electric conductivity due to the carbon flake coating. This peculiar carbon coating method with the unique hierarchical nanostructure may provide a new insight into the preparation of 'oxides + carbon' hybrid electrode materials for energy storage applications.

  18. Electrodeposition of catalytic and magnetic gold nanoparticles on dendrimer-carbon nanotube layer-by-layer films.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José R; Gabriel, Rayla C; Zucolotto, Valtencir; Silva, Anielle C A; Dantas, Noelio O; Gasparotto, Luiz H S

    2012-11-07

    Magnetic and catalytic gold nanoparticles were electrodeposited through potential pulse on dendrimer-carbon nanotube layer-by-layer (LbL) films. A plasmon absorption band at about 550 nm revealed the presence of nanoscale gold in the film. The location of the Au nanoparticles in the film was clearly observed by selecting the magnetic force microscopy mode. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the electrochemical synthesis of magnetic Au nanoparticles. In addition to the magnetic properties, the Au nanoparticles also exhibited high catalytic activity towards ethanol and glycerol oxidation in alkaline medium.

  19. Fabrication of graphene-silicon layered heterostructures by carbon penetration of silicon film.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lei; Wang, Yeliang; Li, Linfei; Gao, H-J

    2017-02-24

    A new, easy, in situ technique for fabricating a two-dimensional graphene-silicon layered heterostructure has been developed to meet the demand for integration between graphene and silicon-based microelectronic technology. First, carbon atoms are stored in bulk iridium, and then silicon atoms are deposited onto the Ir(111) surface and annealed. With longer annealing times, the carbon atoms penetrate from the bulk iridium to the top of the silicon and eventually coalesce there into graphene islands. Atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy images, high-pass fast Fourier transform treatment and Raman spectroscopy demonstrate that the top graphene layer is intact and continuous, and beneath it is the silicon layer.

  20. Fabrication of graphene–silicon layered heterostructures by carbon penetration of silicon film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Lei; Wang, Yeliang; Li, Linfei; Gao, H.-J.

    2017-02-01

    A new, easy, in situ technique for fabricating a two-dimensional graphene–silicon layered heterostructure has been developed to meet the demand for integration between graphene and silicon-based microelectronic technology. First, carbon atoms are stored in bulk iridium, and then silicon atoms are deposited onto the Ir(111) surface and annealed. With longer annealing times, the carbon atoms penetrate from the bulk iridium to the top of the silicon and eventually coalesce there into graphene islands. Atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy images, high-pass fast Fourier transform treatment and Raman spectroscopy demonstrate that the top graphene layer is intact and continuous, and beneath it is the silicon layer.

  1. Designing an ultrathin silica layer for highly durable carbon nanofibers as the carbon support in polymer electrolyte fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sun-Mi; Park, Jae-Hyun; Lim, Seongyop; Jung, Doo-Hwan; Guim, Hwanuk; Yoon, Young-Gi; Yim, Sung-Dae; Kim, Tae-Young

    2014-10-21

    A critical issue for maintaining long-term applications of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) is the development of an innovative technique for the functionalization of a carbon support that preserves their exceptional electrical conductivity and robustly enriches their durability. Here, we report for the first time how the formation of a partially coated, ultrathin, hydrophobic silica layer around the surfaces of the carbon nanofiber (CNF) helps improve the durability of the CNF without decreasing the significant electrical conductivity of the virgin CNF. The synthesis involved the adsorption of polycarbomethylsilane (PS) on the CNF's sidewalls, followed by high temperature pyrolysis of PS, resulting in a highly durable, conductive carbon support in PEFCs. The Pt nanoparticles are in direct contact with the surface of the carbon in the empty spaces between unevenly coated silica layers, which are not deposited directly onto the silica layer. The presence of a Pt nanoparticle layer that was thicker than the silica layer would be a quite advantageous circumstance that provides contact with other neighboring CNFs without having a significant adverse effect that deeply damages the electrical conductivity of the neighboring CNF composites with the silica layer. Furthermore, the ultrathin, hydrophobic silica layer around the surfaces of the CNF provides great potential to reduce the presence of water molecules in the vicinity of the carbon supports and the ˙OH radicals formed on the surface of the Pt catalyst. As a result, the CNF with a 5 wt% silica layer that we prepared has had extremely high initial performance and durability under severe carbon corrosion conditions, starting up with 974 mA cm(-2) at 0.6 V and ending up with more than 58% of the initial performance (i.e., 569 mA cm(-2) at 0.6 V) after a 1.6 V holding test for 6 h. The beginning-of-life and end-of-life performances based on the virgin CNF without the silica layer were 981 and 340 mA cm(-2) at 0

  2. Experiments on passive hypersonic boundary layer control using ultrasonically absorptive carbon-carbon material with random microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Alexander; Kuhn, Markus; Martinez Schramm, Jan; Hannemann, Klaus

    2013-10-01

    For the first time, the influence of ultrasonically absorptive carbon-carbon material on hypersonic laminar to turbulent boundary layer transition was investigated experimentally. A 7° half-angle blunted cone with a nose radius of 2.5 mm and a total length of 1,077 mm was tested at zero angle of attack in the High Enthalpy Shock Tunnel Göttingen of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) at Mach 7.5. One-third of the metallic model surface in circumferential direction was replaced by DLR in-house manufactured ultrasonically absorptive carbon-carbon material with random microstructure for passive transition control. The remaining model surface consisted of polished steel and served as reference surface. The model was equipped with coaxial thermocouples to determine the transition location by means of surface heat flux distribution. Flush-mounted piezoelectric fast-response pressure transducers were used to measure the pressure fluctuations in the boundary layer associated with second-mode instabilities. The free-stream unit Reynolds number was varied over a range of Re m = 1.5 × 106 m-1 to Re m = 6.4 × 106 m-1 at a stagnation enthalpy of h 0 ≈ 3.2 MJ/kg and a wall temperature ratio of T w/ T 0 ≈ 0.1. The present study revealed a clear damping of the second-mode instabilities and a delay of boundary layer transition along the ultrasonically absorptive carbon-carbon insert.

  3. Nanoporous carbon for electric double layer supercapacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Betzaida Batalla

    The subject of this study is the synthesis, characterization, chemical composition, and tuning of the porous structure of organic and carbon cryogels for electrochemical applications, particularly supercapacitors. Alternate methods such as an improved synthesis using a reactive catalyst, surface chemical modifications and an electrochemical characterization that takes into account the pore morphology are discussed. Impedance spectroscopy, complex capacitance and power were used to identify key energy losses in the capacitor; an optimal pore size of ca. 2 nm and other features were found. Also, synthesis modification and surface chemistry were used to improve the chemistry and structure of the electrodes reducing metal impurities and removing detrimental functional groups. First, carbon cryogels produced without metal ion impurities were synthesized using hexamine (an amine base catalyst), resorcinol, furaldehyde and solvent mixtures. These metal ion free amine-catalyzed gels also produced strong cryogels that can be machined. The carbon cryogels produced using the amine catalyst have cycle stability performances that exceed that of commercial samples. Carbon cryogels were also doped using ammonia borane to promote boron and nitrogen esters and improved the capacitance up to 30% due to faradaic reactions. Furthermore, nitrogen esters were also introduced into the carbon (via pyrolysis of hexamine) with yields of up to 14 at%. These new esters have low content of oxygen and increased the capacitance up to 50%.

  4. Towards Lego Snapping; Integration of Carbon Nanotubes and Few-Layer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasseri, Mohsen; Boland, Mathias; Farrokhi, M. Javad; Strachan, Douglas

    Integration of semiconducting, conducting, and insulating nanomaterials into precisely aligned complicated systems is one of the main challenges to the ultimate size scaling of electronic devices, which is a key goal in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This integration could be made more effective through controlled alignment of the crystallographic lattices of the nanoscale components. Of the vast number of materials of atomically-thin materials, two of the sp2 bonded carbon structures, graphene and carbon nanotubes, are ideal candidates for this type of application since they are built from the same backbone carbon lattice. Here we report carbon nanotube and graphene hybrid nanostructures fabricated through their catalytic synthesis and etching. The growth formations we have investigated through various high-resolution microscopy techniques provide evidence of lego-snapped interfaces between nanotubes and graphene into device-relevant orientations. We will finish with a discussion of the various size and energy regimes relevant to these lego-snapped interfaces and their implications on developing these integrated formations.

  5. New biosensing platforms based on the layer-by-layer self-assembling of polyelectrolytes on Nafion/carbon nanotubes-coated glassy carbon electrodes.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Gustavo A; Miscoria, Silvia A; Desbrieres, Jacques; Barrera, Gustavo D

    2007-01-15

    We are proposing for the first time the use of a Nafion/multi-walled carbon nanotubes dispersion deposited on glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) as a new platform for developing enzymatic biosensors based on the self-assembling of a chitosan derivative and different oxidases. The electrodes are obtained by deposition of a layer of Nafion/multi-wall carbon nanotubes dispersion on glassy carbon electrodes, followed by the adsorption of a chitosan derivative as polycation and glucose oxidase, l-aminoacid oxidase or polyphenol oxidase, as polyanions and biorecognition elements. The optimum configuration for glucose biosensors has allowed a highly sensitive (sensitivity=(0.28+/-0.02)muAmM(-1), r=0.997), fast (4s in reaching the maximum response), and highly selective (0% interference of ascorbic acid and uric acid at maximum physiological levels) glucose quantification at 0.700V with detection and quantification limits of 0.035 and 0.107mM, respectively. The repetitivity for 10 measurements was 5.5%, while the reproducibility was 8.4% for eight electrodes. The potentiality of the new platform was clearly demonstrated by using the carbon nanotubes/Nafion layer as a platform for the self-assembling of l-aminoacid oxidase and polyphenol oxidase. Therefore, the platform we are proposing here, that combines the advantages of nanostructured materials with those of the layer-by-layer self-assembling of polyelectrolytes, opens the doors to new and exciting possibilities for the development of enzymatic and affinity biosensors using different transdution modes.

  6. Zero lattice mismatch and twin-free single crystalline ScN buffer layers for GaN growth on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Lupina, L.; Zoellner, M. H.; Dietrich, B.; Capellini, G.; Niermann, T.; Lehmann, M.; Thapa, S. B.; Haeberlen, M.; Storck, P.; Schroeder, T.

    2015-11-16

    We report the growth of thin ScN layers deposited by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si(111) substrates. Using x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, we find that ScN films grown at 600 °C are single crystalline, twin-free with rock-salt crystal structure, and exhibit a direct optical band gap of 2.2 eV. A high degree of crystalline perfection and a very good lattice matching between ScN and GaN (misfit < 0.1%) makes the ScN/Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} buffer system a very promising template for the growth of high quality GaN layers on silicon.

  7. Layer definition and pressure buildup case histories in a carbonate reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Vadgama, U.N.; Arifi, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents case histories of pressure buildup analysis in a layered carbonate reservoir (Zella/Aswad Fields in the Socialist People's Libyan Arab Jamahiria). The productive formation consists of several dolomite and limestone layers separated by thin tight streaks. Lack of pressure communication between layers has been determined by pressure measurements in the individual layers using the Repeat Formation Tester (RFT). Results of the two-dimensional radial model simulated pressure buildup performance are compared to the actual measured pressure buildup data. 14 refs.

  8. Characterization of nitrogen doped silicon-carbon multi-layer nanostructures obtained by TVA method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciupina, Victor; Vasile, Eugeniu; Porosnicu, Corneliu; Prodan, Gabriel C.; Lungu, Cristian P.; Vladoiu, Rodica; Jepu, Ionut; Mandes, Aurelia; Dinca, Virginia; Caraiane, Aureliana; Nicolescu, Virginia; Dinca, Paul; Zaharia, Agripina

    2016-09-01

    Ionized nitrogen doped Si-C multi-layer thin films used to increase the oxidation resistance of carbon have been obtained by Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA) method. The 100 nm thickness carbon thin films were deposed on silicon or glass substrates and then seven N doped Si-C successively layers on carbon were deposed. To characterize the microstructure, tribological and electrical properties of as prepared N-SiC multi-layer films, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, STEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDXS), electrical and tribological techniques were achieved. Samples containing multi-layer N doped Si-C coating on carbon were investigated up to 1000°C. Oxidation protection is based on the reaction between SiC and elemental oxygen, resulting SiO2 and CO2, and also on the reaction involving N, O and Si-C, resulting silicon oxynitride (SiNxOy) with a continuously vary composition, and because nitrogen can acts as a trapping barrier for oxygen. The tribological properties of structures were studied using a tribometer with ball-on-disk configuration from CSM device with sapphire ball. The measurements show that the friction coefficient on the N-SiC is smaller than friction coefficient on uncoated carbon layer. Electrical conductivity at different temperatures was measured in constant current mode. The results confirm the fact that conductivity is greater when nitrogen content is greater. To justify the temperature dependence of conductivity we assume a thermally activated electrical transport mechanism.

  9. The Effect of Carbon Layer Variations in Carbon/Porous Silicon Composite Rugate Filters for End-of-Service-Life Indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gofus, John Stephen, III

    Carbon/porous silicon composite rugate filters, for use as end-of service-life indicators in gas mask filters, are more capable of increased sensitivity to volatile organic chemical vapors than porous silicon sensors alone. Compositional variations of the carbon layer within these composite materials have not been well studied. At low carbon content, the carbonized surface will not effectively mimic the active carbon used in gas mask filters. At high carbon content, there is increased noise and a broader, less intense rugate stop band, reducing the signal to noise level of the sensor response. The focus of this thesis is the optimization of the carbon layer in the carbon/porous silicon composite rugate filters. To accomplish this, porous silicon rugate filters were etched and then carbonized using varying concentrations of the poly(furfuryl alcohol) precursor. Variations in the carbon layer were then analyzed via spectral analysis, elemental analysis, and nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms. At concentrations greater than 50% furfuryl alcohol there is minimal difference observed in the carbon layer on the porous silicon surface. Samples were also shown to have a minimal increase in sensitivity at concentrations greater than 50% furfuryl alcohol, and an increased signal-to-noise with increased furfuryl alcohol concentration. It is shown that the optimal carbon layer for volatile organic vapor sensing is achieved by using a furfuryl alcohol concentration of 50% furfuryl alcohol (in ethanol) during carbon layer synthesis.

  10. Canopy Carbon Discrimination in a Dense Forest Estimated From a Multi-Layer Biophysical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knohl, A.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2005-12-01

    Carbon isotope discrimination during photosynthesis of plant canopies has been used to constrain global carbon models and to partition ecosystem fluxes into its components. Often carbon discrimination is estimated based on a big-leaf model assuming constant environmental forcing for the entire canopy. In dense and tall forest canopies, however, microclimatic conditions and therefore stomata control on discrimination can strongly vary vertically within the canopy. Numerous studies found a large vertical gradient in bulk leaf carbon isotope values indicating the importance of microclimate on discrimination. It remains unclear how well big-leaf models represent actual canopy discrimination considering microclimatic variations throughout the canopy. Here we use a multi-layered biophysical canopy model to estimate discrimination for each layer and to obtain flux-weighted canopy discrimination for the entire canopy. The model consists of 40 layers, each distinguishing sunlit and shaded leaves. Leaf energy balance, leaf transpiration and photosynthesis are calculated for each layer based on turbulence inside the canopy and light penetration through the canopy. The model showed very good agreement with carbon, water and energy fluxes measured with the eddy covariance technique. The modeled vertical gradient in carbon discrimination matches well with observations made in bulk material and sugars from leaves indicating the importance of microclimatic gradients on canopy discrimination in dense forests.

  11. Carbon transport in the bottom boundary layer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, I.D.

    1998-11-01

    The central goal of DOE`s Ocean Margin Program (OMP) has been to determine whether continental shelves are quantitatively significant in removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and isolating it via burial in sediments or exporting it to the open ocean. The purpose of this research was to recover and process samples from two sediment traps deployed on the continental slope in conjunction with the OMP physical oceanography mooring program.

  12. Experimental study of lattice dynamics in individual semiconducting double-walled carbon nanotubes: Tangential G modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshov, D. I.; Tran, H. N.; Slabodyan, Yu. S.; Osadchii, A. V.; Roshal', S. B.; Yuzyuk, Yu. I.

    2017-02-01

    The tangential G modes in individual semiconducting double-walled nanotubes have been examined via Raman spectroscopy over a wide laser excitation wavelength range. Individual suspended nanotubes have been synthesized via chemical vapor deposition. The ( n, m) chirality indices are determined via electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The pronounced shift in the tangential modes compared to the analogous modes of single-walled nanotubes has been observed in Raman spectra of double-walled nanotubes. The shift value is shown to depend on the interlayer distance and on the van der Waals interaction between the layers in a double-walled tube.

  13. Molecular simulation of electric double-layer capacitors based on carbon nanotube forests.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Fishbine, Brian H; Migliori, Albert; Pratt, Lawrence R

    2009-09-02

    Described here are the first simulations of electric double-layer capacitors based on carbon nanotube forests modeled fully at a molecular level. The computations determine single-electrode capacitances in the neighborhood of 80 F/g, in agreement with experimental capacitances of electric double-layer capacitors utilizing carbon nanotube forests or carbide-derived carbons as electrode material. The capacitance increases modestly with the decrease of the pore size through radii greater than 1 nm, which is consistent with recent experiments on carbide-derived carbon electrodes. Because the various factors included in these simulations are precisely defined, these simulation data will help to disentangle distinct physical chemical factors that contribute to the performance of these materials, e.g., pore geometry, variable filling of the pores, pseudocapacitance, and electronic characteristics of the nanotubes.

  14. SiC multi-layer protective coating on carbon obtained by thermionic vacuum arc method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciupina, V.; Lungu, C. P.; Vladoiu, R.; Epure, T.-D.; Prodan, G.; Roşca, C.; Porosnicu, C.; Jepu, I.; Belc, M.; Prodan, M.; Stanescu, I. M.; Stefanov, C.; Contulov, M.; Mandes, A.; Dinca, V.; Vasile, E.; Zarovschi, V.; Nicolescu, V.

    2013-09-01

    SiC single-layer or multi-layer on C used to improve the oxidation resistance and tribological properties of C have been obtained by Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA) method. The 200nm thickness carbon thin films was deposed on glass or Si substrate and then 100÷500 nm thickness SiC successively layers on carbon thin film was deposed. The microstructure and mechanical characteristics of as-prepared SiC coating were investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, STEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS), Electron Scattering Chemical Analysis (ESCA) and tribological techniques. Samples containing SiC single-layer or multi-layer coating on carbon were investigated up to 1000°C. The results of thermal treatments reveals the increase of oxidation resistance with increase of the number of SiC layers. The mechanism of oxidation protection is based on the reaction between SiC and elemental oxygen resulting SiO2 and CO. The tribological behavior of SiC coatings was evaluated with a tribometer with ball-on-disk configuration from CSM device with 6mm diameter sapphire ball, sliding speed in dry conditions being 0.2m/s, with normal contact loads of 0.5N, 1N, 1.5N and 2N, under unlubricated conditions. The friction coefficient on SiC was compared with the friction coefficient on uncoated carbon layer. Electrical surface resistance of SiC coating on carbon at different temperatures was measured comparing the potential drop on the sample with the potential drop on a series standard resistance in constant mode.

  15. Microstructure and properties of pure iron/copper composite cladding layers on carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Long; Huang, Yong-xian; Lü, Shi-xiong; Huang, Ti-fang; Lü, Zong-liang

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, pure iron/copper composite metal cladding was deposited onto carbon steel by tungsten inert gas welding. The study focused on interfacial morphological, microstructural, and mechanical analyses of the composite cladding layers. Iron liquid-solid-phase zones were formed at copper/steel and iron interfaces because of the melting of the steel substrate and iron. Iron concentrated in the copper cladding layer was observed to exhibit belt, globule, and dendrite morphologies. The appearance of iron-rich globules indicated the occurrence of liquid phase separation (LPS) prior to solidification, and iron-rich dendrites crystallized without the occurrence of LPS. The maximum microhardness of the iron/steel interface was lower than that of the copper/steel interface because of the diffusion of elemental carbon. All samples fractured in the cladding layers. Because of a relatively lower strength of the copper layer, a short plateau region appeared when shear movement was from copper to iron.

  16. Ammonia and carbon dioxide concentrations in a layer house.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Ilker; Yaslioglu, Erkan

    2014-08-01

    Higher concentrations of ammonia (NH3) and carbon dioxide (CO2) in animal barns can negatively affect production and health of animals and workers. This paper focuses on measurements of summer concentrations of ammonia (NH3) and carbon dioxide (CO2) in a naturally ventilated laying henhouse located at an egg production facility in Bursa region, western Turkey. Also, indoor and ambient environmental conditions such as temperature and relative humidity were measured simultaneously with pollutant gas concentrations. The average NH3 concentrations during summer of 2013 was 8.05 ppm for exhaust and 5.42 ppm for inlet while average CO2 concentration was 732 ppm for exhaust and 625 ppm for inlet throughout summer. The overall minimum, average and maximum values and humidity were obtained as 16.8°C, 24.72°C, and 34.71°C for indoor temperature and 33.64%, 63.71%, and 86.18% for relative humidity. The lowest exhaust concentrations for NH3 and CO2 were 6.98 ppm and 609 ppm, respectively. They were measured in early morning at the maximum diurnal ventilation rate in July 2013 and August 2013. The highest concentrations were 10.58 ppm for NH3 and 904 ppm for CO2 recorded in the afternoon when the ventilation rate was the lowest in June 2013.

  17. Surface growth for molten silicon infiltration into carbon millimeter-sized channels: Lattice-Boltzmann simulations, experiments and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergi, Danilo; Camarano, Antonio; Molina, José Miguel; Ortona, Alberto; Narciso, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The process of liquid silicon (Si) infiltration is investigated for channels with radii from 0.25[mm] to 0.75[mm] drilled in compact carbon (C) preforms. The advantage of this setup is that the study of the phenomenon results can be simplified. For comparison purposes, attempts are made in order to work out a framework for evaluating the accuracy of simulations. The approach relies on dimensionless numbers involving the properties of the surface reaction. It turns out that complex hydrodynamic behavior derived from second Newton law can be made consistent with Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulations. The experiments give clear evidence that the growth of silicon carbide (SiC) proceeds in two different stages and basic mechanisms are highlighted. LB simulations prove to be an effective tool for the description of the growing phase. Namely, essential experimental constraints can be implemented. As a result, the existing models are useful to gain more insight on the process of reactive infiltration into porous media in the first stage of penetration, i.e. up to pore closure because of surface growth. A way allowing one to implement the resistance from chemical reaction in Darcy law is also proposed.

  18. EXAMINATION OF DISLOCATIONS IN LATTICE-MISMATCHED GaInAs/BUFFER LAYER/GaAs FOR III-V PHOTOVOLTAICS

    SciTech Connect

    Levander, A.; Geisz, J.

    2007-01-01

    Dislocations act as sites for nonradiative electron/hole pair recombination, which reduces the effi ciency of photovoltaics. Lattice-matched materials can be grown on top of one another without forming a high density of dislocations. However, when the growth of lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials is attempted, many dislocations result from the relaxation of strain in the crystal structure. In an attempt to reduce the number of dislocations that propagate into a solar device when using LMM materials, a compositionally step-graded buffer is placed between the two LMM materials. In order to confi ne the dislocations to the buffer layer and therefore increase material quality and device effi ciency, the growth temperature and thickness of the buffer layer were varied. A GaInP compositionally graded buffer and GaInAs p-n junction were grown on a GaAs substrate in a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system. A multibeam optical stress sensor (MOSS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the strain in the epilayers. Electrical and optoelectronic properties were measured using a probe station and multimeter setup, solar simulator, and a quantum effi ciency instrument. It was determined that device functionality was highly dependent on the growth temperature of the graded buffer. As growth temperature increased, so did the dislocation density in the device despite an increase in the dislocation velocity, which should have increased the dislocation annihilation rate and the diffusion of dislocations to the edge of the crystal. The thickness of the graded buffer also affected device effi ciency with thinner samples performing poorly. The thinner graded buffer layers had high internal resistances from reduced carrier concentrations. In terms of effi ciency, the empirically derived recipe developed by the scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) produced the highest quality cells.

  19. Single-layer nano-carbon film, diamond film, and diamond/nano-carbon composite film field emission performance comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Wang, Jinye; Wang, Lijun

    2016-05-01

    A series of single-layer nano-carbon (SNC) films, diamond films, and diamond/nano-carbon (D/NC) composite films have been prepared on the highly doped silicon substrate by using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition techniques. The films were characterised by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and field emission I-V measurements. The experimental results indicated that the field emission maximum current density of D/NC composite films is 11.8-17.8 times that of diamond films. And the field emission current density of D/NC composite films is 2.9-5 times that of SNC films at an electric field of 3.0 V/μm. At the same time, the D/NC composite film exhibits the advantage of improved reproducibility and long term stability (both of the nano-carbon film within the D/NC composite cathode and the SNC cathode were prepared under the same experimental conditions). And for the D/NC composite sample, a high current density of 10 mA/cm2 at an electric field of 3.0 V/μm was obtained. Diamond layer can effectively improve the field emission characteristics of nano-carbon film. The reason may be due to the diamond film acts as the electron acceleration layer.

  20. A facile method for fabricating TiO2@mesoporous carbon and three-layered nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong; Jin, Haibao; Zhu, Shenmin; Liu, Yunchun; Long, Mingce; Zhou, Yongfeng; Yan, Deyue

    2012-08-01

    Herein, we report a new and facile method for fabricating TiO2@mesoporous carbon hybrid materials. Uniform polydopamine (PDA) layers were coated onto the surface of titanate nanotubes (TNTs) and TiO2 nanorods (TNDs) through the spontaneous adhesion and self-polymerization of dopamine during the dipping process. Core-shell mesoporous carbon nanotubes with TiO2 nanorods or nanoparticles encapsulated inside (TiO2@MC) were then obtained by transforming PDA layers into carbonaceous ones through calcination in nitrogen at 800 °C. The thickness of the mesoporous carbon layers is tens of nanometers and can be controlled by adjusting the coated PDA layers through the self-polymerization reaction time. In addition, three-layered nanocomposites of TiO2@MC@MO (MO, metal oxide) can be readily prepared by utilizing PDA layers in TNTs@PDA or TNDs@PDA to adsorb the metal ions, followed by the calcination process.

  1. Crystallinity Modulation of Layered Carbon Nitride for Enhanced Photocatalytic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianhai; Shen, Yanfei; Li, Ying; Liu, Songqin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As an emerging metal‐free semiconductor, covalently bonded carbon nitride (CN) has attracted much attention in photocatalysis. However, drawbacks such as a high recombination rate of excited electrons and holes hinder its potential applications. Tailoring the crystallinity of semiconductors is an important way to suppress unwanted charge recombination, but has rarely been applied to CN so far. Herein, a simple method to synthesize CN of high crystallinity by protonation of specific intermediate species during conventional polymerization is reported. Interestingly, the as‐obtained CN exhibited improved photocatalytic activities of up to seven times those of the conventional bulk CN. This approach, with only a slight change to the conventional method, provides a facile way to effectively regulate the crystallinity of bulk CN to improve its photocatalytic activities and sheds light on large‐scale industrial applications of CN with high efficiency for sustainable energy. PMID:27436164

  2. The layered structure of the carbon arc discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vekselman, Vladislav; Stratton, Brentley; Raitses, Yevgeny; LaboratoryPlasma Nanosynthesis Team

    2016-10-01

    The arc discharge with a consumed anode is commonly used for synthesis of nanomaterials such as fullerenes, nanotubes and, more recently, graphene. The role of the arc plasma in nanosynthesis processes, including ablation of the graphite anode, nucleation and growth of nanostructures remains unclear. Our recent fast frame camera measurements revealed arc oscillations associated with the ablation processes at the anode. More sophisticated measurements using optical emission spectroscopy and spectrally resolved fast framing imaging revealed the complex, layered structure of plasma species distribution, which is dynamically changing. The results of this research include time- and space- resolved distributions of plasma species, plasma electron density and temperature. The obtained experimental data suggest a strong correlation between arc plasma parameters and nanosynthesis processes. This work was supported by US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  3. Soil carbon stock increases in the organic layer of boreal middle-aged stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häkkinen, M.; Heikkinen, J.; Mäkipää, R.

    2011-02-01

    Changes in the soil carbon stock can potentially have a large influence on global carbon balance between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere. Since carbon sequestration of forest soils is influenced by human activities, reporting of the soil carbon pool is a compulsory part of the national greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories. Various soil carbon models are applied in GHG inventories, however, the verification of model-based estimates is lacking. In general, the soil carbon models predict accumulation of soil carbon in the middle-aged stands, which is in good agreement with chronosequence studies and flux measurements of eddy sites, but they have not been widely tested with repeated measurements of permanent plots. The objective of this study was to evaluate soil carbon changes in the organic layer of boreal middle-aged forest stands. Soil carbon changes on re-measured sites were analyzed by using soil survey data that was based on composite samples as a first measurement and by taking into account spatial variation on the basis of the second measurement. By utilizing earlier soil surveys, a long sampling interval, which helps detection of slow changes, could be readily available. The range of measured change in the soil organic layer varied from -260 to 1260 g m-2 over the study period of 16-19 years and 23 ± 2 g m-2 per year, on average. The increase was significant in 6 out of the 38 plots from which data were available. Although the soil carbon change was difficult to detect at the plot scale, the overall increase measured across the middle-aged stands agrees with predictions of the commonly applied soil models. Further verification of the soil models is needed with larger datasets that cover wider geographical area and represent all age classes, especially young stands with potentially large soil carbon source.

  4. Soil carbon stock increases in the organic layer of boreal middle-aged stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häkkinen, M.; Heikkinen, J.; Mäkipää, R.

    2011-05-01

    Changes in the soil carbon stock can potentially have a large influence on global carbon balance between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere. Since carbon sequestration of forest soils is influenced by human activities, reporting of the soil carbon pool is a compulsory part of the national greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories. Various soil carbon models are applied in GHG inventories, however, the verification of model-based estimates is lacking. In general, the soil carbon models predict accumulation of soil carbon in the middle-aged stands, which is in good agreement with chronosequence studies and flux measurements of eddy sites, but they have not been widely tested with repeated measurements of permanent plots. The objective of this study was to evaluate soil carbon changes in the organic layer of boreal middle-aged forest stands. Soil carbon changes on re-measured sites were analyzed by using soil survey data that was based on composite samples as a first measurement and by taking into account spatial variation on the basis of the second measurement. By utilizing earlier soil surveys, a long sampling interval, which helps detection of slow changes, could be readily available. The range of measured change in the soil organic layer varied from -260 to 1260 g m-2 over the study period of 16-19 years and 23 ± 2 g m-2 per year, on average. The increase was significant in 6 out of the 38 plots from which data were available. Although the soil carbon change was difficult to detect at the plot scale, the overall increase measured across the middle-aged stands agrees with predictions of the commonly applied soil models. Further verification of the soil models is needed with larger datasets that cover wider geographical area and represent all age classes, especially young stands with potentially large soil carbon source.

  5. Carbon Surface Layers on a High-Rate LiFePO4

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrisch, Heike; Wilcox, James D.; Doeff, Marca M.

    2005-09-06

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to image particles of a high-rate LiFePO4 sample containing a small amount of in situ carbon. The particle morphology is highly irregular, with a wide size distribution. Nevertheless, coatings, varying from about 5-10 nm in thickness, could readily be detected on surfaces of particles as well as on edges of agglomerates. Elemental mapping using Energy Filtered TEM (EFTEM) indicates that these very thin surface layers are composed of carbon. These observations have important implications for the design of high-rate LiFePO4 materials in which, ideally, a minimal amount of carbon coating is used.

  6. Fabrication of carbon layer coated FE-nanoparticles using an electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Bin; Jeun, Joon Pyo; Kang, Phil Hyun; Oh, Seung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    A novel synthesis of carbon encapsulated Fe nanoparticles was developed in this study. Fe chloride (III) and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) were used as precursors. The crosslinking of PAN molecules and the nucleation of Fe nanoparticles were controlled by the electron beam irradiation dose. Stabilization and carbonization processes were carried out using a vacuum furnace at 275 °C and 1000 °C, respectively. Micro structures were evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Fe nanoparticles were formed with diameters of 100 nm, and the Fe nanoparticles were encapsulated by carbon layers. As the electron beam irradiation dose increased, it was observed that the particle sizes decreased.

  7. Carbon Diffusion through SiO2 from a Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Layer and Accumulation at the SiO2/Si Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafcsik, Olga H.; Vida, György; Pócsik, István; Josepovits, Katalin V.; Deák, Péter

    2001-04-01

    Carbon diffusion in a SiO2/Si system was investigated. The source was provided by chemical vapor deposition of a hydrogenated amorphous carbon layer onto the oxide at low temperature. From layers with low oxygen content, no carbon outdiffusion was detected up to 1190°C@. If the O content was high, the diffusion would start suddenly at 1140°C, and carbon accumulation would be found on the Si side of the SiO2/Si interface in the form of SiC precipitates. These results are interpreted by assuming oxygen-assisted dissociation of carbon atoms from the carbon layer in form of CO molecules, fast CO diffusion through SiO2 and an exothermic reaction of CO with Si. No carbon segregation was found in SiO2. Consequences of carbon island formation during SiC oxidation are pointed out.

  8. Thermal properties of carbon nanowall layers measured by a pulsed photothermal technique

    SciTech Connect

    Achour, A.; Belkerk, B. E.; Ait Aissa, K.; Gautron, E.; Carette, M.; Jouan, P.-Y.; Brizoual, L. Le; Scudeller, Y.; Djouadi, M.-A.; Vizireanu, S.; Dinescu, G.

    2013-02-11

    We report the thermal properties of carbon nanowall layers produced by expanding beam radio-frequency plasma. The thermal properties of carbon nanowalls, grown at 600 Degree-Sign C on aluminium nitride thin-film sputtered on fused silica, were measured with a pulsed photo-thermal technique. The apparent thermal conductivity of the carbon at room temperature was found to increase from 20 to 80 Wm{sup -1} K{sup -1} while the thickness varied from 700 to 4300 nm, respectively. The intrinsic thermal conductivity of the carbon nanowalls attained 300 Wm{sup -1} K{sup -1} while the boundary thermal resistance with the aluminium nitride was 3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} Km{sup 2} W{sup -1}. These results identify carbon nanowalls as promising material for thermal management applications.

  9. Carbon film coating on gas diffusion layer for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jui-Hsiang; Chen, Wei-Hung; Su, Shih-Hsuan; Liao, Yuan-Kai; Ko, Tse-Hao

    This study discusses a novel process to increase the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). In order to improve the electrical conductivity and reduce the surface indentation of the carbon fibers, we modified the carbon fibers with pitch-based carbon materials (mesophase pitch and coal tar pitch). Compared with the gas diffusion backing (GDB), GDB-A240 and GDB-MP have 32% and 33% higher current densities at 0.5 V, respectively. Self-made carbon paper with the addition of a micro-porous layer (MPL) (GDL-A240 and GDL-MP) show improved performance compared with GDB-A240 and GDB-MP. The current densities of GDL-A240 and GDL-MP at 0.5 V increased by 37% and 31% compared with GDL, respectively. This study combines these two effects (carbon film and MPL coating) to promote high current density in a PEMFC.

  10. High-pressure layered structure of carbon disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghavi, S. Shahab; Crespo, Yanier; MartoÅák, Roman; Tosatti, Erio

    2015-06-01

    Solid CS2 is superficially similar to CO2, with the same C m c a molecular crystal structure at low pressures, which has suggested similar phases also at high pressures. We carried out an extensive first-principles evolutionary search in order to identify the zero-temperature lowest-enthalpy structures of CS2 for increasing pressure up to 200 GPa. Surprisingly, the molecular C m c a phase does not evolve into β -cristobalite as in CO2 but transforms instead into phases HP2 and HP1, both recently described in high-pressure SiS2. HP1 in particular, with a wide stability range, is a layered P 21/c structure characterized by pairs of edge-sharing tetrahedra and is theoretically more robust than all other CS2 phases discussed so far. Its predicted Raman spectrum and pair correlation function agree with experiment better than those of β -cristobalite, and further differences are predicted between their respective IR spectra. The band gap of HP1-CS2 is calculated to close under pressure, yielding an insulator-metal transition near 50 GPa, in agreement with experimental observations. However, the metallic density of states remains modest above this pressure, suggesting a different origin for the reported superconductivity.

  11. Influence of Carbon in Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition of Few-Layer WSe2 Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaotian; Al Balushi, Zakaria Y.; Zhang, Fu; Choudhury, Tanushree H.; Eichfeld, Sarah M.; Alem, Nasim; Jackson, Thomas N.; Robinson, Joshua A.; Redwing, Joan M.

    2016-12-01

    Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) is a promising technique to form large-area, uniform films of monolayer or few-layer transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) thin films; however, unintentional carbon incorporation is a concern. In this work, we report the presence of a defective graphene layer that forms simultaneously during MOCVD growth of tungsten diselenide (WSe2) on sapphire at high growth temperature and high Se:W ratio when using tungsten hexacarbonyl (W(CO)6) and dimethyl selenide ((CH3)2Se, DMSe) as precursors. The graphene layer alters the surface energy of the substrate reducing the lateral growth and coalescence of WSe2 domains. The use of hydrogen selenide (H2Se) instead of DMSe eliminates the defective graphene layer enabling coalesced monolayer and few-layer WSe2 films.

  12. Microanalysis of deposited layers in the divertor of JET following operations with carbon wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsåker, H.; Petersson, P.; Bykov, I.; Possnert, G.; Likonen, J.; Koivuranta, S.; Coad, J. P.; Widdowson, A. M.; JET EFDA contributors

    2013-07-01

    Elemental mapping of cross sections of deposited layers on inboard tiles in the JET divertor after exposure to plasma operations with carbon wall are presented. The study was made using microbeam ion beam analysis methods in combination with optical microscopy and SEM. The surfaces had been exposed to plasma through different periods of operation (1998-2007, 2007-2009 and 1998-2009). The texture and composition of the layers are non-uniform. The physical structures include columnar, lamellar and disordered globular appearances. The distribution of trapped deuterium was frequently found to be lamellar, with well-defined sub layers with higher deuterium concentration. However, 3D regions with dimensions of about 100 μm with enhanced deuterium content were also found, both at the layer surfaces and in the layer cross sections. The distributions of beryllium and Inconel components were lamellar but did not otherwise show large non-uniformity on the same scale length as the deuterium.

  13. Direct synthesis of multilayer graphene on an insulator by Ni-induced layer exchange growth of amorphous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, H.; Toko, K.; Saitoh, N.; Yoshizawa, N.; Suemasu, T.

    2017-01-01

    Multilayer graphene (MLG) growth on arbitrary substrates is desired for incorporating carbon wiring and heat spreaders into electronic devices. We investigated the metal-induced layer exchange growth of a sputtered amorphous C layer using Ni as a catalyst. A MLG layer uniformly formed on a SiO2 substrate at 600 °C by layer exchange between the C and Ni layers. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy showed that the resulting MLG layer was highly oriented and contained relatively few defects. The present investigation will pave the way for advanced electronic devices integrated with carbon materials.

  14. Validation of the numerical model of single-layer composites reinforced with carbon fiber and aramid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sava, Mihaela; Hadǎr, Anton; Pǎrǎuşanu, Ioan; Petrescu, Horia-Alexandru; Baciu, Florin; Marinel, Stǎnescu Marius

    2016-06-01

    In this work we studied the experimental validation of the model and finite element analysis for a single layer of composite materials reinforced with carbon (denoted as C), aramid (K) and carbon-aramid (C-K) fibers. In the literature there are not many details about the differences that arise between transversal and longitudinal characteristics of composite materials reinforced with fabric, compared to those with unidirectional fibers. In order to achieve carbon and aramid composites we used twill fabric and for carbon-aramid plain fabric, as shown in Figure 1. In order to observe the static behavior of the considered specimens, numerical simulations were carried out in addition to the experimental determination of the characteristics of these materials. Layered composites are obviously the most widespread formula for getting advanced composite structures. It allows a unique variety of material and structural combinations leading to optimal design in a wide range of applications [1,2]. To design and verify the material composites it is necessary to know the basic mechanical constants of the materials. Almost all the layered composites consider that the every layer is an orthotropic material, so there are nine independent constants of material corresponding to the three principal directions: Young modulus E1, E2 and E3, shear modulus G12, G23 and G13, and major poison ratios ν12, ν23, ν13. Experimental determinations were performed using traction tests and strain gauges. For each of the three above mentioned materials, five samples were manufactured.

  15. Infrared spectroscopic measurements of carbon monoxide within a high temperature ablative boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, S. D.; Tibère-Inglesse, A. C.; Laux, C. O.

    2016-12-01

    Theoretical studies have indicated that the formation of carbon monoxide within a high temperature ablative boundary layer can significantly alter the afterbody radiative heat transfer to the surface of a reentry capsule. This paper represents a first attempt to experimentally measure the concentration of carbon monoxide within the high temperature boundary layer surrounding an ablative material exposed to an atmospheric pressure air plasma. A plasma torch facility was used to produce the high temperature flow and a sample of ASTERM ablative material was inserted into the flow. At the stagnation point, the heat flux to the surface was estimated at 8 MW m-2 and the surface temperature at 2900  ±  100 K. Both emission and absorption spectroscopy techniques were used to measure the distribution of carbon monoxide within the flow. Emission spectroscopy yielded better signal-to-noise measurements, but the absorption spectroscopy measurements were used to validate emission measurements. In the cases examined, both emission and absorption measurements were consistent and in agreement with one another. Estimates of carbon monoxide temperature and mole fraction were deduced from the spectra taken within the boundary layer downstream of the stagnation point. No carbon monoxide was observed at the stagnation point. These measurements provide a test case for numerical simulations of plasma-ablator interactions.

  16. Magnetic and electrode properties, structure and phase relations of the layered triangular-lattice tellurate Li{sub 4}NiTeO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Zvereva, Elena A.; Nalbandyan, Vladimir B.; Evstigneeva, Maria A.; Koo, Hyun-Joo; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan; Ushakov, Arseni V.; Medvedev, Boris S.; Medvedeva, Larisa I.; Gridina, Nelly A.; Yalovega, Galina E.; Churikov, Alexei V.; Vasiliev, Alexander N.; Büchner, Bernd

    2015-05-15

    We examined the magnetic properties of layered oxide Li{sub 4}NiTeO{sub 6} by magnetic susceptibility, magnetization and ESR measurements and density functional calculations, and characterized phase relations, crystal structure and electrochemical properties of Li{sub 4}NiTeO{sub 6}. The magnetization and ESR data indicate the absence of a long-range magnetic order down to 1.8 K, and the magnetic susceptibility data the presence of dominant antiferromagnetic interactions. These observations are well accounted for by density functional calculations, which show that the spin exchanges of the LiNiTeO{sub 6} layers in Li{sub 4}NiTeO{sub 6} are strongly spin frustrated. The electrochemical charging of Li{sub 4}NiTeO{sub 6} takes place at constant potential of ca. 4.2 V vs. Li/Li{sup +} indicating two-phase process as confirmed by X-rays. The starting phase is only partially recovered on discharge due to side reactions. - Graphical abstract: No long-range magnetic order due to frustration in 2D triangular lattice antiferromagnet Li{sub 4}NiTeO{sub 6}. - Highlights: • Li{sub 4}NiTeO{sub 6} is 2D triangular lattice magnet with no long-range order down to 1.8 K. • Intralayer exchange interactions are antiferromagnetic and strongly spin frustrated. • The electrochemical Li extraction proceeds in a two-phase mode at 4.2 V vs. Li/Li{sup +}. • The electrochemical charge–discharge is only partially reversible. • Li{sub 2}O–NiO{sub y}–TeO{sub x} phase relations are reported; Li{sub 4}NiTeO{sub 6} is essentially stoichiometric.

  17. A thin layer including a carbon material improves the rate capability of an electric double layer capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Takaya; Marukane, Shoko; Morinaga, Takashi; Uemura, Taichi; Fukumoto, Kunihiro; Yamazaki, Satoshi

    2011-03-01

    We present a new method to improve the rate capability of an electric double layer capacitor (EDLC) using a thin polymer layer having a high concentration of carbon material on a current collector (CLC). A novel thermocuring coating composed of a glycol-chitosan, a pyromellitic acid and a conductive carbon powder can form stable CLC on a metal foil current collector simply by spreading and curing at 160 °C for a couple of minutes. We compared the performance of some demonstration EDLC cells using three kinds of current collector: a conventional aluminum oxide foil for EDLC, an aluminum foil and an aluminum foil with CLC. The cell with the CLC had a much higher rate capability than the cell without CLC. Only the CLC cell was able to discharge at a current density of 500C. This cell shows a slight deterioration in capacity in a high temperature, continuous charging, life test, and the CLC has a suppressing effect on the internal resistance increase of EDLCs. The use of a CLC film current collector is one of the most effective and simple methods for the improvement of EDLC rate performance. In particular, a current collector consisting of aluminum foil coupled with a CLC promises to be a low cost alternative to the aluminum oxide foil commonly used in EDLCs.

  18. Layer-by-layer assembled carbon nanotube films with molecule recognition function and lower capacitive background current.

    PubMed

    Kong, Bo; Zeng, Jinxiang; Luo, Guangming; Luo, Shenglian; Wei, Wanzhi; Li, Jun

    2009-02-01

    Multilayer films of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with molecule recognition function were assembled on glassy carbon (GC) electrode with lower capacitive background current by two steps: first, MWCNTs interacted with beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) with the aid of sonication to form beta-CD-MWCNTs nanocomposite, then the beta-CD-MWCNTs nanocomposite was assembled on GC electrode using layer-by-layer (LBL) method based on electrostatic interaction of positively charged biopolymer chitosan and negatively charged MWCNTs. The assembled beta-CD-MWCNTs multilayer films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry. The SEM indicated that the MWCNTs multilayer films with beta-CD were somewhat more compact than that of the MWCNTs multilayer films without beta-CD. The cyclic voltammetric results indicated that the assembled MWCNTs with beta-CD on GC electrode exhibited lower capacitive background current than the assembled MWCNTs without beta-CD. The MWCNTs multilayer films with beta-CD were studied with respect to the electrocatalytic activity toward dopamine (DA). Compared with the MWCNTs multilayer films without beta-CD, the MWCNTs multilayer films with beta-CD possesses a much lower capacitive background current and higher electrocatalytic activity in phosphate buffer, which was ascribed to the relatively compact three-dimensional structure of the MWCNTs multilayer films with beta-CD and the excellent molecule recognition function of beta-CD.

  19. Layer-by-layer assembled carbon nanotubes for selective determination of dopamine in the presence of ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meining; Gong, Kuanping; Zhang, Hongwu; Mao, Lanqun

    2005-01-15

    Multilayer films of shortened multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are homogeneously and stably assembled on glassy carbon (GC) electrodes using layer-by-layer (LBL) method based on electrostatic interaction of positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) and negatively charged shortened MWNTs. The assembled MWNT multilayer films were studied with respect to the electrocatalytic activity toward ascorbic acid (AA) and dopamine (DA) and were further applied for selective determination of DA in the presence of AA. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) used for characterization of MWNT films indicates that the assembled MWNTs are almost in a form of small bundles or single nanotubes on the electrodes. Cyclic voltammetric results with assembled MWNT electrode indicate that the strategy based on the LBL method for assembling the MWNT multilayer films on substrate well retains the electrochemical catalytic activity of the MWNTs toward AA and DA, offering some advantages particularly attractive for analytical applications, such as the form of MWNTs assembled on the substrate, i.e., small bundles or single tubes, homogeneity and stability of the as-assembled MWNT films. These features make the assembled MWNTs relatively potential for selective and sensitive determination of DA in the presence of AA.

  20. Multichannel carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with compound channel layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changxin; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yafei

    2009-11-01

    A multichannel carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (MC-CNTFET) with compound channel layer has been built. In this MC-CNTFET, a dispersedly directed array of long single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is used as primary channel layer and a randomly aligned monolayer network of short SWCNTs acts as secondary set of "bridge" channel layer, which causes large numbers of short semiconducting percolation paths formed. The device exhibits a large on-state current of 2.01 mA and simultaneously retains a high current on/off ratio of 103-104. The function dependency of the on-state current on the density of long SWCNTs and length of short SWCNTs is also presented.

  1. Rapid exchange between atmospheric CO2 and carbonate anion intercalated within magnesium rich layered double hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Pathik; Ishihara, Shinsuke; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Deguchi, Kenzo; Ohki, Shinobu; Tansho, Masataka; Shimizu, Tadashi; Eisaku, Nii; Sasai, Ryo; Labuta, Jan; Ishikawa, Daisuke; Hill, Jonathan P; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Bastakoti, Bishnu Prasad; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Iyi, Nobuo

    2014-10-22

    The carbon cycle, by which carbon atoms circulate between atmosphere, oceans, lithosphere, and the biosphere of Earth, is a current hot research topic. The carbon cycle occurring in the lithosphere (e.g., sedimentary carbonates) is based on weathering and metamorphic events so that its processes are considered to occur on the geological time scale (i.e., over millions of years). In contrast, we have recently reported that carbonate anions intercalated within a hydrotalcite (Mg0.75Al0.25(OH)2(CO3)0.125·yH2O), a class of a layered double hydroxide (LDH), are dynamically exchanging on time scale of hours with atmospheric CO2 under ambient conditions. (Ishihara et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013, 135, 18040-18043). The use of (13)C-labeling enabled monitoring by infrared spectroscopy of the dynamic exchange between the initially intercalated (13)C-labeled carbonate anions and carbonate anions derived from atmospheric CO2. In this article, we report the significant influence of Mg/Al ratio of LDH on the carbonate anion exchange dynamics. Of three LDHs of various Mg/Al ratios of 2, 3, or 4, magnesium-rich LDH (i.e., Mg/Al ratio = 4) underwent extremely rapid exchange of carbonate anions, and most of the initially intercalated carbonate anions were replaced with carbonate anions derived from atmospheric CO2 within 30 min. Detailed investigations by using infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, adsorption, thermogravimetric analysis, and solid-state NMR revealed that magnesium rich LDH has chemical and structural features that promote the exchange of carbonate anions. Our results indicate that the unique interactions between LDH and CO2 can be optimized simply by varying the chemical composition of LDH, implying that LDH is a promising material for CO2 storage and/or separation.

  2. Lattice and transport properties of the misfit-layered oxide thermoelectric Ca3Co4O9 from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebola, Alejandro; Klie, Robert; Zapol, Peter; Ogut, Serdar

    2013-03-01

    The misfit-layered oxide Ca3Co4O9 (CCO) has recently been the subject of many experimental and some theoretical investigations due to its remarkable thermoelectric properties. CCO is composed of two incommensurate subsystems, a distorted rocksalt-type Ca2CoO3 layer sandwiched between hexagonal CoO2 layers. Taking into account that the composition ratio between these subsystems is very close to the golden mean, which is the limit of the sequence of the ratios of consecutive Fibonacci numbers F (n) , we model CCO from first principles[1] by using rational approximants of composition [Ca2CoO3]2 F (n)[CoO2]2 F (n + 1). In the present study, we use 3/2 and 5/3 rational approximants and PBE+U computations to calculate the ab initio phonon dispersion curves, related thermal properties, as well as ab initio electronic transport properties such as DC conductivity and thermopower within the relaxation time approximation by applying the Boltzmann transport theory. Results are compared with available experimental data and potential routes for increasing the thermopower of CCO are discussed.

  3. Wafer-scale synthesis of multi-layer graphene by high-temperature carbon ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Janghyuk; Lee, Geonyeop; Kim, Jihyun

    2015-07-01

    We report on the synthesis of wafer-scale (4 in. in diameter) high-quality multi-layer graphene using high-temperature carbon ion implantation on thin Ni films on a substrate of SiO2/Si. Carbon ions were bombarded at 20 keV and a dose of 1 × 1015 cm-2 onto the surface of the Ni/SiO2/Si substrate at a temperature of 500 °C. This was followed by high-temperature activation annealing (600-900 °C) to form a sp2-bonded honeycomb structure. The effects of post-implantation activation annealing conditions were systematically investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Carbon ion implantation at elevated temperatures allowed a lower activation annealing temperature for fabricating large-area graphene. Our results indicate that carbon-ion implantation provides a facile and direct route for integrating graphene with Si microelectronics.

  4. Electric double-layer capacitors based on highly graphitized nanoporous carbons derived from ZIF-67.

    PubMed

    Torad, Nagy L; Salunkhe, Rahul R; Li, Yunqi; Hamoudi, Hicham; Imura, Masataka; Sakka, Yoshio; Hu, Chi-Chang; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2014-06-23

    Nanoporous carbons (NPCs) have large specific surface areas, good electrical and thermal conductivity, and both chemical and mechanical stability, which facilitate their use in energy storage device applications. In the present study, highly graphitized NPCs are synthesized by one-step direct carbonization of cobalt-containing zeolitic imidazolate framework-67 (ZIF-67). After chemical etching, the deposited Co content can be completely removed to prepare pure NPCs with high specific surface area, large pore volume, and intrinsic electrical conductivity (high content of sp(2) -bonded carbons). A detailed electrochemical study is performed using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements. Our NPC is very promising for efficient electrodes for high-performance supercapacitor applications. A maximum specific capacitance of 238 F g(-1) is observed at a scan rate of 20 mV s(-1) . This value is very high compared to previous works on carbon-based electric double layer capacitors.

  5. Different determinants of soil carbon decomposition between active and permafrost layers: evidence from alpine permafrost on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Chen, L.; Qin, S.; Ding, J.; Yang, G.; Li, F.

    2015-12-01

    The fate of permafrost carbon is of great concern among global change community due to its potential positive feedback to climate warming. However, the determinants of soil carbon decomposition between active layer and permafrost layers remain poorly understood. This incubation study was designed to test the following two hypotheses: 1) low carbon quantity and microbial abundances in permafrost soils limit decomposition rates compared with active layer soils; 2) carbon losses from active layer are more controlled by environmental factors, whereas those from permafrost depth are primarily determined by the microbial condition. We collected five active layer and permafrost soils from alpine grasslands on the Tibetan Plateau and compared the carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions at -5 and 5 °C in a 80-days aerobic incubation. The availability of organic carbon and microbial abundances (fungi, bacteria, and actinomycete) within permafrost soils were significantly lower than active layer soils, which, together with the environmental data supports the reduced cumulative CO2 emissions in permafrost depth. However, the decomposability of SOC from permafrost was similar or even higher than surface soils. The carbon loss not only depended on SOC quantity and microbial abundance, but also nitrogen availability and soil pH. Nevertheless, the controls on carbon emissions between active and permafrost layers were significantly different. Cumulative CO2 emission from active layers was best predicted by soil moisture, and carbon emission from permafrost depths was highly associated with fungal-PLFAs. Taken together, these results demonstrate that different controls on carbon emission between active layer and permafrost soils. These differences highlight the importance of distinguishing permafrost depth in Earth System Models when predicting the responses of deep soil carbon to environmental change.

  6. Effect of diffuse layer and pore shapes in mesoporous carbon supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent; Qiao, Rui

    2010-01-01

    In the spirit of the theoretical evolution from the Helmholtz model to the Gouy Chapman Stern model for electric double-layer capacitors, we explored the effect of a diffuse layer on the capacitance of mesoporous carbon supercapacitors by solving the Poisson Boltzmann (PB) equation in mesopores of diameters from 2 to 20 nm. To evaluate the effect of pore shape, both slit and cylindrical pores were considered. We found that the diffuse layer does not affect the capacitance significantly. For slit pores, the area-normalized capacitance is nearly independent of pore size, which is not experimentally observed for template carbons. In comparison, for cylindrical pores, PB simulations produce a trend of slightly increasing area-normalized capacitance with pore size, similar to that depicted by the electric double-cylinder capacitor model proposed earlier. These results indicate that it is appropriate to approximate the pore shape of mesoporous carbons as being cylindrical and the electric double-cylinder capacitor model should be used for mesoporous carbons as a replacement of the traditional Helmholtz model.

  7. Manganese oxide nanowires wrapped with nitrogen doped carbon layers for high performance supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Mei, Yuan; Zhang, Lin-Qun; Wang, Jian-Hai; Liu, An-Ran; Zhang, Yuan-Jian; Liu, Song-Qin

    2015-10-01

    In this study, manganese oxide nanowires wrapped by nitrogen-doped carbon layers (MnO(x)@NCs) were prepared by carbonization of poly(o-phenylenediamine) layer coated onto MnO2 nanowires for high performance supercapacitors. The component and structure of the MnO(x)@NCs were controlled through carbonization procedure under different temperatures. Results demonstrated that this composite combined the high conductivity and high specific surface area of nitrogen-doped carbon layers with the high pseudo-capacitance of manganese oxide nanowires. The as-prepared MnO(x)@NCs exhibited superior capacitive properties in 1 M Na2SO4 aqueous solution, such as high conductivity (4.167×10(-3) S cm(-1)), high specific capacitance (269 F g(-1) at 10 mV s(-1)) and long cycle life (134 F g(-1) after 1200 cycles at a scan rate of 50 mV s(-1)). It is reckoned that the present novel hybrid nanowires can serve as a promising electrode material for supercapacitors and other electrochemical devices.

  8. Amperometric Choline Biosensor Fabricated through Electrostatic Assembly of Bienzyme/Polyelectrolyte Hybrid Layers on Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2006-03-01

    We report a flow injection amperometric choline biosensors based on the electrostatic assembly of an enzyme of choline oxidase (ChO) and a bi-enzyme of ChO and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) onto multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) modified glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. These choline biosensors were fabricated by immobilization of enzymes on the negatively charged MWCNT surface through alternatively assembling a cationic polydiallydiimethylammonium chloride (PDDA) layer and an enzyme layer. Using this layer-by-layer assembling approach, bioactive nanocomposite film of a PDDA/ChO/PDDA/HRP/PDDA/CNT (ChO/HRP/CNT) and a PDDA/ChO/PDDA/ CNT (ChO/ CNT) were fabricated on GC surface, respectively. Owning to the electrocatalytic effect of carbon nanotubes, the measurement of faradic responses resulting from enzymatic reactions has been realized at low potential with acceptable sensitivity. It is found the ChO/HRP/CNT biosensor is more sensitive than the ChO/CNT one. Experimental parameters affecting the sensitivity of biosensors, e.g. applied potential, flow rate, etc. were optimized and potential interference was examined. The response time for this choline biosensor is fast (less than a few seconds). The linear range of detection for the choline biosensor is from 5 x 10-5 to 5 x 10-3 M and the detection limit is determined to be about 1.0 x 10-5 M.

  9. Atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide films for carbon nanotube network transistor passivation.

    PubMed

    Grigoras, Kestutis; Zavodchikova, Marina Y; Nasibulin, Albert G; Kauppinen, Esko I; Ermolov, Vladimir; Franssila, Sami

    2011-10-01

    Ultra-thin (2-5 nm thick) aluminum oxide layers were grown on non-functionalized individual single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and their bundles by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique in order to investigate the mechanism of the coating process. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to examine the uniformity and conformality of the coatings grown at different temperatures (80 degrees C or 220 degrees C) and with different precursors for oxidation (water and ozone). We found that bundles of SWCNTs were coated continuously, but at the same time, bare individual nanotubes remained uncoated. The successful coating of bundles was explained by the formation of interstitial pores between the individual SWCNTs constituting the bundle, where the precursor molecules can adhere, initiating the layer growth. Thicker alumina layers (20-35 nm thick) were used for the coating of bottom-gated SWCNT-network based field effect transistors (FETs). ALD layers, grown at different conditions, were found to influence the performance of the SWCNT-network FETs: low temperature ALD layers caused the ambipolarity of the channel and pronounced n-type conduction, whereas high temperature ALD processes resulted in hysteresis suppression in the transfer characteristics of the SWCNT transistors and preserved p-type conduction. Fixed charges in the ALD layer have been considered as the main factor influencing the conduction change of the SWCNT network based transistors.

  10. Ultrasonic absorption characteristics of porous carbon-carbon ceramics with random microstructure for passive hypersonic boundary layer transition control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Alexander; Hannemann, Klaus; Kuhn, Markus

    2014-06-01

    Preceding studies in the high enthalpy shock tunnel Göttingen of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) revealed that carbon fibre reinforced carbon ceramic (C/C) surfaces can be utilized to damp hypersonic boundary layer instabilities leading to a delay of boundary layer transition onset. To assess the ultrasonic absorption properties of the material, a test rig was set up to measure the reflection coefficient at ambient pressures ranging from 0.1 × 105 to 1 × 105 Pa. For the first time, broadband ultrasonic sound transducers with resonance frequencies of up to 370 kHz were applied to directly cover the frequency range of interest with respect to the second-mode instabilities observed in previous experiments. The reflection of ultrasonic waves from three flat plate test samples with a porous layer thickness between 5 and 30 mm was investigated and compared to an ideally reflecting surface. C/C was found to absorb up to 19 % of the acoustic power transmitted towards the material. The absorption characteristics were investigated theoretically by means of the quasi-homogeneous absorber theory. The experimental results were found to be in good agreement with the theory.

  11. Mass Conservation in Modeling Moisture Diffusion in Multi-Layer Carbon Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurge, Mark A.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Starr, Stanley O.

    2009-01-01

    Moisture diffusion in multi-layer carbon composite structures is difficult to model using finite difference methods due to the discontinuity in concentrations between adjacent layers of differing materials. Applying a mass conserving approach at these boundaries proved to be effective at accurately predicting moisture uptake for a sample exposed to a fixed temperature and relative humidity. Details of the model developed are presented and compared with actual moisture uptake data gathered over 130 days from a graphite epoxy composite sandwich coupon with a Rohacell foam core.

  12. Controlling single and few-layer graphene crystals growth in a solid carbon source based chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Papon, Remi; Sharma, Subash; Shinde, Sachin M.; Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Tanemura, Masaki; Kalita, Golap

    2014-09-29

    Here, we reveal the growth process of single and few-layer graphene crystals in the solid carbon source based chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Nucleation and growth of graphene crystals on a polycrystalline Cu foil are significantly affected by the injection of carbon atoms with pyrolysis rate of the carbon source. We observe micron length ribbons like growth front as well as saturated growth edges of graphene crystals depending on growth conditions. Controlling the pyrolysis rate of carbon source, monolayer and few-layer crystals and corresponding continuous films are obtained. In a controlled process, we observed growth of large monolayer graphene crystals, which interconnect and merge together to form a continuous film. On the other hand, adlayer growth is observed with an increased pyrolysis rate, resulting few-layer graphene crystal structure and merged continuous film. The understanding of monolayer and few-layer crystals growth in the developed CVD process can be significant to grow graphene with controlled layer numbers.

  13. Layer-by-layer carbon nanotube bio-templates for in situ monitoring of the metabolic activity of nitrifying bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Kenneth J.; Guest, Jeremy S.; Ho, Genevieve; Lynch, Jerome P.; Love, Nancy G.

    2009-03-01

    Despite the wide variety of effective disinfection and wastewater treatment techniques for removing organic and inorganic wastes, pollutants such as nitrogen remain in wastewater effluents. If left untreated, these nitrogenous wastes can adversely impact the environment by promoting the overgrowth of aquatic plants, depleting dissolved oxygen, and causing eutrophication. Although nitrification/denitrification processes are employed during advanced wastewater treatment, effective and efficient operation of these facilities require information of the pH, dissolved oxygen content, among many other parameters, of the wastewater effluent. In this preliminary study, a biocompatible CNT-based nanocomposite is proposed and validated for monitoring the biological metabolic activity of nitrifying bacteria in wastewater effluent environments (i.e., to monitor the nitrification process). Using carbon nanotubes and a pH-sensitive conductive polymer (i.e., poly(aniline) emeraldine base), a layer-by-layer fabrication technique is employed to fabricate a novel thin film pH sensor that changes its electrical properties in response to variations in ambient pH environments. Laboratory studies are conducted to evaluate the proposed nanocomposite's biocompatibility with wastewater effluent environments and its pH sensing performance.

  14. Carbon nanotubes supported cerium dioxide and platinum nanohybrids: Layer-by-layer synthesis and enhanced electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Xinyuan; Chen, Jiayi; Wang, Mengdi; Gu, Jialei; Wu, Ping; Sun, Dongmei; Tang, Yawen

    2015-08-01

    We successfully synthesize carbon nanotubes (CNTs) supported cerium dioxide and platinum (Pt/CeO2/CNTs) nanohybrids via layer-by-layer assembly. The composition, morphology and structure of the as-prepared Pt/CeO2/CNTs nanohybrids are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). By comparison of the electrocatalytic properties of the Pt/CeO2/CNTs with the Pt/CNTs, we systematically investigate the promotion effect of CeO2 on the Pt/CeO2/CNTs catalysts towards methanol oxidation. It is found that the introduction of CeO2 not only enhances the electrocatalytic activity and stability of the Pt/CeO2/CNTs catalyst for methanol oxidation but also minimizes the CO poisoning, probably accounting for the good oxygen carrying capacity of CeO2 and its high stability in acidic solution.

  15. Boundary-Layer Detection at Cryogenic Conditions Using Temperature Sensitive Paint Coupled with a Carbon Nanotube Heating Layer.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Kyle Z; Lipford, William E; Watkins, Anthony Neal

    2016-12-03

    Detection of flow transition on aircraft surfaces and models can be vital to the development of future vehicles and computational methods for evaluating vehicle concepts. In testing at ambient conditions, IR thermography is ideal for this measurement. However, for higher Reynolds number testing, cryogenic facilities are often used, in which IR thermography is difficult to employ. In these facilities, temperature sensitive paint is an alternative with a temperature step introduced to enhance the natural temperature change from transition. Traditional methods for inducing the temperature step by changing the liquid nitrogen injection rate often change the tunnel conditions. Recent work has shown that adding a layer consisting of carbon nanotubes to the surface can be used to impart a temperature step on the model surface with little change in the operating conditions. Unfortunately, this system physically degraded at 130 K and lost heating capability. This paper describes a modification of this technique enabling operation down to at least 77 K, well below the temperature reached in cryogenic facilities. This is possible because the CNT layer is in a polyurethane binder. This was tested on a Natural Laminar Flow model in a cryogenic facility and transition detection was successfully visualized at conditions from 200 K to 110 K. Results were also compared with the traditional temperature step method.

  16. Reagentless biosensor based on layer-by-layer assembly of functional multiwall carbon nanotubes and enzyme-mediator biocomposite*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xing-hua; Xi, Feng-na; Zhang, Yi-ming; Lin, Xian-fu

    2011-01-01

    A simple and controllable layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly method was proposed for the construction of reagentless biosensors based on electrostatic interaction between functional multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and enzyme-mediator biocomposites. The carboxylated MWNTs were wrapped with polycations poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and the resulting PAH-MWNTs were well dispersed and positively charged. As a water-soluble dye methylene blue (MB) could mix well with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) to form a biocompatible and negatively-charged HRP-MB biocomposite. A (PAH-MWNTs/HRP-MB)n bionanomultilayer was then prepared by electrostatic LBL assembly of PAH-MWNTs and HRP-MB on a polyelectrolyte precursor film-modified Au electrode. Due to the excellent biocompatibility of HRP-MB biocomposite and the uniform LBL assembly, the immobilized HRP could retain its natural bioactivity and MB could efficiently shuttle electrons between HRP and the electrode. The incorporation of MWNTs in the bionanomultilayer enhanced the surface coverage concentration of the electroactive enzyme and increased the catalytic current response of the electrode. The proposed biosensor displayed a fast response (2 s) to hydrogen peroxide with a low detection limit of 2.0×10−7 mol/L (S/N=3). This work provided a versatile platform in the further development of reagentless biosensors. PMID:21634040

  17. Boundary-Layer Detection at Cryogenic Conditions Using Temperature Sensitive Paint Coupled with a Carbon Nanotube Heating Layer

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Kyle Z.; Lipford, William E.; Watkins, Anthony Neal

    2016-01-01

    Detection of flow transition on aircraft surfaces and models can be vital to the development of future vehicles and computational methods for evaluating vehicle concepts. In testing at ambient conditions, IR thermography is ideal for this measurement. However, for higher Reynolds number testing, cryogenic facilities are often used, in which IR thermography is difficult to employ. In these facilities, temperature sensitive paint is an alternative with a temperature step introduced to enhance the natural temperature change from transition. Traditional methods for inducing the temperature step by changing the liquid nitrogen injection rate often change the tunnel conditions. Recent work has shown that adding a layer consisting of carbon nanotubes to the surface can be used to impart a temperature step on the model surface with little change in the operating conditions. Unfortunately, this system physically degraded at 130 K and lost heating capability. This paper describes a modification of this technique enabling operation down to at least 77 K, well below the temperature reached in cryogenic facilities. This is possible because the CNT layer is in a polyurethane binder. This was tested on a Natural Laminar Flow model in a cryogenic facility and transition detection was successfully visualized at conditions from 200 K to 110 K. Results were also compared with the traditional temperature step method. PMID:27918493

  18. Ion-sensitive field effect transistors using carbon nanotubes as the transducing layer.

    PubMed

    Cid, Cristina C; Riu, Jordi; Maroto, Alicia; Rius, F Xavier

    2008-08-01

    We report a new type of ion-sensitive field effect transistor (ISFET). This type of ISFET incorporates a new architecture, containing a network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the transduction layer, making an external reference electrode unnecessary. To show an example of its application, the SWCNT-based ISFET is able to detect at least 10(-8) M of potassium in water using an ion-selective membrane containing valinomycin.

  19. Assessment of carbon layer growth induced by resists outgassing in multi e-beams lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marusic, JC; Pourteau, ML; Cêtre, S.; Pain, L.; Mebiene-Engohang, AP; David, S.; Labau, S.; Boussey, J.

    2014-10-01

    The development of multiple e-beam lithography equipment is seen as an alternative for next generation lithography. However, similarly to EUV lithography, this technology faces important challenges in controlling the contamination of the optics due to deposition of carbon layer induced by the outgassed chemical species from resist under electron bombardment. An experimental setup was designed and built at LETI to study the outgassed species and observe the carbon layer. In this setup, resist coated wafers 100 mm size are exposed under a 5 kV e-beam gun. During exposure, byproducts from outgassed species are monitored with a Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA). The identification of outgassed chemical species is done with an ex-situ TD-GC-MS analysis (ThermoDesorption-Gaz Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry). In a second part of this investigation, we observed the contamination carbon layer growth induced by the outgassing. Thereby, we fabricated a device which consists of a silicon membrane with micro-machined apertures. During e-beam exposure, this device simulates the multiple parallel beams of the optic system of a maskless lithography tool. The deposited contamination layer on device is then observed and thickness measured under SEM. In this paper, we present the results of outgassing and contamination on 3 chemically amplified resists showing that contamination is not directly dependent of the overall outgassing rate but on first order of the outgassing from Photo Acid Generator (PAG). It also reports on the performance in reducing outgassing and contamination of applying a top-coat layer on top of the resist and shows that reduction is more important for contamination than for outgassing.

  20. Topological defects in electric double layers of ionic liquids at carbon interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Black, Jennifer M.; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Feng, Guang; ...

    2015-06-07

    The structure and properties of the electrical double layer in ionic liquids is of interest in a wide range of areas including energy storage, catalysis, lubrication, and many more. Theories describing the electrical double layer for ionic liquids have been proposed, however a full molecular level description of the double layer is lacking. To date, studies have been predominantly focused on ion distributions normal to the surface, however the 3D nature of the electrical double layer in ionic liquids requires a full picture of the double layer structure not only normal to the surface, but also in plane. Here wemore » utilize 3D force mapping to probe the in plane structure of an ionic liquid at a graphite interface and report the direct observation of the structure and properties of topological defects. The observation of ion layering at structural defects such as step-edges, reinforced by molecular dynamics simulations, defines the spatial resolution of the method. Observation of defects allows for the establishment of the universality of ionic liquid behavior vs. separation from the carbon surface and to map internal defect structure. In conclusion, these studies offer a universal pathway for probing the internal structure of topological defects in soft condensed matter on the nanometer level in three dimensions.« less

  1. Topological defects in electric double layers of ionic liquids at carbon interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Jennifer M.; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Feng, Guang; Cummings, Peter T.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Balke, Nina

    2015-06-07

    The structure and properties of the electrical double layer in ionic liquids is of interest in a wide range of areas including energy storage, catalysis, lubrication, and many more. Theories describing the electrical double layer for ionic liquids have been proposed, however a full molecular level description of the double layer is lacking. To date, studies have been predominantly focused on ion distributions normal to the surface, however the 3D nature of the electrical double layer in ionic liquids requires a full picture of the double layer structure not only normal to the surface, but also in plane. Here we utilize 3D force mapping to probe the in plane structure of an ionic liquid at a graphite interface and report the direct observation of the structure and properties of topological defects. The observation of ion layering at structural defects such as step-edges, reinforced by molecular dynamics simulations, defines the spatial resolution of the method. Observation of defects allows for the establishment of the universality of ionic liquid behavior vs. separation from the carbon surface and to map internal defect structure. In conclusion, these studies offer a universal pathway for probing the internal structure of topological defects in soft condensed matter on the nanometer level in three dimensions.

  2. Synthesis and electrochemical properties of niobium pentoxide deposited on layered carbide-derived carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuanfang (John); Maloney, Ryan; Lukatskaya, Maria R.; Beidaghi, Majid; Dyatkin, Boris; Perre, Emilie; Long, Donghui; Qiao, Wenming; Dunn, Bruce; Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-01-01

    Herein we report on the hydrothermal synthesis of niobium pentoxide on carbide-derived carbon (Nb2O5/CDC) with a layered structure. The presence of phenylphosphonic acid guides the deposition during preparation, leading to the formation of amorphous Nb2O5 particles which are 4-10 nm in diameter and homogeneously distributed on the CDC framework. Electrochemical testing of the Nb2O5/CDC electrode indicated that the highest capacitance and Coulombic efficiency occurred using an electrolyte comprised of 1 M lithium perchlorate in ethylene carbonate/dimethyl carbonate. Subsequent heat treatment of Nb2O5/CDC in CO2 environment led to crystallization of the Nb2O5, allowing reversible Li+ intercalation/de-intercalation. For sweep rates corresponding to charging and discharging in under 3 min, a volumetric charge of 180 C cm-3 and Coulombic efficiency of 99.2% were attained.

  3. Effect of amorphous carbon layers on the growth of diamond in dual-frequency plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinke, P.; Klemberg-Sapieha, J. E.; Martinu, L.

    1994-11-01

    In the present work we study the growth of diamond in a dual-mode microwave/radio frequency plasma. We investigate the effect of the thickness of predeposited hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films and of ion bombardment of the nucleation process and on the crystal quality. The deposits are characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and by scanning electron microscopy. The XPS spectra of the C(1s) carbon peak and of the plasmon features confirm the presence of an amorphous, carbonaceous phase and of silicon carbide on the surface. Radio frequency biasing during the initial stage of diamond growth leads to a lower crystal quality, but to a higher nucleation density N(sub D). Without biasing, good quality, predominantly (100) oriented diamond crystals are obtained on a Si(100) surface. The N(sub D) values are found to increase with the thickness of the predeposited a-C:H layer. Evolution of the nucleus size distributions indicates that the a-C:H film contributes to the carbon supply, enhancing the nucleation efficiency and shortening the incubation time of seed crystals. Before a continuous layer is formed, the growth of crystals is determined by the interaction with the gas phase as well as by the amount of carbon available on the surface.

  4. Synthesis of carbon nano-structures using organic-molecule intercalated taeniolite layered silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maezumi, Takaaki; Wada, Noboru

    2015-03-01

    By calcinating organic-molecule intercalated taeniolite layered silicates, carbon nano-structures were made between the 2:1 layered silicate sheets. Raman scattering, XRD, TGA and SEM were used to characterize the samples. Large taeniolite crystals (NaLiMg2Si4O10F) were first prepared by melting appropriate chemicals at high temperatures using a platinum crucible. Then, the taeniolite crystals made were cation-exchanged with Li+, K+, NH4+,Ca2+ + and Mg2+ in salt solution. Finally, various organic molecules such as ethylene glycol, pyridine and so on were intercalated into the taeniolite crystals, and calcinated under a N2 atmosphere at about 1000K. The resulting crystals are usually gray or black. X-ray (00l) diffraction patterns suggested that the carbon structures may be monolayer thick (i.e., graphene-like). Raman scattering spectra which exhibited a sharp G-band peak with a high G-band/D-band ratio indicated that the carbon structures were relatively well crystallized. Cation and organic-molecule dependence on the carbon structures will be discussed. In addition, evidence for stage-2 taeniolite will be presented.

  5. Identification of new pillared-layered carbon nitride materials at high pressure

    PubMed Central

    Salamat, Ashkan; Deifallah, Malek; Cabrera, Raul Quesada; Corà, Furio; McMillan, Paul F.

    2013-01-01

    The compression of the layered carbon nitride C6N9H3·HCl was studied experimentally and with density functional theory (DFT) methods. This material has a polytriazine imide structure with Cl− ions contained within C12N12 voids in the layers. The data indicate the onset of layer buckling accompanied by movement of the Cl− ions out of the planes beginning above 10–20 GPa followed by an abrupt change in the diffraction pattern and c axis spacing associated with formation of a new interlayer bonded phase. The transition pressure is calculated to be 47 GPa for the ideal structures. The new material has mixed sp2–sp3 hybridization among the C and N atoms and it provides the first example of a pillared-layered carbon nitride material that combines the functional properties of the graphitic-like form with improved mechanical strength. Similar behavior is predicted to occur for Cl-free structures at lower pressures. PMID:23817211

  6. Does the vertical profile of ethane contain more insight into mixing layer height than carbon monoxide?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herndon, Scott; Yacovitch, Tara; Pusede, Sally; Diskin, Glenn; DiGangi, Joshua; Sachse, Glenn; Crawford, James

    2015-04-01

    To improve the interpretation of satellite data measurements near the surface, the DISCOVER-AQ project embarked on a four year campaign to produce an integrated dataset of airborne and surface based measurements at various locations in North America. One of the key metrics when pursuing the the goal of measuring the surface air quality from space is the mixing layer height. The measurement phase in 2014 included the novel 1-Hz Aerodyne Research, Inc. fast Ethane Spectrometer to distinguish the methane emissions from thermogenic (oil&gas) and biogenic sources in the Denver-Julesberg basin. A second potential use of ethane as a determinant of mixing layer height is revealed in the analysis of 213 vertical profiles collected at 7 points during 21 flights. The findings are evaluated relative to other in-situ metrics, such as carbon monoxide and remote sensing attributions of mixing layer height.

  7. Ultracold Quantum Gases in Hexagonal Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengstock, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    Hexagonal structures occur in a vast variety of systems, ranging from honeycombs of bees in life sciences to carbon nanotubes in material sciences. The latter, in particular its unfolded two-dimensional layer -- Graphene -- has rapidly grown to one of the most discussed topics in condensed-matter physics. Not only does it show proximity to various carbon-based materials but also exceptional properties owing to its unusual energy spectrum. In quantum optics, ultracold quantum gases confined in periodic light fields have shown to be very general and versatile instruments to mimic solid state systems. However, so far nearly all experiments were performed in cubic lattice geometries only. Here we report on the first experimental realization of ultracold quantum gases in a state-dependent, two-dimensional, Graphene-like optical lattice with hexagonal symmetry. The lattice is realized via a spin-dependent optical lattice structure with alternating σ^+ and σ^- -sites and thus constitutes a so called `magnetic'-lattice with `antiferromagnetic'-structure. Atoms with different spin orientation can be loaded to specific lattice sites or -- depending on the parameters -- to the whole lattice. As a consequence e.g. superpositions of a superfluid spin component with a different spin component in the Mott-insulating phase can be realized as well as spin-dependent transport properties, disorder etc. After preparing an antiferromagnetically ordered state we e.g. measure sustainable changes of the transport properties of the atoms. This manifests in a significant reduction of the tunneling as compared to a single-component system. We attribute this observation to a partial tunneling blockade for one spin component induced by population in another spin component localized at alternating lattice sites. Within a Gutzwiller-Ansatz we calculate the phase diagrams for the mixed spin-states and find very good agreement with our experimental results. Moreover, by state-resolved recording

  8. Electrostatic Layer-By-Layer Self-Assembled Graphene/Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Hybrid Multilayers as Efficient 'All Carbon' Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanju; Heintzman, Eli; Price, Carson

    2016-05-01

    In this work, covalently bonded graphene/carbon nanotube (Gr/CNT) conjoined materials are fabricated as engineered three-dimensional hybrid multilayer supercapacitors for high-performance integrated electrochemical energy storage. Stable aqueous dispersion of polymer-modified graphene sheets are prepared in the presence of cationic poly(ethyleneimine), PEI (PEI-Gr) for sequential or electrostatic layer-by-layer (E-LBL) self-assembly with negatively charged acid-oxidized or functionalized multi-walled CNT (fMWCNT), forming (PEI-Gr/fMWCNT)n architecture as "all carbon" super-capacitor, where n = 1, 2, 4, 6, 9, 12 and 15. These films possess an interconnected network of mesoporous nanocarbon structure with well-defined interfaces allowing sufficient surface adsorption and faster ion transport due to short diffusion distances. They exhibit nearly rectangular cyclic voltammograms at an exceedingly high scan rate of 1 V/s with an average specific capacitance of -450 F g(-1) and specific energy density of 75.5 Wh kg(-1) based on electrode weight, measured at a current density of 0.3 A g(-1), comparable to that of Ni metal hydride battery and charged/discharged within a few seconds or a minute. This is attributed to the maximized synergistic effect of the highest specific surface areas by preventing re-aggregation of PEI-Gr or PEI-rGO via fMWCNT as spacers. We also determined relative contributions of the interfacial capacitance (C(dl)) and charge transfer (R(ct)) properties of the hybrids and investigated interfacial properties by SECM technique.

  9. Sodium layer chiral distribution and spin structure of Na2Ni2TeO6 with a Ni honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karna, Sunil K.; Zhao, Y.; Sankar, R.; Avdeev, M.; Tseng, P. C.; Wang, C. W.; Shu, G. J.; Matan, K.; Guo, G. Y.; Chou, F. C.

    2017-03-01

    The nature of Na ion distribution, diffusion path, and the spin structure of P 2 -type Na2Ni2TeO6 with a Ni honeycomb lattice has been explored. The nuclear density distribution of Na ions reveals a two-dimensional (2D) chiral pattern within Na layers without breaking the original 3D crystal symmetry, which has been achieved uniquely via an inverse Fourier transform (iFT)-assisted neutron-diffraction technique. The Na diffusion pathway described by the calculated isosurface of the Na ion bond valence sum (BVS) map is found consistent to a chiral diffusion mechanism. The Na site occupancy and Ni2 + spin ordering were examined in detail with the neutron diffraction, magnetic susceptibility, specific heat, thermal conductivity, and transport measurements. Signatures of both strong incommensurate (ICM) and weak commensurate (CM) antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin ordering were identified in the polycrystalline sample studied, and the CM-AFM spin ordering was confirmed by using a single-crystal sample through the k scan in the momentum space corresponding to the AFM peak of (1/2 ,0 ,1 ).

  10. A carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation study of the molecular conformation of the nootropic drug 2-oxopyrrolidin-1-ylacetamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldo, M.; Grassi, A.; Guidoni, L.; Nicolini, M.; Pappalardo, G. C.; Viti, V.

    The spin-lattice relaxation times ( T1) of carbon-13 resonances of the drug 2-oxopyrrolidin- 1-ylacetamide ( 2OPYAC) were determined in CDCl 3 + DMSO and H 2O solutions to investigate the internal conformational flexibility. The measured T1s for the hydrogen-bearing carbon atoms of the 2-pyrrolidone ring fragment were diagnostic of a rigid conformation with respect to the acetamide linked moiety. The model of anisotropic reorientation of a rigid body was used to analyse the measured relaxation data in terms of a single conformation. Owing to the small number of T1 data available the fitting procedure for each of the possible conformations failed. The structure corresponding to the rigid conformation was therefore considered to be the one that is strongly stabilized by internal hydrogen bonding as predicted on the basis of theoretical MO ab initio quantum chemical calculations.

  11. Surface characterization and orientation interaction between diamond- like carbon layer structure and dimeric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naradikian, H.; Petrov, M.; Katranchev, B.; Milenov, T.; Tinchev, S.

    2017-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) and amorphous carbon films are very promising type of semiconductor materials. Depending on the hybridization sp2/sp3 ratio, the material’s band gap varies between 0.8 and 3 eV. Moreover carbon films possess different interesting for practice properties: comparable to the Silicon, Diamond like structure has 22-time better thermal conductivity etc. Here we present one type of implementation of such type nanostructure. That is one attempt for orientation of dimeric LC by using of pre-deposited DLC layer with different ratio of sp2/sp3 hybridized carbon content. It could be expected a pronounced π1-π2interaction between s and p orbital levels on the surface and the dimeric ring of LC. We present comparison of surface anchoring strengths of both orientation inter-surfaces DLC/dimeric LC and single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT)/dimeric LC. The mechanism of interaction of dimeric LC and activated surfaces with DLC or SWCNT will be discussed. In both cases we have π-π interaction, which in combination with hydrogen bonding, typical for the dimeric LCs, influence the LC alignment. The Raman spectroscopy data evidenced the presence of charge transfer between contacting hexagonal rings of DLC and the C = O groups of the LC molecules.

  12. An electrochemical double layer capacitor using an activated carbon electrode with gel electrolyte binder

    SciTech Connect

    Osaka, Tetsuya, Liu, X.; Nojima, Masashi; Momma, Toshiyuki

    1999-05-01

    An electric double layer capacitor (EDLC) was prepared with an activated carbon powder electrode with poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene) (PVdF-HFP) based gel electrolyte. Ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) were used as plasticizer and tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEABF{sub 4}) was used as the supporting electrolyte. An optimized gel electrolyte of PVdF-HFP/PC/EC/TEABF{sub 4} - 23/31/35/11 mass ratio exhibited high ionic conductivity of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} S/cm, high electrode capacitance, and good mechanical strength. An electrode consisting of activated carbon (AC) with the gel electrolyte as the binder (AC/PVdF-HFP based gel, 7/3 mass ratio) showed a higher specific capacitance and a lower ion diffusion resistance within the electrode than a carbon electrode, prepared with PVdF-HFP binder without plasticizer. This suggests that an electrode mixed with the gel electrolyte has a lower ion diffusion resistance inside the electrode. The highest specific capacitance of 123 F/g was achieved with an electrode containing AC with a specific surface area of 2500 m{sup 2}/g. A coin-type EDLC cell with optimized components showed excellent cycleability exceeding 10{sup 4} cycles with ca. 100% coulombic efficiency achieved when charging and discharging was repeated between 1.0 and 2.5 V at 1.66 mA/cm{sup 2}.

  13. Formation of carburized layer structure with reverted austenite on low-carbon martensitic steel 12Kh2G2NMFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. S.; Bogdanova, M. V.

    2013-03-01

    The structure of surface layer in low-carbon martensitic steel 12Kh2G2NMFT obtained by carburizing followed by high-temperature tempering and quenching from the intercritical temperature range is investigated.

  14. Distinct temperature sensitivity of soil carbon decomposition in forest organic layer and mineral soil.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenhua; Li, Wei; Jiang, Ping; Wang, Hui; Bai, Edith

    2014-10-01

    The roles of substrate availability and quality in determining temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil carbon (C) decomposition are still unclear, which limits our ability to predict how soil C storage and cycling would respond to climate change. Here we determined Q10 in surface organic layer and subsurface mineral soil along an elevation gradient in a temperate forest ecosystem. Q10 was calculated by comparing the times required to respire a given amount of soil C at 15 and 25°C in a 350-day incubation. Results indicated that Q10 of the organic layer was 0.22-0.71 (absolute difference) higher than Q10 of the mineral soil. Q10 in both the organic layer (2.5-3.4) and the mineral soil (2.1-2.8) increased with decreasing substrate quality during the incubation. This enhancement of Q10 over incubation time in both layers suggested that Q10 of more labile C was lower than that of more recalcitrant C, consistent with the Arrhenius kinetics. No clear trend of Q10 was found along the elevation gradient. Because the soil organic C pool of the organic layer in temperate forests is large, its higher temperature sensitivity highlights its importance in C cycling under global warming.

  15. The effect of the carbon nanotube buffer layer on the performance of a Li metal battery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ding; Zhou, Yi; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan

    2016-06-07

    Lithium (Li) metal is one of the most promising candidates as an anode for the next-generation energy storage systems because of its high specific capacity and lowest negative electrochemical potential. But the growth of Li dendrites limits the application of the Li metal battery. In this work, a type of modified Li metal battery with a carbon nanotube (CNT) buffer layer inserted between the separator and the Li metal electrode was reported. The electrochemical results show that the modified batteries have a much better rate capability and cycling performance than the conventional Li metal batteries. The mechanism study by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy reveals that the modified battery has a smaller charge transfer resistance and larger Li ion diffusion coefficient during the deposition process on the Li electrode than the conventional Li metal batteries. Symmetric battery tests show that the interfacial behavior of the Li metal electrode with the buffer layer is more stable than the naked Li metal electrode. The morphological characterization of the CNT buffer layer and Li metal lamina reveals that the CNT buffer layer has restrained the growth of Li dendrites. The CNT buffer layer has great potential to solve the safety problem of the Li metal battery.

  16. Enhancement of dopamine sensing by layer-by-layer assembly of PVI-dmeOs and Nafion on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Hui-Fang; Cui, Yu-Han; Sun, Yu-Long; Zhang, Kuan; Zhang, Wei-De

    2010-05-01

    In this study, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were modified to further improve their performance in electrochemical sensing of dopamine (DA) levels. After a redox polymer, poly(vinylimidazole) complexed with Os(4, 4'-dimethyl- 2, 2-bipyridine)2Cl (termed PVI-dmeOs) was electrodeposited on multi-wall CNTs (MWCNTs), Nafion and PVI-dmeOs films were successfully layer-by-layer (LBL) assembled on the hydrophilic surface of the as-prepared PVI-dmeOs/CNTs nanocomposites through electrostatic interactions. The LBL assembly was proved by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemistry and UV-vis spectroscopy measurements. LBL assembly of Nafion/PVI-dmeOs films on CNTs significantly enhanced their linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) response sensitivity to DA, with a maximum enhancement for three Nafion/PVI-dmeOs film-modified MWCNTs. The LSV peak current density of (Nafion/PV I-dmeOs)3/CNT electrodes in response to 10 and 50 µM DA solutions was about 7.3 and 3.9 times those for bare CNTs. At the (Nafion/PV I-dmeOs)3/CNT electrodes, the limit of detection (LOD) (signal-to-noise ratio: 3) was 0.05 µM DA, the linear range was 0.1-10 µM DA (with a linear regression coefficient of 0.97) and the DA-sensing sensitivity was 8.15 µA cm - 2 µM - 1. The newly fabricated (Nafion/PV I-dmeOs)3/CNT electrodes may be developed as an ideal biosensor for direct and in situ measurement of DA levels.

  17. Enhancement of dopamine sensing by layer-by-layer assembly of PVI-dmeOs and Nafion on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hui-Fang; Cui, Yu-Han; Sun, Yu-Long; Zhang, Kuan; Zhang, Wei-De

    2010-05-28

    In this study, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were modified to further improve their performance in electrochemical sensing of dopamine (DA) levels. After a redox polymer, poly(vinylimidazole) complexed with Os(4, 4'-dimethyl- 2, 2-bipyridine)(2)Cl (termed PVI-dmeOs) was electrodeposited on multi-wall CNTs (MWCNTs), Nafion and PVI-dmeOs films were successfully layer-by-layer (LBL) assembled on the hydrophilic surface of the as-prepared PVI-dmeOs/CNTs nanocomposites through electrostatic interactions. The LBL assembly was proved by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemistry and UV-vis spectroscopy measurements. LBL assembly of Nafion/PVI-dmeOs films on CNTs significantly enhanced their linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) response sensitivity to DA, with a maximum enhancement for three Nafion/PVI-dmeOs film-modified MWCNTs. The LSV peak current density of (Nafion/PV I-dmeOs)(3)/CNT electrodes in response to 10 and 50 microM DA solutions was about 7.3 and 3.9 times those for bare CNTs. At the (Nafion/PV I-dmeOs)(3)/CNT electrodes, the limit of detection (LOD) (signal-to-noise ratio: 3) was 0.05 microM DA, the linear range was 0.1-10 microM DA (with a linear regression coefficient of 0.97) and the DA-sensing sensitivity was 8.15 microA cm( - 2) microM( - 1). The newly fabricated (Nafion/PV I-dmeOs)(3)/CNT electrodes may be developed as an ideal biosensor for direct and in situ measurement of DA levels.

  18. Recent developments in the layer-by-layer assembly of polyaniline and carbon nanomaterials for energy storage and sensing applications. From synthetic aspects to structural and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Marmisollé, Waldemar A; Azzaroni, Omar

    2016-05-21

    The construction of hybrid polymer-inorganic nanoarchitectures for electrochemical purposes based on the layer-by-layer assembly of conducting polymers and carbon nanomaterials has become increasingly popular over the last decade. This explosion of interest is primarily related to the increasing mastery in the design of supramolecular constructs using simple wet chemical approaches. Concomitantly, this continuous research activity paved the way to the rapid development of nanocomposites or "nanoblends" readily integrable into energy storage and sensing devices. In this sense, the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly technique has allowed us to access three-dimensional (3D) multicomponent carbon-based network nanoarchitectures displaying addressable electrical, electrochemical and transport properties in which conducting polymers, such as polyaniline, and carbon nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes or nanographene, play unique roles without disrupting their inherent functions - complementary entities coexisting in harmony. Over the last few years the level of functional sophistication reached by LbL-assembled carbon-based 3D network nanoarchitectures, and the level of knowledge related to how to design, fabricate and optimize the properties of these 3D nanoconstructs have advanced enormously. This feature article presents and discusses not only the recent advances but also the emerging challenges in complex hybrid nanoarchitectures that result from the layer-by-layer assembly of polyaniline, a quintessential conducting polymer, and diverse carbon nanomaterials. This is a rapidly developing research area, and this work attempts to provide an overview of the diverse 3D network nanoarchitectures prepared up to now. The importance of materials processing and LbL integration is explored within each section and while the overall emphasis is on energy storage and sensing applications, the most widely-used synthetic strategies and characterization methods for "nanoblend

  19. Recent developments in the layer-by-layer assembly of polyaniline and carbon nanomaterials for energy storage and sensing applications. From synthetic aspects to structural and functional characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmisollé, Waldemar A.; Azzaroni, Omar

    2016-05-01

    The construction of hybrid polymer-inorganic nanoarchitectures for electrochemical purposes based on the layer-by-layer assembly of conducting polymers and carbon nanomaterials has become increasingly popular over the last decade. This explosion of interest is primarily related to the increasing mastery in the design of supramolecular constructs using simple wet chemical approaches. Concomitantly, this continuous research activity paved the way to the rapid development of nanocomposites or ``nanoblends'' readily integrable into energy storage and sensing devices. In this sense, the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly technique has allowed us to access three-dimensional (3D) multicomponent carbon-based network nanoarchitectures displaying addressable electrical, electrochemical and transport properties in which conducting polymers, such as polyaniline, and carbon nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes or nanographene, play unique roles without disrupting their inherent functions - complementary entities coexisting in harmony. Over the last few years the level of functional sophistication reached by LbL-assembled carbon-based 3D network nanoarchitectures, and the level of knowledge related to how to design, fabricate and optimize the properties of these 3D nanoconstructs have advanced enormously. This feature article presents and discusses not only the recent advances but also the emerging challenges in complex hybrid nanoarchitectures that result from the layer-by-layer assembly of polyaniline, a quintessential conducting polymer, and diverse carbon nanomaterials. This is a rapidly developing research area, and this work attempts to provide an overview of the diverse 3D network nanoarchitectures prepared up to now. The importance of materials processing and LbL integration is explored within each section and while the overall emphasis is on energy storage and sensing applications, the most widely-used synthetic strategies and characterization methods for ``nanoblend

  20. Temperature Oscillation Modulated Self-Assembly of Periodic Concentric Layered Magnesium Carbonate Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shihong; Wang, Zheng Jim; Chang, Ting-Tung

    2014-01-01

    Intriguing patterns of periodic, concentric, layered, mineral microstructure are present in nature and organisms, yet they have elusive geneses. We hypothesize temperature oscillation can be an independent factor that causes the self-assembly of such patterns in mineral phases synthesized in solution. Static experiments verify that rhythmic concentric multi-layered magnesium carbonate microhemispheres can be synthesized from bicarbonate solution by temperature oscillation, without use of a chemical template, additive or gel-diffusion system. Appropriate reactant concentration and initial pH value can restrain the competitive growth of other mineral generations. Polarized light microscopy images indicate the microhemispheres are crystalline and the crystallinity increases with incubation time. The thickness of a single mineral layer of microhemisphere in microscale is precisely controlled by the waveform parameters of the temperature oscillation, while the layer number, which can reach tens to about one hundred, is constrained by the temperature oscillation period number. FT-IR spectra show that these microhemispheres synthesized under different conditions can be identified as the basic form of magnesium carbonate, hydromagnesite (Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2⋅4H2O). SEM images exhibit the characteristic microscopic texture of the alternating dark and light rings of these microhemispheres. TEM images and ED patterns suggest the nanoflakes of microhemispheres are present in polycrystalline form with some degree of oriented assembly. The temperature oscillation modulated self-assembly may offer a new mechanism to understand the formation of layered microstructure of minerals in solution, and provide a non-invasive and programmable means to synthesize hierarchically ordered materials. PMID:24520410

  1. Temperature oscillation modulated self-assembly of periodic concentric layered magnesium carbonate microparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Shihong; Wang, Zheng Jim; Chang, Ting-Tung

    2014-01-01

    Intriguing patterns of periodic, concentric, layered, mineral microstructure are present in nature and organisms, yet they have elusive geneses. We hypothesize temperature oscillation can be an independent factor that causes the self-assembly of such patterns in mineral phases synthesized in solution. Static experiments verify that rhythmic concentric multi-layered magnesium carbonate microhemispheres can be synthesized from bicarbonate solution by temperature oscillation, without use of a chemical template, additive or gel-diffusion system. Appropriate reactant concentration and initial pH value can restrain the competitive growth of other mineral generations. Polarized light microscopy images indicate the microhemispheres are crystalline and the crystallinity increases with incubation time. The thickness of a single mineral layer of microhemisphere in microscale is precisely controlled by the waveform parameters of the temperature oscillation, while the layer number, which can reach tens to about one hundred, is constrained by the temperature oscillation period number. FT-IR spectra show that these microhemispheres synthesized under different conditions can be identified as the basic form of magnesium carbonate, hydromagnesite (Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2 ⋅ 4H2O). SEM images exhibit the characteristic microscopic texture of the alternating dark and light rings of these microhemispheres. TEM images and ED patterns suggest the nanoflakes of microhemispheres are present in polycrystalline form with some degree of oriented assembly. The temperature oscillation modulated self-assembly may offer a new mechanism to understand the formation of layered microstructure of minerals in solution, and provide a non-invasive and programmable means to synthesize hierarchically ordered materials.

  2. Four-layer tin-carbon nanotube yolk-shell materials for high-performance lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Wu, Fengdan; Wang, Yong

    2014-05-01

    All high-capacity anodes for lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries, such as those based on tin (Sn) and silicon (Si), suffer from large volume changes during cycling with lithium ions, and their high capacities can be only achieved in the first few cycles. We design and synthesize a unique four-layer yolk-shell tin-carbon (Sn-C) nanotube array to address this problem. The shape and size of the exterior Sn nanotube@carbon core-shell layer, the encapsulated interior Sn nanowire@carbon nanotube core-shell layer, and the filling level of each layer can be all controlled by adjusting the experimental conditions. Such a nanostructure has not been reported for any metal or metal oxide-based material. Owing to the special design of the electrode structure, the four-layer hierarchical structure demonstrates excellent Li-ion storage properties in terms of high capacity, long cycle life, and high rate performance.

  3. Black carbon solar absorption suppresses turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Eric M; Thomas, Rick M; Praveen, Puppala S; Pistone, Kristina; Bender, Frida A-M; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran

    2016-10-18

    The introduction of cloud condensation nuclei and radiative heating by sunlight-absorbing aerosols can modify the thickness and coverage of low clouds, yielding significant radiative forcing of climate. The magnitude and sign of changes in cloud coverage and depth in response to changing aerosols are impacted by turbulent dynamics of the cloudy atmosphere, but integrated measurements of aerosol solar absorption and turbulent fluxes have not been reported thus far. Here we report such integrated measurements made from unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) during the CARDEX (Cloud Aerosol Radiative Forcing and Dynamics Experiment) investigation conducted over the northern Indian Ocean. The UAV and surface data reveal a reduction in turbulent kinetic energy in the surface mixed layer at the base of the atmosphere concurrent with an increase in absorbing black carbon aerosols. Polluted conditions coincide with a warmer and shallower surface mixed layer because of aerosol radiative heating and reduced turbulence. The polluted surface mixed layer was also observed to be more humid with higher relative humidity. Greater humidity enhances cloud development, as evidenced by polluted clouds that penetrate higher above the top of the surface mixed layer. Reduced entrainment of dry air into the surface layer from above the inversion capping the surface mixed layer, due to weaker turbulence, may contribute to higher relative humidity in the surface layer during polluted conditions. Measurements of turbulence are important for studies of aerosol effects on clouds. Moreover, reduced turbulence can exacerbate both the human health impacts of high concentrations of fine particles and conditions favorable for low-visibility fog events.

  4. Synthesis of Graphene Layers from Metal-Carbon Melts: Nucleation and Growth Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Shaahin

    A new method for growth of large-area graphene, which can lead to a scalable low-cost high-throughput production technology, was demonstrated. The method is based on growing of graphene films on the surface of metal-carbon melts and involves dissolving carbon in a molten metal at a specified temperature and then allowing the dissolved carbon to nucleate and grow on top of the melt at a lower temperature. The synthesized graphene layers were subjected to detailed microscopic and Raman spectroscopic characterizations. The deconvolution of the Raman 2D band was used to accurately determine the number of atomic planes in the resulting graphene layers and access their quality. The results indicated that the technology can provide bulk graphite films, few-layer graphene as well as high-quality single layer graphene on metals. It was also shown that upon cooling of supersaturated metal-carbon melts; graphite would also grow inside the melt either with flake or sphere morphology, depending on the solidification rate and degree of supersaturation. At small solidification rates, graphite crystals are normally bounded by faceted low index basal and prismatic planes which grow by lateral movement of ledges produced by 2D-nucleation or dislocations. At higher growth rates, however, both interfaces become kinetically rough, and growth becomes limited by diffusion of carbon to the growing interface. The roughening transition from faceted to non-faceted was found to depend on the driving force and nature of growing plane. Due to high number of C-C dangling bonds in prismatic face, its roughening transition occurs at smaller driving forces. At intermediate rates, the prismatic interfaces become rough and grow faster while the basal plane is still faceted, leading to formation of flake graphite. At higher growth rates, both interfaces grow with a relatively similar rate leading to initiation of graphite sphere formation, which later grows by a multi-stage growth mechanism. An

  5. Bioavailable Carbon and the Relative Degradation State of Organic Matter in Active Layer and Permafrost Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jastrow, J. D.; Burke, V. J.; Vugteveen, T. W.; Fan, Z.; Hofmann, S. M.; Lederhouse, J. S.; Matamala, R.; Michaelson, G. J.; Mishra, U.; Ping, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    The decomposability of soil organic carbon (SOC) in permafrost regions is a key uncertainty in efforts to predict carbon release from thawing permafrost and its impacts. The cold and often wet environment is the dominant factor limiting decomposer activity, and soil organic matter is often preserved in a relatively undecomposed and uncomplexed state. Thus, the impacts of soil warming and permafrost thaw are likely to depend at least initially on the genesis and past history of organic matter degradation before its stabilization in permafrost. We compared the bioavailability and relative degradation state of SOC in active layer and permafrost soils from Arctic tundra in Alaska. To assess readily bioavailable SOC, we quantified salt (0.5 M K2SO4) extractable organic matter (SEOM), which correlates well with carbon mineralization rates in short-term soil incubations. To assess the relative degradation state of SOC, we used particle size fractionation to isolate fibric (coarse) from more degraded (fine) particulate organic matter (POM) and separated mineral-associated organic matter into silt- and clay-sized fractions. On average, bulk SOC concentrations in permafrost were lower than in comparable active layer horizons. Although SEOM represented a very small proportion of the bulk SOC, this proportion was greater in permafrost than in comparable active layer soils. A large proportion of bulk SOC was found in POM for all horizons. Even for mineral soils, about 40% of bulk SOC was in POM pools, indicating that organic matter in both active layer and permafrost mineral soils was relatively undecomposed compared to typical temperate soils. Not surprisingly, organic soils had a greater proportion of POM and mineral soils had greater silt- and clay-sized carbon pools, while cryoturbated soils were intermediate. For organic horizons, permafrost organic matter was generally more degraded than in comparable active layer horizons. However, in mineral and cryoturbated horizons

  6. Carbon doped GaN buffer layer using propane for high electron mobility transistor applications: Growth and device results

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Nilsson, D.; Danielsson, Ö.; Pedersen, H.; Janzén, E.; Forsberg, U.; Bergsten, J.; Rorsman, N.

    2015-12-28

    The creation of a semi insulating (SI) buffer layer in AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) devices is crucial for preventing a current path beneath the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). In this investigation, we evaluate the use of a gaseous carbon gas precursor, propane, for creating a SI GaN buffer layer in a HEMT structure. The carbon doped profile, using propane gas, is a two stepped profile with a high carbon doping (1.5 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}) epitaxial layer closest to the substrate and a lower doped layer (3 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −3}) closest to the 2DEG channel. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry measurement shows a uniform incorporation versus depth, and no memory effect from carbon doping can be seen. The high carbon doping (1.5 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}) does not influence the surface morphology, and a roughness root-mean-square value of 0.43 nm is obtained from Atomic Force Microscopy. High resolution X-ray diffraction measurements show very sharp peaks and no structural degradation can be seen related to the heavy carbon doped layer. HEMTs are fabricated and show an extremely low drain induced barrier lowering value of 0.1 mV/V, demonstrating an excellent buffer isolation. The carbon doped GaN buffer layer using propane gas is compared to samples using carbon from the trimethylgallium molecule, showing equally low leakage currents, demonstrating the capability of growing highly resistive buffer layers using a gaseous carbon source.

  7. Carbon doped GaN buffer layer using propane for high electron mobility transistor applications: Growth and device results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Bergsten, J.; Nilsson, D.; Danielsson, Ö.; Pedersen, H.; Rorsman, N.; Janzén, E.; Forsberg, U.

    2015-12-01

    The creation of a semi insulating (SI) buffer layer in AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) devices is crucial for preventing a current path beneath the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). In this investigation, we evaluate the use of a gaseous carbon gas precursor, propane, for creating a SI GaN buffer layer in a HEMT structure. The carbon doped profile, using propane gas, is a two stepped profile with a high carbon doping (1.5 × 1018 cm-3) epitaxial layer closest to the substrate and a lower doped layer (3 × 1016 cm-3) closest to the 2DEG channel. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry measurement shows a uniform incorporation versus depth, and no memory effect from carbon doping can be seen. The high carbon doping (1.5 × 1018 cm-3) does not influence the surface morphology, and a roughness root-mean-square value of 0.43 nm is obtained from Atomic Force Microscopy. High resolution X-ray diffraction measurements show very sharp peaks and no structural degradation can be seen related to the heavy carbon doped layer. HEMTs are fabricated and show an extremely low drain induced barrier lowering value of 0.1 mV/V, demonstrating an excellent buffer isolation. The carbon doped GaN buffer layer using propane gas is compared to samples using carbon from the trimethylgallium molecule, showing equally low leakage currents, demonstrating the capability of growing highly resistive buffer layers using a gaseous carbon source.

  8. Atomic-Layer-Deposition Functionalized Carbonized Mesoporous Wood Fiber for High Sulfur Loading Lithium Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chao; Zhu, Hongli; Luo, Wei; Shen, Fei; Fan, Xiulin; Dai, Jiaqi; Liang, Yujia; Wang, Chunsheng; Hu, Liangbing

    2017-04-14

    Lithium-sulfur battery (LSB) as one of the most promising energy storage devices suffers from poor conductivity of sulfur and fast capacity decay triggered by the dissolution of polysulfides. In this work, functionalized carbonized mesoporous wood fiber (f-CMWF) is employed as a host to accommodate sulfur for the first time. Natural wood microfiber has unique hierarchical and mesoporous structure, which is well maintained after carbonization. With such a hierarchical mesoporous structure, a high sulfur loading of 76 wt% is achieved in CMWF electrodes. The pore size of CMWF is tunable by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of 5 nm Al2O3 coating to form the f-CMWF. Such a thin layer coating slightly decreases the sulfur loading to 70%, but remarkably promotes the cyclic stability of sulfur cathode, which delivers an initial capacity of 1115 mAh g-1, and maintains a reversible capacity of 859 mAh g-1 for 450 cycles, corresponding to a slow capacity decay rate of 0.046% per cycle. More importantly, natural wood microfiber is firstly used as a raw material for sulfur encapsulating. This work is also critical for using low cost and mesoporous biomass carbon as bi-functional scaffold for LSB.

  9. Shielding the chemical reactivity using graphene layers for controlling the surface properties of carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Sedykh, A E; Gordeev, E G; Pentsak, E O; Ananikov, V P

    2016-02-14

    Graphene can efficiently shield chemical interactions and gradually decrease the binding to reactive defect areas. In the present study, we have used the observed graphene shielding effect to control the reactivity patterns on the carbon surface. The experimental findings show that a surface coating with a tiny carbon layer of 1-2 nm thickness is sufficient to shield the defect-mediated reactivity and create a surface with uniform binding ability. The shielding effect was directly observed using a combination of microscopy techniques and evaluated with computational modeling. The theoretical calculations indicate that a few graphene layers can drastically reduce the binding energy of the metal centers to the surface defects by 40-50 kcal mol(-1). The construction of large carbon areas with controlled surface reactivity is extremely difficult, which is a key limitation in many practical applications. Indeed, the developed approach provides a flexible and simple tool to change the reactivity patterns on large surface areas within a few minutes.

  10. Ruthenium/Graphene-like Layered Carbon Composite as an Efficient Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Electrocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Lu, Jinfeng; Ai, Yuejie; Ji, Yongfei; Adschiri, Tadafumi; Wan, Lijun

    2016-12-28

    Efficient water splitting through electrocatalysis has been studied extensively in modern energy devices, while the development of catalysts with activity and stability comparable to those of Pt is still a great challenge. In this work, we successfully developed a facile route to synthesize graphene-like layered carbon (GLC) from a layered silicate template. The obtained GLC has layered structure similar to that of the template and can be used as support to load ultrasmall Ru nanoparticles on it in supercritical water. The specific structure and surface properties of GLC enable Ru nanoparticles to disperse highly uniformly on it even at a large loading amount (62 wt %). When the novel Ru/GLC was used as catalyst on a glass carbon electrode for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in a 0.5 M H2SO4 solution, it exhibits an extremely low onset potential of only 3 mV and a small Tafel slope of 46 mV/decade. The outstanding performance proved that Ru/GLC is highly active catalyst for HER, comparable with transition-metal dichalcogenides or selenides. As the price of ruthenium is much lower than platinum, our study shows that Ru/GLC might be a promising candidate as an HER catalyst in future energy applications.

  11. Atomic layer confined vacancies for atomic-level insights into carbon dioxide electroreduction

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shan; Sun, Zhongti; Liu, Wei; Jiao, Xingchen; Zu, Xiaolong; Hu, Qitao; Sun, Yongfu; Yao, Tao; Zhang, Wenhua; Wei, Shiqiang; Xie, Yi

    2017-01-01

    The role of oxygen vacancies in carbon dioxide electroreduction remains somewhat unclear. Here we construct a model of oxygen vacancies confined in atomic layer, taking the synthetic oxygen-deficient cobalt oxide single-unit-cell layers as an example. Density functional theory calculations demonstrate the main defect is the oxygen(II) vacancy, while X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy reveals their distinct oxygen vacancy concentrations. Proton transfer is theoretically/experimentally demonstrated to be a rate-limiting step, while energy calculations unveil that the presence of oxygen(II) vacancies lower the rate-limiting activation barrier from 0.51 to 0.40 eV via stabilizing the formate anion radical intermediate, confirmed by the lowered onset potential from 0.81 to 0.78 V and decreased Tafel slope from 48 to 37 mV dec−1. Hence, vacancy-rich cobalt oxide single-unit-cell layers exhibit current densities of 2.7 mA cm−2 with ca. 85% formate selectivity during 40-h tests. This work establishes a clear atomic-level correlation between oxygen vacancies and carbon dioxide electroreduction. PMID:28220847

  12. Stable carbon isotope ratios of toluene in the boundary layer and the lower free troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintel, J.; Hösen, E.; Koppmann, R.; Krebsbach, M.

    2013-04-01

    Measurements of stable carbon isotope ratios in VOC are a powerful tool to identify sources or to track both dynamical and chemical processes. During the field campaign ZEPTER-2 in autumn 2008 whole air samples were collected on board a Zeppelin NT airship in the planetary boundary layer and the lower free troposphere over south-west Germany. These samples were analysed with respect to VOC mixing ratios and stable carbon isotope ratios using a gas chromatograph combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometer. In this study we present the results for toluene, one of the major anthropogenic pollutants. In the boundary layer we observed rather fresh emissions mixing into the background and derived a toluene source isotope ratio of δ13C = -28.2 ± 0.5 ‰. Using the concept of the effective kinetic isotope effect, we were able to separate the effects of dilution processes and photochemical degradation in the free troposphere. We estimated the photochemical age of toluene in the atmosphere in two different ways (using isotope ratios and mixing ratios, respectively). The results differ strongly in the planetary boundary layer, probably due to mixing processes, but are compatible with each other in the free troposphere.

  13. Atomic layer confined vacancies for atomic-level insights into carbon dioxide electroreduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Sun, Zhongti; Liu, Wei; Jiao, Xingchen; Zu, Xiaolong; Hu, Qitao; Sun, Yongfu; Yao, Tao; Zhang, Wenhua; Wei, Shiqiang; Xie, Yi

    2017-02-01

    The role of oxygen vacancies in carbon dioxide electroreduction remains somewhat unclear. Here we construct a model of oxygen vacancies confined in atomic layer, taking the synthetic oxygen-deficient cobalt oxide single-unit-cell layers as an example. Density functional theory calculations demonstrate the main defect is the oxygen(II) vacancy, while X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy reveals their distinct oxygen vacancy concentrations. Proton transfer is theoretically/experimentally demonstrated to be a rate-limiting step, while energy calculations unveil that the presence of oxygen(II) vacancies lower the rate-limiting activation barrier from 0.51 to 0.40 eV via stabilizing the formate anion radical intermediate, confirmed by the lowered onset potential from 0.81 to 0.78 V and decreased Tafel slope from 48 to 37 mV dec-1. Hence, vacancy-rich cobalt oxide single-unit-cell layers exhibit current densities of 2.7 mA cm-2 with ca. 85% formate selectivity during 40-h tests. This work establishes a clear atomic-level correlation between oxygen vacancies and carbon dioxide electroreduction.

  14. Electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical behavior of the TCNQ(0/)(-) couple on a glassy carbon electrode. Layer-by-layer nucleation and growth.

    PubMed

    Gómez, L; Rodríguez-Amaro, R

    2006-08-15

    On the basis of the electrochemical results obtained for thin films of 7,7,8,8- tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) on a glassy carbon electrode, the reduction and oxidation of the [TCNQ](0/)(-) couple in KCl aqueous media occurs via a mechanism involving layer-by-layer nucleation and growth. In situ recorded UV-visible spectroelectrochemical data allow two different crystal structures for the oxidized form of TCNQ to be discriminated.

  15. Influence of depositional setting and sedimentary fabric on mechanical layer evolution in carbonate aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, Wall B.R.

    2006-01-01

    Carbonate aquifers in fold-thrust belt settings often have low-matrix porosity and permeability, and thus groundwater flow pathways depend on high porosity and permeability fracture and fault zones. Methods from sedimentology and structural geology are combined to understand the evolution of fracture controlled flow pathways and determine their spatial distribution. Through this process bed-parallel pressure-solution surfaces (PS1) are identified as a fracture type which influences fragmentation in peritidal and basinal carbonate, and upon shearing provides a major flow pathway in fold - thrust belt carbonate aquifers. Through stratigraphic analysis and fracture mapping, depositional setting is determined to play a critical role in PS1 localization and spacing where peritidal strata have closer spaced and less laterally continuous PS1 than basinal strata. In the peritidal platform facies, units with planar lamination have bed-parallel pressure-solution seams along mudstone laminae. In contrast, burrowed units of peritidal strata have solution seams with irregular and anastamosing geometries. Laminated units with closely spaced bed-parallel solution seams are more fragmented than bioturbated units with anastamosing solution seams. In the deeper-water depositional environment, pelagic settling and turbidity currents are the dominant sedimentation processes, resulting in laterally continuous deposits relative to the peritidal platform environment. To quantify the fracture patterns in the basinal environment, mechanical layer thickness values were measured from regions of low to high bed dip. The results define a trend in which mechanical layer thickness decreases as layer dip increases. A conceptual model is presented that emphasizes the link between sedimentary and structural fabric for the peritidal and basinal environments, where solution seams localize in mud-rich intervals, and the resulting pressure-solution surface geometry is influenced by sedimentary geometry

  16. The development of chloride ion selective polypyrrole thin film on a layer-by-layer carbon nanotube working electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Lynch, Jerome

    2011-04-01

    A chloride ion selective thin film sensor is proposed for measuring chloride ion concentration, which is an environmental parameter correlated to corrosion. In this work, electrochemical polymerization of Polypyrrole (PPy) doped with chloride ions was achieved on the top of a carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film as a working electrode in an electrochemical cell. The underlying CNT layer conjugated with doped PPy thin film can form a multifunctional "selfsensing" material platform for chloride ion detection in a concrete environment. The paper presents the first type of work using CNT and PPy as hybrid materials for chloride ion sensing. Electrochemical polymerization of PPy results in oxidation that yields an average of one positive charge distributed over four pyrrole units. This positive charge is compensated by negatively-charged chloride ions in the supporting electrolyte. In effect, the chloride ion-doped PPy has become molecularly imprinted with chloride ions thereby providing it with some degree of perm-selectivity for chloride ions. The detection limit of the fabricated chloride ion-doped PPy thin film can reach 10-8 M and selectivity coefficients are comparable to those in the literature. The reported work aims to lay a strong foundation for detecting chloride ion concentrations in the concrete environment.

  17. Rigidity of lattice domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savelyev, V. A.

    1979-01-01

    The means of ensuring total rigidity of lattice domes, using comparison with solid shells of 1-3 layers are discussed. Irregularities of manufacture, processing, and other factors are considered, as they relate to diminution of rigidity. The discussion uses the concepts of upper and lower critical loads on the structure in question.

  18. Ultra-Thin Optically Transparent Carbon Electrodes Produced from Layers of Adsorbed Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Alharthi, Sarah A.; Benavidez, Tomas E.; Garcia, Carlos D.

    2013-01-01

    This work describes a simple, versatile, and inexpensive procedure to prepare optically transparent carbon electrodes, using proteins as precursors. Upon adsorption, the protein-coated substrates were pyrolyzed under reductive conditions (5% H2) to form ultra-thin, conductive electrodes. Because proteins spontaneously adsorb to interfaces forming uniform layers, the proposed method does not require a precise control of the preparation conditions, specialized instrumentation, or expensive precursors. The resulting electrodes were characterized by a combination of electrochemical, optical, and spectroscopic means. As a proof-of-concept, the optically-transparent electrodes were also used as substrate for the development of an electrochemical glucose biosensor. The proposed films represent a convenient alternative to more sophisticated, and less available, carbon-based nanomaterials. Furthermore, these films could be formed on a variety of substrates, without classical limitations of size or shape. PMID:23421732

  19. Novel polydopamine imprinting layers coated magnetic carbon nanotubes for specific separation of lysozyme from egg white.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ruixia; Zhang, Lili; Hao, Yi; Cui, Xihui; Liu, Dechun; Zhang, Min; Tang, Yuhai

    2015-11-01

    Novel core-shell nanocomposites, consisting of magnetic carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) core surrounded by a thin polydopamine (PDA) imprinting shell for specific recognition of lysozyme (Lyz), were fabricated for the first time. The obtained products were characterized and the results showed that the PDA layer was successfully attached onto the surface of MCNTs and the corresponding thickness of imprinting layer was just about 10nm which could enable the template access the recognition cavities easily. The polymerization conditions and adsorption performance of the resultant nanomaterials were investigated in detail. The results indicated that the obtained imprinted polymers showed fast kinetic and high affinity towards Lyz and could be used to specifically separate Lyz from real egg white. In addition, the prepared materials had excellent stability and no obvious deterioration after five adsorption-regeneration cycles. Easy preparation, rapid separation, high binding capacity, and satisfactory selectivity for the template protein make this polymer attractive in biotechnology and biosensors.

  20. Multilayers Diamond-Like Carbon Film with Germanium Buffer Layers by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; Lu, Y. M.; Guo, Y. L.; Huang, G. J.; Wang, S. Y.; Tian, F. T.

    Multilayer diamond-like carbon film with germanium buffer layers, which was composed of several thick DLC layers and thin germanium island “layers” and named as Ge-DLC film, was prepared on the germanium substrate by ultraviolet laser. The Ge-DLC film had almost same surface roughness as the pure DLC film. Hardness of the Ge-DLC film was above 48.1GPa, which was almost the same as that of pure DLC film. Meanwhile, compared to the pure DLC film, the critical load of Ge-DLC film on the germanium substrate increased from 81.6mN to 143.8mN. Moreover, Ge-DLC film on germanium substrates had no change after fastness tests. The results showed that Ge-DLC film not only kept high hardness but also had higher critical load than that of pure DLC film. Therefore, it could be used as practical protective films.

  1. Determinants of carbon release from the active layer and permafrost deposits on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Leiyi; Liang, Junyi; Qin, Shuqi; Liu, Li; Fang, Kai; Xu, Yunping; Ding, Jinzhi; Li, Fei; Luo, Yiqi; Yang, Yuanhe

    2016-10-01

    The sign and magnitude of permafrost carbon (C)-climate feedback are highly uncertain due to the limited understanding of the decomposability of thawing permafrost and relevant mechanistic controls over C release. Here, by combining aerobic incubation with biomarker analysis and a three-pool model, we reveal that C quality (represented by a higher amount of fast cycling C but a lower amount of recalcitrant C compounds) and normalized CO2-C release in permafrost deposits were similar or even higher than those in the active layer, demonstrating a high vulnerability of C in Tibetan upland permafrost. We also illustrate that C quality exerts the most control over CO2-C release from the active layer, whereas soil microbial abundance is more directly associated with CO2-C release after permafrost thaw. Taken together, our findings highlight the importance of incorporating microbial properties into Earth System Models when predicting permafrost C dynamics under a changing environment.

  2. Determinants of carbon release from the active layer and permafrost deposits on the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Chen, Leiyi; Liang, Junyi; Qin, Shuqi; Liu, Li; Fang, Kai; Xu, Yunping; Ding, Jinzhi; Li, Fei; Luo, Yiqi; Yang, Yuanhe

    2016-10-05

    The sign and magnitude of permafrost carbon (C)-climate feedback are highly uncertain due to the limited understanding of the decomposability of thawing permafrost and relevant mechanistic controls over C release. Here, by combining aerobic incubation with biomarker analysis and a three-pool model, we reveal that C quality (represented by a higher amount of fast cycling C but a lower amount of recalcitrant C compounds) and normalized CO2-C release in permafrost deposits were similar or even higher than those in the active layer, demonstrating a high vulnerability of C in Tibetan upland permafrost. We also illustrate that C quality exerts the most control over CO2-C release from the active layer, whereas soil microbial abundance is more directly associated with CO2-C release after permafrost thaw. Taken together, our findings highlight the importance of incorporating microbial properties into Earth System Models when predicting permafrost C dynamics under a changing environment.

  3. Modeling and optimization of atomic layer deposition processes on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Nuri; Chawla, Vipin; Edwards, Eve; Wood, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many energy conversion and storage devices exploit structured ceramics with large interfacial surface areas. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays have emerged as possible scaffolds to support large surface area ceramic layers. However, obtaining conformal and uniform coatings of ceramics on structures with high aspect ratio morphologies is non-trivial, even with atomic layer deposition (ALD). Here we implement a diffusion model to investigate the effect of the ALD parameters on coating kinetics and use it to develop a guideline for achieving conformal and uniform thickness coatings throughout the depth of ultra-high aspect ratio structures. We validate the model predictions with experimental data from ALD coatings of VACNT arrays. However, the approach can be applied to predict film conformality as a function of depth for any porous topology, including nanopores and nanowire arrays. PMID:24778944

  4. Modeling and optimization of atomic layer deposition processes on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Nuri; Chawla, Vipin; Edwards, Eve; Wood, Vanessa; Park, Hyung Gyu; Utke, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Many energy conversion and storage devices exploit structured ceramics with large interfacial surface areas. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays have emerged as possible scaffolds to support large surface area ceramic layers. However, obtaining conformal and uniform coatings of ceramics on structures with high aspect ratio morphologies is non-trivial, even with atomic layer deposition (ALD). Here we implement a diffusion model to investigate the effect of the ALD parameters on coating kinetics and use it to develop a guideline for achieving conformal and uniform thickness coatings throughout the depth of ultra-high aspect ratio structures. We validate the model predictions with experimental data from ALD coatings of VACNT arrays. However, the approach can be applied to predict film conformality as a function of depth for any porous topology, including nanopores and nanowire arrays.

  5. Dense Carbon Monoxide to 160 GPa: Stepwise Polymerization to Two-Dimensional Layered Solid

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Young-Jay; Kim, Minseob; Lim, Jinhyuk; Dias, Ranga; Klug, Dennis; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2016-11-14

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is the first molecular system found to transform into a nonmolecular “polymeric” solid above 5.5 GPa, yet been studied beyond 10 GPa. Here, we show a series of pressure-induced phase transformations in CO to 160 GPa: from a molecular solid to a highly colored, low-density polymeric phase I to translucent, high-density phase II to transparent, layered phase III. The properties of these phases are consistent with those expected from recently predicted 1D P21/m, 3D I212121, and 2D Cmcm structures, respectively. Thus, the present results advocate a stepwise polymerization of CO triple bonds to ultimately a 2D singly bonded layer structure with an enhanced ionic character.

  6. Aerosol black carbon characteristics over Central India: Temporal variation and its dependence on mixed layer height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompalli, Sobhan Kumar; Babu, S. Suresh; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Manoj, M. R.; Kumar, N. V. P. Kiran; Shaeb, K. Hareef Baba; Joshi, Ashok Kumar

    2014-10-01

    In a first of its kind study over the Indian region, concurrent and extensive measurements of black carbon (BC) concentration and atmospheric boundary layer parameters are used to quantify the role of atmospheric boundary layer in producing temporal changes in BC. During this study, 18 months (2011-12) data of continuous measurements of BC aerosols, made over a semi-urban location, Nagpur, in Central India are used along with concurrent measurements of vertical profiles of atmospheric thermodynamics, made using weekly ascents of GPS aided Radiosonde for a period of 1 year. From the balloon data, mixed layer heights and ventilation coefficients are estimated, and the monthly and seasonal changes in BC mass concentration are examined in the light of the boundary layer changes. Seasonally, the BC mass concentration was highest (~ 4573 ± 1293 ng m- 3) in winter (December-February), and lowest (~ 1588 ± 897 ng m- 3) in monsoon (June-September), while remained moderate (~ 3137 ± 1446 ng m- 3) in pre-monsoon (March-May), and post-monsoon (~ 3634 ± 813 ng m- 3) (October-November) seasons. During the dry seasons, when the rainfall is scanty or insignificantly small, the seasonal variations in BC concentrations have a strong inverse relationship with mixed layer height and ventilation coefficient. However, the lowest BC concentrations do not occur during the season when the mixed layer height (MLH) is highest or the ventilation coefficient is the highest; rather it occurs when the rainfall is strong (during summer monsoon season) and airmass changes to primarily of marine origin.

  7. Wafer-scale synthesis of multi-layer graphene by high-temperature carbon ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Janghyuk; Lee, Geonyeop; Kim, Jihyun

    2015-07-20

    We report on the synthesis of wafer-scale (4 in. in diameter) high-quality multi-layer graphene using high-temperature carbon ion implantation on thin Ni films on a substrate of SiO{sub 2}/Si. Carbon ions were bombarded at 20 keV and a dose of 1 × 10{sup 15 }cm{sup −2} onto the surface of the Ni/SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate at a temperature of 500 °C. This was followed by high-temperature activation annealing (600–900 °C) to form a sp{sup 2}-bonded honeycomb structure. The effects of post-implantation activation annealing conditions were systematically investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Carbon ion implantation at elevated temperatures allowed a lower activation annealing temperature for fabricating large-area graphene. Our results indicate that carbon-ion implantation provides a facile and direct route for integrating graphene with Si microelectronics.

  8. Nonlinear dynamics of bi-layered graphene sheet, double-walled carbon nanotube and nanotube bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajbhiye, Sachin O.; Singh, S. P.

    2016-05-01

    Due to strong van der Waals (vdW) interactions, the graphene sheets and nanotubes stick to each other and form clusters of these corresponding nanostructures, viz. bi-layered graphene sheet (BLGS), double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) and nanotube bundle (NB) or ropes. This research work is concerned with the study of nonlinear dynamics of BLGS, DWCNT and NB due to nonlinear interlayer vdW forces using multiscale atomistic finite element method. The energy between two adjacent carbon atoms is represented by the multibody interatomic Tersoff-Brenner potential, whereas the nonlinear interlayer vdW forces are represented by Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential function. The equivalent nonlinear material model of carbon-carbon bond is used to model it based on its force-deflection relation. Newmark's algorithm is used to solve the nonlinear matrix equation governing the motion of the BLGS, DWCNT and NB. An impulse and harmonic excitations are used to excite these nanostructures under cantilevered, bridged and clamped boundary conditions. The frequency responses of these nanostructures are computed, and the dominant resonant frequencies are identified. Along with the forced vibration of these structures, the eigenvalue extraction problem of armchair and zigzag NB is also considered. The natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes are extracted for the different length and boundary conditions of the nanotube bundle.

  9. Carbon nano-onions (multi-layer fullerenes): chemistry and applications

    PubMed Central

    Bartelmess, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review focuses on the development of multi-layer fullerenes, known as carbon nano-onions (CNOs). First, it briefly summarizes the most important synthetic pathways for their preparation and their properties and it gives the reader an update over new developments in the recent years. This is followed by a discussion of the published synthetic procedures for CNO functionalization, which are of major importance when elucidating future applications and addressing drawbacks for possible applications, such as poor solubility in common solvents. Finally, it gives an overview over the fields of application, in which CNO materials were successfully implemented. PMID:25383308

  10. Evidence for reduced charge recombination in carbon nanotube/perovskite-based active layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bag, Monojit; Renna, Lawrence A.; Jeong, Seung Pyo; Han, Xu; Cutting, Christie L.; Maroudas, Dimitrios; Venkataraman, D.

    2016-10-01

    Using impedance spectroscopy and computation, we show that incorporation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in the bulk of the active layer of perovskite-based solar cells reduces charge recombination and increases the open circuit voltage. An ∼87% reduction in recombination was achieved when MWCNTs were introduced in the planar-heterostructure perovskite solar cell containing mixed counterions. The open circuit voltage (Voc) of perovskite/MWCNTs devices was increased by 70 mV, while the short circuit current density (Jsc) and fill factor (FF) remained unchanged.

  11. Magnetic fine particles of Fe and Co encapsulated by carbon layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokoro, Hisato; Fujii, Shigeo; Oku, Takeo

    2005-04-01

    Fine particles of Fe and Co encapsulated by carbon (C) nanolayers were synthesized through reduction of the metal oxides by C. They were ∼400 nm in diameter, and the shell of the C layers was ∼5 nm in thickness. The Fe particles were composed of mixture of body-centered cubic (BCC), α , and face-centered cubic (FCC), γ -phase, and the Co particles were composed of a FCC, α -phase. Maximum saturation magnetization of the Fe was 101 Am2/kg and that of the Co was 136 Am2/kg. Those C-encapsulated particles showed excellent soft magnetic properties and oxidation resistance in air.

  12. The benefit of thresholding carbon layers in electron tomographic tilt series by intensity downshifting.

    PubMed

    Gontard, Lionel C; Cintas, Jesús; Borkowski, Rafal E Dunin

    2017-03-01

    When performing electron tomography, tilt series of images are often acquired from samples that contain unwanted carbonaceous material, such as an embedding resin, a thin carbon support film or hydrocarbon contamination. The presence of such layers can introduce artefacts in reconstructions, obscuring features of interest. Here, we illustrate the benefit of preprocessing a high-angle annular dark-field tomographic tilt series by thresholding unwanted low-density materials using a simple intensity downshifting procedure. The resulting tomograms have fewer artefacts and segmentation can be performed more accurately. We present two representative examples taken from studies of catalyst nanoparticles and amyloid plaque core material from the human brain.

  13. Aligned carbon nanotube film enables thermally induced state transformations in layered polymeric materials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeonyoon; Stein, Itai Y; Kessler, Seth S; Wardle, Brian L

    2015-04-29

    The energy losses and geometric constraints associated with conventional curing techniques of polymeric systems motivate the study of a highly scalable out-of-oven curing method using a nanostructured resistive heater comprised of aligned carbon nanotubes (A-CNT). The experimental results indicate that, when compared to conventional oven based techniques, the use of an "out-of-oven" A-CNT integrated heater leads to orders of magnitude reductions in the energy required to process polymeric layered structures such as composites. Integration of this technology into structural systems enables the in situ curing of large-scale polymeric systems at high efficiencies, while adding sensing and control capabilities.

  14. Can the Carbonated Layer Protect Wellbore Cement During Geologic CO2 Sequestration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Jun, Y. S.; Steefel, C. I.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding and improving the integrity of wellbores are crucial to prevent CO2 leakage during geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS). With advanced knowledge, cement deterioration caused by injected CO2 can be minimized. We have experimentally analyzed the chemical and mechanical property changes of Portland cement paste samples after 10 days of exposure to 0.5 M NaCl brine saturated with 100 bar CO2 at 95 oC. After exposure, the 3 mm thick cement samples had a total CO2-attacked depth of 1220 μm from both sides, including a 960 μm thick portlandite-depleted region next to the intact core, a 100 μm thick carbonated layer, and a 170 μm surface layer. The portlandite-depleted zone developed abundant micro-cracks and showed a decreased hardness. A hard carbonated layer which developed near the sample surface could not protect the cement due to formation of this portlandite-depleted zone, where abundant micro-cracks accounted for a 90% decrease in strength of the bulk sample. Using the reactive transport code CrunchTope, we further investigated the mechanism of portlandite-depleted zone formation. The cement deterioration process was simulated with a 1-D continuum model that captured the dissolution of the portlandite and the formation of a calcite zone closer to the sample edge. Modeling results highlighted that the apparent bypass of CO2 through the carbonated layer is critical for the evolution of the portlandite-depleted zone, since otherwise the 1-D model predicts complete clogging of the porosity. Defects within the carbonated zone could be due to reaction-induced fractures or to the heterogeneity of the cement. We also incorporated nucleation kinetics for secondary calcite precipitation using previously obtained thermodynamic parameters. We found that the nucleation energy barrier does not suppress calcite formation and thus cannot explain the absence of calcite in the portlandite-depleted zone. The findings from our study help further our understanding of CO2

  15. Transparent actuators and robots based on single-layer superaligned carbon nanotube sheet and polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Luzhuo; Weng, Mingcen; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Zhiwei; Zhou, Yi; Xia, Dan; Li, Jiaxin; Huang, Zhigao; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan

    2016-03-28

    Transparent actuators have been attracting emerging interest recently, as they demonstrate potential applications in the fields of invisible robots, tactical displays, variable-focus lenses, and flexible cellular phones. However, previous technologies did not simultaneously realize macroscopic transparent actuators with advantages of large-shape deformation, low-voltage-driven actuation and fast fabrication. Here, we develop a fast approach to fabricate a high-performance transparent actuator based on single-layer superaligned carbon nanotube sheet and polymer composites. Various advantages of single-layer nanotube sheets including high transparency, considerable conductivity, and ultra-thin dimensions together with selected polymer materials completely realize all the above required advantages. Also, this is the first time that a single-layer nanotube sheet has been used to fabricate actuators with high transparency, avoiding the structural damage to the single-layer nanotube sheet. The transparent actuator shows a transmittance of 72% at the wavelength of 550 nm and bends remarkably with a curvature of 0.41 cm(-1) under a DC voltage for 5 s, demonstrating a significant advance in technological performances compared to previous conventional actuators. To illustrate their great potential usage, a transparent wiper and a humanoid robot "hand" were elaborately designed and fabricated, which initiate a new direction in the development of high-performance invisible robotics and other intelligent applications with transparency.

  16. Experimental evidence of a mechanical coupling between layers in an individual double-walled carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Levshov, D; Than, T X; Arenal, R; Popov, V N; Parret, R; Paillet, M; Jourdain, V; Zahab, A A; Michel, T; Yuzyuk, Yu I; Sauvajol, J-L

    2011-11-09

    We perform transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and Raman scattering experiments on an individual suspended double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT). The first two techniques allow the unambiguous determination of the DWCNT structure: (12,8)@(16,14). However, the low-frequency features in the Raman spectra cannot be connected to the derived layer diameters d by means of the 1/d power law, widely used for the diameter dependence of the radial-breathing mode of single-walled nanotubes. We discuss this disagreement in terms of mechanical coupling between the layers of the DWCNT, which results in collective vibrational modes. Theoretical predictions for the breathing-like modes of the DWCNT, originating from the radial-breathing modes of the layers, are in a very good agreement with the observed Raman spectra. Moreover, the mechanical coupling qualitatively explains the observation of Raman lines of breathing-like modes, whenever only one of the layers is in resonance with the laser energy.

  17. Biosensors Fabricated through Electrostatic Assembly of Enzymes/Polyelectrolyte Hybrid Layers on Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuehe; Liu, Guodong; Wang, Jun

    2006-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have emerged as new class of nanomaterials that is receiving considerable interest because of their unique structure, mechanical, and electronic properties. One promising application of CNTs is to fabricate highly sensitive chemo/biosensors.1-4 For construction of these CNT-based sensors, the CNTs first have to be modified with some molecules specific to the interests. Generally, covalent binding, affinity, and electrostatic interaction have been utilized for the modification of CNTs. Among them, the electrostatic method is attractive due to its simplicity and high efficiency. In present work, we have developed highly sensitively amperometric biosensors for glucose, choline, organophosphate pesticide (OPP) and nerve agents (NAs) based on electrostatically assembling enzymes on the surface of CNTs. All these biosensors were fabricated by immobilization of enzymes on the negatively charged CNTs surface through alternately assembling a cationic poly(diallydimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) layer and an enzyme layer. Using this layer-by-layer (LBL) technique, a bioactive nanocomposite film was fabricated on the electrode surface. Owing to the electrocatalytic effect of CNTs, an amplified electrochemical signal was achieved, which leads to low detections limits for glucose, choline, and OPP and NAs.

  18. Novel growth method of carbon nanotubes using catalyst-support layer developed by alumina grit blasting.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiromichi; Ishii, Juntaro; Ota, Keishin

    2016-08-19

    We propose an efficient method of growing carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on a variety of metals, alloys, and carbon materials using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) assisted by a simple surface treatment of the materials. The main feature of this method is the application of grit blasting with fine alumina particles to the development of a catalyst-support layer required for the growth of CNTs on various conductive materials, including ultra-hard metals such as tungsten. Auger electron spectroscopy shows that grit blasting can form a non-continuous layer where alumina nanoparticles are embedded as residues in the blasting media left on the treated surfaces. This work reveals that such a non-continuous alumina layer can behave as the catalyst-support layer, which is generally prepared by sputter or a vacuum evaporation coating process that considerably restricts the practical applications of CNTs. We have attempted to grow CNTs on grit-blasted substrates of eighteen conventionally used conductive materials using CVD together with a floating iron catalyst. The proposed method was successful in growing multi-walled CNT arrays on the grit-blasted surfaces of all the examined materials, demonstrating its versatility. Furthermore, we found that the group IV metal oxide films thermally grown on the as-received substrates can support the catalytic activity of iron nanoparticles in the CVD process just as well as the alumina film developed by grit blasting. Spectral emissivity of the CNT arrays in the visible and infrared wavelength ranges has been determined to assess the applicability of the CNT arrays as a black coating media.

  19. Novel growth method of carbon nanotubes using catalyst-support layer developed by alumina grit blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hiromichi; Ishii, Juntaro; Ota, Keishin

    2016-08-01

    We propose an efficient method of growing carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on a variety of metals, alloys, and carbon materials using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) assisted by a simple surface treatment of the materials. The main feature of this method is the application of grit blasting with fine alumina particles to the development of a catalyst-support layer required for the growth of CNTs on various conductive materials, including ultra-hard metals such as tungsten. Auger electron spectroscopy shows that grit blasting can form a non-continuous layer where alumina nanoparticles are embedded as residues in the blasting media left on the treated surfaces. This work reveals that such a non-continuous alumina layer can behave as the catalyst-support layer, which is generally prepared by sputter or a vacuum evaporation coating process that considerably restricts the practical applications of CNTs. We have attempted to grow CNTs on grit-blasted substrates of eighteen conventionally used conductive materials using CVD together with a floating iron catalyst. The proposed method was successful in growing multi-walled CNT arrays on the grit-blasted surfaces of all the examined materials, demonstrating its versatility. Furthermore, we found that the group IV metal oxide films thermally grown on the as-received substrates can support the catalytic activity of iron nanoparticles in the CVD process just as well as the alumina film developed by grit blasting. Spectral emissivity of the CNT arrays in the visible and infrared wavelength ranges has been determined to assess the applicability of the CNT arrays as a black coating media.

  20. Photoelectrochemical, photophysical and morphological studies of electrostatic layer-by-layer thin films based on poly(p-phenylenevinylene) and single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Almeida, L C P; Zucolotto, V; Domingues, R A; Atvars, T D Z; Nogueira, A F

    2011-11-01

    The preparation of multilayer films based on poly(p-phenylenevinylene) (PPV) and carboxylic-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT-COOH) by electrostatic interaction using the layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition method is reported herein. The multilayer build-up, monitored by UV-Vis and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopies, displayed a linear behavior with the number of PPV and SWNT-COOH layers deposited that undergo deviation and spectral changes for thicker films. Film morphology was evaluated by AFM and epifluorescence microscopies showing remarkable changes after incorporation of SWNT-COOH layers. Films without SWNT show roughness and present dispersed grains; films with SWNT-COOH layers are flatter and some carbon nanotube bundles can be visualized. The photoinduced charge transfer from the conducting polymer to SWNT-COOH was analyzed by PL quenching either by the decrease of the emission intensity or by the presence of dark domains in the epifluorescence micrographs. Photoelectrochemical characterization was performed under white light and the films containing SWNT-COOH displayed photocurrent values between 2.0 μA cm(-2) and 7.5 μA cm(-2), as the amount of these materials increases in the film. No photocurrent was observed for the film without carbon nanotubes. Photocurrent generation was enhanced and became more stable when an intermediate layer of PEDOT:PSS was interposed between the active layer and the ITO electrode, indicating an improvement in hole transfer to the contacts. Our results indicate that these multilayer films are promising candidates as active layers for organic photovoltaic cells.

  1. Molecular carbon isotope variations in core samples taken at the Permian-Triassic boundary layers in southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruiliang; Zhang, Shuichang; Brassell, Simon; Wang, Jiaxue; Lu, Zhengyuan; Ming, Qingzhong; Wang, Xiaomei; Bian, Lizeng

    2012-07-01

    Stable carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of carbonate sediments and the molecular (biomarker) characteristics of a continuous Permian-Triassic (PT) layer in southern China were studied to obtain geochemical signals of global change at the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB). Carbonate carbon isotope values shifted toward positive before the end of the Permian period and then shifted negative above the PTB into the Triassic period. Molecular carbon isotope values of biomarkers followed the same trend at and below the PTB and remained negative in the Triassic layer. These biomarkers were acyclic isoprenoids, ranging from C15 to C40, steranes (C27 dominates) and terpenoids that were all significantly more abundant in samples from the Permian layer than those from the Triassic layer. The Triassic layer was distinguished by the dominance of higher molecular weight (waxy) n-alkanes. Stable carbon isotope values of individual components, including n-alkanes and acyclic isoprenoids such as phytane, isop-C25, and squalane, are depleted in δ13C by up to 8-10‰ in the Triassic samples as compared to the Permian. Measured molecular and isotopic variations of organic matter in the PT layers support the generally accepted view of Permian oceanic stagnation followed by a massive upwelling of toxic deep waters at the PTB. A series of large-scale (global) outgassing events may be associated with the carbon isotope shift we measured. This is also consistent with the lithological evidence we observed of white thin-clay layers in this region. Our findings, in context with a generally accepted stagnant Permian ocean, followed by massive upwelling of toxic deep waters might be the major causes of the largest global mass extinction event that occurred at the Permian-Triassic boundary.

  2. Lattice Boltzmann methods applied to large-scale three-dimensional virtual cores constructed from digital optical borehole images of the karst carbonate Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michael Sukop,; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Digital optical borehole images at approximately 2 mm vertical resolution and borehole caliper data were used to create three-dimensional renderings of the distribution of (1) matrix porosity and (2) vuggy megaporosity for the karst carbonate Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida. The renderings based on the borehole data were used as input into Lattice Boltzmann methods to obtain intrinsic permeability estimates for this extremely transmissive aquifer, where traditional aquifer test methods may fail due to very small drawdowns and non-Darcian flow that can reduce apparent hydraulic conductivity. Variogram analysis of the borehole data suggests a nearly isotropic rock structure at lag lengths up to the nominal borehole diameter. A strong correlation between the diameter of the borehole and the presence of vuggy megaporosity in the data set led to a bias in the variogram where the computed horizontal spatial autocorrelation is strong at lag distances greater than the nominal borehole size. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of flow across a 0.4 × 0.4 × 17 m (2.72 m3 volume) parallel-walled column of rendered matrix and vuggy megaporosity indicates a high hydraulic conductivity of 53 m s−1. This value is similar to previous Lattice Boltzmann calculations of hydraulic conductivity in smaller limestone samples of the Biscayne aquifer. The development of simulation methods that reproduce dual-porosity systems with higher resolution and fidelity and that consider flow through horizontally longer renderings could provide improved estimates of the hydraulic conductivity and help to address questions about the importance of scale.

  3. Distribution and landscape controls of organic layer thickness and carbon within the Alaskan Yukon River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pastick, Neal J.; Rigge, Matthew B.; Wylie, Bruce K.; Jorgenson, M. Torre; Rose, Joshua R.; Johnson, Kristofer D.; Ji, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of the organic layer thickness (OLT) and organic layer carbon (OLC) stocks in subarctic ecosystems is critical due to their importance in the global carbon cycle. Moreover, post-fire OLT provides an indicator of long-term successional trajectories and permafrost susceptibility to thaw. To these ends, we 1) mapped OLT and associated uncertainty at 30 m resolution in the Yukon River Basin (YRB), Alaska, employing decision tree models linking remotely sensed imagery with field and ancillary data, 2) converted OLT to OLC using a non-linear regression, 3) evaluate landscape controls on OLT and OLC, and 4) quantified the post-fire recovery of OLT and OLC. Areas of shallow (2 = 0.68; OLC: R2 = 0.66), where an average of 16 cm OLT and 5.3 kg/m2 OLC were consumed by fires. Strong predictors of OLT included climate, topography, near-surface permafrost distributions, soil wetness, and spectral information. Our modeling approach enabled us to produce regional maps of OLT and OLC, which will be useful in understanding risks and feedbacks associated with fires and climate feedbacks.

  4. Effective diffusivity in partially-saturated carbon-fiber gas diffusion layers: Effect of local saturation and application to macroscopic continuum models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Salaberri, Pablo A.; Gostick, Jeff T.; Hwang, Gisuk; Weber, Adam Z.; Vera, Marcos

    2015-11-01

    Macroscopic continuum models are an essential tool to understand the complex transport phenomena that take place in gas diffusion layers (GDLs) used in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Previous work has shown that macroscopic models require effective properties obtained under uniform saturation conditions to get a consistent physical formulation. This issue, mostly unappreciated in the open literature, is addressed in detail in this work. To this end, lattice Boltzmann simulations were performed on tomographic images of dry and water-invaded carbon-paper GDL subsamples with nearly uniform porosity and saturation distributions. The computed effective diffusivity shows an anisotropic dependence on local porosity similar to that reported for morphologically analogous GDLs. In contrast, the dependence on local saturation is rather isotropic, following a nearly quadratic power law. The capability of the local correlations to recover the layer-scale properties obtained from inhomogeneous GDLs is checked by global averaging. Good agreement is found between the upscaled results and the diffusivity data of the GDL from which the present subsamples were taken, as well as other global data presented in the literature. A higher blockage effect of local saturation is, however, expected for the under-the-rib region in operating PEFCs.

  5. Layer-by-Layer Polyelectrolyte Assisted Growth of 2D Ultrathin MoS2 Nanosheets on Various 1D Carbons for Superior Li-Storage.

    PubMed

    Qu, Qunting; Qian, Feng; Yang, Siming; Gao, Tian; Liu, Weijie; Shao, Jie; Zheng, Honghe

    2016-01-20

    Transitional metal sulfide/carbon hybrids with well-defined structures could not only maximize the functional properties of each constituent but engender some unique synergistic effects, holding great promise for applications in Li-ion batteries and supercapacitors and for catalysis. Herein, a facile and versatile approach is developed to controllably grow 2D ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets with a large quantity of exposed edges onto various 1D carbons, including carbon nanotubes (CNTs), electrospun carbon nanofibers, and Te-nanowire-templated carbon nanofibers. The typical approach involves the employment of layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembled polyelectrolyte, which controls spatially the uniform growth and orientation of ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets on these 1D carbons irrespective of their surface properties. Such unique structures of the as-prepared CNTs@MoS2 hybrid are significantly favorable for the fast diffusions of both Li-ions and electrons, satisfying the kinetic requirements of high-power lithium ion batteries. As a result, CNTs@MoS2 hybrids exhibit excellent electrochemical performances for lithium storage, including a high reversible capacity (1027 mAh g(-1)), high-rate capability (610 mAh g(-1) at 5 C), and excellent cycling stability (negligible capacity loss after 200 continuous cycles).

  6. Single- and Two-Layer Coatings of Metal Blends onto Carbon Steel: Mechanical, Wear, and Friction Characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Kumar, Aditya; Bhushan, Bharat

    2014-01-01

    Single- and two-layer coatings were deposited onto carbon steel using a high-velocity oxy-fuel deposition gun. The two-layer coating consisted of a top layer of tungsten carbide cobalt/nickel alloy blend that provides wear resistance and a bottom layer of iron/molybdenum blend that provides corrosion resistance. The morphological changes in the single- and two-layer coatings were examined using scanning electron microscopy. The residual stresses formed on the surface of various coatings were determined from x-ray diffraction data. Nanomechanical properties were measured using the nanoindentation technique. Microhardness and fracture toughness were measured incorporating the microindentation tests. Macrowear and macrofriction characteristics were measured using the pin-on-disk testing apparatus. The goal of this study was to ensure that the mechanical properties, friction, and wear resistance of the two-layer coating are similar to that of the single-layer coating.

  7. Conformal atomic layer deposition of alumina on millimeter tall, vertically-aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Stano, Kelly L; Carroll, Murphy; Padbury, Richard; McCord, Marian; Jur, Jesse S; Bradford, Philip D

    2014-11-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to coat high aspect ratio and high surface area substrates with conformal and precisely controlled thin films. Vertically aligned arrays of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with lengths up to 1.5 mm were conformally coated with alumina from base to tip. The nucleation and growth behaviors of Al2O3 ALD precursors on the MWCNTs were studied as a function of CNT surface chemistry. CNT surfaces were modified through a series of post-treatments including pyrolytic carbon deposition, high temperature thermal annealing, and oxygen plasma functionalization. Conformal coatings were achieved where post-treatments resulted in increased defect density as well as the extent of functionalization, as characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Using thermogravimetric analysis, it was determined that MWCNTs treated with pyrolytic carbon and plasma functionalization prior to ALD coating were more stable to thermal oxidation than pristine ALD coated samples. Functionalized and ALD coated arrays had a compressive modulus more than two times higher than a pristine array coated for the same number of cycles. Cross-sectional energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed that Al2O3 could be uniformly deposited through the entire thickness of the vertically aligned MWCNT array by manipulating sample orientation and mounting techniques. Following the ALD coating, the MWCNT arrays demonstrated hydrophilic wetting behavior and also exhibited foam-like recovery following compressive strain.

  8. Mesoscopic modeling of cancer photothermal therapy using single-walled carbon nanotubes and near infrared radiation: insights through an off-lattice Monte Carlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Feng; Hongyan, Zhang; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V.; Bui, Khoa; Lim, Christina; Duong, Hai M.

    2014-05-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are promising heating agents in cancer photothermal therapy when under near infrared radiation, yet few efforts have been focused on the quantitative understanding of the photothermal energy conversion in biological systems. In this article, a mesoscopic study that takes into account SWNT morphologies (diameter and aspect ratio) and dispersions (orientation and concentration), as well as thermal boundary resistance, is performed by means of an off-lattice Monte Carlo simulation. Results indicate that SWNTs with orientation perpendicular to the laser, smaller diameter and better dispersion have higher heating efficiency in cancer photothermal therapy. Thermal boundary resistances greatly inhibit thermal energy transfer away from SWNTs, thereby affecting their heating efficiency. Through appropriate interfacial modification around SWNTs, compared to the surrounding healthy tissue, a higher temperature of the cancer cell can be achieved, resulting in more effective cancer photothermal therapy. These findings promise to bridge the gap between macroscopic and microscopic computational studies of cancer photothermal therapy.

  9. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Khan, S. F.; Pak, A. E.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; Ma, T.; Doeppner, T.; Rygg, J. R.; Field, J. E.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Hamza, A. V.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2014-10-01

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations <10 ns. A series of experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.5 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This talk describes these experiments and comparisons with the design code HYDRA. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape; however, other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. The streak camera-based SPIDER diagnostic showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of a low-temperature hot spot. Changes to the laser pulse-shape and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot-spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1 . 8 ×1015 neutrons. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Far-and mid-infrared properties of carbon layers elaborated by plasma sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Benoit; Ammar, Mohamed Ramzi; Bormann, Denis; Simon, Patrick; Rabat, Hervé; Brault, Pascal

    2016-12-01

    The far-and mid-infrared reflectivity spectra of two carbon layers deposited on pure (100) silicon substrates by DC magnetron sputtering were investigated at room temperature in the 10-5000 cm-1 wavenumber range. Their structural and textural features were also studied by combining Raman spectroscopy, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM), X-Ray Reflectivity (XRR) and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS). The set of results was used to discuss afterwards the influence of the texture on the infrared properties at varying length scale. Thereby, the two layers were found to be heterogeneous as assessed by RBS, XRR and FESEM and their thicknesses had been measured by XRR and FESEM. The information on the structural organization and "crystallite" size was given by Raman spectroscopy. The influence of both the textural and structural parameters on the measured infrared reflectivity spectra was discussed. Finally, a methodology was proposed to recover the intrinsic index of refraction and the intrinsic index of absorption of each layer.

  11. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    DOE PAGES

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; ...

    2015-06-02

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightlymore » oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10¹⁵ neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.« less

  12. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Izumi, N.; Kyrala, G. A.; Moody, J. D.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Sepke, S. M.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Biener, J.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Eckart, M. J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hamza, A. V.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoover, D. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Kroll, J. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Nikroo, A.; Sayre, D. B.; Stadermann, M.; Wild, C.; Yoxall, B. E.; Landen, O. L.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-06-02

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10¹⁵ neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  13. [Impact of tillage practices on microbial biomass carbon in top layer of black soils].

    PubMed

    Sun, Bing-jie; Jia, Shu-xia; Zhang, Xiao-ping; Liang, Ai-zhen; Chen, Xue-wen; Zhang, Shi-xiu; Liu, Si-yi; Chen, Sheng-long

    2015-01-01

    A study was conducted on a long-term (13 years) tillage and rotation experiment on black soil in northeast China to determine the effects of tillage, time and soil depth on soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC). Tillage systems included no tillage (NT), ridge tillage (RT) and mould-board plough (MP). Soil sampling was done at 0-5, 5-10 and 10-20 cm depths in June, August and September, 2013, and April, 2014 in the corn phase of corn-soybean rotation plots. MBC content was measured by the chloroform fumigation extraction (CFE) method. The results showed that the MBC content varied with sampling time and soil depth. Soil MBC content was the lowest in April for all three tillage systems, and was highest in June for MP, and highest in August for NT and RT. At each sampling time, tillage system had a significant effect on soil MBC content only in the top 0-5 cm layer. The MBC content showed obvious stratification under NT and RT with a higher MBC content in the top 0-5 cm layer than under MP. The stratification ratios under NT and RT were greatest in September when they were respectively 67.8% and 95.5% greater than under MP. Our results showed that soil MBC contents were greatly affected by the time and soil depth, and were more apparently accumulated in the top layer under NT and RT.

  14. Emissions of ammonia, carbon dioxide and particulate matter from cage-free layer houses in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xingjun; Zhang, Ruihong; Jiang, Shumei; El-Mashad, Hamed; Xin, Hongwei

    2017-03-01

    Cage-free housing systems have attracted considerable attention in the United States recently as they provide more space and other resources (such as litter area, perches, and nest boxes) for hens and are considered to be more favorable from the standpoint of hen welfare. This study was carried out to quantify emissions of aerial ammonia (NH3), carbon dioxide (CO2) and particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) from cage-free layer houses in California and compare the values with those for other types of layer houses. Two commercial cage-free houses with 38,000 hens each were monitored from March 1, 2012 to April 1, 2013. Results show that NH3 and CO2 concentrations in the houses were affected by ventilation rate, which was largely influenced by ambient air temperature. The PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations in the houses depended on the activity of birds, ventilation rate and relative humidity of the ambient air. The average emission rates of NH3, CO2, PM10 and PM2.5 were 0.29, 89.9, 0.163 and 0.020 g d-1 hen-1, respectively. The NH3 emission rate determined in this study was higher than those of aviary houses. The PM10 and PM2.5 emission rates were higher than those reported for high-rise layer houses.

  15. Ultra-thin clay layers facilitate seismic slip in carbonate faults.

    PubMed

    Smeraglia, Luca; Billi, Andrea; Carminati, Eugenio; Cavallo, Andrea; Di Toro, Giulio; Spagnuolo, Elena; Zorzi, Federico

    2017-04-06

    Many earthquakes propagate up to the Earth's surface producing surface ruptures. Seismic slip propagation is facilitated by along-fault low dynamic frictional resistance, which is controlled by a number of physico-chemical lubrication mechanisms. In particular, rotary shear experiments conducted at seismic slip rates (1 ms(-1)) show that phyllosilicates can facilitate co-seismic slip along faults during earthquakes. This evidence is crucial for hazard assessment along oceanic subduction zones, where pelagic clays participate in seismic slip propagation. Conversely, the reason why, in continental domains, co-seismic slip along faults can propagate up to the Earth's surface is still poorly understood. We document the occurrence of micrometer-thick phyllosilicate-bearing layers along a carbonate-hosted seismogenic extensional fault in the central Apennines, Italy. Using friction experiments, we demonstrate that, at seismic slip rates (1 ms(-1)), similar calcite gouges with pre-existing phyllosilicate-bearing (clay content ≤3 wt.%) micro-layers weaken faster than calcite gouges or mixed calcite-phyllosilicate gouges. We thus propose that, within calcite gouge, ultra-low clay content (≤3 wt.%) localized along micrometer-thick layers can facilitate seismic slip propagation during earthquakes in continental domains, possibly enhancing surface displacement.

  16. Size distribution of carbon layer planes in biochar from different plant type of feedstock with different heating temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guan-Yang; Ikeya, Kosuke; Watanabe, Akira

    2016-11-01

    Biochar application to soil is a strategy to decelerate the increase in the atmospheric carbon concentration. The composition of condensed aromatic clusters appears to be an important determinant of the degradation rate of char in soil. The objective of the present study was to determine the size distribution of carbon layer planes in biochars produced from different types of feedstock (a broadleaf and a coniferous tree and two herbs) using different heating treatment temperatures (HTT; 400 °C-800 °C) using X-ray diffraction 11 band profile analysis. (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance with the phase-adjusted spinning side bands of the chars indicated different spectral features depending on the HTT and similar carbon composition among the plant types at each HTT. Both the content and composition of carbon layer planes in biochar produced using the same HTT were also similar among the plant types. The carbon layer plane size in the 400 °C and 600 °C chars was distributed from 0.24 to 1.68 or 1.92 nm (corresponding to 37 or 52 rings) with the mean size of 0.79-0.92 and 0.80-1.14 nm, respectively. The carbon layer planes in the 800 °C chars ranged from 0.72-0.96 nm (7-14 rings) to 2.64-3.60 nm (91-169 rings) and the mean values were 1.47-1.89 nm. The relative carbon layer plane content in the 600 °C and 800 °C chars was typically 2 and 3 times that in the 400 °C chars. These results indicate the progression of the formation and/or the size development of graphite-like structures, suggesting that a char produced at a higher HTT would have better carbon sequestrating characteristics.

  17. Transparent actuators and robots based on single-layer superaligned carbon nanotube sheet and polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Luzhuo; Weng, Mingcen; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Zhiwei; Zhou, Yi; Xia, Dan; Li, Jiaxin; Huang, Zhigao; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan

    2016-03-01

    Transparent actuators have been attracting emerging interest recently, as they demonstrate potential applications in the fields of invisible robots, tactical displays, variable-focus lenses, and flexible cellular phones. However, previous technologies did not simultaneously realize macroscopic transparent actuators with advantages of large-shape deformation, low-voltage-driven actuation and fast fabrication. Here, we develop a fast approach to fabricate a high-performance transparent actuator based on single-layer superaligned carbon nanotube sheet and polymer composites. Various advantages of single-layer nanotube sheets including high transparency, considerable conductivity, and ultra-thin dimensions together with selected polymer materials completely realize all the above required advantages. Also, this is the first time that a single-layer nanotube sheet has been used to fabricate actuators with high transparency, avoiding the structural damage to the single-layer nanotube sheet. The transparent actuator shows a transmittance of 72% at the wavelength of 550 nm and bends remarkably with a curvature of 0.41 cm-1 under a DC voltage for 5 s, demonstrating a significant advance in technological performances compared to previous conventional actuators. To illustrate their great potential usage, a transparent wiper and a humanoid robot ``hand'' were elaborately designed and fabricated, which initiate a new direction in the development of high-performance invisible robotics and other intelligent applications with transparency.Transparent actuators have been attracting emerging interest recently, as they demonstrate potential applications in the fields of invisible robots, tactical displays, variable-focus lenses, and flexible cellular phones. However, previous technologies did not simultaneously realize macroscopic transparent actuators with advantages of large-shape deformation, low-voltage-driven actuation and fast fabrication. Here, we develop a fast approach to

  18. Carbon uptake, microbial community structure, and mineralization of layered mats from Imperial Geyser, Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woycheese, K. M.; Grabenstatter, J.; Haddad, A.; Ricci, J. N.; Johnson, H.; Berelson, W.; Spear, J. R.; Caporaso, J. G.; International Geobiology Course 2011

    2011-12-01

    Layered microbial mats provide an analog for early microbial communities, and remain one of the few microbiological structures consistently preserved in the geologic record. Despite this, growth rates, metabolic capabilities, and methods of mineralization in modern communities are poorly understood. Imperial Geyser, an alkaline siliceous hot spring in Yellowstone National Park, provides a useful setting to study these parameters. Mat and water samples (T = 64-40 °C) were collected for 13C analysis and 13C-spiked bicarbonate and acetate incubation experiments. Carbon isotopes were measured for the stream water, pore water and biomass. We experimentally determined rates of bicarbonate uptake, acetate uptake and mineral content. Bicarbonate uptake rates ranged from 0 - 0.4% per day, while acetate uptake rates ranged from 0 - 2.0% per day. These results indicate that the mat biomass is capable of turnover in about 300 days resulting in potential growth rates of 1-2 cm/year. Organic carbon content (% dry weight) ranged from 2 to 16%, and decreased with depth in the mat. The mineral content of these mats is predominantly amorphous SiO2. An inverse correlation between mineral percent and bicarbonate uptake rate was observed, suggesting that there may be a link between metabolism and the prevention of mineralization. Comparing the 13C and carbon uptake rates with 16S rDNA pyrosequencing data we were able to hypothesize the carbon fixation pathways and heterotrophic interactions occurring in this environment. In general, two patterns of 13C values were observed. The first pattern was characterized by increased heterotrophy with depth. In the other, preliminary evidence supporting a photoheterotrophic lifestyle for Roseiflexus spp. was found.

  19. Revisiting the Rectifier: New Observations of Covariance Between Terrestrial Carbon Cycling and Boundary Layer Depth (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denning, S.; McGrath-Spangler, E. L.

    2013-12-01

    Covariance between land-surface carbon fluxes and vertical mixing in the atmosphere is among the strongest determinants of the spatial distribution of atmospheric CO2 in the lower troposphere. Differences in the magnitude of this "CO2 rectifier effect" among different tracer transport models has been shown to explain most of the variability in estimates of terrestrial carbon sinks over the northern (vs tropical) continents. We present a new analysis of the magnitude of the CO2 rectifier using a climatology of PBL depth estimated using vertical profiles of LIDAR backscatter from the CALIPSO satellite. Millions of separate soundings of PBL depth were matched with hourly estimates of photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration from the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB3) at the same locations and times over more than 6 years. Strong covariance between net carbon flux and atmospheric mixing were observed over the northern continents, especially over Boreal Asia. Negative covariance is observed over monsoon regions, which is especially strong over India. Covariance of net carbon flux with the reciprocal of PBL depth has the units of CO2 tendency (ppm per month), and can be expressed as rectifier forcing. Satellite sampling of this quantity reveals spatially-coherent patterns as strong as +/- 10 ppm per month over Siberia and India. We computed rectifier forcing with NASA's Modern Era Reanalysis (MERRA) for the same locations and times sampled by CALIPSO from 2006-2012. Comparison of the MERRA and CALIPSO data reveal that the spatial patterns and magnitudes are similar over the northern continents, but much weaker in MERRA than CALIPSO over the tropics. Using MERRA to compute the rectifier effect for SiB fluxes in GEOS-Chem allows us to establish a quantitative relationship between rectifier forcing and response that is evaluated against the CALIPSO boundary layer data. We propose a framework for model intercomparison and evaluation that can leverage the rich new data set.

  20. Layered double hydroxide materials coated carbon electrode: New challenge to future electrochemical power devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djebbi, Mohamed Amine; Braiek, Mohamed; Namour, Philippe; Ben Haj Amara, Abdesslem; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole

    2016-11-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) have been widely used in the past years due to their unique physicochemical properties and promising applications in electroanalytical chemistry. The present paper is going to focus exclusively on magnesium-aluminum and zinc-aluminum layered double hydroxides (MgAl & ZnAl LDHs) in order to investigate the property and structure of active cation sites located within the layer structure. The MgAl and ZnAl LDH nanosheets were prepared by the constant pH co-precipitation method and uniformly supported on carbon-based electrode materials to fabricate an LDH electrode. Characterization by powder x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed the LDH form and well-crystallized materials. Wetting surface properties (hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity) of both prepared LDHs were recorded by contact angle measurement show hydrophilic character and basic property. The electrochemical performance of these hybrid materials was investigated by mainly cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and chronoamperometry techniques to identify the oxidation/reduction processes at the electrode/electrolyte interface and the effect of the divalent metal cations in total reactivity. The hierarchy of the modified electrode proves that the electronic conductivity of the bulk material is considerably dependent on the divalent cation and affects the limiting parameter of the overall redox process. However, MgAl LDH shows better performance than ZnAl LDH, due to the presence of magnesium cations in the layers. Following the structural, morphological and electrochemical behavior studies of both synthesized LDHs, the prepared LDH modified electrodes were tested through microbial fuel cell configuration, revealing a remarkable, potential new pathway for high-performance and cost-effective electrode use in electrochemical power devices.

  1. Four-Dimensional Lung Treatment Planning in Layer-Stacking Carbon Ion Beam Treatment: Comparison of Layer-Stacking and Conventional Ungated/Gated Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Shinichiro; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Asakura, Hiroshi; Sharp, Gregory C.; Kumagai, Motoki; Dobashi, Suguru; Nakajima, Mio; Yamamoto, Naoyoshi; Kandatsu, Susumu; Baba, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: We compared four-dimensional (4D) layer-stacking and conventional carbon ion beam distribution in the treatment of lung cancer between ungated and gated respiratory strategies using 4DCT data sets. Methods and Materials: Twenty lung patients underwent 4DCT imaging under free-breathing conditions. Using planning target volumes (PTVs) at respective respiratory phases, two types of compensating bolus were designed, a full single respiratory cycle for the ungated strategy and an approximately 30% duty cycle for the exhalation-gated strategy. Beams were delivered to the PTVs for the ungated and gated strategies, PTV(ungated) and PTV(gated), respectively, which were calculated by combining the respective PTV(Tn)s by layer-stacking and conventional irradiation. Carbon ion beam dose distribution was calculated as a function of respiratory phase by applying a compensating bolus to 4DCT. Accumulated dose distributions were calculated by applying deformable registration. Results: With the ungated strategy, accumulated dose distributions were satisfactorily provided to the PTV, with D95 values for layer-stacking and conventional irradiation of 94.0% and 96.2%, respectively. V20 for the lung and Dmax for the spinal cord were lower with layer-stacking than with conventional irradiation, whereas Dmax for the skin (14.1 GyE) was significantly lower (21.9 GyE). In addition, dose conformation to the GTV/PTV with layer-stacking irradiation was better with the gated than with the ungated strategy. Conclusions: Gated layer-stacking irradiation allows the delivery of a carbon ion beam to a moving target without significant degradation of dose conformity or the development of hot spots.

  2. Layer-by-layer assembly of TiO2 nanowire/carbon nanotube films and characterization of their photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darányi, Mária; Csesznok, Tamás; Kukovecz, Ákos; Kónya, Zoltán; Kiricsi, Imre; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Vajtai, Robert

    2011-05-01

    We report on the layer-by-layer (LbL) formation of TiO2-MWNT-TiO2 coatings on quartz with either trititanate derived TiO2 nanowires or Degussa P25 as the photocatalytically active material. The optimized deposition sequence is discussed in detail and the morphology of the prepared coatings is analyzed by SEM and XRD. The heterogeneous photocatalytic performance of the coatings was tested in the methyl orange oxidation reaction. The apparent first order rate constant fell in the 0.01-0.20 h - 1 range over a 2.5 × 2.5 cm2 film depending on the type and the thickness of the titanate coating. Building a multiwall carbon nanotube layer into the middle of the layer improved the photocatalytic activity for each material for all of the studied thicknesses. P25 based films performed 2-5 times better than TiO2 nanowire films; however, the pores in the P25 based films were largely blocked because the isotropic P25 nanoparticles form closely packed layers by themselves and even more so with the comparably sized multiwall carbon nanotubes. Therefore, films derived from titanate nanowires appear to be more suitable for use as multifunctional, photocatalytically active filtration media.

  3. Layer-by-layer assembly of TiO2 nanowire/carbon nanotube films and characterization of their photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Darányi, Mária; Csesznok, Tamás; Kukovecz, Akos; Kónya, Zoltán; Kiricsi, Imre; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Vajtai, Robert

    2011-05-13

    We report on the layer-by-layer (LbL) formation of TiO(2)-MWNT-TiO(2) coatings on quartz with either trititanate derived TiO(2) nanowires or Degussa P25 as the photocatalytically active material. The optimized deposition sequence is discussed in detail and the morphology of the prepared coatings is analyzed by SEM and XRD. The heterogeneous photocatalytic performance of the coatings was tested in the methyl orange oxidation reaction. The apparent first order rate constant fell in the 0.01-0.20 h(-1) range over a 2.5 × 2.5 cm(2) film depending on the type and the thickness of the titanate coating. Building a multiwall carbon nanotube layer into the middle of the layer improved the photocatalytic activity for each material for all of the studied thicknesses. P25 based films performed 2-5 times better than TiO(2) nanowire films; however, the pores in the P25 based films were largely blocked because the isotropic P25 nanoparticles form closely packed layers by themselves and even more so with the comparably sized multiwall carbon nanotubes. Therefore, films derived from titanate nanowires appear to be more suitable for use as multifunctional, photocatalytically active filtration media.

  4. Deposition of carbon and beryllium and retention of deuterium on probes in the scrape-off layer of JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsåker, H.; Coad, J. P.; Behrisch, R.; Clement, S.; Lama, F.; Martinelli, A. P.; Prozesky, V. M.; Simpson, J. C. B.; Röver, G.

    1990-12-01

    Surface probes have been exposed at JET with all-carbon walls, when beryllium was evaporated onto graphite limiters, and with beryllium limiters. The aims have been to study the impurity content in the scrape-off, erosion and deposition, and the pumping of deuterium by codeposition with carbon and beryllium. Thermally activated erosion makes it difficult to study time resolved erosion close to the LCFS. In the all-carbon machine, the carbon density in the outboard scrapeoff between the belts was estimated to ~ 20% of the deuterium. With a fresh Be coating on the limiters, carbon in the SOL was initially suppressed, but increased from discharge to discharge. The D/C ratio in codeposition layers was three times larger with Be-evaporation than in all-carbon conditions. Edge profiles determined from impurity deposition became flatter during RF heating and current ramp down.

  5. Graphene-based carbon-layered electrode array technology for neural imaging and optogenetic applications.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong-Wook; Schendel, Amelia A; Mikael, Solomon; Brodnick, Sarah K; Richner, Thomas J; Ness, Jared P; Hayat, Mohammed R; Atry, Farid; Frye, Seth T; Pashaie, Ramin; Thongpang, Sanitta; Ma, Zhenqiang; Williams, Justin C

    2014-10-20

    Neural micro-electrode arrays that are transparent over a broad wavelength spectrum from ultraviolet to infrared could allow for simultaneous electrophysiology and optical imaging, as well as optogenetic modulation of the underlying brain tissue. The long-term biocompatibility and reliability of neural micro-electrodes also require their mechanical flexibility and compliance with soft tissues. Here we present a graphene-based, carbon-layered electrode array (CLEAR) device, which can be implanted on the brain surface in rodents for high-resolution neurophysiological recording. We characterize optical transparency of the device at >90% transmission over the ultraviolet to infrared spectrum and demonstrate its utility through optical interface experiments that use this broad spectrum transparency. These include optogenetic activation of focal cortical areas directly beneath electrodes, in vivo imaging of the cortical vasculature via fluorescence microscopy and 3D optical coherence tomography. This study demonstrates an array of interfacing abilities of the CLEAR device and its utility for neural applications.

  6. From carbon nanotubes and silicate layers to graphene platelets for polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Izzuddin; Kuan, Hsu-Chiang; Dai, Jingfei; Kawashima, Nobuyuki; Michelmore, Andrew; Sovi, Alex; Dong, Songyi; Luong, Lee; Ma, Jun

    2012-07-01

    In spite of extensive studies conducted on carbon nanotubes and silicate layers for their polymer-based nanocomposites, the rise of graphene now provides a more promising candidate due to its exceptionally high mechanical performance and electrical and thermal conductivities. The present study developed a facile approach to fabricate epoxy-graphene nanocomposites by thermally expanding a commercial product followed by ultrasonication and solution-compounding with epoxy, and investigated their morphologies, mechanical properties, electrical conductivity and thermal mechanical behaviour. Graphene platelets (GnPs) of 3.57 +/- 0.50 nm in thickness were created after the expanded product was dispersed in tetrahydrofuran using 60 min ultrasonication. Since epoxy resins cured by various hardeners are widely used in industries, we chose two common hardeners: polyoxypropylene (J230) and 4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulfone (DDS). DDS-cured nanocomposites showed a better dispersion and exfoliation of GnPs, a higher improvement (573%) in fracture energy release rate and a lower percolation threshold (0.612 vol%) for electrical conductivity, because DDS contains benzene groups which create π-π interactions with GnPs promoting a higher degree of dispersion and exfoliation of GnPs during curing. This research pointed out a potential trend where GnPs would replace carbon nanotubes and silicate layers for many applications of polymer nanocomposites.In spite of extensive studies conducted on carbon nanotubes and silicate layers for their polymer-based nanocomposites, the rise of graphene now provides a more promising candidate due to its exceptionally high mechanical performance and electrical and thermal conductivities. The present study developed a facile approach to fabricate epoxy-graphene nanocomposites by thermally expanding a commercial product followed by ultrasonication and solution-compounding with epoxy, and investigated their morphologies, mechanical properties, electrical

  7. Ultra-low loading Pt nanocatalysts prepared by atomic layer deposition on carbon aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    King, J S; Wittstock, A; Biener, J; Kucheyev, S O; Wang, Y M; Baumann, T F; Giri, S; Hamza, A V; Baeumer, M; Bent, S F

    2008-04-21

    Using atomic layer deposition (ALD), we show that Pt nanoparticles can be deposited on the inner surfaces of carbon aerogels (CA). The resultant Pt-loaded materials exhibit high catalytic activity for the oxidation of CO even at loading levels as low as {approx}0.05 mg Pt/cm{sup 2}. We observe a conversion efficiency of nearly 100% in the temperatures range 150-250 C, and the total conversion rate seems to be only limited by the thermal stability of our CA support in ambient oxygen. Our ALD approach described here is universal in nature, and can be applied to the design of new catalytic materials for a variety of applications, including fuel cells, hydrogen storage, pollution control, green chemistry, and liquid fuel production.

  8. Carbon-Nanotube-Based Electrochemical Double-Layer Capacitor Technologies for Spaceflight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, S.; Fireman, H.; Huffman, C.; Maloney, P.; Nikolaev, P.; Yowell, L.; Kim, K.; Kohl, P. A.; Higgins, C. D.; Turano, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors, or supercapacitors, have tremendous potential as high-power energy sources for use in low-weight hybrid systems for space exploration. Electrodes based on single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) offer exceptional power and energy performance due to the high surface area, high conductivity, and the ability to functionalize the SWCNTs to optimize capacitor properties. This paper will report on the preparation of electrochemical capacitors incorporating SWCNT electrodes and their performance compared with existing commercial technology. Preliminary results indicate that substantial increases in power and energy density are possible. The effects of nanotube growth and processing methods on electrochemical capacitor performance is also presented. The compatibility of different SWCNTs and electrolytes was studied by varying the type of electrolyte ions that accumulate on the high-surface-area electrodes.

  9. Single-walled carbon nanotubes coated with ZnO by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Partha P.; Gilshteyn, Evgenia; Jiang, Hua; Timmermans, Marina; Kaskela, Antti; Tolochko, Oleg V.; Kurochkin, Alexey V.; Karppinen, Maarit; Nisula, Mikko; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Nasibulin, Albert G.

    2016-12-01

    The possibility of ZnO deposition on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with the help of an atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique was successfully demonstrated. The utilization of pristine SWCNTs as a support resulted in a non-uniform deposition of ZnO in the form of nanoparticles. To achieve uniform ZnO coating, the SWCNTs first needed to be functionalized by treating the samples in a controlled ozone atmosphere. The uniformly ZnO coated SWCNTs were used to fabricate UV sensing devices. An UV irradiation of the ZnO coated samples turned them from hydrophobic to hydrophilic behaviour. Furthermore, thin films of the ZnO coated SWCNTs allowed us switch p-type field effect transistors made of pristine SWCNTs to have ambipolar characteristics.

  10. Formation of high-carbon abrasion-resistant surface layers when high-energy heating by high-frequency currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikova, N. V.; Skeeba, V. Yu; Martyushev, N. V.; Miller, R. A.; Rubtsova, N. S.

    2016-11-01

    The paper shows the possibility of carburization of low-carbon steel surface layers using high-frequency currents. The mathematical modeling of carburization using high-energy heating by high-frequency currents (HEH HFC) has been carried out, the temperature fields formed during the given processing have been calculated, as well as the structural changes in the surface layers have been simulated. The features of the structure formation in the surface layers of low-carbon steel after carburizing via HEH HFC have been determined by optical and scanning microscopy, which is confirmed by the computational models. The rational mode of fusion via HEH HFC has also been determined (power density of the source qs = (1.5 ... 4.0) • 108 W m-2, (the relative travel speed of parts Vp = 5 ... 100 mm / sec), with forming the compressive retained stresses in the surface layer (σRS ≈ -300 ... -400 MPa).

  11. Multifunctional Nitrogen-Doped Loofah Sponge Carbon Blocking Layer for High-Performance Rechargeable Lithium Batteries.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xingxing; Tong, Chuan-Jia; Rehman, Sarish; Liu, Li-Min; Hou, Yanglong; Zhang, Shanqing

    2016-06-29

    Low-cost, long-life, and high-performance lithium batteries not only provide an economically viable power source to electric vehicles and smart electricity grids but also address the issues of the energy shortage and environmental sustainability. Herein, low-cost, hierarchically porous, and nitrogen-doped loofah sponge carbon (N-LSC) derived from the loofah sponge has been synthesized via a simple calcining process and then applied as a multifunctional blocking layer for Li-S, Li-Se, and Li-I2 batteries. As a result of the ultrahigh specific area (2551.06 m(2) g(-1)), high porosity (1.75 cm(3) g(-1)), high conductivity (1170 S m(-1)), and heteroatoms doping of N-LSC, the resultant Li-S, Li-Se, and Li-I2 batteries with the N-LSC-900 membrane deliver outstanding electrochemical performance stability in all cases, i.e., high reversible capacities of 623.6 mA h g(-1) at 1675 mA g(-1) after 500 cycles, 350 mA h g(-1) at 1356 mA g(-1) after 1000 cycles, and 150 mA h g(-1) at 10550 mA g(-1) after 5000 cycles, respectively. The successful application to Li-S, Li-Se, and Li-I2 batteries suggests that loofa sponge carbon could play a vital role in modern rechargeable battery industries as a universal, cost-effective, environmentally friendly, and high-performance blocking layer.

  12. In situ synthesis carbonated hydroxyapatite layers on enamel slices with acidic amino acids by a novel two-step method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Xu; Li, Yi; Yang, Tao; Yan, Xiujuan; Wang, Ke

    2015-09-01

    In situ fabrication of carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) remineralization layer on an enamel slice was completed in a novel, biomimetic two-step method. First, a CaCO3 layer was synthesized on the surface of demineralized enamel using an acidic amino acid (aspartic acid or glutamate acid) as a soft template. Second, at the same concentration of the acidic amino acid, rod-like carbonated hydroxyapatite was produced with the CaCO3 layer as a sacrificial template and a reactant. The morphology, crystallinity and other physicochemical properties of the crystals were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), respectively. Acidic amino acid could promote the uniform deposition of hydroxyapatite with rod-like crystals via absorption of phosphate and carbonate ions from the reaction solution. Moreover, compared with hydroxyapatite crystals coated on the enamel when synthesized by a one-step method, the CaCO3 coating that was synthesized in the first step acted as an active bridge layer and sacrificial template. It played a vital role in orienting the artificial coating layer through the template effect. The results show that the rod-like carbonated hydroxyapatite crystals grow into bundles, which are similar in size and appearance to prisms in human enamel, when using the two-step method with either aspartic acid or acidic glutamate (20.00 mmol/L).

  13. Gradation of mechanical properties in gas-diffusion electrode. Part 2: Heterogeneous carbon fiber and damage evolution in cell layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poornesh, K. K.; Cho, C. D.; Lee, G. B.; Tak, Y. S.

    In PEM fuel cell, gas-diffusion electrode (GDE) plays very significant role in force transmission from bipolar plate to the membrane. This paper investigates the effects of geometrical heterogeneities of gas-diffusion electrode layer (gas-diffusion layer (GDL) and catalyst layer (CL)) on mechanical damage evolution and propagation. We present a structural integrity principle of membrane electrode assembly (MEA) based on the interlayer stress transfer capacity and corresponding cell layer material response. Commonly observable damages such as rupture of hydrophobic coating and breakage of carbon fiber in gas-diffusion layer are attributed to the ductile to brittle phase transition within a single carbon fiber. Effect of material inhomogeneity on change in modulus, hardness, contact stiffness, and electrical contact resistance is also discussed. Fracture statistics of carbon fiber and variations in flexural strength of GDL are studied. The damage propagation in CL is perceived to be influenced by the type of gradation and the vicinity from which crack originates. Cohesive zone model has been proposed based on the traction-separation law to investigate the damage propagation throughout the two interfaces (carbon fiber/CL and CL/membrane).

  14. Characterization and organic electric-double-layer-capacitor application of KOH activated coal-tar-pitch-based carbons: Effect of carbonization temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Poo Reum; Lee, Eunji; Kwon, Soon Hyung; Jung, Ji Chul; Kim, Myung-Soo

    2015-12-01

    The present study reports the influence of pre-carbonization on the properties of KOH-activated coal tar pitch (CTP). The change of crystallinity and pore structure of pre-carbonized CTPs as well as their activated carbons (ACs) as function of pre-carbonization temperature are investigated. The crystallinity of pre-carbonized CTPs increases with increasing the carbonization temperature up to 600 °C, but a disorder occurs during the carbonization around 700 °C and an order happens gradually with increasing the carbonization temperatures in range of 800-1000 °C. The CTPs pre-carbonized at high temperatures are more difficult to be activated with KOH than those pre-carbonized at low temperatures due to the increase of micro-crystalline size and the decrease of surface functional groups. The micro-pores and meso-pores are well developed at around 1.0 nm and 2.4 nm, respectively, as the ACs are pre-carbonized at temperatures of 500-600 °C, exhibiting high specific capacitances as electrode materials for electric double layer capacitor (EDLC). Although the specific surface area (SSA) and pore volume of ACs pre-carbonized at temperatures of 900-1000 °C are extraordinary low (non-porous) as compared to those of AC pre-carbonized at 600 °C, their specific capacitances are comparable to each other. The large specific capacitances with low SSA ACs can be attributed to the structural change resulting from the electrochemical activation during the 1st charge above 2.0 V.

  15. Broadband photodetector based on carbon nanotube thin film/single layer graphene Schottky junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Teng-Fei; Li, Zhi-Peng; Wang, Jiu-Zhen; Kong, Wei-Yu; Wu, Guo-An; Zheng, Yu-Zhen; Zhao, Yuan-Wei; Yao, En-Xu; Zhuang, Nai-Xi; Luo, Lin-Bao

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we present a broadband nano-photodetector based on single-layer graphene (SLG)-carbon nanotube thin film (CNTF) Schottky junction. It was found that the as-fabricated device exhibited obvious sensitivity to a wide range of illumination, with peak sensitivity at 600 and 920 nm. In addition, the SLG-CNTF device had a fast response speed (τr = 68 μs, τf = 78 μs) and good reproducibility in a wide range of switching frequencies (50–5400 Hz). The on-off ratio, responsivity, and detectivity of the device were estimated to be 1 × 102, 209 mAW‑1 and 4.87 × 1010 cm Hz1/2 W‑1, respectively. What is more, other device parameters including linear performance θ and linear dynamic range (LDR) were calculated to be 0.99 and 58.8 dB, respectively, which were relatively better than other carbon nanotube based devices. The totality of the above study signifies that the present SLG-CNTF Schottky junction broadband nano-photodetector may have promising application in future nano-optoelectronic devices and systems.

  16. Broadband photodetector based on carbon nanotube thin film/single layer graphene Schottky junction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Teng-Fei; Li, Zhi-Peng; Wang, Jiu-Zhen; Kong, Wei-Yu; Wu, Guo-An; Zheng, Yu-Zhen; Zhao, Yuan-Wei; Yao, En-Xu; Zhuang, Nai-Xi; Luo, Lin-Bao

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we present a broadband nano-photodetector based on single-layer graphene (SLG)-carbon nanotube thin film (CNTF) Schottky junction. It was found that the as-fabricated device exhibited obvious sensitivity to a wide range of illumination, with peak sensitivity at 600 and 920 nm. In addition, the SLG-CNTF device had a fast response speed (τr = 68 μs, τf = 78 μs) and good reproducibility in a wide range of switching frequencies (50–5400 Hz). The on-off ratio, responsivity, and detectivity of the device were estimated to be 1 × 102, 209 mAW−1 and 4.87 × 1010 cm Hz1/2 W−1, respectively. What is more, other device parameters including linear performance θ and linear dynamic range (LDR) were calculated to be 0.99 and 58.8 dB, respectively, which were relatively better than other carbon nanotube based devices. The totality of the above study signifies that the present SLG-CNTF Schottky junction broadband nano-photodetector may have promising application in future nano-optoelectronic devices and systems. PMID:27929053

  17. One-step synthesis of hierarchically porous carbons for high-performance electric double layer supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Jun; Su, Hai; Liu, Fangyan; Yang, Weiqing

    2016-05-01

    With plenty of unique porous structure at micro-/nano scale, hierarchically porous carbons (HPCs) are promising for usage in advanced electric double layer supercapacitors (EDLCs) as the electrode materials. However, wide-range adoption of HPC for practical application is largely shadowed by its extremely complex synthesis process with considerably low production efficiency. Herein we reported a simple template-free, one-step sintering method, to massively produce the HPCs for high-performance EDLCs. Resorting to the 3D structure modification of the wide pore size distribution, high surface area of HPCs (up to 3000 m2 g-1) was achieved. By using 1 M Na2SO4 as electrolyte, the as-fabricated HPCs based EDLCs can be operated reversibly over a wide voltage window of 1.6 V with superior specific capacitance of 240 F g-1 under a current density of 0.5 A g-1. In the meanwhile, the EDLCs exhibit excellent rate capability (high power density of 16 kW kg-1 at 10.2 Wh kg-1) and long-term cycling stability with 9% loss of its initial capacitance after 2000 cycles. This output performance distinguished itself among most of the carbon-based EDLCs with neutral aqueous electrolyte. Thus, the template-free one-step sintering method produced HPCs for EDLCs represents a new approach for high-performance energy storage.

  18. Bimodal Latex Effect on Spin-Coated Thin Conductive Polymer-Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Layers.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Mohammad-Amin; Larrakoetxea Angoitia, Katalin; van Berkel, Stefan; Gnanasekaran, Karthikeyan; Friedrich, Heiner; Heuts, Johan P A; van der Schoot, Paul; van Herk, Alex M

    2015-11-10

    We synthesize two differently sized poly(methyl methacrylate-co-tert-butyl acrylate) latexes by emulsion polymerization and mix these with a sonicated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) dispersion, in order to prepare 3% SWCNT composite mixtures. We spin-coat these mixtures at various spin-speed rates and spin times over a glass substrate, producing a thin, transparent, solid, conductive layer. Keeping the amount of SWCNTs constant, we vary the weight fraction of our smaller 30-nm latex particles relative to the larger 70-nm-sized ones. We find a maximum in the electrical conductivity up to 370 S/m as a function of the weight fraction of smaller particles, depending on the overall solid content, the spin speed, and the spin time. This maximum occurs at 3-5% of the smaller latex particles. We also find a more than 2-fold increase in conductivity parallel to the radius of spin-coating than perpendicular to it. Atomic force microscopy points at the existence of lanes of latex particles in the spin-coated thin layer, while large-area transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that the SWCNTs are aligned over a grid fixed on the glass substrate during the spin-coating process. We extract the conductivity distribution on the surface of the thin film and translate this into the direction of the SWCNTs in it.

  19. Impact of layer thickness and well orientation on caprock integrity for geologic carbon storage

    DOE PAGES

    Newell, P.; Martinez, M. J.; Eichhubl, P.

    2016-07-29

    Economic feasibility of geologic carbon storage demands sustaining large storage rates without damaging caprock seals. Reactivation of pre-existing or newly formed fractures may provide a leakage pathway across caprock layers. In this paper, we apply an equivalent continuum approach within a finite element framework to model the fluid-pressure-induced reactivation of pre-existing fractures within the caprock, during high-rate injection of super-critical CO2 into a brine-saturated reservoir in a hypothetical system, using realistic geomechanical and fluid properties. We investigate the impact of reservoir to caprock layer thickness, wellbore orientation, and injection rate on overall performance of the system with respect to caprockmore » failure and leakage. We find that vertical wells result in locally higher reservoir pressures relative to horizontal injection wells for the same injection rate, with high pressure inducing caprock leakage along reactivated opening-mode fractures in the caprock. After prolonged injection, leakage along reactivated fractures in the caprock is always higher for vertical than horizontal injection wells. Furthermore, we find that low ratios of reservoir to caprock thickness favor high excess pressure and thus fracture reactivation in the caprock. Finally, injection into thick reservoir units thus lowers the risk associated with CO2 leakage.« less

  20. Controlled release based on the dissolution of a calcium carbonate layer deposited on hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Ogomi, Daisuke; Serizawa, Takeshi; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2005-03-21

    It is possible that inorganic materials conjugated to suitable organic materials may induce unique mechanical, optical and other functional properties. Therefore, artificial conjugation of organic and inorganic components is attractive for preparing novel functional materials. Recently, we developed an alternate soaking process for calcium salt formation on/in polymer materials. In this study, a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel-calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) composite was prepared by the aforementioned process as a controlled release support. Brilliant blue FCF (Mw = 794), FITC labeled BSA (Mw = 6.6 x 10(4)), FITC labeled dextran-10 k (Mw = 9.5 x 10(3)) and FITC labeled dextran-40 k (Mw = 4.3 x 10(4)) were loaded into the composite as model drugs. CaCO(3) dissolution and model drug release rates increased with a decrease in buffer pH. In addition, model drug release rates increased with a decrease in model drug molecular weight. These results show that CaCO(3) layers on hydrogels behave as capping layers for model drug release; the release rate of model drugs can be controlled by the dissolution rate of CaCO(3) and the molecular weight of the drug.

  1. Determinants of carbon release from the active layer and permafrost deposits on the Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Leiyi; Liang, Junyi; Qin, Shuqi; Liu, Li; Fang, Kai; Xu, Yunping; Ding, Jinzhi; Li, Fei; Luo, Yiqi; Yang, Yuanhe

    2016-01-01

    The sign and magnitude of permafrost carbon (C)-climate feedback are highly uncertain due to the limited understanding of the decomposability of thawing permafrost and relevant mechanistic controls over C release. Here, by combining aerobic incubation with biomarker analysis and a three-pool model, we reveal that C quality (represented by a higher amount of fast cycling C but a lower amount of recalcitrant C compounds) and normalized CO2–C release in permafrost deposits were similar or even higher than those in the active layer, demonstrating a high vulnerability of C in Tibetan upland permafrost. We also illustrate that C quality exerts the most control over CO2–C release from the active layer, whereas soil microbial abundance is more directly associated with CO2–C release after permafrost thaw. Taken together, our findings highlight the importance of incorporating microbial properties into Earth System Models when predicting permafrost C dynamics under a changing environment. PMID:27703168

  2. Impact of layer thickness and well orientation on caprock integrity for geologic carbon storage

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, P.; Martinez, M. J.; Eichhubl, P.

    2016-07-29

    Economic feasibility of geologic carbon storage demands sustaining large storage rates without damaging caprock seals. Reactivation of pre-existing or newly formed fractures may provide a leakage pathway across caprock layers. In this paper, we apply an equivalent continuum approach within a finite element framework to model the fluid-pressure-induced reactivation of pre-existing fractures within the caprock, during high-rate injection of super-critical CO2 into a brine-saturated reservoir in a hypothetical system, using realistic geomechanical and fluid properties. We investigate the impact of reservoir to caprock layer thickness, wellbore orientation, and injection rate on overall performance of the system with respect to caprock failure and leakage. We find that vertical wells result in locally higher reservoir pressures relative to horizontal injection wells for the same injection rate, with high pressure inducing caprock leakage along reactivated opening-mode fractures in the caprock. After prolonged injection, leakage along reactivated fractures in the caprock is always higher for vertical than horizontal injection wells. Furthermore, we find that low ratios of reservoir to caprock thickness favor high excess pressure and thus fracture reactivation in the caprock. Finally, injection into thick reservoir units thus lowers the risk associated with CO2 leakage.

  3. Surface modification of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes by ozone via atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lushington, Andrew; Liu, Jian; Tang, Yongji; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang

    2014-01-15

    The use of ozone as an oxidizing agent for atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes is rapidly growing due to its strong oxidizing capabilities. However, the effect of ozone on nanostructured substrates such as nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) and pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PCNTs) are not very well understood and may provide an avenue toward functionalizing the carbon nanotube surface prior to deposition. The effects of ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs and PCNTs using 10 wt. % ozone at temperatures of 150, 250, and 300 °C are studied. The effect of ozone pulse time and ALD cycle number on NCNTs and PCNTs was also investigated. Morphological changes to the substrate were observed by scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurements were also conducted to determine surface area, pore size, and pore size distribution following ozone treatment. The graphitic nature of both NCNTs and PCNTs was determined using Raman analysis while x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to probe the chemical nature of NCNTs. It was found that O{sub 3} attack occurs preferentially to the outermost geometric surface of NCNTs. Our research also revealed that the deleterious effects of ozone are found only on NCNTs while little or no damage occurs on PCNTs. Furthermore, XPS analysis indicated that ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs, at elevated temperatures, results in loss of nitrogen content. Our studies demonstrate that ALD ozone treatment is an effective avenue toward creating low nitrogen content, defect rich substrates for use in electrochemical applications and ALD of various metal/metal oxides.

  4. Method and apparatus for detecting the presence and thickness of carbon and oxide layers on EUV reflective surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Malinowski, Michael E.

    2005-01-25

    The characteristics of radiation that is reflected from carbon deposits and oxidation formations on highly reflective surfaces such as Mo/Si mirrors can be quantified and employed to detect and measure the presence of such impurities on optics. Specifically, it has been shown that carbon deposits on a Mo/Si multilayer mirror decreases the intensity of reflected HeNe laser (632.8 nm) light. In contrast, oxide layers formed on the mirror should cause an increase in HeNe power reflection. Both static measurements and real-time monitoring of carbon and oxide surface impurities on optical elements in lithography tools should be achievable.

  5. Morphology and crystallinity control of ultrathin TiO2 layers deposited on carbon nanotubes by temperature-step atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra-Nuñez, Carlos; Zhang, Yucheng; Li, Meng; Chawla, Vipin; Erni, Rolf; Michler, Johann; Park, Hyung Gyu; Utke, Ivo

    2015-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with titanium oxide (TiO2) have generated considerable interest over the last decade and become a promising nanomaterial for a wide range of energy applications. The efficient use of the outstanding electrical properties of this nanostructure relies heavily on the quality of the interface and the thickness and morphology of the TiO2 layer. However, complete surface coverage of the chemically inert CNTs and appropriate control of the morphology of the TiO2 layer have not been achieved so far. Here, we report a new strategy to obtain ultrathin TiO2 coatings deposited by ``Temperature-step'' Atomic Layer Deposition (TS-ALD) with complete surface coverage of non-functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and controlled morphology and crystallinity of the TiO2 film. This strategy consists of adjusting the temperature during the ALD deposition to obtain the desired morphology. Complete coverage of long non-functionalized MWCNTs with conformal anatase layers was obtained by using a low temperature of 60 °C during the nucleation stage followed by an increase to 220 °C during the growth stage. This resulted in a continuous and amorphous TiO2 layer, covered with a conformal anatase coating. Starting with the deposition at 220 °C and reducing to 60 °C resulted in sporadic crystal grains at the CNT/TiO2 interface covered with an amorphous TiO2 layer. The results were accomplished through an extensive study of nucleation and growth of titanium oxide films on MWCNTs, of which a detailed characterization is presented in this work.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with titanium oxide (TiO2) have generated considerable interest over the last decade and become a promising nanomaterial for a wide range of energy applications. The efficient use of the outstanding electrical properties of this nanostructure relies heavily on the quality of the interface and the thickness and morphology of the TiO2 layer. However, complete surface coverage of the

  6. Prediction of the moments in advection-diffusion lattice Boltzmann method. II. Attenuation of the boundary layers via double-Λ bounce-back flux scheme.

    PubMed

    Ginzburg, Irina

    2017-01-01

    Impact of the unphysical tangential advective-diffusion constraint of the bounce-back (BB) reflection on the impermeable solid surface is examined for the first four moments of concentration. Despite the number of recent improvements for the Neumann condition in the lattice Boltzmann method-advection-diffusion equation, the BB rule remains the only known local mass-conserving no-flux condition suitable for staircase porous geometry. We examine the closure relation of the BB rule in straight channel and cylindrical capillary analytically, and show that it excites the Knudsen-type boundary layers in the nonequilibrium solution for full-weight equilibrium stencil. Although the d2Q5 and d3Q7 coordinate schemes are sufficient for the modeling of isotropic diffusion, the full-weight stencils are appealing for their advanced stability, isotropy, anisotropy and anti-numerical-diffusion ability. The boundary layers are not covered by the Chapman-Enskog expansion around the expected equilibrium, but they accommodate the Chapman-Enskog expansion in the bulk with the closure relation of the bounce-back rule. We show that the induced boundary layers introduce first-order errors in two primary transport properties, namely, mean velocity (first moment) and molecular diffusion coefficient (second moment). As a side effect, the Taylor-dispersion coefficient (second moment), skewness (third moment), and kurtosis (fourth moment) deviate from their physical values and predictions of the fourth-order Chapman-Enskog analysis, even though the kurtosis error in pure diffusion does not depend on grid resolution. In two- and three-dimensional grid-aligned channels and open-tubular conduits, the errors of velocity and diffusion are proportional to the diagonal weight values of the corresponding equilibrium terms. The d2Q5 and d3Q7 schemes do not suffer from this deficiency in grid-aligned geometries but they cannot avoid it if the boundaries are not parallel to the coordinate lines. In order

  7. Prediction of the moments in advection-diffusion lattice Boltzmann method. II. Attenuation of the boundary layers via double-Λ bounce-back flux scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, Irina

    2017-01-01

    Impact of the unphysical tangential advective-diffusion constraint of the bounce-back (BB) reflection on the impermeable solid surface is examined for the first four moments of concentration. Despite the number of recent improvements for the Neumann condition in the lattice Boltzmann method-advection-diffusion equation, the BB rule remains the only known local mass-conserving no-flux condition suitable for staircase porous geometry. We examine the closure relation of the BB rule in straight channel and cylindrical capillary analytically, and show that it excites the Knudsen-type boundary layers in the nonequilibrium solution for full-weight equilibrium stencil. Although the d2Q5 and d3Q7 coordinate schemes are sufficient for the modeling of isotropic diffusion, the full-weight stencils are appealing for their advanced stability, isotropy, anisotropy and anti-numerical-diffusion ability. The boundary layers are not covered by the Chapman-Enskog expansion around the expected equilibrium, but they accommodate the Chapman-Enskog expansion in the bulk with the closure relation of the bounce-back rule. We show that the induced boundary layers introduce first-order errors in two primary transport properties, namely, mean velocity (first moment) and molecular diffusion coefficient (second moment). As a side effect, the Taylor-dispersion coefficient (second moment), skewness (third moment), and kurtosis (fourth moment) deviate from their physical values and predictions of the fourth-order Chapman-Enskog analysis, even though the kurtosis error in pure diffusion does not depend on grid resolution. In two- and three-dimensional grid-aligned channels and open-tubular conduits, the errors of velocity and diffusion are proportional to the diagonal weight values of the corresponding equilibrium terms. The d2Q5 and d3Q7 schemes do not suffer from this deficiency in grid-aligned geometries but they cannot avoid it if the boundaries are not parallel to the coordinate lines. In order

  8. Ultrathin carbon layer coated MoO2 nanoparticles for high-performance near-infrared photothermal cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Sun, Chunyang; He, Qun; Liu, Daobin; Khalil, Adnan; Xiang, Ting; Wu, Ziyu; Wang, Jun; Song, Li

    2015-06-21

    Carbon layer-coated molybdenum dioxide nanoparticles exhibit strong photo-absorption in the near infrared (NIR) region with good photostability. The in vitro and in vivo experiments reveal that an excellent photothermal ablation induced from the nanoparticle agents under NIR irradiation can kill tumor cells not only at the cellular level but also in living organs.

  9. Sulfur-infiltrated graphene-based layered porous carbon cathodes for high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Fan; Huang, Yi; Chen, Yongsheng

    2014-05-27

    Because of advantages such as excellent electronic conductivity, high theoretical specific surface area, and good mechanical flexibility, graphene is receiving increasing attention as an additive to improve the conductivity of sulfur cathodes in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. However, graphene is not an effective substrate material to confine the polysulfides in cathodes and stable the cycling. Here, we designed and synthesized a graphene-based layered porous carbon material for the impregnation of sulfur as cathode for Li-S battery. In this composite, a thin layer of porous carbon uniformly covers both surfaces of the graphene and sulfur is highly dispersed in its pores. The high specific surface area and pore volume of the porous carbon layers not only can achieve a high sulfur loading in highly dispersed amorphous state, but also can act as polysulfide reservoirs to alleviate the shuttle effect. When used as the cathode material in Li-S batteries, with the help of the thin porous carbon layers, the as-prepared materials demonstrate a better electrochemical performance and cycle stability compared with those of graphene/sulfur composites.

  10. Black carbon concentrations and sources in the marine boundary layer of the tropical Atlantic Ocean using four methodologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combustion-derived aerosols in the marine boundary layer have been poorly studied, especially in remote environments such as the open Atlantic Ocean. The tropical Atlantic has the potential to contain a high concentration of aerosols, such as black carbon, due to the African emis...

  11. A conceptual framework to quantify the influence of convective boundary layer development on carbon dioxide mixing ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Peters, W.; Schroter, J.; van Heerwaarden, C. C.; Krol, M.

    2011-12-01

    Interpretation of observed diurnal carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios near the surface requires knowledge of the local dynamics of the planetary boundary layer. In this paper, we quantify the relationship between the boundary layer dynamics and the CO2 budget in convective conditions through a newly derived set of analytical equations. From these equations, we are able to quantify how uncertainties in boundary layer dynamical variables or in the morning CO2 distribution in the mixed-layer or in the free atmosphere influence the bulk CO2 mixing ratio. We find that the largest uncertainty incurred on the mid-day CO2 mixing ratio comes from the prescribed early morning CO2 mixing ratios in the stable boundary layer, and in the free atmosphere. Errors in these values influence CO2 mixing ratios inversely proportional to the boundary layer depth (h), just like uncertainties in the assumed initial boundary layer depth and surface CO2 flux. The influence of uncertainties in the boundary layer depth itself are one order of magnitude smaller. If we "invert" the problem and calculate CO2 surface exchange from observed or simulated CO2 mixing ratios, the sensitivities to errors in boundary layer dynamics also invert: they become linearly proportional to the boundary layer depth. We demonstrate these relations for a typical well characterized situation at the Cabauw tower in the Netherlands, and conclude that knowledge of the temperature and carbon dioxide vertical profiles in the early morning are of vital importance to correctly interpret observed CO2 mixing ratios during midday.

  12. A conceptual framework to quantify the influence of convective boundary layer development on carbon dioxide mixing ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Peters, W.; Schröter, J.; van Heerwaarden, C. C.; Krol, M. C.

    2012-03-01

    Interpretation of observed diurnal carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios near the surface requires knowledge of the local dynamics of the planetary boundary layer. In this paper, we study the relationship between the boundary layer dynamics and the CO2 budget in convective conditions through a newly derived set of analytical equations. From these equations, we are able to quantify how uncertainties in boundary layer dynamical variables or in the morning CO2 distribution in the mixed-layer or in the free atmosphere (FA) influence the bulk CO2 mixing ratio. We find that the largest uncertainty incurred on the mid-day CO2 mixing ratio comes from the prescribed early morning CO2 mixing ratios in the stable boundary layer, and in the free atmosphere. Errors in these values influence CO2 mixing ratios inversely proportional to the boundary layer depth (h), just like uncertainties in the assumed initial boundary layer depth and surface CO2 flux. The influence of uncertainties in the boundary layer depth itself is one order of magnitude smaller. If we "invert" the problem and calculate CO2 surface exchange from observed or simulated CO2 mixing ratios, the sensitivities to errors in boundary layer dynamics also invert: they become linearly proportional to the boundary layer depth. We demonstrate these relations for a typical well characterized situation at the Cabauw site in The Netherlands, and conclude that knowledge of the temperature and carbon dioxide profiles of the atmosphere in the early morning are of vital importance to correctly interpret observed CO2 mixing ratios during midday.

  13. Modeling of phase equilibrium and vapor adsorption on carbon black based on a combination of a lattice theory and equation of state.

    PubMed

    Ustinov, E A; Do, D D

    2002-09-15

    A thermodynamic approach is developed in this paper to describe the behavior of a subcritical fluid in the neighborhood of vapor-liquid interface and close to a graphite surface. The fluid is modeled as a system of parallel molecular layers. The Helmholtz free energy of the fluid is expressed as the sum of the intrinsic Helmholtz free energies of separate layers and the potential energy of their mutual interactions calculated by the 10-4 potential. This Helmholtz free energy is described by an equation of state (such as the Bender or Peng-Robinson equation), which allows us a convenient means to obtain the intrinsic Helmholtz free energy of each molecular layer as a function of its two-dimensional density. All molecular layers of the bulk fluid are in mechanical equilibrium corresponding to the minimum of the total potential energy. In the case of adsorption the external potential exerted by the graphite layers is added to the free energy. The state of the interface zone between the liquid and the vapor phases or the state of the adsorbed phase is determined by the minimum of the grand potential. In the case of phase equilibrium the approach leads to the distribution of density and pressure over the transition zone. The interrelation between the collision diameter and the potential well depth was determined by the surface tension. It was shown that the distance between neighboring molecular layers substantially changes in the vapor-liquid transition zone and in the adsorbed phase with loading. The approach is considered in this paper for the case of adsorption of argon and nitrogen on carbon black. In both cases an excellent agreement with the experimental data was achieved without additional assumptions and fitting parameters, except for the fluid-solid potential well depth. The approach has far-reaching consequences and can be readily extended to the model of adsorption in slit pores of carbonaceous materials and to the analysis of multicomponent adsorption

  14. Effect of Carbon in the Dielectric Fluid and Workpieces on the Characteristics of Recast Layers Machined by Electrical Discharge Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muttamara, Apiwat; Kanchanomai, Chaosuan

    2016-06-01

    Electrical discharge machining (EDM) is a popular non-traditional machining technique that is usually performed in kerosene. Carbon from the kerosene is mixed into the recast layer during EDM, increasing its hardness. EDM can be performed in deionized water, which causes decarburization. We studied the effects of carbon in the dielectric fluid and workpiece on the characteristics of recast layers. Experiments were conducted using gray cast iron and mild steel workpieces in deionized water or kerosene under identical operating conditions. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the recast layer formed on gray iron was rougher than that produced on mild steel. Moreover, the dispersion of graphite flakes in the gray iron seemed to cause subsurface cracks, even when EDM was performed in deionized water. Dendritic structures and iron carbides were found in the recast layer of gray iron treated in deionized water. Kerosene caused more microcracks to form and increased surface roughness compared with deionized water. The microcrack length per unit area of mild steel treated in deionized water was greater than that treated in kerosene, but the cracks formed in kerosene were wider. The effect of the diffusion of carbon during cooling on the characteristics of the recast layer was discussed.

  15. Hybrid magnetic amphiphilic composites based on carbon nanotube/nanofibers and layered silicates fragments as efficient adsorbent for ethynilestradiol.

    PubMed

    Purceno, Aluir D; Teixeira, Ana Paula C; de Souza, Nubia Janaína; Fernandez-Outon, Luis E; Ardisson, José D; Lago, Rochel M

    2012-08-01

    In this work, hybrid magnetic amphiphilic composites were prepared by the catalytic growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanofibers CNF on layered silicates fragments. SEM, TEM, Raman, XRD, Mössbauer, TG/DTA showed that CVD with CH(4) at 800°C produced CNF and magnetic Fe cores fixed on the surface of microfragments of silicates layers. Due to the amphiphilic character, the composites can be easily dispersed in water and efficiently adsorb hydrophobic contaminant molecules. For example, the composites showed remarkable adsorption capacities for the hormone ethinylestradiol, e.g. 2-4 mg m(-2), compared to ca. 0.1 mg m(-2) obtained for high surface area activated carbon and multiwall CNT. These results are discussed in terms of a high hydrophobic exposed surface area of the CNT and CNF fixed on the layered silicates fragments surface. Moreover, the composites can be easily removed from water by a simple magnetic separation process.

  16. Lattice overview

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1984-01-01

    After reviewing some recent developments in supercomputer access, the author discusses a few areas where perturbation theory and lattice gauge simulations make contact. The author concludes with a brief discussion of a deterministic dynamics for the Ising model. This may be useful for numerical studies of nonequilibrium phenomena. 13 references.

  17. Carbon Structural Investigations of Concentric Layers Within Macro-aggregates From Forest and Agricultural Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dria, K. J.; Gamblin, D. E.; Smucker, A. J.; Park, E.; Filley, T. R.

    2004-12-01

    Much of the current research on the potential of agricultural and forest soils to act as sinks for greenhouse gases focuses on the capacity of the systems to form long-term stabilized fractions of soil organic matter (SOM). One proposed mechanism is that carbon is sequestered within soil aggregate interiors during the aggregation process. Repeated wetting-drying cycles change internal pore geometries and associated microhabitats and create more stable macro-aggregates. Research by Smucker and coworkers (EGU Abstracts, 2004) suggest that the exterior portions of aggregates contain greater concentrations of C and N than their interiors, establishing gradients of \\ä13C values across these aggregates. We present the results of a study to test if there exists molecular evidence of such gradients. Soil samples from forest, conventional tillage (CT) and no tillage (NT) agriculture ecosystems in Hoytville and Wooster LTER sites were gently sieved into various size fractions. Soil macro-aggregates (6.3-9.5mm) were peeled, by mechanical erosion chambers, into concentric layers and separated into exterior, transitional and interior regions. Alkaline CuO oxidation was used to determine the composition of lignin, suberin, and cutin biopolymers to determine changes in source and degradative states of SOM. Preliminary results indicate that both soils show similar relative yields of lignin and hydroxyl fatty acids with a greater abundance of lignin than cutin and suberin acids. Greater abundances (per 100mg organic carbon) of CuO products were observed in the native forest than in either agricultural system. The lignin in the NT agricultural soil was least oxidized, followed by the forest soils, then the CT agricultural soils. For both soils, slight trends in biopolymer concentrations were observed between the exterior, transitional and interior regions of the aggregates from the forest and CT or NT ecosystems.

  18. Layer-by-layer self-assembled mesoporous PEDOT-PSS and carbon black hybrid films for platinum free dye-sensitized-solar-cell counter electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Koji; Shiratori, Seimei

    2011-05-13

    A thin film of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid) (PEDOT-PSS), which is an alternative cathodic catalyst for Pt in dye-sensitized solar cells, was prepared using the layer-by-layer self-assembly method (LbL). The film is highly adhesive to the substrate and has a controllable thickness. Therefore, the PEDOT-PSS film prepared using LbL is expected have high performance and durability as a counter electrode. Moreover, when carbon black was added to the PEDOT-PSS solution, highly mesoporous PEDOT-PSS and carbon black hybrid films were obtained. These films showed high cathodic activity. In this study, we investigated the change in morphology in the obtained film with increasing carbon black content, and the influence of the porosity and thickness on the performance of the cells. In this study, a Pt-free counter electrode with performance similar to that of Pt-based counter electrodes was successfully fabricated. The achieved efficiency of 4.71% was only a factor of 8% lower than that of the cell using conventional thermally deposited Pt on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass counter electrodes.

  19. Protein-mediated layer-by-layer synthesis of TiO₂(B)/anatase/carbon coating on nickel foam as negative electrode material for lithium-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaobo; Yan, Yong; Hao, Bo; Chen, Ge

    2013-05-01

    Through an aqueous, protein-mediated layer-by-layer titania deposition process, we have fabricated a protamine/titania composite layer on nickel foam. The coating was composed of amorphous carbon and TiO2(B)/anatase nanoparticles and formed upon organic pyrolysis under a reducing atmosphere (5% H2-Ar mixture). X-ray diffraction analyses, Auger electron spectroscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed that the obtained coatings contained fine monoclinic TiO2(B) and anatase nanocrystals, along with amorphous carbon. Moreover, the coating can be used as a binder-free negative electrode material for lithium-ion batteries and exhibits high reversible capacity and fast charge-discharge properties; a reversible capacity of 245 mAh g(-1) was obtained at a current density of 50 mA g(-1), and capacities of 167 and 143 mAh g(-1) were obtained at current densities of 1 and 2 A g(-1), respectively.

  20. Carbon corrosion of proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalyst layers studied by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchcock, Adam P.; Berejnov, Viatcheslav; Lee, Vincent; West, Marcia; Colbow, Vesna; Dutta, Monica; Wessel, Silvia

    2014-11-01

    Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) at the C 1s, F 1s and S 2p edges has been used to investigate degradation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEM-FC) membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) subjected to accelerated testing protocols. Quantitative chemical maps of the catalyst, carbon support and ionomer in the cathode layer are reported for beginning-of-test (BOT), and end-of-test (EOT) samples for two types of carbon support, low surface area carbon (LSAC) and medium surface area carbon (MSAC), that were exposed to accelerated stress testing with upper potentials (UPL) of 1.0, 1.2, and 1.3 V. The results are compared in order to characterize catalyst layer degradation in terms of the amounts and spatial distributions of these species. Pt agglomeration, Pt migration and corrosion of the carbon support are all visualized, and contribute to differing degrees in these samples. It is found that there is formation of a distinct Pt-in-membrane (PTIM) band for all EOT samples. The cathode thickness shrinks due to loss of the carbon support for all MSAC samples that were exposed to the different upper potentials, but only for the most aggressive testing protocol for the LSAC support. The amount of ionomer per unit volume significantly increases indicating it is being concentrated in the cathode as the carbon corrosion takes place. S 2p spectra and mapping of the cathode catalyst layer indicates there are still sulfonate groups present, even in the most damaged material.

  1. Chiral-Selective Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Lattice-Mismatched Epitaxial Cobalt Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    He, Maoshuai; Jiang, Hua; Liu, Bilu; Fedotov, Pavel V.; Chernov, Alexander I.; Obraztsova, Elena D.; Cavalca, Filippo; Wagner, Jakob B.; Hansen, Thomas W.; Anoshkin, Ilya V.; Obraztsova, Ekaterina A.; Belkin, Alexey V.; Sairanen, Emma; Nasibulin, Albert G.; Lehtonen, Juha; Kauppinen, Esko I.

    2013-01-01

    Controlling chirality in growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is important for exploiting their practical applications. For long it has been conceptually conceived that the structural control of SWNTs is potentially achievable by fabricating nanoparticle catalysts with proper structures on crystalline substrates via epitaxial growth techniques. Here, we have accomplished epitaxial formation of monometallic Co nanoparticles with well-defined crystal structure, and its use as a catalyst in the selective growth of SWNTs. Dynamics of Co nanoparticles formation and SWNT growth inside an atomic-resolution environmental transmission electron microscope at a low CO pressure was recorded. We achieved highly preferential growth of semiconducting SWNTs (~90%) with an exceptionally large population of (6, 5) tubes (53%) in an ambient CO atmosphere. Particularly, we also demonstrated high enrichment in (7, 6) and (9, 4) at a low growth temperature. These findings open new perspectives both for structural control of SWNTs and for elucidating the growth mechanisms. PMID:23492872

  2. Sub-5 nm nanostructures fabricated by atomic layer deposition using a carbon nanotube template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Ju Yeon; Han, Hyo; Kim, Ji Weon; Lee, Seung-Mo; Ha, Jeong Sook; Shim, Joon Hyung; Han, Chang-Soo

    2016-07-01

    The fabrication of nanostructures having diameters of sub-5 nm is very a important issue for bottom-up nanofabrication of nanoscale devices. In this work, we report a highly controllable method to create sub-5 nm nano-trenches and nanowires by combining area-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as templates. Alumina nano-trenches having a depth of 2.6 ∼ 3.0 nm and SiO2 nano-trenches having a depth of 1.9 ∼ 2.2 nm fully guided by the SWNTs have been formed on SiO2/Si substrate. Through infilling ZnO material by ALD in alumina nano-trenches, well-defined ZnO nanowires having a thickness of 3.1 ∼ 3.3 nm have been fabricated. In order to improve the electrical properties of ZnO nanowires, as-fabricated ZnO nanowires by ALD were annealed at 350 °C in air for 60 min. As a result, we successfully demonstrated that as-synthesized ZnO nanowire using a specific template can be made for various high-density resistive components in the nanoelectronics industry.

  3. Carbon materials with quasi-graphene layers: The dielectric, percolation properties and the electronic transport mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ming-Ming; Yuan, Jie; Wen, Bo; Liu, Jia; Cao, Wen-Qiang; Cao, Mao-Sheng

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the dielectric properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and graphite filling in SiO2 with the filling concentration of 2-20 wt.% in the frequency range of 102-107 Hz. MWCNTs and graphite have general electrical properties and percolation phenomena owing to their quasi-structure made up of graphene layers. Both permittivity ɛ and conductivity σ exhibit jumps around the percolation threshold. Variations of dielectric properties of the composites are in agreement with the percolation theory. All the percolation phenomena are determined by hopping and migrating electrons, which are attributed to the special electronic transport mechanism of the fillers in the composites. However, the twin-percolation phenomenon exists when the concentration of MWCNTs is between 5-10 wt.% and 15-20 wt.% in the MWCNTs/SiO2 composites, while in the graphite/SiO2 composites, there is only one percolation phenomenon in the graphite concentration of 10-15 wt.%. The unique twin-percolation phenomenon of MWCNTs/SiO2 is described and attributed to the electronic transfer mechanism, especially the network effect of MWCNTs in the composites. The network formation plays an essential role in determining the second percolation threshold of MWCNTs/SiO2.

  4. Determining water content in activated carbon for double-layer capacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egashira, Minato; Izumi, Takuma; Yoshimoto, Nobuko; Morita, Masayuki

    2016-09-01

    Karl-Fisher titration is used to estimate water contents in activated carbon and the distribution of impurity-level water in an activated carbon-solvent system. Normalization of the water content of activated carbon is attempted using vacuum drying after immersion in water was controlled. Although vacuum drying at 473 K and 24 h can remove large amounts of water, a substantial amount of water remains in the activated carbon. The water release to propylene carbonate is less than that to acetonitrile. The degradation of capacitor cell capacitance for activated carbon with some amount of water differs according to the electrolyte solvent type: acetonitrile promotes greater degradation than propylene carbonate does.

  5. Construction of flame retardant nanocoating on ramie fabric via layer-by-layer assembly of carbon nanotube and ammonium polyphosphate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Yan, Hongqiang; Peng, Mao; Wang, Lili; Ding, Hongliang; Fang, Zhengping

    2013-04-07

    A new flame retardant nanocoating has been constructed by the alternate adsorption of polyelectrolyte amino-functionalized multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT-NH2) and ammonium polyphosphate (APP) onto flexible and porous ramie fabric. Scanning electron microscopy indicates that the adsorbed carbon nanotube coating is a randomly oriented and overlapped network structure, which is a promising candidate for flame retardancy applications. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis confirm that the APP is successfully incorporated into the multilayers sequentially. Assessment of the thermal and flammability properties for the pristine and nanocoated ramie fabrics shows that the thermal stability, flame retardancy and residual char are enhanced as the concentration of MWNT-NH2 suspension and number of deposition cycles increases. The enhancements are mostly attributed to the barrier effect of intumescent network structure, which is composed of MWNT-NH2 and the absorbed APP.

  6. Preparation of crystallographically aligned layers of silicon carbide by pulsed laser deposition of carbon onto Si wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimai, L.; Ager, R.; Weber, W. H.; Hangas, J.; Poindexter, B. D.

    1994-10-01

    It is demonstrated that SiC films can be deposited epitaxially on [001] and [111] Si wafers by excimer laser ablation of just a carbon target, in vacuum, at deposition temperatures as low as 1100 °C. Diffraction studies show that the SiC films have the same crystalline orientation as the substrates. The film growth on the Si substrate to thicknesses as large as 4000 Å with no significant excess carbon indicates that in addition to reaction of the carbon in the plume with Si of the substrate, there is transport of Si within the SiC film. For continued deposition beyond this thickness a carbon layer will form.

  7. Characteristics and analysis of 4H-SiC PiN diodes with a carbon-implanted drift layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiangmei, Feng; Huajun, Shen; Xiaohua, Ma; Yun, Bai; Jia, Wu; Chengzhan, Li; Kean, Liu; Xinyu, Liu

    2016-04-01

    The characteristics of 4H-SiC PiN diodes with a carbon-implanted drift layer was investigated and the reason of characteristics improvement was analyzed. The forward voltage drops of the diodes with carbon-implanted drift layer were around 3.3 V, which is lower than that of devices without carbon implantation, the specific-on resistance was decreased from 9.35 to 4.38 mΩ·cm2 at 100 A/cm2, and the reverse leakage current was also decreased. The influence of carbon incorporation in the SiC crystalline grids was studied by using deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). The DLTS spectra revealed that the Z 1/2 traps, which were regarded as the main lifetime limiting defects, were dramatically reduced. It is proposed that the reduction of Z 1/2 traps can achieve longer carrier lifetime in the drift layer, which is beneficial to the performance of bipolar devices. Project supported by the Opening Project of Key Laboratory of Microelectronics Devices & Integrated Technology, Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  8. A two-step etching route to ultrathin carbon nanosheets for high performance electrical double layer capacitors.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bing; Wang, Jie; Wang, Ya; Chang, Zhi; Pang, Gang; Dou, Hui; Zhang, Xiaogang

    2016-06-07

    Two-dimensional (2D) carbon materials have attracted intense research interest for electrical double layer capacitors (EDLCs) due to their high aspect ratio and large surface area. Herein, we propose an exfoliation-chlorination route for preparing ultrathin carbon nanosheets by using ternary layered carbide Ti3AlC2 as the precursor. Due to the large intersheet space of exfoliated layered carbide (MXene), the as-prepared carbon nanosheets exhibit a thickness of 3-4 nm and a large specific surface area of 1766 m(2) g(-1) with hierarchical porosity. These features significantly improve the ion-accessible surface area for charge storage and shorten the ion transport length in the thin dimension. As a result, the carbon nanosheets show a high specific capacitance (220 F g(-1) at 0.5 A g(-1)), remarkable high power capability (79% capacitance retention at 20 A g(-1)) when measured in a symmetrical two-electrode configuration in an aqueous electrolyte. The method described in this work provides a new route to prepare 2D electrode materials from a bulk precursor, thus exploiting their full potential for EDLCs.

  9. Structural modifications of graphyne layers consisting of carbon atoms in the sp- and sp{sup 2}-hybridized states

    SciTech Connect

    Belenkov, E. A.; Mavrinskii, V. V.; Belenkova, T. E.; Chernov, V. M.

    2015-05-15

    A model scheme is proposed for obtaining layered compounds consisting of carbon atoms in the sp- and (vnsp){sup 2}-hybridized states. This model is used to find the possibility of existing the following seven basic structural modifications of graphyne: α-, β1-, β2-, β3-, γ1-, γ2-, and γ3-graphyne. Polymorphic modifications β3 graphyne and γ3 graphyne are described. The basic structural modifications of graphyne contain diatomic polyyne chains and consist only of carbon atoms in two different crystallographically equivalent states. Other nonbasic structural modifications of graphyne can be formed via the elongation of the carbyne chains that connect three-coordinated carbon atoms and via the formation of graphyne layers with a mixed structure consisting of basic layer fragments, such as α-β-graphyne, α-γ-graphyne, and β-γ-graphyne. The semiempirical quantum-mechanical MNDO, AM1, and PM3 methods and ab initio STO6-31G basis calculations are used to find geometrically optimized structures of the basic graphyne layers, their structural parameters, and energies of their sublimation. The energy of sublimation is found to be maximal for γ2-graphyne, which should be the most stable structural modification of graphyne.

  10. Si-rich layer formation on olivine surfaces during reaction with water and supercritical carbon dioxide under conditions relevant for geologic carbon storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, N. C.; Jackson, A.; Maher, K.; Bird, D. K.; Brown, G. E.

    2013-12-01

    The reaction of Mg-silicate minerals (i.e. olivine) with carbon dioxide (CO2) is a promising method for secure, long-term, geologic carbon storage. Several technical challenges must be overcome before implementing mineral carbonation technology on a large scale, one of which is slow reaction kinetics. This study probes surface reaction limitations of olivine carbonation, specifically the formation of a passivating, Si-rich layer on olivine surfaces upon exposure to water and CO2 under sequestration conditions (elevated temperature and pressure). A series of batch reactions were performed at 60°C and 100 bar CO2 pressure in Dickson-style rocker bombs, varying the length of reaction and the amount of mixing (rocking). The initial aqueous phase was spiked with 29Si. Fluid samples were taken periodically and analyzed for cation content, alkalinity, and dissolved inorganic carbon. At the end of each experiment, the solid products were analyzed with a Sensitive High Resolution Ion Microprobe Reverse Geometry (SHRIMP-RG) in order to measure the amount of 29Si incorporated into the Si-rich layer on reacted olivine grains. We also cut cross sections of reacted grains from each experiment using a Focused Ion Beam (FIB) which were thinned to <100nm and imaged using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). SHRIMP-RG results show incorporation of 29Si on olivine grain surfaces reacted for 19 days with no mixing, and TEM images of olivine grains from the same experiment show an amorphous, Si-rich layer that is 30nm thick. Similarly, SHRIMP-RG results for olivine grains reacted for 19 days with mixing indicate 29SiO2 precipitation and TEM images reveal a Si-rich layer 60nm thick. In both experiments, EDS (energy dispersive spectroscopy) data show a step change in composition from the bulk rock to the surface layer in addition to the sharp crystalline/amorphous interface visible in the TEM images. Olivine from the unmixed experiment also has a slow decrease in Mg relative to Si

  11. Dynamic layer-by-layer self-assembly of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on quartz wool for on-line separation of lysozyme in egg white.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhuo; Zhang, Suling; Zhou, Chanyuan; Liu, Miao; Li, Gongke

    2012-05-30

    The multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) coated quartz wool (MWNTs/QW) prepared by dynamic layer-by-layer self-assembly was used as solid-phase extraction (SPE) absorbent for on-line separation and preconcentration of lysozyme in egg white. The coating procedures were performed continuously in a flow system operated by a set of sequential injection devices. The quartz wool was placed in a microcolumn forming a loose packing to guarantee the minimized flow impedance and the intimate contact between proteins and absorbent surface. Various parameters affecting SPE efficiency including the volume, pH, ionic strength and flow rate of sample and eluent were systematically studied. The feasibility of the proposed method was validated by successfully applied to the separation of lysozyme in egg white.

  12. UHV-STM of single-walled carbon nanotubes in registration with the atomic lattices of silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Peter

    2005-03-01

    A room-temperature UHV-STM is used to elucidate the registration dependence of the electronic and mechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) adsorbed onto silicon surfaces. The SWCNTs are deposited onto the Si surface in situ using a dry contact transfer (DCT) technique [1], with the resultant pristine SWCNT-Si interface enabling a joint atomic-resolution topographic and spectroscopic study of individual SWCNTs on both clean and H-passivated Si(100)-2x1 surfaces. Pronounced variations in the I-V and dI/dV-V spectra acquired along an isolated SWCNT were found to correlate with a transition from parallel to perpendicular alignment of the tube with respect to the dimer rows of the clean Si surface. Recent theoretical work [2] suggests that SWCNT-Si alignment is indeed energetically favorable and may give rise to novel nanotube-surface interactions unobserved in previous STM studies of SWCNTs in contact with a metallic substrate. [1] P.M. Albrecht and J.W. Lyding, APL 83, 5029 (2003). [2] W. Orellana, R.H. Miwa, and A. Fazzio, PRL 91, 166802 (2003).

  13. Lattice fermions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczek, Frank

    1987-01-01

    A simple heuristic proof of the Nielsen-Ninomaya theorem is given. A method is proposed whereby the multiplication of fermion species on a lattice is reduced to the minimal doubling, in any dimension, with retention of appropriate chiral symmetries. Also, it is suggested that use of spatially thinned fermion fields is likely to be a useful and appropriate approximation in QCD - in any case, it is a self-checking one.

  14. Importance of carbon isotopic data of the Permian-Triassic boundary layers in the Verkhoyansk region for the global correlation of the basal Triassic layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Yu. D.; Biakov, A. S.; Richoz, S.; Horacek, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to a global correlation of marine Permian-Triassic boundary layers on the basis of partially published and original data on the δ13Corg and δ13Ccarb values of the Suol section (Setorym River, South Verkhoyansk region). The section consists of six carbon isotopic intervals, which are easily distinguishable in the carbon isotopic curves for a series of Permian-Triassic reference sections of Eurasia and Northern America, including paleontologically described sections of Central Iran, Kashmir, and Southern China. This suggests that the Permian-Triassic boundary in the Suol section is close to the carbon isotopic minimum of interval IV. In light of new data, we suggest considering the upper part of the Late Permian Changhsingian Stage and the lower substage of the Early Triassic Induan Stage of Siberia in the volumes of the rank Otoceras concavum zone and the Tompophiceras pascoei and Wordieoceras decipiens zones, respectively. The O. concavum zone of the Verkhoyansk region probably corresponds to the Late Changhsingian Hypophiceras triviale zone of Greenland. The carbon isotopic intervals II, III, IV, and V in the Permian-Triassic boundary layers of the Verkhoyansk region traced in a series of the reference sections of Eurasia correspond, most likely, to intensification of volcanic activity at the end of the Late Changhsingian and to the first massive eruptions of Siberian traps at the end of the Changhsingian and the beginning of the Induan Stages. New data indicate the possible survival of ammonoids of the Otoceratoidea superfamily at the species level after mass extinction of organisms at the end of the Permian.

  15. Effect of Amount of Carbon on the Reduction Efficiency of Iron Ore-Coal Composite Pellets in Multi-layer Bed Rotary Hearth Furnace (RHF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Srinibash; Roy, Gour Gopal

    2016-08-01

    The effect of carbon-to-hematite molar ratio has been studied on the reduction efficiency of iron ore-coal composite pellet reduced at 1523 K (1250 °C) for 20 minutes in a laboratory scale multi-layer bed rotary hearth furnace (RHF). Reduced pellets have been characterized through weight loss measurement, estimation of porosity, shrinkage, qualitative and quantitative phase analysis by XRD. Performance parameters such as the degree of reduction, metallization, carbon efficiency, productivity, and compressive strength have been calculated to compare the process efficacy at different carbon levels in the pellets. Pellets with optimum carbon-to-hematite ratio (C/Fe2O3 molar ratio = 1.66) that is much below the stoichiometric carbon required for direct reduction of hematite yielded maximum reduction, better carbon utilization, and productivity for all three layers. Top layer exhibited maximum reduction at comparatively lower carbon level (C/Fe2O3 molar ratio <2.33) in the pellet, while bottom layer exceeded top layer reduction at higher carbon level (C/Fe2O3 molar ratio >2.33). Correlation between degree of reduction and metallization indicated non-isothermal kinetics influenced by heat and mass transfer in multi-layer bed RHF. Compressive strength of the partially reduced pellet with optimum carbon content (C/Fe2O3 molar ratio = 1.66) showed that they could be potentially used as an alternate feed in a blast furnace or any other smelting reactor.

  16. Black carbon concentrations and sources in the marine boundary layer of the tropical Atlantic Ocean using four methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, K.; Cantwell, M.; Herckes, P.; Lohmann, R.

    2014-07-01

    Combustion-derived aerosols in the marine boundary layer have been poorly studied, especially in remote environments such as the open Atlantic Ocean. The tropical Atlantic has the potential to contain a high concentration of aerosols, such as black carbon, due to the African emission plume of biomass and agricultural burning products. Atmospheric particulate matter samples across the tropical Atlantic boundary layer were collected in the summer of 2010 during the southern hemispheric dry season when open fire events were frequent in Africa and South America. The highest black carbon concentrations were detected in the Caribbean Sea and within the African plume, with a regional average of 0.6 μg m-3 for both. The lowest average concentrations were measured off the coast of South America at 0.2 to 0.3 μg m-3. Samples were quantified for black carbon using multiple methods to provide insights into the form and stability of the carbonaceous aerosols (i.e., thermally unstable organic carbon, soot like, and charcoal like). Soot-like aerosols composed up to 45% of the carbonaceous aerosols in the Caribbean Sea to as little as 4% within the African plume. Charcoal-like aerosols composed up to 29% of the carbonaceous aerosols over the oligotrophic Sargasso Sea, suggesting that non-soot-like particles could be present in significant concentrations in remote environments. To better apportion concentrations and forms of black carbon, multiple detection methods should be used, particularly in regions impacted by biomass burning emissions.

  17. Room temperature performance of 4 V aqueous hybrid supercapacitor using multi-layered lithium-doped carbon negative electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Sho; Yamamoto, Rie; Sugimoto, Shigeyuki; Sugimoto, Wataru

    2016-09-01

    Water-stable multi-layered lithium-doped carbon (LixC6) negative electrode using poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-lithium bis(trifluoromethansulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) polymer electrolyte containing N-methyl-N-propylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethansulfonyl)imide (PP13TFSI) ionic liquid was developed. Electrochemical properties at 60 °C of the aqueous hybrid supercapacitor using activated carbon positive electrode and a multi-layered LixC6 negative electrode (LixC6 | PEO-LiTFSI | LTAP) without PP13TFSI exhibited performance similar to that using Li anode (Li | PEO-LiTFSI | LTAP). A drastic decrease in ESR was achieved by the addition of PP13TFSI to PEO-LiTFSI, allowing room temperature operation. The ESR of the multi-layered LixC6 negative electrode with PEO-LiTFSI-PP13TFSI at 25 °C was 801 Ω cm2, which is 1/6 the value of the multi-layered Li negative electrode with PEO-LiTFSI (5014 Ω cm2). Charge/discharge test of the aqueous hybrid supercapacitor using multi-layered LixC6 negative electrode with PEO-LiTFSI-PP13TFSI at 25 °C afforded specific capacity of 20.6 mAh (g-activated carbon)-1 with a working voltage of 2.7-3.7 V, and good long-term capability up to 3000 cycles. Furthermore, an aqueous hybrid supercapacitor consisting of a high capacitance RuO2 nanosheet positive electrode and multi-layered LixC6 negative electrode with PEO-LiTFSI-PP13TFSI showed specific capacity of 196 mAh (g-RuO2)-1 and specific energy of 625 Wh (kg-RuO2)-1 in 2.0 M acetic acid-lithium acetate buffered solution at 25 °C.

  18. Deuterium Retention in the Co-Deposition Carbon Layers Deposited by Radio-Frequency Magnetron Sputtering in D2 Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei-Yuan; Shi, Li-Qun; Zhang, Bin; Hu, Jian-Sheng

    2014-05-01

    Carbon is deposited on C and Si substrates by rf magnetron plasma sputtering in a D2 atmosphere. The deposited layers are examined with ion beam analysis and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The growth rates of the layers deposited on Si decrease with increasing substrate temperature, while increase significantly with the increase of D2 pressure. Meanwhile, the deuterium concentrations in the layers deposited on the Si substrates decrease from 30% to 2% and from 31% to 1% on the C substrates, respectively, when the substrate temperature varies from 350K to 900 K. Similarly, the D concentration in the layer on the Si substrates increases from 3.4% to 47%, and from 8% to 35% on the C substrates when the D2 pressure increases from 0.3Pa to 8.0Pa. D desorption characterized by TDS is mainly in the forms of D2, HD, HDO, CD4, and C2D4, and a similar release peak occurs at 645 K. The release peak of D2 molecules at 960K can be attributed to the escaped gas from the thin co-deposited deuterium-rich carbon layer in the form of C-D bonding.

  19. A three-layered nano-carbonated hydroxyapatite/collagen/PLGA composite membrane for guided tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Liao, Susan; Wang, Wei; Uo, Motohiro; Ohkawa, Shoji; Akasaka, Tsukasa; Tamura, Kazuchika; Cui, Fuzhai; Watari, Fumio

    2005-12-01

    Functional graded materials (FGM) provided us one new concept for guided tissue regeneration (GTR) membrane design with graded component and graded structure where one face of the membrane is porous thereby allowing cell growth thereon and the opposite face of the membrane is smooth, thereby inhibiting cell adhesion in periodontal therapy. The goal of the present study was to develop a three-layered graded membrane, with one face of 8% nano-carbonated hydroxyapatite/collagen/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (nCHAC/PLGA) porous membrane, the opposite face of pure PLGA non-porous membrane, the middle layer of 4% nCHAC/PLGA as the transition through layer-by-layer casting method. Then the three layers were combined well with each other with flexibility and enough high mechanical strength as membrane because the three layers all contained PLGA polymer that can be easily used for practical medical application. This high biocompatibility and osteoconductivity of this biodegraded composite membrane was enhanced by the nCHAC addition, for the same component and nano-level crystal size with natural bone tissue. The osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured on the three-layered composite membrane, the primary result shows the positive response compared with pure PLGA membrane.

  20. Deep soil layer is fundamental for evaluating carbon accumulation in agroecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Ferro, Nicola; Morari, Francesco; Simonetti, Gianluca; Polese, Riccardo; Berti, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is essential to secure key ecosystem services such as the provision of food and other biomass production, the filtering, buffering and transformation capacity and the climate regulation. It has been estimated that approximately 57% of the globally emitted C (8.7 Gt y-1) to the atmosphere is adsorbed by biospheric C pools, ascertaining the potential soil C sink capacity of managed ecosystems at 55 to 78 Gt, of which only 50 to 66% attainable. Therefore it is essential the full knowledge of soil management practices that can affect SOC dynamics and, in turn, climate change. Several studies focussed on the evaluation of the best cropping management practices to accumulate C in the soil profile. Nevertheless, in most cases soil analyses were made in the topsoil (generally in the 0-30 cm layer), ignoring the effect of C translocation in the deeper soil profile as a result of tillage practices, crop root deepening etc. In this context, in a long-term experiment established in the early 1960s, we quantified the SOC accumulation within the soil profile (0-90 cm) and evaluate the effects of different cropping system on SOC dynamics. The experiment is located at the experimental farm of the University of Padova, in northeastern Italy. The trial compares four rotations with three levels of mineral fertilisation and with or without organic fertilisation. The rotations considered are: continuous crops (grain maize, forage maize, winter wheat and permanent meadow); two-year (maize-wheat); four-year (sugarbeet, soybean, wheat, maize) and six-year (maize, sugarbeet, maize, wheat, alfalfa, alfalfa) with different levels of mineral, organic and mixed fertilisations. Crops with superficially developed rooting systems (e.g. permanent meadow) highly increased SOC only in the topsoil. This effect was enhanced by the contribution of organic amendment-C. Root-derived carbon played a pivotal role also in the deepest soil profile (60-90 cm) by increasing the SOC

  1. Acoustic characterization of void distributions across carbon-fiber composite layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayong, Rostand B.; Smith, Robert A.; Pinfield, Valerie J.

    2016-02-01

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) composites are often used as aircraft structural components, mostly due to their superior mechanical properties. In order to improve the efficiency of these structures, it is important to detect and characterize any defects occurring during the manufacturing process, removing the need to mitigate the risk of defects through increased thicknesses of structure. Such defects include porosity, which is well-known to reduce the mechanical performance of composite structures, particularly the inter-laminar shear strength. Previous work by the authors has considered the determination of porosity distributions in a fiber-metal laminate structure [1]. This paper investigates the use of wave-propagation modeling to invert the ultrasonic response and characterize the void distribution within the plies of a CFRP structure. Finite Element (FE) simulations are used to simulate the ultrasonic response of a porous composite laminate to a typical transducer signal. This simulated response is then applied as input data to an inversion method to calculate the distribution of porosity across the layers. The inversion method is a multi-dimensional optimization utilizing an analytical model based on a normal-incidence plane-wave recursive method and appropriate mixture rules to estimate the acoustical properties of the structure, including the effects of plies and porosity. The effect of porosity is defined through an effective wave-number obtained from a scattering model description. Although a single-scattering approach is applied in this initial study, the limitations of the method in terms of the considered porous layer, percentage porosity and void radius are discussed in relation to single- and multiple-scattering methods. A comparison between the properties of the modeled structure and the void distribution obtained from the inversion is discussed. This work supports the general study of the use of ultrasound methods with inversion to

  2. Layered double hydroxide-oxidized carbon nanotube hybrids as highly efficient flame retardant nanofillers for polypropylene.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanshan; Zhang, Yu; Williams, Gareth R; O'Hare, Dermot; Wang, Qiang

    2016-10-18

    Aqueous miscible organic layered double hydroxides (AMO-LDHs) can act as organophilic inorganic flame retardant nanofillers for unmodified non-polar polymers. In this contribution, AMO [Mg3Al(OH)8](CO3)0.5·yH2O LDH-oxidized carbon nanotube (AMO-LDH-OCNT) hybrids are shown to perform better than the equivalent pure AMO-LDH. A synergistic effect between the AMO-LDH and OCNT was observed; this endows the hybrid material with enhanced flame retardancy, thermal stability, and mechanical properties. The thermal stability of polypropylene (PP) was significantly enhanced by adding AMO-LDH-OCNT hybrids. For PP mixed with AMO-LDH-OCNT hybrids to produce a composite with 10 wt% LDH and 2 wt% OCNT, the 50% weight loss temperature was increased by 43 °C. Further, a system with 10 wt% of AMO-LDH and 1 wt% OCNT showed a peak heat release rate (PHRR) reduction of 40%, greater than the PHRR reduction with PP/20 wt% AMO-LDH (31%). The degree of dispersion (mixability) between AMO-LDH and OCNT has a significant effect on the flame retardant performance of the hybrids. In addition, the incorporation of AMO-LDH-OCNT hybrids led to better mechanical properties, such as higher tensile strength (27.5 MPa) and elongation at break (17.9%), than those composites containing only AMO-LDH (25.6 MPa and 7.5%, respectively).

  3. Layered double hydroxide-oxidized carbon nanotube hybrids as highly efficient flame retardant nanofillers for polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yanshan; Zhang, Yu; Williams, Gareth R.; O’Hare, Dermot; Wang, Qiang

    2016-10-01

    Aqueous miscible organic layered double hydroxides (AMO-LDHs) can act as organophilic inorganic flame retardant nanofillers for unmodified non-polar polymers. In this contribution, AMO [Mg3Al(OH)8](CO3)0.5·yH2O LDH–oxidized carbon nanotube (AMO-LDH–OCNT) hybrids are shown to perform better than the equivalent pure AMO-LDH. A synergistic effect between the AMO-LDH and OCNT was observed; this endows the hybrid material with enhanced flame retardancy, thermal stability, and mechanical properties. The thermal stability of polypropylene (PP) was significantly enhanced by adding AMO-LDH–OCNT hybrids. For PP mixed with AMO-LDH–OCNT hybrids to produce a composite with 10 wt% LDH and 2 wt% OCNT, the 50% weight loss temperature was increased by 43 °C. Further, a system with 10 wt% of AMO-LDH and 1 wt% OCNT showed a peak heat release rate (PHRR) reduction of 40%, greater than the PHRR reduction with PP/20 wt% AMO-LDH (31%). The degree of dispersion (mixability) between AMO-LDH and OCNT has a significant effect on the flame retardant performance of the hybrids. In addition, the incorporation of AMO-LDH–OCNT hybrids led to better mechanical properties, such as higher tensile strength (27.5 MPa) and elongation at break (17.9%), than those composites containing only AMO-LDH (25.6 MPa and 7.5%, respectively).

  4. Layered double hydroxide-oxidized carbon nanotube hybrids as highly efficient flame retardant nanofillers for polypropylene

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanshan; Zhang, Yu; Williams, Gareth R.; O’Hare, Dermot; Wang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Aqueous miscible organic layered double hydroxides (AMO-LDHs) can act as organophilic inorganic flame retardant nanofillers for unmodified non-polar polymers. In this contribution, AMO [Mg3Al(OH)8](CO3)0.5·yH2O LDH–oxidized carbon nanotube (AMO-LDH–OCNT) hybrids are shown to perform better than the equivalent pure AMO-LDH. A synergistic effect between the AMO-LDH and OCNT was observed; this endows the hybrid material with enhanced flame retardancy, thermal stability, and mechanical properties. The thermal stability of polypropylene (PP) was significantly enhanced by adding AMO-LDH–OCNT hybrids. For PP mixed with AMO-LDH–OCNT hybrids to produce a composite with 10 wt% LDH and 2 wt% OCNT, the 50% weight loss temperature was increased by 43 °C. Further, a system with 10 wt% of AMO-LDH and 1 wt% OCNT showed a peak heat release rate (PHRR) reduction of 40%, greater than the PHRR reduction with PP/20 wt% AMO-LDH (31%). The degree of dispersion (mixability) between AMO-LDH and OCNT has a significant effect on the flame retardant performance of the hybrids. In addition, the incorporation of AMO-LDH–OCNT hybrids led to better mechanical properties, such as higher tensile strength (27.5 MPa) and elongation at break (17.9%), than those composites containing only AMO-LDH (25.6 MPa and 7.5%, respectively). PMID:27752096

  5. Carbon monoxide uptake by temperate forest soils: the effects of leaves and humus layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanhueza, E.; Dong, Y.; Scharffe, D.; Lobert, J. M.; Crutzen, P. J.

    1998-02-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) fluxes between soil and atmosphere were measured between October 1990 and December 1991 in a temperate, deciduous forest near Darmstadt, Germany. Flux measurements were made with an enclosed chamber technique before and after the removal of leaves and humus from the forest floor as well as from leaves and humus alone. CO depth profiles were obtained during the period July to December, 1991. A net uptake of CO was observed under all conditions with an average of -47.3±24.0ng CO m-2s-1for undisturbed forest soils, which increased significantly when the leaves or both leaves and humus were removed from the forest floor. The mean deposition velocity in undisturbed conditions was 0.027±0.008cm s-1. Our results indicate that CO has a short lifetime within the soil and that the consumption of atmospheric CO occurs mainly in the top few centimeters of the humus layer (O horizon). We conclude that temperate forests are a significant net sink for atmospheric CO and that leaves and humus significantly affect CO fluxes. The global soil sink for atmospheric CO was estimated to be 115 230 Tg CO yr-1.

  6. Stable carbon isotope ratios of toluene in the boundary layer and the lower free troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintel, J.; Hösen, E.; Koppmann, R.; Krebsbach, M.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Rohrer, F.

    2013-11-01

    During the field campaign ZEPTER-2 in autumn 2008 whole air samples were collected on board a Zeppelin NT airship in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and the lower free troposphere (LFT) over south-west Germany using the ZEppelin Based Isotope Sampler (ZEBIS). These samples were analysed with respect to volatile organic compound (VOC) mixing ratios and stable carbon isotope ratios using a gas chromatograph combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC-C-IRMS). In this study we present results for toluene, one of the major anthropogenic pollutants, which emphasise the viability of isotope ratio measurements in VOC for atmospheric research, especially to study VOC sources or to track both dynamical and chemical processes. In situ measurements of CO mixing ratios on board the Zeppelin NT were used to allocate the air samples either to the PBL or the LFT. In the PBL we observed rather fresh emissions mixing into the background air. We estimated a toluene source isotope ratio of δ13C = -28.2 ± 0.5‰. Samples from the PBL and the LFT were clearly distinguishable by means of their mixing ratio and isotope ratio signatures. Using the concept of the effective kinetic isotope effect, we were able to separate the effects of dilution processes and photochemical degradation in the free troposphere. We calculated the photochemical age of toluene in the atmosphere in two different ways using isotope ratios and mixing ratios. The results differ strongly in the PBL, probably due to mixing processes, but are compatible with each other in the LFT. Here, they correlate with a slope of 0.90±0.31.

  7. Global Distribution of Total Inorganic Carbon and Total Alkalinity below the Deepest Winter Mixed Layer Depths

    SciTech Connect

    Goyet, C.; Healy, R.; Ryan, J.; Kozyr, A.

    2000-05-01

    Modeling the global ocean-atmosphere carbon dioxide system is becoming increasingly important to greenhouse gas policy. These models require initialization with realistic three-dimensional (3-D) oceanic carbon fields. This report presents an approach to establishing these initial conditions from an extensive global database of ocean carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) system measurements and well-developed interpolation methods.

  8. Stable, Microfabricated Thin Layer Chromatography Plates without Volume Distortion on Patterned, Carbon and Al2O3-Primed Carbon Nanotube Forests

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, David S.; Kanyal, Supriya S.; Gupta, Vipul; Vail, Michael A.; Dadson, Andrew; Engelhard, Mark H.; Vanfleet, Richard; Davis, Robert C.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2012-09-28

    In a recent report (Song, J.; et al., Advanced Functional Materials 2011, 21, 1132-1139) some of us described the fabrication of thin layer chromatography (TLC) plates from patterned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests, which were directly infiltrated/coated with silicon by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of silicon using SiH4. Following infiltration, the nanotubes were removed from the assemblies and the silicon simultaneously converted to SiO2 in a high temperature oxidation step. However, while straightforward, this process had some shortcomings, not the least of which was some distortion of the lithographically patterned features during the volume expansion that accompanied oxidation. Herein we overcome theis issue and also take substantial steps forward in the microfabrication of TLC plates by showing: (i) A new method for creating an adhesion promotion layer on CNT forests by depositing a few nanometers of carbon followed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al2O3. This method for appears to be new, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the expected presence of oxygen after carbon deposition. ALD of Al2O3 alone and in combination with the carbon on patterned CNT forests was also explored as an adhesion promotion layer for CNT forest infiltration. (ii) Rapid, conformal deposition of an inorganic material that does not require subsequent oxidation: fast pseudo-ALD growth of SiO2 via alumina catalyzed deposition of tris(tert-butoxy)silanol onto the carbon/Al2O3-primed CNT forests. (iii) Faithful reproduction of the features in the masks used to microfabricate the TLC plates (M-TLC) this advance springs from the previous two points. (iv) A bonded (amino) phase on a CNT-templated microfabricated TLC plate. (v) Fast, highly efficient (125,000 - 225,000 N/m) separations of fluorescent dyes on M-TLC plates. (vi) Extensive characterization of our new materials by TEM, SEM, EDAX, DRIFT, and XPS. (vii) A substantially lower process temperature for the

  9. High-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy study of the ordering transition of an amorphous carbon layer into graphene on ruthenium(0001).

    PubMed

    Günther, Sebastian; Dänhardt, Sebastian; Ehrensperger, Martin; Zeller, Patrick; Schmitt, Stefan; Wintterlin, Joost

    2013-01-22

    The ordering transition of an amorphous carbon layer into graphene was investigated by high-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. A disordered C layer was prepared on a Ru(0001) surface by chemical vapor deposition of ethylene molecules at ~660 K. The carbon layer grows in the form of dendritic islands that have almost the same density as graphene. Upon annealing of the fully covered surface, residual hydrogen desorbs and a coherent but still disordered carbon layer forms, with almost the same carbon coverage as in graphene. The ordering of this layer into graphene at 920 to 950 K was monitored as a function of time. A unique mechanism was observed that involves small topographic holes in the carbon layer. The holes are mobile, and on the trajectories of the holes the disordered carbon layer is transformed into graphene. The transport of C atoms across the holes or along the hole edges provides a low-energy pathway for the ordering transition. This mechanism is prohibited in a dense graphene layer, which offers an explanation for the difficulty of removing defects from graphene synthesized by chemical methods.

  10. Solid state double layer capacitor based on a polyether polymer electrolyte blend and nanostructured carbon black electrode composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavall, Rodrigo L.; Borges, Raquel S.; Calado, Hállen D. R.; Welter, Cezar; Trigueiro, João P. C.; Rieumont, Jacques; Neves, Bernardo R. A.; Silva, Glaura G.

    An all solid double layer capacitor was assembled by using poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(propylene glycol)- b-poly(ethylene glycol)- b-poly(propylene glycol)-bis(2-aminopropyl ether) blend (PEO-NPPP) and LiClO 4 as polymer electrolyte layer and PEO-NPPP-carbon black (CB) as electrode film. High molecular weight PEO and the block copolymer NPPP with molecular mass of 2000 Da were employed, which means that the design is safe from the point of view of solvent or plasticizer leakage and thus, a separator is not necessary. Highly conductive with large surface area nanostructured carbon black was dispersed in the polymer blend to produce the electrode composite. The electrolyte and electrode multilayers prepared by spray were studied by differential scanning calorimetry, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and impedance spectroscopy. The ionic conductivity as a function of temperature was fitted with the Williams-Landel-Ferry equation, which indicates a conductivity mechanism typical of solid polymer electrolyte. AFM images of the nanocomposite electrode showed carbon black particles of approximately 60 nm in size well distributed in a semicrystalline and porous polymer blend coating. The solid double layer capacitor with 10 wt.% CB was designed with final thickness of approximately 130 μm and delivered a capacitance of 17 F g -1 with a cyclability of more than 1000 cycles. These characteristics make possible the construction of a miniature device in complete solid state which will avoid electrolyte leakage and present a performance superior to other similar electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs) presented in literature, as assessed in specific capacitance by total carbon mass.

  11. Sedimentary sources of old high molecular weight dissolved organic carbon from the ocean margin benthic nepheloid layer

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, L. Santschi, P.H.

    2000-02-01

    Average {sup 14}C ages of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the ocean are 3--6,000 years, and are influenced by old DOC from continental margins. However, sources of DOC from terrestrial, autochthonous, and sedimentary organic carbon seem to be too young to be responsible for the old DOC observed in the ocean. Since colloidal organic carbon (COC, i.e., high molecular weight DOC), which is chemically very similar to that of bulk DOC, can be effectively isolated from seawater using cross-flow ultrafiltration, it can hold clues to sources and pathways of DOC turnover in the ocean. Radiocarbon measurements on COC in the water column and benthic nepheloid layer (BNL) from two continental margin areas (the Middle Atlantic Bight and the Gulf of Mexico) and controlled laboratory experiments were carried out to study sources of old DOC in the ocean margin areas. Vertical distributions of suspended particulate matter (SPM), particulate organic carbon (POC), nitrogen (PON), and DOC in the water column and bottom waters near the sediment-water interface all demonstrate a well developed benthic nepheloid layer in both ocean margin areas. COC from the BNL was much older than COC from the overlying water column. These results, together with strong concentration gradients of SPM, POC, PON, and DOC, suggest a sedimentary source for organic carbon species and possibly for old COC as well in BNL waters. This is confirmed by the results from controlled laboratory experiments. The heterogeneity of {Delta}{sup 14}C signatures in bulk SOC thus points to a preferential release of old organic components from sediment resuspension, which can be the transport mechanism of the old benthic COC observed in ocean margin areas. Old COC from continental margin nepheloid layers may thus be a potential source of old DOC to the deep ocean.

  12. Photocatalytic enhancement of floating photocatalyst: Layer-by-layer hybrid carbonized chitosan and Fe-N- codoped TiO2 on fly ash cenospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jingke; Wang, Xuejiang; Bu, Yunjie; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Jing; Huang, Jiayu; Ma, RongRong; Zhao, Jianfu

    2017-01-01

    Due to the advantage of floating on water surface, floating photocatalysts show higher rates of radical formation and collection efficiencies. And they were expected to be used for solar remediation of non-stirred and non-oxygenated reservoirs. In this research, floating fly ash cenospheres (FAC) supported layer-by- layer hybrid carbonized chitosan and Fe-N-codoped TiO2 was prepared by a simple sol-gel method. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction(XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy(FESEM), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy(FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy(DRS), nitrogen adsorption analyses for Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area. It is indicated that Fe-N codoped narrowed the material's band gap, and the layer of carbonized chitosan (Cts) increased the catalyst's adsorption capacity and the absorption ability of visible light. Comparing with Fe-N-TiO2/FAC and N-TiO2/FAC, the composite photocatalyst show excellent performance on the degradation of RhB. Photodegradation rate of RhB by Fe-N-TiO2/FAC-Cts was 0.01018 min-1, which is about 1.5 and 2.09 times higher than Fe-N-TiO2/FAC and N-TiO2/FAC under visible light irradiation in 240 min, respectively. The dye photosentization, capture of holes and electrons by Fe3+ ion, and synergistic effect of adsorption and photodegradation were attributed to the results for the improvement of photocatalytic performance. The floating photocatalyst can be reused for at least three consecutive times without any significant decrease on the degradation of Rhodamin B after each reuse.

  13. Nitrogen-enriched, double-shelled carbon/layered double hydroxide hollow microspheres for excellent electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jie; He, Fei; Gai, Shili; Zhang, Shenghuan; Li, Lei; Yang, Piaoping

    2014-08-01

    A unique, double-shelled, hollow, carbon-based composite with enriched nitrogen has been prepared through a facile and versatile synthetic strategy. The hierarchical composite employs the nitrogen-enriched carbon hollow sphere as an interior shell and intercrossed Ni/Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanosheets as an exterior shell. The obtained N-C@LDH hollow microspheres (HMS) have high nitrogen enrichment, large specific surface area (337 m2 g-1), and uniform and open mesoporous structure. Taking advantage of these characteristics, the composite exhibits obviously superior capacitive behavior, including high specific capacitance, excellent rate capability and good cycling stability, compared with nitrogen-free carbon@LDH composite and hollow LDH without carbon shell. The composite displays high specific capacitance of 1711.51 F g-1 at a current density of 1 A g-1. In particular, the high specific capacitance can be kept to 997.3 F g-1 at a high current density of 10 A g-1, which still retains 94.97% of the initial specific capacitance after 500 cycles at this high current density. This N-enriched, hollow carbon/LDH composite can be expected to be a promising electrode material for electrochemical capacitors due to its high electrochemical performance.A unique, double-shelled, hollow, carbon-based composite with enriched nitrogen has been prepared through a facile and versatile synthetic strategy. The hierarchical composite employs the nitrogen-enriched carbon hollow sphere as an interior shell and intercrossed Ni/Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanosheets as an exterior shell. The obtained N-C@LDH hollow microspheres (HMS) have high nitrogen enrichment, large specific surface area (337 m2 g-1), and uniform and open mesoporous structure. Taking advantage of these characteristics, the composite exhibits obviously superior capacitive behavior, including high specific capacitance, excellent rate capability and good cycling stability, compared with nitrogen

  14. Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembling Gold Nanorods and Glucose Oxidase onto Carbon Nanotubes Functionalized Sol-Gel Matrix for an Amperometric Glucose Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Baoyan; Hou, Shihua; Miao, Zhiying; Zhang, Cong; Ji, Yanhong

    2015-01-01

    A novel amperometric glucose biosensor was fabricated by layer-by-layer self-assembly of gold nanorods (AuNRs) and glucose oxidase (GOD) onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)-functionalized three-dimensional sol-gel matrix. A thiolated aqueous silica sol containing SWCNTs was first assembled on the surface of a cleaned Au electrode, and then the alternate self-assembly of AuNRs and GOD were repeated to assemble multilayer films of AuNRs-GOD onto SWCNTs-functionalized silica gel for optimizing the biosensor. Among the resulting glucose biosensors, the four layers of AuNRs-GOD-modified electrode showed the best performance. The sol-SWCNTs-(AuNRs-GOD)4/Au biosensor exhibited a good linear range of 0.01–8 mM glucose, high sensitivity of 1.08 μA/mM, and fast amperometric response within 4 s. The good performance of the proposed glucose biosensor could be mainly attributed to the advantages of the three-dimensional sol-gel matrix and stereo self-assembly films, and the natural features of one-dimensional nanostructure SWCNTs and AuNRs. This study may provide a new facile way to fabricate the enzyme-based biosensor with high performance.

  15. Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembling Gold Nanorods and Glucose Oxidase onto Carbon Nanotubes Functionalized Sol-Gel Matrix for an Amperometric Glucose Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Baoyan; Hou, Shihua; Miao, Zhiying; Zhang, Cong; Ji, Yanhong

    2015-09-18

    A novel amperometric glucose biosensor was fabricated by layer-by-layer self-assembly of gold nanorods (AuNRs) and glucose oxidase (GOD) onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)-functionalized three-dimensional sol-gel matrix. A thiolated aqueous silica sol containing SWCNTs was first assembled on the surface of a cleaned Au electrode, and then the alternate self-assembly of AuNRs and GOD were repeated to assemble multilayer films of AuNRs-GOD onto SWCNTs-functionalized silica gel for optimizing the biosensor. Among the resulting glucose biosensors, the four layers of AuNRs-GOD-modified electrode showed the best performance. The sol-SWCNTs-(AuNRs- GOD)₄/Au biosensor exhibited a good linear range of 0.01-8 mM glucose, high sensitivity of 1.08 μA/mM, and fast amperometric response within 4 s. The good performance of the proposed glucose biosensor could be mainly attributed to the advantages of the three-dimensional sol-gel matrix and stereo self-assembly films, and the natural features of one-dimensional nanostructure SWCNTs and AuNRs. This study may provide a new facile way to fabricate the enzyme-based biosensor with high performance.

  16. Microscale characterisation of stochastically reconstructed carbon fiber-based Gas Diffusion Layers; effects of anisotropy and resin content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiotis, Andreas G.; Kainourgiakis, Michael E.; Charalambopoulou, Georgia C.; Stubos, Athanassios K.

    2016-07-01

    A novel process-based methodology is proposed for the stochastic reconstruction and accurate characterisation of Carbon fiber-based matrices, which are commonly used as Gas Diffusion Layers in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells. The modeling approach is efficiently complementing standard methods used for the description of the anisotropic deposition of carbon fibers, with a rigorous model simulating the spatial distribution of the graphitized resin that is typically used to enhance the structural properties and thermal/electrical conductivities of the composite Gas Diffusion Layer materials. The model uses as input typical pore and continuum scale properties (average porosity, fiber diameter, resin content and anisotropy) of such composites, which are obtained from X-ray computed microtomography measurements on commercially available carbon papers. This information is then used for the digital reconstruction of realistic composite fibrous matrices. By solving the corresponding conservation equations at the microscale in the obtained digital domains, their effective transport properties, such as Darcy permeabilities, effective diffusivities, thermal/electrical conductivities and void tortuosity, are determined focusing primarily on the effects of medium anisotropy and resin content. The calculated properties are matching very well with those of Toray carbon papers for reasonable values of the model parameters that control the anisotropy of the fibrous skeleton and the materials resin content.

  17. Experimental studies and physically substantiated model of carbon dioxide emission from the exposed cultural layer of Velikii Novgorod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smagin, A. V.; Dolgikh, A. V.; Karelin, D. V.

    2016-04-01

    The results of quantitative assessment and modeling of carbon dioxide emission from urban pedolithosediments (cultural layer) in the central part of Velikii Novgorod are discussed. At the first stages after the exposure of the cultural layer to the surface in archaeological excavations, very high CO2 emission values reaching 10-15 g C/(m2 h) have been determined. These values exceed the normal equilibrium emission from the soil surface by two orders of magnitude. However, they should not be interpreted as indications of the high biological activity of the buried urban sediments. A model based on physical processes shows that the measured emission values can be reliably explained by degassing of the soil water and desorption of gases from the urban sediments. This model suggests the diffusion mechanism of the transfer of carbon dioxide from the cultural layer into the atmosphere; in addition, it includes the equations to describe nonequilibrium interphase interactions (sorption-desorption and dissolution-degassing of CO2) with the first-order kinetics. With the use of statistically reliable data on physical parameters—the effective diffusion coefficient as dependent on the aeration porosity, the effective solubility, the Henry constant for the CO2 sorption, and the kinetic constants of the CO2 desorption and degassing of the soil solution—this model reproduces the experimental data on the dynamics of CO2 emission from the surface of the exposed cultural layer obtained by the static chamber method.

  18. Pore-scale study of the effect of secondary carbonate precipitation on the dissolution of primary minerals using the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Q.; Chen, L.; Carey, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Reactive transport processes involving dissolution and/or precipitation are pervasive in Earth, energy, and environmental systems. One typical example is geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. Among these reactive processes, it is commonly encountered that a second phase precipitates while the primary phase dissolves, and the precipitation and dissolution reactions are fully coupled with each other. In the case of mineral trapping of CO2, the primary silicate mineral dissolves due to a decrease of pH caused by the dissolution of CO2 into the solution; meanwhile the dissolved CO2 can react with cations to form a secondary precipitate of carbonate mineral. Although the effect of precipitation of secondary solid phase on the dissolution of the primary solid phase has been studied extensively, the results reported in the literature are often inconclusive and sometimes even contradict one another. The reason is that the coupled dissolution and precipitation processes are controlled by several factors whose contribution is difficult to ascertain, including the dissolution and precipitation reaction kinetics, temperature and pressure, pH and species concentration of the solution, physicochemical properties of the primary and secondary minerals, as well as the nucleation and crystal mechanisms of the precipitates, etc. In this study, a pore-scale (mesoscopic) model based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is developed to investigate the effects of secondary precipitation on the dissolution of the primary mineral. The model can predict coupled multiple physicochemical processes including fluid flow, mass transport, chemical reaction, dissolution, precipitation consisting of nucleation and crystal growth, as well as dynamical evolution of pore geometries. Effects of dissolution and precipitation reaction kinetics, molar volumes of primary and secondary minerals, initial powder size and surface roughness of the primary mineral, as well as nucleation and crystal growth

  19. Black carbon concentrations across the tropical Atlantic boundary layer using three methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, K.; Lohmann, R.; Cantwell, M.; Herckes, P.

    2012-12-01

    24 particulate black carbon (BC) samples were quantified using three methods: a chemo-thermal oxidation at 375°C (CTO-375), a thermal optical transition method (Sunset Method), and pyrene fluorescence loss (PFL). BC samples were taken using a high-volume air sampler aboard the R/V Endeavor during the summer of 2010 in the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean in order to sample the aeolian "hotspot" plume of aerosols that extend from the African continent. Models have shown that annual elemental carbon (EC) deposition fluxes in this area could be as high as 25μg cm-2 a-1, which may be a significant contribution to the overall carbon budget as well as climate forcing simulations. Expected BC concentrations for this area, based on a global BC inventory using the MOGUNTIA global transport model, range between 0.01-1μg/m3 depending on season. The CTO-375 processed samples were run on an IRMS to get the total organic carbon (TOC), BC concentrations, and δ13C isotope ratios. BC was detected in every sample and concentrations ranged between 0.16-9.97μg/m3. BC concentrations were highest off the coast of the US and Caribbean islands but were lower (0.16-0.26μg/m3) in the African plume sampled between 1-5°N and 21-29°W. BC comprised between 13-81% of the TOC pool and δ13C isotopes between the TOC and BC for each sample differed by no more than 3‰. The TOC and BC pools average was -28.9‰ and -28.1‰ respectively, suggesting a C4 plant origin. A different isotope trend was evident for samples 16-19 (African plume). Their δ13C average was -23.1‰ for TOC, suggesting a mostly marine origin of the organic carbon or a mix of marine with C3 and C4 plants. This supports the observed lower BC/TOC ratio in these samples (13-50%). EC concentrations determined by the Sunset Method ranged between 0-0.32μg/m3, with EC being detected in only 8 of the 24 samples. In general, EC was found above the detection limit near the United States coastline or in the "hotspot" plume off Africa

  20. Digital lattice gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohar, Erez; Farace, Alessandro; Reznik, Benni; Cirac, J. Ignacio

    2017-02-01

    We propose a general scheme for a digital construction of lattice gauge theories with dynamical fermions. In this method, the four-body interactions arising in models with 2 +1 dimensions and higher are obtained stroboscopically, through a sequence of two-body interactions with ancillary degrees of freedom. This yields stronger interactions than the ones obtained through perturbative methods, as typically done in previous proposals, and removes an important bottleneck in the road towards experimental realizations. The scheme applies to generic gauge theories with Lie or finite symmetry groups, both Abelian and non-Abelian. As a concrete example, we present the construction of a digital quantum simulator for a Z3 lattice gauge theory with dynamical fermionic matter in 2 +1 dimensions, using ultracold atoms in optical lattices, involving three atomic species, representing the matter, gauge, and auxiliary degrees of freedom, that are separated in three different layers. By moving the ancilla atoms with a proper sequence of steps, we show how we can obtain the desired evolution in a clean, controlled way.

  1. Effect of blending carbon nanoparticles and nanotubes on the formation of porous structure and the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalyst layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takahiro; Hashizume, Ryohei; Hayase, Masanori

    2015-07-01

    Different kinds of sub-micron structured carbon, namely carbon black and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), were blended in catalyst ink in order to fabricate catalyst layers having differing porous structures. Carbon black is used as catalyst support in the conventional catalyst layers; the pore structure depends strongly on its aggregate structure. MWCNTs have a structure completely different from the carbon black at sub-micron scale. Two kinds of MWCNT, of differing diameters, were used as blending materials in the catalyst ink with the platinum-supported carbon, and their effects on the porous structure and cell performance were investigated. The catalyst layer containing thick MWCNT had lower porosity, fewer micro-cracks and larger pores than the conventional catalyst layer blended with carbon black. The MWCNT diameter influenced the distribution of pore sizes in the catalyst layers. The catalyst layer containing the smaller diameter MWCNTs displayed a shift in the peak of the pore size distribution, toward smaller size. These characteristic porous structures affected the performance of the resulting cell and caused a large voltage drop at high current densities in the polarization curve. This is because of the porosity and also the pore size.

  2. Thin carbon layer coated Ti3+-TiO2 nanocrystallites for visible-light driven photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Baojiang; Tang, Yunqi; Qu, Yang; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Xie, Ying; Tian, Chungui; Zhou, Wei; Fu, Honggang

    2015-03-01

    Black TiO2 containing Ti3+ attracts enormous attention due to its excellent visible-light driven photocatalytic activity. Herein, an in situ thermal decomposition approach to synthesize uniform thin carbon coated Ti3+-TiO2 nanocrystals is presented. During the oleic acid-assisted solvothermal process, the crystal size and morphology of TiO2 were controlled through oleic acid with carboxylic acid groups. Then the residual small quantities of oleic acid anchored on TiO2 were used as a carbon source, which could be in situ pyrolyzed into a carbon layer on TiO2 at high temperature and under an inert atmosphere. Meanwhile, Ti4+ species were partly reduced into Ti3+ states/oxygen vacancies on the surface of TiO2 due to the carbothermal reduction reaction for the carbon-encapsulated Ti3+-TiO2 structure. A series of characterizations indicated that the 20-25 nm TiO2 nanocrystals obtained were wrapped evenly by 1-2 nm carbon layers, which had an important effect on the energy band structure change of TiO2. The presence of the carbon layer also improves the Ti3+ stability and the conduction behavior of the composites. The Ti3+ states/oxygen vacancies created on the surface of TiO2 were responsible for the remarkable photogenerated charge separation and extended visible-light absorption range. Furthermore, Ti3+ states/oxygen vacancies and the carbon layer together could enhance the adsorption ability of O2 so as to promote the photogenerated electrons captured by the adsorbed O2, leading to a great increase in the charge separation. As a result, the composites exhibit high photocatalytic performance for organic pollutants under visible light irradiation. This simple and new method may pave the way to practical applications for efficient photocatalytic degradation under visible light.Black TiO2 containing Ti3+ attracts enormous attention due to its excellent visible-light driven photocatalytic activity. Herein, an in situ thermal decomposition approach to synthesize uniform

  3. Electron beam-induced nanopatterning of multilayer graphene and amorphous carbon films with metal layers

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Manzo, Julio A.; Banhart, Florian

    2011-05-02

    Thin Co and Ni lamellae grow under electron irradiation of metal crystals supported on multilayer graphene or amorphous carbon films. The lateral growth of a lamella from a source crystal is achieved by directing an electron beam to the periphery of the metal crystal and moving the beam over the surrounding carbon. Patterns of linear, branched, or ringlike metal lamellae can be created. The patterning is carried out in situ in a transmission electron microscope, allowing simultaneous structuring and imaging. The process is driven by the metal-carbon interaction at a beam-activated carbon surface.

  4. Lattice matched semiconductor growth on crystalline metallic substrates

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew G; Ptak, Aaron J; McMahon, William E

    2013-11-05

    Methods of fabricating a semiconductor layer or device and said devices are disclosed. The methods include but are not limited to providing a metal or metal alloy substrate having a crystalline surface with a known lattice parameter (a). The methods further include growing a crystalline semiconductor alloy layer on the crystalline substrate surface by coincident site lattice matched epitaxy. The semiconductor layer may be grown without any buffer layer between the alloy and the crystalline surface of the substrate. The semiconductor alloy may be prepared to have a lattice parameter (a') that is related to the lattice parameter (a). The semiconductor alloy may further be prepared to have a selected band gap.

  5. The dynamics of the North Atlantic carbon cycle and its relation to the temperature of the winter mixed layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broström, Göran

    2004-02-01

    Property property relationships between oceanic carbon species and physical parameters have been used extensively to extrapolate sparse measurements to larger areas. However, the physical processes behind the applied relationships are not always described, implying that uncertainties are introduced to the method. In this study, it is shown that the dynamical features of the North Atlantic carbon cycle can be condensed into a simple framework by focusing on the properties of the winter mixed layer and the equilibrium concentration of the system. The change in the equilibrium concentration between the Sargasso Sea and the Nordic seas is about 250 μmol kg-1, where 50 μmol kg-1 is due to the corrections from the annual cycles in sea surface temperature and biological production. A theoretical framework that focuses on the relation between variables and the temperature of the winter mixed layer is presented and analyzed in some detail using results from a general circulation model. The derived model predicts that there is a tight relation between the total dissolved inorganic carbon concentration and the temperature in the winter mixed layer, and such relation can indeed be found from the TTO/NAS expedition data. Furthermore, the analysis shows that the system is relatively close to the equilibrium concentration in the Sargasso Sea but that the system is highly undersaturated in the Nordic seas. Further, the analysis shows that both the entrainment of carbon-rich deep water and the air sea flux of CO2 must be correctly accounted for to describe the system.

  6. Preparation of hierarchical porous carbon from waste printed circuit boards for high performance electric double-layer capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xuan; Wang, Li; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Yi; Qi, Tao; Li, Chang Ming

    2016-08-01

    Renewable clean energy and resources recycling have become inevitable choices to solve worldwide energy shortages and environmental pollution problems. It is a great challenge to recycle tons of waste printed circuit boards (PCB) produced every year for clean environment while creating values. In this work, low cost, high quality activated carbons (ACs) were synthesized from non-metallic fractions (NMF) of waste PCB to offer a great potential for applications of electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs). After recovering metal from waste PCB, hierarchical porous carbons were produced from NMF by carbonization and activation processes. The experimental results exhibit that some pores were formed after carbonization due to the escape of impurity atoms introduced by additives in NMF. Then the pore structure was further tailored by adjusting the activation parameters. Roles of micropores and non-micropores in charge storage were investigated when the hierarchical porous carbons were applied as electrode of EDLCs. The highest specific capacitance of 210 F g-1 (at 50 mA g-1) and excellent rate capability were achieved when the ACs possessing a proper micropores/non-micropores ratio. This work not only provides a promising method to recycle PCB, but also investigates the structure tailoring arts for a rational hierarchical porous structure in energy storage/conversion.

  7. Transmission Electron Microscope Measures Lattice Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, William T.

    1996-01-01

    Convergent-beam microdiffraction (CBM) in thermionic-emission transmission electron microscope (TEM) is technique for measuring lattice parameters of nanometer-sized specimens of crystalline materials. Lattice parameters determined by use of CBM accurate to within few parts in thousand. Technique developed especially for use in quantifying lattice parameters, and thus strains, in epitaxial mismatched-crystal-lattice multilayer structures in multiple-quantum-well and other advanced semiconductor electronic devices. Ability to determine strains in indivdual layers contributes to understanding of novel electronic behaviors of devices.

  8. Efficiency enhancement of solution-processed inverted organic solar cells with a carbon-nanotube-doped active layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wen-Kai; Su, Shui-Hsiang; Yeh, Meng-Cheng; Huang, Yang-Chan; Yokoyama, Meiso

    2016-01-01

    Solution-processed titanium-doped ZnO (TZO) is synthesized by the sol-gel method to be the electron-transporting layer (ETL) in an inverted organic solar cell (IOSC). Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are doped into an active layer of poly(3-hexylthiophene):[6,6]-phenyl C 61 butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM). The addition of CNTs in the P3HT:PCBM composite increases the conjugation length of P3HT:PCBM:CNTs, which simultaneously enhances the capacity of the composite to absorb solar energy radiation. Vanadium oxide (V2O5) was spin-coated onto the active layer to be a hole-transporting layer (HTL). The power conversion efficiency (PCE) results indicate that the V2O5 nanobelt structure possesses better phase separation and provides a more efficient surface area for the P3HT:PCBM:CNT active layer to increase photocurrent. The optimized IOSCs exhibited an open circuit voltage (Voc), a short-circuit current density (Jsc), a fill factor (FF), and a PCE of 0.55 V, 6.50 mA/cm2, 58.34%, and 2.20%, respectively, under simulated AM1.5G illumination of 100 mW/cm2.

  9. The effects of oxygen on controlling the number of carbon layers in the chemical vapor deposition of graphene on a nickel substrate.

    PubMed

    Dou, Wei-Dong; Yang, Qingdan; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2013-05-10

    While oxygen is typically considered undesirable during the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene on metal substrates, we demonstrate that suitable amounts of oxygen in the CVD system can in fact improve the uniformity and thickness control of the graphene film. The role of oxygen on the CVD of graphene on a nickel substrate using a propylene precursor was investigated with various surface analytical techniques. It was found that the number of carbon layers in the deposited graphene sample decreases as the concentration of oxygen increases. In particular, single-layer graphene can be easily obtained with an oxygen/propylene ratio of 1/9. In the presence of oxygen, a thin layer of nickel oxide will form on the substrate. The oxide layer decreases the concentration of carbon atoms dissolved in the nickel substrate and results in graphene samples with a decreasing number of carbon layers.

  10. Processes in the benthic boundary layer at the Iberian continental margin and their implication for carbon mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, L.; vanWeering, T.; Gust, G.

    This paper evaluates the role of biological processes in the cycling of particulate organic matter within the benthic boundary layer (BBL). It reveals that horizontal, advective fluxes of particulate matter exceed the vertically sinking fluxes through the water column. The data suggest that there is an important additional mechanism of carbon mineralization at hydrodynamically energetic continental margins, and that not the sediment surface but the near-bed fluid layer of the BBL is the major region for organic carbon mineralisation, and the amount of carbon finally buried depends on the time that aggregates are exposed to the BBL. Water and sediment samples were taken during three cruises to the North East Atlantic continental margin. The study site covered the area between 41°N, 9°W and 44°N, 13°W with transects perpendicular to and along the continental margin, resolving velocity and particle features of the benthic boundary layer [BBL] at 5-40 cm height above the sea floor. Particulate organic carbon in the BBL ranged from 29 to 102 mg m -3, total particulate matter from 1.2 to 6.2 g m -3 and Chloroplastic pigments from 0.01 to 0.26 mg m -3. Sediments on the continental margin consisted of an aggregated surface layer, which covered the underlying sediments. At all stations, surface erosion yielded BBL aggregates > 100 μm at critical friction velocities [u ∗c] of 0.4 to 1.2 cms -1. The erosion thresholds of underlying cohesive sediments typically increased from 1.1 to 1.8 cms -1 from shallow to deeper sites. Long-term flow velocity data reveal a tidally modulated flow field with repetitive cycling of particles between sea bed and suspension, representing altogether a situation of prolonged particle resuspension time, moderate residual currents and large variability of flow speed. The currents parallel and cross slope (north-south, on -and offslope) move the BBL aggregates with little net distance in one direction per tidal cycle. Within the ensuing

  11. Atomic layer deposition of Al-doped ZnO/Al2O3 double layers on vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays.

    PubMed

    Malek, Gary A; Brown, Emery; Klankowski, Steven A; Liu, Jianwei; Elliot, Alan J; Lu, Rongtao; Li, Jun; Wu, Judy

    2014-05-14

    High-aspect-ratio, vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) were conformally coated with aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) using atomic layer deposition (ALD) in order to produce a three-dimensional array of metal-insulator-metal core-shell nanostructures. Prefunctionalization before ALD, as required for initiating covalent bonding on a carbon nanotube surface, was eliminated on VACNFs due to the graphitic edges along the surface of each CNF. The graphitic edges provided ideal nucleation sites under sequential exposures of H2O and trimethylaluminum to form an Al2O3 coating up to 20 nm in thickness. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and scanning electron microscopy images confirmed the conformal core-shell AZO/Al2O3/CNF structures while energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy verified the elemental composition of the different layers. HRTEM selected area electron diffraction revealed that the as-made Al2O3 by ALD at 200 °C was amorphous, and then, after annealing in air at 450 °C for 30 min, was converted to polycrystalline form. Nevertheless, comparable dielectric constants of 9.3 were obtained in both cases by cyclic voltammetry at a scan rate of 1000 V/s. The conformal core-shell AZO/Al2O3/VACNF array structure demonstrated in this work provides a promising three-dimensional architecture toward applications of solid-state capacitors with large surface area having a thin, leak-free dielectric.

  12. Solid oxide fuel cell bi-layer anode with gadolinia-doped ceria for utilization of solid carbon fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, Isaiah D.; Koylu, Umit O.; Dogan, Fatih

    Pyrolytic carbon was used as fuel in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with a yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte and a bi-layer anode composed of nickel oxide gadolinia-doped ceria (NiO-GDC) and NiO-YSZ. The common problems of bulk shrinkage and emergent porosity in the YSZ layer adjacent to the GDC/YSZ interface were avoided by using an interlayer of porous NiO-YSZ as a buffer anode layer between the electrolyte and the NiO-GDC primary anode. Cells were fabricated from commercially available component powders so that unconventional production methods suggested in the literature were avoided, that is, the necessity of glycine-nitrate combustion synthesis, specialty multicomponent oxide powders, sputtering, or chemical vapor deposition. The easily-fabricated cell was successfully utilized with hydrogen and propane fuels as well as carbon deposited on the anode during the cyclic operation with the propane. A cell of similar construction could be used in the exhaust stream of a diesel engine to capture and utilize soot for secondary power generation and decreased particulate pollution without the need for filter regeneration.

  13. Bioturbation delays attenuation of DDT by clean sediment cap but promotes sequestration by thin-layered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Lin, Diana; Cho, Yeo-Myoung; Werner, David; Luthy, Richard G

    2014-01-21

    The effects of bioturbation on the performance of attenuation by sediment deposition and activated carbon to reduce risks from DDT-contaminated sediment were assessed for DDT sediment-water flux, biouptake, and passive sampler (PE) uptake in microcosm experiments with a freshwater worm, Lumbriculus variegatus. A thin-layer of clean sediment (0.5 cm) did not reduce the DDT flux when bioturbation was present, while a thin (0.3 cm) AC cap was still capable of reducing the DDT flux by 94%. Bioturbation promoted AC sequestration by reducing the 28-day DDT biouptake (66%) and DDT uptake into PE (>99%) compared to controls. Bioturbation further promoted AC-sediment contact by mixing AC particles into underlying sediment layers, reducing PE uptake (55%) in sediment compared to the AC cap without bioturbation. To account for the observed effects from bioturbation, a mass transfer model together with a biodynamic model were developed to simulate DDT flux and biouptake, respectively, and models confirmed experimental results. Both experimental measurements and modeling predictions imply that thin-layer activated carbon placement on sediment is effective in reducing the risks from contaminated sediments in the presence of bioturbation, while natural attenuation process by clean sediment deposition may be delayed by bioturbation.

  14. Diagenesis, weathering and paleoenvironmental conditions from postglacial diamictite/cap carbonate transition layers of the Otavi Group (NW-Namibia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyollai, I.; Popp, F.; Mader, D.; Koeberl, Ch.

    2012-04-01

    Introduction The so-called "Snowball Earth hypothesis" states that the "Sturtian" (710 Ma) and "Marinoan" glaciations (635 Ma) were of global extent and may have lasted for several million years. Our samples were collected from conspicuous transition layers on top of the glaciogenic Chuos (Sturtian) (10 samples) and Ghaub (Marinoan) formations (63 samples) of the Neoproterozoic Otavi Group in NW-Namibia. The goal of this study is to obtain information concerning the provenance and geochemical composition of postglacial diamictite/cap carbonate transition layers and to estimate the paleoenvironmental conditions with respect to glacio-marine sea water composition and attendant sediment accumulation in mineralogical-geochemical aspects. Methods The mineralogical composition of our samples was studied using the petrographic microscope, X-ray powder diffraction, cathodoluminescence microscopy, and micro-Raman spectrometry. Instrumental neutron activation and X-ray fluorescence analyses, as well as analytical electron microscopy, were used for the geochemical study. Results Detrital components derived from crystalline and/or dolomite platform source areas are enclosed within a diagenetically recrystallized matrix of carbonate and quartz minerals. Clay samples from both, Marinoan and some Sturtian postglacial layers are characterized by high Ni/Co, Cr/V, and low Th/Sc, La/Sc, V/Ni and Cr/Ni ratios compared to PAAS (Postarchean Australian shale, [1]), which could indicate mafic-ultramafic source material[1]. According to SEM-EDX measurements, only hematite, quartz, and feldspar make up the detrital composition, thus the Cr-Ni enrichment does not seem to be associated with any specific mineral phases. Specific results for the Sturtian postglacial transition layers: An U/Th ratio >0.75, and Mo-enrichment in the topmost iron-rich Sturtian diamictites (Chuos Fm.) and their superposed postglacial boundary layers (Rasthof Fm) indicates reducing conditions in the sea water [2

  15. Layer-by-Layer Assembled Architecture of Polyelectrolyte Multilayers and Graphene Sheets on Hollow Carbon Spheres/Sulfur Composite for High-Performance Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng; Li, Jian; Su, Yuefeng; Wang, Jing; Yang, Wen; Li, Ning; Chen, Lai; Chen, Shi; Chen, Renjie; Bao, Liying

    2016-09-14

    In the present work, polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) and graphene sheets are applied to sequentially coat on the surface of hollow carbon spheres/sulfur composite by a flexible layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly strategy. Owing to the strong electrostatic interactions between the opposite charged materials, the coating agents are very stable and the coating procedure is highly efficient. The LBL film shows prominent impact on the stability of the cathode by acting as not only a basic physical barrier, and more importantly, an ion-permselective film to block the polysulfides anions by Coulombic repulsion. Furthermore, the graphene sheets can help to stabilize the polyelectrolytes film and greatly reduce the inner resistance of the electrode by changing the transport of the electrons from a "point-to-point" mode to a more effective "plane-to-point'' mode. On the basis of the synergistic effect of the PEMs and graphene sheets, the fabricated composite electrode exhibits very stable cycling stability for over 200 cycles at 1 A g(-1), along with a high average Coulombic efficiency of 99%. With the advantages of rapid and controllable fabrication of the LBL coating film, the multifunctional architecture developed in this study should inspire the design of other lithium-sulfur cathodes with unique physical and chemical properties.

  16. The fabrication of single-walled carbon nanotube/polyelectrolyte multilayer composites by layer-by-layer assembly and magnetic field assisted alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ying; Park, Jin Gyu; Cheng, Qunfeng; Liang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Chuck; Wang, Ben

    2009-08-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/polymer composites are widely studied because of their potential for high mechanical performance and multifunctional applications. In order to realize highly ordered multilayer nanostructures, we combined the layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly method with magnetic force-induced alignment to fabricate SWNT/poly(ethylamine) (PEI) multilayer composites. The SWNTs were functionalized with the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (NaDDBS) to realize negative charge at pH>7, while the PEI is positively charged at pH<7. The LBL method is based on the electrostatic absorption between the charged SWNTs and PEI resin to form multilayer composites on a solid substrate polydimethylsiloxane. Since the fabricated thickness of each SWNT-NaDDBS/PEI bilayer is uniform (~150 nm), the multilayer film thickness can be strictly controlled via the number of deposition cycles. A high magnetic field (8.5 Tesla) was used to align the SWNTs during the LBL process. The resultant LBL composite samples demonstrated high SWNT loading of approximately 50 wt% and uniform distribution of SWNTs in the multilayer structures, which was verified using a quartz crystal microbalance. Good alignment was also realized and observed through using high magnetic fields to align the nanotubes during the LBL deposition process. The results indicate that the LBL/magnetic alignment approach has potential for fabricating nanotube composites with highly ordered nanostructures for multifunctional materials and device applications.

  17. Polymer network/carbon layer on monolith support and monolith catalytic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Nordquist, Andrew Francis; Wilhelm, Frederick Carl; Waller, Francis Joseph; Machado, Reinaldo Mario

    2003-08-26

    The present invention relates to an improved monolith catalytic reactor and a monolith support. The improvement in the support resides in a polymer network/carbon coating applied to the surface of a porous substrate and a catalytic metal, preferably a transition metal catalyst applied to the surface of the polymer network/carbon coating. The monolith support has from 100 to 800 cells per square inch and a polymer network/carbon coating with surface area of from 0.1 to 15 m.sup.2 /gram as measured by adsorption of N.sub.2 or Kr using the BET method.

  18. Improvement of Ohmic contact to p-GaN by controlling the residual carbon concentration in p++-GaN layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Feng; Zhao, Degang; Jiang, Desheng; Liu, Zongshun; Zhu, Jianjun; Chen, Ping; Yang, Jing; Liu, Wei; Li, Xiang; Liu, Shuangtao; Xing, Yao; Zhang, Liqun; Yang, Hui; Long, Heng; Li, Mo

    2017-06-01

    Growth conditions are used to control the residual carbon impurity incorporation in p++-GaN layers. Specific contact resistance (ρc) with various residual carbon concentrations has been investigated through the circular transmission line model (CTLM) method and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis. A correlation between residual carbon and ρc indicates that incorporation of proper carbon impurity can be an advantage for Ohmic contact, although carbon can also act as a compensating donor to worsen the Ohmic contact at a very high concentration. Finally, ρc is improved to 6.80 × 10-5 Ω × cm2 with a carbon concentration of 8.3 × 1017 cm-3 in p++-GaN layer, when the growth temperature, pressure and flow rate of CP2Mg and TMGa are 940 °C, 100 Torr, 3 μmol/min and 28 μmol/min, respectively.

  19. Mesoporous and carbon hybrid structures from layered molecular precursors for Li-ion battery application: the case of β-In2S3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Jian; Tian, Lei-Lei; Li, Shuankui; Lin, Ling-Piao; Pan, Feng

    2016-04-04

    A new method was demonstrated to construct mesoporous and carbon hybrid structures of β-In2S3 from the thermal decomposition of layered molecular precursors. When applied to LIBs, they all exhibit good cycling stability and excellent rate performance due to the great uniformity of mesopores and pyrolysis carbon distributed in the materials.

  20. Influence of tree cover on herbaceous layer development and carbon and water fluxes in a Portuguese cork-oak woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbert, Maren; Mosena, Alexander; Piayda, Arndt; Cuntz, Matthias; Correia, Alexandra Cristina; Pereira, Joao Santos; Werner, Christiane

    2014-08-01

    Facilitation and competition between different vegetation layers may have a large impact on small-scale vegetation development. We propose that this should not only influence overall herbaceous layer yield but also species distribution and understory longevity, and hence the ecosystems carbon uptake capacity especially during spring. We analyzed the effects of trees on microclimate and soil properties (water and nitrate content) as well as the development of an herbaceous community layer regarding species composition, aboveground biomass and net water and carbon fluxes in a cork-oak woodland in Portugal, between April and November 2011. The presence of trees caused a significant reduction in photosynthetic active radiation of 35 mol m-2 d-1 and in soil temperature of 5 °C from April to October. At the same time differences in species composition between experimental plots located in open areas and directly below trees could be observed: species composition and abundance of functional groups became increasingly different between locations from mid April onwards. During late spring drought adapted native forbs had significantly higher cover and biomass in the open area while cover and biomass of grasses and nitrogen fixing forbs was highest under the trees. Further, evapotranspiration and net carbon exchange decreased significantly stronger under the tree crowns compared to the open during late spring and the die back of herbaceous plants occurred earlier and faster under trees. This was most likely caused by interspecific competition for water between trees and herbaceous plants, despite the more favorable microclimate conditions under the trees during the onset of summer drought.

  1. Superelastic Few-Layer Carbon Foam Made from Natural Cotton for All-Solid-State Electrochemical Capacitors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tianquan; Liu, Fengxin; Xu, Feng; Bi, Hui; Du, Yahui; Tang, Yufeng; Huang, Fuqiang

    2015-11-18

    Flexible/stretchable devices for energy storage are essential for future wearable and flexible electronics. Electrochemical capacitors (ECs) are an important technology for supplement batteries in the energy storage and harvesting field, but they are limited by relatively low energy density. Herein, we report a superelastic foam consisting of few-layer carbon nanowalls made from natural cotton as a good scaffold to growth conductive polymer polyaniline for stretchable, lightweight, and flexible all-solid-state ECs. As-prepared superelastic bulk tubular carbon foam (surface area ∼950 m(2)/g) can withstand >90% repeated compression cycling and support >45,000 times its own weight but no damage. The flexible device has a high specific capacitance of 510 F g(-1), a specific energy of 25.5 Wh kg(-1) and a power density of 28.5 kW kg(-1) in weight of the total electrode materials and withstands 5,000 charging/discharging cycles.

  2. Hydrogen in thin Pd-based layers deposited on reticulated vitreous carbon-A new system for electrochemical capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łukaszewski, M.; Żurowski, A.; Czerwiński, A.

    Reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) has been used as a matrix for electrodeposition of thin layers of Pd and Pd-rich Pd-Rh alloys. It was found that RVC substrate does not affect qualitatively hydrogen absorption behavior of Pd-based deposits. Similarly to thin Pd or Pd alloy layers deposited on Au wires, the α-β phase transition controls the overall rate of hydrogen absorption and desorption into/from Pd-based/RVC electrodes. The possibility of the application of these materials as phase charging-discharging systems was investigated. The values of specific pseudocapacitance, specific power and specific energy were comparable with those for supercapacitors utilizing various redox reactions.

  3. Intrinsic carrier mobility of a single-layer graphene covalently bonded with single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dian; Shao, Zhi-Gang; Hao, Qing; Zhao, Hongbo

    2014-06-21

    We report intrinsic carrier mobility calculations of a two-dimensional nanostructure that consists of porous single layer graphene covalently bonded with single-walled carbon nanotubes on both sides. We used first-principles calculation and found that the deformation potential of such system is about 25% of that of graphene, and the carrier mobility is about 5 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} for both electrons and holes, about one order of magnitude lower than that of graphene. This nanostructure and its three-dimensional stacking could serve as novel organic electronic materials.

  4. Disposable DNA biosensor with the carbon nanotubes-polyethyleneimine interface at a screen-printed carbon electrode for tests of DNA layer damage by quinazolines.

    PubMed

    Galandová, Júlia; Ovádeková, Renáta; Ferancová, Adriana; Labuda, Ján

    2009-06-01

    A screen-printed carbon working electrode within a commercially available screen-printed three-electrode assembly was modified by using a composite of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) dispersed in polyethylenimine (PEI) followed by covering with the calf thymus dsDNA layer. Several electrochemical methods were used to characterize the biosensor and to evaluate damage to the surface-attached DNA: square wave voltammetry of the [Ru(bpy)(3)](2+) redox indicator and mediator of the guanine moiety oxidation, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the presence of the [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-) indicator in solution. Due to high electroconductivity and large surface area of MWCNT and positive charge of PEI, the MWCNT-PEI composite is an advantageous platform for the DNA immobilization by the polyelectrolyte complexation and its voltammetric and impedimetric detection. In this respect, the MWCNT-PEI interface exhibited better properties than the MWCNT-chitosan one reported from our laboratory previously. A deep DNA layer damage at incubation of the biosensor in quinazoline solution was found, which depends on the quinazoline concentration and incubation time.

  5. Effects of multiple polyaniline layers immobilized on carbon nanotube and glutaraldehyde on performance and stability of biofuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christwardana, Marcelinus; Kwon, Yongchai

    2015-12-01

    Enzymatic biofuel cell (EBC) employing new catalyst for anode electrode is fabricated. The new catalyst consists of glucose oxidase (GOx), polyaniline (PANI) and carbon nanotube (CNT) that are multiply stacked together and finally the stack layer is surrounded by glutaraldehyde (GA) (GA/[GOx/PANI/CNT]n). To evaluate how the GA/[GOx/PANI/CNT]n layer affects EBC performance and stability, electrochemical characterizations are implemented. Regarding optimization, GA/[GOx/PANI/CNT]3 is determined. For elucidating reaction mechanism between glucose and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) of GA/[GOx/PANI/CNT]3, associated investigations are performed. In the evaluations, drop in reduction current peak of FAD is observed with provisions of glucose and O2, while glucose does not influence FAD reaction without O2, confirming O2 makes mediator role. When the GA/[GOx/PANI/CNT]3 layer is adopted, superior catalytic activity and EBC performance are gained (electron transfer rate constant of 5.1 s-1, glucose sensitivity of 150 ìA mM-1 cm-2, and EBC maximum power density (MPD) of 0.29 mW cm-2). Regarding EBC stability, MPD of EBC adopting GA/[GOx/PANI/CNT]3 maintains up to 93% of their initial value even after four weeks. Although GA is little effective for improving EBC performance, EBC stability is helped by GA due to its adhesion promotion capability with [GOx/PANI/CNT]n layer.

  6. Nanodiamonds and Carbon Spherules from Tunguska, the K/T Boundary, and the Younger Dryas Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittke, J. H.; Bunch, T. E.; West, A.; Kennett, J.; Kennett, D. J.; Howard, G. A.

    2009-12-01

    More than a dozen markers, including nanodiamonds (NDs) and carbon spherules (CS), occur in a sedimentary layer marking the onset of the Younger Dryas (YD) cooling episode at ~12.9 ka. This boundary layer, called the YDB, has been found at nearly forty locations across North America, Europe, and Asia, although not all markers are present at any given site. Firestone et al. (2007) and Kennett et al. (2008, 2009) proposed that these markers resulted from a cosmic impact/airburst and impact-related biomass burning. Here we report features common to the YDB event, the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) impact, and the Tunguska airburst of 1908. In sediments attributed to each event, we and other researchers have recovered NDs either inside or closely associated with CS, which appear to be the high-temperature by-products of biomass burning. CS range in diameter from about 500 nanometers to 4 millimeters with a mean of ~100 microns, and they typically contain NDs, including lonsdaleite (hexagonal diamonds), in the interior matrix and in the crust. To date, CS and NDs have been found in the K/T layer in the United States, Spain, and New Zealand. Similarly, CS and NDs have been found in the YDB layer in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany, and France. Thus far, every site examined contains NDs and/or CS in the K/T and YDB layers; conversely, we have yet to detect CS associated with NDs in any non-YDB sediments tested. Five allotropes of NDs have been identified in association with CS: cubic diamonds, lonsdaleite, n-diamonds, p-diamonds, and i-carbon, which are differentiated by slight variations in their crystalline structure. All allotropes have been identified using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with confirmation by selected area diffraction (SAED). Lonsdaleite is found on Earth only in three instances: (1) in the laboratory, where it is produced

  7. The seasonal cycle of the mixing layer height and its impact on black carbon concentrations in the Kathmandu Valley (Nepal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mues, Andrea; Rupakheti, Maheswar; Hoor, Peter; Bozem, Heiko; Münkel, Christoph; Lauer, Axel; Butler, Tim

    2016-04-01

    The properties and the vertical structure of the mixing layer as part of the planetary boundary layer are of key importance for local air quality. They have a substantial impact on the vertical dispersion of pollutants in the lower atmosphere and thus on their concentrations near the surface. In this study, ceilometer measurements taken within the framework of the SusKat project (Sustainable Atmosphere for the Kathmandu Valley) are used to investigate the mixing layer height in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. The applied method is based on the assumption that the aerosol concentration is nearly constant in the vertical and distinctly higher within the mixing layer than in the air above. Thus, the height with the steepest gradient within the ceilometer backscatter profile marks the top of the mixing layer. Ceilometer and black carbon (BC) measurements conducted from March 2013 through February 2014 provide a unique and important dataset for the analysis of the meteorological and air quality conditions in the Kathmandu Valley. In this study the mean diurnal cycle of the mixing layer height in the Kathmandu Valley for each season (pre-monsoon, monsoon, post-monsoon and winter season) and its dependency on the meteorological situation is investigated. In addition, the impact of the mixing layer height on the BC concentration is analyzed and compared to the relevance of other important processes such as emissions, horizontal advection and deposition. In all seasons the diurnal cycle is typically characterized by low mixing heights during the night, gradually increasing after sun rise reaching to maximum values in the afternoon before decreasing again. Seasonal differences can be seen particularly in the height of the mixing layer, e.g. from on average 153/1200 m (pre-monsoon) to 241/755 m (monsoon season) during the night/day, and the duration of enhanced mixing layer heights during daytime (around 12 hours (pre-monsoon season) to 8 hours (winter)). During the monsoon

  8. The ocean quasi-homogeneous layer model and global cycle of carbon dioxide in system of atmosphere-ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushkov, Alexander; Glushkov, Alexander; Loboda, Nataliya; Khokhlov, Valery; Serbov, Nikoly; Svinarenko, Andrey

    The purpose of this paper is carrying out the detailed model of the CO2 global turnover in system of "atmosphere-ocean" with using the ocean quasi-homogeneous layer model. Practically all carried out models are functioning in the average annual regime and accounting for the carbon distribution in bio-sphere in most general form (Glushkov et al, 2003). We construct a modified model for cycle of the carbon dioxide, which allows to reproduce a season dynamics of carbon turnover in ocean with account of zone ocean structure (up quasi-homogeneous layer, thermocline and deepest layer). It is taken into account dependence of the CO2 transfer through the bounder between atmosphere and ocean upon temperature of water and air, wind velocity, buffer mechanism of the CO2 dissolution. The same program is realized for atmosphere part of whole system. It is obtained a tempo-ral and space distribution for concentration of non-organic carbon in ocean, partial press of dissolute CO2 and value of exchange on the border between atmosphere and ocean. It is estimated a role of the wind intermixing of the up ocean layer. The increasing of this effect leads to increasing the plankton mass and further particles, which are transferred by wind, contribute to more quick immersion of microscopic shells and organic material. It is fulfilled investigation of sen-sibility of the master differential equations system solutions from the model parameters. The master differential equa-tions system, describing a dynamics of the CO2 cycle, is numerically integrated by the four order Runge-Cutt method under given initial values of valuables till output of solution on periodic regime. At first it is indicated on possible real-zation of the chaos scenario in system. On our data, the difference of the average annual values for the non-organic car-bon concentration in the up quasi-homogeneous layer between equator and extreme southern zone is 0.15 mol/m3, be-tween the equator and extreme northern zone is 0

  9. Fabrication and modeling of electrochemical double-layer capacitors using carbon nano-onion electrode structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parigi, Fabio

    Electrochemical capacitors or ultracapacitors (UCs) that are commercially available today overcome battery limitations in terms of charging time (from tens of minutes to seconds) and limited lifetime (from a few thousand cycles up to more than one million) but still lack specific energy and energy density (2-5% of a lithium ion battery). The latest innovations in carbon nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes as an active electrode material for UCs, can provide up to five times as much energy and deliver up to seven times more power than today's activated carbon electrodes. Further improvements in UC power density have been achieved by using state-of-the-art carbon nano-onions (CNOs) for ultracapacitor electrodes. CNO UCs could exhibit up to five times the power density of single-wall CNT UCs and could substantially contribute to reducing the size of an energy storage system as well as the volume and weight, thus improving device performance. This dissertation describes the fabrication of CNO electrodes as part of an UC device, the measurement and analysis of the new electrode's performance as an energy storage component, and development of a new circuit model that accurately describes the CNO UC electrical behavior. The novel model is based on the impedance spectra of CNO UCs and cyclic voltammetry measurements. Further, the model was validated using experimental data and simulation. My original contributions are the fabrication process for reliable and repeatable electrode fabrication and the modeling of a carbon nano-onion ultracapacitor. The carbon nano-onion ultracapacitor model, composed of a resistor, an inductor, a capacitor (RLC), and a constant phase element (CPE), was developed along with a parameter extraction procedure for the benefit of other users. The new model developed, proved to be more accurate than previously reported UC models.

  10. Few-layer graphene growth from polystyrene as solid carbon source utilizing simple APCVD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Shahrokh; Afzalzadeh, Reza

    2016-07-01

    This research article presents development of an economical, simple, immune and environment friendly process to grow few-layer graphene by controlling evaporation rate of polystyrene on copper foil as catalyst and substrate utilizing atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) method. Evaporation rate of polystyrene depends on molecular structure, amount of used material and temperature. We have found controlling rate of evaporation of polystyrene by controlling the source temperature is easier than controlling the material weight. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as Raman Spectroscopy has been used for characterization of the layers. The frequency of G‧ to G band ratio intensity in some samples varied between 0.8 and 1.6 corresponding to few-layer graphene. Topography characterization by atomic force microscopy confirmed Raman results.

  11. Thin germanium carbon layers deposited directly on silicon for metal oxide semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, D. Q.; Wiedmann, I.; García-Gutierrez, D. I.; José-Yacamán, M.; Banerjee, S. K.

    2007-01-01

    We report the growth process and materials characterization of germanium-carbon alloys (Ge1-xCx) deposited directly on Si (1 0 0) substrates by ultra-high-vacuum chemical vapour deposition. The Ge1-xCx films are characterized by transmission electron microscopy, etch-pit density, x-ray diffraction, secondary ion mass spectrometry and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The results show that the films exhibit low threading dislocation densities despite significant strain relaxation. We also present evidence for carbon segregation in the Ge1-xCx and interpret these results as a strain relaxation mechanism.

  12. Outer layers of a carbon star: The view from the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.; Ensman, Lisa M.; Alexander, D. R.; Avrett, E. H.; Brown, A.; Carpenter, K. G.; Eriksson, K.; Gustafsson, B.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Judge, Philip D.

    1995-01-01

    To advance our understanding of the relationship between stellar chromospheres and mass loss, which is a common property of carbon stars and other asymptotic giant branch stars, we have obtained ultraviolet spectra of the nearby N-type carbon star UU Aur using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). In this paper we describe the HST observations, identify spectral features in both absorption and emission, and attempt to infer the velocity field in the chromosphere, upper troposphere, and circumstellar envelope from spectral line shifts. A mechanism for producing fluoresced emission to explain a previously unobserved emission line is proposed. Some related ground-based observations are also described.

  13. 25th anniversary article: Artificial carbonate nanocrystals and layered structural nanocomposites inspired by nacre: synthesis, fabrication and applications.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hong-Bin; Ge, Jin; Mao, Li-Bo; Yan, You-Xian; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2014-01-08

    Rigid biological systems are increasingly becoming a source of inspiration for the fabrication of next generation advanced functional materials due to their diverse hierarchical structures and remarkable engineering properties. Among these rigid biomaterials, nacre, as the main constituent of the armor system of seashells, exhibiting a well-defined 'brick-and-mortar' architecture, excellent mechanical properties, and interesting iridescence, has become one of the most attractive models for novel artificial materials design. In this review, recent advances in nacre-inspired artificial carbonate nanocrystals and layered structural nanocomposites are presented. To clearly illustrate the inspiration of nacre, the basic principles relating to plate-like aragonite single-crystal growth and the contribution of hierarchical structure to outstanding properties in nacre are discussed. The inspiration of nacre for the synthesis of carbonate nanocrystals and the fabrication of layered structural nanocomposites is also discussed. Furthermore, the broad applications of these nacre inspired materials are emphasized. Finally, a brief summary of present nacre-inspired materials and challenges for the next generation of nacre-inspired materials is given.

  14. Electric double-layer capacitor composed of activated carbon fiber cloth electrodes and solid polymer electrolytes containing alkylammonium salts

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Masashi; Morita, Masayuki; Ihara, Mitsuo; Matsuda, Yoshiharu . Dept. of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering)

    1994-07-01

    Solid polymer electrolytes consisting of complexes of poly(ethylene oxide)-grafted poly(methyl)-methacrylate (PEO-PMMA) and tetraalkylammonium salts [tetrabutylammonium perchlorate, tetraethylammonium perchlorate, and tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEABF[sub 4])] have been investigated for electric double-layer capacitors with activated carbon fiber cloth electrodes. The PEO-PMMA and tetraalkylammonium composites obtained showed high ionic conductivity (>10[sup [minus]4] S cm[sup [minus]1] at 298 K). The ionic conductivity depended on both the concentration and the size of each ion. The composites had good stability over a wide potential range (ca. 5.0 V). When the PEO-PMMA and TEABF[sub 4] composites were used in solid-state electric double-layer capacitors with activated carbon fiber cloths as polarizable electrodes, the capacitors showed charge/discharge behavior with large values of capacitance and high coulombic efficiency. The long voltage retention was observed in the self-discharge test of the capacitor with TEABF[sub 4].

  15. Effects of microstructure on carbon support in the catalyst layer on the performance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Makoto; Fukuoka, Yuko; Sugawara, Yasushi

    1996-12-31

    In the case of the Polymer-electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), the reaction sites exist on the platinum (Pt) surface covered with PFSI. Though PFSI membrane is used as an electrolyte of the PEFC, the membrane does not soak deeply into the electrodes as a liquid electrolyte does. Therefore, PFSI solution was impregnated into the catalyst layers to increase the contact areas between Pt and PFSI. In our previous work we proposed a new preparation method of the M&E assembly which emphasized the colloid formation of the PFSI to optimize the network of PFSIs in the catalyst layer and also to simplify the fabrication process of the M&E assembly. Following this work, we focused on the microstructure of the catalyst layer. The importance of the morphological properties of the gas-diffusion electrodes on performance has been reported in several papers. The catalyst layer was claimed to have had two distinctive pore distributions with a boundary of ca. 0.1 {mu}m. The smaller pore (primary pore) was identified with the space in and between the primary particles in the agglomerate of the carbon support and the larger one (secondary pore) was that between the agglomerates. In our recent work, we reported that the PFSI was distributed only in the secondary pores, and the reaction sites were therefore limited to that location. The results indicated that the PEFC system required a particular design rather than a conventional one for the fuel cells with liquid electrolytes. We proposed that novel structure and/or preparation methods of the catalyst layer were keys to higher utilization of Pt.

  16. Nanospherical solid electrolyte interface layer formation in binder-free carbon nanotube aerogel/Si nanohybrids to provide lithium-ion battery anodes with a long-cycle life and high capacity.

    PubMed

    Shim, Hyung Cheoul; Kim, Ilhwan; Woo, Chang-Su; Lee, Hoo-Jeong; Hyun, Seungmin

    2017-04-06

    Silicon anodes for lithium ion batteries (LiBs) have been attracting considerable attention due to a theoretical capacity up to about 10 times higher than that of conventional graphite. However, huge volume expansion during the cycle causes cracks in the silicon, resulting in the degradation of cycling performance and eventual failure. Moreover, low electrical conductivity and an unstable solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer resulting from repeated changes in volume still block the next step forward for the commercialization of the silicon material. Herein we demonstrate the carbon nanotube (CNT) aerogel/Si nanohybrid structure for anode materials of LiBs via freeze casting followed by an RF magnetron sputtering process, exhibiting improved capacity retention compared to Si only samples during 1000 electrochemical cycles. The CNT aerogels as 3D porous scaffold structures could provide buffer volume for the expansion/shrinkage of Si lattices upon cycling and increase electrical conductivity. In addition, the nanospherical and relatively thin SEI layers of the CNT aerogel/Si nanohybrid structure show better lithium ion diffusion characteristics during cycling. For this reason, the Si@CNT aerogel anode still yielded a high specific capacity of 1439 mA h g(-1) after 1000 charge/discharge cycles with low capacity fading. Our approach could be applied to other group IV LiB materials that undergo large volume changes, and also has promising potential for high performance energy applications.

  17. Atomic and Molecular Layer Deposition for Enhanced Lithium Ion Battery Electrodes and Development of Conductive Metal Oxide/Carbon Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travis, Jonathan

    The performance and safety of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are dependent on interfacial processes at the positive and negative electrodes. For example, the surface layers that form on cathodes and anodes are known to affect the kinetics and capacity of LIBs. Interfacial reactions between the electrolyte and the electrodes are also known to initiate electrolyte combustion during thermal runaway events that compromise battery safety. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) and molecular layer deposition (MLD) are thin film deposition techniques based on sequential, self-limiting surface reactions. ALD and MLD can deposit ultrathin and conformal films on high aspect ratio and porous substrates such as composite particulate electrodes in lithium-ion batteries. The effects of electrode surface modification via ALD and MLD are studied using a variety of techniques. It was found that sub-nm thick coatings of Al2O 3 deposited via ALD have beneficial effects on the stability of LIB anodes and cathodes. These same Al2O3 ALD films were found to improve the safety of graphite based anodes through prevention of exothermic solid electrolyte interface (SEI) degradation at elevated temperatures. Ultrathin and conformal metal alkoxide polymer films known as "metalcones" were grown utilizing MLD techniques with trimethylaluminum (TMA) or titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) and organic diols or triols, such as ethylene glycol (EG), glycerol (GL) or hydroquinone (HQ), as the reactants. Pyrolysis of these metalcone films under inert gas conditions led to the development of conductive metal oxide/carbon composites. The composites were found to contain sp2 carbon using micro-Raman spectroscopy in the pyrolyzed films with pyrolysis temperatures ≥ 600°C. Four point probe measurements demonstrated that the graphitic sp2 carbon domains in the metalcone films grown using GL and HQ led to significant conductivity. The pyrolysis of conformal MLD films to obtain conductive metal oxide/carbon composite films

  18. Preparation and photovoltaic properties of layered TiO2/carbon nanotube/TiO2 photoanodes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberio, M.; Grosso, D. R.; Imbrogno, A.; Xu, F.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report on the realization of photoanodes for dye sensitized solar cells based on composites of carbon nanotubes and titanium dioxide nanoparticles. Our results show the best photovoltaics performance for carbon nanotubes weight percentages between 0.2% and 0.4%. Photoanodes realized in three-layer configuration, TiO2/carbon nanotube/TiO2, show a cell efficiency of 10.5% and a fill factor of 70%, values 2.4 times greater with respect to that of classical TiO2 anode. The presence of carbon nanotubes enhances the charge transport, strongly reducing the electron/hole recombination in the anode bulk, while the double layer of TiO2 increases the dye adsorption limiting the reduction caused by the presence of carbon nanotubes.

  19. Electrically conductive PVC layers filled with active carbon containing H+-conducting porous structures of sulfuric acid complexes of cyclams on fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsivadze, A. Yu.; Fridman, A. Ya.; Morozova, E. M.; Sokolova, N. P.; Voloshchuk, A. M.; Petukhova, G. A.; Bardyshev, I. I.; Gorbunov, A. M.; Novikov, A. K.; Polyakova, I. Ya.; Titova, V. N.; Yavich, A. A.; Petrova, N. V.; Krasil'nikova, O. K.

    2015-07-01

    Electrically conductive PVC layers are synthesized. The layers are filled with active carbons containing porous H+-conductive structures of hydroxyethylcyclam/sulfuric acid complexes crosslinked with cellulose fabric. They are interlaid with layers based on the same structures containing added benzene and hexane adsorbates and solvates. It is found that upon anode or cathode polarization of the layers as H+-conductive electrochemical bridges in air and in the vapor and liquid phases of benzene and hexane, either the electroreduction of H+ to H2 or the electrooxidation of H2O to O2 occurs in the areas of contact between active carbon particles and the complexes. The dependences of rates of H2 and O2 formation on the voltage are studied. The magnitudes of overvoltage and the constants of electrochemical reactions are found to depend on the composition of a layer.

  20. About Reverted Austenite in Carburized Layers of Low-Carbon Martensitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. S.; Bogdanova, M. V.; Vylezhnev, V. P.

    2015-05-01

    Processes of surface hardening in low-carbon martensitic steel 24Kh2G2NMFTB under carburizing and subsequent quenching from the intercritical temperature range are studied. Special features of formation of reverted austenite with high strength and stability are considered.

  1. CARBON MONOXIDE FLUXES OF DIFFERENT SOIL LAYERS IN UPLAND CANADIAN BOREAL FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dark or low-light carbon monoxide fluxes at upland Canadian boreal forest sites were measured on-site with static chambers and with a laboratory incubation technique using cores from different depths at the same sites. Three different upland black spruce sites, burned in 1987,199...

  2. Catalyzed double layer cathodes for high performance and long life molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bischoff, M.; Jantsch, U.; Rohland, B.

    1996-12-31

    NiO/LiCoO{sub 2} double layer cathodes (DLCs) were prepared with a thin highly active LiCoO{sub 2}-layer by a new double layer tape casting/sintering procedure. The resulting metallic porous precursor plates were mounted into the MCFC and heated up by a special procedure to form LiCoO{sub 2} from air, Co and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} in a solid/gas reaction. MCFCs with highly active NiO/LiCoO{sub 2}-DLCs can operate over prolonged periods of time with a Ni-precipitation which is 10% lower than one finds with state of the art NiO cathodes. According to LiCoO{sub 2}-cathodes have theoretical life times of more than 100 000 hours at nonpressurized conditions. MCFCs with new NiO/LiCoO{sub 2} double layer cathodes (DLC) were investigated with regard to variable parameters of their microstructure. From the agglomerate model of the porous MCFC cathode, the dependence of the polarization resistance from the radius of the agglomerates and the inner agglomerate surface area was calculated.

  3. Carbon nanosheet-titania nanocrystal composites from reassembling of exfoliated graphene oxide layers with colloidal titania nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yongjun; Aizawa, Mami; Peng Wenqing; Wang Zhengming; Hirotsu, Takahiro

    2013-01-15

    Nanoporous composites of carbon nanosheets (CNS) and titania nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by reassembling of delaminated graphite oxide (GO) layers with titania clear sol (TCS), and their structural and porous properties were examined by various physico-chemical methods such as XRD, TG/DTA, FT-IR, Raman, FE-SEM/TEM, and low temperature N{sub 2} adsorption. It was found that the facile approach, which utilizes the electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged GO layers and the positively charged TCS particles, leads to a well composed CNS and ultrafine TiO{sub 2} NPs material whose titania amount reaches up to 71 wt%. The titania phase in these composite materials is mainly anatase, which is resistible against high temperature calcination, but also contains a little amount of rutile and brookite depending on synthesis condition. The porosity of the composite is improved and partially affected by the size distributions of TiO{sub 2} NPs. The unique structure, better porosity, and compatible surface affinity of these composites bring about an adsorption concentration-promoted photocatalytic effects toward organic dyes by successfully combining both properties of CNS and titania NPs. - Graphical Abstract: Carbon nanosheet-titania nanocrystal composites can be synthesized by a facile delamination-reassembling method from graphene oxide and colloidal titania. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A facile delamination-reassembling method for graphene oxide-titania nanocomposite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A nanoporous composite containing mixed phase titania nanocrystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Partition effect of carbon nanosheets preventing TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles from aggregating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption concentration-promoted photocatalysis.

  4. Antiferromagnetic Kondo lattice in the layered compound CePd1–xBi₂ and comparison to the superconductor LaPd1–xBi₂

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Fei; Wan, Xiangang; Phelan, Daniel; ...

    2015-07-13

    The layered compound CePd1–xBi₂ with the tetragonal ZrCuSi₂-type structure was obtained from excess Bi flux. Magnetic susceptibility data of CePd1–xBi₂ show an antiferromagnetic ordering below 6 K and are anisotropic along the c axis and the ab plane. The anisotropy is attributed to crystal-electric-field (CEF) effects and a CEF model which is able to describe the susceptibility data is given. An enhanced Sommerfeld coefficient γ of 0.191 J mol Ce⁻¹ K⁻² obtained from specific-heat measurement suggests a moderate Kondo effect in CePd1–xBi₂. Other than the antiferromagnetic peak at 6 K, the resistivity curve shows a shoulderlike behavior around 75 Kmore » which could be attributed to the interplay between Kondo and CEF effects. Magnetoresistance and Hall-effect measurements suggest that the interplay reconstructs the Fermi-surface topology of CePd1–xBi₂ around 75 K. Electronic structure calculations reveal that the Pd vacancies are important to the magnetic structure and enhance the CEF effects which quench the orbital moment of Ce at low temperatures.« less

  5. Growth of CuGaSe2 Layers on Closely Lattice-Matched GaAs Substrates by Migration-Enhanced Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Miki; Kawaharazuka, Atsushi; Nishinaga, Jiro; Ploog, Klaus H.; Horikoshi, Yoshiji

    2011-12-01

    CuGaSe2 single-crystal films are grown on the As-stabilized (2×4) surface of (001) GaAs by migration-enhanced epitaxy (MEE), where Cu+Ga and Se are alternately deposited. The growth process is monitored by refraction high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) in the [110] azimuth. Under the Cu-enriched growth condition, a deformed 4-fold pattern is observed in both Cu+Ga and Se deposition periods. The deformed 4-fold pattern is found to be related to the segregation of Cu2Se on the CuGaSe2 surface as confirmed by the results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement. By reducing the beam equivalent pressure of Cu (Cu-BEP), clear 4-fold patterns appear in both Cu+Ga and Se deposition periods instead of deformed 4-fold patterns. Further reduction of Cu-BEP results in clear 4- and 2-fold patterns for Cu+Ga and Se deposition periods. Under these growth conditions, Cu2Se-segregation-free CGS growth is achieved. Thus, the CuGaSe2 single-crystal layers without Cu2Se-segregation are successfully grown on GaAs(001) substrates by optimizing the Cu-BEP.

  6. Toward Two-Dimensional All-Carbon Heterostructures via Ion Beam Patterning of Single-Layer Graphene.

    PubMed

    Kotakoski, Jani; Brand, Christian; Lilach, Yigal; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Mangler, Clemens; Arndt, Markus; Meyer, Jannik C

    2015-09-09

    Graphene has many claims to fame: it is the thinnest possible membrane, it has unique electronic and excellent mechanical properties, and it provides the perfect model structure for studying materials science at the atomic level. However, for many practical studies and applications the ordered hexagon arrangement of carbon atoms in graphene is not directly suitable. Here, we show that the atoms can be locally either removed or rearranged into a random pattern of polygons using a focused ion beam (FIB). The atomic structure of the disordered regions is confirmed with atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images. These structural modifications can be made on macroscopic scales with a spatial resolution determined only by the size of the ion beam. With just one processing step, three types of structures can be defined within a graphene layer: chemically inert graphene, chemically active amorphous 2D carbon, and empty areas. This, along with the changes in properties, gives promise that FIB patterning of graphene will open the way for creating all-carbon heterostructures to be used in fields ranging from nanoelectronics and chemical sensing to composite materials.

  7. Physical defect formation in few layer graphene-like carbon on metals: influence of temperature, acidity, and chemical functionalization.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Christoph M; Grass, Robert N; Rossier, Michael; Athanassiou, Evagelos K; Stark, Wendelin J

    2012-03-06

    A systematical examination of the chemical stability of cobalt metal nanomagnets with a graphene-like carbon coating is used to study the otherwise rather elusive formation of nanometer-sized physical defects in few layer graphene as a result of acid treatments. We therefore first exposed the core-shell nanomaterial to well-controlled solutions of altering acidity and temperature. The release of cobalt into these solutions over time offered a simple tool to monitor the progress of particle degradation. The results suggested that the oxidative damage of the graphene-like coatings was the rate-limiting step during particle degradation since only fully intact or entirely emptied carbon shells were found after the experiments. If ionic noble metal species were additionally present in the acidic solutions, the noble metal was found to reduce on the surface of specific, defective particles. The altered electrochemical gradients across the carbon shells were however not found to lead to a faster release of cobalt from the particles. The suggested mechanistic insight was further confirmed by the covalent chemical functionalization of the particle surface with chemically inert aryl species, which leads to an additional thickening of the shells. This leads to reduced cobalt release rates as well as slower noble metal reduction rates depending on the augmentation of the shell thickness.

  8. Different distribution of in-situ thin carbon layer in hollow cobalt sulfide nanocages and their application for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Meng; Lu, Shi-Yu; Ma, Li; Gan, Meng-Yu; Lei, Yao; Zhang, Xiu-Ling; Fu, Gang; Yang, Pei-Shu; Yan, Mao-Fa

    2017-02-01

    Recently, cobalt sulfides emerge as a candidate for energy reserve and conversation. However, the problem of poor stability and low rate capability for cobalt sulfides restrict its practical application. Thin carbon layer (TCL) coated has been regarded as a promising constructing strategy for high performance supercapacitors, because TCL can promote the tremendous properties of bare materials. In this literature, we report a very interesting phenomenon that different distribution of in-situ carbon coated hollow CoS2 nanocages (external and both external and interior) can be synthesized only by adjusting sulfuration time, followed by calcination. Moreover, it is clearly observed that CoS2-C@TCL exhibits significant improvement for specific capacitance and good stability (better than CoS2@TCL and CoS2). These results compel us to design a series of experiments to figure out the reason and the more detailed mechanism is discussed in paper. More importantly, it will provide a new strategy for synthesis of special structure with in-situ carbon coated sulfide for energy conversion.

  9. A Novel Layered Sedimentary Rocks Structure of the Oxygen-Enriched Carbon for Ultrahigh-Rate-Performance Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin-Lin; Li, Huan-Huan; Shi, Yan-Hong; Fan, Chao-Ying; Wu, Xing-Long; Wang, Hai-Feng; Sun, Hai-Zhu; Zhang, Jing-Ping

    2016-02-17

    In this paper, gelatin as a natural biomass was selected to successfully prepare an oxygen-enriched carbon with layered sedimentary rocks structure, which exhibited ultrahigh-rate performance and excellent cycling stability as supercapacitors. The specific capacitance reached 272.6 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) and still retained 197.0 F g(-1) even at 100 A g(-1) (with high capacitance retention of 72.3%). The outstanding electrochemical performance resulted from the special layered structure with large surface area (827.8 m(2) g(-1)) and high content of oxygen (16.215 wt %), which effectively realized the synergistic effects of the electrical double-layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance. Moreover, it delivered an energy density of 25.3 Wh kg(-1) even with a high power density of 34.7 kW kg(-1) and ultralong cycling stability (with no capacitance decay even over 10,000 cycles at 2 A g(-1)) in a symmetric supercapacitor, which are highly desirable for their practical application in energy storage devices and conversion.

  10. Imaging of oil layers, curvature and contact angle in a mixed-wet and a water-wet carbonate rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kamaljit; Bijeljic, Branko; Blunt, Martin J.

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the effect of wettability of carbonate rocks on the morphologies of remaining oil after sequential oil and brine injection in a capillary-dominated flow regime at elevated pressure. The wettability of Ketton limestone was altered in situ using an oil phase doped with fatty acid which produced mixed-wet conditions (the contact angle where oil contacted the solid surface, measured directly from the images, θ=180°, while brine-filled regions remained water-wet), whereas the untreated rock (without doped oil) was weakly water-wet (θ=47 ± 9°). Using X-ray micro-tomography, we show that the brine displaces oil in larger pores during brine injection in the mixed-wet system, leaving oil layers in the pore corners or sandwiched between two brine interfaces. These oil layers, with an average thickness of 47 ± 17 µm, may provide a conductive flow path for slow oil drainage. In contrast, the oil fragments into isolated oil clusters/ganglia during brine injection under water-wet conditions. Although the remaining oil saturation in a water-wet system is about a factor of two larger than that obtained in the mixed-wet rock, the measured brine-oil interfacial area of the disconnected ganglia is a factor of three smaller than that of oil layers.

  11. What is below the support layer affects carbon nanotube growth: an iron catalyst reservoir yields taller nanotube carpets.

    PubMed

    Shawat, E; Mor, V; Oakes, L; Fleger, Y; Pint, C L; Nessim, G D

    2014-01-01

    Here we demonstrate an approach to enhance the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by including a catalyst reservoir underneath the thin-film alumina catalyst underlayer. This reservoir led to enhanced CNT growth due to the migration of catalytic material from below the underlayer up to the surface through alumina pinholes during processing. This led to the formation of large Fe particles, which in turn influenced the morphology evolution of the catalytic iron surface layer through Ostwald ripening. With inclusion of this catalyst reservoir, we observed CNT growth up to 100% taller than that observed without the catalyst reservoir consistently across a wide range of annealing and growth durations. Imaging studies of catalyst layers both for different annealing times and for different alumina support layer thicknesses demonstrate that the surface exposure of metal from the reservoir leads to an active population of smaller catalyst particles upon annealing as opposed to a bimodal catalyst size distribution that appears without inclusion of a reservoir. Overall, the mechanism for growth enhancement we present here demonstrates a new route to engineering efficient catalyst structures to overcome the limitations of CNT growth processes.

  12. Direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase immobilized on the layered calcium carbonate-gold nanoparticles inorganic hybrid composite.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Feng, Yan; Wang, Zhen; Yang, Limin; Zhuo, Linhai; Tang, Bo

    2010-06-15

    A mediator-free hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) biosensor was fabricated based on immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on layered calcium carbonate-gold nanoparticles (CaCO(3)-AuNPs) inorganic hybrid composite. The proposed biosensor showed a strong electrocatalytic activity toward the reduction of H(2)O(2), which could be attributed to the favored orientation of HRP in the well-confined surface as well as the high electrical conductivity of the resulting CaCO(3)-AuNPs inorganic hybrid composite. The hybrid composite was obtained by the adsorption of AuNPs onto the surfaces of layered CaCO(3) through electrostatic interaction. The key analytical parameters relative to the biosensor performance such as pH and applied potential were optimized. The developed biosensor also exhibited a fast amperometric response (3s), a good linear response toward H(2)O(2) over a wide range of concentration from 5.0x10(-7) to 5.2x10(-3)M, and a low detection limit of 1.0x10(-7)M. The facile, inexpensive and reliable sensing platform based on layered CaCO(3)-AuNPs inorganic hybrid composite should hold a huge potential for the fabrication of more other biosensors.

  13. Local solid phase growth of few-layer graphene on silicon carbide from nickel silicide supersaturated with carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Escobedo-Cousin, Enrique; Vassilevski, Konstantin; Hopf, Toby; Wright, Nick; O'Neill, Anthony; Horsfall, Alton; Goss, Jonathan; Cumpson, Peter

    2013-03-21

    Patterned few-layer graphene (FLG) films were obtained by local solid phase growth from nickel silicide supersaturated with carbon, following a fabrication scheme, which allows the formation of self-aligned ohmic contacts on FLG and is compatible with conventional SiC device processing methods. The process was realised by the deposition and patterning of thin Ni films on semi-insulating 6H-SiC wafers followed by annealing and the selective removal of the resulting nickel silicide by wet chemistry. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to confirm both the formation and subsequent removal of nickel silicide. The impact of process parameters such as the thickness of the initial Ni layer, annealing temperature, and cooling rates on the FLG films was assessed by Raman spectroscopy, XPS, and atomic force microscopy. The thickness of the final FLG film estimated from the Raman spectra varied from 1 to 4 monolayers for initial Ni layers between 3 and 20 nm thick. Self-aligned contacts were formed on these patterned films by contact photolithography and wet etching of nickel silicide, which enabled the fabrication of test structures to measure the carrier concentration and mobility in the FLG films. A simple model of diffusion-driven solid phase chemical reaction was used to explain formation of the FLG film at the interface between nickel silicide and silicon carbide.

  14. Carbon doping for the GaAs base layer of Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors in a production scale MOVPE reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, F.; Bergunde, T.; Richter, E.; Kurpas, P.; Achouche, M.; Maaßdorf, A.; Würfl, J.; Weyers, M.

    2000-12-01

    In this work different approaches for carbon doping of GaAs in MOVPE are compared with respect to their growth- and device-related material properties. Doping levels up to 6×10 19 cm -3 and smooth surface morphologies are achieved with either intrinsically (TMG and AsH 3 or TMAs) or extrinsically (CBr 4) doped layers. Despite comparable structural and majority carrier properties differences in GaInP/GaAs-HBT device performance depending on base doping conditions are obtained. Devices with an intrinsically doped base layer (TMG+AsH 3) show superior transistor performance with a current gain to base sheet resistance ratio ( β/ Rsb) exceeding 0.5 for base thicknesses as large as 120 nm. The use of either CBr 4 or TMAs as base growth precursors results in reduced current gains ( β/ Rsb⩽0.3). It is shown that the achieved HBT current gain is directly related to recombination centers in the heavily doped base layer depending on doping method.

  15. Evolution of fault zones in carbonates with mechanical stratigraphy - Insights from scale models using layered cohesive powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gent, Heijn W.; Holland, Marc; Urai, Janos L.; Loosveld, Ramon

    2010-09-01

    We present analogue models of the formation of dilatant normal faults and fractures in carbonate fault zones, using cohesive hemihydrate powder (CaSO 4·½H 2O). The evolution of these dilatant fault zones involves a range of processes such as fragmentation, gravity-driven breccia transport and the formation of dilatant jogs. To allow scaling to natural prototypes, extensive material characterisation was done. This showed that tensile strength and cohesion depend on the state of compaction, whereas the friction angle remains approximately constant. In our models, tensile strength of the hemihydrate increases with depth from 9 to 50 Pa, while cohesion increases from 40 to 250 Pa. We studied homogeneous and layered material sequences, using sand as a relatively weak layer and hemihydrate/graphite mixtures as a slightly stronger layer. Deformation was analyzed by time-lapse photography and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to calculate the evolution of the displacement field. With PIV the initial, predominantly elastic deformation and progressive localization of deformation are observed in detail. We observed near-vertical opening-mode fractures near the surface. With increasing depth, dilational shear faults were dominant, with releasing jogs forming at fault-dip variations. A transition to non-dilatant shear faults was observed near the bottom of the model. In models with mechanical stratigraphy, fault zones are more complex. The inferred stress states and strengths in different parts of the model agree with the observed transitions in the mode of deformation.

  16. Templated quasicrystalline molecular layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smerdon, Joe; Young, Kirsty; Lowe, Michael; Hars, Sanger; Yadav, Thakur; Hesp, David; Dhanak, Vinod; Tsai, An-Pang; Sharma, Hem Raj; McGrath, Ronan

    2014-03-01

    Quasicrystals are materials with long range ordering but no periodicity. We report scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) observations of quasicrystalline molecular layers on five-fold quasicrystal surfaces. The molecules adopt positions and orientations on the surface consistent with the quasicrystalline ordering of the substrate. Carbon-60 adsorbs atop sufficiently-separated Fe atoms on icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe to form a unique quasicrystalline lattice whereas further C60 molecules decorate remaining surface Fe atoms in a quasi-degenerate fashion. Pentacene (Pn) adsorbs at tenfold-symmetric points around surface-bisected rhombic triacontahedral clusters in icosahedral Ag-In-Yb. These systems constitute the first demonstrations of quasicrystalline molecular ordering on a template. EPSRC EP/D05253X/1, EP/D071828/1, UK BIS.

  17. Novel layer-by-layer assembly molecularly imprinted sol-gel sensor for selective recognition of clindamycin based on Au electrode decorated by multi-wall carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaohui; Hu, Yufang; Zhang, Huabin; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2010-04-01

    A novel sensitive molecularly imprinted electrochemical sensor was constructed for selective detection of clindamycin by combination of a multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWNT) layer with a thin molecularly imprinted sol-gel film. The sensor was fabricated onto Au electrode via stepwise modification of MWNT and a thin sol-gel film of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) by using electrodeposition method. The molecularly imprinted film displayed excellent selectivity towards clindamycin. Due to such combination, the sensor responded quickly to clindamycin. The response peak current was linear to the concentration of clindamycin in the range from 5.0 x 10(-7) mol L(-1) to 8.0 x 10(-5) mol L(-1), and the detection limit was 2.44 x 10(-8) mol L(-1). This imprinted sensor was applied to the determination of clindamycin in human urine samples successfully. These results revealed that the imprinted sensor fulfilled the selectivity, sensitivity, speed and simplicity requirements for clindamycin detection, and provided possibilities of clinical application in physiological fluids.

  18. Influence of H-C bonds on the stopping power of hard and soft carbonized layers

    SciTech Connect

    Boutard, D.; Moeller, W.; Scherzer, B.M.U.

    1988-08-15

    Soft and hard carbon-hydrogen films were deposited in a rf glow discharge. Their stopping powers were deduced from depth-profile analysis by means of proton enhanced-cross-section scattering at around 1.5 MeV and /sup 4/He/sup +/ elastic-recoil detection at 2.6 MeV. In the case of soft films, ion-induced hydrogen depletion allowed study of the dependence of the stopping on hydrogen concentration. The presence of hydrogen increases the stopping power of the film by a factor of up to approx.2 compared to the predicted value for pure carbon. Moreover, Bragg's rule underestimates the total stopping considerably. However, good agreement is obtained with a recent theoretical model by Sabin et al. which takes into account the different C-C and C-H chemical bonds.

  19. Electrochemistry of Layered Graphitic Carbon Nitride Synthesised from Various Precursors: Searching for Catalytic Effects.

    PubMed

    Yew, Ying Teng; Lim, Chee Shan; Eng, Alex Yong Sheng; Oh, Junghoon; Park, Sungjin; Pumera, Martin

    2016-02-16

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3 N4 ), synthesised by pyrolysis of different precursors (dicyandiamide, melamine and urea) under varying reaction conditions (air and nitrogen gas) is subjected to electrochemical studies for the elucidation of the inherent catalytic efficiency of the pristine material. Contrary to popular belief, pristine g-C3 N4 shows negligible, if any, enhancement in its electrochemical behaviour in this comprehensive study. Voltammetric analysis reveals g-C3 N4 to display similar catalytic efficiency to the unmodified glassy carbon electrode surface on which the bulk material was deposited. This highlights the non-catalytic nature of the pristine material and challenges the feasibility of using g-C3 N4 as a heterogeneous catalyst to deliver numerous promised applications.

  20. Atomic Layer Deposition on Gram Quantities of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-03

    Technol. 61 1899 [34] Coleman J N, Khan U, Blau W J and Gun’ko Y K 2006 Carbon 44 1624 [ 35 ] Lau K T, Gu C and Hui D 2006 Composites B 37 425 [36] Breuer...B 22 240 [63] Zhang W, Brongersma S H, Richard O, Brijs B, Palmans R, Froyen L and Maex K 2004 Microelectron. Eng. 76 146 10

  1. Alternate dipping preparation of biomimetic apatite layers in the presence of carbonate ions.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, Grégory; Bourgeois, Damien; Ravaux, Johann; Averseng, Olivier; Vidaud, Claude; Meyer, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    The classical simulated body fluids method cannot be employed to prepare biomimetic apatites encompassing metallic ions that lead to very stable phosphates. This is the case for heavy metals such as uranium, whose presence in bone mineral after contamination deserves toxicological study. We have demonstrated that existing methods, based on alternate dipping into calcium and phosphate ions solutions, can be adapted to achieve this aim. We have also especially studied the impact of the presence of carbonate ions in the medium as these are necessary to avoid hydrolysis of the contaminating metallic cations. Both the apatite-collagen complex method and a standard chemical (STD) method employing only mineral solutions lead to biomimetic apatites when calcium and carbonate ions are introduced simultaneously. The obtained materials were fully characterized and we established that the STD method tolerates the presence of carbonate ions much better, and this leads to homogeneous samples. Emphasis was set on the repeatability of the method to ensure the relevancy of further work performed on series of samples. Finally, osteoblasts cultured on these samples also proved a similar yield and standard-deviation in their adenosine triphosphate content when compared to commercially available substrates designed to study of such cell cultures.

  2. Ion beam analysis of tungsten layers in EUROFER model systems and carbon plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ström, Petter; Petersson, Per; Rubel, Marek; Primetzhofer, Daniel; Brezinsek, Sebastijan; Kreter, Arkadi; Unterberg, Bernhard; Sergienko, Gennady; Sugiyama, Kazuyoshi

    2016-03-01

    The tungsten enriched surface layers in two fusion-relevant EUROFER steel model samples, consisting of an iron-tungsten mixture exposed to sputtering by deuterium ions, were studied by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and medium energy ion scattering. Exposure conditions were the same for the two samples and the total amount of tungsten atoms per unit area in the enriched layers were similar (2 · 1015 and 2.4 · 1015 atoms/cm2 respectively), despite slightly different initial atomic compositions. A depth profile featuring exponential decrease in tungsten content towards higher depths with 10-20 at.% of tungsten at the surface and a decay constant between 0.05 and 0.08 Å-1 was indicated in one sample, whereas only the total areal density of tungsten atoms was measured in the other. In addition, two different beams, iodine and chlorine, were employed for elastic recoil detection analysis of the deposited layer on a polished graphite plate from a test limiter in the TEXTOR tokamak following experiments with tungsten hexafluoride injection. The chlorine beam was preferred for tungsten analysis, mainly because it (as opposed to the iodine beam) does not give rise to problems with overlap of forward scattered beam particles and recoiled tungsten in the spectrum.

  3. Thermally-induced single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations from a 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer to a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Fan, Rui Qing; Wang, Xin Ming; Wei, Li Guo; Song, Yang; Du, Xi; Xing, Kai; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yu Lin

    2016-07-28

    In this work, a rare 2D → 3D single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation (SCSC) is observed in metal-organic coordination complexes, which is triggered by thermal treatment. The 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer [Cd(IBA)2]n (1) is irreversibly converted into a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework {[Cd(IBA)2(H2O)]·2.5H2O}n (2) (HIBA = 4-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)benzoic acid). Consideration is given to these two complexes with different interpenetrating structures and dimensionality, and their influence on photovoltaic properties are studied. Encouraged by the UV-visible absorption and HOMO-LUMO energy states matched for sensitizing TiO2, the two complexes are employed in combination with N719 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) to compensate absorption in the ultraviolet and blue-violet region, offset competitive visible light absorption of I3(-) and reducing charge the recombination of injected electrons. After co-sensitization with 1 and 2, the device co-sensitized by 1/N719 and 2/N719 to yield overall efficiencies of 7.82% and 8.39%, which are 19.94% and 28.68% higher than that of the device sensitized only by N719 (6.52%). Consequently, high dimensional interpenetrating complexes could serve as excellent co-sensitizers and have application in DSSCs.

  4. Extended applications of the vortex lattice method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, L. R.

    1976-01-01

    The application of the vortex lattice method to problems not usually dealt with by this technique is considered. It is shown that if the discrete vortex lattice is considered as an approximation to surface-distributed vorticity, then the concept of the generalized principal part of an integral yields a residual term to the vortex-induced velocity that renders the vortex lattice method valid for supersonic flow. Special schemes for simulating non-zero thickness lifting surfaces and fusiform bodies with vortex lattice elements are presented. Thickness effects of wing-like components are simulated by a double vortex lattice layer, and fusiform bodies are represented by a vortex grid arranged on a series of concentric cylindrical surfaces. Numerical considerations peculiar to the application of these techniques are briefly discussed.

  5. Electronic and material characterization of silicon-germanium and silicon-germanium-carbon epitaxial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Jeffrey John

    This dissertation presents results of material and electronic characterization of strained SiGe and SiGeC epitaxial layers grown on (100) silicon using Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition and Reduced Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition. Fabrication techniques for SiGe and SiGeC are also presented. Materials characterization of epitaxial SiGe and SiGeC was done to characterize crystallinity using visual, microscopic, and Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) characterization. Surface roughness was characterized and found to correspond roughly with epitaxial crystal quality. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to study epitaxial layer composition and thickness, requiring development of models for nSiGe and nSiGeC versus composition (the first published for nSiGeC) and generation of ellipsometric nomograms. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of epitaxial strain and relaxation showed Ge composition dominates the stress, although strain compensation due to C was observed. XRD, Raman, and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) characterization were done to characterize substitutional C in SiGeC epitaxial layers, finding that C incorporation into SiGeC saturates for C contents >1%. Fabrication techniques for SiGe and SiGeC were examined. Low thermal budget processing of strained layers were investigated as well as fabrication techniques using advantageous material properties of SiGe and SiGeC. Ti/Al contacts were developed and characterized for electrical contact to SiGe and SiGeC. Schottky contacts of Pt silicide on SiGe and SiGeC was done; formation and resistivity were characterized. Four separate resistivity characterization structures have been fabricated using mesa-etch and Si etch-stop techniques. A NPN Heterojunction Bipolar transistor has been fabricated using successive mesa-etches and SiGe (or SiGeC) etch-stops. Electronic characterization of in-situ doped SiGe and SiGeC epitaxial layers was done to determine resistivity, mobility, and bandgap. Resistivities

  6. Modeling the effects of fire severity and climate warming on active layer and soil carbon dynamics of black spruce forests across the landscape in interior Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Genet, H.; McGuire, Anthony David; Barrett, K.; Breen, A.; Euskirchen, E.S.; Johnstone, J.F.; Kasischke, E.S.; Melvin, A.M.; Bennett, A.; Mack, M.C.; Rupp, T.S.; Schuur, A.E.G.; Turetsky, M.R.; Yuan, F.

    2013-01-01

    There is a substantial amount of carbon stored in the permafrost soils of boreal forest ecosystems, where it is currently protected from decomposition. The surface organic horizons insulate the deeper soil from variations in atmospheric temperature. The removal of these insulating horizons through consumption by fire increases the vulnerability of permafrost to thaw, and the carbon stored in permafrost to decomposition. In this study we ask how warming and fire regime may influence spatial and temporal changes in active layer and carbon dynamics across a boreal forest landscape in interior Alaska. To address this question, we (1) developed and tested a predictive model of the effect of fire severity on soil organic horizons that depends on landscape-level conditions and (2) used this model to evaluate the long-term consequences of warming and changes in fire regime on active layer and soil carbon dynamics of black spruce forests across interior Alaska. The predictive model of fire severity, designed from the analysis of field observations, reproduces the effect of local topography (landform category, the slope angle and aspect and flow accumulation), weather conditions (drought index, soil moisture) and fire characteristics (day of year and size of the fire) on the reduction of the organic layer caused by fire. The integration of the fire severity model into an ecosystem process-based model allowed us to document the relative importance and interactions among local topography, fire regime and climate warming on active layer and soil carbon dynamics. Lowlands were more resistant to severe fires and climate warming, showing smaller increases in active layer thickness and soil carbon loss compared to drier flat uplands and slopes. In simulations that included the effects of both warming and fire at the regional scale, fire was primarily responsible for a reduction in organic layer thickness of 0.06 m on average by 2100 that led to an increase in active layer thickness

  7. Graphene-oxide-supported CuAl and CoAl layered double hydroxides as enhanced catalysts for carbon-carbon coupling via Ullmann reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Nesreen S.; Menzel, Robert; Wang, Yifan; Garcia-Gallastegui, Ainara; Bawaked, Salem M.; Obaid, Abdullah Y.; Basahel, Sulaiman N.; Mokhtar, Mohamed

    2017-02-01

    Two efficient catalyst based on CuAl and CoAl layered double hydroxides (LDHs) supported on graphene oxide (GO) for the carbon-carbon coupling (Classic Ullmann Homocoupling Reaction) are reported. The pure and hybrid materials were synthesised by direct precipitation of the LDH nanoparticles onto GO, followed by a chemical, structural and physical characterisation by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), surface area measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The GO-supported and unsupported CuAl-LDH and CoAl-LDH hybrids were tested over the Classic Ullman Homocoupling Reaction of iodobenzene. In the current study CuAl- and CoAl-LDHs have shown excellent yields (91% and 98%, respectively) at very short reaction times (25 min). GO provides a light-weight, charge complementary and two-dimensional material that interacts effectively with the 2D LDHs, in turn enhancing the stability of LDH. After 5 re-use cycles, the catalytic activity of the LDH/GO hybrid is up to 2 times higher than for the unsupported LDH.

  8. Suppression of interlaminar damage in carbon/epoxy laminates by use of interleaf layers

    SciTech Connect

    Tanimoto, Toshio . Dept. of Materials Science Ceramic Technology)

    1994-10-15

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) have been widely used as a structural material. In general, fiber orientation angle of each lamina in these laminates is variously chosen in order to taylor a material which meets the particular requirement for the material properties in arbitrary direction of laminate. Quasi-isotropic lamination, in which the laminate consisted of laminae with fiber orientation of 0[degree], +45[degree], [minus]45[degree] and 90[degree] to loading axis, is most commonly employed in the actual application. However, quasi-isotropic carbon/epoxy laminates are known to develop the interlaminar stress concentrations near the free edge region. These laminates have a strong tendency to delaminate near the edges when subjected to axial in-plane loading. Such a free edge delamination under loading in the plane of the laminate is a unique problem to laminated composites. This paper summarizes the author's investigation which was performed to reduce the free edge interlaminar stresses in the laminate by incorporating interleaf films between plies and thus to improve the mechanical properties of these materials. In their previous work, the authors have shown that these laminates exhibit a high vibration damping capability. Loss factor values for these CFRP/interleaf laminates which were measured in cantilever beam tests, are 5 to 50 times as large as that for conventional CFRP. In this paper, discussion will be provided on the mechanical properties of the interleaved quasi-isotropic carbon/epoxy laminate, [0/[+-]45/90][sub s], with a special emphasis on the optimum design of interply locations to incorporate the interleaf films for the particular requirement such as static strength, elastic modulus, fatigue resistance and so on.

  9. Carbon and nitrogen abundance determinations from transition layer lines. [giant stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika; Mena-Werth, Jose

    1988-01-01

    For red giants a smooth increase in the nitrogen to carbon abundance ratio for increasing B-V as is expected for the first dredge up phase when the outer convection zone deepens is found. An average increase in the nitrogen to silicon ratio for B-V = 0.6 which goes back to almost solar values for cool giants with B - V approximately 1.0 is reported. It looks as if Si would be enriched for deeper mixing contrary to expectations from standard evolution theory.

  10. Partially oxidized atomic cobalt layers for carbon dioxide electroreduction to liquid fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Lin, Yue; Jiao, Xingchen; Sun, Yongfu; Luo, Qiquan; Zhang, Wenhua; Li, Dianqi; Yang, Jinlong; Xie, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Electroreduction of CO2 into useful fuels, especially if driven by renewable energy, represents a potentially ‘clean’ strategy for replacing fossil feedstocks and dealing with increasing CO2 emissions and their adverse effects on climate. The critical bottleneck lies in activating CO2 into the CO2•- radical anion or other intermediates that can be converted further, as the activation usually requires impractically high overpotentials. Recently, electrocatalysts based on oxide-derived metal nanostructures have been shown to enable CO2 reduction at low overpotentials. However, it remains unclear how the electrocatalytic activity of these metals is influenced by their native oxides, mainly because microstructural features such as interfaces and defects influence CO2 reduction activity yet are difficult to control. To evaluate the role of the two different catalytic sites, here we fabricate two kinds of four-atom-thick layers: pure cobalt metal, and co-existing domains of cobalt metal and cobalt oxide. Cobalt mainly produces formate (HCOO-) during CO2 electroreduction; we find that surface cobalt atoms of the atomically thin layers have higher intrinsic activity and selectivity towards formate production, at lower overpotentials, than do surface cobalt atoms on bulk samples. Partial oxidation of the atomic layers further increases their intrinsic activity, allowing us to realize stable current densities of about 10 milliamperes per square centimetre over 40 hours, with approximately 90 per cent formate selectivity at an overpotential of only 0.24 volts, which outperforms previously reported metal or metal oxide electrodes evaluated under comparable conditions. The correct morphology and oxidation state can thus transform a material from one considered nearly non-catalytic for the CO2 electroreduction reaction into an active catalyst. These findings point to new opportunities for manipulating and improving the CO2 electroreduction properties of metal systems

  11. Biofunctionalization of carbon nanotubes/chitosan hybrids on Ti implants by atom layer deposited ZnO nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yizhou; Liu, Xiangmei; Yeung, Kelvin W. K.; Chu, Paul K.; Wu, Shuilin

    2017-04-01

    One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of ZnO using atomic layer deposition (ALD) on chitosan (CS) modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were first introduced onto the surfaces of biomedical implants. When the content of ZnO is not sufficient, CNTs can strengthen the antibacterial activity against E. coli and S. aureus by 8% and 39%, respectively. CS can improve the cytocompatibility of CNTs and ZnO. The amount of Zn content can be controlled by changing the cycling numbers of ALD processes. This hybrid coating can not only endow medical implants with high self-antibacterial efficacy against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) of over 73% and 98%, respectively, but also regulate the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts by controlling the amount of ZnO.

  12. Curvature Effect on the Capacitance of Electric Double Layers at Ionic Liquid/Onion-Like Carbon Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Guang; Jiang, Deen; Cummings, Peter T

    2012-01-01

    Recent experiments have revealed that onion-like carbons (OLCs) offer high energy density and charging/discharging rates when used as the electrodes in supercapacitors. To understand the physical origin of this phenomenon, molecular dynamics simulations were performed for a room-temperature ionic liquid near idealized spherical OLCs with radii ranging from 0.356 to 1.223 nm. We find that the surface charge density increases almost linearly with the potential applied on electric double layers (EDLs) near OLCs. This leads to a nearly flat shape of the differential capacitance versus the potential, unlike the bell or camel shape observed on planar electrodes. Moreover, our simulations reveal that the capacitance of EDLs on OLCs increases with the curvature or as the OLC size decreases, in agreement with experimental observations. The curvature effect is explained by dominance of charge overscreening over a wide potential range and increased ion density per unit area of electrode surface as the OLC becomes smaller.

  13. Atomic layer deposition of ruthenium on plasma-treated vertically aligned carbon nanotubes for high-performance ultracapacitors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Woo; Kim, Byungwoo; Park, Suk Won; Kim, Woong; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2014-10-31

    It is challenging to realize a conformal metal coating by atomic layer deposition (ALD) because of the high surface energy of metals. In this study, ALD of ruthenium (Ru) on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was carried out. To activate the surface of CNTs that lack surface functional groups essential for ALD, oxygen plasma was applied ex situ before ALD. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy confirmed surface activation of CNTs by the plasma pretreatment. Transmission electron microscopy analysis with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy composition mapping showed that ALD Ru grew conformally along CNTs walls. ALD Ru/CNTs were electrochemically oxidized to ruthenium oxide (RuOx) that can be a potentially useful candidate for use in the electrodes of ultracapacitors. Electrode performance of RuOx/CNTs was evaluated using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements.

  14. The surface chemical properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified by thermal fluorination for electric double-layer capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Min-Jung; Jeong, Euigyung; Lee, Young-Seak

    2015-08-01

    The surfaces of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were thermally fluorinated at various temperatures to enhance the electrochemical properties of the MWCNTs for use as electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC) electrodes. The fluorine functional groups were added to the surfaces of the MWCNTs via thermal fluorination. The thermal fluorination exposed the Fe catalyst on MWCNTs, and the specific surface area increased due to etching during the fluorination. The specific capacitances of the thermally fluorinated at 100 °C, MWCNT based electrode increased from 57 to 94 F/g at current densities of 0.2 A/g, respectively. This enhancement in capacitance can be attributed to increased polarization of the thermally fluorinated MWCNT surface, which increased the affinity between the electrode surface and the electrolyte ions.

  15. Polishing and coating carbon fiber-reinforced carbon composites with a carbon-titanium layer enhances adhesion and growth of osteoblast-like MG63 cells and vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bacáková, L; Starý, V; Kofronová, O; Lisá, V

    2001-03-15

    Carbon fiber-reinforced carbon composites (CFRC) are considered to be promising materials for orthopedic and dental surgery. Their mechanical properties can be tailored to be similar to those of bone, and their chemical composition (close to pure carbon) promises that they will be tolerated well by the surrounding tissue. In this study, CFRC composites were fabricated from phenolic resin and unidirectionally oriented Torayca carbon fibers by carbonization (1000 degrees C) and graphitization (2500 degrees C). The material then was cut with a diamond saw into sheets of 8 x 10 x 3 mm, and the upper surface was polished by colloidal SiO2 and/or covered with a carbon-titanium (C:Ti) layer (3.3 microm) using the plasma-enhanced physical vapor deposition method. Three different kinds of modified samples were prepared: polished only, covered only, and polished + covered. Untreated samples served as a control. The surface roughness of these samples, measured by a Talysurf profilometer, decreased significantly after polishing but usually did not decrease after coating with a C:Ti layer. On all three modified surfaces, human osteoblast-like cells of the MG63 line and rat vascular smooth muscle cells (both cultured in a Dulbecco's minimum essential medium with 10% fetal bovine serum) adhered at higher numbers (by 21-87% on day 1 after seeding) and exhibited a shorter population doubling time (by 13-40%). On day 4 after seeding, these cells attained higher population densities (by 61-378%), volume (by 18-37%), and protein content (by 16-120%). These results were more pronounced in VSMC than in MG63 cells and in both groups of C:Ti-covered samples than in the polished only samples. The release of carbon particles from the CFRC composites was significantly decreased--by 8 times in the polished only, 24 times in the covered only, and 42 times in the polished + covered samples. These results show that both polishing and carbon-titanium covering significantly improve the

  16. Carbon nanotube assisted Lift off of GaN layers on sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Hao; Feng, Xiaohui; Wei, Yang; Yu, Tongjun; Fan, Shoushan; Ying, Leiying; Zhang, Baoping

    2017-02-01

    Laser lift off (LLO) was one of the most essential processes in fabrication of vertical GaN-based LEDs. However, traditional laser lift off of GaN on sapphire substrates needed high laser energy threshold, which deteriorated the GaN crystal. In this paper, it was found that inserting carbon nanotube between GaN and sapphire could effectively reduce the laser energy threshold in GaN LLO, from 1.5 J /cm2 of conventional GaN/sapphire to 1.3 J /cm2 of CNT inserted GaN/sapphire. The temperature distributions at the GaN/sapphire interfaces with and without CNTs were simulated by the finite elements calculation under laser irradiation. It was found that, due to the higher laser absorption coefficient of CNT, the CNT played as a powerful heating wire, sending out the thermal outside to elevate the GaN's temperature, and thus reduce the laser threshold for LLO. Raman and photoluminescence measurements indicated that residual stress of GaN membranes was as small as 0.3 GPa by the carbon nanotube assisted LLO. This work not only opens new application of CNTs, but also demonstrates the potential of high performance blue and green LEDs.

  17. Comparison Of Landscape-level Carbon Flux Estimates from Budgeting The Planetary Boundary Layer And Footprinting On Remote Sensing Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Chen, J. M.; Mo, G.

    2006-12-01

    Carbon balance estimation at the landscape/regional scale is a challenge because of the heterogeneity of the land surface and the nonlinearity inherent in ecophysiological processes. Two methodologies, a simple atmospheric boundary-layer budgeting method and an integrated modeling method, were explored and compared in this study. Studies of the atmospheric boundary-layer (ABL) budget of CO2 have the potential to provide information on carbon balance of the land surface on a regional scale. Indeed, the surface area of integration by the ABL moving through a tower in one day was estimated to be ~104 km2. Two novel methodologies to retrieve the landscape/regional carbon balance information captured by the CO2 concentration measurements are explored and compared in this study: boundary-layer budgeting and remote sensing-based footprint integration. We investigated four boreal continental sites in this study. Boundary-layer budgeting: By assuming the horizontal advection is negligible, the regional surface net flux (representative of an upwind area ~105 km2) can be calculated as, Fc=(Cm-CFT)ù+dC/dt*zi, where ù is the mean vertical velocity, zi is the mean ABL height, and and are the biweekly mean mixing ratio of CO2 in the ABL and the free troposphere, respectively. ù is from the NCEP (National Centers for Environmental Prediction) reanalysis data, while zi was simulated by an one-dimensional ABL model. The CO2 flux in the upwind area of the tower was also estimated based on ecosystem modeling using remote sensing measurements. Remote sensing-based footprint integration: The total regional flux captured by the sensor on a tower (mixing ratio) is the weighted sum of the upwind footprint source areas (Ømega), Fc= Σ FiWi, where Fi and Wi are the CO2 flux and its weighting factor for each pixel, respectively. Fiis calculated using an ecosystem model (BEPS: Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator). Wiis comparative contribution factor of footprint function for each

  18. Modeling the effects of fire severity and climate warming on active layer thickness and soil carbon storage of black spruce forests across the landscape in interior Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Genet, Helene; McGuire, A. David; Barrett, K.; Breen, Amy; Euskirchen, Eugenie S; Johnstone, J. F.; Kasischke, Eric S.; Melvin, A. M.; Bennett, A.; Mack, M. C.; Rupp, Scott T.; Schuur, Edward; Turetsky, M. R.; Yuan, Fengming

    2013-01-01

    There is a substantial amount of carbon stored in the permafrost soils of boreal forest ecosystems, where it is currently protected from decomposition. The surface organic horizons insulate the deeper soil from variations in atmospheric temperature. The removal of these insulating horizons through consumption by fire increases the vulnerability of permafrost to thaw, and the carbon stored in permafrost to decomposition. In this study we ask how warming and fire regime may influence spatial and temporal changes in active layer and carbon dynamics across a boreal forest landscape in interior Alaska. To address this question, we (1) developed and tested a predictive model of the effect of fire severity on soil organic horizons that depends on landscape-level conditions and (2) used this model to evaluate the long-term consequences of warming and changes in fire regime on active layer and soil carbon dynamics of black spruce forests across interior Alaska. The predictive model of fire severity, designed from the analysis of field observations, reproduces the effect of local topography (landform category, the slope angle and aspect and flow accumulation), weather conditions (drought index, soil moisture) and fire characteristics (day of year and size of the fire) on the reduction of the organic layercaused by fire. The integration of the fire severity model into an ecosystem process-based model allowed us to document the relative importance and interactions among local topography, fire regime and climate warming on active layer and soil carbon dynamics. Lowlands were more resistant to severe fires and climate warming, showing smaller increases in active layer thickness and soil carbon loss compared to drier flat uplands and slopes. In simulations that included the effects of both warming and fire at the regional scale, fire was primarily responsible for a reduction in organic layer thickness of 0.06 m on average by 2100 that led to an increase in active layer thickness

  19. Van Der Waals heterogeneous layer-layer carbon nanostructures involving π···H-C-C-H···π···H-C-C-H stacking based on graphene and graphane sheets.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kun; Zhao, Rui-Sheng; Zheng, Jia-Jia; Zheng, Hong; Nagase, Shigeru; Zhao, Sheng-Dun; Liu, Yan-Zhi; Zhao, Xiang

    2017-04-15

    Noncovalent interactions involving aromatic rings, such as π···π stacking, CH···π are very essential for supramolecular carbon nanostructures. Graphite is a typical homogenous carbon matter based on π···π stacking of graphene sheets. Even in systems not involving aromatic groups, the stability of diamondoid dimer and layer-layer graphane dimer originates from C - H···H - C noncovalent interaction. In this article, the structures and properties of novel heterogeneous layer-layer carbon-nanostructures involving π···H-C-C-H···π···H-C-C-H stacking based on [n]-graphane and [n]-graphene and their derivatives are theoretically investigated for n = 16-54 using dispersion corrected density functional theory B3LYP-D3 method. Energy decomposition analysis shows that dispersion interaction is the most important for the stabilization of both double- and multi-layer-layer [n]-graphane@graphene. Binding energy between graphane and graphene sheets shows that there is a distinct additive nature of CH···π interaction. For comparison and simplicity, the concept of H-H bond energy equivalent number of carbon atoms (noted as NHEQ), is used to describe the strength of these noncovalent interactions. The NHEQ of the graphene dimers, graphane dimers, and double-layered graphane@graphene are 103, 143, and 110, indicating that the strength of C-H···π interaction is close to that of π···π and much stronger than that of C-H···H-C in large size systems. Additionally, frontier molecular orbital, electron density difference and visualized noncovalent interaction regions are discussed for deeply understanding the nature of the C-H···π stacking interaction in construction of heterogeneous layer-layer graphane@graphene structures. We hope that the present study would be helpful for creations of new functional supramolecular materials based on graphane and graphene carbon nano-structures. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. High Power Electric Double-Layer Capacitors based on Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids and Nanostructured Carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Carlos R.

    The efficient storage of electrical energy constitutes both a fundamental challenge for 21st century science and an urgent requirement for the sustainability of our technological civilization. The push for cleaner renewable forms of energy production, such as solar and wind power, strongly depends on a concomitant development of suitable storage methods to pair with these intermittent sources, as well as for mobile applications, such as vehicles and personal electronics. In this regard, Electrochemical Double-Layer Capacitors (supercapacitors) represent a vibrant area of research due to their environmental friendliness, long lifetimes, high power capability, and relative underdevelopment when compared to electrochemical batteries. Currently supercapacitors have gravimetric energies one order of magnitude lower than similarly advanced batteries, while conversly enjoying a similar advantage over them in terms of power. The challenge is to increase the gravimentric energies and conserve the high power. On the material side, research focuses on highly porous supports and electrolytes, the critical components of supercapacitors. Through the use of electrolyte systems with a wider electrochemical stability window, as well as properly tailored carbon nanomaterials as electrodes, significant improvements in performance are possible. Room Temperature Ionic Liquids and Carbide-Derived Carbons are promising electrolytes and electrodes, respectively. RTILs have been shown to be stable at up to twice the voltage of organic solvent-salt systems currently employed in supercapacitors, and CDCs are tunable in pore structure, show good electrical conductivity, and superior demonstrated capability as electrode material. This work aims to better understand the interplay of electrode and electrolyte parameters, such as pore structure and ion size, in the ultimate performance of RTIL-based supercapacitors in terms of power, energy, and temperature of operation. For this purpose, carbon

  1. Effect of ion charges on the electric double layer capacitance of activated carbon in aqueous electrolyte systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Icaza, Juan C.; Guduru, Ramesh K.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon based electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs) are known for high power density, but their energy density is limited due to surface characteristics of the electrode materials as well as the size and charge of the ions used in the electrolyte. Therefore, considering the current demand for enhanced energy density devices, we investigated the use of multivalent electrolytes to increase the capacitance of activated carbon (AC) based EDLCs. As part of these studies, we examined the effect of the charge of the multivalent ions on the capacitive behavior of microporous AC electrodes and compared with the univalent Li+ system. We performed impedance and cyclic voltammetry measurements on AC electrodes in a symmetric two electrode configuration to determine the impedance and capacitance with respect to varying charge and concentration of the ions in the aqueous nitrate electrolytes. These studies clearly demonstrated an increased capacitance with Mg2+ and Al3+ implying the possible effects of ion mobility and electrolyte conductivity in addition to the multivalent charge. These preliminary observations clearly point to the importance of selection of electrolyte ions with more charge, conductivity, and suitable size with respect to the pore size of the electrodes in order to increase the capacitance of EDLCs.

  2. Phase diagram and transformations of iron pentacarbonyl to nm layered hematite and carbon-oxygen polymer under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Young Jay; Kim, Minseob; Yoo, Choong -Shik

    2015-10-12

    In this study, we present the phase diagram of Fe(CO)5, consisting of three molecular polymorphs (phase I, II and III) and an extended polymeric phase that can be recovered at ambient condition. The phase diagram indicates a limited stability of Fe(CO)5 within a pressure-temperature dome formed below the liquid- phase II- polymer triple point at 4.2 GPa and 580 K. The limited stability, in turn, signifies the temperature-induced weakening of Fe-CO back bonds, which eventually leads to the dissociation of Fe-CO at the onset of the polymerization of CO. The recovered polymer is a composite of novel nm-lamellar layers of crystalline hematite Fe2O3 and amorphous carbon-oxygen polymers. These results, therefore, demonstrate the synthesis of carbon-oxygen polymer by compressing Fe(CO)5, which advocates a novel synthetic route to develop atomistic composite materials by compressing organometallic compounds.

  3. Multi-electrode double layer capacitor having single electrolyte seal and aluminum-impregnated carbon cloth electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Farahmandi, C.J.; Dispennette, J.M.; Blank, E.; Kolb, A.C.

    1999-01-19

    A single cell, multi-electrode high performance double layer capacitor includes first and second flat stacks of electrodes adapted to be housed in a closeable two-part capacitor case which includes only a single electrolyte seal. Each electrode stack has a plurality of electrodes connected in parallel, with the electrodes of one stack being interleaved with the electrodes of the other stack to form an interleaved stack, and with the electrodes of each stack being electrically connected to respective capacitor terminals. A porous separator sleeve is inserted over the electrodes of one stack before interleaving to prevent electrical shorts between the electrodes. The electrodes are made by folding a compressible, low resistance, aluminum-impregnated carbon cloth, made from activated carbon fibers, around a current collector foil, with a tab of the foils of each electrode of each stack being connected in parallel and connected to the respective capacitor terminal. The height of the interleaved stack is somewhat greater than the inside height of the closed capacitor case, thereby requiring compression of the interleaved electrode stack when placed inside of the case, and thereby maintaining the interleaved electrode stack under modest constant pressure. The closed capacitor case is filled with an electrolytic solution and sealed. A preferred electrolytic solution is made by dissolving an appropriate salt into acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN). In one embodiment, the two parts of the capacitor case are conductive and function as the capacitor terminals. 32 figs.

  4. Reduced graphene oxide with ultrahigh conductivity as carbon coating layer for high performance sulfur@reduced graphene oxide cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongbin; Peng, Zhenhuan; Wang, Wenjun; Chen, Xikun; Fang, Jianhui; Xu, Jiaqiang

    2014-01-01

    We developed hydrogen iodide (HI) reduction of rGO and surfactant-assisted chemical reaction- deposition method to form hybrid material of sulfur (S) encapsulated in reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets for rechargeable lithium batteries. The surfactant-assisted chemical reaction-deposition method strategy provides intimate contact between the S and graphene oxide. Chemical reduced rGO with high conductivity as carbon coating layer prevented the dissolution of polysulfide ions and improved the electron transfer. This novel core-shell structured S@rGO composites with high S content showed high reversible capacity, good discharge capacity retention and enhanced rate capability used as cathodes in rechargeable Li/S cells. We demonstrated here that an electrode prepared from a S@rGO with up to 85 wt% S maintains a stable discharge capacity of about 980 mAh g-1 at 0.05 C and 570 mAh g-1 at 1C after 200 cycles charge/discharge. These results emphasize the importance of rGO with high electrical conductivity after HI-reduced rGO homogeneously coating on the surface of S, therefore, effectively alleviating the shuttle phenomenon of polysulfides in organic electrolyte. Our surfactant-assisted chemical reaction-HI reduction approach should offer a new technique for the design and synthesis of battery electrodes based on highly conducting carbon materials.

  5. Multiresidue analysis of pesticides in vegetables and fruits using two-layered column with graphitized carbon and water absorbent polymer.

    PubMed

    Obana, H; Akutsu, K; Okihashi, M; Hori, S

    2001-09-01

    A high-throughput multiresidue analysis of pesticides in non-fatty vegetables and fruits was developed. The method consisted of a single extraction and a single clean-up procedure. Food samples were extracted with ethyl acetate and the mixture of extract and food dregs were poured directly into the clean-up column. The clean-up column consisted of two layers of water-absorbent polymer (upper) and graphitized carbon (lower), which were packed in a reservoir (75 ml ) of a cartridge column. The polymer removed water in the extract while the carbon performed clean-up. In a recovery test, 110 pesticides were spiked and average recoveries were more than 95% from spinach and orange. Most pesticides were recovered in the range 70-115% with RSD usually < 10% for five experiments. The residue analyses were performed by the extraction of 12 pesticides from 13 samples. The two methods resulted in similar residue levels except chlorothalonil in celery, for which the result was lower with the proposed method. The results confirmed that the proposed method could be applied to monitoring of pesticide residue in foods.

  6. Influence of the ionomer/carbon ratio for low-Pt loading catalyst layer prepared by reactive spray deposition technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haoran; Roller, Justin M.; Mustain, William E.; Maric, Radenka

    2015-06-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) catalyst layers (CLs) were fabricated by direct deposition of the catalyst onto Nafion® membranes using reactive spray deposition technique (RSDT) to reduce platinum (Pt) loading and reduce the number of catalyst synthesis and processing steps. Nitrogen adsorption, mercury porosimetry, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to investigate the effects of ionomer/carbon ratio (I/C) on the surface area, pore structure and morphology of the CLs; cyclic voltammetry and polarization curves were used to determine the electrochemically active area (ECSA) and PEMFC performance. The BET surface area and pore volume of the CLs decreased continuously with increasing I/C ratio regardless of the catalyst loading. Bimodal distribution of pores with diameters ranging from 1.7 to 10 nm and from 30 to 100 nm were observed from the pore-size distribution of the CLs. The catalyst-coated membrane (CCM) with an I/C ratio of 0.3 showed the highest ECSA of 62 m2 gPt-1 and the best performance at 0.6 V for oxygen (1400 mA cm-2) and air (650 mA cm-2) among all RSDT samples. The optimum I/C ratio is lower compared to ink-based methods, and Pt nanoparticles showed improved distribution on the carbon surface. The RSDT process shows promise in achieving better ionomer coverage and penetration in the CL microstructure, enhancing the performance of low Pt-loading PEMFCs.

  7. Multi-electrode double layer capacitor having single electrolyte seal and aluminum-impregnated carbon cloth electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Farahmandi, C. Joseph; Dispennette, John M.; Blank, Edward; Kolb, Alan C.

    1999-01-19

    A single cell, multi-electrode high performance double layer capacitor includes first and second flat stacks of electrodes adapted to be housed in a closeable two-part capacitor case which includes only a single electrolyte seal. Each electrode stack has a plurality of electrodes connected in parallel, with the electrodes of one stack being interleaved with the electrodes of the other stack to form an interleaved stack, and with the electrodes of each stack being electrically connected to respective capacitor terminals. A porous separator sleeve is inserted over the electrodes of one stack before interleaving to prevent electrical shorts between the electrodes. The electrodes are made by folding a compressible, low resistance, aluminum-impregnated carbon cloth, made from activated carbon fibers, around a current collector foil, with a tab of the foils of each electrode of each stack being connected in parallel and connected to the respective capacitor terminal. The height of the interleaved stack is somewhat greater than the inside height of the closed capacitor case, thereby requiring compression of the interleaved electrode stack when placed inside of the case, and thereby maintaining the interleaved electrode stack under modest constant pressure. The closed capacitor case is filled with an electrolytic solution and sealed. A preferred electrolytic solution is made by dissolving an appropriate salt into acetonitrile (CH.sub.3 CN). In one embodiment, the two parts of the capacitor case are conductive and function as the capacitor terminals.

  8. Multi-electrode double layer capacitor having single electrolyte seal and aluminum-impregnated carbon cloth electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Farahmandi, C. J.; Dispennette, J. M.; Blank, E.; Kolb, A. C.

    1999-05-25

    A single cell, multi-electrode high performance double layer capacitor includes first and second flat stacks of electrodes adapted to be housed in a closeable two-part capacitor case which includes only a single electrolyte seal. Each electrode stack has a plurality of electrodes connected in parallel, with the electrodes of one stack being interleaved with the electrodes of the other stack to form an interleaved stack, and with the electrodes of each stack being electrically connected to respective capacitor terminals. A porous separator sleeve is inserted over the electrodes of one stack before interleaving to prevent electrical shorts between the electrodes. The electrodes are made by folding a compressible, low resistance, aluminum-impregnated carbon cloth, made from activated carbon fibers, around a current collector foil, with a tab of the foils of each electrode of each stack being connected in parallel and connected to the respective capacitor terminal. The height of the interleaved stack is somewhat greater than the inside height of the closed capacitor case, thereby requiring compression of the interleaved electrode stack when placed inside of the case, and thereby maintaining the interleaved electrode stack under modest constant pressure. The closed capacitor case is filled with an electrolytic solution and sealed. A preferred electrolytic solution is made by dissolving an appropriate salt into acetonitrile (CH[sub 3]CN). In one embodiment, the two parts of the capacitor case are conductive and function as the capacitor terminals. 32 figs.

  9. Multi-electrode double layer capacitor having single electrolyte seal and aluminum-impregnated carbon cloth electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Farahmandi, C Joseph [San Diego, CA; Dispennette, John M [Oceanside, CA; Blank, Edward [San Diego, CA; Kolb, Alan C [Rancho Santa Fe, CA

    1999-05-25

    A single cell, multi-electrode high performance double layer capacitor includes first and second flat stacks of electrodes adapted to be housed in a closeable two-part capacitor case which includes only a single electrolyte seal. Each electrode stack has a plurality of electrodes connected in parallel, with the electrodes of one stack being interleaved with the electrodes of the other stack to form an interleaved stack, and with the electrodes of each stack being electrically connected to respective capacitor terminals. A porous separator sleeve is inserted over the electrodes of one stack before interleaving to prevent electrical shorts between the electrodes. The electrodes are made by folding a compressible, low resistance, aluminum-impregnated carbon cloth, made from activated carbon fibers, around a current collector foil, with a tab of the foils of each electrode of each stack being connected in parallel and connected to the respective capacitor terminal. The height of the interleaved stack is somewhat greater than the inside height of the closed capacitor case, thereby requiring compression of the interleaved electrode stack when placed inside of the case, and thereby maintaining the interleaved electrode stack under modest constant pressure. The closed capacitor case is filled with an electrolytic solution and sealed. A preferred electrolytic solution is made by dissolving an appropriate salt into acetonitrile (CH.sub.3 CN). In one embodiment, the two parts of the capacitor case are conductive and function as the capacitor terminals.

  10. Influence of Metal Contacts on Graphene Transport Characteristics and Its Removal with Nano-carbon Interfacial Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Akinobu; Ito, Yu; Katakura, Kenta; Sonoda, Hiroki; Higuchi, Shoma; Tomori, Hikari; Ootuka, Youiti

    Graphene is a promising candidate for the next-generation electronic material. While considerable effort has been devoted to achieve higher mobility in graphene films, relatively little attention has been paid to the effect of metal contacts, which are indispensable to the electric devices. At a graphene/metal interface, mainly due to the difference in work functions, carriers are injected from the metal to graphene. The resulting shift of local Dirac point is not limited at the graphene/metal interface but extends into the graphene channel. This carrier doping affects more significantly the performance of graphene field effect devices with shorter channel, as well as may conceal Dirac physics at the graphene/metal interface. Here, we experimentally investigate the channel length dependence of graphene transport properties in a wide gate-voltage range and extract the effect of metal contact. Several metal species are investigated. We reveal the origin of electron-hole asymmetry and the effect of the chemical interaction between graphene and metal, and derive the effective work function of graphene (4.93 eV). Furthermore, we succeed in reducing the influence of metal contact by inserting a thin nano-carbon layer (amorphous carbon or multilayer graphene (MLG)) at the interface.

  11. Horseradish peroxidase immobilization on carbon nanodots/CoFe layered double hydroxides: direct electrochemistry and hydrogen peroxide sensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinling; Wang, Zhangcui; Rui, Yeping; Li, Maoguo

    2015-02-15

    Carbon nanodots and CoFe layered double hydroxide composites (C-Dots/LDHs) were prepared via simply mixing C-Dots and CoFe-LDHs. The as-prepared composites were used for the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on the glass carbon (GC) electrode. The electrochemical behavior of the HRP/C-Dots/LDHs/GC electrode and its application as a H2O2 biosensor were investigated. The results indicated that HRP immobilized by C-Dots/LDHs retained the activity of enzyme and displayed quasi-reversible redox behavior and fast electron transfer with an electron transfer rate constant ks of 8.46 s(-1). Under optimum experimental conditions, the HRP/C-Dots/LDHs/GC electrode displayed good electrocatalytic reduction activity and excellent analytic performance toward H2O2. The H2O2 biosensor showed a linear range of 0.1-23.1 μM (R(2) = 0.9942) with a calculated detection limit of 0.04 μM (S/N = 3). In addition, the biosensor exhibited high sensitivity, good selectivity, acceptable reproducibility and stability. The superior properties of this biosensor are attributed to the synergistic effect of HRP, C-Dots and CoFe-LDHs, which has been proved by investigating their electrochemical response to H2O2. Thus the C-Dots and LDHs composites provide a promising platform for the immobilization of redox enzymes and construction of sensitive biosensors.

  12. Phase diagram and transformations of iron pentacarbonyl to nm layered hematite and carbon-oxygen polymer under pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Ryu, Young Jay; Kim, Minseob; Yoo, Choong -Shik

    2015-10-12

    In this study, we present the phase diagram of Fe(CO)5, consisting of three molecular polymorphs (phase I, II and III) and an extended polymeric phase that can be recovered at ambient condition. The phase diagram indicates a limited stability of Fe(CO)5 within a pressure-temperature dome formed below the liquid- phase II- polymer triple point at 4.2 GPa and 580 K. The limited stability, in turn, signifies the temperature-induced weakening of Fe-CO back bonds, which eventually leads to the dissociation of Fe-CO at the onset of the polymerization of CO. The recovered polymer is a composite of novel nm-lamellar layers ofmore » crystalline hematite Fe2O3 and amorphous carbon-oxygen polymers. These results, therefore, demonstrate the synthesis of carbon-oxygen polymer by compressing Fe(CO)5, which advocates a novel synthetic route to develop atomistic composite materials by compressing organometallic compounds.« less

  13. Phase Diagram and Transformations of Iron Pentacarbonyl to nm Layered Hematite and Carbon-Oxygen Polymer under Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Young Jay; Kim, Minseob; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2015-01-01

    We present the phase diagram of Fe(CO)5, consisting of three molecular polymorphs (phase I, II and III) and an extended polymeric phase that can be recovered at ambient condition. The phase diagram indicates a limited stability of Fe(CO)5 within a pressure-temperature dome formed below the liquid- phase II- polymer triple point at 4.2 GPa and 580 K. The limited stability, in turn, signifies the temperature-induced weakening of Fe-CO back bonds, which eventually leads to the dissociation of Fe-CO at the onset of the polymerization of CO. The recovered polymer is a composite of novel nm-lamellar layers of crystalline hematite Fe2O3 and amorphous carbon-oxygen polymers. These results, therefore, demonstrate the synthesis of carbon-oxygen polymer by compressing Fe(CO)5, which advocates a novel synthetic route to develop atomistic composite materials by compressing organometallic compounds. PMID:26456761

  14. Supercritical carbon dioxide-assisted rapid synthesis of few-layer black phosphorus for hydrogen peroxide sensing.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shancheng; Wang, Bojun; Wang, Zhulan; Hu, Dong; Xu, Xin; Wang, Junzhuan; Shi, Yi

    2016-06-15

    Solutions with large-scale dispersions of 2D black phosphorus (BP), often referred to as phosphorene, are obtained through solvent exfoliation. But, rapid phosphorene synthesis remains a challenge. Furthermore, although the chemical sensing capability of BP-based sensors has been theoretically predicted, its experimental verification remains lacking. In this study, we demonstrate the use of supercritical carbon dioxide-assisted rapid synthesis (5h) of few-layer BP. In addition, we construct a non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) sensor based on few-layer BP for the first time to utilize BP degradation under ambient conditions. The proposed H2O2 sensor exhibits a considerably lower detection limit of 1 × 10(-7) M compared with the general detection limit of 1 × 10(-7) M-5 × 10(-5)M via electrochemical methods. Overall, the results of this study will not only expand the coverage of BP research but will also identify the important sensing characteristics of BP.

  15. Carbon nanosheet-titania nanocrystal composites from reassembling of exfoliated graphene oxide layers with colloidal titania nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong-Jun; Aizawa, Mami; Peng, Wen-Qing; Wang, Zheng-Ming; Hirotsu, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    Nanoporous composites of carbon nanosheets (CNS) and titania nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by reassembling of delaminated graphite oxide (GO) layers with titania clear sol (TCS), and their structural and porous properties were examined by various physico-chemical methods such as XRD, TG/DTA, FT-IR, Raman, FE-SEM/TEM, and low temperature N2 adsorption. It was found that the facile approach, which utilizes the electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged GO layers and the positively charged TCS particles, leads to a well composed CNS and ultrafine TiO2 NPs material whose titania amount reaches up to 71 wt%. The titania phase in these composite materials is mainly anatase, which is resistible against high temperature calcination, but also contains a little amount of rutile and brookite depending on synthesis condition. The porosity of the composite is improved and partially affected by the size distributions of TiO2 NPs. The unique structure, better porosity, and compatible surface affinity of these composites bring about an adsorption concentration-promoted photocatalytic effects toward organic dyes by successfully combining both properties of CNS and titania NPs.

  16. Hierarchically Structured Hole Transport Layers of Spiro-OMeTAD and Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes for Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiyong; Menamparambath, Mini Mol; Hwang, Jae-Yeol; Baik, Seunghyun

    2015-07-20

    The low electrical conductivity of spiro-OMeTAD hole transport layers impedes further enhancements of the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of perovskite solar cells. We embedded multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in spiro-OMeTAD (spiro-OMeTAD/MWNTs) to increase carrier mobility and conductivity. However, direct electrical contact between CH3 NH3 PbI3 and the MWNTs created pathways for undesirable back-electron transfer, owing to the large work function of MWNTs, limiting enhancements of the PCE. A hierarchical structure of pure spiro-OMeTAD and spiro-OMeTAD/MWNTs was designed to block back-electron transfer and fully exploit the enhanced charge transport of spiro-OMeTAD/MWNTs. The enhanced fill factor, short-circuit current density, open-circuit voltage, and PCE (15.1 %) were achieved by using this hierarchical hole transport layer structure (MWNT concentration=2 wt %). The perovskite solar cells were fabricated by a low-temperature solution process, further decreasing their per-Watt cost.

  17. Impact of the atomic layer deposition precursors diffusion on solid-state carbon nanotube based supercapacitors performances.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Giuseppe; Vollebregt, Sten; Tichelaar, F D; Ishihara, Ryoichi; Sarro, Pasqualina M

    2015-02-13

    A study on the impact of atomic layer deposition (ALD) precursors diffusion on the performance of solid-state miniaturized nanostructure capacitor array is presented. Three-dimensional nanostructured capacitor array based on double conformal coating of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) bundles is realized using ALD to deposit Al2O3 as dielectric layer and TiN as high aspect-ratio conformal counter-electrode on 2 μm long MWCNT bundles. The devices have a small footprint (from 100 μm(2) to 2500 μm(2)) and are realized using an IC wafer-scale manufacturing process with high reproducibility (≤0.3E-12F deviation). To evaluate the enhancement of the electrode surface, the measured capacitance values are compared to a lumped circuital model. The observed discrepancies are explained with a partial coating of the CNT, that determine a limited use of the available electrode surface area. To analyze the CNT coating effectiveness, the ALD precursors diffusions inside the CNT bundle is studied using a Knudsen diffusion mechanism.

  18. Potentiometric strip cell based on carbon nanotubes as transducer layer: toward low-cost decentralized measurements.

    PubMed

    Rius-Ruiz, F Xavier; Crespo, Gastón A; Bejarano-Nosas, Diego; Blondeau, Pascal; Riu, Jordi; Rius, F Xavier

    2011-11-15

    In this study, we developed a potentiometric planar strip cell based on single-walled carbon nanotubes that aims to exploit the attributes of solid-contact ion-selective electrodes for decentralized measurements. That is, the ion-selective and reference electrodes have been simultaneously miniaturized onto a plastic planar substrate by screen-printing and drop-casting techniques, obtaining disposable strip cells with satisfactory performance characteristics (i.e., the sensitivity is 57.4 ± 1.3 mV/dec, the response time is ≤30 s within the linear range from log a(K+) = -5 to -2, and the limit of detection is -6.5), no need of maintenance during long dry storage, quick signal stabilization, and light insensitivity in short-term measurements. We also show how the new potentiometric strip cell makes it possible to perform decentralized and rapid determinations of ions in real samples, such as saliva or beverages.

  19. Two layer 4:4 co-ordinated KI crystals grown within single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, J.; Novotny, M. C.; Bailey, S. R.; Brown, G.; Xu, C.; Williams, V. C.; Friedrichs, S.; Flahaut, E.; Callender, R. L.; York, A. P. E.; Coleman, K. S.; Green, M. L. H.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Hutchison, J. L.

    2000-10-01

    The formation of `all surface' 4:4 co-ordinated KI crystals within 1.4 nm diameter single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) is reported. KI was inserted into the SWNTs by a capillary method [J. Sloan, D.M. Wright, H.G. Woo, S. Bailey, G. Brown, A.P.E. York, K.S. Coleman, J.L. Hutchison, M.L.H. Green, J. Chem. Soc. Chem. Commun. (1999) 699], whereby the nanotubes were combined intimately with the molten halide. The crystals grew with <0 0 1> (relative to bulk KI) parallel to the tubule axes and were continuous tetragonally distorted bilayer crystals composed of alternating columns of K-I and I-K pairs when viewed along <1 0 0> .

  20. Dendron growth from vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube thin layer arrays for photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Bissett, Mark Alexander; Köper, Ingo; Quinton, Jamie Scott; Shapter, Joe George

    2011-04-07

    Single-walled carbon nanotube arrays attached to conductive transparent electrodes have previously shown promise for use in photovoltaic devices, whilst still retaining light transmission. Here, chemical modification of these thin (<200 nm) arrays with PAMAM-type dendrons has been undertaken to enhance the photoresponse of these devices. The effect of modification on the electrode was measured by differential pulse voltammetry to detect the dendrons, and the effect on the nanotubes was measured by Raman spectroscopy. Solar simulator illumination of the cells was performed to measure the effect of the nanotube modification on the cell power, and determine the optimal modification. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was also used to investigate the equivalent electronic circuit elements of the cells. The optimal dendron modification occurred with the second generation (G-2.0), which gave a 70% increase in power over the unmodified nanotube array.

  1. Single standing carbon nanotube array in gate holes using a silicon nitride cap layer

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Sung Hoon; Yoon, Hyun Sik; Moon, Jong Hyun; Park, Kyu Chang; Jang, Jin

    2005-12-12

    We studied the growth of a single standing carbon nanotube (CNT) which was grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition in the gate hole formed by conventional photolithography in the silicon nitride. The number of CNT per hole increases with increasing the gate hole diameter and a single CNT could be grown in a 3 {mu}m hole. A single standing CNT in a gate hole exhibited the turn-on field of 1.6 V/{mu}m and the current density of 16 {mu}A at 3.3 V/{mu}m. The emission currents follow the Fowler-Nordheim equation with a field enhancement factor of 1.14x10{sup 7}.

  2. Comparative studies of S-layer proteins from Bacillus stearothermophilus strains expressed during growth in continuous culture under oxygen-limited and non-oxygen-limited conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Sára, M; Sleytr, U B

    1994-01-01

    The specific properties of S-layer proteins from three different Bacillus stearothermophilus strains revealing oblique, square, or hexagonal lattice symmetry were preserved during growth in continuous culture on complex medium only under oxygen-limited conditions in which glucose was used as the sole carbon source. When oxygen limitation was relieved, amino acids became metabolized, cell density increased, and different S-layer proteins from wild-type strains became rapidly replaced by a new common type of S-layer protein with an apparent subunit molecular weight of 97,000 which assembled into an identical oblique (p2) lattice type. During switching from wild-type strains to variants, patches of the S-layer lattices characteristics for wild-type strains, granular regions, and areas with oblique lattice symmetry could be observed on the surface of individual cells from all organisms. The granular regions apparently consisted of mixtures of the S-layer proteins from the wild-type strains and the newly synthesized p2 S-layer proteins from the variants. S-layer proteins from wild-type strains possessed identical N-terminal regions but led to quite different cleavage products upon peptide mapping, indicating that they are encoded by different genes. Chemical analysis including N-terminal sequencing and peptide mapping showed that the oblique S-layer lattices synthesized under increased oxygen supply were composed of identical protein species. Images PMID:7961489

  3. Diurnal and vertical variability of the sensible heat and carbon dioxide budgets in the atmospheric surface layer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casso-Torralba, P.; de Arellano, J. V. -G.; Bosveld, F.; Soler, M.R.; Vermeulen, A.; Werner, C.; Moors, E.

    2008-01-01

    The diurnal and vertical variability of heat and carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmospheric surface layer are studied by analyzing measurements from a 213 in tower in Cabauw (Netherlands). Observations of thermodynamic variables and CO2 mixing ratio as well as vertical profiles of the turbulent fluxes are used to retrieve the contribution of the budget terms in the scalar conservation equation. On the basis of the daytime evolution of turbulent fluxes, we calculate the budget terms by assuming that turbulent fluxes follow a linear profile with height. This assumption is carefully tested and the deviation ftom linearity is quantified. The budget calculation allows us to assess the importance of advection of heat and CO2 during day hours for three selected days. It is found that, under nonadvective conditions, the diurnal variability of temperature and CO2 is well reproduced from the flux divergence measurements. Consequently, the vertical transport due to the turbulent flux plays a major role in the daytime evolution of both scalars and the advection is a relatively small contribution. During the analyzed days with a strong contribution of advection of either heat or carbon dioxide, the flux divergence is still an important contribution to the budget. For heat, the quantification of the advection contribution is in close agreement with results from a numerical model. For carbon dioxide, we qualitatively corroborate the results with a Lagrangian transport model. Our estimation of advection is compared with, traditional estimations based on the Net Ecosystem-atmosphere Exchange (NEE). Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Cobalt Ferrite Bearing Nitrogen-Doped Reduced Graphene Oxide Layers Spatially Separated with Microporous Carbon as Efficient Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Varchaswal; Singh, Santosh K; Kurungot, Sreekumar

    2016-08-17

    The present work discloses how high-quality dispersion of fine particles of cobalt ferrite (CF) could be attained on nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (CF/N-rGO) and how this material in association with a microporous carbon phase could deliver significantly enhanced activity toward electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Our study indicates that the microporous carbon phase plays a critical role in spatially separating the layers of CF/N-rGO and in creating a favorable atmosphere to ensure the seamless distribution of the reactants to the active sites located on CF/N-rGO. In terms of the ORR current density, the heat-treated hybrid catalyst at 150 °C (CF/N-rGO-150) is found to be clearly outperforming (7.4 ± 0.5 mA/cm(2)) the state-of-the-art 20 wt % Pt-supported carbon catalyst (PtC) (5.4 ± 0.5 mA/cm(2)). The mass activity and stability of CF-N-rGO-150 are distinctly superior to PtC even after 5000 electrochemical cycles. As a realistic system level exploration of the catalyst, testing of a primary zinc-air battery could be demonstrated using CF/N-rGO-150 as the cathode catalyst. The battery is giving a galvanostatic discharge time of 15 h at a discharge current density of 20 mA/cm(2) and a specific capacity of ∼630 mAh g(-1) in 6 M KOH by using a Zn foil as the anode. Distinctly, the battery performance of this system is found to be superior to that of PtC in less concentrated KOH solution as the electrolyte.

  5. Disordered Carbons and Battery Applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hang

    This dissertation describes studies of the crystal structure of disordered carbons and the electrochemical intercalation of lithium in the disordered carbons. One of the most important applications of carbons is as an electrode material in rechargable lithium-ion (rocking chair) battery systems. These usually use carbon as the anode and thus depend on the related behavior of lithium intercalation in carbons. An important quantity for measuring the performance of such a battery is the maximum reversible capacity, which strongly depends on the carbon crystal structure. In order to study the structure of disordered carbons, we have developed a structural model for disordered carbons and a corresponding automated structure refinement program for X-ray powder diffraction patterns of disordered carbons. These diffraction patterns can be complex to interpret because of the complicated nature of layer stacking in disordered carbons. The structural model used in the refinement program is divided into two cases, the one-layer model (for highly disordered carbons) and the two-layer model (for graphitic carbons). Some of the important parameters of the model are, for example, (1) the probability P of finding a random shift between layers, which is large for disordered carbons like coke and carbon fibers, small for heat treated synthetic graphitic carbons and practically zero for natural graphite; (2) P_{t}, the probability of finding a local 3R stacking fault in graphitic carbons; (3) 1-g (only in the one layer model), the percentage of unorganized carbon in disordered carbons; (4) zeta, a dimensionless parameter for measuring in-plane strain in the carbon layer; (5) the finite size of carbon grains L_{a}, (parallel to the layers) and L_{c}, (perpendicular to the layers), (6) fluctuations in the spacing between adjacent layers; (7) the average lattice constants, c and a; (8) the constant background and other important quantities. The program minimizes the difference between

  6. Exotic damping ring lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    This paper looks at, and compares three types of damping ring lattices: conventional, wiggler lattice with finite ..cap alpha.., wiggler lattice with ..cap alpha.. = 0, and observes the attainable equilibrium emittances for the three cases assuming a constraint on the attainable longitudinal impedance of 0.2 ohms. The emittance obtained are roughly in the ratio 4:2:1 for these cases.

  7. Synthesis of multi-layer graphene and multi-wall carbon nanotubes from direct decomposition of ethanol by microwave plasma without using metal catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincón, R.; Melero, C.; Jiménez, M.; Calzada, M. D.

    2015-06-01

    The synthesis of nanostructured carbon materials by using microwave plasmas at atmospheric pressure is presented. This technique involves only one step and without any other supplementary chemical process or metal catalyst. Multi-layer graphene, multi-wall carbon nananotubes and H2 were obtained by the plasma after ethanol decomposition. Strong emissions of both C2 molecular bands and C carbon were emitted by the plasma during the process. Futhermore, plasma parameters were studied. Our research shows that both C2 radicals and high gas temperatures (>3000 K) are required for the synthesis of these materials, which contribute to the understanding of materials synthesis by plasma processes.

  8. A new nonlinear optical silicate carbonate K2Ca[Si2O5](CO3) with a hybrid structure of kalsilite and soda-like layered fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belokoneva, Elena L.; Stefanovich, Sergey Yu.; Volkov, Anatoly S.; Dimitrova, Olga V.

    2016-10-01

    Single crystals of a new silicate carbonate, K2Ca[Si2O5](CO3), have been synthesized in a multi-components hydrothermal solution with a pH value close to neutral and a high concentration of a carbonate mineralizer. The new compound has an axial structure (s.g. P6322) with unit cell parameters a = 5.04789 (15), c = 17.8668 (6) Å. Pseudosymmetry of the structure corresponds to s.g. P63/mmc which is broken only by one oxygen position. The structure consists of two layered fragments: one of the type of the mineral kalsilite (KAlSiO4) and the other of the high-temperature soda-like α-Na2CO3, Ca substituting for Na. The electro-neutral layer K2[Si2O5] (denoted K) as well as the layer Ca(CO3) (denoted S) may separately correspond to individual structures. In K2Ca[Si2O5](CO3) the S-K layers are connected together via Ca-O interactions between Ca atoms from the carbonate layer and apical O atoms from the silicate one, and also via K-O interlayer interactions. A hypothetical acentric structure, sp.gr. P-62c, is predicted on the basis of the order-disorder theory. It presents another symmetrical option for the arrangement of K-layers relative to S-layers. The K,Ca-silicate-carbonate powder produces a moderate SHG signal that is two times larger that of the α-quartz powder standard and close to other silicates with acentric structures and low electronic polarizability.

  9. Graphene-like carbon nitride layers: stability, porosity, band gaps, and magnetic ground states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacham, Helio; da Silva-Araujo, Joice; Brito, Walber

    In the present work, we investigate the relative stability and electronic properties of carbon nitride (CxNy) graphene-like structures using a combination of a new bond-counting method and density-functional-theory (DFT) first-principles calculations. We obtain analytical and numerical results for the energetics and the morphology of graphene-like CxNy For instance, at high N concentrations, the bond-counting method allows us to search among millions of possible structures, and we find several ones with ab initio formation energies per N atom comparable to, or even smaller than, that of the isolated graphitic N impurity. Those structures are characterized by a variety of nanoporous graphene morphologies. The low-energy C-N structures also present a variety of band gaps, from zero to 1.6 eV, which can be tuned by stoichiometry and porosity. Several structures also present ferro- and antiferromagnetic ground states. We thank support from CNPq, CAPES, and FAPEMIG.

  10. Carbon nanotube/polymer composites as a highly stable hole collection layer in perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Habisreutinger, Severin N; Leijtens, Tomas; Eperon, Giles E; Stranks, Samuel D; Nicholas, Robin J; Snaith, Henry J

    2014-10-08

    Organic-inorganic perovskite solar cells have recently emerged at the forefront of photovoltaics research. Power conversion efficiencies have experienced an unprecedented increase to reported values exceeding 19% within just four years. With the focus mainly on efficiency, the aspect of stability has so far not been thoroughly addressed. In this paper, we identify thermal stability as a fundamental weak point of perovskite solar cells, and demonstrate an elegant approach to mitigating thermal degradation by replacing the organic hole transport material with polymer-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) embedded in an insulating polymer matrix. With this composite structure, we achieve JV scanned power-conversion efficiencies of up to 15.3% with an average efficiency of 10 ± 2%. Moreover, we observe strong retardation in thermal degradation as compared to cells employing state-of-the-art organic hole-transporting materials. In addition, the resistance to water ingress is remarkably enhanced. These are critical developments for achieving long-term stability of high-efficiency perovskite solar cells.

  11. Effect of ordered mesoporous carbon contact layer on the sensing performance of sputtered RuO2 thin film pH sensor.

    PubMed

    Lonsdale, W; Maurya, D K; Wajrak, M; Alameh, K

    2017-03-01

    The effect of contact layer on the pH sensing performance of a sputtered RuO2 thin film pH sensor is investigated. The response of pH sensors employing RuO2 thin film electrodes on screen-printed Pt, carbon and ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) contact layers are measured over a pH range from 4 to 10. Working electrodes with OMC contact layer are found to have Nernstian pH sensitivity (-58.4mV/pH), low short-term drift rate (5.0mV/h), low hysteresis values (1.13mV) and fast reaction times (30s), after only 1h of conditioning. A pH sensor constructed with OMC carbon contact layer displays improved sensing performance compared to Pt and carbon-based counterparts, making this electrode more attractive for applications requiring highly-accurate pH sensing with reduced conditioning time.

  12. Large pore volume mesoporous copper particles and scaffold microporous carbon material obtained from an inorganic-organic nanohybrid material, copper-succinate-layered hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Ghotbi, Mohammad Yeganeh; Bagheri, Narjes; Sadrnezhaad, S K

    2011-10-01

    Copper-succinate-layered hydroxide (CSLH), a new nanohybrid material, was synthesized as an inorganic-organic nanohybrid, in which organic moiety was intercalated between the layers of a single cation layered material, copper hydroxide nitrate. Microporous scaffold carbon material was obtained by thermal decomposition of the nanohybrid at 500 °C under argon atmosphere followed by acid washing process. Furthermore, the heat-treated product of the nanohybrid at 600 °C was ultrafine mesoporous metallic copper particles. The results of this study confirmed the great potential of CSLH to produce the carbon material with large surface area (580 m(2)/g) and high pore volume copper powder (2.04 cm(3)/g).

  13. Excess carbon in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X.; Oxley, M. P.; Puzyrev, Y.; Tuttle, B. R.; Duscher, G.; Pantelides, S. T.

    2010-12-01

    The application of SiC in electronic devices is currently hindered by low carrier mobility at the SiC/SiO2 interfaces. Recently, it was reported that 4H-SiC/SiO2 interfaces might have a transition layer on the SiC substrate side with C/Si ratio as high as 1.2, suggesting that carbon is injected into the SiC substrate during oxidation or other processing steps. We report finite-temperature quantum molecular dynamics simulations that explore the behavior of excess carbon in SiC. For SiC with 20% excess carbon, we find that, over short time (˜24 ps), carbon atoms bond to each other and form various complexes, while the silicon lattice is largely unperturbed. These results, however, suggest that at macroscopic times scale, C segregation is likely to occur; therefore a transition layer with 20% extra carbon would not be stable. For a dilute distribution of excess carbon, we explore the pairing of carbon interstitials and show that the formation of dicarbon interstitial cluster is kinetically very favorable, which suggests that isolated carbon clusters may exist inside SiC substrate.

  14. Multi-phase micro-scale flow simulation in the electrodes of a PEM fuel cell by lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Li, X.

    The gas diffusion layer of a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is a porous medium generally made of carbon cloth or paper. The gas diffusion layer has been modeled conventionally as a homogeneous porous medium with a constant permeability in the literature of PEM fuel cell. However, in fact, the permeability of such fibrous porous medium is strongly affected by the fiber orientation having non-isotropic permeability. In this work, the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is applied to the multi-phase flow phenomenon in the inhomogeneous gas diffusion layer of a PEM fuel cell. The inhomogeneous porous structure of the carbon cloth and carbon paper has been modeled as void space and porous area using Stokes/Brinkman formulation and void space and impermeable fiber distributions obtained from various microscopic images. The permeability of the porous medium is calculated and compared to the experimental measurements in literature showing a good agreement. Simulation results for various fiber distributions indicate that the permeability of the medium is strongly influenced by the effect of fiber orientation. Present lattice Boltzmann flow models are applied to the multi-phase flow simulations by incorporating multi-component LB model with inter-particle interaction forces. The model successfully simulates the complicated unsteady behaviors of liquid droplet motion in the porous medium providing a useful tool to investigate the mechanism of liquid water accumulation/removal in a gas diffusion layer of a PEM fuel cell.

  15. Macroscale cobalt-MOFs derived metallic Co nanoparticles embedded in N-doped porous carbon layers as efficient oxygen electrocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hai-Sheng; Zhang, Haimin; Liu, Rongrong; Zhang, Xian; Zhao, Huijun; Wang, Guozhong

    2017-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) materials have aroused great research interest in different areas owing to their unique properties, such as high surface area, various composition, well-organized framework and controllable porous structure. Controllable fabrication of MOFs materials at macro-scale may be more promising for their large-scale practical applications. Here we report the synthesis of macro-scale Co-MOFs crystals using 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid (H3BTC) linker in the presence of Co2+, triethylamine (TEA) and nonanoic acid by a facile solvothermal reaction. Further, the as-fabricated Co-MOFs as precursor was pyrolytically treated at different temperatures in N2 atmosphere to obtain metallic Co nanoparticles embedded in N-doped porous carbon layers (denoted as Co@NPC). The results demonstrate that the Co-MOFs derived sample obtained at 900 °C (Co@NPC-900) shows a porous structure (including micropore and mesopore) with a surface area of 110.8 m2 g-1 and an N doping level of 1.62 at.% resulted from TEA in the pyrolysis process. As electrocatalyst, the Co@NPC-900 exhibits bifunctional electrocatalytic activities toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in alkaline media which are key reactions in some renewable energy technologies such as fuel cells and rechargeable metal-air batteries. The results indicate that the Co@NPC-900 can afford an onset potential of 1.50 V (vs. RHE) and a potential value of 1.61 V (vs. RHE) at a current density of 10 mA cm-2 for ORR and OER with high applicable stability, respectively. The efficient catalytic activity of Co@NPC-900 as bifunctional oxygen electrocatalyst can be ascribed to N doping and embedded metallic Co nanoparticles in carbon structure providing catalytic active sites and porous structure favourable for electrocatalysis-related mass transport.

  16. Atomic layer deposition of high-k dielectrics on single-walled carbon nanotubes: a Raman study.

    PubMed

    Liyanage, Luckshitha Suriyasena; Cott, Daire J; Delabie, Annelies; Van Elshocht, Sven; Bao, Zhenan; Wong, H-S Philip

    2013-06-21

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have great potential to become the channel material for future high-speed transistor technology. However, to realize a carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNTFET) with excellent gate control, the high-k dielectrics between the CNT and the metal gate must have superb electrical properties and extremely high uniformity. Thus it is essential to understand the interactions between high-k materials and the SWCNTs to effectively control the transistor characteristics. In this study, we investigate the effects of atomic layer deposited (ALD) high-k dielectrics (Al2O3 and HfO2) on SWCNTs using Raman spectroscopy. We subjected the SWCNTs to various ALD cycles and studied the nucleation and growth of ALD dielectrics at defect sites using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images. We analyzed these samples using Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The Raman peak shifts of the G-peak and the 2D (G') peaks suggest doping and stress induced effects on the CNTs by the surrounding high-k oxide environment. Trends in the G-peak FWHM and G/D-peak ratios were identified and compared between Al2O3 and HfO2. We confirmed the ALD-deposited HfO2 is polycrystalline using x-ray diffraction and analyzed dielectric-CNT bonding states using XPS measurements. This study provides insights on the effects of ALD high-k materials on SWCNTs for future high-speed transistor applications.

  17. Atomic layer deposition of high-k dielectrics on single-walled carbon nanotubes: a Raman study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriyasena Liyanage, Luckshitha; Cott, Daire J.; Delabie, Annelies; Van Elshocht, Sven; Bao, Zhenan; Wong, H.-S. Philip

    2013-06-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have great potential to become the channel material for future high-speed transistor technology. However, to realize a carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNTFET) with excellent gate control, the high-k dielectrics between the CNT and the metal gate must have superb electrical properties and extremely high uniformity. Thus it is essential to understand the interactions between high-k materials and the SWCNTs to effectively control the transistor characteristics. In this study, we investigate the effects of atomic layer deposited (ALD) high-k dielectrics (Al2O3 and HfO2) on SWCNTs using Raman spectroscopy. We subjected the SWCNTs to various ALD cycles and studied the nucleation and growth of ALD dielectrics at defect sites using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images. We analyzed these samples using Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The Raman peak shifts of the G-peak and the 2D (G‧) peaks suggest doping and stress induced effects on the CNTs by the surrounding high-k oxide environment. Trends in the G-peak FWHM and G/D-peak ratios were identified and compared between Al2O3 and HfO2. We confirmed the ALD-deposited HfO2 is polycrystalline using x-ray diffraction and analyzed dielectric-CNT bonding states using XPS measurements. This study provides insights on the effects of ALD high-k materials on SWCNTs for future high-speed transistor applications.

  18. Impact of carbon and tungsten as divertor materials on the scrape-off layer conditions in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groth, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Belo, P.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Brix, M.; Clever, M.; Coenen, J. W.; Corrigan, C.; Eich, T.; Flanagan, J.; Guillemaut, C.; Giroud, C.; Harting, D.; Huber, A.; Jachmich, S.; Kruezi, U.; Lawson, K. D.; Lehnen, M.; Lowry, C.; Maggi, C. F.; Marsen, S.; Meigs, A. G.; Pitts, R. A.; Sergienko, G.; Sieglin, B.; Silva, C.; Sirinelli, A.; Stamp, M. F.; van Rooij, G. J.; Wiesen, S.; JET-EFDA Contributors, the

    2013-09-01

    The impact of carbon and beryllium/tungsten as plasma-facing components on plasma radiation, divertor power and particle fluxes, and plasma and neutral conditions in the divertors has been assessed in JET both experimentally and by edge fluid code simulations for plasmas in low-confinement mode. In high-recycling conditions the studies show a 30% reduction in total radiation in the scrape-off (SOL) layer when replacing carbon (JET-C) with beryllium in the main chamber and tungsten in the divertor (JET-ILW). Correspondingly, at the low-field side (LFS) divertor plate a two-fold increase in power conducted to the plate and a two-fold increase in electron temperature at the strike point were measured. In low-recycling conditions the SOL was found to be nearly identical for both materials' configurations. Saturation and rollover of the ion currents to both low- and high-field side (HFS) plates was measured to occur at 30% higher upstream densities and radiated power fraction in JET-ILW. Past saturation, it was possible to reduce the ion currents to the LFS targets by a factor of 2 and to continue operating in stable, detached conditions in JET-ILW; in JET-C the reduction was limited to 50%. These observations are in qualitative agreement with predictions from the fluid edge code package EDGE2D/EIRENE, for which a 30% reduction of the total radiated power is also yielded when switching from C to Be/W. For matching upstream parameters the magnitude of predicted radiation is, however, 50% to 100% lower than measured, independent of the materials' configuration. Inclusion of deuterium molecules and molecular ions, and temperature and density dependent rates in EIRENE reproduced the experimentally observed rollover of the ion current to the LFS plate, via reducing the electron temperature at the plate.

  19. Initial evaluation and comparison of plasma damage to atomic layer carbon materials using conventional and low T{sub e} plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtiani, Ashish V.; Miyazoe, Hiroyuki; Chang, Josephine; Farmer, Damon B.; Engel, Michael; Neumayer, Deborah; Han, Shu-Jen; Engelmann, Sebastian U. Joseph, Eric A.; Boris, David R.; Hernández, Sandra C.; Walton, Scott G.; Lock, Evgeniya H.

    2016-01-15

    The ability to achieve atomic layer precision is the utmost goal in the implementation of atomic layer etch technology. Carbon-based materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene are single atomic layers of carbon with unique properties and, as such, represent the ultimate candidates to study the ability to process with atomic layer precision and assess impact of plasma damage to atomic layer materials. In this work, the authors use these materials to evaluate the atomic layer processing capabilities of electron beam generated plasmas. First, the authors evaluate damage to semiconducting CNTs when exposed to beam-generated plasmas and compare these results against the results using typical plasma used in semiconductor processing. The authors find that the beam generated plasma resulted in significantly lower current degradation in comparison to typical plasmas. Next, the authors evaluated the use of electron beam generated plasmas to process graphene-based devices by functionalizing graphene with fluorine, nitrogen, or oxygen to facilitate atomic layer deposition (ALD). The authors found that all adsorbed species resulted in successful ALD with varying impact on the transconductance of the graphene. Furthermore, the authors compare the ability of both beam generated plasma as well as a conventional low ion energy inductively coupled plasma (ICP) to remove silicon nitride (SiN) deposited on top of the graphene films. Our results indicate that, while both systems can remove SiN, an increase in the D/G ratio from 0.08 for unprocessed graphene to 0.22 to 0.26 for the beam generated plasma, while the ICP yielded values from 0.52 to 1.78. Generally, while some plasma-induced damage was seen for both plasma sources, a much wider process window as well as far less damage to CNTs and graphene was observed when using electron beam generated plasmas.

  20. Grafting effect on the wetting and electrochemical performance of carbon cloth electrode and polypropylene separator in electric double layer capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepniak, Izabela; Ciszewski, Aleksander

    Activated carbon (AC) fiber cloths and hydrophobic microporous polypropylene (PP) membrane, both modified by plasma-induced graft polymerization of acrylic acid (AAc) under UV irradiation, and filled with saturated lithium hydroxide solution were used as electrodes, a separator and electrolyte in electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs). The modification process changed the hydrophobic character of AC and PP materials to hydrophilic, made them wettable and serviceable as components of an electrochemical capacitor. The presence of poly(acrylic acid) on the AC and PP surface was confirmed by SEM and XPS methods. Electrochemical characteristics of EDLCs were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge cycle tests and also by impedance spectroscopy. At the 1000th cycle of potential cycling (1 A g -1) the specific capacitance of 110 F g -1 was obtained with a specific energy of 11 Wh kg -1 at power density of 1 kW kg -1. The above results provide valuable information which may be used when developing novel compositions of EDLCs.

  1. Carbon Quantum Dots/TiOx Electron Transport Layer Boosts Efficiency of Planar Heterojunction Perovskite Solar Cells to 19.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Shi, Weina; Huang, Wenchao; Yao, En-Ping; Han, Junbo; Chen, Zhifan; Liu, Shuangshuang; Shen, Yan; Wang, Mingkui; Yang, Yang

    2017-03-06

    In planar n-i-p heterojunction perovskite solar cells, the electron transport layer (ETL) plays important roles in charge extraction and determine the morphology of the perovskite film. Here, we report a solution-processed carbon quantum dots (CQDs)/TiO2 composite that has negligible absorption in the visible spectral range, a very attractive feature for perovskite solar cells. Using this novel CQDs/TiO2 ETL in conjunction with a planar n-i-p heterojunction, we achieved an unprecedented efficiency of ∼19% under standard illumination test conditions. It was found that a CQDs/TiO2 combination increases both the open circuit voltage and short-circuits current density as compared to using TiO2 alone. Various advanced spectroscopic characterizations including ultrafast spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, and electronic impedance spectroscopy elucidate that the CQDs increases the electronic coupling between the CH3NH3PbI3-xClx and TiO2 ETL interface as well as energy levers that contribute to electron extraction.

  2. Synthesis of carbon nanotube-nickel nanocomposites using atomic layer deposition for high-performance non-enzymatic glucose sensing.

    PubMed

    Choi, Taejin; Kim, Soo Hyeon; Lee, Chang Wan; Kim, Hangil; Choi, Sang-Kyung; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Eunkyoung; Park, Jusang; Kim, Hyungjun

    2015-01-15

    A useful strategy has been developed to fabricate carbon-nanotube-nickel (CNT-Ni) nanocomposites through atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Ni and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of functionalized CNTs. Various techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), were used to characterize the morphology and the structure of as-prepared samples. It was confirmed that the products possess uniform Ni nanoparticles that are constructed by finely controlled deposition of Ni onto oxygen or bromine functionalized CNT surface. Electrochemical studies indicate that the CNT-Ni nanocomposites exhibit high electrocatalytic activity for glucose oxidation in alkaline solutions, which enables the products to be used in enzyme-free electrochemical sensors for glucose determination. It was demonstrated that the CNT-Ni nanocomposite-based glucose biosensor offers a variety of merits, such as a wide linear response window for glucose concentrations of 5 μM-2 mM, short response time (3 s), a low detection limit (2 μM), high sensitivity (1384.1 μA mM(-1) cm(-2)), and good selectivity and repeatability.

  3. Electric double-layer capacitors with tea waste derived activated carbon electrodes and plastic crystal based flexible gel polymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleman, M.; Deraman, M.; Othman, M. A. R.; Omar, R.; Hashim, M. A.; Basri, N. H.; Nor, N. S. M.; Dolah, B. N. M.; Hanappi, M. F. Y. M.; Hamdan, E.; Sazali, N. E. S.; Tajuddin, N. S. M.; Jasni, M. R. M.

    2016-08-01

    We report a novel configuration of symmetrical electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) comprising a plastic crystalline succinonitrile (SN) based flexible polymer gel electrolyte, incorporated with sodium trifluoromethane sulfonate (NaTf) immobilised in a host polymer poly (vinylidine fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVdF-HFP). The cost-effective activated carbon powder possessing a specific surface area (SSA) of ~ 1700 m2g-1 containing a large proportion of meso-porosity has been derived from tea waste to use as supercapacitor electrodes. The high ionic conductivity (~3.6×10-3 S cm-1 at room temperature) and good electrochemical stability render the gel polymer electrolyte film a suitable candidate for the fabrication of EDLCs. The performance of the EDLCs has been tested by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and galvanostatic charge-discharge studies. The performance of the EDLC cell is found to be promising in terms of high values of specific capacitance (~270 F g-1), specific energy (~ 36 Wh kg-1), and power density (~ 33 kW kg-1).

  4. Fiber containment for improved laboratory handling and uniform nanocoating of milligram quantities of carbon nanotubes by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Devine, Christina K; Oldham, Christopher J; Jur, Jesse S; Gong, Bo; Parsons, Gregory N

    2011-12-06

    The presence of nanostructured materials in the workplace is bringing attention to the importance of safe practices for nanomaterial handling. We explored novel fiber containment methods to improve the handling of carbon nanotube (CNT) powders in the laboratory while simultaneously allowing highly uniform and controlled atomic layer deposition (ALD) coatings on the nanotubes, down to less than 4 nm on some CNT materials. Moreover, the procedure yields uniform coatings on milligram quantities of nanotubes using a conventional viscous flow reactor system, circumventing the need for specialized fluidized bed or rotary ALD reactors for laboratory-scale studies. We explored both fiber bundles and fiber baskets as possible containment methods and conclude that the baskets are more suitable for coating studies. An extended precursor and reactant dose and soak periods allowed the gases to diffuse through the fiber containment, and the ALD coating thickness scaled linearly with the number of ALD cycles. The extended dose period produced thicker coatings compared to typical doses on CNT controls not encased in the fibers, suggesting some effects due to the extended reactant dose. Film growth was compared on a range of single-walled NTs, double-walled NTs, and acid-functionalized multiwalled NTs, and we found that ultrathin coatings were most readily controlled on the multiwalled NTs.

  5. Detection Of Uric Acid Based On Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Polymerized With A Layer Of Molecularly Imprinted PMAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Yen; Lin, Chia-Yu; Ho, Kuo-Chuan

    2009-05-01

    A molecularly imprinted poly-metharylic acid (PMAA), polymerizing on the surface of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT), was synthesized. The MWCNT was modified by a layer of carboxylic acid and reacted with EDC and NHS to activate the carboxylic acid, which was prepared for the purpose of bonding allyl amine and getting an unsaturated side chain (-C=C). The resultant structure is abbreviated as MWCNTs-CH=CH2. It is well known that the vinyl group side chain provides good attachment between the MWCNTs and the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP). The MIP based on PMAA was polymerized on the surface of MWCNTs-CH=CH2 with the addition of uric acid (UA). The non-imprinted polymer (NIP) was polymerized without adding UA. The adsorbed amount of UA approached the equilibrium value upon 60 min adsorption. The adsorption isotherm was obtained by immersing 10 mg of MIP or NIP in 5 mL aqueous solution containing different concentrations of UA. The adsorbed amounts were measured via a UV-Vis spectrometer at a wavelength of 292 nm. From the adsorption isotherm, it is seen that the MIP particles possess a good imprinting efficiency of about 4.41.

  6. Direct formation of anatase TiO2 nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes by atomic layer deposition and their photocatalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sheng-Hsin; Liao, Shih-Yun; Wang, Chih-Chieh; Kei, Chi-Chung; Gan, Jon-Yiew; Perng, Tsong-Pyng

    2016-10-01

    TiO2 with different morphology was deposited on acid-treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by atomic layer deposition at 100 °C-300 °C to form a TiO2@CNT structure. The TiO2 fabricated at 100 °C was an amorphous film, but became crystalline anatase nanoparticles when fabricated at 200 °C and 300 °C. The saturation growth rates of TiO2 nanoparticles at 300 °C were about 1.5 and 0.4 Å/cycle for substrate-enhanced growth and linear growth processes, respectively. It was found that the rate constants for methylene blue degradation by the TiO2@CNT structure formed at 300 °C were more suitable to fit with second-order reaction. The size of 9 nm exhibited the best degradation efficiency, because of the high specific area and appropriate diffusion length for the electrons and holes.

  7. Fibrous Containment for Improved Laboratory Handling and Uniform Nanocoating of Milligram Quantities of Carbon Nanotubes by Atomic Layer Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Devine, Christina K.; Oldham, Christopher J.; Jur, Jesse S.; Gong, Bo; Parsons, Gregory N.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of nanostructured materials in the work place is bringing attention to the importance of safe practices for nanomaterial handling. We explored novel fiber containment methods to improve the handling of carbon nanotube (CNT) powders in the laboratory, while simultaneously allowing highly uniform and controlled atomic layer deposition (ALD) coatings on the nanotubes, down to less than 4 nm on some CNT materials. Moreover, the procedure yields uniform coatings on milligram quantities of nanotubes using a conventional viscous flow reactor system, circumventing the need for specialized fluidized bed or rotary ALD reactors for lab-scale studies. We explored both fiber bundles and fiber baskets as possible containment methods and conclude that the baskets are more suitable for coating studies. An extended precursor and reactant dose and soak periods allowed the gases to diffuse through the fiber containment, and the ALD coating thickness scaled linearly with the number of ALD cycles. The extended dose period produced thicker coatings compared with typical doses onto CNT controls not encased in the fibers, suggesting some effects due to the extended reactant dose. Film growth was compared on a range of single wall NTs, double wall NTs, and acid functionalized multiwall NTs and we found that ultrathin coatings were most readily controlled on the multi-walled NTs. PMID:22070742

  8. Carbon gel assisted low temperature liquid-phase synthesis of C-LiFePO4/graphene layers with high rate and cycle performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hongwei; Si, Yanli; Chang, Kun; Fu, Xiaoning; li, Bao; Shangguan, Enbo; Chang, Zhaorong; Yuan, Xiao-Zi; Wang, Haijiang

    2015-11-01

    Nano-scale LiFePO4/graphene oxide (GO) as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries has been successfully synthesized via a one-step carbon gel assisted liquid-phase approach at a low-temperature (108 °C) and normal pressure. C-LiFePO4/graphene layers (G) composites, composed of LiFePO4, amorphous carbon and graphene layers, are then produced after rapid high temperature carbon treatment. Interface tunnel effect, produced by the intimate contact of LiFePO4 particles with amorphous carbon and graphene layers, greatly improves the properties of the composites. Electrochemical tests indicate that the optimal amount of GO addition is 1 wt.% in terms of achieving a high electrochemical performance of the C-LiFePO4/G composites. Discharge capacity of the C-LiFePO4/G composites is 160.0 mAh g-1 at 0.2 C. When the current rate is further increased to 60 C, the discharge capacity of C-LiFePO4/G can reach 68 mAh g-1. At a high current rate of 20 C, the capacity attenuation rate of the C-LiFePO4/G electrode is only 9.6% after 200 cycles, showing excellent high-rate discharge capability and cycle performance. This is achieved under a facile synthesis condition of a simple procedure, low temperature, and normal pressure.

  9. Nanotube-Substrate Interactions: Distinguishing Carbon Nanotubes by the Helical Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolmogorov, Aleksey N.; Crespi, Vincent H.; Schleier-Smith, Monika H.; Ellenbogen, James C.

    2004-02-01

    We investigate the interaction of a carbon nanotube with a graphite substrate, using an interlayer potential that explicitly treats the registry dependence of the interaction. The carbon-carbon bond lengths in nanotubes differ slightly from those in flat graphite, so that the naively commensurate angular orientations for the tube with respect to the substrate lattice are destroyed. The interaction of a one-dimensional tube with a two-dimensional substrate then leads to an unusual registry phenomenon not visible in standard layer-on-layer growth: the system develops favorable orientations which clearly are incommensurate.

  10. Molecular motions of [Beta]-carotene and a carotenoporphyrin dyad in solution. A carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation time study

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.; Swindle, S.L.; Smith, S.K.; Nieman, R.A.; Moore, A.L.; Moore, T.A.; Gust, D. )

    1995-03-09

    Analysis of [sup 13]C NMR spin-lattice relaxation times (T[sub 1]) yields information concerning both overall tumbling of molecules in solution and internal rotations about single bonds. Relaxation time and nuclear Overhauser effect data have been obtained for [Beta]-carotene and two related molecules, squalane and squalene, for zinc meso-tetraphenylporphyrin, and for a dyad consisting of a porphyrin covalently linked to a carotenoid polyene through a trimethylene bridge. Squalane and squalene, which lack conjugated double bonds, behave essentially as limp string, with internal rotations at least as rapid as overall isotropic tumbling motions. In contrast, [Beta]-carotene reorients as a rigid rod, with internal motions which are too slow to affect relaxation times. Modeling it as an anisotropic rotor yields a rotational diffusion coefficient for motion about the major axis which is 14 times larger than that for rotation about axes perpendicular to that axis. The porphyrin reorients more nearly isotropically and features internal librational motions about the single bonds to the phenyl groups. The relaxation time data for the carotenoporphyrin are consistent with internal motions similar to those of a medieval military flail. 31 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: lattice corneal dystrophy type I

    MedlinePlus

    ... lattice pattern. Affected individuals often have recurrent corneal erosions, which are caused by separation of particular layers of the cornea from one another. Corneal erosions are very painful and can cause sensitivity to ...

  12. Materials based on carbon-filled porous layers of PVC cyclam derivatives cross-linked with the surfaces of asbestos fabric fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzivadze, A. Yu.; Fridman, A. Ya.; Morozova, E. M.; Sokolova, N. P.; Voloshchuk, A. M.; Petukhova, G. A.; Bardishev, I. I.; Gorbunov, A. M.; Novikov, A. K.; Polyakova, I. Ya.; Titova, V. N.; Yavich, A. A.; Petrova, N. V.

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis of bilayer materials with porous upper layers composed of PVC hydroxyethylcyclam derivatives filled with carbon and a layer consisting of hydroxyethylcyclam, cross-linked via Si-O-C groups with the silica chains of a developed surface of asbestos fabric, is described. The aza-crown groups in these materials are bound with aqua complexes of H2SO4 or NaOH. The structure of the materials is examined, their adsorption characteristics are determined, and the rate of motion of H+ or OH- ions in electrochemical bridges is measured, while the formation of H2 and O2 in their cathodic and anodic polarization is determined as a function of voltage. It is shown that the upper layer of these materials is adsorption-active and electronand H+- or OH-- conductive, while the bottom layer is only H+- or OH-- conductive; through it, the upper layer is supplied with the H+ or OH- ions needed for the regeneration of the aqua complexes broken down to H2 and O2 on carbon particles.

  13. SISGR: Improved Electrical Energy Storage with Electrochemical Double Layer Capacitance Based on Novel Carbon Electrodes, New Electrolytes, and Thorough Development of a Strong Science Base

    SciTech Connect

    Ruoff, Rodney S.; Alam, Todd M.; Bielawski, Christopher W.; Chabal, Yves; Hwang, Gyeong; Ishii, Yoshitaka; Rogers, Robin

    2014-07-23

    The broad objective of the SISGR program is to advance the fundamental scientific understanding of electrochemical double layer capacitance (EDLC) and thus of ultracapacitor systems composed of a new type of electrode based on chemically modified graphene (CMG) and (primarily) with ionic liquids (ILs) as the electrolyte. Our team has studied the interplay between graphene-based and graphene-derived carbons as the electrode materials in electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLC) systems on the one hand, and electrolytes including novel ionic liquids (ILs), on the other, based on prior work on the subject.

  14. Realizing Parafermions in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fangli; Gorshkov, Alexey

    2016-05-01

    Parafermions, which are the fractional versions of Majorana fermions, possess more exotic braiding statistics than Majorana fermions and are therefore more powerful from the point of view of topological quantum computing. We propose a scheme to realize parafermionic zero modes in optical lattices, without the use of superconductive paring. With the help of laser assisted tunneling and on-site interactions, two layers of ultracold atoms in distinct hyperfine states can be engineered to host +/- 1 / m fractional quantum Hall states. We then introduce a finite-extent potential barrier that pierces both layers - this gives rise to two counter-propagating edge states that sit on top of each other. Finally, laser induced coupling is used to introduce backscattering between the two edge states and to gap them out. We show that the resulting defects give rise to the topological degeneracy associated with parafermions. We also discuss methods for preparation and detection.

  15. Dissipative photonic lattice solitons.

    PubMed

    Ultanir, Erdem A; Stegeman, George I; Christodoulides, Demetrios N

    2004-04-15

    We show that discrete dissipative optical lattice solitons are possible in waveguide array configurations that involve periodically patterned semiconductor optical amplifiers and saturable absorbers. The characteristics of these low-power soliton states are investigated, and their propagation constant eigenvalues are mapped on Floquet-Bloch band diagrams. The prospect of observing such low-power dissipative lattice solitons is discussed in detail.

  16. Influence of a nanorod molecular layer on the biological activity of neuronal cells. A semiclassical model for complex solid/liquid interfaces with carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mezzasalma, Stefano A

    2011-08-15

    A general account of electric effects is given for a biological phase interacting with a nanorod molecular layer by means of the formed hard-soft and solid-liquid interfaces. In particular, the frequency enhancement previously detected for the spontaneous activity of neuronal cultures interfaced with carbon nanotubes is quantitatively explained upon a quantum/semiclassical description, where the duration of a biological signal is viewed as the (average) lifetime of a decaying state (or population of states), and the effect of the carbon phase as a linewidth broadening. Four contributions were principally accounted for, one biological, for the synaptic strength, one electrochemical, for the overall capacitance increase implied by the nanotube double layers, one geometric, for the typical scales ruling the electron and ion conduction mechanisms, and one electromagnetic-like, translating the membrane polarization changes. These calculations predict an enhancement factor equal on average to ≃6.39, against a former experimental value ≃6.08.

  17. Formation and microstructure of carbon encapsulated superparamagnetic Co nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiang-Cheng; Reyes-Gasga, J.; Dong, X. L.

    Carbon encapsulated magnetic cobalt nanoparticles have been synthesized by the modified arc-discharge method. Both high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) profiles reveal the presence of 8-15nm diameter crystallites coated with 1-3 carbon layers. In particular, HREM images indicate that the intimate and contiguous carbon fringe around those Co nanoparticles is good evidence for complete encapsulation by carbon shell layers. The encapsulated phases are identified as hcp α-Co, fcc β-Co and cobalt carbide (Co 3 C) nanocrystals using X-ray diffraction (XRD), nano-area electron diffraction (SAED) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). However, some fcc β-Co particles with a significant fraction of stacking faults are observed by HREM and confirmed by means of numerical fast Fourier transform (FFT) of HREM lattice images. The carbon encapsulation formation and growth mechanism are also reviewed.

  18. On interlayer stability and high-cycle simulator performance of diamond-like carbon layers for articulating joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Thorwarth, Kerstin; Thorwarth, Götz; Figi, Renato; Weisse, Bernhard; Stiefel, Michael; Hauert, Roland

    2014-06-11

    Diamond like carbon (DLC) coatings have been proven to be an excellent choice for wear reduction in many technical applications. However, for successful adaption to the orthopaedic field, layer performance, stability and adhesion in physiologically relevant setups are crucial and not consistently investigated. In vitro wear testing as well as adequate corrosion tests of interfaces and interlayers are of great importance to verify the long term stability of DLC coated load bearing implants in the human body. DLC coatings were deposited on articulating lumbar spinal disks made of CoCr28Mo6 biomedical implant alloy using a plasma-activated chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) process. As an adhesion promoting interlayer, tantalum films were deposited by magnetron sputtering. Wear tests of coated and uncoated implants were performed in physiological solution up to a maximum of 101 million articulation cycles with an amplitude of ±2° and -3/+6° in successive intervals at a preload of 1200 N. The implants were characterized by gravimetry, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and cross section scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. It is shown that DLC coated surfaces with uncontaminated tantalum interlayers perform very well and no corrosive or mechanical failure could be observed. This also holds true in tests featuring overload and third-body wear by cortical bone chips present in the bearing pairs. Regarding the interlayer tolerance towards interlayer contamination (oxygen), limits for initiation of potential failure modes were established. It was found that mechanical failure is the most critical aspect and this mode is hypothetically linked to the α-β tantalum phase switch induced by increasing oxygen levels as observed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). It is concluded that DLC coatings are a feasible candidate for near zero wear articulations on implants, potentially even surpassing the performance of ceramic vs. ceramic.

  19. Sensitivity of remote sensing-derived phytoplankton productivity to mixed layer depth: Lessons from the carbon-based productivity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milutinović, Svetlana; Behrenfeld, Michael J.; Johannessen, Johnny A.; Johannessen, Truls

    2009-12-01

    Mixed layer depth (MLD) has long been recognized as having an important influence on underwater light budget and, thus, net primary productivity (NPP) of phytoplankton. The depth- and wavelength-integrated carbon-based productivity model (DWI CbPM) is one of a few productivity algorithms that explicitly use information on MLD to estimate ocean NPP from remote sensing observations. This study evaluates the sensitivity of NPP estimates from the DWI CbPM to MLD input by using MLD fields from four different ocean models. Owing to the effect of MLD on light availability, the model NPP is generally inversely related to MLD, but the strength of this relationship is highly variable. In most of the ocean, it exhibits a seasonal character. In summer, NPP at middle and high latitudes can show substantial sensitivity to subtle changes in MLD, but is largely robust to strong MLD variability in winter. An opposite seasonal pattern is encountered in subtropical ocean gyres. A lack of seasonality is observed in tropical areas, among which only the equatorial Pacific displays strong response of NPP to small or moderate changes in MLD. We find that the spatial and temporal variability of the MLD-NPP relationship can be explained by nonlinearity and light saturation/limitation thresholds indicated in the DWI CbPM, as well as the influence of surface irradiance (I0) and diffuse attenuation coefficient for downwelling light at 490 nm (Kd(490)). NPP is sensitive to varying MLD only if coincidental I0 and Kd(490) values are such that combined with the coexisting differences in MLD estimates, they have potential to give effective differences in light saturation/limitation of photosynthesis.

  20. On Interlayer Stability and High-Cycle Simulator Performance of Diamond-Like Carbon Layers for Articulating Joint Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Thorwarth, Kerstin; Thorwarth, Götz; Figi, Renato; Weisse, Bernhard; Stiefel, Michael; Hauert, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Diamond like carbon (DLC) coatings have been proven to be an excellent choice for wear reduction in many technical applications. However, for successful adaption to the orthopaedic field, layer performance, stability and adhesion in physiologically relevant setups are crucial and not consistently investigated. In vitro wear testing as well as adequate corrosion tests of interfaces and interlayers are of great importance to verify the long term stability of DLC coated load bearing implants in the human body. DLC coatings were deposited on articulating lumbar spinal disks made of CoCr28Mo6 biomedical implant alloy using a plasma-activated chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) process. As an adhesion promoting interlayer, tantalum films were deposited by magnetron sputtering. Wear tests of coated and uncoated implants were performed in physiological solution up to a maximum of 101 million articulation cycles with an amplitude of ±2° and −3/+6° in successive intervals at a preload of 1200 N. The implants were characterized by gravimetry, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and cross section scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. It is shown that DLC coated surfaces with uncontaminated tantalum interlayers perform very well and no corrosive or mechanical failure could be observed. This also holds true in tests featuring overload and third-body wear by cortical bone chips present in the bearing pairs. Regarding the interlayer tolerance towards interlayer contamination (oxygen), limits for initiation of potential failure modes were established. It was found that mechanical failure is the most critical aspect and this mode is hypothetically linked to the α-β tantalum phase switch induced by increasing oxygen levels as observed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). It is concluded that DLC coatings are a feasible candidate for near zero wear articulations on implants, potentially even surpassing the performance of ceramic vs. ceramic. PMID

  1. Problem of soot aggregates separation and purification for Carbon isotopic composition analyses - burning experiment and real black layers from speleothems examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hercman, Helena; Zawidzki, Pawel; Majewska, Agata

    2015-04-01

    Burning products are often used as an indicator of fire or prehistoric men activities. When it consists of macroscopically visible black layer it may be studied by different methods. When it is dispersed within sediment it is necessary to apply method for burning product separation. Soot aggregates as a result of incomplete combustion of organic materials are most reliable indication of burning. Size of soot particles is too small to observe by optical microscopy. There are two main advantages of application of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for investigations of samples formed as a result of organic materials (like wood) combustion. First, it makes possible to investigate not only morphology but also its interior structure. The carbon layers arrangement is characteristic for particles obtained from combustion processes, and it directly confirm that these particles were formed that way. And second, analysis of chemical composition using of EDS spectroscopy in transmission microscope are precise and it spatial resolution is about a few nanometers. Burning chamber for wood burning experiments was constructed. It allows wood burning with controlling of burning temperature, carbon isotopic composition in carbon dioxide of burning atmosphere and carbon dioxide originated during burning. Burning products are collected on the plates with controlling of plates material, temperature and distance from flame. Two types of samples were studied. The first type of samples consisted the products of recent wood burning. The second type of samples consisted of black layers collected from speleothems. Soot aggregates were chemically separated from other burning products collected on plates. Process of chemical separation and purity of soot material were tested by TEM observations. Isotopic carbon composition at each step of soot separation as well as original wood fragments was analysed at the Isotopic Laboratory for Dating and Palaeoenvironment Studies, Polish Academy of

  2. The Influence of Multiple Nested Layer Waviness on the Compression Strength of Double Nested Wave Formations in a Carbon Fiber Composite Laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Z. M.; Adams, D. O.; Anas, S.

    2016-01-01

    As advanced composite materials having superior physical and mechanical properties are being developed, the optimization of their processing techniques is eagerly sought. One of the most common defects arising during processing of structural composites is layer waviness. The layer waviness is more pronounced in thick-section flat and cylindrical laminates, which are extensively used in large wind turbine blades, submersibles, and space platforms. The layer waviness undulates the entire layer of a multidirectional laminate in the throughthe-thickness direction, leading to a gross deterioration of its compressive strength. This research investigates the influence of multiple layer waviness in a double nest formation on the compression strength of a composite laminate. Different wave fractions of wavy 0° layers were fabricated in an IM/8551-7 carbon-epoxy composite laminate on a steel mold by using a single-step fabrication procedure. The test laminates were cured on a heated press according to the specific curing cycle of epoxy. Their static compression testing was performed using a NASA short block compression fixture on an MTS servohydraulic machine. The purpose of these tests was to determine the effects of multiple layer wave regions on the compression strength of the composite laminate. The experimental and analytical results obtained revealed that the reduction in the compression strength of composite laminate was constant after the fraction of the wavy 0° layers exceeded 35%. This analysis indicated that the percentage of the 0° wavy layer may be used to estimate the reduction in the compression strength of a double nested wave formation in a composite laminate.

  3. 2D Space-Confined Synthesis of Few-Layer MoS2 Anchored on Carbon Nanosheet for Lithium-Ion Battery Anode.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jingwen; Qin, Jian; Zhang, Xiang; Shi, Chunsheng; Liu, Enzuo; Li, Ji