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Sample records for layered carbon lattices

  1. Josephson vortex lattice in layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, A. E.; Dodgson, M. J. W.

    2013-09-15

    Many superconducting materials are composed of weakly coupled conducting layers. Such a layered structure has a very strong influence on the properties of vortex matter in a magnetic field. This review focuses on the properties of the Josephson vortex lattice generated by the magnetic field applied in the direction of the layers. The theoretical description is based on the Lawrence-Doniach model in the London limit, which takes only the phase degree of freedom of the superconducting order parameter into account. In spite of its simplicity, this model leads to an amazingly rich set of phenomena. We review in detail the structure of an isolated vortex line and various properties of the vortex lattice, in both dilute and dense limits. In particular, we extensively discuss the influence of the layered structure and thermal fluctuations on the selection of lattice configurations at different magnetic fields.

  2. Buried Porous Silicon-Germanium Layers in Monocrystalline Silicon Lattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Robert W. (Inventor); George, Thomas (Inventor); Jones, Eric W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Monocrystalline semiconductor lattices with a buried porous semiconductor layer having different chemical composition is discussed and monocrystalline semiconductor superlattices with a buried porous semiconductor layers having different chemical composition than that of its monocrystalline semiconductor superlattice are discussed. Lattices of alternating layers of monocrystalline silicon and porous silicon-germanium have been produced. These single crystal lattices have been fabricated by epitaxial growth of Si and Si-Ge layers followed by patterning into mesa structures. The mesa structures are strain etched resulting in porosification of the Si-Ge layers with a minor amount of porosification of the monocrystalline Si layers. Thicker Si-Ge layers produced in a similar manner emitted visible light at room temperature.

  3. A theoretical study of a carbon lattice system for lithium intercalated carbon anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlon, L.G.; Storch, D.M.; Newton, J.H.; Sandi, G.

    1997-09-01

    A theoretical study was performed using computational chemistry to describe the intermolecular forces between graphite layers as well as spacing and conformation. It was found that electron correlation and a diffuse basis set were important for this calculation. In addition, the high reactivity of edge sites in lithium intercalated carbon anodes was also investigated. In this case, the reactive sites appear to strongly correlate with the relative distribution of the total atomic spin densities as well as total atomic charges. The spacing of graphite layers and lithium ion separation within an {open_quotes}approximated{close_quotes} lithium intercalated carbon anode was also investigated. The spacing of the carbon layers used in this investigation agrees most closely for that found in disordered carbon lattices.

  4. Lattice-Matched Semiconductor Layers on Single Crystalline Sapphire Substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang; King, Glen; Park, Yeonjoon

    2009-01-01

    SiGe is an important semiconductor alloy for high-speed field effect transistors (FETs), high-temperature thermoelectric devices, photovoltaic solar cells, and photon detectors. The growth of SiGe layer is difficult because SiGe alloys have different lattice constants from those of the common Si wafers, which leads to a high density of defects, including dislocations, micro-twins, cracks, and delaminations. This innovation utilizes newly developed rhombohedral epitaxy of cubic semiconductors on trigonal substrates in order to solve the lattice mismatch problem of SiGe by using trigonal single crystals like sapphire (Al2O3) as substrate to give a unique growth-orientation to the SiGe layer, which is automatically controlled at the interface upon sapphire (0001). This technology is different from previous silicon on insulator (SOI) or SGOI (SiGe on insulator) technologies that use amorphous SiO2 as the growth plane. A cubic semiconductor crystal is a special case of a rhombohedron with the inter-planar angle, alpha = 90 deg. With a mathematical transformation, all rhombohedrons can be described by trigonal crystal lattice structures. Therefore, all cubic lattice constants and crystal planes (hkl) s can be transformed into those of trigonal crystal parameters. These unique alignments enable a new opportunity of perfect lattice matching conditions, which can eliminate misfit dislocations. Previously, these atomic alignments were thought to be impossible or very difficult. With the invention of a new x-ray diffraction measurement method here, growth of cubic semiconductors on trigonal crystals became possible. This epitaxy and lattice-matching condition can be applied not only to SiGe (111)/sapphire (0001) substrate relations, but also to other crystal structures and other materials, including similar crystal structures which have pointgroup rotational symmetries by 120 because the cubic (111) direction has 120 rotational symmetry. The use of slightly miscut (less than

  5. Asymptotically optimal unsaturated lattice cubature formulae with bounded boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanov, M D

    2013-07-31

    This paper describes a new algorithm for constructing lattice cubature formulae with bounded boundary layer. These formulae are unsaturated (in the sense of Babenko) both with respect to the order and in regard to the property of asymptotic optimality on W{sub 2}{sup m}-spaces, m element of (n/2,∞). Most of the results obtained apply also to W{sub 2}{sup μ}(R{sup n})-spaces with a hypoelliptic multiplier of smoothness μ. Bibliography: 6 titles.

  6. Simulating Electric Double Layer Capacitance by Using Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ning; Gersappe, Dilip

    2015-03-01

    By using the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) we studied diffuse-charge dynamics in electrochemical systems. We use the LBM to solve Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations (PNP) and Modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations (MPNP). The isotropic permittivity of electrolyte is modeled using the Booth model. The results show that both steric effect (MPNP) and isotropic permittivity (Booth model) can have large influence on diffuse-charge dynamics, especially when electrolyte concentration or applied potential is high. This model can be applied to simulate electric double layer capacitance of super capacitors with complex geometry and also incorporate other effects such as heat convection in a modular manner.

  7. nBn and pBp infrared detectors with graded barrier layer, graded absorption layer, or chirped strained layer super lattice absorption layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An nBn detector is described where for some embodiments the barrier layer has a concentration gradient, for some embodiments the absorption layer has a concentration gradient, and for some embodiments the absorption layer is a chirped strained layer super lattice. The use of a graded barrier or absorption layer, or the use of a chirped strained layer super lattice for the absorption layer, allows for design of the energy bands so that the valence band may be aligned across the device. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  8. Growth of coincident site lattice matched semiconductor layers and devices on crystalline substrates

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew G; Ptak, Aaron J

    2013-08-13

    Methods of fabricating a semiconductor layer or device and said devices are disclosed. The methods include but are not limited to providing a substrate having a crystalline surface with a known lattice parameter (a). The method further includes growing a crystalline semiconductor layer on the crystalline substrate surface by coincident site lattice matched epitaxy, without any buffer layer between the crystalline semiconductor layer and the crystalline surface of the substrate. The crystalline semiconductor layer will be prepared to have a lattice parameter (a') that is related to the substrate lattice parameter (a). The lattice parameter (a') maybe related to the lattice parameter (a) by a scaling factor derived from a geometric relationship between the respective crystal lattices.

  9. Microscopy of single-layer carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Su; Zhou, Dan

    1994-07-01

    Single-layer carbon nanotubes produced with yttrium carbide as catalyst have been studied with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The morphology, condition of iamging and the method of measurement to determine the actual diameter of a single-layer carbon nanotube have been detailed and the growth mechanism of single-layer carbon nanotubes has been discussed in this research.

  10. Method of producing buried porous silicon-geramanium layers in monocrystalline silicon lattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Robert W. (Inventor); George, Thomas (Inventor); Jones, Eric W. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Lattices of alternating layers of monocrystalline silicon and porous silicon-germanium have been produced. These single crystal lattices have been fabricated by epitaxial growth of Si and Si--Ge layers followed by patterning into mesa structures. The mesa structures are stain etched resulting in porosification of the Si--Ge layers with a minor amount of porosification of the monocrystalline Si layers. Thicker Si--Ge layers produced in a similar manner emitted visible light at room temperature.

  11. Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Enzymes on Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-06-01

    The use of Layer-by-layer techniques for immobilizing several types of enzymes, e.g. glucose oxidase (GOx), horse radish oxidases(HRP), and choline oxidase(CHO) on carbon nanotubes and their applications for biosenseing are presented. The enzyme is immobilized on the negatively charged CNT surface by alternatively assembling a cationic polydiallyldimethyl-ammonium chloride (PDDA) layer and a enzyme layer. The sandwich-like layer structure (PDDA/enzyme/PDDA/CNT) formed by electrostatic assembling provides a favorable microenvironment to keep the bioactivity of enzyme and to prevent enzyme molecule leakage. The morphologies and electrocatalytic acitivity of the resulted enzyme film were characterized using TEM and electrochemical techniques, respectively. It was found that these enzyme-based biosensors are very sensitive, selective for detection of biomolecules, e.g. glucose, choline.

  12. Lattice Breathing Inhibited Layered Vanadium Oxide Ultrathin Nanobelts for Enhanced Sodium Storage.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qiulong; Jiang, Zhouyang; Tan, Shuangshuang; Li, Qidong; Huang, Lei; Yan, Mengyu; Zhou, Liang; An, Qinyou; Mai, Liqiang

    2015-08-26

    Operating as the "rocking-chair" battery, sodium ion battery (SIB) with acceptable high capacity is a very promising energy storage technology. Layered vanadium oxide xerogel exhibits high sodium storage capacity. But it undergoes large lattice breathing during sodiation/desodiation, resulting in fast capacity fading. Herein, we develop a facile hydrothermal method to synthesize iron preintercalated vanadium oxide ultrathin nanobelts (Fe-VOx) with constricted interlayer spacing. Using the Fe-VOx as cathode for SIB, the lattice breathing during sodiation/desodiation is largely inhibited and the interlayer spacing is stabilized for reversible and rapid Na(+) insertion/extraction, displaying enhanced cycling and rate performance. This work presents a new strategy to reduce the lattice breathing of layered materials for enhanced sodium storage through interlayer spacing engineering.

  13. Triangular lattice of carbon nanotube arrays for negative index of refraction and subwavelength lensing effect

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Wang, X.; Rybczynski, J.; Wang, D.Z.; Kempa, K.; Ren, Z.F.

    2005-04-11

    Self-assembly of polystyrene microspheres has been utilized in a two-step masking technique to prepare triangular lattices of catalytic nanodots at low cost. Subsequent triangular lattices of aligned carbon nanotubes on a silicon substrate are achieved by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Nickel is used both in the nanodots and in the secondary mask. The triangular lattices of carbon nanotube arrays as two-dimensional photonic crystals show higher geometrical symmetry than the hexagonal lattices previously reported, enabling broader applications including negative index of refraction and subwavelength lensing effect.

  14. Electronic state of a CoO2 layer with hexagonal structure: a Kagomé lattice structure in a triangular lattice.

    PubMed

    Koshibae, W; Maekawa, S

    2003-12-19

    The electronic state in layered cobalt oxides with a hexagonal structure is examined. We find that the electronic structure reflects the nature of the Kagomé lattice hidden in the CoO2 layer which consists of stacked triangular lattices of oxygen ions and of cobalt ions. A fundamental model for the electron system is proposed, and the mechanism of the unique transport and magnetic properties of the cobalt oxides are discussed in light of the model.

  15. Isolation of two physiologically induced variant strains of Bacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a and characterization of their S-layer lattices.

    PubMed Central

    Sára, M; Pum, D; Küpcü, S; Messner, P; Sleytr, U B

    1994-01-01

    During growth of Bacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a in continuous culture on complex medium, the chemical properties of the S-layer glycoprotein and the characteristic oblique lattice were maintained only if glucose was used as the sole carbon source. With increased aeration, amino acids were also metabolized, accompanied by liberation of ammonium and by changes in the S-layer protein. Depending on the stage of fermentation at which oxygen limitation was relieved, two different variants, one with a more delicate oblique S-layer lattice (variant 3a/V1) and one with a square S-layer lattice (variant 3a/V2), were isolated. During the switch from the wild-type strain to a variant or from variant 3a/V2 to variant 3a/V1, monolayers of two types of S-layer lattices could be demonstrated on the surfaces of single cells. S-layer proteins from variants had different molecular sizes and a significantly lower carbohydrate content than S-layer proteins from the wild-type strain did. Although the S-layer lattices from the wild-type and variant strains showed quite different protein mass distributions in two- and three-dimensional reconstructions, neither the amino acid composition nor the pore size, as determined by permeability studies, was significantly changed. Peptide mapping and N-terminal sequencing results strongly indicated that the three S-layer proteins are encoded by different genes and are not derived from a universal precursor form. Images PMID:8300538

  16. Double layer capacitance of carbon foam electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Delnick, F.M.; Ingersoll, D.; Firsich, D.

    1993-11-01

    We have evaluated a wide variety of microcellular carbon foams prepared by the controlled pyrolysis and carbonization of several polymers including: polyacrylonitrile (PAN), polymethacrylonitrile (PMAN), resorcinol/formaldehyde (RF), divinylbenzene/methacrylonitrile (DVB), phenolics (furfuryl/alcohol), and cellulose polymers such as Rayon. The porosity may be established by several processes including: Gelation (1-5), phase separation (1-3,5-8), emulsion (1,9,10), aerogel/xerogel formation (1,11,12,13), replication (14) and activation. In this report we present the complex impedance analysis and double layer charging characteristics of electrodes prepared from one of these materials for double layer capacitor applications, namely activated cellulose derived microcellular carbon foam.

  17. Anomalous Raman scattering and lattice dynamics in mono- and few-layer WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younghee; Jhon, Young In; Park, June; Kim, Jae Hun; Lee, Seok; Jhon, Young Min

    2016-01-01

    Tungsten ditelluride (WTe2) is a layered material that exhibits excellent magnetoresistance and thermoelectric behaviors, which are deeply related with its distorted orthorhombic phase that may critically affect the lattice dynamics of this material. Here, we report comprehensive characterization of Raman spectra of WTe2 from bulk to monolayer using experimental and computational methods. We find that mono and bi-layer WTe2 are easily identified by Raman spectroscopy since two or one Raman modes that are observed in higher-layer WTe2 are greatly suppressed below the noise level in the mono- and bi-layer WTe2, respectively. In addition, the frequency of in-plane A17 mode of WTe2 remains almost constant as the layer number decreases, while all the other Raman modes consistently blueshift, which is completely different from the vibrational behavior of hexagonal metal dichalcogenides. First-principles calculation validates experimental results and reveals that anomalous lattice vibrations in WTe2 are attributed to the formation of tungsten chains that make WTe2 structurally one-dimensional.Tungsten ditelluride (WTe2) is a layered material that exhibits excellent magnetoresistance and thermoelectric behaviors, which are deeply related with its distorted orthorhombic phase that may critically affect the lattice dynamics of this material. Here, we report comprehensive characterization of Raman spectra of WTe2 from bulk to monolayer using experimental and computational methods. We find that mono and bi-layer WTe2 are easily identified by Raman spectroscopy since two or one Raman modes that are observed in higher-layer WTe2 are greatly suppressed below the noise level in the mono- and bi-layer WTe2, respectively. In addition, the frequency of in-plane A17 mode of WTe2 remains almost constant as the layer number decreases, while all the other Raman modes consistently blueshift, which is completely different from the vibrational behavior of hexagonal metal dichalcogenides

  18. Mode dependent lattice thermal conductivity of single layer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Zhiyong; Yang, Juekuan; Bi, Kedong; Chen, Yunfei

    2014-10-21

    Molecular dynamics simulation is performed to extract the phonon dispersion and phonon lifetime of single layer graphene. The mode dependent thermal conductivity is calculated from the phonon kinetic theory. The predicted thermal conductivity at room temperature exhibits important quantum effects due to the high Debye temperature of graphene. But the quantum effects are reduced significantly when the simulated temperature is as high as 1000 K. Our calculations show that out-of-plane modes contribute about 41.1% to the total thermal conductivity at room temperature. The relative contribution of out-of-plane modes has a little decrease with the increase of temperature. Contact with substrate can reduce both the total thermal conductivity of graphene and the relative contribution of out-of-plane modes, in agreement with previous experiments and theories. Increasing the coupling strength between graphene and substrate can further reduce the relative contribution of out-of-plane modes. The present investigations also show that the relative contribution of different mode phonons is not sensitive to the grain size of graphene. The obtained phonon relaxation time provides useful insight for understanding the phonon mean free path and the size effects in graphene.

  19. Coupled double-layer Fano resonance photonic crystal filters with lattice-displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Shuai, Yichen; Zhao, Deyin; Singh Chadha, Arvinder; Zhou, Weidong; Seo, Jung-Hun; Ma, Zhenqiang; Yang, Hongjun; Fan, Shanhui

    2013-12-09

    We present here ultra-compact high-Q Fano resonance filters with displaced lattices between two coupled photonic crystal slabs, fabricated with crystalline silicon nanomembrane transfer printing and aligned e-beam lithography techniques. Theoretically, with the control of lattice displacement between two coupled photonic crystal slabs layers, optical filter Q factors can approach 211 000 000 for the design considered here. Experimentally, Q factors up to 80 000 have been demonstrated for a filter design with target Q factor of 130 000.

  20. Layered solid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bingyun; Jiang, Bingbing; Gray, McMahan L; Fauth, Daniel J; Pennline, Henry W; Richards, George A

    2014-11-18

    A solid sorbent for the capture and the transport of carbon dioxide gas is provided having at least one first layer of a positively charged material that is polyethylenimine or poly(allylamine hydrochloride), that captures at least a portion of the gas, and at least one second layer of a negatively charged material that is polystyrenesulfonate or poly(acryclic acid), that transports the gas, wherein the second layer of material is in juxtaposition to, attached to, or crosslinked with the first layer for forming at least one bilayer, and a solid substrate support having a porous surface, wherein one or more of the bilayers is/are deposited on the surface of and/or within the solid substrate. A method of preparing and using the solid sorbent is provided.

  1. Four-State Sub-12-nm FETs Employing Lattice-Matched II-VI Barrier Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, F.; Chan, P.-Y.; Suarez, E.; Lingalugari, M.; Kondo, J.; Gogna, P.; Miller, B.; Chandy, J.; Heller, E.

    2013-11-01

    Three-state behavior has been demonstrated in Si and InGaAs field-effect transistors (FETs) when two layers of cladded quantum dots (QDs), such as SiO x -cladded Si or GeO x -cladded Ge, are assembled on the thin tunnel gate insulator. This paper describes FET structures that have the potential to exhibit four states. These structures include: (1) quantum dot gate (QDG) FETs with dissimilar dot layers, (2) quantum dot channel (QDC) with and without QDG layers, (3) spatial wavefunction switched (SWS) FETs with multiple coupled quantum well channels, and (4) hybrid SWS-QDC structures having multiple drains/sources. Four-state FETs enable compact low-power novel multivalued logic and two-bit memory architectures. Furthermore, we show that the performance of these FETs can be enhanced by the incorporation of II-VI nearly lattice-matched layers in place of gate oxides and quantum well/dot barriers or claddings. Lattice-matched high-energy gap layers cause reduction in interface state density and control of threshold voltage variability, while providing a higher dielectric constant than SiO2. Simulations involving self-consistent solutions of the Poisson and Schrödinger equations, and transfer probability rate from channel (well or dot layer) to gate (QD layer) are used to design sub-12-nm FETs, which will aid the design of multibit logic and memory cells.

  2. Coincident site lattice-matched growth of semiconductors on substrates using compliant buffer layers

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew

    2016-08-23

    A method of producing semiconductor materials and devices that incorporate the semiconductor materials are provided. In particular, a method is provided of producing a semiconductor material, such as a III-V semiconductor, on a silicon substrate using a compliant buffer layer, and devices such as photovoltaic cells that incorporate the semiconductor materials. The compliant buffer material and semiconductor materials may be deposited using coincident site lattice-matching epitaxy, resulting in a close degree of lattice matching between the substrate material and deposited material for a wide variety of material compositions. The coincident site lattice matching epitaxial process, as well as the use of a ductile buffer material, reduce the internal stresses and associated crystal defects within the deposited semiconductor materials fabricated using the disclosed method. As a result, the semiconductor devices provided herein possess enhanced performance characteristics due to a relatively low density of crystal defects.

  3. Engineered oxide thin films as 100% lattice match buffer layers for YBCO coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akin, Y.; Heiba, Z. K.; Sigmund, W.; Hascicek, Y. S.

    2003-12-01

    One of the most important qualities of buffer layers for RE-BCO coated conductors' growth is close lattice match with RE-BCO. However, there is no natural material with a 100% lattice match with RE-BCO. In this study mixtures of europium oxide (Eu 2O 3) and ytterbium oxide (Yb 2O 3), (Eu 1- uYb u) 2O 3 (0.0⩽ u⩽1.0), were investigated as a candidate buffer layer that could have same lattice parameter as YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ(YBCO). Because the pseudocubic lattice parameter of Eu 2O 3 is bigger, and that of Yb 2O 3 is smaller than lattice parameter of YBCO, and the mixed oxides with appropriate ratio would have same lattice parameter of YBCO. The mixtures were prepared using metal-organic precursor by sol-gel process, and it was found that all mixed samples are single phase, complete solid solutions, and have same crystal system over the whole range of " u". Lattice parameters of mixed (Eu 1- uYb u) 2O 3 oxide powders were changed between 10.86831 and 10.42828 Å which are lattice parameter of Eu 2O 3 and Yb 2O 3, respectively by changing the ratio of Eu/Yb in the mixture. Phase and lattice parameter analysis revealed that pseudocubic lattice parameter of (Eu 0.893Yb 0.107) 2O 3 is 3.82 Å which is same as the lattice parameter of YBCO. Textured (Eu 0.893Yb 0.107) 2O 3 buffer layers were grown on biaxially textured-Ni (1 0 0) substrates. The solution was prepared from Europium and Ytterbium 2,4-pentadioanate, and was deposited on the Ni substrates using a reel-to-reel sol-gel dip coating system. The textured films were annealed at 1150 °C for 10 min under 4% H 2-Ar gas flow. Extensive texture analysis has been done to characterize the texture of (Eu 0.893Yb 0.107) 2O 3 buffer layers. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of the buffer layer showed strong out-of-plane orientation on Ni tape. The (Eu 0.893Yb 0.107) 2O 3 (2 2 2) pole figure indicated a single cube-on-cube textured structure. The omega and phi scans revealed good out-of-plane and in-plane alignments. The full

  4. Columnar structured FePt films epitaxially grown on large lattice mismatched intermediate layer

    PubMed Central

    Dong, K. F.; Deng, J. Y.; Peng, Y. G.; Ju, G.; Chow, G. M.; Chen, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure and magnetic properties of the FePt films grown on large mismatched ZrN (15.7%) intermediate layer were investigated. With using ZrN intermediate layer, FePt 10 nm films exhibited (001) texture except for some weaker FePt (110) texture. Good epitaxial relationships of FePt (001) <100>//ZrN (001) <100>//TiN (001) <100> among FePt and ZrN/TiN were revealed from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. As compared with TiN intermediate layer, although FePt-SiO2-C films grown on ZrN/TiN intermediate layer showed isotropic magnetic properties, the large interfacial energy and lattice mismatch between FePt and ZrN would lead to form columnar structural FePt films with smaller grain size and improved isolation. By doping ZrN into the TiN layer, solid solution of ZrTiN was formed and the lattice constant is increased comparing with TiN and decreased comparing with ZrN. Moreover, FePt-SiO2-C films grown on TiN 2 nm-20 vol.% ZrN/TiN 3 nm intermediate layer showed an improved perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Simultaneously, columnar structure with smaller grain size retained. PMID:27686046

  5. Growth of high quality GaN layer on carbon nanotube-graphene network structure as intermediate layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Taeo Hoon; Park, Ah Hyun; Park, Sungchan; Kim, Myung Jong; Suh, Eun-Kyung

    2015-03-01

    In general, high-quality GaN layers are synthesized on low-temperature (LT) GaN buffer layer on a single crystal sapphire substrate. However, large differences in fundamental properties such as lattice constants and thermal expansion coefficients between GaN layer and sapphire substrate generate high density of threading dislocation (TD) that leads to deterioration of optical and structural properties. Graphene has been attracting much attention due to its excellent physical properties However, direct epitaxial growth of GaN film onto graphene layer on substrates is not easily accessible due to the lack of chemical reactivity on graphene which consisted of C-C bond of sp2 hexagonally arranged carbon atoms with no dangling bonds. In this work, an intermediate layer for the GaN growth on sapphire substrate was constructed by inserting carbon nanotubes and graphene hybrid structure (CGH) Optical and structural properties of GaN layer grown on CGH were compared with those of GaN layer directly grown on sapphire CNTs act as nucleation sites and play a crucial role in the growth of single crystal high-quality GaN on graphene layer. Also, graphene film acts as a mask for epitaxial lateral overgrowth of GaN layer, which can effectively reduce TD density. A grant from the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) institutional program.

  6. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides: promising near-lattice-matched substrates for GaN growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Priti; Rahman, A. A.; Subramanian, Shruti; Gupta, Shalini; Thamizhavel, Arumugam; Orlova, Tatyana; Rouvimov, Sergei; Vishwanath, Suresh; Protasenko, Vladimir; Laskar, Masihhur R.; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2016-03-01

    Most III-nitride semiconductors are grown on non-lattice-matched substrates like sapphire or silicon due to the extreme difficulty of obtaining a native GaN substrate. We show that several layered transition-metal dichalcogenides are closely lattice-matched to GaN and report the growth of GaN on a range of such layered materials. We report detailed studies of the growth of GaN on mechanically-exfoliated flakes WS2 and MoS2 by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy. Structural and optical characterization show that strain-free, single-crystal islands of GaN are obtained on the underlying chalcogenide flakes. We obtain strong near-band-edge emission from these layers, and analyse their temperature-dependent photoluminescence properties. We also report a proof-of-concept demonstration of large-area growth of GaN on CVD MoS2. Our results show that the transition-metal dichalcogenides can serve as novel near-lattice-matched substrates for nitride growth.

  7. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides: promising near-lattice-matched substrates for GaN growth.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Priti; Rahman, A A; Subramanian, Shruti; Gupta, Shalini; Thamizhavel, Arumugam; Orlova, Tatyana; Rouvimov, Sergei; Vishwanath, Suresh; Protasenko, Vladimir; Laskar, Masihhur R; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2016-03-30

    Most III-nitride semiconductors are grown on non-lattice-matched substrates like sapphire or silicon due to the extreme difficulty of obtaining a native GaN substrate. We show that several layered transition-metal dichalcogenides are closely lattice-matched to GaN and report the growth of GaN on a range of such layered materials. We report detailed studies of the growth of GaN on mechanically-exfoliated flakes WS2 and MoS2 by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy. Structural and optical characterization show that strain-free, single-crystal islands of GaN are obtained on the underlying chalcogenide flakes. We obtain strong near-band-edge emission from these layers, and analyse their temperature-dependent photoluminescence properties. We also report a proof-of-concept demonstration of large-area growth of GaN on CVD MoS2. Our results show that the transition-metal dichalcogenides can serve as novel near-lattice-matched substrates for nitride growth.

  8. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides: promising near-lattice-matched substrates for GaN growth

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Priti; Rahman, A. A.; Subramanian, Shruti; Gupta, Shalini; Thamizhavel, Arumugam; Orlova, Tatyana; Rouvimov, Sergei; Vishwanath, Suresh; Protasenko, Vladimir; Laskar, Masihhur R.; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    Most III-nitride semiconductors are grown on non-lattice-matched substrates like sapphire or silicon due to the extreme difficulty of obtaining a native GaN substrate. We show that several layered transition-metal dichalcogenides are closely lattice-matched to GaN and report the growth of GaN on a range of such layered materials. We report detailed studies of the growth of GaN on mechanically-exfoliated flakes WS2 and MoS2 by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy. Structural and optical characterization show that strain-free, single-crystal islands of GaN are obtained on the underlying chalcogenide flakes. We obtain strong near-band-edge emission from these layers, and analyse their temperature-dependent photoluminescence properties. We also report a proof-of-concept demonstration of large-area growth of GaN on CVD MoS2. Our results show that the transition-metal dichalcogenides can serve as novel near-lattice-matched substrates for nitride growth. PMID:27025461

  9. Tunable Lattice Constant and Band Gap of Single- and Few-Layer ZnO.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junseok; Sorescu, Dan C; Deng, Xingyi

    2016-04-01

    Single and few-layer ZnO(0001) (ZnO(nL), n = 1-4) grown on Au(111) have been characterized via scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that the in-plane lattice constants of the ZnO(nL, n ≤ 3) are expanded compared to that of the bulk wurtzite ZnO(0001). The lattice constant reaches a maximum expansion of 3% in the ZnO(2L) and decreases to the bulk wurtzite ZnO value in the ZnO(4L). The band gap decreases monotonically with increasing number of ZnO layers from 4.48 eV (ZnO(1L)) to 3.42 eV (ZnO(4L)). These results suggest that a transition from a planar to the bulk-like ZnO structure occurs around the thickness of ZnO(4L). The work also demonstrates that the lattice constant and the band gap in ultrathin ZnO can be tuned by controlling the number of layers, providing a basis for further investigation of this material. PMID:27003692

  10. Multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, John P.; Friedmann, Thomas A.

    1998-01-01

    A multi-layer resistive carbon film field emitter device for cold cathode field emission applications. The multi-layered film of the present invention consists of at least two layers of a conductive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, where the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure can be a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film can be a plurality of carbon layers, where adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced.

  11. Multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, J.P.; Friedmann, T.A.

    1998-10-13

    A multi-layer resistive carbon film field emitter device for cold cathode field emission applications is disclosed. The multi-layered film of the present invention consists of at least two layers of a conductive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, where the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure can be a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film can be a plurality of carbon layers, where adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced. 8 figs.

  12. Layered graphene structure of a hexagonal carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin

    2013-06-01

    Experiments show that there is a novel hexagonal carbon polymorph restricted to the space group of P-62c, but the detailed atomic structure is not determined. Here we set carbon atoms occupying P-62c 4f or P-62c 2c and 2d Wyckoff positions, and calculate the total energy of the different cell structures changing the internal parameter by first-principles calculations, which demonstrates that the stable structures in energy (at local minima) are hexagonal carbon (P-62c 2c and 2d) and hexagonal diamond (P-62c 4f, z=1/16). The calculated bulk modulus 437±16 GPa and interlayer distance 2.062 Å of the layered graphene structure P-62c 2c and 2d are in good agreement with those of the proposed new carbon, which indicates that P-62c 2c and 2d is a possible precursor or intermediate hard phase during the structural transformation of carbon.

  13. Magnetization Process of Spin-1/2 Heisenberg Antiferromagnets on a Layered Triangular Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Daisuke; Marmorini, Giacomo; Danshita, Ippei

    2016-02-01

    We study the magnetization process of the spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on a layered triangular lattice by means of a numerical cluster mean-field method with a scaling scheme (CMF+S). It has been known that antiferromagnetic spins on a two-dimensional (2D) triangular lattice with quantum fluctuations exhibit a one-third magnetization plateau in the magnetization curve under magnetic field. We demonstrate that the CMF+S quantitatively reproduces the magnetization curve including the stabilization of the plateau. We also discuss the effects of a finite interlayer coupling, which is unavoidable in real quasi-2D materials. It has been recently argued for a model of the layered-triangular-lattice compound Ba3CoSb2O9 that such interlayer coupling can induce an additional first-order transition at a strong field. We present the detailed CMF+S results for the magnetization and susceptibility curves of the fundamental Heisenberg Hamiltonian in the presence of magnetic field and weak antiferromagnetic interlayer coupling. The extra first-order transition appears as a quite small jump in the magnetization curve and a divergence in the susceptibility at a strong magnetic field ˜0.712 of the saturation field.

  14. Coherent Lattice Vibrations in Mono- and Few-Layer WSe2.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Tae Young; Jin, Byung Moon; Rhim, Sonny H; Debbichi, Lamjed; Park, Jaesung; Jang, Yu Dong; Lee, Hyang Rok; Chae, Dong-Hun; Lee, Donghan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Jung, Suyong; Yee, Ki Ju

    2016-05-24

    We report the observation of coherent lattice vibrations in mono- and few-layer WSe2 in the time domain, which were obtained by performing time-resolved transmission measurements. Upon the excitation of ultrashort pulses with the energy resonant to that of A excitons, coherent oscillations of the A1g optical phonon and longitudinal acoustic phonon at the M point of the Brillouin zone (LA(M)) were impulsively generated in monolayer WSe2. In multilayer WSe2 flakes, the interlayer breathing mode (B1) is found to be sensitive to the number of layers, demonstrating its usefulness in characterizing layered transition metal dichalcogenide materials. On the basis of temperature-dependent measurements, we find that the A1g optical phonon mode decays into two acoustic phonons through the anharmonic decay process. PMID:27102714

  15. Effect of interfacial layer on water flow in nanochannels: Lattice Boltzmann simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yakang; Liu, Xuefeng; Liu, Zilong; Lu, Shuangfang; Xue, Qingzhong

    2016-04-01

    A novel interfacial model was proposed to understand water flow mechanism in nanochannels. Based on our pore-throat nanochannel model, the effect of interfacial layer on water flow in nanochannels was quantitatively studied using Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). It is found that both the permeability of nanochannel and water velocity in the nanochannel dramatically decrease with increasing the thickness of interfacial layer. The permeability of nanochannel with pore radius of 10 nm decreases by about three orders of magnitude when the thickness of interfacial layer is changed from 0 nm to 3 nm gradually. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that the cross-section shape has a great effect on the water flow inside nanochannel and the effect of interfacial layer on the permeability of nanochannel has a close relationship with cross-section shape when the pore size is smaller than 12 nm. Besides, both pore-throat ratio and throat length can greatly affect water flow in nanochannels, and the influence of interfacial layer on water flow in nanochannels becomes more evident with increasing pore-throat ratio and throat length. Our theoretical results provide a simple and effective method to study the flow phenomena in nano-porous media, particularly to quantitatively study the interfacial layer effect in nano-porous media.

  16. Photochemical bonding of epithelial cell-seeded collagen lattice to rat muscle layer for esophageal tissue engineering: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Barbara P.; Sato, M.; Vacanti, Joseph P.; Kochevar, Irene E.; Redmond, Robert W.

    2005-04-01

    Bilayered tube structures consist of epithelial cell-seeded collagen lattice and muscle layer have been fabricated for esophageal tissue engineering. Good adhesion between layers in order to facilitate cell infiltration and neovascularization in the collagen lattice is required. Previous efforts include using other bioglues such as fibrin glue and silicone tube as the physical support. However, the former is subjected to chances of transmitting blood-born infectious disease and is time consuming while the latter requires a second surgical procedure. The current project aimed to bond the cell-seeded collagen lattice to muscle layer using photochemical bonding, which has previously been demonstrated a rapid and non-thermal procedure in bonding collagenous tissues. Rat esophageal epithelial cells were seeded on collagen lattice and together with the latissimus dorsi muscle layer, were exposed to a photosensitizer rose Bengal at the bonding surface. An argon laser was used to irradiate the approximated layers. Bonding strength was measured during the peeling test of the collagen layer from the muscle layer. Post-bonding cell viability was assessed using a modified NADH-diaphorase microassay. A pilot in vivo study was conducted by directly bonding the cell-seeded collagen layer onto the muscle flap in rats and the structures were characterized histologically. Photochemical bonding was found to significantly increase the adherence at the bonding interface without compromising the cell viability. This indicates the feasibility of using the technique to fabricate multi-layered structures in the presence of living cells. The pilot animal study demonstrated integration of the collagen lattice with the muscle layer at the bonding interface although the subsequent surgical manipulation disturbed the integration at some region. This means that an additional procedure removing the tube could be avoided if the approximation and thus the bonding are optimized. Cell infiltration

  17. Spectroscopy of dipolar fermions in layered two-dimensional and three-dimensional lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Hazzard, Kaden R. A.; Rey, Ana Maria; Gorshkov, Alexey V.

    2011-09-15

    Motivated by ongoing measurements at JILA, we calculate the recoil-free spectra of dipolar interacting fermions, for example ultracold heteronuclear molecules, in a one-dimensional lattice of two-dimensional layers or ''pancakes'', spectroscopically probing transitions between different internal (e.g., rotational) states. We additionally incorporate p-wave interactions and losses, which are important for reactive molecules such as KRb. Moreover, we consider other sources of spectral broadening: interaction-induced quasiparticle lifetimes and the different polarizabilities of the rotational states used for the spectroscopy. Although our main focus is molecules, some of the calculations are also useful for optical lattice atomic clocks. For example, understanding the p-wave shifts between identical fermions and small dipolar interactions coming from the excited clock state is necessary to reach future precision goals. Finally, we consider the spectra in a deep three-dimensional lattice and show how they give a great deal of information about static correlation functions, including all the moments of the density correlations between nearby sites. The range of correlations measurable depends on spectroscopic resolution and the dipole moment.

  18. Strength, hardness, and lattice vibrations of Z-carbon and W-carbon: First-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiping; Gao, Faming; Xu, Ziming

    2012-04-01

    The strength, hardness, and lattice vibrations of two superhard carbon allotropies, Z-carbon and W-carbon are investigated by first-principles calculations. Phonon dispersion calculations indicate that Z-carbon and W-carbon are dynamically stable at least up to 300 GPa. The strength calculations reveal that the failure mode in Z-carbon is dominated by the tensile type, and the [010] direction is the weakest one. In W-carbon, the failure mode is dominated by the shear type, and the (101)[111¯] direction is the weakest one. Although the ideal strength of diamond is distinctly greater than that of Z-carbon and W-carbon, the tensile strength and shear strength for Z-carbon and W-carbon show much lower anisotropies than that of diamond. The hardness calculations indicate that the average hardness of Z-carbon is less than that of diamond but greater than that of the W-carbon, M-carbon, and body-centered-tetragonal-C4 carbon. The simulated Raman spectra show that the Ag modes at 1094 cm-1 for Z-carbon and 1109.7 cm-1 for W-carbon are in agreement with that of 1082 cm-1 observed in the experiment of cold-compressed graphite at 9.8 GPa.

  19. Local atomic arrangements and lattice distortions in layered Ge-Sb-Te crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotnyk, Andriy; Ross, Ulrich; Bernütz, Sabine; Thelander, Erik; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Insights into the local atomic arrangements of layered Ge-Sb-Te compounds are of particular importance from a fundamental point of view and for data storage applications. In this view, a detailed knowledge of the atomic structure in such alloys is central to understanding the functional properties both in the more commonly utilized amorphous–crystalline transition and in recently proposed interfacial phase change memory based on the transition between two crystalline structures. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy allows direct imaging of local arrangement in the crystalline lattice with atomic resolution. However, due to the non-trivial influence of thermal diffuse scattering on the high-angle scattering signal, a detailed examination of the image contrast requires comparison with theoretical image simulations. This work reveals the local atomic structure of trigonal Ge-Sb-Te thin films by using a combination of direct imaging of the atomic columns and theoretical image simulation approaches. The results show that the thin films are prone to the formation of stacking disorder with individual building blocks of the Ge2Sb2Te5, Ge1Sb2Te4 and Ge3Sb2Te6 crystal structures intercalated within randomly oriented grains. The comparison with image simulations based on various theoretical models reveals intermixed cation layers with pronounced local lattice distortions, exceeding those reported in literature.

  20. Local atomic arrangements and lattice distortions in layered Ge-Sb-Te crystal structures

    PubMed Central

    Lotnyk, Andriy; Ross, Ulrich; Bernütz, Sabine; Thelander, Erik; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Insights into the local atomic arrangements of layered Ge-Sb-Te compounds are of particular importance from a fundamental point of view and for data storage applications. In this view, a detailed knowledge of the atomic structure in such alloys is central to understanding the functional properties both in the more commonly utilized amorphous–crystalline transition and in recently proposed interfacial phase change memory based on the transition between two crystalline structures. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy allows direct imaging of local arrangement in the crystalline lattice with atomic resolution. However, due to the non-trivial influence of thermal diffuse scattering on the high-angle scattering signal, a detailed examination of the image contrast requires comparison with theoretical image simulations. This work reveals the local atomic structure of trigonal Ge-Sb-Te thin films by using a combination of direct imaging of the atomic columns and theoretical image simulation approaches. The results show that the thin films are prone to the formation of stacking disorder with individual building blocks of the Ge2Sb2Te5, Ge1Sb2Te4 and Ge3Sb2Te6 crystal structures intercalated within randomly oriented grains. The comparison with image simulations based on various theoretical models reveals intermixed cation layers with pronounced local lattice distortions, exceeding those reported in literature. PMID:27220411

  1. Local atomic arrangements and lattice distortions in layered Ge-Sb-Te crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Lotnyk, Andriy; Ross, Ulrich; Bernütz, Sabine; Thelander, Erik; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2016-05-25

    Insights into the local atomic arrangements of layered Ge-Sb-Te compounds are of particular importance from a fundamental point of view and for data storage applications. In this view, a detailed knowledge of the atomic structure in such alloys is central to understanding the functional properties both in the more commonly utilized amorphous-crystalline transition and in recently proposed interfacial phase change memory based on the transition between two crystalline structures. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy allows direct imaging of local arrangement in the crystalline lattice with atomic resolution. However, due to the non-trivial influence of thermal diffuse scattering on the high-angle scattering signal, a detailed examination of the image contrast requires comparison with theoretical image simulations. This work reveals the local atomic structure of trigonal Ge-Sb-Te thin films by using a combination of direct imaging of the atomic columns and theoretical image simulation approaches. The results show that the thin films are prone to the formation of stacking disorder with individual building blocks of the Ge2Sb2Te5, Ge1Sb2Te4 and Ge3Sb2Te6 crystal structures intercalated within randomly oriented grains. The comparison with image simulations based on various theoretical models reveals intermixed cation layers with pronounced local lattice distortions, exceeding those reported in literature.

  2. Simulation of arrested salt wedges with a multi-layer Shallow Water Lattice Boltzmann model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestininzi, P.; Montessori, A.; La Rocca, M.; Sciortino, G.

    2016-10-01

    The ability to accurately and efficiently model the intrusion of salt wedges into river beds is crucial to assay its interaction with human activities and the natural environment. We present a 2D multi-layer Shallow Water Lattice Boltzmann (SWLB) model able to predict the salt wedge intrusion in river estuaries. The formulation usually employed for the simulation of gravity currents is here equipped with proper boundary conditions to handle both the downstream seaside outlet and the upstream river inlet. Firstly, the model is validated against highly accurate semi-analytical solutions of the steady state 1D two-layer Shallow Water model. Secondly, the model is applied to a more complex, fully 3D geometry, to assess its capability to handle realistic cases. The simple formulation proposed for the shear interlayer stress is proven to be consistent with the general 3D viscous solution. In addition to the accuracy, the model inherits the efficiency of the Lattice Boltzmann approach to fluid dynamics problems.

  3. Lattice Boltzmann method for short-pulsed laser transport in a multi-layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2015-04-01

    We construct a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for transient radiative transfer in one-dimensional multi-layered medium with distinct refractive index in each layer. The left boundary is irradiated normally by a short-pulsed laser. The Fresnel interfaces conditions, which incorporate reflection and refraction, are used at the boundaries and the interfaces. Based on the Fresnel's law and Snell's law, the interfacial intensity formulas are introduced. The collimated and diffuse intensities are treated individually. At a transient time step, the collimated component is first solved by LBM and then embedded into the transient radiative transfer equation as a source term. To keep the consistency of the directions in all the layers, angular interpolation of the intensities at the interfaces is adopted. The transient radiative transfer in a two-layer medium is first investigated, and the time-resolved results are validated by comparing with those by the Monte Carlo method (MCM). Of particular interest, the angular intensities along the slab at different times are presented to illustrate a variety of interesting phenomena, and the discontinuous nature of the intensity at the interfaces is discussed. The effects of various parameters on the time-resolved signals are examined.

  4. Nucleation, Growth, and Strain Relaxation of Lattice-Mismatched III-V Semiconductor Epitaxial Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welser, R. E.; Guido, L. J.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the early stages of evolution of highly strained 2-D InAs layers and 3-D InAs islands grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on (100) and (111) B GaAs substrates. The InAs epilayer / GaAs substrate combination has been chosen because the lattice-mismatch is severe (approx. 7.20%), yet these materials are otherwise very similar. By examining InAs-on-GaAs composites Instead of the more common In(x)Ga(1-x)As alloy, we remove an additional degree of freedom (x) and thereby simplify data interpretation. A matrix of experiments is described in which the MOCVD growth parameters -- susceptor temperature, TMIn flux, and AsH3 flux -- have been varied over a wide range. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis have been employed to observe the thin film surface morphology. In the case of 3-D growth, we have extracted activation energies and power-dependent exponents that characterize the nucleation process. As a consequence, optimized growth conditions have been identified for depositing approx. 250 A thick (100) and (111)B oriented InAs layers with relatively smooth surfaces. Together with preliminary data on the strain relaxation of these layers, the above results on the evolution of thin InAs films indicate that the (111)B orientation is particularly promising for yielding lattice-mismatched films that are fully relaxed with only misfit dislocations at the epilayer / substrate interface.

  5. Nucleation, growth, and strain relaxation of lattice-mismatched 3-5 semiconductor epitaxial layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welser, R. E.; Guido, L. J.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the early stages of evolution of highly strained 2-D InAs layers and 3-D InAs islands grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on (100) and (111)B GaAs substrates. The InAs epilayer/GaAs substrate combination has been chosen because the lattice-mismatch is severe (approximately 7.2 percent), yet these materials are otherwise very similar. By examining InAs-on-GaAs composites instead of the more common In(x)Ga(1-x)As alloy we remove an additional degree of freedom (x) and thereby simplify data interpretation. A matrix of experiments is described in which the MOCVD growth parameters - susceptor temperature, Thin flux, and AsH3 flux - have been varied over a wide range. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis have been employed to observe the thin film surface morphology. In the case of 3-D growth, we have extracted activation energies and power-dependent exponents that characterize the nucleation process. As a consequence, optimized growth conditions have been identified for depositing approximately 250 A thick (100) and (111)B oriented InAs layers with relatively smooth surfaces. Together with preliminary data on the strain relaxation of these layers, the above results on the evolution of thin InAs films indicate that the (111)B orientation is particularly promising for yielding lattice-mismatched films that are fully relaxed with only misfit dislocations at the epilayer/substrate interface.

  6. Single pentagon in a hexagonal carbon lattice revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    An, B.; Fukuyama, S.; Yokogawa, K.; Yoshimura, M.; Egashira, M.; Korai, Y.; Mochida, I.

    2001-06-04

    The electronic structure of a single pentagon in a hexagonal carbon lattice has been revealed on an atomic scale by scanning tunneling microscopy. The pentagon is located at the apex of the conical protuberance of the graphitic particle. The enhanced charge density localized at each carbon atom in the pentagon is identified, and the ringlike pattern of the ({radical}3{times}{radical}3)R30{degree} superstructure of graphite is clearly observed around the pentagon. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  7. X-Ray measurement of lattice strains in textured low carbon steel under uniaxial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. H.; Koo, Y. M.

    1995-03-01

    To examine the effect of relative crystallite misorientations on the inhomogeneous deformation behavior, lattice strains in the crystallites of a textured low-carbon steel are measured by an in situ X-ray diffraction method under uniaxial loading. Internal microstresses of the crystallites are also determined from the lattice strains measured along different directions of the crystallites. The low-carbon steel has the rolling texture of orientation relationship: {211}<01Ī>, {111}<2Ī<, and {100}<011>. Different lattice stress-strain curves are obtained from the different crystallite groups, which show dissimilarity in the proportionality constant between the stress and lattice strain and the elastic limit of each crystallite group. The external elastic limit can be calculated from averaging the individual lattice yield points of each crystallite groups. Triaxial stress states are developed in the crystallites in the entire range of the elastic and plastic regions during uniaxial loading. The residual stresses of the specimen unloaded at a strain level of about 3 pet are in a biaxial stress state.

  8. Turbulent boundary layer control through spanwise wall oscillation using Kagome lattice structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, James; Santer, Matthew; Morrison, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    It is well established that a reduction in skin-friction and turbulence intensity can be achieved by applying in-plane spanwise forcing to a surface beneath a turbulent boundary layer. It has also been shown in DNS (M. Quadrio, P. Ricco, & C. Viotti; J. Fluid Mech; 627, 161, 2009), that this phenomenon is significantly enhanced when the forcing takes the form of a streamwise travelling wave of spanwise perturbation. In the present work, this type of forcing is generated by an active surface comprising a compliant structure, based on a Kagome lattice geometry, supporting a membrane skin. The structural design ensures negligible wall normal displacement while facilitating large in-plane velocities. The surface is driven pneumatically, achieving displacements of 3 mm approximately, at frequencies in excess of 70 Hz for a turbulent boundary layer at Reτ ~ 1000 . As the influence of this forcing on boundary layer is highly dependent on the wavenumber and frequency of the travelling wave, a flat surface was designed and optimised to allow these forcing parameters to be varied, without reconfiguration of the experiment. Simultaneous measurements of the fluid and surface motion are presented, and notable skin-friction drag reduction is demonstrated. Airbus support agreement IW202838 is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Intrinsic half-metallicity in fractal carbon nitride honeycomb lattices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aizhu; Zhao, Mingwen

    2015-09-14

    Fractals are natural phenomena that exhibit a repeating pattern "exactly the same at every scale or nearly the same at different scales". Defect-free molecular fractals were assembled successfully in a recent work [Shang et al., Nature Chem., 2015, 7, 389-393]. Here, we adopted the feature of a repeating pattern in searching two-dimensional (2D) materials with intrinsic half-metallicity and high stability that are desirable for spintronics applications. Using first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that the electronic properties of fractal frameworks of carbon nitrides have stable ferromagnetism accompanied by half-metallicity, which are highly dependent on the fractal structure. The ferromagnetism increases gradually with the increase of fractal order. The Curie temperature of these metal-free systems estimated from Monte Carlo simulations is considerably higher than room temperature. The stable ferromagnetism, intrinsic half-metallicity, and fractal characteristics of spin distribution in the carbon nitride frameworks open an avenue for the design of metal-free magnetic materials with exotic properties.

  10. Microscopic model calculations for the magnetization process of layered triangular-lattice quantum antiferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Daisuke; Marmorini, Giacomo; Danshita, Ippei

    2015-01-16

    Magnetization processes of spin-1/2 layered triangular-lattice antiferromagnets (TLAFs) under a magnetic field H are studied by means of a numerical cluster mean-field method with a scaling scheme. We find that small antiferromagnetic couplings between the layers give rise to several types of extra quantum phase transitions among different high-field coplanar phases. Especially, a field-induced first-order transition is found to occur at H≈0.7H_{s}, where H_{s} is the saturation field, as another common quantum effect of ideal TLAFs in addition to the well-established one-third plateau. Our microscopic model calculation with appropriate parameters shows excellent agreement with experiments on Ba_{3}CoSb_{2}O_{9} [T. Susuki et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 267201 (2013)]. Given this fact, we suggest that the Co^{2+}-based compounds may allow for quantum simulations of intriguing properties of this simple frustrated model, such as quantum criticality and supersolid states. PMID:25635561

  11. Lattice Strain Mapping of Platinum Nanoparticles on Carbon and SnO2 Supports

    PubMed Central

    Daio, Takeshi; Staykov, Aleksandar; Guo, Limin; Liu, Jianfeng; Tanaka, Masaki; Matthew Lyth, Stephen; Sasaki, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    It is extremely important to understand the properties of supported metal nanoparticles at the atomic scale. In particular, visualizing the interaction between nanoparticle and support, as well as the strain distribution within the particle is highly desirable. Lattice strain can affect catalytic activity, and therefore strain engineering via e.g. synthesis of core-shell nanoparticles or compositional segregation has been intensively studied. However, substrate-induced lattice strain has yet to be visualized directly. In this study, platinum nanoparticles decorated on graphitized carbon or tin oxide supports are investigated using spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-corrected STEM) coupled with geometric phase analysis (GPA). Local changes in lattice parameter are observed within the Pt nanoparticles and the strain distribution is mapped. This reveals that Pt nanoparticles on SnO2 are more highly strained than on carbon, especially in the region of atomic steps in the SnO2 lattice. These substrate-induced strain effects are also reproduced in density functional theory simulations, and related to catalytic oxygen reduction reaction activity. This study suggests that tailoring the catalytic activity of electrocatalyst nanoparticles via the strong metal-support interaction (SMSI) is possible. This technique also provides an experimental platform for improving our understanding of nanoparticles at the atomic scale. PMID:26283473

  12. Lattice Strain Mapping of Platinum Nanoparticles on Carbon and SnO2 Supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daio, Takeshi; Staykov, Aleksandar; Guo, Limin; Liu, Jianfeng; Tanaka, Masaki; Matthew Lyth, Stephen; Sasaki, Kazunari

    2015-08-01

    It is extremely important to understand the properties of supported metal nanoparticles at the atomic scale. In particular, visualizing the interaction between nanoparticle and support, as well as the strain distribution within the particle is highly desirable. Lattice strain can affect catalytic activity, and therefore strain engineering via e.g. synthesis of core-shell nanoparticles or compositional segregation has been intensively studied. However, substrate-induced lattice strain has yet to be visualized directly. In this study, platinum nanoparticles decorated on graphitized carbon or tin oxide supports are investigated using spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-corrected STEM) coupled with geometric phase analysis (GPA). Local changes in lattice parameter are observed within the Pt nanoparticles and the strain distribution is mapped. This reveals that Pt nanoparticles on SnO2 are more highly strained than on carbon, especially in the region of atomic steps in the SnO2 lattice. These substrate-induced strain effects are also reproduced in density functional theory simulations, and related to catalytic oxygen reduction reaction activity. This study suggests that tailoring the catalytic activity of electrocatalyst nanoparticles via the strong metal-support interaction (SMSI) is possible. This technique also provides an experimental platform for improving our understanding of nanoparticles at the atomic scale.

  13. Substrate/layer interface of amorphous-carbon hard coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, O.; Cebollada, A.; Yang, S.; Teer, D. G.; Albella, J. M.; Román, E.

    2000-08-01

    A combined study of the crystalline structure, the chemical interaction, and diffusion processes of the substrate/layer interface of amorphous-carbon hard coatings is presented. The structure of the coatings and their gradient layer interface to a chromium buffer layer has been investigated on two substrates [Si(100) and tool steel] using x-ray diffraction (XRD). Chemical interaction and diffusion processes at the interfaces and within the layers were analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy depth profiles. The chromium buffer layer revealed similar textured structure on both substrates. The subsequent gradient layer was determined (within XRD limits) to be amorphous and composed of an amorphous-carbon and chromium-carbide composite. The chromium carbide maintains the same stoichiometry (Cr3C2), regardless of the gradually changing chromium content. No large-scale interdiffusion was measured, either between or within the layers.

  14. 7Li NMR study of intercalated lithium in curved carbon lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerald, R. E.; Johnson, C. S.; Rathke, J. W.; Klingler, R. J.; Sandí, G.; Scanlon, L. G.

    A device was invented that permits nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of the internal elements of a coin cell battery. The Coin Cell Battery Imager was used to record wideline 7Li NMR spectra of the lithium ions that were electrochemically intercalated into three different types of carbon-based materials. The samples included graphite, corannulene, and carbon derived from sepiolite clay. All samples were excised from 2032-size coin cells that were cycled multiple times and left in a discharged state (i.e., fully lithiated). A comparison of the 7Li NMR spectra recorded for the three carbons revealed that the curved carbon lattice derived from sepiolite affected the lithium resonances in a manner similar to that observed for the curved molecule corannulene, while both differed from the flat lattice of graphite. In addition, it was possible to observe lithium dendrites on the surface of a hard carbon electrode even in the presence of a large lithium counter electrode using NMR imaging techniques.

  15. Dynamic behaviors of liquid droplets on a gas diffusion layer surface: Hybrid lattice Boltzmann investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jie; Huang, Jun-Jie

    2015-07-01

    Water management is one of the key issues in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Fundamentally, it is related to dynamic behaviors of droplets on a gas diffusion layer (GDL) surface, and consequently they are investigated in this work. A two-dimensional hybrid method is employed to implement numerical simulations, in which the flow field is solved by using the lattice Boltzmann method and the interface between droplet and gas is captured by solving the Cahn-Hilliard equation directly. One or two liquid droplets are initially placed on the GDL surface of a gas channel, which is driven by the fully developed Poiseuille flow. At a fixed channel size, the effects of viscosity ratio of droplet to gas ( μ ∗ ), Capillary number (Ca, ratio of gas viscosity to surface tension), and droplet interaction on the dynamic behaviors of droplets are systematically studied. By decreasing viscosity ratio or increasing Capillary number, the single droplet can detach from the GDL surface easily. On the other hand, when two identical droplets stay close to each other or a larger droplet is placed in front of a smaller droplet, the removal of two droplets is promoted.

  16. Monte-Carlo simulations of methane/carbon dioxide and ethane/carbon dioxide mixture adsorption in zeolites and comparison with matrix treatment of statistical mechanical lattice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Lawrence J.; Furgani, Akrem; Jalili, Sayed; Manos, George

    2009-05-01

    Adsorption isotherms have been computed by Monte-Carlo simulation for methane/carbon dioxide and ethane/carbon dioxide mixtures adsorbed in the zeolite silicalite. These isotherms show remarkable differences with the ethane/carbon dioxide mixtures displaying strong adsorption preference reversal at high coverage. To explain the differences in the Monte-Carlo mixture isotherms an exact matrix calculation of the statistical mechanics of a lattice model of mixture adsorption in zeolites has been made. The lattice model reproduces the essential features of the Monte-Carlo isotherms, enabling us to understand the differing adsorption behaviour of methane/carbon dioxide and ethane/carbon dioxide mixtures in zeolites.

  17. Role of lattice structure and low temperature resistivity in fast-electron-beam filamentation in carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dance, R. J.; Butler, N. M. H.; Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; Rusby, D. R.; Scott, G. G.; Zielbauer, B.; Bagnoud, V.; Xu, H.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Neely, D.; McKenna, P.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of low temperature (eV to tens-of-eV) electrical resistivity on the onset of the filamentation instability in fast-electron transport is investigated in targets comprising of layers of ordered (diamond) and disordered (vitreous) carbon. It is shown experimentally and numerically that the thickness of the disordered carbon layer influences the degree of filamentation of the fast-electron beam. Strong filamentation is produced if the thickness is of the order of 60 μm or greater, for an electron distribution driven by a sub-picosecond, mid-1020 Wcm-2 laser pulse. It is shown that the position of the vitreous carbon layer relative to the fast-electron source (where the beam current density and background temperature are highest) does not have a strong effect because the resistive filamentation growth rate is high in disordered carbon over a wide range of temperatures up to the Spitzer regime.

  18. Capacitance of carbon-based electrical double-layer capacitors.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hengxing; Zhao, Xin; Qiao, Zhenhua; Jung, Jeil; Zhu, Yanwu; Lu, Yalin; Zhang, Li Li; MacDonald, Allan H; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2014-01-01

    Experimental electrical double-layer capacitances of porous carbon electrodes fall below ideal values, thus limiting the practical energy densities of carbon-based electrical double-layer capacitors. Here we investigate the origin of this behaviour by measuring the electrical double-layer capacitance in one to five-layer graphene. We find that the capacitances are suppressed near neutrality, and are anomalously enhanced for thicknesses below a few layers. We attribute the first effect to quantum capacitance effects near the point of zero charge, and the second to correlations between electrons in the graphene sheet and ions in the electrolyte. The large capacitance values imply gravimetric energy storage densities in the single-layer graphene limit that are comparable to those of batteries. We anticipate that these results shed light on developing new theoretical models in understanding the electrical double-layer capacitance of carbon electrodes, and on opening up new strategies for improving the energy density of carbon-based capacitors.

  19. Carbon kagome lattice and orbital-frustration-induced metal-insulator transition for optoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanping; Sun, Y Y; Wang, H; West, D; Xie, Yuee; Zhong, J; Meunier, V; Cohen, Marvin L; Zhang, S B

    2014-08-22

    A three-dimensional elemental carbon kagome lattice, made of only fourfold-coordinated carbon atoms, is proposed based on first-principles calculations. Despite the existence of 60° bond angles in the triangle rings, widely perceived to be energetically unfavorable, the carbon kagome lattice is found to display exceptional stability comparable to that of C(60). The system allows us to study the effects of triangular frustration on the electronic properties of realistic solids, and it demonstrates a metal-insulator transition from that of graphene to a direct gap semiconductor in the visible blue region. By minimizing s-p orbital hybridization, which is an intrinsic property of carbon, not only the band edge states become nearly purely frustrated p states, but also the band structure is qualitatively different from any known bulk elemental semiconductors. For example, the optical properties are similar to those of direct-gap semiconductors GaN and ZnO, whereas the effective masses are comparable to or smaller than those of Si.

  20. Carbon additives for electrical double layer capacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingarth, D.; Cericola, D.; Mornaghini, F. C. F.; Hucke, T.; Kötz, R.

    2014-11-01

    Electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs) are inherently high power devices when compared to rechargeable batteries. While capacitance and energy storage ability are mainly increased by optimizing the electrode active material or the electrolyte, the power capability could be improved by including conductive additives in the electrode formulations. This publication deals with the use of four different carbon additives - two carbon blacks and two graphites - in standard activated carbon based EDLC electrodes. The investigations include: (i) physical characterization of carbon powder mixtures such as surface area, press density, and electrical resistivity measurements, and (ii), electrochemical characterization via impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry of full cells made with electrodes containing 5 wt.% of carbon additive and compared to cells made with pure activated carbon electrodes in organic electrolyte. Improved cell performance was observed in both impedance and cyclic voltammetry responses. The results are discussed considering the main characteristics of the different carbon additives, and important considerations about electrode structure and processability are drawn.

  1. Lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As window layers for indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Wilt, David M.; Flood, Dennis J.

    1993-01-01

    The efficiency of indium phosphide (InP) solar cells is limited by its high surface recombination velocity (approximately 10(exp 7) cm/s). This might be reduced by a wide-bandgap window layer. The performance of InP solar cells with wide-bandgap (1.8 eV) lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As as a window layer was calculated. Because the required window layer thickness is less than the critical layer thickness, growth of strained (pseudomorphic) layers without interfacial misfit dislocations should be possible. Calculations using the PC-lD numerical code showed that the efficiencies of baseline and optimized p(+)n (p-on-n) cells are increased to more than 22 and 24 percent, (air mass zero (AMO), 25 C), respectively for a lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As window layer of 10-nm thickness. Currently, most cell development work has been focused on n(+)p (n-on-p) structures although comparatively little improvement has been found for n(+)p cells.

  2. Permeability and charge-dependent adsorption properties of the S-layer lattice from Bacillus coagulans E38-66.

    PubMed Central

    Sára, M; Pum, D; Sleytr, U B

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the permeability properties of the oblique S-layer lattice from Bacillus coagulans E38-66 after depositing cell wall fragments on a microfiltration membrane, cross-linking the S-layer protein with glutaraldehyde, and degrading the peptidoglycan with lysozyme. Comparative permeability studies on such multilayered S-layer membranes and suspended S-layer vesicles from thermophilic members of the family Bacillaceae with use of the space technique (M. Sára and U. B. Sleytr, J. Bacteriol. 169:4092-4098, 1987) revealed identical molecular exclusion limits (M. Sára and U. B. Sleytr, J. Membr. Sci. 33:27-49, 1987). Examination of the S-layer lattice from B. coagulans E38-66 with the S-layer membrane technique revealed unhindered passage for molecules up to the size of myoglobin (M(r) 17,000). The molecular dimensions of this protein (2.8 by 3.2 by 4.5 nm) correspond approximately to the size of the ovoid-shaped pore previously shown by high-resolution electron microscopy of negatively stained S-layer self-assembly products (D. Pum, M. Sára, and U. B. Sleytr, J. Bacteriol. 171:5296-5303, 1989). Chemical modification of the S-layer protein and comparative labeling, adsorption, and permeability studies clearly demonstrated that (i) in the native state, free amino and carboxyl groups are present on the outer S-layer face and in the interior of the pores and (ii) electrostatic interactions between these groups prevent unspecific adsorption of the S-layer in vivo. Images PMID:1317378

  3. Self-assembled two-dimensional protein arrays in bionanotechnology: From S-layers to designed lattices

    PubMed Central

    Baneyx, François; Matthaei, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Although the crystalline S-layer arrays that form the exoskeleton of many archaea and bacteria have been studied for decades, a long-awaited crystal structure coupled with a growing understanding of the S-layer assembly process are injecting new excitement in the field. The trend is amplified by computational strategies that allow for in silico design of protein building blocks capable of self-assembling into 2D lattices and other prescribed quaternary structures. We review these and other recent developments towards achieving unparalleled control over the geometry, chemistry and function of protein-based 2D objects from the nano- to the mesoscale. PMID:24832073

  4. Novel nanoscroll structures from carbon nitride layers.

    PubMed

    Perim, Eric; Galvao, Douglas S

    2014-08-01

    Nanoscrolls (papyrus-like nanostructures) are very attractive structures for a variety of applications, owing to their tunable diameter and large accessible surface area. They have been successfully synthesized from different materials. In this work, we investigate, through fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, the dynamics of scroll formation for a series of graphene-like carbon nitride (CN) two-dimensional systems: g-CN, triazine-based g-C3 N4 , and heptazine-based g-C3 N4 . Our results show that stable nanoscrolls can be formed for each of these structures. Possible synthetic routes to produce these nanostructures are also addressed. PMID:24819427

  5. Stability of organic carbon in deep soil layers controlled by fresh carbon supply.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Sébastien; Barot, Sébastien; Barré, Pierre; Bdioui, Nadia; Mary, Bruno; Rumpel, Cornelia

    2007-11-01

    The world's soils store more carbon than is present in biomass and in the atmosphere. Little is known, however, about the factors controlling the stability of soil organic carbon stocks and the response of the soil carbon pool to climate change remains uncertain. We investigated the stability of carbon in deep soil layers in one soil profile by combining physical and chemical characterization of organic carbon, soil incubations and radiocarbon dating. Here we show that the supply of fresh plant-derived carbon to the subsoil (0.6-0.8 m depth) stimulated the microbial mineralization of 2,567 +/- 226-year-old carbon. Our results support the previously suggested idea that in the absence of fresh organic carbon, an essential source of energy for soil microbes, the stability of organic carbon in deep soil layers is maintained. We propose that a lack of supply of fresh carbon may prevent the decomposition of the organic carbon pool in deep soil layers in response to future changes in temperature. Any change in land use and agricultural practice that increases the distribution of fresh carbon along the soil profile could however stimulate the loss of ancient buried carbon.

  6. Raman spectroscopy of single layer graphitic carbon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Therrien, Joel; Li, Yancen; Schmidt, Daniel; Collard, Adam; Finkenstadt, Daniel; Yust, Taylor

    2013-03-01

    Single layer graphitic carbon nitride (referred to as melon) has been synthesized by our group in sizes up to 50 μm across. Raman spectroscopy has been performed on single layer melon and multi layer samples. Much like graphene, melon shows a unique raman spectrum when in single layer form. These experimental results have been compared to theoretical calculations for possible melon structures. Bond counts for feasible structures of hexagonal carbon nitride have been calculated and some possible structures have been eliminated from consideration based on these efforts. Periodic supercells have been built to make sheets based on structures to be modeled via density-functional theory, as implemented using VASP, to calculate thermodynamic and structural stability and frequencies of IR and Raman active modes.

  7. Carbon vaporization into a nonequilibrium, stagnation-point boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, T.

    1978-01-01

    The heat transfer to the stagnation point of an ablating carbonaceous heat shield, where both the gas-phase boundary layer and the heterogeneous surface reactions are not in chemical equilibrium, is examined. Specifically, the nonequilibrium changes in the mass fraction profiles of carbon species calculated for frozen flow are studied. A set of equations describing the steady-state, nonequilibrium laminar boundary layer in the axisymmetric stagnation region, over an ablating graphite surface, is solved, with allowance for the effects of finite rate of carbon vaporization.

  8. Lattice constants of pure methane and carbon dioxide hydrates at low temperatures. Implementing quantum corrections to classical molecular dynamics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costandy, Joseph; Michalis, Vasileios K.; Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N.; Stubos, Athanassios K.; Economou, Ioannis G.

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a simple correction to the calculation of the lattice constants of fully occupied structure sI methane or carbon dioxide pure hydrates that are obtained from classical molecular dynamics simulations using the TIP4PQ/2005 water force field. The obtained corrected lattice constants are subsequently used in order to obtain isobaric thermal expansion coefficients of the pure gas hydrates that exhibit a trend that is significantly closer to the experimental behavior than previously reported classical molecular dynamics studies.

  9. Energy dissipation in intercalated carbon nanotube forests with metal layers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests were synthesized to study their quasi-static mechanical properties in a layered configuration with metallization. The top and bottom surfaces of CNT forests were metalized with Ag, Fe, and In using paste, sputtering, and thermal evaporation, respectiv...

  10. Flattened Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube with Multi-Layered Structure.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Hideo; Hasegawa, Takayuki; Ichikawa, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    Fabrication of novel nanostructures based on carbon nanotubes has been a focus of recent interest since they are expected to inherit excellent properties of carbon nanotube. To find new nanotube-based nanostructures, it is important to find a new growth mode or process. This paper reports the formation of a multiwalled carbon nanotube that has bi-layered structure and is partly flattened. Transmission electron microscopy observations suggest that the outer multiwalled layer was formed first from a Fe catalyst nanoparticle, and was partly flattened during the growth. Then the catalyst nanoparticle worked again to form the inner multiwalled tube moving inside the outer tube and became flattened at the same position of the outer tube. It is likely that the inner growth gave an expansion stress against the flattened outer tube; nevertheless, the flattened part of the outer tube remained. This observation evidences that the flattening of the nanotube occurred simultaneously during the growth and was stabilized by structural defect.

  11. Convergent beam electron diffraction study of lattice distortion in InGaAs/GaAs strained-layer superlattices grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Q. H.; Fung, K. K.; York, P. K.; Fernandez, G. E.; Eades, J. A.; Coleman, J. J.

    1990-11-01

    The intensities of sidebands in convergent beam electron diffraction reflections from plan-view specimens of strain modulated InGaAs/GaAs superlattices are dependent on the natural lattice mismatch, the ratio of the thicknesses of the superlattice layers, the period (sum of layer thicknesses) of the superlattice, and the g vectors of the reflections. The intensities of kinematic higher-order Laue zone (HOLZ) reflections have been calculated from a simple model based on alternate contraction and expansion of lattice spacings of the superlattice layers. An accurate estimate of the In content of InGaAs can be deduced from the elastic strains in the superlattice layers so obtained.

  12. Mechanism of electrochemical activation of carbon electrodes: Role of graphite lattice defects

    SciTech Connect

    Bowling, R.J.; Packard, R.T.; McCreery, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    By use of Raman spectroscopy as a probe, the relationship between carbon microstructure and increases in the heterogeneous electron-transfer rate for carbon electrodes was examined. A distinctive Raman band at 1360/cm is proportional to the density of graphitic edge planes and may be used to monitor changes in edge plane density induced by carbon pretreatment procedures. It was shown that electrochemical oxidation of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) caused fracturing of the graphite lattice, thus increasing edge plane density. This result is consistent with other reports from laser activation of HOPG, which correlate increased edge plane density with increased electron-transfer rate. Creation of edge plane is a phenomenon common to both oxidative and nonoxidative activation procedures and is responsible for HOPG activation. Arguments about the involvement of graphitic oxide or oxygen containing functional groups in electron-transfer activation are presented. After the present results are combined with those from the literature, it appears unlikely the oxygen functional groups are involved in electron-transfer activation of several benchmark redox systems on carbon electrodes.

  13. The reactivity of lattice carbon and nitrogen species in molybdenum (oxy)carbonitrides prepared by single-source routes

    SciTech Connect

    AlShalwi, M.; Hargreaves, J.S.J.; Liggat, J.J.; Todd, D.

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molybdenum (oxy)carbonitrides have been prepared from single source routes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrogen species are more reactive than carbon species within the carbonitrides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reactivity of nitrogen species is a function of carbonitride composition. -- Abstract: Molybdenum (oxy)carbonitrides of different compositions have been prepared from hexamethylenetetramine molybdate and ethylenediamine molybdate precursors and the reactivity of the lattice carbon and nitrogen species within them has been determined by temperature programmed reduction and thermal volatilisation studies. Nitrogen is found to be much more reactive than carbon and the nature of its reactivity is influenced by composition with the presence of carbon enhancing the reactivity of nitrogen. The difference in reactivity observed indicates that molybdenum carbonitrides are not suitable candidates as reagents for which the simultaneous loss of nitrogen and carbon from the lattice would be desirable.

  14. Intrinsic degradation mechanism of nearly lattice-matched InAlN layers grown on GaN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perillat-Merceroz, Guillaume; Cosendey, Gatien; Carlin, Jean-François; Butté, Raphaël; Grandjean, Nicolas

    2013-02-01

    Thanks to its high refractive index contrast, band gap, and polarization mismatch compared to GaN, In0.17Al0.83N layers lattice-matched to GaN are an attractive solution for applications such as distributed Bragg reflectors, ultraviolet light-emitting diodes, or high electron mobility transistors. In order to study the structural degradation mechanism of InAlN layers with increasing thickness, we performed metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy of InAlN layers of thicknesses ranging from 2 to 500 nm, on free-standing (0001) GaN substrates with a low density of threading dislocations, for In compositions of 13.5% (layers under tensile strain), and 19.7% (layers under compressive strain). In both cases, a surface morphology with hillocks is initially observed, followed by the appearance of V-defects. We propose that those hillocks arise due to kinetic roughening, and that V-defects subsequently appear beyond a critical hillock size. It is seen that the critical thickness for the appearance of V-defects increases together with the surface diffusion length either by increasing the temperature or the In flux because of a surfactant effect. In thick InAlN layers, a better (worse) In incorporation occurring on the concave (convex) shape surfaces of the V-defects is observed leading to a top phase-separated InAlN layer lying on the initial homogeneous InAlN layer after V-defects coalescence. It is suggested that similar mechanisms could be responsible for the degradation of thick InGaN layers.

  15. Carbon Nanostructure Examined by Lattice Fringe Analysis of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Tomasek, Aaron J.; Street, Kenneth; Thompson, William K.

    2002-01-01

    The dimensions of graphitic layer planes directly affect the reactivity of soot towards oxidation and growth. Quantification of graphitic structure could be used to develop and test correlations between the soot nanostructure and its reactivity. Based upon transmission electron microscopy images, this paper provides a demonstration of the robustness of a fringe image analysis code for determining the level of graphitic structure within nanoscale carbon, i.e. soot. Results, in the form of histograms of graphitic layer plane lengths, are compared to their determination through Raman analysis.

  16. Carbon Nanostructure Examined by Lattice Fringe Analysis of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Tomasek, Aaron J.; Street, Kenneth; Thompson, William K.; Hull, David R.

    2003-01-01

    The dimensions of graphitic layer planes directly affect the reactivity of soot towards oxidation and growth. Quantification of graphitic structure could be used to develop and test correlations between the soot nanostructure and its reactivity. Based upon transmission electron microscopy images, this paper provides a demonstration of the robustness of a fringe image analysis code for determining the level of graphitic structure within nanoscale carbon, i.e., soot. Results, in the form of histograms of graphitic layer plane lengths, are compared to their determination through Raman analysis.

  17. Phase structure of the anisotropic antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on a layered triangular lattice: Spiral state and deconfined spin liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Nakane, Kazuya; Kamijo, Takeshi; Ichinose, Ikuo

    2011-02-01

    In the present paper, we study a spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic (AF) Heisenberg model on layered anisotropic triangular lattice and obtain its phase structure. We use the Schwinger bosons for representing spin operators and also a coherent-state path integral for calculating physical quantities. Finite-temperature properties of the system are investigated by means of the numerical Monte-Carlo simulations. A detailed phase diagram of the system is obtained by calculating internal energy, specific heat, spin correlation functions, etc. There are AF Neel, paramagnetic, and spiral states. Turning on the plaquette term (i.e., the Maxwell term on a lattice) of an emergent U(1) gauge field that flips a pair of parallel spin-singlet bonds, we found that there appears a phase that is regarded as a deconfined spin-liquid state, though 'transition' to this phase from the paramagnetic phase is not of second order but a crossover. In that phase, the emergent gauge boson is a physical gapless excitation coupled with spinons. These results support our previous study on an AF Heisenberg model on a triangular lattice at vanishing temperature.

  18. The effect of neutron irradiation and annealing temperature on the electrical properties and lattice constant of epitaxial gallium nitride layers

    SciTech Connect

    Boyko, V. M.; Verevkin, S. S.; Kolin, N. G. Korulin, A. V.; Merkurisov, D. I.; Polyakov, A. Y.; Chevychelov, V. A.

    2011-01-15

    Effect of irradiation with high reactor-neutron fluences ({Phi} = 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17}-8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -2}) and subsequent heat treatments in the temperature range 100-1000 Degree-Sign C on the electrical properties and lattice constant of epitaxial GaN layers grown on an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate is considered. It is shown that, with the neutron fluence increasing to (1-2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}, the resistivity of the material grows to values of about 10{sup 10} {Omega} cm because of the formation of radiation defects, and, with the fluence raised further, the resistivity passes through a maximum and then decreases to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} {Omega} cm at 300 K, which is accounted for by the appearance of a hopping conductivity via deep defects in the overlapping outer parts of disordered regions. With the neutron fluence raised to 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -2}, the lattice constant c increases by 0.38% at a nearly unchanged parameter a. Heat treatment of irradiated samples at temperatures as high as 1000 Degree-Sign C does not fully restore the lattice constant and the electrical parameters of the material.

  19. Persistence Length Control of the Polyelectrolyte Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembly on Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S J; Artyukhin, A B; Wang, Y; Ju, J; Stroeve, P; Noy, A

    2005-04-30

    One-dimensional inorganic materials such as carbon nanotubes1 and semiconductor nanowires have been central to important advances in materials science in the last decade. Unique mechanical and electronic properties of these molecular-scale wires enabled a variety of applications ranging from novel composite materials, to electronic circuits, to new sensors. Often, these applications require non-covalent modification of carbon nanotubes with organic compounds, DNA and biomolecules, and polymers to change nanotube properties or to add new functionality. We recently demonstrated a versatile and flexible strategy for non-covalent modification of carbon nanotubes using layer-by-layer self-assembly of polyelectrolytes. Researchers used this technique extensively for modification of flat surfaces, micro-, and nano-particles; however, little is known about the mechanism and the factors influencing layer-by-layer self-assembly in one-dimensional nanostructures. The exact conformation of polyelectrolyte chains deposited on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) is still unknown. There are two possible configurations: flexible polymers wrapping around the nanotube and stretched, rigid chains stacked parallel to the nanotube axis. Several factors, such as polymer rigidity, surface curvature, and strength of polymer-surface interactions, can determine the nature of assembly. Persistence length of the polymer chain should be one of the critical parameters, since it determines the chain's ability to wrap around the nanotube. Indeed, computer simulations for spherical substrates show that polymer rigidity and substrate surface curvature can influence the deposition process. Computational models also show that the persistence length of the polymer must fall below the threshold values determined by target surface curvature in order to initiate polyelectrolyte deposition process. Although these models described the effects of salt concentration and target surface curvature, they

  20. Diameter Dependence of Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Study from Ab Initio.

    PubMed

    Yue, Sheng-Ying; Ouyang, Tao; Hu, Ming

    2015-10-22

    The effects of temperature, tube length, defects, and surface functionalization on the thermal conductivity (κ) of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were well documented in literature. However, diameter dependence of thermal conductivity of SWCNTs received less attentions. So far, diverse trends of the diameter dependence have been discussed by different methods and all the previous results were based on empirical interatomic potentials. In this paper, we emphasize to clarify accurate κ values of SWCNTs with different diameters and in-plane κ of graphene. All the studies were under the framework of anharmonic lattice dynamics and Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) based on first principle calculations. We try to infer the right trend of diameter dependent thermal conductivity of SWCNTs. We infer that graphene is the limitation as SWCNT with an infinite diameter. We analyzed the thermal conductivity contributions from each phonon mode in SWCNTs to explain the trend. Meanwhile, we also identify the extremely low thermal conductivity of ultra-thin SWCNTs.

  1. Carbon nanotube forests growth using catalysts from atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bingan; Zhang, Can; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Xie, Rongsi; Zhong, Guofang; Robertson, John; Bhardwaj, Sunil; Cepek, Cinzia

    2014-04-14

    We have grown carbon nanotubes using Fe and Ni catalyst films deposited by atomic layer deposition. Both metals lead to catalytically active nanoparticles for growing vertically aligned nanotube forests or carbon fibres, depending on the growth conditions and whether the substrate is alumina or silica. The resulting nanotubes have narrow diameter and wall number distributions that are as narrow as those grown from sputtered catalysts. The state of the catalyst is studied by in-situ and ex-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We demonstrate multi-directional nanotube growth on a porous alumina foam coated with Fe prepared by atomic layer deposition. This deposition technique can be useful for nanotube applications in microelectronics, filter technology, and energy storage.

  2. Pore-scale Numerical Simulation Using Lattice Boltzmann Method for Mud Erosion in Methane Hydrate Bearing Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Sato, T.; Oyama, H.

    2014-12-01

    Methane hydrates in subsea environments near Japan are believed to new natural gas resources. These methane hydrate crystals are very small and existed in the intergranular pores of sandy sediments in sand mud alternate layers. For gas production, several processes for recovering natural gas from the methane hydrate in a sedimentary reservoir have been proposed, but almost all technique are obtain dissociated gas from methane hydrates. When methane hydrates are dissociated, gas and water are existed. These gas and water are flown in pore space of sand mud alternate layers, and there is a possibility that the mud layer is eroded by these flows. It is considered that the mad erosion causes production trouble such as making skins or well instability. In this study, we carried out pore scale numerical simulation to represent mud erosion. This research aims to develop a fundamental simulation method based on LBM (Lattice Boltzmann Method). In the simulation, sand particles are generated numerically in simulation area which is approximately 200x200x200μm3. The periodic boundary condition is used except for mud layers. The water/gas flow in pore space is calculated by LBM, and shear stress distribution is obtained at the position flow interacting mud surface. From this shear stress, we consider that the driving force of mud erosion. As results, mud erosion can be reproduced numerically by adjusting the parameters such as critical shear stress. We confirmed that the simulation using LBM is appropriate for mud erosion.

  3. Covalent layer-by-layer functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes by click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; He, Hongkun; Gao, Chao; Wu, Jiayan

    2009-05-19

    The covalent functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by layer-by-layer (LbL) click chemistry is reported. The clickable polymers of poly(2-azidoethyl methacrylate) and poly(propargyl methacrylate) were synthesized at first by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of 2-azidoethyl methacrylate and reverse addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of propargyl methacrylate, respectively. The two polymers were then alternately coated on alkyne-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes using Cu(I)-catalyzed click reaction of Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between azides and alkynes. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements confirm that the quantity and thickness of the clicked polymer shell on MWNTs can be well controlled by adjusting the cycles or numbers of click reaction and the polymer shell is uniform and even. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier tranform infrared (FTIR) measurements showed that there were still a great amount of residual azido groups on the surfaces of the functionalized MWNTs after clicking three layers of polymers. Furthermore, alkyne-modified rhodamine B and monoalkyne-terminated polystyrene were subsequently used to functionalize the clickable polymer grafted MWNTs, giving rise to fluorescent carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and CNT-based polystyrene brushes, respectively. It demonstrates that the residual azido groups on the surfaces of MWNTs are available for further click reaction with various functional molecules. PMID:19374339

  4. Method of depositing multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, J.P.; Friedmann, T.A.

    1999-08-10

    A novel field emitter device is disclosed for cold cathode field emission applications, comprising a multi-layer resistive carbon film. The multi-layered film of the present invention is comprised of at least two layers of a resistive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, such that the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure comprises a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film comprises a plurality of carbon layers, wherein adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced. Field emitters made according the present invention display improved electron emission characteristics in comparison to conventional field emitter materials. 8 figs.

  5. Method of depositing multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, John P.; Friedmann, Thomas A.

    1999-01-01

    A novel field emitter device for cold cathode field emission applications, comprising a multi-layer resistive carbon film. The multi-layered film of the present invention is comprised of at least two layers of a resistive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, such that the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure comprises a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film comprises a plurality of carbon layers, wherein adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced. Field emitters made according the present invention display improved electron emission characteristics in comparison to conventional field emitter materials.

  6. Lattice constants of pure methane and carbon dioxide hydrates at low temperatures. Implementing quantum corrections to classical molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Costandy, Joseph; Michalis, Vasileios K; Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N; Stubos, Athanassios K; Economou, Ioannis G

    2016-03-28

    We introduce a simple correction to the calculation of the lattice constants of fully occupied structure sI methane or carbon dioxide pure hydrates that are obtained from classical molecular dynamics simulations using the TIP4PQ/2005 water force field. The obtained corrected lattice constants are subsequently used in order to obtain isobaric thermal expansion coefficients of the pure gas hydrates that exhibit a trend that is significantly closer to the experimental behavior than previously reported classical molecular dynamics studies. PMID:27036466

  7. Analysis of alignment effect on carbon nanotube layer in nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Preeti; Upadhyay, S. H.

    2015-02-01

    In this work, effect of various alignments of double walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) in composite is evaluated for axial, lateral and through plane properties. Layers of DWCNTs are incorporated in the matrix. Four models with different layer combinations are analysed using 3D representative volume element. The highest value of axial modulus is observed for composite in which DWCNTs are aligned in direction of loading. Enhancement in lateral stiffness is observed for the models in which layers are aligned in plane perpendicular direction. Through plane stiffness is improved in vertically aligned DWCNT composite. It is observed that both axial and lateral moduli of composite behave non-linearly with respect to DWCNT volume fraction. This is because of the effect of agglomeration, due to the higher content of DWCNT in the composite. The proposed simulation is based on the experimentally adopted alignment of carbon nanotubes. DWCNT based composites with specific properties along various directions can be designed by controlling the volume fractions and alignment of the DWCNT sheets.

  8. Carbon transport in the bottom boundary layer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lohrenz, S.E.; Asper, V.L.

    1997-09-01

    The authors objective was to characterize distributions of chloropigment fluorescence in relation to physical processes in the benthic boundary layer in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) Ocean Margins Program`s (OMP) goal of quantifying carbon transport across the continental shelf. Their approach involved participation in the Ocean Margins Program (OMP) field experiment on the continental shelf off Cape Hatteras by conducting multi-sensor fluorescence measurements of photosynthetic pigments. Specific tasks included (1) pre- and post-deployment calibration of multiple fluorescence sensors in conjunction with Woods Hole personnel; (2) collection and analysis of photosynthetic pigment concentrations and total particulate carbon in water column samples to aid in interpretation of the fluorescence time-series during the field experiment; (3) collaboration in the analysis and interpretation of 1994 and 1996 time-series data in support of efforts to quantify pigment and particulate organic carbon transport on the continental shelf off Cape Hatteras. This third component included analysis of data obtained with a multi-sensor fiber-optic fluorometer in the benthic boundary layer of the inner shelf off Cape Hatteras during summer 1994.

  9. Ab initio lattice dynamics and thermochemistry of layered bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurhelle, Alexander F.; Deringer, Volker L.; Stoffel, Ralf P.; Dronskowski, Richard

    2016-03-01

    We present density-functional theory calculations of the lattice dynamics of bismuth telluride, yielding force constants, mean-square displacements and partial densities of phonon states which corroborate and complement previous nuclear inelastic scattering experiments. From these data, we derive an element- and energy-resolved view of the vibrational anharmonicity, quantified by the macroscopic Grüneisen parameter γ which results in 1.56. Finally, we calculate thermochemical properties in the quasiharmonic approximation, especially the heat capacity at constant pressure and the enthalpy of formation for bismuth telluride; the latter arrives at ▵H f (Bi2Te3)  =  -102 kJ mol-1 at 298 K.

  10. Ab initio lattice dynamics and thermochemistry of layered bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3).

    PubMed

    Zurhelle, Alexander F; Deringer, Volker L; Stoffel, Ralf P; Dronskowski, Richard

    2016-03-23

    We present density-functional theory calculations of the lattice dynamics of bismuth telluride, yielding force constants, mean-square displacements and partial densities of phonon states which corroborate and complement previous nuclear inelastic scattering experiments. From these data, we derive an element- and energy-resolved view of the vibrational anharmonicity, quantified by the macroscopic Grüneisen parameter γ which results in 1.56. Finally, we calculate thermochemical properties in the quasiharmonic approximation, especially the heat capacity at constant pressure and the enthalpy of formation for bismuth telluride; the latter arrives at ΔHf (Bi2Te3)  =  -102 kJ mol(-1) at 298 K.

  11. Ab initio lattice dynamics and thermochemistry of layered bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3).

    PubMed

    Zurhelle, Alexander F; Deringer, Volker L; Stoffel, Ralf P; Dronskowski, Richard

    2016-03-23

    We present density-functional theory calculations of the lattice dynamics of bismuth telluride, yielding force constants, mean-square displacements and partial densities of phonon states which corroborate and complement previous nuclear inelastic scattering experiments. From these data, we derive an element- and energy-resolved view of the vibrational anharmonicity, quantified by the macroscopic Grüneisen parameter γ which results in 1.56. Finally, we calculate thermochemical properties in the quasiharmonic approximation, especially the heat capacity at constant pressure and the enthalpy of formation for bismuth telluride; the latter arrives at ΔHf (Bi2Te3)  =  -102 kJ mol(-1) at 298 K. PMID:26894844

  12. Lattice-matched HfN buffer layers for epitaxy of GaN on Si

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, Robert; Yang, Qing; Feick, Henning; Gebauer, Joerg; Weber, Eicke R.; Shinkai, Satoko; Sasaki, Katsutaka

    2002-05-08

    Gallium nitride is grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on (111) and (001) silicon substrates using sputter-deposited hafnium nitride buffer layers. Wurtzite GaN epitaxial layers are obtained on both the (111) and (001) HfN/Si surfaces, with crack-free thickness up to 1.2 (mu)m. Initial results for GaN grown on the (111) surface show a photoluminescence peak width of 17 meV at 11 K, and an asymmetric x-ray rocking curve width of 20 arcmin. Wurtzite GaN on HfN/Si(001) shows reduced structural quality and peculiar low-temperature luminescence features. However, growth on the (001) surface results in nearly stress-free films, suggesting that much thicker crack-free layers could be obtained.

  13. High quality InAlN single layers lattice-matched to GaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Gacevic, Z.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Calleja, E.; Estrade, S.

    2011-07-18

    We report on properties of high quality {approx}60 nm thick InAlN layers nearly in-plane lattice-matched to GaN, grown on c-plane GaN-on-sapphire templates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Excellent crystalline quality and low surface roughness are confirmed by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. High annular dark field observations reveal a periodic in-plane indium content variation (8 nm period), whereas optical measurements evidence certain residual absorption below the band-gap. The indium fluctuation is estimated to be {+-} 1.2% around the nominal 17% indium content via plasmon energy oscillations assessed by electron energy loss spectroscopy with sub-nanometric spatial resolution.

  14. Characterization of few-layered graphene grown by carbon implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kin Kiong; McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Jamieson, David N.

    2014-02-21

    Graphene is considered to be a very promising material for applications in nanotechnology. The properties of graphene are strongly dependent on defects that occur during growth and processing. These defects can be either detrimental or beneficial to device performance depending on defect type, location and device application. Here we present experimental results on formation of few-layered graphene by carbon ion implantation into nickel films and characteristics of graphene devices formed by graphene transfer and lithographic patterning. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to determine the number of graphene layers formed and identify defects arising from the device processing. The graphene films were cleaned by annealing in vacuum. Transport properties of cleaned graphene films were investigated by fabrication of back-gated field-effect transistors, which exhibited high hole and electron mobility of 1935 and 1905 cm2/Vs, respectively.

  15. Electrophoretic Deposition of Carbon Nitride Layers for Photoelectrochemical Applications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingsan; Shalom, Menny

    2016-05-25

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is used for the growth of carbon nitride (C3N4) layers on conductive substrates. EPD is fast, environmentally friendly, and allows the deposition of negatively charged C3N4 with different compositions and chemical properties. In this method, C3N4 can be deposited on various conductive substrates ranging from conductive glass and carbon paper to nickel foam possessing complex 3D geometries. The high flexibility of this approach enables us to readily tune the photophysical and photoelectronic properties of the C3N4 electrodes. The advantage of this method was further illustrated by the tailored construction of a heterostructure between two complementary C3N4, with marked photoelectrochemical activity.

  16. Optically transparent carbon nanotube film electrode for thin layer spectroelectrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tingting; Zhao, Daoli; Alvarez, Noe; Shanov, Vesselin N; Heineman, William R

    2015-10-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) film was evaluated as an optically transparent electrode (OTE) for thin layer spectroelectrochemistry. Chemically inert CNT arrays were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using thin films of Fe and Co as catalysts. Vertically aligned CNT arrays were drawn onto a quartz slide to form CNT films that constituted the OTE. Adequate conductivity and transparency make this material a good OTE for spectroelectrochemistry. These properties could be varied by the number of layers of CNTs used to form the OTE. Detection in the UV/near UV region down to 200 nm can be achieved using these transparent CNT films on quartz. The OTE was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and thin layer spectroelectrochemistry. Ferricyanide, tris(2,2'-bipyridine) ruthenium(II) chloride, and cytochrome c were used as representative redox probes for thin layer spectroelectrochemistry using the CNT film OTE, and the results correlated well with their known properties. Direct electron transfer of cytochrome c was achieved on the CNT film electrode. PMID:26291731

  17. Ultralight anisotropic foams from layered aligned carbon nanotube sheets.

    PubMed

    Faraji, Shaghayegh; Stano, Kelly L; Yildiz, Ozkan; Li, Ang; Zhu, Yuntian; Bradford, Philip D

    2015-10-28

    In this work, we present large scale, ultralight aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) structures which have densities an order of magnitude lower than CNT arrays, have tunable properties and exhibit resiliency after compression. By stacking aligned sheets of carbon nanotubes and then infiltrating with a pyrolytic carbon (PyC), resilient foam-like materials were produced that exhibited complete recovery from 90% compressive strain. With density as low as 3.8 mg cm(-3), the foam structure is over 500 times less dense than bulk graphite. Microscopy revealed that PyC coated the junctions among CNTs, and also increased CNT surface roughness. These changes in the morphology explain the transition from inelastic behavior to foam-like recovery of the layered CNT sheet structure. Mechanical and thermal properties of the foams were tuned for different applications through variation of PyC deposition duration while dynamic mechanical analysis showed no change in mechanical properties over a large temperature range. Observation of a large and linear electrical resistance change during compression of the aligned CNT/carbon (ACNT/C) foams makes strain/pressure sensors a relevant application. The foams have high oil absorption capacities, up to 275 times their own weight, which suggests they may be useful in water treatment and oil spill cleanup. Finally, the ACNT/C foam's high porosity, surface area and stability allow for demonstration of the foams as catalyst support structures.

  18. Ultralight anisotropic foams from layered aligned carbon nanotube sheets.

    PubMed

    Faraji, Shaghayegh; Stano, Kelly L; Yildiz, Ozkan; Li, Ang; Zhu, Yuntian; Bradford, Philip D

    2015-10-28

    In this work, we present large scale, ultralight aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) structures which have densities an order of magnitude lower than CNT arrays, have tunable properties and exhibit resiliency after compression. By stacking aligned sheets of carbon nanotubes and then infiltrating with a pyrolytic carbon (PyC), resilient foam-like materials were produced that exhibited complete recovery from 90% compressive strain. With density as low as 3.8 mg cm(-3), the foam structure is over 500 times less dense than bulk graphite. Microscopy revealed that PyC coated the junctions among CNTs, and also increased CNT surface roughness. These changes in the morphology explain the transition from inelastic behavior to foam-like recovery of the layered CNT sheet structure. Mechanical and thermal properties of the foams were tuned for different applications through variation of PyC deposition duration while dynamic mechanical analysis showed no change in mechanical properties over a large temperature range. Observation of a large and linear electrical resistance change during compression of the aligned CNT/carbon (ACNT/C) foams makes strain/pressure sensors a relevant application. The foams have high oil absorption capacities, up to 275 times their own weight, which suggests they may be useful in water treatment and oil spill cleanup. Finally, the ACNT/C foam's high porosity, surface area and stability allow for demonstration of the foams as catalyst support structures. PMID:26419855

  19. Carbon sequestration via aqueous olivine mineral carbonation: role of passivating layer formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdallah Bearat; Michael J. McKelvy; Andrew V.G. Chizmeshya; Deirdre Gormley; Ryan Nunez; R.W. Carpenter; Kyle Squires; George H. Wolf

    2006-08-01

    CO{sub 2} sequestration via carbonation of widely available low-cost minerals, such as olivine, can permanently dispose of CO{sub 2} in an environmentally benign and a geologically stable form. The paper reports the results of studies of the mechanisms that limit aqueous olivine carbonation reactivity under the optimum sequestration reaction conditions observed to date: 1 M NaCl + 0.64 M NaHCO{sub 3} at T {approx} 185{sup o}C and P{sub CO{sub 2}} {approx} 135 bar. A reaction limiting silica-rich passivating layer (PL) forms on the feedstock grains, slowing carbonate formation and raising process cost. The morphology and composition of the passivating layers are investigated using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and atomic level modeling. Postreaction analysis of feedstock particles, recovered from stirred autoclave experiments at 1500 rpm, provides unequivocal evidence of local mechanical removal (chipping) of PL material, suggesting particle abrasion. This is corroborated by the observation that carbonation increases dramatically with solid particle concentration in stirred experiments. Multiphase hydrodynamic calculations are combined with experiment to better understand the associated slurry-flow effects. Large-scale atomic-level simulations of the reaction zone suggest that the PL possesses a 'glassy' but highly defective SiO{sub 2} structure that can permit diffusion of key reactants. Mitigating passivating layer effectiveness is critical to enhancing carbonation and lowering sequestration process cost. 30 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Anomalous Lattice Vibrations of Single- and Few-Layer MoS2

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Changgu; Yan, Hugen; Brus, Louis E.; Heinz, Tony F.; Hone, James; Ryu, Sunmin

    2010-05-25

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) of single- and few-layer thickness was exfoliated on SiO2/Si substrate and characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The number of S-Mo-S layers of the samples was independently determined by contact-mode atomic force microscopy. Two Raman modes, E12g and A1g, exhibited sensitive thickness dependence, with the frequency of the former decreasing and that of the latter increasing with thickness. The results provide a convenient and reliable means for determining layer thickness with atomic-level precision. The opposite direction of the frequency shifts, which cannot be explained solely by van der Waals interlayer coupling, is attributed to Coulombic interactions and possible stacking-induced changes of the intralayer bonding. Finally, this work exemplifies the evolution of structural parameters in layered materials in changing from the three-dimensional to the two-dimensional regime.

  1. Quantitative C lattice site distributions in epitaxial Ge{sub 1-y}C{sub y}/Ge(001) layers

    SciTech Connect

    D'Arcy-Gall, J.; Gall, D.; Petrov, I.; Desjardins, P.; Greene, J. E.

    2001-10-15

    Epitaxial metastable Ge{sub 1-y}C{sub y} alloy layers with y{<=}0.035 were grown on Ge(001) from hyperthermal Ge and C atomic beams at deposition temperatures T{sub s} of 250 and 300 C. The use of hyperthermal beams allows us to controllably vary the concentration of C incorporated as Ge--C split interstitials. Ge{sub 1-y}C{sub y} layers grown with incident Ge-atom energy distributions corresponding to {<=}0.14 lattice displacement per incident atom (dpa) are in a state of in-plane tension and contain significant concentrations of C atoms incorporated in substitutional sites. Increasing the dpa to 0.24 yields layers in compression with C incorporated primarily as Ge--C split interstitials. Ab initio density functional calculations of the formation energies and strain coefficients associated with C atomic arrangements in Ge show that configurations containing multiple C atoms, referred to collectively as C nanoclusters, are energetically more favorable than substitutional C and Ge--C split interstitials and yield a nearly zero average strain. In contrast, substitutional C and Ge--C split interstitials produce large tensile and compressive strains, respectively. Using the calculated strain coefficients, measured layer strains obtained from high-resolution reciprocal lattice maps, and substitutional C concentrations determined by Raman spectroscopy, we obtain the fraction of C atoms incorporated in substitutional, Ge--C split interstitial, and nanocluster sites as a function of the total C concentration y and T{sub s}. We find that at low y and T{sub s} values, all C atoms are incorporated in single-C configurations: substitutional C and Ge--C split interstitials. Their relative concentrations are controlled by the dpa through the production of near-surface Ge self-interstitials which are trapped by substitutional C atoms to form Ge--C split interstitials. Increasing y and T{sub s}, irrespective of the dpa, leads to an increase in the fraction of C nanoclusters, while

  2. Lattice mismatch induced curved configurations of hybrid boron nitride-carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin

    2016-10-01

    A unique curved configuration is observed in freestanding hybrid boron nitride-carbon nanotubes (BN-CNTs) based on molecular dynamics simulations, which, in previous studies, was tacitly assumed as a straight configuration. The physical fundamentals of this phenomenon are explored by using the continuum mechanics theory, where the curved configuration of BN-CNTs is found to be induced by the bending effect due to the lattice mismatch between the C domain and the BN domain. In addition, our results show that the curvature of the curved BN-CNTs is determined by their radius and composition. The curvature of BN-CNTs decreases with growing radius of BN-CNTs and becomes ignorable when their radius is relatively large. A non-monotonic relationship is detected between the curvature and the composition of BN-CNTs. Specifically, the curvature of BN-CNTs increases with growing BN concentration when the molar fraction of BN atoms is smaller than a critical value 0.52, but decreases with growing BN concentration when the molar fraction of BN atoms is larger than this critical value.

  3. Diameter Dependence of Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Study from Ab Initio

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Sheng-Ying; Ouyang, Tao; Hu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The effects of temperature, tube length, defects, and surface functionalization on the thermal conductivity (κ) of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were well documented in literature. However, diameter dependence of thermal conductivity of SWCNTs received less attentions. So far, diverse trends of the diameter dependence have been discussed by different methods and all the previous results were based on empirical interatomic potentials. In this paper, we emphasize to clarify accurate κ values of SWCNTs with different diameters and in-plane κ of graphene. All the studies were under the framework of anharmonic lattice dynamics and Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) based on first principle calculations. We try to infer the right trend of diameter dependent thermal conductivity of SWCNTs. We infer that graphene is the limitation as SWCNT with an infinite diameter. We analyzed the thermal conductivity contributions from each phonon mode in SWCNTs to explain the trend. Meanwhile, we also identify the extremely low thermal conductivity of ultra-thin SWCNTs. PMID:26490342

  4. Active Layer Soil Carbon and Nutrient Mineralization, Barrow, Alaska, 2012

    DOE Data Explorer

    Stan D. Wullschleger; Holly M. Vander Stel; Colleen Iversen; Victoria L. Sloan; Richard J. Norby; Mallory P. Ladd; Jason K. Keller; Ariane Jong; Joanne Childs; Deanne J. Brice

    2015-10-29

    This data set consists of bulk soil characteristics as well as carbon and nutrient mineralization rates of active layer soils manually collected from the field in August, 2012, frozen, and then thawed and incubated across a range of temperatures in the laboratory for 28 day periods in 2013-2015. The soils were collected from four replicate polygons in each of the four Areas (A, B, C, and D) of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Soil samples were coincident with the established Vegetation Plots that are located in center, edge, and trough microtopography in each polygon. Data included are 1) bulk soil characteristics including carbon, nitrogen, gravimetric water content, bulk density, and pH in 5-cm depth increments and also by soil horizon, 2) carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus mineralization rates for soil horizons incubated aerobically (and in one case both aerobically and anaerobically) for 28 days at temperatures that included 2, 4, 8, and 12 degrees C. Additional soil and incubation data are forthcoming. They will be available when published as part of another paper that includes additional replicate analyses.

  5. Local boundary reflections in lattice Boltzmann schemes: Spurious boundary layers and their impact on the velocity, diffusion and dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, Irina; Roux, Laetitia; Silva, Goncalo

    2015-10-01

    This work demonstrates that in advection-diffusion Lattice Boltzmann schemes, the local mass-conserving boundary rules, such as bounce-back and local specular reflection, may modify the transport coefficients predicted by the Chapman-Enskog expansion when they enforce to zero not only the normal, but also the tangential boundary flux. In order to accommodate it to the bulk solution, the system develops a Knudsen-layer correction to the non-equilibrium part of the population solution. Two principal secondary effects-(i) decrease in the diffusion coefficient, and (ii) retardation of the average advection velocity, obtained in a closed analytical form, are proportional, respectively, to freely assigned diagonal weights for equilibrium mass and velocity terms. In addition, due to their transverse velocity gradients, the boundary layers affect the longitudinal diffusion coefficient similarly to Taylor dispersion, as they grow as the square of the Péclet number. These numerical artifacts can be eliminated or reduced by a proper space distribution of the free-tunable collision eigenvalue in two-relaxation-time schemes.

  6. Electronic structure and lattice dynamics at the interface of single layer FeSe and SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Towfiq; Balatsky, Alexander; Zhu, Jian-Xin

    Recent discovery of high-temperature superconductivity with the superconducting energy gap opening at temperatures close to or above the liquid nitrogen boiling point in the single-layer FeSe grown on SrTiO3 has attracted significant interest. It suggests that the interface effects can be utilized to enhance the superconductivity. It has been shown recently that the coupling between the electrons in FeSe and vibrational modes at the interface play an important role. Here we report on a detailed study of electronic structure and lattice dynamics in the single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 interface by using the state-of-art electronic structure method within the density functional theory. The nature of the vibrational modes at the interface and their coupling to the electronic degrees of freedom are analyzed. In addition, the effect of hole and electron doping in SrTiO3 on the electron-mode coupling strength is also considered. This work was carried out under the auspices of the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. DOE at LANL under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396, and was supported by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  7. Modified emission of extended light emitting layers by selective coupling to collective lattice resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezani, Mohammad; Lozano, Gabriel; Verschuuren, Marc A.; Gómez-Rivas, Jaime

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that the coupling between light emitters in extended polymer layers and modes supported by arrays of plasmonic particles can be selectively enhanced by accurate positioning of the emitters in regions where the electric field intensity of a given mode is maximized. The enhancement, which we measure to reach up to 70%, is due to the improved spatial overlap and coupling between the optical mode and emitters. This improvement of the coupling leads to a modification of the emission spectrum and the luminous efficacy of the sample.

  8. Ultralight anisotropic foams from layered aligned carbon nanotube sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraji, Shaghayegh; L. Stano, Kelly; Yildiz, Ozkan; Li, Ang; Zhu, Yuntian; Bradford, Philip D.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we present large scale, ultralight aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) structures which have densities an order of magnitude lower than CNT arrays, have tunable properties and exhibit resiliency after compression. By stacking aligned sheets of carbon nanotubes and then infiltrating with a pyrolytic carbon (PyC), resilient foam-like materials were produced that exhibited complete recovery from 90% compressive strain. With density as low as 3.8 mg cm-3, the foam structure is over 500 times less dense than bulk graphite. Microscopy revealed that PyC coated the junctions among CNTs, and also increased CNT surface roughness. These changes in the morphology explain the transition from inelastic behavior to foam-like recovery of the layered CNT sheet structure. Mechanical and thermal properties of the foams were tuned for different applications through variation of PyC deposition duration while dynamic mechanical analysis showed no change in mechanical properties over a large temperature range. Observation of a large and linear electrical resistance change during compression of the aligned CNT/carbon (ACNT/C) foams makes strain/pressure sensors a relevant application. The foams have high oil absorption capacities, up to 275 times their own weight, which suggests they may be useful in water treatment and oil spill cleanup. Finally, the ACNT/C foam's high porosity, surface area and stability allow for demonstration of the foams as catalyst support structures.In this work, we present large scale, ultralight aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) structures which have densities an order of magnitude lower than CNT arrays, have tunable properties and exhibit resiliency after compression. By stacking aligned sheets of carbon nanotubes and then infiltrating with a pyrolytic carbon (PyC), resilient foam-like materials were produced that exhibited complete recovery from 90% compressive strain. With density as low as 3.8 mg cm-3, the foam structure is over 500 times less dense than

  9. Engineering lattice matching, doping level, and optical properties of KY(WO4)2:Gd, Lu, Yb layers for a cladding-side-pumped channel waveguide laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravazhi, Shanmugam; Geskus, Dimitri; van Dalfsen, Koop; Vázquez-Córdova, Sergio A.; Grivas, Christos; Griebner, Uwe; García-Blanco, Sonia M.; Pollnau, Markus

    2013-05-01

    Single-crystalline KY1- x-y-z GdxLuyYbz(WO4)2 layers are grown onto undoped KY(WO4)2 substrates by liquid-phase epitaxy. The purpose of co-doping the KY(WO4)2 layer with suitable fractions of Gd3+ and Lu3+ is to achieve lattice-matched layers that allow us to engineer a high refractive-index contrast between waveguiding layer and substrate for obtaining tight optical mode confinement and simultaneously accommodate a large range of Yb3+ doping concentrations by replacing Lu3+ ions of similar ionic radius for a variety of optical amplifier or laser applications. Crack-free layers, up to a maximum lattice mismatch of ~0.08 %, are grown with systematic variations of Y3+, Gd3+, Lu3+, and Yb3+ concentrations, their refractive indices are measured at several wavelengths, and Sellmeier dispersion curves are derived. The influence of co-doping on the spectroscopy of Yb3+ is investigated. As evidenced by the experimental results, the lattice constants, refractive indices, and transition cross-sections of Yb3+ in these co-doped layers can be approximated with good accuracy by weighted averages of data from the pure compounds. The obtained information is exploited to fabricate a twofold refractive-index-engineered sample consisting of a highly Yb3+-doped tapered channel waveguide embedded in a passive planar waveguide, and a cladding-side-pumped channel waveguide laser is demonstrated.

  10. Carbon Doping of Compound Semiconductor Epitaxial Layers Grown by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition Using Carbon Tetrachloride.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Brian Thomas

    1990-01-01

    A dilute mixture of CCl_4 in high purity H_2 has been used as a carbon dopant source for rm Al_ {x}Ga_{1-x}As grown by low pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). To understand the mechanism for carbon incorporation from CCl_4 doping and to provide experimental parameters for the growth of carbon doped device structures, the effects of various crystal growth parameters on CCl _4 doping have been studied, including growth temperature, growth rate, V/III ratio, Al composition, and CCl_4 flow rate. Although CCl _4 is an effective p-type dopant for MOCVD rm Al_{x}Ga_ {1-x}As, injection of CCl_4 into the reactor during growth of InP resulted in no change in the carrier concentration or carbon concentration. Abrupt, heavy carbon doping spikes in GaAs have been obtained using CCl_4 without a dopant memory effect. By annealing samples with carbon doping spikes grown within undoped, n-type, and p-type GaAs, the carbon diffusion coefficient in GaAs at 825 ^circC has been estimated and has been found to depend strongly on the GaAs background doping. Heavily carbon doped rm Al_{x}Ga _{1-x}As/GaAs superlattices have been found to be more stable against impurity induced layer disordering (IILD) than Mg or Zn doped superlattices, indicating that the low carbon diffusion coefficient limits the IILD process. Carbon doping has been used in the base region on an Npn AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT). Transistors with 3 x 10 μm self-aligned emitter fingers have been fabricated which exhibit a current gain cutoff frequency of f_ {rm t} = 26 GHz.

  11. Numerical modeling of carrier gas flow in atomic layer deposition vacuum reactor: A comparative study of lattice Boltzmann models

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Dongqing; Chien Jen, Tien; Li, Tao; Yuan, Chris

    2014-01-15

    This paper characterizes the carrier gas flow in the atomic layer deposition (ALD) vacuum reactor by introducing Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) to the ALD simulation through a comparative study of two LBM models. Numerical models of gas flow are constructed and implemented in two-dimensional geometry based on lattice Bhatnagar–Gross–Krook (LBGK)-D2Q9 model and two-relaxation-time (TRT) model. Both incompressible and compressible scenarios are simulated and the two models are compared in the aspects of flow features, stability, and efficiency. Our simulation outcome reveals that, for our specific ALD vacuum reactor, TRT model generates better steady laminar flow features all over the domain with better stability and reliability than LBGK-D2Q9 model especially when considering the compressible effects of the gas flow. The LBM-TRT is verified indirectly by comparing the numerical result with conventional continuum-based computational fluid dynamics solvers, and it shows very good agreement with these conventional methods. The velocity field of carrier gas flow through ALD vacuum reactor was characterized by LBM-TRT model finally. The flow in ALD is in a laminar steady state with velocity concentrated at the corners and around the wafer. The effects of flow fields on precursor distributions, surface absorptions, and surface reactions are discussed in detail. Steady and evenly distributed velocity field contribute to higher precursor concentration near the wafer and relatively lower particle velocities help to achieve better surface adsorption and deposition. The ALD reactor geometry needs to be considered carefully if a steady and laminar flow field around the wafer and better surface deposition are desired.

  12. Coherent Control of the Optical Absorption in a Plasmonic Lattice Coupled to a Luminescent Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirruccio, Giuseppe; Ramezani, Mohammad; Rodriguez, Said Rahimzadeh-Kalaleh; Rivas, Jaime Gómez

    2016-03-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the coherent control, i.e., phase-dependent enhancement and suppression, of the optical absorption in an array of metallic nanoantennas covered by a thin luminescent layer. The coherent control is achieved by using two collinear, counterpropagating, and phase-controlled incident waves with wavelength matching the absorption spectrum of dye molecules coupled to the array. Symmetry arguments shed light on the relation between the relative phase of the incident waves and the excitation efficiency of the optical resonances of the system. This coherent control is associated with a phase-dependent distribution of the electromagnetic near fields in the structure which enables a significant reduction of the unwanted dissipation in the metallic structures.

  13. Coherent Control of the Optical Absorption in a Plasmonic Lattice Coupled to a Luminescent Layer.

    PubMed

    Pirruccio, Giuseppe; Ramezani, Mohammad; Rodriguez, Said Rahimzadeh-Kalaleh; Rivas, Jaime Gómez

    2016-03-11

    We experimentally demonstrate the coherent control, i.e., phase-dependent enhancement and suppression, of the optical absorption in an array of metallic nanoantennas covered by a thin luminescent layer. The coherent control is achieved by using two collinear, counterpropagating, and phase-controlled incident waves with wavelength matching the absorption spectrum of dye molecules coupled to the array. Symmetry arguments shed light on the relation between the relative phase of the incident waves and the excitation efficiency of the optical resonances of the system. This coherent control is associated with a phase-dependent distribution of the electromagnetic near fields in the structure which enables a significant reduction of the unwanted dissipation in the metallic structures. PMID:27015478

  14. Graphene coated with controllable N-doped carbon layer by molecular layer deposition as electrode materials for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yao; Gao, Zhe; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Shichao; Qin, Yong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, graphene is coated with nitrogen-doped carbon layer, which is produced by a carbonization process of aromatic polyimide (PI) films deposited on the surfaces of graphene by molecular layer deposition (MLD). The utilization of MLD not only allows uniform coating of PI layers on the surfaces of pristine graphene without any surface treatment, but also enables homogenous dispersion of doped nitrogen atoms in the carbonized products. The as-prepared N-doped carbon layer coated graphene (NC-G) exhibited remarkable capacitance performance as electrode materials for supercapacitor, showing a high specific capacitance of 290.2 F g-1 at current density of 1 A g-1 in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolyte, meanwhile maintaining good rate performance and stable cycle capability. The NC-G synthesized by this way represents an alternative promising candidate as electrode material for supercapacitors.

  15. Multifunctional carbon nanotube thin film composites by layer-by-layer assembly technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Bong Sup

    Polymeric layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly offers a pathway for multifunctional/multicomponent materials with molecular-scale control of stratified structures. Among the wide variety nanoscale building blocks such as nanowires and nanodots, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are regarded as one of the most versatile because of their superior mechanical and electrical properties as well as geometrical perfection. In this thesis, LBL assembled SWNT thin film nanocomposites with high mechanical strength/toughness and with high electrical/optical properties are presented. Exceptional exfoliation state of SWNTs and controlled nm-thick layered structures are the basis for achieving tunable physical properties. Highly anisotropic features of SWNTs are translated into 2 dimensional alignments by meniscus combing technique during LBL assemblies. Advanced LBL assemblies by dewetting methods are also introduced, which significantly accelerate the process with improved lateral organization of nanowires. Furthermore, SWNT composite coating on commodity cotton yarns produced intelligent electronic textiles (e-textiles) with intrinsic humidity sensibility. This e-textile has been further combined with antigen/antibody sensing capability in order to develop a selective albumin biosensor which provides a direct route for the application of these materials as wearable biomonitoring and telemedicine sensors.

  16. The importance of a surface organic layer in simulating permafrost thermal and carbon dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarov, Elchin; Schaefer, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Permafrost-affected soils contain twice as much carbon as currently exists in the atmosphere. Studies show that warming of the perennially frozen ground could initiate significant release of the frozen soil carbon into the atmosphere. Initializing the frozen permafrost carbon with the observed soil carbon distribution from the Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database reduces the uncertainty associated with the modeling of the permafrost carbon feedback. To improve permafrost thermal and carbon dynamics we implemented a dynamic surface organic layer with vertical carbon redistribution, and introduced dynamic root growth controlled by active layer thickness, which improved soil carbon exchange between frozen and thawed pools. These changes increased the initial amount of simulated frozen carbon from 313 to 560 Gt C, consistent with observed frozen carbon stocks, and increased the spatial correlation of the simulated and observed distribution of frozen carbon from 0.12 to 0.63.

  17. The outer layers of cool, non-Mira carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.

    1991-01-01

    The outer layers and near circumstellar envelope (CSE) of a typical carbon star have been studied using available data from theoretical and empirical models. An attempt is made to match the density-velocity structure of the photosphere-chromosphere region to values from the radio CO observations, which arise from the outer CSE. It is concluded that the stellar atmosphere includes a relatively thin high-temperature region close to hydrostatic equilibrium and a much more extended cooler region of outflowing gas and dust. To extend the outer photosphere and chromosphere to match the mass loss density appears to require an injection of energy and momentum by some mechanism rather close to the stellar surface.

  18. Limiting factors for carbon based chemical double layer capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, M. Frank; Johnson, C.; Owens, T.; Stevens, B.

    1993-01-01

    The Chemical Double Layer (CDL) capacitor improves energy storage density dramatically when compared with conventional electrolytic capacitors. When compared to batteries, the CDL Capacitor is much less energy dense; however, the power density is orders of magnitude better. As a result, CDL-battery combinations present an interesting pulse power system with many potential applications. Due to the nature of the CDL it is inherently a low voltage device. The applications of the CDL can be tailored to auxiliary energy and burst mode storages which require fast charge/discharge cycles. Typical of the applications envisioned are power system backup, directed energy weapons concepts, electric automobiles, and electric actuators. In this paper, we will discuss some of the general characteristics of carbon-based CDL technology describing the structure, performance parameters, and methods of construction. Further, analytical and experimental results which define the state of the art are presented and described in terms of impact on applications.

  19. Development of spin-on carbon hardmasks with comparable etch resistance to Amorphous Carbon Layer (ACL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Hwan-Sung; Yoon, Kyong-Ho; Kim, Min-Soo; Oh, Seung Bae; Song, Jee-Yun; Tokareva, Nataliya; Kim, Jong-Seob; Chang, Tuwon

    2008-11-01

    In recent microlithography of semiconductor fabrication, spin-on hardmask (SOH) process continue to gain popularity as it replaces the traditional SiON/ACL hardmask scheme which suffers from high CoO, low productivity, particle contamination, and layer alignment issues. In the SOH process, organic polymer with high carbon content is spin-cast to form a carbon hardmask film. In the previous papers, we reported the development of organic SOH materials and their application in sub-70 nm lithography. In this paper, we describe the synthesis of organic polymers with very high carbon contents (>92 wt.%) and the evaluation of the spin-coated films for the hardmask application. The high carbon content of the polymer ensures improved etch resistance which amounts to >90% of ACL's resistance. However, as the carbon content of the polymers increases, the solubility in common organic solvents becomes lower. Here we report the strategies to improve the solubility of the high carbon content resins and optimization of the film properties for the SOH application.

  20. Physisorption of Fullerenes in Graphene layers and carbon Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Monica; Orellana, Pedro; Correa, Julian

    2015-03-01

    The study of nanostructures based on carbon allotropes has captured the interest of the scientific community in the last two decades, due to its great versatility. In such structures a simple change of geometry leads to important changes in their physicochemical properties. In this context it has been studied different carbon allotropes complexes in particular for the development of photovoltaic systems. In this paper we show a study of opto-electronic properties of fullerenes physisorbed on graphene nanoribbons. Our calculations are carried out within the framework of density functional theory (DFT) using the SIESTA package. Our results show that effectively the fullerenes bind both to the layer of graphene as well as to the nanoribbons, with binding energies of about 0.5EV. We find that when the complex is formed, the physical properties of fullerenes, graphene and nanoribbons are preserved and when graphene is functionalized with various fullerenes the electronic spectrum is composed of bands of energy which increases the intensity of the optical absorption spectrum of the complex. Conicyt ACT 1204, USM 11.14.68.

  1. Anisotropy measurement of pyrolytic carbon layers of coated particles

    SciTech Connect

    Vesyolkin, Ju. A. Ivanov, A. S.; Trushkina, T. V.

    2015-12-15

    Equipment at the National Research Center Kurchatov Institute intended for the anisotropy determination of pyrolytic carbon layers in coated particles (CPs) of the GT-MGR reactor is tested and calibrated. The dependence of the anisotropy coefficient on the size of the measurement region is investigated. The results of measuring the optical anisotropy factor (OPTAF) for an aluminum mirror, rutile crystal, and available CP samples with the known characteristics measured previously using ORNL equipment (United States) are presented. In addition, measurements of CP samples prepared at VNIINM are performed. A strong dependence of the data on the preparation quality of metallographic sections is found. Our investigations allow us to make the conclusion on the working capacity of the existing equipment for measuring the anisotropy of pyrolytic carbon CP coatings using the equipment at the Kurchatov Institute with the relative error of about 1%. It is shown that the elimination of the errors caused by the stochastic fluctuations in a measuring path by mathematical processing of the signal allows us to decrease the relative error of OPTAF measurements to ∼0.3%.

  2. Nearly lattice-matched n, i, and p layers for InGaN p-i-n photodiodes in the 365-500 nm spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkman, E. A.; El-Masry, N. A.; Emara, A.; Bedair, S. M.

    2008-03-01

    We report on nearly lattice-matched grown InGaN based p-i-n photodiodes detecting in the 365-500nm range with tunable peak responsivity tailored by the i-layer properties. The growth of lattice matched i- and n-InGaN layer leads to improvement in the device performance. This approach produced photodiodes with zero-bias responsivities up to 0.037A /W at 426nm, corresponding to 15.5% internal quantum efficiency. The peak responsivity wavelength ranged between 416 and 466nm, the longest reported for III-N photodiodes. The effects of InN content and i-layer thickness on photodiode properties and performance are discussed.

  3. Growth of metal-free carbon nanotubes on glass substrate with an amorphous carbon catalyst layer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jae Keun; Choi, Won Seok; Kim, Hee Dong; Lee, Jae-Hyeoung; Choi, Eun Chang; Kim, Hyung Jin; Hong, Byungyou

    2011-12-01

    We have investigated the direct growth of metal-free carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on glass substrates with microwave-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD). Amorphous carbon (a-C) films were used as a catalyst layer to grow metal-free CNTs. The a-C films were deposited on Corning glass substrates using RF magnetron sputtering with the use of a carbon target (99.99%) at room temperature. They were pretreated with hydrogen plasma using a microwave PECVD at 600 degrees C. Then, CNTs were prepared using microwave PECVD with a mixture of methane (CH4) and hydrogen (H2) gases. The CNTs were grown at different substrate temperatures (400 degrees C, 500 degrees C, and 600 degrees C) for 30 minutes. Other conditions were fixed. The growth trends of CNTs against substrate temperature were observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The structure of a-C catalyst layer and grown CNTs were measured by Raman spectroscopy. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) images showed that the CNTs had bamboo-like multi-walled structures. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) measurements confirmed that the CNTs consisted of only carbon. PMID:22409050

  4. Nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond and multi-layer-graphene-like hybrid carbon films

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Yonhua; Yeh, Shoupu; Fang, Wei Cheng; Chu, Yuehchieh

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond (N-UNCD) and multi-layer-graphene-like hybrid carbon films have been synthesized by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) on oxidized silicon which is pre-seeded with diamond nanoparticles. MPECVD of N-UNCD on nanodiamond seeds produces a base layer, from which carbon structures nucleate and grow perpendicularly to form standing carbon platelets. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering measurements reveal that these carbon platelets are comprised of ultrananocrystalline diamond embedded in multilayer-graphene-like carbon structures. The hybrid carbon films are of low electrical resistivity. UNCD grains in the N-UNCD base layer and the hybrid carbon platelets serve as high-density diamond nuclei for the deposition of an electrically insulating UNCD film on it. Biocompatible carbon-based heaters made of low-resistivity hybrid carbon heaters encapsulated by insulating UNCD for possible electrosurgical applications have been demonstrated. PMID:24681781

  5. Antiferromagnetic Kondo lattice in the layered compounds Re2NiGa9Ge2 (Re =Ce, Pr, Sm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yanglin; Liu, Jinyu; Hu, Jin; Adams, Daniel; Spinu, Leonard; Mao, Zhiqiang

    Intermetallic compounds containing rare-earth/actinide elements with 4f/5f electrons have formed a special family of strongly correlated materials, i.e. heavy fermion systems. We have recently found a new layered rare earth intermetallic system showing moderate heavy fermion behavior: Re2NiGa9Ge2 (Re =Ce, Sm, Pr). The Re =Ce and Sm members were previously synthesized, while their electronic properties have not been reported. We have recently grown single crystals of Re2NiGa9Ge2 (Re =Ce, Sm, Pr) and characterized their electronic and magnetic properties. We find all these materials are antiferromagnetic, with TN = 2.5 K, 5 K, 3.4 K respectively for Re =Ce, Pr and Sm. Moreover, they also exhibit large values of electronic specific coefficient: γ ~ 101 mJ mol-Ce-1 K-2 for Re =Ce, 368 mJ mol-Pr-1 K-2 for Re =Pr, and 196.4 mJ mol-Sm-1 K-2 for Re =Sm, indicating enhanced Kondo effect and the presence of AFM Kondo lattice. Our findings suggest that Re2NiGa9Ge2 (Re =Ce, Pr, Sm) could be interesting candidate materials for exploring novel exotic properties of correlated electrons through external parameter tuning such as chemical substitution and pressure.

  6. Low-Temperature Solution Synthesis of Few-Layer 1T '-MoTe2 Nanostructures Exhibiting Lattice Compression.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yifan; Wang, Yuanxi; Sun, Du; Carvalho, Bruno R; Read, Carlos G; Lee, Chia-Hui; Lin, Zhong; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Robinson, Joshua A; Crespi, Vincent H; Terrones, Mauricio; Schaak, Raymond E

    2016-02-18

    Molybdenum ditelluride, MoTe2 , is emerging as an important transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) material because of its favorable properties relative to other TMDs. The 1T ' polymorph of MoTe2 is particularly interesting because it is semimetallic with bands that overlap near the Fermi level, but semiconducting 2H-MoTe2 is more stable and therefore more accessible synthetically. Metastable 1T '-MoTe2 forms directly in solution at 300 °C as uniform colloidal nanostructures that consist of few-layer nanosheets, which appear to exhibit an approx. 1 % lateral lattice compression relative to the bulk analogue. Density functional theory calculations suggest that small grain sizes and polycrystallinity stabilize the 1T ' phase in the MoTe2 nanostructures and suppress its transformation back to the more stable 2H polymorph through grain boundary pinning. Raman spectra of the 1T '-MoTe2 nanostructures exhibit a laser energy dependence, which could be caused by electronic transitions. PMID:26804980

  7. Low-Temperature Solution Synthesis of Few-Layer 1T '-MoTe2 Nanostructures Exhibiting Lattice Compression.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yifan; Wang, Yuanxi; Sun, Du; Carvalho, Bruno R; Read, Carlos G; Lee, Chia-Hui; Lin, Zhong; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Robinson, Joshua A; Crespi, Vincent H; Terrones, Mauricio; Schaak, Raymond E

    2016-02-18

    Molybdenum ditelluride, MoTe2 , is emerging as an important transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) material because of its favorable properties relative to other TMDs. The 1T ' polymorph of MoTe2 is particularly interesting because it is semimetallic with bands that overlap near the Fermi level, but semiconducting 2H-MoTe2 is more stable and therefore more accessible synthetically. Metastable 1T '-MoTe2 forms directly in solution at 300 °C as uniform colloidal nanostructures that consist of few-layer nanosheets, which appear to exhibit an approx. 1 % lateral lattice compression relative to the bulk analogue. Density functional theory calculations suggest that small grain sizes and polycrystallinity stabilize the 1T ' phase in the MoTe2 nanostructures and suppress its transformation back to the more stable 2H polymorph through grain boundary pinning. Raman spectra of the 1T '-MoTe2 nanostructures exhibit a laser energy dependence, which could be caused by electronic transitions.

  8. Carbon nanotube and carbon nanorod-filled polyacrylonitrile electrospun stationary phase for ultrathin layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xin; Olesik, Susan V

    2014-06-01

    The application of carbon nanotube or nanorod/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) composite electrospun nanofibrous stationary phase for ultrathin layer chromatography (UTLC) is described herein. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and edge-plane carbon (EPC) nanorods were prepared and electrospun with the PAN polymer solution to form composite nanofibers for use as a UTLC stationary phase. The analysis of laser dyes demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing carbon nanoparticle-filled electrospun nanofibers as a UTLC stationary phase. The contribution of MWCNT or EPC in changing selectivity of the stationary phase was studied by comparing the chromatographic behavior among MWCNT-PAN plates, EPC-PAN plates and pure PAN plates. Carbon nanoparticles in the stationary phase were able to establish strong π-π interactions with aromatic analytes. The separation of five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) demonstrated enhanced chromatographic performance of MWCNT-filled stationary phase by displaying substantially improved resolution and separation efficiency. Band broadening of the spots for MWCNT or EPC-filled UTLC stationary phases was also investigated and compared with that for pure PAN stationary phases. A 50% improvement in band dispersion was noted using the MWCNT based composite nanofibrous UTLC plates. PMID:24856506

  9. High-Performance Carbon Nanotube/Polymer Composite Fiber from Layer-by-Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min Le; Chen, Yun; Zhang, Liang; Zhan, Hang; Qiang, Lei; Wang, Jian Nong

    2016-03-01

    So far, preparation of high-performance carbon nanotube (CNT)/polymer composites still faces big challenges mainly due to the limited control of CNT dispersion, fraction, and alignment in polymers. Here, a new "layer-by-layer deposition" method is put forward for preparing CNT/polymer composite fibers using poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as an exemplary polymer. This is based on the continuous production of a hollow cylindrical CNT assembly from a high temperature reactor and its shrinking by a PVA-containing solution and deposition on a removable substrate wire. The in situ mixing of the two composite components at the molecular level allows CNTs to disperse and PVA to infiltrate into the fiber efficiently. As a result, remarkable effects of the CNT reinforcement on the PVA matrix are observed, including a strength improvement from ∼50 to 1255 MPa and electrical conductivity from ∼0 to 1948 S cm(-1). The new method offers good controllability of CNT dispersion and fraction in the polymer matrix, variability for making composite fibers using different polymers, and suitability for scaled up production. This study thus provides a new research direction for preparing CNT-reinforced composites and future performance maximization.

  10. High-Performance Carbon Nanotube/Polymer Composite Fiber from Layer-by-Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min Le; Chen, Yun; Zhang, Liang; Zhan, Hang; Qiang, Lei; Wang, Jian Nong

    2016-03-01

    So far, preparation of high-performance carbon nanotube (CNT)/polymer composites still faces big challenges mainly due to the limited control of CNT dispersion, fraction, and alignment in polymers. Here, a new "layer-by-layer deposition" method is put forward for preparing CNT/polymer composite fibers using poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as an exemplary polymer. This is based on the continuous production of a hollow cylindrical CNT assembly from a high temperature reactor and its shrinking by a PVA-containing solution and deposition on a removable substrate wire. The in situ mixing of the two composite components at the molecular level allows CNTs to disperse and PVA to infiltrate into the fiber efficiently. As a result, remarkable effects of the CNT reinforcement on the PVA matrix are observed, including a strength improvement from ∼50 to 1255 MPa and electrical conductivity from ∼0 to 1948 S cm(-1). The new method offers good controllability of CNT dispersion and fraction in the polymer matrix, variability for making composite fibers using different polymers, and suitability for scaled up production. This study thus provides a new research direction for preparing CNT-reinforced composites and future performance maximization. PMID:26959406

  11. Power generation using carbon mesh cathodes with different diffusion layers in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yong; Zhang, Fang; Wei, Bin; Liu, Guangli; Zhang, Renduo; Logan, Bruce E.

    An inexpensive carbon material, carbon mesh, was examined to replace the more expensive carbon cloth usually used to make cathodes in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Three different diffusion layers were tested using carbon mesh: poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and Goretex cloth. Carbon mesh with a mixture of PDMS and carbon black as a diffusion layer produced a maximum power density of 1355 ± 62 mW m -2 (normalized to the projected cathode area), which was similar to that obtained with a carbon cloth cathode (1390 ± 72 mW m -2). Carbon mesh with a PTFE diffusion layer produced only a slightly lower (6.6%) maximum power density (1303 ± 48 mW m -2). The Coulombic efficiencies were a function of current density, with the highest value for the carbon mesh and PDMS (79%) larger than that for carbon cloth (63%). The cost of the carbon mesh cathode with PDMS/Carbon or PTFE (excluding catalyst and binder costs) is only 2.5% of the cost of the carbon cloth cathode. These results show that low cost carbon materials such as carbon mesh can be used as the cathode in an MFC without reducing the performance compared to more expensive carbon cloth.

  12. Statistical mechanical lattice models of endohedral and exohedral xenon adsorption in carbon nanotubes and comparison with Monte-Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Lawrence J.; Manos, George; Rekabi, Mahdi

    2009-01-01

    Adsorption of xenon in carbon nanotubes has been investigated by Kuznetsova et al. [A. Kuznetsova, J.T. Yates Jr., J. Liu, R.E. Smalley, J. Chem. Phys. 112 (2000) 9590] and Simonyan et al. [V. Simonyan, J.K. Johnson, A Kuznetsova, J.T. Yates Jr., J. Chem. Phys. 114 (2001) 4180] where endohedral adsorption isotherms show a step-like structure. A matrix method is used for calculation of the statistical mechanics of a lattice model of xenon endohedral adsorption which reproduces the isotherm structure while exohedral adsorption is treated by mean-field theory.

  13. Atomic migration of carbon in hard turned layers of carburized bearing steel

    DOE PAGES

    Bedekar, Vikram; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Guo, Wei; Shivpuri, Rajiv; Scott Hyde, R.

    2016-01-01

    In grain finement and non-equilibrium there is carbon segregation within grain boundaries alters the mechanical performance of hard turning layers in carburized bearing steel. Moreover, an atom probe tomography (APT) study on the nanostructured hard turning layers reveals carbon migration to grain boundaries as a result of carbide decomposition during severe plastic deformation. In addition, samples exposed to different cutting speeds show that the carbon migration rate increases with the cutting speed. For these two effects lead to an ultrafine carbon network structure resulting in increased hardness and thermal stability in the severely deformed surface layer.

  14. Development of carbon free diffusion layer for activated carbon air cathode of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wulin; Kim, Kyoung-Yeol; Logan, Bruce E

    2015-12-01

    The fabrication of activated carbon air cathodes for larger-scale microbial fuel cells requires a diffusion layer (DL) that is highly resistant to water leakage, oxygen permeable, and made using inexpensive materials. A hydrophobic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane synthesized using a simple phase inversion process was examined as a low cost ($0.9/m(2)), carbon-free DL that prevented water leakage at high pressure heads compared to a polytetrafluoroethylene/carbon black DL ($11/m(2)). The power density produced with a PVDF (20%, w/v) DL membrane of 1400±7mW/m(2) was similar to that obtained using a wipe DL [cloth coated with poly(dimethylsiloxane)]. Water head tolerance reached 1.9m (∼19kPa) with no mesh supporter, and 2.1m (∼21kPa, maximum testing pressure) with a mesh supporter, compared to 0.2±0.05m for the wipe DL. The elimination of carbon black from the DL greatly simplified the fabrication procedure and further reduced overall cathode costs. PMID:26342345

  15. Highly stable perovskite solar cells with an all-carbon hole transport layer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feijiu; Endo, Masaru; Mouri, Shinichiro; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Ohno, Yutaka; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Murata, Yasujiro; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2016-06-01

    Nano-carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide) have potential application for photovoltaics because of their excellent optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate that a single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer greatly improves the photovoltaic performance of organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer works as an efficient hole transport/electron blocking layer. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in the organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cell due to the complementary properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Furthermore, the great improvement of photovoltaic performance stability in the perovskite solar cells using carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide/polymethyl methacrylate was demonstrated in comparison with that using a typical organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene.

  16. Highly stable perovskite solar cells with an all-carbon hole transport layer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feijiu; Endo, Masaru; Mouri, Shinichiro; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Ohno, Yutaka; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Murata, Yasujiro; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2016-06-01

    Nano-carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide) have potential application for photovoltaics because of their excellent optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate that a single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer greatly improves the photovoltaic performance of organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer works as an efficient hole transport/electron blocking layer. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in the organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cell due to the complementary properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Furthermore, the great improvement of photovoltaic performance stability in the perovskite solar cells using carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide/polymethyl methacrylate was demonstrated in comparison with that using a typical organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene. PMID:27232674

  17. Highly stable perovskite solar cells with an all-carbon hole transport layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feijiu; Endo, Masaru; Mouri, Shinichiro; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Ohno, Yutaka; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Murata, Yasujiro; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2016-06-01

    Nano-carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide) have potential application for photovoltaics because of their excellent optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate that a single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer greatly improves the photovoltaic performance of organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer works as an efficient hole transport/electron blocking layer. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in the organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cell due to the complementary properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Furthermore, the great improvement of photovoltaic performance stability in the perovskite solar cells using carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide/polymethyl methacrylate was demonstrated in comparison with that using a typical organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene.Nano-carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide) have potential application for photovoltaics because of their excellent optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate that a single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer greatly improves the photovoltaic performance of organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer works as an efficient hole transport/electron blocking layer. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in the organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cell due to the complementary properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Furthermore, the great improvement of photovoltaic performance stability in the perovskite solar cells using carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide/polymethyl methacrylate was demonstrated in comparison with that using a typical organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  18. Lattice-Boltzmann Simulations of Multiphase Flows in Gas-Diffusion-Layer (GDL) of a PEM Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjeea, Shiladitya; Cole, J Vernon; Jainb, Kunal; Gidwania, Ashok

    2008-11-01

    Improved power density and freeze-thaw durability in automotive applications of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs) requires effective water management at the membrane. This is controlled by a porous hydrophobic gas-diffusion-layer (GDL) inserted between the membrane catalyst layer and the gas reactant channels. The GDL distributes the incoming gaseous reactants on the catalyst surface and removes excess water by capillary action. There is, however, limited understanding of the multiphase, multi-component transport of liquid water, vapor and gaseous reactants within these porous materials. This is due primarily to the challenges of in-situ diagnostics for such thin (200 -“ 300 {microns}), optically opaque (graphite) materials. Transport is typically analyzed by fitting Darcy's Law type expressions for permeability, in conjunction with capillary pressure relations based on formulations derived for media such as soils. Therefore, there is significant interest in developing predictive models for transport in GDLs and related porous media. Such models could be applied to analyze and optimize systems based on the interactions between cell design, materials, and operating conditions, and could also be applied to evaluating material design concepts. Recently, the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) has emerged as an effective tool in modeling multiphase flows in general, and flows through porous media in particular. This method is based on the solution of a discrete form of the well-known Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE) for molecular distribution, tailored to recover the continuum Navier-Stokes flow. The kinetic theory basis of the method allows simple implementation of molecular forces responsible for liquid-gas phase separation and capillary effects. The solution advances by a streaming and collision type algorithm that makes it suitable to implement for domains with complex boundaries. We have developed both single and multiphase LB models and applied them to

  19. Influence of corannulene's curved carbon lattice (C{sub 20}H{sub 10}) on lithium intercalation.

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlon, L. G.

    1998-06-08

    Ab initio molecular orbital calculations have been used to investigate the influence of corannulene's curved carbon lattice (C{sub 20}H{sub 10}) on lithium intercalation. This has been approximated by investigating the reaction of lithium atoms with either the corannulene molecule directly or with a sandwich structure formed from two corannulene molecules. In the first case, one corannulene molecule, three, six and seven lithiums have been used to form Li{sub 3}(C{sub 20}H{sub 10}), Li{sub 6}(C{sub 20}H{sub 10}) and Li{sub 7}(C{sub 20}H{sub 10}). The last complex has a lithium to carbon ratio of 1:2.86 indicative of a high capacity lithium carbon anode versus the 1:6 ratio found in stage 1 lithium intercalated graphite. The change in Gibbs energy for formation of Li{sub 3}(C{sub 20}H{sub 10}) with a multiplicity of 4 (3 unpaired electrons) is -4.75 kcal/mole. However, when a multiplicity of 2 is used (1 unpaired electron), the change in Gibbs energy is -8.49 kcal/mole. The change in Gibbs energy for formation of Li{sub 6}(C{sub 20}H{sub 10}) and Li{sub 7}(C{sub 20}H{sub 10}) (multiplicity of 2) are -26.48 and -26.47 kcal/mole, respectively. In all the lithium corannulene complexes described, each complex has a molecular orbital composed only of lithium orbitals, indicative of lithium cluster formation. However, in the formation of Li{sub 3}(C{sub 20}H{sub 10}) with three lithium atoms intercalated between two corannulene carbon lattices, there are no molecular orbitals indicative of lithium cluster formation. The multiplicity for this chemical system is 4 and the corannulene lattices are stacked one over the other like saucers. The corannulene carbon lattices are separated by approximately 4.5 {angstrom}. The separations between lithiums are 3.13, 3.60 and 3.79 {angstrom}. These results are in contrast to those found in the Li{sub 3}C{sub 60} endohedral complex with a multiplicity of 4. In this complex there is a molecular orbital composed only of lithium orbitals

  20. Catalytic properties of composite amorphous carbon-platinum layers in fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nechitailov, A. A. Zvonareva, T. K.; Remenyuk, A. D.; Tolmachev, V. A.; Goryachev, D. N.; El'tsina, O. S.; Belyakov, L. V.; Sreseli, O. M.

    2008-10-15

    Catalytic properties of composite amorphous carbon-platinum layers produced by magnetron cosputtering have been studied. The layers were characterized by electron microscopy, IR spectroscopy, ellipsometry, gravimetry, and spectrophotometric chemical analysis. The catalytic activity of the layers was studied in an air-hydrogen fuel cell by measuring its load and power characteristics.

  1. Hierarchy carbon paper for the gas diffusion layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Chunyu; Wang, Baorong; Cheng, Xinqun

    This communication described the fabrication of a hierarchy carbon paper, and its application to the gas diffusion layer (GDL) of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The carbon paper was fabricated by growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on carbon fibers via covalently assembling metal nanocatalysts. Surface morphology observation revealed a highly uniform distribution of hydrophobic materials within the carbon paper. The contact angle to water of this carbon paper was not only very large but also particularly even. Polarization measurements verified that the hierarchy carbon paper facilitated the self-humidifying of PEM fuel cells, which could be mainly attributed to its higher hydrophobic property as diagnosed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS).

  2. Influence of carbon dopants on the structure, elasticity and lattice dynamics of Ti5Si3C x Nowotny phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wdowik, Urszula D.; Wasik, Magdalena; Twardowska, Agnieszka

    2016-02-01

    Density functional theory studies on the Ti5Si3C x systems with various concentrations of carbon impurities (x=0, 0.25, 0.50, 1.00 ) are reported. The effects of interstitial carbon atoms on crystal and electronic structures, and on the elastic and vibrational properties of the Ti5Si3C x compound are analysed and discussed. The results of the present investigations indicate not only strong bonding between carbon atoms and their neighbouring titanium atoms, but also the effects of carbon impurities on the atomic bonds beyond the immediate proximity of the dopants. These determine to a great extent the electron densities of states, and the structural and elastic properties of the Ti5Si3C x Nowotny phases. Although carbon atoms tend to stabilise Ti5Si3C x phases, they also have a negative effect on their ductile properties. The strong impact of carbon impurities on the lattice dynamics of Ti5Si3C x compounds is revealed by the phonon and Raman spectra, which remain sensitive to changes in the interatomic distances. In C-doped systems the phonon bands originating from the vibrations of carbon impurities appear at high frequencies and remain well-separated from the lower lying phonon bands dominated by the vibrations of Ti and Si sublattices. The lower frequency phonon bands also experience changes due to the incorporated dopants. Impurities occupying the interstitials of the Ti5Si3 lattice are responsible for the appearance of new infrared active and optically inactive modes of A 2u , E 1u and E 2u symmetries, leaving the number of Raman active modes unchanged. Modifications to the dynamical properties of ternary Ti5Si3C x phases manifest themselves via shifts and the suppression of phonon peaks as well as the emergence of new phonon peaks which are absent in the binary Ti5Si3 system. The observed effects become enhanced with an increased concentration of carbon impurities.

  3. Assembling carbon quantum dots to a layered carbon for high-density supercapacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guanxiong; Wu, Shuilin; Hui, Liwei; Zhao, Yuan; Ye, Jianglin; Tan, Ziqi; Zeng, Wencong; Tao, Zhuchen; Yang, Lihua; Zhu, Yanwu

    2016-01-01

    It is found that carbon quantum dots (CQDs) self-assemble to a layer structure at ice crystals-water interface with freeze- drying. Such layers interconnect with each other, forming a free-standing CQD assembly, which has an interlayer distance of about 0.366 nm, due to the existence of curved carbon rings other than hexagons in the assembly. CQDs are fabricated by rupturing C60 by KOH activation with a production yield of ~15 wt.%. The CQDs obtained have an average height of 1.14 nm and an average lateral size of 7.48 nm, and are highly soluble in water. By packaging annealed CQD assembly to high density (1.23 g cm‑3) electrodes in supercapacitors, a high volumetric capacitance of 157.4 F cm‑3 and a high areal capacitance of 0.66 F cm‑2 (normalized to the loading area of electrodes) are demonstrated in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolyte with a good rate capability.

  4. Assembling carbon quantum dots to a layered carbon for high-density supercapacitor electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guanxiong; Wu, Shuilin; Hui, Liwei; Zhao, Yuan; Ye, Jianglin; Tan, Ziqi; Zeng, Wencong; Tao, Zhuchen; Yang, Lihua; Zhu, Yanwu

    2016-01-01

    It is found that carbon quantum dots (CQDs) self-assemble to a layer structure at ice crystals-water interface with freeze- drying. Such layers interconnect with each other, forming a free-standing CQD assembly, which has an interlayer distance of about 0.366 nm, due to the existence of curved carbon rings other than hexagons in the assembly. CQDs are fabricated by rupturing C60 by KOH activation with a production yield of ~15 wt.%. The CQDs obtained have an average height of 1.14 nm and an average lateral size of 7.48 nm, and are highly soluble in water. By packaging annealed CQD assembly to high density (1.23 g cm−3) electrodes in supercapacitors, a high volumetric capacitance of 157.4 F cm−3 and a high areal capacitance of 0.66 F cm−2 (normalized to the loading area of electrodes) are demonstrated in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolyte with a good rate capability. PMID:26754463

  5. Considerably improved photovoltaic performance of carbon nanotube-based solar cells using metal oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feijiu; Kozawa, Daichi; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Hiraoka, Kazushi; Mouri, Shinichiro; Ohno, Yutaka; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2015-02-01

    Carbon nanotube-based solar cells have been extensively studied from the perspective of potential application. Here we demonstrated a significant improvement of the carbon nanotube solar cells by the use of metal oxide layers for efficient carrier transport. The metal oxides also serve as an antireflection layer and an efficient carrier dopant, leading to a reduction in the loss of the incident solar light and an increase in the photocurrent, respectively. As a consequence, the photovoltaic performance of both p-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/n-Si and n-SWNT/p-Si heterojunction solar cells using MoOx and ZnO layers is improved, resulting in very high photovoltaic conversion efficiencies of 17.0 and 4.0%, respectively. These findings regarding the use of metal oxides as multifunctional layers suggest that metal oxide layers could improve the performance of various electronic devices based on carbon nanotubes.

  6. Considerably improved photovoltaic performance of carbon nanotube-based solar cells using metal oxide layers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feijiu; Kozawa, Daichi; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Hiraoka, Kazushi; Mouri, Shinichiro; Ohno, Yutaka; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube-based solar cells have been extensively studied from the perspective of potential application. Here we demonstrated a significant improvement of the carbon nanotube solar cells by the use of metal oxide layers for efficient carrier transport. The metal oxides also serve as an antireflection layer and an efficient carrier dopant, leading to a reduction in the loss of the incident solar light and an increase in the photocurrent, respectively. As a consequence, the photovoltaic performance of both p-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/n-Si and n-SWNT/p-Si heterojunction solar cells using MoOx and ZnO layers is improved, resulting in very high photovoltaic conversion efficiencies of 17.0 and 4.0%, respectively. These findings regarding the use of metal oxides as multifunctional layers suggest that metal oxide layers could improve the performance of various electronic devices based on carbon nanotubes.

  7. Method of evaluating the integrity of the outer carbon layer of triso-coated reactor fuel particles

    DOEpatents

    Caputo, Anthony J.; Costanzo, Dante A.; Lackey, Jr., Walter J.; Layton, Frank L.; Stinton, David P.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for determining defective final layers of carbon on triso-coated fuel particles and the like. Samples of the particles are subjected to a high temperature treatment with gaseous chlorine and thereafter radiographed. The chlorine penetrates through any defective carbon layer and reacts with the underlying silicon carbide resulting in the volatilization of the silicon as SiCl.sub.4 leaving carbon as a porous layer. This porous carbon layer is easily detected by the radiography.

  8. Suppression of tin precipitation in SiSn alloy layers by implanted carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Gaiduk, P. I.; Lundsgaard Hansen, J. Nylandsted Larsen, A.

    2014-06-09

    By combining transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, we have identified carbon related suppression of dislocations and tin precipitation in supersaturated molecular-beam epitaxial grown SiSn alloy layers. Secondary ion mass spectrometry has exposed the accumulation of carbon in the SiSn layers after high temperature carbon implantation and high temperature thermal treatment. Strain-enhanced separation of point defects and formation of dopant-defect complexes are suggested to be responsible for the effects. The possibility for carbon assisted segregation-free high temperature growth of heteroepitaxial SiSn/Si and GeSn/Si structures is argued.

  9. Complex use of the diffraction techniques in depth profiling of the crystal lattice parameter and composition of InGaAs/GaAs gradient layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidakova, M. V.; Kirilenko, D. A.; Sitnikova, A. A.; Yagovkina, M. A.; Klimko, G. V.; Sorokin, S. V.; Sedova, I. V.; Ivanov, S. V.; Romanov, A. E.

    2016-05-01

    A technique is proposed for testing thick (1 μm and larger) gradient layers with the composition and relaxation degree alternating over the layer depth on the basis of comparative analysis of X-ray scattered intensity maps in the reciprocal space and depth profiles of the crystal lattice parameters obtained by electron microdiffraction. The informativity of the proposed technique is demonstrated using the example of an In x Ga1- x As/GaAs layer with linear depth variation in x. Complex representation of the diffraction data in the form of the depth-profiled reciprocal space map allows taking into account the additional relaxation caused by thinning electron microscopy specimens.

  10. Growth of a-plane GaN on lattice-matched ZnO substrates using a room-temperature buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Kawano, Satoshi; Ueno, Kohei; Ohta, Jitsuo; Fujioka, Hiroshi; Amanai, Hidetaka; Nagao, Satoru; Horie, Hideyoshi

    2007-11-01

    Nonpolar a-plane GaN films were grown on nearly lattice-matched a-plane ZnO substrates by pulsed laser deposition. Growth of GaN on a-plane ZnO at conventional growth temperatures (around 700°C) resulted in the formation of polycrystalline materials, probably due to the interface reactions between GaN and ZnO. However, single crystalline a-plane GaN with an atomically flat surface can be grown on ZnO at room temperature in the layer-by-layer mode. X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence measurements revealed that high-quality a-plane GaN films can also be grown at elevated substrate temperatures (up to 700°C) by using a RT a-plane GaN film as a buffer layer.

  11. Optical properties of spray coated layers with carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenc, Zofia; Krzeminski, Jakub; Wroblewski, Grzegorz; Salbut, Leszek

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes as well as graphene are allotropic forms of carbon. Graphene is a two dimensional (2D) form of atomic-scale, hexagonal lattice, while carbon nanotube is a cylindrical nanostructure composed of a rolled sheet of graphene lattice at specific and discrete angles. Both of discussed materials have a high potential for modern engineering, especially in organic and printed electronics. High transparency in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum and low electrical resistance are desirable features in various applications and may be fulfilled with studied carbon nanomaterials. They have chances to become an important technological improvement in customers electronic devices by applying them to electrodes production in flexible screens and light sources. Graphene end carbon nanotubes are conceptually similar. However, characteristic properties of these two substances are different. In the article authors present the results of the transmission in visible electromagnetic spectrum characteristics of different samples. This parameter and the resistance of electrodes are tested, analysed and compared. Characteristics of optical transmittance against resistance with the optimal point of that relationship are presented in paper. Moreover, dependency of graphene nanoplatelets agglomerates arrangement against type of nano-fillers is shown. Two groups of tested inks contain graphene nanoplatelets with different fillers diameters. The third group contains carbon nanotubes. Described parameters are important for production process and results of analysis can be used by technologists working with elastic electronics.

  12. TECHNICAL NOTE: Design and development of electromagnetic absorbers with carbon fiber composites and matching dielectric layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neo, C. P.; Varadan, V. K.

    2001-10-01

    Radar absorbing materials are designed and developed with carbon fibers and suitable matching layers. Complex permittivities of carbon fiber composite are predicted on the basis that the modulus of permittivity obeys a logarithmic law of mixtures and the dielectric loss tangents are related through a linear law of mixtures. Linear regression analysis performed on the data points provides the constants which are used to predict the effective permittivities of carbon fiber composite at different frequencies. Using the free space measurement system, complex permittivities of the lossy dielectric at different frequencies are obtained. These complex permittivities are used to predict the reflectivity of a thin lossy dielectric layer on carbon fiber composite substrate. The predicted results agree quite well with the measured data. It is interesting to note that the thin lossy dielectric layer, about 0.03 mm thick, has helped to reduce the reflectivity of the 5.2 mm thick carbon fiber composite considerably.

  13. Long wavelength emitting GaInN quantum wells on metamorphic GaInN buffer layers with enlarged in-plane lattice parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Däubler, J. Passow, T.; Aidam, R.; Köhler, K.; Kirste, L.; Kunzer, M.; Wagner, J.

    2014-09-15

    Metamorphic (i.e., linear composition graded) GaInN buffer layers with an increased in-plane lattice parameter, grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, were used as templates for metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) grown GaInN/GaInN quantum wells (QWs), emitting in the green to red spectral region. A composition pulling effect was observed allowing considerable higher growth temperatures for the QWs for a given In composition. The internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of the QWs was determined by temperature and excitation power density dependent photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. An increase in IQE by a factor of two was found for green emitting QWs grown on metamorphic GaInN buffer compared to reference samples grown on standard GaN buffer layers. The ratio of room temperature to low temperature intensity PL of the red emitting QWs were found to be comparable to the PL efficiency of green emitting QWs, both grown on metamorphic GaInN buffers. The excitation density and well width dependence of the IQE indicate a reduction of the quantum confined Stark effect upon growth on GaInN buffer layers with increased in-plane lattice parameter.

  14. Quantitative determination of lattice fluoride effects on the solubility and crystallinity of carbonated apatites with incorporated fluoride.

    PubMed

    Yan, G; Moribe, K; Otsuka, M; Papangkorn, K; Higuchi, W I

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the effects of fluoride on the solubility and crystallinity of carbonated apatites (CAPs) after its incorporation into the crystal lattice using the metastable equilibrium solubility (MES) distribution method. Fluoride-incorporated CAPs (F-CAPs) of two different carbonate levels (3 and 5%) and fluoride contents from 0 to 20,000 µg/g were synthesized. X-ray diffraction experiments and Rietveld analysis were conducted to obtain crystallite microstrain and unit cell parameters. Acetate buffer MES solution media were prepared at two solution fluoride concentrations (0.2 and 2.0 mg/l) and at two pHs (5.0 and 5.7). The unit cell a-axis values of the F-CAPs were found to decrease as the fluoride content increased, consistent with the fluoride being incorporated into the crystal lattice. The fluoride concentrations in the MES solution media were high enough to provide a 'swamping' effect such that the fluoride released from the F-CAPs during dissolution was minimal in changing the solution fluoride concentration. Employing the MES distribution superposition method, it was shown that the surface complex possessing the fluorapatite (FAP) stoichiometry [Ca10(PO4)6F2] accounted for the MES distribution behavior of all experiments. In addition, the mean pIFAP [the value of -log(aCa(10)aPO4(6)aF(2)) calculated from the ionic activity product based on FAP stoichiometry of the MES dissolution media in which 50% of the F-CAPs had dissolved] correlated well with the crystallite microstrain parameters of the F-CAPs. The incorporated fluoride in the F-CAPs showed only modest effects on F-CAP crystallinity and solubility.

  15. Carbon-Nanotube Conductive Layers for Thin-Film Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2005-01-01

    Thin, transparent layers comprising mats of carbon nanotubes have been proposed for providing lateral (that is, inplane) electrical conductivities for collecting electric currents from the front surfaces of the emitter layers of thin-film solar photovoltaic cells. Traditionally, thin, semitransparent films of other electrically conductive materials (usually, indium tin oxide, zinc oxide, or cadmium sulfide) have been used for this purpose. As in the cases of the traditional semitransparent conductive films, the currents collected by the nanotube layers would, in turn, be further collected by front metal contact stripes. Depending on details of a specific solar-cell design, the layer of carbon nanotubes would be deposited in addition to, or instead of, a semitransparent layer of one of these traditional conductive materials (see figure). The proposal is expected to afford the following advantages: The electrical conductivity of the carbon- nanotube layer would exceed that of the corresponding semitransparent layer of traditional electrically conductive material. The greater electrical conductivity of the carbon-nanotube layer would make it possible to retain adequate lateral electrical conductivity while reducing the thickness of, or eliminating entirely, the traditional semitransparent conductive layer. As a consequence of thinning or elimination of the traditional semitransparent conductive layer, less light would be absorbed, so that more of the incident light would be available for photovoltaic conversion. The greater electrical conductivity of the carbon-nanotube layer would make it possible to increase the distance between front metal contact stripes, in addition to (or instead of) thinning or eliminating the layer of traditional semitransparent conductive material. Consequently, the fraction of solar-cell area shadowed by front metal contact stripes would be reduced again, making more of the incident light available for photovoltaic conversion. The electrical

  16. Atomic Layer Deposition on Carbon Nanotubes and their Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stano, Kelly Lynn

    Global issues related to energy and the environment have motivated development of advanced material solutions outside of traditional metals ceramics, and polymers. Taking inspiration from composites, where the combination of two or more materials often yields superior properties, the field of organic-inorganic hybrids has recently emerged. Carbon nanotube (CNT)-inorganic hybrids have drawn widespread and increasing interest in recent years due to their multifunctionality and potential impact across several technologically important application areas. Before the impacts of CNT-inorganic hybrids can be realized however, processing techniques must be developed for their scalable production. Optimization in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods for synthesis of CNTs and vertically aligned CNT arrays has created production routes both high throughput and economically feasible. Additionally, control of CVD parameters has allowed for growth of CNT arrays that are able to be drawn into aligned sheets and further processed to form a variety of aligned 1, 2, and 3-dimensional bulk assemblies including ribbons, yarns, and foams. To date, there have only been a few studies on utilizing these bulk assemblies for the production of CNT-inorganic hybrids. Wet chemical methods traditionally used for fabricating CNT-inorganic hybrids are largely incompatible with CNT assemblies, since wetting and drying the delicate structures with solvents can destroy their structure. It is therefore necessary to investigate alternative processing strategies in order to advance the field of CNT-inorganic hybrids. In this dissertation, atomic layer deposition (ALD) is evaluated as a synthetic route for the production of large-scale CNT-metal oxide hybrids as well as pure metal oxide architectures utilizing CNT arrays, ribbons, and ultralow density foams as deposition templates. Nucleation and growth behavior of alumina was evaluated as a function of CNT surface chemistry. While highly graphitic

  17. Electrodeposition of catalytic and magnetic gold nanoparticles on dendrimer-carbon nanotube layer-by-layer films.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José R; Gabriel, Rayla C; Zucolotto, Valtencir; Silva, Anielle C A; Dantas, Noelio O; Gasparotto, Luiz H S

    2012-11-01

    Magnetic and catalytic gold nanoparticles were electrodeposited through potential pulse on dendrimer-carbon nanotube layer-by-layer (LbL) films. A plasmon absorption band at about 550 nm revealed the presence of nanoscale gold in the film. The location of the Au nanoparticles in the film was clearly observed by selecting the magnetic force microscopy mode. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the electrochemical synthesis of magnetic Au nanoparticles. In addition to the magnetic properties, the Au nanoparticles also exhibited high catalytic activity towards ethanol and glycerol oxidation in alkaline medium. PMID:23007196

  18. Electrodeposition of catalytic and magnetic gold nanoparticles on dendrimer-carbon nanotube layer-by-layer films.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José R; Gabriel, Rayla C; Zucolotto, Valtencir; Silva, Anielle C A; Dantas, Noelio O; Gasparotto, Luiz H S

    2012-11-01

    Magnetic and catalytic gold nanoparticles were electrodeposited through potential pulse on dendrimer-carbon nanotube layer-by-layer (LbL) films. A plasmon absorption band at about 550 nm revealed the presence of nanoscale gold in the film. The location of the Au nanoparticles in the film was clearly observed by selecting the magnetic force microscopy mode. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the electrochemical synthesis of magnetic Au nanoparticles. In addition to the magnetic properties, the Au nanoparticles also exhibited high catalytic activity towards ethanol and glycerol oxidation in alkaline medium.

  19. Atomic-layer-deposition-assisted formation of carbon nanoflakes on metal oxides and energy storage application.

    PubMed

    Guan, Cao; Zeng, Zhiyuan; Li, Xianglin; Cao, Xiehong; Fan, Yu; Xia, Xinhui; Pan, Guoxiang; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Hong Jin

    2014-01-29

    Nanostructured carbon is widely used in energy storage devices (e.g., Li-ion and Li-air batteries and supercapacitors). A new method is developed for the generation of carbon nanoflakes on various metal oxide nanostructures by combining atomic layer deposition (ALD) and glucose carbonization. Various metal oxide@nanoflake carbon (MO@f-C) core-branch nanostructures are obtained. For the mechanism, it is proposed that the ALD Al2 O3 and glucose form a composite layer. Upon thermal annealing, the composite layer becomes fragmented and moves outward, accompanied by carbon deposition on the alumina skeleton. When tested as electrochemical supercapacitor electrode, the hierarchical MO@f-C nanostructures exhibit better properties compared with the pristine metal oxides or the carbon coating without ALD. The enhancement can be ascribed to increased specific surface areas and electric conductivity due to the carbon flake coating. This peculiar carbon coating method with the unique hierarchical nanostructure may provide a new insight into the preparation of 'oxides + carbon' hybrid electrode materials for energy storage applications.

  20. Effect of Alloying, Heat Treatment and Carbon Content on White Layer Formation in Machining of Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Sangil; Melkote, Shreyes N; Riester, Laura

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of the effects of alloying, carbon content, and heat treatment on white layer formation in machining of steels. The investigation is carried out by machining steels that differ in alloying, heat treatment and carbon content, via orthogonal cutting tests performed with low cBN content tools. The depth of white layer and its hardness are measured for every case. Specifically, the thickness and hardness of white layer produced in cutting AISI 1045 and AISI 4340 annealed steels are compared to determine the effect of alloying on white layer formation. The effect of heat treatment on white layer formation and its hardness are investigated by machining annealed and hardened (53 HRC) AISI 4340 steels. The effect of carbon content on white layer formation is investigated by cutting hardened AISI 52100 and AISI 4340 steels of the same hardness (53 HRC). The results of the study show that alloying, heat treatment, and carbon content influence white layer formation and its hardness.

  1. Zero lattice mismatch and twin-free single crystalline ScN buffer layers for GaN growth on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Lupina, L.; Zoellner, M. H.; Dietrich, B.; Capellini, G.; Niermann, T.; Lehmann, M.; Thapa, S. B.; Haeberlen, M.; Storck, P.; Schroeder, T.

    2015-11-16

    We report the growth of thin ScN layers deposited by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si(111) substrates. Using x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, we find that ScN films grown at 600 °C are single crystalline, twin-free with rock-salt crystal structure, and exhibit a direct optical band gap of 2.2 eV. A high degree of crystalline perfection and a very good lattice matching between ScN and GaN (misfit < 0.1%) makes the ScN/Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} buffer system a very promising template for the growth of high quality GaN layers on silicon.

  2. Importance of capillary forces in the assembly of carbon nanotubes in a polymer colloid lattice.

    PubMed

    Jurewicz, Izabela; Keddie, Joseph L; Dalton, Alan B

    2012-05-29

    We highlight the significance of capillary pressure in the directed assembly of nanorods in ordered arrays of colloidal particles. Specifically, we discuss mechanisms for the assembly of carbon nanotubes at the interstitial sites between latex polymer particles during composite film formation. Our study points to general design rules to be considered to optimize the ordering of nanostructures within such polymer matrices. In particular, gaining an understanding of the role of capillary forces is critical. Using a combination of electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, we show that the capillary forces acting on the latex particles during the drying process are sufficient to bend carbon nanotubes. The extent of bending depends on the flexural rigidity of the carbon nanotubes and whether or not they are present as bundled ensembles. We also show that in order to achieve long-range ordering of the nanotubes templated by the polymer matrix, it is necessary for the polymer to be sufficiently mobile to ensure that the nanotubes are frozen into the ordered network when the film is formed and the capillary forces are no longer dominant. In our system, the polymer is plasticized by the addition of surfactant, so that it is sufficiently mobile at room temperature. Interestingly, the carbon nanotubes effectively act as localized pressure sensors, and as such, the study agrees well with previous theoretical predictions calculating the magnitude of capillary forces during latex film formation.

  3. Towards Lego Snapping; Integration of Carbon Nanotubes and Few-Layer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasseri, Mohsen; Boland, Mathias; Farrokhi, M. Javad; Strachan, Douglas

    Integration of semiconducting, conducting, and insulating nanomaterials into precisely aligned complicated systems is one of the main challenges to the ultimate size scaling of electronic devices, which is a key goal in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This integration could be made more effective through controlled alignment of the crystallographic lattices of the nanoscale components. Of the vast number of materials of atomically-thin materials, two of the sp2 bonded carbon structures, graphene and carbon nanotubes, are ideal candidates for this type of application since they are built from the same backbone carbon lattice. Here we report carbon nanotube and graphene hybrid nanostructures fabricated through their catalytic synthesis and etching. The growth formations we have investigated through various high-resolution microscopy techniques provide evidence of lego-snapped interfaces between nanotubes and graphene into device-relevant orientations. We will finish with a discussion of the various size and energy regimes relevant to these lego-snapped interfaces and their implications on developing these integrated formations.

  4. Production of three-dimensional quantum dot lattice of Ge/Si core-shell quantum dots and Si/Ge layers in an alumina glass matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buljan, M.; Radić, N.; Sancho-Paramon, J.; Janicki, V.; Grenzer, J.; Bogdanović-Radović, I.; Siketić, Z.; Ivanda, M.; Utrobičić, A.; Hübner, R.; Weidauer, R.; Valeš, V.; Endres, J.; Car, T.; Jerčinović, M.; Roško, J.; Bernstorff, S.; Holy, V.

    2015-02-01

    We report on the formation of Ge/Si quantum dots with core/shell structure that are arranged in a three-dimensional body centered tetragonal quantum dot lattice in an amorphous alumina matrix. The material is prepared by magnetron sputtering deposition of Al2O3/Ge/Si multilayer. The inversion of Ge and Si in the deposition sequence results in the formation of thin Si/Ge layers instead of the dots. Both materials show an atomically sharp interface between the Ge and Si parts of the dots and layers. They have an amorphous internal structure that can be crystallized by an annealing treatment. The light absorption properties of these complex materials are significantly different compared to films that form quantum dot lattices of the pure Ge, Si or a solid solution of GeSi. They show a strong narrow absorption peak that characterizes a type II confinement in accordance with theoretical predictions. The prepared materials are promising for application in quantum dot solar cells.

  5. Investigation of the electrospun carbon web as the catalyst layer for vanadium redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guanjie; Fan, Xinzhuang; Liu, Jianguo; Yan, Chuanwei

    2014-12-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) carbon nonwoven web consisting of 100-200 nm ultrafine fibers has been developed by electrospinning and subsequent carbonization process at 1000 °C for different times. The surface morphology, composition, structure, and electrical conductivity of the electrospun carbon webs (ECWs) as well as their electrochemical properties toward vanadium redox couples have been characterized. With the increasing of carbonization time, the electrochemical reversibility of the vanadium redox couples on the ECW is enhanced greatly. As the carbonization time increases up to 120 min, the hydrogen evolution is facilitated while the reversibility is promoted a little bit further. The excellent performance of ECW may be attributed to the conversion of fibers carbon structure and improvement of electrical conductivity. Due to the good electrochemical activity and freestanding 3-dimensional structure, the ECW carbonized for 90 min is used as catalyst layer in vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) and enhances the cell performance.

  6. Carbon transport in the bottom boundary layer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, I.D.

    1998-11-01

    The central goal of DOE`s Ocean Margin Program (OMP) has been to determine whether continental shelves are quantitatively significant in removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and isolating it via burial in sediments or exporting it to the open ocean. The purpose of this research was to recover and process samples from two sediment traps deployed on the continental slope in conjunction with the OMP physical oceanography mooring program.

  7. Double Layer Charging for Conductivity Enhancement of Pure Metallic and Semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Nathanael; Kuznetsov, Alexander; Zakhidov, Anvar

    2011-03-01

    Injecting high electronic charge densities can profoundly change the optical, electrical, and magnetic properties of materials. Evidence suggests a possibility of significantly improving conductivity of carbon nanotubes through double layer charge injection. Double layer charge injection can prove to be a powerful method when applied to carbon nanotubes because of theirs high surface area and chemical stability. Investigation has commenced on the effect of charging on various types of carbon nanotubes, specifically 99% purified single wall semiconducting and single wall metallic tubes. An electrical double layer is electrochemically introduced upon a sheet of carbon nanotubes via application of potential (up to +/- 5 volts) to a sample immersed in ionic-liquid-based electrolyte. Resistance of carbon nanotube as a function of applied charging voltage is recorded to determine the effects of charge injection. Results show that the electrical double layer considerably reduces the resistance across both samples. ESR/LFMA studies combined with low temperature magnetic and transport measurements are conducted to search for charge injection induced superconductivity in carbon nanotubes. Supported by AFOSR grant FA 9550-09-1-0384.

  8. EXAMINATION OF DISLOCATIONS IN LATTICE-MISMATCHED GaInAs/BUFFER LAYER/GaAs FOR III-V PHOTOVOLTAICS

    SciTech Connect

    Levander, A.; Geisz, J.

    2007-01-01

    Dislocations act as sites for nonradiative electron/hole pair recombination, which reduces the effi ciency of photovoltaics. Lattice-matched materials can be grown on top of one another without forming a high density of dislocations. However, when the growth of lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials is attempted, many dislocations result from the relaxation of strain in the crystal structure. In an attempt to reduce the number of dislocations that propagate into a solar device when using LMM materials, a compositionally step-graded buffer is placed between the two LMM materials. In order to confi ne the dislocations to the buffer layer and therefore increase material quality and device effi ciency, the growth temperature and thickness of the buffer layer were varied. A GaInP compositionally graded buffer and GaInAs p-n junction were grown on a GaAs substrate in a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system. A multibeam optical stress sensor (MOSS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the strain in the epilayers. Electrical and optoelectronic properties were measured using a probe station and multimeter setup, solar simulator, and a quantum effi ciency instrument. It was determined that device functionality was highly dependent on the growth temperature of the graded buffer. As growth temperature increased, so did the dislocation density in the device despite an increase in the dislocation velocity, which should have increased the dislocation annihilation rate and the diffusion of dislocations to the edge of the crystal. The thickness of the graded buffer also affected device effi ciency with thinner samples performing poorly. The thinner graded buffer layers had high internal resistances from reduced carrier concentrations. In terms of effi ciency, the empirically derived recipe developed by the scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) produced the highest quality cells.

  9. Bio-deposition of a calcium carbonate layer on degraded limestone by Bacillus species.

    PubMed

    Dick, Jan; De Windt, Wim; De Graef, Bernard; Saveyn, Hans; Van der Meeren, Paul; De Belie, Nele; Verstraete, Willy

    2006-08-01

    To obtain a restoring and protective calcite layer on degraded limestone, five different strains of the Bacillus sphaericus group and one strain of Bacillus lentus were tested for their ureolytic driven calcium carbonate precipitation. Although all the Bacillus strains were capable of depositing calcium carbonate, differences occurred in the amount of precipitated calcium carbonate on agar plate colonies. Seven parameters involved in the process were examined: calcite deposition on limestone cubes, pH increase, urea degrading capacity, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS)-production, biofilm formation, zeta-potential and deposition of dense crystal layers. The strain selection for optimal deposition of a dense CaCO(3) layer on limestone, was based on decrease in water absorption rate by treated limestone. Not all of the bacterial strains were effective in the restoration of deteriorated Euville limestone. The best calcite precipitating strains were characterised by high ureolytic efficiency, homogeneous calcite deposition on limestone cubes and a very negative zeta-potential. PMID:16491305

  10. Bio-deposition of a calcium carbonate layer on degraded limestone by Bacillus species.

    PubMed

    Dick, Jan; De Windt, Wim; De Graef, Bernard; Saveyn, Hans; Van der Meeren, Paul; De Belie, Nele; Verstraete, Willy

    2006-08-01

    To obtain a restoring and protective calcite layer on degraded limestone, five different strains of the Bacillus sphaericus group and one strain of Bacillus lentus were tested for their ureolytic driven calcium carbonate precipitation. Although all the Bacillus strains were capable of depositing calcium carbonate, differences occurred in the amount of precipitated calcium carbonate on agar plate colonies. Seven parameters involved in the process were examined: calcite deposition on limestone cubes, pH increase, urea degrading capacity, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS)-production, biofilm formation, zeta-potential and deposition of dense crystal layers. The strain selection for optimal deposition of a dense CaCO(3) layer on limestone, was based on decrease in water absorption rate by treated limestone. Not all of the bacterial strains were effective in the restoration of deteriorated Euville limestone. The best calcite precipitating strains were characterised by high ureolytic efficiency, homogeneous calcite deposition on limestone cubes and a very negative zeta-potential.

  11. Integrated random-aligned carbon nanotube layers: deformation mechanism under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhiping; Gui, Xuchun; Gan, Qiming; Lin, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Yuan; Zhang, Wenhui; Xiang, Rong; Cao, Anyuan; Tang, Zikang

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have the potential to construct highly compressible and elastic macroscopic structures such as films, aerogels and sponges. The structure-related deformation mechanism determines the mechanical behavior of those structures and niche applications. Here, we show a novel strategy to integrate aligned and random nanotube layers and reveal their deformation mechanism under uniaxial compression with a large range of strain and cyclic testing. Integrated nanotube layers deform sequentially with different mechanisms due to the distinct morphology of each layer. While the aligned layer forms buckles under compression, nanotubes in the random layer tend to be parallel and form bundles, resulting in the integration of quite different properties (strength and stiffness) and correspondingly distinct plateau regions in the stress-strain curves. Our results indicate a great promise of constructing hierarchical carbon nanotube structures with tailored energy absorption properties, for applications such as cushioning and buffering layers in microelectromechanical systems.Carbon nanotubes have the potential to construct highly compressible and elastic macroscopic structures such as films, aerogels and sponges. The structure-related deformation mechanism determines the mechanical behavior of those structures and niche applications. Here, we show a novel strategy to integrate aligned and random nanotube layers and reveal their deformation mechanism under uniaxial compression with a large range of strain and cyclic testing. Integrated nanotube layers deform sequentially with different mechanisms due to the distinct morphology of each layer. While the aligned layer forms buckles under compression, nanotubes in the random layer tend to be parallel and form bundles, resulting in the integration of quite different properties (strength and stiffness) and correspondingly distinct plateau regions in the stress-strain curves. Our results indicate a great promise of

  12. Multilayer membranes for glucose biosensing via layer-by-layer assembly of multiwall carbon nanotubes and glucose oxidase.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongtao; Ju, Huangxian

    2006-03-01

    A bilayer of the polyelectrolytes poly(dimethyldiallylammonium chloride) (PDDA) and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) was formed on a 3-mercapto-1-propanesulfonic-acid-modified Au electrode. Subsequently, multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) wrapped by positively charged PDDA were assembled layer-by-layer with negatively charged glucose oxidase (GOx) onto the PSS-terminated bilayer. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were adopted to monitor the regular growth of the PDDA-MWCNTs/GOx bilayers. Using GOx as a model enzyme, the assembled multilayer membranes showed some striking features such as the adsorbed form of GOx on individual MWCNT, uniformity, good stability, and electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction. Based on the consumption of dissolved oxygen during the oxidation process of glucose catalyzed by the immobilized GOx, a sensitive amperometric biosensor was developed for the detection of glucose up to 5.0 mM with a detection limit of 58 microM. The sensitivity increased with increasing sensing layers up to five bilayers. Ascorbic acid and uric acid did not cause any interference due to the use of a low operating potential. The present method showed high reproducibility for the fabrication of carbon-nanotubes-based amperometric biosensors.

  13. Microstructure and properties of pure iron/copper composite cladding layers on carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Long; Huang, Yong-xian; Lü, Shi-xiong; Huang, Ti-fang; Lü, Zong-liang

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, pure iron/copper composite metal cladding was deposited onto carbon steel by tungsten inert gas welding. The study focused on interfacial morphological, microstructural, and mechanical analyses of the composite cladding layers. Iron liquid-solid-phase zones were formed at copper/steel and iron interfaces because of the melting of the steel substrate and iron. Iron concentrated in the copper cladding layer was observed to exhibit belt, globule, and dendrite morphologies. The appearance of iron-rich globules indicated the occurrence of liquid phase separation (LPS) prior to solidification, and iron-rich dendrites crystallized without the occurrence of LPS. The maximum microhardness of the iron/steel interface was lower than that of the copper/steel interface because of the diffusion of elemental carbon. All samples fractured in the cladding layers. Because of a relatively lower strength of the copper layer, a short plateau region appeared when shear movement was from copper to iron.

  14. Study of microstructure of surface layers of low-carbon steel after turning and ultrasonic finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevskaya, Zh. G.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Perevalova, O. B.; Klimenov, V. A.; Uvarkin, P. V.

    2013-01-01

    Profilometry and optical and transmission electron microscopy are used to examine the microstructure of surface layers of a low-carbon ferrite-pearlite steel subjected to turning and ultrasonic finishing. It is shown that turning peaks and valleys have different microstructures, which stipulates manifestation of technological hereditary when processing surfaces of machined parts. Ultrasonic finishing causes the severe plastic deformation of the surface layer, which favors the elimination of a technological heredity that is acquired during turning.

  15. Surface growth for molten silicon infiltration into carbon millimeter-sized channels: Lattice-Boltzmann simulations, experiments and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergi, Danilo; Camarano, Antonio; Molina, José Miguel; Ortona, Alberto; Narciso, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The process of liquid silicon (Si) infiltration is investigated for channels with radii from 0.25[mm] to 0.75[mm] drilled in compact carbon (C) preforms. The advantage of this setup is that the study of the phenomenon results can be simplified. For comparison purposes, attempts are made in order to work out a framework for evaluating the accuracy of simulations. The approach relies on dimensionless numbers involving the properties of the surface reaction. It turns out that complex hydrodynamic behavior derived from second Newton law can be made consistent with Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulations. The experiments give clear evidence that the growth of silicon carbide (SiC) proceeds in two different stages and basic mechanisms are highlighted. LB simulations prove to be an effective tool for the description of the growing phase. Namely, essential experimental constraints can be implemented. As a result, the existing models are useful to gain more insight on the process of reactive infiltration into porous media in the first stage of penetration, i.e. up to pore closure because of surface growth. A way allowing one to implement the resistance from chemical reaction in Darcy law is also proposed.

  16. Carbon-layer-protected cuprous oxide nanowire arrays for efficient water reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhonghai; Dua, Rubal; Zhang, Lianbin; Zhu, Haibo; Zhang, Hongnan; Wang, Peng

    2013-02-26

    In this work, we propose a solution-based carbon precursor coating and subsequent carbonization strategy to form a thin protective carbon layer on unstable semiconductor nanostructures as a solution to the commonly occurring photocorrosion problem of many semiconductors. A proof-of-concept is provided by using glucose as the carbon precursor to form a protective carbon coating onto cuprous oxide (Cu₂O) nanowire arrays which were synthesized from copper mesh. The carbon-layer-protected Cu₂O nanowire arrays exhibited remarkably improved photostability as well as considerably enhanced photocurrent density. The Cu₂O nanowire arrays coated with a carbon layer of 20 nm thickness were found to give an optimal water splitting performance, producing a photocurrent density of -3.95 mA cm⁻² and an optimal photocathode efficiency of 0.56% under illumination of AM 1.5G (100 mW cm⁻²). This is the highest value ever reported for a Cu₂O-based electrode coated with a metal/co-catalyst-free protective layer. The photostability, measured as the percentage of the photocurrent density at the end of 20 min measurement period relative to that at the beginning of the measurement, improved from 12.6% on the bare, nonprotected Cu₂O nanowire arrays to 80.7% on the continuous carbon coating protected ones, more than a 6-fold increase. We believe that the facile strategy presented in this work is a general approach that can address the stability issue of many nonstable photoelectrodes and thus has the potential to make a meaningful contribution in the general field of energy conversion.

  17. Chemical vapour deposition growth and Raman characterization of graphene layers and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Y.-C.; Rafailov, P. M.; Vlaikova, E.; Marinova, V.; Lin, S. H.; Yu, P.; Yu, S.-C.; Chi, G. C.; Dimitrov, D.; Sveshtarov, P.; Mehandjiev, V.; Gospodinov, M. M.

    2016-02-01

    Single-layer graphene films were grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on Cu foil. The CVD process was complemented by plasma enhancement to grow also vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes using Ni nanoparticles as catalyst. The obtained samples were characterized by Raman spectroscopy analysis. Nature of defects in the samples and optimal growth conditions leading to achieve high quality of graphene and carbon nanotubes are discussed.

  18. Crystallinity Modulation of Layered Carbon Nitride for Enhanced Photocatalytic Activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhai; Shen, Yanfei; Li, Ying; Liu, Songqin; Zhang, Yuanjian

    2016-08-22

    As an emerging metal-free semiconductor, covalently bonded carbon nitride (CN) has attracted much attention in photocatalysis. However, drawbacks such as a high recombination rate of excited electrons and holes hinder its potential applications. Tailoring the crystallinity of semiconductors is an important way to suppress unwanted charge recombination, but has rarely been applied to CN so far. Herein, a simple method to synthesize CN of high crystallinity by protonation of specific intermediate species during conventional polymerization is reported. Interestingly, the as-obtained CN exhibited improved photocatalytic activities of up to seven times those of the conventional bulk CN. This approach, with only a slight change to the conventional method, provides a facile way to effectively regulate the crystallinity of bulk CN to improve its photocatalytic activities and sheds light on large-scale industrial applications of CN with high efficiency for sustainable energy. PMID:27436164

  19. Crystallinity Modulation of Layered Carbon Nitride for Enhanced Photocatalytic Activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhai; Shen, Yanfei; Li, Ying; Liu, Songqin; Zhang, Yuanjian

    2016-08-22

    As an emerging metal-free semiconductor, covalently bonded carbon nitride (CN) has attracted much attention in photocatalysis. However, drawbacks such as a high recombination rate of excited electrons and holes hinder its potential applications. Tailoring the crystallinity of semiconductors is an important way to suppress unwanted charge recombination, but has rarely been applied to CN so far. Herein, a simple method to synthesize CN of high crystallinity by protonation of specific intermediate species during conventional polymerization is reported. Interestingly, the as-obtained CN exhibited improved photocatalytic activities of up to seven times those of the conventional bulk CN. This approach, with only a slight change to the conventional method, provides a facile way to effectively regulate the crystallinity of bulk CN to improve its photocatalytic activities and sheds light on large-scale industrial applications of CN with high efficiency for sustainable energy.

  20. Toward uniform and ultrathin carbon layer coating on lithium iron phosphate using liquid carbon dioxide for enhanced electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seung-Ah; Kim, Dong Hyun; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Chang, Wonyoung; Yoo, Jibeom; Kim, Jaehoon

    2014-09-01

    In this communication, uniform and ultrathin carbon coating on LiFePO4 (LFP) particles are performed using liquid carbon dioxide (l-CO2)-based free-meniscus coating. The uniform and conformal coverage of the carbon layer on LFP with a thickness of 3.3 nm, and a uniform distribution of carbon on the entire surface of the LFP particle are confirmed. The carbon-coated LFP (C-LFP) with a carbon content of 1.9 wt.% obtained using l-CO2-based coating exhibits a discharge capacity of 169 mAh g-1 at 0.1 C and 71 mAh g-1 at 30 C, while much lower discharge capacity of 146 mAh g-1 at 0.1 C and 17 mAh g-1 at 30 C is observed when C-LFP with an optimized carbon content of 6.0 wt.% is prepared using conventional aqueous-based coating.

  1. Film of lignocellulosic carbon material for self-supporting electrodes in electric double-layer capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funabashi, Tsubasa; Mizuno, Jun; Sato, Masamichi; Kitajima, Masao; Matsuura, Makoto; Shoji, Shuichi

    2013-09-01

    A novel thin, wood-based carbon material with heterogeneous pores, film of lignocellulosic carbon material (FLCM), was successfully fabricated by carbonizing softwood samples of Picea jezoensis (Jezo spruce). Simultaneous increase in the specific surface area of FLCM and its affinity for electrolyte solvents in an electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC) were achieved by the vacuum ultraviolet/ozone (VUV/O3) treatment. This treatment increased the specific surface area of FLCM by 50% over that of original FLCM. The results obtained in this study confirmed that FLCM is an appropriate self-supporting EDLC electrode material without any warps and cracks.

  2. Carbon Surface Layers on a High-Rate LiFePO4

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrisch, Heike; Wilcox, James D.; Doeff, Marca M.

    2005-09-06

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to image particles of a high-rate LiFePO4 sample containing a small amount of in situ carbon. The particle morphology is highly irregular, with a wide size distribution. Nevertheless, coatings, varying from about 5-10 nm in thickness, could readily be detected on surfaces of particles as well as on edges of agglomerates. Elemental mapping using Energy Filtered TEM (EFTEM) indicates that these very thin surface layers are composed of carbon. These observations have important implications for the design of high-rate LiFePO4 materials in which, ideally, a minimal amount of carbon coating is used.

  3. High-pressure layered structure of carbon disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghavi, S. Shahab; Crespo, Yanier; MartoÅák, Roman; Tosatti, Erio

    2015-06-01

    Solid CS2 is superficially similar to CO2, with the same C m c a molecular crystal structure at low pressures, which has suggested similar phases also at high pressures. We carried out an extensive first-principles evolutionary search in order to identify the zero-temperature lowest-enthalpy structures of CS2 for increasing pressure up to 200 GPa. Surprisingly, the molecular C m c a phase does not evolve into β -cristobalite as in CO2 but transforms instead into phases HP2 and HP1, both recently described in high-pressure SiS2. HP1 in particular, with a wide stability range, is a layered P 21/c structure characterized by pairs of edge-sharing tetrahedra and is theoretically more robust than all other CS2 phases discussed so far. Its predicted Raman spectrum and pair correlation function agree with experiment better than those of β -cristobalite, and further differences are predicted between their respective IR spectra. The band gap of HP1-CS2 is calculated to close under pressure, yielding an insulator-metal transition near 50 GPa, in agreement with experimental observations. However, the metallic density of states remains modest above this pressure, suggesting a different origin for the reported superconductivity.

  4. Magnetic and electrode properties, structure and phase relations of the layered triangular-lattice tellurate Li{sub 4}NiTeO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Zvereva, Elena A.; Nalbandyan, Vladimir B.; Evstigneeva, Maria A.; Koo, Hyun-Joo; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan; Ushakov, Arseni V.; Medvedev, Boris S.; Medvedeva, Larisa I.; Gridina, Nelly A.; Yalovega, Galina E.; Churikov, Alexei V.; Vasiliev, Alexander N.; Büchner, Bernd

    2015-05-15

    We examined the magnetic properties of layered oxide Li{sub 4}NiTeO{sub 6} by magnetic susceptibility, magnetization and ESR measurements and density functional calculations, and characterized phase relations, crystal structure and electrochemical properties of Li{sub 4}NiTeO{sub 6}. The magnetization and ESR data indicate the absence of a long-range magnetic order down to 1.8 K, and the magnetic susceptibility data the presence of dominant antiferromagnetic interactions. These observations are well accounted for by density functional calculations, which show that the spin exchanges of the LiNiTeO{sub 6} layers in Li{sub 4}NiTeO{sub 6} are strongly spin frustrated. The electrochemical charging of Li{sub 4}NiTeO{sub 6} takes place at constant potential of ca. 4.2 V vs. Li/Li{sup +} indicating two-phase process as confirmed by X-rays. The starting phase is only partially recovered on discharge due to side reactions. - Graphical abstract: No long-range magnetic order due to frustration in 2D triangular lattice antiferromagnet Li{sub 4}NiTeO{sub 6}. - Highlights: • Li{sub 4}NiTeO{sub 6} is 2D triangular lattice magnet with no long-range order down to 1.8 K. • Intralayer exchange interactions are antiferromagnetic and strongly spin frustrated. • The electrochemical Li extraction proceeds in a two-phase mode at 4.2 V vs. Li/Li{sup +}. • The electrochemical charge–discharge is only partially reversible. • Li{sub 2}O–NiO{sub y}–TeO{sub x} phase relations are reported; Li{sub 4}NiTeO{sub 6} is essentially stoichiometric.

  5. Chemical-thermal quantitative methodology for carbon speciation in damage layers on building surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ghedini, Nadia; Sabbioni, Cristina; Bonazza, Alessandra; Gobbi, Giancarlo

    2006-02-01

    The issue of environment protection, including the conservation of the monumental heritage worldwide, is related to atmospheric pollution, and its future therefore depends on air pollutant reduction. Carbonaceous particles emitted by combustion processes are the main factors responsible for the blackening of buildings. The identification and evaluation of the carbon species constituting the noncarbonate fraction of total carbon in damage layers, particularly in urban areas, are required in orderto investigate atmospheric deposition on building surfaces. Since noncarbonate carbon contains organic and elemental carbon originating from various human activities, its measurement and speciation are crucial to the protection and conservation of monuments and ancient masonry, playing an important role both in the proposal of mitigation strategies and in the definition of conservation treatments. The availability of a correct, accurate, and reproducible analytical method for a complete carbon balance is essential in studying the effects of atmospheric pollutants on the environment, including those affecting cultural heritage. A chemical-thermal methodology was set up, and its sensitivity, accuracy, repeatability, and reproducibility were tested on appropriate standard samples of composition similar to the black crusts on stones and mortars. The results indicate thatthe technique satisfactorily distinguishes among carbon species, particularly those of anthropogenic origin, allowing a reliable evaluation of their quantities in damage layers. In view of the difficulties encountered in applying the thermo-optical methods adopted for the measurement of carbon filters, the proposed methodology contributes to filling the current gap in suitable and reliable analytical procedures in the field of cultural heritage protection. PMID:16509340

  6. Chemical-thermal quantitative methodology for carbon speciation in damage layers on building surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ghedini, Nadia; Sabbioni, Cristina; Bonazza, Alessandra; Gobbi, Giancarlo

    2006-02-01

    The issue of environment protection, including the conservation of the monumental heritage worldwide, is related to atmospheric pollution, and its future therefore depends on air pollutant reduction. Carbonaceous particles emitted by combustion processes are the main factors responsible for the blackening of buildings. The identification and evaluation of the carbon species constituting the noncarbonate fraction of total carbon in damage layers, particularly in urban areas, are required in orderto investigate atmospheric deposition on building surfaces. Since noncarbonate carbon contains organic and elemental carbon originating from various human activities, its measurement and speciation are crucial to the protection and conservation of monuments and ancient masonry, playing an important role both in the proposal of mitigation strategies and in the definition of conservation treatments. The availability of a correct, accurate, and reproducible analytical method for a complete carbon balance is essential in studying the effects of atmospheric pollutants on the environment, including those affecting cultural heritage. A chemical-thermal methodology was set up, and its sensitivity, accuracy, repeatability, and reproducibility were tested on appropriate standard samples of composition similar to the black crusts on stones and mortars. The results indicate thatthe technique satisfactorily distinguishes among carbon species, particularly those of anthropogenic origin, allowing a reliable evaluation of their quantities in damage layers. In view of the difficulties encountered in applying the thermo-optical methods adopted for the measurement of carbon filters, the proposed methodology contributes to filling the current gap in suitable and reliable analytical procedures in the field of cultural heritage protection.

  7. Microanalysis of deposited layers in the divertor of JET following operations with carbon wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsåker, H.; Petersson, P.; Bykov, I.; Possnert, G.; Likonen, J.; Koivuranta, S.; Coad, J. P.; Widdowson, A. M.; JET EFDA contributors

    2013-07-01

    Elemental mapping of cross sections of deposited layers on inboard tiles in the JET divertor after exposure to plasma operations with carbon wall are presented. The study was made using microbeam ion beam analysis methods in combination with optical microscopy and SEM. The surfaces had been exposed to plasma through different periods of operation (1998-2007, 2007-2009 and 1998-2009). The texture and composition of the layers are non-uniform. The physical structures include columnar, lamellar and disordered globular appearances. The distribution of trapped deuterium was frequently found to be lamellar, with well-defined sub layers with higher deuterium concentration. However, 3D regions with dimensions of about 100 μm with enhanced deuterium content were also found, both at the layer surfaces and in the layer cross sections. The distributions of beryllium and Inconel components were lamellar but did not otherwise show large non-uniformity on the same scale length as the deuterium.

  8. Thermal properties of carbon nanowall layers measured by a pulsed photothermal technique

    SciTech Connect

    Achour, A.; Belkerk, B. E.; Ait Aissa, K.; Gautron, E.; Carette, M.; Jouan, P.-Y.; Brizoual, L. Le; Scudeller, Y.; Djouadi, M.-A.; Vizireanu, S.; Dinescu, G.

    2013-02-11

    We report the thermal properties of carbon nanowall layers produced by expanding beam radio-frequency plasma. The thermal properties of carbon nanowalls, grown at 600 Degree-Sign C on aluminium nitride thin-film sputtered on fused silica, were measured with a pulsed photo-thermal technique. The apparent thermal conductivity of the carbon at room temperature was found to increase from 20 to 80 Wm{sup -1} K{sup -1} while the thickness varied from 700 to 4300 nm, respectively. The intrinsic thermal conductivity of the carbon nanowalls attained 300 Wm{sup -1} K{sup -1} while the boundary thermal resistance with the aluminium nitride was 3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} Km{sup 2} W{sup -1}. These results identify carbon nanowalls as promising material for thermal management applications.

  9. Validation of the numerical model of single-layer composites reinforced with carbon fiber and aramid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sava, Mihaela; Hadǎr, Anton; Pǎrǎuşanu, Ioan; Petrescu, Horia-Alexandru; Baciu, Florin; Marinel, Stǎnescu Marius

    2016-06-01

    In this work we studied the experimental validation of the model and finite element analysis for a single layer of composite materials reinforced with carbon (denoted as C), aramid (K) and carbon-aramid (C-K) fibers. In the literature there are not many details about the differences that arise between transversal and longitudinal characteristics of composite materials reinforced with fabric, compared to those with unidirectional fibers. In order to achieve carbon and aramid composites we used twill fabric and for carbon-aramid plain fabric, as shown in Figure 1. In order to observe the static behavior of the considered specimens, numerical simulations were carried out in addition to the experimental determination of the characteristics of these materials. Layered composites are obviously the most widespread formula for getting advanced composite structures. It allows a unique variety of material and structural combinations leading to optimal design in a wide range of applications [1,2]. To design and verify the material composites it is necessary to know the basic mechanical constants of the materials. Almost all the layered composites consider that the every layer is an orthotropic material, so there are nine independent constants of material corresponding to the three principal directions: Young modulus E1, E2 and E3, shear modulus G12, G23 and G13, and major poison ratios ν12, ν23, ν13. Experimental determinations were performed using traction tests and strain gauges. For each of the three above mentioned materials, five samples were manufactured.

  10. Carbon deposition on multi-layer mirrors by extreme ultra violet ray irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunari, S.; Aoki, T.; Murakami, K.; Gomei, Y.; Terashima, S.; Takase, H.; Tanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Kakutani, Y.; Niibe, M.; Fukuda, Y.

    2007-03-01

    Organic gases cause carbon depositions on the multi-layer mirrors by Extreme Ultra Violet (EUV) light irradiations in EUV lithography tool. The dependences on organic gas species, organic gas pressure and EUV light intensity in the carbon deposition were researched in order to understand this reaction. EUV light was irradiated on a (Si/Mo) multilayer mirror sample injecting organic gas like buthane, buthanol, methyl propionate, hexane, perfluoro octane, decane, decanol, methyl nonanoate, diethyl benzene, dimethyl phthalate and hexadecane. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements revealed that organic gases with heavier molecule weight or higher boiling temperature caused faster carbon deposition rates. Carbon deposition rates increased linearly with organic gas pressures. Dependence on EUV light intensity was estimated from comparisons between an EUV light profile and carbon distributions on irradiated samples. Carbon deposition rates increased rapidly, but became saturated at higher EUV light intensities. Three chemical reactions, an adsorption, a desorption and a carbon deposition by EUV light irradiation, were taken into account to explain the behavior of the carbon deposition. Electron irradiation on a mirror sample revealed that photoelectrons emitting from the mirror surface played an important role in carbon deposition.

  11. From spent Mg/Al layered double hydroxide to porous carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Laipan, Minwang; Zhu, Runliang; Chen, Qingze; Zhu, Jianxi; Xi, Yunfei; Ayoko, Godwin A; He, Hongping

    2015-12-30

    Adsorption has been considered as an efficient method for the treatment of dye effluents, but proper disposal of the spent adsorbents is still a challenge. This work attempts to provide a facile method to reutilize the spent Mg/Al layered double hydroxide (Mg/Al-LDH) after the adsorption of orange II (OII). Herein, the spent hybrid was carbonized under the protection of nitrogen, and then washed with acid to obtain porous carbon materials. Thermogravimetric analysis results suggested that the carbonization could be well achieved above 600°C, as mass loss of the spent hybrid gradually stabilized. Therefore, the carbonization process was carried out at 600, 800, and 1000°C, respectively. Scanning electron microscope showed that the obtained carbon materials possessed a crooked flaky morphology. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption results showed that the carbon materials had large BET surface area and pore volume, e.g., 1426 m(2)/g and 1.67 cm(3)/g for the sample carbonized at 800°C. Moreover, the pore structure and surface chemistry compositions were tunable, as they were sensitive to the temperature. Toluene adsorption results demonstrated that the carbon materials had high efficiency in toluene removal. This work provided a facile approach for synthesizing porous carbon materials using spent Mg/Al-LDH.

  12. From spent Mg/Al layered double hydroxide to porous carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Laipan, Minwang; Zhu, Runliang; Chen, Qingze; Zhu, Jianxi; Xi, Yunfei; Ayoko, Godwin A; He, Hongping

    2015-12-30

    Adsorption has been considered as an efficient method for the treatment of dye effluents, but proper disposal of the spent adsorbents is still a challenge. This work attempts to provide a facile method to reutilize the spent Mg/Al layered double hydroxide (Mg/Al-LDH) after the adsorption of orange II (OII). Herein, the spent hybrid was carbonized under the protection of nitrogen, and then washed with acid to obtain porous carbon materials. Thermogravimetric analysis results suggested that the carbonization could be well achieved above 600°C, as mass loss of the spent hybrid gradually stabilized. Therefore, the carbonization process was carried out at 600, 800, and 1000°C, respectively. Scanning electron microscope showed that the obtained carbon materials possessed a crooked flaky morphology. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption results showed that the carbon materials had large BET surface area and pore volume, e.g., 1426 m(2)/g and 1.67 cm(3)/g for the sample carbonized at 800°C. Moreover, the pore structure and surface chemistry compositions were tunable, as they were sensitive to the temperature. Toluene adsorption results demonstrated that the carbon materials had high efficiency in toluene removal. This work provided a facile approach for synthesizing porous carbon materials using spent Mg/Al-LDH. PMID:26257095

  13. Rapid exchange between atmospheric CO2 and carbonate anion intercalated within magnesium rich layered double hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Pathik; Ishihara, Shinsuke; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Deguchi, Kenzo; Ohki, Shinobu; Tansho, Masataka; Shimizu, Tadashi; Eisaku, Nii; Sasai, Ryo; Labuta, Jan; Ishikawa, Daisuke; Hill, Jonathan P; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Bastakoti, Bishnu Prasad; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Iyi, Nobuo

    2014-10-22

    The carbon cycle, by which carbon atoms circulate between atmosphere, oceans, lithosphere, and the biosphere of Earth, is a current hot research topic. The carbon cycle occurring in the lithosphere (e.g., sedimentary carbonates) is based on weathering and metamorphic events so that its processes are considered to occur on the geological time scale (i.e., over millions of years). In contrast, we have recently reported that carbonate anions intercalated within a hydrotalcite (Mg0.75Al0.25(OH)2(CO3)0.125·yH2O), a class of a layered double hydroxide (LDH), are dynamically exchanging on time scale of hours with atmospheric CO2 under ambient conditions. (Ishihara et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013, 135, 18040-18043). The use of (13)C-labeling enabled monitoring by infrared spectroscopy of the dynamic exchange between the initially intercalated (13)C-labeled carbonate anions and carbonate anions derived from atmospheric CO2. In this article, we report the significant influence of Mg/Al ratio of LDH on the carbonate anion exchange dynamics. Of three LDHs of various Mg/Al ratios of 2, 3, or 4, magnesium-rich LDH (i.e., Mg/Al ratio = 4) underwent extremely rapid exchange of carbonate anions, and most of the initially intercalated carbonate anions were replaced with carbonate anions derived from atmospheric CO2 within 30 min. Detailed investigations by using infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, adsorption, thermogravimetric analysis, and solid-state NMR revealed that magnesium rich LDH has chemical and structural features that promote the exchange of carbonate anions. Our results indicate that the unique interactions between LDH and CO2 can be optimized simply by varying the chemical composition of LDH, implying that LDH is a promising material for CO2 storage and/or separation.

  14. In situ small angle neutron scattering revealing ion sorption in microporous carbon electrical double layer capacitors.

    PubMed

    Boukhalfa, Sofiane; Gordon, Daniel; He, Lilin; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Nitta, Naoki; Magasinski, Alexandre; Yushin, Gleb

    2014-03-25

    Experimental studies showed the impact of the electrolyte solvents on both the ion transport and the specific capacitance of microporous carbons. However, the related structure-property relationships remain largely unclear and the reported results are inconsistent. The details of the interactions of the charged carbon pore walls with electrolyte ions and solvent molecules at a subnanometer scale are still largely unknown. Here for the first time we utilize in situ small angle neutron scattering (SANS) to reveal the electroadsorption of organic electrolyte ions in carbon pores of different sizes. A 1 M solution of tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEATFB) salt in deuterated acetonitrile (d-AN) was used in an activated carbon with the pore size distribution similar to that of the carbons used in commercial double layer capacitors. In spite of the incomplete wetting of the smallest carbon pores by the d-AN, we observed enhanced ion sorption in subnanometer pores under the applied potential. Such results suggest the visible impact of electrowetting phenomena counterbalancing the high energy of the carbon/electrolyte interface in small pores. This behavior may explain the characteristic butterfly wing shape of the cyclic voltammetry curve that demonstrates higher specific capacitance at higher applied potentials, when the smallest pores become more accessible to electrolyte. Our study outlines a general methodology for studying various organic salts-solvent-carbon combinations.

  15. Layered growth of crayfish gastrolith: about the stability of amorphous calcium carbonate and role of additives.

    PubMed

    Habraken, Wouter J E M; Masic, Admir; Bertinetti, Luca; Al-Sawalmih, Ali; Glazer, Lilah; Bentov, Shmuel; Fratzl, Peter; Sagi, Amir; Aichmayer, Barbara; Berman, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on pre-molt gastroliths have shown a typical onion-like morphology of layers of amorphous mineral (mostly calcium carbonate) and chitin, resulting from the continuous deposition and densification of amorphous mineral spheres on a chitin-matrix during time. To investigate the consequences of this layered growth on the local structure and composition of the gastrolith, we performed spatially-resolved Raman, X-ray and SEM-EDS analysis on complete pre-molt gastrolith cross-sections. Results show that especially the abundance of inorganic phosphate, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)/citrate and proteins is not uniform throughout the organ but changes from layer to layer. Based on these results we can conclude that ACC stabilization in the gastrolith takes place by more than one compound and not by only one of these additives.

  16. Thin catalyst layers based on carbon nanotubes for PEM-fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnenberger, T.; Matovic, J.; Schmid, U.

    2011-06-01

    In this study, two approaches are compared to develop thin, multifunctional films of carbon nanotubes (CNT) which are targeted to serve as a catalyst layer in fuel cells. The first is based on the direct deposition of mixed multi- and single-wall CNTs on metalized silicon wafers, using the metallization as a sacrificial layer to subsequently detach the CNT film from the substrate. It is a less time consuming and a straight forward method compared to the alternative under investigation, the layer-by-layer technique (LbL). The LbL uses bilayers of charged nanotubes to slowly build up a film with an exactly defined thickness. The process is well controlled, but the time constants for deposition of each bilayer are rather high (i.e. about 1 h). With additional annealing steps implemented during film generation this method, however, is regarded advantageous as membranes results with improved mechanical stability and a good homogeneity.

  17. Electric double-layer capacitors based on highly graphitized nanoporous carbons derived from ZIF-67.

    PubMed

    Torad, Nagy L; Salunkhe, Rahul R; Li, Yunqi; Hamoudi, Hicham; Imura, Masataka; Sakka, Yoshio; Hu, Chi-Chang; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2014-06-23

    Nanoporous carbons (NPCs) have large specific surface areas, good electrical and thermal conductivity, and both chemical and mechanical stability, which facilitate their use in energy storage device applications. In the present study, highly graphitized NPCs are synthesized by one-step direct carbonization of cobalt-containing zeolitic imidazolate framework-67 (ZIF-67). After chemical etching, the deposited Co content can be completely removed to prepare pure NPCs with high specific surface area, large pore volume, and intrinsic electrical conductivity (high content of sp(2) -bonded carbons). A detailed electrochemical study is performed using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements. Our NPC is very promising for efficient electrodes for high-performance supercapacitor applications. A maximum specific capacitance of 238 F g(-1) is observed at a scan rate of 20 mV s(-1) . This value is very high compared to previous works on carbon-based electric double layer capacitors.

  18. Amperometric Choline Biosensor Fabricated through Electrostatic Assembly of Bienzyme/Polyelectrolyte Hybrid Layers on Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2006-03-01

    We report a flow injection amperometric choline biosensors based on the electrostatic assembly of an enzyme of choline oxidase (ChO) and a bi-enzyme of ChO and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) onto multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) modified glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. These choline biosensors were fabricated by immobilization of enzymes on the negatively charged MWCNT surface through alternatively assembling a cationic polydiallydiimethylammonium chloride (PDDA) layer and an enzyme layer. Using this layer-by-layer assembling approach, bioactive nanocomposite film of a PDDA/ChO/PDDA/HRP/PDDA/CNT (ChO/HRP/CNT) and a PDDA/ChO/PDDA/ CNT (ChO/ CNT) were fabricated on GC surface, respectively. Owning to the electrocatalytic effect of carbon nanotubes, the measurement of faradic responses resulting from enzymatic reactions has been realized at low potential with acceptable sensitivity. It is found the ChO/HRP/CNT biosensor is more sensitive than the ChO/CNT one. Experimental parameters affecting the sensitivity of biosensors, e.g. applied potential, flow rate, etc. were optimized and potential interference was examined. The response time for this choline biosensor is fast (less than a few seconds). The linear range of detection for the choline biosensor is from 5 x 10-5 to 5 x 10-3 M and the detection limit is determined to be about 1.0 x 10-5 M.

  19. Effect of diffuse layer and pore shapes in mesoporous carbon supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent; Qiao, Rui

    2010-01-01

    In the spirit of the theoretical evolution from the Helmholtz model to the Gouy Chapman Stern model for electric double-layer capacitors, we explored the effect of a diffuse layer on the capacitance of mesoporous carbon supercapacitors by solving the Poisson Boltzmann (PB) equation in mesopores of diameters from 2 to 20 nm. To evaluate the effect of pore shape, both slit and cylindrical pores were considered. We found that the diffuse layer does not affect the capacitance significantly. For slit pores, the area-normalized capacitance is nearly independent of pore size, which is not experimentally observed for template carbons. In comparison, for cylindrical pores, PB simulations produce a trend of slightly increasing area-normalized capacitance with pore size, similar to that depicted by the electric double-cylinder capacitor model proposed earlier. These results indicate that it is appropriate to approximate the pore shape of mesoporous carbons as being cylindrical and the electric double-cylinder capacitor model should be used for mesoporous carbons as a replacement of the traditional Helmholtz model.

  20. Manganese oxide nanowires wrapped with nitrogen doped carbon layers for high performance supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Mei, Yuan; Zhang, Lin-Qun; Wang, Jian-Hai; Liu, An-Ran; Zhang, Yuan-Jian; Liu, Song-Qin

    2015-10-01

    In this study, manganese oxide nanowires wrapped by nitrogen-doped carbon layers (MnO(x)@NCs) were prepared by carbonization of poly(o-phenylenediamine) layer coated onto MnO2 nanowires for high performance supercapacitors. The component and structure of the MnO(x)@NCs were controlled through carbonization procedure under different temperatures. Results demonstrated that this composite combined the high conductivity and high specific surface area of nitrogen-doped carbon layers with the high pseudo-capacitance of manganese oxide nanowires. The as-prepared MnO(x)@NCs exhibited superior capacitive properties in 1 M Na2SO4 aqueous solution, such as high conductivity (4.167×10(-3) S cm(-1)), high specific capacitance (269 F g(-1) at 10 mV s(-1)) and long cycle life (134 F g(-1) after 1200 cycles at a scan rate of 50 mV s(-1)). It is reckoned that the present novel hybrid nanowires can serve as a promising electrode material for supercapacitors and other electrochemical devices.

  1. Accurate Estimation of the Fine Layering Effect on the Wave Propagation in the Carbonate Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchaala, F.; Ali, M. Y.

    2014-12-01

    The attenuation caused to the seismic wave during its propagation can be mainly divided into two parts, the scattering and the intrinsic attenuation. The scattering is an elastic redistribution of the energy due to the medium heterogeneities. However the intrinsic attenuation is an inelastic phenomenon, mainly due to the fluid-grain friction during the wave passage. The intrinsic attenuation is directly related to the physical characteristics of the medium, so this parameter is very can be used for media characterization and fluid detection, which is beneficial for the oil and gas industry. The intrinsic attenuation is estimated by subtracting the scattering from the total attenuation, therefore the accuracy of the intrinsic attenuation is directly dependent on the accuracy of the total attenuation and the scattering. The total attenuation can be estimated from the recorded waves, by using in-situ methods as the spectral ratio and frequency shift methods. The scattering is estimated by assuming the heterogeneities as a succession of stacked layers, each layer is characterized by a single density and velocity. The accuracy of the scattering is strongly dependent on the layer thicknesses, especially in the case of the media composed of carbonate rocks, such media are known for their strong heterogeneity. Previous studies gave some assumptions for the choice of the layer thickness, but they showed some limitations especially in the case of carbonate rocks. In this study we established a relationship between the layer thicknesses and the frequency of the propagation, after certain mathematical development of the Generalized O'Doherty-Anstey formula. We validated this relationship through some synthetic tests and real data provided from a VSP carried out over an onshore oilfield in the emirate of Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates, primarily composed of carbonate rocks. The results showed the utility of our relationship for an accurate estimation of the scattering

  2. Atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide films for carbon nanotube network transistor passivation.

    PubMed

    Grigoras, Kestutis; Zavodchikova, Marina Y; Nasibulin, Albert G; Kauppinen, Esko I; Ermolov, Vladimir; Franssila, Sami

    2011-10-01

    Ultra-thin (2-5 nm thick) aluminum oxide layers were grown on non-functionalized individual single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and their bundles by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique in order to investigate the mechanism of the coating process. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to examine the uniformity and conformality of the coatings grown at different temperatures (80 degrees C or 220 degrees C) and with different precursors for oxidation (water and ozone). We found that bundles of SWCNTs were coated continuously, but at the same time, bare individual nanotubes remained uncoated. The successful coating of bundles was explained by the formation of interstitial pores between the individual SWCNTs constituting the bundle, where the precursor molecules can adhere, initiating the layer growth. Thicker alumina layers (20-35 nm thick) were used for the coating of bottom-gated SWCNT-network based field effect transistors (FETs). ALD layers, grown at different conditions, were found to influence the performance of the SWCNT-network FETs: low temperature ALD layers caused the ambipolarity of the channel and pronounced n-type conduction, whereas high temperature ALD processes resulted in hysteresis suppression in the transfer characteristics of the SWCNT transistors and preserved p-type conduction. Fixed charges in the ALD layer have been considered as the main factor influencing the conduction change of the SWCNT network based transistors.

  3. Atomic layer deposition encapsulated activated carbon electrodes for high voltage stable supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kijoo; Cho, Moonkyu; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-01-28

    Operating voltage enhancement is an effective route for high energy density supercapacitors. Unfortunately, widely used activated carbon electrode generally suffers from poor electrochemical stability over 2.5 V. Here we present atomic layer deposition (ALD) encapsulation of activated carbons for high voltage stable supercapacitors. Two-nanometer-thick Al2O3 dielectric layers are conformally coated at activated carbon surface by ALD, well-maintaining microporous morphology. Resultant electrodes exhibit excellent stability at 3 V operation with 39% energy density enhancement from 2.5 V operation. Because of the protection of surface functional groups and reduction of electrolyte degradation, 74% of initial voltage was maintained 50 h after full charge, and 88% of capacitance was retained after 5000 cycles at 70 °C accelerated test, which correspond to 31 and 17% improvements from bare activated carbon, respectively. This ALD-based surface modification offers a general method to enhance electrochemical stability of carbon materials for diverse energy and environmental applications.

  4. Ultrasonicated double wall carbon nanotubes for enhanced electric double layer capacitance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Srikrishna; Maiti, Uday N.; Palanisamy, Kowsalya; Nikolaev, Pavel; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2014-06-01

    An intense ultrasonication of the double wall carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) causes fractures and splitting of the individual tubes. This not only generates open tips and edges in DWCNTs but also incorporates defects in the tube walls. The electric double layer capacitor (EDLC) electrodes of intensively ultrasonicated DWCNTs (U-DWCNTs) form organized layered-porous structures. The EDLC behavior of U-DWCNTs electrodes shows dramatic improvements (specific capacitance 10 times and 222 times larger than the pristine DWCNTs at scan rates 5 mV s-1 and 500 mV s-1, respectively) due to the increased wettability of electrodes and accessibility of the electrolyte ions.

  5. Mass Conservation in Modeling Moisture Diffusion in Multi-Layer Carbon Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurge, Mark A.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Starr, Stanley O.

    2009-01-01

    Moisture diffusion in multi-layer carbon composite structures is difficult to model using finite difference methods due to the discontinuity in concentrations between adjacent layers of differing materials. Applying a mass conserving approach at these boundaries proved to be effective at accurately predicting moisture uptake for a sample exposed to a fixed temperature and relative humidity. Details of the model developed are presented and compared with actual moisture uptake data gathered over 130 days from a graphite epoxy composite sandwich coupon with a Rohacell foam core.

  6. Microwave absorption properties of carbon nanocoils coated with highly controlled magnetic materials by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guizhen; Gao, Zhe; Tang, Shiwei; Chen, Chaoqiu; Duan, Feifei; Zhao, Shichao; Lin, Shiwei; Feng, Yuhong; Zhou, Lei; Qin, Yong

    2012-12-21

    In this work, atomic layer deposition is applied to coat carbon nanocoils with magnetic Fe(3)O(4) or Ni. The coatings have a uniform and highly controlled thickness. The coated nanocoils with coaxial multilayer nanostructures exhibit remarkably improved microwave absorption properties compared to the pristine carbon nanocoils. The enhanced absorption ability arises from the efficient complementarity between complex permittivity and permeability, chiral morphology, and multilayer structure of the products. This method can be extended to exploit other composite materials benefiting from its convenient control of the impedance matching and combination of dielectric-magnetic multiple loss mechanisms for microwave absorption applications.

  7. Ultrasonic absorption characteristics of porous carbon-carbon ceramics with random microstructure for passive hypersonic boundary layer transition control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Alexander; Hannemann, Klaus; Kuhn, Markus

    2014-06-01

    Preceding studies in the high enthalpy shock tunnel Göttingen of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) revealed that carbon fibre reinforced carbon ceramic (C/C) surfaces can be utilized to damp hypersonic boundary layer instabilities leading to a delay of boundary layer transition onset. To assess the ultrasonic absorption properties of the material, a test rig was set up to measure the reflection coefficient at ambient pressures ranging from 0.1 × 105 to 1 × 105 Pa. For the first time, broadband ultrasonic sound transducers with resonance frequencies of up to 370 kHz were applied to directly cover the frequency range of interest with respect to the second-mode instabilities observed in previous experiments. The reflection of ultrasonic waves from three flat plate test samples with a porous layer thickness between 5 and 30 mm was investigated and compared to an ideally reflecting surface. C/C was found to absorb up to 19 % of the acoustic power transmitted towards the material. The absorption characteristics were investigated theoretically by means of the quasi-homogeneous absorber theory. The experimental results were found to be in good agreement with the theory.

  8. Enzyme and Mediator-coadsorbed Carbon Felt Electrode for Electrochemical Detection of Glucose Covered with Polymer Layers Based on Layer-by-Layer Technique.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Soichi; Hirata, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Glucose dehydrogenase (GlDH) and ferrocene were coadsorbed on a carbon felt (CF) sheet (5 × 10 mm, 2 mm thickness), which was used to construct an electrode for the electrochemical detection of glucose. A potential of +0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl was applied on the base CF, and the current was measured. After the addition of glucose, the current increased and reached a steady state within 50 s. The current response was proportional to the glucose concentration up to 20 μM, with a lower detection limit of 1 μM. The surface of the CF electrode was covered by layers of polystyrene sulfonate and poly-L-lysine using layer-by-layer technique. Again the current response was proportional to glucose concentration up to 20 μM, with a lower detection limit of 2 μM. The oxidation current owing to electrochemical interferents such as L-ascorbate and acetaminophen was 1/8 times of the current observed on the unprotected electrode. In addition, the protection imparted stability to the electrode. Our work demonstrates that a GlDH/ferrocene CF electrode, protected with polystyrene sulfonate and poly-L-lysine, could be used for the electrochemical detection of glucose. PMID:26165293

  9. Layer-by-layer carbon nanotube bio-templates for in situ monitoring of the metabolic activity of nitrifying bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Kenneth J.; Guest, Jeremy S.; Ho, Genevieve; Lynch, Jerome P.; Love, Nancy G.

    2009-03-01

    Despite the wide variety of effective disinfection and wastewater treatment techniques for removing organic and inorganic wastes, pollutants such as nitrogen remain in wastewater effluents. If left untreated, these nitrogenous wastes can adversely impact the environment by promoting the overgrowth of aquatic plants, depleting dissolved oxygen, and causing eutrophication. Although nitrification/denitrification processes are employed during advanced wastewater treatment, effective and efficient operation of these facilities require information of the pH, dissolved oxygen content, among many other parameters, of the wastewater effluent. In this preliminary study, a biocompatible CNT-based nanocomposite is proposed and validated for monitoring the biological metabolic activity of nitrifying bacteria in wastewater effluent environments (i.e., to monitor the nitrification process). Using carbon nanotubes and a pH-sensitive conductive polymer (i.e., poly(aniline) emeraldine base), a layer-by-layer fabrication technique is employed to fabricate a novel thin film pH sensor that changes its electrical properties in response to variations in ambient pH environments. Laboratory studies are conducted to evaluate the proposed nanocomposite's biocompatibility with wastewater effluent environments and its pH sensing performance.

  10. Layer-by-layer assembly of multifunctional porous N-doped carbon nanotube hybrid architectures for flexible conductors and beyond.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Songfang; Gao, Yongju; Li, Jinhui; Zhang, Guoping; Zhi, Chunyi; Deng, Libo; Sun, Rong; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Coassemble diverse functional nanomaterials with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to form three-dimensional (3D) porous CNTs hybrid architectures (CHAs) are potentially desirable for applications in energy storage, flexible conductors, and catalysis, because of diverse functionalities and synergistic effects in the CHAs. Herein, we report a scalable strategy to incorporate various functional nanomaterials with N-doped CNTs (N-CNTs) into such 3D porous CHAs on the polyurethane (PU) sponge skeletons via layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly. To investigate their properties and applications, the specific CHAs based on N-CNTs and Ag nanoparticles (NPs), denoted as PU-(N-CNTs/Ag NPs)n, are developed. The unique binary structure enables these specific CHAs conductors to possess reliable mechanical and electrical performance under various elastic deformations as well as excellent hydrophilicity. Moreover, they are employed as strain-gauge sensor and heterogeneous catalyst, respectively. The sensor could detect continuous signal, static signal, and pulse signal with superior sustainability and reversibility, indicating an important branch of electromechanical devices. Furthermore, the synergistic effects among N-CNTs, Ag NPs, and porous structure endow the CHAs with excellent performance in catalysis. We have a great expectation that LbL assembly can afford a universal route for incorporating diverse functional materials into one structure. PMID:25749434

  11. Reagentless biosensor based on layer-by-layer assembly of functional multiwall carbon nanotubes and enzyme-mediator biocomposite*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xing-hua; Xi, Feng-na; Zhang, Yi-ming; Lin, Xian-fu

    2011-01-01

    A simple and controllable layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly method was proposed for the construction of reagentless biosensors based on electrostatic interaction between functional multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and enzyme-mediator biocomposites. The carboxylated MWNTs were wrapped with polycations poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and the resulting PAH-MWNTs were well dispersed and positively charged. As a water-soluble dye methylene blue (MB) could mix well with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) to form a biocompatible and negatively-charged HRP-MB biocomposite. A (PAH-MWNTs/HRP-MB)n bionanomultilayer was then prepared by electrostatic LBL assembly of PAH-MWNTs and HRP-MB on a polyelectrolyte precursor film-modified Au electrode. Due to the excellent biocompatibility of HRP-MB biocomposite and the uniform LBL assembly, the immobilized HRP could retain its natural bioactivity and MB could efficiently shuttle electrons between HRP and the electrode. The incorporation of MWNTs in the bionanomultilayer enhanced the surface coverage concentration of the electroactive enzyme and increased the catalytic current response of the electrode. The proposed biosensor displayed a fast response (2 s) to hydrogen peroxide with a low detection limit of 2.0×10−7 mol/L (S/N=3). This work provided a versatile platform in the further development of reagentless biosensors. PMID:21634040

  12. Carbon nanotubes supported cerium dioxide and platinum nanohybrids: Layer-by-layer synthesis and enhanced electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Xinyuan; Chen, Jiayi; Wang, Mengdi; Gu, Jialei; Wu, Ping; Sun, Dongmei; Tang, Yawen

    2015-08-01

    We successfully synthesize carbon nanotubes (CNTs) supported cerium dioxide and platinum (Pt/CeO2/CNTs) nanohybrids via layer-by-layer assembly. The composition, morphology and structure of the as-prepared Pt/CeO2/CNTs nanohybrids are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). By comparison of the electrocatalytic properties of the Pt/CeO2/CNTs with the Pt/CNTs, we systematically investigate the promotion effect of CeO2 on the Pt/CeO2/CNTs catalysts towards methanol oxidation. It is found that the introduction of CeO2 not only enhances the electrocatalytic activity and stability of the Pt/CeO2/CNTs catalyst for methanol oxidation but also minimizes the CO poisoning, probably accounting for the good oxygen carrying capacity of CeO2 and its high stability in acidic solution.

  13. Controlling single and few-layer graphene crystals growth in a solid carbon source based chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Papon, Remi; Sharma, Subash; Shinde, Sachin M.; Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Tanemura, Masaki; Kalita, Golap

    2014-09-29

    Here, we reveal the growth process of single and few-layer graphene crystals in the solid carbon source based chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Nucleation and growth of graphene crystals on a polycrystalline Cu foil are significantly affected by the injection of carbon atoms with pyrolysis rate of the carbon source. We observe micron length ribbons like growth front as well as saturated growth edges of graphene crystals depending on growth conditions. Controlling the pyrolysis rate of carbon source, monolayer and few-layer crystals and corresponding continuous films are obtained. In a controlled process, we observed growth of large monolayer graphene crystals, which interconnect and merge together to form a continuous film. On the other hand, adlayer growth is observed with an increased pyrolysis rate, resulting few-layer graphene crystal structure and merged continuous film. The understanding of monolayer and few-layer crystals growth in the developed CVD process can be significant to grow graphene with controlled layer numbers.

  14. Atomic layer deposition on suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes via gas-phase noncovalent functionalization.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Damon B; Gordon, Roy G

    2006-04-01

    Alternating exposures of nitrogen dioxide gas and trimethylaluminum vapor are shown to functionalize the surfaces of single-walled carbon nanotubes with a self-limited monolayer. Functionalized nanotube surfaces are susceptible to atomic layer deposition of continuous, radially isotropic material. This allows for the creation of coaxial nanotube structures of multiple materials with precisely controlled diameters. Functionalization involves only weak physical bonding, avoiding covalent modification, which should preserve the unique optical, electrical, and mechanical properties of the nanotubes. PMID:16608267

  15. Assessment of carbon layer growth induced by resists outgassing in multi e-beams lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marusic, JC; Pourteau, ML; Cêtre, S.; Pain, L.; Mebiene-Engohang, AP; David, S.; Labau, S.; Boussey, J.

    2014-10-01

    The development of multiple e-beam lithography equipment is seen as an alternative for next generation lithography. However, similarly to EUV lithography, this technology faces important challenges in controlling the contamination of the optics due to deposition of carbon layer induced by the outgassed chemical species from resist under electron bombardment. An experimental setup was designed and built at LETI to study the outgassed species and observe the carbon layer. In this setup, resist coated wafers 100 mm size are exposed under a 5 kV e-beam gun. During exposure, byproducts from outgassed species are monitored with a Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA). The identification of outgassed chemical species is done with an ex-situ TD-GC-MS analysis (ThermoDesorption-Gaz Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry). In a second part of this investigation, we observed the contamination carbon layer growth induced by the outgassing. Thereby, we fabricated a device which consists of a silicon membrane with micro-machined apertures. During e-beam exposure, this device simulates the multiple parallel beams of the optic system of a maskless lithography tool. The deposited contamination layer on device is then observed and thickness measured under SEM. In this paper, we present the results of outgassing and contamination on 3 chemically amplified resists showing that contamination is not directly dependent of the overall outgassing rate but on first order of the outgassing from Photo Acid Generator (PAG). It also reports on the performance in reducing outgassing and contamination of applying a top-coat layer on top of the resist and shows that reduction is more important for contamination than for outgassing.

  16. Topological defects in electric double layers of ionic liquids at carbon interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Black, Jennifer M.; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Feng, Guang; Cummings, Peter T.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Balke, Nina

    2015-06-07

    The structure and properties of the electrical double layer in ionic liquids is of interest in a wide range of areas including energy storage, catalysis, lubrication, and many more. Theories describing the electrical double layer for ionic liquids have been proposed, however a full molecular level description of the double layer is lacking. To date, studies have been predominantly focused on ion distributions normal to the surface, however the 3D nature of the electrical double layer in ionic liquids requires a full picture of the double layer structure not only normal to the surface, but also in plane. Here wemore » utilize 3D force mapping to probe the in plane structure of an ionic liquid at a graphite interface and report the direct observation of the structure and properties of topological defects. The observation of ion layering at structural defects such as step-edges, reinforced by molecular dynamics simulations, defines the spatial resolution of the method. Observation of defects allows for the establishment of the universality of ionic liquid behavior vs. separation from the carbon surface and to map internal defect structure. In conclusion, these studies offer a universal pathway for probing the internal structure of topological defects in soft condensed matter on the nanometer level in three dimensions.« less

  17. Topological defects in electric double layers of ionic liquids at carbon interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Jennifer M.; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Feng, Guang; Cummings, Peter T.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Balke, Nina

    2015-06-07

    The structure and properties of the electrical double layer in ionic liquids is of interest in a wide range of areas including energy storage, catalysis, lubrication, and many more. Theories describing the electrical double layer for ionic liquids have been proposed, however a full molecular level description of the double layer is lacking. To date, studies have been predominantly focused on ion distributions normal to the surface, however the 3D nature of the electrical double layer in ionic liquids requires a full picture of the double layer structure not only normal to the surface, but also in plane. Here we utilize 3D force mapping to probe the in plane structure of an ionic liquid at a graphite interface and report the direct observation of the structure and properties of topological defects. The observation of ion layering at structural defects such as step-edges, reinforced by molecular dynamics simulations, defines the spatial resolution of the method. Observation of defects allows for the establishment of the universality of ionic liquid behavior vs. separation from the carbon surface and to map internal defect structure. In conclusion, these studies offer a universal pathway for probing the internal structure of topological defects in soft condensed matter on the nanometer level in three dimensions.

  18. Chemical Cleavage of Layered Carbon Nitride with Enhanced Photoluminescent Performances and Photoconduction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhixin; Shen, Yanfei; Li, Ying; Liu, Anran; Liu, Songqin; Zhang, Yuanjian

    2015-12-22

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) and carbon dots (C-dots) have various alluring properties and potential applications, but they are often limited by unsatisfied optical performance such as low quantum yield, ambiguous fluorescence emission mechanism, and narrow emission wavelength. Herein, we report that bulk polymeric carbon nitride could be utilized as a layered precursor to prepare carbon nitride nanostructures such as nanorods, nanoleaves and quantum dots by chemical tailoring. As doped carbon materials, these carbon nitride nanostructures not only intrinsically emitted UV lights but also well inherited the explicit photoluminescence mechanism of the bulk pristine precursor, both of which were rarely reported for GQDs and C-dots. Especially, carbon nitride quantum dots (CNQDs) had a photoluminescence quantum yield (QY) up to 46%, among the highest QY for metal-free quantum dots so far. As examples, the CNQDs were utilized as a photoluminescence probe for rapid detection of Fe(3+) with a detection limit of 1 μM in 2 min and a photoconductor in an all-solid-state device. This work would open up an avenue for doped nanocarbon in developing photoelectrical devices and sensors.

  19. The effect of the carbon nanotube buffer layer on the performance of a Li metal battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ding; Zhou, Yi; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan

    2016-05-01

    Lithium (Li) metal is one of the most promising candidates as an anode for the next-generation energy storage systems because of its high specific capacity and lowest negative electrochemical potential. But the growth of Li dendrites limits the application of the Li metal battery. In this work, a type of modified Li metal battery with a carbon nanotube (CNT) buffer layer inserted between the separator and the Li metal electrode was reported. The electrochemical results show that the modified batteries have a much better rate capability and cycling performance than the conventional Li metal batteries. The mechanism study by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy reveals that the modified battery has a smaller charge transfer resistance and larger Li ion diffusion coefficient during the deposition process on the Li electrode than the conventional Li metal batteries. Symmetric battery tests show that the interfacial behavior of the Li metal electrode with the buffer layer is more stable than the naked Li metal electrode. The morphological characterization of the CNT buffer layer and Li metal lamina reveals that the CNT buffer layer has restrained the growth of Li dendrites. The CNT buffer layer has great potential to solve the safety problem of the Li metal battery.Lithium (Li) metal is one of the most promising candidates as an anode for the next-generation energy storage systems because of its high specific capacity and lowest negative electrochemical potential. But the growth of Li dendrites limits the application of the Li metal battery. In this work, a type of modified Li metal battery with a carbon nanotube (CNT) buffer layer inserted between the separator and the Li metal electrode was reported. The electrochemical results show that the modified batteries have a much better rate capability and cycling performance than the conventional Li metal batteries. The mechanism study by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy reveals that the modified battery has a

  20. Sequential Layer Analysis of Protein Immunosensors based on Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Forests

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Ruchika; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios; Rusling, James F.

    2010-01-01

    Electrochemical immunosensors using vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) forests can provide ultrasensitive, accurate cancer biomarker protein assays. Herein we report a systematic investigation of the structure, thickness and functionality of each layer of these immunosensors using atomic force microscopy (AFM), quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and scanning white light interferometry (SWLI). This provides a detailed picture of the surface morphology of each layer along with surface concentration and thickness of each protein layer. Results reveal that the major reasons for sensitivity gain can be assigned to the dense packing of carboxylated SWNT forest tips, which translate to a large surface concentration of capture antibodies, together with the high quality of conductive SWNT forests. PMID:20731335

  1. Multi-layer stretchable pressure sensors using ionic liquids and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatani, Morteza; Vatani, Mohamad; Choi, J. W.

    2016-02-01

    A stretchable and pressure sensitive polymer capable of detecting strains was developed through the incorporation of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate as an ionic liquid (IL) into a stretchable photopolymer. The developed IL/polymer composite showed both a field effect characteristic and piezoresistivity by embedding the composite between two layers of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based stretchable electrodes. A multi-layer pressure sensitive taxel was formed using a hybrid manufacturing process, where two electrode layers were fabricated by screen printing and the IL/polymer composite was formed by casting using a mold. A composite material for the electrodes was developed through the dispersion of CNTs into a highly stretchable photo/thermal crosslinkable prepolymer. The fabricated sensor was evaluated with different forces ranging from 0 to 140 g. The experiment results showed that the developed stretchable sensor had good repeatability and reliability in detecting applied pressures.

  2. Synthesis and electrochemical properties of niobium pentoxide deposited on layered carbide-derived carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuanfang (John); Maloney, Ryan; Lukatskaya, Maria R.; Beidaghi, Majid; Dyatkin, Boris; Perre, Emilie; Long, Donghui; Qiao, Wenming; Dunn, Bruce; Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-01-01

    Herein we report on the hydrothermal synthesis of niobium pentoxide on carbide-derived carbon (Nb2O5/CDC) with a layered structure. The presence of phenylphosphonic acid guides the deposition during preparation, leading to the formation of amorphous Nb2O5 particles which are 4-10 nm in diameter and homogeneously distributed on the CDC framework. Electrochemical testing of the Nb2O5/CDC electrode indicated that the highest capacitance and Coulombic efficiency occurred using an electrolyte comprised of 1 M lithium perchlorate in ethylene carbonate/dimethyl carbonate. Subsequent heat treatment of Nb2O5/CDC in CO2 environment led to crystallization of the Nb2O5, allowing reversible Li+ intercalation/de-intercalation. For sweep rates corresponding to charging and discharging in under 3 min, a volumetric charge of 180 C cm-3 and Coulombic efficiency of 99.2% were attained.

  3. Enhancement of electric double layer capacitance of carbon nanotubes by gallium ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Padmnabh; Pandey, Srikrishna; Menemparabath, Minimol; Sug Kim, Young; Nikolaev, Pavel; Arepalli, Sivaram; Lee, Il Ha

    2011-02-15

    Irradiation by 30 keV Ga{sup +} ions was used to create defects in multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Damage to the graphitic structure of the nanotube wall resulting from ion irradiation was observed by a transmission electron microscope which was accompanied by corresponding changes in Raman spectra. It was found that ion irradiation at 2 x 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} cumulative dose increases the electric double layer capacitance of a multiwalled carbon nanotube electrode by a factor of 2.3, followed by a decrease and saturation at higher (2 x 10{sup 14} and 4 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}) doses. This might be a trade-off between the enhancement caused by the tip opening and lowering of the capacitance due to amorphization of carbon nanotubes.

  4. Ultracold Quantum Gases in Hexagonal Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengstock, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    Hexagonal structures occur in a vast variety of systems, ranging from honeycombs of bees in life sciences to carbon nanotubes in material sciences. The latter, in particular its unfolded two-dimensional layer -- Graphene -- has rapidly grown to one of the most discussed topics in condensed-matter physics. Not only does it show proximity to various carbon-based materials but also exceptional properties owing to its unusual energy spectrum. In quantum optics, ultracold quantum gases confined in periodic light fields have shown to be very general and versatile instruments to mimic solid state systems. However, so far nearly all experiments were performed in cubic lattice geometries only. Here we report on the first experimental realization of ultracold quantum gases in a state-dependent, two-dimensional, Graphene-like optical lattice with hexagonal symmetry. The lattice is realized via a spin-dependent optical lattice structure with alternating σ^+ and σ^- -sites and thus constitutes a so called `magnetic'-lattice with `antiferromagnetic'-structure. Atoms with different spin orientation can be loaded to specific lattice sites or -- depending on the parameters -- to the whole lattice. As a consequence e.g. superpositions of a superfluid spin component with a different spin component in the Mott-insulating phase can be realized as well as spin-dependent transport properties, disorder etc. After preparing an antiferromagnetically ordered state we e.g. measure sustainable changes of the transport properties of the atoms. This manifests in a significant reduction of the tunneling as compared to a single-component system. We attribute this observation to a partial tunneling blockade for one spin component induced by population in another spin component localized at alternating lattice sites. Within a Gutzwiller-Ansatz we calculate the phase diagrams for the mixed spin-states and find very good agreement with our experimental results. Moreover, by state-resolved recording

  5. Carrier dynamics and design optimization of electrolyte-induced inversion layer carbon nanotube-silicon Schottky junction solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenchao; Seol, Gyungseon; Rinzler, Andrew G.; Guo, Jing

    2012-03-01

    Carrier dynamics of the electrolyte-induced inversion layer carbon nanotube-silicon Schottky junction solar cells is explored by numerical simulations. Operation mechanisms of the solar cells with and without the electrolyte-induced inversion layer are presented and compared, which clarifies the current flow mechanisms in a solar cell with an induced inversion layer. A heavily doped back contact layer can behave as a hole block layer. In addition to lowering contact resistance and surface recombination, it is particularly useful for improving carrier separation in an electrolyte-induced inversion layer solar cell or a metal-insulator-semiconductor grating solar cell.

  6. Electrostatic Layer-By-Layer Self-Assembled Graphene/Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Hybrid Multilayers as Efficient 'All Carbon' Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanju; Heintzman, Eli; Price, Carson

    2016-05-01

    In this work, covalently bonded graphene/carbon nanotube (Gr/CNT) conjoined materials are fabricated as engineered three-dimensional hybrid multilayer supercapacitors for high-performance integrated electrochemical energy storage. Stable aqueous dispersion of polymer-modified graphene sheets are prepared in the presence of cationic poly(ethyleneimine), PEI (PEI-Gr) for sequential or electrostatic layer-by-layer (E-LBL) self-assembly with negatively charged acid-oxidized or functionalized multi-walled CNT (fMWCNT), forming (PEI-Gr/fMWCNT)n architecture as "all carbon" super-capacitor, where n = 1, 2, 4, 6, 9, 12 and 15. These films possess an interconnected network of mesoporous nanocarbon structure with well-defined interfaces allowing sufficient surface adsorption and faster ion transport due to short diffusion distances. They exhibit nearly rectangular cyclic voltammograms at an exceedingly high scan rate of 1 V/s with an average specific capacitance of -450 F g(-1) and specific energy density of 75.5 Wh kg(-1) based on electrode weight, measured at a current density of 0.3 A g(-1), comparable to that of Ni metal hydride battery and charged/discharged within a few seconds or a minute. This is attributed to the maximized synergistic effect of the highest specific surface areas by preventing re-aggregation of PEI-Gr or PEI-rGO via fMWCNT as spacers. We also determined relative contributions of the interfacial capacitance (C(dl)) and charge transfer (R(ct)) properties of the hybrids and investigated interfacial properties by SECM technique. PMID:27483821

  7. Electrostatic Layer-By-Layer Self-Assembled Graphene/Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Hybrid Multilayers as Efficient 'All Carbon' Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanju; Heintzman, Eli; Price, Carson

    2016-05-01

    In this work, covalently bonded graphene/carbon nanotube (Gr/CNT) conjoined materials are fabricated as engineered three-dimensional hybrid multilayer supercapacitors for high-performance integrated electrochemical energy storage. Stable aqueous dispersion of polymer-modified graphene sheets are prepared in the presence of cationic poly(ethyleneimine), PEI (PEI-Gr) for sequential or electrostatic layer-by-layer (E-LBL) self-assembly with negatively charged acid-oxidized or functionalized multi-walled CNT (fMWCNT), forming (PEI-Gr/fMWCNT)n architecture as "all carbon" super-capacitor, where n = 1, 2, 4, 6, 9, 12 and 15. These films possess an interconnected network of mesoporous nanocarbon structure with well-defined interfaces allowing sufficient surface adsorption and faster ion transport due to short diffusion distances. They exhibit nearly rectangular cyclic voltammograms at an exceedingly high scan rate of 1 V/s with an average specific capacitance of -450 F g(-1) and specific energy density of 75.5 Wh kg(-1) based on electrode weight, measured at a current density of 0.3 A g(-1), comparable to that of Ni metal hydride battery and charged/discharged within a few seconds or a minute. This is attributed to the maximized synergistic effect of the highest specific surface areas by preventing re-aggregation of PEI-Gr or PEI-rGO via fMWCNT as spacers. We also determined relative contributions of the interfacial capacitance (C(dl)) and charge transfer (R(ct)) properties of the hybrids and investigated interfacial properties by SECM technique.

  8. Evolution Of Lattice Structure And Chemical Composition Of The Surface Reconstruction Layer In Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 Cathode Material For Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Pengfei; Nie, Anmin; Zheng, Jianming; Zhou, Yungang; Lu, Dongping; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Rui; Belharouak, Ilias; Zu, Xiaotao; Xiao, Jie; Amine, Khalil; Liu, Jun; Gao, Fei; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza; Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Chong M.

    2015-01-14

    Voltage and capacity fading of layer structured lithium and manganese rich (LMR) transition metal oxide is directly related to the structural and composition evolution of the material during the cycling of the battery. However, understanding such evolution at atomic level remains elusive. Based on atomic level structural imaging, elemental mapping of the pristine and cycled samples and density functional theory calculations, it is found that accompanying the hoping of Li ions is the simultaneous migration of Ni ions towards the surface from the bulk lattice, leading to the gradual depletion of Ni in the bulk lattice and thickening of a Ni enriched surface reconstruction layer (SRL). Furthermore, Ni and Mn also exhibit concentration partitions within the thin layer of SRL in the cycled samples where Ni is almost depleted at the very surface of the SRL, indicating the preferential dissolution of Ni ions in the electrolyte. Accompanying the elemental composition evolution, significant structural evolution is also observed and identified as a sequential phase transition of C2/m →I41→Spinel. For the first time, it is found that the surface facet terminated with pure cation is more stable than that with a mixture of cation and anion. These findings firmly established how the elemental species in the lattice of LMR cathode transfer from the bulk lattice to surface layer and further into the electrolyte, clarifying the long standing confusion and debate on the structure and chemistry of the surface layer and their correlation with the voltage fading and capacity decaying of LMR cathode. Therefore, this work provides critical insights for designing of cathode materials with both high capacity and voltage stability during cycling.

  9. Enhancement of dopamine sensing by layer-by-layer assembly of PVI-dmeOs and Nafion on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hui-Fang; Cui, Yu-Han; Sun, Yu-Long; Zhang, Kuan; Zhang, Wei-De

    2010-05-28

    In this study, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were modified to further improve their performance in electrochemical sensing of dopamine (DA) levels. After a redox polymer, poly(vinylimidazole) complexed with Os(4, 4'-dimethyl- 2, 2-bipyridine)(2)Cl (termed PVI-dmeOs) was electrodeposited on multi-wall CNTs (MWCNTs), Nafion and PVI-dmeOs films were successfully layer-by-layer (LBL) assembled on the hydrophilic surface of the as-prepared PVI-dmeOs/CNTs nanocomposites through electrostatic interactions. The LBL assembly was proved by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemistry and UV-vis spectroscopy measurements. LBL assembly of Nafion/PVI-dmeOs films on CNTs significantly enhanced their linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) response sensitivity to DA, with a maximum enhancement for three Nafion/PVI-dmeOs film-modified MWCNTs. The LSV peak current density of (Nafion/PV I-dmeOs)(3)/CNT electrodes in response to 10 and 50 microM DA solutions was about 7.3 and 3.9 times those for bare CNTs. At the (Nafion/PV I-dmeOs)(3)/CNT electrodes, the limit of detection (LOD) (signal-to-noise ratio: 3) was 0.05 microM DA, the linear range was 0.1-10 microM DA (with a linear regression coefficient of 0.97) and the DA-sensing sensitivity was 8.15 microA cm( - 2) microM( - 1). The newly fabricated (Nafion/PV I-dmeOs)(3)/CNT electrodes may be developed as an ideal biosensor for direct and in situ measurement of DA levels. PMID:20431203

  10. The effect of the carbon nanotube buffer layer on the performance of a Li metal battery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ding; Zhou, Yi; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan

    2016-06-01

    Lithium (Li) metal is one of the most promising candidates as an anode for the next-generation energy storage systems because of its high specific capacity and lowest negative electrochemical potential. But the growth of Li dendrites limits the application of the Li metal battery. In this work, a type of modified Li metal battery with a carbon nanotube (CNT) buffer layer inserted between the separator and the Li metal electrode was reported. The electrochemical results show that the modified batteries have a much better rate capability and cycling performance than the conventional Li metal batteries. The mechanism study by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy reveals that the modified battery has a smaller charge transfer resistance and larger Li ion diffusion coefficient during the deposition process on the Li electrode than the conventional Li metal batteries. Symmetric battery tests show that the interfacial behavior of the Li metal electrode with the buffer layer is more stable than the naked Li metal electrode. The morphological characterization of the CNT buffer layer and Li metal lamina reveals that the CNT buffer layer has restrained the growth of Li dendrites. The CNT buffer layer has great potential to solve the safety problem of the Li metal battery. PMID:27181758

  11. The effect of the carbon nanotube buffer layer on the performance of a Li metal battery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ding; Zhou, Yi; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan

    2016-06-01

    Lithium (Li) metal is one of the most promising candidates as an anode for the next-generation energy storage systems because of its high specific capacity and lowest negative electrochemical potential. But the growth of Li dendrites limits the application of the Li metal battery. In this work, a type of modified Li metal battery with a carbon nanotube (CNT) buffer layer inserted between the separator and the Li metal electrode was reported. The electrochemical results show that the modified batteries have a much better rate capability and cycling performance than the conventional Li metal batteries. The mechanism study by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy reveals that the modified battery has a smaller charge transfer resistance and larger Li ion diffusion coefficient during the deposition process on the Li electrode than the conventional Li metal batteries. Symmetric battery tests show that the interfacial behavior of the Li metal electrode with the buffer layer is more stable than the naked Li metal electrode. The morphological characterization of the CNT buffer layer and Li metal lamina reveals that the CNT buffer layer has restrained the growth of Li dendrites. The CNT buffer layer has great potential to solve the safety problem of the Li metal battery.

  12. Distinct temperature sensitivity of soil carbon decomposition in forest organic layer and mineral soil.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenhua; Li, Wei; Jiang, Ping; Wang, Hui; Bai, Edith

    2014-10-01

    The roles of substrate availability and quality in determining temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil carbon (C) decomposition are still unclear, which limits our ability to predict how soil C storage and cycling would respond to climate change. Here we determined Q10 in surface organic layer and subsurface mineral soil along an elevation gradient in a temperate forest ecosystem. Q10 was calculated by comparing the times required to respire a given amount of soil C at 15 and 25°C in a 350-day incubation. Results indicated that Q10 of the organic layer was 0.22-0.71 (absolute difference) higher than Q10 of the mineral soil. Q10 in both the organic layer (2.5-3.4) and the mineral soil (2.1-2.8) increased with decreasing substrate quality during the incubation. This enhancement of Q10 over incubation time in both layers suggested that Q10 of more labile C was lower than that of more recalcitrant C, consistent with the Arrhenius kinetics. No clear trend of Q10 was found along the elevation gradient. Because the soil organic C pool of the organic layer in temperate forests is large, its higher temperature sensitivity highlights its importance in C cycling under global warming.

  13. An electrochemical double layer capacitor using an activated carbon electrode with gel electrolyte binder

    SciTech Connect

    Osaka, Tetsuya, Liu, X.; Nojima, Masashi; Momma, Toshiyuki

    1999-05-01

    An electric double layer capacitor (EDLC) was prepared with an activated carbon powder electrode with poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene) (PVdF-HFP) based gel electrolyte. Ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) were used as plasticizer and tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEABF{sub 4}) was used as the supporting electrolyte. An optimized gel electrolyte of PVdF-HFP/PC/EC/TEABF{sub 4} - 23/31/35/11 mass ratio exhibited high ionic conductivity of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} S/cm, high electrode capacitance, and good mechanical strength. An electrode consisting of activated carbon (AC) with the gel electrolyte as the binder (AC/PVdF-HFP based gel, 7/3 mass ratio) showed a higher specific capacitance and a lower ion diffusion resistance within the electrode than a carbon electrode, prepared with PVdF-HFP binder without plasticizer. This suggests that an electrode mixed with the gel electrolyte has a lower ion diffusion resistance inside the electrode. The highest specific capacitance of 123 F/g was achieved with an electrode containing AC with a specific surface area of 2500 m{sup 2}/g. A coin-type EDLC cell with optimized components showed excellent cycleability exceeding 10{sup 4} cycles with ca. 100% coulombic efficiency achieved when charging and discharging was repeated between 1.0 and 2.5 V at 1.66 mA/cm{sup 2}.

  14. Stable kagome lattices from group IV elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenaerts, O.; Schoeters, B.; Partoens, B.

    2015-03-01

    A thorough investigation of three-dimensional kagome lattices of group IV elements is performed with first-principles calculations. The investigated kagome lattices of silicon and germanium are found to be of similar stability as the recently proposed carbon kagome lattice. Carbon and silicon kagome lattices are both direct-gap semiconductors but they have qualitatively different electronic band structures. While direct optical transitions between the valence and conduction bands are allowed in the carbon case, no such transitions can be observed for silicon. The kagome lattice of germanium exhibits semimetallic behavior but can be transformed into a semiconductor after compression.

  15. Recent developments in the layer-by-layer assembly of polyaniline and carbon nanomaterials for energy storage and sensing applications. From synthetic aspects to structural and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Marmisollé, Waldemar A; Azzaroni, Omar

    2016-05-21

    The construction of hybrid polymer-inorganic nanoarchitectures for electrochemical purposes based on the layer-by-layer assembly of conducting polymers and carbon nanomaterials has become increasingly popular over the last decade. This explosion of interest is primarily related to the increasing mastery in the design of supramolecular constructs using simple wet chemical approaches. Concomitantly, this continuous research activity paved the way to the rapid development of nanocomposites or "nanoblends" readily integrable into energy storage and sensing devices. In this sense, the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly technique has allowed us to access three-dimensional (3D) multicomponent carbon-based network nanoarchitectures displaying addressable electrical, electrochemical and transport properties in which conducting polymers, such as polyaniline, and carbon nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes or nanographene, play unique roles without disrupting their inherent functions - complementary entities coexisting in harmony. Over the last few years the level of functional sophistication reached by LbL-assembled carbon-based 3D network nanoarchitectures, and the level of knowledge related to how to design, fabricate and optimize the properties of these 3D nanoconstructs have advanced enormously. This feature article presents and discusses not only the recent advances but also the emerging challenges in complex hybrid nanoarchitectures that result from the layer-by-layer assembly of polyaniline, a quintessential conducting polymer, and diverse carbon nanomaterials. This is a rapidly developing research area, and this work attempts to provide an overview of the diverse 3D network nanoarchitectures prepared up to now. The importance of materials processing and LbL integration is explored within each section and while the overall emphasis is on energy storage and sensing applications, the most widely-used synthetic strategies and characterization methods for "nanoblend

  16. Recent developments in the layer-by-layer assembly of polyaniline and carbon nanomaterials for energy storage and sensing applications. From synthetic aspects to structural and functional characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmisollé, Waldemar A.; Azzaroni, Omar

    2016-05-01

    The construction of hybrid polymer-inorganic nanoarchitectures for electrochemical purposes based on the layer-by-layer assembly of conducting polymers and carbon nanomaterials has become increasingly popular over the last decade. This explosion of interest is primarily related to the increasing mastery in the design of supramolecular constructs using simple wet chemical approaches. Concomitantly, this continuous research activity paved the way to the rapid development of nanocomposites or ``nanoblends'' readily integrable into energy storage and sensing devices. In this sense, the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly technique has allowed us to access three-dimensional (3D) multicomponent carbon-based network nanoarchitectures displaying addressable electrical, electrochemical and transport properties in which conducting polymers, such as polyaniline, and carbon nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes or nanographene, play unique roles without disrupting their inherent functions - complementary entities coexisting in harmony. Over the last few years the level of functional sophistication reached by LbL-assembled carbon-based 3D network nanoarchitectures, and the level of knowledge related to how to design, fabricate and optimize the properties of these 3D nanoconstructs have advanced enormously. This feature article presents and discusses not only the recent advances but also the emerging challenges in complex hybrid nanoarchitectures that result from the layer-by-layer assembly of polyaniline, a quintessential conducting polymer, and diverse carbon nanomaterials. This is a rapidly developing research area, and this work attempts to provide an overview of the diverse 3D network nanoarchitectures prepared up to now. The importance of materials processing and LbL integration is explored within each section and while the overall emphasis is on energy storage and sensing applications, the most widely-used synthetic strategies and characterization methods for ``nanoblend

  17. Layer-By-Layer Assembled Hybrid Film of Carbon Nanotubes/Iron Oxide Nanocrystals for Reagentless Electrochemical Detection of H2O2

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yuqing; Wang, Hua; Shao, Yuyan; Tang, Zhiwen; Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-04-01

    A new approach to construct a reagentless H2O2 electrochemical sensor is described. Iron oxide magnetic nanocystals (IOMNs), as peroxidase mimetics, were employed to assemble a multilayer structure layer by layer. Polythionin was electrodeposited onto the glassy carbon electrode surface to introduce amino groups. Carboxyl functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes, amino functionalized IOMNs, and thionin monomers were anchored onto a polythionin-functionalized GC surface in order by carbodiimide or glutaraldehyde chemistry. The resulting multilayer construction with three layers of IOMNs and thionin mediator exhibits excellent electrochemical response to the reduction of H2O2, whereas such a modified electrode with one layer construction only yields a slight response to H2O2 of the same concentration. The tethered MWCNs enlarge the amount of immobilized IOMNs and effectively shuttle electrons between the electrode and the thionin.

  18. Temperature oscillation modulated self-assembly of periodic concentric layered magnesium carbonate microparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Shihong; Wang, Zheng Jim; Chang, Ting-Tung

    2014-01-01

    Intriguing patterns of periodic, concentric, layered, mineral microstructure are present in nature and organisms, yet they have elusive geneses. We hypothesize temperature oscillation can be an independent factor that causes the self-assembly of such patterns in mineral phases synthesized in solution. Static experiments verify that rhythmic concentric multi-layered magnesium carbonate microhemispheres can be synthesized from bicarbonate solution by temperature oscillation, without use of a chemical template, additive or gel-diffusion system. Appropriate reactant concentration and initial pH value can restrain the competitive growth of other mineral generations. Polarized light microscopy images indicate the microhemispheres are crystalline and the crystallinity increases with incubation time. The thickness of a single mineral layer of microhemisphere in microscale is precisely controlled by the waveform parameters of the temperature oscillation, while the layer number, which can reach tens to about one hundred, is constrained by the temperature oscillation period number. FT-IR spectra show that these microhemispheres synthesized under different conditions can be identified as the basic form of magnesium carbonate, hydromagnesite (Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2 ⋅ 4H2O). SEM images exhibit the characteristic microscopic texture of the alternating dark and light rings of these microhemispheres. TEM images and ED patterns suggest the nanoflakes of microhemispheres are present in polycrystalline form with some degree of oriented assembly. The temperature oscillation modulated self-assembly may offer a new mechanism to understand the formation of layered microstructure of minerals in solution, and provide a non-invasive and programmable means to synthesize hierarchically ordered materials. PMID:24520410

  19. Bioavailable Carbon and the Relative Degradation State of Organic Matter in Active Layer and Permafrost Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jastrow, J. D.; Burke, V. J.; Vugteveen, T. W.; Fan, Z.; Hofmann, S. M.; Lederhouse, J. S.; Matamala, R.; Michaelson, G. J.; Mishra, U.; Ping, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    The decomposability of soil organic carbon (SOC) in permafrost regions is a key uncertainty in efforts to predict carbon release from thawing permafrost and its impacts. The cold and often wet environment is the dominant factor limiting decomposer activity, and soil organic matter is often preserved in a relatively undecomposed and uncomplexed state. Thus, the impacts of soil warming and permafrost thaw are likely to depend at least initially on the genesis and past history of organic matter degradation before its stabilization in permafrost. We compared the bioavailability and relative degradation state of SOC in active layer and permafrost soils from Arctic tundra in Alaska. To assess readily bioavailable SOC, we quantified salt (0.5 M K2SO4) extractable organic matter (SEOM), which correlates well with carbon mineralization rates in short-term soil incubations. To assess the relative degradation state of SOC, we used particle size fractionation to isolate fibric (coarse) from more degraded (fine) particulate organic matter (POM) and separated mineral-associated organic matter into silt- and clay-sized fractions. On average, bulk SOC concentrations in permafrost were lower than in comparable active layer horizons. Although SEOM represented a very small proportion of the bulk SOC, this proportion was greater in permafrost than in comparable active layer soils. A large proportion of bulk SOC was found in POM for all horizons. Even for mineral soils, about 40% of bulk SOC was in POM pools, indicating that organic matter in both active layer and permafrost mineral soils was relatively undecomposed compared to typical temperate soils. Not surprisingly, organic soils had a greater proportion of POM and mineral soils had greater silt- and clay-sized carbon pools, while cryoturbated soils were intermediate. For organic horizons, permafrost organic matter was generally more degraded than in comparable active layer horizons. However, in mineral and cryoturbated horizons

  20. Four-layer tin-carbon nanotube yolk-shell materials for high-performance lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Wu, Fengdan; Wang, Yong

    2014-05-01

    All high-capacity anodes for lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries, such as those based on tin (Sn) and silicon (Si), suffer from large volume changes during cycling with lithium ions, and their high capacities can be only achieved in the first few cycles. We design and synthesize a unique four-layer yolk-shell tin-carbon (Sn-C) nanotube array to address this problem. The shape and size of the exterior Sn nanotube@carbon core-shell layer, the encapsulated interior Sn nanowire@carbon nanotube core-shell layer, and the filling level of each layer can be all controlled by adjusting the experimental conditions. Such a nanostructure has not been reported for any metal or metal oxide-based material. Owing to the special design of the electrode structure, the four-layer hierarchical structure demonstrates excellent Li-ion storage properties in terms of high capacity, long cycle life, and high rate performance.

  1. Electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical behavior of the TCNQ(0/)(-) couple on a glassy carbon electrode. Layer-by-layer nucleation and growth.

    PubMed

    Gómez, L; Rodríguez-Amaro, R

    2006-08-15

    On the basis of the electrochemical results obtained for thin films of 7,7,8,8- tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) on a glassy carbon electrode, the reduction and oxidation of the [TCNQ](0/)(-) couple in KCl aqueous media occurs via a mechanism involving layer-by-layer nucleation and growth. In situ recorded UV-visible spectroelectrochemical data allow two different crystal structures for the oxidized form of TCNQ to be discriminated. PMID:16893249

  2. Electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical behavior of the TCNQ(0/)(-) couple on a glassy carbon electrode. Layer-by-layer nucleation and growth.

    PubMed

    Gómez, L; Rodríguez-Amaro, R

    2006-08-15

    On the basis of the electrochemical results obtained for thin films of 7,7,8,8- tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) on a glassy carbon electrode, the reduction and oxidation of the [TCNQ](0/)(-) couple in KCl aqueous media occurs via a mechanism involving layer-by-layer nucleation and growth. In situ recorded UV-visible spectroelectrochemical data allow two different crystal structures for the oxidized form of TCNQ to be discriminated.

  3. Stable carbon isotope ratios of toluene in the boundary layer and the lower free troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintel, J.; Hösen, E.; Koppmann, R.; Krebsbach, M.

    2013-04-01

    Measurements of stable carbon isotope ratios in VOC are a powerful tool to identify sources or to track both dynamical and chemical processes. During the field campaign ZEPTER-2 in autumn 2008 whole air samples were collected on board a Zeppelin NT airship in the planetary boundary layer and the lower free troposphere over south-west Germany. These samples were analysed with respect to VOC mixing ratios and stable carbon isotope ratios using a gas chromatograph combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometer. In this study we present the results for toluene, one of the major anthropogenic pollutants. In the boundary layer we observed rather fresh emissions mixing into the background and derived a toluene source isotope ratio of δ13C = -28.2 ± 0.5 ‰. Using the concept of the effective kinetic isotope effect, we were able to separate the effects of dilution processes and photochemical degradation in the free troposphere. We estimated the photochemical age of toluene in the atmosphere in two different ways (using isotope ratios and mixing ratios, respectively). The results differ strongly in the planetary boundary layer, probably due to mixing processes, but are compatible with each other in the free troposphere.

  4. Carbon doped GaN buffer layer using propane for high electron mobility transistor applications: Growth and device results

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Nilsson, D.; Danielsson, Ö.; Pedersen, H.; Janzén, E.; Forsberg, U.; Bergsten, J.; Rorsman, N.

    2015-12-28

    The creation of a semi insulating (SI) buffer layer in AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) devices is crucial for preventing a current path beneath the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). In this investigation, we evaluate the use of a gaseous carbon gas precursor, propane, for creating a SI GaN buffer layer in a HEMT structure. The carbon doped profile, using propane gas, is a two stepped profile with a high carbon doping (1.5 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}) epitaxial layer closest to the substrate and a lower doped layer (3 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −3}) closest to the 2DEG channel. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry measurement shows a uniform incorporation versus depth, and no memory effect from carbon doping can be seen. The high carbon doping (1.5 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}) does not influence the surface morphology, and a roughness root-mean-square value of 0.43 nm is obtained from Atomic Force Microscopy. High resolution X-ray diffraction measurements show very sharp peaks and no structural degradation can be seen related to the heavy carbon doped layer. HEMTs are fabricated and show an extremely low drain induced barrier lowering value of 0.1 mV/V, demonstrating an excellent buffer isolation. The carbon doped GaN buffer layer using propane gas is compared to samples using carbon from the trimethylgallium molecule, showing equally low leakage currents, demonstrating the capability of growing highly resistive buffer layers using a gaseous carbon source.

  5. Carbon doped GaN buffer layer using propane for high electron mobility transistor applications: Growth and device results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Bergsten, J.; Nilsson, D.; Danielsson, Ö.; Pedersen, H.; Rorsman, N.; Janzén, E.; Forsberg, U.

    2015-12-01

    The creation of a semi insulating (SI) buffer layer in AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) devices is crucial for preventing a current path beneath the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). In this investigation, we evaluate the use of a gaseous carbon gas precursor, propane, for creating a SI GaN buffer layer in a HEMT structure. The carbon doped profile, using propane gas, is a two stepped profile with a high carbon doping (1.5 × 1018 cm-3) epitaxial layer closest to the substrate and a lower doped layer (3 × 1016 cm-3) closest to the 2DEG channel. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry measurement shows a uniform incorporation versus depth, and no memory effect from carbon doping can be seen. The high carbon doping (1.5 × 1018 cm-3) does not influence the surface morphology, and a roughness root-mean-square value of 0.43 nm is obtained from Atomic Force Microscopy. High resolution X-ray diffraction measurements show very sharp peaks and no structural degradation can be seen related to the heavy carbon doped layer. HEMTs are fabricated and show an extremely low drain induced barrier lowering value of 0.1 mV/V, demonstrating an excellent buffer isolation. The carbon doped GaN buffer layer using propane gas is compared to samples using carbon from the trimethylgallium molecule, showing equally low leakage currents, demonstrating the capability of growing highly resistive buffer layers using a gaseous carbon source.

  6. Formation of Diffusion Layers by Anode Plasma Electrolytic Nitrocarburizing of Low-Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmanov, S. A.; Kusmanova, Yu. V.; Naumov, A. R.; Belkin, P. N.

    2015-08-01

    The structure of the low-carbon steel after plasma electrolytic nitrocarburizing in the electrolyte containing acetonitrile was investigated. The cross-sectional microstructure, composition, and phase constituents of a modified layer under different processing conditions were characterized. It is shown that the electrolyte that contained ammonium chloride and acetonitrile provides the saturation of steel with nitrogen and carbon and the formation of the Fe4N and FeN0.05 nitrides, Fe4C carbide and other phases. The nitrogen diffusion decreases the austenitization temperature and results in the formation of martensite after the sample cooling in the electrolyte. The formation of a carbon and nitrogen source in a vapor-gas envelope (VGE) is investigated. The proposed mechanism includes evaporation of acetonitrile in the VGE, its adsorption on an anode with the following thermal decomposition, and also the acetonitrile reduction to amine with subsequent hydrolysis to ethanol that is determined with the use of chromatographic method. The aqueous solution that contained 10 wt.% NH4Cl and 10 wt.% CH3CN allows one to obtain the nitrocarburized layer with the thickness of 0.22 mm and microhardness up to 740 HV during 10 min at 850 °C. This treatment regime leads to the decrease in the surface roughness of steel R a from 1.01 μm to 0.17 μm.

  7. Transmission of Thermonuclear Detonations through Layers of Burned Material in Carbon-Oxygen White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamezo, V. N.; Oran, E. S.

    2006-06-01

    In three-dimensional delayed-detonation models of type Ia supernovae, detonations propagate through funnels of degenerate carbon-oxygen matter that are left unburned by turbulent deflagrations in central parts of a white dwarf. Some of these funnels can be disconnected from the rest of the unburned material, thus creating unburned pockets that cannot be directly reached by a detonation wave. These pockets may or may not ignite when strong shocks generated by detonations reach them through layers of burned material. In this work, we study the detonation transmission phenomena in exploding white dwarfs using one-dimensional time-dependent numerical simulations based on reactive Euler equations. The thermonuclear burning of carbon-oxygen mixture is modeled by a 13-nuclei alpha network. We use a steady-state solution for the reaction-zone structure of a one-dimensional detonation wave as an initial condition. Time-dependent computations performed for a fully resolved carbon reaction scale show that a detonation shock passing through a layer of burned material can initiate a new detonation or decay. The critical thickness of burned material that allows the detonation reignition is a function of density. This work was supported in part by the NASA ATP program (NRA-02-OSS-01-ATP) and by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) through the Office of Naval Research.

  8. Influence of depositional setting and sedimentary fabric on mechanical layer evolution in carbonate aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, Wall B.R.

    2006-01-01

    Carbonate aquifers in fold-thrust belt settings often have low-matrix porosity and permeability, and thus groundwater flow pathways depend on high porosity and permeability fracture and fault zones. Methods from sedimentology and structural geology are combined to understand the evolution of fracture controlled flow pathways and determine their spatial distribution. Through this process bed-parallel pressure-solution surfaces (PS1) are identified as a fracture type which influences fragmentation in peritidal and basinal carbonate, and upon shearing provides a major flow pathway in fold - thrust belt carbonate aquifers. Through stratigraphic analysis and fracture mapping, depositional setting is determined to play a critical role in PS1 localization and spacing where peritidal strata have closer spaced and less laterally continuous PS1 than basinal strata. In the peritidal platform facies, units with planar lamination have bed-parallel pressure-solution seams along mudstone laminae. In contrast, burrowed units of peritidal strata have solution seams with irregular and anastamosing geometries. Laminated units with closely spaced bed-parallel solution seams are more fragmented than bioturbated units with anastamosing solution seams. In the deeper-water depositional environment, pelagic settling and turbidity currents are the dominant sedimentation processes, resulting in laterally continuous deposits relative to the peritidal platform environment. To quantify the fracture patterns in the basinal environment, mechanical layer thickness values were measured from regions of low to high bed dip. The results define a trend in which mechanical layer thickness decreases as layer dip increases. A conceptual model is presented that emphasizes the link between sedimentary and structural fabric for the peritidal and basinal environments, where solution seams localize in mud-rich intervals, and the resulting pressure-solution surface geometry is influenced by sedimentary geometry

  9. Rigidity of lattice domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savelyev, V. A.

    1979-01-01

    The means of ensuring total rigidity of lattice domes, using comparison with solid shells of 1-3 layers are discussed. Irregularities of manufacture, processing, and other factors are considered, as they relate to diminution of rigidity. The discussion uses the concepts of upper and lower critical loads on the structure in question.

  10. Enhanced electric double-layer capacitance by desolvation of lithium ions in confined nanospaces of microporous carbon.

    PubMed

    Urita, Koki; Ide, Nozomi; Isobe, Kosuke; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Moriguchi, Isamu

    2014-04-22

    Carbon electrodes with specific microporous structures are strongly desired to improve the performance of electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs). We report solvated states of Li ions in confined carbon micropores affecting specific capacitance. The average Li(+) solvation number of 1 M LiClO4/propylene carbonate (PC) electrolyte introduced into porous carbon electrodes was determined using Raman spectroscopy and (7)Li NMR. Micropores with slightly larger pore size against the solvated molecules and the narrow two-dimensional spaces decreased the solvation number, enhancing specific capacitance. Hence, specific carbon morphology may be related to high EDL capacitance, and micropore structure is important in obtaining highly capacitive EDLC materials. PMID:24646017

  11. Conductive surface modification of LiFePO4 with nitrogen doped carbon layers for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sukeun; Liao, Chen; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Bridges, Craig A; Unocic, Raymond R; Nanda, Jagjit; Dai, Sheng; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans

    2012-01-01

    The LiFePO4 rod surface modified with nitrogen doped carbon layer has been prepared using hydrothermal processing followed by post-annealing in the presence of an ionic liquid. The coated LiFePO4 rod exhibits good capacity retention and high rate capability as the nitrogen doped carbon improves conductivity and prevents aggregation of the rod during cycling.

  12. Modeling and optimization of atomic layer deposition processes on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Nuri; Chawla, Vipin; Edwards, Eve; Wood, Vanessa; Park, Hyung Gyu; Utke, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Many energy conversion and storage devices exploit structured ceramics with large interfacial surface areas. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays have emerged as possible scaffolds to support large surface area ceramic layers. However, obtaining conformal and uniform coatings of ceramics on structures with high aspect ratio morphologies is non-trivial, even with atomic layer deposition (ALD). Here we implement a diffusion model to investigate the effect of the ALD parameters on coating kinetics and use it to develop a guideline for achieving conformal and uniform thickness coatings throughout the depth of ultra-high aspect ratio structures. We validate the model predictions with experimental data from ALD coatings of VACNT arrays. However, the approach can be applied to predict film conformality as a function of depth for any porous topology, including nanopores and nanowire arrays.

  13. Novel polydopamine imprinting layers coated magnetic carbon nanotubes for specific separation of lysozyme from egg white.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ruixia; Zhang, Lili; Hao, Yi; Cui, Xihui; Liu, Dechun; Zhang, Min; Tang, Yuhai

    2015-11-01

    Novel core-shell nanocomposites, consisting of magnetic carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) core surrounded by a thin polydopamine (PDA) imprinting shell for specific recognition of lysozyme (Lyz), were fabricated for the first time. The obtained products were characterized and the results showed that the PDA layer was successfully attached onto the surface of MCNTs and the corresponding thickness of imprinting layer was just about 10nm which could enable the template access the recognition cavities easily. The polymerization conditions and adsorption performance of the resultant nanomaterials were investigated in detail. The results indicated that the obtained imprinted polymers showed fast kinetic and high affinity towards Lyz and could be used to specifically separate Lyz from real egg white. In addition, the prepared materials had excellent stability and no obvious deterioration after five adsorption-regeneration cycles. Easy preparation, rapid separation, high binding capacity, and satisfactory selectivity for the template protein make this polymer attractive in biotechnology and biosensors.

  14. Modeling and optimization of atomic layer deposition processes on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Nuri; Chawla, Vipin; Edwards, Eve; Wood, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many energy conversion and storage devices exploit structured ceramics with large interfacial surface areas. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays have emerged as possible scaffolds to support large surface area ceramic layers. However, obtaining conformal and uniform coatings of ceramics on structures with high aspect ratio morphologies is non-trivial, even with atomic layer deposition (ALD). Here we implement a diffusion model to investigate the effect of the ALD parameters on coating kinetics and use it to develop a guideline for achieving conformal and uniform thickness coatings throughout the depth of ultra-high aspect ratio structures. We validate the model predictions with experimental data from ALD coatings of VACNT arrays. However, the approach can be applied to predict film conformality as a function of depth for any porous topology, including nanopores and nanowire arrays. PMID:24778944

  15. Cross-plane heat transfer through single-layer carbon structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaichen; Nedea, Silvia V; Rindt, Camilo C M; Smeulders, David M J

    2016-02-21

    Graphene-based nano-structures have been recently proposed to function as additives to improve the conductivity of thermally sluggish phase change materials (PCMs). Based on the existing research studies, the improvement is dependent not only on the matrix material, but also on the geometry of the carbon structure. To gain more insight into the nano-scale thermal transport problem, we launched the current pilot research using water as the matrix material, to represent the hydroxyl-group-rich sugar alcohols as PCMs. We have found that the heat conduction across a graphene layer to water is much faster than the heat conduction to the graphene layer itself. Also, the high graphene-water thermal contact resistance fails to acknowledge the fast thermal kinetics of the low frequency phonons. In the investigation of the geometry effect, the cross-plane heat transfer coefficient is found to decrease with decreasing CNT diameter except CNT(9,9). PMID:26818392

  16. Modeling and optimization of atomic layer deposition processes on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Nuri; Chawla, Vipin; Edwards, Eve; Wood, Vanessa; Park, Hyung Gyu; Utke, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Many energy conversion and storage devices exploit structured ceramics with large interfacial surface areas. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays have emerged as possible scaffolds to support large surface area ceramic layers. However, obtaining conformal and uniform coatings of ceramics on structures with high aspect ratio morphologies is non-trivial, even with atomic layer deposition (ALD). Here we implement a diffusion model to investigate the effect of the ALD parameters on coating kinetics and use it to develop a guideline for achieving conformal and uniform thickness coatings throughout the depth of ultra-high aspect ratio structures. We validate the model predictions with experimental data from ALD coatings of VACNT arrays. However, the approach can be applied to predict film conformality as a function of depth for any porous topology, including nanopores and nanowire arrays. PMID:24778944

  17. Organic Light Emitting Diodes with Opal Photonic Crystal Layer and Carbon Nanotube Anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovalle Robles, Raquel; Del Rocio Nava, Maria; Williams, Christopher; Zhang, Mei; Fang, Shaoli; Lee, Sergey; Baughman, Ray; Zakhidov, Anvar

    2007-03-01

    We report electroluminescence intensity and spectral changes in light emission from organic light emitting diode (OLEDs) structures, which have thin transparent films of opal photonic crystal (PC). The anode in such PC-OLED is laminated on opal layer from free standing optically transparent multiwall carbon nanotubes (T-CNT) sheets made by dry spinning from CVD grown forests. Silica and polystyrene opal films were grown on glass substrates by vertical sedimentation in colloids in thermal baths and the particle size of opal spheres ranges from 300 nm to 450 nm. The use of T-CNTs, (coated by PEDOT-PSS to avoid shorting) as hole injector, allows to eliminate the use of vacuum deposition of metals and permits to achieve tunneling hole injection regime from CNT tips into Alq^3 emission layer

  18. Synthesis of carbon fibers with branched nanographene sheets for electrochemical double layer capacitor application.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Masahiro; Kalita, Golap; Kato, Kimitoshi; Noda, Mikio; Uchida, Hideo; Wakita, Koichi; Umeno, Masayoshi; Tanemura, Masaki

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate a one step technique to synthesis the carbon fibers (CNFs) with branched nanographene sheets by the pulsed discharge (PD) plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Highly crystalline branched nanographene sheets were directly grown from the surface of the carbon fibers to obtain a three dimensional (3D) nanostructure. The growth process can be explained from the catalyst support growth of the CNFs, and subsequently nucleation and growth of the nanographene sheets from the crystalline surface of the CNF. The deposited nanostructured films with different pulse discharge were used as an electrode for electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLC). It is observed that the capacitance is dependent on the morphology of the electrode materials and an optimum capacitance is obtained with the branched nanographene on CNFs. PMID:24745271

  19. Ultra-Thin Optically Transparent Carbon Electrodes Produced from Layers of Adsorbed Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Alharthi, Sarah A.; Benavidez, Tomas E.; Garcia, Carlos D.

    2013-01-01

    This work describes a simple, versatile, and inexpensive procedure to prepare optically transparent carbon electrodes, using proteins as precursors. Upon adsorption, the protein-coated substrates were pyrolyzed under reductive conditions (5% H2) to form ultra-thin, conductive electrodes. Because proteins spontaneously adsorb to interfaces forming uniform layers, the proposed method does not require a precise control of the preparation conditions, specialized instrumentation, or expensive precursors. The resulting electrodes were characterized by a combination of electrochemical, optical, and spectroscopic means. As a proof-of-concept, the optically-transparent electrodes were also used as substrate for the development of an electrochemical glucose biosensor. The proposed films represent a convenient alternative to more sophisticated, and less available, carbon-based nanomaterials. Furthermore, these films could be formed on a variety of substrates, without classical limitations of size or shape. PMID:23421732

  20. Biosensors Fabricated through Electrostatic Assembly of Enzymes/Polyelectrolyte Hybrid Layers on Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuehe; Liu, Guodong; Wang, Jun

    2006-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have emerged as new class of nanomaterials that is receiving considerable interest because of their unique structure, mechanical, and electronic properties. One promising application of CNTs is to fabricate highly sensitive chemo/biosensors.1-4 For construction of these CNT-based sensors, the CNTs first have to be modified with some molecules specific to the interests. Generally, covalent binding, affinity, and electrostatic interaction have been utilized for the modification of CNTs. Among them, the electrostatic method is attractive due to its simplicity and high efficiency. In present work, we have developed highly sensitively amperometric biosensors for glucose, choline, organophosphate pesticide (OPP) and nerve agents (NAs) based on electrostatically assembling enzymes on the surface of CNTs. All these biosensors were fabricated by immobilization of enzymes on the negatively charged CNTs surface through alternately assembling a cationic poly(diallydimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) layer and an enzyme layer. Using this layer-by-layer (LBL) technique, a bioactive nanocomposite film was fabricated on the electrode surface. Owing to the electrocatalytic effect of CNTs, an amplified electrochemical signal was achieved, which leads to low detections limits for glucose, choline, and OPP and NAs.

  1. Transparent actuators and robots based on single-layer superaligned carbon nanotube sheet and polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Luzhuo; Weng, Mingcen; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Zhiwei; Zhou, Yi; Xia, Dan; Li, Jiaxin; Huang, Zhigao; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan

    2016-03-28

    Transparent actuators have been attracting emerging interest recently, as they demonstrate potential applications in the fields of invisible robots, tactical displays, variable-focus lenses, and flexible cellular phones. However, previous technologies did not simultaneously realize macroscopic transparent actuators with advantages of large-shape deformation, low-voltage-driven actuation and fast fabrication. Here, we develop a fast approach to fabricate a high-performance transparent actuator based on single-layer superaligned carbon nanotube sheet and polymer composites. Various advantages of single-layer nanotube sheets including high transparency, considerable conductivity, and ultra-thin dimensions together with selected polymer materials completely realize all the above required advantages. Also, this is the first time that a single-layer nanotube sheet has been used to fabricate actuators with high transparency, avoiding the structural damage to the single-layer nanotube sheet. The transparent actuator shows a transmittance of 72% at the wavelength of 550 nm and bends remarkably with a curvature of 0.41 cm(-1) under a DC voltage for 5 s, demonstrating a significant advance in technological performances compared to previous conventional actuators. To illustrate their great potential usage, a transparent wiper and a humanoid robot "hand" were elaborately designed and fabricated, which initiate a new direction in the development of high-performance invisible robotics and other intelligent applications with transparency.

  2. Carbon nano-onions (multi-layer fullerenes): chemistry and applications

    PubMed Central

    Bartelmess, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review focuses on the development of multi-layer fullerenes, known as carbon nano-onions (CNOs). First, it briefly summarizes the most important synthetic pathways for their preparation and their properties and it gives the reader an update over new developments in the recent years. This is followed by a discussion of the published synthetic procedures for CNO functionalization, which are of major importance when elucidating future applications and addressing drawbacks for possible applications, such as poor solubility in common solvents. Finally, it gives an overview over the fields of application, in which CNO materials were successfully implemented. PMID:25383308

  3. Evidence for reduced charge recombination in carbon nanotube/perovskite-based active layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bag, Monojit; Renna, Lawrence A.; Jeong, Seung Pyo; Han, Xu; Cutting, Christie L.; Maroudas, Dimitrios; Venkataraman, D.

    2016-10-01

    Using impedance spectroscopy and computation, we show that incorporation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in the bulk of the active layer of perovskite-based solar cells reduces charge recombination and increases the open circuit voltage. An ∼87% reduction in recombination was achieved when MWCNTs were introduced in the planar-heterostructure perovskite solar cell containing mixed counterions. The open circuit voltage (Voc) of perovskite/MWCNTs devices was increased by 70 mV, while the short circuit current density (Jsc) and fill factor (FF) remained unchanged.

  4. Synthesis and carbon dioxide sorption of layered double hydroxide/silica foam nanocomposites with hierarchical mesostructure.

    PubMed

    Fu, Liling; Qi, Genggeng; Shekhah, Osama; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Estevez, Luis; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Giannelis, Emmanuel P

    2014-04-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) with a hierarchical mesostructure are successfully synthesized on mesoporous silica foams by simple impregnation and hydrothermal treatment. The as-synthesized LDH/silica foam nanocomposites show well-defined mesostructures with high surface areas, large pore volumes, and mesopores of 6-7 nm. The nanocomposites act as carbon dioxide (CO2 ) sorbents under simulated flue gas conditions. They also exhibit significantly enhanced CO2 capacities under high-pressure conditions and high CO2 /N2 and CO2 /CH4 selectivities.

  5. Can the Carbonated Layer Protect Wellbore Cement During Geologic CO2 Sequestration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Jun, Y. S.; Steefel, C. I.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding and improving the integrity of wellbores are crucial to prevent CO2 leakage during geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS). With advanced knowledge, cement deterioration caused by injected CO2 can be minimized. We have experimentally analyzed the chemical and mechanical property changes of Portland cement paste samples after 10 days of exposure to 0.5 M NaCl brine saturated with 100 bar CO2 at 95 oC. After exposure, the 3 mm thick cement samples had a total CO2-attacked depth of 1220 μm from both sides, including a 960 μm thick portlandite-depleted region next to the intact core, a 100 μm thick carbonated layer, and a 170 μm surface layer. The portlandite-depleted zone developed abundant micro-cracks and showed a decreased hardness. A hard carbonated layer which developed near the sample surface could not protect the cement due to formation of this portlandite-depleted zone, where abundant micro-cracks accounted for a 90% decrease in strength of the bulk sample. Using the reactive transport code CrunchTope, we further investigated the mechanism of portlandite-depleted zone formation. The cement deterioration process was simulated with a 1-D continuum model that captured the dissolution of the portlandite and the formation of a calcite zone closer to the sample edge. Modeling results highlighted that the apparent bypass of CO2 through the carbonated layer is critical for the evolution of the portlandite-depleted zone, since otherwise the 1-D model predicts complete clogging of the porosity. Defects within the carbonated zone could be due to reaction-induced fractures or to the heterogeneity of the cement. We also incorporated nucleation kinetics for secondary calcite precipitation using previously obtained thermodynamic parameters. We found that the nucleation energy barrier does not suppress calcite formation and thus cannot explain the absence of calcite in the portlandite-depleted zone. The findings from our study help further our understanding of CO2

  6. Fabrication process of carbon nanotube field effect transistors using atomic layer deposition passivation for biosensors.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yasuhiro; Ohno, Yutaka; Kishimoto, Shigeru; Okochi, Mina; Honda, Hiroyuki; Mizutani, Takashi

    2010-06-01

    Fabrication process of the carbon nanotube (CNT) field effect transistors (FETs) for biosensors was studied. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of HfO2 was applied to the deposition of the passivation/gate insulator film. The CNT-FETs did not show the drain current degradation after ALD passivation even though the passivation by Si3N4 deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) resulted in a significant drain current decrease. This indicates the advantage of the present ALD technique in terms of the damage suppression. The biosensing operation was confirmed using thus fabricated CNT-FETs. PMID:20355371

  7. Few-layer graphene shells and nonmagnetic encapsulates: a versatile and nontoxic carbon nanomaterial.

    PubMed

    Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Mendes, Rafael G; Hirsch, Cordula; Jähne, Carsten; Lohe, Martin R; Grothe, Julia; Kaskel, Stefan; Fu, Lei; Klingeler, Rüdiger; Eckert, Jürgen; Wick, Peter; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2013-12-23

    In this work a simple and scalable approach to coat nonmagnetic nanoparticles with few-layer graphene is presented. In addition, the easy processing of such nanoparticles to remove their core, leaving only the 3D graphene nanoshell, is demonstrated. The samples are comprehensively characterized, as are their versatility in terms of functionalization and as a material for electrochemical storage. Indeed, these 3D graphene nanostructures are easily functionalized much as is found with carbon nanotubes and planar graphene. Electrochemical investigations indicate these nanostructures are promising for stable long-life battery applications. Finally, initial toxicological investigations suggest no acute health risk from these 3D graphene nanostructures.

  8. Wafer-scale synthesis of multi-layer graphene by high-temperature carbon ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Janghyuk; Lee, Geonyeop; Kim, Jihyun

    2015-07-20

    We report on the synthesis of wafer-scale (4 in. in diameter) high-quality multi-layer graphene using high-temperature carbon ion implantation on thin Ni films on a substrate of SiO{sub 2}/Si. Carbon ions were bombarded at 20 keV and a dose of 1 × 10{sup 15 }cm{sup −2} onto the surface of the Ni/SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate at a temperature of 500 °C. This was followed by high-temperature activation annealing (600–900 °C) to form a sp{sup 2}-bonded honeycomb structure. The effects of post-implantation activation annealing conditions were systematically investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Carbon ion implantation at elevated temperatures allowed a lower activation annealing temperature for fabricating large-area graphene. Our results indicate that carbon-ion implantation provides a facile and direct route for integrating graphene with Si microelectronics.

  9. Nonlinear dynamics of bi-layered graphene sheet, double-walled carbon nanotube and nanotube bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajbhiye, Sachin O.; Singh, S. P.

    2016-05-01

    Due to strong van der Waals (vdW) interactions, the graphene sheets and nanotubes stick to each other and form clusters of these corresponding nanostructures, viz. bi-layered graphene sheet (BLGS), double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) and nanotube bundle (NB) or ropes. This research work is concerned with the study of nonlinear dynamics of BLGS, DWCNT and NB due to nonlinear interlayer vdW forces using multiscale atomistic finite element method. The energy between two adjacent carbon atoms is represented by the multibody interatomic Tersoff-Brenner potential, whereas the nonlinear interlayer vdW forces are represented by Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential function. The equivalent nonlinear material model of carbon-carbon bond is used to model it based on its force-deflection relation. Newmark's algorithm is used to solve the nonlinear matrix equation governing the motion of the BLGS, DWCNT and NB. An impulse and harmonic excitations are used to excite these nanostructures under cantilevered, bridged and clamped boundary conditions. The frequency responses of these nanostructures are computed, and the dominant resonant frequencies are identified. Along with the forced vibration of these structures, the eigenvalue extraction problem of armchair and zigzag NB is also considered. The natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes are extracted for the different length and boundary conditions of the nanotube bundle.

  10. Novel growth method of carbon nanotubes using catalyst-support layer developed by alumina grit blasting.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiromichi; Ishii, Juntaro; Ota, Keishin

    2016-08-19

    We propose an efficient method of growing carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on a variety of metals, alloys, and carbon materials using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) assisted by a simple surface treatment of the materials. The main feature of this method is the application of grit blasting with fine alumina particles to the development of a catalyst-support layer required for the growth of CNTs on various conductive materials, including ultra-hard metals such as tungsten. Auger electron spectroscopy shows that grit blasting can form a non-continuous layer where alumina nanoparticles are embedded as residues in the blasting media left on the treated surfaces. This work reveals that such a non-continuous alumina layer can behave as the catalyst-support layer, which is generally prepared by sputter or a vacuum evaporation coating process that considerably restricts the practical applications of CNTs. We have attempted to grow CNTs on grit-blasted substrates of eighteen conventionally used conductive materials using CVD together with a floating iron catalyst. The proposed method was successful in growing multi-walled CNT arrays on the grit-blasted surfaces of all the examined materials, demonstrating its versatility. Furthermore, we found that the group IV metal oxide films thermally grown on the as-received substrates can support the catalytic activity of iron nanoparticles in the CVD process just as well as the alumina film developed by grit blasting. Spectral emissivity of the CNT arrays in the visible and infrared wavelength ranges has been determined to assess the applicability of the CNT arrays as a black coating media. PMID:27389659

  11. Novel growth method of carbon nanotubes using catalyst-support layer developed by alumina grit blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hiromichi; Ishii, Juntaro; Ota, Keishin

    2016-08-01

    We propose an efficient method of growing carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on a variety of metals, alloys, and carbon materials using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) assisted by a simple surface treatment of the materials. The main feature of this method is the application of grit blasting with fine alumina particles to the development of a catalyst-support layer required for the growth of CNTs on various conductive materials, including ultra-hard metals such as tungsten. Auger electron spectroscopy shows that grit blasting can form a non-continuous layer where alumina nanoparticles are embedded as residues in the blasting media left on the treated surfaces. This work reveals that such a non-continuous alumina layer can behave as the catalyst-support layer, which is generally prepared by sputter or a vacuum evaporation coating process that considerably restricts the practical applications of CNTs. We have attempted to grow CNTs on grit-blasted substrates of eighteen conventionally used conductive materials using CVD together with a floating iron catalyst. The proposed method was successful in growing multi-walled CNT arrays on the grit-blasted surfaces of all the examined materials, demonstrating its versatility. Furthermore, we found that the group IV metal oxide films thermally grown on the as-received substrates can support the catalytic activity of iron nanoparticles in the CVD process just as well as the alumina film developed by grit blasting. Spectral emissivity of the CNT arrays in the visible and infrared wavelength ranges has been determined to assess the applicability of the CNT arrays as a black coating media.

  12. Photocatalytic activity of porous multiwalled carbon nanotube-TiO2 composite layers for pollutant degradation.

    PubMed

    Zouzelka, Radek; Kusumawati, Yuly; Remzova, Monika; Rathousky, Jiri; Pauporté, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    TiO2 nanoparticles are suitable building blocks nanostructures for the synthesis of porous functional thin films. Here we report the preparation of films using brookite, P25 titania and anatase pristine nanoparticles and of nanocomposite layers combining anatase nanoparticles and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) at various concentrations. The structure and phase composition of the layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Their morphology and texture properties were determined by scanning electron microscopy and krypton adsorption experiments, respectively. Additionally to a strong absorption in the UV range, the composites exhibited light absorption in the visible range as well. The photocatalytic performance of the layers was tested in the degradation of aqueous solutions of 4-chlorophenol serving as a model of an eco-persistent pollutant. Besides the determination of the decrease in the concentration of 4-chlorophenol, also the formation of intermediate degradation products, namely hydroquinone and benzoquinone, was followed. The presence of MWCNTs had a beneficial effect on the photocatalytic performance, a marked increase in the photocatalytic degradation rate constant being observed even at very low concentrations of MWCNTs. Compared to a P25 reference layer, the first order rate reaction constant increased by about 100% for the composite films containing MWCNTs at concentrations above 0.6 wt%. The key parameters for the enhancement of the photocatalytic performance are discussed. The presence of carbon nanotubes influences beneficially the degradation of 4-chlorophenol by an attack of the primarily photoproduced hydroxyl radicals onto the 4-chlorophenol molecules. The degradation due to the direct charge transfer is practically not influenced at all.

  13. Photocatalytic activity of porous multiwalled carbon nanotube-TiO2 composite layers for pollutant degradation.

    PubMed

    Zouzelka, Radek; Kusumawati, Yuly; Remzova, Monika; Rathousky, Jiri; Pauporté, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    TiO2 nanoparticles are suitable building blocks nanostructures for the synthesis of porous functional thin films. Here we report the preparation of films using brookite, P25 titania and anatase pristine nanoparticles and of nanocomposite layers combining anatase nanoparticles and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) at various concentrations. The structure and phase composition of the layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Their morphology and texture properties were determined by scanning electron microscopy and krypton adsorption experiments, respectively. Additionally to a strong absorption in the UV range, the composites exhibited light absorption in the visible range as well. The photocatalytic performance of the layers was tested in the degradation of aqueous solutions of 4-chlorophenol serving as a model of an eco-persistent pollutant. Besides the determination of the decrease in the concentration of 4-chlorophenol, also the formation of intermediate degradation products, namely hydroquinone and benzoquinone, was followed. The presence of MWCNTs had a beneficial effect on the photocatalytic performance, a marked increase in the photocatalytic degradation rate constant being observed even at very low concentrations of MWCNTs. Compared to a P25 reference layer, the first order rate reaction constant increased by about 100% for the composite films containing MWCNTs at concentrations above 0.6 wt%. The key parameters for the enhancement of the photocatalytic performance are discussed. The presence of carbon nanotubes influences beneficially the degradation of 4-chlorophenol by an attack of the primarily photoproduced hydroxyl radicals onto the 4-chlorophenol molecules. The degradation due to the direct charge transfer is practically not influenced at all. PMID:27262272

  14. Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bornyakov, V.G.

    2005-06-01

    Possibilities that are provided by a lattice regularization of QCD for studying nonperturbative properties of QCD are discussed. A review of some recent results obtained from computer calculations in lattice QCD is given. In particular, the results for the QCD vacuum structure, the hadron mass spectrum, and the strong coupling constant are considered.

  15. Superradiance Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Da-Wei; Liu, Ren-Bao; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Scully, Marlan O.

    2015-01-01

    We show that the timed Dicke states of a collection of three-level atoms can form a tight-binding lattice in momentum space. This lattice, coined the superradiance lattice (SL), can be constructed based on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). For a one-dimensional SL, we need the coupling field of the EIT system to be a standing wave. The detuning between the two components of the standing wave introduces an effective uniform force in momentum space. The quantum lattice dynamics, such as Bloch oscillations, Wannier-Stark ladders, Bloch band collapsing, and dynamic localization can be observed in the SL. The two-dimensional SL provides a flexible platform for Dirac physics in graphene. The SL can be extended to three and higher dimensions where no analogous real space lattices exist with new physics waiting to be explored.

  16. GO-induced assembly of gelatin toward stacked layer-like porous carbon for advanced supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Jiao, Yanqing; Sun, Li; Wang, Lei; Wu, Aiping; Yan, Haijing; Meng, Meichen; Tian, Chungui; Jiang, Baojiang; Fu, Honggang

    2016-01-28

    Layer-like nanocarbons with high surface area and good conductivity are promising materials for supercapacitors due to their good ability for effective charge-transfer and mass-transfer. In this paper, stacked layer-like porous carbon containing RGO (reduced graphene oxides) (LPCG) was constructed via the GO-induced assembly of gelatin followed by carbonization and activation processes. Under suitable conditions, LPCG-based materials with a thickness of about 100 nm and a high specific surface area (up to 1476 m(2) g(-1)) could be obtained. In the materials, the closed combination of RGO and porous carbon can be observed, which is favourable for the development of the synergistic effects of both components. The presence of GO can not only enhance the conductivity of LPCG-based materials, but also is essential for the formation of a thin carbon sheet with a stacked structure. Otherwise, the plate-like, non-stacked carbon with a thickness of about 500 nm could be formed in the absence of RGO. The porous structure along with the presence of RGO allows rapid charge-transfer and easy access and diffusion of electrolyte ions. As a result, the materials exhibited a high discharge specific capacitance (455 F g(-1) at 0.5 A g(-1), 366 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1)), good rate capability (221 F g(-1) at density 30 A g(-1)) and good cycling stability. In aqueous electrolytes, the energy density could be up to 9.32 W h kg(-1) at a relatively low power density of 500 W kg(-1) with a good cycling stability (>96% over 5000 cycles). It was found that (1) the rational combination of RGO and porous carbon is essential for enhancing the capacitance performance and improving the cycling stability and (2) the high conductivity is favorable for improving the rate performance of the materials. The LPCG-based materials have extensive potential for practical applications in energy storage and conversion devices.

  17. Diamond-Like-Carbon LC-Alignment Layers for Application in LCOS Microdisplays

    SciTech Connect

    Bol,A.; Dvorak, J.; Arena, D.

    2005-01-01

    To improve the lifetime and yield of LCOS microdisplays, non-contact LC alignment techniques using inorganic materials are under investigation. This report focuses on oblique ion-beam treatment of diamond-like carbon (DLC) layers, and in particular on the influence of the ion dose on the LC alignment on DLC, keeping the ion-beam angle (40 degrees) and ion-beam energy (170 eV) the same. LC alignment on ion-milled DLC layers is uniform if the ion dose is between 3.8 x 10{sup -4} C/cm{sup 2} and 5.5x10{sup -3} C/cm{sup 2}. Above and below this ion dose range, non-uniform alignment is observed. NEXAFS experiments show that this is caused by lack of molecular anisotropy on the surface of the ion-milled DLC layers. By varying the ion dose between 3.8 x 10{sup -4} C/cm{sup 2} and 5.5 x 10{sup -3} C/cm{sup 2}, LC molecules have an average pre-tilt between 3 and 5 degrees, which is within the desired range for application in LCOS microdisplays. The lifetime of the LCOS microdisplays with ion-milled DLC for projection-TV application is, however, shorter than the lifetime of microdisplays with PI layers. Ion milling probably creates a reactive surface that is unstable under the high light fluxes used in projection TVs. A solution for this problem could be chemical passivation of the ion-milled alignment layers. Initial experiments with passivation of ion-milled PI resulted in an increase in lifetime, but the lifetime after passivation was still lower than the lifetime of rubbed PI layers (factor 0.7). Nevertheless, ion-milling of DLC or PI can be a good alternative LC alignment technique in other LCD applications. LC-alignment layers based on inorganic layers such as obliquely deposited SiO{sub 2} films would be a better option for application in LCOS microdisplays due to their higher light stability.

  18. Preparation and microstructure characteristics of low-temperature bainite in surface layer of low carbon gear steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.; Zhang, F. C.; Wang, T. S.

    2011-06-01

    A kind of technology was proposed for the development of low-temperature bainitic microstructure in the surface layer of low-carbon gear steel 20CrMnMo, which is based on carburization and succedent low-temperature austempering. The carbon content in the surface carburization layer increases to 0.81 wt.%, making the martensite starting point depressed. Low-temperature bainite formed in the carburization layer and lath martensite with low carbon content in the center by austempering at a low temperature slightly higher than the martensite starting point of the surface layer. Aluminum is added as alloying elements with the purpose of enhancing the driving force of bainitic transformation and retarding the precipitation of cementite during austempering. With the excellent toughness of low-temperature bainite, this low-temperature austempering technology could be a potential substitute of the traditional quenching and tempering heat treatment in the manufacture of gear.

  19. Molecular carbon isotope variations in core samples taken at the Permian-Triassic boundary layers in southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruiliang; Zhang, Shuichang; Brassell, Simon; Wang, Jiaxue; Lu, Zhengyuan; Ming, Qingzhong; Wang, Xiaomei; Bian, Lizeng

    2012-07-01

    Stable carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of carbonate sediments and the molecular (biomarker) characteristics of a continuous Permian-Triassic (PT) layer in southern China were studied to obtain geochemical signals of global change at the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB). Carbonate carbon isotope values shifted toward positive before the end of the Permian period and then shifted negative above the PTB into the Triassic period. Molecular carbon isotope values of biomarkers followed the same trend at and below the PTB and remained negative in the Triassic layer. These biomarkers were acyclic isoprenoids, ranging from C15 to C40, steranes (C27 dominates) and terpenoids that were all significantly more abundant in samples from the Permian layer than those from the Triassic layer. The Triassic layer was distinguished by the dominance of higher molecular weight (waxy) n-alkanes. Stable carbon isotope values of individual components, including n-alkanes and acyclic isoprenoids such as phytane, isop-C25, and squalane, are depleted in δ13C by up to 8-10‰ in the Triassic samples as compared to the Permian. Measured molecular and isotopic variations of organic matter in the PT layers support the generally accepted view of Permian oceanic stagnation followed by a massive upwelling of toxic deep waters at the PTB. A series of large-scale (global) outgassing events may be associated with the carbon isotope shift we measured. This is also consistent with the lithological evidence we observed of white thin-clay layers in this region. Our findings, in context with a generally accepted stagnant Permian ocean, followed by massive upwelling of toxic deep waters might be the major causes of the largest global mass extinction event that occurred at the Permian-Triassic boundary.

  20. Layered spherical carbon composites with nanoparticles of different metals grown simultaneously inside and outside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shaochun; Vongehr, Sascha; Meng, Xiangkang

    2012-03-01

    We report a general one-step route to place nanoparticles (NPs) of different noble metals controllably into interior or surface locations of submicron nanoporous carbon spheres (CSs). In particular, Pd and Au NPs can be easily put either inside or outside of the CSs by selecting these metals’ differently charged precursor ions. Employing mixed precursor solutions, the method allows different metals to grow simultaneously yet selectively in the separate locations, thus resulting in composites with a complex layered structure, for example Pd or Au outside and Ag inside, Au or Pt outside and Pd inside, and other combinations. The synthesis is fast and needs no additional steps like a functionalization of surfaces. It crucially involves microwave heating, the power setting of which further influences the locations and sizes of the NPs especially in the interior of the amorphous carbon matrix. The three-dimensional composite structures are analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersed x-ray spectroscopy combined with quantitative analysis by comparison with simulation. The UV-visible absorption of monometallic and layered composites is compared. The involved mechanisms leading to the selective decoration are discussed; important aspects being the charge of the precursor ions and selective microwave absorption.

  1. Layered spherical carbon composites with nanoparticles of different metals grown simultaneously inside and outside.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shaochun; Vongehr, Sascha; Meng, Xiangkang

    2012-03-01

    We report a general one-step route to place nanoparticles (NPs) of different noble metals controllably into interior or surface locations of submicron nanoporous carbon spheres (CSs). In particular, Pd and Au NPs can be easily put either inside or outside of the CSs by selecting these metals' differently charged precursor ions. Employing mixed precursor solutions, the method allows different metals to grow simultaneously yet selectively in the separate locations, thus resulting in composites with a complex layered structure, for example Pd or Au outside and Ag inside, Au or Pt outside and Pd inside, and other combinations. The synthesis is fast and needs no additional steps like a functionalization of surfaces. It crucially involves microwave heating, the power setting of which further influences the locations and sizes of the NPs especially in the interior of the amorphous carbon matrix. The three-dimensional composite structures are analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersed x-ray spectroscopy combined with quantitative analysis by comparison with simulation. The UV-visible absorption of monometallic and layered composites is compared. The involved mechanisms leading to the selective decoration are discussed; important aspects being the charge of the precursor ions and selective microwave absorption.

  2. Distribution and landscape controls of organic layer thickness and carbon within the Alaskan Yukon River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pastick, Neal J.; Rigge, Matthew B.; Wylie, Bruce K.; Jorgenson, M. Torre; Rose, Joshua R.; Johnson, Kristofer D.; Ji, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of the organic layer thickness (OLT) and organic layer carbon (OLC) stocks in subarctic ecosystems is critical due to their importance in the global carbon cycle. Moreover, post-fire OLT provides an indicator of long-term successional trajectories and permafrost susceptibility to thaw. To these ends, we 1) mapped OLT and associated uncertainty at 30 m resolution in the Yukon River Basin (YRB), Alaska, employing decision tree models linking remotely sensed imagery with field and ancillary data, 2) converted OLT to OLC using a non-linear regression, 3) evaluate landscape controls on OLT and OLC, and 4) quantified the post-fire recovery of OLT and OLC. Areas of shallow (2 = 0.68; OLC: R2 = 0.66), where an average of 16 cm OLT and 5.3 kg/m2 OLC were consumed by fires. Strong predictors of OLT included climate, topography, near-surface permafrost distributions, soil wetness, and spectral information. Our modeling approach enabled us to produce regional maps of OLT and OLC, which will be useful in understanding risks and feedbacks associated with fires and climate feedbacks.

  3. Lattice Boltzmann methods applied to large-scale three-dimensional virtual cores constructed from digital optical borehole images of the karst carbonate Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michael Sukop,; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Digital optical borehole images at approximately 2 mm vertical resolution and borehole caliper data were used to create three-dimensional renderings of the distribution of (1) matrix porosity and (2) vuggy megaporosity for the karst carbonate Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida. The renderings based on the borehole data were used as input into Lattice Boltzmann methods to obtain intrinsic permeability estimates for this extremely transmissive aquifer, where traditional aquifer test methods may fail due to very small drawdowns and non-Darcian flow that can reduce apparent hydraulic conductivity. Variogram analysis of the borehole data suggests a nearly isotropic rock structure at lag lengths up to the nominal borehole diameter. A strong correlation between the diameter of the borehole and the presence of vuggy megaporosity in the data set led to a bias in the variogram where the computed horizontal spatial autocorrelation is strong at lag distances greater than the nominal borehole size. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of flow across a 0.4 × 0.4 × 17 m (2.72 m3 volume) parallel-walled column of rendered matrix and vuggy megaporosity indicates a high hydraulic conductivity of 53 m s−1. This value is similar to previous Lattice Boltzmann calculations of hydraulic conductivity in smaller limestone samples of the Biscayne aquifer. The development of simulation methods that reproduce dual-porosity systems with higher resolution and fidelity and that consider flow through horizontally longer renderings could provide improved estimates of the hydraulic conductivity and help to address questions about the importance of scale.

  4. Effective diffusivity in partially-saturated carbon-fiber gas diffusion layers: Effect of local saturation and application to macroscopic continuum models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Salaberri, Pablo A.; Gostick, Jeff T.; Hwang, Gisuk; Weber, Adam Z.; Vera, Marcos

    2015-11-01

    Macroscopic continuum models are an essential tool to understand the complex transport phenomena that take place in gas diffusion layers (GDLs) used in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Previous work has shown that macroscopic models require effective properties obtained under uniform saturation conditions to get a consistent physical formulation. This issue, mostly unappreciated in the open literature, is addressed in detail in this work. To this end, lattice Boltzmann simulations were performed on tomographic images of dry and water-invaded carbon-paper GDL subsamples with nearly uniform porosity and saturation distributions. The computed effective diffusivity shows an anisotropic dependence on local porosity similar to that reported for morphologically analogous GDLs. In contrast, the dependence on local saturation is rather isotropic, following a nearly quadratic power law. The capability of the local correlations to recover the layer-scale properties obtained from inhomogeneous GDLs is checked by global averaging. Good agreement is found between the upscaled results and the diffusivity data of the GDL from which the present subsamples were taken, as well as other global data presented in the literature. A higher blockage effect of local saturation is, however, expected for the under-the-rib region in operating PEFCs.

  5. Layer-by-Layer Polyelectrolyte Assisted Growth of 2D Ultrathin MoS2 Nanosheets on Various 1D Carbons for Superior Li-Storage.

    PubMed

    Qu, Qunting; Qian, Feng; Yang, Siming; Gao, Tian; Liu, Weijie; Shao, Jie; Zheng, Honghe

    2016-01-20

    Transitional metal sulfide/carbon hybrids with well-defined structures could not only maximize the functional properties of each constituent but engender some unique synergistic effects, holding great promise for applications in Li-ion batteries and supercapacitors and for catalysis. Herein, a facile and versatile approach is developed to controllably grow 2D ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets with a large quantity of exposed edges onto various 1D carbons, including carbon nanotubes (CNTs), electrospun carbon nanofibers, and Te-nanowire-templated carbon nanofibers. The typical approach involves the employment of layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembled polyelectrolyte, which controls spatially the uniform growth and orientation of ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets on these 1D carbons irrespective of their surface properties. Such unique structures of the as-prepared CNTs@MoS2 hybrid are significantly favorable for the fast diffusions of both Li-ions and electrons, satisfying the kinetic requirements of high-power lithium ion batteries. As a result, CNTs@MoS2 hybrids exhibit excellent electrochemical performances for lithium storage, including a high reversible capacity (1027 mAh g(-1)), high-rate capability (610 mAh g(-1) at 5 C), and excellent cycling stability (negligible capacity loss after 200 continuous cycles).

  6. Layer-by-Layer Polyelectrolyte Assisted Growth of 2D Ultrathin MoS2 Nanosheets on Various 1D Carbons for Superior Li-Storage.

    PubMed

    Qu, Qunting; Qian, Feng; Yang, Siming; Gao, Tian; Liu, Weijie; Shao, Jie; Zheng, Honghe

    2016-01-20

    Transitional metal sulfide/carbon hybrids with well-defined structures could not only maximize the functional properties of each constituent but engender some unique synergistic effects, holding great promise for applications in Li-ion batteries and supercapacitors and for catalysis. Herein, a facile and versatile approach is developed to controllably grow 2D ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets with a large quantity of exposed edges onto various 1D carbons, including carbon nanotubes (CNTs), electrospun carbon nanofibers, and Te-nanowire-templated carbon nanofibers. The typical approach involves the employment of layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembled polyelectrolyte, which controls spatially the uniform growth and orientation of ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets on these 1D carbons irrespective of their surface properties. Such unique structures of the as-prepared CNTs@MoS2 hybrid are significantly favorable for the fast diffusions of both Li-ions and electrons, satisfying the kinetic requirements of high-power lithium ion batteries. As a result, CNTs@MoS2 hybrids exhibit excellent electrochemical performances for lithium storage, including a high reversible capacity (1027 mAh g(-1)), high-rate capability (610 mAh g(-1) at 5 C), and excellent cycling stability (negligible capacity loss after 200 continuous cycles). PMID:26709711

  7. [Impact of tillage practices on microbial biomass carbon in top layer of black soils].

    PubMed

    Sun, Bing-jie; Jia, Shu-xia; Zhang, Xiao-ping; Liang, Ai-zhen; Chen, Xue-wen; Zhang, Shi-xiu; Liu, Si-yi; Chen, Sheng-long

    2015-01-01

    A study was conducted on a long-term (13 years) tillage and rotation experiment on black soil in northeast China to determine the effects of tillage, time and soil depth on soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC). Tillage systems included no tillage (NT), ridge tillage (RT) and mould-board plough (MP). Soil sampling was done at 0-5, 5-10 and 10-20 cm depths in June, August and September, 2013, and April, 2014 in the corn phase of corn-soybean rotation plots. MBC content was measured by the chloroform fumigation extraction (CFE) method. The results showed that the MBC content varied with sampling time and soil depth. Soil MBC content was the lowest in April for all three tillage systems, and was highest in June for MP, and highest in August for NT and RT. At each sampling time, tillage system had a significant effect on soil MBC content only in the top 0-5 cm layer. The MBC content showed obvious stratification under NT and RT with a higher MBC content in the top 0-5 cm layer than under MP. The stratification ratios under NT and RT were greatest in September when they were respectively 67.8% and 95.5% greater than under MP. Our results showed that soil MBC contents were greatly affected by the time and soil depth, and were more apparently accumulated in the top layer under NT and RT.

  8. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Izumi, N.; Kyrala, G. A.; Moody, J. D.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Sepke, S. M.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Biener, J.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Eckart, M. J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hamza, A. V.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoover, D. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Kroll, J. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Nikroo, A.; Sayre, D. B.; Stadermann, M.; Wild, C.; Yoxall, B. E.; Landen, O. L.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-06-02

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10¹⁵ neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  9. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    DOE PAGES

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; et al

    2015-06-02

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightlymore » oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10¹⁵ neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.« less

  10. Conformal atomic layer deposition of alumina on millimeter tall, vertically-aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Stano, Kelly L; Carroll, Murphy; Padbury, Richard; McCord, Marian; Jur, Jesse S; Bradford, Philip D

    2014-11-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to coat high aspect ratio and high surface area substrates with conformal and precisely controlled thin films. Vertically aligned arrays of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with lengths up to 1.5 mm were conformally coated with alumina from base to tip. The nucleation and growth behaviors of Al2O3 ALD precursors on the MWCNTs were studied as a function of CNT surface chemistry. CNT surfaces were modified through a series of post-treatments including pyrolytic carbon deposition, high temperature thermal annealing, and oxygen plasma functionalization. Conformal coatings were achieved where post-treatments resulted in increased defect density as well as the extent of functionalization, as characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Using thermogravimetric analysis, it was determined that MWCNTs treated with pyrolytic carbon and plasma functionalization prior to ALD coating were more stable to thermal oxidation than pristine ALD coated samples. Functionalized and ALD coated arrays had a compressive modulus more than two times higher than a pristine array coated for the same number of cycles. Cross-sectional energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed that Al2O3 could be uniformly deposited through the entire thickness of the vertically aligned MWCNT array by manipulating sample orientation and mounting techniques. Following the ALD coating, the MWCNT arrays demonstrated hydrophilic wetting behavior and also exhibited foam-like recovery following compressive strain.

  11. GO-induced assembly of gelatin toward stacked layer-like porous carbon for advanced supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Jiao, Yanqing; Sun, Li; Wang, Lei; Wu, Aiping; Yan, Haijing; Meng, Meichen; Tian, Chungui; Jiang, Baojiang; Fu, Honggang

    2016-01-01

    Layer-like nanocarbons with high surface area and good conductivity are promising materials for supercapacitors due to their good ability for effective charge-transfer and mass-transfer. In this paper, stacked layer-like porous carbon containing RGO (reduced graphene oxides) (LPCG) was constructed via the GO-induced assembly of gelatin followed by carbonization and activation processes. Under suitable conditions, LPCG-based materials with a thickness of about 100 nm and a high specific surface area (up to 1476 m2 g-1) could be obtained. In the materials, the closed combination of RGO and porous carbon can be observed, which is favourable for the development of the synergistic effects of both components. The presence of GO can not only enhance the conductivity of LPCG-based materials, but also is essential for the formation of a thin carbon sheet with a stacked structure. Otherwise, the plate-like, non-stacked carbon with a thickness of about 500 nm could be formed in the absence of RGO. The porous structure along with the presence of RGO allows rapid charge-transfer and easy access and diffusion of electrolyte ions. As a result, the materials exhibited a high discharge specific capacitance (455 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1, 366 F g-1 at 1 A g-1), good rate capability (221 F g-1 at density 30 A g-1) and good cycling stability. In aqueous electrolytes, the energy density could be up to 9.32 W h kg-1 at a relatively low power density of 500 W kg-1 with a good cycling stability (>96% over 5000 cycles). It was found that (1) the rational combination of RGO and porous carbon is essential for enhancing the capacitance performance and improving the cycling stability and (2) the high conductivity is favorable for improving the rate performance of the materials. The LPCG-based materials have extensive potential for practical applications in energy storage and conversion devices.Layer-like nanocarbons with high surface area and good conductivity are promising materials for

  12. Mesoscopic modeling of cancer photothermal therapy using single-walled carbon nanotubes and near infrared radiation: insights through an off-lattice Monte Carlo approach.

    PubMed

    Gong, Feng; Hongyan, Zhang; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V; Bui, Khoa; Lim, Christina; Duong, Hai M

    2014-05-23

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are promising heating agents in cancer photothermal therapy when under near infrared radiation, yet few efforts have been focused on the quantitative understanding of the photothermal energy conversion in biological systems. In this article, a mesoscopic study that takes into account SWNT morphologies (diameter and aspect ratio) and dispersions (orientation and concentration), as well as thermal boundary resistance, is performed by means of an off-lattice Monte Carlo simulation. Results indicate that SWNTs with orientation perpendicular to the laser, smaller diameter and better dispersion have higher heating efficiency in cancer photothermal therapy. Thermal boundary resistances greatly inhibit thermal energy transfer away from SWNTs, thereby affecting their heating efficiency. Through appropriate interfacial modification around SWNTs, compared to the surrounding healthy tissue, a higher temperature of the cancer cell can be achieved, resulting in more effective cancer photothermal therapy. These findings promise to bridge the gap between macroscopic and microscopic computational studies of cancer photothermal therapy.

  13. Transparent actuators and robots based on single-layer superaligned carbon nanotube sheet and polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Luzhuo; Weng, Mingcen; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Zhiwei; Zhou, Yi; Xia, Dan; Li, Jiaxin; Huang, Zhigao; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan

    2016-03-01

    Transparent actuators have been attracting emerging interest recently, as they demonstrate potential applications in the fields of invisible robots, tactical displays, variable-focus lenses, and flexible cellular phones. However, previous technologies did not simultaneously realize macroscopic transparent actuators with advantages of large-shape deformation, low-voltage-driven actuation and fast fabrication. Here, we develop a fast approach to fabricate a high-performance transparent actuator based on single-layer superaligned carbon nanotube sheet and polymer composites. Various advantages of single-layer nanotube sheets including high transparency, considerable conductivity, and ultra-thin dimensions together with selected polymer materials completely realize all the above required advantages. Also, this is the first time that a single-layer nanotube sheet has been used to fabricate actuators with high transparency, avoiding the structural damage to the single-layer nanotube sheet. The transparent actuator shows a transmittance of 72% at the wavelength of 550 nm and bends remarkably with a curvature of 0.41 cm-1 under a DC voltage for 5 s, demonstrating a significant advance in technological performances compared to previous conventional actuators. To illustrate their great potential usage, a transparent wiper and a humanoid robot ``hand'' were elaborately designed and fabricated, which initiate a new direction in the development of high-performance invisible robotics and other intelligent applications with transparency.Transparent actuators have been attracting emerging interest recently, as they demonstrate potential applications in the fields of invisible robots, tactical displays, variable-focus lenses, and flexible cellular phones. However, previous technologies did not simultaneously realize macroscopic transparent actuators with advantages of large-shape deformation, low-voltage-driven actuation and fast fabrication. Here, we develop a fast approach to

  14. Size distribution of carbon layer planes in biochar from different plant type of feedstock with different heating temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guan-Yang; Ikeya, Kosuke; Watanabe, Akira

    2016-11-01

    Biochar application to soil is a strategy to decelerate the increase in the atmospheric carbon concentration. The composition of condensed aromatic clusters appears to be an important determinant of the degradation rate of char in soil. The objective of the present study was to determine the size distribution of carbon layer planes in biochars produced from different types of feedstock (a broadleaf and a coniferous tree and two herbs) using different heating treatment temperatures (HTT; 400 °C-800 °C) using X-ray diffraction 11 band profile analysis. (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance with the phase-adjusted spinning side bands of the chars indicated different spectral features depending on the HTT and similar carbon composition among the plant types at each HTT. Both the content and composition of carbon layer planes in biochar produced using the same HTT were also similar among the plant types. The carbon layer plane size in the 400 °C and 600 °C chars was distributed from 0.24 to 1.68 or 1.92 nm (corresponding to 37 or 52 rings) with the mean size of 0.79-0.92 and 0.80-1.14 nm, respectively. The carbon layer planes in the 800 °C chars ranged from 0.72-0.96 nm (7-14 rings) to 2.64-3.60 nm (91-169 rings) and the mean values were 1.47-1.89 nm. The relative carbon layer plane content in the 600 °C and 800 °C chars was typically 2 and 3 times that in the 400 °C chars. These results indicate the progression of the formation and/or the size development of graphite-like structures, suggesting that a char produced at a higher HTT would have better carbon sequestrating characteristics.

  15. Control of gene transfer on a DNA-fibronectin-apatite composite layer by the incorporation of carbonate and fluoride ions.

    PubMed

    Yazaki, Yushin; Oyane, Ayako; Sogo, Yu; Ito, Atsuo; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Tsurushima, Hideo

    2011-07-01

    Gene transfer techniques are useful tools for controlling cell behavior, such as proliferation and differentiation. We have recently developed an efficient area-specific gene transfer system using a DNA-fibronectin-apatite composite layer (DF-Ap layer). In this system, partial dissolution of the composite layer is likely to be a crucial step for gene transfer. In the present study, layer solubility was adjusted by incorporating various contents of carbonate or fluoride ions into the DF-Ap layer via ionic substitution for the apatite crystals. Carbonate ion incorporation increased the solubility of the DF-Ap layer, thereby increasing the efficiency of gene transfer on the layer. In contrast, the incorporation of fluoride ions decreased the solubility of the DF-Ap layer, thereby decreasing the efficiency and delaying the timing of gene transfer on the layer dose-dependently. The present gene transfer system with controllable efficiency and timing would be useful in tissue engineering applications because cell differentiation can be induced effectively by regulating appropriate gene expression with suitable timing.

  16. Layered double hydroxide materials coated carbon electrode: New challenge to future electrochemical power devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djebbi, Mohamed Amine; Braiek, Mohamed; Namour, Philippe; Ben Haj Amara, Abdesslem; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole

    2016-11-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) have been widely used in the past years due to their unique physicochemical properties and promising applications in electroanalytical chemistry. The present paper is going to focus exclusively on magnesium-aluminum and zinc-aluminum layered double hydroxides (MgAl & ZnAl LDHs) in order to investigate the property and structure of active cation sites located within the layer structure. The MgAl and ZnAl LDH nanosheets were prepared by the constant pH co-precipitation method and uniformly supported on carbon-based electrode materials to fabricate an LDH electrode. Characterization by powder x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed the LDH form and well-crystallized materials. Wetting surface properties (hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity) of both prepared LDHs were recorded by contact angle measurement show hydrophilic character and basic property. The electrochemical performance of these hybrid materials was investigated by mainly cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and chronoamperometry techniques to identify the oxidation/reduction processes at the electrode/electrolyte interface and the effect of the divalent metal cations in total reactivity. The hierarchy of the modified electrode proves that the electronic conductivity of the bulk material is considerably dependent on the divalent cation and affects the limiting parameter of the overall redox process. However, MgAl LDH shows better performance than ZnAl LDH, due to the presence of magnesium cations in the layers. Following the structural, morphological and electrochemical behavior studies of both synthesized LDHs, the prepared LDH modified electrodes were tested through microbial fuel cell configuration, revealing a remarkable, potential new pathway for high-performance and cost-effective electrode use in electrochemical power devices.

  17. Imaging Fourier transform spectroscopy of the boundary layer plume from laser irradiated polymers and carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, Roberto I.

    The high-energy laser (HEL) lethality community needs for enhanced laser weapons systems requires a better understanding of a wide variety of emerging threats. In order to reduce the dimensionality of laser-materials interaction it is necessary to develop novel predictive capabilities of these events. The objective is to better understand the fundamentals of laser lethality testing by developing empirical models from hyperspectral imagery, enabling a robust library of experiments for vulnerability assessments. Emissive plumes from laser irradiated fiberglass reinforced polymers (FRP), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and porous graphite targets were investigated primarily using a mid-wave infrared (MWIR) imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). Polymer and graphite targets were irradiated with a continuous wave (cw) fiber lasers. Data was acquired with a spectral resolution of 2 cm-1 and spatial resolution as high as 0.52 mm2 per pixel. Strong emission from H2O, CO, CO2 and hydrocarbons were observed in the MWIR between 1900-4000 cm-1. A single-layer radiative transfer model was developed to estimate spatial maps of temperature and column densities of CO and CO2 from the hyperspectral imagery of the boundary layer plume. The spectral model was used to compute the absorption cross sections of CO and CO2, using spectral line parameters from the high temperature extension of the HITRAN. Also, spatial maps of gas-phase temperature and methyl methacrylate (MMA) concentration were developed from laser irradiated carbon black-pigmented PMMA at irradiances of 4-22 W/cm2. Global kinetics interplay between heterogeneous and homogeneous combustion kinetics are shown from experimental observations at high spatial resolutions. Overall the boundary layer profile at steady-state is consistent with CO being mainly produced at the surface by heterogeneous reactions followed by a rapid homogeneous combustion in the boundary layer towards buoyancy.

  18. Revisiting the Rectifier: New Observations of Covariance Between Terrestrial Carbon Cycling and Boundary Layer Depth (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denning, S.; McGrath-Spangler, E. L.

    2013-12-01

    Covariance between land-surface carbon fluxes and vertical mixing in the atmosphere is among the strongest determinants of the spatial distribution of atmospheric CO2 in the lower troposphere. Differences in the magnitude of this "CO2 rectifier effect" among different tracer transport models has been shown to explain most of the variability in estimates of terrestrial carbon sinks over the northern (vs tropical) continents. We present a new analysis of the magnitude of the CO2 rectifier using a climatology of PBL depth estimated using vertical profiles of LIDAR backscatter from the CALIPSO satellite. Millions of separate soundings of PBL depth were matched with hourly estimates of photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration from the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB3) at the same locations and times over more than 6 years. Strong covariance between net carbon flux and atmospheric mixing were observed over the northern continents, especially over Boreal Asia. Negative covariance is observed over monsoon regions, which is especially strong over India. Covariance of net carbon flux with the reciprocal of PBL depth has the units of CO2 tendency (ppm per month), and can be expressed as rectifier forcing. Satellite sampling of this quantity reveals spatially-coherent patterns as strong as +/- 10 ppm per month over Siberia and India. We computed rectifier forcing with NASA's Modern Era Reanalysis (MERRA) for the same locations and times sampled by CALIPSO from 2006-2012. Comparison of the MERRA and CALIPSO data reveal that the spatial patterns and magnitudes are similar over the northern continents, but much weaker in MERRA than CALIPSO over the tropics. Using MERRA to compute the rectifier effect for SiB fluxes in GEOS-Chem allows us to establish a quantitative relationship between rectifier forcing and response that is evaluated against the CALIPSO boundary layer data. We propose a framework for model intercomparison and evaluation that can leverage the rich new data set.

  19. Carbon and Nitrogen Storage in Aboveground Biomass and Organic Layer in Natural Larix Stands in Eastern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibuya, M.; Saito, H.; Sawamoto, T.; Hatano, R.; Yajima, T.; Takahashi, K.; Cha, J.; Isaev, A.; Maximov, T.

    2002-12-01

    To evaluate the carbon storage capacity of natural Larix stands in eastern Siberia, aboveground biomass, carbon and nitrogen storage in the biomass and organic layer of soil, and net primary production (NPP) were estimated in relation to stand age. Stands studied were from young to mature growth stage. The aboveground biomass and carbon storage in the biomass increased sigmoidally with stand age. The asymptotes of the biomass and carbon storage were 104 t\\ha-1 and 52 tC\\ha-1, respectively. The carbon storage capacity of the aboveground biomass was considered not to be small depending on the long period during which a large biomass close to the asymptote is retained, while the annual increment of the biomass is small. Also, carbon sink efficiency of the biomass changed with stand age. NPP of the stands was small comparing with those of temperate and boreal stands. Estimated net ecosystem production was positive even in a mature stand. Siberian Larix stands studied were carbon sink irrespective of stand age. The carbon storage in organic layer of soil accounted for 80-100 % of that in the aboveground biomass and was a significant carbon sink. Nitrogen was considered as a limited nutrient for the production of the stands from its allocation pattern to aboveground tree organs and storage pattern in soil. Furthermore, the decomposition rate of litter was small and affects the accumulation of organic materials.

  20. Four-Dimensional Lung Treatment Planning in Layer-Stacking Carbon Ion Beam Treatment: Comparison of Layer-Stacking and Conventional Ungated/Gated Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Shinichiro; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Asakura, Hiroshi; Sharp, Gregory C.; Kumagai, Motoki; Dobashi, Suguru; Nakajima, Mio; Yamamoto, Naoyoshi; Kandatsu, Susumu; Baba, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: We compared four-dimensional (4D) layer-stacking and conventional carbon ion beam distribution in the treatment of lung cancer between ungated and gated respiratory strategies using 4DCT data sets. Methods and Materials: Twenty lung patients underwent 4DCT imaging under free-breathing conditions. Using planning target volumes (PTVs) at respective respiratory phases, two types of compensating bolus were designed, a full single respiratory cycle for the ungated strategy and an approximately 30% duty cycle for the exhalation-gated strategy. Beams were delivered to the PTVs for the ungated and gated strategies, PTV(ungated) and PTV(gated), respectively, which were calculated by combining the respective PTV(Tn)s by layer-stacking and conventional irradiation. Carbon ion beam dose distribution was calculated as a function of respiratory phase by applying a compensating bolus to 4DCT. Accumulated dose distributions were calculated by applying deformable registration. Results: With the ungated strategy, accumulated dose distributions were satisfactorily provided to the PTV, with D95 values for layer-stacking and conventional irradiation of 94.0% and 96.2%, respectively. V20 for the lung and Dmax for the spinal cord were lower with layer-stacking than with conventional irradiation, whereas Dmax for the skin (14.1 GyE) was significantly lower (21.9 GyE). In addition, dose conformation to the GTV/PTV with layer-stacking irradiation was better with the gated than with the ungated strategy. Conclusions: Gated layer-stacking irradiation allows the delivery of a carbon ion beam to a moving target without significant degradation of dose conformity or the development of hot spots.

  1. Layer-by-layer assembly of TiO2 nanowire/carbon nanotube films and characterization of their photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darányi, Mária; Csesznok, Tamás; Kukovecz, Ákos; Kónya, Zoltán; Kiricsi, Imre; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Vajtai, Robert

    2011-05-01

    We report on the layer-by-layer (LbL) formation of TiO2-MWNT-TiO2 coatings on quartz with either trititanate derived TiO2 nanowires or Degussa P25 as the photocatalytically active material. The optimized deposition sequence is discussed in detail and the morphology of the prepared coatings is analyzed by SEM and XRD. The heterogeneous photocatalytic performance of the coatings was tested in the methyl orange oxidation reaction. The apparent first order rate constant fell in the 0.01-0.20 h - 1 range over a 2.5 × 2.5 cm2 film depending on the type and the thickness of the titanate coating. Building a multiwall carbon nanotube layer into the middle of the layer improved the photocatalytic activity for each material for all of the studied thicknesses. P25 based films performed 2-5 times better than TiO2 nanowire films; however, the pores in the P25 based films were largely blocked because the isotropic P25 nanoparticles form closely packed layers by themselves and even more so with the comparably sized multiwall carbon nanotubes. Therefore, films derived from titanate nanowires appear to be more suitable for use as multifunctional, photocatalytically active filtration media.

  2. Sorption of uranium from carbonate solutions by thin-layer sorbents based on titanium hydroxoperoxide and activated carbon, and the elution of uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Prishchepo, R.S.; Betenekov, N.D.; Pershko, A.A.; Vasilevskii, V.A.

    1986-05-01

    This paper studies the sorption of uranium from carbonate solutions and the elution of uranium under static conditions, on thin-layer inorganic sorbents obtained by homogeneous precipitation of titanium hydroperoxide on SKT activated carbon. The exchange capacity of the sorbents for uranium has been determined in relation to the quantity of titanium in the film, the sorbent particle size, and the contact time. Conditions have been selected for the elution.

  3. Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, K. J.; Jeong, T. S.; Youn, C. J.

    2014-09-01

    The temperature-dependent photoresponse characteristics of MnAl2S4 layers have been investigated, for the first time, by use of photocurrent (PC) spectroscopy. Three peaks were observed at all temperatures. The electronic origin of these peaks was associated with band-to-band transitions from the valence-band states Γ4( z), Γ5( x), and Γ5( y) to the conduction-band state Γ1( s). On the basis of the relationship between PC-peak energy and temperature, the optical band gap could be well expressed by the expression E g( T) = E g(0) - 2.80 × 10-4 T 2/(287 + T), where E g(0) was estimated to be 3.7920 eV, 3.7955 eV, and 3.8354 eV for the valence-band states Γ4( z), Γ5( x), and Γ5( y), respectively. Results from PC spectroscopy revealed the crystal-field and spin-orbit splitting were 3.5 meV and 39.9 meV. The gradual decrease of PC intensity with decreasing temperature can be explained on the basis of trapping centers associated with native defects in the MnAl2S4 layers. Plots of log J ph, the PC current density, against 1/ T, revealed a dominant trap level in the high-temperature region. By comparing PC and the Hall effect results, we confirmed that this trap level is a shallow donor 18.9 meV below the conduction band.

  4. Impedance analysis of porous carbon electrodes to predict rate capability of electric double-layer capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Hyun Deog; Jang, Jong Hyun; Ryu, Ji Heon; Park, Yuwon; Oh, Seung M.

    2014-12-01

    Electrochemical impedance analysis is performed to predict the rate capability of two commercial activated carbon electrodes (RP20 and MSP20) for electric double-layer capacitor. To this end, ac impedance data are fitted with an equivalent circuit that comprises ohmic resistance and impedance of intra-particle pores. To characterize the latter, ionic accessibility into intra-particle pores is profiled by using the fitted impedance parameters, and the profiles are transformed into utilizable capacitance plots as a function of charge-discharge rate. The rate capability that is predicted from the impedance analysis is well-matched with that observed from a charge-discharge rate test. It is found that rate capability is determined by ionic accessibility as well as ohmic voltage drop. A lower value in ionic accessibility for MSP20 is attributed to smaller pore diameter, longer length, and higher degree of complexity in pore structure.

  5. Electrochemical double layer capacitor electrodes using aligned carbon nanotubes grown directly on metals.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rakesh; Zhang, Xianfeng; Talapatra, Saikat

    2009-09-30

    We report on the fabrication of electrochemical double layer capacitor (EDLC) electrodes with aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown directly on conductive substrates using an air assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. The fabricated EDLCs showed very small equivalent series resistances (approximately few hundreds of mOmega), a direct consequence of integrating CNTs with metal current collectors. The specific capacitance of the CNTs used for EDLC electrodes increased with decreasing CNT lengths and ranged from 10.75 F g(-1) to 21.57 F g(-1) with maximum energy and power density ranging from 2.3 to 5.4 Wh kg(-1) and 19.6 to 35.4 kW kg(-1), respectively. These results indicate that the integrated CNT electrodes fabricated using a simple single step process hold significant promise in applications related to electrochemical energy storage. PMID:19726841

  6. Modified Separator Using Thin Carbon Layer Obtained from Its Cathode for Advanced Lithium Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Naiqiang; Huang, Bicheng; Wang, Weikun; Shao, Hongyuan; Li, Chengming; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Anbang; Yuan, Keguo; Huang, Yaqin

    2016-06-29

    The realization of a practical lithium sulfur battery system, despite its high theoretical specific capacity, is severely limited by fast capacity decay, which is mainly attributed to polysulfide dissolution and shuttle effect. To address this issue, we designed a thin cathode inactive material interlayer modified separator to block polysulfides. There are two advantages for this strategy. First, the coating material totally comes from the cathode, thus avoids the additional weights involved. Second, the cathode inactive material modified separator improve the reversible capacity and cycle performance by combining gelatin to chemically bond polysulfides and the carbon layer to physically block polysulfides. The research results confirm that with the cathode inactive material modified separator, the batteries retain a reversible capacity of 644 mAh g(-1) after 150 cycles, showing a low capacity decay of about 0.11% per circle at the rate of 0.5C. PMID:27267483

  7. Carbon-Nanotube-Based Electrochemical Double-Layer Capacitor Technologies for Spaceflight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, S.; Fireman, H.; Huffman, C.; Maloney, P.; Nikolaev, P.; Yowell, L.; Kim, K.; Kohl, P. A.; Higgins, C. D.; Turano, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors, or supercapacitors, have tremendous potential as high-power energy sources for use in low-weight hybrid systems for space exploration. Electrodes based on single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) offer exceptional power and energy performance due to the high surface area, high conductivity, and the ability to functionalize the SWCNTs to optimize capacitor properties. This paper will report on the preparation of electrochemical capacitors incorporating SWCNT electrodes and their performance compared with existing commercial technology. Preliminary results indicate that substantial increases in power and energy density are possible. The effects of nanotube growth and processing methods on electrochemical capacitor performance is also presented. The compatibility of different SWCNTs and electrolytes was studied by varying the type of electrolyte ions that accumulate on the high-surface-area electrodes.

  8. Electric Double Layer Capacitors with Carbon Nanotubes Electrodes and Gel Polymer/polyacid Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanping; Pan, Likun; Gao, Yang; Zhang, Zhejuan; Sun, Zhuo

    Electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs) with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) film electrodes and gel polymer/polyacid electrolytes have been demonstrated. The low-cost CNTs film is directly grown on Cu-Ni current collector by low pressure and low temperature thermal chemical vapor deposition. The electrolytes consist of gel polymer poly(vinyl alcohol), polyacid phosphomolybdic acid (PMA) with different concentrations from 10 to 40 wt.% and KCl. The electrochemical measurement of the EDLCs by cyclic voltammetry and chronopotentiometry shows that gel polymer/polyacid electrolytes can work stable at a wide potential range of -1.5 to 1.5 V and EDLCs with electrolytes containing 30 wt.% PMA exhibit optimum capacitive behavior with 8.09 F/g specific capacitance.

  9. Field emission properties of hybrid few-layer graphene-carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei Qi, Jun; Zhang, Fu; Xia Zhang, Li; Cao, Jian; Cai Feng, Ji

    2014-04-01

    Few-layer graphene (FLG) and carbon nanotube (CNT) hybrid is prepared by in situ growth of FLG on the walls of CNTs, using PECVD, without catalyst. The amount and size of FLG can be controlled by total gas pressure and growth time. The field emission (FE) characteristics of CNTs coated with different-density FLG were studied, and an FE phenomenon schematic and electrostatic field equipotential model of these FLG-CNTs were proposed. These results show that the geometrical morphology of FLG plays an important role in the FE property of hybrid FLG-CNTs. The medium-density FLG on the CNTs exhibits excellent FE properties, with a low turn-on electric field and threshold field, as well as large field enhancement factor, which are much better than those of the as-grown CNTs. The excellent FE properties of the FLG-CNT hybrids make them promising candidates for high-performance FE emitters.

  10. Ultralow loading Pt nanocatalysts prepared by atomic layer deposition on carbon aerogels.

    PubMed

    King, Jeffrey S; Wittstock, Arne; Biener, Juergen; Kucheyev, Sergei O; Wang, Yinmin M; Baumann, Theodore F; Giri, Sandeep K; Hamza, Alex V; Baeumer, Marcus; Bent, Stacey F

    2008-08-01

    Using atomic layer deposition (ALD), we show that Pt nanoparticles can be deposited on the inner surfaces of carbon aerogels (CA). The resultant Pt-loaded materials exhibit high catalytic activity for the oxidation of CO even at loading levels as low as approximately 0.05 mg Pt/cm2. We observe a conversion efficiency of nearly 100% in the 150-250 degrees C temperatures range, and the total conversion rate seems to be limited only by the thermal stability of the CA support in ambient oxygen. The ALD approach described here is universal in nature, and can be applied to the design of new catalytic materials for a variety of applications, including fuel cells, hydrogen storage, pollution control, green chemistry, and liquid fuel production.

  11. Effect of π-π+ stacking on the layering of ionic liquids confined to an amorphous carbon surface.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiao; Kozbial, Andrew; Rose, Franck; Li, Lei

    2015-04-01

    In the current paper, AFM studies were conducted on nanometer-thick ionic liquids (ILs) confined to an amorphous carbon (AC) surface, which is critical to the design of the next-generation media lubricant for hard disk drives (HDDs). The results indicated that the existence of the delocalized ring in the cation is critical to layering of ILs. Extended layering was observed only when there is imidazolium ring in the cation. When the imidazolium ring is replaced by an aliphatic moiety, "drop-on-layer" (dewetting) structure was observed. On the basis of the experimental results, we proposed that π-π+ stacking between sp(2) carbon in the AC and the imidazolium cation in the ILs is the key to the extended layering of ILs at the ILs/AC interface. PMID:25808335

  12. Multifunctional Nitrogen-Doped Loofah Sponge Carbon Blocking Layer for High-Performance Rechargeable Lithium Batteries.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xingxing; Tong, Chuan-Jia; Rehman, Sarish; Liu, Li-Min; Hou, Yanglong; Zhang, Shanqing

    2016-06-29

    Low-cost, long-life, and high-performance lithium batteries not only provide an economically viable power source to electric vehicles and smart electricity grids but also address the issues of the energy shortage and environmental sustainability. Herein, low-cost, hierarchically porous, and nitrogen-doped loofah sponge carbon (N-LSC) derived from the loofah sponge has been synthesized via a simple calcining process and then applied as a multifunctional blocking layer for Li-S, Li-Se, and Li-I2 batteries. As a result of the ultrahigh specific area (2551.06 m(2) g(-1)), high porosity (1.75 cm(3) g(-1)), high conductivity (1170 S m(-1)), and heteroatoms doping of N-LSC, the resultant Li-S, Li-Se, and Li-I2 batteries with the N-LSC-900 membrane deliver outstanding electrochemical performance stability in all cases, i.e., high reversible capacities of 623.6 mA h g(-1) at 1675 mA g(-1) after 500 cycles, 350 mA h g(-1) at 1356 mA g(-1) after 1000 cycles, and 150 mA h g(-1) at 10550 mA g(-1) after 5000 cycles, respectively. The successful application to Li-S, Li-Se, and Li-I2 batteries suggests that loofa sponge carbon could play a vital role in modern rechargeable battery industries as a universal, cost-effective, environmentally friendly, and high-performance blocking layer. PMID:27250732

  13. Increasing carbon inventory of the intermediate layers of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericson, Ylva; Ulfsbo, Adam; van Heuven, Steven; Kattner, Gerhard; Anderson, Leif G.

    2014-04-01

    Concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA), nutrients, and oxygen in subsurface waters of the central Arctic Ocean have been investigated for conceivable time trends over the last two decades. Data from six cruises (1991-2011) that cover the Nansen, Amundsen, and Makarov Basins were included in this analysis. In waters deeper than 2000 m, no statistically significant trend could be observed for DIC, TA, phosphate, or nitrate, but a small rate of increase in apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) was noticeable. For the individual stations, differences in concentration of each property were computed between the mean concentrations in the Arctic Atlantic Water (AAW) or the upper Polar Deep Water (uPDW), i.e., between about 150 and 1400 m depth, and in the deep water (assumed invariable over time). In these shallower water layers, we observe significant above-zero time trends for DIC, in the range of 0.6-0.9 μmol kg-1 yr-1 (for AAW) and 0.4-0.6 µmol kg-1 yr-1 (for uPDW). No time trend in nutrients could be observed, indicating no change in the rate of organic matter mineralization within this depth range. Consequently, the buildup of DIC is attributed to increasing concentrations of anthropogenic carbon in the waters flowing into these depth layers of the Arctic Ocean. The resulting rate of increase of the column inventory of anthropogenic CO2 is estimated to be between 0.6 and 0.9 mol C m-2 yr-1, with distinct differences between basins.

  14. Multifunctional Nitrogen-Doped Loofah Sponge Carbon Blocking Layer for High-Performance Rechargeable Lithium Batteries.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xingxing; Tong, Chuan-Jia; Rehman, Sarish; Liu, Li-Min; Hou, Yanglong; Zhang, Shanqing

    2016-06-29

    Low-cost, long-life, and high-performance lithium batteries not only provide an economically viable power source to electric vehicles and smart electricity grids but also address the issues of the energy shortage and environmental sustainability. Herein, low-cost, hierarchically porous, and nitrogen-doped loofah sponge carbon (N-LSC) derived from the loofah sponge has been synthesized via a simple calcining process and then applied as a multifunctional blocking layer for Li-S, Li-Se, and Li-I2 batteries. As a result of the ultrahigh specific area (2551.06 m(2) g(-1)), high porosity (1.75 cm(3) g(-1)), high conductivity (1170 S m(-1)), and heteroatoms doping of N-LSC, the resultant Li-S, Li-Se, and Li-I2 batteries with the N-LSC-900 membrane deliver outstanding electrochemical performance stability in all cases, i.e., high reversible capacities of 623.6 mA h g(-1) at 1675 mA g(-1) after 500 cycles, 350 mA h g(-1) at 1356 mA g(-1) after 1000 cycles, and 150 mA h g(-1) at 10550 mA g(-1) after 5000 cycles, respectively. The successful application to Li-S, Li-Se, and Li-I2 batteries suggests that loofa sponge carbon could play a vital role in modern rechargeable battery industries as a universal, cost-effective, environmentally friendly, and high-performance blocking layer.

  15. In situ synthesis carbonated hydroxyapatite layers on enamel slices with acidic amino acids by a novel two-step method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Xu; Li, Yi; Yang, Tao; Yan, Xiujuan; Wang, Ke

    2015-09-01

    In situ fabrication of carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) remineralization layer on an enamel slice was completed in a novel, biomimetic two-step method. First, a CaCO3 layer was synthesized on the surface of demineralized enamel using an acidic amino acid (aspartic acid or glutamate acid) as a soft template. Second, at the same concentration of the acidic amino acid, rod-like carbonated hydroxyapatite was produced with the CaCO3 layer as a sacrificial template and a reactant. The morphology, crystallinity and other physicochemical properties of the crystals were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), respectively. Acidic amino acid could promote the uniform deposition of hydroxyapatite with rod-like crystals via absorption of phosphate and carbonate ions from the reaction solution. Moreover, compared with hydroxyapatite crystals coated on the enamel when synthesized by a one-step method, the CaCO3 coating that was synthesized in the first step acted as an active bridge layer and sacrificial template. It played a vital role in orienting the artificial coating layer through the template effect. The results show that the rod-like carbonated hydroxyapatite crystals grow into bundles, which are similar in size and appearance to prisms in human enamel, when using the two-step method with either aspartic acid or acidic glutamate (20.00 mmol/L).

  16. Bimodal Latex Effect on Spin-Coated Thin Conductive Polymer-Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Layers.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Mohammad-Amin; Larrakoetxea Angoitia, Katalin; van Berkel, Stefan; Gnanasekaran, Karthikeyan; Friedrich, Heiner; Heuts, Johan P A; van der Schoot, Paul; van Herk, Alex M

    2015-11-10

    We synthesize two differently sized poly(methyl methacrylate-co-tert-butyl acrylate) latexes by emulsion polymerization and mix these with a sonicated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) dispersion, in order to prepare 3% SWCNT composite mixtures. We spin-coat these mixtures at various spin-speed rates and spin times over a glass substrate, producing a thin, transparent, solid, conductive layer. Keeping the amount of SWCNTs constant, we vary the weight fraction of our smaller 30-nm latex particles relative to the larger 70-nm-sized ones. We find a maximum in the electrical conductivity up to 370 S/m as a function of the weight fraction of smaller particles, depending on the overall solid content, the spin speed, and the spin time. This maximum occurs at 3-5% of the smaller latex particles. We also find a more than 2-fold increase in conductivity parallel to the radius of spin-coating than perpendicular to it. Atomic force microscopy points at the existence of lanes of latex particles in the spin-coated thin layer, while large-area transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that the SWCNTs are aligned over a grid fixed on the glass substrate during the spin-coating process. We extract the conductivity distribution on the surface of the thin film and translate this into the direction of the SWCNTs in it. PMID:26491888

  17. Bimodal Latex Effect on Spin-Coated Thin Conductive Polymer-Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Layers.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Mohammad-Amin; Larrakoetxea Angoitia, Katalin; van Berkel, Stefan; Gnanasekaran, Karthikeyan; Friedrich, Heiner; Heuts, Johan P A; van der Schoot, Paul; van Herk, Alex M

    2015-11-10

    We synthesize two differently sized poly(methyl methacrylate-co-tert-butyl acrylate) latexes by emulsion polymerization and mix these with a sonicated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) dispersion, in order to prepare 3% SWCNT composite mixtures. We spin-coat these mixtures at various spin-speed rates and spin times over a glass substrate, producing a thin, transparent, solid, conductive layer. Keeping the amount of SWCNTs constant, we vary the weight fraction of our smaller 30-nm latex particles relative to the larger 70-nm-sized ones. We find a maximum in the electrical conductivity up to 370 S/m as a function of the weight fraction of smaller particles, depending on the overall solid content, the spin speed, and the spin time. This maximum occurs at 3-5% of the smaller latex particles. We also find a more than 2-fold increase in conductivity parallel to the radius of spin-coating than perpendicular to it. Atomic force microscopy points at the existence of lanes of latex particles in the spin-coated thin layer, while large-area transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that the SWCNTs are aligned over a grid fixed on the glass substrate during the spin-coating process. We extract the conductivity distribution on the surface of the thin film and translate this into the direction of the SWCNTs in it.

  18. Determinants of carbon release from the active layer and permafrost deposits on the Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Leiyi; Liang, Junyi; Qin, Shuqi; Liu, Li; Fang, Kai; Xu, Yunping; Ding, Jinzhi; Li, Fei; Luo, Yiqi; Yang, Yuanhe

    2016-01-01

    The sign and magnitude of permafrost carbon (C)-climate feedback are highly uncertain due to the limited understanding of the decomposability of thawing permafrost and relevant mechanistic controls over C release. Here, by combining aerobic incubation with biomarker analysis and a three-pool model, we reveal that C quality (represented by a higher amount of fast cycling C but a lower amount of recalcitrant C compounds) and normalized CO2–C release in permafrost deposits were similar or even higher than those in the active layer, demonstrating a high vulnerability of C in Tibetan upland permafrost. We also illustrate that C quality exerts the most control over CO2–C release from the active layer, whereas soil microbial abundance is more directly associated with CO2–C release after permafrost thaw. Taken together, our findings highlight the importance of incorporating microbial properties into Earth System Models when predicting permafrost C dynamics under a changing environment. PMID:27703168

  19. Controlled release based on the dissolution of a calcium carbonate layer deposited on hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Ogomi, Daisuke; Serizawa, Takeshi; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2005-03-21

    It is possible that inorganic materials conjugated to suitable organic materials may induce unique mechanical, optical and other functional properties. Therefore, artificial conjugation of organic and inorganic components is attractive for preparing novel functional materials. Recently, we developed an alternate soaking process for calcium salt formation on/in polymer materials. In this study, a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel-calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) composite was prepared by the aforementioned process as a controlled release support. Brilliant blue FCF (Mw = 794), FITC labeled BSA (Mw = 6.6 x 10(4)), FITC labeled dextran-10 k (Mw = 9.5 x 10(3)) and FITC labeled dextran-40 k (Mw = 4.3 x 10(4)) were loaded into the composite as model drugs. CaCO(3) dissolution and model drug release rates increased with a decrease in buffer pH. In addition, model drug release rates increased with a decrease in model drug molecular weight. These results show that CaCO(3) layers on hydrogels behave as capping layers for model drug release; the release rate of model drugs can be controlled by the dissolution rate of CaCO(3) and the molecular weight of the drug.

  20. Inkjet printing of carbon supported platinum 3-D catalyst layers for use in fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, André D.; Kim, Edward Y.; Humes, Virgil P.; Kizuka, Jeremy; Thompson, Levi T.

    We present a method of using inkjet printing (IJP) to deposit catalyst materials onto gas diffusion layers (GDLs) that are made into membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) for polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEMFC). Existing ink deposition methods such as spray painting or screen printing are not well suited for ultra low (<0.5 mg Pt cm -2) loadings. The IJP method can be used to deposit smaller volumes of water based catalyst ink solutions with picoliter precision provided the solution properties are compatible with the cartridge design. By optimizing the dispersion of the ink solution we have shown that this technique can be successfully used with catalysts supported on different carbon black (i.e. XC-72R, Monarch 700, Black Pearls 2000, etc.). Our ink jet printed MEAs with catalyst loadings of 0.020 mg Pt cm -2 have shown Pt utilizations in excess of 16,000 mW mg -1 Pt which is higher than our traditional screen printed MEAs (800 mW mg -1 Pt). As a further demonstration of IJP versatility, we present results of a graded distribution of Pt/C catalyst structure using standard Johnson Matthey (JM) catalyst. Compared to a continuous catalyst layer of JM Pt/C (20% Pt), the graded catalyst structure showed enhanced performance.

  1. Aligned Carbon Nanotube Array Functionalization for Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition of Platinum Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dameron, A. A.; Pylypenko, S.; Bult, J. B.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Bochert, C.; Leong, G. J.; Frisco, S. L.; Simpson, L.; Dinh, H. N.; Pivovar, B.

    2012-04-15

    Uniform metal deposition onto high surface area supports is a key challenge of developing successful efficient catalyst materials. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) circumvents permeation difficulties, but relies on gas-surface reactions to initiate growth. Our work demonstrates that modified surfaces within vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays, from plasma and molecular precursor treatments, can lead to improved catalyst deposition. Gas phase functionalization influences the number of ALD nucleation sites and the onset of ALD growth and, in turn, affects the uniformity of the coating along the length of the CNTs within the aligned arrays. The induced chemical changes for each functionalization route are identified by X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. The most effective functionalization routes increase the prevalence of oxygen moieties at defect sites on the carbon surfaces. The striking effects of the functionalization are demonstrated with ALD Pt growth as a function of surface treatment and ALD cycles examined by electron microscopy of the arrays and the individual CNTs. Finally, we demonstrate applicability of these materials as fuel cell electrocatalysts and show that surface functionalization affects their performance towards oxygen reduction reaction.

  2. One-step synthesis of hierarchically porous carbons for high-performance electric double layer supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Jun; Su, Hai; Liu, Fangyan; Yang, Weiqing

    2016-05-01

    With plenty of unique porous structure at micro-/nano scale, hierarchically porous carbons (HPCs) are promising for usage in advanced electric double layer supercapacitors (EDLCs) as the electrode materials. However, wide-range adoption of HPC for practical application is largely shadowed by its extremely complex synthesis process with considerably low production efficiency. Herein we reported a simple template-free, one-step sintering method, to massively produce the HPCs for high-performance EDLCs. Resorting to the 3D structure modification of the wide pore size distribution, high surface area of HPCs (up to 3000 m2 g-1) was achieved. By using 1 M Na2SO4 as electrolyte, the as-fabricated HPCs based EDLCs can be operated reversibly over a wide voltage window of 1.6 V with superior specific capacitance of 240 F g-1 under a current density of 0.5 A g-1. In the meanwhile, the EDLCs exhibit excellent rate capability (high power density of 16 kW kg-1 at 10.2 Wh kg-1) and long-term cycling stability with 9% loss of its initial capacitance after 2000 cycles. This output performance distinguished itself among most of the carbon-based EDLCs with neutral aqueous electrolyte. Thus, the template-free one-step sintering method produced HPCs for EDLCs represents a new approach for high-performance energy storage.

  3. Energetics of order-disorder in layered magnesium aluminum double hydroxides with interlayer carbonate.

    PubMed

    Shivaramaiah, Radha; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-04-01

    Laboratory synthesis of layered double hydroxides (LDH) often results in materials replete with stacking faults. Faults are known to affect several properties including sorption, electrochemical, and catalytic activity of this important class of materials. Understanding the occurrence of faults thus calls for a comprehensive analysis of formation and stability of ordered and faulted LDHs. High-temperature oxide melt solution calorimetric measurements made on an ordered and a faulted Mg-Al LDH with carbonate interlayer anion shows that ordered LDH is energetically more stable than the faulted one by ∼6 kJ/mol. The stacking faults are an intergrowth of 3R1 and 2H1 polytypes, and faults could thus mediate transformation of 3R1 to 2H1 polytypes. Several factors including pH and temperature of precipitation also affect layer stacking. The formation of stacking faults could therefore have its origin in kinetics. Water content in the interlayer also affects layer stacking, and hence it may affect properties of LDH. Improved understanding of the distribution of water molecules in LDH is also crucial in an environmental context, as LDH occur as minerals and are important for contaminant amelioration in the environment. Water adsorption calorimetry on dehydrated LDH shows a continuous decrease in the magnitude of adsorption enthalpy with increasing coverage, indicating the presence of energetically heterogeneous sites where the water molecules reside. The results also indicate that the energy of several sites where the water molecules may reside (whether in the interlayer or on the surface) overlaps, and hence it is hard to differentiate among them. PMID:25750986

  4. Identification and characterisation of a calcium carbonate-binding protein, blue mussel shell protein (BMSP), from the nacreous layer.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Michio; Iwashima, Ai; Tsutsui, Naoaki; Ohira, Tsuyoshi; Kogure, Toshihiro; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2011-11-01

    The nacreous layer of molluscan shells consists of a highly organised, layered structure comprising calcium carbonate aragonite crystals, each surrounded by an organic matrix. In the Japanese pearl oyster Pinctada fucata, the Pif protein from the nacreous layer functions in aragonite binding, and plays a key role in nacre formation. Here, we investigated whether the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis also has a protein with similar functions in the nacreous layer. By using a calcium carbonate-binding assay, we identified the novel protein blue mussel shell protein (BMSP) 100 that can bind calcium carbonate crystals of both aragonite and calcite. When the entire sequence of a cDNA encoding BMSP 100 was determined, it was found that BMSP is a preproprotein consisting of a signal peptide and two proteins, BMSP 120 and BMSP 100. BMSP 120 contains four von Willebrand factor A (VWA) domains and one chitin-binding domain, thus suggesting that it has a role in maintaining structure within the matrix. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that BMSP 100 is present throughout the nacreous layer with dense localisation in the myostracum. Posttranslational modification analysis indicated that BMSP 100 is phosphorylated and glycosylated. These results suggest that there is a common molecular mechanism between P. fucata and M. galloprovincialis that underlies the nacreous layer formation.

  5. Surface modification of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes by ozone via atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lushington, Andrew; Liu, Jian; Tang, Yongji; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang

    2014-01-15

    The use of ozone as an oxidizing agent for atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes is rapidly growing due to its strong oxidizing capabilities. However, the effect of ozone on nanostructured substrates such as nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) and pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PCNTs) are not very well understood and may provide an avenue toward functionalizing the carbon nanotube surface prior to deposition. The effects of ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs and PCNTs using 10 wt. % ozone at temperatures of 150, 250, and 300 °C are studied. The effect of ozone pulse time and ALD cycle number on NCNTs and PCNTs was also investigated. Morphological changes to the substrate were observed by scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurements were also conducted to determine surface area, pore size, and pore size distribution following ozone treatment. The graphitic nature of both NCNTs and PCNTs was determined using Raman analysis while x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to probe the chemical nature of NCNTs. It was found that O{sub 3} attack occurs preferentially to the outermost geometric surface of NCNTs. Our research also revealed that the deleterious effects of ozone are found only on NCNTs while little or no damage occurs on PCNTs. Furthermore, XPS analysis indicated that ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs, at elevated temperatures, results in loss of nitrogen content. Our studies demonstrate that ALD ozone treatment is an effective avenue toward creating low nitrogen content, defect rich substrates for use in electrochemical applications and ALD of various metal/metal oxides.

  6. Characterization and organic electric-double-layer-capacitor application of KOH activated coal-tar-pitch-based carbons: Effect of carbonization temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Poo Reum; Lee, Eunji; Kwon, Soon Hyung; Jung, Ji Chul; Kim, Myung-Soo

    2015-12-01

    The present study reports the influence of pre-carbonization on the properties of KOH-activated coal tar pitch (CTP). The change of crystallinity and pore structure of pre-carbonized CTPs as well as their activated carbons (ACs) as function of pre-carbonization temperature are investigated. The crystallinity of pre-carbonized CTPs increases with increasing the carbonization temperature up to 600 °C, but a disorder occurs during the carbonization around 700 °C and an order happens gradually with increasing the carbonization temperatures in range of 800-1000 °C. The CTPs pre-carbonized at high temperatures are more difficult to be activated with KOH than those pre-carbonized at low temperatures due to the increase of micro-crystalline size and the decrease of surface functional groups. The micro-pores and meso-pores are well developed at around 1.0 nm and 2.4 nm, respectively, as the ACs are pre-carbonized at temperatures of 500-600 °C, exhibiting high specific capacitances as electrode materials for electric double layer capacitor (EDLC). Although the specific surface area (SSA) and pore volume of ACs pre-carbonized at temperatures of 900-1000 °C are extraordinary low (non-porous) as compared to those of AC pre-carbonized at 600 °C, their specific capacitances are comparable to each other. The large specific capacitances with low SSA ACs can be attributed to the structural change resulting from the electrochemical activation during the 1st charge above 2.0 V.

  7. Method and apparatus for detecting the presence and thickness of carbon and oxide layers on EUV reflective surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Malinowski, Michael E.

    2005-01-25

    The characteristics of radiation that is reflected from carbon deposits and oxidation formations on highly reflective surfaces such as Mo/Si mirrors can be quantified and employed to detect and measure the presence of such impurities on optics. Specifically, it has been shown that carbon deposits on a Mo/Si multilayer mirror decreases the intensity of reflected HeNe laser (632.8 nm) light. In contrast, oxide layers formed on the mirror should cause an increase in HeNe power reflection. Both static measurements and real-time monitoring of carbon and oxide surface impurities on optical elements in lithography tools should be achievable.

  8. Evidence of double layer/capacitive charging in carbon nanomaterial-based solid contact polymeric ion-selective electrodes.

    PubMed

    Cuartero, Maria; Bishop, Josiah; Walker, Raymart; Acres, Robert G; Bakker, Eric; De Marco, Roland; Crespo, Gaston A

    2016-08-11

    This paper presents the first direct spectroscopic evidence for double layer or capacitive charging of carbon nanomaterial-based solid contacts in all-solid-state polymeric ion-selective electrodes (ISEs). Here, we used synchrotron radiation-X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-XPS) and SR valence band (VB) spectroscopy in the elucidation of the charging mechanism of the SCs.

  9. Black carbon concentrations and sources in the marine boundary layer of the tropical Atlantic Ocean using four methodologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combustion-derived aerosols in the marine boundary layer have been poorly studied, especially in remote environments such as the open Atlantic Ocean. The tropical Atlantic has the potential to contain a high concentration of aerosols, such as black carbon, due to the African emis...

  10. Sulfur-infiltrated graphene-based layered porous carbon cathodes for high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Fan; Huang, Yi; Chen, Yongsheng

    2014-05-27

    Because of advantages such as excellent electronic conductivity, high theoretical specific surface area, and good mechanical flexibility, graphene is receiving increasing attention as an additive to improve the conductivity of sulfur cathodes in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. However, graphene is not an effective substrate material to confine the polysulfides in cathodes and stable the cycling. Here, we designed and synthesized a graphene-based layered porous carbon material for the impregnation of sulfur as cathode for Li-S battery. In this composite, a thin layer of porous carbon uniformly covers both surfaces of the graphene and sulfur is highly dispersed in its pores. The high specific surface area and pore volume of the porous carbon layers not only can achieve a high sulfur loading in highly dispersed amorphous state, but also can act as polysulfide reservoirs to alleviate the shuttle effect. When used as the cathode material in Li-S batteries, with the help of the thin porous carbon layers, the as-prepared materials demonstrate a better electrochemical performance and cycle stability compared with those of graphene/sulfur composites.

  11. Effect of Carbon in the Dielectric Fluid and Workpieces on the Characteristics of Recast Layers Machined by Electrical Discharge Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muttamara, Apiwat; Kanchanomai, Chaosuan

    2016-06-01

    Electrical discharge machining (EDM) is a popular non-traditional machining technique that is usually performed in kerosene. Carbon from the kerosene is mixed into the recast layer during EDM, increasing its hardness. EDM can be performed in deionized water, which causes decarburization. We studied the effects of carbon in the dielectric fluid and workpiece on the characteristics of recast layers. Experiments were conducted using gray cast iron and mild steel workpieces in deionized water or kerosene under identical operating conditions. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the recast layer formed on gray iron was rougher than that produced on mild steel. Moreover, the dispersion of graphite flakes in the gray iron seemed to cause subsurface cracks, even when EDM was performed in deionized water. Dendritic structures and iron carbides were found in the recast layer of gray iron treated in deionized water. Kerosene caused more microcracks to form and increased surface roughness compared with deionized water. The microcrack length per unit area of mild steel treated in deionized water was greater than that treated in kerosene, but the cracks formed in kerosene were wider. The effect of the diffusion of carbon during cooling on the characteristics of the recast layer was discussed.

  12. A two-step etching route to ultrathin carbon nanosheets for high performance electrical double layer capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Bing; Wang, Jie; Wang, Ya; Chang, Zhi; Pang, Gang; Dou, Hui; Zhang, Xiaogang

    2016-05-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) carbon materials have attracted intense research interest for electrical double layer capacitors (EDLCs) due to their high aspect ratio and large surface area. Herein, we propose an exfoliation-chlorination route for preparing ultrathin carbon nanosheets by using ternary layered carbide Ti3AlC2 as the precursor. Due to the large intersheet space of exfoliated layered carbide (MXene), the as-prepared carbon nanosheets exhibit a thickness of 3-4 nm and a large specific surface area of 1766 m2 g-1 with hierarchical porosity. These features significantly improve the ion-accessible surface area for charge storage and shorten the ion transport length in the thin dimension. As a result, the carbon nanosheets show a high specific capacitance (220 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1), remarkable high power capability (79% capacitance retention at 20 A g-1) when measured in a symmetrical two-electrode configuration in an aqueous electrolyte. The method described in this work provides a new route to prepare 2D electrode materials from a bulk precursor, thus exploiting their full potential for EDLCs.Two-dimensional (2D) carbon materials have attracted intense research interest for electrical double layer capacitors (EDLCs) due to their high aspect ratio and large surface area. Herein, we propose an exfoliation-chlorination route for preparing ultrathin carbon nanosheets by using ternary layered carbide Ti3AlC2 as the precursor. Due to the large intersheet space of exfoliated layered carbide (MXene), the as-prepared carbon nanosheets exhibit a thickness of 3-4 nm and a large specific surface area of 1766 m2 g-1 with hierarchical porosity. These features significantly improve the ion-accessible surface area for charge storage and shorten the ion transport length in the thin dimension. As a result, the carbon nanosheets show a high specific capacitance (220 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1), remarkable high power capability (79% capacitance retention at 20 A g-1) when measured in a

  13. Removal of Metal-Oxide Layers Formed on Stainless and Carbon Steel Surfaces by Excimer Laser Irradiation in Various Atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Kameo, Yutaka; Nakashima, Mikio; Hirabayashi, Takakuni

    2002-02-15

    To apply the laser ablation technique for decontamination of metal wastes contaminated with radioactive nuclides, the effect of irradiation atmospheres on removal of oxide layers on steel surfaces by laser ablation was studied. Based on the assumption that the absorption of laser light follows the Lambert-Beer law, ablation parameters, such as absorption length and threshold fluence for ablation, of sintered Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and stainless and carbon steels were measured in He, O{sub 2}, Kr, or SF{sub 6} atmospheres. The results indicated that SF{sub 6} was the most effective gas of all irradiation atmospheres studied for the exclusive removal of oxide layers formed on stainless and carbon steel samples in high-temperature pressurized water. Secondary ion mass spectroscopic measurement and scanning electron microscopic observation confirmed that no oxide layer existed on the steel samples after the exclusive removal with laser irradiation.

  14. Effect of layers of carbon-nanotube-patterned substrate on GaN-based light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Liang; Wei, Tongbo; Sun, Yuanping; Zhang, Yonghui; Xiong, Zhuo; Zhen, Aigong; Wang, Junxi; Wei, Yang; Li, Jinmin

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the high-performance GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on sapphire substrates, fabricated by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), were demonstrated. The different layers of a CNT-patterned sapphire substrate (CNPSS) grown by an optimized growth process were discussed. Results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the threading dislocations to be suppressed, thus the crystal quality of the GaN film was improved by introducing the carbon nanotube films. The LEDs with a CNPSS exhibited lower reverse-bias current and divergent angle, and larger enhancement of the light output power (LOP) compared with the conventional LEDs. With the increase in the number of layers of CNTs, the CNPSS-LED exhibited better crystal quality and photoelectric property, but more layers of CNTs also absorbed more light. There is a trade-off between the crystalline quality of the LED and light absorption.

  15. Gas diffusion layers coated with a microporous layer containing hydrophilic carbon nanotubes for performance enhancement of polymer electrolyte fuel cells under both low and high humidity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitahara, Tatsumi; Nakajima, Hironori; Okamura, Kosuke

    2015-06-01

    Gas diffusion layers (GDLs) coated with a hydrophobic microporous layer (MPL) composed of carbon black and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) have been commonly used to improve the water management characteristics of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). However, the hydrophobic MPL coated GDL designed to prevent dehydration of the membrane under low humidity conditions is generally inferior at reducing flooding under high humidity conditions. It is therefore important to develop a robust MPL coated GDL that can enhance the PEFC performance regardless of the humidity conditions. In the present study, a GDL coated with an MPL containing hydrophilic carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was developed. The less hydrophobic pores incorporating CNTs are effective at conserving the membrane humidity under low humidity conditions. The MPL with CNTs is also effective at expelling excess water from the catalyst layer while maintaining oxygen flow pathways from the GDL substrate, allowing the mean flow pore diameter to be decreased to 2 μm without reducing the ability of the MPL to prevent flooding under high humidity conditions. An MPL coated GDL with a CNT content of 4 mass% exhibits significantly higher performance under both low and high humidity conditions than a hydrophobic MPL coated GDL.

  16. A SnO2-samarium doped ceria additional anode layer in a direct carbon fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Baolong; Zhao, Yicheng; Li, Yongdan

    2016-02-01

    The role of a SnO2-samarium doped ceria (SDC) additional anode layer in a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) with SDC-(Li0.67Na0.33)2CO3 composite electrolyte and lithiated NiO-SDC-(Li0.67Na0.33)2CO3 composite cathode is investigated and compared with a NiO-SDC extra anode layer. Catalytic grown carbon fiber mixed with (Li0.67Na0.33)2CO3 is used as a fuel. At 750 °C, the maximum power outputs of 192 and 143 mW cm-2 are obtained by the cells with SnO2-SDC and NiO-SDC layers, respectively. In the SnO2-SDC layer, the reduction of SnO2 and the oxidation of Sn happen simultaneously during the cell operation, and the Sn/SnO2 redox cycle provides an additional route for fuel conversion. The formation of an insulating dense interlayer between the anode and electrolyte layers, which usually happens in DCFCs with metal anodes, is avoided in the cell with the SnO2-SDC layer, and the stability of the cell is improved consequently.

  17. Nitrogen-doped Fe/Fe3C@graphitic layer/carbon nanotube hybrids derived from MOFs: efficient bifunctional electrocatalysts for ORR and OER.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji-Sen; Li, Shun-Li; Tang, Yu-Jia; Han, Min; Dai, Zhi-Hui; Bao, Jian-Chun; Lan, Ya-Qian

    2015-02-14

    A novel nitrogen-doped Fe/Fe3C@graphitic layer/carbon nanotube hybrid derived from MOFs has been first fabricated by a facile approach. The hybrid exhibited outstanding bifunctional electrocatalytic activity for ORR and OER, due to the merits of graphitic layer/carbon nanotube structures with highly active N and Fe/Fe3C sites.

  18. Determination of nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios from transition layer emission lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1992-01-01

    We have finished studying the nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios for stars with different effective temperatures T(sub eff) and luminosities using transition layer emission lines and using spectra available in the IUE archives. The N/C abundance ratio determinations using transition layer emission lines are as accurate as the photospheric abundance determinations as found by comparison of results obtained by both methods for the same stars. Our measurements confirm photospheric abundance determinations in regions of the HR diagram where they can be obtained. Our studies have extended the temperature range to higher temperatures. They have shown the exact positions in the HR diagram where the mixing due to the outer convection zones reaches deep enough to bring nuclear processed material to the surface. This occurs at effective temperatures which are higher by delta log T(sub eff) approximately 0.04 or roughly 400 K than expected theoretically. Since the depth of the convection zone increases rapidly with decreasing T(sub eff) this may indicate considerable overshoot beyond the lower boundary of the convection zone. Our N/C abundance ratio determinations from transition layer emission lines have confirmed that the actual enrichment observed for some cool giants is larger than expected theoretically, again indicating a larger degree of mixing in several stars either from below or from above. For the supergiants it probably indicates overshoot above the convective core in the progenitor main sequence stars. For the more massive giants this may also be the case, though we did not find a correlation between delta log N/C and the absolute magnitudes, but these are rather uncertain. As byproducts of these studies we also found anomalies in Si/C and N/C abundance ratios for F giants which can be understood as the relict of surface abundance changes for their main sequence progenitors due to diffusion. This anomaly disappears for G giants, for which the depths of the

  19. Carbon corrosion of proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalyst layers studied by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchcock, Adam P.; Berejnov, Viatcheslav; Lee, Vincent; West, Marcia; Colbow, Vesna; Dutta, Monica; Wessel, Silvia

    2014-11-01

    Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) at the C 1s, F 1s and S 2p edges has been used to investigate degradation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEM-FC) membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) subjected to accelerated testing protocols. Quantitative chemical maps of the catalyst, carbon support and ionomer in the cathode layer are reported for beginning-of-test (BOT), and end-of-test (EOT) samples for two types of carbon support, low surface area carbon (LSAC) and medium surface area carbon (MSAC), that were exposed to accelerated stress testing with upper potentials (UPL) of 1.0, 1.2, and 1.3 V. The results are compared in order to characterize catalyst layer degradation in terms of the amounts and spatial distributions of these species. Pt agglomeration, Pt migration and corrosion of the carbon support are all visualized, and contribute to differing degrees in these samples. It is found that there is formation of a distinct Pt-in-membrane (PTIM) band for all EOT samples. The cathode thickness shrinks due to loss of the carbon support for all MSAC samples that were exposed to the different upper potentials, but only for the most aggressive testing protocol for the LSAC support. The amount of ionomer per unit volume significantly increases indicating it is being concentrated in the cathode as the carbon corrosion takes place. S 2p spectra and mapping of the cathode catalyst layer indicates there are still sulfonate groups present, even in the most damaged material.

  20. Size distribution of carbon layer planes in biochar from different plant type of feedstock with different heating temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guan-Yang; Ikeya, Kosuke; Watanabe, Akira

    2016-11-01

    Biochar application to soil is a strategy to decelerate the increase in the atmospheric carbon concentration. The composition of condensed aromatic clusters appears to be an important determinant of the degradation rate of char in soil. The objective of the present study was to determine the size distribution of carbon layer planes in biochars produced from different types of feedstock (a broadleaf and a coniferous tree and two herbs) using different heating treatment temperatures (HTT; 400 °C-800 °C) using X-ray diffraction 11 band profile analysis. (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance with the phase-adjusted spinning side bands of the chars indicated different spectral features depending on the HTT and similar carbon composition among the plant types at each HTT. Both the content and composition of carbon layer planes in biochar produced using the same HTT were also similar among the plant types. The carbon layer plane size in the 400 °C and 600 °C chars was distributed from 0.24 to 1.68 or 1.92 nm (corresponding to 37 or 52 rings) with the mean size of 0.79-0.92 and 0.80-1.14 nm, respectively. The carbon layer planes in the 800 °C chars ranged from 0.72-0.96 nm (7-14 rings) to 2.64-3.60 nm (91-169 rings) and the mean values were 1.47-1.89 nm. The relative carbon layer plane content in the 600 °C and 800 °C chars was typically 2 and 3 times that in the 400 °C chars. These results indicate the progression of the formation and/or the size development of graphite-like structures, suggesting that a char produced at a higher HTT would have better carbon sequestrating characteristics. PMID:27537403

  1. High-capacity electric double-layer capacitor with high-density-activated carbon fiber electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Shudo, Atsushi; Miura, Kouichi

    2000-01-01

    Recently the authors have presented a method to prepare activated carbon fiber with high bulk density (HD-ACF) without using any binders. The possibility of using the HD-ACF as an electrode for electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) was examined in this paper. The capacitance of the EDLC with the HD-ACF electrode increased with the increase of bulk density of the HD-ACF, indicating that individual fibers are highly packed without losing their capacitance. The capacitance also increased in proportion to the size of the HD-ACF electrode. The initial discharge current of the EDLC showed little dependency on either the bulk density or the size of the HD-ACF electrode. These results clarified that the HD-ACF electrode is suitable for constructing a high-power EDLC. The initial discharge current was directly proportional to the conductivity of aqueous KCI used as the electrolyte, indicating that the resistance of the electrolyte is much higher than that of the HD-ACF electrode. This result showed that the efficiency of the HD-ACF was well above the efficiency of the electrolyte used in this study and that the improvement of the ionic conductivity of electrolyte is also necessary for developing a high-power EDLC.

  2. Hierarchical porous carbon derived from sulfonated pitch for electrical double layer capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yan; Shi, Zhi-qiang; Chen, Ming-ming; Wang, Cheng-yang

    2014-04-01

    Hierarchical porous carbon (HPC) has been synthesized using sulfonated pitch as a precursor with a simple KOH activation process. Sulfonated pitch has a high content of oxygen-containing groups which enable it to be easily wetted in KOH solution and facilitate the activation process. The effect of the activation agent to precursor ratio on the porosity and the specific surface area is studied by nitrogen adsorption-desorption. A maximum specific surface area of 3548 m2 g-1 is achieved with a KOH to sulfonated pitch ratio of 3 and this produces a structure with micro-, meso- and macropores. Among the various HPC samples, the sample prepared with an activation agent to precursor ratio of 1.5 exhibits the best electrochemical performance as an electrode in an electrical double layer capacitor (EDLC) in 6 M KOH electrolyte. Its gravimetric specific capacitance is 157 F g-1 at a current density of 100 A g-1 and it has a capacitance retention ratio of 98.4% even after 10,000 cycles. The sample also presents outstanding electrochemical performance in 1 M Li2SO4 and 1 M TEA BF4/PC electrolytes. Thus, HPC derived from sulfonated pitch is a promising electrode material for EDLCs.

  3. Impact of future nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide emissions on the stratospheric ozone layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; Douglass, Anne R.; Oman, Luke D.; Waugh, Darryn W.

    2015-03-01

    The atmospheric levels of human-produced chlorocarbons and bromocarbons are projected to make only small contributions to ozone depletion by 2100. Increases in carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) will become increasingly important in determining the future of the ozone layer. N2O increases lead to increased production of nitrogen oxides (NOx), contributing to ozone depletion. CO2 increases cool the stratosphere and affect ozone levels in several ways. Cooling decreases the rate of many photochemical reactions, thus slowing ozone loss rates. Cooling also increases the chemical destruction of nitrogen oxides, thereby moderating the effect of increased N2O on ozone depletion. The stratospheric ozone level projected for the end of this century therefore depends on future emissions of both CO2 and N2O. We use a two-dimensional chemical transport model to explore a wide range of values for the boundary conditions for CO2 and N2O, and find that all of the current scenarios for growth of greenhouse gases project the global average ozone to be larger in 2100 than in 1960.

  4. Single-Particle Black Carbon Aerosol Verticle Profiles From the Boundary Layer to the Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, J. P.; Gao, R. S.; Fahey, D. W.; Laurel, W. A.; Thomson, D. S.; Kok, G. L.; Baumgardner, D.; Wilson, J. C.; Lopez, J.; Aikin, K.; Jost, H.; Thompson, T. L.; Reeves, J. M.; Lowenstein, M.

    2005-12-01

    A single-particle soot photometer (SP2) was flown on a NASA WB-57F high-altitude research aircraft in November 2004 from Houston, TX. The SP2 uses laser-induced incandescence to directly measure the mass of individual black-carbon (BC) particles in the mass range of ~0.3-300 fg. Scattered light is used to size non-absorbing aerosols in the range of ~150 - 700 nm diameter. Data from two mid-latitude flights has been used to generate size distributions and profiles of both aerosol types from the boundary layer to the lower stratosphere. Results for scattering aerosol concentrations are in good agreement with typical particle spectrometer measurements in the same region. Mass mixing ratios of BC between 5 and 18.7 km were roughly an order of magnitude lower than typical values as reported with wire impactor measurements and as predicted by two global BC models. The impact of this discrepancy on estimates of direct radiative forcing of BC aerosol will also be discussed.

  5. Acoustic modes of finite length homogeneous and layered cylindrical shells: Single and multiwall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangyan; Lamberton, G. A.; Gladden, J. R.

    2008-08-01

    We present a numerical study of the normal modes of vibration of both homogeneous and heterogeneous finite length cylindrical shells of arbitrary wall thickness with applications toward single and multiwall carbon nanotubes in the continuum limit. The method is checked by comparison of computed and measured resonance spectra for a machined aluminum cylindrical shell. The dependence of the natural frequencies of various radial modes with the length and radius of single wall tubes is investigated and compared to atomistic models and Raman spectroscopy data. The radial dependence for the radial breathing mode and four harmonics of the squash mode are found to be well fitted by power laws and agree with analytical solutions in the thin wall limit. A general model for an elastically heterogeneous layered cylindrical shell is applied to multiwall tubes with graphene sheets and gaps between the sheets represented by two different materials. The frequency dependence on length and diameter is investigated for tubes composed of two to four concentric shells.

  6. Modulation of Field Electron Emission from Carbon Nanotubes by Double layer Charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhidov, Anvar

    2005-03-01

    Field emission from carbon nanotubes is well known phenomenon. In this work we present a novel method of modulating the current densities and threshold voltages. We studied field emission characteristics of HIPCO Single Walled Nanotube (SWNT) paper charged in NaCl electrolyte. The charge injection was by double layer electro chemical doping and it showed significant change in the threshold electric fields and the current densities. This was attributed mostly to a change in the work function and partially due to the change in the field enhancement factor beta. The turn on field (for 1microA of emission current) was seen to change from 1.04 V/micron to 0.82 V/micron for the negatively charged paper (Na ions) and similarly on the positively charged (Cl ions) it increased from 1.01 V/micron to 2.1 V/micron. Calculated values of the work function were compared with values from Kelvin Probe measurements. The work function values showed a significant decrease in the negatively charged samples and a sharp increase in the positively charged samples as compared to the uncharged ones. Experiments were repeated by varying the charging time from 2000 sec to 3 hrs with the current being kept constant.

  7. Sub-5 nm nanostructures fabricated by atomic layer deposition using a carbon nanotube template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Ju Yeon; Han, Hyo; Kim, Ji Weon; Lee, Seung-Mo; Ha, Jeong Sook; Shim, Joon Hyung; Han, Chang-Soo

    2016-07-01

    The fabrication of nanostructures having diameters of sub-5 nm is very a important issue for bottom-up nanofabrication of nanoscale devices. In this work, we report a highly controllable method to create sub-5 nm nano-trenches and nanowires by combining area-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as templates. Alumina nano-trenches having a depth of 2.6 ∼ 3.0 nm and SiO2 nano-trenches having a depth of 1.9 ∼ 2.2 nm fully guided by the SWNTs have been formed on SiO2/Si substrate. Through infilling ZnO material by ALD in alumina nano-trenches, well-defined ZnO nanowires having a thickness of 3.1 ∼ 3.3 nm have been fabricated. In order to improve the electrical properties of ZnO nanowires, as-fabricated ZnO nanowires by ALD were annealed at 350 °C in air for 60 min. As a result, we successfully demonstrated that as-synthesized ZnO nanowire using a specific template can be made for various high-density resistive components in the nanoelectronics industry.

  8. Determining water content in activated carbon for double-layer capacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egashira, Minato; Izumi, Takuma; Yoshimoto, Nobuko; Morita, Masayuki

    2016-09-01

    Karl-Fisher titration is used to estimate water contents in activated carbon and the distribution of impurity-level water in an activated carbon-solvent system. Normalization of the water content of activated carbon is attempted using vacuum drying after immersion in water was controlled. Although vacuum drying at 473 K and 24 h can remove large amounts of water, a substantial amount of water remains in the activated carbon. The water release to propylene carbonate is less than that to acetonitrile. The degradation of capacitor cell capacitance for activated carbon with some amount of water differs according to the electrolyte solvent type: acetonitrile promotes greater degradation than propylene carbonate does.

  9. Phase transitions and critical properties of the frustrated Heisenberg model on a layer triangular lattice with next-to-nearest-neighbor interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Murtazaev, A. K.; Ramazanov, M. K. Badiev, V. K.

    2012-08-15

    The critical behavior of the three-dimensional antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model with nearest-neighbor (J) and next-to-nearest-neighbor (J{sub 1}) interactions is studied by the replica Monte Carlo method. The first-order phase transition and pseudouniversal critical behavior of this model are established for a small lattice in the interval R = vertical bar J{sub 1}/J vertical bar = 0-0.115. A complete set of the main static magnetic and chiral critical indices is calculated in this interval using the finite-dimensional scaling theory.

  10. Structural modifications of graphyne layers consisting of carbon atoms in the sp- and sp{sup 2}-hybridized states

    SciTech Connect

    Belenkov, E. A.; Mavrinskii, V. V.; Belenkova, T. E.; Chernov, V. M.

    2015-05-15

    A model scheme is proposed for obtaining layered compounds consisting of carbon atoms in the sp- and (vnsp){sup 2}-hybridized states. This model is used to find the possibility of existing the following seven basic structural modifications of graphyne: α-, β1-, β2-, β3-, γ1-, γ2-, and γ3-graphyne. Polymorphic modifications β3 graphyne and γ3 graphyne are described. The basic structural modifications of graphyne contain diatomic polyyne chains and consist only of carbon atoms in two different crystallographically equivalent states. Other nonbasic structural modifications of graphyne can be formed via the elongation of the carbyne chains that connect three-coordinated carbon atoms and via the formation of graphyne layers with a mixed structure consisting of basic layer fragments, such as α-β-graphyne, α-γ-graphyne, and β-γ-graphyne. The semiempirical quantum-mechanical MNDO, AM1, and PM3 methods and ab initio STO6-31G basis calculations are used to find geometrically optimized structures of the basic graphyne layers, their structural parameters, and energies of their sublimation. The energy of sublimation is found to be maximal for γ2-graphyne, which should be the most stable structural modification of graphyne.

  11. Characteristics and analysis of 4H-SiC PiN diodes with a carbon-implanted drift layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiangmei, Feng; Huajun, Shen; Xiaohua, Ma; Yun, Bai; Jia, Wu; Chengzhan, Li; Kean, Liu; Xinyu, Liu

    2016-04-01

    The characteristics of 4H-SiC PiN diodes with a carbon-implanted drift layer was investigated and the reason of characteristics improvement was analyzed. The forward voltage drops of the diodes with carbon-implanted drift layer were around 3.3 V, which is lower than that of devices without carbon implantation, the specific-on resistance was decreased from 9.35 to 4.38 mΩ·cm2 at 100 A/cm2, and the reverse leakage current was also decreased. The influence of carbon incorporation in the SiC crystalline grids was studied by using deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). The DLTS spectra revealed that the Z 1/2 traps, which were regarded as the main lifetime limiting defects, were dramatically reduced. It is proposed that the reduction of Z 1/2 traps can achieve longer carrier lifetime in the drift layer, which is beneficial to the performance of bipolar devices. Project supported by the Opening Project of Key Laboratory of Microelectronics Devices & Integrated Technology, Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  12. A two-step etching route to ultrathin carbon nanosheets for high performance electrical double layer capacitors.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bing; Wang, Jie; Wang, Ya; Chang, Zhi; Pang, Gang; Dou, Hui; Zhang, Xiaogang

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) carbon materials have attracted intense research interest for electrical double layer capacitors (EDLCs) due to their high aspect ratio and large surface area. Herein, we propose an exfoliation-chlorination route for preparing ultrathin carbon nanosheets by using ternary layered carbide Ti3AlC2 as the precursor. Due to the large intersheet space of exfoliated layered carbide (MXene), the as-prepared carbon nanosheets exhibit a thickness of 3-4 nm and a large specific surface area of 1766 m(2) g(-1) with hierarchical porosity. These features significantly improve the ion-accessible surface area for charge storage and shorten the ion transport length in the thin dimension. As a result, the carbon nanosheets show a high specific capacitance (220 F g(-1) at 0.5 A g(-1)), remarkable high power capability (79% capacitance retention at 20 A g(-1)) when measured in a symmetrical two-electrode configuration in an aqueous electrolyte. The method described in this work provides a new route to prepare 2D electrode materials from a bulk precursor, thus exploiting their full potential for EDLCs.

  13. A two-step etching route to ultrathin carbon nanosheets for high performance electrical double layer capacitors.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bing; Wang, Jie; Wang, Ya; Chang, Zhi; Pang, Gang; Dou, Hui; Zhang, Xiaogang

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) carbon materials have attracted intense research interest for electrical double layer capacitors (EDLCs) due to their high aspect ratio and large surface area. Herein, we propose an exfoliation-chlorination route for preparing ultrathin carbon nanosheets by using ternary layered carbide Ti3AlC2 as the precursor. Due to the large intersheet space of exfoliated layered carbide (MXene), the as-prepared carbon nanosheets exhibit a thickness of 3-4 nm and a large specific surface area of 1766 m(2) g(-1) with hierarchical porosity. These features significantly improve the ion-accessible surface area for charge storage and shorten the ion transport length in the thin dimension. As a result, the carbon nanosheets show a high specific capacitance (220 F g(-1) at 0.5 A g(-1)), remarkable high power capability (79% capacitance retention at 20 A g(-1)) when measured in a symmetrical two-electrode configuration in an aqueous electrolyte. The method described in this work provides a new route to prepare 2D electrode materials from a bulk precursor, thus exploiting their full potential for EDLCs. PMID:27181616

  14. Importance of carbon isotopic data of the Permian-Triassic boundary layers in the Verkhoyansk region for the global correlation of the basal Triassic layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Yu. D.; Biakov, A. S.; Richoz, S.; Horacek, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to a global correlation of marine Permian-Triassic boundary layers on the basis of partially published and original data on the δ13Corg and δ13Ccarb values of the Suol section (Setorym River, South Verkhoyansk region). The section consists of six carbon isotopic intervals, which are easily distinguishable in the carbon isotopic curves for a series of Permian-Triassic reference sections of Eurasia and Northern America, including paleontologically described sections of Central Iran, Kashmir, and Southern China. This suggests that the Permian-Triassic boundary in the Suol section is close to the carbon isotopic minimum of interval IV. In light of new data, we suggest considering the upper part of the Late Permian Changhsingian Stage and the lower substage of the Early Triassic Induan Stage of Siberia in the volumes of the rank Otoceras concavum zone and the Tompophiceras pascoei and Wordieoceras decipiens zones, respectively. The O. concavum zone of the Verkhoyansk region probably corresponds to the Late Changhsingian Hypophiceras triviale zone of Greenland. The carbon isotopic intervals II, III, IV, and V in the Permian-Triassic boundary layers of the Verkhoyansk region traced in a series of the reference sections of Eurasia correspond, most likely, to intensification of volcanic activity at the end of the Late Changhsingian and to the first massive eruptions of Siberian traps at the end of the Changhsingian and the beginning of the Induan Stages. New data indicate the possible survival of ammonoids of the Otoceratoidea superfamily at the species level after mass extinction of organisms at the end of the Permian.

  15. Equilibrium Lattice Relaxation and Misfit Dislocations in Step-Graded In x Ga1- x As/GaAs (001) and In x Al1- x As/GaAs (001) Metamorphic Buffer Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujofsa, Tedi; Ayers, John E.

    2016-06-01

    The inclusion of metamorphic buffer layers (MBLs) in the design of lattice-mismatched semiconductor heterostructures is important in enhancing reliability and performance of optoelectronic and electronic devices through proper control of threading dislocations; threading dislocation can be reduced by allowing the distribution of the misfit dislocations throughout the MBL, rather than concentrating them at the interface where substrate defects and tangling can pin dislocations or otherwise reduce their mobility. Compositionally graded layers have been particularly used for this purpose and in this work we considered heterostructures involving a step-graded In x Ga1- x As or In x Al1- x As epitaxial layer on a GaAs (001) substrate. For each structure type, we present minimum energy calculations including (i) the surface and (ii) average in-plane strain and (iii) the misfit dislocation density profile with various grading coefficients (thickness and indium composition variation). In both types of structures, the average in-plane strain and misfit dislocation density profile scale with the average grading coefficient, but In x Al1- x As structures with a greater average elastic stiffness constants exhibit slightly higher average compressive in-plane strain (absolute valued) which is associated with higher misfit dislocation densities. However, the rate of change in the normalized relaxation percentage per unit thickness of each step with respect to the lattice mismatch of the step is lower in the In x Al1- x As material system. The difference of the in-plane strain is small (<3%), however, so that these material systems are virtually interchangeable in terms of their mechanical behavior (<5.1% change in elastic constants).

  16. Room temperature performance of 4 V aqueous hybrid supercapacitor using multi-layered lithium-doped carbon negative electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Sho; Yamamoto, Rie; Sugimoto, Shigeyuki; Sugimoto, Wataru

    2016-09-01

    Water-stable multi-layered lithium-doped carbon (LixC6) negative electrode using poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-lithium bis(trifluoromethansulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) polymer electrolyte containing N-methyl-N-propylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethansulfonyl)imide (PP13TFSI) ionic liquid was developed. Electrochemical properties at 60 °C of the aqueous hybrid supercapacitor using activated carbon positive electrode and a multi-layered LixC6 negative electrode (LixC6 | PEO-LiTFSI | LTAP) without PP13TFSI exhibited performance similar to that using Li anode (Li | PEO-LiTFSI | LTAP). A drastic decrease in ESR was achieved by the addition of PP13TFSI to PEO-LiTFSI, allowing room temperature operation. The ESR of the multi-layered LixC6 negative electrode with PEO-LiTFSI-PP13TFSI at 25 °C was 801 Ω cm2, which is 1/6 the value of the multi-layered Li negative electrode with PEO-LiTFSI (5014 Ω cm2). Charge/discharge test of the aqueous hybrid supercapacitor using multi-layered LixC6 negative electrode with PEO-LiTFSI-PP13TFSI at 25 °C afforded specific capacity of 20.6 mAh (g-activated carbon)-1 with a working voltage of 2.7-3.7 V, and good long-term capability up to 3000 cycles. Furthermore, an aqueous hybrid supercapacitor consisting of a high capacitance RuO2 nanosheet positive electrode and multi-layered LixC6 negative electrode with PEO-LiTFSI-PP13TFSI showed specific capacity of 196 mAh (g-RuO2)-1 and specific energy of 625 Wh (kg-RuO2)-1 in 2.0 M acetic acid-lithium acetate buffered solution at 25 °C.

  17. Effect of Amount of Carbon on the Reduction Efficiency of Iron Ore-Coal Composite Pellets in Multi-layer Bed Rotary Hearth Furnace (RHF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Srinibash; Roy, Gour Gopal

    2016-08-01

    The effect of carbon-to-hematite molar ratio has been studied on the reduction efficiency of iron ore-coal composite pellet reduced at 1523 K (1250 °C) for 20 minutes in a laboratory scale multi-layer bed rotary hearth furnace (RHF). Reduced pellets have been characterized through weight loss measurement, estimation of porosity, shrinkage, qualitative and quantitative phase analysis by XRD. Performance parameters such as the degree of reduction, metallization, carbon efficiency, productivity, and compressive strength have been calculated to compare the process efficacy at different carbon levels in the pellets. Pellets with optimum carbon-to-hematite ratio (C/Fe2O3 molar ratio = 1.66) that is much below the stoichiometric carbon required for direct reduction of hematite yielded maximum reduction, better carbon utilization, and productivity for all three layers. Top layer exhibited maximum reduction at comparatively lower carbon level (C/Fe2O3 molar ratio <2.33) in the pellet, while bottom layer exceeded top layer reduction at higher carbon level (C/Fe2O3 molar ratio >2.33). Correlation between degree of reduction and metallization indicated non-isothermal kinetics influenced by heat and mass transfer in multi-layer bed RHF. Compressive strength of the partially reduced pellet with optimum carbon content (C/Fe2O3 molar ratio = 1.66) showed that they could be potentially used as an alternate feed in a blast furnace or any other smelting reactor.

  18. Carbon-tolerant solid oxide fuel cells using NiTiO3 as an anode internal reforming layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiquan; Wang, Zhenbin; Yang, Wenqiang; Peng, Ranran; Lu, Yalin

    2014-06-01

    In this work, adding a NiTiO3 (NTO) reforming layer is firstly adopted as a low cost method to improve the carbon tolerance in solid oxide fuel cells. XRD patterns suggest that NTO has a good chemical compatibility with the YSZ electrolyte, and NTO can be totally reduced to Ni and TiO2 when exposing to the H2 atmosphere. Maximum power densities for the cells with the NTO layers at 700 °C are 270 mWcm-2 with wet H2 fuel, and 236 mWcm-2 with wet methane fuel, respectively. Improved discharging stability for the cells with NTO layers has also been observed. The current density remains unchanged for the cells with NTO layers during a 26 h test, while it drops to zero within 1 h for the cells without NTO. Above electro-performance and long term stability tests suggest that fabricating a NTO reforming layer on the anode surface is an efficient and inexpensive method to realize highly carbon tolerant SOFCs.

  19. Deuterium Retention in the Co-Deposition Carbon Layers Deposited by Radio-Frequency Magnetron Sputtering in D2 Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei-Yuan; Shi, Li-Qun; Zhang, Bin; Hu, Jian-Sheng

    2014-05-01

    Carbon is deposited on C and Si substrates by rf magnetron plasma sputtering in a D2 atmosphere. The deposited layers are examined with ion beam analysis and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The growth rates of the layers deposited on Si decrease with increasing substrate temperature, while increase significantly with the increase of D2 pressure. Meanwhile, the deuterium concentrations in the layers deposited on the Si substrates decrease from 30% to 2% and from 31% to 1% on the C substrates, respectively, when the substrate temperature varies from 350K to 900 K. Similarly, the D concentration in the layer on the Si substrates increases from 3.4% to 47%, and from 8% to 35% on the C substrates when the D2 pressure increases from 0.3Pa to 8.0Pa. D desorption characterized by TDS is mainly in the forms of D2, HD, HDO, CD4, and C2D4, and a similar release peak occurs at 645 K. The release peak of D2 molecules at 960K can be attributed to the escaped gas from the thin co-deposited deuterium-rich carbon layer in the form of C-D bonding.

  20. Black carbon concentrations and sources in the marine boundary layer of the tropical Atlantic Ocean using four methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, K.; Cantwell, M.; Herckes, P.; Lohmann, R.

    2014-07-01

    Combustion-derived aerosols in the marine boundary layer have been poorly studied, especially in remote environments such as the open Atlantic Ocean. The tropical Atlantic has the potential to contain a high concentration of aerosols, such as black carbon, due to the African emission plume of biomass and agricultural burning products. Atmospheric particulate matter samples across the tropical Atlantic boundary layer were collected in the summer of 2010 during the southern hemispheric dry season when open fire events were frequent in Africa and South America. The highest black carbon concentrations were detected in the Caribbean Sea and within the African plume, with a regional average of 0.6 μg m-3 for both. The lowest average concentrations were measured off the coast of South America at 0.2 to 0.3 μg m-3. Samples were quantified for black carbon using multiple methods to provide insights into the form and stability of the carbonaceous aerosols (i.e., thermally unstable organic carbon, soot like, and charcoal like). Soot-like aerosols composed up to 45% of the carbonaceous aerosols in the Caribbean Sea to as little as 4% within the African plume. Charcoal-like aerosols composed up to 29% of the carbonaceous aerosols over the oligotrophic Sargasso Sea, suggesting that non-soot-like particles could be present in significant concentrations in remote environments. To better apportion concentrations and forms of black carbon, multiple detection methods should be used, particularly in regions impacted by biomass burning emissions.

  1. Acoustic characterization of void distributions across carbon-fiber composite layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayong, Rostand B.; Smith, Robert A.; Pinfield, Valerie J.

    2016-02-01

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) composites are often used as aircraft structural components, mostly due to their superior mechanical properties. In order to improve the efficiency of these structures, it is important to detect and characterize any defects occurring during the manufacturing process, removing the need to mitigate the risk of defects through increased thicknesses of structure. Such defects include porosity, which is well-known to reduce the mechanical performance of composite structures, particularly the inter-laminar shear strength. Previous work by the authors has considered the determination of porosity distributions in a fiber-metal laminate structure [1]. This paper investigates the use of wave-propagation modeling to invert the ultrasonic response and characterize the void distribution within the plies of a CFRP structure. Finite Element (FE) simulations are used to simulate the ultrasonic response of a porous composite laminate to a typical transducer signal. This simulated response is then applied as input data to an inversion method to calculate the distribution of porosity across the layers. The inversion method is a multi-dimensional optimization utilizing an analytical model based on a normal-incidence plane-wave recursive method and appropriate mixture rules to estimate the acoustical properties of the structure, including the effects of plies and porosity. The effect of porosity is defined through an effective wave-number obtained from a scattering model description. Although a single-scattering approach is applied in this initial study, the limitations of the method in terms of the considered porous layer, percentage porosity and void radius are discussed in relation to single- and multiple-scattering methods. A comparison between the properties of the modeled structure and the void distribution obtained from the inversion is discussed. This work supports the general study of the use of ultrasound methods with inversion to

  2. Deep soil layer is fundamental for evaluating carbon accumulation in agroecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Ferro, Nicola; Morari, Francesco; Simonetti, Gianluca; Polese, Riccardo; Berti, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is essential to secure key ecosystem services such as the provision of food and other biomass production, the filtering, buffering and transformation capacity and the climate regulation. It has been estimated that approximately 57% of the globally emitted C (8.7 Gt y-1) to the atmosphere is adsorbed by biospheric C pools, ascertaining the potential soil C sink capacity of managed ecosystems at 55 to 78 Gt, of which only 50 to 66% attainable. Therefore it is essential the full knowledge of soil management practices that can affect SOC dynamics and, in turn, climate change. Several studies focussed on the evaluation of the best cropping management practices to accumulate C in the soil profile. Nevertheless, in most cases soil analyses were made in the topsoil (generally in the 0-30 cm layer), ignoring the effect of C translocation in the deeper soil profile as a result of tillage practices, crop root deepening etc. In this context, in a long-term experiment established in the early 1960s, we quantified the SOC accumulation within the soil profile (0-90 cm) and evaluate the effects of different cropping system on SOC dynamics. The experiment is located at the experimental farm of the University of Padova, in northeastern Italy. The trial compares four rotations with three levels of mineral fertilisation and with or without organic fertilisation. The rotations considered are: continuous crops (grain maize, forage maize, winter wheat and permanent meadow); two-year (maize-wheat); four-year (sugarbeet, soybean, wheat, maize) and six-year (maize, sugarbeet, maize, wheat, alfalfa, alfalfa) with different levels of mineral, organic and mixed fertilisations. Crops with superficially developed rooting systems (e.g. permanent meadow) highly increased SOC only in the topsoil. This effect was enhanced by the contribution of organic amendment-C. Root-derived carbon played a pivotal role also in the deepest soil profile (60-90 cm) by increasing the SOC

  3. Stable carbon isotope ratios of toluene in the boundary layer and the lower free troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintel, J.; Hösen, E.; Koppmann, R.; Krebsbach, M.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Rohrer, F.

    2013-11-01

    During the field campaign ZEPTER-2 in autumn 2008 whole air samples were collected on board a Zeppelin NT airship in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and the lower free troposphere (LFT) over south-west Germany using the ZEppelin Based Isotope Sampler (ZEBIS). These samples were analysed with respect to volatile organic compound (VOC) mixing ratios and stable carbon isotope ratios using a gas chromatograph combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC-C-IRMS). In this study we present results for toluene, one of the major anthropogenic pollutants, which emphasise the viability of isotope ratio measurements in VOC for atmospheric research, especially to study VOC sources or to track both dynamical and chemical processes. In situ measurements of CO mixing ratios on board the Zeppelin NT were used to allocate the air samples either to the PBL or the LFT. In the PBL we observed rather fresh emissions mixing into the background air. We estimated a toluene source isotope ratio of δ13C = -28.2 ± 0.5‰. Samples from the PBL and the LFT were clearly distinguishable by means of their mixing ratio and isotope ratio signatures. Using the concept of the effective kinetic isotope effect, we were able to separate the effects of dilution processes and photochemical degradation in the free troposphere. We calculated the photochemical age of toluene in the atmosphere in two different ways using isotope ratios and mixing ratios. The results differ strongly in the PBL, probably due to mixing processes, but are compatible with each other in the LFT. Here, they correlate with a slope of 0.90±0.31.

  4. Layered double hydroxide-oxidized carbon nanotube hybrids as highly efficient flame retardant nanofillers for polypropylene

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanshan; Zhang, Yu; Williams, Gareth R.; O’Hare, Dermot; Wang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Aqueous miscible organic layered double hydroxides (AMO-LDHs) can act as organophilic inorganic flame retardant nanofillers for unmodified non-polar polymers. In this contribution, AMO [Mg3Al(OH)8](CO3)0.5·yH2O LDH–oxidized carbon nanotube (AMO-LDH–OCNT) hybrids are shown to perform better than the equivalent pure AMO-LDH. A synergistic effect between the AMO-LDH and OCNT was observed; this endows the hybrid material with enhanced flame retardancy, thermal stability, and mechanical properties. The thermal stability of polypropylene (PP) was significantly enhanced by adding AMO-LDH–OCNT hybrids. For PP mixed with AMO-LDH–OCNT hybrids to produce a composite with 10 wt% LDH and 2 wt% OCNT, the 50% weight loss temperature was increased by 43 °C. Further, a system with 10 wt% of AMO-LDH and 1 wt% OCNT showed a peak heat release rate (PHRR) reduction of 40%, greater than the PHRR reduction with PP/20 wt% AMO-LDH (31%). The degree of dispersion (mixability) between AMO-LDH and OCNT has a significant effect on the flame retardant performance of the hybrids. In addition, the incorporation of AMO-LDH–OCNT hybrids led to better mechanical properties, such as higher tensile strength (27.5 MPa) and elongation at break (17.9%), than those composites containing only AMO-LDH (25.6 MPa and 7.5%, respectively). PMID:27752096

  5. 'Bucky gel' of multiwalled carbon nanotubes as electrodes for high performance, flexible electric double layer capacitors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manoj K; Kumar, Yogesh; Hashmi, S A

    2013-11-22

    We report the preparation of a gelled form of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with an ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methyl pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide (BMPTFSI)), referred to as 'bucky gel', to be used as binderless electrodes in electrical double layer capacitors (EDLCs). The characteristics of gelled MWCNTs are compared with pristine MWCNTs using transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and Raman studies. A gel polymer electrolyte film consisting of a blend of poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) and BMPTFSI, exhibiting a room temperature ionic conductivity of 1.5 × 10(-3) S cm(-1), shows its suitability as an electrolyte/separator in flexible EDLCs. The performance of EDLCs, assembled with bucky gel electrodes, using impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and charge-discharge analyses, are compared with those fabricated with pristine MWCNT-electrodes. An improvement in specific capacitance (from 19.6 to 51.3 F g(-1)) is noted when pristine MWCNTs are replaced by gelled MWCNT-binderless electrodes. Although the rate performance of the EDLCs with gelled MWCNT-electrodes is reduced, the pulse power of the device is sufficiently high (~10.5 kW kg(-1)). The gelled electrodes offer improvements in energy and power densities from 2.8 to 8.0 Wh kg(-1) and 2.0 to 4.7 kW kg(-1), respectively. Studies indicate that the gel formation of MWCNTs with ionic liquid is an excellent route to obtain high-performance EDLCs.

  6. Thinning segregated graphene layers on high carbon solubility substrates of rhodium foils by tuning the quenching process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mengxi; Zhang, Yanfeng; Chen, Yubin; Gao, Yabo; Gao, Teng; Ma, Donglin; Ji, Qingqing; Zhang, Yu; Li, Cong; Liu, Zhongfan

    2012-12-21

    We report the synthesis of large-scale uniform graphene films on high carbon solubility substrates of Rh foils for the first time using an ambient-pressure chemical vapor deposition method. We find that, by increasing the cooling rate in the growth process, the thickness of graphene can be tuned from multilayer to monolayer, resulting from the different segregation amount of carbon atoms from bulk to surface. The growth feature was characterized with scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectra, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy. We also find that bilayer or few-layer graphene prefers to stack deviating from the Bernal stacking geometry, with the formation of versatile moiré patterns. On the basis of these results, we put forward a segregation growth mechanism for graphene growth on Rh foils. Of particular importance, we propose that this randomly stacked few-layer graphene can be a model system for exploring some fantastic physical properties such as van Hove singularities.

  7. Fabrication of particular structures of hexagonal boron nitride and boron-carbon-nitrogen layers by anisotropic etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Sharma, Subash; Shinde, Sachin M.; Sharma, Kamal P.; Thangaraja, Amutha; Kalita, Golap; Tanemura, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    Anisotropic etching of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and boron-carbon-nitrogen (BCN) basal plane can be an exciting platform to develop well-defined structures with interesting properties. Here, we developed an etching process of atomically thin h-BN and BCN layers to fabricate nanoribbons (NRs) and other distinct structures by annealing in H2 and Ar gas mixture. BCN and h-BN films are grown on Cu foil by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using solid camphor and ammonia borane as carbon, nitrogen and boron source, respectively. Formation of micron size well-defined etched holes and NRs are obtained in both h-BN and BCN layers by the post growth annealing process. The etching process of h-BN and BCN basal plane to fabricate NRs and other structures with pronounced edges can open up new possibilities in 2D hybrid materials.

  8. Global Distribution of Total Inorganic Carbon and Total Alkalinity below the Deepest Winter Mixed Layer Depths

    SciTech Connect

    Goyet, C.; Healy, R.; Ryan, J.; Kozyr, A.

    2000-05-01

    Modeling the global ocean-atmosphere carbon dioxide system is becoming increasingly important to greenhouse gas policy. These models require initialization with realistic three-dimensional (3-D) oceanic carbon fields. This report presents an approach to establishing these initial conditions from an extensive global database of ocean carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) system measurements and well-developed interpolation methods.

  9. Controlled Zn-mediated grafting of thin layers of bipodal diazonium salt on gold and carbon substrates.

    PubMed

    Torréns, Mabel; Ortiz, Mayreli; Turner, Anthony P F; Beni, Valerio; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2015-01-01

    A controlled, rapid, and potentiostat-free method has been developed for grafting the diazonium salt (3,5-bis(4-diazophenoxy)benzoic acid tetrafluoroborate (DCOOH)) on gold and carbon substrates, based on a Zn-mediated chemical dediazonation. The highly stable thin layer organic platforms obtained were characterized by cyclic voltammetry, AFM, impedance, XP, and Raman spectroscopies. A dediazonation mechanism based on radical formation is proposed. Finally, DCOOH was proved as a linker to an aminated electroactive probe.

  10. Shallow donor and deep DX-like center in InAlN layers nearly lattice-matched to GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Py, Marcel A.; Lugani, Lorenzo; Taniyasu, Yoshitaka; Carlin, Jean-François; Grandjean, Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    Nonintentionally doped 200-nm-thick In0.16Al0.84N /n+-GaN samples were grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy and used for the electrical characterization of InAlN. In the temperature range 180-400 K, the forward current of Schottky diodes is dominated by a tunneling mechanism below 1.2 V. Capacitance and conductance-temperature characteristics were measured at 1 MHz in the 90-400 K range and at various voltages. The conductance vs temperature reveals two peaks D1 and D2, which are attributed to bulk states in InAlN. Their characterization by admittance spectroscopy gives thermal activation energies of ≈68 meV and 290 meV, and thermal capture cross section of 9.7×10-17 cm2 and ≈6.2×10-15 cm2, respectively. The same levels are also revealed by extracting the temperature dependence of the carrier density in the neutral region of InAlN from I-V-T characteristics on the Schottky diode. A partial carrier freeze out is demonstrated and discussed in the framework of an existing theory for DX centers. The use of this approach is supported by the evidence of persistent photoconductivity effects, which strongly indicate the presence of DX centers in our material. It results that each donor in InAlN would exist in two distinct lattice configurations, a substitutional one (D1, hydrogenic state) and a lattice-distorted one (D2, DX state). From secondary ion mass spectrometry data, theoretical grounds, and previous experimental evidence in the AlxGa1-xN system, oxygen is the most probable candidate for such an unintentional dopant.

  11. Competition between the Direct Exchange Interaction and Superexchange Interaction in Layered Compounds LiCrSe2, LiCrTe2, and NaCrTe2 with a Triangular Lattice.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shintaro; Ueda, Hiroaki; Michioka, Chishiro; Yoshimura, Kazuyoshi

    2016-08-01

    Physical properties of new S = 3/2 triangular-lattice compounds LiCrSe2, LiCrTe2, and NaCrTe2 have been investigated by X-ray diffraction and magnetic measurements. These compounds crystallize in the ordered NiAs-type structure, where alkali metal ions and Cr atoms stack alternately. Despite their isomorphic structures, magnetic properties of these three compounds are different; NaCrTe2 has an A-type spin structure with ferromagnetic layers, LiCrTe2 is likely to exhibit a helical spin structure, and LiCrSe2 shows a first-order-like phase transition from the paramagnetic trigonal phase to the antiferromagnetic monoclinic phase. In these compounds and the other chromium chalcogenides with a triangular lattice, we found a general relationship between the Curie-Weiss temperature and magnetic structures. This relation indicates that the competition between the antiferromagnetic direct d-d exchange interaction and the ferromagnetic superexchange interaction plays an important role in determining the ground state of chromium chalcogenides. PMID:27400024

  12. Stable, Microfabricated Thin Layer Chromatography Plates without Volume Distortion on Patterned, Carbon and Al2O3-Primed Carbon Nanotube Forests

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, David S.; Kanyal, Supriya S.; Gupta, Vipul; Vail, Michael A.; Dadson, Andrew; Engelhard, Mark H.; Vanfleet, Richard; Davis, Robert C.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2012-09-28

    In a recent report (Song, J.; et al., Advanced Functional Materials 2011, 21, 1132-1139) some of us described the fabrication of thin layer chromatography (TLC) plates from patterned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests, which were directly infiltrated/coated with silicon by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of silicon using SiH4. Following infiltration, the nanotubes were removed from the assemblies and the silicon simultaneously converted to SiO2 in a high temperature oxidation step. However, while straightforward, this process had some shortcomings, not the least of which was some distortion of the lithographically patterned features during the volume expansion that accompanied oxidation. Herein we overcome theis issue and also take substantial steps forward in the microfabrication of TLC plates by showing: (i) A new method for creating an adhesion promotion layer on CNT forests by depositing a few nanometers of carbon followed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al2O3. This method for appears to be new, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the expected presence of oxygen after carbon deposition. ALD of Al2O3 alone and in combination with the carbon on patterned CNT forests was also explored as an adhesion promotion layer for CNT forest infiltration. (ii) Rapid, conformal deposition of an inorganic material that does not require subsequent oxidation: fast pseudo-ALD growth of SiO2 via alumina catalyzed deposition of tris(tert-butoxy)silanol onto the carbon/Al2O3-primed CNT forests. (iii) Faithful reproduction of the features in the masks used to microfabricate the TLC plates (M-TLC) this advance springs from the previous two points. (iv) A bonded (amino) phase on a CNT-templated microfabricated TLC plate. (v) Fast, highly efficient (125,000 - 225,000 N/m) separations of fluorescent dyes on M-TLC plates. (vi) Extensive characterization of our new materials by TEM, SEM, EDAX, DRIFT, and XPS. (vii) A substantially lower process temperature for the

  13. Sedimentary sources of old high molecular weight dissolved organic carbon from the ocean margin benthic nepheloid layer

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, L. Santschi, P.H.

    2000-02-01

    Average {sup 14}C ages of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the ocean are 3--6,000 years, and are influenced by old DOC from continental margins. However, sources of DOC from terrestrial, autochthonous, and sedimentary organic carbon seem to be too young to be responsible for the old DOC observed in the ocean. Since colloidal organic carbon (COC, i.e., high molecular weight DOC), which is chemically very similar to that of bulk DOC, can be effectively isolated from seawater using cross-flow ultrafiltration, it can hold clues to sources and pathways of DOC turnover in the ocean. Radiocarbon measurements on COC in the water column and benthic nepheloid layer (BNL) from two continental margin areas (the Middle Atlantic Bight and the Gulf of Mexico) and controlled laboratory experiments were carried out to study sources of old DOC in the ocean margin areas. Vertical distributions of suspended particulate matter (SPM), particulate organic carbon (POC), nitrogen (PON), and DOC in the water column and bottom waters near the sediment-water interface all demonstrate a well developed benthic nepheloid layer in both ocean margin areas. COC from the BNL was much older than COC from the overlying water column. These results, together with strong concentration gradients of SPM, POC, PON, and DOC, suggest a sedimentary source for organic carbon species and possibly for old COC as well in BNL waters. This is confirmed by the results from controlled laboratory experiments. The heterogeneity of {Delta}{sup 14}C signatures in bulk SOC thus points to a preferential release of old organic components from sediment resuspension, which can be the transport mechanism of the old benthic COC observed in ocean margin areas. Old COC from continental margin nepheloid layers may thus be a potential source of old DOC to the deep ocean.

  14. Layer by layer assembly of catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid onto titanium nitride nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode: study of direct voltammetry and bioelectrocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Saadati, Shagayegh; Salimi, Abdollah; Hallaj, Rahman; Rostami, Amin

    2012-11-13

    A novel, simple and facile layer by layer (LBL) approach is used for modification of glassy carbon (GC) electrode with multilayer of catalase and nanocomposite containing 1-(3-Aminopropyl)-3-methylimidazolium bromide (amine terminated ionic liquid (NH(2)-IL)) and titanium nitride nanoparticles (TiNnp). First a thin layer of NH(2)-IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation method. Then, with alternative self assemble positively charged NH(2)-IL and negatively charged catalase a sensitive H(2)O(2) biosensor is constructed, whose response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. The surface coverage of active catalase per bilayer, heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k(s)) and Michaelis-Menten constant (K(M)) of immobilized catalase were 3.32×10(-12) mol cm(-2), 5.28s(-1) and 1.1 mM, respectively. The biosensor shows good stability, high reproducibility, long life-time, and fast amperometric response with the high sensitivity of 380 μA mM(-1)cm(-2) and low detection limit of 100 nM at concentration range up to 2.1 mM.

  15. Probing the Interfacial Interaction in Layered-Carbon-Stabilized Iron Oxide Nanostructures: A Soft X-ray Spectroscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Liu, Jinyin; Zhao, Guanqi; Gao, Yongjun; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Glans, Per-Anders; Guo, Jinghua; Ma, Ding; Sun, Xu-Hui; Zhong, Jun

    2015-04-22

    We have stabilized the iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) of various sizes on layered carbon materials (Fe-oxide/C) that show excellent catalytic performance. From the characterization of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy (XMCD), a strong interfacial interaction in the Fe-oxide/C hybrids has been observed between the small iron oxide NPs and layered carbon in contrast to the weak interaction in the large iron oxide NPs. The interfacial interaction between the NPs and layered carbon is found to link with the improved catalytic performance. In addition, the Fe L-edge XMCD spectra show that the large iron oxide NPs are mainly γ-Fe2O3 with a strong ferromagnetic property, whereas the small iron oxide NPs with strong interfacial interaction are mainly α-Fe2O3 or amorphous Fe2O3 with a nonmagnetic property. The results strongly suggest that the interfacial interaction plays a key role for the catalytic performance, and the experimental findings may provide guidance toward rational design of high-performance catalysts. PMID:25839786

  16. Probing the Interfacial Interaction in Layered-Carbon-Stabilized Iron Oxide Nanostructures: A Soft X-ray Spectroscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Liu, Jinyin; Zhao, Guanqi; Gao, Yongjun; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Glans, Per-Anders; Guo, Jinghua; Ma, Ding; Sun, Xu-Hui; Zhong, Jun

    2015-04-22

    We have stabilized the iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) of various sizes on layered carbon materials (Fe-oxide/C) that show excellent catalytic performance. From the characterization of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy (XMCD), a strong interfacial interaction in the Fe-oxide/C hybrids has been observed between the small iron oxide NPs and layered carbon in contrast to the weak interaction in the large iron oxide NPs. The interfacial interaction between the NPs and layered carbon is found to link with the improved catalytic performance. In addition, the Fe L-edge XMCD spectra show that the large iron oxide NPs are mainly γ-Fe2O3 with a strong ferromagnetic property, whereas the small iron oxide NPs with strong interfacial interaction are mainly α-Fe2O3 or amorphous Fe2O3 with a nonmagnetic property. The results strongly suggest that the interfacial interaction plays a key role for the catalytic performance, and the experimental findings may provide guidance toward rational design of high-performance catalysts.

  17. The effects of cell assembly compression on the performance of carbon electrochemical double-layer capacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourdin, Gerald; Jiang, Thomas; Smith, Patricia; Qu, Deyang

    2012-10-01

    Our previous work concluded that the application of force altered the physical structure of the activated carbon electrodes, which resulted in a decrease in the accessible surface area and a displacement of the electrolyte. In this work, the response that different carbon material electrodes exhibit to an applied force was evaluated. Activated carbon powders possess different porous structures, which would exhibit different behaviors when subjected to an applied force and after the release of that force. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to characterize the response behaviors of the different carbons. Furthermore, a porosimetry analysis was conducted on the carbon material of the electrode before and after the application of force. It was concluded that the application of force shifted the pore distribution toward overall smaller pores through a compression of the porous structure of the carbon. This resulted in a decrease in the more easily accessible surface area, which was exhibited as a decrease in the capacitance values as calculated from the cyclic voltammetry data. There was no longer sufficient time to access the now smaller powers at the given time scale of the cyclic voltammetry analysis, which negatively impacted the formation of the double layer.

  18. Application of polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layer for detection of mercury, lead and iron ions using surface plasmon resonance technique.

    PubMed

    Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Noor, A S M; Bahrami, Afarin; Lim, H N; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Mahdi, Mohd Adzir

    2014-01-01

    Polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layers were used to modify the gold layer to measure heavy metal ions using the surface plasmon resonance technique. The new sensor was fabricated to detect trace amounts of mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and iron (Fe) ions. In the present research, the sensitivity of a polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layer and a polypyrrole layer were compared. The application of polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotubes enhanced the sensitivity and accuracy of the sensor for detecting ions in an aqueous solution due to the binding of mercury, lead, and iron ions to the sensing layer. The Hg ion bonded to the sensing layer more strongly than did the Pb and Fe ions. The limitation of the sensor was calculated to be about 0.1 ppm, which produced an angle shift in the region of 0.3° to 0.6°. PMID:24733263

  19. Application of polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layer for detection of mercury, lead and iron ions using surface plasmon resonance technique.

    PubMed

    Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Noor, A S M; Bahrami, Afarin; Lim, H N; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Mahdi, Mohd Adzir

    2014-01-01

    Polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layers were used to modify the gold layer to measure heavy metal ions using the surface plasmon resonance technique. The new sensor was fabricated to detect trace amounts of mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and iron (Fe) ions. In the present research, the sensitivity of a polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layer and a polypyrrole layer were compared. The application of polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotubes enhanced the sensitivity and accuracy of the sensor for detecting ions in an aqueous solution due to the binding of mercury, lead, and iron ions to the sensing layer. The Hg ion bonded to the sensing layer more strongly than did the Pb and Fe ions. The limitation of the sensor was calculated to be about 0.1 ppm, which produced an angle shift in the region of 0.3° to 0.6°.

  20. The effects of the electrical double layer on giant ionic currents through single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bearden, Samuel; Zhang, Guigen

    2013-03-29

    We developed a computational model for investigating the cause for the high ionic current through a single-walled carbon nanotube nanofluidic device by considering the electrical double layer at a solid-liquid interface. With this model, we were able to examine the influence of the Gouy-Chapman-Stern electrical double layer and the solution concentration on the ionic conductance in the device. Results showed that the conductance-concentration relationship predicted from our model agreed well with experimental observation. Moreover, our model showed that the compact layer thickness increased with the increase of the bulk solution concentration, reducing the internal volume of the nanotube channel available for fluid transport. Fluid within the channel had an enhanced concentration and a net charge which increased the electroosmotic and electrophoretic transport properties of the device, increasing the total ionic conductance of the system.

  1. Experimental studies and physically substantiated model of carbon dioxide emission from the exposed cultural layer of Velikii Novgorod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smagin, A. V.; Dolgikh, A. V.; Karelin, D. V.

    2016-04-01

    The results of quantitative assessment and modeling of carbon dioxide emission from urban pedolithosediments (cultural layer) in the central part of Velikii Novgorod are discussed. At the first stages after the exposure of the cultural layer to the surface in archaeological excavations, very high CO2 emission values reaching 10-15 g C/(m2 h) have been determined. These values exceed the normal equilibrium emission from the soil surface by two orders of magnitude. However, they should not be interpreted as indications of the high biological activity of the buried urban sediments. A model based on physical processes shows that the measured emission values can be reliably explained by degassing of the soil water and desorption of gases from the urban sediments. This model suggests the diffusion mechanism of the transfer of carbon dioxide from the cultural layer into the atmosphere; in addition, it includes the equations to describe nonequilibrium interphase interactions (sorption-desorption and dissolution-degassing of CO2) with the first-order kinetics. With the use of statistically reliable data on physical parameters—the effective diffusion coefficient as dependent on the aeration porosity, the effective solubility, the Henry constant for the CO2 sorption, and the kinetic constants of the CO2 desorption and degassing of the soil solution—this model reproduces the experimental data on the dynamics of CO2 emission from the surface of the exposed cultural layer obtained by the static chamber method.

  2. Microscale characterisation of stochastically reconstructed carbon fiber-based Gas Diffusion Layers; effects of anisotropy and resin content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiotis, Andreas G.; Kainourgiakis, Michael E.; Charalambopoulou, Georgia C.; Stubos, Athanassios K.

    2016-07-01

    A novel process-based methodology is proposed for the stochastic reconstruction and accurate characterisation of Carbon fiber-based matrices, which are commonly used as Gas Diffusion Layers in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells. The modeling approach is efficiently complementing standard methods used for the description of the anisotropic deposition of carbon fibers, with a rigorous model simulating the spatial distribution of the graphitized resin that is typically used to enhance the structural properties and thermal/electrical conductivities of the composite Gas Diffusion Layer materials. The model uses as input typical pore and continuum scale properties (average porosity, fiber diameter, resin content and anisotropy) of such composites, which are obtained from X-ray computed microtomography measurements on commercially available carbon papers. This information is then used for the digital reconstruction of realistic composite fibrous matrices. By solving the corresponding conservation equations at the microscale in the obtained digital domains, their effective transport properties, such as Darcy permeabilities, effective diffusivities, thermal/electrical conductivities and void tortuosity, are determined focusing primarily on the effects of medium anisotropy and resin content. The calculated properties are matching very well with those of Toray carbon papers for reasonable values of the model parameters that control the anisotropy of the fibrous skeleton and the materials resin content.

  3. Black carbon concentrations across the tropical Atlantic boundary layer using three methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, K.; Lohmann, R.; Cantwell, M.; Herckes, P.

    2012-12-01

    24 particulate black carbon (BC) samples were quantified using three methods: a chemo-thermal oxidation at 375°C (CTO-375), a thermal optical transition method (Sunset Method), and pyrene fluorescence loss (PFL). BC samples were taken using a high-volume air sampler aboard the R/V Endeavor during the summer of 2010 in the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean in order to sample the aeolian "hotspot" plume of aerosols that extend from the African continent. Models have shown that annual elemental carbon (EC) deposition fluxes in this area could be as high as 25μg cm-2 a-1, which may be a significant contribution to the overall carbon budget as well as climate forcing simulations. Expected BC concentrations for this area, based on a global BC inventory using the MOGUNTIA global transport model, range between 0.01-1μg/m3 depending on season. The CTO-375 processed samples were run on an IRMS to get the total organic carbon (TOC), BC concentrations, and δ13C isotope ratios. BC was detected in every sample and concentrations ranged between 0.16-9.97μg/m3. BC concentrations were highest off the coast of the US and Caribbean islands but were lower (0.16-0.26μg/m3) in the African plume sampled between 1-5°N and 21-29°W. BC comprised between 13-81% of the TOC pool and δ13C isotopes between the TOC and BC for each sample differed by no more than 3‰. The TOC and BC pools average was -28.9‰ and -28.1‰ respectively, suggesting a C4 plant origin. A different isotope trend was evident for samples 16-19 (African plume). Their δ13C average was -23.1‰ for TOC, suggesting a mostly marine origin of the organic carbon or a mix of marine with C3 and C4 plants. This supports the observed lower BC/TOC ratio in these samples (13-50%). EC concentrations determined by the Sunset Method ranged between 0-0.32μg/m3, with EC being detected in only 8 of the 24 samples. In general, EC was found above the detection limit near the United States coastline or in the "hotspot" plume off Africa

  4. Lattice matched semiconductor growth on crystalline metallic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, Andrew G; Ptak, Aaron J; McMahon, William E

    2013-11-05

    Methods of fabricating a semiconductor layer or device and said devices are disclosed. The methods include but are not limited to providing a metal or metal alloy substrate having a crystalline surface with a known lattice parameter (a). The methods further include growing a crystalline semiconductor alloy layer on the crystalline substrate surface by coincident site lattice matched epitaxy. The semiconductor layer may be grown without any buffer layer between the alloy and the crystalline surface of the substrate. The semiconductor alloy may be prepared to have a lattice parameter (a') that is related to the lattice parameter (a). The semiconductor alloy may further be prepared to have a selected band gap.

  5. Lattice Boltzmann Methods Applied to Three-Dimensional Virtual Cores Constructed from Digital Optical Borehole Images of a Karst Carbonate Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. S.; Sukop, M. C.; Cunningham, K. J.

    2008-05-01

    Recovery of whole-core samples from macroporous karst carbonate is nearly impossible with conventional drilling technology. Thus, the most porous part of coreholes drilled in karst systems rarely yield whole-core samples. The consequent lack of samples for measurement of fluid-flow properties in karst carbonate aquifers impedes characterization of ground-water flow within these systems. This study uses advanced modeling techniques together with geophysical corehole data acquired from the karst carbonate Biscayne aquifer of southeastern Florida, USA, to explore a combination of innovative technologies designed to compensate for the lack of macroporous whole-core sample data. Specifically, these methods are being used to better understand the ground-water flow regime in the Biscayne aquifer. In this study, digital optical borehole image logs were compiled for test coreholes that penetrate the rocks of the Biscayne aquifer. The borehole image data were then processed to map the 3-D distribution of macropores and rock matrix present on the borehole walls using Stanford geostatistical software (SGeMS). The SGeMS program was used to compute variograms that were used as input for a computer simulation. The simulation results provided virtual 3-D renderings of the complex karst macropore network of the Biscayne aquifer that statistically replicate the borehole wall image data. These renderings provided 3-D visual records of areas of the aquifer that are composed of a carbonate eogenetic macropore system dominated by centimeter-scale vugs produced by fossil molds and voids associated with trace fossils. The vugs can coalesce over broad areas in the Biscayne aquifer to form laterally persistent zones of preferential ground-water flow. Lattice Boltzmann methods (LBMs) were used to measure the intrinsic permeability of the 3-D aquifer renderings. When using LBMs the rock matrix was assumed to be a nonporous media, thus permeability was only measured within the network of

  6. Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb/Er nanotubes: Layer-by-layer assembly on carbon-nanotube templates and their upconversion luminescence properties

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Weishi; Shen, Jianfeng; Wan, Lei; Chang, Yu; Ye, Mingxin

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Well-shaped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb/Er nanotubes have been successfully synthesized on a large scale via layer-by-layer assembly on carbon nanotubes templates followed by a subsequent heat treatment process. The as-prepared Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb/Er nanotubes show a strong red emission corresponding to the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}–{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transition of the Er{sup 3+} ions under excitation at 980 nm. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Well-shaped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb/Er nanotubes have been successfully synthesized. ► CNTs were used as templates for Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb/Er nanotubes. ► LBL assembly and calcination were used for preparation of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb/Er nanotubes. ► The as-prepared Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb/Er nanotubes show a strong red emission. -- Abstract: Well-shaped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb/Er nanotubes have been successfully synthesized on a large scale via layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) templates followed by a subsequent heat treatment process. The crystal structure, element analysis, morphology and upconversion luminescence properties were characterized. XRD results demonstrate that the diffraction peaks of the samples calcinated at 800 °C or above can be indexed to the pure cubic phase of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. SEM images indicate that a large quantity of uniform and rough nanotubes with diameters of about 30–60 nm can be observed. The as-prepared Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb/Er nanotubes show a strong red emission corresponding to the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}–{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transition of the Er{sup 3+} ions under excitation at 980 nm, which have potential applications in such fields as nanoscale devices, molecular catalysts, nanobiotechnology, photonics and optoelectronics.

  7. Electron beam-induced nanopatterning of multilayer graphene and amorphous carbon films with metal layers

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Manzo, Julio A.; Banhart, Florian

    2011-05-02

    Thin Co and Ni lamellae grow under electron irradiation of metal crystals supported on multilayer graphene or amorphous carbon films. The lateral growth of a lamella from a source crystal is achieved by directing an electron beam to the periphery of the metal crystal and moving the beam over the surrounding carbon. Patterns of linear, branched, or ringlike metal lamellae can be created. The patterning is carried out in situ in a transmission electron microscope, allowing simultaneous structuring and imaging. The process is driven by the metal-carbon interaction at a beam-activated carbon surface.

  8. Preparation of nanoporous carbons via a grafting method for the application to electrochemical double layer capacitors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wooyoung; Kang, Mi Yeong; Kim, Nam Dong; Joo, Ji Bong; Yi, Jongheop

    2011-01-01

    Nanoporous carbon materials with a controlled pore size and surface area were prepared using grafting method. The use of 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) as a grafting material played an important role in producing a porous structure by linking the silica to the polymer, with the subsequent formation of a silica-polymer composite. Importantly, the use of an organic solvent, compared to an aqueous solvent, has a positive effect in forming uniform and well-developed carbon structures, due to the high degree of dispersion with well-mixing of the carbon and silica precursors. The amounts of MPTMS and carbon precursor used determined the pore size and surface area of resulting carbon materials. The optimum ratio of MPTMS and carbon precursor for achieving a high surface area in excess of 2000 m2/g was determined. The use of a large amount of carbon precursor resulted in carbons with a relatively small surface area and an increase in MPTMS content led to an increase in the microporous structures. The capacitance value of the porous carbon prepared using the optimum ratio was determined to be 150 F/g.

  9. Analyses of 2-DEG characteristics in GaN HEMT with AlN/GaN super-lattice as barrier layer grown by MOCVD.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peiqiang; Jiang, Yang; Chen, Yao; Ma, Ziguang; Wang, Xiaoli; Deng, Zhen; Li, Yan; Jia, Haiqiang; Wang, Wenxin; Chen, Hong

    2012-02-20

    GaN-based high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) with AlN/GaN super-lattices (SLs) (4 to 10 periods) as barriers were prepared on (0001) sapphire substrates. An innovative method of calculating the concentration of two-dimensional electron gas (2-DEG) was brought up when AlN/GaN SLs were used as barriers. With this method, the energy band structure of AlN/GaN SLs was analyzed, and it was found that the concentration of 2-DEG is related to the thickness of AlN barrier and the thickness of the period; however, it is independent of the total thickness of the AlN/GaN SLs. In addition, we consider that the sheet carrier concentration in every SL period is equivalent and the 2-DEG concentration measured by Hall effect is the average value in one SL period. The calculation result fitted well with the experimental data. So, we proposed that our method can be conveniently applied to calculate the 2-DEG concentration of HEMT with the AlN/GaN SL barrier.

  10. Analyses of 2-DEG characteristics in GaN HEMT with AlN/GaN super-lattice as barrier layer grown by MOCVD

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    GaN-based high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) with AlN/GaN super-lattices (SLs) (4 to 10 periods) as barriers were prepared on (0001) sapphire substrates. An innovative method of calculating the concentration of two-dimensional electron gas (2-DEG) was brought up when AlN/GaN SLs were used as barriers. With this method, the energy band structure of AlN/GaN SLs was analyzed, and it was found that the concentration of 2-DEG is related to the thickness of AlN barrier and the thickness of the period; however, it is independent of the total thickness of the AlN/GaN SLs. In addition, we consider that the sheet carrier concentration in every SL period is equivalent and the 2-DEG concentration measured by Hall effect is the average value in one SL period. The calculation result fitted well with the experimental data. So, we proposed that our method can be conveniently applied to calculate the 2-DEG concentration of HEMT with the AlN/GaN SL barrier. PMID:22348545

  11. Efficiency enhancement of solution-processed inverted organic solar cells with a carbon-nanotube-doped active layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wen-Kai; Su, Shui-Hsiang; Yeh, Meng-Cheng; Huang, Yang-Chan; Yokoyama, Meiso

    2016-01-01

    Solution-processed titanium-doped ZnO (TZO) is synthesized by the sol-gel method to be the electron-transporting layer (ETL) in an inverted organic solar cell (IOSC). Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are doped into an active layer of poly(3-hexylthiophene):[6,6]-phenyl C 61 butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM). The addition of CNTs in the P3HT:PCBM composite increases the conjugation length of P3HT:PCBM:CNTs, which simultaneously enhances the capacity of the composite to absorb solar energy radiation. Vanadium oxide (V2O5) was spin-coated onto the active layer to be a hole-transporting layer (HTL). The power conversion efficiency (PCE) results indicate that the V2O5 nanobelt structure possesses better phase separation and provides a more efficient surface area for the P3HT:PCBM:CNT active layer to increase photocurrent. The optimized IOSCs exhibited an open circuit voltage (Voc), a short-circuit current density (Jsc), a fill factor (FF), and a PCE of 0.55 V, 6.50 mA/cm2, 58.34%, and 2.20%, respectively, under simulated AM1.5G illumination of 100 mW/cm2.

  12. Preparation and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with nickel–phosphorous layers of high magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yi; Qi, Shuhua; Zhang, Fan

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ► Impurities in crude MWNTs were effectively removed after purification treatment. ► Many Ni nanoparticles were homogenously coated on the purified MWNTs. ► The saturation magnetization (Ms) of the MWNTs with Ni–P layers is 91.5 emu/g. -- Abstract: The multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with nickel–phosphorous (Ni–P) layers were prepared by electroless plating method. To obtain the MWNTs with Ni–P layers of high magnetic properties, an effective purification treatment and a pre-treatment procedure were developed. The crude MWNTs, the purified MWNTs and the MWNTs with Ni–P layers were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM)/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). SEM results, TEM images and XRD results indicate that impurities in the crude MWNTs were effectively removed after the purification treatment and a large number of Ni nanoparticles were homogenously coated on the surface of the purified MWNTs. According to the VSM test, the saturation magnetization (Ms) of the MWNTs with Ni–P layers is 91.5 emu/g which is higher than results of other researchers.

  13. Preparation of hierarchical porous carbon from waste printed circuit boards for high performance electric double-layer capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xuan; Wang, Li; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Yi; Qi, Tao; Li, Chang Ming

    2016-08-01

    Renewable clean energy and resources recycling have become inevitable choices to solve worldwide energy shortages and environmental pollution problems. It is a great challenge to recycle tons of waste printed circuit boards (PCB) produced every year for clean environment while creating values. In this work, low cost, high quality activated carbons (ACs) were synthesized from non-metallic fractions (NMF) of waste PCB to offer a great potential for applications of electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs). After recovering metal from waste PCB, hierarchical porous carbons were produced from NMF by carbonization and activation processes. The experimental results exhibit that some pores were formed after carbonization due to the escape of impurity atoms introduced by additives in NMF. Then the pore structure was further tailored by adjusting the activation parameters. Roles of micropores and non-micropores in charge storage were investigated when the hierarchical porous carbons were applied as electrode of EDLCs. The highest specific capacitance of 210 F g-1 (at 50 mA g-1) and excellent rate capability were achieved when the ACs possessing a proper micropores/non-micropores ratio. This work not only provides a promising method to recycle PCB, but also investigates the structure tailoring arts for a rational hierarchical porous structure in energy storage/conversion.

  14. Atomic layer deposition of Al-doped ZnO/Al2O3 double layers on vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays.

    PubMed

    Malek, Gary A; Brown, Emery; Klankowski, Steven A; Liu, Jianwei; Elliot, Alan J; Lu, Rongtao; Li, Jun; Wu, Judy

    2014-05-14

    High-aspect-ratio, vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) were conformally coated with aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) using atomic layer deposition (ALD) in order to produce a three-dimensional array of metal-insulator-metal core-shell nanostructures. Prefunctionalization before ALD, as required for initiating covalent bonding on a carbon nanotube surface, was eliminated on VACNFs due to the graphitic edges along the surface of each CNF. The graphitic edges provided ideal nucleation sites under sequential exposures of H2O and trimethylaluminum to form an Al2O3 coating up to 20 nm in thickness. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and scanning electron microscopy images confirmed the conformal core-shell AZO/Al2O3/CNF structures while energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy verified the elemental composition of the different layers. HRTEM selected area electron diffraction revealed that the as-made Al2O3 by ALD at 200 °C was amorphous, and then, after annealing in air at 450 °C for 30 min, was converted to polycrystalline form. Nevertheless, comparable dielectric constants of 9.3 were obtained in both cases by cyclic voltammetry at a scan rate of 1000 V/s. The conformal core-shell AZO/Al2O3/VACNF array structure demonstrated in this work provides a promising three-dimensional architecture toward applications of solid-state capacitors with large surface area having a thin, leak-free dielectric.

  15. Atomic layer deposition of Al-doped ZnO/Al2O3 double layers on vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays.

    PubMed

    Malek, Gary A; Brown, Emery; Klankowski, Steven A; Liu, Jianwei; Elliot, Alan J; Lu, Rongtao; Li, Jun; Wu, Judy

    2014-05-14

    High-aspect-ratio, vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) were conformally coated with aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) using atomic layer deposition (ALD) in order to produce a three-dimensional array of metal-insulator-metal core-shell nanostructures. Prefunctionalization before ALD, as required for initiating covalent bonding on a carbon nanotube surface, was eliminated on VACNFs due to the graphitic edges along the surface of each CNF. The graphitic edges provided ideal nucleation sites under sequential exposures of H2O and trimethylaluminum to form an Al2O3 coating up to 20 nm in thickness. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and scanning electron microscopy images confirmed the conformal core-shell AZO/Al2O3/CNF structures while energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy verified the elemental composition of the different layers. HRTEM selected area electron diffraction revealed that the as-made Al2O3 by ALD at 200 °C was amorphous, and then, after annealing in air at 450 °C for 30 min, was converted to polycrystalline form. Nevertheless, comparable dielectric constants of 9.3 were obtained in both cases by cyclic voltammetry at a scan rate of 1000 V/s. The conformal core-shell AZO/Al2O3/VACNF array structure demonstrated in this work provides a promising three-dimensional architecture toward applications of solid-state capacitors with large surface area having a thin, leak-free dielectric. PMID:24689702

  16. Selective Breaking of Hydrogen Bonds of Layered Carbon Nitride for Visible Light Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yuyang; Yang, Yongqiang; Yin, Li-Chang; Kang, Xiangdong; Wang, Lianzhou; Liu, Gang; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Selective breaking of the hydrogen bonds of graphitic carbon nitride can introduce favorable features, including increased band tails close to the band edges and the creation of abundant pores. These features can simultaneously improve the three basic processes of photocatalysis. As a consequence, the photocatalytic hydrogen-generation activity of carbon nitride under visible light is drastically increased by tens of times.

  17. Optimal deposition conditions of TiN barrier layers for the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes onto metallic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Céspedes, J.; Álvarez-García, J.; Zhang, X.; Hampshire, J.; Bertran, E.

    2009-05-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical deposition (PECVD) has proven over the years to be the preferred method for the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes and nanofibres (VACNTs and VACNFs, respectively). In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown on metallic surfaces present a great potential for high power applications, including low resistance electrical contacts, high power switches, electron guns or supercapacitors. Nevertheless, the deposition of CNTs onto metallic substrates is challenging, due to the intrinsic incompatibility between such substrates and the metallic precursor layers required to promote the growth of CNTs. In particular, the formation of CNT films is assisted by the presence of a nanometric (10-100 nm) monolayer of catalyst clusters, which act as nucleation sites for CNTs. The nanometric character of the precursor layer, together with the high growth temperature involved during the PECVD process (~700 °C), strongly favours the in-diffusion of the catalyst nanoclusters into the bulk of the metallic substrate, which results in a dramatic reduction in the nucleation of CNTs. In order to overcome this problem, it is necessary to coat the metallic substrate with a diffusion barrier layer, prior to the growth of the catalyst precursor. Unlike other conventional ceramic barrier layers, TiN provides high electrical conductivity, thus being a promising candidate for use as barrier material in applications involving low resistance contacts. In this work we investigate the anti-diffusion properties of TiN sputtered coatings and its potential applicability to the growth of CNTs onto copper substrates, using Fe as catalyst material. The barrier and catalyst layers were deposited by magnetron sputtering. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to determine the diffusivity of Fe into TiN. Morphological characterization of the CNTs coatings was performed on scanning and transmission electron microscopes. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction were employed to

  18. Tuning indium tin oxide work function with solution-processed alkali carbonate interfacial layers for high-efficiency inverted organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Chen, Qi; Mao, Lin; Wang, Yixin; Huang, Xun; Lu, Wei; Wang, Bing; Chen, Liwei

    2013-12-01

    Selective electron collection by an interfacial layer modified indium tin oxide cathode is critically important for achieving high-efficiency inverted structure organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. Here, we demonstrate that solution-processed alkali carbonates, such as Li2CO3, Na2CO3, K2CO3, Rb2CO3, Cs2CO3, are good interfacial layer materials. Both carbonate concentration and annealing conditions can affect cathode work function and surface roughness. By proper optimization, different alkali carbonates can be almost equally effective as the cathode interfacial layer. Furthermore, good device performance can be achieved at a low annealing temperature (<50 ° C), which allows for potential applications in solution-processed inverted OPV cells on plastic substrates. This work indicates that alkali carbonates, not just cesium carbonate, are valid choices as the cathode interlayer in inverted OPV devices.

  19. Bioturbation delays attenuation of DDT by clean sediment cap but promotes sequestration by thin-layered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Lin, Diana; Cho, Yeo-Myoung; Werner, David; Luthy, Richard G

    2014-01-21

    The effects of bioturbation on the performance of attenuation by sediment deposition and activated carbon to reduce risks from DDT-contaminated sediment were assessed for DDT sediment-water flux, biouptake, and passive sampler (PE) uptake in microcosm experiments with a freshwater worm, Lumbriculus variegatus. A thin-layer of clean sediment (0.5 cm) did not reduce the DDT flux when bioturbation was present, while a thin (0.3 cm) AC cap was still capable of reducing the DDT flux by 94%. Bioturbation promoted AC sequestration by reducing the 28-day DDT biouptake (66%) and DDT uptake into PE (>99%) compared to controls. Bioturbation further promoted AC-sediment contact by mixing AC particles into underlying sediment layers, reducing PE uptake (55%) in sediment compared to the AC cap without bioturbation. To account for the observed effects from bioturbation, a mass transfer model together with a biodynamic model were developed to simulate DDT flux and biouptake, respectively, and models confirmed experimental results. Both experimental measurements and modeling predictions imply that thin-layer activated carbon placement on sediment is effective in reducing the risks from contaminated sediments in the presence of bioturbation, while natural attenuation process by clean sediment deposition may be delayed by bioturbation.

  20. Layer-by-Layer Assembled Architecture of Polyelectrolyte Multilayers and Graphene Sheets on Hollow Carbon Spheres/Sulfur Composite for High-Performance Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng; Li, Jian; Su, Yuefeng; Wang, Jing; Yang, Wen; Li, Ning; Chen, Lai; Chen, Shi; Chen, Renjie; Bao, Liying

    2016-09-14

    In the present work, polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) and graphene sheets are applied to sequentially coat on the surface of hollow carbon spheres/sulfur composite by a flexible layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly strategy. Owing to the strong electrostatic interactions between the opposite charged materials, the coating agents are very stable and the coating procedure is highly efficient. The LBL film shows prominent impact on the stability of the cathode by acting as not only a basic physical barrier, and more importantly, an ion-permselective film to block the polysulfides anions by Coulombic repulsion. Furthermore, the graphene sheets can help to stabilize the polyelectrolytes film and greatly reduce the inner resistance of the electrode by changing the transport of the electrons from a "point-to-point" mode to a more effective "plane-to-point'' mode. On the basis of the synergistic effect of the PEMs and graphene sheets, the fabricated composite electrode exhibits very stable cycling stability for over 200 cycles at 1 A g(-1), along with a high average Coulombic efficiency of 99%. With the advantages of rapid and controllable fabrication of the LBL coating film, the multifunctional architecture developed in this study should inspire the design of other lithium-sulfur cathodes with unique physical and chemical properties. PMID:27479273

  1. Incorporating nanoporous polyaniline into layer-by-layer ionic liquid-carbon nanotube-graphene paper: towards freestanding flexible electrodes with improved supercapacitive performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yimin; Fang, Zheng; Wang, Chenxu; Zhou, Aijun; Duan, Hongwei

    2015-09-01

    The growing demand for lightweight and flexible supercapacitor devices necessitates innovation in electrode materials and electrode configuration. We have developed a new type of three-dimensional (3D) flexible nanohybrid electrode by incorporating nanoporous polyaniline (PANI) into layer-by-layer ionic liquid (IL) functionalized carbon nanotube (CNT)-graphene paper (GP), and explored its practical application as a freestanding flexible electrode in a supercapacitor. Our results have demonstrated that the surface modification of graphene nanosheets and CNTs by hydrophilic IL molecules makes graphene and CNTs well-dispersed in aqueous solution, and also improves the hydrophility of the assembled graphene-based paper. Furthermore, the integration of highly conductive one-dimensional (1D) CNTs with two-dimensional (2D) graphene nanosheets leads to 3D sandwich-structured nanohybrid paper with abundant interconnected pores, which is preferred for fast mass and electron transport kinetics. For in situ electropolymerization of PANI on paper electrodes, the IL functionalized CNT-GP (IL-CNT-GP) offers large surface area and interlayer spacing and the unique π surface of graphene and CNTs for efficient and stable loading of PANI. A key finding is that the structural integration of multiple components in this 3D freestanding flexible sheet electrode gives rise to a synergic effect, leading to a high capacitance of 725.6 F g-1 at a current density of 1 A g-1 and good cycling stability by retaining 90% of the initial specific capacitance after 5000 cycles.

  2. Dye sensitized solar cell based on platinum decorated multiwall carbon nanotubes as catalytic layer on the counter electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Ambily; Rao, G. Mohan; Munichandraiah, N.

    2011-11-15

    Graphical abstract: I-V characteristics of the DSSCs with Pt CE and Pt/MWCNT CE measured at 100 mW/cm{sup 2}. It shows relatively better performance with Pt/MWCNT counter electrodes. Highlights: {yields} Synthesis of multiwalled carbon nanotubes by pyrolysis. {yields} Synthesis of Pt/MWCNT composite by chemical reduction. {yields} Fabrication DSSC using Pt/MWCNT as catalytic layer on the counter electrode. {yields} Study of catalytic activity by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy. -- Abstract: In this study we have employed multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), decorated with platinum as catalytic layer for the reduction of tri-iodide ions in dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC). MWCNTs have been prepared by a simple one step pyrolysis method using ferrocene as the catalyst and xylene as the carbon source. Platinum decorated MWCNTs have been prepared by chemical reduction method. The as prepared MWCNTs and Pt/MWCNTs have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In combination with a dye adsorbed TiO{sub 2} photoanode and an organic liquid electrolyte, Pt/MWCNT composite showed an enhanced short circuit current density of 16.12 mA/cm{sup 2} leading to a cell efficiency of 6.50% which is comparable to that of Platinum.

  3. Diagenesis, weathering and paleoenvironmental conditions from postglacial diamictite/cap carbonate transition layers of the Otavi Group (NW-Namibia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyollai, I.; Popp, F.; Mader, D.; Koeberl, Ch.

    2012-04-01

    Introduction The so-called "Snowball Earth hypothesis" states that the "Sturtian" (710 Ma) and "Marinoan" glaciations (635 Ma) were of global extent and may have lasted for several million years. Our samples were collected from conspicuous transition layers on top of the glaciogenic Chuos (Sturtian) (10 samples) and Ghaub (Marinoan) formations (63 samples) of the Neoproterozoic Otavi Group in NW-Namibia. The goal of this study is to obtain information concerning the provenance and geochemical composition of postglacial diamictite/cap carbonate transition layers and to estimate the paleoenvironmental conditions with respect to glacio-marine sea water composition and attendant sediment accumulation in mineralogical-geochemical aspects. Methods The mineralogical composition of our samples was studied using the petrographic microscope, X-ray powder diffraction, cathodoluminescence microscopy, and micro-Raman spectrometry. Instrumental neutron activation and X-ray fluorescence analyses, as well as analytical electron microscopy, were used for the geochemical study. Results Detrital components derived from crystalline and/or dolomite platform source areas are enclosed within a diagenetically recrystallized matrix of carbonate and quartz minerals. Clay samples from both, Marinoan and some Sturtian postglacial layers are characterized by high Ni/Co, Cr/V, and low Th/Sc, La/Sc, V/Ni and Cr/Ni ratios compared to PAAS (Postarchean Australian shale, [1]), which could indicate mafic-ultramafic source material[1]. According to SEM-EDX measurements, only hematite, quartz, and feldspar make up the detrital composition, thus the Cr-Ni enrichment does not seem to be associated with any specific mineral phases. Specific results for the Sturtian postglacial transition layers: An U/Th ratio >0.75, and Mo-enrichment in the topmost iron-rich Sturtian diamictites (Chuos Fm.) and their superposed postglacial boundary layers (Rasthof Fm) indicates reducing conditions in the sea water [2

  4. Polymer network/carbon layer on monolith support and monolith catalytic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Nordquist, Andrew Francis; Wilhelm, Frederick Carl; Waller, Francis Joseph; Machado, Reinaldo Mario

    2003-08-26

    The present invention relates to an improved monolith catalytic reactor and a monolith support. The improvement in the support resides in a polymer network/carbon coating applied to the surface of a porous substrate and a catalytic metal, preferably a transition metal catalyst applied to the surface of the polymer network/carbon coating. The monolith support has from 100 to 800 cells per square inch and a polymer network/carbon coating with surface area of from 0.1 to 15 m.sup.2 /gram as measured by adsorption of N.sub.2 or Kr using the BET method.

  5. Modeling the effect of active layer deepening on stocks of soil organic carbon in the Pechora River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, P.; Hugelius, G.; Marchenko, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    This study investigates how much of the estimated mass of surface permafrost (1 m deep) soil organic carbon stored in soils of the northern Pechora River Basin (Russian Arctic) could be affected due to active layer deepening for the time period 1980 to 2099. The study estimates how much of the upper permafrost soil organic carbon (1-100 cm depth range) will be affected by active layer deepening due to climate warming, on what timescale the deepening will take place and if the estimated changes differ depending on the extent of permafrost in the region. A model developed in a Geographic Information System combines datasets from The Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database (Hugelius, in press), field data of soil organic carbon content (SOCC) in different permafrost soil horizons in the Usa basin (Hugelius et al., 2011) and data of recent (observed) and future (projected) active layer depth from a spatially distributed permafrost dynamics model in the Pechora River Basin (GIPL2 model; Marchenko et al., 2008). For the simulation of permafrost dynamics we used output from the regional climate model HIRHAM5 with the physical parameterization of ECHAM5 with a doubling gradual increase of atmospheric CO2 concentration by the end of the current century (Stendel et al., 2010). According to this specific climate scenario, projections of future changes in permafrost suggest that by the end of the 21st century, permafrost in the Russian North may be actively thawing at many locations of the Pechora River watershed. The results show that in 1980, 75% of the available 0-100 cm Gelisol SOCC is affected by seasonal thawing (Figure 1). In 2050 the proportion is increased to 86% and by 2090 almost the whole study area has an active layer deeper than 1 meter (98%). This indicates an increase from approximately 0.64% to 0.84% of the total 1-100 cm soil organic carbon mass in the northern permafrost region. The change is more gradual in the isolated and the sporadic permafrost zones

  6. Graphene oxide-based carbon interconnecting layer for polymer tandem solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yonghua; Lin, Wei-Chun; Liu, Jun; Dai, Liming

    2014-03-12

    Tandem polymer solar cells (PSCs), consisting of more than one (normally two) subcells connected by a charge recombination layer (i.e., interconnecting layer), hold great promise for enhancing the performance of PSCs. For an ideal tandem solar cell, the open circuit voltage (Voc) equals to the sum of those of the subcells while keeping the short circuit current the same as the lower one, leading to an increased overall power conversion efficiency. The interconnecting layer plays an important role in regulating the tandem device performance. Here, we report that graphene oxide (GO)/GO-Cs (cesium neutralized GO) bilayer modified with ultrathin Al and MoO3 can act as an efficient interconnecting layer in tandem PSCs to achieve a significantly increased Voc, reaching almost 100% of the sum of the subcell V(oc)s under standard AM 1.5 conditions. PMID:24521516

  7. Characterization of the passivation layer on disordered carbons in lithium-ion cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, R.; Johnson, B.

    1995-12-01

    Intercalation anodes of graphite or disordered carbon in rechargeable Li-ion batteries (based on aprotic organic solvents) develop a passivating film during the first intercalation of Li{sup +}. The formation of this film reduces the cycling efficiency and results in excessive consumption of Li{sup +}. The exact nature of this film is not well defined, although there are many similarities in properties to the films that form on Li anodes under similar cycling conditions. In this study we report on characterization studies of films formed during galvanostatic cycling of disordered carbons derived from polymethylacryolintrile (PMAN) in a 1M LiPF{sub 6} solution in ethylene carbonateldimethyl carbonate solution (1:1 by vol.). Complementary tests were also conducted with glass carbon, where intercalation cannot occur. Complex-impedance spectroscopy was the primary measurement technique, supplemented by cyclic voltammetry.

  8. Mesoporous and carbon hybrid structures from layered molecular precursors for Li-ion battery application: the case of β-In2S3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Jian; Tian, Lei-Lei; Li, Shuankui; Lin, Ling-Piao; Pan, Feng

    2016-04-01

    A new method was demonstrated to construct mesoporous and carbon hybrid structures of β-In2S3 from the thermal decomposition of layered molecular precursors. When applied to LIBs, they all exhibit good cycling stability and excellent rate performance due to the great uniformity of mesopores and pyrolysis carbon distributed in the materials. PMID:26957349

  9. Influence of tree cover on herbaceous layer development and carbon and water fluxes in a Portuguese cork-oak woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbert, Maren; Mosena, Alexander; Piayda, Arndt; Cuntz, Matthias; Correia, Alexandra Cristina; Pereira, Joao Santos; Werner, Christiane

    2014-08-01

    Facilitation and competition between different vegetation layers may have a large impact on small-scale vegetation development. We propose that this should not only influence overall herbaceous layer yield but also species distribution and understory longevity, and hence the ecosystems carbon uptake capacity especially during spring. We analyzed the effects of trees on microclimate and soil properties (water and nitrate content) as well as the development of an herbaceous community layer regarding species composition, aboveground biomass and net water and carbon fluxes in a cork-oak woodland in Portugal, between April and November 2011. The presence of trees caused a significant reduction in photosynthetic active radiation of 35 mol m-2 d-1 and in soil temperature of 5 °C from April to October. At the same time differences in species composition between experimental plots located in open areas and directly below trees could be observed: species composition and abundance of functional groups became increasingly different between locations from mid April onwards. During late spring drought adapted native forbs had significantly higher cover and biomass in the open area while cover and biomass of grasses and nitrogen fixing forbs was highest under the trees. Further, evapotranspiration and net carbon exchange decreased significantly stronger under the tree crowns compared to the open during late spring and the die back of herbaceous plants occurred earlier and faster under trees. This was most likely caused by interspecific competition for water between trees and herbaceous plants, despite the more favorable microclimate conditions under the trees during the onset of summer drought.

  10. Phase Diagram and Transformations of Iron Pentacarbonyl to nm Layered Hematite and Carbon-Oxygen Polymer under Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Young Jay; Kim, Minseob; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2015-10-01

    We present the phase diagram of Fe(CO)5, consisting of three molecular polymorphs (phase I, II and III) and an extended polymeric phase that can be recovered at ambient condition. The phase diagram indicates a limited stability of Fe(CO)5 within a pressure-temperature dome formed below the liquid- phase II- polymer triple point at 4.2 GPa and 580 K. The limited stability, in turn, signifies the temperature-induced weakening of Fe-CO back bonds, which eventually leads to the dissociation of Fe-CO at the onset of the polymerization of CO. The recovered polymer is a composite of novel nm-lamellar layers of crystalline hematite Fe2O3 and amorphous carbon-oxygen polymers. These results, therefore, demonstrate the synthesis of carbon-oxygen polymer by compressing Fe(CO)5, which advocates a novel synthetic route to develop atomistic composite materials by compressing organometallic compounds.

  11. Superelastic Few-Layer Carbon Foam Made from Natural Cotton for All-Solid-State Electrochemical Capacitors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tianquan; Liu, Fengxin; Xu, Feng; Bi, Hui; Du, Yahui; Tang, Yufeng; Huang, Fuqiang

    2015-11-18

    Flexible/stretchable devices for energy storage are essential for future wearable and flexible electronics. Electrochemical capacitors (ECs) are an important technology for supplement batteries in the energy storage and harvesting field, but they are limited by relatively low energy density. Herein, we report a superelastic foam consisting of few-layer carbon nanowalls made from natural cotton as a good scaffold to growth conductive polymer polyaniline for stretchable, lightweight, and flexible all-solid-state ECs. As-prepared superelastic bulk tubular carbon foam (surface area ∼950 m(2)/g) can withstand >90% repeated compression cycling and support >45,000 times its own weight but no damage. The flexible device has a high specific capacitance of 510 F g(-1), a specific energy of 25.5 Wh kg(-1) and a power density of 28.5 kW kg(-1) in weight of the total electrode materials and withstands 5,000 charging/discharging cycles.

  12. Activated carbon made from cow dung as electrode material for electrochemical double layer capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjya, Dhrubajyoti; Yu, Jong-Sung

    2014-09-01

    Cow dung is one of the most abundant wastes generated on earth and has been traditionally used as fertilizer and fuel in most of the developing countries. In this study activated carbon is synthesized from cow dung by a modified chemical activation method, where partially carbonized cow dung is treated with KOH in different ratio. The synthesized activated carbon possesses irregular surface morphology with high surface area in the range of 1500-2000 m2 g-1 with proper amount of micropore and mesopore volume. In particular, we demonstrate that the surface morphology and porosity parameters change with increase in KOH ratio. These activated carbons are tested as electrode material in two-electrode symmetric supercapacitor system in non-aqueous electrolyte and found to exhibit high specific capacitance with excellent retention of it at high current density and for long term operation. In particular, the activated carbon synthesized at 2:1 ratio of KOH and the pre-carbonized char shows the best performance with specific capacitance of 124 F g-1 at 0.1 A g-1 and retains up to 117 F g-1 at 1.0 A g-1 current density. The performance is attributed to high surface area along with optimum amount of micropore and mesopore volume.

  13. Effects of multiple polyaniline layers immobilized on carbon nanotube and glutaraldehyde on performance and stability of biofuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christwardana, Marcelinus; Kwon, Yongchai

    2015-12-01

    Enzymatic biofuel cell (EBC) employing new catalyst for anode electrode is fabricated. The new catalyst consists of glucose oxidase (GOx), polyaniline (PANI) and carbon nanotube (CNT) that are multiply stacked together and finally the stack layer is surrounded by glutaraldehyde (GA) (GA/[GOx/PANI/CNT]n). To evaluate how the GA/[GOx/PANI/CNT]n layer affects EBC performance and stability, electrochemical characterizations are implemented. Regarding optimization, GA/[GOx/PANI/CNT]3 is determined. For elucidating reaction mechanism between glucose and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) of GA/[GOx/PANI/CNT]3, associated investigations are performed. In the evaluations, drop in reduction current peak of FAD is observed with provisions of glucose and O2, while glucose does not influence FAD reaction without O2, confirming O2 makes mediator role. When the GA/[GOx/PANI/CNT]3 layer is adopted, superior catalytic activity and EBC performance are gained (electron transfer rate constant of 5.1 s-1, glucose sensitivity of 150 ìA mM-1 cm-2, and EBC maximum power density (MPD) of 0.29 mW cm-2). Regarding EBC stability, MPD of EBC adopting GA/[GOx/PANI/CNT]3 maintains up to 93% of their initial value even after four weeks. Although GA is little effective for improving EBC performance, EBC stability is helped by GA due to its adhesion promotion capability with [GOx/PANI/CNT]n layer.

  14. Intrinsic carrier mobility of a single-layer graphene covalently bonded with single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dian; Shao, Zhi-Gang; Hao, Qing; Zhao, Hongbo

    2014-06-21

    We report intrinsic carrier mobility calculations of a two-dimensional nanostructure that consists of porous single layer graphene covalently bonded with single-walled carbon nanotubes on both sides. We used first-principles calculation and found that the deformation potential of such system is about 25% of that of graphene, and the carrier mobility is about 5 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} for both electrons and holes, about one order of magnitude lower than that of graphene. This nanostructure and its three-dimensional stacking could serve as novel organic electronic materials.

  15. Improvement in the Characteristics of Electric Double Layer Capacitor Using a Mixture of Arc Black and Carbon Nanoballoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Yuta; Izumi, Harutaka; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Tanoue, Hideto; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Ue, Hitoshi; Shimizu, Kazuki

    2013-11-01

    Carbon nanomaterials with different structures were mixed for an electric double layer capacitor (EDLC) electrode. We used two kinds of carbon nanomaterial: arc black (AcB) and a carbon nanoballoon (CNB). Arc black was synthesized by arc discharge. CNB was produced by heating the prepared AcB at 2400 °C. AcB mostly consists of an amorphous component and has a large specific surface area. On the other hand, CNB has a graphitic surface and a high conductivity. To utilize their characteristics, AcB and CNB were used as the main materials of the EDLC electrode in weight ratios of 1:1, 2:1, and 1:2. The obtained EDLC electrode was filled with 1 M H2SO4 as the electrolyte. As a result, by mixing AcB and CNB, both the power and energy densities became higher than those of AcB or CNB alone. The EDLC mixed in 1:1 weight ratio of AcB and CNB showed the highest performance, with a higher electric power density than activated carbon (AC).

  16. Size-selective catalytic growth of nearly 100% pure carbon nanocoils with copper nanoparticles produced by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guizhen; Ran, Gu; Wan, Gengping; Yang, Peng; Gao, Zhe; Lin, Shiwei; Fu, Chuan; Qin, Yong

    2014-05-27

    In this paper, Cu nanoparticles with narrow size distribution are synthesized by reduction of CuO films produced by atomic layer deposition (ALD), which are used as catalysts for the catalytic growth of carbon nanostructures. By properly adjusting the ALD cycle numbers, the size of produced Cu nanoparticles can be well controlled. Uniform carbon nanocoils with near 100% purity can be obtained by using 50-80 nm Cu nanoparticles, while thin straight fibers and thick straight fibers are produced by applying 5-35 and 100-200 nm Cu nanoparticles, respectively. The mechanism of the particle size-dependent growth of the carbon nanostructure was analyzed based on the experimental results and theoretical simulation. Our results can provide important information for the preparation of helical carbon nanostructures with high purity. Moreover, this work also demonstrates that ALD is a viable technique for synthesizing nanoparticles with highly controllable size and narrow size distribution suitable for studying particle size-dependent catalytic behavior and other applications.

  17. The seasonal cycle of the mixing layer height and its impact on black carbon concentrations in the Kathmandu Valley (Nepal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mues, Andrea; Rupakheti, Maheswar; Hoor, Peter; Bozem, Heiko; Münkel, Christoph; Lauer, Axel; Butler, Tim

    2016-04-01

    The properties and the vertical structure of the mixing layer as part of the planetary boundary layer are of key importance for local air quality. They have a substantial impact on the vertical dispersion of pollutants in the lower atmosphere and thus on their concentrations near the surface. In this study, ceilometer measurements taken within the framework of the SusKat project (Sustainable Atmosphere for the Kathmandu Valley) are used to investigate the mixing layer height in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. The applied method is based on the assumption that the aerosol concentration is nearly constant in the vertical and distinctly higher within the mixing layer than in the air above. Thus, the height with the steepest gradient within the ceilometer backscatter profile marks the top of the mixing layer. Ceilometer and black carbon (BC) measurements conducted from March 2013 through February 2014 provide a unique and important dataset for the analysis of the meteorological and air quality conditions in the Kathmandu Valley. In this study the mean diurnal cycle of the mixing layer height in the Kathmandu Valley for each season (pre-monsoon, monsoon, post-monsoon and winter season) and its dependency on the meteorological situation is investigated. In addition, the impact of the mixing layer height on the BC concentration is analyzed and compared to the relevance of other important processes such as emissions, horizontal advection and deposition. In all seasons the diurnal cycle is typically characterized by low mixing heights during the night, gradually increasing after sun rise reaching to maximum values in the afternoon before decreasing again. Seasonal differences can be seen particularly in the height of the mixing layer, e.g. from on average 153/1200 m (pre-monsoon) to 241/755 m (monsoon season) during the night/day, and the duration of enhanced mixing layer heights during daytime (around 12 hours (pre-monsoon season) to 8 hours (winter)). During the monsoon

  18. Few-layer graphene growth from polystyrene as solid carbon source utilizing simple APCVD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Shahrokh; Afzalzadeh, Reza

    2016-07-01

    This research article presents development of an economical, simple, immune and environment friendly process to grow few-layer graphene by controlling evaporation rate of polystyrene on copper foil as catalyst and substrate utilizing atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) method. Evaporation rate of polystyrene depends on molecular structure, amount of used material and temperature. We have found controlling rate of evaporation of polystyrene by controlling the source temperature is easier than controlling the material weight. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as Raman Spectroscopy has been used for characterization of the layers. The frequency of G‧ to G band ratio intensity in some samples varied between 0.8 and 1.6 corresponding to few-layer graphene. Topography characterization by atomic force microscopy confirmed Raman results.

  19. [Calcium-oxygen modified amorphous and nanocrystalline carbon layers as biomaterials].

    PubMed

    Dorner-Reisel, A; Schürer, C; Nischan, C; Klemm, V; Irmer, G; Müller, E

    2002-01-01

    Undoped and Ca-O-modified diamond-like carbon coatings were deposited by a direct current discharge. Hardness and Young's modulus of Ca-O-modified DLCs were reduced in comparison with the undoped DLC, but the adherence of the Ca-O-modified films is improved. Ca-O-modified DLCs have a higher fraction of nano-crystalline regions with carbon in sp2 hybridisation. In addition, an increased oxygen content and CaCO3 was identified in Ca-O-modified DLCs. While mouse fibroblasts of the type L929 attach and grow on unmodified diamond-like carbon coatings synthesized by the decomposition of hydrocarbon, the addition of CaO-H2O into the precursor gas improves the coatings biological acceptance by the cells. PMID:12451874

  20. Antiferromagnetic Kondo lattice in the layered compound CePd1–xBi₂ and comparison to the superconductor LaPd1–xBi₂

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Fei; Wan, Xiangang; Phelan, Daniel; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Sturza, Mihai; Malliakas, Christos D.; Li, Qing'an; Han, Tian-Heng; Zhao, Qingbiao; Chung, Duck Young; et al

    2015-07-13

    The layered compound CePd1–xBi₂ with the tetragonal ZrCuSi₂-type structure was obtained from excess Bi flux. Magnetic susceptibility data of CePd1–xBi₂ show an antiferromagnetic ordering below 6 K and are anisotropic along the c axis and the ab plane. The anisotropy is attributed to crystal-electric-field (CEF) effects and a CEF model which is able to describe the susceptibility data is given. An enhanced Sommerfeld coefficient γ of 0.191 J mol Ce⁻¹ K⁻² obtained from specific-heat measurement suggests a moderate Kondo effect in CePd1–xBi₂. Other than the antiferromagnetic peak at 6 K, the resistivity curve shows a shoulderlike behavior around 75 Kmore » which could be attributed to the interplay between Kondo and CEF effects. Magnetoresistance and Hall-effect measurements suggest that the interplay reconstructs the Fermi-surface topology of CePd1–xBi₂ around 75 K. Electronic structure calculations reveal that the Pd vacancies are important to the magnetic structure and enhance the CEF effects which quench the orbital moment of Ce at low temperatures.« less

  1. Graphitic-Carbon Layers on Oxides: Toward Stable Heterogeneous Catalysts for Biomass Conversion Reactions.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Haifeng; Schwartz, Thomas J; Andersen, Nalin I; Dumesic, James A; Datye, Abhaya K

    2015-06-26

    Conversion of biomass-derived molecules involves catalytic reactions under harsh conditions in the liquid phase (e.g., temperatures of 250 °C and possibly under either acidic or basic conditions). Conventional oxide-supported catalysts undergo pore structure collapse and surface area reduction leading to deactivation under these conditions. Here we demonstrate an approach to deposit graphitic carbon to protect the oxide surface. The heterogeneous catalysts supported on the graphitic carbon/oxide composite exhibit excellent stability (even under acidic conditions) for biomass conversion reactions. PMID:25973732

  2. Outer layers of a carbon star: The view from the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.; Ensman, Lisa M.; Alexander, D. R.; Avrett, E. H.; Brown, A.; Carpenter, K. G.; Eriksson, K.; Gustafsson, B.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Judge, Philip D.

    1995-01-01

    To advance our understanding of the relationship between stellar chromospheres and mass loss, which is a common property of carbon stars and other asymptotic giant branch stars, we have obtained ultraviolet spectra of the nearby N-type carbon star UU Aur using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). In this paper we describe the HST observations, identify spectral features in both absorption and emission, and attempt to infer the velocity field in the chromosphere, upper troposphere, and circumstellar envelope from spectral line shifts. A mechanism for producing fluoresced emission to explain a previously unobserved emission line is proposed. Some related ground-based observations are also described.

  3. Graphitic-Carbon Layers on Oxides: Toward Stable Heterogeneous Catalysts for Biomass Conversion Reactions.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Haifeng; Schwartz, Thomas J; Andersen, Nalin I; Dumesic, James A; Datye, Abhaya K

    2015-06-26

    Conversion of biomass-derived molecules involves catalytic reactions under harsh conditions in the liquid phase (e.g., temperatures of 250 °C and possibly under either acidic or basic conditions). Conventional oxide-supported catalysts undergo pore structure collapse and surface area reduction leading to deactivation under these conditions. Here we demonstrate an approach to deposit graphitic carbon to protect the oxide surface. The heterogeneous catalysts supported on the graphitic carbon/oxide composite exhibit excellent stability (even under acidic conditions) for biomass conversion reactions.

  4. Pd(II)-Directed Encapsulation of Hydrogenase within the Layer-by-Layer Multilayers of Carbon Nanotube Polyelectrolyte Used as a Heterogeneous Catalyst for Oxidation of Hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Zorin, Nikolay A; Chen, Meng; Qian, Dong-Jin

    2015-06-16

    A metal-directed assembling approach has been developed to encapsulate hydrogenase (H2ase) within a layer-by-layer (LBL) multilayer of carbon nanotube polyelectrolyte (MWNT-PVPMe), which showed efficient biocatalytic oxidation of H2 gas. The MWNT-PVPMe was prepared via a diazonium process and addition reactions with poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP) and methyl iodide (MeI). The covalently attached polymers and organic substituents in the polyelectrolyte comprised 60-70% of the total weight. The polyelectrolyte was then used as a substrate for H2ase binding to produce MWNT-PVPMe@H2ase bionanocomposites. X-ray photoelectron spectra revealed that the bionanocomposites included the elements of Br, S, C, N, O, I, Fe, and Ni, which confirmed that they were composed of MWNT-PVPMe and H2ase. Field emission transmission electron microscope images revealed that the H2ase was adsorbed on the surface of MWNT-PVPMe with the domains ranging from 20 to 40 nm. Further, with the use of the bionanocomposites as nanolinkers and Na2PdCl4 as connectors, the (Pd/MWNT-PVPMe@H2ase)n multilayers were constructed on the quartz and gold substrate surfaces by the Pd(II)-directed LBL assembling technique. Finally, the as-prepared LBL multilayers were used as heterogeneous catalysts for hydrogen oxidation with methyl viologen (MV(2+)) as an electron carrier. The dynamic processes for the reversible color change between blue-colored MV(+) and colorless MV(2+) (catalyzed by the LBL multilayers) were video recorded, which confirmed that the H2ase encapsulated within the present LBL multilayers was of much stronger stability and higher biocatalytic activity of H2 oxidation resulting in potential applications for the development of H2 biosensors and fuel cells.

  5. Effects of microstructure on carbon support in the catalyst layer on the performance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Makoto; Fukuoka, Yuko; Sugawara, Yasushi

    1996-12-31

    In the case of the Polymer-electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), the reaction sites exist on the platinum (Pt) surface covered with PFSI. Though PFSI membrane is used as an electrolyte of the PEFC, the membrane does not soak deeply into the electrodes as a liquid electrolyte does. Therefore, PFSI solution was impregnated into the catalyst layers to increase the contact areas between Pt and PFSI. In our previous work we proposed a new preparation method of the M&E assembly which emphasized the colloid formation of the PFSI to optimize the network of PFSIs in the catalyst layer and also to simplify the fabrication process of the M&E assembly. Following this work, we focused on the microstructure of the catalyst layer. The importance of the morphological properties of the gas-diffusion electrodes on performance has been reported in several papers. The catalyst layer was claimed to have had two distinctive pore distributions with a boundary of ca. 0.1 {mu}m. The smaller pore (primary pore) was identified with the space in and between the primary particles in the agglomerate of the carbon support and the larger one (secondary pore) was that between the agglomerates. In our recent work, we reported that the PFSI was distributed only in the secondary pores, and the reaction sites were therefore limited to that location. The results indicated that the PEFC system required a particular design rather than a conventional one for the fuel cells with liquid electrolytes. We proposed that novel structure and/or preparation methods of the catalyst layer were keys to higher utilization of Pt.

  6. 25th anniversary article: Artificial carbonate nanocrystals and layered structural nanocomposites inspired by nacre: synthesis, fabrication and applications.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hong-Bin; Ge, Jin; Mao, Li-Bo; Yan, You-Xian; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Rigid biological systems are increasingly becoming a source of inspiration for the fabrication of next generation advanced functional materials due to their diverse hierarchical structures and remarkable engineering properties. Among these rigid biomaterials, nacre, as the main constituent of the armor system of seashells, exhibiting a well-defined 'brick-and-mortar' architecture, excellent mechanical properties, and interesting iridescence, has become one of the most attractive models for novel artificial materials design. In this review, recent advances in nacre-inspired artificial carbonate nanocrystals and layered structural nanocomposites are presented. To clearly illustrate the inspiration of nacre, the basic principles relating to plate-like aragonite single-crystal growth and the contribution of hierarchical structure to outstanding properties in nacre are discussed. The inspiration of nacre for the synthesis of carbonate nanocrystals and the fabrication of layered structural nanocomposites is also discussed. Furthermore, the broad applications of these nacre inspired materials are emphasized. Finally, a brief summary of present nacre-inspired materials and challenges for the next generation of nacre-inspired materials is given. PMID:24338814

  7. Effect of metal base layer on the absorptance and emittance of sputtered graded metal-carbon selective absorbing surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, G. L.; Craig, S.

    1981-08-01

    Solar absorptance and temperature-dependent emittance is measured for graded metal-carbon films deposited onto smooth aluminum, copper, nickel, and stainless steel base layers, sputter-deposited onto glass tubes at relatively low argon pressure (approximately 0.5 Pa), and deposited onto textured copper using argon pressures 3 to 40 Pa. Absorptance measurements are made on surfaces deposited onto small plane glass slides attached to a glass tube in the coating system, and emittance measurements are made on coated tubes, assembled into glass envelopes. Both the small planar specimens of selective surface and coated tubes were inserted in continuously evacuated glass envelopes and annealed at 500 C for approximately 1 hr. It is shown that solar absorptance varies by only 1-2% for the different base layers, whereas the emittance of surfaces based on nickel and stainless steel is considerably higher than for surfaces based on copper and aluminum. Small changes occur in absorptances and emittances after annealing. It is concluded that the optimum selective surface for evacuated collectors used with mirrors of low concentrations consists of graded metal-carbon overlaid with smooth copper.

  8. Removal of Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium by Means of Soil Vapor Extraction Enhanced by Desiccation and Water Table Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Mart; Dane, Jacob H.; Wietsma, Thomas W.

    2005-11-14

    A two-dimensional flow cell experiment was conducted to study the removal of the carbon tetrachloride component of a DNAPL mixture from a layered porous medium through soil vapor extraction (SVE) with moist and dry air. A dual-energy gamma radiation system was used at various times to non-intrusively determine fluid saturations. The mixture, which contained the volatile organic carbon tetrachloride, mimics the DNAPL disposed at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The flow cell, which is 100 cm long, 75 cm high and 5.5 cm wide, was packed with two sloped coarse sand and two sloped silt layers in an otherwise uniform matrix of medium-grained sand. A V-shaped fine sand layer was placed at the bottom of the flow cell to prevent DNAPL from exiting the flow cell. The water table was located 2 cm from the bottom, creating variably saturated conditions. A 500-mL spill was introduced at the top of the flow cell from a small source area. It was observed that the DNAPL largely by-passed the silt layers but easily moved into the coarse sand layers. Residual DNAPL was formed in the medium-grained sand matrix. The DNAPL caused a distinct reduction of the capillary fringe. Most of the DNAPL ended up in a pool on top of the V-shaped fine sand. Through four treatments with moist air soil vapor extraction, most residual carbon tetrachloride was removed from the medium-grained matrix and the coarse sand layers. However, soil vapor extraction with moist air was not able to remove the carbon tetrachloride from the silt layers and the pool. Through a water table reduction and subsequent soil vapor extraction with dry air, the carbon tetrachloride in the silt layers and the pool was effectively removed. Based on gamma measurements and carbon tetrachloride vapor concentration data, it was estimated that after the final remediation treatment, almost 90% of the total mass was removed.

  9. Thermal stability of diamondlike carbon buried layer fabricated by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition in silicon on insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Di Zengfeng; Huang Anping; Fu, Ricky K.Y.; Chu, Paul K.; Shao Lin; Hoechbauer, T.; Nastasi, M.; Zhang Miao; Liu Weili; Shen Qinwo; Luo Suhua; Song Zhitang; Lin Chenglu

    2005-09-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) as a potential low-cost substitute for diamond has been extended to microelectronics and we have demonstrated the fabrication of silicon on diamond (SOD) as a silicon-on-insulator structure using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition in conjunction with layer transfer and wafer bonding. The thermal stability of our SOD structure was found to be better than that expected for conventional DLC films. In the work reported here, we investigate the mechanism of the enhanced thermal stability. We compare the thermal stability of exposed and buried DLC films using Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Our Raman analysis indicates that the obvious separation of the D and G peaks indicative of nanocrystalline graphite emerges at 500 deg. C in the exposed DLC film. In contrast, the separation appears in the buried DLC film only at annealing temperatures above 800 deg. C. Analysis of the XPS C{sub 1s} core-level spectra shows that the (sp{sup 3}+C-H) carbon content of the unprotected DLC film decreases rapidly between 300-700 deg. C indicating the rapid transformation of sp{sup 3}-bonded carbon to sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon combined with hydrogen evolution. In comparison, the decrease in the (sp{sup 3}+C-H) carbon content of the buried DLC film is slower below 800 deg. C. Elastic recoil detection results show that this superior thermal stability is due to the slower hydrogen out diffusion from the buried DLC film thereby impeding the graphitization process. We propose that the SiO{sub 2} overlayer retards the graphitization process during annealing by shifting the chemical equilibrium.

  10. Catalyzed double layer cathodes for high performance and long life molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bischoff, M.; Jantsch, U.; Rohland, B.

    1996-12-31

    NiO/LiCoO{sub 2} double layer cathodes (DLCs) were prepared with a thin highly active LiCoO{sub 2}-layer by a new double layer tape casting/sintering procedure. The resulting metallic porous precursor plates were mounted into the MCFC and heated up by a special procedure to form LiCoO{sub 2} from air, Co and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} in a solid/gas reaction. MCFCs with highly active NiO/LiCoO{sub 2}-DLCs can operate over prolonged periods of time with a Ni-precipitation which is 10% lower than one finds with state of the art NiO cathodes. According to LiCoO{sub 2}-cathodes have theoretical life times of more than 100 000 hours at nonpressurized conditions. MCFCs with new NiO/LiCoO{sub 2} double layer cathodes (DLC) were investigated with regard to variable parameters of their microstructure. From the agglomerate model of the porous MCFC cathode, the dependence of the polarization resistance from the radius of the agglomerates and the inner agglomerate surface area was calculated.

  11. Formation of oxide layers on aluminum, niobium, and tantalum in molten alkali metal carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitina, E. V.; Kazakovtseva, N. A.

    2013-08-01

    The electrochemical synthesis of niobium, tantalum, and aluminum oxide nanolayers is studied in the melt of lithium, sodium, and potassium carbonates with various additives to a salt phase in an oxidizing atmosphere at a temperature of 773 and 873 K. A scheme is proposed for high-temperature anion local activation of the process.

  12. CARBON MONOXIDE FLUXES OF DIFFERENT SOIL LAYERS IN UPLAND CANADIAN BOREAL FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dark or low-light carbon monoxide fluxes at upland Canadian boreal forest sites were measured on-site with static chambers and with a laboratory incubation technique using cores from different depths at the same sites. Three different upland black spruce sites, burned in 1987,199...

  13. Electrically conductive PVC layers filled with active carbon containing H+-conducting porous structures of sulfuric acid complexes of cyclams on fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsivadze, A. Yu.; Fridman, A. Ya.; Morozova, E. M.; Sokolova, N. P.; Voloshchuk, A. M.; Petukhova, G. A.; Bardyshev, I. I.; Gorbunov, A. M.; Novikov, A. K.; Polyakova, I. Ya.; Titova, V. N.; Yavich, A. A.; Petrova, N. V.; Krasil'nikova, O. K.

    2015-07-01

    Electrically conductive PVC layers are synthesized. The layers are filled with active carbons containing porous H+-conductive structures of hydroxyethylcyclam/sulfuric acid complexes crosslinked with cellulose fabric. They are interlaid with layers based on the same structures containing added benzene and hexane adsorbates and solvates. It is found that upon anode or cathode polarization of the layers as H+-conductive electrochemical bridges in air and in the vapor and liquid phases of benzene and hexane, either the electroreduction of H+ to H2 or the electrooxidation of H2O to O2 occurs in the areas of contact between active carbon particles and the complexes. The dependences of rates of H2 and O2 formation on the voltage are studied. The magnitudes of overvoltage and the constants of electrochemical reactions are found to depend on the composition of a layer.

  14. Mechanical properties of nanostructured carbon layers grown by CVD and PLD techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangione, A.; Lanzara, G.; Torrisi, L.; Caridi, F.

    2010-10-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) have been proven to be among the most successful techniques for growing the entire spectrum of carbon films, which can be used in a wide range of technical applications. Here an investigation has been performed to explore the effect of different growing techniques (PLD and CVD) and process parameters (such as deposition time and substrate type) on the films' morphology and mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of the grown thin films were characterised by means of nano/micro indentation and scratch test techniques. It was observed that the thickness of the Al2O3 interlayer (between the Fe catalyst nanoparticles and the silicon substrate) is a critical parameter that can be used to significantly enhance the adhesion strength of PLD-grown carbon films. PLD-grown carbon films were in fact found to have higher adhesion to the substrate than CVD-grown carbon nanotubes (CNT), and the adhesion strength was found to increase with increasing thickness of the Al2O3 interlayer. On the other hand, CVD-grown carbon films (made of aligned CNTs) seem to offer a greater response in terms of elastic modulus. A thorough scanning electron microscopy characterisation suggested that the observed mechanical responses might be correlated to the films' morphology at the nano/microscale. It was in fact observed that, in PLD-grown samples, an increasing deposition time and Al2O3 content leads to a grain size increase and to a clustering effect, thus to a loss in film uniformity.

  15. Carbon nanosheet-titania nanocrystal composites from reassembling of exfoliated graphene oxide layers with colloidal titania nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yongjun; Aizawa, Mami; Peng Wenqing; Wang Zhengming; Hirotsu, Takahiro

    2013-01-15

    Nanoporous composites of carbon nanosheets (CNS) and titania nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by reassembling of delaminated graphite oxide (GO) layers with titania clear sol (TCS), and their structural and porous properties were examined by various physico-chemical methods such as XRD, TG/DTA, FT-IR, Raman, FE-SEM/TEM, and low temperature N{sub 2} adsorption. It was found that the facile approach, which utilizes the electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged GO layers and the positively charged TCS particles, leads to a well composed CNS and ultrafine TiO{sub 2} NPs material whose titania amount reaches up to 71 wt%. The titania phase in these composite materials is mainly anatase, which is resistible against high temperature calcination, but also contains a little amount of rutile and brookite depending on synthesis condition. The porosity of the composite is improved and partially affected by the size distributions of TiO{sub 2} NPs. The unique structure, better porosity, and compatible surface affinity of these composites bring about an adsorption concentration-promoted photocatalytic effects toward organic dyes by successfully combining both properties of CNS and titania NPs. - Graphical Abstract: Carbon nanosheet-titania nanocrystal composites can be synthesized by a facile delamination-reassembling method from graphene oxide and colloidal titania. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A facile delamination-reassembling method for graphene oxide-titania nanocomposite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A nanoporous composite containing mixed phase titania nanocrystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Partition effect of carbon nanosheets preventing TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles from aggregating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption concentration-promoted photocatalysis.

  16. Imaging of oil layers, curvature and contact angle in a mixed-wet and a water-wet carbonate rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kamaljit; Bijeljic, Branko; Blunt, Martin J.

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the effect of wettability of carbonate rocks on the morphologies of remaining oil after sequential oil and brine injection in a capillary-dominated flow regime at elevated pressure. The wettability of Ketton limestone was altered in situ using an oil phase doped with fatty acid which produced mixed-wet conditions (the contact angle where oil contacted the solid surface, measured directly from the images, θ=180°, while brine-filled regions remained water-wet), whereas the untreated rock (without doped oil) was weakly water-wet (θ=47 ± 9°). Using X-ray micro-tomography, we show that the brine displaces oil in larger pores during brine injection in the mixed-wet system, leaving oil layers in the pore corners or sandwiched between two brine interfaces. These oil layers, with an average thickness of 47 ± 17 µm, may provide a conductive flow path for slow oil drainage. In contrast, the oil fragments into isolated oil clusters/ganglia during brine injection under water-wet conditions. Although the remaining oil saturation in a water-wet system is about a factor of two larger than that obtained in the mixed-wet rock, the measured brine-oil interfacial area of the disconnected ganglia is a factor of three smaller than that of oil layers.

  17. Local solid phase growth of few-layer graphene on silicon carbide from nickel silicide supersaturated with carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Escobedo-Cousin, Enrique; Vassilevski, Konstantin; Hopf, Toby; Wright, Nick; O'Neill, Anthony; Horsfall, Alton; Goss, Jonathan; Cumpson, Peter

    2013-03-21

    Patterned few-layer graphene (FLG) films were obtained by local solid phase growth from nickel silicide supersaturated with carbon, following a fabrication scheme, which allows the formation of self-aligned ohmic contacts on FLG and is compatible with conventional SiC device processing methods. The process was realised by the deposition and patterning of thin Ni films on semi-insulating 6H-SiC wafers followed by annealing and the selective removal of the resulting nickel silicide by wet chemistry. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to confirm both the formation and subsequent removal of nickel silicide. The impact of process parameters such as the thickness of the initial Ni layer, annealing temperature, and cooling rates on the FLG films was assessed by Raman spectroscopy, XPS, and atomic force microscopy. The thickness of the final FLG film estimated from the Raman spectra varied from 1 to 4 monolayers for initial Ni layers between 3 and 20 nm thick. Self-aligned contacts were formed on these patterned films by contact photolithography and wet etching of nickel silicide, which enabled the fabrication of test structures to measure the carrier concentration and mobility in the FLG films. A simple model of diffusion-driven solid phase chemical reaction was used to explain formation of the FLG film at the interface between nickel silicide and silicon carbide.

  18. A Novel Layered Sedimentary Rocks Structure of the Oxygen-Enriched Carbon for Ultrahigh-Rate-Performance Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin-Lin; Li, Huan-Huan; Shi, Yan-Hong; Fan, Chao-Ying; Wu, Xing-Long; Wang, Hai-Feng; Sun, Hai-Zhu; Zhang, Jing-Ping

    2016-02-17

    In this paper, gelatin as a natural biomass was selected to successfully prepare an oxygen-enriched carbon with layered sedimentary rocks structure, which exhibited ultrahigh-rate performance and excellent cycling stability as supercapacitors. The specific capacitance reached 272.6 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) and still retained 197.0 F g(-1) even at 100 A g(-1) (with high capacitance retention of 72.3%). The outstanding electrochemical performance resulted from the special layered structure with large surface area (827.8 m(2) g(-1)) and high content of oxygen (16.215 wt %), which effectively realized the synergistic effects of the electrical double-layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance. Moreover, it delivered an energy density of 25.3 Wh kg(-1) even with a high power density of 34.7 kW kg(-1) and ultralong cycling stability (with no capacitance decay even over 10,000 cycles at 2 A g(-1)) in a symmetric supercapacitor, which are highly desirable for their practical application in energy storage devices and conversion.

  19. What is below the support layer affects carbon nanotube growth: an iron catalyst reservoir yields taller nanotube carpets.

    PubMed

    Shawat, E; Mor, V; Oakes, L; Fleger, Y; Pint, C L; Nessim, G D

    2014-01-01

    Here we demonstrate an approach to enhance the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by including a catalyst reservoir underneath the thin-film alumina catalyst underlayer. This reservoir led to enhanced CNT growth due to the migration of catalytic material from below the underlayer up to the surface through alumina pinholes during processing. This led to the formation of large Fe particles, which in turn influenced the morphology evolution of the catalytic iron surface layer through Ostwald ripening. With inclusion of this catalyst reservoir, we observed CNT growth up to 100% taller than that observed without the catalyst reservoir consistently across a wide range of annealing and growth durations. Imaging studies of catalyst layers both for different annealing times and for different alumina support layer thicknesses demonstrate that the surface exposure of metal from the reservoir leads to an active population of smaller catalyst particles upon annealing as opposed to a bimodal catalyst size distribution that appears without inclusion of a reservoir. Overall, the mechanism for growth enhancement we present here demonstrates a new route to engineering efficient catalyst structures to overcome the limitations of CNT growth processes. PMID:24323364

  20. A Novel Layered Sedimentary Rocks Structure of the Oxygen-Enriched Carbon for Ultrahigh-Rate-Performance Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin-Lin; Li, Huan-Huan; Shi, Yan-Hong; Fan, Chao-Ying; Wu, Xing-Long; Wang, Hai-Feng; Sun, Hai-Zhu; Zhang, Jing-Ping

    2016-02-17

    In this paper, gelatin as a natural biomass was selected to successfully prepare an oxygen-enriched carbon with layered sedimentary rocks structure, which exhibited ultrahigh-rate performance and excellent cycling stability as supercapacitors. The specific capacitance reached 272.6 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) and still retained 197.0 F g(-1) even at 100 A g(-1) (with high capacitance retention of 72.3%). The outstanding electrochemical performance resulted from the special layered structure with large surface area (827.8 m(2) g(-1)) and high content of oxygen (16.215 wt %), which effectively realized the synergistic effects of the electrical double-layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance. Moreover, it delivered an energy density of 25.3 Wh kg(-1) even with a high power density of 34.7 kW kg(-1) and ultralong cycling stability (with no capacitance decay even over 10,000 cycles at 2 A g(-1)) in a symmetric supercapacitor, which are highly desirable for their practical application in energy storage devices and conversion. PMID:26815316

  1. Evolution of fault zones in carbonates with mechanical stratigraphy - Insights from scale models using layered cohesive powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gent, Heijn W.; Holland, Marc; Urai, Janos L.; Loosveld, Ramon

    2010-09-01

    We present analogue models of the formation of dilatant normal faults and fractures in carbonate fault zones, using cohesive hemihydrate powder (CaSO 4·½H 2O). The evolution of these dilatant fault zones involves a range of processes such as fragmentation, gravity-driven breccia transport and the formation of dilatant jogs. To allow scaling to natural prototypes, extensive material characterisation was done. This showed that tensile strength and cohesion depend on the state of compaction, whereas the friction angle remains approximately constant. In our models, tensile strength of the hemihydrate increases with depth from 9 to 50 Pa, while cohesion increases from 40 to 250 Pa. We studied homogeneous and layered material sequences, using sand as a relatively weak layer and hemihydrate/graphite mixtures as a slightly stronger layer. Deformation was analyzed by time-lapse photography and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to calculate the evolution of the displacement field. With PIV the initial, predominantly elastic deformation and progressive localization of deformation are observed in detail. We observed near-vertical opening-mode fractures near the surface. With increasing depth, dilational shear faults were dominant, with releasing jogs forming at fault-dip variations. A transition to non-dilatant shear faults was observed near the bottom of the model. In models with mechanical stratigraphy, fault zones are more complex. The inferred stress states and strengths in different parts of the model agree with the observed transitions in the mode of deformation.

  2. Multifunctional and Stable Monolayers on Carbon: A Simple and Reliable Method for Backfilling Sparse Layers Grafted from Protected Aryldiazonium Ions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lita; Gunby, Nathaniel R; Crittenden, Deborah L; Downard, Alison J

    2016-03-22

    A new strategy for preparation of robust multifunctional low nanometer thickness monolayers on carbon substrates is presented. Beginning with protected aryldiazonium salts, sparse monolayers of ethynyl-, amino-, and carboxy-terminated tethers are covalently anchored to the surface. The layers are then backfilled with a second modifier via the nucleophilic addition of an amine derivative to the surface. Through use of electroactive moieties coupled to the tethers, and an electroactive amine for backfilling, electrochemical measurements reveal that backfilling approximately doubles the surface concentration of the monolayer. Cyclic voltammetry of solution-based redox probes at the modified surfaces is consistent with the expected blocking properties at various stages of surface preparation. Fractional surface coverages of the layers are estimated using electrochemically determined surface concentrations of modifiers and computationally derived modifier footprints. Assuming free rotation of the coupled ferrocenyl or nitrophenyl groups leads to physically unreasonable fractional surface coverages, indicating that these larger modifiers must be rotationally restricted. Using a conformationally constrained model produces lower bound estimates of the total fractional surface coverage close to 0.4, with tether-only coverages close to 0.2. The backfilled tether layers constitute practical platforms for controlled construction of complex interfaces with many potential applications including sensing, molecular electronics, and catalysis.

  3. "Egg-Box"-Assisted Fabrication of Porous Carbon with Small Mesopores for High-Rate Electric Double Layer Capacitors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Danmiao; Liu, Qinglei; Gu, Jiajun; Su, Yishi; Zhang, Wang; Zhang, Di

    2015-11-24

    Here we report a method to fabricate porous carbon with small mesopores around 2-4 nm by simple activation of charcoals derived from carbonization of seaweed consisting of microcrystalline domains formed by the "egg-box" model. The existence of mesopores in charcoals leads to a high specific surface area up to 3270 m(2) g(-1), with 95% surface area provided by small mesopores. This special pore structure shows high adaptability when used as electrode materials for an electric double layer capacitor, especially at high charge-discharge rate. The gravimetric capacitance values of the porous carbon are 425 and 210 F g(-1) and volumetric capacitance values are 242 and 120 F cm(-3) in 1 M H2SO4 and 1 M TEA BF4/AN, respectively. The capacitances even remain at 280 F g(-1) (160 F cm(-3)) at 100 A g(-1) and 156 F g(-1) (90 F cm(-3)) at 50 A g(-1) in the aqueous and organic electrolytes, demonstrating excellent high-rate capacitive performance.

  4. Thermally-induced single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations from a 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer to a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Fan, Rui Qing; Wang, Xin Ming; Wei, Li Guo; Song, Yang; Du, Xi; Xing, Kai; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yu Lin

    2016-07-28

    In this work, a rare 2D → 3D single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation (SCSC) is observed in metal-organic coordination complexes, which is triggered by thermal treatment. The 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer [Cd(IBA)2]n (1) is irreversibly converted into a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework {[Cd(IBA)2(H2O)]·2.5H2O}n (2) (HIBA = 4-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)benzoic acid). Consideration is given to these two complexes with different interpenetrating structures and dimensionality, and their influence on photovoltaic properties are studied. Encouraged by the UV-visible absorption and HOMO-LUMO energy states matched for sensitizing TiO2, the two complexes are employed in combination with N719 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) to compensate absorption in the ultraviolet and blue-violet region, offset competitive visible light absorption of I3(-) and reducing charge the recombination of injected electrons. After co-sensitization with 1 and 2, the device co-sensitized by 1/N719 and 2/N719 to yield overall efficiencies of 7.82% and 8.39%, which are 19.94% and 28.68% higher than that of the device sensitized only by N719 (6.52%). Consequently, high dimensional interpenetrating complexes could serve as excellent co-sensitizers and have application in DSSCs. PMID:27356177

  5. Thermally-induced single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations from a 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer to a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Fan, Rui Qing; Wang, Xin Ming; Wei, Li Guo; Song, Yang; Du, Xi; Xing, Kai; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yu Lin

    2016-07-28

    In this work, a rare 2D → 3D single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation (SCSC) is observed in metal-organic coordination complexes, which is triggered by thermal treatment. The 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer [Cd(IBA)2]n (1) is irreversibly converted into a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework {[Cd(IBA)2(H2O)]·2.5H2O}n (2) (HIBA = 4-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)benzoic acid). Consideration is given to these two complexes with different interpenetrating structures and dimensionality, and their influence on photovoltaic properties are studied. Encouraged by the UV-visible absorption and HOMO-LUMO energy states matched for sensitizing TiO2, the two complexes are employed in combination with N719 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) to compensate absorption in the ultraviolet and blue-violet region, offset competitive visible light absorption of I3(-) and reducing charge the recombination of injected electrons. After co-sensitization with 1 and 2, the device co-sensitized by 1/N719 and 2/N719 to yield overall efficiencies of 7.82% and 8.39%, which are 19.94% and 28.68% higher than that of the device sensitized only by N719 (6.52%). Consequently, high dimensional interpenetrating complexes could serve as excellent co-sensitizers and have application in DSSCs.

  6. Deuterium retention in codeposited layers and carbon materials exposed to high flux D-plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, I. I.; Gorodetsky, A. E.; Zalavutdinov, R. Kh; Zakharov, A. P.; Burtseva, T. A.; Mazul, I. V.; Khripunov, B. I.; Shapkin, V. V.; Petrov, V. B.

    A ceramic BCN target with samples of dense RG-Ti-91 without boron, RG-Ti-B with boron (0.1 at.%) and porous POCO AXF-5Q graphites was exposed in a stationary D-plasma of the `Lenta' device with an ion energy of 200 eV and an ion flux of (3 - 6) × 10 17 D/cm 2s at 1040 and 1400 K to a fluence of ˜1 × 10 22 D/cm 2. Codeposited layers were obtained for comparison on the target surface. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) showed that the amount of deuterium in RG-Ti after exposure at 1040 K was more than an order of magnitude higher than in POCO (9 × 10 17 and 7 × 10 16 D/cm 2, respectively). The retention took place preferentially in a surface layer about 100 μm thick. The bulk deuterium concentration in both RG-Ti and POCO was lower than 1 appm. The irradiated RG-Ti surface was subjected to strong erosion and consisted of `columnar' grains covered with TiC at their tips. The deuterium in RG-Ti irradiated at 1400 K was located in the surface layer (1.5 × 10 16 D/cm 2). The value of the bulk concentration did not exceed 0.1 appm while in POCO it was equal to about 20 appm. TDS for deuterium in RG-Ti demonstrated a spectrum similar to that for codeposited layers on a target surface. The differences in deuterium retention in the graphites are explained on the basis of structural differences. Considering tritium inventory assessment for ITER, dense graphites like RG-Ti are preferred for working divertor plates at high temperatures.

  7. High pseudocapacitive cobalt carbonate hydroxide films derived from CoAl layered double hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhiyi; Zhu, Wei; Lei, Xiaodong; Williams, Gareth R.; O'Hare, Dermot; Chang, Zheng; Sun, Xiaoming; Duan, Xue

    2012-05-01

    A thin nanosheet of mesoporous cobalt carbonate hydroxide (MPCCH) has been fabricated from a CoAl-LDH nanosheet following removal of the Al cations by alkali etching. The basic etched electrode exhibits enhanced specific capacitance (1075 F g-1 at 5 mA cm-2) and higher rate capability and cycling stability (92% maintained after 2000 cycles).A thin nanosheet of mesoporous cobalt carbonate hydroxide (MPCCH) has been fabricated from a CoAl-LDH nanosheet following removal of the Al cations by alkali etching. The basic etched electrode exhibits enhanced specific capacitance (1075 F g-1 at 5 mA cm-2) and higher rate capability and cycling stability (92% maintained after 2000 cycles). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental procedure, specific capacitance calculation, EDS and FTIR results, electrochemical results of CoAl-LDH and SEM image. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30617d

  8. Electrochemistry of Layered Graphitic Carbon Nitride Synthesised from Various Precursors: Searching for Catalytic Effects.

    PubMed

    Yew, Ying Teng; Lim, Chee Shan; Eng, Alex Yong Sheng; Oh, Junghoon; Park, Sungjin; Pumera, Martin

    2016-02-16

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3 N4 ), synthesised by pyrolysis of different precursors (dicyandiamide, melamine and urea) under varying reaction conditions (air and nitrogen gas) is subjected to electrochemical studies for the elucidation of the inherent catalytic efficiency of the pristine material. Contrary to popular belief, pristine g-C3 N4 shows negligible, if any, enhancement in its electrochemical behaviour in this comprehensive study. Voltammetric analysis reveals g-C3 N4 to display similar catalytic efficiency to the unmodified glassy carbon electrode surface on which the bulk material was deposited. This highlights the non-catalytic nature of the pristine material and challenges the feasibility of using g-C3 N4 as a heterogeneous catalyst to deliver numerous promised applications.

  9. Ion beam analysis of tungsten layers in EUROFER model systems and carbon plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ström, Petter; Petersson, Per; Rubel, Marek; Primetzhofer, Daniel; Brezinsek, Sebastijan; Kreter, Arkadi; Unterberg, Bernhard; Sergienko, Gennady; Sugiyama, Kazuyoshi

    2016-03-01

    The tungsten enriched surface layers in two fusion-relevant EUROFER steel model samples, consisting of an iron-tungsten mixture exposed to sputtering by deuterium ions, were studied by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and medium energy ion scattering. Exposure conditions were the same for the two samples and the total amount of tungsten atoms per unit area in the enriched layers were similar (2 · 1015 and 2.4 · 1015 atoms/cm2 respectively), despite slightly different initial atomic compositions. A depth profile featuring exponential decrease in tungsten content towards higher depths with 10-20 at.% of tungsten at the surface and a decay constant between 0.05 and 0.08 Å-1 was indicated in one sample, whereas only the total areal density of tungsten atoms was measured in the other. In addition, two different beams, iodine and chlorine, were employed for elastic recoil detection analysis of the deposited layer on a polished graphite plate from a test limiter in the TEXTOR tokamak following experiments with tungsten hexafluoride injection. The chlorine beam was preferred for tungsten analysis, mainly because it (as opposed to the iodine beam) does not give rise to problems with overlap of forward scattered beam particles and recoiled tungsten in the spectrum.

  10. Irreversible membrane fouling abatement through pre-deposited layer of hierarchical porous carbons.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Juma Z; Dua, Rubal; Kurniasari, Novita; Kennedy, Maria D; Wang, Peng; Amy, Gary L

    2014-11-15

    In this work, dual-templated hierarchical porous carbons (HPCs), produced from a coupled ice-hard templating approach, are shown to be a highly effective solution to the commonly occurring problem of irreversible fouling of low-pressure membranes used for pre-treatment in wastewater reuse. For the first time, dual-templated HPCs, along with their respective counterparts - single-templated meso-porous carbon (MPCs) (without macropores) - are tested in terms of their fouling reduction capacity and ability to remove different effluent organic matter fractions present in wastewater and compared with a commercially available powdered activated carbon (PAC). The synthesized HPCs provided exceptional fouling abatement, a 4-fold higher fouling reduction as compared to the previously reported best performing commercial PAC and ∼2.5-fold better fouling reduction than their respective mesoporous counterpart. Thus, it is shown that not only mesoporosity, but macroporosity is also necessary to achieve high fouling reduction, thus emphasizing the need for dual templating. In the case of HPCs, the pre-deposition technique is also found to outperform the traditional sorbent-feed mixing approach, mainly in terms of removal of fouling components. Based on their superior performance, a high permeability (ultra-low-pressure) membrane consisting of the synthesized HPC pre-deposited on a large pore size membrane support (0.45 μm membrane), is shown to give excellent pre-treatment performance for wastewater reuse application.

  11. Irreversible membrane fouling abatement through pre-deposited layer of hierarchical porous carbons.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Juma Z; Dua, Rubal; Kurniasari, Novita; Kennedy, Maria D; Wang, Peng; Amy, Gary L

    2014-11-15

    In this work, dual-templated hierarchical porous carbons (HPCs), produced from a coupled ice-hard templating approach, are shown to be a highly effective solution to the commonly occurring problem of irreversible fouling of low-pressure membranes used for pre-treatment in wastewater reuse. For the first time, dual-templated HPCs, along with their respective counterparts - single-templated meso-porous carbon (MPCs) (without macropores) - are tested in terms of their fouling reduction capacity and ability to remove different effluent organic matter fractions present in wastewater and compared with a commercially available powdered activated carbon (PAC). The synthesized HPCs provided exceptional fouling abatement, a 4-fold higher fouling reduction as compared to the previously reported best performing commercial PAC and ∼2.5-fold better fouling reduction than their respective mesoporous counterpart. Thus, it is shown that not only mesoporosity, but macroporosity is also necessary to achieve high fouling reduction, thus emphasizing the need for dual templating. In the case of HPCs, the pre-deposition technique is also found to outperform the traditional sorbent-feed mixing approach, mainly in terms of removal of fouling components. Based on their superior performance, a high permeability (ultra-low-pressure) membrane consisting of the synthesized HPC pre-deposited on a large pore size membrane support (0.45 μm membrane), is shown to give excellent pre-treatment performance for wastewater reuse application. PMID:25128660

  12. On the structure of the outer layers of cool carbon stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querci, F.; Querci, M.; Wing, R. F.; Cassatella, A.; Heck, A.

    1982-07-01

    Exposures on the spectra of four late C-type stars have been made with the IUE satellite in the wavelength range of the LWR camera (1900-3200 A). Two Mira variables near maximum light and two semiregular variables were observed. Although the exposure times used, which range up to 240 min in the low-resolution mode, were more than sufficient to record the continuum and emission lines of Mg II, Fe II, and Al II in normal M stars of similar magnitude and temperature, no light was recorded. It is concluded that the far-ultraviolet continuum is strongly depressed in these cool carbon stars. The absence of UV emission lines implies either that the chromospheric lines observed in M stars require an ultraviolet flux for their excitation, or that cool carbon stars have no chromosphere at all or that the opacity source is located above even the emission-line-forming region. This opacity source, which is probably some carbon condensate since it is weak or absent in M stars while absorbing strongly in C stars, is discussed both in terms of the chromospheric interpretation of the emission lines and in terms of their shock-wave interpretation.

  13. Modeling the effects of fire severity and climate warming on active layer and soil carbon dynamics of black spruce forests across the landscape in interior Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Genet, H.; McGuire, Anthony David; Barrett, K.; Breen, A.; Euskirchen, E.S.; Johnstone, J.F.; Kasischke, E.S.; Melvin, A.M.; Bennett, A.; Mack, M.C.; Rupp, T.S.; Schuur, A.E.G.; Turetsky, M.R.; Yuan, F.

    2013-01-01

    There is a substantial amount of carbon stored in the permafrost soils of boreal forest ecosystems, where it is currently protected from decomposition. The surface organic horizons insulate the deeper soil from variations in atmospheric temperature. The removal of these insulating horizons through consumption by fire increases the vulnerability of permafrost to thaw, and the carbon stored in permafrost to decomposition. In this study we ask how warming and fire regime may influence spatial and temporal changes in active layer and carbon dynamics across a boreal forest landscape in interior Alaska. To address this question, we (1) developed and tested a predictive model of the effect of fire severity on soil organic horizons that depends on landscape-level conditions and (2) used this model to evaluate the long-term consequences of warming and changes in fire regime on active layer and soil carbon dynamics of black spruce forests across interior Alaska. The predictive model of fire severity, designed from the analysis of field observations, reproduces the effect of local topography (landform category, the slope angle and aspect and flow accumulation), weather conditions (drought index, soil moisture) and fire characteristics (day of year and size of the fire) on the reduction of the organic layer caused by fire. The integration of the fire severity model into an ecosystem process-based model allowed us to document the relative importance and interactions among local topography, fire regime and climate warming on active layer and soil carbon dynamics. Lowlands were more resistant to severe fires and climate warming, showing smaller increases in active layer thickness and soil carbon loss compared to drier flat uplands and slopes. In simulations that included the effects of both warming and fire at the regional scale, fire was primarily responsible for a reduction in organic layer thickness of 0.06 m on average by 2100 that led to an increase in active layer thickness

  14. Modeling the effects of fire severity and climate warming on active layer thickness and soil carbon storage of black spruce forests across the landscape in interior Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genet, H.; McGuire, A. D.; Barrett, K.; Breen, A.; Euskirchen, E. S.; Johnstone, J. F.; Kasischke, E. S.; Melvin, A. M.; Bennett, A.; Mack, M. C.; Rupp, T. S.; Schuur, A. E. G.; Turetsky, M. R.; Yuan, F.

    2013-12-01

    There is a substantial amount of carbon stored in the permafrost soils of boreal forest ecosystems, where it is currently protected from decomposition. The surface organic horizons insulate the deeper soil from variations in atmospheric temperature. The removal of these insulating horizons through consumption by fire increases the vulnerability of permafrost to thaw, and the carbon stored in permafrost to decomposition. In this study we ask how warming and fire regime may influence spatial and temporal changes in active layer and carbon dynamics across a boreal forest landscape in interior Alaska. To address this question, we (1) developed and tested a predictive model of the effect of fire severity on soil organic horizons that depends on landscape-level conditions and (2) used this model to evaluate the long-term consequences of warming and changes in fire regime on active layer and soil carbon dynamics of black spruce forests across interior Alaska. The predictive model of fire severity, designed from the analysis of field observations, reproduces the effect of local topography (landform category, the slope angle and aspect and flow accumulation), weather conditions (drought index, soil moisture) and fire characteristics (day of year and size of the fire) on the reduction of the organic layer caused by fire. The integration of the fire severity model into an ecosystem process-based model allowed us to document the relative importance and interactions among local topography, fire regime and climate warming on active layer and soil carbon dynamics. Lowlands were more resistant to severe fires and climate warming, showing smaller increases in active layer thickness and soil carbon loss compared to drier flat uplands and slopes. In simulations that included the effects of both warming and fire at the regional scale, fire was primarily responsible for a reduction in organic layer thickness of 0.06 m on average by 2100 that led to an increase in active layer thickness

  15. Impact of active layer detachments on carbon exchange in a high-Arctic ecosystem, Cape Bounty, Nunavut, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, N. A.; Beamish, A.; Neil, A.; Wagner, I.

    2011-12-01

    High Arctic ecosystems are experiencing some of the earliest and most extreme changes in climate, including increases in both temperature and precipitation leading to a deepening and destabilization of the active layer. This destabilization of shallow slopes can lead to disturbances such as active layer detachments (ALD), which could further alter soil temperature and moisture regimes, potentially releasing carbon (C) and nutrients previously unavailable to soil microbes. We explored the impact of ALD's on carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange at the Cape Bounty Arctic Watershed Observatory on Melville Island, Canada over two growing seasons. CO2 exchange under light and dark conditions was measured approximately every five to nine days across both growing seasons for a total of five sampling day in 2009 and nine sampling days in 2010. Sampling was stratified to include highly disturbed, moderately disturbed, and undisturbed areas. Transparent static chambers were equipped with a Vaisala GMP343 CO2 sensor to measure changes in CO2 concentration over time. Based on static chamber C flux measurements during the growing seasons of 2009 and 2010, we found that the moderately disturbed sites were net sinks of CO2 (-6.44gC m-2 season-1, -8.21gC m-2 season-1, respectively). The highly disturbed sites however were net sources of CO2 in both seasons (3.01gC m-2 season-1, 30.01gC m-2 season-1, respectively). Control sites in 2009 were a net C sink (-6.48gC m-2 season-1) while in 2010 they represented a net C source (16.75gC m-2 season-1). Overall, the formation of ALD's led to highly disturbed areas (roughly 40% of the area of an ALD) becoming C sources, but appeared to enhance C uptake in moderately disturbed areas. Active layer depth explained little of the variation in any of the C fluxes, while combinations of soil moisture, temperature, and air temperature explained up to roughly 40% of the variation in C fluxes. These findings have important implications if temperature and

  16. Partially oxidized atomic cobalt layers for carbon dioxide electroreduction to liquid fuel.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Lin, Yue; Jiao, Xingchen; Sun, Yongfu; Luo, Qiquan; Zhang, Wenhua; Li, Dianqi; Yang, Jinlong; Xie, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Electroreduction of CO2 into useful fuels, especially if driven by renewable energy, represents a potentially 'clean' strategy for replacing fossil feedstocks and dealing with increasing CO2 emissions and their adverse effects on climate. The critical bottleneck lies in activating CO2 into the CO2(•-) radical anion or other intermediates that can be converted further, as the activation usually requires impractically high overpotentials. Recently, electrocatalysts based on oxide-derived metal nanostructures have been shown to enable CO2 reduction at low overpotentials. However, it remains unclear how the electrocatalytic activity of these metals is influenced by their native oxides, mainly because microstructural features such as interfaces and defects influence CO2 reduction activity yet are difficult to control. To evaluate the role of the two different catalytic sites, here we fabricate two kinds of four-atom-thick layers: pure cobalt metal, and co-existing domains of cobalt metal and cobalt oxide. Cobalt mainly produces formate (HCOO(-)) during CO2 electroreduction; we find that surface cobalt atoms of the atomically thin layers have higher intrinsic activity and selectivity towards formate production, at lower overpotentials, than do surface cobalt atoms on bulk samples. Partial oxidation of the atomic layers further increases their intrinsic activity, allowing us to realize stable current densities of about 10 milliamperes per square centimetre over 40 hours, with approximately 90 per cent formate selectivity at an overpotential of only 0.24 volts, which outperforms previously reported metal or metal oxide electrodes evaluated under comparable conditions. The correct morphology and oxidation state can thus transform a material from one considered nearly non-catalytic for the CO2 electroreduction reaction into an active catalyst. These findings point to new opportunities for manipulating and improving the CO2 electroreduction properties of metal systems

  17. Partially oxidized atomic cobalt layers for carbon dioxide electroreduction to liquid fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Lin, Yue; Jiao, Xingchen; Sun, Yongfu; Luo, Qiquan; Zhang, Wenhua; Li, Dianqi; Yang, Jinlong; Xie, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Electroreduction of CO2 into useful fuels, especially if driven by renewable energy, represents a potentially ‘clean’ strategy for replacing fossil feedstocks and dealing with increasing CO2 emissions and their adverse effects on climate. The critical bottleneck lies in activating CO2 into the CO2•- radical anion or other intermediates that can be converted further, as the activation usually requires impractically high overpotentials. Recently, electrocatalysts based on oxide-derived metal nanostructures have been shown to enable CO2 reduction at low overpotentials. However, it remains unclear how the electrocatalytic activity of these metals is influenced by their native oxides, mainly because microstructural features such as interfaces and defects influence CO2 reduction activity yet are difficult to control. To evaluate the role of the two different catalytic sites, here we fabricate two kinds of four-atom-thick layers: pure cobalt metal, and co-existing domains of cobalt metal and cobalt oxide. Cobalt mainly produces formate (HCOO-) during CO2 electroreduction; we find that surface cobalt atoms of the atomically thin layers have higher intrinsic activity and selectivity towards formate production, at lower overpotentials, than do surface cobalt atoms on bulk samples. Partial oxidation of the atomic layers further increases their intrinsic activity, allowing us to realize stable current densities of about 10 milliamperes per square centimetre over 40 hours, with approximately 90 per cent formate selectivity at an overpotential of only 0.24 volts, which outperforms previously reported metal or metal oxide electrodes evaluated under comparable conditions. The correct morphology and oxidation state can thus transform a material from one considered nearly non-catalytic for the CO2 electroreduction reaction into an active catalyst. These findings point to new opportunities for manipulating and improving the CO2 electroreduction properties of metal systems

  18. Partially oxidized atomic cobalt layers for carbon dioxide electroreduction to liquid fuel.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Lin, Yue; Jiao, Xingchen; Sun, Yongfu; Luo, Qiquan; Zhang, Wenhua; Li, Dianqi; Yang, Jinlong; Xie, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Electroreduction of CO2 into useful fuels, especially if driven by renewable energy, represents a potentially 'clean' strategy for replacing fossil feedstocks and dealing with increasing CO2 emissions and their adverse effects on climate. The critical bottleneck lies in activating CO2 into the CO2(•-) radical anion or other intermediates that can be converted further, as the activation usually requires impractically high overpotentials. Recently, electrocatalysts based on oxide-derived metal nanostructures have been shown to enable CO2 reduction at low overpotentials. However, it remains unclear how the electrocatalytic activity of these metals is influenced by their native oxides, mainly because microstructural features such as interfaces and defects influence CO2 reduction activity yet are difficult to control. To evaluate the role of the two different catalytic sites, here we fabricate two kinds of four-atom-thick layers: pure cobalt metal, and co-existing domains of cobalt metal and cobalt oxide. Cobalt mainly produces formate (HCOO(-)) during CO2 electroreduction; we find that surface cobalt atoms of the atomically thin layers have higher intrinsic activity and selectivity towards formate production, at lower overpotentials, than do surface cobalt atoms on bulk samples. Partial oxidation of the atomic layers further increases their intrinsic activity, allowing us to realize stable current densities of about 10 milliamperes per square centimetre over 40 hours, with approximately 90 per cent formate selectivity at an overpotential of only 0.24 volts, which outperforms previously reported metal or metal oxide electrodes evaluated under comparable conditions. The correct morphology and oxidation state can thus transform a material from one considered nearly non-catalytic for the CO2 electroreduction reaction into an active catalyst. These findings point to new opportunities for manipulating and improving the CO2 electroreduction properties of metal systems

  19. Suppression of interlaminar damage in carbon/epoxy laminates by use of interleaf layers

    SciTech Connect

    Tanimoto, Toshio . Dept. of Materials Science Ceramic Technology)

    1994-10-15

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) have been widely used as a structural material. In general, fiber orientation angle of each lamina in these laminates is variously chosen in order to taylor a material which meets the particular requirement for the material properties in arbitrary direction of laminate. Quasi-isotropic lamination, in which the laminate consisted of laminae with fiber orientation of 0[degree], +45[degree], [minus]45[degree] and 90[degree] to loading axis, is most commonly employed in the actual application. However, quasi-isotropic carbon/epoxy laminates are known to develop the interlaminar stress concentrations near the free edge region. These laminates have a strong tendency to delaminate near the edges when subjected to axial in-plane loading. Such a free edge delamination under loading in the plane of the laminate is a unique problem to laminated composites. This paper summarizes the author's investigation which was performed to reduce the free edge interlaminar stresses in the laminate by incorporating interleaf films between plies and thus to improve the mechanical properties of these materials. In their previous work, the authors have shown that these laminates exhibit a high vibration damping capability. Loss factor values for these CFRP/interleaf laminates which were measured in cantilever beam tests, are 5 to 50 times as large as that for conventional CFRP. In this paper, discussion will be provided on the mechanical properties of the interleaved quasi-isotropic carbon/epoxy laminate, [0/[+-]45/90][sub s], with a special emphasis on the optimum design of interply locations to incorporate the interleaf films for the particular requirement such as static strength, elastic modulus, fatigue resistance and so on.

  20. Charge storage mechanism in nanoporous carbons and its consequence for electrical double layer capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, P.; Gogotsi, Y.

    2010-06-21

    Electrochemical capacitors, also known as supercapacitors, are energy storage devices that fill the gap between batteries and dielectric capacitors. Thanks to their unique features, they have a key role to play in energy storage and harvesting, acting as a complement to or even a replacement of batteries which has already been achieved in various applications. One of the challenges in the supercapacitor area is to increase their energy density. Some recent discoveries regarding ion adsorption in microporous carbon exhibiting pores in the nanometre range can help in designing the next generation of high-energy-density supercapacitors.

  1. The surface chemical properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified by thermal fluorination for electric double-layer capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Min-Jung; Jeong, Euigyung; Lee, Young-Seak

    2015-08-01

    The surfaces of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were thermally fluorinated at various temperatures to enhance the electrochemical properties of the MWCNTs for use as electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC) electrodes. The fluorine functional groups were added to the surfaces of the MWCNTs via thermal fluorination. The thermal fluorination exposed the Fe catalyst on MWCNTs, and the specific surface area increased due to etching during the fluorination. The specific capacitances of the thermally fluorinated at 100 °C, MWCNT based electrode increased from 57 to 94 F/g at current densities of 0.2 A/g, respectively. This enhancement in capacitance can be attributed to increased polarization of the thermally fluorinated MWCNT surface, which increased the affinity between the electrode surface and the electrolyte ions.

  2. Curvature Effect on the Capacitance of Electric Double Layers at Ionic Liquid/Onion-Like Carbon Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Guang; Jiang, Deen; Cummings, Peter T

    2012-01-01

    Recent experiments have revealed that onion-like carbons (OLCs) offer high energy density and charging/discharging rates when used as the electrodes in supercapacitors. To understand the physical origin of this phenomenon, molecular dynamics simulations were performed for a room-temperature ionic liquid near idealized spherical OLCs with radii ranging from 0.356 to 1.223 nm. We find that the surface charge density increases almost linearly with the potential applied on electric double layers (EDLs) near OLCs. This leads to a nearly flat shape of the differential capacitance versus the potential, unlike the bell or camel shape observed on planar electrodes. Moreover, our simulations reveal that the capacitance of EDLs on OLCs increases with the curvature or as the OLC size decreases, in agreement with experimental observations. The curvature effect is explained by dominance of charge overscreening over a wide potential range and increased ion density per unit area of electrode surface as the OLC becomes smaller.

  3. A carbon nanotube-infused polysulfone membrane with polyvinyl alcohol layer for treating oil-containing waste water

    PubMed Central

    Maphutha, Selby; Moothi, Kapil; Meyyappan, M.; Iyuke, Sunny E.

    2013-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) integrated polymer composite membrane with a polyvinyl alcohol barrier layer has been prepared to separate oil from water for treatment of oil-containing waste water. The CNTs were synthesised using chemical vapour deposition, and a phase inversion method was employed for the blending of the CNTs in the polymer composite solution for casting of the membrane. Relative to the baseline polymer, an increase of 119% in the tensile strength, 77% in the Young's modulus and 258% in the toughness is seen for a concentration of 7.5% CNTs in the polymer composite. The permeate through the membrane shows oil concentrations below the acceptable 10 mg/L limit with an excellent throughput and oil rejection of over 95%. PMID:23518875

  4. A carbon nanotube-infused polysulfone membrane with polyvinyl alcohol layer for treating oil-containing waste water.

    PubMed

    Maphutha, Selby; Moothi, Kapil; Meyyappan, M; Iyuke, Sunny E

    2013-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) integrated polymer composite membrane with a polyvinyl alcohol barrier layer has been prepared to separate oil from water for treatment of oil-containing waste water. The CNTs were synthesised using chemical vapour deposition, and a phase inversion method was employed for the blending of the CNTs in the polymer composite solution for casting of the membrane. Relative to the baseline polymer, an increase of 119% in the tensile strength, 77% in the Young's modulus and 258% in the toughness is seen for a concentration of 7.5% CNTs in the polymer composite. The permeate through the membrane shows oil concentrations below the acceptable 10 mg/L limit with an excellent throughput and oil rejection of over 95%.

  5. Facile method to control the diameter and density of carbon nanotubes by using a catalyst-embedded supporting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Woong; Han, Jaeseok; Im, Hyunsik; Choi, WonChel; Park, Young S.; Yoon, Seok-Beom

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated an effective method to control the diameter and the density of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by introducing a catalyst-embedded supporting layer (CSL) prepared by using rf-magnetron sputtering with a mixed target consisting of Fe and Al2O3. The type of CNTs was changed from single-walled CNTs with a diameter of 0.85 ~ 1.55 nm to multi-walled CNTs with increasing rf-magnetron sputtering power. The controllability of the diameter and the density of the CNTs was confirmed to have been improved by using the rf power during the sputtering of the CSL and the concentration of Fe in the mixed target, respectively.

  6. Effect of pore morphology on the electrochemical properties of electric double layer carbon cryogel supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalla García, Betzaida; Feaver, Aaron M.; Zhang, Qifeng; Champion, Richard D.; Cao, Guozhong; Fister, Tim T.; Nagle, Ken P.; Seidler, Gerald T.

    2008-07-01

    In this study, a group of carbon cryogels have been synthesized using resorcinol formaldehyde as precursors, and altered via catalysis and activation, to obtain varied nanostructures and pore size distributions. To understand the relation between structure and electrochemical properties, an alternate approach to de Levi's cylindrical pore, transmission line method was utilized. Using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, the capacitor can be studied as a dielectric system composed of a porous electrode and the electrolyte (tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate in propylene carbonate). The complex capacitance and power are used to study the behavior of the system below the relaxation frequency f0 (φ=-45°). Therefore, the relaxation of the capacitor system at the low frequency range, f

  7. Atomic Layer Deposition of ZnO on Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes and Its Use for Synthesis of CNT-ZnO Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Li, X L; Li, C; Zhang, Y; Chu, D P; Milne, W I; Fan, H J

    2010-01-01

    In this article, direct coating of ZnO on PECVD-grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is achieved using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Transmission electron microscopy investigation shows that the deposited ZnO shell is continuous and uniform, in contrast to the previously reported particle morphology. The ZnO layer has a good crystalline quality as indicated by Raman and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. We also show that such ZnO layer can be used as seed layer for subsequent hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanorods, resulting in branched CNT-inorganic hybrid nanostructures. Potentially, this method can also apply to the fabrication of ZnO-based hybrid nanostructures on other carbon nanomaterials. PMID:21124621

  8. Atomic Layer Deposition of ZnO on Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes and Its Use for Synthesis of CNT-ZnO Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. L.; Li, C.; Zhang, Y.; Chu, D. P.; Milne, W. I.; Fan, H. J.

    2010-11-01

    In this article, direct coating of ZnO on PECVD-grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is achieved using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Transmission electron microscopy investigation shows that the deposited ZnO shell is continuous and uniform, in contrast to the previously reported particle morphology. The ZnO layer has a good crystalline quality as indicated by Raman and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. We also show that such ZnO layer can be used as seed layer for subsequent hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanorods, resulting in branched CNT-inorganic hybrid nanostructures. Potentially, this method can also apply to the fabrication of ZnO-based hybrid nanostructures on other carbon nanomaterials.

  9. Modeling the effects of fire severity and climate warming on active layer thickness and soil carbon storage of black spruce forests across the landscape in interior Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Genet, Helene; McGuire, A. David; Barrett, K.; Breen, Amy; Euskirchen, Eugenie S; Johnstone, J. F.; Kasischke, Eric S.; Melvin, A. M.; Bennett, A.; Mack, M. C.; Rupp, Scott T.; Schuur, Edward; Turetsky, M. R.; Yuan, Fengming

    2013-01-01

    There is a substantial amount of carbon stored in the permafrost soils of boreal forest ecosystems, where it is currently protected from decomposition. The surface organic horizons insulate the deeper soil from variations in atmospheric temperature. The removal of these insulating horizons through consumption by fire increases the vulnerability of permafrost to thaw, and the carbon stored in permafrost to decomposition. In this study we ask how warming and fire regime may influence spatial and temporal changes in active layer and carbon dynamics across a boreal forest landscape in interior Alaska. To address this question, we (1) developed and tested a predictive model of the effect of fire severity on soil organic horizons that depends on landscape-level conditions and (2) used this model to evaluate the long-term consequences of warming and changes in fire regime on active layer and soil carbon dynamics of black spruce forests across interior Alaska. The predictive model of fire severity, designed from the analysis of field observations, reproduces the effect of local topography (landform category, the slope angle and aspect and flow accumulation), weather conditions (drought index, soil moisture) and fire characteristics (day of year and size of the fire) on the reduction of the organic layercaused by fire. The integration of the fire severity model into an ecosystem process-based model allowed us to document the relative importance and interactions among local topography, fire regime and climate warming on active layer and soil carbon dynamics. Lowlands were more resistant to severe fires and climate warming, showing smaller increases in active layer thickness and soil carbon loss compared to drier flat uplands and slopes. In simulations that included the effects of both warming and fire at the regional scale, fire was primarily responsible for a reduction in organic layer thickness of 0.06 m on average by 2100 that led to an increase in active layer thickness

  10. Rational Design of Efficient Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction: Single Layers of WS2 Nanoplates Anchored to Hollow Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sunmoon; Kim, Jaehoon; Yoon, Ki Ro; Jung, Ji-Won; Oh, Jihun; Kim, Il-Doo

    2015-12-30

    To exploit the benefits of nanostructuring for enhanced hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), we employed coaxial electrospinning to synthesize single-layered WS2 nanoplates anchored to hollow nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers (WS2@HNCNFs) as efficient electrocatalysts. For comparison, bulk WS2 powder and single layers of WS2 embedded in nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers (WS2@NCNFs) were synthesized and electrochemically tested. The distinctive design of the WS2@HNCNFs enables remarkable electrochemical performances showing a low overpotential with reduced charge transfer resistance, a small Tafel slope, and excellent durability. The experimental results highlight the importance of nanostructure engineering in electrocatalysts for enhanced HER. PMID:26654256

  11. Stabilizing a high-temperature electrochemical silver-carbonate CO2 capture membrane by atomic layer deposition of a ZrO2 overcoat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Tong, Jingjing; Jee, Youngseok; Huang, Kevin

    2016-07-28

    A high-selectivity and high-flux electrochemical silver-carbonate dual-phase membrane was coated with a nanoscaled ZrO2 layer by atomic layer deposition (ALD) for stable CO2 capture at high-temperature (≥800 °C); the latter has an important implication for direct dry methane reforming with the captured CO2 and O2 for syngas production.

  12. Stabilizing a high-temperature electrochemical silver-carbonate CO2 capture membrane by atomic layer deposition of a ZrO2 overcoat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Tong, Jingjing; Jee, Youngseok; Huang, Kevin

    2016-07-28

    A high-selectivity and high-flux electrochemical silver-carbonate dual-phase membrane was coated with a nanoscaled ZrO2 layer by atomic layer deposition (ALD) for stable CO2 capture at high-temperature (≥800 °C); the latter has an important implication for direct dry methane reforming with the captured CO2 and O2 for syngas production. PMID:27417536

  13. Spring summer imbalance of dissolved inorganic carbon in the mixed layer of the north-western Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchal, Olivier; Monfray, Patrick; Bates, Nicholas R.

    1996-02-01

    The surface concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study site (BATS) decreased gradually by ca. 30μmol kg-1from April to October in 1989. This decrease occurred almost in the absence of measurable nitrate in the mixed layer. Although ancillary data about the C system point to the possible importance of lateral transport, horizontal gradients in surface [DIC] and the mean flow in the area indicate that local effects should prevail in the seasonal drawdown of DIC. On the basis of an one-dimensional model, we hence estimate the mixed layer budget of DIC for this period, from surface [DIC] data, temperature profiles, and concomitant meteorological records. According to model uncertainties, the [DIC] drawdown should be mostly explained (71 93%) by a net community production (NCP) averaging 1.4 2.3 mgC m-3 d-1, and to a lesser extent, by outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere. These losses are partially compensated (<30%) by mixing with DIC-rich waters of the thermocline. This NCP must be regarded as a lower estimate, since the mean flow from the northeast should bring waters with slightly higher [DIC] to the mixed layer at the BATS site. The model, which is sensitive to short-term variations in atmospheric forcing (<1day), indicates that this layer has never reached the nitrocline for spring summer 1989, even as a hurricane passed through the region. Hence, the surface NCP should not have been supported by unsampled, pulse-like supplies of deep nutrients. Wet atmospheric deposition of nitrogen measured concurrently on Bermuda could contribute to the biological N requirement (10 20%). According to historical estimates, N2 fixation seems however, insufficient to

  14. High Power Electric Double-Layer Capacitors based on Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids and Nanostructured Carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Carlos R.

    The efficient storage of electrical energy constitutes both a fundamental challenge for 21st century science and an urgent requirement for the sustainability of our technological civilization. The push for cleaner renewable forms of energy production, such as solar and wind power, strongly depends on a concomitant development of suitable storage methods to pair with these intermittent sources, as well as for mobile applications, such as vehicles and personal electronics. In this regard, Electrochemical Double-Layer Capacitors (supercapacitors) represent a vibrant area of research due to their environmental friendliness, long lifetimes, high power capability, and relative underdevelopment when compared to electrochemical batteries. Currently supercapacitors have gravimetric energies one order of magnitude lower than similarly advanced batteries, while conversly enjoying a similar advantage over them in terms of power. The challenge is to increase the gravimentric energies and conserve the high power. On the material side, research focuses on highly porous supports and electrolytes, the critical components of supercapacitors. Through the use of electrolyte systems with a wider electrochemical stability window, as well as properly tailored carbon nanomaterials as electrodes, significant improvements in performance are possible. Room Temperature Ionic Liquids and Carbide-Derived Carbons are promising electrolytes and electrodes, respectively. RTILs have been shown to be stable at up to twice the voltage of organic solvent-salt systems currently employed in supercapacitors, and CDCs are tunable in pore structure, show good electrical conductivity, and superior demonstrated capability as electrode material. This work aims to better understand the interplay of electrode and electrolyte parameters, such as pore structure and ion size, in the ultimate performance of RTIL-based supercapacitors in terms of power, energy, and temperature of operation. For this purpose, carbon

  15. Comparative studies of S-layer proteins from Bacillus stearothermophilus strains expressed during growth in continuous culture under oxygen-limited and non-oxygen-limited conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Sára, M; Sleytr, U B

    1994-01-01

    The specific properties of S-layer proteins from three different Bacillus stearothermophilus strains revealing oblique, square, or hexagonal lattice symmetry were preserved during growth in continuous culture on complex medium only under oxygen-limited conditions in which glucose was used as the sole carbon source. When oxygen limitation was relieved, amino acids became metabolized, cell density increased, and different S-layer proteins from wild-type strains became rapidly replaced by a new common type of S-layer protein with an apparent subunit molecular weight of 97,000 which assembled into an identical oblique (p2) lattice type. During switching from wild-type strains to variants, patches of the S-layer lattices characteristics for wild-type strains, granular regions, and areas with oblique lattice symmetry could be observed on the surface of individual cells from all organisms. The granular regions apparently consisted of mixtures of the S-layer proteins from the wild-type strains and the newly synthesized p2 S-layer proteins from the variants. S-layer proteins from wild-type strains possessed identical N-terminal regions but led to quite different cleavage products upon peptide mapping, indicating that they are encoded by different genes. Chemical analysis including N-terminal sequencing and peptide mapping showed that the oblique S-layer lattices synthesized under increased oxygen supply were composed of identical protein species. Images PMID:7961489

  16. Carbon nanosheet-titania nanocrystal composites from reassembling of exfoliated graphene oxide layers with colloidal titania nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong-Jun; Aizawa, Mami; Peng, Wen-Qing; Wang, Zheng-Ming; Hirotsu, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    Nanoporous composites of carbon nanosheets (CNS) and titania nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by reassembling of delaminated graphite oxide (GO) layers with titania clear sol (TCS), and their structural and porous properties were examined by various physico-chemical methods such as XRD, TG/DTA, FT-IR, Raman, FE-SEM/TEM, and low temperature N2 adsorption. It was found that the facile approach, which utilizes the electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged GO layers and the positively charged TCS particles, leads to a well composed CNS and ultrafine TiO2 NPs material whose titania amount reaches up to 71 wt%. The titania phase in these composite materials is mainly anatase, which is resistible against high temperature calcination, but also contains a little amount of rutile and brookite depending on synthesis condition. The porosity of the composite is improved and partially affected by the size distributions of TiO2 NPs. The unique structure, better porosity, and compatible surface affinity of these composites bring about an adsorption concentration-promoted photocatalytic effects toward organic dyes by successfully combining both properties of CNS and titania NPs.

  17. Impact of the atomic layer deposition precursors diffusion on solid-state carbon nanotube based supercapacitors performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorentino, Giuseppe; Vollebregt, Sten; Tichelaar, F. D.; Ishihara, Ryoichi; Sarro, Pasqualina M.

    2015-02-01

    A study on the impact of atomic layer deposition (ALD) precursors diffusion on the performance of solid-state miniaturized nanostructure capacitor array is presented. Three-dimensional nanostructured capacitor array based on double conformal coating of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) bundles is realized using ALD to deposit Al2O3 as dielectric layer and TiN as high aspect-ratio conformal counter-electrode on 2 μm long MWCNT bundles. The devices have a small footprint (from 100 μm2 to 2500 μm2) and are realized using an IC wafer-scale manufacturing process with high reproducibility (≤0.3E-12F deviation). To evaluate the enhancement of the electrode surface, the measured capacitance values are compared to a lumped circuital model. The observed discrepancies are explained with a partial coating of the CNT, that determine a limited use of the available electrode surface area. To analyze the CNT coating effectiveness, the ALD precursors diffusions inside the CNT bundle is studied using a Knudsen diffusion mechanism.

  18. Hierarchically Structured Hole Transport Layers of Spiro-OMeTAD and Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes for Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiyong; Menamparambath, Mini Mol; Hwang, Jae-Yeol; Baik, Seunghyun

    2015-07-20

    The low electrical conductivity of spiro-OMeTAD hole transport layers impedes further enhancements of the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of perovskite solar cells. We embedded multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in spiro-OMeTAD (spiro-OMeTAD/MWNTs) to increase carrier mobility and conductivity. However, direct electrical contact between CH3 NH3 PbI3 and the MWNTs created pathways for undesirable back-electron transfer, owing to the large work function of MWNTs, limiting enhancements of the PCE. A hierarchical structure of pure spiro-OMeTAD and spiro-OMeTAD/MWNTs was designed to block back-electron transfer and fully exploit the enhanced charge transport of spiro-OMeTAD/MWNTs. The enhanced fill factor, short-circuit current density, open-circuit voltage, and PCE (15.1 %) were achieved by using this hierarchical hole transport layer structure (MWNT concentration=2 wt %). The perovskite solar cells were fabricated by a low-temperature solution process, further decreasing their per-Watt cost.

  19. Supercritical carbon dioxide-assisted rapid synthesis of few-layer black phosphorus for hydrogen peroxide sensing.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shancheng; Wang, Bojun; Wang, Zhulan; Hu, Dong; Xu, Xin; Wang, Junzhuan; Shi, Yi

    2016-06-15

    Solutions with large-scale dispersions of 2D black phosphorus (BP), often referred to as phosphorene, are obtained through solvent exfoliation. But, rapid phosphorene synthesis remains a challenge. Furthermore, although the chemical sensing capability of BP-based sensors has been theoretically predicted, its experimental verification remains lacking. In this study, we demonstrate the use of supercritical carbon dioxide-assisted rapid synthesis (5h) of few-layer BP. In addition, we construct a non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) sensor based on few-layer BP for the first time to utilize BP degradation under ambient conditions. The proposed H2O2 sensor exhibits a considerably lower detection limit of 1 × 10(-7) M compared with the general detection limit of 1 × 10(-7) M-5 × 10(-5)M via electrochemical methods. Overall, the results of this study will not only expand the coverage of BP research but will also identify the important sensing characteristics of BP.

  20. Path-integrated measurements of carbon dioxide in the urban canopy layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büns, Christian; Kuttler, Wilhelm

    2012-01-01

    Continuous CO 2 concentration measurements have been recorded within the city center of Essen, Germany, using a path-integrated measuring system above a typical urban area over the course of nine months (February-October 2010). Mean monthly urban CO 2 concentrations were 396 and 446 ppm in summer and winter, respectively, which were 8.5 % in average higher than at a nearby suburban measuring site. Urban-suburban differences mainly occur due to increased CO 2 emissions from traffic and industry within the urban area, as well as domestic heating in winter. Among the analyzed meteorological variables, low wind velocities increased CO 2 concentrations as well as high atmospheric stability within the urban boundary layer, respectively. The influence of wind direction reflects the heterogeneous distribution of local CO 2 sources at the recording sites, particularly industrial point sources. Other point sources in the vicinity of the urban site strongly influence the additional point measurements but show no significant effect on the measured CO 2 concentrations by the path-integrated measuring system. Within an eight-day case study, a significant positive correlation between CO 2 concentration and traffic count ( R = 0.26; p < 0.05) was found on weekdays using partial correlation analysis after excluding the influence of meteorological variables. This correlation diminishes when combined with the meteorological components, and mixing layer height shows the strongest negative correlation with measured urban CO 2 ( R = -0.59). The path-integrated system provides CO 2 concentrations on a greater temporal and spatial scale than common point measurements, which can be influenced by strong adjacent local CO 2 sources.

  1. Single standing carbon nanotube array in gate holes using a silicon nitride cap layer

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Sung Hoon; Yoon, Hyun Sik; Moon, Jong Hyun; Park, Kyu Chang; Jang, Jin

    2005-12-12

    We studied the growth of a single standing carbon nanotube (CNT) which was grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition in the gate hole formed by conventional photolithography in the silicon nitride. The number of CNT per hole increases with increasing the gate hole diameter and a single CNT could be grown in a 3 {mu}m hole. A single standing CNT in a gate hole exhibited the turn-on field of 1.6 V/{mu}m and the current density of 16 {mu}A at 3.3 V/{mu}m. The emission currents follow the Fowler-Nordheim equation with a field enhancement factor of 1.14x10{sup 7}.

  2. Phase Diagram and Transformations of Iron Pentacarbonyl to nm Layered Hematite and Carbon-Oxygen Polymer under Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Young Jay; Kim, Minseob; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2015-01-01

    We present the phase diagram of Fe(CO)5, consisting of three molecular polymorphs (phase I, II and III) and an extended polymeric phase that can be recovered at ambient condition. The phase diagram indicates a limited stability of Fe(CO)5 within a pressure-temperature dome formed below the liquid- phase II- polymer triple point at 4.2 GPa and 580 K. The limited stability, in turn, signifies the temperature-induced weakening of Fe-CO back bonds, which eventually leads to the dissociation of Fe-CO at the onset of the polymerization of CO. The recovered polymer is a composite of novel nm-lamellar layers of crystalline hematite Fe2O3 and amorphous carbon-oxygen polymers. These results, therefore, demonstrate the synthesis of carbon-oxygen polymer by compressing Fe(CO)5, which advocates a novel synthetic route to develop atomistic composite materials by compressing organometallic compounds. PMID:26456761

  3. Influence of Metal Contacts on Graphene Transport Characteristics and Its Removal with Nano-carbon Interfacial Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Akinobu; Ito, Yu; Katakura, Kenta; Sonoda, Hiroki; Higuchi, Shoma; Tomori, Hikari; Ootuka, Youiti

    Graphene is a promising candidate for the next-generation electronic material. While considerable effort has been devoted to achieve higher mobility in graphene films, relatively little attention has been paid to the effect of metal contacts, which are indispensable to the electric devices. At a graphene/metal interface, mainly due to the difference in work functions, carriers are injected from the metal to graphene. The resulting shift of local Dirac point is not limited at the graphene/metal interface but extends into the graphene channel. This carrier doping affects more significantly the performance of graphene field effect devices with shorter channel, as well as may conceal Dirac physics at the graphene/metal interface. Here, we experimentally investigate the channel length dependence of graphene transport properties in a wide gate-voltage range and extract the effect of metal contact. Several metal species are investigated. We reveal the origin of electron-hole asymmetry and the effect of the chemical interaction between graphene and metal, and derive the effective work function of graphene (4.93 eV). Furthermore, we succeed in reducing the influence of metal contact by inserting a thin nano-carbon layer (amorphous carbon or multilayer graphene (MLG)) at the interface.

  4. Potential Carbon Transport: Linking Soil Aggregate Stability and Sediment Enrichment for Updating the Soil Active Layer within Intensely Managed Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacha, K.; Papanicolaou, T.; Abban, B. K.; Wilson, C. G.

    2014-12-01

    Currently, many biogeochemical models lack the mechanistic capacity to accurately simulate soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics, especially within intensely managed landscapes (IMLs) such as those found in the U.S. Midwest. These modeling limitations originate by not accounting for downslope connectivity of flowpathways initiated and governed by landscape processes and hydrologic forcing, which induce dynamic updates to the soil active layer (generally top 20-30cm of soil) with various sediment size fractions and aggregates being transported and deposited along the downslope. These hydro-geomorphic processes, often amplified in IMLs by tillage events and seasonal canopy, can greatly impact biogeochemical cycles (e.g., enhanced mineralization during aggregate breakdown) and in turn, have huge implications/uncertainty when determining SOC budgets. In this study, some of these limitations were addressed through a new concept, Potential Carbon Transport (PCT), a term which quantifies a maximum amount of material available for transport at various positions of the landscape, which was used to further refine a coupled modeling framework focused on SOC redistribution through downslope/lateral connectivity. Specifically, the size fractions slaked from large and small aggregates during raindrop-induced aggregate stability tests were used in conjunction with rainfall-simulated sediment enrichment ratio (ER) experiments to quantify the PCT under various management practices, soil types and landscape positions. Field samples used in determining aggregate stability and the ER experiments were collected/performed within the historic Clear Creek Watershed, home of the IML Critical Zone Observatory, located in Southeastern Iowa.

  5. Influence of Different Defects in Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes on TiO2 Nanoparticle Formation through Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Acauan, Luiz; Dias, Anna C; Pereira, Marcelo B; Horowitz, Flavio; Bergmann, Carlos P

    2016-06-29

    The chemical inertness of carbon nanotubes (CNT) requires some degree of "defect engineering" for controlled deposition of metal oxides through atomic layer deposition (ALD). The type, quantity, and distribution of such defects rules the deposition rate and defines the growth behavior. In this work, we employed ALD to grow titanium oxide (TiO2) on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT). The effects of nitrogen doping and oxygen plasma pretreatment of the CNT on the morphology and total amount of TiO2 were systematically studied using transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The induced chemical changes for each functionalization route were identified by X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. The TiO2 mass fraction deposited with the same number of cycles for the pristine CNT, nitrogen-doped CNT, and plasma-treated CNT were 8, 47, and 80%, respectively. We demonstrate that TiO2 nucleation is dependent mainly on surface incorporation of heteroatoms and their distribution rather than structural defects that govern the growth behavior. Therefore, selecting the best way to functionalize CNT will allow us to tailor TiO2 distribution and hence fabricate complex heterostructures.

  6. Reduced graphene oxide with ultrahigh conductivity as carbon coating layer for high performance sulfur@reduced graphene oxide cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongbin; Peng, Zhenhuan; Wang, Wenjun; Chen, Xikun; Fang, Jianhui; Xu, Jiaqiang

    2014-01-01

    We developed hydrogen iodide (HI) reduction of rGO and surfactant-assisted chemical reaction- deposition method to form hybrid material of sulfur (S) encapsulated in reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets for rechargeable lithium batteries. The surfactant-assisted chemical reaction-deposition method strategy provides intimate contact between the S and graphene oxide. Chemical reduced rGO with high conductivity as carbon coating layer prevented the dissolution of polysulfide ions and improved the electron transfer. This novel core-shell structured S@rGO composites with high S content showed high reversible capacity, good discharge capacity retention and enhanced rate capability used as cathodes in rechargeable Li/S cells. We demonstrated here that an electrode prepared from a S@rGO with up to 85 wt% S maintains a stable discharge capacity of about 980 mAh g-1 at 0.05 C and 570 mAh g-1 at 1C after 200 cycles charge/discharge. These results emphasize the importance of rGO with high electrical conductivity after HI-reduced rGO homogeneously coating on the surface of S, therefore, effectively alleviating the shuttle phenomenon of polysulfides in organic electrolyte. Our surfactant-assisted chemical reaction-HI reduction approach should offer a new technique for the design and synthesis of battery electrodes based on highly conducting carbon materials.

  7. Phase diagram and transformations of iron pentacarbonyl to nm layered hematite and carbon-oxygen polymer under pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Ryu, Young Jay; Kim, Minseob; Yoo, Choong -Shik

    2015-10-12

    In this study, we present the phase diagram of Fe(CO)5, consisting of three molecular polymorphs (phase I, II and III) and an extended polymeric phase that can be recovered at ambient condition. The phase diagram indicates a limited stability of Fe(CO)5 within a pressure-temperature dome formed below the liquid- phase II- polymer triple point at 4.2 GPa and 580 K. The limited stability, in turn, signifies the temperature-induced weakening of Fe-CO back bonds, which eventually leads to the dissociation of Fe-CO at the onset of the polymerization of CO. The recovered polymer is a composite of novel nm-lamellar layers ofmore » crystalline hematite Fe2O3 and amorphous carbon-oxygen polymers. These results, therefore, demonstrate the synthesis of carbon-oxygen polymer by compressing Fe(CO)5, which advocates a novel synthetic route to develop atomistic composite materials by compressing organometallic compounds.« less

  8. Double blanket effect caused by two layers of black carbon aerosols escalates warming in the Brahmaputra River Valley.

    PubMed

    Rahul, P R C; Bhawar, R L; Ayantika, D C; Panicker, A S; Safai, P D; Tharaprabhakaran, V; Padmakumari, B; Raju, M P

    2014-01-14

    First ever 3-day aircraft observations of vertical profiles of Black Carbon (BC) were obtained during the Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX) conducted on 30(th) August, 4(th) and 6(th) September 2009 over Guwahati (26° 11'N, 91° 44'E), the largest metropolitan city in the Brahmaputra River Valley (BRV) region. The results revealed that apart from the surface/near surface loading of BC due to anthropogenic processes causing a heating of 2 K/day, the large-scale Walker and Hadley atmospheric circulations associated with the Indian summer monsoon help in the formation of a second layer of black carbon in the upper atmosphere, which generates an upper atmospheric heating of ~2 K/day. Lofting of BC aerosols by these large-scale circulating atmospheric cells to the upper atmosphere (4-6 Km) could also be the reason for extreme climate change scenarios that are being witnessed in the BRV region.

  9. Multi-electrode double layer capacitor having single electrolyte seal and aluminum-impregnated carbon cloth electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Farahmandi, C Joseph [San Diego, CA; Dispennette, John M [Oceanside, CA; Blank, Edward [San Diego, CA; Kolb, Alan C [Rancho Santa Fe, CA

    1999-05-25

    A single cell, multi-electrode high performance double layer capacitor includes first and second flat stacks of electrodes adapted to be housed in a closeable two-part capacitor case which includes only a single electrolyte seal. Each electrode stack has a plurality of electrodes connected in parallel, with the electrodes of one stack being interleaved with the electrodes of the other stack to form an interleaved stack, and with the electrodes of each stack being electrically connected to respective capacitor terminals. A porous separator sleeve is inserted over the electrodes of one stack before interleaving to prevent electrical shorts between the electrodes. The electrodes are made by folding a compressible, low resistance, aluminum-impregnated carbon cloth, made from activated carbon fibers, around a current collector foil, with a tab of the foils of each electrode of each stack being connected in parallel and connected to the respective capacitor terminal. The height of the interleaved stack is somewhat greater than the inside height of the closed capacitor case, thereby requiring compression of the interleaved electrode stack when placed inside of the case, and thereby maintaining the interleaved electrode stack under modest constant pressure. The closed capacitor case is filled with an electrolytic solution and sealed. A preferred electrolytic solution is made by dissolving an appropriate salt into acetonitrile (CH.sub.3 CN). In one embodiment, the two parts of the capacitor case are conductive and function as the capacitor terminals.

  10. Multi-electrode double layer capacitor having single electrolyte seal and aluminum-impregnated carbon cloth electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Farahmandi, C. Joseph; Dispennette, John M.; Blank, Edward; Kolb, Alan C.

    1999-01-19

    A single cell, multi-electrode high performance double layer capacitor includes first and second flat stacks of electrodes adapted to be housed in a closeable two-part capacitor case which includes only a single electrolyte seal. Each electrode stack has a plurality of electrodes connected in parallel, with the electrodes of one stack being interleaved with the electrodes of the other stack to form an interleaved stack, and with the electrodes of each stack being electrically connected to respective capacitor terminals. A porous separator sleeve is inserted over the electrodes of one stack before interleaving to prevent electrical shorts between the electrodes. The electrodes are made by folding a compressible, low resistance, aluminum-impregnated carbon cloth, made from activated carbon fibers, around a current collector foil, with a tab of the foils of each electrode of each stack being connected in parallel and connected to the respective capacitor terminal. The height of the interleaved stack is somewhat greater than the inside height of the closed capacitor case, thereby requiring compression of the interleaved electrode stack when placed inside of the case, and thereby maintaining the interleaved electrode stack under modest constant pressure. The closed capacitor case is filled with an electrolytic solution and sealed. A preferred electrolytic solution is made by dissolving an appropriate salt into acetonitrile (CH.sub.3 CN). In one embodiment, the two parts of the capacitor case are conductive and function as the capacitor terminals.

  11. Multi-electrode double layer capacitor having single electrolyte seal and aluminum-impregnated carbon cloth electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Farahmandi, C. J.; Dispennette, J. M.; Blank, E.; Kolb, A. C.

    1999-05-25

    A single cell, multi-electrode high performance double layer capacitor includes first and second flat stacks of electrodes adapted to be housed in a closeable two-part capacitor case which includes only a single electrolyte seal. Each electrode stack has a plurality of electrodes connected in parallel, with the electrodes of one stack being interleaved with the electrodes of the other stack to form an interleaved stack, and with the electrodes of each stack being electrically connected to respective capacitor terminals. A porous separator sleeve is inserted over the electrodes of one stack before interleaving to prevent electrical shorts between the electrodes. The electrodes are made by folding a compressible, low resistance, aluminum-impregnated carbon cloth, made from activated carbon fibers, around a current collector foil, with a tab of the foils of each electrode of each stack being connected in parallel and connected to the respective capacitor terminal. The height of the interleaved stack is somewhat greater than the inside height of the closed capacitor case, thereby requiring compression of the interleaved electrode stack when placed inside of the case, and thereby maintaining the interleaved electrode stack under modest constant pressure. The closed capacitor case is filled with an electrolytic solution and sealed. A preferred electrolytic solution is made by dissolving an appropriate salt into acetonitrile (CH[sub 3]CN). In one embodiment, the two parts of the capacitor case are conductive and function as the capacitor terminals. 32 figs.

  12. Multi-electrode double layer capacitor having single electrolyte seal and aluminum-impregnated carbon cloth electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Farahmandi, C.J.; Dispennette, J.M.; Blank, E.; Kolb, A.C.

    1999-01-19

    A single cell, multi-electrode high performance double layer capacitor includes first and second flat stacks of electrodes adapted to be housed in a closeable two-part capacitor case which includes only a single electrolyte seal. Each electrode stack has a plurality of electrodes connected in parallel, with the electrodes of one stack being interleaved with the electrodes of the other stack to form an interleaved stack, and with the electrodes of each stack being electrically connected to respective capacitor terminals. A porous separator sleeve is inserted over the electrodes of one stack before interleaving to prevent electrical shorts between the electrodes. The electrodes are made by folding a compressible, low resistance, aluminum-impregnated carbon cloth, made from activated carbon fibers, around a current collector foil, with a tab of the foils of each electrode of each stack being connected in parallel and connected to the respective capacitor terminal. The height of the interleaved stack is somewhat greater than the inside height of the closed capacitor case, thereby requiring compression of the interleaved electrode stack when placed inside of the case, and thereby maintaining the interleaved electrode stack under modest constant pressure. The closed capacitor case is filled with an electrolytic solution and sealed. A preferred electrolytic solution is made by dissolving an appropriate salt into acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN). In one embodiment, the two parts of the capacitor case are conductive and function as the capacitor terminals. 32 figs.

  13. Phase diagram and transformations of iron pentacarbonyl to nm layered hematite and carbon-oxygen polymer under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Young Jay; Kim, Minseob; Yoo, Choong -Shik

    2015-10-12

    In this study, we present the phase diagram of Fe(CO)5, consisting of three molecular polymorphs (phase I, II and III) and an extended polymeric phase that can be recovered at ambient condition. The phase diagram indicates a limited stability of Fe(CO)5 within a pressure-temperature dome formed below the liquid- phase II- polymer triple point at 4.2 GPa and 580 K. The limited stability, in turn, signifies the temperature-induced weakening of Fe-CO back bonds, which eventually leads to the dissociation of Fe-CO at the onset of the polymerization of CO. The recovered polymer is a composite of novel nm-lamellar layers of crystalline hematite Fe2O3 and amorphous carbon-oxygen polymers. These results, therefore, demonstrate the synthesis of carbon-oxygen polymer by compressing Fe(CO)5, which advocates a novel synthetic route to develop atomistic composite materials by compressing organometallic compounds.

  14. Influence of the ionomer/carbon ratio for low-Pt loading catalyst layer prepared by reactive spray deposition technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haoran; Roller, Justin M.; Mustain, William E.; Maric, Radenka

    2015-06-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) catalyst layers (CLs) were fabricated by direct deposition of the catalyst onto Nafion® membranes using reactive spray deposition technique (RSDT) to reduce platinum (Pt) loading and reduce the number of catalyst synthesis and processing steps. Nitrogen adsorption, mercury porosimetry, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to investigate the effects of ionomer/carbon ratio (I/C) on the surface area, pore structure and morphology of the CLs; cyclic voltammetry and polarization curves were used to determine the electrochemically active area (ECSA) and PEMFC performance. The BET surface area and pore volume of the CLs decreased continuously with increasing I/C ratio regardless of the catalyst loading. Bimodal distribution of pores with diameters ranging from 1.7 to 10 nm and from 30 to 100 nm were observed from the pore-size distribution of the CLs. The catalyst-coated membrane (CCM) with an I/C ratio of 0.3 showed the highest ECSA of 62 m2 gPt-1 and the best performance at 0.6 V for oxygen (1400 mA cm-2) and air (650 mA cm-2) among all RSDT samples. The optimum I/C ratio is lower compared to ink-based methods, and Pt nanoparticles showed improved distribution on the carbon surface. The RSDT process shows promise in achieving better ionomer coverage and penetration in the CL microstructure, enhancing the performance of low Pt-loading PEMFCs.

  15. A simple strategy for synthesizing highly luminescent carbon nanodots and application as effective down-shifting layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xugen; Zhong, Sihua; Pan, Wei; Shen, Wenzhong

    2015-02-01

    We propose a novel strategy to prepare highly luminescent carbon nanodots (C-dots) by employing a hydrothermal method with citric acid as the carbon source and ethylenediamine as the nitrogen source, together with adding moderate ammonia water (AW) to achieve both appropriate inner structure and excellent N passivation. The effect of pH value and AW amount on the luminescence properties has been thoroughly investigated. The photoluminescence quantum yield of the resultant C-dots reaches as high as 84.8%, which is of 10.56% higher than that of the C-dots synthesized in the absence of AW in the reaction precursors. We have further combined the highest luminescent C-dots with polyvinyl alcohol to form luminescent down-shifting layers on silicon nanowire solar cells. An effective enhancement of short-circuit current density has been realized and the contribution of the down-shifting has been extracted quantitatively from the deterioration of surface reflectance and the gain of the optical absorption redistribution by means of a theoretical model on external quantum efficiency analysis.

  16. Horseradish peroxidase immobilization on carbon nanodots/CoFe layered double hydroxides: direct electrochemistry and hydrogen peroxide sensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinling; Wang, Zhangcui; Rui, Yeping; Li, Maoguo

    2015-02-15

    Carbon nanodots and CoFe layered double hydroxide composites (C-Dots/LDHs) were prepared via simply mixing C-Dots and CoFe-LDHs. The as-prepared composites were used for the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on the glass carbon (GC) electrode. The electrochemical behavior of the HRP/C-Dots/LDHs/GC electrode and its application as a H2O2 biosensor were investigated. The results indicated that HRP immobilized by C-Dots/LDHs retained the activity of enzyme and displayed quasi-reversible redox behavior and fast electron transfer with an electron transfer rate constant ks of 8.46 s(-1). Under optimum experimental conditions, the HRP/C-Dots/LDHs/GC electrode displayed good electrocatalytic reduction activity and excellent analytic performance toward H2O2. The H2O2 biosensor showed a linear range of 0.1-23.1 μM (R(2) = 0.9942) with a calculated detection limit of 0.04 μM (S/N = 3). In addition, the biosensor exhibited high sensitivity, good selectivity, acceptable reproducibility and stability. The superior properties of this biosensor are attributed to the synergistic effect of HRP, C-Dots and CoFe-LDHs, which has been proved by investigating their electrochemical response to H2O2. Thus the C-Dots and LDHs composites provide a promising platform for the immobilization of redox enzymes and construction of sensitive biosensors.

  17. Influence of Different Defects in Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes on TiO2 Nanoparticle Formation through Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Acauan, Luiz; Dias, Anna C; Pereira, Marcelo B; Horowitz, Flavio; Bergmann, Carlos P

    2016-06-29

    The chemical inertness of carbon nanotubes (CNT) requires some degree of "defect engineering" for controlled deposition of metal oxides through atomic layer deposition (ALD). The type, quantity, and distribution of such defects rules the deposition rate and defines the growth behavior. In this work, we employed ALD to grow titanium oxide (TiO2) on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT). The effects of nitrogen doping and oxygen plasma pretreatment of the CNT on the morphology and total amount of TiO2 were systematically studied using transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The induced chemical changes for each functionalization route were identified by X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. The TiO2 mass fraction deposited with the same number of cycles for the pristine CNT, nitrogen-doped CNT, and plasma-treated CNT were 8, 47, and 80%, respectively. We demonstrate that TiO2 nucleation is dependent mainly on surface incorporation of heteroatoms and their distribution rather than structural defects that govern the growth behavior. Therefore, selecting the best way to functionalize CNT will allow us to tailor TiO2 distribution and hence fabricate complex heterostructures. PMID:27269125

  18. Mesoporous activated carbon fiber as electrode material for high-performance electrochemical double layer capacitors with ionic liquid electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bin; Wu, Feng; Chen, Renjie; Cao, Gaoping; Chen, Shi; Yang, Yusheng

    Activated carbon fibers (ACFs) with super high surface area and well-developed small mesopores have been prepared by pyrolyzing polyacrylonitrile fibers and NaOH activation. Their capacitive performances at room and elevated temperatures are evaluated in electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs) using ionic liquid (IL) electrolyte composed of lithium bis(trifluoromethane sulfone)imide (LiN(SO 2CF 3) 2) and 2-oxazolidinone (C 3H 5NO 2). The surface area of the ACF is as high as 3291 m 2 g -1. The pore volume of the carbon reaches 2.162 cm 3 g -1, of which 66.7% is the contribution of the small mesopores of 2-5 nm. The unique microstructures enable the ACFs to have good compatibility with the IL electrolyte. The specific capacitance reaches 187 F g -1 at room temperature with good cycling and self-discharge performances. As the temperature increases to 60 °C, the capacitance increases to 196 F g -1, and the rate capability is dramatically improved. Therefore, the ACF can be a promising electrode material for high-performance EDLCs.

  19. Double blanket effect caused by two layers of black carbon aerosols escalates warming in the Brahmaputra River Valley

    PubMed Central

    Rahul, P. R. C.; Bhawar, R. L.; Ayantika, D. C.; Panicker, A. S.; Safai, P. D.; Tharaprabhakaran, V.; Padmakumari, B.; Raju, M. P.

    2014-01-01

    First ever 3-day aircraft observations of vertical profiles of Black Carbon (BC) were obtained during the Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX) conducted on 30th August, 4th and 6th September 2009 over Guwahati (26°11′N, 91°44′E), the largest metropolitan city in the Brahmaputra River Valley (BRV) region. The results revealed that apart from the surface/near surface loading of BC due to anthropogenic processes causing a heating of 2 K/day, the large-scale Walker and Hadley atmospheric circulations associated with the Indian summer monsoon help in the formation of a second layer of black carbon in the upper atmosphere, which generates an upper atmospheric heating of ~2 K/day. Lofting of BC aerosols by these large-scale circulating atmospheric cells to the upper atmosphere (4–6 Km) could also be the reason for extreme climate change scenarios that are being witnessed in the BRV region. PMID:24419075

  20. Air pollution of Moscow by the carbon monoxide and aerosols, boundary layer parameters and estimation of the CO sources intensity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakitin, V.; Fokeeva, E.; Kuznetsov, R.; Emilenko, A.; Kopeikin, V.

    2009-04-01

    The results of measurements of the carbon monoxide total content, the soot and submicron aerosols content are given for the period 2005-2008 over Moscow. Two identical grating spectrometers of medium resolution (0,2sm-1) are used with appropriate solar tracking systems, one of which is located outside the city at Zvenigorod Scientific Station (ZSS 56oN, 38oE, 60km West from Moscow in the rural zone) and the other one is inside a city center. This method makes possible to determine the characteristics of anthropogenic pollution, urban part of the CO content. Some simultaneously measurements of aerosols content, the CO column and CO background concentrations in Moscow, autumn 2007 are presented. Nephelometer and quartz filters for soot sampling were used for aerosols measurements. Correlations coefficients between aerosols, CO background concentration and urban part of the CO content were obtained. Permanent sounding of boundary layer was carried out using acoustic locator (SODAR) LATAN-3. Applications of SODAR data (profile of wind speed and inversion height) makes possible to forecast of air pollution situations in megacities area. We obtained the correlation coefficients for the urban part of the CO content with the wind speed for cold and warm seasons. Analysis results of measurements demonstrated preeminent influence of the wind in certain boundary layer (up to 500m) upon the CO extension. The intensity of CO sources in Moscow was estimated. The systematization of CO diurnal variations for different meteorological conditions was performed. Comparing our results with the results of the earlier measurements period (1993-2005), we found out that the urban part of the CO content in the surface air layer over the city did not increase in spite of more than tripled number of motor-vehicles in Moscow. So using the applications of this spectroscopic method we can obtain the air pollution trend from the averaged air pollution measured values.